WorldWideScience

Sample records for trust relationships evidence

  1. Trust Management Considerations For the Cooperative Infrastructure Defense Framework: Trust Relationships, Evidence, and Decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiden, Wendy M.

    2009-12-01

    Cooperative Infrastructure Defense (CID) is a hierarchical, agent-based, adaptive, cyber-security framework designed to collaboratively protect multiple enclaves or organizations participating in a complex infrastructure. CID employs a swarm of lightweight, mobile agents called Sensors designed to roam hosts throughout a security enclave to find indications of anomalies and report them to host-based Sentinels. The Sensors’ findings become pieces of a larger puzzle, which the Sentinel puts together to determine the problem and respond per policy as given by the enclave-level Sergeant agent. Horizontally across multiple enclaves and vertically within each enclave, authentication and access control technologies are necessary but insufficient authorization mechanisms to ensure that CID agents continue to fulfill their roles in a trustworthy manner. Trust management fills the gap, providing mechanisms to detect malicious agents and offering more robust mechanisms for authorization. This paper identifies the trust relationships throughout the CID hierarchy, the types of trust evidence that could be gathered, and the actions that the CID system could take if an entity is determined to be untrustworthy.

  2. Trust and Control in Evolving Inter-organisational Relationships : Evidence from the Aerospace Industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varoutsa, Evangelia; Scapens, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to contribute to debates about the relationship between trust and control in the governance of inter-organisational relationships. In particular, the authors focus on the question of how the relationship between trust and control shifts over time.

  3. [Trust in the care relationship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureau, Patrick

    2018-04-01

    A relationship of trust is an expression often used by caregivers, to such an extent that it almost seems self-evident. It is nevertheless important to give some thought to this aspect in order to construct a reliable, authentic and ethical care relationship. Indeed, trust is not automatic. It requires reciprocity, a deliberate choice on the part of the caregiver and the patient. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Social relationships and trust

    OpenAIRE

    Binzel, Christine; Fehr, Dietmar

    2010-01-01

    While social relationships play an important role for individuals to cope with missing market institutions, they also limit individuals' range of trading partners. This paper aims at understanding the determinants of trust at various social distances when information asymmetries are present. Among participants from an informal housing area in Cairo we find that the increase in trust following a reduction in social distance comes from the fact that trustors are much more inclined to follow the...

  5. Trusting Relationships in International Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keating, Vincent Charles; Ruzicka, Jan

    2014-01-01

    How can trusting relationships be identified in international politics? The recent wave of scholarship on trust in International Relations answers this question by looking for one or the combination of three indicators – the incidence of cooperation; discourses expressing trust; or the calculated...

  6. Developing Trusting Relationships Through Communication

    OpenAIRE

    YOKOYAMA, Izumi; OBARA, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the formation of trusting relationships between people through communication. To foster trusting relationships, individuals should disclose private and personal information. However, disclosing such information has both costs and benefits; therefore, both parties must decide on the optimal level of self-disclosure based on a variety of factors, such as the existing level of relationship and the benefits of deepening the trust level. We construct an economics model th...

  7. Exploring trust relationships during times of change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartmut Von der Ohe

    2010-10-01

    Research purpose: The objective of this study was to explore the impact of different variables such as demographics on trust relationships in South African organisations. Motivation for the study: Anecdotal evidence and preliminary data collected for a national trust indicator seemed to suggest a shift in trust levels in organisations. Research design: A trust questionnaire was administered to a convenience sample of 307 respondents in all economic sectors. Parametric and nonparametric analyses were used to determine significant differences among economic sectors, job levels and sample periods. Main findings: No significant differences were found for job levels or the different sample periods. However, significant differences were found for the economic sectors and, specifically, between government participants and other sectors for the dimensions of change, team management, organisational trust, information sharing and credibility. Practical implications: In times of change, leadership in organisations need to be aware of the impact on trust levels. It is therefore important that leaders in government focus more on trust-enhancing behaviours needed to repair mistrust in organisations. Contribution: Although the effect of time on trust levels is inconclusive, the clearly differing levels of trust in various economic sectors point to the importance of appropriate and fitting approaches to building trust and not a ‘one-size-fits-all’ attitude.

  8. Institutional and social trust: Is there a causal relationship?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, Peter Thisted; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    In the literature on social trust, institutional trust is prominent explanations of why people trust the generalized other. However, while institutional trust is a plausible cause of social trust, it is also likely to be consequences of trust or a consequence of deep-rooted personality traits...... affecting both types of trust. Therefore, conventional analyses using cross-sectional data are ill-suited to determine whether institutional trust actually cause social trust. In contrast to previous analyses, this paper utilizes two Danish panel surveys containing measures of the two types of trust...... as regressors), the results provide strong evidence of trust in state institutions exercising an impact on social trust whereas the evidence for a reverse relationship is mixed....

  9. The Relationship between Teamwork and Organizational Trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musab Işık

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between teamwork and organizational trust. In the implementation section the data from the survey of 250 workers is employed in call centers in Erzurum by using relevant statistical methods. Consequently, it is found that there is a positive and significant relationship between teamwork and organizational trust. Thus, the hypothesis of the study is supported as it was expected. Besides, it is found that there are positive and significant relationships between communication, openness to innovation, participation-trust in teamwork and organizational trust, trust in management, trust in co-workers, and trust in workplace.

  10. The Complex Relationship between Cyberbullying and Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieschl, Stephanie; Porsch, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    Theoretically, there are strong arguments for a relationship between cyberbullying and trust. On the one hand, trust is built on experiences; thus, experiences of malevolence such as cyberbullying might contribute to low trust. On the other hand, high trust may lead to risky online behavior such as self-disclosures that could increase the risk of…

  11. Trust and Relationship Building in Electronic Commerce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Panagiota; Andreou, Andreas; Kanellis, Panagiotis; Martakos, Drakoulis

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of the need for trust in electronic commerce to build customer relationships focuses on a model drawn from established theoretical work on trust and relationship marketing that highlights differences between traditional and electronic commerce. Considers how trust can be built into virtual environments. (Contains 50 references.)…

  12. The Relationship between Teamwork and Organizational Trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musab Isik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between teamwork and organizational trust. In the implementation section the data from the survey of 250 workers is employed in call centers in Erzurum by using relevant statistical  methods. Consequently, it is found that there is a positive and significant relationship between teamwork and organizational trust. Thus, the hypothesis of the study is supported as it was expected. Besides, it is found that there are positive and significant relationships between communication, openness to innovation, participation-trust in teamwork and organizational trust, trust in management, trust in co-workers, and trust in workplace.

  13. The relationship between trust in mass media and the healthcare system and individual health: evidence from the AsiaBarometer Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokuda Yasuharu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vertical and horizontal trust, as dimensions of social capital, may be important determinants of health. As mass media campaigns have been used extensively to promote healthy lifestyles and convey health-related information, high levels of individual trust in the media may facilitate the success of such campaigns and, hence, have a positive influence on health. However, few studies have investigated the relationship between trust levels in mass media, an aspect of vertical trust, and health. Methods Based on cross-sectional data of the general population from the AsiaBarometer Survey (2003–2006, we analyzed the relationship between self-rated health and trust in mass media, using a multilevel logistic model, adjusted for age, gender, marital status, income, education, occupation, horizontal trust, and trust in the healthcare system. Results In a total of 39082 participants (mean age 38; 49% male, 26808 (69% were classified as in good health. By the levels of trust in mass media, there were 6399 (16% who reported that they trust a lot, 16327 (42% reporting trust to a degree, 9838 (25% who do not really trust, 3307 (9% who do not trust at all, and 191 (0.5% who have not thought about it. In the multilevel model, trust in mass media was associated with good health (do not trust at all as the base group: the odds ratios (OR of 1.16 (95% confidence interval (CI = 1.05–1.27 for do not really trust; OR of 1.35 (95% CI = 1.23–1.49 for trust to a degree, and 1.57 (95% CI = 1.36–1.81 for trust a lot. Horizontal trust and trust in the healthcare system were also associated with health. Conclusion Vertical trust in mass media is associated with better health in Asian people. Since mass media is likely an important arena for public health, media trust should be enhanced to make people healthier.

  14. Developing patient rapport, trust and therapeutic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Bob

    2017-08-09

    Rapport is established at the first meeting between the patient and nurse, and is developed throughout the therapeutic relationship. However, challenges can arise during this process. Initially, nurses can establish trust with the patient through the questions they ask, however, as care progresses, the nurse will be required to demonstrate a commitment to maintaining the patient's psychological well-being. When the therapeutic relationship ends, the nurse should assist the patient to assess progress and plan the next stage of recovery. This article provides three reflective exercises using case study examples to demonstrate how rapport is developed and sustained. Evidence is provided to identify why challenges arise in the therapeutic relationship and how the nurse can ensure they provide care that the patient regards as genuine.

  15. Mining Trust Relationships from Online Social Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Zhang; Tong Yu

    2012-01-01

    With the growing popularity of online social network,trust plays a more and more important role in connecting people to each other.We rely on our personal trust to accept recommendations,to make purchase decisions and to select transaction partners in the online community.Therefore,how to obtain trust relationships through mining online social networks becomes an important research topic.There are several shortcomings of existing trust mining methods.First,trust is category-dependent.However,most of the methods overlook the category attribute of trust relationships,which leads to low accuracy in trust calculation.Second,since the data in online social networks cannot be understood and processed by machines directly,traditional mining methods require much human effort and are not easily applied to other applications.To solve the above problems,we propose a semantic-based trust reasoning mechanism to mine trust relationships from online social networks automatically.We emphasize the category attribute of pairwise relationships and utilize Semantic Web technologies to build a domain ontology for data communication and knowledge sharing.We exploit role-based and behavior-based reasoning functions to infer implicit trust relationships and category-specific trust relationships.We make use of path expressions to extend reasoning rules so that the mining process can be done directly without much human effort.We perform experiments on real-life data extracted from Epinions.The experimental results verify the effectiveness and wide application use of our proposed method.

  16. Inequality and Trust: Testing a Mediating Relationship for Environmental Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Kemp-Benedict

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Instrumental arguments linking inequality to environmental sustainability often suppose a negative relationship between inequality and social cohesion. While social cohesion is difficult to measure, there are measures of a narrower concept, social trust, and empirical studies have shown that social trust is negatively related to inequality. In this paper we test whether at least part of the observed relationship may be explained by income level, rather than income distribution. We use individual response data from the World Values Survey at the income decile level, and find evidence that income level is indeed important in explaining differences in levels of social trust, but it is insufficient to explain all of the dependence. In the sample used for the study, we find that both income level and income distribution help explain differences in social trust between countries.

  17. The dimensionality of workplace interpersonal trust and its relationship to workplace affective commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J Bagraim

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Trust is fundamental to the existence of human relationships, including the workplace relationship between employees and their co-workers and supervisors. This paper presents the results of a study that investigated the nature and dimensionality of interpersonal trust at work, specifically trust in co-workers and trust in supervisor. Survey questionnaire responses from 278 employees in four South African organisations were analysed. The research findings evidence that interpersonal trust is a multi-foci construct that is differentially related to corresponding foci of affective commitment.

  18. Trusting Relationships in the NATO Alliance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keating, Vincent Charles

    – particularly given the historical (and even current) animosities between some of the member states. How is it that so many states can work together given the structural bias towards distrust in the international system? Given the goal of the papers on this panel to investigate how NATO might in fact facilitate......, in order to reveal the points of intersection that might help us to understand how and why trusting relationships can be formed within the NATO alliance....

  19. The importance of trust for investment : Evidence from venture capital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottazzi, L.; Da Rin, Marco; Hellmann, T.

    We examine the effect of trust in venture capital. Our theory predicts a positive relationship of trust with investment, but a negative relationship with success. Using a hand-collected dataset of European venture capital deals, we find that the Eurobarometer measure of trust among nations

  20. Social Trust and Value Similarity: the Relationship between Social Trust and Human Values in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Beilmann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the current paper is to test whether value similarity may foster social trust in society and whether people have higher levels of social trust when they emphasise the same values that prevail in their country. The relationship between social trust and human values was examined in a sample of 51,308 people across 29 European countries using data from the European Social Survey round 6. Results suggest that value similarity is more important in generating individual level social trust in countries where the overall levels of social trust are higher. There is a stronger positive relationship between value similarity and social trust in Scandinavian countries, which have high social trust levels, while in countries with a low level of social trust, congruity of the personal value structure with the country level value structure tends to decrease the individuals trustfulness

  1. A healthy dose of trust: the relationship between interpersonal trust and health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, I.K.; Konijn, E.A.; Righetti, F.; Rusbult, C.E.

    2011-01-01

    The positive effects of trust are manifold. Recent research has shown that trust levels may even influence physical health. The current work explores this issue and aims to shed light on the mechanisms underlying the relationship between trust and health in a 5-wave longitudinal data set. Results

  2. Trust in automation: integrating empirical evidence on factors that influence trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Kevin Anthony; Bashir, Masooda

    2015-05-01

    We systematically review recent empirical research on factors that influence trust in automation to present a three-layered trust model that synthesizes existing knowledge. Much of the existing research on factors that guide human-automation interaction is centered around trust, a variable that often determines the willingness of human operators to rely on automation. Studies have utilized a variety of different automated systems in diverse experimental paradigms to identify factors that impact operators' trust. We performed a systematic review of empirical research on trust in automation from January 2002 to June 2013. Papers were deemed eligible only if they reported the results of a human-subjects experiment in which humans interacted with an automated system in order to achieve a goal. Additionally, a relationship between trust (or a trust-related behavior) and another variable had to be measured. All together, 101 total papers, containing 127 eligible studies, were included in the review. Our analysis revealed three layers of variability in human-automation trust (dispositional trust, situational trust, and learned trust), which we organize into a model. We propose design recommendations for creating trustworthy automation and identify environmental conditions that can affect the strength of the relationship between trust and reliance. Future research directions are also discussed for each layer of trust. Our three-layered trust model provides a new lens for conceptualizing the variability of trust in automation. Its structure can be applied to help guide future research and develop training interventions and design procedures that encourage appropriate trust. © 2014, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  3. Trusting Relationships and Emotional Epistemologies: A Foundational Leadership Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Brenda R.; Brew, Christine R.

    2004-01-01

    The connections among relational trust, learning and development are implicit in transformational leadership theory. They have also been established empirically in recent studies. Leadership preparation programs often endorse the need for leaders to build effective collaborative relationships that rely on trust. Trust is an emotional phenomenon.…

  4. Investigation of the Relationship between Organizational Trust and Organizational Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastug, Gülsüm; Pala, Adem; Kumartasli, Mehmet; Günel, Ilker; Duyan, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Organizational trust and organizational commitment are considered as the most important entraining factors for organizational success. The most important factor in the formation of organizational commitment is trust that employees have in their organizations. In this study, the relationship between organizational trust and organizational…

  5. Emergent Trust and Work Life Relationships: How to Approach the Relational Moment of Trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tone Bergljot Eikeland

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available How do we trust? What does the basic mechanism of trust look like? These questions define the starting point for a comparison of the classic ideas of how trust works by Mayer et al. (1995, Möllering’s (2006 re-adaption of Giddens’, Simmel’s, and James’ classic ideas of trust, and a phenomenological approach focusing on “emergent trust.” Introducing the concept of emergent trust, the idea is to suggest a phenomenological approach to studies of trust in work-life relationships in professional organizations, as an alternative to trust as a cognitive attitude, where trust becomes a stable, individual possession. The term “emergent” demonstrates a trust that emerges in meetings between persons, it has an immediate, unconditional quality, and shows itself in situations of life where there is a potential for trust to appear. Trust’s basic relationality makes the person morally responsible for the other. Trust appears between persons, as an event, constituting risk and uncertainty as a natural and positive part of our lives. Still, in larger social settings, the responsibility of trust also disperses on to the work itself, and our wider social networks.

  6. Relationships between Organizational Trust, Knowledge Transfer, Knowledge Creation, and Firm's Innovativeness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankowska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study seeks to provide empirical evidence of relationships between organizational trust, knowledge transfer, creation and innovativeness at the firm level. It aims to hypothesize a mediational model implying that organizational trust is related to knowledge transfer, which will, in turn, enhance knowledge creation, thereby…

  7. Trust and Fiduciary Relationships in Education: What Happens When Trust Is Breached?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grierson, Elizabeth Mary

    2018-01-01

    This paper examines trust as a fundamental aspect of fiduciary relationships in education. The specific relationship under examination is that of academic employee and university employer. Both have the value of trust assigned to them as an implicit part of their social and professional contract. The setting is Australia, but the principles apply…

  8. Decoupling, re-Engaging: managing trust relationships in implementation projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jeremy; Schlichter, Bjarne Rerup

    2012-01-01

    , and the complex demands of managing those fluctuations. We investigate evolving trust relationships in a longitudinal case analysis of a large Integrated Hospital System implementation for the Faroe Islands. Trust relationships suffered various breakdowns, but the project was able to recover and eventually meet...... its goals. Based on concepts from Giddens’ later work on modernity, we develop two approaches for managing dynamic trust relationships in implementation projects: decoupling and re-engaging.......An important aspect of the successful implementation of large information systems (such as ERP systems) is trust. These implementations impact the legitimate interests of many groups of stakeholders, and trust is a critical factor for success. Trust in the project is contingent upon many factors...

  9. Determinants of trust in B2C e-commerce and their relationship with consumer online trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojang, Ismaila; Medvedev, Maxim A.; Spasov, Kamen B.; Matvevnina, Arina I.

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate specific determinants or factors that influence consumer online trust in the B2C e-commerce with a focus on consumers. Constructs such as perceived security, perceived privacy, perceived third party assurance, perceived reputation, perceived familiarity and perceived website quality and their relationship with online trust in the B2C context were studied. In conducting the research, a convenience sampling technique was adopted in carrying out the survey. Questionnaires were distributed to the target respondents and the data were analyzed using SPSS version 24. A Pearson's correlation was used to test the six hypotheses identified in this study. The results provided evidence that perceived security has the greatest influence on online trust. This was followed closely by perceived reputation and finally perceived privacy. This clearly shows that e-commerce consumer population considers these factors very imperative in engendering their trust in the virtual B2C e-commerce environment.

  10. The Symbolic Nature of Trust in Heterosexual Adolescent Romantic Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norona, Jerika C; Welsh, Deborah P; Olmstead, Spencer B; Bliton, Chloe F

    2017-08-01

    Trust contributes to young people's capacity for sustaining current and future successful relationships. To date, research has yet to examine the meaning of trust in early dating relationships and reasons for its deterioration. The present study focused on video-recorded conversations about trust between 34 heterosexual adolescent couples in dating relationships living in the U.S. Transcripts from these conversations were qualitatively analyzed using thematic analysis to identify adolescents' meanings of trust and reasons they provided for a lack of trust in their romantic partners. All 34 couples identified concerns specifically related to infidelity. Six major themes for not trusting romantic partners emerged. Results suggested that the lack of trust in romantic relationships might stem from several areas that are directly and indirectly related to the current relationship, including low self-esteem, the experience of betrayal in past romantic relationships, partners' extradyadic behaviors, and gossip among peers. Importantly, peers can play a defining role in influencing young people's perceptions of their romantic partners and developing or sustaining trust in their romantic relationships.

  11. The relationship between organisational trust and quality of work life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolandi van der Berg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Managers within organisations should be more attentive regarding their managerial practices, the quality of work life (QWL and trust relationships, as experienced by employees.Research purpose: The aim of the study was to determine the relationship between organisational trust and QWL.Motivation for the study: Recent organisational changes have refocused attention on the productivity and performance of sales representatives. These changes have brought about a re-evaluation of their QWL and the organisational trust they experience.Research design, approach and method: An Internet-based survey methodology was used to collect primary data from a probability sample of 282 sales representatives; a 72% response rate was obtained. Responses were analysed using quantitative techniques and structural equation modelling.Main findings: Results confirmed a positive relationship between managerial practices with organisational trust and QWL and a lower relationship between the personality dimensions, organisational trust and the QWL.Practical/managerial implications: The study accentuated how important it is for management to be constantly aware of employees’ trust and their experience of a QWL, as these factors can lead to severe consequences if not properly managed.Contribution/value add: The study focused attention on the importance of building good trust relationships within an organisation, as it seems as though the personality traits and managerial practices of managers influence not only the trust relationship experienced by employees, but also their experience of a QWL.

  12. Trust and livelihood strategies : Survey evidence from rural Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewald, S.; Bulte, E.H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between trust and household adaptation strategies for a sample of respondents in a Mexican agrarian community. In particular, we analyze how levels of personalized, generalized, and institutionalized trust shape the adaptation strategies of smallholders, and find

  13. Trust and Livelihood Strategies: Survey Evidence from Rural Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewald, S.F.; Bulte, E.H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between trust and household adaptation strategies for a sample of respondents in a Mexican agrarian community. In particular, we analyze how levels of personalized, generalized, and institutionalized trust shape the adaptation strategies of smallholders, and find

  14. Trust in the context of management relationships: an empirical study.

    OpenAIRE

    Atkinson, Sally; Butcher, David

    2003-01-01

    This paper responds to calls for exploration of the dynamics of trust in the embedded context of interpersonal managerial relationships. Building on theoretical distinctions between different types of interpersonal relationships established in social psychology, the paper proposes a generic typology of interpersonal managerial relationships, along with associated hypotheses and implications for trust. The later part of the paper then reports the results from an initial explorat...

  15. 22 CFR 226.37 - Property trust relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Property trust relationship. 226.37 Section 226.37 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION OF ASSISTANCE AWARDS TO U.S. NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-award Requirements Property Standards § 226.37 Property trust...

  16. The relationship between inter-organizational trust and performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Fiala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with an investigation of the relationship between inter-organizational trust and performance. Using data obtained in a questionnaire survey in 373 organizations with more than 20 employees with their seat in the Czech Republic, we found the relationship between inter-organizational trust and supplier performance, mediated by the level of conflict. Also, the statistically significant negative relationship between inter-organizational trust and costs of negotiation and the statistically significant positive relationship between supplier performance and perceived performance were confirmed. The hypothesis on the statistically significant relationship between inter-organizational trust and negotiating costs was not confirmed. The structural equation modelling technique was used in the calculations. The calculated model fit indices (CFI, NFI, NNFI with values over 0.9 demonstrate a very good quality of the model.

  17. Measuring Institutional Trust: Evidence from Guyana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troy Devon Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Institutional trust is often measured by several items that are analyzed individually or as sum-scores. However, it is difficult to summarize the results of individual-items analyses, whereas sum-scores may be meaningless if the dimensions that the items are assumed to measure are not verified. Although these limitations are circumvented by using factor analysis, response styles may still bias research results. We use data from Guyana to show that a second-order factor model is appropriate for measuring institutional trust. We also demonstrate that response styles can inflate item and factor convergent validity and may either distort regression effects or create completely spurious ones. We therefore recommend using factor models with corrections for response styles in institutional trust research instead of sum-scores and individual-items analyses.

  18. Trust in health research relationships: accounts of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Michael; Townsend, Anne; Cox, Susan M; Paterson, Natasha Damiano; Lafrenière, Darquise

    2008-12-01

    TRUST IS FUNDAMENTAL in health research, yet there is little empirical evidence that explores the meaning of trust from the perspective of human subjects. The analysis presented here focuses on how human subjects talked about trust in the in-depth interviews. It emerged from the accounts that trust could not be assumed in the research setting, rather it was portrayed as a dynamic concept, built and easily broken, characterized by reciprocity and negotiation. Human subjects were ambivalent about who, when, what, and how much to trust in the research endeavor. This paper adds a fresh perspective to the literature on trust, and so offers a currently neglected, and little understood dimension to the discourse around health research ethics.

  19. The relationship between organisational trust and quality of work life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolandi van der Berg

    2013-01-01

    Research purpose: The aim of the study was to determine the relationship between organisational trust and QWL. Motivation for the study: Recent organisational changes have refocused attention on the productivity and performance of sales representatives. These changes have brought about a re-evaluation of their QWL and the organisational trust they experience. Research design, approach and method: An Internet-based survey methodology was used to collect primary data from a probability sample of 282 sales representatives; a 72% response rate was obtained. Responses were analysed using quantitative techniques and structural equation modelling. Main findings: Results confirmed a positive relationship between managerial practices with organisational trust and QWL and a lower relationship between the personality dimensions, organisational trust and the QWL. Practical/managerial implications: The study accentuated how important it is for management to be constantly aware of employees’ trust and their experience of a QWL, as these factors can lead to severe consequences if not properly managed. Contribution/value add: The study focused attention on the importance of building good trust relationships within an organisation, as it seems as though the personality traits and managerial practices of managers influence not only the trust relationship experienced by employees, but also their experience of a QWL.

  20. Collaborative consumption: relationship between trust and cooperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uiara Gonçalves De Menezes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Given the growing concern about impacts caused by high consumption patterns, this paper seeks to analyze a different way to access goods and services through collaboration, without the ownership of a good. Several initiatives of collaborative consumption have won fans in the world and also in Brazil, but little is known about these arrangements. By involving groups of people, aspects related to trust and cooperation are considered relevant to the operation of collaborative consumption. These two aspects were analyzed in eight different initiatives of collaborative consumption, through interviews with eight respective users. The result that emerges from this analysis is that not all initiatives are based on trust, although there is collaboration to achieve the intended goals. The types of initiatives that had greater emphasis on trust, for treating it so indispensable, were couchsurfing, coworking, crowdsourcing and library at bus stops. These forms of consumption, trust is the basis for cooperation, because without it individuals would be unable to achieve the desired result. Other results and specifics are presented in the article.

  1. An Analysis of a supervisor-subordinate trust relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Engelbrecht

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available In view of the importance of interpersonal trust as recognized by organizational scholars and the problems associated with the study of trust in organizations, the development of a conceptual model of organizational trust is essential. The aim of this study was to establish empirically the validity of a theoretically sound model of trust in the South African work context. The overall results confirmed a positive relationship between interpersonal trust, trustworthiness and successful trust relationships. The propensity to trust, as well as the length of the supervisorsubordinate relationship, however, did not prove to have a moderating effect on trustworthiness. Opsomming In die lig van die belangrike rol wat navorsers aan vertroue heg en die probleme verbonde aan die bestudering van vertroue in organisasies, is die ontwikkeling van'n konseptuele model van organisatoriese vertroue essensieel. Die doel van hierdie studie was om empiries te bepaal of 'n teoreties gefundeerde model van vertroue in die Suid-Afrikaanse werkskonteks geldig is. In die algemeen bevestig die resultate die bestaan van n beduidend positiewe verband tussen interpersoonlike vertroue, vertrouenswaardigheid en n suksesvolle vertrouensverhouding. Vertrouensgeneigdheid sowel as lengte van toesighouerondergeskikte verhouding het egter nie 'n moderende invloed op vertrouenswaardigheid getoon nie.

  2. Accounting for control and trust building in interfirm transactional relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vosselman, E.G.J.; van der Meer-Kooistra, J.

    This paper theorises the accounting-control-trust nexus in interfirm transactional relationships. In the context of such relationships, accounting has predominantly been conceptualised as a control technology. However, in our paper we analyse stable and durable relationships as being the results of

  3. Being trusted: How team generational age diversity promotes and undermines trust in cross-boundary relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michele

    2016-04-01

    We examine how demographic context influences the trust that boundary spanners experience in their dyadic relationships with clients. Because of the salience of age as a demographic characteristic as well as the increasing prevalence of age diversity and intergenerational conflict in the workplace, we focus on team age diversity as a demographic social context that affects trust between boundary spanners and their clients. Using social categorization theory and theories of social capital, we develop and test our contextual argument that a boundary spanner's experience of being trusted is influenced by the social categorization processes that occur in dyadic interactions with a specific client and, simultaneously, by similar social categorization processes that influence the degree to which the client team as a whole serves as a cooperative resource for demographically similar versus dissimilar boundary spanner-client dyads. Using a sample of 168 senior boundary spanners from the consulting industry, we find that generational diversity among client team members from a client organization undermines the perception of being trusted within homogeneous boundary spanner-client dyads while it enhances the perception of being trusted within heterogeneous dyads. The perception of being trusted is an important aspect of cross-boundary relationships because it influences coordination and the costs associated with coordination. © 2015 The Author Journal of Organizational Behavior Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. A Model for Investigation of the Intensity of Trust Relationships' Strength among Users in Social Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    rojiar pir mohammadiani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Although trust relations among users in social media are the evidence of social influence, but the level of this impact depends on strength of trust among users. Therefore, in this paper we study the effect of trust relationships’ strength among users through the development of matrix factorization method. Matrix factorization is a method to predict the rate that user assign to the products. For this purpose, based on similarity factors the strength of trust relationship is measured, then this feature as an effective parameter was added to matrix factorization. The proposed model is applied on Epinions data set. The weight of trust relationships’ strength parameter is determined through the proposed model. Based on the results, by adding the strength of trust relationship the error rate is reduced. Furthermore, if the strength of trust between users is larger than 0.8, the error reduction will be more significant. Improving the results through more accurate estimation shows that this effect is set correctly.

  5. Improved Recommendations Based on Trust Relationships in Social Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Tian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to alleviate the pressure of information overload and enhance consumer satisfaction, personalization recommendation has become increasingly popular in recent years. As a result, various approaches for recommendation have been proposed in the past few years. However, traditional recommendation methods are still troubled with typical issues such as cold start, sparsity, and low accuracy. To address these problems, this paper proposed an improved recommendation method based on trust relationships in social networks to improve the performance of recommendations. In particular, we define trust relationship afresh and consider several representative factors in the formalization of trust relationships. To verify the proposed approach comprehensively, this paper conducted experiments in three ways. The experimental results show that our proposed approach leads to a substantial increase in prediction accuracy and is very helpful in dealing with cold start and sparsity.

  6. Trust Me, Principal, or Burn Out! The Relationship between Principals' Burnout and Trust in Students and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Niyazi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the primary school principals' views on trust in students and parents and also, to explore the relationships between principals' levels of professional burnout and their trust in students and parents. To this end, Principal Trust Survey and Friedman Principal Burnout scales were administered on 119…

  7. Trust at first sight: evidence from ERPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzi, Tessa; Righi, Stefania; Ottonello, Sara; Cincotta, Massimo; Viggiano, Maria Pia

    2014-01-01

    We used event-related potentials (ERPs) to tap the temporal dynamics of first impressions based on face appearance. Participants were asked to evaluate briefly presented faces for trustworthiness and political choice. Behaviorally, participants were better at discriminating faces that were pre-rated as untrustworthy. The ERP results showed that the P100 component was enhanced for untrustworthy faces, consistently with the view that signals of potential threat are given precedence in neural processing. The enhanced ERP responses to untrustworthy faces persisted throughout the processing sequence and the amplitude of early posterior negativity (EPN), and subsequent late positive potential (LPP) was increased with respect to trustworthy faces which, in contrast, elicited an enhanced positivity around 150 ms on frontal sites. These ERP patterns were found specifically for the trustworthiness evaluation and not for the political decision task. Political decision yielded an increase in the N170 amplitude, reflecting a more demanding and taxing structural encoding. Similar ERP responses, as previously reported in the literature for facial expressions processing, were found throughout the entire time course specifically elicited by faces explicitly judged as untrustworthy. One possibility might be that evolution has provided the brain with a 'special toolkit' for trust evaluation that is fast and triggers ERPs related to emotional processing.

  8. Exploring the influence of trust relationships on motivation in the health sector: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okello, Dickson R O; Gilson, Lucy

    2015-03-31

    Dedicated and motivated health workers (HWs) play a major role in delivering efficient and effective health services that improve patients' experience of health care. Growing interest in HW motivation has led to a global focus on pay for performance strategies, but less attention has been paid to nurturing intrinsic motivation. Workplace trust relationships involve fair treatment and respectful interactions between individuals. Such relationships enable cooperation among HWs and their colleagues, supervisors, managers and patients and may act as a source of intrinsic motivation. This paper presents findings from a qualitative systematic review of empirical studies providing evidence on HW motivation, to consider what these studies suggest about the possible influence of workplace trust relationships over motivation. Five electronic databases were searched for articles reporting research findings about HW motivation for various cadres published in the 10-year period 2003 to 2013 and with available full free text in the English language. Data extraction involved consideration of the links between trust relationships and motivation, by identifying how studies directly or indirectly mention and discuss relevant factors. Twenty-three articles from low- and middle-income countries and eight from high-income countries that met predetermined quality and inclusion criteria were appraised and subjected to thematic synthesis. Workplace trust relationships with colleagues, supervisors and managers, employing organisation and patients directly and indirectly influence HW motivation. Motivational factors identified as linked to trust include respect; recognition, appreciation and rewards; supervision; teamwork; management support; autonomy; communication, feedback and openness; and staff shortages and resource inadequacy. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first systematic review on trust and motivation in the health sector. Evidence indicates that workplace trust

  9. Trusting the state, trusting each other?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar; Dinesen, Peter Thisted

    2016-01-01

    Trust in state institutions is a prominent explanation of social trust. However, previous—mainly cross-sectional—analyses provide limited causal evidence regarding the relationship between institutional trust and social trust and it is thus essentially unknown whether an observed relationship...... reflects reverse causality (social trust forming institutional trust), or both forms of trust reflecting deep-seated dispositions (common confounding). Against the backdrop of the shortcomings of previous cross-sectional analyses, this paper utilizes two Danish panel surveys containing measures of both...... types of trust for the same individuals surveyed at multiple points in time over a long time-span (up to 18 years) to address the potentially reverse and/or spurious relationship. Using individual fixed effects and cross-lagged panel models, the results provide strong evidence of trust in state...

  10. The Impact of Consumer Knowledge Bias on Narrow-Scope Trust, Broad-Scope Trust, and Relationship Satisfaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben; Grønholdt, Lars; Josiassen, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates how consumer knowledge bias - defined as knowledge over/underconfidence (O/U) - influences two types of trust (broad-scope trust and narrow-scope trust) and consumer relationship satisfaction. Based on a survey comprising 756 mutual fund investors, the contribution...... of this study to the marketing literature is twofold. First, taking a marketing relationship approach this study suggests and demonstrates that knowledge O/U positively influences relationship satisfaction and narrow-scope trust such that the more knowledge O/U a customer becomes, the higher/lower the level...... is low compared to high. Notably, the study findings strongly suggest that marketing managers should carry out their relationship satisfaction and trust improvement efforts relative to the combination of customers‟ subjective and objective knowledge....

  11. Feelings of Clinician-Patient Similarity and Trust Influence Pain: Evidence From Simulated Clinical Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losin, Elizabeth A Reynolds; Anderson, Steven R; Wager, Tor D

    2017-07-01

    Pain is influenced by many factors other than external sources of tissue damage. Among these, the clinician-patient relationship is particularly important for pain diagnosis and treatment. However, the effects of the clinician-patient relationship on pain remain underexamined. We tested the hypothesis that patients who believe they share core beliefs and values with their clinician will report less pain than patients who do not. We also measured feelings of perceived clinician-patient similarity and trust to see if these interpersonal factors influenced pain. We did so by experimentally manipulating perceptions of similarity between participants playing the role of clinicians and participants playing the role of patients in simulated clinical interactions. Participants were placed in 2 groups on the basis of their responses to a questionnaire about their personal beliefs and values, and painful thermal stimulation was used as an analog of a painful medical procedure. We found that patients reported feeling more similarity and trust toward their clinician when they were paired with clinicians from their own group. In turn, patients' positive feelings of similarity and trust toward their clinicians-but not clinicians' feelings toward patients or whether the clinician and patient were from the same group-predicted lower pain ratings. Finally, the most anxious patients exhibited the strongest relationship between their feelings about their clinicians and their pain report. These findings increase our understanding of context-driven pain modulation and suggest that interventions aimed at increasing patients' feelings of similarity to and trust in health care providers may help reduce the pain experienced during medical care. We present novel evidence that the clinician-patient relationship can affect the pain experienced during medical care. We found that "patients" in simulated clinical interactions who reported feeling more similarity and trust toward their

  12. Analysis on the Relationship between Trust Culture and Prejudices in Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Cetin

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: Trust is crucial for creating a positive culture in the school environment, which is called as trust culture. On the other hand, prejudice is thought to be a potential barrier for creating trust culture in schools. Thus, it is meaningful to examine the relationship between trust culture and prejudice in schools and then to…

  13. Development-based Trust: Proposing and Validating a New Trust Measurement Model for Buyer-Seller Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Mauro da Costa Hernandez

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes and validates a trust measurement model for buyer-seller relationships. Baptized as development-based trust, the model encompasses three dimensions of trust: calculus-based, knowledge-based and identification-based. In addition to recognizing that trust is a multidimensional construct, the model also assumes that trust can evolve to take on a different character depending on the stage of the relationship. In order to test the proposed model and compare it to the characteristic-based trust measurement model, the measure most frequently used in the buyer-seller relationship literature, data were collected from 238 clients of an IT product wholesaler. The results show that the scales are valid and reliable and the proposed development-based trust measurement model is superior to the characteristic-based trust measurement model in terms of its ability to explain certain variables of interest in buyer-seller relationships (long-term relationship orientation, information sharing, behavioral loyalty and future intentions. Implications for practice, limitations and suggestions for future studies are discussed.

  14. Trust

    OpenAIRE

    Söllner, Matthias; Benbasat, Izak; Gefen, David; Leimeister, Jan Marco; Pavlou, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Trust is the enabler of social interaction. Although the origins of research on trust traditionally lie outside the Information Systems (IS) domain, the importance of trust for IS research rapidly grew in the late 1990s, and it is still growing with the increasing ubiquity and advancement of technology in organizations, virtual teams, online markets, and user-technology interactions. Theoretically, the central role of trust is tied to the growing social change that Information and Communicati...

  15. Trust

    OpenAIRE

    Fojtů, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    This rigorous thesis is focused on a status of trust in an application practise in a Czech legislation with a context of historical aspects of institutes similar to trusts as well as actual legislation. The thesis includes also analyses of more difficult provisions concerning the trust, including economic impacts representing accounting and tax consequences. Also comparison with established modifications trusts in Europe and their possible utilization of the Czech point of view of the settlor...

  16. Public health and public trust: Survey evidence from the Ebola Virus Disease epidemic in Liberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Robert A; Morse, Benjamin S; Tsai, Lily L

    2017-01-01

    Trust in government has long been viewed as an important determinant of citizens' compliance with public health policies, especially in times of crisis. Yet evidence on this relationship remains scarce, particularly in the developing world. We use results from a representative survey conducted during the 2014-15 Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) epidemic in Monrovia, Liberia to assess the relationship between trust in government and compliance with EVD control interventions. We find that respondents who expressed low trust in government were much less likely to take precautions against EVD in their homes, or to abide by government-mandated social distancing mechanisms designed to contain the spread of the virus. They were also much less likely to support potentially contentious control policies, such as "safe burial" of EVD-infected bodies. Contrary to stereotypes, we find no evidence that respondents who distrusted government were any more or less likely to understand EVD's symptoms and transmission pathways. While only correlational, these results suggest that respondents who refused to comply may have done so not because they failed to understand how EVD is transmitted, but rather because they did not trust the capacity or integrity of government institutions to recommend precautions and implement policies to slow EVD's spread. We also find that respondents who experienced hardships during the epidemic expressed less trust in government than those who did not, suggesting the possibility of a vicious cycle between distrust, non-compliance, hardships and further distrust. Finally, we find that respondents who trusted international non-governmental organizations (INGOs) were no more or less likely to support or comply with EVD control policies, suggesting that while INGOs can contribute in indispensable ways to crisis response, they cannot substitute for government institutions in the eyes of citizens. We conclude by discussing the implications of our findings for future

  17. The Moderating Influence of Broad-Scope Trust on Customer-Seller Relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben

    2012-01-01

    , respectively, this study investigates the moderating influence of BST on relationships between satisfaction, narrow-scope trust, and loyalty and also examines the direct influence of BST on these variables. The results indicate that whereas BST negatively moderates relationships between satisfaction and narrow......-scope trust and between narrow-scope trust and loyalty, BST positively moderates the relationship between satisfaction and loyalty. In addition, it is demonstrated that BST positively influences customer satisfaction and narrow-scope trust...

  18. Accounting for Trust: A Conceptual Model for the Determinants of Trust in the Australian Public Accountant – SME Client Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Cherry

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates trust as it relates to the relationship between Australia’s public accountants and their SME clients. It describes the contribution of the accountancy profession to the SME market, as well as the key challenges faced by accountants and their SME clients. Following the review of prior scholarly studies, a working definition of trust as it relates to this important relationship is also developed and presented. A further consequence of prior academic work is the development of a comprehensive conceptual model to describe the determinants of trust in the Australian public accountant – SME client relationship, which requires testing via empirical studies.

  19. Internal Crisis Communication Strategies to Protect Trust Relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzei, Alessandra; Ravazzani, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Crisis communication has emerged as a hot topic after the global financial crisis that started in the second half of 2008. A survey of 61 Italian companies examined internal crisis communication strategies and the characteristics of that communication in order to understand the role...... of communication in safeguarding relationships of trust with employees. The main results show that companies have used poorly internal communication as a strategic lever to develop employee commitment and have adopted a broadly defensive approach that may undermine their intangible assets. The study offers...

  20. College Education and Social Trust: An Evidence-Based Study on the Causal Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Jian; van den Brink, Henri?tte Maassen; Groot, Wim

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the influence of college education on social trust at the individual level. Based on the literature of trust and social trust, we hypothesize that life experience/development since adulthood and perceptions of cultural/social structures are two primary channels in the causal linkage between college education and social trust. In the first part of the empirical study econometric techniques are employed to tackle the omitted-variable problem and substantial evidence is found...

  1. Parent-Teacher Relationships in Elementary School: An Examination of Parent-Teacher Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Rachel T.; Garbacz, S. Andrew; Beattie, Tiffany; Moore, Christabelle L.

    2016-01-01

    Trust is an important dimension of parent educational involvement and parent-teacher relationships. Preliminary research suggests that parent trust in teachers and schools is associated with student learning and behavior. However, examinations of parent trust in children's education are limited. The present study investigated the influence of…

  2. Outsourcing Relationships between Firms and Their Training Providers: The Role of Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainey, Thomas W.; Klaas, Brian S.

    2005-01-01

    Firms increasingly use external vendors to provide training for their employees. And because trust has been found to be essential in successful interfirm relationships, this study identified a number of factors thought to be associated with both self-interested trust and socially oriented trust between firms and their training suppliers. Using…

  3. The issues of risk, trust, and customer intention: A search for the relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Adiwijaya

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is explaining the relationship between customers trust, perceived risk and online purchase intention. However, we added e-servicescape as the antecedent of customers trust, perceived risk, and purchase intention. The respondents were 120 online shop customers. The data was processed using SmartPLS 2.0. We found e-Servicescape to be an antecedent of both customer trust and perceived risk, and customer trust to be the antecedent of purchase intention. However, we found that the relationship between customer trust and perceived risk, as well as perceived risk and purchase intention to be insignificant. Our findings and managerial implications are discussed.

  4. The trust-commitment challenge in service quality-loyalty relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Antonio Carrizo; Silva, Pedro Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop and empirically test a model to examine service quality, satisfaction, trust and commitment as loyalty antecedents in a private healthcare service. The approach was tested using structural equation modelling, involving 175 patients from a private Portuguese healthcare unit, using a revised Service Quality Assessment Scale (SQAS) scale for service quality evaluation. The scale used to evaluate service quality is valid and meaningful. Service quality proved to be a multidimensional construct and relevant to build satisfaction. The path satisfaction→trust→loyalty was validated, whereas the path satisfaction→commitment→loyalty was not statistically supported. The revised SQAS scale showed good internal consistency in healthcare context. Further trust-commitment antecedents must be examined in a private healthcare landscape to generalise the findings. Healthcare quality managers must explore the service quality dimensions to generate satisfaction among their patients. Developing trust generates positive patient attitudes and loyalty. This study explores using the SQAS scale in a private healthcare context. The authors provide further evidence that service quality is an antecedent and different from satisfaction. All the measures used proved to be valid and reliable. Trust and commitment play different roles in their relationship with loyalty.

  5. Trustsim - A Simulator for Trust Relationships in Grid Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    This report describes the use of Trustsim for simulation of trust- and reputation-based phenomena in small or large scale distributed systems. The trust mechanisms which can be simulated are incremental, in the sense that good behaviour is rewarded by a higher degree of trust and bad behaviour...

  6. Social capital and health: evidence that ancestral trust promotes health among children of immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljunge, Martin

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents evidence that generalized trust promotes health. Children of immigrants in a broad set of European countries with ancestry from across the world are studied. Individuals are examined within country of residence using variation in trust across countries of ancestry. The approach addresses reverse causality and concerns that the trust measure picks up institutional factors in the individual's contextual setting. There is a significant positive estimate of ancestral trust in explaining self-assessed health. The finding is robust to accounting for individual, parental, and extensive ancestral country characteristics. Individuals with higher ancestral trust are also less likely to be hampered by health problems in their daily life, providing evidence of trust influencing real life outcomes. Individuals with high trust feel and act healthier, enabling a more productive life.

  7. Understanding the Interplay Between Consumer Knowledge, Trust and Relationship Satisfaction in Financial Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben; Grønholdt, Lars; Josiassen, Alexander

    , this study contributes to previous research by examining how consumer knowledge O/U affects two types of trust (broad-scope trust and narrow-scope trust) and consumer relationship satisfaction. Trust does not only concern consumer trust in individual companies (i.e., narrow.-scope confidence NST), but also...... concerns consumer confidence in the broader business context in which consumers plan and implement their behavior (i.e., broad scope trust, BST). NST is defined as "the expectation that the service provider can be relied on to deliver on its promises’, while BST is defined as ‘the expectation....../U a consumer becomes, the higher/lower NST and levels of relationship satisfaction will be. Second, it is demonstrated that BST has a negative moderating effect on the relationship between knowledge O/U and satisfaction, such that knowledge O/U has a higher positive/negative effect on relationship satisfaction...

  8. Community trust and household health: A spatially-based approach with evidence from rural Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarychta, Alan

    2015-12-01

    What is the relationship between community trust and household health? Scholars working to understand the effects of trust and social capital on human health tend to focus on individual characteristics or social environments, frequently without integrating these two dimensions. In light of this, the present paper makes contributions in both conceptualization and measurement. First, I develop a spatially-based approach for operationalizing community trust as the product of individual orientation and social environment. This approach highlights the need for a household to trust its neighbors and for those neighbors to reciprocate trust in order to constitute the psychological and material mechanisms critical for linking social context to individual health. Second, I illustrate the utility of this measure by evaluating the relationship between community trust and self-rated health status using an original population census survey from 2009 to 2010 for two municipalities in western Honduras (approximately 2800 households with a response rate of 94.9%). I implement spatial regression analysis and show that there is a positive and substantively meaningful relationship between community trust and household health; households that are trusting and surrounded by similarly trusting neighbors report better health status, while those in uncertain or mutually distrusting environments report worse health. The theory and results presented here suggest an important link between trust and social capital at the community level, which is particularly salient for rural regions in developing countries where health resources are scarce and community-based interventions are common. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Trust

    OpenAIRE

    Bentham, R

    2016-01-01

    Rachel Bentham's 'Let All Tongues Flower' won her many new admirers for its 'openness to form' and 'strong yet subtle feminine sensibility'. It was also a Top 3 selling book on Amazon Kindle Women's Poetry. Here, in her new book 'Trust', she shows she is equally at home with the increasingly popular haiku form - using both classic 5-7-5 and free form haiku, she gives us more treasured and crafted glimpses into her 'unhindered and mostly joyful life'.

  10. Trust

    OpenAIRE

    Carro, Salvatore

    2006-01-01

    Il lavoro eseguito ha per oggetto il trust, istituto, come noto, estraneo alla nostra cultura giuridica, tipico dei sistemi di common law, riconosciuto e regolato dalla Convenzione dell’ Aja, firmata il 1°luglio 1985, ratificata in Italia con L. 16 ottobre 1989, n. 364, ed entrata in vigore il 1° giugno 1992. La ricerca svolta ha, in primo luogo, esaminato la fattispecie, con un approccio comparatistico, analizzando, nella prima parte, il contenuto e la controversa natura giuridica della c...

  11. The Relationship Between Trust-in-God, Positive and Negative Affect, and Hope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadardi, Javad S; Azadi, Zeinab

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to test the relationships between Trust-in-God, positive and negative affect, and feelings of hope. A sample of university students (N = 282, 50 % female) completed the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, the Adult Dispositional Hope Scale, and a Persian measure of Trust-in-God for Muslims. The results of a series of hierarchical regression analyses indicated that Trust-in-God was positively associated with participants' scores for hope and positive affect but was negatively associated with their scores for negative affect. The results support the relationship between Trust-in-God and indices of mental health.

  12. Trust in the doctor-patient relationship in the light of the latest research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawlikowska-Łagód Katarzyna

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Trusting the medical staff, especially the doctor is a fundamental part of the success of the treatment process. Appropriate level of trust in a doctor-patient relationship affects the patient’s compliance with the physician’s recommendations and motivates patient to fight the disease. Over the last few years, numerous studies have been conducted on the level of trust in medical staff, especially doctors.

  13. Analysis of the relationships among trust antecedents, organizational structures, and performance outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Seykora, Joseph T.

    2009-01-01

    Approved for public release, distribution unlimited MBA Professional Report The project explores and seeks to identify relationships among four trust antecedents, two organizational structures, and two performance outcomes. The results will help to further explain associations between trust level (high or low) and organizational structure. Past research found that the edge organization operating in a high trust environment produces the most accurate results in the least amount of time. ...

  14. Birth Weight and Social Trust in Adulthood: Evidence for Early Calibration of Social Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Michael Bang; Aarøe, Lene

    2015-11-01

    Social trust forms the fundamental basis for social interaction within societies. Understanding the cognitive architecture of trust and the roots of individual differences in trust is of key importance. We predicted that one of the factors calibrating individual levels of trust is the intrauterine flow of nutrients from mother to child as indexed by birth weight. Birth weight forecasts both the future external environment and the internal condition of the individual in multiple ways relevant for social cognition. Specifically, we predicted that low birth weight is utilized as a forecast of a harsh environment, vulnerable condition, or both and, consequently, reduces social trust. The results of the study reported here are consistent with this prediction. Controlling for many confounds through sibling and panel designs, we found that lower birth weight reduced social trust in adulthood. Furthermore, we obtained tentative evidence that this effect is mitigated if adult environments do not induce stress. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Relationship between Primary School Teachers' Perceived Social Support and Organizational Trust Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasdan, Murat; Yalcin, Tugba

    2010-01-01

    Perceived social support and organizational trust have gained importance in organizational life along with the human relationship among organizations. While social support concept has been accepted as the support obtained from individual's surroundings, organizational trust is defined as the result of consistent behaviors based on mutual respect…

  16. Educational Hospitality and Trust in Teacher-Student Relationships: A Derridarian Visiting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ruyu

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the meaning of teacher-student relationships in the light of Derrida's notions of hospitality and trust. Drawing on Derrida, the author delineates two aspects of educational hospitality: hospitality without determinacy and hospitality as self-surrender. It is argued that educational hospitality is underpinned by trust. A sound…

  17. Relationships among Principal Authentic Leadership and Teacher Trust and Engagement Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, James J.; Wang, Chuang; Watson, Jim R.; Murray, Louise

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among the authentic leadership style of school principals and the trust and engagement levels of their teachers in a county school district in a Southeastern state. The authenticity of the school principal was found to be significantly positively related to teacher trust and teacher engagement levels. The…

  18. Client Intimacy & Performance Advice: Determinants of Trust in the Public Accountant - SME Client Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianne McGrath

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This multi-discipline research investigated the determinants of trust in the relationship between Australia’s public accountants and their small and medium-sized (SME clients. In excess of four hundred SME owners, across Australia, were surveyed to test a proposed model and client intimacy variables were found to be the most significant predictors of trust in this important relationship. Offer-related variables, primarily the provision of advisory or performance-related services (rather than conformance-related services, were also found to be significant, however, at a lesser level than client intimacy and relationship variables. The multi-dimensionality of the trust construct was also highlighted.

  19. The Role of Trust in Financial Customer-seller Relationships Before and After the Financial Crisis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben

    2014-01-01

    provider. Hence, as a direct managerial implication, financial service managers should consider investing additional resources in satisfying their customers in the after crisis era. In addition, it is suggested that managers should seek to rebuild the positive relationship between trust and loyalty......This study examines the role of trust in customer-seller relationships before and after the 2008 financial crisis. On the basis of two surveys comprising 1155 and 757 bank customers, respectively, it is shown that trust is less likely to mediate the relationship between satisfaction and loyalty...

  20. Parkinson Patients' Initial Trust in Avatars: Theory and Evidence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrija Javor

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disease that affects the motor system and cognitive and behavioral functions. Due to these impairments, PD patients also have problems in using the computer. However, using computers and the Internet could help these patients to overcome social isolation and enhance information search. Specifically, avatars (defined as virtual representations of humans are increasingly used in online environments to enhance human-computer interaction by simulating face-to-face interaction. Our laboratory experiment investigated how PD patients behave in a trust game played with human and avatar counterparts, and we compared this behavior to the behavior of age, income, education and gender matched healthy controls. The results of our study show that PD patients trust avatar faces significantly more than human faces. Moreover, there was no significant difference between initial trust of PD patients and healthy controls in avatar faces, while PD patients trusted human faces significantly less than healthy controls. Our data suggests that PD patients' interaction with avatars may constitute an effective way of communication in situations in which trust is required (e.g., a physician recommends intake of medication. We discuss the implications of these results for several areas of human-computer interaction and neurological research.

  1. Parkinson Patients’ Initial Trust in Avatars: Theory and Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javor, Andrija; Ransmayr, Gerhard; Struhal, Walter; Riedl, René

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease that affects the motor system and cognitive and behavioral functions. Due to these impairments, PD patients also have problems in using the computer. However, using computers and the Internet could help these patients to overcome social isolation and enhance information search. Specifically, avatars (defined as virtual representations of humans) are increasingly used in online environments to enhance human-computer interaction by simulating face-to-face interaction. Our laboratory experiment investigated how PD patients behave in a trust game played with human and avatar counterparts, and we compared this behavior to the behavior of age, income, education and gender matched healthy controls. The results of our study show that PD patients trust avatar faces significantly more than human faces. Moreover, there was no significant difference between initial trust of PD patients and healthy controls in avatar faces, while PD patients trusted human faces significantly less than healthy controls. Our data suggests that PD patients’ interaction with avatars may constitute an effective way of communication in situations in which trust is required (e.g., a physician recommends intake of medication). We discuss the implications of these results for several areas of human-computer interaction and neurological research. PMID:27820864

  2. Young entrepreneurs’ trust during the recession: Evidence from Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babić Vojislav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the influence of positive trust on business activities, entrepreneurship development, and economic growth. During the global recession, institutions make numerous decisions to find answers to the crisis that influence the behaviour of entrepreneurs. In such situations, significant stocks of trust are of great importance for economy stability and the motivation of future entrepreneurs. In the first section the terms, functions, and types of trust are defined. The second section presents the results of measuring the interpersonal and institutional trust of young entrepreneurs, representatives of future entrepreneurship and business and bearers of networking ideas in Serbia. The results show that young entrepreneurs have a serious trust deficit, which is worrying in people who are potential future business leaders. Only one fifth of the respondents intends to start their own firm when they have finished studying. The reasons most often given are that government economic policy and monopolies hamper starting a business. Most of the respondents thought that the government should be more involved in providing a better environment for medium and small business. Most respondents believed that the Serbian recession was caused foremost by wrong governmental economic policy, followed by corruption.

  3. Cross-cultural differences in relationship- and group-based trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuki, Masaki; Maddux, William W; Brewer, Marilynn B; Takemura, Kosuke

    2005-01-01

    Two experiments explored differences in depersonalized trust (trust toward a relatively unknown target person) across cultures. Based on a recent theoretical framework that postulates predominantly different bases for group behaviors in Western cultures versus Eastern cultures, it was predicted that Americans would tend to trust people primarily based on whether they shared category memberships; however, trust for Japanese was expected to be based on the likelihood of sharing direct or indirect interpersonal links. Results supported these predictions. In both Study 1 (questionnaire study) and Study 2 (online money allocation game), Americans trusted ingroup members more than outgroup members; however, the existence of a potential indirect relationship link increased trust for outgroup members more for Japanese than for Americans. Implications for understanding group processes across cultures are discussed.

  4. Customer trust as mediator in the creation of customer relationship intention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimyati Mohamad

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available As in all service industries, banks need to be able to provide their customers with personalized services in order to ensure that they build and maintain long-term relationships which are mutually beneficial. As such, banks must adopt a relational marketing approach based on effective communication and the building of trust with the current customers instead of focusing on acquiring new customers. The current research provides insights into how banks can build trust and maintain their relations with existing customers by testing several predictors of customer trust and customer relationship intention. Thus, the purpose of this study is to examine economic content, resource content and social content as the predictors of trust and relationship intention, and trust as a predictor of relationship intention. In addition, this study also analyzes the role of trust in mediating among economic content, resource content, and social content as a predictor of relationship intention of state owned bank customers in East Java. The sample of the study is formed of 120 customers of three state-owned banks from East Java. The research variables consist of three exogenous variables: economic content, resource content, and social content. The endogenous variables are trust and relationship intention. The data was collected using a questionnaire with multiple items measured using Likert scales. The model was analyzed using SEM with AMOS version 18.0. The result shows that economic content, resource content and social content are positive and significant predictors of trust and relationship intention. The role of economic content, resource content, social content as direct predictors is higher than the mediating role of trust of state owned bank customers.

  5. The role of brand trust in male customers' relationship to luxury brands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Won-Moo; Kim, Minsung; Kim, Hanna

    2014-04-01

    This study examined the role of brand trust in customers' luxury brand consumption behavior. Perceived value and brand satisfaction were presented within a framework as antecedents of brand trust, while brand loyalty and brand risk were presented as consequences. A face-to-face survey was administered to a sample (N = 400) of men between 25 and 54 years of age who had purchased luxury brand and non-luxury brand suits within the previous three months. The results showed the greater the hedonic value on brand satisfaction, the greater the influence of brand satisfaction on brand trust, and the greater was the effect of brand trust on brand loyalty for luxury brands as compared with non-luxury brands. Similar patterns are identified between luxury and non-luxury brands for the positive relationship between utilitarian value and brand satisfaction and the negative relationship between brand trust and brand risk.

  6. The Relationship Between the Co-creation Elements, Satisfaction and Trust in the Service Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Carine Braz Becker

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available New perspectives have emerged in marketing, based, for example, in the co-creation (Vargo & Lusch, 2004. This article aims to analyze the relationship between the elements of co-creation - dialogue, access, risk assessment and transparency -, satisfaction and trust in services with credence qualities (medical services versus services with experience qualities (hairdresser services. To this end, we conducted a survey (n = 230 and moderated mediation analyses to analysis to investigate satisfaction as a mediator of the relationship between the elements of co-creation and trust, and the moderating role of the type of service. The findings show that satisfaction mediates the relationship between dialogue, access and transparency with trust, and these relationships are stronger for the medical service (credential service than hairdresser service (experimental service. Thus, this paper contributes to the marketing literature by proposing new antecedents of trust for services with credence qualities, and empirically tests the co-creation through its elements.

  7. Investigation of the trust status of the nurse-patient relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaras, Gözde; Abaan, Süheyla

    2016-09-07

    Professional nurses provide holistic healthcare to people and deal with patients closely. Furthermore, patients need nurses to do self-care and patients trust them for their treatments. Therefore, trust is extremely important in a professional care relationship and in satisfactory patient outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine the patients' views on the trust status toward nurses and the factors important for the development of trust in a nurse-patient relationship. This research was planned as a descriptive cross-sectional study. The study was carried out between April and July 2014 at the oncology hospital of a university in Ankara, Turkey. The sample size was calculated by power analysis and was composed of 356 inpatients diagnosed with cancer. For data collection, a questionnaire and the "Trust in Nurses Scale" were used. FROM THE HOSPITAL AND WRITTEN INFORMED CONSENT OBTAINED FROM PARTICIPATING PATIENTS: Approval from the University Clinical Research Ethics Committee was obtained. Written approval was obtained from the hospital and consent letter from the patients. The average score on the scale was 24.5 ± 3.9, meaning that patients had a high level of trust toward nurses in this hospital. The patients who were in the 50-59 age group and men had statistically higher scores compared with other groups. Patients' answers revealed that themes of "Personal and Professional Characteristics" were important when developing trust, however "Mistreatment, Professional Incapability, and Communication Problem" were important causing mistrust toward the nurses. In this study, the nurses' professional competencies and interpersonal caring attributes emerged as most important in developing trust. This study paid attention to the values and attitudes that develop patients' trust toward nurses. Moreover, the findings raise ethical questions about how the patients' basic rights are to be protected and how their trust level can be heightened. Nurse managers need to

  8. The Trust-Committment-Flexibility Link in Transnational Buyer-Supplier Relationships: A Network Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matevž Rašković

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to analyze the manner in which trust and commitment impact relationship flexibility in a transnational buyer-supplier network context. There is an abundance of research on trust and commitment related to buyer-supplier relationships in the marketing literature; however, their link to relationship flexibility in particular has not attracted much attention within the marketing field to date. Whereas the marketing literature tends to focus on traditional performance outcomes in buyer-supplier relationships (i.e. financial performance, satisfaction, loyalty, the supply chain management literature emphasizes the importance of flexibility as fundamental characteristics of well-performing supply networks. In this paper, a novel network analysis approach is employed for the marketing literature to analyze the link between trust, commitment and relationship flexibility. The analyzed network is a two-mode, egocentric and valued network, consisting of 11 purchasing managers and 53 suppliers connected to a transnational company in the steel construction industry with headquarters in Slovenia. To analyze the impact of trust and commitment on buyer-supplier relationship flexibility, a Multiple Regression Quadratic Assignment Procedure (MRQAP approach was used. Results show that trust and commitment are not just important determinants of buyer-supplier relationship flexibility in a network context, but also how their impact on relationship flexibility changes depending on the importance of the buyer-supplier relationship. In high importance relationships trust is the overwhelming determinant of relationship flexibility, while in low importance relationships commitment is a more important determinant of relationship flexibility.

  9. The relationship between leader-follower exchange and job insecurity: The mediating role of trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olufemi Adigun Lawal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The study examines the extent and nature of mediational roles of affective and cognitive trusts on the predictive relationship between leader-member exchange (LMX and job insecurity. Six hundred and twenty-six employees are surveyed through questionnaire administration. Analysis of the data is done with simple regression and multiple regression analyses. The findings show no significant prediction of job insecurity by affective trust as well as no significant mediation of the LMX and job insecurity relationship by affective trust. The study also shows significant prediction of job insecurity by LMX, and significant mediation of the LMX-job insecurity relationship by cognitive trust. The results are discussed in the light of reviewed literature and current realities. The implications of the study are also highlighted.

  10. Does the physician's emotional intelligence matter? Impacts of the physician's emotional intelligence on the trust, patient-physician relationship, and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Hui-Ching

    2008-01-01

    Much of the literature pertinent to management indicates that service providers with high emotional intelligence (EI) receive higher customer satisfaction scores. Previous studies offer limited evidence regarding the impact of physician's EI on patient-physician relationship. Using a multilevel and multisource data approach, the current study aimed to build a model that demonstrated the impact of a physician's EI on the patient's trust and the patient-physician relationship. The survey sample included 983 outpatients and 39 physicians representing 11 specialties. Results of path analyses demonstrated that the ratio of patient's follow-up visits (p impact of patient's trust on patient's satisfaction was mediated by the patient-physician relationship at a significant level (p relationship had a significantly positive effect on patient's satisfaction (p relationship; however, mutual trust and professional respect between nurses and physicians play a critical role in reinforcing the patient-physician relationship to effect improvements in the provision of patient-centered care.

  11. Technology Trust and E-Banking Adoption: The Mediating Effect of Customer Relationship Management Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samsudin Wahab

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The electronic revolution in the Malaysian banking sector has started in the 1970's. The first visible form of electronic innovation in the Malaysian banking industry was the introduction of Automated Teller Machines in 1981. Finally, on June 1, 2000, the Malaysian Central Bank gave the green light for locally owned commercial banks to offer Internet banking services. Due to the drastic changes in the business environment, it leads financial institutions to revise their marketing strategies to stress long-lasting relationships with customers. Relationships is important criteria in the selection of private bank. In many conditions, customer satisfaction mediates the relationship between antecedent’s factors and marketing performance. Hence, CRM performance is about maintaining good relationship and repurchases behavior, word-of-mouth and customer retention. Trust has been studied in traditional physical commercial environments. In the marketing and management literatures, trust is strongly associated with attitudes toward products, services, and purchasing behaviors. So that, the main objective of this research paper is to investigate the role of CRM performance as the mediator in the relationship between trust and E-Banking adoption. Hence, this empirical paper confirmed the role of customer relationship management performance as the mediators in the relationship between trust and electronic banking adoption.Key words: Trust, Customer Relationship Management Performance, E-Banking Adoption

  12. Commitment and Trust in Librarian-Faculty Relationships: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Sue F.; Campbell, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study was to examine the methodologies used to study librarian-faculty relationships and to use the Key Mediating Variable model (KMV) of The Trust and Commitment Theory of Relationship Marketing to assess the quality of the librarian-faculty relationship as it has been portrayed in the literature. Relationship…

  13. Social anxiety and the Big Five personality traits: the interactive relationship of trust and openness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Simona C; Levinson, Cheri A; Rodebaugh, Thomas L; Menatti, Andrew; Weeks, Justin W

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that social anxiety (SA) has a positive relationship with neuroticism and a negative relationship with extraversion. However, findings on the relationships between SA and agreeableness, conscientiousness, and openness to experience are mixed. In regard to facet-level personality traits, SA is negatively correlated with trust (a facet of agreeableness) and self-efficacy (a facet of conscientiousness). No research has examined interactions among the Big Five personality traits (e.g., extraversion) and facet levels of personality in relation to SA. In two studies using undergraduate samples (N = 502; N = 698), we examined the relationships between trust, self-efficacy, the Big Five, and SA. SA correlated positively with neuroticism, negatively with extraversion, and had weaker relationships with agreeableness, openness, and trust. In linear regression predicting SA, there was a significant interaction between trust and openness over and above gender. In addition to supporting previous research on SA and the Big Five, we found that openness is related to SA for individuals low in trust. Our results suggest that high openness may protect against the higher SA levels associated with low trust.

  14. Is whistleblowing now mandatory? The impact of mandatory reporting law on trust relationships in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Jayne

    2013-09-01

    Trust is vital for promoting positive health care relationships aimed at achieving positive patient outcomes. Patients, as well as the broader society, trust that health care practitioners who have been granted authority by the state to provide safe and beneficial health care are competent to do so. Recent instances where patients have been harmed as the result of treatment that fell below the accepted standard of competence have negatively impacted on trust. As the state has a responsibility to protect the public from this type of harm, legislation that mandates reporting of certain instances where the behaviour of health care professionals has fallen below the acceptable standard has been introduced. While this may have been designed to restore public trust, this article argues that it has the potential to diminish trust on the basis that mandatory reporting may be equivalent to mandatory whistleblowing.

  15. Trust and Professional Skepticism in the Relationship between auditors and Clients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aschauer, Ewald; Fink, Matthias; Moro, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    This study empirically investigates the relationship between auditors' identification-based trust in client firm's managers and their perceptions of auditors' professional skepticism. We employ a multimethod approach broken Down into two studies. First, in study 1, we approached auditors...... collected from 233 real auditor-client dyads in Germany reveals that auditors' identification-based trust is positively Associated with their clients' perception of the auditors' professional skepticism. The identified coexistence of trust and professional skepticism in auditor-client dyads implies...... that regulatory measures that impede the evolution of trust between auditors and their clients will fail to enhance professional skepticism. instead, regulations should give auditors and their clients sufficient leeway to establish identification-based trust....

  16. Investigating of Relationship between Conflict and Trust on the Golestan Province Red Crescent Society Volunteer Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seidmehdi Mehdi Veiseh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Conflict is the most important behavioral issues that, in several last deceed organizational behavior scholars intentioned to it .according to several idea about positive effects of management of conflict in organization relationship between conflict and many variables had been surveyed .in this research relationship between conflict and trust was surveyed. According to this, researchers studied the theatrical basic of research correctly and recognized main component s and variables by descriptive-survey method in this research and selected sample by random sampling and surveyed research assumptions in Golestan Red Crescent organization. Results of research shows that task conflict related with intergroup trust directly, also there is any relationship between relationship conflict and trust. Finally task conflict related with relationship conflict directly

  17. Trust, attachment, and mindfulness influence intimacy and disengagement during newlyweds' discussions of relationship transgressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifian, Chandra E; Barry, Robin A

    2016-08-01

    Discussions of relationship transgressions-violations of relationship norms-are often difficult for couples to successfully navigate. Nevertheless, engaging in and resolving these discussions should promote intimacy. Drawing on the risk regulation model, individuals' experiences of disengagement and intimacy during transgression discussions should depend on their trust in their partner regarding the transgression and how they regulate distress related to lower trust. Attachment style represents individual differences in emotion regulation in close relationship contexts and is indicated by the risk regulation model. In contrast, mindfulness also improves interpersonal emotion regulation but is not reflected in the model. The present study proposed that the effect of trust on the experience of intimacy and disengagement during transgression discussions would depend on individuals' attachment style or mindfulness. Hypotheses were tested in a sample of 81 heterosexual newlywed couples. Trust was positively associated with intimacy for individuals with higher attachment avoidance, but not for individuals with lower attachment avoidance. Trust was negatively associated with disengagement for individuals with either lower mindfulness or higher attachment avoidance. Trust was not associated with disengagement for individuals with higher mindfulness or lower attachment avoidance. Implications for theory and clinical interventions focused on increasing intimacy and decreasing disengagement in couple relationships are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Reputation, relationships, risk communication, and the role of trust in the prevention and control of communicable disease: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Georgina; de Andrade, Marisa; MacDonald, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Population-level compliance with health protective behavioral advice to prevent and control communicable disease is essential to optimal effectiveness. Multiple factors affect perceptions of trustworthiness, and trust in advice providers is a significant predeterminant of compliance. While competency in assessment and management of communicable disease risks is critical, communications competency may be equally important. Organizational reputation, quality of stakeholder relationships and risk information provision strategies are trust moderating factors, whose impact is strongly influenced by the content, timing and coordination of communications. This article synthesizes the findings of 2 literature reviews on trust moderating communications and communicable disease prevention and control. We find a substantial evidence base on risk communication, but limited research on other trust building communications. We note that awareness of good practice historically has been limited although interest and the availability of supporting resources is growing. Good practice and policy elements are identified: recognition that crisis and risk communications require different strategies; preemptive dialogue and planning; evidence-based approaches to media relations and messaging; and building credibility for information sources. Priority areas for future research include process and cost-effectiveness evaluation and the development of frameworks that integrate communication and biomedical disease control and prevention functions, conceptually and at scale.

  19. Trust and Communication: Perspectives of Mothers of Children with Disabilities on the Role and Importance of Communication in Trusting Relationships with Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner, Julia B.; Angell, Maureen E.

    2014-01-01

    Trust is imperative to effective relationships between teachers and parents of children with disabilities. Communication is the foundation on which trust is established and maintained. This study employed a qualitative research design to investigate the perspectives of 16 mothers of children with varying disabilities, of varying ages, and from…

  20. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE LEADERSHIP BEHAVIORS AND ORGANIZATIONAL TRUST AND ORGANIZATIONAL JUSTICE

    OpenAIRE

    YILMAZ, Kürşad; ALTINKURT, Yahya

    2014-01-01

    This paper examined the relationships between the school administrators’ leadership behavior and teachers’ perceptions of organizational trust, and organizational justice. The sample of the survey model study consists of 271 high school teachers in the province of Kutahya in Turkey. Data is collected by “Organizational Trust Scale”, “Organizational Justice Scale” and “Leadership Behavior Scale”. Data is analyzed through descriptive statistics and Regression Analysis. The research findings sho...

  1. Relationships between Institutional Economics of Cooperation and the Political Economy of Trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Hernandéz

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyse the relationship between institutional economics of cooperation and the political economy of trust. Transactions costs, principal-agent theory, market power, increasing-returns theory and value creation, strategic management: competitive forces, resource-based theory, organisationtal knowledge and learning, strategic choice theory and collective efficiency theory are reviewed. Lastly, the political economy of trust is sustained.

  2. Does Good Governance Mediate Relationship Between E-Government and Public Trust in Lebanon?

    OpenAIRE

    Alaaraj, Hassan; Hassan, Sallahudin

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to study the mediating effect of good governance on the relationship between e-government practices and public trust in Lebanon. Based on extensive literature review and conceptual background including the theories of institutional-based trust and the diffusion of innovation, the theoretical research framework was developed. Primary data was collected using survey involving 400 Lebanese employees from different small and medium enterprises in Beirut. The...

  3. Relationship Between Cybernetics Management and Organizational Trust Among Librarians of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Ghiasi, Mitra; Shahrabi, Afsaneh; Siamian, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose: Organization must keep current skills, abilities, and in the current field of competition, and move one step ahead of other competitors; for this purpose, must be a high degree of trust inside the organization. Cybernetic management is a new approach in management of organizations that its main task according to internal issues. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between cybernetics management and organizational trust among librarians of Mazandaran Univer...

  4. Task conflict and relationship conflict in top management teams: the pivotal role of intragroup trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, T L; Peterson, R S

    2000-02-01

    Task conflict is usually associated with effective decisions, and relationship conflict is associated with poor decisions. The 2 conflict types are typically correlated in ongoing groups, however, which creates a prescriptive dilemma. Three explanations might account for this relationship--misattribution of task conflict as relationship conflict, harsh task conflict tactics triggering relationship conflict, and misattribution of relationship conflict as task conflict. The authors found that intragroup trust moderates the relationship between task conflict and relationship conflict in 70 top management teams. This result supports the "misattribution of task conflict" explanation. The authors also found a weak effect that is consistent with the argument that tactical choices drive the association between the 2 conflict types. We infer that trust is a key to gaining the benefits of task conflict without suffering the costs of relationship conflict.

  5. The Methodical Aspects of Formation of Trusting Relationship between Enterprise and Stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazaliieva Liudmyla V.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at developing the theoretical and methodical aspects of formation of trusting relationship between enterprise and stakeholders. An approach to differentiate all parties concerned in the functioning of enterprise in accordance with the criteria of «level of influence/attitude to enterprise» has been suggested, to provide development of effective approaches and methods of formation of the stakeholders’ confidence. Thus, priority should be given to formation of trusting relationship with stakeholders with the highest level of influence. In doing so, in order to form confidence among internal and external stakeholders, it is necessary to use approaches and methods that take account of their particularities. The form of the trusting relationships between enterprise and stakeholders is suggested to be defined on the basis of available and combined attributes of trusting, i.e. related emotions, intentions, and actions. Assessing the level of trust, inherent to the relationships of enterprise with the parties concerned, will form a strategy of developing relationships with them, directed to overcoming information asymmetry, optimizing transaction costs, harmonizing interests, which in turn will ensure increase in the efficiency of economic activity of enterprise in the long run.

  6. The Relationship between Work Engagement and Organizational Trust: A Study of Elementary School Teachers in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülbahar, Bahadir

    2017-01-01

    The relationships based on trust which are established by a teacher with a school's internal stakeholders can provide greater engagement in work. Teachers who are engaged in their jobs can be decisive in turning their schools into successful and effective schools. It is important to research the relationship between work engagement and…

  7. Sleeping with the enemy. Trust, dependence and contract in interorganisational relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Woolthuis, R.J.A.

    1999-01-01

    'Sleeping with the enemy' refers to the fragile relationship that is built when parties have to cooperate without knowing whether their partner can be trusted. In the development of new products or technologies companies often have to establish such relationships. They depend on each other's

  8. TRUST AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO THE QUALITY OF COMMUNICATION AND EMPLOYEE SATISFACTION IN A LARGE INDONESIAN WORKPLACE: A CASE STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    WULANDARI, Maulina Pia; BURGESS, John

    2010-01-01

    Trust has been noticed as an important role on managerial and organizational effectiveness since the late 1950s. Trust also viewed as the fundamental aspect on developing communication relationship and satisfaction in the workplace. Utilizing 168 employees in the Indonesian oil industry, this study attempted to examine the relationships between trust and quality of communication relationship and employee’s satisfaction. The study applies quantitative methods in order to undertake the ICA audi...

  9. Relationship Between Cybernetics Management and Organizational Trust Among Librarians of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiasi, Mitra; Shahrabi, Afsaneh; Siamian, Hasan

    2017-12-01

    Organization must keep current skills, abilities, and in the current field of competition, and move one step ahead of other competitors; for this purpose, must be a high degree of trust inside the organization. Cybernetic management is a new approach in management of organizations that its main task according to internal issues. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between cybernetics management and organizational trust among librarians of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. This is applied and analytical survey. which its population included all librarians of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, amounting to 42 people which were selected by census and participated in this research. There has no relationship between components of Cybernetics management (participative decision making, commitment, pay equity, Correct flow of information, develop a sense of ownership, online education) with organizational trust amongst librarians of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. And there has a significant relationship between flat Structure of cybernetics management and organizational trust. For data analysis was used Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and linear regression. There is no significant relationship between Cybernetic management and organizational trust amongst librarians of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences.

  10. The Relationship of Trust and Intent to Stay Among Registered Nurses at Jordanian Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atiyeh, Huda Mohammad; AbuAlRub, Raeda Fawzi

    2017-10-01

    This study examined the relationship between the level of trust with immediate supervisor and the level of intent to stay at work among registered nurses (RNs) in Jordan and explored if there is a significant difference between RNs working in governmental- and university-affiliated teaching hospitals. Financial retention strategies are not feasible in low- and middle-income countries. This study investigated if the level of trust that RNs hold toward their immediate supervisors could affect their intent to stay at work, so as to be used as a nonfinancial strategy. A descriptive correlational design was used to examine this relationship among a convenience sample of 260 hospital nurses in Jordan. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data. When the level of trust increased, the level of intent to stay at work also increased. RNs working in governmental-affiliated teaching hospitals reported higher levels of trust and intent to stay at work than those working in university-affiliated teaching hospitals. The findings emphasized the positive effect of trust with immediate supervisor on the level of RNs' intent to stay. Building trust between RNs and their immediate supervisors could be an important retention strategy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Survivors of intimate partner violence speak out: trust in the patient-provider relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Tracy A; Finley, Erin; Liebschutz, Jane M

    2003-08-01

    To identify characteristics that facilitate trust in the patient-provider relationship among survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV). Semistructured, open-ended interviews were conducted to elicit participants' beliefs and attitudes about trust in interactions with health care providers. Using grounded theory methods, the transcripts were analyzed for common themes. A community advisory group, composed of advocates, counselors and IPV survivors, helped interpret themes and interview excerpts. Together, key components of trust were identified. Eastern Massachusetts. Twenty-seven female survivors of IPV recruited from community-based IPV organizations. Participants' ages ranged from 18 to 56 years, 36% were African American, 32% Hispanic, and 18% white. We identified 5 dimensions of provider behavior that were uniquely important to the development of trust for these IPV survivors: 1) communication about abuse: provider was willing to openly discuss abuse; 2) professional competency: provider asked about abuse when appropriate and was familiar with medical and social histories; 3) practice style: provider was consistently accessible, respected confidentiality, and shared decision making; 4) caring: provider demonstrated personal concern beyond biomedical role through nonjudgmental and compassionate gestures, empowering statements, and persistent, committed behaviors; 5) emotional equality: provider shared personal information and feelings and was perceived by the participant as a friend. These IPV survivors identified dimensions of provider behavior that facilitate trust in their clinical relationship. Strengthening these provider behaviors may increase trust with patients and thus improve disclosure of and referral for IPV.

  12. [Personalized nursing care in hospital and its effects on the patient-nurse trust relationship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Juárez, María del Rosario; López-Alonso, Sergio R; Moreno-Verdugo, Ana; Guerra-González, Sara; Fernández-Corchero, Juana; Márquez-Borrego, M José; Orozco-Cózar, M José; Ramos-Bosquet, Gádor

    2013-01-01

    To determine the level of implementation of an inpatient personalized nursing care model in four hospitals of the Andalusian Health Service, and to determine if there is an association between this model and the perception of trust in the nurse by the patient. An observational cross-sectional study included the patients discharged during a period of 12 months from hospital wards that used the Inpatient Personalized Nursing Care Model of the Andalusian Health Service (based on Primary Nursing Model). The level of implemention was evaluated using the Nursing Care Personalized Index (IPC), made by «patient report» methodology, and the nurse-patient trust relationship was evaluated at the same time as the IPC. Statistical analysis included descriptive data analysis, Chi-squared test, and bivariate and multivariate logistic regression, with and without stratifying by hospitals wards. A total of 817 patient were included. The implementation of the inpatient personalized nursing care model varied between 61 and 79%. The IPC values showed a strong association with the nurse-patient trust relationship, and that for each point increase in the IPC score, the probability of a nurse-patient trust relationship increased between 50 and 130% (0.120.58). The implementation of a personalized nursing care model in the wards studied was higher in the surgicals wards and at regular level in medical wards. Furthermore, the influence of the inpatient personalized nursing care model on the nurse-patient trust relationship has been demonstrated using the IPC model. This trust is the main component for the establishment of a therapeutic relationship. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. Risk and Real Estate Investment Trust (REITs Return: Evidence from Listed Public Trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Edi Azhar Binti Mohamad

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study examines an association of risk and returns of REITs from Malaysian REITs listed companies. The secondary data for analysis is retrieved from Bloomberg's Database of all 13 listed REITs in the Bursa Malaysia main market for three year period, from 2007 to 2009 with quarterly observation. The dependent variables are average return, expected return using Capital Asset Pricing Model, Sharpe Index, and Jensen Alpha Index. The independent variables represented by standard deviation, beta, trading volume, gross domestic product, inlation rate, and share price. The control variable for this study is type of REITs, whether it  was  categorized  as  Islamic  or  conventional  REITs.  Applying  correlations  and  multiple regression  analysis,  the  results  provide  evidence  on  the  association  between  return  and risk  on  REITs.  This  study  is  also  hoped  to  bring  beneits  to  the  public  listed  company  and shareholders in obtaining the key factors in determining the REITs yield. ";} // -->activate javascript

  14. Relationship between islamic human resources management (IHRM practices and trust: An empirical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nik Mutasim Nik Ab. Rahman

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore and examines the theoretical frameworks of Islamic human resource management practices and trust in organization. Additionally, to investigate the extent to which Islamic HRM practices inspire and revival employees trust in organization.Design/methodology/approach: This study comprised sample of 236 Islamic Bank employees in Bangladesh. A cross-sectional research design was used to examine the relationship between Islamic Human Resource Management practices and trust. Data were gathered based on personal administered questionnaire.Findings and Originality/value: This study results show that knowledge, understanding and practices of Islamic principles, recruitment and selection, training and development, and reward system significantly related to the trust. But performance appraisal are found have insignificant relationship.Research limitations/implications: The data for this study are collected by self-administered questionnaire, a method with well-known shortcomings. Second, this study concentrated on the Islamic bank employees in Bangladesh.Practical implications: An important implication of this research is that the interesting findings give some insight to the management of Islamic bank to focus on improving Islamic Human Resource Management practices, in their all kind of management, as that could improve their trust in the bank.Originality/value: The findings are original and unique and are based on the literature from different researches. The results are based on a sample of Islamic Bank employees in Bangladesh. The research findings are useful to academics and management of Islamic bank all over the world.

  15. The Relationship among Interactional Justice, Manager Trust and Teachers' Organizational Silence Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yangin, Demet; Elma, Cevat

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between the manager trust and interactional justice perceptions and organizational silence behaviors of those teachers who work in primary and secondary schools. The research is based on the survey model and the population consists of 4761 teachers who worked in Samsun, Turkey. The sample…

  16. The influence of transformational and transactional leadership on dyadic trust relationships through perceptions of fairness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Krafft

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Leadership and interpersonal trust are critical issues for the survival of organisations. Both aspects have been researched thoroughly, but the role organisational justice might play in this relationship has been largely ignored. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between transformational and transactional leadership and interpersonal trust, and whether organisational justice plays a mediating role. Through LISREL analysis, it was found that interactional justice played a greater role in the relationship between transformational leadership and trust than procedural justice. Distributive justice mediated the relationship between transactional leadership and trust. Opsomming Leierskap en interpersoonlike vertroue is kritieke vraagstukke vir die oorlewing van organisasies. Beide aspekte is reeds deeglik nagevors, maar die rol wat organisatoriese geregtigheid in hierdie verband kan speel, is grootliks nagelaat. Die doel van hierdie studie was om die verband tussen transformasionele en transaksionele leierskap en interpersoonlike vertroue te ondersoek, en of organisatoriese geregtigheid ’n tussenkomende rol speel. Deur middel van LISREL-ontleding is gevind dat interaktiewe geregtigheid ’n groter rol in die verband tussen transformasionele leierskap en vertroue speel as prosedurele geregtigheid. Verdelende geregtigheid dien as tussenkomende veranderlike in die verband tussen transaksionele leierskap en vertroue.

  17. Relationship between Professional Learning Community, Bureaucratic Structure and Organisational Trust in Primary Education Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    This research uses relational survey method to determine the relationship between professional learning community, bureaucratic structure and organisational trust according to the perceptions of teachers who work in primary education schools. Data were collected from 805 teachers who work in primary education schools in the districts (Altindag,…

  18. The relationships among asymmetry in task dependence, perceived helping behavior, and trust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Simon B.; Van der Vegt, Gerben S.; Molleman, Eric

    Social relations analyses involving 132 working relationships among 60 individuals from 29 teams revealed that an increase in a team member's task dependence on another team member was associated with higher levels of perceived help from and interpersonal trust in that specific team member, provided

  19. Farmer-buyer relationships in China: The effects of contracts, trust and market environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.Y.; Hu, D.H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is first, to develop constructs to measure three important concepts in the supply chain literature: contracts, trust and market environment, in the Chinese context and to further investigate the relationships amongst these three concepts based on the formulated

  20. Communication Skills to Develop Trusting Relationships on Global Virtual Engineering Capstone Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaugg, Holt; Davies, Randall S.

    2013-01-01

    As universities seek to provide cost-effective, cross-cultural experiences using global virtual (GV) teams, the "soft" communication skills typical of all teams, increases in importance for GV teams. Students need to be taught how to navigate through cultural issues and virtual tool issues to build strong trusting relationships with…

  1. The Relationships between Brand Association, Trust, Commitment, and Satisfaction of Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chuan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore structural relationships among the variables of brand association, student trust, commitment, and satisfaction in the higher education sector. Design/methodology/approach: A survey was used to collect data from a sample of 500 students who studied at universities in Taiwan in 2016. These data were…

  2. Ethnic diversity of the micro-context and social trust: Evidence from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, Peter Thisted; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    The question about how ethnic diversity affects social trust has been a hot topic in recent years. To this point, within-country analyses of this question have been limited by only having data on contextual ethnic diversity at relatively high levels of aggregation. Consequently, the previous...... analyses suffer from the problem that aggregate contextual diversity likely conceals substantial variation in the ethnic diversity actually experienced at the micro-level in which people live and interact (i.e. contains measurement error). This in turn renders the estimate of ethnic diversity on trust both...... diversity at higher levels of aggregation in order to scrutinize how the relationship varies according to the contextual unit in which ethnic diversity is measured. We analyze the question about the impact of ethnic diversity on trust using Danish data from the European Social Survey, which are linked...

  3. Tangible Evidence, Trust and Power: Public Perceptions of Community Environmental Health Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scammell, Madeleine Kangsen; Senier, Laura; Darrah-Okike, Jennifer; Brown, Phil; Santos, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Communities with environmental health concerns in the USA frequently request studies from their local or state departments of public health. This paper presents findings from three focus groups conducted in communities north of Boston that have been the subject of two different environmental health studies. The focus groups were designed to elicit residents’ perceptions of environmental health, and of the particular studies conducted in their communities. In all focus groups, participants had difficulty accepting the findings of health studies that contradicted their own experiences of environmental exposures and illness. Our results suggest that lay knowledge, informed in varying degrees by the experience of what we term “tangible evidence,” creates a lens through which communities interpret a health study’s findings. The differences in reliance on tangible evidence were related to participants’ sense of trust in public officials, and the institutions responsible for conducting health studies. Participants from the wealthier, predominantly white communities discussed trust in study design and methodologies used. In contrast, participants from the lower income, higher minority communities assessed health studies with reference to their trust (or lack thereof) in study sponsors and public health institutions. Participants’ experience of tangible evidence, trust or distrust in health agencies and research institutions, and a sense of relative community power, influence how they assess the findings of environmental health studies and may have implications for pubic health. PMID:18995942

  4. Sustainable Leadership, Organizational Trust on Job Satisfaction: Empirical Evidence from Higher Education Institutions in Syria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serene Dalati

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This research develops a theoretical model of sustainable leadership, organizational trust and satisfaction at work in higher education environment in Syria. The model assesses staff perception of outstanding leadership behaviors and examines its relationship with perceived organizational trust in the field of higher education institutions in Syria. This research examines a conceptual framework identifying outstanding leadership styles and behaviors which are associated with sustainable leadership, organisational trust identified by members’ trust in their coworkers, and job satisfaction at an institutional level. The research methodology applied in this research develops a quantitative approach through application of questionnaire survey. To measure the dimensionality of scale factors an exploratory factor analysis is conducted. Reliability analysis is performed, Cronbach alpha test indicates that the research scales are internally consistent. The sample of the study employed a convenience sample from higher education institutions. The managerial implication of the research study recommends application and adoption of sustainable leadership behaviors among functional, mid and senior levels of managers and academics in management positions in higher education institutions. The limitation of research is mainly indicated in the sample size and measurement scales of sustainable leadership, organizational trust and job satisfaction.

  5. Reduced reciprocal giving in social anxiety - Evidence from the Trust Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderl, Christine; Steil, Regina; Hahn, Tim; Hitzeroth, Patricia; Reif, Andreas; Windmann, Sabine

    2018-06-01

    Social anxiety is known to impair interpersonal relationships. These impairments are thought to partly arise from difficulties to engage in affiliative interactions with others, such as sharing favors or reciprocating prosocial acts. Here, we examined whether individuals high compared to low in social anxiety differ in giving towards strangers in an economic game paradigm. One hundred and twenty seven non-clinical participants who had been pre-screened to be either particularly high or low in social anxiety played an incentivized Trust Game to assess trustful and reciprocal giving towards strangers in addition to providing information on real life interpersonal functioning (perceived social support and attachment style). We found that reciprocal, but not trustful giving, was significantly decreased among highly socially anxious individuals. Both social anxiety and reciprocal giving furthermore showed significant associations with self-reported real life interpersonal functioning. Participants played the Trust Game with the strategy method; results need replication with a clinical sample. Individuals high in social anxiety showed reduced reciprocal, but intact trustful giving, pointing to a constraint in responsiveness. The research may contribute to the development of new treatment and prevention programs to reduce the interpersonal impairments in socially anxious individuals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Empirical Study Regarding the Trust Relationships Established in a Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florina-Valentina NICOLAE

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper that we present aims to address the issue of relationships naturally established in a community through some items that we consider relevant to the proposed topic. In this purpose, we have initiated a quantitative research, developed through a survey, based on questionnaire, self-managed and on line. The recorded answers are statistically interpreted, using IBM SPSS application. The results suggests that the perception of the subjects participating in the study on the relationships established with their communities, on the date of the study, is not clearly contoured.

  7. Preconditions needed for establishing a trusting relationship during health counselling - an interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Irene; Nilsson, Kerstin

    2008-09-01

    To examine the preconditions needed by district nurses to build a trusting relationship during health counselling of patients with hypertension. Trust has been found to be an important aspect of the patient-nurse relationship. Little research has focused on how trust is formed in patient-nurse relationships or the conditions the development process requires when working with health counselling; in particular not in relation to hypertension. Qualitative study. Qualitative data were collected through open-ended interviews with all (10) district nurses from three primary health care districts of western Sweden. All interviewees work with the health counselling of patients with hypertension. A latent content analysis was performed with thematic coding of the content of the interviews. The first theme that emerged from the analysis, the nurses' competence, describes the nurses' consciousness of their method of expression, both oral and non-verbal, as well as their pedagogical competence and their ability to be reliable in their profession. The second theme, the patient meeting, describes the continuity in the patient meeting and creating respectful communication. The results show an awareness of preconditions influencing building a trusting relationship. When creating a trusting relationship the communication and pedagogical competences of district nurses have considerable importance. Despite this awareness they state that it is easy to fall into a routinised way of working. The implications of this study might be used as support and guidance for district nurses when developing their competence in health counselling in relations to patients with hypertension. This knowledge is also important when planning for nurse-led clinics for this patient group.

  8. Trust in the Almighty God from the Viewpoint of Psychology and its Relationship with Self-Confidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayyedali Mostajaboldavati

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Religious behaviors, among which Trust in the Almighty God is a major representation, play a key role in giving meaning to life, generation of hope, and mental relaxation. The present study was conducted aimed at examination of the subject Trust in the Almighty God and analysis of the concept Trust from the perspective of psychology, delineating its relationship with self-confidence. In this study, therefore, Trust in the Almighty God is addressed from three cognitive, mental, and behavioral dimensions as well as mental etymology of Trust in the Almighty God and the relationship between trust and self-confidence. Methods: This study is a review-descriptive research that has made use of library and digital resources to collect its required data. Results: In examination of the subject Trust in the Almighty God from the viewpoint of psychology and delineation of the relationship between trust and self-confidence, it is found that trust in the Almighty God is not a barrier to self-confidence. What is more, it is an effective factor in its recovery, stabilization, and reinforcement. Conclusion: Religious behaviors, among which Trust in the Almighty God is a major representation, play a key role in giving meaning to life, generation of hope, and mental relaxation. Psychologically speaking, Trust in the Almighty God has three cognitive, mental, and behavioral dimensions. Cognitive aspect of trust in the Almighty God is associated with understanding the creator-creature relationship, the world, and the phenomena in the universe. In the emotional aspect, humankinds, relying on the Almighty God’s power, feel an inner serenity within themselves. Finally, application of this intrinsic force is materialized in the behavioral dimension of trust in the Almighty God.

  9. Relationship between nurses' organizational trust levels and their organizational citizenship behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuntas, Serap; Baykal, Ulku

    2010-06-01

    This research used a descriptive and explorative design to determine the levels of nurses' organizational trust and organizational citizenship and to investigate relationships between the levels of organizational trust and organizational citizenship behaviors. Nurses who had completed their orientation from a total of 11 hospitals with bed capacities of 100 and located in the European district of Istanbul were included in the sample for this study. Formal, written applications and approval of the ethical committee were obtained from concerned institutions before proceeding with the data collection step. The Organizational Trust Inventory and the Organizational Citizenship Level Scale, a questionnaire form including five questions regarding nurses' personal characteristics, were used in data collection. Data collection tools were distributed to 900 nurses in total, and usable data were obtained from 482 nurses. Number and percentage calculations and Pearson correlation analysis were used to assess research data. The results of the present research showed that nurses had a higher than average level of trust in their managers and coworkers and they trusted more in their managers and coworkers than their institutions. The Organizational Citizenship Level Scale indicated that the behavior most frequently demonstrated by the nurses was conscientiousness, followed by courtesy and civic virtue, whereas sportsmanship was displayed to an average extent. An analysis of relationships between nurses' level of organizational trust and their organizational citizenship behaviors revealed that nurses who trust in their managers, institutions, and coworkers demonstrated the organizational citizenship behaviors of conscientiousness, civic virtue, courtesy, and altruism more frequently. The findings attained in this study indicated that the organizational trust the staff had in their institutions, managers, and coworkers influenced the organizational citizenship behaviors of

  10. A Trust Evaluation Algorithm for Wireless Sensor Networks Based on Node Behaviors and D-S Evidence Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangwen Wan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available For wireless sensor networks (WSNs, many factors, such as mutual interference of wireless links, battlefield applications and nodes exposed to the environment without good physical protection, result in the sensor nodes being more vulnerable to be attacked and compromised. In order to address this network security problem, a novel trust evaluation algorithm defined as NBBTE (Node Behavioral Strategies Banding Belief Theory of the Trust Evaluation Algorithm is proposed, which integrates the approach of nodes behavioral strategies and modified evidence theory. According to the behaviors of sensor nodes, a variety of trust factors and coefficients related to the network application are established to obtain direct and indirect trust values through calculating weighted average of trust factors. Meanwhile, the fuzzy set method is applied to form the basic input vector of evidence. On this basis, the evidence difference is calculated between the indirect and direct trust values, which link the revised D-S evidence combination rule to finally synthesize integrated trust value of nodes. The simulation results show that NBBTE can effectively identify malicious nodes and reflects the characteristic of trust value that ‘hard to acquire and easy to lose’. Furthermore, it is obvious that the proposed scheme has an outstanding advantage in terms of illustrating the real contribution of different nodes to trust evaluation.

  11. A trust evaluation algorithm for wireless sensor networks based on node behaviors and D-S evidence theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Renjian; Xu, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Xiang; Wan, Jiangwen

    2011-01-01

    For wireless sensor networks (WSNs), many factors, such as mutual interference of wireless links, battlefield applications and nodes exposed to the environment without good physical protection, result in the sensor nodes being more vulnerable to be attacked and compromised. In order to address this network security problem, a novel trust evaluation algorithm defined as NBBTE (Node Behavioral Strategies Banding Belief Theory of the Trust Evaluation Algorithm) is proposed, which integrates the approach of nodes behavioral strategies and modified evidence theory. According to the behaviors of sensor nodes, a variety of trust factors and coefficients related to the network application are established to obtain direct and indirect trust values through calculating weighted average of trust factors. Meanwhile, the fuzzy set method is applied to form the basic input vector of evidence. On this basis, the evidence difference is calculated between the indirect and direct trust values, which link the revised D-S evidence combination rule to finally synthesize integrated trust value of nodes. The simulation results show that NBBTE can effectively identify malicious nodes and reflects the characteristic of trust value that 'hard to acquire and easy to lose'. Furthermore, it is obvious that the proposed scheme has an outstanding advantage in terms of illustrating the real contribution of different nodes to trust evaluation.

  12. Communication skills to develop trusting relationships on global virtual engineering capstone teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaugg, Holt; Davies, Randall S.

    2013-05-01

    As universities seek to provide cost-effective, cross-cultural experiences using global virtual (GV) teams, the 'soft' communication skills typical of all teams, increases in importance for GV teams. Students need to be taught how to navigate through cultural issues and virtual tool issues to build strong trusting relationships with distant team members. Weekly team meetings provide an excellent opportunity to observe key team interactions that facilitate relationship and trust-building among team members. This study observed the weekly team meetings of engineering students attending two US universities and one Asian university as they collaborated as a single GV capstone GV team. In addition local team members were interviewed individually and collectively throughout the project to determine strategies that facilitated team relations and trust. Findings indicate the importance of student choice of virtual communication tools, the refining of communication practices, and specific actions to build trusting relationships. As student developed these attributes, collaboration and success was experienced on this GV team.

  13. Relationship between Trust, Distributed Leadership and Job Performance in Health Care Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Ajay K.; Günzel-Jensen, Franziska

    2014-01-01

    satisfaction mediates the relationship between vertical trust and distributed leadership, and further distributed leadership had a positive impact on job performance. Furthermore, the results also showed that job satisfaction had a positively significant impact on distributed leadership and employees......´ performance. Moreover, distributed leadership has affected employees´ performance positively and it carries the impact of job satisfaction on performance. Implications: The study showed that trust and job satisfaction are important triggers of DL. Furthermore, results are also interesting because literature......Purpose: This study aims at investigating the effect of vertical trust on distributed leadership and performance as mediated by job satisfaction, and further to see the role of DL in carrying out the effect of satisfaction on employees´ performance. Design: Grounded in literature on organizational...

  14. Trust and management-to-employee communication in Slovenian companies: Some evidence from the current economic crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Matevž Rašković; Maja Makovec Brenčič; Barbara Moerec

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes the importance of trust and management-to-employee communication among top Slovenian employers from the Golden Thread Survey. The paper analyzes the changes and impact of the deteriorating external economic situation on (a) company-employee relational trust, and on the (b) perceived importance of “trust and long-term relationships with the company in the eyes of the customer” by respondent managers. Furthermore, our analysis also looks at the impact of management-to-employ...

  15. An Unlikely Trusting Relationship? The United States and Japan since 1945

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruzicka, Jan; Keating, Vincent

    The U.S.-Japanese security relationship since 1945 has provided a fertile ground for the study of international politics. Constructivists have used it to demonstrate that security is ultimately dependent on cultural norms and identity. Realists, on the other hand, maintain that the relationship...... is best understood in terms of alliance politics where one state (Japan) passes the costs of its own defence onto its ally (the United States). Given the previously-identified weaknesses in both explanations, this article explores whether the relationship could better serve as an example of a trusting...... relationship in international politics by focussing on the mutual reduction of hedging strategies....

  16. An Investigation of Justice in Supply Chain Trust and Relationship Commitment - An Empirical Study of Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziaullah Muhammad

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years supply chain integration (SCI has received increasing attention from scholars and practitioners. However, our knowledge of what influences the supply chain integration practice of relationship commitment is still very limited. The objective of this study is to investigate the relationship among supply chain justices (procedural, distributive and interactional, trust and inter-firms relationship commitment in mainland Pakistan. The research variables have considerable importance in the literature of supply chain management (SCM. The conceptual model comprises five hypotheses. Then hypotheses are tested via an empirical study in which data are collected from 170 manufacturers, distributors, suppliers and retailers of main stream spectrum industries in Pakistan. We used exploratory factor analysis (EFA, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA to examine the validity and reliability of the measurement model, and structural equation modeling (SEM to test the hypotheses. The findings delineate that supply chain justices can develop relationship commitment (affective and continuance via establishing trust among supply chain partners. Moreover, this study reveals interesting and useful implications of supply chain justices, trust and relationship commitment for practitioners.

  17. Relationship learning as a dimension of relationship quality : tentative evidence from transnational buyer-supplier relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raškovic, M.; Makovec Brencic, M.; Ferligoj, A.; Fransoo, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    While relationship learning has been addressed in marketing theory, it has not yet been explored as a possible dimension of the second-order construct of relationship quality (RQ). This construct has so far been mostly conceptualized to consist of trust and commitment, sometimes also satisfaction;

  18. An Analysis of the Relationship between Media Consumption and Level of Social Trust among Students of the University of Isfahan

    OpenAIRE

    Seyad Javad Emamjomehzadeh; Zahra Sadeghi Naghdali; Reza Mahmoud Oghli; Reza Rahbar Ghazi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Social trust is one of the most important aspects of human life; it is one of those social phenomena that plays a crucial role in human interactions and relationships. As an important indicator of social capital, trust is essential for creating coherence and unity in society and facilitating participation in social systems. Trust accelerates cooperation in various fields of economic, social, political and cultural systems and increases individuals' willingness to cooperate wit...

  19. National and Organizational Culture, Performance Evaluation and Trust: Evidence from Multinational Company Subsidiary in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unggul Purwohedi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of national and organizational culture on the relationship between accounting and trust in a subsidiary of a Western Multi-National Company (MNC in Indonesia. This study use a qualitative field study of one French MNC subsidiary and interview four expatriate directors, nine Indonesian managers and 10 Indonesian employees. Key themes were identified with the assistance of NVivo software. In this study, accounting, through formal performance evaluation, contributes to trust building between supervisors and their subordinates. Formal performance evaluation through transparent and objective evaluation increases trust in the supervisor. On the other hand, informal performance evaluation tends to decrease trustful behaviour due to secrecy in the evaluation process.  It appears that Indonesian national culture does influence organizational culture preference in the local staff. Individuals share national culture as a result of values developed from family, religion, education, and experience.DOI: 10.15408/sjie.v6i2.4733 

  20. Consumer trust in food safety--a multidisciplinary approach and empirical evidence from Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei-Fang

    2008-12-01

    Food scandals that happened in recent years have increased consumers' risk perceptions of foods and decreased their trust in food safety. A better understanding of the consumer trust in food safety can improve the effectiveness of public policy and allow the development of the best practice in risk communication. This study proposes a research framework from a psychometric approach to investigate the relationships between the consumer's trust in food safety and the antecedents of risk perceptions of foods based on a reflexive modernization perspective and a cultural theory perspective in the hope of benefiting the future empirical study. The empirical results from a structural equation modeling analysis of Taiwan as a case in point reveal that this research framework based on a multidisciplinary perspective can be a valuable tool for a growing understanding of consumer trust in food safety. The antecedents in the psychometric research framework comprised reflexive modernization factors and cultural theory factors have all been supported in this study except the consumer's perception of pessimism toward food. Moreover, the empirical results of repeated measures analysis of variance give more detailed information to grasp empirical implications and to provide some suggestions to the actors and institutions involved in the food supply chain in Taiwan.

  1. Education and Social Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskarsson, Sven; Dinesen, Peter Thisted; Dawes, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    One of the clearest results in previous studies on social trust is the robust positive relationship with educational attainment. The most common interpretation is that education has a causal effect on social trust. The theoretical argument and empirical results in this article suggest a different...... interpretation. We argue that common preadult factors such as cognitive abilities and personality traits rooted in genes and early-life family environment may confound the relationship between educational attainment and social trust. We provide new evidence on this question by utilizing the quasi......-experiment of twinning. By looking at the relationship between education and social trust within monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs, we are able to avoid potential confounders rooted in genetic factors and common environmental influences because the monozygotic twins share both. The results suggest that when controlling...

  2. Why Trust the Head? Key Practices for Transformational School Leaders to Build a Purposeful Relationship of Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Trust is widely recognized as one of the key qualities that a successful leader needs to bring about change within his/her organization. Literature has also shown that trust plays a pivotal role in effective school leadership. However, little research has been undertaken to identify specific actions of a transformational school leader enabling…

  3. The Swift Trust Partnership: A Project Management Exercise Investigating the Effects of Trust and Distrust in Outsourcing Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Terry R.

    2005-01-01

    The Swift Trust exercise provides instructors with the opportunity to discuss the issues of managing trust and distrust perceptions in a team-based design. Lewicki, McAllister, and Bies's (1998) framework is used to allow students to experience the difficulties of deriving a common set of contract requirements based on team dynamics and…

  4. When Volunteering Breeds Trust – and When it Does Not A Panel Study of the Volunteering – Trust Relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, René

    2006-01-01

    It is a common belief that participation in voluntary associations makes citizens more trusting of others. This paper reports longitudinal analyses of volunteering and trust on the Giving in the Netherlands Panel Study (2002-2004; n=1246) refuting this belief. I find that volunteering has little

  5. Virtual Team and Trust Relationship: Focus Group Interviews in Multimedia Super Corridor Status Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norizah Aripin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to discuss the trust relationship in virtual teams in Multimedia Super Corridor (MSC status companies. The study used qualitative method that is phenomenology approach through focus group interviews. In-depth interview were also used with semi-structured and openended questions. The interviews involved six staffs at different position in virtual team (two team leaders, and four team members. The interviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed according to the thematic analysis. Results showed that dimensions on virtual team trust relationship including interpersonal communication, personality, team members size, face-to-face meeting needs, safety information when discussing face-to-face in public places, and difficulty to recall interaction via video conferencing with other team members.

  6. Exploring the Relationships among Service Quality, Satisfaction, Trust and Store Loyalty among Retail Customers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çerri Shpëtim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to investigate the relationships among service quality, satisfaction, trust, and store loyalty in a retailing context. All these variables have considerable importance on store performance, measured by financial indicators or market ones. The data were collected from a sample of 258 students at two universities in Albania, during the first quarter of 2012. The items included in the survey measured the variables of the study as well as demographic characteristics of the sample. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA and structural equation modeling (SEM were used to evaluate the hypotheses regarding relationships among model constructs. All the hypotheses developed in the study were positively confirmed, reinforcing the theory and previous research on this field. The study also reveals interesting implications in service quality, satisfaction, trust, and store loyalty, useful to both academics and practitioners. Managers will find this research helpful in better understanding these variables and their roles on their companies’ performance.

  7. Pengaruh Relationship Marketing Dan Brand Trust Terhadap Loyalitas Pelanggan (Survey Pelanggan Pada Kfc Sudirman Cabang Pekanbaru)

    OpenAIRE

    Pratama C, Yudi; Heriyanto, Meyzi

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to determine how much influence relationship marketing and brand trust to consumer loyality. Samples in this study were taken as many as 100 respondents and techniques used Accidental Sampling approach. The data used in this study using primary data obtained from the answers of the respondents who had buyed in KFC Sudirman Pekanbaru branch. The method of analysis used in this study using multiple linear regression analysis consisting of the t test, F test, determination test a...

  8. Relationship Between Adding Value, Trust and Job Satisfaction Based on Teachers€™ Perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Masoumeh Pourrajab, Roya Roustaee, Ramli Bin Basri, Baharak Talebloo, Sara Kasmaienezhadfard

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between adding value; trust and teacher satisfaction among primaryand secondary school teachers in Malaysia.In this research,375 teachers were selected based on convenience random sampling from teachers who study in educational field. This study is quantitative research and data were collected based on questionnaire and were analyzed using descriptive, correlation and regression analysis. Based on Pearson Product-Moment Correlation Coeffi...

  9. Influence of Relationship Commitment and Trust on Collaborative Behaviour in Supply Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Mlaker Kač

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses theoretically and examines empirically the influence of the relationship commitment on collaborative behaviour in supply chains. In today’s unstable business environment companies should collaborate to achieve mutual goals and competitive advantage. Defining relationship commitment and collaboration in supply chains (from social exchange theory point of view is the basis of the research of this paper. Our aim is to examine the influence of relationship commitment on collaboration in supply chains in Slovenian economy. The qualitative research part discusses if the relationship commitment between partners in supply chain influences the collaborative behaviour between partners and which are the antecedents of relationship commitment. The research is based on a quantitative analysis of the online questionnaire survey made on the Slovenian economy. The research results show strong influence of trust and relationship commitment on collaboration between partners in supply chains.

  10. Relationship between automation trust and operator performance for the novice and expert in spacecraft rendezvous and docking (RVD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jianwei; Geng, He; Zhang, Yijing; Du, Xiaoping

    2018-09-01

    Operator trust in automation is a crucial factor influencing its use and operational performance. However, the relationship between automation trust and performance remains poorly understood and requires further investigation. The objective of this paper is to explore the difference in trust and performance on automation-aided spacecraft rendezvous and docking (RVD) between the novice and the expert and to investigate the relationship between automation trust and performance as well. We employed a two-factor mixed design, with training skill (novice and expert) and automation mode (manual RVD and automation aided RVD) serving as the two factors. Twenty participants, 10 novices and 10 experts, were recruited to conduct six RVD tasks for two automation levels. After the tasks, operator performance was recorded by the desktop hand-held docking training equipment. Operator trust was also measured by a 12-items questionnaire at the beginning and end of each trial. As a result, automation narrowed the performance gap significantly between the novice and the expert, and the automation trust showed a marginally significant difference between the novice and the expert. Furthermore, the result demonstrated that the attitude angle control error of the expert was related to the total trust score, whereas other automation performance indicators were not related to the total score of trust. However, automation performance was related to the dimensions of trust, such as entrust, harmful, and dependable. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Relationship between Trust and Acculturation Attitudes (With Ukrainians in Russia and Russians in Latvia as an Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatarko A.N.,

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This research focuses on the relationship between various types of trust and acculturation strategies (according to J. Berry’s model in ethnic minorities and migrants. Trust is a major resource both of an individual and society. On the individual level it is considered as a component of the social psychological capital of personality, and on the societal level — as a core part of the social capital of the society. This study aimed to test the assumption that generalized trust in migrants or minorities is related to their preferred acculturation strategies and that this relationship is mediated by more particular types of trust, such as trust in representa- tives of own ethnic group and trust in representatives of other ethnic groups. The study involved Russians living in Riga, Latvia (N=336 and Ukrainian migrants who have been living in Moscow for approximately 1,5 years (N=80. The outcomes show that generalized trust and trust in representative of non-ethnic groups correlate with the choice of acculturation strategies aimed at integration with the society. Trust in representatives of own ethnic group correlates positively with the choice of the “Separation” strategy.

  12. Open, trusting relationships underpin safety in rural maternity a hermeneutic phenomenology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Susan; Smythe, Elizabeth

    2016-11-24

    There are interwoven personal, professional and organisational relationships to be navigated in maternity in all regions. In rural regions relationships are integral to safe maternity care. Yet there is a paucity of research on how relationships influence safety and nurture satisfying experiences for rural maternity care providers and mothers and families in these regions. This paper draws attention to how these relationships matter. This research is informed by hermeneutic phenomenology drawing on Heidegger and Gadamer. Thirteen participants were recruited via purposeful sampling and asked to share their experiences of rural maternity care in recorded unstructured in-depth interviews. Participants were women and health care providers living and working in rural regions. Recordings were transcribed and data interpretively analysed until a plausible and trustworthy thematic pattern emerged. Throughout the data the relational nature of rural living surfaced as an interweaving tapestry of connectivity. Relationships in rural maternity are revealed in myriad ways: for some optimal relationships, for others feeling isolated, living with discord and professional disharmony. Professional misunderstandings undermine relationships. Rural maternity can become unsustainable and unsettling when relationships break down leading to unsafeness. This study reveals how relationships are an important and vital aspect to the lived-experience of rural maternity care. Relationships are founded on mutual understanding and attuned to trust matter. These relationships are forged over time and keep childbirth safe and enable maternity care providers to work sustainably. Yet hidden unspoken pre-understandings of individuals and groups build tension in relationships leading to discord. Trust builds healthy rural communities of practice within which everyone can flourish, feel accepted, supported and safe. This is facilitated by collaborative learning activities and open respectful

  13. A cross-cultural study of perceived benefit versus risk as mediators in the trust-acceptance relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfman, Nicolás C; Vázquez, Esperanza López

    2011-12-01

    Several recent studies have identified the significant role social trust in regulatory organizations plays in the public acceptance of various technologies and activities. In a cross-cultural investigation, the current work explores empirically the relationship between social trust in management authorities and the degree of public acceptability of hazards for individuals residing in either developed or emerging Latin American economies using confirmatory rather than exploratory techniques. Undergraduates in Mexico, Brazil, and Chile and the United States and Spain assessed trust in regulatory authorities, public acceptance, personal knowledge, and the risks and benefits for 23 activities and technological hazards. Four findings were encountered. (i) In Latin American nations trust in regulatory entities was strongly and significantly (directly as well as indirectly) linked with the public's acceptance of any activity or technology. In developed countries trust and acceptability are essentially linked indirectly (through perceived risk and perceived benefit). (ii) Lack of knowledge strengthened the magnitude and statistical significance of the trust-acceptability relationship in both developed and developing countries. (iii) For high levels of claimed knowledge, the impact on the trust-acceptability relationship varied depending upon the origin of the sample. (iv) Confirmatory analysis revealed the relative importance of perceived benefit over perceived risk in meditating the trust-acceptability causal chain. © 2011 Society for Risk Analysis.

  14. Trust and management-to-employee communication in Slovenian companies: Some evidence from the current economic crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Makovec Brenčič

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the importance of trust and management-to-employee communication among top Slovenian employers from the Golden Thread Survey. The paper analyzes the changes and impact of the deteriorating external economic situation on (a company-employee relational trust, and on the (b perceived importance of “trust and long-term relationships with the company in the eyes of the customer” by respondent managers. Furthermore, our analysis also looks at the impact of management-to-employee communication on both trust perspectives. The results show a stable level of company-employee relational trust in the face of the current economic crisis, despite a high level of perceived organizational process changes and a sharp decline in financial performance. On the other hand, the perceived importance of “trust and long-term relationships with the company in the eyes of the customer” has increased substantially as the crisis has deepened, supporting our claim that relationships and the external relationship orientation gain importance in the time of crisis. There is also a strong link between the degree of open and frequent management-to-employee communication, and both perspectives of measured trust among top Slovenian employers.

  15. Pengaruh Customer Relationship Marketing Dan Brand Trust Terhadap Customer Loyalty Pada PT. Asuransi Jiwasraya (Persero) Cabang Pekanbaru

    OpenAIRE

    Pasaribu, Verawati; Karneli, Okta

    2017-01-01

    The development of business nowadays claim theirself to give the best and to do the improvement not only for the service but also their product. The dinamyc competition enable the business not to find the new customer, but to defend them for a loyal so that they don't interest to the other business. One of the customer loyalty strategy is Customer Relationship Marketing and Brand Trust. This reserach analyzes the influence of Customer Relationship Marketing and Brand Trust to Customer Loyalty...

  16. Supply chain relationships between first and second tier suppliers in South African automotive supply chains: A focus on trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aletta S. Tolmay

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The automotive industry is characterised by a network of long term collaborative agreements between component suppliers and assemblers. For collaboration to be successful trust between the supply chain partners is vital. Although many variables influence the efficiency of collaborative relationships, the human behaviour issues related to culture and trust are often much more difficult to solve. Trust is singled out in this article as a contributor to value in the supply chain relationships. Increased trust leads to more confidence resulting in better collaboration. Objectives: The purpose of the study was to explore collaborative relationships between first and second tier suppliers (component manufacturers in automotive supply chains in South Africa and the role of trust in the relationship value. Method: This quantitative study had been conducted amongst members of the National Association for Automobile Component and Allied Manufacturers of South Africa (NAACAM, who are suppliers to the large automotive assemblers. The research utilised closed ended questions to obtain the perceptions of managers in automotive component manufacture regarding trust and relationship value with their best suppliers. Results: With a linear regression model it was found that there is a high degree of trust in the collaborative relationships between first and second tier suppliers of components in the automotive industry in South Africa. Conclusion: The automotive industry is one of the most successful industries in South Africa. They compete globally and apply best practices, particularly those in supply chain management. The industry is characterised by networks of collaborative relationships on different levels. These relationships seem to be successful as they are based on trust.

  17. Community member and faith leader perspectives on the process of building trusting relationships between communities and researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakes, Kimberley D; Vaughan, Elaine; Pham, Jennifer; Tran, Tuyet; Jones, Marissa; Baker, Dean; Swanson, James M; Olshansky, Ellen

    2014-02-01

    In the first phase of this research, we conducted, audio-recorded, and transcribed seven focus groups with more than 50 English- or Spanish-speaking women of childbearing age. Qualitative analysis revealed the following themes: (1) expectation that participation would involve relationships based on trust that is built over time and impacted by cultural factors; (2) perceived characteristics of research staff that would help facilitate the development of trusting relationships; (3) perceptions about the location of the visits that may affect trust; (4) perceptions of a research study and trust for the institution conducting the study may affect trust; (5) connecting the study to larger communities, including faith communities, could affect trust and willingness to participate. In the second phase of this research, we conducted, recorded, transcribed, and analyzed interviews with leaders from diverse faith communities to explore the potential for research partnerships between researchers and faith communities. In addition to confirming themes identified in focus groups, faith leaders described an openness to research partnerships between the university and faith communities and considerations for the formation of these partnerships. Faith leaders noted the importance of finding common ground with researchers, establishing and maintaining trusting relationships, and committing to open, bidirectional communication. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Students' Trust, Value and Loyalty: Evidence from Higher Education in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Claudio Hoffmann; Perin, Marcelo Gattermann; Simoes, Claudia; Kleinowski, Hamilton

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on students' perception of value, trust and loyalty and how these constructs connect in the context of higher education in Brazil. For this endeavor we conducted a survey among undergraduate business students in Brazil. The findings suggest that trust in faculty and trust in staff positively affects students' trust in management…

  19. College Education and Social Trust: An Evidence-Based Study on the Causal Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian; van den Brink, Henriette Maassen; Groot, Wim

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the influence of college education on social trust at the individual level. Based on the literature of trust and social trust, we hypothesize that life experience/development since adulthood and perceptions of cultural/social structures are two primary channels in the causal linkage between college education and social trust.…

  20. Learning to Trust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nooteboom, B.

    2005-01-01

    Trust is full of puzzle and paradox.Trust is both rational and emotional. Trust can go beyond calculative self-interest, but has its limits.People may want to trust, while they may also feel threatened by it.If trust is not in place prior to a relationship, on the basis of institutions, prior

  1. Evidence for a relationship between trait gratitude and prosocial behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost-Dubrow, Rachel; Dunham, Yarrow

    2018-03-01

    Prosocial behaviour towards unrelated others is communally beneficial but can be individually costly. The emotion of gratitude mitigates this cost by encouraging direct as well as "upstream" reciprocity, thereby facilitating cooperation. A widely used method for measuring trait gratitude is the Gratitude Questionnaire (GQ6) [McCullough, M., Emmons, R., & Tsang, J. (2002). The grateful disposition: A conceptual and empirical topography. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 82, 112-127. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.82.1.112 ]. Here we undertake an assessment of the external validity of the GQ6 by examining its relationship with two incentivized economic games that serve as face valid indices of generosity and reciprocity. In two studies (total N = 501) we find that trait gratitude as measured by the GQ6 predicts greater donations in a charity donation task as well as greater transfers and returns in an incentivized trust game. These results support the hypothesis that individuals with higher trait gratitude are more generous and trusting on average, and provide initial evidence as to the predictive validity of the GQ6.

  2. An analysis of relationships among transformational leadership, job satisfaction, organizational commitment and organizational trust in two Turkish hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Top, Mehmet; Tarcan, Menderes; Tekingündüz, Sabahattin; Hikmet, Neşet

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among employee organizational commitment, organizational trust, job satisfaction and employees' perceptions of their immediate supervisors' transformational leadership behaviors in Turkey. First, this study examined the relationships among organizational commitment, organizational trust, job satisfaction and transformational leadership in two Turkish public hospitals. Second, this investigation examined how job satisfaction, organizational trust and transformational leadership affect organizational commitment. Moreover, it was aimed to investigate how organizational commitment, job satisfaction and transformational leadership affect organizational trust. A quantitative, cross-sectional method, self-administered questionnaire was used for this study. Eight hundred four employees from two public hospitals in Turkey were recruited for collecting data. The overall response rate was 38.14%. The measurement instruments of survey were the Job Satisfaction Survey (developed by P. Spector), the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire (developed by J. Meyer and N. Allen), the Organizational Trust Inventory-short form (developed by L. Cummings and P. Bromiley) and the Transformational Leadership Inventory (TLI) (developed by P. M. Podsakoff). Five-point Likert scales were used in these measurement instruments. Correlation test (the Pearson's rank test) was used to examine relationships between variables. Also, multiple regression analysis was used to determine the regressors for organizational commitment and organizational trust. There were significant relationships among overall job satisfaction, overall transformational leadership and organizational trust. Regression analyses showed that organizational trust and two job satisfaction dimensions (contingent rewards and communication) were significant predictors for organizational commitment. It was found that one transformational leadership dimension (articulating

  3. What factors influence online brand trust: evidence from online tickets buyers in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Shah Alam, Syed; Mohd Yasin, Norjaya

    2010-01-01

    This study examines online brand trust and its influencing factors in the specific context of online air ticket buyers in Malaysia. Summarizing academic literature on online brand trust drivers, it was found that there is a need to conduct research on online brand trust. Accordingly our hypotheses is that word-of-mouth, online experience, security/privacy, perceived risk, brand reputation and quality information have significant influence on online brand trust. Our hypothesis is being tested ...

  4. Trust-Based Working Time and Organizational Performance: Evidence from German Establishment-Level Panel Data

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Beckmann; Istvàn Hegedüs

    2011-01-01

    This paper empirically examines the impact of trust-based working time on firm performance using panel data from German establishments. Trust-based working time is a human resource management practice that involves a high degree of worker autonomy in terms of scheduling individual working time. From the theoretical viewpoint, trust-based working time may affect worker motivation positively as well as negatively. Therefore, at the establishment level the performance effects of trust-based work...

  5. How Consumer Trust in Financial Institutions Influences Relationships Between Knowledge, Cognitive Effort and Financial Healthiness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben

    2014-01-01

    Trust not only relates to customer trust in individual financial companies (i.e., narrow-scope trust) but also relates to the broader business context in which consumers carry out their financial decisions (i.e., broad-scope trust). Based on two surveys comprising 1,155 bank consumers and 764...... pension consumers, respectively, the results of this study indicate that broad-scope trust negatively moderates relations between knowledge and financial healthiness and between cognitive effort and financial healthiness. In addition, it is demonstrated that broad-scope trust negatively influences...... cognitive effort and positively influences financial healthiness....

  6. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT WITH THE TRUST TO MANAGEMENT OF THE ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ercan ZORBA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine whether the relationship between organizational trust and organizational commitment. In order words, is intended to determine whether an effective factor on organizational commitment of the trusth levels to management of athletes. As research data collection tool is used the short form of Organizational trust Inventory developed by Bromiley and Cummings (1996. Tüzün (2006 has turned the Turkish and has tested of scale reliability and validity using the varimax rotated factor analysis. According to Alpha (Cronbach's alpha is designated as the reliability coefficient of 0.84. The obtained data are calculated frequency and percent values. In the analysis of data was used independent sample t tes t and One - way analysis of variance (ANOVA. In addition, is used "Personal Information Form" prepared by the researcher to achieve to some personal information of participants. The universe of this study, is creating licensed athletes in sports clubs, samp le; who voluntarily agree to participate in research constitutes 240 licensed athletes from sports club in Muğla. When examined by gender and organizational commitment status, although a have higher women than men organizational commitment scores, there is no commitment levels significant difference at the 0.05 level. Organizational commitment status was higher married participants than single participants also p <0.05 level has a significant difference. According to the education level, has a significant difference p<0.05 level among organizational commitment scores. As a result, a tendency to participate in high - level statements about the participants' emotional and cognitive organizational trust can say they play. We can say that the statements were und ecided about emotional commitment. Statements regarding the normative commitment and high level of participation is seen as unstable and exhibits a high level of participation towards their continued

  7. College education and social trust: an evidence-based study on the causal mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, J.; Maassen van den Brink, H.; Groot, W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the influence of college education on social trust at the individual level. Based on the literature of trust and social trust, we hypothesize that life experience/development since adulthood and perceptions of cultural/social structures are two primary channels in the causal

  8. Trust in the public sector: Is there any evidence for a long-term decline?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.G.J. Van de Walle (Steven); S. van Roosbroek (Steven); G. Bouckaert (Geert)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractConcerns with declining public trust in government have become a permanent element of the contemporary political discourse. This concern also extends to levels of citizens’ trust in the public administration and public services. Trust is said to be declining, and this decline is

  9. The Importance of Trust for Investment : Evidence From Venture Capital (Revision of DP 2009-43)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottazzi, L.; Da Rin, M.; Hellmann, T.

    2010-01-01

    We examine the effect of trust on financial investment and contracting decisions in a micro-economic environment where trust is exogenous. Using hand-collected data on European venture capital, we show that the Eurobarometer measure of trust among nations significantly affects investment decisions.

  10. The Importance of Trust for Investment : Evidence from Venture Capital (Replaced by DP 2010-49)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottazzi, L.; Da Rin, M.; Hellmann, T.

    2009-01-01

    We examine the effect of trust on financial investment and contracting decisions in a micro-economic environment where trust is exogenous. Using hand-collected data on European venture capital, we show that the Eurobarometer measure of trust among nations significantly affects investment decisions.

  11. Corporate Brand Trust as a Mediator in the Relationship between Consumer Perception of CSR, Corporate Hypocrisy, and Corporate Reputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Kim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to investigate the relationship between consumer perception of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR, corporate brand trust, corporate hypocrisy, and corporate reputation. Based on the one-to-one interview method using a structured questionnaire of 560 consumers in South Korea, the proposed model was estimated by structural equation modeling analysis. The model suggests that consumer perception of CSR influences consumer attitudes toward a corporation (i.e., perceived corporate hypocrisy and corporate reputation by developing corporate brand trust. This in turn further enhances corporate reputation while decreasing corporate hypocrisy. The findings of our study demonstrate that consumer perception of CSR is an antecedent to corporate brand trust, which fully mediates the relationship between consumer perception of CSR and corporate reputation. In addition, corporate brand trust has the role of partial mediator in the relationship between consumer perception of CSR and corporate hypocrisy. These results imply that to better understand the relationship between consumer perception of CSR and consumer attitudes toward a corporation, it is necessary to consider corporate brand trust as an important mediating variable. The theoretical and practical implications of this study are discussed, together with its limitations and potential for future research.

  12. Increasing interpersonal trust through divergent thinking

    OpenAIRE

    Sellaro, Roberta; Hommel, Bernhard; de Kwaadsteniet, Erik W.; van de Groep, Suzanne; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2014-01-01

    Interpersonal trust is an essential ingredient of many social relationships but how stable is it actually, and how is it controlled? There is evidence that the degree of trust into others might be rather volatile and can be affected by manipulations like drawing attention to personal interdependence or independence. Here we investigated whether the degree of interpersonal trust can be biased by inducing either a more integrative or a more focused/exclusive cognitive control mode by means of a...

  13. Parental loss, trusting relationship with current caregivers, and psychosocial adjustment among children affected by AIDS in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junfeng; Li, Xiaoming; Barnett, Douglas; Lin, Xiuyun; Fang, Xiaoyi; Zhao, Guoxiang; Naar-King, Sylvie; Stanton, Bonita

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between parental loss, trusting relationship with current caregivers, and psychosocial adjustment among children affected by AIDS in China. In this study, cross-sectional data were collected from 755 AIDS orphans (296 double orphans and 459 single orphans), 466 vulnerable children living with HIV-infected parents, and 404 comparison children in China. The trusting relationship with current caregivers was measured with a 15-item scale (Cronbach's α = 0.84) modified from the Trusting Relationship Questionnaire developed by Mustillo et al. in 2005 (Quality of relationships between youth and community service providers: Reliability and validity of the trusting relationship questionnaire. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 14, 577-590). The psychosocial measures include rule compliance/acting out, anxiety/withdrawal, peer social skills, school interest, depressive symptoms, loneliness, self-esteem, future expectation, hopefulness about future, and perceived control over the future. Group mean comparisons using analysis of variance suggested a significant association (p anxiety and depression. These associations remained significant in General Linear Model analysis, controlling for children's gender, age, family socioeconomic status, orphan status (orphans, vulnerable children, and comparison children), and appropriate interaction terms among factor variables. The findings in the current study support the global literature on the importance of attachment relationship with caregivers in promoting children's psychosocial development. Future prevention intervention efforts to improve AIDS orphans' psychosocial well-being will need to take into consideration the quality of the child's attachment relationships with current caregivers and help their current caregivers to improve the quality of care for these children. Future study is needed to explore the possible reasons for the lack of association between a

  14. Trust and Collaboration in PLC Teams: Teacher Relationships, Principal Support, and Collaborative Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallam, Pamela R.; Smith, Henry R.; Hite, Julie M.; Hite, Steven J.; Wilcox, Bradley R.

    2015-01-01

    Professional learning communities (PLCs) are being recognized as effective in improving teacher collaboration and student achievement. Trust is critical in effectively implementing the PLC model, and the school principal is best positioned to influence school trust levels. Using five facets of trust, this research sought to clarify the impact of…

  15. Relationship between trust and usability in virtual environments: An ongoing study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salanitri, Davide; Hare, Chrisminder; Borsci, Simone; Lawson, Glyn; Sharples, Sarah; Water Fi Eld, Brian; Kurosu, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Usability and trust have been observed to be related in several domains including web retail, information systems, and e-health. Trust in technology reflects beliefs about the attributes of a technology. Research has shown that trust is a key factor for the success of different systems – e.g.,

  16. Rethinking trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Roderick M

    2009-06-01

    Will we ever learn? We'd barely recovered from Enron and WorldCom before we faced the subprime mortgage meltdown and more scandals that shook our trust in businesspeople. Which raises the question: Do we trust too much? In this article, Stanford professor and social psychologist Kramer explores the reasons we trust so easily--and, often, so unwisely. He explains that genetics and childhood learning make us predisposed to trust and that it's been a good survival mechanism. That said, our willingness to trust makes us vulnerable. Our sense of trust kicks in on remarkably simple cues, such as when people look like us or are part of our social group. We also rely on third parties to verify the character of others, sometimes to our detriment (as the victims of Bernard Madoff learned). Add in our illusions of invulnerability and our tendencies to see what we want to see and to overestimate our own judgment, and the bottom line is that we're often easily fooled. We need to develop tempered trust. For those who trust too much, that means reading cues better; for the distrustful, it means developing more receptive behaviors. Everyone should start with small acts of trust that encourage reciprocity and build up. Having a hedge against potential abuses also helps. Hollywood scriptwriters, for instance, register their treatments with the Writers Guild of America to prevent their ideas from being stolen by the executives they pitch. To attract the right relationships, people must strongly signal their own honesty, proactively allay concerns, and, if their trust is abused, retaliate. Trusting individuals in certain roles, which essentially means trusting the system that selects and trains them, also works but isn't foolproof. And don't count on due diligence alone for protection; constant vigilance is needed to make sure the landscape hasn't changed.

  17. Ethnic Diversity and Social Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, Peter Thisted; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    2018-01-01

    Due to its wide-ranging implications for social cohesion in diversifying Western countries, the question of the potential negative consequences of ethnic diversity for social trust is arguably the most contentious question in the literature on social trust. In this chapter we critically review...... the empirical evidence for a negative relationship between contextual ethnic diversity (measured locally within countries) and social trust. We cautiously conclude that there are indications of a negative relationship, although with important variations across study characteristics including national setting......, context unit analyzed, and conditioning on moderating influences. Building on the review, we highlight a number of paths for theoretical and methodological advances, which we argue would advance the literature on the relationship between ethnic diversity and social trust....

  18. The Determinant Factors of Real Estate Investment Trust (REIT’s Performance: Evidence from Asian REITs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Edi Azhar Binti Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} This paper investigates the factors that can influence the Real Estate Investment Trust (REIT’s performance, paying particular attention to the listed REIT’s in Asian.  Samples of 45 Asian listed REITs are selected from five different countries namely Taiwan, Thailand, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Japan and Singapore for 5 years basis from 2007 to 2011 with 225 observations. Study used Net Asset value (NAV and Return as the proxy for REITs performance while risk, dividend yield, net income and size to represent the determinants variable. Applying correlations and multiple regression analysis, the results provide evidence on the association between NAV and return with risk, dividend yield, net income and size of REITs. Results of this study are hoped to help the investors and portfolio managers to deepen their understanding of the dependence factors that might influence the performance of REITs in Asian. Keywords: Net asset value (NAV, Real Estate Investment Trust (REITs, Risk and Dividend Yield.

  19. The level of influence of trust, commitment, cooperation, and power in the interorganizational relationships of Brazilian credit cooperatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Maria Martins

    Full Text Available Abstract This article aims to analyze the level of influence of trust, commitment, cooperation, and power in the interrelationships of individual credit cooperatives and their central organization in Brazil. The quantitative and descriptive research was developed in unique credit unions linked to the Central Bank of Brazil and the Organization of Brazilian Cooperatives. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling, with the estimation through partial least squares. The results obtained for the coefficients of determination (R2 of the endogenous latent variables confirmed the assumptions found in the theoretical models of Morgan and Hunt (1994 and Coote, Forrest, and Tam (2003. Statistical significance was also found in the relationships between power and trust, commitment and cooperation, trust and commitment, trust and cooperation, and power and commitment. However, in this study the relationship between power and commitment characterized the significance and was positive between the individual credit cooperatives and their central organization. This is in line with the understanding that power is the solution to resolving conflicts. The research identifies how the constructs of trust, commitment, cooperation, and power show relevance to the alignment of relations between individual credit cooperatives and their central organization.

  20. A Cross-Cultural Perspective on the Relationships between Emotional Separation, Parental Trust, and Identity in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura, Kazumi; Crocetti, Elisabetta; Hatano, Kai; Kaniušonytė, Goda; Hihara, Shogo; Žukauskienė, Rita

    2018-04-01

    Emotional separation and parental trust in parent-adolescent relationships are important factors for adolescent identity formation. However, prior research findings on emotional separation are inconsistent. This study aimed to conduct a more rigorous examination of the associations of emotional separation and parental trust with identity synthesis, confusion, and consolidation by applying a bi-factor model to identity, using adolescent samples from Lithuania (N = 610; 53.9% female; M age  = 14.92), Italy (N = 411; 57.4% female; M age  = 15.03), and Japan (N = 759; 43.7% female; M age  = 14.13). Structural equation modeling revealed that emotional separation and parental trust were consistently associated with identity consolidation across the three countries, rather than associated with identity synthesis and identity confusion. Furthermore, the patterns of associations of emotional separation and parental trust with identity synthesis and identity confusion differed across the three nations. Overall, this study provides a better understanding of the role of emotional separation and parental trust in adolescent identity formation by suggesting the importance of the identity consolidation in the association between parent-child relationships and identity formation across three countries.

  1. Analyzing the Relationship of Organizational Trust and Organizational Culture with Knowledge Sharing Behavior in Teachers of Second Intermediate Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahhosseini, Sakineh; Nadi, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    The present paper aims to study the relationship of organizational trust, organizational culture with knowledge sharing behavior among teachers of Second Intermediate Period in the City of Isfahan. Research method was correlation and statistical population included all teachers of Second Intermediate Period of Isfahan in academic year 2013-2014 (N…

  2. Network strength, transaction-specific investments, inter-personal trust, and relationship satisfaction in Chinese agrifood SMEs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu Hualiang,; Feng, S.; Trienekens, J.H.; Omta, S.W.F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of network strength, transaction-specific investments and inter-personal trust on business relationship satisfaction for small-and-medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) involved in agri-food processing and exporting in China.

  3. Relationship between trusting behaviors and psychometrics associated with social network and depression among young generation: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watabe, Motoki; Kato, Takahiro A; Teo, Alan R; Horikawa, Hideki; Tateno, Masaru; Hayakawa, Kohei; Shimokawa, Norihiro; Kanba, Shigenobu

    2015-01-01

    Maladaptive social interaction and its related psychopathology have been highlighted in psychiatry especially among younger generations. In Japan, novel expressive forms of psychiatric phenomena such as "modern-type depression" and "hikikomori" (a syndrome of severe social withdrawal lasting for at least six months) have been reported especially among young people. Economic games such as the trust game have been utilized to evaluate real-world interpersonal relationships as a novel candidate for psychiatric evaluations. To investigate the relationship between trusting behaviors and various psychometric scales, we conducted a trust game experiment with eighty-one Japanese university students as a pilot study. Participants made a risky financial decision about whether to trust each of 40 photographed partners. Participants then answered a set of questionnaires with seven scales including the Lubben Social Network Scale (LSNS)-6 and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-9. Consistent with previous research, male participants trusted partners more than female participants. Regression analysis revealed that LSNS-family (perceived support from family) for male participants, and item 8 of PHQ-9 (subjective agitation and/or retardation) for female participants were associated with participants' trusting behaviors. Consistent with claims by social scientists, our data suggest that, for males, support from family was negatively associated with cooperative behavior toward non-family members. Females with higher subjective agitation (and/or retardation) gave less money toward males and high attractive females, but not toward low attractive females in interpersonal relationships. We believe that our data indicate the possible impact of economic games in psychiatric research and clinical practice, and validation in clinical samples including modern-type depression and hikikomori should be investigated.

  4. Relationship between trusting behaviors and psychometrics associated with social network and depression among young generation: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoki Watabe

    Full Text Available Maladaptive social interaction and its related psychopathology have been highlighted in psychiatry especially among younger generations. In Japan, novel expressive forms of psychiatric phenomena such as "modern-type depression" and "hikikomori" (a syndrome of severe social withdrawal lasting for at least six months have been reported especially among young people. Economic games such as the trust game have been utilized to evaluate real-world interpersonal relationships as a novel candidate for psychiatric evaluations. To investigate the relationship between trusting behaviors and various psychometric scales, we conducted a trust game experiment with eighty-one Japanese university students as a pilot study. Participants made a risky financial decision about whether to trust each of 40 photographed partners. Participants then answered a set of questionnaires with seven scales including the Lubben Social Network Scale (LSNS-6 and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9. Consistent with previous research, male participants trusted partners more than female participants. Regression analysis revealed that LSNS-family (perceived support from family for male participants, and item 8 of PHQ-9 (subjective agitation and/or retardation for female participants were associated with participants' trusting behaviors. Consistent with claims by social scientists, our data suggest that, for males, support from family was negatively associated with cooperative behavior toward non-family members. Females with higher subjective agitation (and/or retardation gave less money toward males and high attractive females, but not toward low attractive females in interpersonal relationships. We believe that our data indicate the possible impact of economic games in psychiatric research and clinical practice, and validation in clinical samples including modern-type depression and hikikomori should be investigated.

  5. Organization structure as a moderator of the relationship between procedural justice, interactional justice, perceived organizational support, and supervisory trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Maureen L; Schminke, Marshall

    2003-04-01

    Organizational justice researchers recognize the important role organization context plays in justice perceptions, yet few studies systematically examine contextual variables. This article examines how 1 aspect of context--organizational structure--affects the relationship between justice perceptions and 2 types of social exchange relationships, organizational and supervisory. The authors suggest that under different structural conditions, procedural and interactional justice will play differentially important roles in determining the quality of organizational social exchange (as evidenced by perceived organizational support [POS]) and supervisory social exchange (as evidenced by supervisory trust). In particular, the authors hypothesized that the relationship between procedural justice and POS would be stronger in mechanistic organizations and that the relationship between interactional justice and supervisory trust would be stronger in organic organizations. The authors' results support these hypotheses.

  6. Generalized Trust Through Civic Engagement? Evidence from Five National Panel Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ingen, Erik; Bekkers, René

    2015-01-01

    According to a popular version of social capital theory, civic engagement should produce generalized trust among citizens. We put this theory to the test by examining the causal connection between civic engagement and generalized trust using multiple methods and multiple (prospective) panel

  7. Do Trust and Sexual Intimacy Mediate Attachment's Pathway Toward Sexual Violence Occurring in Same Sex Romantic Relationships?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbay, Nicolas; Lafontaine, Marie-France

    2017-07-01

    This study tested a serial mediation model examining how dyadic trust and sexual intimacy mediate the relationship between insecure romantic attachment and perpetrated sexual violence occurring between same sex intimate partners (sexual SSIPV). A community sample of adults ( N = 310; 203 women, 107 men) involved in a committed (6 months or longer) same sex romantic relationship completed an encrypted online questionnaire package which included psychometric measures designed to assess the aforementioned variables. Controlling for gender effects, analyses conducted using bootstrapping procedures supported full mediation pathways for both attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance. That is, attachment anxiety and avoidance were both directly associated to the perpetration of sexual SSIPV, and these relationships were both fully mediated by dyadic trust and sexual intimacy, in that respective order.

  8. Does Trust Matter for Entrepreneurship: Evidence from a Cross-Section of Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oasis Kodila-Tedika

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Differences in trust levels between countries explain the observed discrepancies in entrepreneurial spirit amongst them. We test this hypothesis with a cross-section of 60 countries in 2010. Our findings suggest that about half of the variation in entrepreneurial spirit across countries in the world is driven by trust considerations. This result is robust to regional clustering, outliers and alternative conditioning variables. The findings of the study indicate that while formal incentives to nurture entrepreneurship must be maintained, policy makers should also seek to pay attention to the role of trust cultivated through informal networks.

  9. Collaboration management framework for OEM - suppliers relationships: a trust-based conceptual approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkadi, Farouk; Messaadia, Mourad; Bernard, Alain; Baudry, David

    2017-08-01

    Due to the increased competitiveness and the diversity of requirements in today's markets, manufacturing companies need to join their competencies and resources to propose innovative solutions for each specific market, with the possibility to transpose these solutions to another market, by means of slight adaptations. Thus, manufacturing firms must constantly conduct new collaborations with known partners in most cases, but also with new partners. The critical question for managers in this latter case is how to define the best collaborative strategy according to the goals of the project and the specificity of the target market. This paper tackles the problem by proposing a conceptual framework for supporting the management of collaborative situations in the case of Original equipment manufacturers (OEMs). Based on the concept of trust level, the framework proposes a classification of different collaboration modes to be adopted in various contexts of inter-enterprise relationships, in manufacturing sector. The aim is to support the flexible navigation between different collaborative situations by taking into account all decision-making levels from the strategy to the implementation of the information technologies (IT) systems at the operational level.

  10. Infidelity, trust, and condom use among Latino youth in dating relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Sonya S; Tschann, Jeanne M; Ellen, Jonathan M; Flores, Elena

    2009-04-01

    Latino youth in the United States are at greater risk for contracting sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in comparison with non-Hispanic white youth. Sexually active heterosexual Latino youth aged 16 to 22 years (N = 647) were recruited for interviews through a large health maintenance organization or community clinics. Adjusting for gender, age, ethnic heritage, and recruitment method, woman's consistent use of hormonal contraceptives, ambivalence about avoiding pregnancy, longer length of sexual relationship, and greater overall trust in main partner were independently associated with inconsistent condom use and engagement in a greater number of sexual intercourse acts that were unprotected by condom use. Perception that one's main partner had potentially been unfaithful, but not one's own sexual concurrency, was associated with consistent condom use and fewer acts of unprotected sexual intercourse. Sexually concurrent youth who engaged in inconsistent condom use with other partners were more likely to engage in inconsistent condom use and a greater number of unprotected sexual intercourse acts with main partners. Increasing attachment between youth may be a risk factor for the transmission of STIs via normative declines in condom use. Perception that one's partner has potentially been unfaithful may result in greater condom use. However, many Latino adolescents and young adults who engage in sexual concurrency may not take adequate steps to protect their partners from contracting STIs. Some youth may be more focused on the emotional and social repercussions of potentially revealing infidelity by advocating condom use than the physical repercussions of unsafe sex.

  11. Understanding the relationship between trust in health care and attitudes toward living donor transplant among African Americans with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Evangeline L; Powell, C Lamonte; Perryman, Jennie P; Thompson, Nancy J; Arriola, Kimberly R Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Transplantation is the favored therapy for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Unfortunately, demand for available organs far outpaces the supply. African Americans are disproportionately affected by the ever-widening gap between organ supply and demand. Additionally, structural, biological, and social factors contribute to feelings of unease some African Americans may feel regarding living donor transplant (LDT). The present research examines the relationship between trust in health care and attitudes toward LDT among African American ESRD patients. We hypothesized that lower trust in health care would be significantly associated with negative attitudes toward LDT, and that this relationship would be moderated by patient attitudes toward dialysis. Data were collected from August 2011 to April 2012 as part of a larger study. Measures included trust (of doctors, racial equity of treatment, and hospitals) and attitudes toward both LDT and dialysis. Bivariate analysis revealed that trust in one's doctor, hospital, and in racial equity in health care was significantly correlated with attitudes toward LDT (r = 0.265; r = 0.131; and r = 0.202, respectively). Additionally, attitudes toward dialysis moderated the relationships between Trust in Doctors/Attitudes toward LDT and Trust in Racial equity of treatment/Attitudes toward LDT. Findings suggest a strong relationship between trust in health care and attitudes toward LDT. These findings also shed light on how dialysis experiences are related to the relationship between trust in health care and attitudes toward LDT. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Trust matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Lise Rosendal

    2015-01-01

    This article makes a contribution to the debate about health service utilisation and the role of trust in fostering demand for health services in sub-Saharan Africa. It is framed as a narrative literature review based on a thematic analysis of nine empirical, qualitative studies. For the purposes...... of this article trust is defined as a voluntary course of action, which involves the optimistic expectation that the trustee will do no harm to the trustor and is increasingly perceived as an important influence on health system functioning. The article looks at trust issues in interpersonal, intergroup...... and institutional situations. The findings of the review point to four elements that are important for trust to develop in health sector relationships: the sensitive use of discretionary power by health workers, perceived empathy by patients of the health workers, the quality of medical care and workplace...

  13. PERFORMANCE OF ISLAMIC UNIT TRUSTS DURING THE 2007 GLOBAL FINANCIAL CRISIS: EVIDENCE FROM MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salina H. Kassim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available By focusing on the Malaysian Islamic unit trusts over the period of January 2000 to December 2009, this study attempts to analyse the performance of the Islamic unit trusts in various economic conditions; during a crisis period and non-crisis period. The adjusted Sharpe index, adjusted Jensen Alpha index, and Treynor index are adopted to compare the performance of the Islamic unit trusts against the market benchmark and risk-free return. In measuring risk and diversification, the study relies on the standard deviation and R2 coefficient of determination, respectively. The findings reveal that during the non-crisis period, the performance of the Islamic unit trusts is comparable to that of the market benchmark, while during the crisis period, the Islamic unit trusts perform better compared to the non-crisis period. These findings suggests that the Islamic unit trust funds can be an ideal hedging instrument during a down market and provide potential portfolio diversification benefits for the investors. Based on these findings, the investors could strategize and diversify their portfolio accordingly during different market conditions.

  14. Trust in management as a buffer of the relationships between overload and strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Steve; Kelloway, E Kevin; Duncan-Leiper, Leslie

    2003-10-01

    This study examined the role of trust in management as a moderating factor in work overload's impact on personal strain (i.e., burnout, psychological strain, and work's interference with family). Participants were 94 employees of an accounting firm responding to a survey. The results were supportive of all study propositions. Both work overload and trust in management had the expected negative and positive main effects on the outcomes variables, respectively. The impact of work overload on the outcome variables was moderated by employees' trust in management. The significance of these results and areas of future research are discussed. 2003 APA

  15. Increasing interpersonal trust through divergent thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta eSellaro

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal trust is an essential ingredient of many social relationships but how stable is it actually, and how is it controlled? There is evidence that the degree of trust into others might be rather volatile and can be affected by manipulations like drawing attention to personal interdependence or independence. Here we investigated whether the degree of interpersonal trust can be biased by inducing either a more integrative or a more cognitive-control mode by means of a creativity task requiring divergent or convergent thinking, respectively. Participants then performed the Trust Game, which provides an index of interpersonal trust by assessing the money units one participant (the trustor transfers to another participant (the trustee. As expected, participants transferred significantly more money to the trustee after engaging in divergent thinking as compared to convergent thinking. This observation provides support for the idea that interpersonal trust is controlled by domain-general (i.e., not socially dedicated cognitive states.

  16. A Study on Persuasive Technologies: The Relationship between User Emotions, Trust and Persuasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Nooraishya Wan Ahmad

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available A successful persuasive technology is able to persuade people to change from one state to a more well known state. Therefore, to allow for a change, persuasive technology must be able to affect users’ emotion and make the user trust the technology so that they will adopt the persuasive technology into their daily life routine, as well as continue to use the technology for long period. This paper is aimed to study the relation between users’ emotion with trust and persuasion and how they may contribute to the success of changing a person attitude or behavior towards a certain context or issue. Twenty five participants have completed the study in 6 weeks by using two types of persuasive technology that were assessed at three different interaction stages: pre, during and post. Result shows that emotions have a significant effect on trust, whereas the effect of emotions on persuasion using the persuasive technology was mediated by trust.

  17. ?You don?t want to lose that trust that you?ve built with this patient??: (Dis)trust, medical tourism, and the Canadian family physician-patient relationship

    OpenAIRE

    Crooks, Valorie A; Li, Neville; Snyder, Jeremy; Dharamsi, Shafik; Benjaminy, Shelly; Jacob, Karen J; Illes, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent trends document growth in medical tourism, the private pursuit of medical interventions abroad. Medical tourism introduces challenges to decision-making that impact and are impacted by the physician-patient trust relationship—a relationship on which the foundation of beneficent health care lies. The objective of the study is to examine the views of Canadian family physicians about the roles that trust plays in decision-making about medical tourism, and the impact of medic...

  18. The study of the relationship between value creation and customer loyalty with the role of trust moderation and customer satisfaction in Sari hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Zienolabedin; Ranjbar, Mansour; Gara, Ali Asgar Nadi; gorji, Mohammad Ali Heidari

    2017-01-01

    Background Healthcare providers are competitive, owing to heightened customers’ awareness and expectations of health care services. Objective The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between customer value creation and loyalty with mediator trust and customer satisfaction. Methods This is a cross sectional survey study. Participants were 196 patients referred to private hospitals in Sari city, Iran from May to June 2014 which were selected by convenience sampling method. Data were collected using questionnaires. Data were analyzed using the structural equation modeling software Smart PLS. Results The results revealed a relationship between customer value creation and customer loyalty in a Sari city private hospital, and customer satisfaction and trust, mediate the relationship between customer value creation and customer loyalty. The results also revealed significant positive relationship between customer satisfaction and trust (p=0.000 r=0.585). Conclusion customer satisfaction and trust mediate the relationship between customer value creation and customer loyalty. PMID:28848619

  19. The study of the relationship between value creation and customer loyalty with the role of trust moderation and customer satisfaction in Sari hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Zienolabedin; Ranjbar, Mansour; Gara, Ali Asgar Nadi; Gorji, Mohammad Ali Heidari

    2017-06-01

    Healthcare providers are competitive, owing to heightened customers' awareness and expectations of health care services. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between customer value creation and loyalty with mediator trust and customer satisfaction. This is a cross sectional survey study. Participants were 196 patients referred to private hospitals in Sari city, Iran from May to June 2014 which were selected by convenience sampling method. Data were collected using questionnaires. Data were analyzed using the structural equation modeling software Smart PLS. The results revealed a relationship between customer value creation and customer loyalty in a Sari city private hospital, and customer satisfaction and trust, mediate the relationship between customer value creation and customer loyalty. The results also revealed significant positive relationship between customer satisfaction and trust (p=0.000 r=0.585). customer satisfaction and trust mediate the relationship between customer value creation and customer loyalty.

  20. When trust is threatened: Qualitative study of parents' perspectives on problematic clinical relationships in child cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Sarah; Salmon, Peter; Young, Bridget

    2017-09-01

    We explored parents' accounts of the parent-clinician relationship in childhood cancer to understand how parents who perceive threats to the relationship can be supported. Multicentre longitudinal qualitative study, with 67 UK parents of children (aged 1-12 years) receiving treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Analyses drew on the wider sample but focussed on 50 semistructured interviews with 20 parents and were informed by constant comparison. All 20 parents described problems with clinical care such as inadequate information or mistakes by staff but varied in how much the problems threatened their sense of relationship with clinicians. Some parents saw the problems as having no relevance to the parent-clinician relationship. Others saw the problems as threats to the clinical relationship but worked to "contain" the threat in ways that preserved a trusting relationship with at least one senior clinician. Parents' containment work protected the security they needed from the parent-clinician relationship, but containment was a tenuous process for some. A few parents were unable to contain the problems at all; lacking trust in clinicians, these parents suffered considerably. Given the complexity of childhood cancer care, problems with clinical care are inevitable. By engaging in containment work, parents met their needs to feel secure in the face of these problems, but the extent to which parents should have to do this work is debatable. Parents could benefit from support to seek help when problems arise which threaten their trust in clinicians. Attachment theory can guide clinicians in giving this support. © 2017 The Authors. Psycho-Oncology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Ethnic diversity of the micro-context and generalized trust: Evidence from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, Peter Thisted; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    The question about how ethnic diversity affects generalized trust has been a hot topic in recent years. To this point, within-country analyses of this question have been limited by only having data on contextual ethnic diversity at relatively high levels of aggregation. Consequently, the previous...... analyses suffer from the problem that aggregate contextual diversity likely conceals substantial variation in the ethnic diversity actually experienced at the micro-level in which people live and interact, thereby rendering the estimate of ethnic diversity on trust both imprecise and potentially biased....... In the present paper we add to the literature by analyzing, as the first study ever, how ethnic diversity of the immediate micro-context affects people’s trust in others. In addition, we compare the effect in the micro context to the impact of ethnic diversity at higher levels of aggregation in order...

  2. A Fuzzy Collusive Attack Detection Mechanism for Reputation Aggregation in Mobile Social Networks: A Trust Relationship Based Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While the mechanism of reputation aggregation proves to be an effective scheme for indicating an individual’s trustworthiness and further identifying malicious ones in mobile social networks, it is vulnerable to collusive attacks from malicious nodes of collaborative frauds. To conquer the challenge of detecting collusive attacks and then identifying colluders for the reputation system in mobile social networks, a fuzzy collusive attack detection mechanism (FCADM is proposed based on nodes’ social relationships, which comprises three parts: trust schedule, malicious node selection, and detection traversing strategy. In the first part, the trust schedule provides the calculation method of interval valued fuzzy social relationships and reputation aggregation for nodes in mobile social networks; further, a set of fuzzy valued factors, that is, item judgment factor, node malicious factor, and node similar factor, is given for evaluating the probability of collusive fraud happening and identifying single malicious nodes in the second part; and moreover, a detection traversing strategy is given based on random walk algorithm under the perspectives of fuzzy valued nodes’ trust schedules and proposed malicious factors. Finally, our empirical results and analysis show that the proposed mechanism in this paper is feasible and effective.

  3. An examining the relationship between the trust in supervisors and interactional justice among the tourism employees

    OpenAIRE

    Pınar Çelik; Cengiz Gök

    2016-01-01

    In recent years there has been a great increase in the number of researches dealing with trust in different disciplines.  The reason of this increase is as modern societies become more and more complicated and disciplines pay more attention to reasons of human behaviour. One of the sectors that human behaviour has a vital and important role is tourism industry.  Knowing the level of trust that employees have for their supervisors in tourism industry will help the enterprises to increase the l...

  4. The relationship between servant leadership and employee empowerment, commitment, trust and innovative behaviour: A project management perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla L. Krog

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Understanding the relationship between a project sponsor’s servant leadership traits and employee commitment, trust and innovative behaviour. Research purpose: This study aimed to understand the relationship, if any, between a project sponsor’s servant leadership traits of altruistic calling, emotional healing, wisdom, persuasive mapping and organisational stewardship and a project team’s empowerment, commitment, trust and innovative behaviour. Motivation of the study: Most project leadership studies focus on understanding the role and power position of the project manager, with very little research being dedicated to understanding the effect the leadership style has on the project team and project success. Research approach: A survey was conducted amongst a non-probability sample of 48 project team members from amongst a population of 257, comprising project managers, business analysts and IT staff of a medium sized fleet management organisation that is in the process of implementing an entirely new enterprise resource planning system. Main findings: Through inferential statistical analysis, using structural equation modelling and path analysis, it was determined that persuasive mapping has the strongest impact on employee innovative behaviour, followed by employee commitment and trust via the mediator of employee perceived empowerment. Wisdom and organisational stewardship had a negative impact on employee perceived empowerment. Practical/managerial implications: Project sponsors need to exhibit persuasive mapping, altruistic calling and emotional healing traits due to the significant influence that these have on employee innovative behaviour, commitment and trust, albeit through their perceived empowerment. Contribution/value-add: This study contributes to knowledge of leadership, more especially servant leadership and its significance in project management, which knowledge may contribute to project success

  5. The productivity of trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian; Méon, Pierre-Guillaume

    This paper returns to one of the early questions of the literature on social trust, whether trust affects total factor productivity (TFP). Using both development and growth accounting, we find strong evidence of a causal effect of trust on the level and growth of TFP. Using a three-stage least...

  6. Interpersonal Trust Consistency and the Quality of Peer Relationships during Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotenberg, Ken J.; Boulton, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Five hundred five children (267 female) enrolled in school years 5 and 6 in the UK (M = 9 years and 9 months) completed measures of trust beliefs in peers, best friendships, ascriptions of trustworthiness, and trustworthiness toward peers. Children's social disengagement, peer preference, and peer victimization were assessed by sociometric…

  7. Advancing Public Trust Relationships in Electronic Government : The Singapore E-Filing Journey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, Eric T. K.; Tan, Chee-Wee; Cyr, Dianne; Pan, Shan L.; Xiao, Bo

    2012-01-01

    E-governments have become an increasingly integral part of the virtual economic landscape. However, e-government systems have been plagued by an unsatisfactory, or even a decreasing, level of trust among citizen users. The political exclusivity and longstanding bureaucracy of governmental

  8. The Relationship between School Climate, Trust, Enabling Structures, and Perceived School Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayerson, Deborah R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of Deborah R. Mayerson was to assess the relative impact of climate, trust, and bureaucratic structure upon teachers' perceptions of organizational effectiveness. An existing data set compiled by Nancy Casella (2006) for her dissertation was analyzed. The data consisted of questionnaire responses of a random sample of 220 public school…

  9. Relationship of transformational leadership style with employee health and well-being: The mediating role of trust in the leader

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyria Esperanza Perilla-Toro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relationship between transformational leadership and employee well-being indicators in developing countries, as well as the mediation role of trust in the leader. Five hundred ninety-seven employees of Colombian and Mexican organizations answered a questionnaire. Results indicated that transformational leadership relates positively with job satisfaction and negatively with distress symptomatology. No relationship was established between transformational leadership and psychological well-being. Trust in the leader mediated totally the relationship between transformational leadership and job satisfaction and symptoms of distress. These results confirm the previously described relationship between transformational leadership, less distress, and higher job satisfaction. However, it suggests too that the possible effect of transformational leadership on employees health and well-being would be limited to promoting affective aspects of well-being, but not psychological well-being. This result invites to a thorough review of the meaning and use of the concepts affective and psychological well-being and the differences between them.

  10. Are happier people less judgmental of other people's selfish behaviors? Experimental survey evidence from trust and gift exchange games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouvelis, Michalis; Powdthavee, Nattavudh

    2015-10-01

    What determines people's moral judgments of selfish behaviors? Here we study whether people's normative views in trust and gift exchange games, which underlie many situations of economic and social significance, are themselves functions of positive emotions. We use experimental survey methods to investigate the moral judgments of impartial observers empirically, and explore whether we could influence subsequent judgments by deliberately making some individuals happier. We find that moral judgments of selfish behaviors in the economic context depend strongly on the behavior of the interaction partner of the judged person, but their relationships are significantly moderated by an increase in happiness for the person making the judgment.

  11. Outsourcing cleaning services increases MRSA incidence: Evidence from 126 English Acute Trusts

    OpenAIRE

    Toffolutti, V; Reeves, A; McKee, M; Stuckler, D

    2016-01-01

    : There has been extensive outsourcing of hospital cleaning services in the NHS in England, in part because of the potential to reduce costs. Yet some argue that this leads to lower hygiene standards and more infections, such as MRSA and, perhaps because of this, the Scottish, Welsh, and Northern Irish health services have rejected outsourcing. This study evaluates whether contracting out cleaning services in English acute hospital Trusts (legal authorities that run one or more hospitals) is ...

  12. Relationships among Trust in Messages, Risk Perception, and Risk Reduction Preferences Based upon Avian Influenza in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, David; Fang, Chen-Ling; Tsai, Bi-Kun; Lan, Li-Chi; Hsu, Wen-Shan

    2012-01-01

    Improvements in communications technology enable consumers to receive information through diverse channels. In the case of avian influenza, information repeated by the mass media socially amplifies the consumer awareness of risks. Facing indeterminate risks, consumers may feel anxious and increase their risk perception. When consumers trust the information published by the media, their uncertainty toward avian influenza may decrease. Consumers might take some actions to reduce risk. Therefore, this study focuses on relationships among trust in messages, risk perception and risk reduction preferences. This study administered 525 random samples and consumer survey questionnaires in different city of Taiwan in 2007. Through statistical analysis, the results demonstrate: (1) the higher the trust consumers have in messages about avian influenza, the lower their risk perceptions are; (2) the higher the consumers’ risk perceptions are and, therefore, the higher their desired level of risk reductive, the more likely they are to accept risk reduction strategies; (3) consumer attributes such as age, education level, and marital status correlate with significant differences in risk perception and risk reduction preferences acceptance. Gender has significant differences only in risk reduction preferences and not in risk perception. PMID:23066394

  13. Relationship between perceived organizational politics, organizational trust, human resource management practices and turnover intention among Nigerian nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramatu Abdulkareem Abubakar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Prior research has indicated that employee turnover is detrimental to both individuals and organisations. Because a turnover intention in the workplace is detrimental, several factors have been suggested to better understand the reasons why employees may decide to leave their organisations. Some of the organizational-related factors that have been considered by previous research include perceived organizational justice, job satisfaction, perceived psychological contract breach, and perceived organizational support, among others. Despite these empirical studies, literatures indicate that less attention has been paid to the influence of perceived organisational politics, organizational trust, and perceived human resource practices management (HRM practices on employee turnover. Hence, the present study fills in the gap by examining the relationship between perceived organisational politics, organizational trust, perceived human resource management practices and employee turnover among Registered Nurses in Nigerian public hospitals using multiple regression analysis technique. One hundred and seventy five Registered Nurses participated in the study. Result indicated that perceived organisational politics was significantly and positively related to turnover intentions. The result also showed that both organizational trust and perceived human resource practices were significantly and negatively related to turnover intentions. Theoretical and practical implications of the results are discussed.

  14. Relationships among Trust in Messages, Risk Perception, and Risk Reduction Preferences Based upon Avian Influenza in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Shan Hsu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Improvements in communications technology enable consumers to receive information through diverse channels. In the case of avian influenza, information repeated by the mass media socially amplifies the consumer awareness of risks. Facing indeterminate risks, consumers may feel anxious and increase their risk perception. When consumers trust the information published by the media, their uncertainty toward avian influenza may decrease. Consumers might take some actions to reduce risk. Therefore, this study focuses on relationships among trust in messages, risk perception and risk reduction preferences. This study administered 525 random samples and consumer survey questionnaires in different city of Taiwan in 2007. Through statistical analysis, the results demonstrate: (1 the higher the trust consumers have in messages about avian influenza, the lower their risk perceptions are; (2 the higher the consumers’ risk perceptions are and, therefore, the higher their desired level of risk reductive, the more likely they are to accept risk reduction strategies; (3 consumer attributes such as age, education level, and marital status correlate with significant differences in risk perception and risk reduction preferences acceptance. Gender has significant differences only in risk reduction preferences and not in risk perception.

  15. Trust as a valuable strategic variable in the food industry: different types of trust and their implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindgreen, A.

    2003-01-01

    Although it is often suggested that trust is an important construct in relationship marketing, there is only little empirical evidence of how, if at all, trust may be used as a valuable strategic variable. In the 1990s, the international food industry faced a number of serious challenges, most

  16. Analysis of the Relationships among Trust Antecedents, Organizational Structures, and Performance Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    adopted by the U.S. Marine Corps as one of fourteen desirable traits that leaders should develop. In market economies, trust refers to “a combination...translate their common purpose into specific, measurable performance goals; - are of a manageable size; - develop the right mix of expertise...industry, is a matrix organization (Miles & Snow, 1992; TRW website). Finally, network structures—used by organizations such as Nike —began to form

  17. An Empirical Study on the Organizational Trust, Employee-Organization Relationship and Innovative Behavior from the Integrated Perspective of Social Exchange and Organizational Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chuan Yu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Combining social exchange and inducement-contribution theory as our overarching theoretical framework, we examine innovative climate as a boundary condition and organizational trust as a mediating mechanism to explain when and how the employee-organization relationship (EOR is associated with workplace innovative behavior. We conducted a field study using multi-source data to test our hypotheses. The results indicated that creativity positively predicted innovative behavior through organizational trust, and an innovative climate moderated the indirect effect of EOR on innovative behavior via organizational trust. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings and directions for future research are discussed.

  18. Hype and public trust in science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Master, Zubin; Resnik, David B

    2013-06-01

    Social scientists have begun elucidating the variables that influence public trust in science, yet little is known about hype in biotechnology and its effects on public trust. Many scholars claim that hyping biotechnology results in a loss of public trust, and possibly public enthusiasm or support for science, because public expectations of the biotechnological promises will be unmet. We argue for the need for empirical research that examines the relationships between hype, public trust, and public enthusiasm/support. We discuss the complexities in designing empirical studies that provide evidence for a causal link between hype, public trust, and public enthusiasm/support, but also illustrate how this may be remedied. Further empirical research on hype and public trust is needed in order to improve public communication of science and to design evidence-based education on the responsible conduct of research for scientists. We conclude that conceptual arguments made on hype and public trust must be nuanced to reflect our current understanding of this relationship.

  19. Dependence on Supplier, Supplier Trust and Green Supplier Integration: The Moderating Role of Contract Management Difficulty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuesong Zhao

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the impacts of dependence on supplier and supplier trust on green supplier integration, and the moderating role of contract management difficulty. In this study, we develop a dependence-trust-integration model based on resource dependence theory, social capital theory and transaction cost theory. We examine the hypothesized relationships using hierarchical regression analyses based on data collected from 187 Chinese firms. Our findings suggest that dependence on supplier has positive impacts on green supplier integration and supplier trust. Supplier trust partially mediates the relationship between dependence on supplier and green supplier integration. In addition, contract management difficulty negatively moderates the relationship between supplier trust and green supplier integration. This research contributes to the literature by offering empirical evidence concerning the indirect relationship between dependence on supplier and green supplier integration via supplier trust, and the trust-integration link depends on the level of contract management difficulty.

  20. Consumer Evaluation of a Vertical Brand Extension in the Lodging Industry: Relationships among Brand Trust, Band Loyalty, Brand Distance, and Brand Extension

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Yu Mi

    2013-01-01

    Vertical brand extensions have been used as popular strategies in the lodging industry. Research on brand extension that is related with brand trust and brand loyalty has been useful in making brand extensions successful. However, previous research focused on aggregated relationships among brand trust, brand loyalty, and brand extension. In addition, it has been found that quality and price distance from a core brand of the brand extension has an impact on the success of the brand extension. ...

  1. Assess and enhance public trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia Winter; James Absher; Alan Watson

    2007-01-01

    Trust is a form of social capital, facilitating effective land management, communication and collaboration. Although trust in the Forest Service is at least moderately high for most publics, evidence of a lack of trust and outright distrust has been found in some communities. However, the amount, types, and conditions of trust necessary for effective management to...

  2. Outsourcing cleaning services increases MRSA incidence: Evidence from 126 english acute trusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toffolutti, Veronica; Reeves, Aaron; McKee, Martin; Stuckler, David

    2017-02-01

    There has been extensive outsourcing of hospital cleaning services in the NHS in England, in part because of the potential to reduce costs. Yet some argue that this leads to lower hygiene standards and more infections, such as MRSA and, perhaps because of this, the Scottish, Welsh, and Northern Irish health services have rejected outsourcing. This study evaluates whether contracting out cleaning services in English acute hospital Trusts (legal authorities that run one or more hospitals) is associated with risks of hospital-borne MRSA infection and lower economic costs. By linking data on MRSA incidence per 100,000 hospital bed-days with surveys of cleanliness among patient and staff in 126 English acute hospital Trusts during 2010-2014, we find that outsourcing cleaning services was associated with greater incidence of MRSA, fewer cleaning staff per hospital bed, worse patient perceptions of cleanliness and staff perceptions of availability of handwashing facilities. However, outsourcing was also associated with lower economic costs (without accounting for additional costs associated with treatment of hospital acquired infections). Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. The Relationship of Perceived Value, Service Quality, Brand Trust, and Brand Loyalty: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IKRAMUDDIN

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of loyalty has evolved as an important issue in the world of marketing as companies are focusing their strategy in retaining customers and increasing their sales. The purpose of this study is to re-evaluate the involvement of various factors related to the perception of value, service quality, brand trust and brand loyalty in the industry of mobile phones through literature review and examination of previous research. Some studies have found that the observed variables are the key drivers of brand loyalty. However, other opinions are also presented for their different perspectives and a broader view of the research topic.

  4. Information from Relationship Lending : Evidence from China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, C.; Liao, G.; Yu, X.; Ni, Z.

    2009-01-01

    We study the economic role of banks’ soft information, which evolved from repeated lending relationships, in the context of loan default. Using a proprietary database from one of the largest state-owned commercial banks in China, we find that the bank’s internal credit rating scores play a

  5. [Crises of trust].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Thai-Form; Tseng, Hsing-Chau

    2006-02-01

    Extensive media coverage is warning of a crisis of trust that has emerged as a serious issue in our society. This article explores the meaning of "crisis," concepts of crisis management, mechanisms for building trust, and the underlying significance of trust and distrust. Evidence is adduced to testify to the erosion of trust and factors in our society that reflect the potential for crises of trust. Organizational decision makers, including hospital managers, are urged to identify and reflect upon weaknesses in their organizations in order that remedial action can be taken to preempt such crises.

  6. School Leader Relationships: The Need for Explicit Training on Rapport, Trust, and Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasater, Kara

    2016-01-01

    An important aspect of school leadership is relationship development, but developing meaningful relationships as a school leader is challenging. School leader relationships are challenged by diverse stakeholder groups, varied contexts, and difficult situations. The complex nature of school leader relationships necessitates explicit training for…

  7. Trust in Strategic Alliances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bo

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the dynamic and multi-dimensional nature of trust in strategic alliances. Adopting a co-evolutionary approach, I developed a framework to show how trust, conceptualised in different forms, plays distinct roles at various evolutionary stages of the alliance relationship....... Emphasising the multi-dimensional and dynamic role of trust, the framework illustrates how initial levels of a particular type of trust may co-evolve with the alliance and influence subsequent phases of the relationship – either on its own or in combination with other types or dimensions of trust....... The theoretical distinction between trust as antecedent, moderator and outcome during the evolution of the alliance relationship leads to research questions that may guide future empirical research....

  8. The Pay-What-You-Want game: What can be learned from the experimental evidence on Dictator and Trust Games?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greiff Matthias

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the Pay-What-You-Want game which represents the interaction between a buyer and a seller in a Pay-What-You-Want (PWYW situation. The PWYW game embeds the dictator game and the trust game as subgames. This allows us to use previous experimental studies with the dictator and the trust game to identify three factors that can influence the success of PWYW pricing in business practice: (i social context, (ii social information, and (iii deservingness. Only few cases of PWYW pricing for a longer period of time have been documented. By addressing repeated games, we isolate two additional factors which are likely to contribute to successful implementations of PWYW as a long term pricing strategy. These are (iv communication and (v the reduction of goal conflicts. The central contribution of this study is an attempt to bridge the gap between laboratory experiments and the research on PWYW pricing, which relies largely on evidence from the field. By reviewing the relevant experiments, this study identifies factors crucial for the success of PWYW pricing and provides guidance to developing long-term applications of PWYW pricing.

  9. How doctors communicate the initial diagnosis of cancer matters: cancer disclosure and its relationship with Patients' hope and trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Weidan; Qi, Xiaona; Yao, Ting; Han, Xuanye; Feng, Xujing

    2017-05-01

    The study is to examine the relationships between perceived initial cancer disclosure communication with doctors, levels of hope, and levels of trust in doctors among cancer patients in China. A total number of 192 cancer inpatients in a cancer hospital in China were surveyed. Perceived disclosure strategies, levels of hope, levels of trust in their doctors, as well as the demographic information were obtained from the participants. In addition to age, patients who had higher levels of perceived emotional support from doctors, or higher levels of perceived personalized disclosure from doctors, or higher levels of perceived discussion of multiple treatment plans with doctors were more likely to have higher levels of trust in doctors. In addition to perceived health status, perceived emotional support from doctors significantly predicted participants' levels of hope. That is, patients who had higher higher levels of perceived doctors' emotional support were more likely to have higher levels of hope. Key disclosure person was a marginally significant variable, that is, patients who were mainly disclosed by family members might have higher levels of hope compared with patients who were mainly disclosed by doctors. When communicating with a cancer patient, doctors might not ignore the importance of emotional support during cancer diagnosis communication. Doctors might want to involve family and collaborate with family to find out ways of personalized disclosure. During the communication process, doctors could provide their patients with multiple treatment options and discuss the benefits and side effects of each treatment. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. A Study on the Social Belonging of People to Iranian Society and its Relationship with Social Trust and Individualism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pari Naz Bidel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of The present study investigated the extent of social belonging of people of Mashhad to Iran society and the relationship with social trust and individualism has been. Research has been Survey and data was collected through questionnaires. The Statistical Society' who was twenty years in Mashhad with a population 1530827 equals the number 384 as the sample size by using multi-stage cluster sampling is the selection and Specified. The results show the average amount of social belonging, respondents scored2/7, and to a maximum of5 points, the value of 2/3 is the score. The social belonging of the people of Mashhad to Iran is in the middle. Social belonging with increasing age and also social belonging in the Persians than other ethnic groups as well as practitioners than other people and in The middle class than other classes more have been. Overall, the independent variables were entered into multiple regression coefficients with 40% of the changes made to explain the dependent variable (R2=0/40 the variable «social trust» by a factor of 0/61 had the greatest impact on social belonging and then « extreme individualism «-0/1 8 determining factor influencing the next time it is used, thus increasing social distrust of the people most affected has had on their social belonging.

  11. Trust, autonomy and relationships: the help-seeking preferences of young people in secondary level schools in London (UK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavey, Gerard; Rothi, Despina; Paul, Rini

    2011-08-01

    Help-seeking among young people is complicated, often determined vicariously by the ability of adults, family or professionals, to recognize, and respond to, their difficulties. We know very little about the complex concerns of teenage young people and how they impact on help-seeking preferences. We aimed to ascertain the help-seeking preferences for a range of mental health problems among adolescents attending schools in an inner-city area of London. In particular we sought to examine the relationship between such adolescents and their family doctor. Using a mixed methods approach we explored help-seeking attitudes of young people. Emotional and mental health problems are not seen by young people as the domain of General practitioners. Moreover, there is a worrying lack of confidence and trust placed in family doctor and other professionals by young people. Young people do not tend easily to trust adults to help them with emotional difficulties. Copyright © 2010 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. All rights reserved.

  12. Fostering Partner Dependence as Trust Insurance: The Implicit Contingencies of the Exchange Script in Close Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Sandra L.; Aloni, Maya; Holmes, John G.; Derrick, Jaye L.; Stinson, Danu Anthony; Leder, Sadie

    2008-01-01

    A model of the trust-insurance system is proposed to examine how low and high self-esteem people cope with the interdependence dilemma posed by feeling inferior to a romantic partner. Feeling inferior automatically activates “if-then” contingencies that link inferiority to the exchange script (i.e., partner qualities are evenly traded) and exchange script anxieties to reparative efforts to secure a partner's dependence. A daily diary study of newlyweds and five experiments supported the model. Induced upward social comparisons to the partner activated exchange anxieties for low, but not high, self-esteem people. When implicitly primed, the exchange script heightened worries about being inferior and motivated behavioral efforts to increase the partner's dependence regardless of self-esteem. When consciously deliberated, the exchange script only elicited dependence-promotion for low self-esteem people. PMID:19159135

  13. Trust Trust Me (The Additivity)

    OpenAIRE

    Mano , Ken; Sakurada , Hideki; Tsukada , Yasuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Part 4: Trust Metrics; International audience; We present a mathematical formulation of a trust metric using a quality and quantity pair. Under a certain assumption, we regard trust as an additive value and define the soundness of a trust computation as not to exceed the total sum. Moreover, we point out the importance of not only soundness of each computed trust but also the stability of the trust computation procedure against changes in trust value assignment. In this setting, we define tru...

  14. Emotion Work in the Arab Context: Its Relationship to Job Satisfaction and the Moderating Role of Trust to the Employer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozionelos, Georgios

    2016-08-01

    The research investigated the relationship of emotion work directed towards customers and towards coworkers with job satisfaction in Saudi Arabia. Emotion work means the requirement to display particular emotions as part of the job and includes surface acting where actual emotions differ from displayed emotions and deep acting where displayed and felt emotions are congruent. Participants were 147 flight attendants (31 men, 116 women; mean age = 36.9 years, SD = 7.5) employed by a major Saudi Arabian airline, who were either Saudi nationals or nationals of other Gulf Arab countries. Data were collected with questionnaires. Analysis was based on the General Linear Model and indicated that deep acting towards customers and towards coworkers was positively related to job satisfaction. On the other hand, the hypothesized negative relationship between surface acting and job satisfaction was not supported. Organizational trust moderated the relationship of emotion work with job satisfaction. The findings indicate the importance of considering emotion work in interactions with coworkers along with the influence of national culture in the relationships of emotion work with key variables. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. The Mediation Effect of Trusting Beliefs on The Relationship between Expectation-Confirmation and Satisfaction with The Usage of Online Product Recommendation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ashraf

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Online Product Recommendations (OPRs are increasingly available to onlinecustomers as a value-added self-service in evaluating and choosing a product.Research has highlighted several advantages that customers can gain from usingOPRs. However, the realization of these advantages depends on whether and towhat extent customers embrace and fully utilise them. The relatively low OPR usagerate indicates that customers have not yet developed trust in OPRs’ performance.Past studies also have established that satisfaction is a valid measure of systemperformance and a consistent significant determinant of users’ continuous systemusage. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the mediation effect of trustingbeliefs on the relationship between expectation-confirmation and satisfaction. Theproposed research model is tested using data collected via an online survey from626 existing users of OPRs. The empirical results revealed that social-psychologicalbeliefs (perceived confirmation and trust are significant contributors to customersatisfaction with OPRs. Additionally, trusting beliefs partially mediate the impactof perceived confirmation on customer satisfaction. Moreover, this study validatesthe extensions of the interpersonal trust construct to trust in OPRs and examinesthe nomological validity of trust in terms of competence, benevolence, andintegrity. The findings provide a number of theoretical and practical implications. 

  16. Why So Difficult? Exploring Negative Relationships between Educational Leaders: The Role of Trust, Climate, and Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Alan J.; Moolenaar, Nienke M.; Liou, Yi-Hwa; Tuytens, Melissa; del Fresno, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Recent work suggests the importance of collaboration among district-office and school leaders. Most studies examine prosocial relationships, but negative social ties, which may be more consequential, are rarely examined. We collected survey data from 78 educational leaders on perceptions of culture and negative relationships and used…

  17. Measuring Trust

    OpenAIRE

    Glaeser, Edward Ludwig; Laibson, David I.; Scheinkman, Jose A.; Soutter, Christine L.

    2000-01-01

    We combine two experiments and a survey to measure trust and trustworthiness—two key components of social capital. Standard attitudinal survey questions about trust predict trustworthy behavior in our experiments much better than they predict trusting behavior. Trusting behavior in the experiments is predicted by past trusting behavior outside of the experiments. When individuals are closer socially, both trust and trustworthiness rise. Trustworthiness declines when partners are of differen...

  18. "You don't want to lose that trust that you've built with this patient...": (dis)trust, medical tourism, and the Canadian family physician-patient relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, Valorie A; Li, Neville; Snyder, Jeremy; Dharamsi, Shafik; Benjaminy, Shelly; Jacob, Karen J; Illes, Judy

    2015-02-25

    Recent trends document growth in medical tourism, the private pursuit of medical interventions abroad. Medical tourism introduces challenges to decision-making that impact and are impacted by the physician-patient trust relationship-a relationship on which the foundation of beneficent health care lies. The objective of the study is to examine the views of Canadian family physicians about the roles that trust plays in decision-making about medical tourism, and the impact of medical tourism on the therapeutic relationship. We conducted six focus groups with 22 family physicians in the Canadian province of British Columbia. Data were analyzed thematically using deductive and inductive codes that captured key concepts across the narratives of participants. Family physicians indicated that they trust their patients to act as the lead decision-makers about medical tourism, but are conflicted when the information they are managing contradicts the best interests of the patients. They reported that patients distrust local health care systems when they experience insufficiencies in access to care and that this can prompt patients to consider going abroad for care. Trust fractures in the physician-patient relationship can arise from shame, fear and secrecy about medical tourism. Family physicians face diverse tensions about medical tourism as they must balance their roles in: (1) providing information about medical tourism within a context of information deficits; (2) supporting decision-making while distancing themselves from patients' decisions to engage in medical tourism; and (3) acting both as agents of the patient and of the domestic health care system. These tensions highlight the ongoing need for reliable third-party informational resources about medical tourism and the development of responsive policy.

  19. Trust and Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    the behavior or attitudes of others). LIST SUB-AREAS IN PORTFOLIO: Science of Reliance • Trust in Autonomous Systems/ Autonomy – identify the...error •Humans have trust biases (Lyons & Stokes, 2012) •Little is known about how human trust principles apply to autonomy /robotics...for the model in western context (Colquitt et al., 2007) • Some evidence that benevolence is favored by collectivist culture (Branzei et al., 2007

  20. Enacting trust: contract, law and informal economic relationships in a Spanish border enclave in Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Campbell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Small and removed from the Spanish mainland, the Enclave of Ceuta has always depended on flows of goods and labour out of the Moroccan hinterland, with individuals from different ethnic and religious groups forming informal, flexible and personal economic bonds based on mutual ‘confianza’ (trust. Since its entry into the European Union in 1986,the Spanish government has erected a border-wall around the enclave, and introduced new migration policies branding many informal workers within its borders as a threat to Spanish society. Based on my preliminary months of research, this paper compares the Ceutancontext with other research recently conducted on the topics of migration and borders in the Mediterranean region. It brings into focus key theoretical issues and assumptions that constantly emerge in such literature, particularly regarding the role of ‘a-cultural’ personal ties between migrants and locals in undermining State categories and ideology. This paper observes how the Ceutan case encourages us to expand our focuses and consequently problematise our understanding of crucial concepts such as ‘trust’ and ‘integration’.

  1. Girls cannot be trusted: young men's perspectives on contraceptive decision making and sexual relationships in Bolgatanga, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krugu, John K; Mevissen, Fraujke E F; Flore, Kirsten A; Ruiter, Robert A C

    2018-04-01

    There is extensive research on African girls sexual experiences, but much less is known about boys thoughts and actions. There is a need to understand the male perspective in order to develop sexuality education programmes that address the high rates of teenage pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections in sub-Saharan Africa. For this qualitative, phenomenological study we spoke to 20 boys from Bolgatanga, Ghana and explored their sexual decision making, using semi-structured interviews designed to highlight psychosocial and environmental factors. Content analysis was used to construct categories and later the themes. Boys often had negative perceptions about sexual relationships. They believed that girls could not be trusted and mostly embarked on sexual relationships for material gain. The boys reported engaging in multiple sexual partnerships to secure their masculine status; however, they expected girls to be 'faithful'. We found that accurate knowledge of safe sex was lacking, boys were under peer pressure to conform to beliefs about masculinity and communication about sex mainly took place within peer groups. There is a need to emphasise condom use in established relationships. There should also be more discussion of issues surrounding fidelity and gender equality, as part of sexuality programmes aimed at boys in Ghana and in similar cultures.

  2. The Relationship between Organizational Justice and Organizational Citizenship Behavior among Nurses (Examining the Mediating Role of Organizational Commitment, Organizational Trust, and Job Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    shadi Mahmoudi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Justice has been recognized as the pivot of different organizational research, that the designation of the causal pattern involving the most important variables associated with it was the main objective of the present study. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive-survey study. The statistical population consisted of all nurses of Imam Khomeini hospital in Urmia (n= 420, of which 201 nurses were selected by using Morgan’s table and by random sampling method. The instruments included questionnaires of organizational justice, organizational commitment, organizational trust, job satisfaction, and Organizational Citizenship Behavior whose reliability and validity were confirmed. The structural equations model method was used to analyze the data.  Results:The results showed there was a positive and significant relationship between justice perception with organizational commitment, organizational trust, and job satisfaction. In addition, the mediating role of organizational commitment and trust was acknowledged in the relationship between justice and citizenship behavior in the model; however, the mediating role of satisfaction was not fitted in the relationship between justice and citizenship.  Conclusion: According the research results that there was a positive and significant relationship between perception of justice with organizational commitment, organizational trust, and job satisfaction, paying attention to organizational justice for improving the staff’s organizational citizenship behavior is critical and indicates the distinct position of this variable in improving all attitudinal and behavioral variables and consequently in the hospital employees’ performance.

  3. Interviewee Perceptions of Employment Screening Interviews: Relationships among Perceptions of Communication Satisfaction, Interviewer Credibility and Trust, Interviewing Experience, and Interview Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablin, Fredric M.; And Others

    A study examined employment screening interviews to determine the relationships between an interviewee's perceptions of interview communication satisfaction, interviewer credibility and trust, previous interviewing experiences, and a number of interview outcomes, including expectation of a second interview. Data were collected from 69 students…

  4. Understanding Trust in Financial Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben

    2012-01-01

    Although the financial crisis has elevated the interest for factors such as consumer financial healthiness, broad-scope trust, financial knowledge, and consumer relationship satisfaction, no existing model describes how these factors may influence consumer financial relationship trust...... healthiness, broad-scope trust, knowledge, and satisfaction positively affect narrow-scope trust in financial services. Furthermore, it is found that broad-scope trust negatively moderates the relationships between financial healthiness and narrow-scope trust and between satisfaction and narrow-scope trust....... This research extends prior research by developing a conceptual framework explaining how these constructs affect consumers' trust in their financial service provider. Based on two surveys comprising 764 pension consumers and 892 mortgage consumers, respectively, the results of this study indicate that financial...

  5. How company responses and trusting relationships protect brand equity in times of crises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hegner, Sabrina; Hegner, Sabrina M.; Beldad, Ardion Daroca; Kamphuis op Heguis, Sjarlot

    2014-01-01

    Brands are susceptible to various forms of crises, regardless of whether a brand’s conscious deviation from socially acceptable practices or forces and activities beyond the brand’s control prompted a crisis. Undeniably, crises can have negative ramifications for the brand’s consumer relationships

  6. THE MEDIATING ROLE OF TRUST TOWARDS E-WOM ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BIG FIVE PERSONALITY CHARACTERISTICS AND INFLUENCE BY E-WOM

    OpenAIRE

    algur, mehmet selami; erden, nil selenay

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Aim of this study is to investigate the mediating role of trust towards e-WOM on the relationship between big five personality characteristics (extraversion, agreeableness, emotional stability, conscientiousness, openness to experience) and influence by e-WOM in order to provide insight for the role of individual differences, one of which is a neglected domain in e-WOM studies. Results indicate that the relationships between agreeableness, conscientiousness and influence by e-WOM ar...

  7. Building Trusting Relationships in the Medical Practice Team: Thirty Rules to Live By for You and Your Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura

    2015-01-01

    A medical practice team without trust isn't really a team; it's just a group of individuals who work together in a medical practice, often making disappointing progress. This is true no matter how capable or talented the individuals are. Your staff may never reach its full potential if trust is not present. This article offers medical practice managers 30 rules for building trust in their practices: 15 rules that will help them in their leadership roles, and 15 rules to teach and discuss with their employees. It suggests a trust-building screening question to include in job interviews to determine if applicants have a high capacity for trust. It also describes Reina and Reina's "Three C's of Trust," a model that practice managers may find useful as they develop trust competencies in their staffs. This article also includes 10 inspiring quotes that will help medical practice employees build trust and five easy-to-facilitate trust-building exercises that managers can use with the medical practice team.

  8. An Examination of the Relationship among Structure, Trust, and Conflict Management Styles in Virtual Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojing; Magjuka, Richard J.; Lee, Seung-hee

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of new technologies has made it increasingly easy for distributed collaboration in both educational and noneducational settings. Although the effectiveness in traditional settings of the dynamics of small group work has been widely researched, there is limited research that offers evidence on how teams can work effectively in a…

  9. Does Religiosity Promote or Discourage Social Trust? Evidence from Cross-Country and Cross-State Comparisons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian; Berggren, Niclas

    We look at the effect of religiosity on social trust, defined as the share of a population that thinks that people in general can be trusted. This is important since social trust is related to many desired outcomes, such as growth, education, democratic stability and subjective well-being. The ef......We look at the effect of religiosity on social trust, defined as the share of a population that thinks that people in general can be trusted. This is important since social trust is related to many desired outcomes, such as growth, education, democratic stability and subjective well......-being. The effect of religiosity is theoretically unclear: while all major religions call for behaving well to others, religious groups may primarily trust people in their own groups and distrust others, as well as cause division in the broader population. We make use of new data from the Gallup World Poll for 105...... countries and the U.S. states, measuring religiosity by the share of the population that answers yes to the question "Is religion an important part of your daily life?". Our empirical results, making use of regression analysis whereby we control for other possible determinants of social trust and, by using...

  10. RELATIONSHIP AMONG E-SERVICE QUALITY, CULTURE, ATTITUDE, TRUST, RISK OF ONLINE SHOPPING

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Al-Nasser; Rushami Zien Yusoff; Rabiul Islam; Abdullah Al-Nasser

    2014-01-01

    Purchasing is considered a risky business specifically in the online purchasing environment. The research was designed to fill the gap in the existing body of knowledge regarding attitudes and differences in electronic service quality perception between two different geographical and cultural countries-Malaysia and Saudi Arabia-regarding online shopping. Specifically, this research extended previous effort done in an online shopping context by providing evidence that high service quality incr...

  11. Student-Faculty Trust and Its Relationship with Student Success in Pre-Licensure BSN Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarbrough, John E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Student-faculty trust and related concept characteristics have been shown to be factors associated with successful student learning. Research investigating the role of trust in communications and education has been conducted with students in other disciplines but not with nursing students. The purpose of the research is to investigate…

  12. Maintaining warm, trusting relationships with brands: increased temperature perceptions after thinking of communal brands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans IJzerman

    Full Text Available Classical theories on interpersonal relations have long suggested that social interactions are influenced by sensation, such as the experience of warmth. Past empirical work now confirms that perceived differences in temperature impact how people form thoughts about relationships. The present work first integrates our knowledge database on brand research with this idea of "grounded social cognition". It then leverages a large sample (total N = 2,552 toward elucidating links between estimates of temperature and positive versus negative evaluations of communal brands. In five studies, the authors have found that thinking about positively (vs. negatively perceived communal brands leads to heightened temperature estimates. A meta-analysis of the five studies shows a small but consistent effect in this noisy environment, r = .11, 95% CI, .05, .18. Exploratory analyses in Studies 1a and b further suggest that temperature perceptions mediate the (significant relationship between perceived communality and willingness to purchase from the brand. The authors discuss implications for theory and practice and consider the effects from a Social Baseline Perspective.

  13. Maintaining warm, trusting relationships with brands: increased temperature perceptions after thinking of communal brands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    IJzerman, Hans; Janssen, Janneke A; Coan, James A

    2015-01-01

    Classical theories on interpersonal relations have long suggested that social interactions are influenced by sensation, such as the experience of warmth. Past empirical work now confirms that perceived differences in temperature impact how people form thoughts about relationships. The present work first integrates our knowledge database on brand research with this idea of "grounded social cognition". It then leverages a large sample (total N = 2,552) toward elucidating links between estimates of temperature and positive versus negative evaluations of communal brands. In five studies, the authors have found that thinking about positively (vs. negatively) perceived communal brands leads to heightened temperature estimates. A meta-analysis of the five studies shows a small but consistent effect in this noisy environment, r = .11, 95% CI, .05, .18. Exploratory analyses in Studies 1a and b further suggest that temperature perceptions mediate the (significant) relationship between perceived communality and willingness to purchase from the brand. The authors discuss implications for theory and practice and consider the effects from a Social Baseline Perspective.

  14. The relationship between higher social trust and lower late HIV diagnosis and mortality differs by race/ethnicity: results from a state-level analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransome, Yusuf; Batson, Ashley; Galea, Sandro; Kawachi, Ichiro; Nash, Denis; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2017-04-06

    trust was associated with lower all-cause mortality rates and that association varied by race/ethnicity within the male-to-male and IDU transmission groups only. Social trust may promote timely HIV testing, which can facilitate earlier HIV diagnosis, thus it can be a useful determinant to monitor the relationship with HIV care continuum outcomes especially for racial/ethnic minority groups disproportionately infected by HIV.

  15. Languages, communication potential and generalized trust in Sub-Saharan Africa: evidence based on the Afrobarometer Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzasi, Katalin

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate whether speaking other than home languages in Sub-Saharan Africa promotes generalized trust. Based on various psychological and economic theories, a simple model is provided to illustrate how languages might shape trust through various channels. Relying on data from the Afrobarometer Project, which provides information on home and additional languages, the Index of Communication Potential (ICP) is introduced to capture the linguistic situation in the 20 sample countries. The ICP, which can be computed at any desired level of aggregation, refers to the probability that an individual can communicate with a randomly selected person in the society based on common languages. The estimated two-level hierarchical models show that, however, individual level communication potential does not seem to impact trust formation, but living in an area with higher average communication potential increases the chance of exhibiting higher trust toward unknown people. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Trust in initial encounters : a motivational, cognitive theory

    OpenAIRE

    Johansen, Svein Tvedt

    2007-01-01

    In this dissertation I develop a theoretical model on the effects of risk on the formation of trust in the initial stages of a relationship. Risk is proposed to influence trust in two ways: First, risk exerts a direct influence on trust. Risk may decrease trust, increase trust, or increase trust under specific conditions. Second, risk may affect the level of trust indirectly by influencing the effect of social stimuli on the formation of trust. In this second indirect effect of risk, ri...

  17. 'Love and trust, you can be blinded': HIV risk within relationships among Latina women in Miami, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibañez, Gladys E; Whitt, Elaine; Avent, Tenesha; Martin, Steve S; Varga, Leah M; Cano, Miguel A; O'Connell, Daniel J

    2017-10-01

    Latina women are disproportionately affected by HIV in the US, and account for 30% of all HIV infections in Miami-Dade County, Florida. The main risk for Latina women is heterosexual contact. Little is known about the relational and cultural factors that may impact women's HIV risk perception. This study aims to describe Latina women's perception of their HIV risk within a relational, cultural, and linguistic context. Eight focus groups of Latina women (n = 28), four English speaking groups and four Spanish speaking groups, were conducted between December 2013 and May 2014. Women were recruited from a diversion program for criminal justice clients and by word of mouth. Eligibility criteria included the following: self-identify as Hispanic/Latino, 18-49 years of age, and self-identify as heterosexual. A two-level open coding analytic approach was conducted to identify themes across groups. Most participants were foreign-born (61%) and represented the following countries: Cuba (47%), Honduras (17.5%), Mexico (12%), as well as Nicaragua, Puerto Rico, Colombia, and Venezuela (15%). Participant ages ranged between 18 and 49, with a mean age of 32 years. Relationship factors were important in perceiving HIV risk including male infidelity, women's trust in their male partners, relationship type, and getting caught up in the heat of the moment. For women in the English speaking groups, drug use and trading sex for drugs were also reasons cited for putting them at risk for HIV. English speaking women also reported that women should take more responsibility regarding condom use. Findings emphasize the importance of taking relational and cultural context into account when developing HIV prevention programs for Latina women. Interventions targeting English speaking Latina women should focus on women being more proactive in their sexual health; interventions focused on Spanish speaking women might target their prevention messages to either men or couples.

  18. The Impact of Trust on the Mode of Transaction Governance between Manufacturer and Distributor: Evidence from Georgia

    OpenAIRE

    George BERULAVA; David LEZHAVA

    2008-01-01

    The goal of the paper is to explore main determinants of the mode of transaction governance between manufacturers and distributors. We examine a number of types of transaction governance, viz., markets, relational transacting, and hierarchies. The model proposed in the paper integrates the concept of trust with key dimensions of transaction cost economics, being estimated with data from a sample of Georgian manufacturing industries. The main finding of the study is that trust along with tra...

  19. Do Corruption and Social Trust affect Economic Growth? A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serritzlew, Søren; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2014-01-01

    Two separate literatures suggest that corruption and social trust, respectively, are related to economic growth, although the strengths of the relationships, and the direction of causality, are still debated. In this paper, we review these literatures and evaluate the evidence for causal effects...... of corruption and trust on economic growth, and discuss how corruption and trust are interrelated. The reviews show that absence of corruption and high levels of social trust foster economic growth. The literatures also indicate that corruption has a causal effect on social trust, while the opposite effect...... is more uncertain. In the conclusion, we offer the suggestion that fighting corruption may yield a “double dividend”, as reduced corruption is likely to have both direct and indirect effects on growth....

  20. An Empirical Study on Exploring Relationship among Information Quality, E-satisfaction, E-trust and Young Generation’s Commitment to Chinese Online Retailing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziaullah Muhammad

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship among online retailing information quality, e-satisfaction, e-trust and young generation customer’s commitment in mainland China. The study variables have considerable importance in e-tailers performance. The data were collected based on a sample of 383 students from Chinese universities during the first quarter of 2014. We used confirmatory factor analysis (CFA and structural equation modeling (SEM to evaluate the hypotheses about the relationship among model constructs. Thus, all the hypotheses developed in the study were positively confirmed except one. Therefore, the investigated variables are reinforcing the theory and previous research in this field. This study reveals interesting implications of information quality, e-satisfaction, e-trust and customers commitment that are useful to both academicians and practitioners.

  1. Trust, trustworthiness and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Angus

    2015-01-01

    Trust is an essential component of good healthcare. If patients trust their physicians, then the relationship between them can be a richer and more meaningful one. The patient is more likely to feel confident and able to disclose symptoms, helping diagnosis and future care. If public health and community workers are trusted, not only is it likely that their work will be easier, in that their actions will be respected and accepted, but their advice will also be sought spontaneously. Trust, can, therefore, be thought of as something that is of benefit to all: healthcare workers, individuals and communities. Trust is, generally, something to be prized and we need to do anything we can to strengthen it.

  2. Abusive Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Abusive Relationships KidsHealth / For Teens / Abusive Relationships Print en español Relaciones de maltrato Healthy Relationships = Respect & Trust Healthy relationships involve respect, trust, and ...

  3. THE MEDIATION EFFECTS OF GREEN PERCEIVED CONSUMER SKEPTICISM AND GREEN PERCEIVED RISK IN THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN GREENWASHING AND GREEN TRUST

    OpenAIRE

    LEBLEBİCİ KOÇER, Leyla; DELİCE, Tuğba

    2017-01-01

    This study was carried out on the consumers in Kayseri and explores the influenceof greenwashing on green trust and discusses the mediation roles of green perceivedskepticism and green perceived risk. 430 consumers were participate in the research.Structural equation modelling was applied to test the research hypothesis. Thisstudy found that greenwashing has a negative association with green trust. In addition,it found that greenwashing is positively associated with green perceived consumersk...

  4. Trust, Behavior, and High School Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Lisa S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the literature on student trust and to examine the relationship between student trust, behavior, and academic outcomes in high school. It asks, first, does trust have a positive effect on high school outcomes? Second, does trust influence student behavior, exerting an indirect effect on…

  5. The Influence of Trust on Project Management Practice within the Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Strahorn

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Given that any construction project is inherently a human endeavour, it follows that issues of trust are significant in terms of the stakeholder interactions that deliver eventual project outcomes.  Previous research indicates that the relational basis upon which projects are undertaken are intended to influence the likelihood of trusting relationships between stakeholders.  Thus, experiences of trust in a construction project environment are likely to be influenced by the contextual specifics of respective transactional and relational contracting (RC procurement mechanisms, given the divergent theoretical principles upon which they are founded.  The influence of trust has therefore been examined through the lived experiences of construction practitioners.  A phenomenological interview study consisting of thirty-five (35 participants was conducted with sensitivity to the procurement of experiences being recounted. Issues of trust were shown to be integral to stakeholder experiences in both procurement environments, with the benefits of trust acknowledged in many instances.  However, little understanding was evident regarding methods for building and maintaining trust, nor for repairing trust when problems arose. Importantly, despite the differing principles that underpin transactional and relational procurement, and particularly the contention that relational procurement would increase trust between trading partners, this was not evident; with individual personalities and appropriate risk apportionment shown to be greater influences upon the likelihood of trusting relationships.  It is reasonable to conjecture that relational contracts actually diminish the need for trust, given that the objective is to reduce uncertainty through formulaic approaches to risk distribution and reward; the absence of risk negates the need for trust.  Ultimately, the potential to deliver improved project outcomes as a result of proactive approaches to

  6. Evidence summary: The relationship between oral diseases and diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    D Aiuto, F.; Gable, D.; Syed, Z.; Allen, Y.; Wanyonyi, K. L.; White, S.; Gallagher, J. E.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction This paper is the third of four rapid reviews undertaken to explore the relationships between oral health and general medical conditions in order to support teams within Public Health England, health practitioners and policymakers.Aims This review aimed to explore the nature of the association between poor oral health and diabetes when found in the same individuals or populations, having reviewed the most contemporary evidence in the field.Methods The reviews were undertaken by f...

  7. Trust vs. Crisis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    The three social phenomena -- norms, trust, and crisis -- are in this paper combined into one model that illustrates their function and relationship. Crisis is seen as a reaction to serious violations of expectations that leave people disoriented, insecure about situational norms, and unable...... to judge whom to trust. One logical solution to a crisis is to rebuild a shared understanding of the norms involved in any given context. Banking is used as a case. Central concepts are borrowed from Niklas Luhmann Trust (1968), Alf Ross Directives and Norms (1967), and Arthur G. Neal National Trauma...

  8. Trust vs. Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Mogensen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The three social phenomena -- norms, trust, and crisis -- are in this paper combined into one model that illustrates their function and relationship. Crisis is seen as a reaction to serious violations of expectations that leave people disoriented, insecure about situational norms, and unable to judge whom to trust. One logical solution to a crisis is to rebuild a shared understanding of the norms involved in any given context. Banking is used as a case. Central concepts are borrowed from Niklas Luhmann Trust (1968, Alf Ross Directives and Norms (1967, and Arthur G. Neal National Trauma & Collective Memory (1998.

  9. Building Trust, Forging Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principal Leadership, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Scott Andrews was a former guidance counselor with no experience in school administration when he became Amityville Memorial High School's principal in 2004, but he brought a wealth of knowledge and experience in psychology--including a doctorate--to the position. He also quickly recruited Peter Hutchison, a special education teacher, to be an…

  10. The Impact of Trust on the Mode of Transaction Governance between Manufacturer and Distributor: Evidence from Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George BERULAVA

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the paper is to explore main determinants of the mode of transaction governance between manufacturers and distributors. We examine a number of types of transaction governance, viz., markets, relational transacting, and hierarchies. The model proposed in the paper integrates the concept of trust with key dimensions of transaction cost economics, being estimated with data from a sample of Georgian manufacturing industries. The main finding of the study is that trust along with traditional dimensions of transaction cost economics has a significant impact on the choice of exchange governance mode

  11. Women Favour Dyadic Relationships, but Men Prefer Clubs: Cross-Cultural Evidence from Social Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    David-Barrett, Tamas; Rotkirch, Anna; Carney, James; Behncke Izquierdo, Isabel; Krems, Jaimie A.; Townley, Dylan; McDaniell, Elinor; Byrne-Smith, Anna; Dunbar, Robin I. M.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to create lasting, trust-based friendships makes it possible for humans to form large and coherent groups. The recent literature on the evolution of sociality and on the network dynamics of human societies suggests that large human groups have a layered structure generated by emotionally supported social relationships. There are also gender differences in adult social style which may involve different trade-offs between the quantity and quality of friendships. Although many have suggested that females tend to focus on intimate relations with a few other females, while males build larger, more hierarchical coalitions, the existence of such gender differences is disputed and data from adults is scarce. Here, we present cross-cultural evidence for gender differences in the preference for close friendships. We use a sample of ∼112,000 profile pictures from nine world regions posted on a popular social networking site to show that, in self-selected displays of social relationships, women favour dyadic relations, whereas men favour larger, all-male cliques. These apparently different solutions to quality-quantity trade-offs suggest a universal and fundamental difference in the function of close friendships for the two sexes. PMID:25775258

  12. Women favour dyadic relationships, but men prefer clubs: cross-cultural evidence from social networking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamas David-Barrett

    Full Text Available The ability to create lasting, trust-based friendships makes it possible for humans to form large and coherent groups. The recent literature on the evolution of sociality and on the network dynamics of human societies suggests that large human groups have a layered structure generated by emotionally supported social relationships. There are also gender differences in adult social style which may involve different trade-offs between the quantity and quality of friendships. Although many have suggested that females tend to focus on intimate relations with a few other females, while males build larger, more hierarchical coalitions, the existence of such gender differences is disputed and data from adults is scarce. Here, we present cross-cultural evidence for gender differences in the preference for close friendships. We use a sample of ∼112,000 profile pictures from nine world regions posted on a popular social networking site to show that, in self-selected displays of social relationships, women favour dyadic relations, whereas men favour larger, all-male cliques. These apparently different solutions to quality-quantity trade-offs suggest a universal and fundamental difference in the function of close friendships for the two sexes.

  13. The Condition for Generous Trust.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obayashi Shinya

    Full Text Available Trust has been considered the "cement" of a society and is much studied in sociology and other social sciences. Most studies, however, have neglected one important aspect of trust: it involves an act of forgiving and showing tolerance toward another's failure. In this study, we refer to this concept as "generous trust" and examine the conditions under which generous trust becomes a more viable option when compared to other types of trust. We investigate two settings. First, we introduce two types of uncertainties: uncertainty as to whether trustees have the intention to cooperate, and uncertainty as to whether trustees have enough competence to accomplish the entrusted tasks. Second, we examine the manner in which trust functions in a broader social context, one that involves matching and commitment processes. Since we expect generosity or forgiveness to work differently in the matching and commitment processes, we must differentiate trust strategies into generous trust in the matching process and that in the commitment process. Our analytical strategy is two-fold. First, we analyze the "modified" trust game that incorporates the two types of uncertainties without the matching process. This simplified setting enables us to derive mathematical results using game theory, thereby giving basic insight into the trust mechanism. Second, we investigate socially embedded trust relationships in contexts involving the matching and commitment processes, using agent-based simulation. Results show that uncertainty about partner's intention and competence makes generous trust a viable option. In contrast, too much uncertainty undermines the possibility of generous trust. Furthermore, a strategy that is too generous cannot stand alone. Generosity should be accompanied with moderate punishment. As for socially embedded trust relationships, generosity functions differently in the matching process versus the commitment process. Indeed, these two types of generous

  14. Deception Detection: The Relationship of Levels of Trust and Perspective Taking in Real-Time Online and Offline Communication Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Catherine; Fox Hamilton, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    Where humans have been found to detect lies or deception only at the rate of chance in offline face-to-face communication (F2F), computer-mediated communication (CMC) online can elicit higher rates of trust and sharing of personal information than F2F. How do levels of trust and empathetic personality traits like perspective taking (PT) relate to deception detection in real-time CMC compared to F2F? A between groups correlational design (N = 40) demonstrated that, through a paired deceptive conversation task with confederates, levels of participant trust could predict accurate detection online but not offline. Second, participant PT abilities could not predict accurate detection in either conversation medium. Finally, this study found that conversation medium also had no effect on deception detection. This study finds support for the effects of the Truth Bias and online disinhibition in deception, and further implications in law enforcement are discussed.

  15. Trust matters: Patients' and providers' accounts of the role of trust in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kahabi Isangula

    Conclusion: The findings suggest that trust in patient-doctor relationship ... Improving trust in the patient - doctor relationship may be one of the important lenses ...... World Bank. (2015) Country and Lending Groups. (Internet). Available at.

  16. THE INTERVENING EFFECTS OF PROCEDURAL FAIRNESS AND INTERPERSONAL TRUST ON THE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN MULTIPLE MEASURES-BASED PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AND MANAGERS' JOB SATISFACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahfud Sholihin

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Criticisms directed at the use of financial measures alone for performance evaluation have led to much interest in the use of nonfinancial performance measures to balance the financial measures. Hence, much recent research has been directed to investigate the effectiveness sand behavioral consequences of a mix of financial and nonfinancial measures (e.g. the Balanced Scorecard approach in contemporary settings. However, there is evidence from prior studies to suggest that the manner or how performance measures are used may affect the subordinates' behavior and work-related attitudes indirectly through the subordinates' perception of the justness of these measures and the interpersonal trust these measures promote. There is also evidence to indicate that it is the extent of the subordinates' agreement with the performance measures used in the evaluation, rather than the measures per se, which affects their behavior and work-related attitudes. Subordinates are more likely to agree with performance measures which they regard as fair and which enhance their trust in their superiors. This study therefore investigates if the effects of a mix of financial and nonfinancial measures (such as those used in the Balanced Scorecard approach on subordinates' job satisfaction are indirect through the subordinates' perception of the greater extent of fairness (justness in the evaluation process and the greater extent of trust such a mix of measures promotes. The results, based on a sample of 70 managers, support the expectation that a mix of financial and nonfinancial has no direct effect on subordinates’ job satisfaction. Instead, the effects of such a mix of performance measures on subordinates’ job satisfaction are indirect through the enhancement of the subordinates’ favorable perceptions of procedural fairness and interpersonal trust.

  17. Evidence-based health care: development and audit of a clinical standard for research and its impact on an NHS trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkin, Claire; Bullock, Ian

    2005-04-01

    Working within a modern National Health Service in the United Kingdom, the place for research and its dissemination is increasingly important. The organization of this within each National Health Service (NHS) Trust is challenging but nevertheless essential. If health care professionals are to be empowered to adopt an evidence-based approach in both the planning and delivery of care, research aware employees are crucial. This paper highlights the importance of NHS hospital trusts implementing initiatives that will facilitate this process. One such initiative has been the development and survey of a clinical standard for research. The primary development aim was to provide a benchmark standard for all nursing research. The standard was developed to fit within the current dynamic quality improvement (DQI) programme and has directly contributed to an evolving culture of research by shaping nurses' awareness, and offering a support and consultancy network within the Trust. The standard is one aspect of a research awareness programme, with the primary objective of providing guidance and education whilst developing nurses throughout the research process. The planned strategic outcome is to see a positive outcome on the quality of research in the Trust. A baseline survey was conducted to provide a definitive snap shot of research understanding and practice within the Trust following the introduction of the research standard. The standard was developed by a team of clinicians led by a member of the quality team, to ensure that it fitted the DQI structure, and a member of the Nursing Research Unit (NRU). The standard was distributed to every clinical area and 192 nurses were surveyed to evaluate its impact on their awareness of educational opportunities, their use of the consultancy and support service, their use of other support services, their research utilization and research quality. The survey demonstrated that the implementation of the standard had increased awareness

  18. Towards Trust-based Cognitive Networks: A Survey of Trust Management for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    of trust. First, social trust refers to properties derived from social relationships . Examples of social networks are strong social ... relationships such as colleagues or relatives or loose social relationships such as school alumni or friends with common interests [44]. Social trust may...also use social relationships in evaluating the trust metric among group members by employing the concept of social networks. Yu et al. [44] define

  19. Autonomy, Trust, and Respect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nys, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    This article seeks to explore and analyze the relationship between autonomy and trust, and to show how these findings could be relevant to medical ethics. First, I will argue that the way in which so-called "relational autonomy theories" tie the notions of autonomy and trust together is not entirely satisfying Then, I will introduce the so-called Encapsulated Interest Account as developed by Russell Hardin. This will bring out the importance of the reasons for trust. What good reasons do we have for trusting someone? I will criticize Hardin's business model as insufficiently robust, especially in the context of health care, and then turn to another source of trust, namely, love. It may seem that trust-through-love is much better suited for the vulnerability that is often involved in health care, but I will also show that it has its own deficiencies. Good health care should therefore pay attention to both models of trust, and I will offer some tentative remarks on how to do this. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy Inc. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Relational Ruin or Social Glue? The Joint Effect of Relationship Type and Gossip Valence on Liking, Trust, and Expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Monique Mitchell; Mazur, Michelle A.; Wendel, Nicole; Winslow, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Explores gossip's function as a social influence tool. Considers if gossip is untrustworthy, leading to relational demise, or whether gossip can lead to perceived liking, trust, and expertise. Indicates that for the undergraduate student subjects, both positive and negative gossip are perceived negatively for both friends and strangers. (SG)

  1. The Relationship between Organizational Trust and Organizational Silence with Job Satisfaction and Organizational Commitment of the Employees of University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fard, Parastoo Gashtasebi; Karimi, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the structural model between organizational trust and organizational silence with job satisfaction and organizational commitment of the employees of Islamic Azad University of Isfahan, (Khorasgan) branch. The study method is descriptive-correlation. The study population is the employees of Islamic Azad University of…

  2. The role of trust in the transition from traditional to electronic B2B relationships in agri-food chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canavari, M.; Fritz, M.; Hofstede, G.J.; Matopoulos, A.; Vlachopoulou, M.

    2010-01-01

    E-business adoption rates in the agri-food sector are rather low, despite the fact that technical barriers have been mostly overcome during the last years and a large number of sophisticated offers are available. However, concerns about trust seem to impede the development of electronic

  3. The Effects of Trust Transference, Mobile Attributes and Enjoyment on Mobile Trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Junqueira Giovannini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Trust is essential in building relationships. In mobile commerce, as in electronic commerce, trust is even more valuable given the absence of human contact and direct observation of the service provider. Despite the importance of trust for mobile commerce, there has been little academic effort to study the relationships between mobile devices unique components of interactivity and customer trust, or the relationship between offline, online and mobile trust. This study proposes a trust-mediated model for customer attitude and transaction intentions in mobile commerce contexts that incorporates trust transference and unique factors present in mobile commerce. Data were collected in an online survey and analyzed via structural equations modeling. Results suggest that trust transferred from online contexts and ease of use have significant effects on mobile trust formation, while also indicating that mobile trust influences consumers’ attitudes and intentions to purchase using mobile devices.

  4. Trust and School Life: The Role of Trust for Learning, Teaching, Leading, and Bridging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Maele, Dimitri, Ed.; Forsyth, Patrick B., Ed.; Van Houtte, Miek, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    This book samples recent and emerging trust research in education including an array of conceptual approaches, measurement innovations, and explored determinants and outcomes of trust. The collection of pathways explores the phenomenon of trust and establishes the significance of trust relationships in school life. It emboldens the claim that…

  5. Balancing trust and power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm-Jørgensen, Marie; Guassora, Ann Dorrit; Reventlow, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about how strategies of retaining patients are acted out by general practitioners (GPs) in the clinical encounter. With this study, we apply Grimens’ (2009) analytical connection between trust and power to explore how trust and power appear in preventive health checks...... of clinical encounters. Results: From the empirical data, we identified three dimensions of respect: respect for the patient’s autonomy, respect for professional authority and respect as a mutual exchange. A balance of respect influenced trust in the relationship between GP and patients and the transfer...... of power in the encounter. The GPs articulated that a balance was needed in preventive health checks in order to establish trust and thus retain the patient in the clinic. One way this balance of respect was carried out was with the use of humour. Conclusions: To retain patients without formal education...

  6. The impact of the customer relationship management on organizational productivity, customer trust and satisfaction by using the structural equation model: A study in the Iranian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghoubi, Maryam; Asgari, Hamed; Javadi, Marzieh

    2017-01-01

    One of the challenges in the fiercely competitive space of health organizations is responding to customers and building trust and satisfaction in them in the shortest time, with best quality and highest productivity. Hence the aim of this study is to survey the impact of customer relationship management (CRM) on organizational productivity, customer loyalty, satisfaction and trust in selected hospitals of Isfahan (in Iran). This study is a correlation descriptive research. Study population was the nurses in selected hospitals of Isfahan and the sampling has been conducted using stratified random method. Data collection tool is a researcher-made questionnaire of CRM and its effects (organizational productivity, customer loyalty, satisfaction and trust) which its validity and reliability has been confirmed by researchers. Structural equation method was used to determine the impact of variables. Data analysis method was structural equation modeling and the software used was SPSS version 16 (IBM, SPSS, 2007 Microsoft Corp., Bristol, UK) and AMOS version 18 (IBM, SPSS, 2010 Microsoft Corp, Bristol, UK). Among the dimensions of CRM, diversification had the highest impact (0.83) and customer acquisition had the lowest (0.57) CRM, had the lowest impact on productivity (0.59) and the highest effect on customer satisfaction (0.83). For the implementation of CRM, it is necessary that the studied hospitals improve strategies of acquiring information about new customers, attracting new customers and keeping them and communication with patients outside the hospital and improve the system of measuring patient satisfaction and loyalty.

  7. An Operational Semantics for Trust Policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krukow, Karl Kristian

    2005-01-01

    In the trust-structure model of trust management, principals specify their trusting relationships with other principals in terms of trust policies. In their paper on trust structures, Carbone et al. present a language for trust policies, and provide a suitable denotational semantics. The semantics...... ensures that for any collection of trust policies, there is always a unique global trust-state, compatible with all the policies, specifying everyone's degree of trust in everyone else. However, as the authors themselves point out, the language lacks an operational model: the global trust-state is a well......-defined mathematical object, but it is not clear how principals can actually compute it. This becomes even more apparent when one considers the intended application environment: vast numbers of autonomous principals, distributed and possibly mobile. We provide a compositional operational semantics for a language...

  8. Sailing across the North Sea: the development of trust in a short-term high intensity environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotryna K. Fraser

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal trust among team members is an important phenomenon influencing working relationships and performance outcomes. However, there is a lack of empirical studies investigating the development of trust with respect to behavioural and environmental factors in a group of strangers. This exploratory, mixed method study investigated the development of two-dimensional interpersonal trust (affective and cognitive and team cohesion in a newly formed temporary team of novice adults during a seven-day sail training programme. A descriptive longitudinal case study approach was adopted in the current study. Seven crew members completed the standardised psychometric questionnaires and were interviewed during the voyage. Results suggested that the development of trust occurs over three phases; 1 initial perception of shared identity, 2 early trust and 3 two dimensional trust comprising cognitive and affective dimensions. Distinct antecedents for the development of trust at each stage were identified and the importance of the competence-oriented subcomponent of cognitive trust within this challenging environmental context was highlighted. Exploratory interpretation suggests some overlap in the antecedents of interpersonal trust and team cohesion. However, further longitudinal research must examine this relationship and establish corroborative evidence for the model of trust. This research can impact on practitioners leading programmes to better understand how trust can develop over time, and offers a pragmatic approach to investigations in real world contexts.

  9. Computationally Modeling Interpersonal Trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Joo eLee

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a computational model capable of predicting—above human accuracy—the degree of trust a person has toward their novel partner by observing the trust-related nonverbal cues expressed in their social interaction. We summarize our prior work, in which we identify nonverbal cues that signal untrustworthy behavior and also demonstrate the human mind’s readiness to interpret those cues to assess the trustworthiness of a social robot. We demonstrate that domain knowledge gained from our prior work using human-subjects experiments, when incorporated into the feature engineering process, permits a computational model to outperform both human predictions and a baseline model built in naivete' of this domain knowledge. We then present the construction of hidden Markov models to incorporate temporal relationships among the trust-related nonverbal cues. By interpreting the resulting learned structure, we observe that models built to emulate different levels of trust exhibit different sequences of nonverbal cues. From this observation, we derived sequence-based temporal features that further improve the accuracy of our computational model. Our multi-step research process presented in this paper combines the strength of experimental manipulation and machine learning to not only design a computational trust model but also to further our understanding of the dynamics of interpersonal trust.

  10. Consumer Trust in Information Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad Love

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Trust is essential to understanding public reaction to innovative issues. This research focuses on trust in information sources by explicating the construct of trust and testing a comprehensive model on several information sources about genetically modified foods. Results from a survey of 369 participants reveal the significance of projecting competence and the role of the environment in which a target public receives information. Perceptions of regulatory, social, business, and technical environments affect how likely individuals are to follow advice from institutions like the Food and Drug Administration and the news media. Future research should incorporate knowledge levels and personal relevance as variables likely to influence trusting relationships.

  11. Trust and communication as predictors of customer satisfaction in business-to-business relationship marketing in the South African cement manufacturing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phineas Mbango

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Customer satisfaction has become relevant in the South African cement industry as it leads to customer loyalty and cooperation. In the current climate, to ensure long-term profitability, cement suppliers need to adopt strategies to ensure customer satisfaction. This study’s literature search has revealed that there is limited published research, particularly in South Africa, which deals with customer satisfaction determinants in the cement industry. The major objective of the study was to test if trust and communication influence customer satisfaction in the context of business-to-business relationship marketing in the South African cement manufacturing industry. The methodology involved a survey and was quantitative in nature. Data were collected from 362 major business-to-business cement customers throughout South Africa’s nine provinces using the face-to-face interview technique using a seven-point Likert scale structured self-administered questionnaires. The data collected in the empirical study were analysed using descriptive, correlation and regression analysis. The empirical results of this study suggest that, in order to maintain customer satisfaction, a cement supplier has to invest in ways of enhancing customer trust and communication. As a result this study makes both theoretical and practical contribution in the field of relationship marketing

  12. Decision-making of older patients in context of the doctor-patient relationship: a typology ranging from "self-determined" to "doctor-trusting" patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrede-Sach, Jennifer; Voigt, Isabel; Diederichs-Egidi, Heike; Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Dierks, Marie-Luise; Junius-Walker, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Background. This qualitative study aims to gain insight into the perceptions and experiences of older patients with regard to sharing health care decisions with their general practitioners. Patients and Methods. Thirty-four general practice patients (≥70 years) were asked about their preferences and experiences concerning shared decision making with their doctors using qualitative semistructured interviews. All interviews were analysed according to principles of content analysis. The resulting categories were then arranged into a classification grid to develop a typology of preferences for participating in decision-making processes. Results. Older patients generally preferred to make decisions concerning everyday life rather than medical decisions, which they preferred to leave to their doctors. We characterised eight different patient types based on four interdependent positions (self-determination, adherence, information seeking, and trust). Experiences of a good doctor-patient relationship were associated with trust, reliance on the doctor for information and decision making, and adherence. Conclusion. Owing to the varied patient decision-making types, it is not easy for doctors to anticipate the desired level of patient involvement. However, the decision matter and the self-determination of patients provide good starting points in preparing the ground for shared decision making. A good relationship with the doctor facilitates satisfying decision-making experiences.

  13. 'Trust my doctor, trust my pancreas': trust as an emergent quality of social practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Simon

    2015-06-11

    Growing attention is being paid to the importance of trust, and its corollaries such as mistrust and distrust, in health service and the central place they have in assessments of quality of care. Although initially focussing on doctor-patient relationships, more recent literature has broadened its remit to include trust held in more abstract entities, such as organisations and institutions. There has consequently been growing interest to develop rigorous and universal measures of trust. Drawing on illustrative ethnographic material from observational research in a UK diabetes clinic, this paper supports an approach that foregrounds social practice and resists conceiving trust as solely a psychological state that can be divorced from its context. Beyond exploring the less-than-conscious nature of trust, the interpretations attend to the extent to which trust practices are distributed across a range of actors. Data from clinical encounters reveal the extent to which matters of trust can emerge from the relationships between people, and sometimes people and things, as a result of a wide range of pragmatic concerns, and hence can usefully be conceived of as an extended property of a situation rather than a person. Trust is rarely explicitly articulated, but remains a subtle feature of experience that is frequently ineffable. A practice approach highlights some of the problems with adopting a general psychological or intellectualist conception of trust. In particular, assuming it is a sufficiently stable internal state that can be stored or measured not only transforms a diffuse and often ephemeral quality into a durable thing, but ultimately presents it as a generic state that has meaning independent of the specific relationships and context that achieve it. Emphasising the context-specific nature of trust practices does not dismiss the potential of matters of trust, when they emerge, to be transposed to other contexts. But it does highlight how, on each occasion

  14. Trust Matters: Leadership for Successful Schools, 2nd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschannen-Moran, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Make your school soar by escalating trust between teachers, students, and families. Trust is an essential element in all healthy relationships, and the relationships that exist in your school are no different. How can your school leaders or teachers cultivate trust? How can your institution maintain trust once it is established? These are the…

  15. Low-Level Evidence Suggests that Perceived Ability to Evaluate and Trust Online Health Information is Associated with Low Health Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Alcock

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To review, based on research evidence, the correlation between low health literacy and four outcomes of interest: (1 the ability to evaluate online health information based on (2 perceived reliability and accuracy, (3 trust in the Internet as an information source, and (4 the application of established evaluation criteria. Design – Systematic review and narrative synthesis. Setting –MEDLINE, PsycInfo, Web of Science, CINAHL, and Communication and Mass-media Complete as well as articles discovered through the snowball method. Subjects – 38 studies identified through a systematic literature search. Methods – An exhaustive list of potential articles was gathered through searching five online databases and Google Scholar, and hand searching of references. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied in a two-phase screening process in which two researchers participated to address reliability. Data, including study characteristics and metadata, predictors, assessment methods, and outcomes, were extracted from relevant studies, and then synthesized narratively. Main Results – Following duplication removal 13,632 records were retrieved, 254 of which were identified for full-text assessment. Thirty-eight studies met the eligibility criteria. All studies were non-experimental and therefore graded as a low level of evidence; 35 were cross-sectional designs, 1 a focus group, and 2 were observational studies. Studies varied widely in population definition and sample size and were published between 2001 and 2013, primarily in North America. Overall, a positive association was identified between health literacy and outcomes related to the ability to evaluate or trust Internet health information, while findings were inconsistent related to perceived quality of information and the application of evaluative criteria. Four studies examined the impact of health literacy levels on one or more of the outcomes of interest. The most prevalent

  16. Trust: the sublime duty in health care leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Llewellyn E

    2010-01-01

    Trust is the essence of human social existence. From the moment of birth, trust is the basic component in any human relationship and interaction. Trust is the Holy Grail for human confidence in others. From human survival to organizational survival, trust is the primordial bond. No organization is more dependent on trust than health care. This article views trust as the most basic fundamental quality for leadership. Trust is a sublime duty of a leader and the leadership of an organization. Leadership sets the culture of trust. Trust is the one quality that is essential for guiding an organization toward serving others. This article addresses trust from many perspectives. Trust is viewed from our subordinates, our peers, our superiors, and the public we serve. This article postulates how trust in an organization is the sublime duty of leadership that unites all human understanding and without it destroys all human relationships.

  17. The fair factor in matters of trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lauren L

    2006-01-01

    Communities are bound together by trust among their members. Trust thrives when a pervasive sense of fairness exists. Evidence suggests that trust has social, professional, and economic value for today's organizations, making it worthy of attention. Matters of trust and justice are important and timely for nurse leaders to consider given the challenge to improve practice settings in a manner that enhances nurse satisfaction. The aim of this article is to make explicit the value in building organizational justice and trust within an organization's nursing community. Nursing leadership strategies are integrated, thus offering practical guidance in creating a culture of justice, making trust explicit, and establishing trustworthiness.

  18. Trust, accreditation and Philanthropy in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, R.H.F.P.

    2003-01-01

    Given the increasing numbers of scandals, the awareness among fund-raisers that the public's trust is crucial for the nonprofit sector is growing. This study investigates the relationship between trust and charitable giving. Charitable organizations can increase the public's trust by signaling their

  19. Trust, accreditation, and philanthropy in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, Rene H.F.P.

    2003-01-01

    Given the increasing numbers of scandals, the awareness among fund-raisers that the public’s trust is crucial for the nonprofit sector is growing. This study investigates the relationship between trust and charitable giving. Charitable organizations can increase the public’s trust by signaling their

  20. Public trust: expectancies, beliefs, and behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alink, D.

    2014-01-01

    Most people think of trust as the bonding force between people in romantic, professional, and family relationships. Of growing importance however is public trust: trust in organizations that are not represented by a single person, such as companies, non-profit organizations and governmental

  1. The edge of trust : An introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, A.M.; Krueger, J.I.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of interpersonal trust are an essential part of understanding how people think and act in social interactions. Trust enables human beings to form meaningful personal relationships (Simpson, 2007) and engage in mutually profitable social and economic exchanges (Kohn, 2008). Yet, trust is

  2. The impact of the customer relationship management on organizational productivity, customer trust and satisfaction by using the structural equation model: A study in the Iranian hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghoubi, Maryam; Asgari, Hamed; Javadi, Marzieh

    2017-01-01

    Context: One of the challenges in the fiercely competitive space of health organizations is responding to customers and building trust and satisfaction in them in the shortest time, with best quality and highest productivity. Hence the aim of this study is to survey the impact of customer relationship management (CRM) on organizational productivity, customer loyalty, satisfaction and trust in selected hospitals of Isfahan (in Iran). Materials and Methods: This study is a correlation descriptive research. Study population was the nurses in selected hospitals of Isfahan and the sampling has been conducted using stratified random method. Data collection tool is a researcher-made questionnaire of CRM and its effects (organizational productivity, customer loyalty, satisfaction and trust) which its validity and reliability has been confirmed by researchers. Structural equation method was used to determine the impact of variables. Data analysis method was structural equation modeling and the software used was SPSS version 16 (IBM, SPSS, 2007 Microsoft Corp., Bristol, UK) and AMOS version 18 (IBM, SPSS, 2010 Microsoft Corp, Bristol, UK). Results: Among the dimensions of CRM, diversification had the highest impact (0.83) and customer acquisition had the lowest (0.57) CRM, had the lowest impact on productivity (0.59) and the highest effect on customer satisfaction (0.83). Conclusions: For the implementation of CRM, it is necessary that the studied hospitals improve strategies of acquiring information about new customers, attracting new customers and keeping them and communication with patients outside the hospital and improve the system of measuring patient satisfaction and loyalty. PMID:28546971

  3. Can we trust robots?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coeckelbergh, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Can we trust robots? Responding to the literature on trust and e-trust, this paper asks if the question of trust is applicable to robots, discusses different approaches to trust, and analyses some preconditions for trust. In the course of the paper a phenomenological-social approach to trust is

  4. Customer satisfaction as a mediator between causes (trust and communication and the outcome (customer loyalty in business-to-business relationship marketing in the South African cement manufacturing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phineas Mbango

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Customer loyalty has become more relevant in the cement industry since the unbundling of the cartel system in 1994, the entrance of new competitors into the market and the effect of globalization. This study’s literature review reveals that there is limited published research in the Cement Industry, particularly in South Africa, which deals with customer loyalty management. The major objective of the study was to test satisfaction as a mediator between causes and outcome, the causes being trust and communication and the outcome being customer loyalty. The methodological approach followed was a survey and quantitative in nature. Data were collected from 362 major business-to-business cement customers throughout South Africa’s nine provinces using the face-to-face interview technique with self-administered questionnaires. The data collected in the empirical study were analysed using the structural equations modelling (SEM. The results show that in order to maintain customer loyalty, a cement supplier has to focus on strategies to build relationships on the basis of creating customer satisfaction and/or exceeding customer needs and wants. They also need to invest in enhancing customer trust and communication. Another important finding is that trust and communication have no direct effect on loyalty. Customer satisfaction is therefore the most important mediator as it leads to customer loyalty. Customer loyalty is crucial for business success in terms of repeat purchase, referrals (word-of-mouth marketing, retention and long-term profitability. There exists evidence from literature of an outcry for a need for future studies to examine causes and outcomes of satisfaction to specific industries. This study contributes to theory and practice by closing that gap, by providing a framework of causes and outcomes of satisfaction specifically aimed at the cement industry. Another contribution of this study is its examination of the sequential logic of

  5. An Operational Semantics for Trust Policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krukow, Karl

    2006-01-01

    In the trust-structure framework for trust management, principals specify their trusting relationships in terms of trust policies. In their paper on trust structures, Carbone et al. present a language for such policies, and provide a suitable denotational semantics. The semantics ensures that for......In the trust-structure framework for trust management, principals specify their trusting relationships in terms of trust policies. In their paper on trust structures, Carbone et al. present a language for such policies, and provide a suitable denotational semantics. The semantics ensures...... that for any collection of policies, there is always a unique global trust-state, compatible with all the policies, specifying everyone's degree of trust in everyone else. However, as the authors themselves point out, the language lacks an operational model: the global trust-state is a well......-defined mathematical object, but it is not clear how principals can actually compute it. This becomes even more apparent when one considers the intended application environment: vast numbers of autonomous principals, distributed and possibly mobile. We provide a compositional operational semantics for a language...

  6. Trust dynamics in a large system implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlichter, Bjarne Rerup; Rose, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    outcomes, but largely ignored the dynamics of trust relations. Giddens, as part of his study of modernity, theorises trust dynamics in relation to abstract social systems, though without focusing on information systems. We use Giddens’ concepts to investigate evolving trust relationships in a longitudinal......A large information systems implementation (such as Enterprise Resource Planning systems) relies on the trust of its stakeholders to succeed. Such projects impact diverse groups of stakeholders, each with their legitimate interests and expectations. Levels of stakeholder trust can be expected...... case analysis of a large Integrated Hospital System implementation for the Faroe Islands. Trust relationships suffered a serious breakdown, but the project was able to recover and meet its goals. We develop six theoretical propositions theorising the relationship between trust and project outcomes...

  7. SERVANT LEADERSHIP AND ORGANIZATIONAL TRUST: THE MEDIATING EFFECT OF THE LEADER TRUST AND ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morad Rezaei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper aims to clarify the relationship between servant leadership and organizational trust, and tries to demonstrate the mediator role of leader trust and organizational communication in this relationship. The study sample included 258 employees of Guilan province Tax Administration and for sampling we used cluster method. Previous studies have also focused on the positive impact of servant leadership in organizational trust and in this article the results show that there is a significant relationship between servant leadership, organizational trust, leader trust and organizational communication.

  8. Ethnic divisions, trust, and the size of the informal sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, David Dreyer

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between ethnic fractionalization and the size of the informal, or hidden, economy. Recent experimental and empirical research links, in turn, ethnicity and trust, and trust and tax compliance. In addition, recent empirical studies have identified...... an unwillingness to contribute to public goods benefiting other ethnic groups. Combining these insights, we argue that increasing ethnic fractionalization decreases voluntary tax compliance, and we present empirical evidence at the macro level in a cross-section of more than 50 countries that more ethnically...

  9. Experimental Evidence that Social Relationships Determine Individual Foraging Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth, Josh A; Voelkl, Bernhard; Farine, Damien R; Sheldon, Ben C

    2015-12-07

    Social relationships are fundamental to animals living in complex societies. The extent to which individuals base their decisions around their key social relationships, and the consequences this has on their behavior and broader population level processes, remains unknown. Using a novel experiment that controlled where individual wild birds (great tits, Parus major) could access food, we restricted mated pairs from being allowed to forage at the same locations. This introduced a conflict for pair members between maintaining social relationships and accessing resources. We show that individuals reduce their own access to food in order to sustain their relationships and that individual foraging activity was strongly influenced by their key social counterparts. By affecting where individuals go, social relationships determined which conspecifics they encountered and consequently shaped their other social associations. Hence, while resource distribution can determine individuals' spatial and social environment, we illustrate how key social relationships themselves can govern broader social structure. Finally, social relationships also influenced the development of social foraging strategies. In response to forgoing access to resources, maintaining pair bonds led individuals to develop a flexible "scrounging" strategy, particularly by scrounging from their pair mate. This suggests that behavioral plasticity can develop to ameliorate conflicts between social relationships and other demands. Together, these results illustrate the importance of considering social relationships for explaining behavioral variation due to their significant impact on individual behavior and demonstrate the consequences of key relationships for wider processes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. NOAA's Regional Climate Services Program: Building Relationships with Partners and Customers to Deliver Trusted Climate Information at Usable Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecray, E. L.; Dissen, J.

    2016-12-01

    Federal agencies across multiple sectors from transportation to health, emergency management and agriculture, are now requiring their key stakeholders to identify and plan for climate-related impacts. Responding to the drumbeat for climate services at the regional and local scale, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) formed its Regional Climate Services (RCS) program to include Regional Climate Services Directors (RCSD), Regional Climate Centers, and state climatologists in a partnership. Since 2010, the RCS program has engaged customers across the country and amongst many of the nation's key economic sectors to compile information requirements, deliver climate-related products and services, and build partnerships among federal agencies and their regional climate entities. The talk will include a sketch from the Eastern Region that may shed light on the interaction of the multiple entities working at the regional scale. Additionally, we will show examples of our interagency work with the Department of Interior, the Department of Agriculture, and others in NOAA to deliver usable and trusted climate information and resources. These include webinars, print material, and face-to-face customer engagements to gather and respond to information requirements. NOAA/National Centers for Environmental Information's RCSDs work on-the-ground to learn from customers about their information needs and their use of existing tools and resources. As regional leads, the RCSDs work within NOAA and with our regional partners to ensure the customer receives a broad picture of the tools and information from across the nation.

  11. Outcomes From the First Helene Fuld Health Trust National Institute for Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing and Healthcare Invitational Expert Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek; Gallagher-Ford, Lynn; Zellefrow, Cindy; Tucker, Sharon; Van Dromme, Laurel; Thomas, Bindu Koshy

    2018-02-01

    Even though multiple positive outcomes are the result of evidence-based care, including improvements in healthcare quality, safety, and costs, it is not consistently delivered by clinicians in healthcare systems throughout the world. In an attempt to accelerate the implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) across the United States, an invitational Interprofessional National EBP Forum to determine major priorities for the advancement of EBP was held during the launch of the newly established Helene Fuld Health Trust National Institute for Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing and Healthcare at The Ohio State University College of Nursing. Interprofessional leaders from national organizations and federal agencies across the United States were invited to participate in the Forum. A pre-Forum survey was disseminated to participants to assess their perceptions of the state of EBP and actions necessary to speed the translation of research into real-world clinical settings. Findings from a pre-Forum survey (n = 47) indicated ongoing low implementation of EBP in U.S. healthcare settings. These findings were shared with leaders from 45 organizations and agencies who attended the Forum. Breakout groups on practice, education, implementation science, and policy discussed the findings and responded to a set of standardized questions. High-priority action tactics were identified, including the need for: (a) enhanced reimbursement for EBP, (b) more interprofessional education and skills building in EBP, and (c) leaders to prioritize EBP and fuel it with resources. The delivery of and reimbursement for evidence-based care must become a high national priority. Academic faculty across all healthcare disciplines need to teach EBP, healthcare systems must invest in EBP resources, and payers must attach reimbursement to care that is evidence-based. An action collaborative of the participating organizations has been formed to accelerate EBP across the United States to achieve the

  12. Trust in food: a comparative and institutional analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kjærnes, Unni; Warde, Alan; Harvey, Mark

    2007-01-01

    ... and institutional performance 2.6 Institutionalized relationships of trust 2.7 Determinants of trust in institutionalized arrangements 2.8 Forms of institutionalization and forms of trust in contemporary food markets 18 19 21 23 25 27 29 34 37 3 Enquiring into Trust: Some Methodological Considerations 3.1 The project 3.2 The nature of the comparative inst...

  13. What information do people use, trust, and find useful during a disaster? Evidence from five large wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toddi A. Steelman; Sarah M. McCaffrey; Anne-Lise Knox Velez; Jason Alexander. Briefel

    2015-01-01

    The communication system through which information flows during a disaster can be conceived of as a set of relationships among sources and recipients who are concerned about key information characteristics. The recipient perspective is often neglected within this system. In this article, we explore recipient perspectives related to what information was used, useful,...

  14. Predictors and Extent of Institutional Trust in Government, Banks, the Media and Religious Organisations: Evidence from Cross-Sectional Surveys in Six Asia-Pacific Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Paul R.; Miller, Emma; Pearce, Alex R.; Meyer, Samantha B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Building or maintaining institutional trust is of central importance in democratic societies since negative experiences (potentially leading to mistrust) with government or other institutions may have a much more profound effect than positive experiences (potentially maintaining trust). Healthy democracy relies on more than simply trusting the national government of the time, and is mediated through other symbols of institutional power, such as the legal system, banks, the media an...

  15. Trust matters: Patients' and providers' accounts of the role of trust in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Also, trust was considered as potentially contributing to trusted doctors' behaviour changes such as excessive self-pride, faking being busy and sluggishness in care provision as well as increasing their work load. Conclusion: The findings suggest that trust in patient-doctor relationship matters for hypertension care in rural ...

  16. Models for governing relationships in healthcare organizations: Some empirical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romiti, Anna; Del Vecchio, Mario; Grazzini, Maddalena

    2018-01-01

    Recently, most European countries have undergone integration processes through mergers and strategic alliances between healthcare organizations. The present paper examined three cases within the Italian National Health Service in order to determine how different organizations, within differing institutional contexts, govern an healthcare integration process. Furthermore, we explored the possibility that the governance mode, usually seen as alternatives (i.e., merger or alliance), could be considered as a separate step in the development of a more suitable integration process. Multiple case studies were used to compare different integration approaches. Specifically, three cases were considered, of which two were characterized by collaborative processes and the other by a merger. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with managers involved in the processes. Each case presents different governing modes, structures, and mechanisms for achieving integration. The role played by the institutional context also led to different results with unique advantages and disadvantages. Three main conclusions are discussed: (a) Alliances and mergers can be interpreted as different steps in a path leading to a better integration; (b) The alignment between institutional/political time horizon and the time needed for the organizations to achieve an integration process lead to a better integration; (c) Trust plays an important role in integration process operating at different levels that of institutional and organizational level and that built between people.

  17. The Influence of Trust in Traditional Contracting: Investigating the "Lived Experience" of Stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Strahorn

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The traditional procurement approach is ever-present within the construction industry. With fundamental design principles founded on definitive risk allocation, this transactional based approach fails to acknowledge or foster the cooperative relationships considered to be vital to the success of any project. Contractual design encourages stakeholders to defend their own individual interest to the likely detriment of project objectives. These failings are not disputed, however, given that trust is a fundamental requirement for human interaction the influence of trust is potentially important in terms of stakeholder relationships and ultimate project success. Trust is therefore examined within this context. A conceptual framework of trust is presented and subsequently used to code and analyse detailed, semi-structured interviews with multiple stakeholders from different projects. Using a phenomenological investigation of trust via the lived experiences of multiple practitioners, issues pertaining to the formation and maintenance of trust within traditionally procured construction projects are examined. Trust was found to be integral to the lived experiences of practitioners, with both good and bad relationships evident within the constructs of traditional procurement mechanisms. In this regard, individual personalities were considered significant, along with appropriate risk identification and management. Communication, particularly of an informal nature, was also highlighted. A greater emphasis on project team selection during the initial stages of a project would therefore be beneficial, as would careful consideration of the allocation of risk. Contract design would also be enhanced through prescriptive protocols for developing and maintaining trust, along with mandated mechanisms for informal communication, particularly when responding to negative events. A greater understanding regarding the consequences of lost trust and the intricacies of

  18. Trust and Distrust in E-Commerce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk-Joo Lee

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Trust is the key ingredient for sustainable transactions. In the concept of trust, the trustor trusts the trustees. In e-commerce, the trustor is the buyer and the trustees are the intermediaries and the seller. Intermediaries provide the web-based infrastructure that enables buyers and sellers to make transactions. Trust is the buyer’s judgment and comprises two distinct concepts; both trust and distrust reside in the trustor. The purpose of this study was to examine the complicated effects of trust and distrust on a buyer’s purchase intentions. Previous studies have provided theoretical frameworks illustrating co-existent trust and distrust, trust transfers from one to another, and trust in buyer-intermediary-seller relationships. Based on these frameworks, this study (i presented a holistic model that contained the judgment of buyers resulting in trust or distrust in the intermediary and the seller; (ii investigated trust and distrust transfer from the intermediary to the seller, and (iii explored the effects of various antecedents that affect trust and distrust. To validate the proposed model, we employed Partial Least Squares (PLS. A summary of key findings are as follows. First, buyer’s trust in an intermediary positively affected his or her trust in the seller, positively influencing purchase intention. In other words, we found the trust transfer from an intermediary to its seller. Second, distrust in an intermediary directly impacted on the buyer’s perceived risk, negatively influencing his or her purchase intentions. Third, structural assurance and perceived website quality of an intermediary gave a positive impact on buyer’s trust in the intermediary. The results of this study shed light on the necessity of managing both trust and distrust to facilitate sales in e-commerce.

  19. Predictors and Extent of Institutional Trust in Government, Banks, the Media and Religious Organisations: Evidence from Cross-Sectional Surveys in Six Asia-Pacific Countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul R Ward

    Full Text Available Building or maintaining institutional trust is of central importance in democratic societies since negative experiences (potentially leading to mistrust with government or other institutions may have a much more profound effect than positive experiences (potentially maintaining trust. Healthy democracy relies on more than simply trusting the national government of the time, and is mediated through other symbols of institutional power, such as the legal system, banks, the media and religious organisations. This paper focuses on institutional trust-the level and predictors of trust in some of the major institutions in society, namely politics, the media, banks, the legal system and religious organisations. We present analyses from a consolidated dataset containing data from six countries in the Asia Pacific region-Australia, Hong Kong, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan and Thailand.Cross-sectional surveys were undertaken in each country in 2009-10, with an overall sample of 6331. Analyses of differences in overall levels of institutional trust between countries were undertaken using Chi square analyses. Multivariate binomial logistic regression analysis was undertaken to identify socio-demographic predictors of trust in each country.Religious institutions, banks and the judicial system had the highest overall trust across all countries (70%, 70% and 67% respectively, followed by newspapers and TV (59% and 58% and then political leaders (43%. The range of levels of higher trust between countries differed from 43% for banks (range 49% in Australia to 92% in Thailand to 59% for newspapers (28% in Australia to 87% in Japan. Across all countries, except for Australia, trust in political leaders had the lowest scores, particularly in Japan and South Korea (25% in both countries. In Thailand, people expressed the most trust in religious organisations (94%, banks (92% and in their judicial/legal system (89%. In Hong Kong, people expressed the highest level of

  20. Predictors and Extent of Institutional Trust in Government, Banks, the Media and Religious Organisations: Evidence from Cross-Sectional Surveys in Six Asia-Pacific Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Paul R; Miller, Emma; Pearce, Alex R; Meyer, Samantha B

    2016-01-01

    Building or maintaining institutional trust is of central importance in democratic societies since negative experiences (potentially leading to mistrust) with government or other institutions may have a much more profound effect than positive experiences (potentially maintaining trust). Healthy democracy relies on more than simply trusting the national government of the time, and is mediated through other symbols of institutional power, such as the legal system, banks, the media and religious organisations. This paper focuses on institutional trust-the level and predictors of trust in some of the major institutions in society, namely politics, the media, banks, the legal system and religious organisations. We present analyses from a consolidated dataset containing data from six countries in the Asia Pacific region-Australia, Hong Kong, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan and Thailand. Cross-sectional surveys were undertaken in each country in 2009-10, with an overall sample of 6331. Analyses of differences in overall levels of institutional trust between countries were undertaken using Chi square analyses. Multivariate binomial logistic regression analysis was undertaken to identify socio-demographic predictors of trust in each country. Religious institutions, banks and the judicial system had the highest overall trust across all countries (70%, 70% and 67% respectively), followed by newspapers and TV (59% and 58%) and then political leaders (43%). The range of levels of higher trust between countries differed from 43% for banks (range 49% in Australia to 92% in Thailand) to 59% for newspapers (28% in Australia to 87% in Japan). Across all countries, except for Australia, trust in political leaders had the lowest scores, particularly in Japan and South Korea (25% in both countries). In Thailand, people expressed the most trust in religious organisations (94%), banks (92%) and in their judicial/legal system (89%). In Hong Kong, people expressed the highest level of trust in

  1. Trusted Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Theis Solberg; Torbensen, Rune

    2012-01-01

    remote access via IP-based devices such as smartphones. The Trusted Domain platform fits existing legacy technologies by managing their interoperability and access controls, and it seeks to avoid the security issues of relying on third-party servers outside the home. It is a distributed system...... of wireless standards, limited resources of embedded systems, etc. Taking these challenges into account, we present a Trusted Domain home automation platform, which dynamically and securely connects heterogeneous networks of Short-Range Wireless devices via simple non-expert user. interactions, and allows......In the digital age of home automation and with the proliferation of mobile Internet access, the intelligent home and its devices should be accessible at any time from anywhere. There are many challenges such as security, privacy, ease of configuration, incompatible legacy devices, a wealth...

  2. Ethnic Diversity and Social Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, Peter Thisted; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    2015-01-01

    We argue that residential exposure to ethnic diversity reduces social trust. Previous within-country analyses of the relationship between contextual ethnic diversity and trust have been conducted at higher levels of aggregation, thus ignoring substantial variation in actual exposure to ethnic......, whereas the effect vanishes in larger contextual units. This supports the conjecture that interethnic exposure underlies the negative relationship between ethnic diversity in residential contexts and social trust....... diversity. In contrast, we analyze how ethnic diversity of the immediate micro-context—where interethnic exposure is inevitable—affects trust. We do this using Danish survey data linked with register-based data, which enables us to obtain precise measures of the ethnic diversity of each individual...

  3. Trusted Objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CAMPBELL, PHILIP L.; PIERSON, LYNDON G.; WITZKE, EDWARD L.

    1999-01-01

    In the world of computers a trusted object is a collection of possibly-sensitive data and programs that can be allowed to reside and execute on a computer, even on an adversary's machine. Beyond the scope of one computer we believe that network-based agents in high-consequence and highly reliable applications will depend on this approach, and that the basis for such objects is what we call ''faithful execution.''

  4. The life of relationship in globalized financial economic devices: Evidences from the experience of a group-analytic transcultural workshop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Lo Mauro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The present contribution - starting from the experience of the EATGA Workshop 2011 that took place in Palermo and that had as its theme “Intersubjective bonds in the globalized economy” - invites to reflect on the quality of the life of relationship and intersubjective connectedness in social contemporary world. One of the characterizing cultural phenomena influencing contemporary reality is made up by the dominant and pervasive presence of logic and language of financial markets in policies and activities that organize and articulate daily life. Theoretical hypothesis driving our research is that the structures of subjectivity, the meaning and the way of being in a relationship are characteristics (cultural themes that emerge within a defined cultural and historical system. In such a theoretical perspective, cultural themes are incorporated or interiorized by men belonging a shared cultural system and so became elements of the shared subjectivity and of the meanings given to intersubjective exchanges and bonds. From the workshop experience some meanings emerge concerning the role of economical-financial system in promoting codes and symbols that define the shape and the sense of relationship. The cultural codes of the market have gone out from the economic circle in which they were born and they are offered as organizers of affections and relationships. This is an evidence for the critical actual historical moment, in which the values and the cultural codes organized on the trust, on the reciprocity, on the common share and participation seems to be interdicted.Keywords: Transcultural Group-Analysis, Intersubjective Relationship, Cultural Models of the Exchange

  5. Experimental Evidence that Social Relationships Determine Individual Foraging Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Firth, Josh A.; Voelkl, Bernhard; Farine, Damien R.; Sheldon, Ben C.

    2015-01-01

    Social relationships are fundamental to animals living in complex societies [1-3]. The extent to which individuals base their decisions around their key social relationships, and the consequences this has on their behavior and broader population level processes, remains unknown. Using a novel experiment that controlled where individual wild birds (great tits, Parus major) could access food, we restricted mated pairs from being allowed to forage at the same locations. This introduced a conflic...

  6. Evolution of Evidence for Selected Nutrient and Disease Relationships

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    ...: Implications for Chronic Disease Risk (D&H) (NRC, 1989). It was then to determine the extent to which subsequent scientific evidence from the peerreviewed literature used in published reports from the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) series...

  7. Familiarity Vs Trust: A Comparative Study of Domain Scientists' Trust in Visual Analytics and Conventional Analysis Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Aritra; Lee, Joon-Yong; Wilson, Ryan; Lafrance, Robert A; Cramer, Nick; Cook, Kristin; Payne, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    Combining interactive visualization with automated analytical methods like statistics and data mining facilitates data-driven discovery. These visual analytic methods are beginning to be instantiated within mixed-initiative systems, where humans and machines collaboratively influence evidence-gathering and decision-making. But an open research question is that, when domain experts analyze their data, can they completely trust the outputs and operations on the machine-side? Visualization potentially leads to a transparent analysis process, but do domain experts always trust what they see? To address these questions, we present results from the design and evaluation of a mixed-initiative, visual analytics system for biologists, focusing on analyzing the relationships between familiarity of an analysis medium and domain experts' trust. We propose a trust-augmented design of the visual analytics system, that explicitly takes into account domain-specific tasks, conventions, and preferences. For evaluating the system, we present the results of a controlled user study with 34 biologists where we compare the variation of the level of trust across conventional and visual analytic mediums and explore the influence of familiarity and task complexity on trust. We find that despite being unfamiliar with a visual analytic medium, scientists seem to have an average level of trust that is comparable with the same in conventional analysis medium. In fact, for complex sense-making tasks, we find that the visual analytic system is able to inspire greater trust than other mediums. We summarize the implications of our findings with directions for future research on trustworthiness of visual analytic systems.

  8. Trust Revision for Conflicting Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    strategy is to first revise a priori trust assignments as a function of the degree of conflict, before the evidence is fused. This paper focuses on the...practical trust transitivity seems to be idiosyncratic for humans and animals, with no true analogue among non- living forms (and in the physical world ...visiting a foreign country Alice is looking for a restaurant where the locals go, because she would like to avoid places overrun by tourists. She meets a

  9. Trust in a Time of Increasing Diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, Peter Thisted; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    2012-01-01

    . Existing evidence from the Anglo-Saxon countries would suggest that this is the case, whereas evidence from the European continent mainly suggests that no link exists between ethnic diversity and social trust. The empirical analysis uses individual-level data on social trust from several surveys in Denmark...

  10. Social trust, interpersonal trust and self-rated health in China: a multi-level study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhixin; Vlachantoni, Athina; Liu, Xiaoting; Jones, Kelvyn

    2016-11-08

    Trust is important for health at both the individual and societal level. Previous research using Western concepts of trust has shown that a high level of trust in society can positively affect individuals' health; however, it has been found that the concepts and culture of trust in China are different from those in Western countries and research on the relationship between trust and health in China is scarce. The analyses use data from the national scale China General Social Survey (CGSS) on adults aged above 18 in 2005 and 2010. Two concepts of trust ("out-group" and "in-group" trust) are used to examine the relationship between trust and self-rated health in China. Multilevel logistical models are applied, examining the trust at the individual and societal level on individuals' self-rated health. In terms of interpersonal trust, both "out-group" and "in-group" trust are positively associated with good health in 2005 and 2010. At the societal level, the relationships between the two concepts of trust and health are different. In 2005, higher "out-group" social trust (derived from trust in strangers) is positively associated with better health; however, higher "in-group" social trust (derived from trust in most people) is negatively associated with good health in 2010. The cross-level interactions show that lower educated individuals (no education or only primary level), rural residents and those on lower incomes are the most affected groups in societies with higher "out-group" social trust; whereas people with lower levels of educational attainment, a lower income, and those who think that most people can be trusted are the most affected groups in societies with higher "in-group" social trust. High levels of interpersonal trust are of benefit to health. Higher "out-group" social trust is positively associated with better health; while higher "in-group" social trust is negatively associated with good health. Individuals with different levels of educational

  11. Plasma Oxytocin Immunoreactive Products and Response to Trust in Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoge, EA; Lawson, EA; Metcalf, CA; Keshaviah, A; Zak, PJ; Pollack, MH; Simon, NM

    2013-01-01

    Background Generalized Social Anxiety Disorder (GSAD) is characterized by excessive fear and avoidance of several types of social and performance situations. The pathophysiology is not well understood, but research in animals and humans has provided evidence that oxytocin helps regulate normal social affiliative behavior. Previous work in healthy male subjects demonstrated a rise in plasma oxytocin after receiving a high trust signal. To examine the oxytocin system in GSAD, we measured plasma oxytocin in GSAD patients and controls, before and after the social “Trust Game,” a neuroeconomic test examining trust behavior and reaction to trust using real monetary incentives. Methods Thirty-nine subjects with GSAD and 28 healthy controls provided three blood samples for oxytocin measurement before the Trust Game, and one sample after the game. Plasma estradiol was also measured at baseline. The Trust Game protocol version prioritized the sending of a signal of high cooperation and trust to all participants. All analyses controlled for gender and estradiol levels. Results Mean oxytocin levels post-Trust Game (p=0.025), and overall (area under the curve, p=0.011) were lower in GSAD patients compared to controls, after controlling for sex and estradiol. There was no significant change in oxytocin levels after the Game in either group. Conclusions We report low plasma oxytocin levels in patients with generalized social anxiety disorder during a pro-social laboratory task paradigm. Additional research will be important to further examine the relationship between oxytocin and social behavior in GSAD. PMID:22807189

  12. Dose-response relationship with radiotherapy: an evidence?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauvet, B.; Rauglaudre, G. de; Mineur, L.; Alfonsi, M.; Reboul, F.

    2003-01-01

    The dose-response relationship is a fundamental basis of radiobiology. Despite many clinical data, difficulties remain to demonstrate a relation between dose and local control: relative role of treatment associated with radiation therapy (surgery, chemotherapy, hormonal therapy), tumor heterogeneity, few prospective randomized studies, uncertainty of local control assessment. Three different situations are discussed: tumors with high local control probabilities for which dose effect is demonstrated by randomized studies (breast cancer) or sound retrospective data (soft tissues sarcomas), tumors with intermediate local control probabilities for which dose effect seems to be important according to retrospective studies and ongoing or published phase III trials (prostate cancer), tumors with low local control probabilities for which dose effect appears to be modest beyond standard doses, and inferior to the benefit of concurrent chemotherapy (lung and oesophageal cancer). For head and neck tumors, the dose-response relationship has been explored through hyperfractionation and accelerated radiation therapy and a dose effect has been demonstrated but must be compared to the benefit of concurrent chemotherapy. Last but not least, the development of conformal radiotherapy allow the exploration of the dose response relationship for tumors such as hepatocellular carcinomas traditionally excluded from the field of conventional radiation therapy. In conclusion, the dose-response relationship remains a sound basis of radiation therapy for many tumors and is a parameter to take into account for further randomized studies. (author)

  13. Army Profession: How Effective Leadership Reinforces an Ethos of Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    34 Won-Woo Park and Sangyun Kim, “The Need of Leader-Subordinate Reciprocal Dyadic Trust to Build the Subordinate’s Trust in the...Behavior: Communication and Understanding in Relationships, eds. A. G. Athos and J. J. Gabarro (Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1978), 290-303...the trust recommendations were senior Army leader strategic communication programs, trust development in doctrine, and making trust a topic for all

  14. Trust between man and machine in a teleoperation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dassonville, I.; Jolly, D.; Desodt, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The work we present deals with the trust of man in a teleoperation system. Trust is important because it is linked to stress which modifies human reliability. We are trying to quantify trust. In this paper, we'll present the theory of trust in relationships, and its extension for a man-machine system. Then, we explain the links between trust and human reliability. Then, we introduce our experimental process and the first results concerning selfconfidence

  15. The Relationship between Philosophy and Evidence in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Gina; Brighouse, Harry

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the ways that philosophy and evidence interact in the exploration of normative questions in philosophy of education. First, the authors provide a description of reflective equilibrium, a central method in normative philosophizing. They proceed to describe three tasks of normative philosophy, each of which requires engagement…

  16. Analyzing the relationships among perceptions on store loyalty programs, trust, customer commitment to the relationship and store loyalty through structural equation modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Yeniçeri, Tülay; Erten, Ela

    2008-01-01

    Especially in the retail industry, where there is intense competition, companies have started to initiate customer loyalty programs. By the help of these programs companies expect to develop long - term relationships with their customers and collect useful information about them as well. The purpose of this research is to analyze a supermarket customer loyalty program to investigate the relationship between customer loyalty programs and the actual customer loyalty to a company’s products and ...

  17. "You have to cover up the words of the doctor": the mediation of trust in interpreted consultations in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Nadia; Greenhalgh, Trisha

    2006-01-01

    This article explores issues of trust in narratives of interpreted consultations in primary health care. The paper is based on empirical data from a qualitative study of accounts of interpreted consultations in U.K. primary care, undertaken in three north London boroughs. In a total of 69 individual interviews and two focus groups, narratives of interpreted consultations were sought from 18 service users, 17 professional interpreters, nine family member interpreters, 13 general practitioners, 15 nurses, eight receptionists, and three practice managers. The study collected and analysed these using a grounded theory approach and taking the story as the main unit of analysis. It applies a theoretical model that draws on three key concepts: Greener's taxonomy of trust based on the different "faces" of power in medical consultations; Weber's notion of bureaucratic vs traditional social roles; and Habermas' distinction between communicative and strategic action. Trust was a prominent theme in almost all the narratives. The triadic nature of interpreted consultations creates six linked trust relationships (patient-interpreter, patient-clinician, interpreter-patient, interpreter-clinician, clinician-patient and clinician-interpreter). Three different types of trust are evident in these different relationships--voluntary trust (based on either kinship-like bonds and continuity of the interpersonal relationship over time, or on confidence in the institution and professional role that the individual represents), coercive trust (where one person effectively has no choice but to trust the other, as when a health problem requires expert knowledge that the patient does not have and cannot get) and hegemonic trust (where a person's propensity to trust, and awareness of alternatives, is shaped and constrained by the system so that people trust without knowing there is an alternative). These different types of trust had important implications for the nature of communication in the

  18. Equilibrium Trust

    OpenAIRE

    Luca Anderlini; Daniele Terlizzese

    2009-01-01

    We build a simple model of trust as an equilibrium phenomenon, departing from standard "selfish" preferences in a minimal way. Agents who are on the receiving end of an other to transact can choose whether to cheat and take away the entire surplus, taking into account a "cost of cheating." The latter has an idiosyncratic component (an agent's type), and a socially determined one. The smaller the mass of agents who cheat, the larger the cost of cheating suffered by those who cheat. Depending o...

  19. Enacting Trust

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Small and removed from the Spanish mainland, the Enclave of Ceuta has always depended\\ud on flows of goods and labour out of the Moroccan hinterland, with individuals from\\ud different ethnic and religious groups forming informal, flexible and personal economic\\ud bonds based on mutual ‘confianza’ (trust). Since its entry into the European Union in 1986,\\ud the Spanish government has erected a border-wall around the enclave, and introduced new\\ud migration policies branding many informal work...

  20. Cultural identity and patient trust among older American Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonds, Vanessa W; Goins, R Turner; Krantz, Elizabeth M; Garroutte, Eva Marie

    2014-03-01

    Patients' trust in healthcare providers and institutions has been identified as a likely contributor to racial-ethnic health disparities. The likely influence of patients' cultural characteristics on trust is widely acknowledged but inadequately explored. To compare levels of patients' trust in primary care provider (interpersonal trust) with trust in healthcare organizations (institutional trust) among older American Indians (AIs), and determine associations with cultural identity. Patient survey administered following primary care visits. Two-hundred and nineteen American Indian patients ≥ 50 years receiving care for a non-acute condition at two clinics operated by the Cherokee Nation in northeastern Oklahoma. Self-reported sociodemographic and cultural characteristics. Trust was measured using three questions about interpersonal trust and one measure of institutional trust; responses ranged from strongly agree to strongly disagree. Finding substantial variation only in institutional trust, we used logistic generalized estimating equations to examine relationships of patient cultural identity with institutional trust. Ninety-five percent of patients reported trusting their individual provider, while only 46 % reported trusting their healthcare institution. Patients who strongly self-identified with an AI cultural identity had significantly lower institutional trust compared to those self-identifying less strongly (OR: 0.6, 95 % CI: 0.4, 0.9). Interpersonal and institutional trust represent distinct dimensions of patients' experience of care that may show important relationships to patients' cultural characteristics. Strategies for addressing low institutional trust may have special relevance for patients who identify strongly with AI culture.

  1. Phylogenomics provides strong evidence for relationships of butterflies and moths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Akito Y; Breinholt, Jesse W

    2014-08-07

    Butterflies and moths constitute some of the most popular and charismatic insects. Lepidoptera include approximately 160 000 described species, many of which are important model organisms. Previous studies on the evolution of Lepidoptera did not confidently place butterflies, and many relationships among superfamilies in the megadiverse clade Ditrysia remain largely uncertain. We generated a molecular dataset with 46 taxa, combining 33 new transcriptomes with 13 available genomes, transcriptomes and expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Using HaMStR with a Lepidoptera-specific core-orthologue set of single copy loci, we identified 2696 genes for inclusion into the phylogenomic analysis. Nucleotides and amino acids of the all-gene, all-taxon dataset yielded nearly identical, well-supported trees. Monophyly of butterflies (Papilionoidea) was strongly supported, and the group included skippers (Hesperiidae) and the enigmatic butterfly-moths (Hedylidae). Butterflies were placed sister to the remaining obtectomeran Lepidoptera, and the latter was grouped with greater than or equal to 87% bootstrap support. Establishing confident relationships among the four most diverse macroheteroceran superfamilies was previously challenging, but we recovered 100% bootstrap support for the following relationships: ((Geometroidea, Noctuoidea), (Bombycoidea, Lasiocampoidea)). We present the first robust, transcriptome-based tree of Lepidoptera that strongly contradicts historical placement of butterflies, and provide an evolutionary framework for genomic, developmental and ecological studies on this diverse insect order. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Exploring the Combination of Dempster-Shafer Theory and Neural Network for Predicting Trust and Distrust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In social media, trust and distrust among users are important factors in helping users make decisions, dissect information, and receive recommendations. However, the sparsity and imbalance of social relations bring great difficulties and challenges in predicting trust and distrust. Meanwhile, there are numerous inducing factors to determine trust and distrust relations. The relationship among inducing factors may be dependency, independence, and conflicting. Dempster-Shafer theory and neural network are effective and efficient strategies to deal with these difficulties and challenges. In this paper, we study trust and distrust prediction based on the combination of Dempster-Shafer theory and neural network. We firstly analyze the inducing factors about trust and distrust, namely, homophily, status theory, and emotion tendency. Then, we quantify inducing factors of trust and distrust, take these features as evidences, and construct evidence prototype as input nodes of multilayer neural network. Finally, we propose a framework of predicting trust and distrust which uses multilayer neural network to model the implementing process of Dempster-Shafer theory in different hidden layers, aiming to overcome the disadvantage of Dempster-Shafer theory without optimization method. Experimental results on a real-world dataset demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework.

  3. A Model of Trust for Developing Trustworthy Systems From Untrustworthy Actors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ray, Indrajit; Ray, Indrakshi

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop a new model of trust that allowed one to reason about trust relationships in information systems with special emphasis on trust as it related to integrity and availability...

  4. On the role of trust types and levels on inventory replenishment decision

    OpenAIRE

    Darvish, M.; Kaboli, A.; Cheikhrouhou, N.; Glardon, R.

    2014-01-01

    Using a participatory simulation platform, this paper investigates the inventory replenishment decisions made under different trust categories. Depending on the type of trust (trust in supplier versus trust in customer) and level of trust (high versus low), each decision is categorized and analyzed. We investigate how the inventory manager`s ordering behavior varies regarding their type and level of trust. This study provides evidence for the role of trust in inventory replenishment decision....

  5. Trust and Online Reputation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Ming; Ramachandran, Deepak

    Web 2.0 technologies provide organizations with unprecedented opportunities to expand and solidify relationships with their customers, partners, and employees—while empowering firms to define entirely new business models focused on sharing information in online collaborative environments. Yet, in and of themselves, these technologies cannot ensure productive online interactions. Leading enterprises that are experimenting with social networks and online communities are already discovering this fact and along with it, the importance of establishing trust as the foundation for online collaboration and transactions. Just as today's consumers must feel secure to bank, exchange personal information and purchase products and services online; participants in Web 2.0 initiatives will only accept the higher levels of risk and exposure inherent in e-commerce and Web collaboration in an environment of trust. Indeed, only by attending to the need to cultivate online trust with customers, partners and employees will enterprises ever fully exploit the expanded business potential posed by Web 2.0. But developing online trust is no easy feat. While various preliminary attempts have occurred, no definitive model for establishing or measuring it has yet been established. To that end, nGenera has identified three, distinct dimensions of online trust: reputation (quantitative-based); relationship (qualitative-based) and process (system-based). When considered together, they form a valuable model for understanding online trust and a toolbox for cultivating it to support Web 2.0 initiatives.

  6. From the general to the specific: How social trust motivates relational trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Blaine G

    2016-01-01

    When people form beliefs about the trustworthiness of others with respect to particular matters (i.e., when individuals trust), theory suggests that they rely on preexistent cognitive schemas regarding the general cooperativeness of individuals and organizations (i.e., social trust). In spite of prior work, the impact of social trust on relational trust-or what Russell Hardin (2002) calls trust as a three-part relation where actor A trusts actor B with reference to matter Y-is not well established. Four vignette experiments were administered to Amazon.com Mechanical Turk workers (N = 1388 and N = 1419) and to public university undergraduate students (N = 995 and N = 956) in order to investigate the relationship between social trust and relational trust. Measures of general social trust and particular social trust produced statistically equivalent effects that were positively associated with relational trust. Political trust, however, was statistically unrelated to relational trust. These results support the idea that people rely on schemas and stereotypes concerned with the general cooperativeness and helpfulness of others when forming beliefs about another person's trustworthiness with respect to a particular matter at hand. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Trust us Trust Thorp Campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, John

    1995-01-01

    The history of the nuclear industry in the UK has been dominated by Sellafield reprocessing site in west Cumbria. The site, formerly owned by the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority was transferred to the newly-formed British Nuclear Fuels plc in 1971. Although trade union representation existed at Sellafield before the emergence of BNFL, it is only after this date that collective trade union activity began to emerge. In 1977, after a long running dispute with management about the issue of radiation dose uptake, the workforce went on strike, forcing the management to question their previous 'need to know' attitude and to improve industrial relations. In 1984, it was recognised that the lobbying influence of trade unions within politics, and especially the Labour party could be used to greater effect to challenge potentially -damaging influence of anti-nuclear campaigners. The National Campaign for the Nuclear Industry (NCNI) was born, combining nine industrial and non-industrial trade unions within the nuclear industry. Its task during the last ten years has been to put forward the interests of its members collectively and to secure the, role of nuclear power. within a balanced energy policy in the political arena. In dome so, it has gained a credible voice within both the trade union movement and the Labour party. The new Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP) received strong support from the NCNI during its construction and commissioning phases. When it became clear that the anti-nuclear lobby had gained the upper hand and were beginning to seriously delay the necessary legal instruments required to start the plant, the power of collective action was once again recognised, and the TRUST US campaign was born. The campaign was run and organised by a clerks committee and fronted by the Trade Unions at Sellafield., and turned out to be one of the most successful] trade union campaigns in recent history. The first task involved getting, the entire workforce on

  8. Dimensionality of trust: An analysis of the relations between propensity, trustworthiness and trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marita Heyns

    2015-05-01

    Research purpose: This study examined the dynamic interplay between trust propensity, trustworthiness beliefs and the decision to trust, as perceived within dyadic workplace relationships. Motivation for the study: No studies, as far as the authors are aware, have ever attempted to use a combination of Mayer and Davis’s well-known assessment of trustworthiness and Gillespie’s measure of behavioural trust within the same study. By including measures of main antecedents and the actual decision to trust in the same study, the multidimensionality of trust can be established more concretely. Research approach, design and method: A cross-sectional survey design with a convenience sample (N = 539 was used. The Behavioural Trust Inventory and the Organisational Trust Instrument were administered. Main findings: Results confirmed the distinctness of propensity, trustworthiness and trust as separate main constructs. Trust was strongly associated with trustworthiness beliefs. Trustworthiness beliefs fully mediated the relationship between propensity and trust. The observed relations between propensity and trustworthiness suggest that individuals with a natural predisposition to trust others will be more inclined to perceive a specific trust referent as trustworthy. Practical/managerial implications: Leaders should realise that their attitudes and behaviour have a decisive impact on trust formation processes: if they are being perceived as trustworthy, followers will be likely to respond by engaging in trusting behaviours towards them. Tools to assess followers’ perceptions of the trustworthiness of the leader may provide useful feedback that can guide leaders. Contribution/value-add: This study contributes to scientific knowledge regarding the influence of propensity to trust and trustworthiness on trust of leaders.

  9. The social context of trust relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kojić Milena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the widest sense, this paper focuses on the problematization (and operationalization of the concept of trust and its social context, with a special emphasis on its multiple meanings, the ways of establishing trust, as well as its functions. After pointing to the various definitions of trust that highlight its cognitive, behavioral, and relational groundings, we proceed to examine the aspects of 'social embeddedness' of trust. In this context, we highlight the structural aspect of trust relations, their institutional embeddedness, mediation through cultural meanings, as well as the wider context of social circumstances and limitations. We place a special emphasis on the concept of 'trust culture', its morphogenesis and functions, as well as the significance of trust culture in the context of diminishing the social uncertainty that arises in the situations when trust is demonstrated. Finally, we point to the social functions of trust on the macro level, the functional substitutes for trust, as well as the relationship between trust and social capital.

  10. Social interactions, trust and risky alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seid, Abdu Kedir

    2016-12-01

    The association of social capital and alcohol consumption is one of the most robust empirical findings in health economics of the past decade. However, the direction of the relationship between the two is heavily dependent on which dimension of social capital is studied and which alcohol measure is used. In this paper, we examine the effect of social interactions and generalised trust on drinking in the general Danish population survey. Participants (n = 2569) were recruited as part of a larger study. The double-hurdle model for the volume of alcohol consumption and the multivariate logistic model for heavy episodic drinking were estimated. We found evidence that social networking with male friends, membership in voluntary organisations, and generalised trust were significantly associated with the mean volume of alcohol consumption and heavy drinking. We also observed that social support at the community level had a buffering effect against heavy episodic drinking. The findings support previous findings in which social interactions and generalised trust were found to predict individuals' volume of drinking and heavy episodic drinking. However, the results varied across the indicators.

  11. Trust, accreditation and Philanthropy in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Bekkers, R.H.F.P.

    2003-01-01

    Given the increasing numbers of scandals, the awareness among fund-raisers that the public’s trust is crucial for the nonprofit sector is growing. This study investigates the relationship between trust and charitable giving. Charitable organizations can increase the public’s trust by signaling their trustworthiness. The example of the Netherlands shows how a system of accreditation can be an instrument for signaling trustworthiness to the public. Donors aware of the accreditation system have ...

  12. Bidirectional relationship between diabetes and periodontal disease: Review of Evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, B.A.Q.; Syed, A.; Izhar, F.; Ali Khan, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    Presently there are 170 million diabetic patients worldwide. Pakistan ranks sixth in the world with approximately 6.2 million in the 20-79 year age affected by the diabetes. 6-10% of the 35-44 year old diabetic patients have been reported to be affected by moderate form of periodontal disease in Pakistan. Periodontal disease is referred to as sixth complication of diabetes. The association between diabetes and periodontal disease has been reported for more than 40 years but reverse has not been the focus of researchers until recently. Studies have suggested a bidirectional relationship between periodontal disease and glycemic control with each disease having a potential impact on the other. (author)

  13. Evaluating the impact of relationship marketing components on customers' loyalty level: Evidence from Iran Khodro Corporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hakkak

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available During the past few years, Iranian auto industries sell their products directly to customers and the increase competition among domestic auto makers has increased motivation to pay especial attention to their customers. This paper investigates relationship between marketing and customer’s loyalty. The study designs a questionnaire consists of three parts. The first part is associated with customer information, the second part considers relationship marketing factors and the third part measures components of customer’s loyalty. Cronbach alpha in relationship marketing, loyalty and overall alpha were measured 0.878, 0.891 and 0.712, respectively. Obtained data were analyzed using LISREL software. Ranking the components of the internal and external latent variable are discussed by using the Friedman test and our investigation indicates that some components are not meaningful when the level of significance is five percent. Based on the results of Freedman test, common sense is the most important factor with relative weight of 4.08, followed by relationship (4.01, trust (3.90, commitment(3.86, trouble shooting (2.88 and for the variable of loyalty, quality(3.89, reputation(3.57, decoration(3.4, responsibility(2.96, clients seeking variety (1.75 have the highest average respectively. Note that the results of Friedman test are consistent with the results of structural equation modeling. Chi-Square values have been calculated as 597.701 and 108.917 for marketing relationship and loyalty, respectively.

  14. On the interpretation of World Values Survey trust question - global expectations vs. local beliefs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banerjee, Ritwik

    How should we interpret the World Values Survey (WVS) trust question? We conduct an experiment in India - a low trust country, to correlate the WVS trust question with trust decisions in an incentivized Trust Game. Evidence supports findings from one strand of the fractured literature - the WVS t...

  15. Organizational dimensions of relationship-centered care. Theory, evidence, and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, Dana Gelb; Miller, William; Beckman, Howard

    2006-01-01

    Four domains of relationship have been highlighted as the cornerstones of relationship-centered health care. Of these, clinician-patient relationships have been most thoroughly studied, with a rich empirical literature illuminating significant linkages between clinician-patient relationship quality and a wide range of outcomes. This paper explores the realm of clinician-colleague relationships, which we define to include the full array of relationships among clinicians, staff, and administrators in health care organizations. Building on a stream of relevant theories and empirical literature that have emerged over the past decade, we synthesize available evidence on the role of organizational culture and relationships in shaping outcomes, and posit a model of relationship-centered organizations. We conclude that turning attention to relationship-centered theory and practice in health care holds promise for advancing care to a new level, with breakthroughs in quality of care, quality of life for those who provide it, and organizational performance.

  16. The role of trust in the perception of the quality of local food products: with particular reference to direct relationships between producer and consumer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Hérault-Fournier

    2005-05-01

    qualification process of food products, and that this influence is closely linked to the components of trust emerging from the relationship.

  17. Is it feasible to pool funds for local children's services in England? Evidence from the national evaluation of children's trust pathfinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorgelly, Paula; Bachmann, Max; Shreeve, Ann; Reading, Richard; Thorburn, June; Mugford, Miranda; O'Brien, Margaret; Husbands, Chris

    2009-01-01

    To describe how funds were pooled or otherwise jointly managed by National Health Service (NHS) primary care trusts and local authorities in England. To compare expenditure on local children's services by health, education and social services. We conducted a questionnaire survey of all 35 children's trust pathfinders, six months after they were launched, with a follow-up at 2.5 years. We also undertook an in-depth analysis of local authorities and primary care trusts, within eight pathfinder areas and three non-pathfinder areas, whereby we compared expenditure on children's services, interviewed managers and professionals and examined financial documents. Local authorities and NHS trusts coordinated expenditure in various ways, most commonly through informal agreements and aligning budgets but also by formally pooling budgets. The latter were usually for selected services such as child and adolescent mental health services, though four children's trusts pathfinders pooled (or aligned) their budgets for all children's services. Total expenditure per child was greatest for education, lowest for social services and intermediate for health. However, it was difficult to quantify education expenditure on children with health and social care needs, and health care expenditure on children. Sharing money for local children's services requires shared objectives, trust, and legal and accounting expertise. Several different mechanisms are permitted and many are feasible but programme budgeting for children's services could make them more effective.

  18. Does Ideological Education in China Suppress Trust in Religion and Foster Trust in Government?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Xie

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A major goal of ideological education in China is to promote loyalty to the party-state and to instill atheism among the people. How effective is this ideological education? This article examines the relationship between education and trust in government and trust in religion using data from the 2010 Chinese General Social Survey. We find that education is negatively associated with trust in government, while positively related to trust in religion. Our findings suggest that policies aimed at displacing religion in favor of the Communist ideology have largely failed to shape the public mindset; rather, the more educated, the more people tend to trust religion instead of the government.

  19. The Impact of Interfirm Relationships on Investment: Evidence from the Polish Dairy Sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dries, L.K.E.; Swinnen, J.

    2010-01-01

    Financial constraints and credit market imperfections are a major constraint on investment, growth and poverty reduction in transition and developing countries. This paper analyses the impact on investments of financial assistance programs as part of interfirm relationships. Our empirical evidence

  20. New Evidence on the Relationship Between Climate and Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, M.

    2015-12-01

    We synthesize a large new body of research on the relationship between climate and conflict. We consider many types of human conflict, ranging from interpersonal conflict -- domestic violence, road rage, assault, murder, and rape -- to intergroup conflict -- riots, coups, ethnic violence, land invasions, gang violence, and civil war. After harmonizing statistical specifications and standardizing estimated effect sizes within each conflict category, we implement a meta-analysis that allows us to estimate the mean effect of climate variation on conflict outcomes as well as quantify the degree of variability in this effect size across studies. Looking across more than 50 studies, we find that deviations from moderate temperatures and precipitation patterns systematically increase the risk of conflict, often substantially, with average effects that are highly statistically significant. We find that contemporaneous temperature has the largest average effect by far, with each 1 standard deviation increase toward warmer temperatures increasing the frequency of contemporaneous interpersonal conflict by 2% and of intergroup conflict by more than 10%. We also quantify substantial heterogeneity in these effect estimates across settings.

  1. The Role of Trust on the Relationship Between Organizational Engagement and Corporate Reputation(Çalışanların Örgüte Cezbolması ve Kurumların İtibarı İlişkisinde Güvenin Rolü

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emel ESEN

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the role of organizational trust between corporate reputation practices and organizational engagement in airline sector. In the first section, results of the relationship between corporate reputation practices, organizational trust and organizational engagement are examined. In the following section, data was gathered from 343 participants. According to the results of the study, corporate reputation practices and organizational trust have effect on organizational engagement but organizational trust hasn’t had any intervening role between these variables.

  2. Social-cognitive processes in preschoolers' selective trust: three cultures compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Amanda J; Lewis, Charlie; Pala, F Cansu; Wong, Katie; Berridge, Damon

    2013-03-01

    Research on preschoolers' selective learning has mostly been conducted in English-speaking countries. We compared the performance of Turkish preschoolers (who are exposed to a language with evidential markers), Chinese preschoolers (known to be advanced in executive skills), and English preschoolers on an extended selective trust task (N = 144). We also measured children's executive function skills and their ability to attribute false belief. Overall we found a Turkish (rather than a Chinese) advantage in selective trust and a relationship between selective trust and false belief (rather than executive function). This is the 1st evidence that exposure to a language that obliges speakers to state the sources of their knowledge may sensitize preschoolers to informant reliability. It is also the first demonstration of an association between false belief and selective trust. Together these findings suggest that effective selective learning may progress alongside children's developing capacity to assess the knowledge of others.

  3. Explaining Large-N Cooperation: Generalized Social Trust and the Social Exchange Heuristic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a new argument that links generalized social trust and collective action in situations with a large number of actors, who do not have specific information on each other. Generalized social trust enhances large-N cooperation through the social exchange heuristic, which...... stimulate conditional cooperation in social dilemmas. Using data from a survey in four countries and recycling behavior as an indicator of collective action, this explanation is tested with individual level data. While the relationship between generalized social trust and large-N collective action is often...... hypothesized, there is scant micro level evidence as it has mainly been tested at the macro level. The results show that people holding generalized social trust cooperate more readily in large-N dilemmas, and that they most likely do so because of the social exchange heuristic....

  4. To Trust or Not to Trust? What Drives Public Trust in Science in Social Media Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwong, Y. L.; Oliver, C.; Van Kranendonk, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    The erosion of public trust in science is a serious concern today. This climate of distrust has real consequences, from the anti-vaccination movement to climate change denials. The age of social media promises opportunities for improved interactivity between scientists and the public, which experts hope will help improve public confidence in science. However, evidence linking social media engagement and public attitude towards science is scarce. Our study aimed to help fill this gap. We examined Twitter engagement and its impact on public trust in science, focusing on two related science issues: space science and climate change. Our datasets comprised of 10,000 randomly sampled tweets over a month's period in 2016. We used human annotation and machine learning to analyse the tweets. Results revealed the level of distrust was significantly higher in the climate change tweets. However, in the climate change network, people who engaged with science personalities trust science more than those who did not. This difference in trust levels was not present in the space science network. There the two clusters of people displayed similar levels of trust in science. Additionally, we used machine learning to predict the trust labels of tweets and conducted feature analysis to find the properties of trust-inspiring tweets. Our supervised learning algorithm was able to predict trust in science in our sample tweets with 84% accuracy. The strongest predictors of trust in science (as conveyed by tweets) were similarity, presence of URL and authenticity. Contrast this with the findings of our previous study investigating the features of highly engaging space science related social media messages, authenticity is the only feature that also inspires trust. This indicates that what works to promote engagement (e.g. `retweets', `Likes') does not necessarily build trust in science. Social media science communication is not as simple as `we engage, therefore they trust'. We suggest that

  5. Trust as networking knowledge: precedents from Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clegg, S.R.; Porras, S.; Crawford, J.

    2004-01-01

    Trust, rather than being simply a resource for establishing collaborative relationships between organizations, is an essential component of their constitution. At base, trust involves interpersonal relations of a specific type. These are relations where there is sufficient probability that a person

  6. Understanding the positive effect of financial compensation on trust after norm violations: Evidence from fMRI in favor of forgiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haesevoets, Tessa; De Cremer, David; Van Hiel, Alain; Van Overwalle, Frank

    2018-05-01

    Norm violations are ubiquitous in organizations and often result in tangible harm and a loss of trust. One possible response to enhance trust involves the provision of financial compensation. Unfortunately, little is known about the processes that underlie the effect of such a tangible response to increase trust. We employed techniques in cognitive neuroscience (functional magnetic resonance imaging) to examine these processes. Participants placed in the scanner played the role of recipient in a series of dictator games with different allocators who (unknown to them) were preprogrammed. An unequal division of resources was used as a norm violation that resulted in a financial loss. Afterward the inflicted harm was restored through equal financial compensation. Our neuroimaging data indicate that financial compensation activates forgiveness-related brain areas and that this activation mediates the positive effect of financial compensation on trust. We discuss the theoretical and managerial implications of using tangible responses to increase trust in organizational settings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Learning to trust: trust and attachment in early psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fett, A.J.; Shergill, S.; Korver-Nieberg, N.; Yakub, F.; Gromann, P.; Krabbendam, L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Distrust and social dysfunction are characteristic in psychosis and may arise from attachment insecurity, which is elevated in the disorder. The relationship between trust and attachment in the early stages of psychosis is unknown, yet could help to understand interpersonal difficulties

  8. Can we trust what parents tell us? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Paul L P; van Dulmen, Sandra

    2017-09-01

    Taking a history is a key diagnostic instrument in paediatric consultations. Numerous issues potentially reduce the history's reliability. Therefore, paediatricians have always expressed ambivalence regarding history taking from parents, both valuing and distrusting it. In this review, we describe how parents build and present a description of their child's health issues in the conceptual framework of self-regulation theory. We performed a systematic review on the literature on the reliability of history taking. No studies examined the reliability of history taking from parents, but there is a considerable body of evidence on the issue of mutual trust in relationships between health care professionals and patients. Because trust is a dynamic relational phenomenon, taking a patient centred approach in consultations is likely to increase the patients' and parents' trust in the health care professional, and their willingness to follow the health care professional's treatment proposals. We provide evidence based recommendations on how to build and maintain trust in paediatric consultations by taking a patient centred approach in such consultations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Trust and safety in the coalmining sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, D.

    2008-01-01

    There is growing evidence that a lack of trust is a serious impediment to OHS outcomes. This paper describes a project that investigated trust through an in-depth analysis at a number of mines and across a number of coal mining companies.

  10. Social Trust and the Growth of Schooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The paper develops a simple model to examine how social trust might affect the growth of schooling through lowering transaction costs associated with employing educated individuals. In a sample of 52 countries, the paper thereafter provides empirical evidence that trust has led to faster growth...

  11. Social Trust and the Growth of Schooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    The paper develops a simple model to exemplify how social trust might affect the growth of schooling through lowering transaction costs. In a sample of 52 countries, the paper thereafter provides empirical evidence that trust has indeed led to faster growth of schooling in the period 1960...

  12. The Value of Trust to Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Marcella M

    2014-01-01

    Trust, one of nursing's intangible assets, impacts nurses' ability to form meaningful relationships with patients and this connection positively impacts health outcomes. Linking trust to the fabric of nursing and investing in its measurement will become essential to nursing's valuation and the resulting investment in nursing. Trust, as nursing's core value, should be fostered by nurse educators as they prepare the next generation of nurses. Nurse administrators should connect the trust a patient has for his or her nurse and patient cooperation and honest transparent communication between providers and the patient. Banking trust as a valuable nursing asset will substantiate nursing's marketing and support its worth. Nursing's trustworthiness is an intangible asset that warrants protection, as trust once lost is hard to recapture.

  13. Antibiotic policies in acute English NHS trusts: implementation of 'Start Smart-Then Focus' and relationship with Clostridium difficile infection rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewelyn, Martin J; Hand, Kieran; Hopkins, Susan; Walker, A Sarah

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to establish how antibiotic prescribing policies at National Health Service (NHS) hospitals match the England Department of Health 'Start Smart-Then Focus' recommendations and relate to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) rates. Antibiotic pharmacists were surveyed regarding recommendations for empirical treatment of common syndromes ('Start Smart') and antimicrobial prescription reviews ('Focus') at their hospital trusts. If no response was provided, policy data were sought from trust websites and the MicroGuide app (Horizon Strategic Partners, UK). Empirical treatment recommendations were categorized as broad spectrum (a β-lactam penicillin/β-lactamase inhibitor, cephalosporin, quinolone or carbapenem) or narrow spectrum. CDI rates were gathered from the national mandatory surveillance system. Data were obtained for 105/145 English acute hospital trusts (72%). β-Lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations were recommended extensively. Only for severe community-acquired pneumonia and pyelonephritis were narrow-spectrum agents recommended first line at a substantial number of trusts [42/105 (40%) and 50/105 (48%), respectively]. Policies commonly recommended dual therapy with aminoglycosides and β-lactams for abdominal sepsis [40/93 trusts (43%)] and undifferentiated severe sepsis [54/94 trusts (57%)]. Most policies recommended treating for ≥ 7 days for most indications. Nearly all policies [100/105 trusts (95%)] recommended antimicrobial prescription reviews, but only 46/96 respondents (48%) reported monitoring compliance. Independent predictors of higher CDI rates were recommending a broad-spectrum regimen for community-acquired pneumonia (P=0.06) and, counterintuitively, a recommended treatment duration of Smart' by recommending broad-spectrum antibiotics for empirical therapy, but this may have the unintended potential to increase the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and risk of CDI unless better mechanisms are in place

  14. Trust in Scientific Publishing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummels, Harry; Roosendaal, Hans E.

    2001-01-01

    Trust is an important phenomenon to reduce organisational complexity and uncertainty. In the literature many types of trust are distinguished. An important framework to understand the variety and development of trust in organisations is provided by Zucker. She distinguishes three types of trust:

  15. TRUST AND DISTRUST: TWO NECESSARY FACTORS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SOCIAL TRUST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RODRIGO YÁÑEZ GALLARDO

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent investigations argue that distrust is the absence of trust and it would be assumed that bothattitudes are independent; that would allow to distinguish between the naïve attitude and the wise attitudein the trust. It has been built a scale to measure the disposition to trust and the relationship has beenexamined among naïve and wise attitude when trusting. The sample was constituted by 575 universitystudents of both sexes, of four faculties and of different years of study. Through a factorial analysis itwas found that trust and distrust correspond to different factors. It was discussed the importance ofincrease an optimal trust in order to develop social abilities and to stimulate the social participation. Itwas questioned the validity of traditional surveys that measure the social trust.

  16. Principals, Trust, and Cultivating Vibrant Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Tschannen-Moran

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Although principals are ultimately held accountable to student learning in their buildings, the most consistent research results have suggested that their impact on student achievement is largely indirect. Leithwood, Patten, and Jantzi proposed four paths through which this indirect influence would flow, and the purpose of this special issue is to examine in greater depth these mediating variables. Among mediating variables, we assert that trust is key. In this paper, we explore the evidence that points to the role that faculty trust in the principal plays in student learning and how principals can cultivate trust by attending to the five facets of trust, as well as the correlates of trust that mediate student learning, including academic press, collective teacher efficacy, and teacher professionalism. We argue that trust plays a role in each of the four paths identified by Leithwood, Patten, and Jantzi. Finally, we explore possible new directions for future research.

  17. Trust and Leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordum, Anders

    2005-01-01

    The concept and phenomenon of trust and its relation to leadership has recently come into focus. What role does trust play? Can trust be created strategically? Questions like these are often raised. How we conceive of and conceptualize trust is not as often discussed. Among those conceptualizations...... flexibility of form for example, the idea that one with leadership tools can consciously bring forth trust. In the conclusion, the question about trust communication is addressed. In this section I argue that trust is positively value-laden, becausesincerity is a functional and pragmatic condition...

  18. Balancing Trust and Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagd, Søren

    This paper focuses on the leadership challenge of balancing trust and control. The relation between trust and control has for a long time been a puzzling issue for management researchers. In the paper I first show that there has been a dramatic change in the way the relation between trust...... and control has been conceptualized in trust research. While the relation between trust and control earlier was conceptualized as a more or less stable balance between trust and control, more recent research conceptualizes the relation between trust and control more as a dynamical process that involves...... an ongoing process of balancing the relation between trust and control. Second, taking the departure in the recent conceptualization of the balance between trust and control as an interactive process I discuss the challenges for management in handling this more subtle balancing of trust and control...

  19. Trust in vehicle technology

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Guy, H.; Stanton, Neville, A.; Salmon, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Driver trust has potentially important implications for how vehicle technology is used and interacted with. In this paper it will be seen how driver trust functions and how it can be understood and manipulated by insightful vehicle design. It will review the theoretical literature to define steps that can be taken establish trust in vehicle technology in the first place, maintain trust in the long term, and even re-establish trust that has been lost along the way. The implication throughout i...

  20. Building trust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Meriel

    1995-01-01

    'Activate' is the energy magazine for secondary schools and is part of the Education Programme which is managed on behalf of the British Nuclear Industry Forum by AEA Technology. activate is the flagship communication device between the British Nuclear Industry Forum's Education Programme and secondary schools in the UK. It was developed from a previous publication, Nuclear Bulletin. There is a need for the nuclear industry to build trust with teachers and students in the UK, where for a long time, everything that the industry has said, written or printed has been disregarded by school teachers as propaganda. Over the last few years the industry has put in a great deal of effort to position itself as a provider of educationally sound and socially acceptable information. 'Activate' was an evolution of this idea and there was a hole in the market for a lively, activity and article based magazine that could be used in the classroom. The target audience is principally teachers of science, mathematics and geography, but also includes teachers of art,, English and history with students of between 11 and 18. The results were very positive in that teachers appreciated the colourful and lively nature of activate and they felt that it provided information and opinions in an un biased and non-propagandist way. Their comments about layout, number of activities style of presentation were taken into account and during the summer of 1994 activate was remodelled ready for re launch in September. The feedback so far is good with more teachers signing up every week to receive their own free copy

  1. In the interest of food safety: a qualitative study investigating communication and trust between food regulators and food industry in the UK, Australia and New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha B Meyer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Food regulatory bodies play an important role in public health, and in reducing the costs of food borne illness that are absorbed by both industry and government. Regulation in the food industry involves a relationship between regulators and members of the industry, and it is imperative that these relationships are built on trust. Research has shown in a variety of contexts that businesses find the most success when there are high levels of trust between them and their key stakeholders. An evidence-based understanding of the barriers to communication and trust is imperative if we are to put forward recommendations for facilitating the (rebuilding of trusting and communicative relationships. Methods We present data from 72 interviews with regulators and industry representatives regarding their trust in and communication with one another. Interviews were conducted in the UK, New Zealand, and Australia in 2013. Results Data identify a variety of factors that shape the dynamic and complex relationships between regulators and industry, as well as barriers to communication and trust between the two parties. Novel in our approach is our emphasis on identifying solutions to these barriers from the voices of industry and regulators. Conclusions We provide recommendations (e.g., development of industry advisory boards to facilitate the (rebuilding of trusting and communicative relationships between the two parties.

  2. In the interest of food safety: a qualitative study investigating communication and trust between food regulators and food industry in the UK, Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Samantha B; Wilson, Annabelle M; Calnan, Michael; Henderson, Julie; Coveney, John; McCullum, Dean; Pearce, Alex R; Ward, Paul; Webb, Trevor

    2017-02-13

    Food regulatory bodies play an important role in public health, and in reducing the costs of food borne illness that are absorbed by both industry and government. Regulation in the food industry involves a relationship between regulators and members of the industry, and it is imperative that these relationships are built on trust. Research has shown in a variety of contexts that businesses find the most success when there are high levels of trust between them and their key stakeholders. An evidence-based understanding of the barriers to communication and trust is imperative if we are to put forward recommendations for facilitating the (re)building of trusting and communicative relationships. We present data from 72 interviews with regulators and industry representatives regarding their trust in and communication with one another. Interviews were conducted in the UK, New Zealand, and Australia in 2013. Data identify a variety of factors that shape the dynamic and complex relationships between regulators and industry, as well as barriers to communication and trust between the two parties. Novel in our approach is our emphasis on identifying solutions to these barriers from the voices of industry and regulators. We provide recommendations (e.g., development of industry advisory boards) to facilitate the (re)building of trusting and communicative relationships between the two parties.

  3. The Impact of Trust on Job Performance in Organisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Nešić

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In circumstances governed by consistent change in all aspects of business, trust represents a significant factor in the behavioural patterns of organisations. Of great importance for a successful communication in organisations is understanding the levels of trust among staff, employees and their management, and trust in the organisation itself. Trust is a cohesive and motivating factor in work groups. Also, based on trust are identification and commitment to the organisation, as well as the relationships of employees. In successful organisations special attention is given to the problems of trust and mistrust. This work considers different theoretical concepts of how trust is created and maintained in organisations, different dimensions of organisational trust, as well as the effects of trust in organisational performance.

  4. Authentic leadership and organisational citizenship behaviour in the public health care sector: The role of workplace trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynelle Coxen

    2016-10-01

    behaviour. Practical/managerial implications: The main findings suggest that public health care institutions would benefit if leaders are encouraged to be more authentic as this might result in increases in both trust among co-workers and in the organisation. Consequently, employees might be more likely to exert additional effort in their work. Contribution/value-add: Limited empirical evidence exists with regard to the relationship between authentic leadership, workplace trust in its three referents and organisational citizenship behaviour. This study aimed to contribute to the limited number of studies conducted.

  5. Trust in School: A Pathway to Inhibit Teacher Burnout?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Maele, Dimitri; Van Houtte, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to consider trust as an important relational source in schools by exploring whether trust lowers teacher burnout. The authors examine how trust relationships with different school parties such as the principal relate to distinct dimensions of teacher burnout. The authors further analyze whether school-level…

  6. Trust me, I am Robot!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoyanova, Angelina; Drefeld, Jonas; Tanev, Stoyan

    of the emerging trust relationship is a key component of the use value of the robotic system and of the value proposition of the robotic system producers. The study is based on a qualitative research approach combining the phenomenological research paradigm with a grounded theory building approach based......The aim of this paper is to discuss some of the issues regarding the emergence of trust within the context of the interaction between human patients and medical rehabilitation technology based on robot system solutions. The starting assumption of the analysis is that the articulation...

  7. Chemically Enhanced Trust: Potential Law Enforcement and Military Applications for Oxytocin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    all theories that de-emphasize the cognitive aspect of trust.19 Despite his efforts to debunk theories about non-cognitive aspects of trust, Hardin...surprisingly, most research (and subsequent knowledge) about trust concentrates on the cognitive aspect of trust.22 However, trust also contains a...performance, recovery and relationship-building.27 Following that line of thought, the non- cognitive aspect of trust may be more influential on behavior

  8. The Lifecycle of Trust in Educational Leadership: An Ecological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsyuruba, Benjamin; Walker, Keith

    2015-01-01

    As establishing and fostering trust are imperative activities for school leaders, cognizance of the fundamental importance of trust is essential for the leader's moral agency and ethical decision-making. In this article, we use an ecological perspective to uncover the dynamics of the lifecycle of trust as evident from extant literature on…

  9. Calculativeness and trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Williamson’s characterisation of calculativeness as inimical to trust contradicts most sociological trust research. However, a similar argument is found within trust phenomenology. This paper re-investigates Williamson’s argument from the perspective of Løgstrup’s phenomenological theory of trust....... Contrary to Williamson, however, Løgstrup’s contention is that trust, not calculativeness, is the default attitude and only when suspicion is awoken does trust falter. The paper argues that while Williamson’s distinction between calculativeness and trust is supported by phenomenology, the analysis needs...... to take actual subjective experience into consideration. It points out that, first, Løgstrup places trust alongside calculativeness as a different mode of engaging in social interaction, rather conceiving of trust as a state or the outcome of a decision-making process. Secondly, the analysis must take...

  10. Dimensions of trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Georg Simmel is the seminal author on trust within sociology, but though inspired by Simmel, subsequent studies of intersubjective trust have failed to address Simmel’s suggestion that trust is as differentiated as the social relations of which it is part. Rather, trust has been studied within...... limited sets of exchange or work relations. This article revisits Simmel’s concept of trust as social form in order to investigate this differentiation. From an interview study, the differentiation and limits of trust are analysed within different types of social relations. Trust is found to vary greatly...... in scope and mode influenced by the intersecting dimensions of relations, objects and situations. Furthermore, trust exists between an outer threshold of expected deceit and an inner threshold of confident reliance. The findings from the qualitative study contribute new knowledge on the diversity of trust...

  11. Control and trust impact on outsourcing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbert-Hansen, Zaza Nadja Lee; Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard; Schmidt, Andreas Strøjer Tynan

    This paper examines the relationships between control, trust and inter-organizational learning in outsourcing relationships, focusing on the question: How do different trust and control strategies affect the sharing and withholding of knowledge between client and vendor? Four studies are conducted......; one, large international client company and three of its vendors. Based on these cases and a literature review, various trust and control strategies are examined, and factors influencing the mutual knowledge interaction are identified. The results show an internal disagreement among managers...

  12. On Propagating Interpersonal Trust in Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Cai-Nicolas

    The age of information glut has fostered the proliferation of data and documents on the Web, created by man and machine alike. Hence, there is an enormous wealth of minable knowledge that is yet to be extracted, in particular, on the Semantic Web. However, besides understanding information stated by subjects, knowing about their credibility becomes equally crucial. Hence, trust and trust metrics, conceived as computational means to evaluate trust relationships between individuals, come into play. Our major contribution to Semantic Web trust management through this work is twofold. First, we introduce a classification scheme for trust metrics along various axes and discuss advantages and drawbacks of existing approaches for Semantic Web scenarios. Hereby, we devise an advocacy for local group trust metrics, guiding us to the second part, which presents Appleseed, our novel proposal for local group trust computation. Compelling in its simplicity, Appleseed borrows many ideas from spreading activation models in psychology and relates their concepts to trust evaluation in an intuitive fashion. Moreover, we provide extensions for the Appleseed nucleus that make our trust metric handle distrust statements.

  13. Lending Competition and Relationship Banking: Evidence from Japanese Prefectural Level Data

    OpenAIRE

    Ogura, Yoshiaki; Yamori, Nobuyoshi

    2009-01-01

    The question of whether more competition among banks increases relationship banking, which is predicted to improve credit availability for informationally opaque firms in theory, is a controversial issue in the banking literature. By using firm-level survey data in Japan, this paper provides evidence for the negative correlation between lending competition and the provision of relationship banking . This paper raises the question whether fierce interbank competition is always beneficial for...

  14. EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS AND THE ROMANIAN STOCK MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iamandi Irina Eugenia

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on empirical studies and theoretical evidence, the paper investigates the relationship between mergers and acquisitions in Romania and Romanian stock market, described by the BET and BET-C indexes. By using the Granger causality test for the number of mergers and acquisitions, the research results suggest that, for the market and period considered, one way and both ways relationships are present.

  15. Insecure Commitment and Resistance: An Examination of Change Leadership, Self-Efficacy, and Trust on the Relationship between Job Insecurity, Employee Commitment, and Resistance to Organizational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert Elijah

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the mediation role of self-efficacy and the moderating roles of change leadership strategy and trust on the change attitudes of job insecure employees. Using job insecurity theory (Greenhalgh, 1983), Chin & Benne's (1961) seminal classification of change leadership strategies and the tripartite model of…

  16. Do professional boundaries limit trust?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smythe, Elizabeth; Hennessy, Julia; Abbott, Max; Hughes, Frances

    2018-02-01

    The present study uses stories of mental health support workers talking about their relationship with clients to wonder about how trust might be limited by the professional boundaries of nursing. The writing arose out of an appreciative inquiry study looking at the role of mental health support workers. Participants talked about how they worked with their clients. As researchers, we were struck by the depth of trust that was built between worker and client. We have brought a phenomenological lens to wonder about the nature of trust, as shown in the data. The original research sought to identify what was working well for mental health support workers. The present study brings a phenomenological interpretive approach to four stories from the discovery phase of the study, with our thinking informed by Heidegger and van Manen. Interviews were conducted with 26 mental health support workers and six stakeholders in 2012-2103. For this paper, we drew from those transcripts stories of three mental health support workers and one stakeholder. Through a process of talking together, writing, and rewriting, we wondered about the meaning within these stories, with a strong focus on how trust was enacted. We saw that mental health support workers in this study, by not carrying the boundaries of being 'professional', seemed free to grow a stronger relationship of trust which was therapeutic. We ask: Is it time to rethink how professional boundaries limit the level of trust achieved with clients to the detriment of impactful care? © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  17. Overview of royalty trusts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panarites, P.

    1996-01-01

    The nature of royalty trusts as a means of financing exploration, development, production, and refining of oil sand and heavy oil to produce competitively marketable petroleum products, was reviewed. Attributes of the two distinct classes of royalty trusts - reflexive class and the fundamental class royalty trusts - and the considerations underlying each one, were summarized. The overall conclusion was that the future performance of conventional oil and gas royalty trusts (reflexive class) will depend heavily on interest rate levels and management's ability to complete acquisitions financed with new trust unit issues. Fundamental class royalty trusts also offer long term pure exposure to the underlying business, in addition to yield

  18. Looking for Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøge, Ask Risom; Lauritsen, Peter

    Trust and surveillance are often seen as opposites. Trust is regularly characterized as the glue that holds society together, while surveillance is seen as corrosive. However, in Scandinavia high levels of trust and surveillance coexist. It is therefore interesting to investigate...... if there is a connection between these phenomena and ask what is the role of trust in the spread of surveillance in Scandinavia? The aim of this paper is: 1) to investigate the role of trust in the history of the Danish DNA database and 2) to experiment with Actor-Network-Theory (ANT) as an ap-proach in studies of trust....

  19. Trust arguments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelman, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    cycle has a complex of general machine building technologies which permit, if necessary, to organize in a very short period, production of non-traditional articles and avoid limitation of working places. This is well proved by the experience of 'Elemash', where in connection with the decrease of demand for nuclear fuel after the accident in Chernobyl, different products are now produced, equipment for dairy industry, tubular, heating elements, hard-alloy tooling for metal cutting and mining industries, a variety of domestic appliances. This peculiar 'conversion' permitted not only preserve the staff but provide employment of youth. We concentrate our attention on one more social side of activity of our enterprise, more of a few in the town having stable interior and exterior market for its products; this is very important in the period of newly-born market economy in Russia. Annual turnover of 'Elemash', only for export of nuclear fuel, is more tan 200 million dollars. It is natural that the majority of this sum comes as taxes to the municipal budget, where it is used for developing social infrastructure of the town (culture, port, health protection education, i.e. for the welfare of the population). Evaluating te general reaction of the population and public, which was discovered as a result of communicating in the Centre with thousands of inhabitants of the town we can state that it is quite favourable and our task is to strengthen the trust to the enterprise in the future. (author)

  20. The Idea of Dialogue, Trust and Reconciliation in the Pilgrimage of Trust on Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyńska Agnieszka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to present the Pilgrimage of Trust on Earth organized by the brothers of Taizé Community as an event building a relationship of dialogue, trust and reconciliation between nations and cultures. The article features an in-depth discussion of the elements of youth meetings and their impact on developing an attitude of dialogue and trust. We will briefly discuss the means used by the brothers to develop a dialogue between people, as well as the methods of spreading the idea of dialogue, trust and solidarity in interpersonal and international relations.

  1. Social trust and ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meadd, E. [Faculty of Environmental Studies, York University, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    The linkages that exist between the environmental risks associated with nuclear energy production (both perceived and real) and the myriad of social and political issues and processes that influence social trust are a current issue in literature, but are not well explored, particularly for the Canadian context. This paper will examine one particular issue and its relationship with social trust: ionizing radiation and public health. Social trust is defined for this paper as including interpersonal trust, but having a much broader focus, extending to public trust in governments, institutions, corporations, and the power elite, and across whole societies. Of particular interest for the nuclear energy issue is how waning social trust may impact the functioning of democratic decision-making processes, particularly those associated with the siting of waste facilities. Social trust is a central issue in the management of environmental risks, particularly those related to high technology; its absence is seen as a major cause of intractable conflict in decisions related to nuclear power generation and waste disposal. Understanding the dynamics of social trust is important if a resolution is to be found to the nuclear waste management debate in Canada, that is, one that involves broad public, or social, support. For instance, what factors cause distrust to emerge, and when distrust emerges, what authorities do members of affected communities seek out for information and support? This paper begins to examine social trust in relation to human health and ionizing radiation, particularly low dose radiation from radioactive wastes resulting from uranium and radium processing activities in Port Hope, Ontario. These activities date back to the 1930s and are of great concern to community members. This paper looks at some of the roots of public concern, for example, scientific uncertainty around whether or not human health is compromised by exposure to low dose ionizing radiation

  2. Social trust and ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meadd, E.

    2002-01-01

    The linkages that exist between the environmental risks associated with nuclear energy production (both perceived and real) and the myriad of social and political issues and processes that influence social trust are a current issue in literature, but are not well explored, particularly for the Canadian context. This paper will examine one particular issue and its relationship with social trust: ionizing radiation and public health. Social trust is defined for this paper as including interpersonal trust, but having a much broader focus, extending to public trust in governments, institutions, corporations, and the power elite, and across whole societies. Of particular interest for the nuclear energy issue is how waning social trust may impact the functioning of democratic decision-making processes, particularly those associated with the siting of waste facilities. Social trust is a central issue in the management of environmental risks, particularly those related to high technology; its absence is seen as a major cause of intractable conflict in decisions related to nuclear power generation and waste disposal. Understanding the dynamics of social trust is important if a resolution is to be found to the nuclear waste management debate in Canada, that is, one that involves broad public, or social, support. For instance, what factors cause distrust to emerge, and when distrust emerges, what authorities do members of affected communities seek out for information and support? This paper begins to examine social trust in relation to human health and ionizing radiation, particularly low dose radiation from radioactive wastes resulting from uranium and radium processing activities in Port Hope, Ontario. These activities date back to the 1930s and are of great concern to community members. This paper looks at some of the roots of public concern, for example, scientific uncertainty around whether or not human health is compromised by exposure to low dose ionizing radiation

  3. The differences between medical trust and mistrust and their respective influences on medication beliefs and ART adherence among African-Americans living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellowski, Jennifer A; Price, Devon M; Allen, Aerielle M; Eaton, Lisa A; Kalichman, Seth C

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between medical mistrust and trust and to determine if these measures differentially predict antiretroviral therapy (ART) medication adherence for African-American adults living with HIV. A total of 458 HIV positive African-Americans completed a cross-sectional survey. Self-reported ART adherence was collected using the visual-analog scale. The Beliefs About Medicines Questionnaire was used to assess medication necessity and concern beliefs. All measures of medical mistrust and trust were significantly negatively correlated, ranging from r = -.339 to -.504. Race-based medical mistrust significantly predicted medication necessity and concern beliefs, whereas general medical mistrust only significantly predicted medication concerns. Both measures of trust significantly predicted medication necessity beliefs and medication concerns. Higher levels of race-based medical mistrust predicted lower medication adherence, whereas, neither trust in own physician nor trust in health care provider significantly predicted medication adherence. However, trust in own physician significantly predicted medication necessity beliefs, which predicted medication adherence. Trust and mistrust are not simply opposites of one another. These findings provide evidence for the complexity of understanding the relationship between health care trust, mistrust and patient-related health beliefs and behaviours.

  4. Balancing Trust and Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagd, Søren

    2010-01-01

    of balancing trust and control becomes an issue that deserve ongoing attention. This paper adds to the discussion on the relation between trust and control by showing that the process perspective reframes the problem of balancing trust and control. More generally, by demonstrating the importance of the process......The purpose of this paper is to show that conceptualizing trust and control as interactively related processes, as opposed to more static conceptualizations of the two concepts and the relations between them, adds importantly towards understanding the challenges involved in balancing of trust...... on trust and control made the problem of finding a balance between trust and control a once and for all decision the process perspective introduced here implies that balancing trust and control is an ongoing process of balancing and rebalancing. The implication for management is that the problem...

  5. The relationship between trees and human health: evidence from the spread of the emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffrey H. Donovan; David T. Butry; Yvonne L. Michael; Jeffrey P. Prestemon; Andrew M. Liebhold; Demetrios Gatziolis; Megan Y. Mao

    2013-01-01

    Background: Several recent studies have identified a relationship between the natural environment and improved health outcomes. However, for practical reasons, most have been observational, cross-sectional studies.Purpose: A natural experiment, which provides stronger evidence of causality, was used to...

  6. Observational evidence of the complementary relationship in regional evaporation lends strong support for Bouchet's hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge A. Ramirez; Michael T. Hobbins; Thomas C. Brown

    2005-01-01

    Using independent observations of actual and potential evapotranspiration at a wide range of spatial scales, we provide direct observational evidence of the complementary relationship in regional evapotranspiration hypothesized by Bouchet in 1963. Bouchet proposed that, for large homogeneous surfaces with minimal advection of heat and moisture, potential and actual...

  7. Ombud's Corner: tried and trusted

    CERN Multimedia

    Sudeshna Datta-Cockerill

    2014-01-01

    Trust is an essential ingredient in all working relationships. When trust breaks down, conflicts may arise and teams may stop working in harmony. The Ombud is there to help you to find your way out before the point of no return is reached.   Reliability, integrity, expertise and good will: these are the four pillars on which trust is built. Trust between colleagues may break down for many different reasons, including misunderstandings, and the way to restoring the relationship is through working on these four pillars. For instance, if we assume that we do indeed have the expertise to deal with a particular task assigned to us, we may need to improve our reliability by making sure that we meet deadlines and expectations or demonstrate our integrity by acknowledging and accepting accountability for this, all the while showing that we are doing our best to do whatever it takes to achieve the common goals and restore our colleagues’ faith in us. All four of these pillars need to be in...

  8. Reliable Design Versus Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Melanie; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation focuses on reliability and trust for the users portion of the FPGA design flow. It is assumed that the manufacturer prior to hand-off to the user tests FPGA internal components. The objective is to present the challenges of creating reliable and trusted designs. The following will be addressed: What makes a design vulnerable to functional flaws (reliability) or attackers (trust)? What are the challenges for verifying a reliable design versus a trusted design?

  9. Fording Canadian Coal Trust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popowich, J.; Millos, R. [Elk Valley Coal Corporation, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    This is the first of five slide/overhead presentations presented at the Fording Canadian Coal Trust and Tech Cominco Ltd. investor day and mine tour. The Fording Canadian Coal Trust is described. The Trust's assets comprise six Elk Valley metallurgical coal mines and six wollastonite operations (in the NYCO Group). Trust structure, corporate responsibility, organizational structure, reserves and resources, management philosophy, operating strategies, steel market dynamics, coal market, production expansion, sales and distribution are outlined. 15 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Trust and controlling

    OpenAIRE

    Bieńkowska Agnieszka; Zabłocka-Kluczka Anna

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to discuss the trust within and towards an organisation in the context of implementation of controlling therein. In this context the essence of trust and its importance in organisation management was presented, as well as trust in the contemporary management methods and concepts. Controlling as a trust-building factor inside an organisation was pointed out. Especially controlling and control were described. Moreover management by considering deviations in controll...

  11. Beyond Rule; Trust and Power as Capacities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffnsøe, Sverre

    2013-01-01

    Taking an approach that avoids comprehending power and trust as entities to be studied apart, the article insists on elucidating trust and power as they are enacted in their intimate and delicate relationship to each other and to other human and social phenomena of similar importance......, such as knowledge and experience, gift-giving, hope, freedom and agency. To permit us to understand power and trust as interdependent dimensions, the article confronts the notions of power as command, coercion, control and calculation and develops a conception of power as a capacity. This permits us to consider...... trusting as an exercise of power and an anticipatory affect. Trust is a resolve to bear an experienced risk by confiding in the new and unknown....

  12. Trust Drives Internet Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljunge, Jan Martin

    This paper estimates the effect of trust on internet use by studying the general population as well as second generation immigrants in 29 European countries with ancestry in 87 nations. There is a significant positive effect of trust on internet use. The positive trust effect is not universal...

  13. Trust Management V

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    from 42 submissions. The papers feature both theoretical research and real-world case studies from academia, business and government focusing on areas such as: trust models, social and behavioral aspects of trust, trust in networks, mobile systems and cloud computation, privacy, reputation systems...

  14. Importance of Trust Building Elements in Business-To-Business Agri-Food Chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meixner, O.; Ameseder, C.; Haas, R.; Canavari, M.; Fritz, M.; Hofstede, G.J.

    2009-01-01

    In marketing literature, trust is perceived as a pivotal aspect of business transactions. However, trust is still a concept that needs to be clarified. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to measure the importance of trust building elements in establishing a trustful relationship between trading

  15. The Relationship between Corporate Governance and Value of the Firm in Developing Countries: Evidence from Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdur Rouf

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to examine the relationship between four corporate governance mechanisms (board size, board independent director, chief executive officer duality and board audit committee and value of the firm (performance measures (return on assets, ROA and return on equity, ROE. The paper is based on a sample of 93 listed non-financial companies in Dhaka Stock Exchanges (DSE 2006. Using OLS as a method of estimation, the results provide evidence of a positive significant relationship between ROA and board independent director as well as chief executive officer duality. The results further reveal a positive significant relationship between ROE and board independent director as well as chief executive officer duality. The study, however, could not provide a significant relationship between the value of the firm measures (ROA and ROE and board size and board audit committee.

  16. Social Trust and Fractionalization:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    2008-01-01

    This paper takes a closer look at the importance of fractionalization for the creation of social trust. It first argues that the determinants of trust can be divided into two categories: those affecting individuals' trust radii and those affecting social polarization. A series of estimates using...... a much larger country sample than in previous literature confirms that fractionalization in the form of income inequality and political diversity adversely affects social trust while ethnic diversity does not. However, these effects differ systematically across countries, questioning standard...... interpretations of the influence of fractionalization on trust....

  17. Physical pain increases interpersonal trust in females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Gao, J; Ma, Y; Zhu, C; Dong, X-W

    2018-01-01

    People behave and interact with others differently when experiencing physical pain. Pain has dramatic effects on one's emotional responses, cognitive functions and social interaction. However, little has been known about whether and how physical pain influences interpersonal trust in social interaction. In the present study, we examined the influence of physical pain on trusting behaviour. A total of 112 healthy participants were recruited and assigned to physical pain condition (induced by Capsaicin) and control condition (with hand cream), respectively. Thirty minutes after pain induction, three decision-making tasks were conducted to measure behaviours in social interaction, including trust and trustworthiness (trust game), non-social risk-taking (risk game) and altruism (dictator game). Results showed that physical pain increased interpersonal trust among females, but not among males. Pain did not influence non-social risk-taking, altruism or trustworthiness, as evaluated by monetary transfers in those tasks. Moreover, the effect of physical pain on interpersonal trust was fully mediated by expectation of monetary profit. These findings demonstrate an effect of pain on interpersonal trust and suggest a reciprocity mechanism that the effect may be driven by self-interest rather than altruistic motivation. The pain effect on trust was evident only in females, implying distinct pain coping strategies used by both genders. The present work highlights the social component of pain and extends our understanding of mutual interactions between pain and social cognition. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  18. Relationships Between Librarians and Faculty Still Need Further Investigation. A Review of: Phelps, S. F., & Campbell, N. (2012. Commitment and trust in librarian-faculty relationships: A systematic review of the literature. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 38(1, 13-19. doi:10.1016/j.acalib.2011.11.003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Badia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To examine how the KeyMediating Variable (KMV model of Morganand Hunt’s Commitment-Trust Theory ofRelationship Marketing can be used to look atthe relationships between librarians andfaculty as reported in the literature.Relationship marketing stresses customerretention and long-term customerrelationships, rather than focusing on theproduct.To also identify: 1 the methods reported in theliterature to evaluate relationships betweenlibrarians and faculty; 2 the elements reportedin the literature that lead to commitment andtrust in librarian-faculty relationships; and 3the elements reported in the literature thatprevent commitment and trust in librarianfacultyrelationships.Design – A systematic review.Setting – A university in the United States.Subjects – 304 journal articles on librarianfacultyrelationships were read and analyzedfor variables included in the KMV model ofrelationship marketing.Methods – The authors searched 20 databasesto find publications in various disciplines.Their search strategy included, but was notlimited, to the following keywords: faculty,librarian*, relationships, library users,information professionals, liaisons, academic,university, college*, collaboration, andperceptions. They initially selected 389references based on the occurrence of searchterms in the title or abstract, as well as the presence of related subject headings. The authors then read the abstracts and included/excluded references based on the following criteria:Inclusion criteria: Academic libraries or special libraries. English language, any instance of collaboration or cooperation, subject term or mention of relationship, the words trust or commitment or antecedents or outcomes from the model included in the abstract. Exclusion criteria: blogs, books, emails, or any article that could not meet the subject inclusion criteria (p. 14.Additional articles were identified by scanning the bibliographies of the articles selected at the

  19. The Effect of Relationship Marketing on Customers’ Loyalty (Evidence from Zemen Bank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherinet Boke Chakiso

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractEvery firm without good marketing team and strategies is bound to fail. In order to be competitive and profitable in the industry, bankers should acquire and retain profitable customers. Definitely this is done with Relationship marketing. Relationship marketing is a philosophy of doing business, a strategic orientation that focuses on keeping and improving current customers rather than acquiring new customers. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of Relationship marketing underpinnings on customers‟ loyalty. The study also investigated the mediating role of top management commitment between relationship marketing and customers‟ loyalty. The study is based on information collected from both primary and secondary sources of data. The sample for this study is taken from customers of Zemen bank in Addis Ababa. Data analyses were done using frequencies, percentages, means, standard deviations, cross-tabulations, and tables followed by discussions. Moreover, inferential statistics of bivariate correlations and simple and multiple regressions were used. Findings of this study reveal that there is a significant and strong correlation between relationship marketing and customers‟ loyalty. Moreover, the study reveals that there is significant effect of trust, commitment, communication, and gratitude on predicting customers’ loyalty. Of these relationships, Gratitude emerged as the strongest factor which influences customers’ loyalty while conflict management remained statistically insignificant and negligible influence on customers’ loyalty in the cumulative model. However, all underpinnings had statistically significant influence on customers’ loyalty as individual. Moreover, management commitment had mediating effect between relationship marketing and customers’ loyalty. Depending on the findings, practical implications of this study is in order to ensure loyalty among bank customers; bankers should build a

  20. Validation of the TRUST tool in a Greek perioperative setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzea, Vasiliki-Eirini; Sifaki-Pistolla, Dimitra; Dey, Nilanjan; Melidoniotis, Evangelos

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to translate, culturally adapt and validate the TRUST questionnaire in a Greek perioperative setting. The TRUST questionnaire assesses the relationship between trust and performance. The study assessed the levels of trust and performance in the surgery and anaesthesiology department during a very stressful period for Greece (economic crisis) and offered a user friendly and robust assessment tool. The study concludes that the Greek version of the TRUST questionnaire is a reliable and valid instrument for measuring team performance among Greek perioperative teams. Copyright the Association for Perioperative Practice.

  1. Trust in Supervisor and Job Engagement: Mediating Effects of Psychological Safety and Felt Obligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basit, Ameer A

    2017-11-17

    In the social context of job engagement, the role of trust in supervisor in predicting engagement of employees has received attention in research. Very limited research, however, has investigated the mechanisms mediating this dynamic relationship. To address this important gap in knowledge, the aim of this study was to examine psychological safety and felt obligation as two psychological mechanisms mediating the effect of trust in supervisor on job engagement. Drawing from job engagement and social exchange theories, the mediating roles of psychological safety and felt obligation in the trust-engagement relationship were empirically investigated in the Malaysian context. Using self-report questionnaires, data were collected from 337 nurses employed in a public hospital located near Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Results fully supported the proposed serial multiple mediator model. Trust in supervisor was indirectly related to job engagement via psychological safety followed by felt obligation. This study provides empirical evidence that trust in supervisor makes employees feel psychologically safe to employ and express their selves in their job roles. This satisfaction of the psychological safety need is interpreted by employees as an important socioemotional benefit that, in turn, makes them feel obligated to pay back to their organization through their enhanced level of job engagement. Implications for theory and practice were discussed.

  2. Leadership behaviours that nurture organizational trust: Re-examining the fundamentals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canute S. Thompson

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the variable of trust in organizational relationships and found six leadership behaviors that foster trust. Using a confirmatory factor analysis, these leadership behaviors were examined to see the nature of the relationships among latent variables. The goal of the research was to establish whether there were some fundamental qualities that characterized trust-producing leadership behaviours. The study used data that were gathered from a survey among teachers in Jamaica. The participants work at various levels of the Jamaican education system and they were selected using a convenience sampling technique. The research is timely given the growing evidence of mistrust among leaders and followers in organizations and its findings are significant in that it offers a new and more nuanced perspective on the kinds of leadership behaviours that nurture organizational trust. The instrument used to collect the data was designed by the researcher and tested for reliability using Cronbach’s Alpha and produced a result of .938. e study proposes recommendations for improving organizational trust.

  3. Autonomy, positive relationships, and IL-6: evidence for gender-specific effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenlohr-Moul, Tory; Segerstrom, Suzanne

    2013-05-01

    A body of evidence indicates that women value relationship-centred aspects of well-being more than men do, while men value autonomy-centred aspects of well-being more than women do. The current study examined whether gender moderates relations between autonomy and positive relationships and interleukin-6 (IL-6), a cytokine associated with inflammatory processes. Aspects of well-being consistent with gender-linked values were expected to be most health protective such that positive relationships would predict lower IL-6 only or more strongly in women, and autonomy would predict lower IL-6 only or more strongly in men. In the first study, a sample of 119 older adults (55% female) living in Kentucky were visited in their homes for interviews and blood draws. In the second study, a sample of 1,028 adults (45% female) living across the United States underwent a telephone interview followed by a visit to a research centre for blood draws. In the Kentucky sample, autonomy was quadratically related to IL-6 such that moderate autonomy predicted higher IL-6; this effect was stronger in men. In the US national sample, more positive relationships were associated with lower IL-6 in women only. When the national sample was restricted to match the Kentucky sample, moderate autonomy was again associated with higher IL-6 in men only. Results provide preliminary evidence for gender-specific effects of positive relationships and autonomy on IL-6. Further work is needed to establish the generalizability of these effects to different ages, cultures, and health statuses. What is already known on this subject? A host of previous work indicates that women value relationship-centred aspects of well-being more than men, while men value autonomy-centred aspects of well-being more than women. Further, there is some evidence suggesting that well-being consistent with gender-linked values is more health protective, such that relationships are more protective for women than for men, while

  4. Interventions for improving patients' trust in doctors and groups of doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, Alix; Cash-Gibson, Lucinda; Car, Josip; Sheikh, Aziz; McKinstry, Brian

    2014-03-04

    Trust is a fundamental component of the patient-doctor relationship and is associated with increased satisfaction, adherence to treatment, and continuity of care. Our 2006 review found little evidence that interventions improve patients' trust in their doctor; therefore an updated search was required to find out if there is further evidence of the effects of interventions that may improve trust in doctors or groups of doctors. To update our earlier review assessing the effects of interventions intended to improve patients' trust in doctors or a group of doctors. In 2003 we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Health Star, PsycINFO, CINAHL, LILACS, African Trials Register, African Health Anthology, Dissertation Abstracts International and the bibliographies of studies selected for inclusion. We also contacted researchers active in the field. We updated and re-ran the searches on available original databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library issue 2, 2013), MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), PsycINFO (OvidSP), CINAHL (Ebsco)) as well as Proquest Dissertations and Current Contents for the period 2003 to 18 March 2013. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-randomised controlled trials, controlled before and after studies, and interrupted time series of interventions (informative, educational, behavioural, organisational) directed at doctors or patients (or carers) where trust was assessed as a primary or secondary outcome. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of included studies. Where mentioned, we extracted data on adverse effects. We synthesised data narratively. We included 10 randomised controlled trials (including 7 new trials) involving 11,063 patients. These studies were all undertaken in North America, and all but two involved primary care.  As expected, there was considerable heterogeneity between

  5. Relationship Between Exclusive Breastfeeding and Lower Risk of Childhood Obesity: A Narrative Review of Published Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Uwaezuoke, Samuel N; Eneh, Chizoma I; Ndu, Ikenna K

    2017-01-01

    Background: The pattern of infant feeding during the first 1000-day period—from conception to the second birthday—has a significant influence on the child’s growth trajectory. The relationship between exclusive breastfeeding and lower risk of childhood obesity has elicited much scientific interest, given the fact that this form of malnutrition is becoming a global epidemic. Aim: This narrative review aims to examine the evidence in the literature linking exclusive breastfeeding with reduction...

  6. A Non-linear "Inflation-Relative Prices Variability" Relationship: Evidence from Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Mª Ángeles Caraballo Pou; Carlos Dabús; Diego Caramuta

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents evidence on a non-linear "inflation-relative prices variability" relationship in three Latin American countries with very high inflation experiences: Argentina, Brazil and Peru. More precisely, and in contrast to results found in previous literature for similar countries, we find a non-concave relation at higher inflation regimes, i.e. when inflation rate surpasses certain threshold. This non-concavity is mainly explained by the unexpected component of inflation, which sug...

  7. Explaining Large-N Cooperation: Generalized Social Trust and the Social Exchange Heuristic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    This paper argues that generalized social trust enhances collective action in situations with a large number of actors, who do not have specific information on each other. This effect comes about through the social exchange heuristic, which stimulate conditional cooperation in social dilemmas....... This paper tests this explanation in an individual level test. While the relationship between generalized social trust and large-N collective action is often hypothesized, there is scant micro level evidence as it has mainly been tested at the macro level. Using recycling behavior as an indicator...... of collective action, the paper shows that people holding generalized social trust cooperate more readily in large-N dilemmas. These results are based on a unique survey of respondents in four countries....

  8. Trust in organizations — organizational, intergroup, and value research perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaltiainen J.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this overview article, we discuss the importance of trust for organizations by employing a multilevel and multidisciplinary perspective. We complement and contribute to the existing reviews by (1 considering trust not only within and between individuals and organizations, but also at the societal level, (2 bridging findings and literature from the fields of organizational, intergroup, and value research, and (3 summarizing recent research on the dynamics of trust and its development in organizations. Related to contemplating trust at various levels, we present multiple topics such as individual’s tendency to trust, employees’ trust in leaders, trust between groups with examples from organizational mergers and interethnic relations, and the relationship between trust and societies’ economic competitiveness. We conclude by summarizing recent organizational literature about the development of trust, transfers of trust towards different levels of leadership, and reciprocity in employees’ trust and fairness perceptions. In so doing, we contribute to the means to promote trust, active citizenship and socially sustainable growth of organizations and our societies.

  9. Terrorism, Trust and Tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Susanne; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2017-01-01

    How does terrorism affect social trust and tourism? The rising number of terrorist attacks in Western Europe has caused safety problems not only for local citizens but also for tourists. In fact, terrorists challenge the formal violence monopoly of the state thus creating a sense of anarchy...... and distrust. Social trust is about trusting strangers, so when less predictable behaviour occurs in, a given country, people become more careful as they tend to trust most other people less. An interesting case for future research is Scandinavia as the level of terrorism is still low and, at the same time......, Scandinavia can record most social trust in the world meaning a competitive advantage when attracting tourists. Arguably, a double dividend is created from fighting terrorism, namely more social trust accumulated and more tourists attracted. Future research should therefore try to further test our model...

  10. Governance, Trust, and Taxes

    OpenAIRE

    Schrøter Joensen, Juanna; Weihe, Guðrið

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the role of social capital (trust) vis-à-vis the propensity of a country to be a tax haven. The empirical analysis corroborates that better governed countries have a higher ceteris paribus probability to be tax havens. However, social capital counteracts the effect of governance quality. This effect is so strong that the partial effect of governance quality is reversed for countries with the trust index in the top quartile – making these high trust countries le...

  11. Trust and Social Commerce

    OpenAIRE

    Julia Y. Lee

    2016-01-01

    Internet commerce has transformed the marketing of goods and services. The separation between point of sale and seller, and the presence of geographically dispersed sellers who do not engage in repeated transactions with the same customers challenge traditional mechanisms for building the trust required for commercial exchanges. In this changing environment, legal rules and institutions play a diminished role in building trust. Instead, new systems and methods are emerging to foster trust in ...

  12. Suspicion, Trust, and Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-08

    Pool (IPIP; Goldberg et al., 2006; 87). A sample item is “I trust others.” Each propensity to trust item was assessed on a 7-point scale from 1...1754-6 Goldberg , L. R., Johnson, J. A., Eber, H. W., Hogan, R., Ashton, M. C., Cloninger, C. R., & Gough, H. C. (2006). The International...trust decision. When examining software inspections, Porter, et al. [6] identified one of the causes of variation in the outcome of the inspection

  13. Leadership, Trust and Organizational Performance in the Public Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo ASENCIO

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study uses survey data on U.S. federal employees to investigate whether employee trust in leaders mediates the relationship between transactional and transformational leadership behaviors and organizational performance. The fi ndings suggest that both transactional and transformational leadership behaviors and employee trust in leaders are positively associated with organizational performance. Employee trust in leaders was found to mediate the relationship between transformational and transactional leadership and organizational performance. The study suggests that public leaders need to continue to develop their leadership skills, particularly their transformational leadership ones, as well as build trust to improve performance within their organizations.

  14. Patient-physician trust: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, D H; Campbell, B

    1997-02-01

    Patients' trust in their physicians has recently become a focus of concern, largely owing to the rise of managed care, yet the subject remains largely unstudied. We undertook a qualitative research study of patients' self-reported experiences with trust in a physician to gain further understanding of the components of trust in the context of the patient-physician relationship. Twenty-nine patients participants, aged 26 to 72, were recruited from three diverse practice sites. Four focus groups, each lasting 1.5 to 2 hours, were conducted to explore patients' experiences with trust. Focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded by four readers, using principles of grounded theory. The resulting consensus codes were grouped into seven categories of physician behavior, two of which related primarily to technical competence (thoroughness in evaluation and providing appropriate and effective treatment) and five of which were interpersonal (understanding patient's individual experience, expressing caring, communicating clearly and completely, building partnership/sharing power and honesty/respect for patient). Two additional categories were predisposing factors and structural/staffing factors. Each major category had multiple subcategories. Specific examples from each major category are provided. These nine categories of physician behavior encompassed the trust experiences related by the 29 patients. These categories and the specific examples provided by patients provide insights into the process of trust formation and suggest ways in which physicians could be more effective in building and maintaining trust.

  15. Recommendation based on trust diffusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jinfeng; Li, Li

    2014-01-01

    Recommender system is emerging as a powerful and popular tool for online information relevant to a given user. The traditional recommendation system suffers from the cold start problem and the data sparsity problem. Many methods have been proposed to solve these problems, but few can achieve satisfactory efficiency. In this paper, we present a method which combines the trust diffusion (DiffTrust) algorithm and the probabilistic matrix factorization (PMF). DiffTrust is first used to study the possible diffusions of trust between various users. It is able to make use of the implicit relationship of the trust network, thus alleviating the data sparsity problem. The probabilistic matrix factorization (PMF) is then employed to combine the users' tastes with their trusted friends' interests. We evaluate the algorithm on Flixster, Moviedata, and Epinions datasets, respectively. The experimental results show that the recommendation based on our proposed DiffTrust + PMF model achieves high performance in terms of the root mean square error (RMSE), Recall, and F Measure.

  16. A question of trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Trust lies at the heart of modern science. As scientists, we trust that the papers we read are honest and correct as far as the data, results, techniques and theories in them are concerned. We trust that our colleagues and collaborators are acting properly and ethically - and not being devious, secretive or sloppy. But perhaps even more important is the public's trust in science. After all, much research is funded by taxpayers, who, quite rightly, want to know that the work will not harm them and, preferably, do them some good.

  17. Trust, Contracting, and Adaptation in Agri-Food Hybrid Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Martino

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the relationship between trust and governance structure from a Transaction Cost Economics perspective. The role of trust in the coordinating decisions is variously conceptualized according to the theoretical view adopted by the scholars. The present study adopt the three-level schema introduced by Williamson (1996 and suggest that determinants of trust may operate both at institutional and governance structure level. The analytical framework depicted maintains that trust may determine a reduction of ex post transaction cost in the adaptation of hybrid structure. As a consequence trust appears to be able to extend the range of existence of the hybrids. The empirical part of the study is dedicated to a case study which illustrates the emerging of conditional trust (Fritz et al., 2008 and the role of trust in the adaptation process.

  18. Trust as the Foundation of Resource Exchange in GENI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall Brinn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Researchers and educators in computer science and other domains are increasingly turning to distributed test beds that offer access to a variety of resources, including networking, computation, storage, sensing, and actuation. The provisioning of resources from their owners to interested experimenters requires establishing sufficient mutual trust between these parties. Building such trust directly between researchers and resource owners will not scale as the number of experimenters and resource owners grows. The NSF GENI (Global Environment for Network Innovation project has focused on establishing scalable mechanisms for maintaining such trust based on common approaches for authentication, authorization and accountability. Such trust reflects the actual trust relationships and agreements among humans or real-world organizations. We describe here GENI’s approaches for federated trust based on mutually trusted authorities, and implemented via cryptographically signed credentials and shared policies.

  19. Autonomy, Positive Relationships, and IL-6: Evidence for Gender-Specific Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenlohr-Moul, Tory A.; Segerstrom, Suzanne C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A body of evidence indicates that women value relationship-centered aspects of well-being more than men do, while men value autonomy-centered aspects of well-being more than women do. The current study examined whether gender moderates relations between autonomy and positive relationships and interleukin-6 (IL-6), a cytokine associated with inflammatory processes. Aspects of well-being consistent with gender-linked values were expected to be most health-protective such that positive relationships would predict lower IL-6 only or more strongly in women, and autonomy would predict lower IL-6 only or more strongly in men. Methods In the first study, a sample of 119 older adults (55% female) living in Kentucky were visited in their homes for interviews and blood draws. In the second study, a sample of 1,028 adults (45% female) living across the United States (U.S.) underwent a telephone interview followed by a visit to a research center for blood draws. Results In the Kentucky sample, autonomy was quadratically related to IL-6 such that average autonomy predicted higher IL-6; this effect was stronger in men, providing support for our hypothesis only at above average levels of IL-6. In the U.S. national sample, more positive relationships were associated with lower IL-6 in women only. When the national sample was restricted to match the Kentucky sample, higher autonomy was associated with lower IL-6 in men only. Conclusions Results provide preliminary evidence for gender-specific effects of positive relationships and autonomy on IL-6. Further work is needed to establish the generalizability of these effects to different ages, cultures, and health statuses. PMID:22908985

  20. Trust Discovery in Online Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piorkowski, John

    2014-01-01

    This research aims to discover interpersonal trust in online communities. Two novel trust models are built to explain interpersonal trust in online communities drawing theories and models from multiple relevant areas, including organizational trust models, trust in virtual settings, speech act theory, identity theory, and common bond theory. In…

  1. Robot transparency, trust and utility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortham, Robert H.; Theodorou, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    As robot reasoning becomes more complex, debugging becomes increasingly hard based solely on observable behaviour, even for robot designers and technical specialists. Similarly, non-specialist users have difficulty creating useful mental models of robot reasoning from observations of robot behaviour. The EPSRC Principles of Robotics mandate that our artefacts should be transparent, but what does this mean in practice, and how does transparency affect both trust and utility? We investigate this relationship in the literature and find it to be complex, particularly in nonindustrial environments where, depending on the application and purpose of the robot, transparency may have a wider range of effects on trust and utility. We outline our programme of research to support our assertion that it is nevertheless possible to create transparent agents that are emotionally engaging despite having a transparent machine nature.

  2. Age-disparate relationships and HIV incidence in adolescent girls and young women: evidence from Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Robin; Gregson, Simon; Eaton, Jeffrey W; Mugurungi, Owen; Rhead, Rebecca; Takaruza, Albert; Maswera, Rufurwokuda; Nyamukapa, Constance

    2017-06-19

    Age-disparate sexual relationships with older men may drive high rates of HIV acquisition in young women in sub-Saharan Africa, but evidence is limited. We investigate the association between age-disparate relationships and HIV incidence in Manicaland, Zimbabwe. A general-population open-cohort study (six surveys) (1998-2013). A total of 3746 young women aged 15-24 years participated in consecutive surveys and were HIV-negative at the beginning of intersurvey periods. Last sexual partner age difference and age-disparate relationships [intergenerational (≥10 years age difference) and intragenerational (5-9 years) versus age-homogeneous (0-4 years)] were tested for associations with HIV incidence in Cox regressions. A proximate determinants framework was used to explore factors possibly explaining variations in the contribution of age-disparate relationships to HIV incidence between populations and over time. About 126 HIV infections occurred over 8777 person-years (1.43 per 100 person-years; 95% confidence interval = 1.17-1.68). Sixty-five percent of women reported partner age differences of at least 5 years. Increasing partner age differences were associated with higher HIV incidence [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 1.05 (1.01-1.09)]. Intergenerational relationships tended to increase HIV incidence [aHR = 1.78 (0.96-3.29)] but not intragenerational relationships [aHR = 0.91 (0.47-1.76)]. Secondary education was associated with reductions in intergenerational relationships [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 0.49 (0.36-0.68)]. Intergenerational relationships were associated with partners having concurrent relationships [aOR = 2.59 (1.81-3.70)], which tended to increase HIV incidence [aHR = 1.74 (0.96-3.17)]. Associations between age disparity and HIV incidence did not change over time. Sexual relationships with older men expose young women to increased risk of HIV acquisition in Manicaland, which did not change over time, even with introduction

  3. Relationship Between Exclusive Breastfeeding and Lower Risk of Childhood Obesity: A Narrative Review of Published Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel N Uwaezuoke

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The pattern of infant feeding during the first 1000-day period—from conception to the second birthday—has a significant influence on the child’s growth trajectory. The relationship between exclusive breastfeeding and lower risk of childhood obesity has elicited much scientific interest, given the fact that this form of malnutrition is becoming a global epidemic. Aim: This narrative review aims to examine the evidence in the literature linking exclusive breastfeeding with reduction in obesity in children. Literature search: Using appropriate search terms, PubMed database was searched for relevant articles that met the review objective. Results: Evidence for the protective effect of exclusive breastfeeding against childhood obesity have been provided by studies which explored 5 physiologic mechanisms and those that established the causality between breastfeeding and lower risk of obesity. The few studies that disputed this relationship highlighted the influence of confounding factors. A new insight on molecular mechanisms, however, points to a direct and indirect effect of human milk oligosaccharides on the prevention of overweight and obesity. Conclusions: The preponderance of current evidence strongly suggests that exclusivity in breastfeeding can prevent the development of obesity in children.

  4. Relationship Between Exclusive Breastfeeding and Lower Risk of Childhood Obesity: A Narrative Review of Published Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwaezuoke, Samuel N; Eneh, Chizoma I; Ndu, Ikenna K

    2017-01-01

    The pattern of infant feeding during the first 1000-day period-from conception to the second birthday-has a significant influence on the child's growth trajectory. The relationship between exclusive breastfeeding and lower risk of childhood obesity has elicited much scientific interest, given the fact that this form of malnutrition is becoming a global epidemic. This narrative review aims to examine the evidence in the literature linking exclusive breastfeeding with reduction in obesity in children. Using appropriate search terms, PubMed database was searched for relevant articles that met the review objective. Evidence for the protective effect of exclusive breastfeeding against childhood obesity have been provided by studies which explored 5 physiologic mechanisms and those that established the causality between breastfeeding and lower risk of obesity. The few studies that disputed this relationship highlighted the influence of confounding factors. A new insight on molecular mechanisms, however, points to a direct and indirect effect of human milk oligosaccharides on the prevention of overweight and obesity. The preponderance of current evidence strongly suggests that exclusivity in breastfeeding can prevent the development of obesity in children.

  5. FEDERAL TRUST AND OTHER EARMARKED FUNDS: Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    .... Despite their importance in the budget, the relationship between federal trust funds such as the Social Security or Medicare trust funds and other earmarked funds such as the Nuclear Waste Fund...

  6. A Matter of Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Jill Harrison; Connolly, Christine; Lee, Abda; Fairley, Emmanuel

    2018-01-01

    Educators at a turnaround school in Boston describe how they built a foundation for achievement gains by building and safeguarding relational trust among staff. The school, Henry Grew Elementary, focused in particular on fostering educators' readiness to trust, clarifying roles, and solidifying routines to support connection and risk-taking.

  7. Trust in regulatory regimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Six, Frédérique; Verhoest, Koen

    2017-01-01

    Within political and administrative sciences generally, trust as a concept is contested, especially in the field of regulatory governance. This groundbreaking book is the first to systematically explore the role and dynamics of trust within regulatory regimes. Conceptualizing, mapping and analyzing

  8. Being pragmatic about trust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nickel, P.J.; Faulkner, P.; Simpson, T.

    2017-01-01

    Trust remains an ambiguous and contested concept. A way to help settle some of the disagreements about it is to appeal to an Explanatory Constraint, according to which trust should (a) be explained as the outcome of central concerns or interests of the relevant actors, and (b) explain the emergence

  9. Towards trusted tradelanes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulstijn, Joris; Hofman, W.; Zomer, G.; Tan, Yao-Hua; Scholl, H. J.; Glassey, O.; Janssen, M.

    Customs administrations are exploring system-based approaches to regulatory supervision, taking the entire set of controls in a process into account. In addition to Trusted Traders, which are recognized by a certification process, customs are considering to identify so called Trusted Trade Lanes:

  10. Neither Trust nor Distrust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tina Gudrun

    2016-01-01

    This article deals with the politicised notions of trust and social cohesion in urban spaces through a focus on practices of everyday relations in a mixed neighbourhood. Quantitative studies maintain that ethnically diverse neighbourhoods lack in trust and solidarity. However, the very meaning an...

  11. The Phenomenon of Trust in Flat Owners’ Collective Renovation Strategies in Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liis Ojamäe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mobilising fl at owners into renovating residential blocks in post-socialist countries has been a complicated process. Evidence from Estonia shows that the success of collective renewal strategies depends not only on economic issues but also on ways investments are organised and, signifi cantly, the relationship of trust between diff erent actors. The paper aims at conceptualising the issue of institutional trust upon the experience of urban housing renewal in Estonia. It is contended that trust is crucial for the joint decision-making in a block as well as for facilitating negotiations between fl at owners’ associations, local municipalities and market actors. The paper draws on three qualitative studies conducted in Estonia during the 2000s, which allow asserting that trust towards new strategies of housing renewal can be achieved and maintained by ‘best practices’, which by concentrating expert knowledge also denote direct communication between experts and fl at owners. While it is important to raise the residents’ technical knowledgeability, it is indispensable to develop abilities to manage and communicate the renovation process between diff erent parties. The public sector is conceived to be a central actor in sustaining trust between actors who have no previous positive experience from collective residential strategies

  12. Association between interpersonal trust, reciprocity, and suicidal behaviors: A longitudinal cohort study in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ja Young; Yoon, Jaehong; Kim, Myoung-Hee; Kim, Seung-Sup

    2017-06-01

    While a growing body of evidence suggest that social capital including interpersonal trust and reciprocity might be associated with mental health outcomes, few studies have explored the relationship with suicidal behaviors. This research examined the prospective association between interpersonal trust and reciprocity and suicidal behaviors using the Korea Welfare Panel Study, a nationally representative longitudinal cohort dataset in South Korea. Interpersonal trust and reciprocity were assessed at the 7th wave of the survey (2012), and each measure was classified into two categories (low vs. high). Experience of suicidal ideation, planning, and attempt was assessed between the 8th (2013) and 10th wave (2015) of the surveys. After adjusting for confounders including lifetime experience of suicidal behaviors at the 7th wave of the survey (2012) as well as socio-demographic information, the low interpersonal trust group was more likely to experience suicidal ideation (OR: 1.30, 95% CI: 1.11-1.53) compared to the high interpersonal trust group whereas no statistically significant association was observed in the reciprocity analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Reputation offsets trust judgments based on social biases among Airbnb users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahao, Bruno; Parigi, Paolo; Gupta, Alok; Cook, Karen S

    2017-09-12

    To provide social exchange on a global level, sharing-economy companies leverage interpersonal trust between their members on a scale unimaginable even a few years ago. A challenge to this mission is the presence of social biases among a large heterogeneous and independent population of users, a factor that hinders the growth of these services. We investigate whether and to what extent a sharing-economy platform can design artificially engineered features, such as reputation systems, to override people's natural tendency to base judgments of trustworthiness on social biases. We focus on the common tendency to trust others who are similar (i.e., homophily) as a source of bias. We test this argument through an online experiment with 8,906 users of Airbnb, a leading hospitality company in the sharing economy. The experiment is based on an interpersonal investment game, in which we vary the characteristics of recipients to study trust through the interplay between homophily and reputation. Our findings show that reputation systems can significantly increase the trust between dissimilar users and that risk aversion has an inverse relationship with trust given high reputation. We also present evidence that our experimental findings are confirmed by analyses of 1 million actual hospitality interactions among users of Airbnb.

  14. Trust and Contracting in Agri-Food Hybrid Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Martino, Gaetano

    2007-01-01

    The paper aims at examining the hypothesis that the influence of trust on contract can be thought of as a dynamic factor of organizational choices in supply chains. The relationship between contract and trust is delineated on the basis of institutional environment, contractual incompleteness, safeguards and restrictive provisions. The interaction between individual and system elements in the formation of trust and its influence in hybrid contracting is considered. According to a New Instituti...

  15. Some empirical evidence on the relationship between inventory management and social responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Elsayed

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the crucial role that inventory plays in supply chain management (SCM, research that examines the relationship between inventory and corporate social responsibility (CSR is rare. This is surprising given the evidence that inventory represents a huge source of cost, a matter that is often reported as a major impediment in practicing social responsibility in SCM. As such, this paper fills this gape in literature by examining directly the effect of inventory management on CSR. Maximum-likelihood ordered logistic regression was performed on a sample of 38 Egyptian listed firms during the period from 2007 to 2010. The results demonstrate that inventory management exerts a positive and significant coefficient on CSR. Further analysis shows that inventory management cannot be safely dropped from model of analysis. Rather, inventory management does add something unique in explaining differences in CSR. For practitioners interested in optimizing their firms’ values, thinking in managing supply chain imperatives, and specially inventory, in terms of social responsibility may guide them to build up a stock of reputational capital that can be used, in turn, to increase the cost of their rivals. This study, to the best of knowledge, is the first one that offers empirical evidence regarding the effect of inventory management on CSR. Moreover, the paper adds to both SCM and CSR literature by providing empirical evidence from Egypt as an emerging market, where much of the existing evidence reflects experience from developed countries.

  16. I trust it, but I don't know why: effects of implicit attitudes toward automation on trust in an automated system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Stephanie M; Heimbaugh, Heather; LaChapell, Jennifer; Lee, Deborah

    2013-06-01

    This study is the first to examine the influence of implicit attitudes toward automation on users' trust in automation. Past empirical work has examined explicit (conscious) influences on user level of trust in automation but has not yet measured implicit influences. We examine concurrent effects of explicit propensity to trust machines and implicit attitudes toward automation on trust in an automated system. We examine differential impacts of each under varying automation performance conditions (clearly good, ambiguous, clearly poor). Participants completed both a self-report measure of propensity to trust and an Implicit Association Test measuring implicit attitude toward automation, then performed an X-ray screening task. Automation performance was manipulated within-subjects by varying the number and obviousness of errors. Explicit propensity to trust and implicit attitude toward automation did not significantly correlate. When the automation's performance was ambiguous, implicit attitude significantly affected automation trust, and its relationship with propensity to trust was additive: Increments in either were related to increases in trust. When errors were obvious, a significant interaction between the implicit and explicit measures was found, with those high in both having higher trust. Implicit attitudes have important implications for automation trust. Users may not be able to accurately report why they experience a given level of trust. To understand why users trust or fail to trust automation, measurements of implicit and explicit predictors may be necessary. Furthermore, implicit attitude toward automation might be used as a lever to effectively calibrate trust.

  17. Trust and controlling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bieńkowska Agnieszka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to discuss the trust within and towards an organisation in the context of implementation of controlling therein. In this context the essence of trust and its importance in organisation management was presented, as well as trust in the contemporary management methods and concepts. Controlling as a trust-building factor inside an organisation was pointed out. Especially controlling and control were described. Moreover management by considering deviations in controlling and the teamwork in controlling were described. The role of controlling in process of trust-building to an organisation was presented. Establishing relations with the environment and systems of measurement of organisation’s achievements were presented, too.

  18. The Determinants of Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    , in particular emphasizing the role of social trust. This is in turn defined as the confidence people have that strangers, i.e. fellow citizens on whom they have no specific information, will not take advantage of them (Uslaner, 2002; Bjørnskov, 2006). Using the answers to the World Values Survey question “In...... general, do you think that most people can be trusted?”, the by now quite substantial literature has found that social trust is associated with a set of different macroeconomic outcomes: economic growth, the rule of law and overall quality of governance, corruption, education, the extent of violent crime...... and subjective well-being are all influenced by the propensity of people within any nation to trust each other. The questions are therefore where trust comes from and whether or not it can be affected by public policy. The answers to these questions seem to divide researchers into two camps: the optimists...

  19. The Interplay Between Consumer Knowledge, Cognitive Effort, Financial Healthiness And Trust In The Financial Marketplace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben

    with a healthy financial behaviour than with the opposite. Hence, financial managers should be engaged with monitoring and influencing broad-scope trust. To conclude, by taking into account the contextual effect of broad-scope trust, the present study adds to our understanding of knowledge......While trust has long been regarded as one of the most critical variables for developing and maintaining well-functioning financial customer-seller relationships it can be suggested that trust not only relates to customer trust in individual companies (narrow-scope trust). Trust also relates...... to the broader business context in which consumers may carry out their financial behaviour (broad-scope trust). However, despite the well-recognized significance of trust in marketing research, only few studies have investigated the role of broad-scope trust in consumer financial behaviour. Moreover, as one...

  20. The Types of Trust Involved in American Muslim Healthcare Decisions: An Exploratory Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padela, Aasim I; Pruitt, Liese; Mallick, Saleha

    2017-08-01

    Trust in physicians and the healthcare system underlies some disparities noted among minority populations, yet a descriptive typology of different types of trust informing healthcare decisions among minority populations is limited. Using data from 13 focus groups with 102 American Muslims, we identified the types and influence of trust in healthcare decision-making. Participants conveyed four types of trust implicating their health-seeking behaviors-(I) trust in allopathic medicine, (II) trust in God, (III) trust in personal relationships, and (IV) trust in self. Healthcare disparity research can benefit from assessing how these types of trust are associated with health outcomes among minority populations so as to inform intervention programs that seek to enhance trust as a means to improve community health.

  1. Trusted Bytecode Virtual Machine Module: A Novel Method for Dynamic Remote Attestation in Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songzhu Mei

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing bring a tremendous complexity to information security. Remote attestation can be used to establish trust relationship in cloud. TBVMM is designed to extend the existing chain of trust into the software layers to support dynamic remote attestation for cloud computing. TBVMM uses Bayesian network and Kalman filter to solve the dynamicity of the trusted relationship. It is proposed to fill the trust gap between the infrastructure and upper software stacks.

  2. Trust and trust relations from the providers' perspective: the case of the healthcare system in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Sumit; Calnan, Michael; Radkar, Anjali

    2015-01-01

    Commentators suggest that there is an erosion of trust in the relations between different actors in the health system in India. This paper presents the results of an exploratory study of the situation of providers in an urban setting in western India, the nature of their relations in terms of trust and what influences these relations. The data on relationships of trust were collected through interviews and focus group discussions with key informants, including public and private providers, regulators, managers and societal actors, such as patients/citizens, politicians and the media.

  3. Trust that binds: the impact of collective felt trust on organizational performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamon, Sabrina Deutsch; Robinson, Sandra L

    2008-05-01

    The impact of employees' collective perceptions of being trusted by management was examined with a longitudinal study involving 88 retail stores. Drawing on the appropriateness framework (March, 1994; Weber, Kopelman, & Messick, 2004), the authors develop and test a model showing that when employees in an organization perceive they are trusted by management, increases in the presence of responsibility norms, as well as in the sales performance and customer service performance of the organization, are observed. Moreover, the relationship between perceptions of being trusted and sales performance is fully mediated by responsibility norms. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. Social trust and grassroots governance in rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhe, Narisong; Chen, Jie; Tang, Min

    2015-09-01

    The relationship between social trust and governance has been one of the focal points of the academic and policy-making communities. Empirical studies on this relationship, however, have focused mostly on democracies. The scarcity of such studies in authoritarian countries has left many important questions unanswered: Is social trust associated with effective governance only in democratic settings? Can social trust improve the quality of governance in non-democracies as well? Drawing on data from 2005 China General Social Survey-a representative survey conducted nationwide at both the individual- and village-level in rural China, this paper attempts to answer these questions empirically by examining the relationship between social trust and the quality of governance in rural China. The findings reveal that different types of social trust-particularized trust and generalized trust-correspond with different effects in rural governance: whereas villagers' trust in people whom they knew personally was positively and significantly associated with the provision of various public goods and services, their trust in strangers had virtually no impact on rural governance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Neuroendocrine control in social relationships in non-human primates: Field based evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Toni E; Crockford, Catherine

    2017-05-01

    Primates maintain a variety of social relationships and these can have fitness consequences. Research has established that different types of social relationships are unpinned by different or interacting hormonal systems, for example, the neuropeptide oxytocin influences social bonding, the steroid hormone testosterone influences dominance relationships, and paternal care is characterized by high oxytocin and low testosterone. Although the oxytocinergic system influences social bonding, it can support different types of social bonds in different species, whether pair bonds, parent-offspring bonds or friendships. It seems that selection processes shape social and mating systems and their interactions with neuroendocrine pathways. Within species, there are individual differences in the development of the neuroendocrine system: the social environment individuals are exposed to during ontogeny alters their neuroendocrine and socio-cognitive development, and later, their social interactions as adults. Within individuals, neuroendocrine systems can also have short-term effects, impacting on social interactions, such as those during hunting, intergroup encounters or food sharing, or the likelihood of cooperating, winning or losing. To understand these highly dynamic processes, extending research beyond animals in laboratory settings to wild animals living within their natural social and ecological setting may bring insights that are otherwise unreachable. Field endocrinology with neuropeptides is still emerging. We review the current status of this research, informed by laboratory studies, and identify questions particularly suited to future field studies. We focus on primate social relationships, specifically social bonds (mother-offspring, father-offspring, cooperative breeders, pair bonds and adult platonic friendships), dominance, cooperation and in-group/out-group relationships, and examine evidence with respect to the 'tend and defend' hypothesis. Copyright © 2017

  6. The relationship between trees and human health: evidence from the spread of the emerald ash borer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Geoffrey H; Butry, David T; Michael, Yvonne L; Prestemon, Jeffrey P; Liebhold, Andrew M; Gatziolis, Demetrios; Mao, Megan Y

    2013-02-01

    Several recent studies have identified a relationship between the natural environment and improved health outcomes. However, for practical reasons, most have been observational, cross-sectional studies. A natural experiment, which provides stronger evidence of causality, was used to test whether a major change to the natural environment-the loss of 100 million trees to the emerald ash borer, an invasive forest pest-has influenced mortality related to cardiovascular and lower-respiratory diseases. Two fixed-effects regression models were used to estimate the relationship between emerald ash borer presence and county-level mortality from 1990 to 2007 in 15 U.S. states, while controlling for a wide range of demographic covariates. Data were collected from 1990 to 2007, and the analyses were conducted in 2011 and 2012. There was an increase in mortality related to cardiovascular and lower-respiratory-tract illness in counties infested with the emerald ash borer. The magnitude of this effect was greater as infestation progressed and in counties with above-average median household income. Across the 15 states in the study area, the borer was associated with an additional 6113 deaths related to illness of the lower respiratory system, and 15,080 cardiovascular-related deaths. Results suggest that loss of trees to the emerald ash borer increased mortality related to cardiovascular and lower-respiratory-tract illness. This finding adds to the growing evidence that the natural environment provides major public health benefits. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Social Collaborative Filtering by Trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Lei, Yu; Liu, Jiming; Li, Wenjie

    2017-08-01

    Recommender systems are used to accurately and actively provide users with potentially interesting information or services. Collaborative filtering is a widely adopted approach to recommendation, but sparse data and cold-start users are often barriers to providing high quality recommendations. To address such issues, we propose a novel method that works to improve the performance of collaborative filtering recommendations by integrating sparse rating data given by users and sparse social trust network among these same users. This is a model-based method that adopts matrix factorization technique that maps users into low-dimensional latent feature spaces in terms of their trust relationship, and aims to more accurately reflect the users reciprocal influence on the formation of their own opinions and to learn better preferential patterns of users for high-quality recommendations. We use four large-scale datasets to show that the proposed method performs much better, especially for cold start users, than state-of-the-art recommendation algorithms for social collaborative filtering based on trust.

  8. Trust and risk: a model for medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, Arvin; Shulruf, Boaz; Jones, Philip

    2017-09-01

    Health care delivery, and therefore medical education, is an inherently risky business. Although control mechanisms, such as external audit and accreditation, are designed to manage risk in clinical settings, another approach is 'trust'. The use of entrustable professional activities (EPAs) represents a deliberate way in which this is operationalised as a workplace-based assessment. Once engaged with the concept, clinical teachers and medical educators may have further questions about trust. This narrative overview of the trust literature explores how risk, trust and control intersect with current thinking in medical education, and makes suggestions for potential directions of enquiry. Beyond EPAs, the importance of trust in health care and medical education is reviewed, followed by a brief history of trust research in the wider literature. Interpersonal and organisational levels of trust and a model of trust from the management literature are used to provide the framework with which to decipher trust decisions in health care and medical education, in which risk and vulnerability are inherent. In workplace learning and assessment, the language of 'trust' may offer a more authentic and practical vocabulary than that of 'competency' because clinical and professional risks are explicitly considered. There are many other trust relationships in health care and medical education. At the most basic level, it is helpful to clearly delineate who is the trustor, the trustee, and for what task. Each relationship has interpersonal and organisational elements. Understanding and considered utilisation of trust and control mechanisms in health care and medical education may lead to systems that maturely manage risk while actively encouraging trust and empowerment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  9. Predators and the public trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treves, Adrian; Chapron, Guillaume; López-Bao, Jose V; Shoemaker, Chase; Goeckner, Apollonia R; Bruskotter, Jeremy T

    2017-02-01

    behavioural ecologies of humans and predators. The scientific community has not reached consensus on sustainable levels of human-caused mortality for many predator populations. This challenge includes both genuine conceptual uncertainty and exploitation of scientific debate for political gain. Second, human intolerance for predators exposes value conflicts about preferences for some wildlife over others and balancing majority rule with the protection of minorities in a democracy. We examine how differences between traditional assumptions and scientific studies of interactions between people and predators impede evidence-based policy. Even if the prior challenges can be overcome, well-reasoned policy on wild animals faces a greater challenge than other environmental assets because animals and humans change behaviour in response to each other in the short term. These coupled, dynamic responses exacerbate clashes between uses that deplete wildlife and uses that enhance or preserve wildlife. Viewed in this way, environmental assets demand sophisticated, careful accounting by disinterested trustees who can both understand the multidisciplinary scientific measurements of relative costs and benefits among competing uses, and justly balance the needs of all beneficiaries including future generations. Without public trust principles, future trustees will seldom prevail against narrow, powerful, and undemocratic interests. Without conservation informed by public trust thinking predator populations will face repeated cycles of eradication and recovery. Our conclusions have implications for the many subfields of the biological sciences that address environmental trust assets from the atmosphere to aquifers. © 2015 The Authors. Biological Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  10. "That is why I have trust": unpacking what 'trust' means to participants in international genetic research in Pakistan and Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Zainab; Hoeyer, Klaus

    2018-06-01

    Trust features prominently in a number of policy documents that have been issued in recent years to facilitate data sharing and international collaboration in medical research. However, it often remains unclear what is meant by 'trust'. By exploring a concrete international collaboration between Denmark and Pakistan, we develop a way of unpacking trust that shifts focus from what trust 'is' to what people invest in relationships and what references to trust do for them in these relationships. Based on interviews in both Pakistan and Denmark with people who provide blood samples and health data for the same laboratory, we find that when participants discuss trust they are trying to shape their relationship to researchers while simultaneously communicating important hopes, fears and expectations. The types of trust people talk about are never unconditional, but involve awareness of uncertainties and risks. There are different things at stake for people in different contexts, and therefore it is not the same to trust researchers in Pakistan as it is in Denmark, even when participants donate to the same laboratory. We conclude that casual references to 'trust' in policy documents risk glossing over important local differences and contribute to a de-politicization of basic inequalities in access to healthcare.

  11. New information and social trust: asymmetry and perseverance of attributions about hazard managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetkovich, George; Siegrist, Michael; Murray, Rachel; Tragesser, Sarah

    2002-04-01

    It has been argued that news about negative events has a much stronger effect on decreasing social trust than does news about positive events on increasing it. This asymmetry principle of trust was investigated in two surveys that also investigated the perseverance of trust. The possibility that established trust attributions persevere in the face of new information raises questions about the limits of trust asymmetry. The two studies yielded evidence that both type of news (good versus bad) and initial general trust in the nuclear power industry or the food supply industry affected level of trust. Compared to individuals trusting the industry, those distrusting the industry exhibited less trust following both bad and good news events. Study I also found that judged informativeness and judged positiveness of news events were affected by type of news and general trust of the industry. Individuals low in general trust of the nuclear power industry judged both bad news and good news as less positive than did those high in general trust. Those low in general trust judged bad news as more informative than good news and than did those high in general trust. An important implication of the perseverance of trust is to focus attention on including not only the effects of information about specific events and actions, but also on the judgment processes underlying social trust. The Salient Value Similarity model is suggested as one way of accounting for these psychological processes.

  12. Perception on justice, trust and tax compliance behavior in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sellywati Mohd Faizal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between justice and trust with tax compliance behavior in Malaysia was studied. Previous studies have acknowledged the perception that justice does have an impact on tax compliance. This study distinguishes justice into procedural justice, distributive justice, and retributive justice. Therefore, this study examined the effect of these three types of justice on tax compliance. Trust also influences the act of tax compliance and it also has a relationship to the element of justice. Perceptions from individual taxpayers were gathered using questionnaires from previous studies. The findings suggest only procedural justice and trust affect tax compliance and procedural justice was positively and significantly correlated to trust. However, trust does not mediate the relationship between justice and compliance. This research will contribute to the tax literature with widened scope on justice in Malaysia.

  13. [Electroconvulsive therapy and level of evidence: From causality to dose-effect relationship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micoulaud-Franchi, J-A; Quilès, C; Cermolacce, M; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Fakra, E; Azorin, J-M

    2016-12-01

    The first objective of this article is to summarize the history of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in psychiatry in order to highlight the transition from clinical level of evidence based on phenomenological descriptions to controlled trial establishing causal relationship. The second objective is to apply the criteria of causation for ECT, to focus on the dose-effect relationship criteria, and thus to analyze the conditions of application of these criteria for ECT. A literature review exploring the use of electricity, ECT and electroencephalography (EEG) in psychiatry was conducted. The publications were identified from the Pubmed and GoogleScholar electronic databases. The scientific literature search of international articles was performed in July 2016. In 1784, a Royal commission established in France by King Louis XVI tested Mesmer's claims concerning animal magnetism. By doing that, the commission, including such prominent scientists as the chemist Anton Lavoisier and the scientist and researcher on electricity and therapeutics Benjamin Franklin, played a central role in establishing the criteria needed to assess the level of evidence of electrical therapeutics in psychiatry. Surprisingly, it is possible to identify the classical Bradford Hill criteria of causation in the report of the commission, except the dose-effect relationship criteria. Since then, it has been conducted blinded randomized controlled trials that confirmed the effectiveness of ECT against ECT placebos for the treatment of psychiatric disorders. At present, the dose-effect relationship criteria can be analyzed through an EEG quality assessment of ECT-induced seizures. EEG quality assessment includes several indices: TSLOW (time to onset of seizure activity ≤5Hz, seconds), peak mid-ictal amplitude (mm), regularity (intensity or morphology of the seizure (0-6)), stereotypy (global seizure patterning, 0-3) and post-ictal suppression (0-3). A manual rating sheet is needed to score theses

  14. Bidirectional relationship between time preference and adolescent smoking and alcohol use: Evidence from longitudinal data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Young Kyung; Shin, Eunhae

    2017-07-01

    Scholarly interest in time preference as a potential predictor of risky health behaviors in adolescents has increased in recent years. However, most of the existing literature is limited due to the exclusive reliance on cross-sectional data, precluding the possibility of establishing the direction of causality. Using longitudinal data from the Korea Youth Panel Survey (2003-7), which followed up a nationally representative sample of 3449 adolescents aged 14years for five years, this study examines a bidirectional relationship between time preference and smoking and drinking behaviors among adolescents. We used discrete time hazard models of smoking and drinking initiation as a function of time preference measured at the baseline and fixed-effects ordered logit model of time preference, respectively. Our measure of time preference was derived from the survey question on a hypothetical choice between immediate enjoyment today and likely higher scores on an exam tomorrow. The overall results provide evidence on the bidirectional relationship; that is, higher time discounting (i.e., greater relative preference for present utility over future utility) results in an increased risk of engaging in smoking and drinking, and conversely, adopting such behaviors leads to a higher discount rate. The bidirectional relationship may function as a mechanism for adolescents to engage in increased smoking and drinking or additional negative health behaviors via gateway effects, strengthening the case for preventing the initiation of risky health behaviors among adolescents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Trust and Credit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harste, Gorm

    The present paper is an answer to the question, how did trust and credit emerge. The systems of trust and credit reduce the environmental and contextual complexities in which trust and credit are embedded. The paper analyses the forms of this reduction in a number of stages in the evolution...... of history from the present risk of modern systems back to early modernity, the Reformation and the high medieval Revolutions in law, organization and theology. It is not a history of economics, but a history of the conditions of some communication codes used in economic systems....

  16. Trust repertoires for collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Lars

    This case study analyses the role of trust in a public private innovation network that involved a private consultancy company as a facilitator. We know that collaboration is a important for innovation, and that collaboration across organizational boundaries is not a trivial issue. But we know very...... little about how such processes develop and how trust, understood as “confident positive expectations” (Lewicki et al. 1998) to collaborative activities, arises out of collaboration. The paper contributes by showing how trust and collaboration are intertwined. The main finding is that a facilitator can...

  17. Competition Fosters Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huck, Steffen; Lünser, Gabriele; Tyran, Jean-Robert Karl

    2012-01-01

    We study the effects of reputation and competition in a trust game. If trustees are anonymous, outcomes are poor: trustees are not trustworthy, and trustors do not trust. If trustees are identifiable and can, hence, build a reputation, efficiency quadruples but is still at only a third of the first...... best. Adding more information by granting trustors access to all trustees' complete history has, somewhat surprisingly, no effect. On the other hand, we find that competition, coupled with some minimal information, eliminates the trust problem almost completely...

  18. Governance, Trust and Taxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weihe, Guri; Joensen, E. Juanna Schröter

    This paper examines the role of social capital (trust) vis-à-vis the propensity of a country to be a tax haven. The empirical analysis corroborates that better governed countries have a higher ceteris paribus probability to be tax havens. However, social capital counteracts the effect of governance...... quality. This effect is so strong that the partial effect of governance quality is reversed for countries with the trust index in the top quartile – making these high trust countries less likely to be tax havens – even as governance quality is increased. Thus it is crucial to consider the interaction...

  19. Trust and Estate Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrington, Brooke

    2012-01-01

    looks at the ways professionals participate in the creation of stratification regimes. Trust and estate planners do this by sheltering their clients' assets from taxation, thereby preserving private wealth for future generations. Using tools such as trusts, offshore banks, and shell corporations......, these professionals keep a significant portion of the world’s private wealth beyond the reach of the state. Trust and estate planning thus contributes to creating and maintaining socioeconomic inequality on a global scale. The significance of the profession has grown as wealth itself has become more fungible...

  20. Quantifying and Qualifying Trust: Spectral Decomposition of Trust Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlovic, Dusko; Degano, Pierpaolo; Etalle, Sandro; Guttman, Joshua

    In a previous FAST paper, I presented a quantitative model of the process of trust building, and showed that trust is accumulated like wealth: the rich get richer. This explained the pervasive phenomenon of adverse selection of trust certificates, as well as the fragility of trust networks in

  1. Organizational Trust of Mobbing Victims: A Study of Turkish Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertürk, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between mobbing behaviour faced by high schools teachers and their organizational trust. The study was based on the survey model. 418 teachers from five different prefectures in the province of Ankara participated in the survey. The NAQ negative acts scale and organizational trust scale…

  2. Trust, power, and vulnerability: a discourse on helping in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Michele A

    2009-12-01

    This article uses philosophical inquiry to present the relationship between the helping role in nursing and the concept of trust essential to it. It characterizes helping as the moral center of the nurse-patient relationship and discusses how patients' expectations of help and caring create obligations of trustworthiness on the part of the nurse. It uses literature from various disciplines to examine different theoretical accounts of trust, each presenting important features of trust relationships that apply to health care professionals, patients, and families. Exploring the concept of trust, and the key leverage points that elicit it, develops a thesis that nurses can improve their understanding of the principal attributes and the conditions that foster or impede trust. The article concludes that trust is the core moral ingredient of helping relationships. Trust as a moral value is even more basic than duties of beneficence, respect, veracity, and autonomy. Trust is the confident expectation that others can be relied upon to act with good will and to secure what is best for the person seeking help.

  3. Trust, Connectivity, and Thriving: Implications for Innovative Behaviors at Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmeli, Abraham; Spreitzer, Gretchen M.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines how trust, connectivity and thriving drive employees' innovative behaviors in the workplace. Using a sample of one hundred and seventy two employees across a variety of jobs and industries, we investigated the relationship between trust, connectivity (both measured at Time 1), thriving and innovative work behaviors (both…

  4. Parental Divorce and Interpersonal Trust in Adult Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Valarie

    2002-01-01

    Examines whether parental divorce is associated with offspring trust in parents, intimate partners, and others. Results reveal that although parental divorce is negatively associated with trust, these effects largely disappear once the quality of the past parent-teen relationship is taken into account. (Contains 48 references and 4 tables.) (GCP)

  5. The Development of Trust in Residential Environmental Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardoin, Nicole M.; DiGiano, Maria L.; O'Connor, Kathleen; Podkul, Timothy E.

    2017-01-01

    Trust, a relational phenomenon that is an important building block of interpersonal relationships and within society, can also be an intermediary outcome of field-based environmental education programs. Trust creates a foundation for collaboration and decision-making, which are core to many ultimate outcomes of environmental education. Yet,…

  6. Review of Interorganizational Trust Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    mais les résultats de la recherche se sont avérés relativement maigres. Bien que nous ayons trouvé de nombreux modèles de confiance...rooted in common values, including a common concept of moral obligation. This type of trust typically takes a long time to develop, and is the type of...Perspectives on relationship repair and implications (Dirks et al., 2009, p. 72) Attributional theories propose that one party uses information about a

  7. Beyond Trust: Plagiarism and Truth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penders, Bart

    2018-03-01

    Academic misconduct distorts the relationship between scientific practice and the knowledge it produces. The relationship between science and the knowledge it produces is, however, not something universally agreed upon. In this paper I will critically discuss the moral status of an act of research misconduct, namely plagiarism, in the context of different epistemological positions. While from a positivist view of science, plagiarism only influences trust in science but not the content of the scientific corpus, from a constructivist point of view both are at stake. Consequently, I argue that discussions of research misconduct and responsible research ought to be explicitly informed by the authors' views on the relationship between science and the knowledge it produces.

  8. Le travail en projet à l’épreuve des rapports de confiance Testing project-based work via relationships of trust  El trabajo por proyecto ante la prueba de las relaciones de confianza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Cihuelo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available En s’appuyant sur l’analyse d’un projet d’informatique industrielle, l’article s’attache à montrer la forme paradoxale du fonctionnement par projet convoquant régulièrement la confiance tout en contrariant son établissement durable. Les relations de confiance prennent une forme obligée et précaire au sens où elles sont soumises aux tensions contradictoires de la temporalité du projet et à l’ambivalence d’acteurs contribuant à des groupes composites. De manière significative, la confiance porte en elle l’enjeu de la construction d’un échange réciproque et, au-delà, la permanence d’alliances entre directions dépassant le cadre même du projet. De manière complémentaire, il se joue dans l’établissement de relations de confiance stables la reconnaissance des individus et leur intégration professionnelle. L’analyse du projet montre que les développeurs vivent une insécurité dans leur relation à l’utilisateur final et à leur environnement de travail, suscitant la méfiance (voire la défiance et affectant la subjectivité des individus.The article uses analysis of an industrial information processing project to scrutinise project-based operations, a paradoxical form of management that consistently relies upon the presence of trust yet makes it difficult for this to take root. Trust relationships tend to assume imposed and precarious forms due to the fact that they are subject to contradictory tensions associated with a project’s temporality, but also because of the ambivalence felt by actors contributing to composite groups. The chief issue associated with trust pertains to the construction of mutual exchanges, and, beyond this, the permanence of inter-departmental alliances superseding a particular project framework. Alongside of this, individuals’ need for recognition and professional inclusion also requires the establishment of stable relationships of trust. Project analysis reveals that

  9. Dispositional pathways to trust: Self-esteem and agreeableness interact to predict trust and negative emotional disclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Megan H; Wood, Joanne V; Holmes, John G

    2017-07-01

    Expressing our innermost thoughts and feelings is critical to the development of intimacy (Reis & Shaver, 1988), but also risks negative evaluation and rejection. Past research suggests that people with high self-esteem are more expressive and self-disclosing because they trust that others care for them and will not reject them (Gaucher et al., 2012). However, feeling good about oneself may not always be enough; disclosure may also depend on how we feel about other people. Drawing on the principles of risk regulation theory (Murray et al., 2006), we propose that agreeableness-a trait that refers to the positivity of interpersonal motivations and behaviors-is a key determinant of trust in a partner's caring and responsiveness, and may work in conjunction with self-esteem to predict disclosure. We examined this possibility by exploring how both self-esteem and agreeableness predict a particularly risky and intimate form of self-disclosure, the disclosure of emotional distress. In 6 studies using correlational, partner-report, and experimental methods, we demonstrate that self-esteem and agreeableness interact to predict disclosure: People who are high in both self-esteem and agreeableness show higher emotional disclosure. We also found evidence that trust mediates this effect. People high in self-esteem and agreeableness are most self-revealing, it seems, because they are especially trusting of their partners' caring. Self-esteem and agreeableness were particularly important for the disclosure of vulnerable emotions (i.e., sadness; Study 5) and disclosures that were especially risky (Study 6). These findings illustrate how dispositional variables can work together to explain behavior in close relationships. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Trust Model to Enhance Security and Interoperability of Cloud Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjuan; Ping, Lingdi

    Trust is one of the most important means to improve security and enable interoperability of current heterogeneous independent cloud platforms. This paper first analyzed several trust models used in large and distributed environment and then introduced a novel cloud trust model to solve security issues in cross-clouds environment in which cloud customer can choose different providers' services and resources in heterogeneous domains can cooperate. The model is domain-based. It divides one cloud provider's resource nodes into the same domain and sets trust agent. It distinguishes two different roles cloud customer and cloud server and designs different strategies for them. In our model, trust recommendation is treated as one type of cloud services just like computation or storage. The model achieves both identity authentication and behavior authentication. The results of emulation experiments show that the proposed model can efficiently and safely construct trust relationship in cross-clouds environment.

  11. A formalization of computational trust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Güven - Ozcelebi, C.; Holenderski, M.J.; Ozcelebi, T.; Lukkien, J.J.

    2018-01-01

    Computational trust aims to quantify trust and is studied by many disciplines including computer science, social sciences and business science. We propose a formal computational trust model, including its parameters and operations on these parameters, as well as a step by step guide to compute trust

  12. An intervention to increase patients' trust in their physicians. Stanford Trust Study Physician Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, D H; Bloch, D A; Segal, E S

    1999-02-01

    To investigate the effect of a one-day workshop in which physicians were taught trust-building behaviors on their patients' levels of trust and on outcomes of care. In 1994, the study recruited 20 community-based family physicians and enrolled 412 consecutive adult patients from those physicians' practices. Ten of the physicians (the intervention group) were randomly assigned to receive a one-day training course in building and maintaining patients' trust. Outcomes were patients' trust in their physicians, patients' and physicians' satisfaction with the office visit, continuity in the patient-physician relationship, patients' adherence to their treatment plans, and the numbers of diagnostic tests and referrals. Physicians and patients in the intervention and control groups were similar in demographic and other data. There was no significant difference in any outcome. Although their overall ratings were not statistically significantly different, the patients of physicians in the intervention group reported more positive physician behaviors than did the patients of physicians in the control group. The trust-building workshop had no measurable effect on patients' trust or on outcomes hypothesized to be related to trust.

  13. Trust and virtual worlds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ess, Charles; Thorseth, May

    2011-01-01

    We collect diverse philosophical analyses of the issues and problems clustering around trust online with specific attention to establishing trust in virtual environments. The book moves forward important discussions of how virtual worlds and virtuality are to be defined and understood; the role o...... by virtuality, such as virtual child pornography. The introduction further develops a philosophical anthropology, rooted in Kantian ethics, phenomenology, virtue ethics, and feminist perspectives, that grounds a specific approach to ethical issues in virtual environments....

  14. Trust is other people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luckner, Naemi; Werner, Katharina; Subasi, Özge

    concerning the interaction with strangers through the platform. Putting trust in an online sharing community seems to be the biggest obstacle that influences whether people draw away rather than move closer together and start collaborating in the sharing community. Here, we report on the main issues...... involving other participants in the hope to find appropriate ways to create trustful sharing environments that reassure potential participants rather than play into their fears....

  15. Trusted Computing Technologies, Intel Trusted Execution Technology.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guise, Max Joseph; Wendt, Jeremy Daniel

    2011-01-01

    We describe the current state-of-the-art in Trusted Computing Technologies - focusing mainly on Intel's Trusted Execution Technology (TXT). This document is based on existing documentation and tests of two existing TXT-based systems: Intel's Trusted Boot and Invisible Things Lab's Qubes OS. We describe what features are lacking in current implementations, describe what a mature system could provide, and present a list of developments to watch. Critical systems perform operation-critical computations on high importance data. In such systems, the inputs, computation steps, and outputs may be highly sensitive. Sensitive components must be protected from both unauthorized release, and unauthorized alteration: Unauthorized users should not access the sensitive input and sensitive output data, nor be able to alter them; the computation contains intermediate data with the same requirements, and executes algorithms that the unauthorized should not be able to know or alter. Due to various system requirements, such critical systems are frequently built from commercial hardware, employ commercial software, and require network access. These hardware, software, and network system components increase the risk that sensitive input data, computation, and output data may be compromised.

  16. Causal Relationship Between Islamic Bonds, Oil Price and Precious Metals: Evidence From Asia Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metadjer Widad

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Sukuk or Islamic bonds as new “Halal” securities had wildly expanded in Muslim and non-Muslim capital markets. So, this study aims to investigate the causal relationship between Islamic bonds (sukuk, oil and precious metals “silver and gold” prices in Asia pacific. This study used VAR model relying on daily data. The findings of Granger causality test and impulse-responses analysis results provide substantial evidence in favor of the relation between sukuk and the commodity market variables (oil, gold, and silver meanwhile and unlike many empirical studies, don’t we have found that oil doesn’t cause changes in precious metals prices. Therefore, the idea that Islamic financial markets provide diversification benefits and they are safe havens during oil crisis cannot be supported empirically.DOI: 10.15408/aiq.v10i2.7171

  17. Income-environment relationship in Sub-Saharan African countries: Further evidence with trade openness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbo, Eléazar

    2017-07-01

    This paper examines the dynamic relationship between energy consumption, income growth, carbon emissions and trade openness in fourteen Sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries. The autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) approach to cointegration and the Toda-Yamamoto causality test were used to investigate the long-run and short-run properties, respectively. The long-run estimations give evidence against the environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) hypothesis in SSA countries. In contrast, the results highlight the significant and monotonically contribution of income growth and energy consumption in explaining carbon emissions in the long-run and short-run in several countries. Furthermore, the results show that trade openness enhances economic growth and is not linked to causing carbon emissions in these countries. Hence, a trade incentive policy may be implemented without harmful effect on the quality of the environment.

  18. Trade, trust and the rule of law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Shu; Beugelsdijk, Sjoerd; de Haan, Jakob

    Well-functioning institutions, both formal (i.e. rule of law) and informal (i.e. trust), facilitate economic exchange. To investigate the nature of the relationship between formal and informal institutions, we analyze bilateral trade patterns in a sample of 16 European countries between 1996-2009.

  19. Trust and Transitions in Modes of Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheshire, Coye; Gerbasi, Alexandra; Cook, Karen S.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the relationship between uncertainty and trust in exogenous shifts in modes of social exchange (i.e., those that are not initiated by the individuals in a given exchange system). We explore how transitions from a high uncertainty environment (reciprocal exchange) to lower-uncertainty environments (nonbinding or…

  20. The role of organizational trust in safety climate's influence on organizational outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kath, Lisa M; Magley, Vicki J; Marmet, Matthew

    2010-09-01

    Based on elements of social exchange theory and other conceptualizations of trust, a model was developed situating organizational trust as a central component to the relationship that safety climate has with organizational outcomes. Specifically, the model specified that two facets of safety climate--upward safety communication and management attitudes toward safety--would be positively related to organizational trust. Increased levels of trust would then predict increased motivation to engage in safe job-related behaviors, increased job satisfaction, and decreased turnover intentions. Another hypothesis investigated whether job safety relevance would moderate the relationship between safety climate and trust. Online survey research was conducted with 599 employees from 97 work groups across a New England grocery store chain. Hierarchical linear modeling indicated support for trust mediating the relationship between safety climate and organizational outcomes; further, the relationship between safety climate and trust was stronger within work groups where safety was more relevant. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.