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Sample records for tritium oxide release

  1. Tritium release from neutron irradiated lithium-aluminium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guggi, D.; Ihle, H.R.; Kurz, U.

    1976-01-01

    The release of tritium from neutron irradiated Li 5 AlO 4 (low temperature phase α-Li 5 AlO 4 ; high temperature phase: β-Li 5 AlO 4 ) and Li 2 O powders was studied. Some measurements were also carried out with γ-LiAlO 2 (samples from fused materials) in order to investigate the effect of grain size on the release of tritium. The results on the tritium release from neutron irradiated powdered α- and β-Li 5 AlO 4 and Li 2 O expressed as time constant tau=r 2 /D.π 2 as a function of temperature are given by the following equations: α-Li 5 AlO 4 :ln(1/tau)=-(4460+-720)/T-(1.13+-0.14); β-Li 5 AlO 4 :ln(1/tau)=-(9000+-1200)/T+(6.06+-0.13); Li 2 O:ln(1/tau)=-(3460+-470)/T-(2.48+-0.12). From these equations it is seen that at elevated temperature, e.g. at 600 0 C tritium is released at a much higher rate from β-Li 5 AlO 4 than from α-Li 5 AlO 4 and Li 2 O

  2. Tritium oxidation and exchange: preliminary studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J.E.; Easterly, C.E.

    1978-05-01

    The radiological hazard resulting from an exposure to either tritium oxide or tritium gas is discussed and the factors contributing to the hazard are presented. From the discussion it appears that an exposure to tritium oxide vapor is 10 4 to 10 5 times more hazardous than exposure to tritium gas. Present and future sources of tritium are briefly considered and indicate that most of the tritium has been and is being released as tritium oxide. The likelihood of gaseous releases, however, is expected to increase in the future, calling to task the present general release assumption that 100% of all tritium released is as oxide. Accurate evaluation of the hazards from a gaseous release will require a knowledge of the conversion rate of tritium gas to tritium oxide. An experiment for determining the conversion rate of tritium gas to tritium oxide is presented along with some preliminary data. The conversion rates obtained for low initial concentrations (10 -4 to 10 -1 mCi/ml) indicate the conversion may proceed more rapidly than would be expected from an extrapolation of previous data taken at higher concentrations

  3. Method and apparatus for controlling accidental releases of tritium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Terry R. [Berkeley, CA

    1980-04-01

    An improvement in a tritium control system based on a catalytic oxidation reactor wherein accidental releases of tritium into room air are controlled by flooding the catalytic oxidation reactor with hydrogen when the tritium concentration in the room air exceeds a specified limit. The sudden flooding with hydrogen heats the catalyst to a high temperature within seconds, thereby greatly increasing the catalytic oxidation rate of tritium to tritiated water vapor. Thus, the catalyst is heated only when needed. In addition to the heating effect, the hydrogen flow also swamps the tritium and further reduces the tritium release.

  4. Method and apparatus for controlling accidental releases of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, T.R.

    1980-01-01

    An improvement in a tritium control system based on a catalytic oxidation reactor is provided wherein accidental releases of tritium into room air are controlled by flooding the catalytic oxidation reactor with hydrogen when the tritium concentration in the room air exceeds a specified limit. The sudden flooding with hydrogen heats the catalyst to a high temperature within seconds, thereby greatly increasing the catalytic oxidation rate of tritium to tritiated water vapor. Thus, the catalyst is heated only when needed. In addition to the heating effect, the hydrogen flow also swamps the tritium and further reduces the tritium release

  5. Improvement of the model for surface process of tritium release from lithium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaki, Daiju; Iwamoto, Akira; Jitsukawa, Shiro

    2000-01-01

    Among the various tritium transport processes in lithium ceramics, the importance and the detailed mechanism of surface reactions remain to be elucidated. The dynamic adsorption and desorption model for tritium desorption from lithium ceramics, especially Li 2 O was constructed. From the experimental results, it was considered that both H 2 and H 2 O are dissociatively adsorbed on Li 2 O and generate OH - on the surface. In the first model developed in 1994, it was assumed that either the dissociative adsorption of H 2 or H 2 O on Li 2 O generates two OH - on the surface. However, recent calculation results show that the generation of one OH - and one H - is more stable than that of two OH - s by the dissociative adsorption of H 2 . Therefore, assumption of H 2 adsorption and desorption in the first model is improved and the tritium release behavior from Li 2 O surface is evaluated again by using the improved model. The tritium residence time on the Li 2 O surface is calculated using the improved model, and the results are compared with the experimental results. The calculation results using the improved model agree well with the experimental results than those using the first model

  6. Evaluation of tritium release properties of advanced tritium breeders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, T. [Breeding Functional Materials Development Group, Department of Blanket Systems Research, JAEA, Rokkasho Fusion Institute, Omotedate, Rokkasho-mura (Japan); Ochiai, K. [Fusion Neutronics Group, Department of Blanket Systems Research, JAEA, Tokai-mura (Japan); Edao, Y.; Kawamura, Y. [Tritium Technology Group, Department of Blanket Systems Research, JAEA, Tokai-mura (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    Demonstration power plant (DEMO) fusion reactors require advanced tritium breeders with high thermal stability. Lithium titanate (Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}) advanced tritium breeders with excess Li (Li{sub 2+x}TiO{sub 3+y}) are stable in a reducing atmosphere at high temperatures. Although the tritium release properties of tritium breeders are documented in databases for DEMO blanket design, no in situ examination under fusion neutron (DT neutron) irradiation has been performed. In this study, a preliminary examination of the tritium release properties of advanced tritium breeders was performed, and DT neutron irradiation experiments were performed at the fusion neutronics source (FNS) facility in JAEA. Considering the tritium release characteristics, the optimum grain size after sintering is <5 μm. From the results of the optimization of granulation conditions, prototype Li{sub 2+x}TiO{sub 3+y} pebbles with optimum grain size (<5 μm) were successfully fabricated. The Li{sub 2+x}TiO{sub 3+y} pebbles exhibited good tritium release properties similar to the Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles. In particular, the released amount of HT gas for easier tritium handling was higher than that of HTO water. (authors)

  7. Tritium behavior intentionally released in the room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Hayashi, T.; Iwai, Y.; Yamanishi, T.; Willms, R. S.; Carlson, R. V.

    2008-01-01

    To construct a fusion reactor with high safety and acceptability, it is necessary to establish and to ensure tritium safe handling technology. Tritium should be well-controlled not to be released to the environment excessively and to prevent workers from excess exposure. It is especially important to grasp tritium behavior in the final confinement area, such as the room and/or building. In order to obtain data for actual tritium behavior in a room and/or building, a series of intentional Tritium Release Experiments (TREs) were planned and carried out within a radiologically controlled area (main cell) at Tritium System Test Assembly (TSTA) in Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) under US-JAPAN collaboration program. These experiments were carried out three times. In these experiments, influence of a difference in the tritium release point and the amount of hydrogen isotope for the initial tritium behavior in the room were suggested. Tritium was released into the main cell at TSTA/LANL. The released tritium reached a uniform concentration about 30 - 40 minutes in all the experiments. The influence of the release point and the amount of hydrogen isotope were not found to be important in these experiments. The experimental results for the initial tritium behavior in the room were also simulated well by the modified three-dimensional eddy flow analysis code FLOW-3D. (authors)

  8. Hazards of exposure to tritium and tritium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, R.C.; Kornberg, H.A.

    1954-01-01

    Experimental data pertinent to the evaluation of hazards involved in the exposure of personnel to tritium and tritium oxide are reviewed. Conclusions are drawn and recommendations made with regard to the control of these hazards.

  9. Procedures for the retention of gaseous tritium released from a tritium enrichment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutowski, H.; Bracha, M.

    1987-01-01

    General aim of the study is the comparison of two alternative processes for the retention of gaseous tritium which is released during normal operation and emergency operation in a tritium-enrichment-plant. Two processes for the retention of tritium were compared: 1. Oxidation-process. The hydrogen-gas containing HT will be burnt on an oxidation catalyst to H 2 O and HTO. In a subsequent step the water will be removed from the process by condensation, freezing and adsorption. 2. TROC-process (Tritium Removal by Organic Compounds). The tritium is added to an organic compound (acid) via catalyst. This reaction is irreversible and leads to solid products. (orig./RB) [de

  10. Thermal release of tritium from SS316

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torikai, Y.; Naoe, S.; Penzhorn, R.D.; Akaishi, K.; Watanabe, K.; Matsuyama, M.

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to improve current understanding of the mechanisms controlling the long-term release of tritium incorporated thermally into stainless steel SS316 and to develop reliable as well as economically feasible techniques for the conditioning of tritium-containing metallic wastes, a systematic investigation is underway in Toyama under carefully controlled conditions. The release rate of tritium from SS316 at ambient pressure was determined experimentally in a flow system at several constant temperatures within the range 287-573 K for rather extended periods of time. Under these conditions HTO was found to constitute by far the most important tritium-containing species being released, i.e. approx. 99 %. Much data has accumulated in recent years with a variety of specimens, i.e. type of stainless steel and specimen dimension, loaded with tritium under different pressure and temperature conditions. Dynamic behavior of long-term tritium release has been successfully modeled using a onedimensional diffusion equation and assuming that the release rate is governed by the tritium flux at the metal surface boundary. The implications of the results for interim storage and thermal conditioning of stainless steel waste will be discussed. (orig.)

  11. Tritium transport and release from lithium ceramic breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.E.; Kopasz, J.P.; Tam, S.W.

    1994-01-01

    In an operating fusion reactor,, the tritium breeding blanket will reach a condition in which the tritium release rate equals the production rate. The tritium release rate must be fast enough that the tritium inventory in the blanket does not become excessive. Slow tritium release will result in a large tritium inventory, which is unacceptable from both economic and safety viewpoints As a consequence, considerable effort has been devoted to understanding the tritium release mechanism from ceramic breeders and beryllium neutron multipliers through theoretical, laboratory, and in-reactor studies. This information is being applied to the development of models for predicting tritium release for various blanket operating conditions

  12. Experimental determination of tritium oxidation speed in atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clerc, H.; Calando, J.P.; Paillard, P.; Gros, R.; Hircq, B.

    1988-01-01

    In the framework of fusion reactor safety studies it is necessary to know the kinetics of gaseous tritium oxidation. Literature differences have conducted the European Communities to realize a research program in case of tritium release for a rapid accidental release and for a slow routine release. This report gives the experimental conditions and the results of rapid accidental release. Experiments have been done at Bruyeres-le-Chatel (FR) with a 40 meters chimney [fr

  13. Tritium release from neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Werle, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reactortechnik

    1998-01-01

    One of the most important open issues related to beryllium for fusion applications refers to the kinetics of the tritium release as a function of neutron fluence and temperature. The EXOTIC-7 as well as the `Beryllium` experiments carried out in the HFR reactor in Petten are considered as the most detailed and significant tests for investigating the beryllium response under neutron irradiation. This paper reviews the present status of beryllium post-irradiation examinations performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe with samples from the above mentioned irradiation experiments, trying to elucidate the tritium release controlling processes. In agreement with previous studies it has been found that release starts at about 500-550degC and achieves a maximum at about 700-750degC. The observed release at about 500-550degC is probably due to tritium escaping from chemical traps, while the maximum release at about 700-750degC is due to tritium escaping from physical traps. The consequences of a direct contact between beryllium and ceramics during irradiation, causing tritium implanting in a surface layer of beryllium up to a depth of about 40 mm and leading to an additional inventory which is usually several times larger than the neutron-produced one, are also presented and the effects on the tritium release are discussed. (author)

  14. Analysis of in-pile tritium release experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopasz, J.P.; Tam, S.W.; Johnson, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this work is to characterize tritium release behavior from lithium ceramics and develop insight into the underlying tritium release mechanisms. Analysis of tritium release data from recent laboratory experiments with lithium aluminate has identified physical processes which were previously unaccounted for in tritium release models. A new model that incorporates the recent data and provides for release from multiple sites rather than only one site was developed. Calculations of tritium release using this model are in excellent agreement with the tritium release behavior reported for the MOZART experiment

  15. Tritium releases, birth defects and infant deaths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The AECB has published a report 'Tritium releases from the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station and Birth Defects and Infant Mortality in Nearby Communities 1971-1988' (report number INFO-0401). This presents the results of a detailed analysis of deaths and birth defects occurring in infants born to mothers living in the area (25 Km radius) of the Pickering nuclear power plant, over an 18-year period. The analysis looked at the frequency of these defects and deaths in comparison to the general rate for Ontario, and also in relation to airborne and waterborne releases of tritium from the power plant. The overall conclusion was that the rates of infant death and birth defects were generally not higher in the study population than in all of Ontario. There was no prevalent relationship between these deaths and defects and tritium releases measured either at the power plant or by ground monitoring stations t some distance from the facility

  16. Release of gaseous tritium during reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruecher, H.; Hartmann, K.

    1983-01-01

    About 50% of the tritium put through an LWR reprocessing plant is obtained as tritium-bearing water, HTO. Gaseous tritium, HT has a radiotoxicity which is by 4 orders of magnitude lower than that of HTO. A possibility for the removal of HTO could therefore be its conversion into the gas phase with subsequent emission of the HT into the atmosphere. However, model computations which are, in part, supported by experimental data reveal that the radiation exposure caused by HT release is only by about one order of magnitude below that caused by HTO. This is being attributed to the relatively quick reoxidation of HT by soil bacteria. Two alternatives for producing HT from HTO (electrolysis; voloxidation with subsequent electrolysis) are presented and compared with the reference process of deep-well injection of HTO. The authors come to the conclusion that tritium removal by HT release into the atmosphere cannot be recommended at present under either radiological or economic aspects. (orig.) [de

  17. Tritium adsorption/release behaviour of advanced EU breeder pebbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Matthias H. H.; Rolli, Rolf; Knitter, Regina

    2017-06-01

    The tritium loading of current grades of advanced ceramic breeder pebbles with three different lithium orthosilicate (LOS)/lithium metatitanate (LMT) compositions (20-30 mol% LMT in LOS) and pebbles of EU reference material, was performed in a consistent way. The temperature dependent release of the introduced tritium was subsequently investigated by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments to gain insight into the desorption characteristics. The obtained TPD data was decomposed into individual release mechanisms according to well-established desorption kinetics. The analysis showed that the pebble composition of the tested samples does not severely change the release behaviour. Yet, an increased content of lithium metatitanate leads to additional desorption peaks at medium temperatures. The majority of tritium is released by high temperature release mechanisms of chemisorbed tritium, while the release of physisorbed tritium is marginal in comparison. The results allow valuable projections for the tritium release behaviour in a fusion blanket.

  18. Simulation of tritium behavior after intended tritium release in ventilated room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Yasunori; Hayashi, Takumi; Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Nishi, Masataka

    2001-01-01

    At the Tritium Process Laboratory (TPL) at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), Caisson Assembly for Tritium Safety study (CATS) with 12 m 3 of large airtight vessel (Caisson) was fabricated for confirmation and enhancement of fusion reactor safety to estimate tritium behavior in the case where a tritium leak event should happen. One of the principal objectives of the present studies is the establishment of simulation method to predict the tritium behavior after the tritium leak event should happen in a ventilated room. The RNG model was found to be valid for eddy flow calculation in the 50 m 3 /h ventilated Caisson with acceptable engineering precision. The calculated initial and removal tritium concentration histories after intended tritium release were consistent with the experimental observations in the 50 m 3 /h ventilated Caisson. It is found that the flow near a wall plays an important role for the tritium transport in the ventilated room. On the other hand, tritium behavior intentionally released in the 3,000 m 3 of tritium handling room was investigated experimentally under a US-Japan collaboration. The tritium concentration history calculated with the same method was consistent with the experimental observations, which proves that the present developed method can be applied to the actual scale of tritium handling room. (author)

  19. Tritium release experiments with CATS and numerical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munakata, Kenzo, E-mail: kenzo@gipc.akita-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Engineering and Resource Sciences, Akita University, Tegata-gakuen-cho 1-1, Akita 010-8502 (Japan); Wajima, Takaaki; Hara, Keisuke; Wada, Kohei [Faculty of Engineering and Resource Sciences, Akita University, Tegata-gakuen-cho 1-1, Akita 010-8502 (Japan); Takeishi, Toshiharu; Shinozaki, Yohei; Mochizuki, Kazuhiro; Katekari, Kenichi [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, Hakozaki 6-10-1, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Iwai, Yasunori; Hayashi, Takumi; Yamanishi, Toshihiko [Tritium Technology Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    In D-T fusion power plants, large amounts of tritium would be handled. Tritium is the radioisotope of protium, and is easily taken into the human body, and thus the behavior of tritium accidentally released in fusion power plants should be studied for the safety design and radioprotection of workers. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the behavior of tritium released into large rooms with objectives, since complex flow fields should exist in such rooms and they could influence the ventilation of the air containing released tritium. Thus, tritium release experiments were conducted using Caisson Assembly for Tritium Safety Study (CATS) in TPL/JAEA. Some data were taken for tritium behavior in the ventilated area and response of tritium monitors. In the experiments, approximately 17 GBq of tritium was released into Caisson with the total volume of 12 m{sup 3}, and the room was ventilated at the rate of 12 m{sup 3}/h after release of tritium. It was found that placement of an objective in the vessel substantially affects decontamination efficiency. With regard to an experimental result, numerical calculation was performed and the experimental result and the result of numerical calculation were compared, which indicates that experimental results are qualitatively reproduced by numerical calculation. However, further R and D needs to be carried out for quantitative reproduction of the experimental results.

  20. Doses due to tritium releases by NET - data base and relevant parameters on biological tritium behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diabate, S.; Strack, S.

    1990-12-01

    This study gives an overview on the current knowledge about the behaviour of tritium in plants and in food chains in order to evaluate the ingestion pathway modelling of existing computer codes for dose estimations. The tritium uptake and retention by plants standing at the beginning of the food chains is described. The different chemical forms of tritium, which may be released into the atmosphere (HT, HTO and tritiated organics), and incorporation of tritium into organic material of plants are considered. Uptake and metabolism of tritiated compounds in animals and man are reviewed with particular respect to organically bound tritium and its significance for dose estimations. Some basic remarks on tritium toxicity are also included. Furthermore, a choice of computer codes for dose estimations due to chronic or accidental tritium releases has been compared with respect to the ingestion pathway. (orig.) [de

  1. Development of dose assessment code for release of tritium during normal operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, J.; Malatova, I.

    2009-01-01

    A computer code PTM H TO has been developed to assess tritium doses to the general public. The code enables to simulate the behavior of tritium in the environment released into the atmosphere under normal operation of nuclear power plants. Code can calculate the doses for the three chemical and physical forms: tritium gas (HT), tritiated water vapor and water drops (HTO). The models in this code consist of the tritium transfer model including oxidation of HT to HTO and reemission of HTO from soil to the atmosphere, and the dose calculation model

  2. The hazard to man of accidental releases of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brearley, I.R.

    1985-03-01

    Some aspects of the atmospheric dispersion of tritium are discussed, followed by consideration of the dosimetric pathways. In order to assess the significance of a tritium release the doses from various pathways are estimated and compared with the doses estimated from a similar release of iodine-131. The major hazard from tritium is the ingestion of contaminated food products. For similar releases of tritium and I 131 the ingestion hazard can be comparable if the release occurs near and before the end of the harvest season. However, in the tritium release case the agricultural season influences the consequences markedly and, at other times during the year, the ingestion hazard from tritium may be approximately 20 times less. The dose from inhalation of tritium is sensitive to its chemical form and for similar releases of tritiated water and tritium gas then the dose from tritiated water is approximately 10 4 greater than the dose from tritium gas. For similar releases of tritiated water and iodine-131 then a comparison of the inhalation shows that the dose from the iodine is approximately 300 times greater. (author)

  3. Tritium release reduction and radiolysis gas formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batifol, G.; Douche, Ch.; Sejournant, Ch.

    2008-01-01

    At CEA Valduc, the usual tritiated waste container is the steel drum. It allows good release reduction performance for middle activity waste but in some cases tritium outgassing from the waste drums is too high. It was decided to over-package each drum in a tighter container called the over-drum. According to good safety practices it was also decided to measure gas composition evolution into the over-drum in order to defect hydrogen formation over time. After a few months, a significant release reduction was observed. Additionally there followed contamination reduction in the roof storage building rainwater. However hydrogen was also observed in some over-drums, in addition to other radiolysis products. Catalyst will be added to manage the hydrogen risk in the over-drums. (authors)

  4. Environmental contamination due to release of a large amount of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Hiroshi

    1988-01-01

    Tritium release incidents have occurred many times in the Savannah Rever Plant in the U.S. A tritium release incident also took place in the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The present article outlines the reports by the plant and laboratory on these incidents and makes some comments on environmental contamination that may results from release of a large amount of tritium from nuclear fusion facilities. Tritium is normally released in the form of a combination of chemical compounds such as HT, DT and T 2 and oxides such as HTO, DTO and T 2 O. The percentage of the oxides is given in the reports by the plant. Oxides, which can be absorbed through the skin, are considered to be nearly a thousand times more toxic than the other type of tritium compounds. The HT type compounds (HT, DT and T 2 ) can be oxidized by microorganisms in soil into oxides (HTO, DTO and T 2 O) and therefore, great care should also given to this type of compounds. After each accidental tritium release, the health physics group of the plant collected various environmental samples, including ground surface water, milk, leaves of plants, soil and human urine, in leeward areas. Results on the contamination of surface water, fish and underground water are outlined and discussed. (Nogami, K.)

  5. Investigation of tritium release and retention in lithium aluminate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopasz, J.P.; Tistchenko, S.; Botter, F.

    1991-01-01

    Tritium release from lithium aluminate, although previously investigated by both in-reactor and ex-reactor experiments, remains poorly understood. Agreement between experiments is lacking, and the mechanisms responsible for tritium release from lithium aluminate are under debate. In an effort to improve our understanding of the mechanisms of tritium release from lithium ceramics, we have investigated tritium release from pure lithium aluminate and lithium aluminate doped with impurities. The results of these experiments on large grain size material indicate that after anneals at low temperature, a large fraction of the tritium present before the anneal remains in the sample. We have modeled this behavior based on first-order release from three types of sites. At the lowest temperature, the release is dominated by one site, while the tritium in the other sites is retained in the solid. Adding magnesium dopant to the ceramic appears to alter the distribution of tritium between the sites. This addition decreases the fraction of tritium released at 777 degree C, while increasing the fractions released at 538 and 950 degree C. 11 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  6. Tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiege, A.

    1992-07-01

    This report contains information on chemical and physical properties, occurence, production, use, technology, release, radioecology, radiobiology, dose estimates, radioprotection and legal aspects of tritium. The objective of this report is to provide a reliable data base for the public discussion on tritium, especially with regard to its use in future nuclear fusion plants and its radiological assessment. (orig.) [de

  7. Description of tritium release from lithium titanate at constant temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, L.; Lagos, S.; Jimenez, J.; Saravia, E. [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago (Chile)

    1998-03-01

    Lithium Titanate Ceramics have been prepared by the solid-state route, pebbles and pellets were fabricated by extrusion and their microstructure was characterized in our laboratories. The ceramic material was irradiated in the La Reina Reactor, RECH-1. A study of post-irradiation annealing test, was performed measuring Tritium release from the Lithium Titanate at constant temperature. The Bertone`s method modified by R. Verrall is used to determine the parameters of Tritium release from Lithium Titanate. (author)

  8. Dose Assessment Model for Chronic Atmospheric Releases of Tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Huifang; Yao Rentai

    2010-01-01

    An improved dose assessment model for chronic atmospheric releases of tritium was proposed. The proposed model explicitly considered two chemical forms of tritium.It was based on conservative assumption of transfer of tritiated water (HTO) from air to concentration of HTO and organic beam tritium (OBT) in vegetable and animal products.The concentration of tritium in plant products was calculated based on considering dividedly leafy plant and not leafy plant, meanwhile the concentration contribution of tritium in the different plants from the tritium in soil was taken into account.Calculating the concentration of HTO in animal products, average water fraction of animal products and the average weighted tritium concentration of ingested water based on the fraction of water supplied by each source were considered,including skin absorption, inhalation, drinking water and food.Calculating the annual doses, the ingestion doses were considered, at the same time the contribution of inhalation and skin absorption to the dose was considered. Concentrations in foodstuffs and dose of annual adult calculated with the specific activity model, NEWTRI model and the model proposed by the paper were compared. The results indicate that the model proposed by the paper can predict accurately tritium doses through the food chain from chronic atmospheric releases. (authors)

  9. Tritium levels in milk in the vicinity of chronic tritium releases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Goff, P; Guétat, Ph; Vichot, L; Leconte, N; Badot, P M; Gaucheron, F; Fromm, M

    2016-01-01

    Tritium is the radioactive isotope of hydrogen. It can be integrated into most biological molecules. Even though its radiotoxicity is weak, the effects of tritium can be increased following concentration in critical compartments of living organisms. For a better understanding of tritium circulation in the environment and to highlight transfer constants between compartments, we studied the tritiation of different agricultural matrices chronically exposed to tritium. Milk is one of the most frequently monitored foodstuffs in the vicinity of points known for chronic release of radionuclides firstly because dairy products find their way into most homes but also because it integrates deposition over large areas at a local scale. It is a food which contains all the main nutrients, especially proteins, carbohydrates and lipids. We thus studied the tritium levels of milk in chronic exposure conditions by comparing the tritiation of the main hydrogenated components of milk, first, component by component, then, sample by sample. Significant correlations were found between the specific activities of drinking water and free water of milk as well as between the tritium levels of cattle feed dry matter and of the main organic components of milk. Our findings stress the importance of the metabolism on the distribution of tritium in the different compartments. Overall, dilution of hydrogen in the environmental compartments was found to play an important role dimming possible isotopic effects even in a food chain chronically exposed to tritium. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Environmental effects of a tritium gas release from the Savannah River Plant on December 31, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, W.R.

    1976-03-01

    At 10:00 p.m. EST on December 31, 1975, 182,000 Ci of tritium gas was released within about 1.5 min from a tritium processing facility at the Savannah River Plant. The release was caused by the failure of a vacuum gage and was exhausted to the atmosphere by way of a 200-ft-high stack. Winds averaging 20 mph carried the tritium offplant toward the east. Calculations indicate that the puff passed out to sea about 35 miles north of Charleston, South Carolina, about 7 hr after the release occurred. Samples from the facility exhaust system indicated that 99.4 percent of the tritium was in elemental form and 0.6 percent was in the more biologically active oxide (water) form. The maximum potential dose to a person (from inhalation and skin absorption) at the puff centerline on the plant boundary was calculated to be 0.014 mrem, or about 0.01 percent of the annual dose received from natural radioactivity. The integrated dose to the population under the release path was calculated to be 0.2 man-rem before the tritium passed out to sea. Over 300 environmental samples were collected and analyzed following the release. These samples included air moisture, atmospheric hydrogen, vegetation, soil, surface water, milk, and human urine. Positive results were obtained in some onplant and plant perimeter samples; these results aided in confirming the close-in puff trajectory. Tritium concentrations in nearly all samples taken beyond the plant perimeter fell within normal ranges; no urine samples indicated any tritium uptakes as a result of the release. Two milk samples did indicate a measurable tritium uptake; the maximum potential dose to an individual drinking this milk was calculated to be about 0.1 mrem. Because calculated doses from assumed exposure to the tritium are low and analyses of environmental samples indicated no significant accumulation of tritium, it is concluded that no significant environmental effects resulted from the December 31, 1975, tritium release

  11. Tritium and helium retention and release from irradiated beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderl, R.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Oates, M.A.; Pawelko, R.J. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental effort to anneal irradiated beryllium specimens and characterize them for steam-chemical reactivity experiments. Fully-dense, consolidated powder metallurgy Be cylinders, irradiated in the EBR-II to a fast neutron (>0.1 MeV) fluence of {approx}6 x 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}, were annealed at temperatures from 450degC to 1200degC. The releases of tritium and helium were measured during the heat-up phase and during the high-temperature anneals. These experiments revealed that, at 600degC and below, there was insignificant gas release. Tritium release at 700degC exhibited a delayed increase in the release rate, while the specimen was at 700degC. For anneal temperatures of 800degC and higher, tritium and helium release was concurrent and the release behavior was characterized by gas-burst peaks. Essentially all of the tritium and helium was released at temperatures of 1000degC and higher, whereas about 1/10 of the tritium was released during the anneals at 700degC and 800degC. Measurements were made to determine the bulk density, porosity and specific surface area for each specimen before and after annealing. These measurements indicated that annealing caused the irradiated Be to swell, by as much as 14% at 700degC and 56% at 1200degC. Kr gas adsorption measurements for samples annealed at 1000degC and 1200degC determined specific surface areas between 0.04 m{sup 2}/g and 0.1 m{sup 2}/g for these annealed specimens. The tritium and helium gas release measurements and the specific surface area measurements indicated that annealing of irradiated Be caused a porosity network to evolve and become surface-connected to relieve internal gas pressure. (author)

  12. Release of tritium from fuel and collection for storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, L.L.; Trevorrow, L.E.

    1976-04-01

    Recent work is reviewed on the technology that has been suggested as applicable to collection and storage of tritium in anticipation of the necessity of that course of action. Collection technology and procedures must be adapted to the tritium-bearing effluent and to the facility from which it emerges. Therefore, this discussion of tritium collection technology includes some information on the processes from which release is expected to occur, the amounts, the nature of the effluent media, and the form in which tritium appears. Recent work on collection and storage concepts has explored, both by experimentation and by feasibility analyses, the operations generally aimed at producing recycle, collection, or storage of tritium from these streams. Storage concepts aimed specifically at tritium involve plans to store volumes ranging from that of the entire effluent stream to only that of a small volume of a concentrate. Decisions between storage of unconcentrated streams and storage of concentrates are expected to be made largely by weighing the cost of storage space against the cost of concentration. The storage of tritium concentrate requires the selection of a form of tritium possessing physical and chemical properties appropriate for the expected storage conditions. This selection of an appropriate storage form has occupied a major portion of recent work concerned with tritium storage concepts. In summary, within the context of present regulations and expected amounts of waste tritium; this waste can be disposed of by dilution and dispersal to the environment. In the future, however, more restrictive regulations might be introduced that could be satisfied only by some collection and storage operations. Technology for this practice is not now available, and the present discussion reviews recent activities devoted to its development

  13. Simulation study of intentional tritium release experiments in the caisson assembly for tritium safety at the TPL/JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Y.; Hayashi, T.; Kobayashi, K.; Nishi, M.

    2001-01-01

    At the Tritium Process Laboratory (TPL) in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), Caisson assembly for tritium safety study (CATS) with 12 m 3 of large airtight vessel (Caisson) was fabricated for confirmation and enhancement of fusion reactor safety to estimate the tritium behavior in the case, where the tritium leak accident should happen. One of the principal objectives of the present studies is the establishment of simulation method to predict the tritium behavior after the tritium leak accident should happen in a ventilated room. As for the understanding of initial tritium behavior until the tritium concentration become steady, the precise estimation of local flow rate in a room and time-dependent release behavior from the leak point are essential to predict the tritium behavior by simulation code. The three-dimensional eddy flow model considering, tritium-related phenomena was adopted to estimate the local flow rate in the 50 m 3 /h ventilated Caisson. The time-dependent tritium release behavior from the sample container was calculated by residence time distribution function. The calculated tritium concentrations were in good agreement with the experimental observations. The primary removal tritium behavior was also investigated by another code. Tritium gas concentrations decreased logarithmically to the time by ventilation. These observations were understandable by the reason that the flow in the ventilated Caisson was regarded as the perfectly mixing flow. The concentrations of tritiated water measured, and indications of tritium concentration by tritium monitors became gradually flat. This phenomena called 'tritium soaking effect' was found to be reasonably explained by considering the contribution of the exhaustion velocity by ventilation system, and the adsorption and desorption reaction rate of tritiated water on the wall material which is SUS 304. The calculated tritium concentrations were in good agreement with the experimental observations

  14. In-pile test of tritium recovery from lithium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurasawa, Toshimasa; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Takeshita, Hidefumi; Miyauchi, Takejiro; Matsui, Tomoaki

    1984-05-01

    In-situ tritium recovery experiment with sintered lithium oxide pellets was performed under a high neutron fluence in the JRR-2. The irradiation hole VT-10 is the vertical one in the fuel rods region of the reactor, and the neutron flux is as follows: the thermal neutron flux with the epithermal neutron; 1.12 x 10 14 n/cm 2 . sec, the fast neutron flux; 1.0 x 10 12 n/cm 2 . sec. Irradiation material is the four pellets of cylindrical Li 2 O with the size of 11mm-OD, 1.8mm-ID, 10mm-H, and their total weight is 6.67g(the apparent bulk density 86%TD). A sweep gas capsule with a inner heater was constructed for the present study. Irradiation temperatures were regulated in the high temperature range, 470 -- 760 0 C. Four cycles of irradiation tests were carried out from May to August in 1983, and the effective thermal neutron fluence and the burnup of 6 Li were 5.9 x 10 19 nvt and 0.24% of total lithium(natural abundance of Li), respectively. The amount of generated tritium was calculated to be 31.2Ci by using a value of the depression factor of the thermal neutron flux(0.148) and the effective neutron cross section(543b) for the 6 Li(n, α) 3 H reaction. Present report describes the tritium release behavior in the in-situ tritium recovery apparatus and discuss the effects of the moisture, the hydrogen spiking, the irradiation temperature, etc.. Problems relative to a real time measurement of a comparatively high tritium concentration(10 -1 -- 10 2 μCi/cm 3 ) in the helium gas stream were also investigated. (author)

  15. Tritium and helium release from beryllium pebbles neutron-irradiated up to 230appm tritium and 3000appm helium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Chakin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Study of tritium and helium release from beryllium pebbles with diameters of 0.5 and 1mm after high-dose neutron irradiation at temperatures of 686–968K was performed. The release rate always has a single peak, and the peak temperatures at heating rates of 0.017K/s and 0.117K/s lie in the range of 1100–1350K for both tritium and helium release. The total tritium release from 1mm pebbles decreases considerably by increasing the irradiation temperature. The total tritium release from 0.5mm pebbles is less than that from 1mm pebbles and remains constant regardless of the irradiation temperature. At high irradiation temperatures, open channels are formed which contribute to the enhanced tritium release.

  16. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P.

    1994-12-01

    This report is a health risk assessment that addresses continuous releases of tritium to the environment from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The NTLF contributes approximately 95% of all tritium releases from LBL. Transport and transformation models were used to determine the movement of tritium releases from the NRLF to the air, surface water, soils, and plants and to determine the subsequent doses to humans. These models were calibrated against environmental measurements of tritium levels in the vicinity of the NTLF and in the surrounding community. Risk levels were determined for human populations in each of these zones. Risk levels to both individuals and populations were calculated. In this report population risks and individual risks were calculated for three types of diseases--cancer, heritable genetic effects, and developmental and reproductive effects.

  17. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P.

    1994-12-01

    This report is a health risk assessment that addresses continuous releases of tritium to the environment from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The NTLF contributes approximately 95% of all tritium releases from LBL. Transport and transformation models were used to determine the movement of tritium releases from the NRLF to the air, surface water, soils, and plants and to determine the subsequent doses to humans. These models were calibrated against environmental measurements of tritium levels in the vicinity of the NTLF and in the surrounding community. Risk levels were determined for human populations in each of these zones. Risk levels to both individuals and populations were calculated. In this report population risks and individual risks were calculated for three types of diseases--cancer, heritable genetic effects, and developmental and reproductive effects

  18. Tritium release and retention properties of highly neutron-irradiated beryllium pebbles from HIDOBE-01 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakin, V., E-mail: vladimir.chakin@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Rolli, R.; Moeslang, A.; Klimenkov, M.; Kolb, M.; Vladimirov, P.; Kurinskiy, P.; Schneider, H.-C. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Til, S. van; Magielsen, A.J. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Westerduinweg 3, Postbus 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Zmitko, M. [The European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy, c/Josep Pla, no. 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-11-15

    The current helium cooled pebble bed (HCPB) tritium breeding blanket concept for fusion reactors includes a bed of 1 mm diameter beryllium pebbles to act as a neutron multiplier. Beryllium pebbles, fabricated by the rotating electrode method, were neutron irradiated in the HFR in Petten within the HIDOBE-01 experiment. This study presents tritium release and retention properties and data on microstructure evolution of beryllium pebbles irradiated at 630, 740, 873, 948 K up to a damage dose of 18 dpa, corresponding to a helium accumulation of about 3000 appm. The measured cumulative released activity from the beryllium pebbles irradiated at 948 K was found to be significantly lower than the calculated value. After irradiation at 873 and 948 K scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses revealed large pores or bubbles in the bulk and oxide films with a thickness of up to 8 μm at the surface of the beryllium pebbles. The radiation-enhanced diffusion of tritium and the formation of open porosity networks accelerate the tritium release from the beryllium pebbles during the high-flux neutron irradiation.

  19. Tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    The role played the large amount supply of tritium and its effects are broadly reviewed. This report is divided into four parts. The introductory part includes the history of tritium research. The second part deals with the physicochemical properties of tritium and the compounds containing tritium such as tritium water and labeled compounds, and with the isotope effects and self radiation effects of tritium. The third part deals with the tritium production by artificial reaction. Attention is directed to the future productivity of tritium from B, Be, N, C, O, etc. by using the beams of high energy protons or neutrons. The problems of the accepting market and the accuracy of estimating manufacturing cost are discussed. The expansion of production may bring upon the reduction of cost but also a large possibility of social impact. The irradiation problem and handling problem in view of environmental preservation are discussed. The fourth part deals with the use of tritium as a target, as a source of radiation or light, and its utilization for geochemistry. The future development of the solid tritium target capable of elongating the life of neutron sources is expected. The rust thickness of the surface of iron can be measured with the X-ray of Ti-T or Zr-T. The tritium can substitute self-light emission paint or lamp. The tritium is suitable for tracing the movement of sea water and land surface water because of its long half life. (Iwakiri, K.)

  20. Effluents and releases of tritium from Novo-Voronezh-5 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babenko, A.G.; Mekhedov, B.N.; Podporinova, L.E.; Popov, S.V.; Shalin, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    Results of systematic measurements of tritium concentration within technological systems of reactor of Novo-Voronezh NPP conducted to evaluate tritium effluents and releases and radiation doses to population from these effluents and releases are given. It is shown that 68% concerning tritium total amount were disposed into sewerage while 17% - through vent tube and 15% - with water and steam from secondary circuit systems. Standartized tritium effluents from WWER-1000 reactor for 5 year run constitute 15±1.9 GBq/MWxyear and it corresponds to mean value of effluents for foreign NPPs. Tritium concentration in the atmosphere constituted according to calculations (4.1-20)x10 -5 Bq/l. Conclusion is made about insignificant dose to population from tritium gaseous effluents. Detail study is necessary for dose connected with tritium contained in water effluents

  1. Environmental effects of a tritium release from the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, A.J.; Wilhite, E.L.; Buckner, M.R.

    1981-11-01

    On March 27, 1981, a small amount of tritiated water was inadvertently released from the tritium-processing facility during a routine maintenance operation. This report describes the environmental effects of this release both on the SRP site and offsite. Also, the operation of the WIND (Wind Information and Display) emergency response system during the incident is discussed, and the predicted and diagnosed behavior of the tritium plume is compared with tritium concentrations deduced from air, vegetation, soil, and bioassay samples

  2. Chemical form of release tritium from solid breeder materials under the various purge gas conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomohiro Kinjyo; Masabumi Nishikawa; Naoya Yamashita; Takanori Koyama; Takaaki Tanifuji; Mikio Enoeda

    2006-01-01

    Understanding of the release behavior of bred tritium from solid breeder materials is necessary to design tritium recovery system from blanket of a fusion reactor because permeation loss of bred tritium in the piping system or type of tritium recovery system depends on the tritium release behavior. Chemical form of released tritium from Li 4 SiO 4 (from FzK), LiAlO 2 (from JAERI), Li 2 TiO 3 (from CEA) and Li 2 ZrO 3 (from MAPI) under various purge gas condition is discussed in this study by using the data obtained from the out-pile tritium release experiment in JAEA. It is experimentally confirmed in this study that not a little portion of bred tritium is release as the chemical form of HTO even when hydrogen is added to the purge gas. It is also confirmed that desorption of surface water together with liberation of water vapor formed by water formation reaction from contact of hydrogen with solid breeder materials at high temperature gives rather high partial pressure of water vapor in the blanket purge gas. Tritium liberation model to represent the release behavior of bred tritium from solid breeder materials has been developed by the present authors considering tritium migration in bulk of grain, tritium transfer from bulk to surface and surface reactions on grain. Then, competition of such surface reactions as adsorption/desorption, isotope exchange reaction with hydrogen in purge gas and isotope exchange reaction with water vapor in purge gas decides the portion of HTO and HT. Using the tritium release model obtained so far, the portion of HTO or HT released from solid breeder materials is estimated and compared with observed values under various conditions in this study. The tritium release behavior and chemical form of tritium in the test blanket module with solid breeder under the ITER condition is also discussed based on the estimation obtained using the tritium release model formed by the present authors. (author)

  3. Characteristics of microstructure and tritium release properties of different kinds of beryllium pebbles for application in tritium breeding modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurinskiy, P., E-mail: petr.kurinskiy@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics (IAM-AWP), P.O. Box 3640, Karlsruhe 76021 (Germany); Vladimirov, P.; Moeslang, A. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics (IAM-AWP), P.O. Box 3640, Karlsruhe 76021 (Germany); Rolli, R. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials – Materials and Biomechanics (IAM-WBM), P.O. Box 3640, Karlsruhe 76021 (Germany); Zmitko, M. [The European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy, c/Josep Pla, no. 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, Barcelona 08019 (Spain)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Tritium release properties and characteristics of microstructure of beryllium pebbles having different sizes of grains were studied. • Fine-grained beryllium pebbles showed the best ability to release tritium compared to pebbles from another charges. • Be pebbles with the grain sizes exceeding 100 μm contain a great number of small pores and inclusions presumably referring to the history of material fabrication. • The sizes of grains are one of a key characteristic of microstructure which influences the parameters of tritium release. - Abstract: Beryllium pebbles with diameters of 1 mm are considered to be perspective material for the use as neutron multiplier in tritium breeding modules of fusion reactors. Up to now, the design of helium-cooled breeding blanket in ITER project foresees the use of 1 mm beryllium pebbles fabricated by NGK Insulators Ltd., Japan. It is notable that beryllium pebbles from Russian Federation and USA are also available and the possibility of their large-scale fabrication is under study. Presented work is dedicated to a study of characteristics of microstructure and parameters of tritium release of beryllium pebbles produced by Bochvar Institute, Russian Federation, and Materion Corporation, USA.

  4. The effect of helium generation and irradiation temperature on tritium release from neutron irradiated beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupriyanov, I.B.; Gorokhov, V.A.; Vlasov, V.V.; Kovalev, A.M.; Chakin, V.P.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of neutron irradiation condition on tritium release from beryllium is described in this paper. Beryllium samples were irradiated in the SM reactor with neutron fluence (E > 0.1 MeV) of (0.37-2.0) x 10 22 cm -2 at 70-100degC and 650-700degC. Mass-spectrometer technique was used in out of tritium release experiments during stepped-temperature anneal within a temperature range from 250 to 1300degC. The total amount of helium accumulated in irradiated beryllium samples varied from 521 appm to 3061 appm. The first signs of tritium release were detected at temperature of 406-553degC. It was shown that irradiation temperature and helium generation level significantly affect the tritium release. A fraction of 44 - 74 % of tritium content in samples irradiated at low temperature (70 - 100degC) is release from beryllium at an annealing temperature below 800degC, whereas for samples after high temperature irradiation (650 - 700 degC) tritium release did not exceed 14 %. Majority of tritium (∼68%) is released within a temperature range from 800 to 920 degC. The increase of helium generation from 521 appm to 3061 appm results in lowering the temperature of maximal tritium release rate and the upper temperature of tritium release from beryllium by 100-130degC and 200-240degC, correspondingly. On the basis of data obtained, the diffusion coefficients of tritium in beryllium were calculated. (author)

  5. Environmental effects of normal and off-normal releases of tritium from CTR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKone, T.E.

    1978-08-01

    Near term fusion technology will utilize the deuterium-tritium reaction. To quantify the magnitude of the hazard presented by major tritium release mechanisms, a method is presented for determining doses to the public from releases of tritium as tritiated water vapor or tritiated lithium compounds. Inclusion of this method in a computer model is described. This model uses the Gaussian dispersion method to predict distribution of tritium species in the downwind environment. Movement of tritium into biological systems is determined by treating these systems as a series of interacting water compartments. Dispersion and uptake calculations are applied to two sample sites in order to predict health effects. These effects are compared to the long range effect of introducing tritium into the world water system

  6. Tritium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    QUESTIONS 5 4 CONSTRAINTS OF BASIC PHYSICS 7 4.1 Neutronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 4.2 Tritium Burnup Fraction...Requirements for tritium-breeding should be one of the key tradeoffs 5 in reactor design. For example, maximizing the burnup fraction fb (a plasma-physics...account for the heterogeneous geometry and structural materials of the reactor, it should be possible to calculate values of the TBR that will be

  7. Environmental transport and long-term exposure for tritium released in the biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, R.; Bergstroem, U.; Evans, S.

    1979-01-01

    Global cycling of tritium is studied with regard to long-term exposure and dose. Dose and dose commitment are calculated for releases at different latitudes to the troposphere, land and upper ocean layer, with particular regard to effects from release into recipients of intermediate size as, for example, the Baltic Sea. The global transport of tritium appears to be governed by first order kinetics. Compartment models based on linear differential equation systems, as used in this study, should therefore be adequate. The realism and applicability of ecological compartment models are analysed with respect to completeness of the systems of reservoirs and pathways as well as accuracy in assumed reservoir sizes and exchange rates. By introducing different biospheric reservoirs and transfer mechanisms, important carriers and recipients are identified for the analysis of tritium released to air, land and water. Terrestrial biota and groundwater are shown to be significant both with regard to reservoir sizes and influence on the land-troposphere and land-sea exchange of tritium. Model studies regarding the conversion of HT to HTO in different biospheric reservoirs indicate that an atmospheric release of HT may yield up to 1.7 times the dose commitment obtained after release of the same amount of tritium as HTO. The global collective dose commitment from a tropospheric release of tritium is 0.002-0.004 man.rem per Ci depending on the latitude at the release point. Release to the surface ocean layers gives a ten times lower collective dose. (author)

  8. Progress in tritium retention and release modeling for ceramic breeders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffray, A.R.; Federici, G.; Billone, M.C.; Tanaka, S.

    1994-01-01

    Tritium behavior in ceramic breeder blankets is a key design issue for this class of blanket because of its impact on safety and fuel self-sufficiency. Over the past 10-15 years, substantial theoretical and experimental efforts have been dedicated world-wide to develop a better understanding of tritium transport in ceramic breeders. Models that are available today seem to cover reasonably well all the key physical transport and trapping mechanisms. They have allowed for reasonable interpretation and reproduction of experimental data and have helped in pointing out deficiencies in material property data base, in providing guidance for future experiments, and in analyzing blanket tritium behavior. This paper highlights the progress in tritium modeling over the last decade. Key tritium transport mechanisms are briefly described along with the more recent and sophisticated models developed to help understand them. Recent experimental data are highlighted and model calibration and validation discussed. Finally, example applications to blanket cases are shown as illustration of progress in the prediction of ceramic breeder blanket tritium inventory

  9. ACUTRI a computer code for assessing doses to the general public due to acute tritium releases

    CERN Document Server

    Yokoyama, S; Noguchi, H; Ryufuku, S; Sasaki, T

    2002-01-01

    Tritium, which is used as a fuel of a D-T burning fusion reactor, is the most important radionuclide for the safety assessment of a nuclear fusion experimental reactor such as ITER. Thus, a computer code, ACUTRI, which calculates the radiological impact of tritium released accidentally to the atmosphere, has been developed, aiming to be of use in a discussion of licensing of a fusion experimental reactor and an environmental safety evaluation method in Japan. ACUTRI calculates an individual tritium dose based on transfer models specific to tritium in the environment and ICRP dose models. In this calculation it is also possible to analyze statistically on meteorology in the same way as a conventional dose assessment method according to the meteorological guide of the Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan. A Gaussian plume model is used for calculating the atmospheric dispersion of tritium gas (HT) and/or tritiated water (HTO). The environmental pathway model in ACUTRI considers the following internal exposures: i...

  10. Individual and population dose to users of the Savannah River following K-Reactor tritium release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlton, W.H.; Hamby, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    Approximately 5700 curies of tritium were released to Pen Branch between December 22, 1991 and December 25, 1991. As expected, the tritiated water traveled through the Savannah River swamp to Steel Creek and the Savannah River. Elevated tritium concentrations in the river at Becks Ferry (Beaufort-Jasper) and Abercorn Creek (Port Wentworth) has caused some concern among downstream water users as to the amount of tritium available for uptake through the domestic drinking water supplies at the Beaufort-Jasper and Port Wentworth water treatment facilities. Radiation dose to the downstream drinking water population is estimated in this report

  11. Tritium oxide uptake and desorption kinetics in a primary producer: chlorella pyrenoidosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunstall, T.G.

    1983-01-01

    The alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa grown in batch culture under chronic tritium oxide exposure was used to model behavior of tritium at the primary producer level of an aquatic food chain. The specific activity ratio of organically bound tritium to medium tritium increased during initial growth stages, then reached an asymptotic steady state value of 0.59 after approximately seven cell doublings. The intracellular to extracellular concentrations of tritium oxide appeared to be in equilibrium. Loss of previously formed organically bound tritium in cells transferred to tritium-free media averaged less than 5 % for exponential growth phase cultures which had undergone more than three cell doublings. Over a comparable time period, a greater loss of organically bound tritium from stationary cells (average 13.4 %) was attributed to increased degradative metabolism in senescent cultures. Concentration of tritium in organically bound form may exceed environmental tritium oxide levels under dynamic conditions in which a pulse of tritium oxide to the environment is dissipated over time

  12. Prostaglandin H synthase catalyzes regiospecific release of tritium from labeled estradiol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degen, G.H.; Jellinck, P.H.; Hershcopf, R.J.

    1987-06-01

    Prostaglandin H synthase (PHS) from ram seminal vesicle microsomes was found to catalyze the release of tritium (3H) from estradiol (E2) regiospecifically labeled in position C-2 or C-4 of ring A but not from positions C-17 alpha, C-16 alpha, or C-6,7. Formation of 3H2O from ring A of E2 is dependent upon native enzyme supplemented with either arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, or hydrogen peroxide and proceeds very rapidly as do other cooxidation reactions catalyzed by PHS-peroxidase. The 3H-loss from ring A of E2 reflecting oxidative displacement of this isotope by PHS increases linearly up to 100 microM under our conditions (8-45 nmol/mg x 5 min). Loss of tritium in various blanks is negligible by comparison. Indomethacin (0.07 and 0.2 mM) inhibited the PHS-dependent release of 3H2O from estradiol but less efficiently than it inhibited DES-cooxidation measured in parallel incubations under similar conditions. Addition of EDTA (0.5 mM) had no effect on the regiospecific transfer of 3H from E2 or on DES-oxidation; ascorbic acid (0.5 mM) or NADH (0.33 mM) clearly inhibited both reactions and to a similar extent. These data suggest that estradiol-2/4-hydroxylation can be catalyzed by PHS in vitro probably via its peroxidase activity and point to PHS as an enzyme that could contribute to catechol estrogen formation in vitro by tissue preparations in the presence of unsaturated fatty acids or peroxides.

  13. Determination of tritium generation and release parameters at lithium CPS under neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponkratov, Yuriy, E-mail: ponkratov@nnc.kz [Institute of Atomic Energy, National Nuclear Center of RK, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan); Baklanov, Viktor; Skakov, Mazhyn; Kulsartov, Timur; Tazhibayeva, Irina; Gordienko, Yuriy; Zaurbekova, Zhanna; Tulubayev, Yevgeniy [Institute of Atomic Energy, National Nuclear Center of RK, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan); Chikhray, Yevgeniy [Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics of Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Lyublinski, Igor [JSC “Star”, Moscow (Russian Federation); NRNU “MEPhI”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Vertkov, Alexey [JSC “Star”, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The main parameters of tritium generation and release from lithium capillary-porous system (CPS) under neutron irradiation at the IVG.1 M research reactor is described in paper. • In the experiments a very small tritium release was fixed likely due to its high solubility in liquid lithium. • If the lithium CPS will be used as a plasma facing material in temperature range up to 773 K under neutron irradiation only helium will release from lithium CPS into a vacuum chamber. - Abstract: This paper describes the main parameters of tritium generation and release from lithium capillary-porous system (CPS) under neutron irradiation at the IVG.1 M research reactor. The experiments were carried out using the method of mass-spectrometric registration of released gases and using a specially constructed ampoule device. Irradiation was carried out at different reactor thermal powers (1, 2 and 6 MW) and sample temperatures from 473 to 773 K. In the experiments a very small tritium release was detected likely due to its high solubility in liquid lithium. It can be caused by formation of lithium tritide during tritium diffusion to the lithium surface.

  14. Development, description and validation of a Tritium Environmental Release Model (TERM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffers, Rebecca S; Parker, Geoffrey T

    2014-01-01

    Tritium is a radioisotope of hydrogen that exists naturally in the environment and may also be released through anthropogenic activities. It bonds readily with hydrogen and oxygen atoms to form tritiated water, which then cycles through the hydrosphere. This paper seeks to model the migration of tritiated species throughout the environment - including atmospheric, river and coastal systems - more comprehensively and more consistently across release scenarios than is currently in the literature. A review of the features and underlying conceptual models of some existing tritium release models was conducted, and an underlying aggregated conceptual process model defined, which is presented. The new model, dubbed 'Tritium Environmental Release Model' (TERM), was then tested against multiple validation sets from literature, including experimental data and reference tests for tritium models. TERM has been shown to be capable of providing reasonable results which are broadly comparable with atmospheric HTO release models from the literature, spanning both continuous and discrete release conditions. TERM also performed well when compared with atmospheric data. TERM is believed to be a useful tool for examining discrete and continuous atmospheric releases or combinations thereof. TERM also includes further capabilities (e.g. river and coastal release scenarios) that may be applicable to certain scenarios that atmospheric models alone may not handle well. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Computer program for assessing the human dose due to stationary release of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Masahiro; Raskob, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    The computer program TriStat (Tritium dose assessment for stationary release) has been developed to assess the dose to humans assuming a stationary release of tritium as HTO and/or HT from nuclear facilities. A Gaussian dispersion model describes the behavior of HT gas and HTO vapor in the atmosphere. Tritium concentrations in soil, vegetables and forage were estimated on the basis of specific tritium concentrations in the free water component and the organic component. The uptake of contamination via food by humans was modeled by assuming a forage compartment, a vegetable component, and an animal compartment. A standardized vegetable and a standardized animal with the relative content of major nutrients, i.e. proteins, lipids and carbohydrates, representing a standard Japanese diet, were included. A standardized forage was defined in a similar manner by using the forage composition for typical farm animals. These standard feed- and foodstuffs are useful to simplify the tritium dosimetry and the food chain related to the tritium transfer to the human body. (author)

  16. Tritium release kinetics of Li{sub 2}O with radiation defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishmanov, V.; Tanaka, Satoru [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1998-03-01

    The study of an influence of radiation defects on tritium release behavior from polycrystalline Li{sub 2}O was performed by the in-pile and out-of-pile tritium release experiments. The samples were pre-irradiated by accelerated electrons to various absorbed doses up to 140 MGy and then exposed to the fluence of 10{sup 17} thermal neutrons/m{sup 2}. The radiation defects introduced by electron irradiation in Li{sub 2}O cause the retention of tritium. The linear temperature increase of the electron-irradiated samples disclosed two tritium release peaks: first starts at {approx}600 K with the maximum at {approx}800 K and second appears at {approx}950 K with the maximum at {approx}1200 K. It is thought that the tritium release at high temperatures (> 950 K) is due to the thermal decomposition of LiT. In order to further investigated the formation of lithium hydrides, the diffuse-reflectance Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectroscopy was applied. The Li{sub 2}O powder was irradiated by electron accelerator under D{sub 2} containing atmosphere (N{sub 2} + 10% D{sub 2}). An absorption band specific to the Li{sub 2}O was observed at 668 cm{sup -1} and attributed to the Li-D stretching vibration. (author)

  17. Modeling and validating tritium transfer in a grassland ecosystem in response to {sup 3}H releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Dizes, S.; Maro, D.; Rozet, M.; Hebert, D.; Solier, L.; Nicoulaud, V. [Institut de radioportection et de surete nucleaire - IRSN (France); Vermorel, F.; Aulagnier, C. [Electricite de France - EDF (France)

    2014-07-01

    Tritium ({sup 3}H) is a major radionuclide released in several forms (HTO, HT) by nuclear facilities under normal operating conditions. In terrestrial ecosystems, tritium can be found under two forms: tritium in tissue free water (TFWT) following absorption of tritiated water by leaves or roots and Organically Bound Tritium (OBT) resulting from TFWT incorporation by the plant organic matter during photosynthesis. In order to study transfers of tritium from atmospheric releases to terrestrial ecosystem such as grasslands, an in-situ laboratory has been set up by IRSN on a ryegrass field plot located 2 km downwind the AREVA NC La Hague nuclear reprocessing plant (North-West of France), as was done in the past for the assessment of transfer of radiocarbon in grasslands. The objectives of this experimental field are: (i) to better understand the OBT formation in plant by photosynthesis, (ii) to evaluate transfer processes of tritium in several forms (HT, HTO) from the atmosphere (air and rainwater) to grass and soil, (iii) to develop a modeling allowing to reproduce the dynamic response of the ecosystem to tritium atmospheric releases depending of variable environmental conditions. For this purpose, tritium activity measurements will be carried out in grass (monthly measurements of HTO, OBT), in air, rainwater, soil (daily measurements of HT, HTO) and CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O fluxes between soil and air compartments will be carried out. Then, the TOCATTA-c model previously developed to simulate {sup 14}C transfers to pasture on a hourly time-step basis will be adapted to take account for processes specific to tritium. The model will be tested by a comparison between simulated results and measurements. The objectives of this presentation are (1) to present the organization of the experimental design of the VATO study (Validation of TOCATTA) dedicated to transfers of tritium in a grassland ecosystem, (2) to document the major assumptions, conceptual modelling and

  18. Modeling and validating tritium transfer in a grassland ecosystem in response to {sup 3}H releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Dizes, S. [Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, IRSN/PRP-ENV/SERIS/LM2E, Centre de Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Maro, D.; Rozet, M.; Hebert, D. [IRSN/PRP-ENV/SERIS/LRC, Cherbourg-Octeville (France)

    2015-03-15

    In this paper a radioecological model (TOCATTA) for tritium transfer in a grassland ecosystem developed on an hourly time-step basis is proposed and compared with the first data set obtained in the vicinity of the AREVA-NC reprocessing plant of La Hague (France). The TOCATTA model aims at simulating dynamics of tritium transfer in agricultural soil and plant ecosystems exposed to time-varying HTO concentrations in air water vapour and possibly in irrigation and rain water. In the present study, gaseous releases of tritium from the AREVA NC nuclear reprocessing plant in normal operation can be intense and intermittent over a period of less than 24 hours. A first comparison of the model predictions with the field data has shown that TOCATTA should be improved in terms of kinetics of tritium transfer.

  19. Tritium labeling of gonadotropin releasing hormone in its proline and histidine residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klauschenz, E.; Bienert, M.; Egler, H.; Pleiss, U.; Niedrich, H.; Nikolics, K.

    1981-01-01

    3,4-dehydroproline9-GnRH prepared by solid phase peptide synthesis was tritiated catalytically under various conditions yielding 3H-GnRH with specific radioactivities in the range from 35-60 Ci/mmol and full LH releasing activity in vitro. Using palladium/alumina catalyst, the tritiation of the double bond occurs within ten minutes. Investigation of the tritium distribution between the amino acid residues showed a remarkably high incorporation of tritium into the histidine residue (11 to 37%). On the basis of this observation, the tritium labeling of GnRH and angiotensin I by direct catalytic hydrogen-tritium exchange was found to be useful for the labeling of these peptides at remarkably high specific radioactivity

  20. Relation between the tritium in continuous atmospheric release and the tritium contents of fruits and tubers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolevych, V Y; Kim, S B

    2013-04-01

    Concentrations of organically bound tritium (OBT) and tissue-free water tritium (TFWT, also referred to as HTO) in fruits and tubers were measured at a garden plot in the vicinity of the source of chronic airborne tritium emissions during the 2008, 2010, and 2011 growing seasons. A continuous record of HTO concentration in the air moisture was reconstructed from the continuous record of Ar-41 ambient gamma radiation, as well as from frequent measurements of air HTO by active samplers at the garden plot and Ar-41 and air HTO monitoring data from the same sector. Performed measurements were used for testing the modified Specific Activity (SA) model based on the assumption that the average air HTO during the pod-filling period provides an appropriate basis for estimating the levels of OBT present in pods, fruits and tubers. It is established that the relationship between the OBT of fruits and tubers and the average air HTO from a 15-20 day wide window centred at the peak of the pod-filling period is consistent throughout the three analysed years, and could be expressed by the fruit or tuber's OBT to air-HTO ratio of 0.93 ± 0.21. For all three years, the concentration of HTO in fruits and tubers was found to be related to levels of HTO in the air, as averaged within a 3-day pre-harvest window. The variability in the ratio of plant HTO to air HTO appears to be three times greater than that for the OBT of the fruits and tubers. It is concluded that the OBT of fruits and tubers adequately follows an empirical relationship based on the average level of air HTO from the pod-filling window, and therefore is clearly in line with the modified SA approach. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Environmental Tritium.

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Environmental tritium was first observed in a helium fraction at a liquid air production facility in Germany in 1949. During the 1950s and early 1960s, huge amounts of artificial tritium were released into the atmosphere by nuclear testing. The environmental tritium level increased to more than 200 times the natural tritium level. Since the signing of a test ban treaty in 1963, the environmental tritium level has decreased, and analysis of recent Japanese rain samples has shown that the envir...

  2. Consequences of tritium release to water pathways from postulated accidents in a DOE production reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Kula, K.R.; Olson, R.L.; Hamby, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    A full-scale PRA of a DOE production reactor has been completed that considers full release of tritium as part of the severe accident source term. Two classes of postulated reactor accidents, a loss-of-moderator pumping accident and a loss-of-coolant accident, are used to bound the expected dose consequence from liquid pathway release. Population doses from the radiological release associated with the two accidents are compared for aqueous discharge and atmospheric release modes. The expectation values of the distribution of possible values for the societal effective dose equivalent to the general public, given a tritium release to the atmosphere, is 2.8 person-Sv/PBq (9.9 x 10 -3 person-rem/Ci). The general public drinking water dose to downstream water consumers is 6.5 x 10 -2 person-Sv/Pbq (2.4 x 10 -4 person-rem/Ci) for aqueous releases to the surface streams eventually reaching the Savannah River. Negligible doses are calculated for freshwater fish and saltwater invertebrate consumption, irrigation, and recreational use of the river, given that an aqueous release is assumed to occur. Relative to the balance of fission products released in a hypothetical severe accident, the tritium-related dose is small. This study suggests that application of regional models (1610 km radius) will indicate larger dose consequences from short-term tritium release to the atmosphere than from comparable tritium source terms to water pathways. However, the water pathways assessment is clearly site-specific, and the overall aqueous dose will be dependent on downstream receptor populations and uses of the river

  3. Tritium containment of controlled thermonuclear fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Tsukumo, Kiyohiko; Suzuki, Tatsushi

    1979-01-01

    It is well known that tritium is used as the fuel for nuclear fusion reactors. The neutrons produced by the nuclear fusion reaction of deuterium and tritium react with lithium in blankets, and tritium is produced. The blankets reproduce the tritium consumed in the D-T reaction. Tritium circulates through the main cooling system and the fuel supply and evacuation system, and is accumulated. Tritium is a radioactive substance emitting β-ray with 12.6 year half-life, and harmful to human bodies. It is an isotope of hydrogen, and apt to diffuse and leak. Especially at high temperature, it permeates through materials, therefore it is important to evaluate the release of tritium into environment, to treat leaked tritium to reduce its release, and to select the method of containing tritium. The permeability of tritium and its solubility in structural materials are discussed. The typical blanket-cooling systems of nuclear fusion reactors are shown, and the tungsten coating of steam generator tubes and tritium recovery system are adopted for reducing tritium leak. In case of the Tokamak type reactor of JAERI, the tritium recovery system is installed, in which the tritium gas produced in blankets is converted to tritium steam with a Pd-Pt catalytic oxidation tower, and it is dehydrated and eliminated with a molecular sieve tower, then purified and recovered. (Kako, I.)

  4. Dynamic evaluation of environmental impact due to tritium accidental release from the fusion reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Baojie; Ni, Muyi; Jiang, Jieqiong; Wu, Yican

    2015-10-01

    As one of the key safety issues of fusion reactors, tritium environmental impact of fusion accidents has attracted great attention. In this work, the dynamic tritium concentrations in the air and human body were evaluated on the time scale based on accidental release scenarios under the extreme environmental conditions. The radiation dose through various exposure pathways was assessed to find out the potential relationships among them. Based on this work, the limits of HT and HTO release amount for arbitrary accidents were proposed for the fusion reactor according to dose limit of ITER. The dynamic results aim to give practical guidance for establishment of fusion emergency standard and design of fusion tritium system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Projected tritium releases from F ampersand H Area Seepage Basins and the Solid Waste Disposal Facilities to Fourmile Branch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Looney, B.B.; Haselow, J.S.; Lewis, C.M.; Harris, M.K.; Wyatt, D.E.; Hetrick, C.S.

    1993-01-01

    A large percentage of the radioactivity released to the environment by operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is due to tritium. Because of the relative importance of the releases of tritium from SRS facilities through the groundwater to the environment, periodic evaluation and documentation of the facility operational status, proposed corrective actions, and projected changes/reductions in tritium releases are justified. Past, current, and projected tritium releases from the F and H Area Seepage Basins and the Solid Waste Disposal Facilities (SWDF) to Fourmile Branch are described. Each section provides a brief operational history along with the current status and proposed corrective actions. A conceptual model and quantitative estimates of tritium release from the facilities into the groundwater and the environment are developed. Tritium releases from the F and H Area Seepage Basins are declining and will be further reduced by the implementation of a groundwater corrective action required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Tritium releases from the SWDF have been relatively stable over the past 10 years. It is anticipated that SWDF tritium releases to Fourmile Branch will remain approximately at current levels for at least 10--20 years. Specific characterization activities are recommended to allow an improved projection of tritium flux and to assist in developing plans for plume mitigation. SRS and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control are developing groundwater corrective action plans for the SWDF. Portions of the SWDF are also regulated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). Reduction of tritium flux is one of the factors considered in the development of the RCRA/CERCLA groundwater corrective action. The final section of the document presents the sum of the projected tritium fluxes from these facilities to Fourmile Branch

  6. The releases of radioactive substances in the sea. The cases of iodine-129 and tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This report briefly presents the iodine-129 (a radio-element having a very long period), evokes its artificial origins and the increase of its presence, and the processing possibilities to reduce it. It also highlights the high levels noticed along the Channel coasts, notably at the vicinity of the La Hague plant (France) which did not implement reduction methods, but also in the North Sea. It addresses the case of tritium, the release of which has increased by a factor 3 during the last 15 years. The La Hague plant is one of the biggest tritium emitter in the world and nuclear power plants located on the Channel coast have however been authorized to increase their tritium emissions. Tritium concentrations at various locations of the Channel and North Sea are given as well as annual releases by the different nuclear installations located in this area. The report highlights the abnormally high level of tritium which has been measured in October 2012 at the vicinity of La Hague

  7. ACUTRI: a computer code for assessing doses to the general public due to acute tritium releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Sumi; Noguchi, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Ryufuku, Susumu; Sasaki, Toshihisa; Kurosawa, Naohiro [Visible Information Center, Inc., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    Tritium, which is used as a fuel of a D-T burning fusion reactor, is the most important radionuclide for the safety assessment of a nuclear fusion experimental reactor such as ITER. Thus, a computer code, ACUTRI, which calculates the radiological impact of tritium released accidentally to the atmosphere, has been developed, aiming to be of use in a discussion of licensing of a fusion experimental reactor and an environmental safety evaluation method in Japan. ACUTRI calculates an individual tritium dose based on transfer models specific to tritium in the environment and ICRP dose models. In this calculation it is also possible to analyze statistically on meteorology in the same way as a conventional dose assessment method according to the meteorological guide of the Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan. A Gaussian plume model is used for calculating the atmospheric dispersion of tritium gas (HT) and/or tritiated water (HTO). The environmental pathway model in ACUTRI considers the following internal exposures: inhalation from a primary plume (HT and/or HTO) released from the facilities and inhalation from a secondary plume (HTO) reemitted from the ground following deposition of HT and HTO. This report describes an outline of the ACUTRI code, a user guide and the results of test calculation. (author)

  8. Assessment of the dose to a representative Japanese due to stationary release of tritium to the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Masahiro

    2005-01-01

    The computer program TriStat was applied to estimate the dose to a representative Japanese due to a stationary release of tritium as HTO and/or HT to the atmosphere from nuclear facilities. In TriStat, the air tritium concentration is estimated by a Gaussian dispersion model. The tritium deposition to the soil was assumed to occur both by dry and wet deposition processes of atmospheric tritium. The primary process of tritium transfer to human body is assumed to take place through a local food-chain in the contaminated area. Tritium concentrations in soil, vegetables and forage were estimated as the tritium concentration per water equivalent. The food chain was modeled by assuming a vegetable compartment and an animal-food compartment. By using TriStat the annual dose to the representative Japanese was evaluated for stationary release of tritium as a function of the distance from a release point. The dose contribution from drinking water was neglected, since the drinking water is generally supplied as tap water or as commercial bottled water. In the case of HT release, the committed dose due to tritium intake through breathing and skin absorption was found to be of minor importance. (author)

  9. Quantitative determination of tritium in metals and oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vance, D.E.; Smith, M.E.; Waterbury, G.R.

    1979-04-01

    Metallic samples are analyzed for tritium by heating the sample at 1225 K in a moist oxygen stream. The volatile products are trapped and the tritium is quantitatively determined by scintillation spectroscopy. The method is used to determine less than 1 ppb of tritium in 100-mg samples of lithium, iron, nickel, cerium, plutonium, and plutonium dioxide. Analysis of 18 cuts of a tritium-zirconium, copper foil standard over a 3-yr period showed a tritium content of 45 ppM and a standard deviation of 6 ppM

  10. Tritium release from lithium silicate and lithium aluminate, in-reactor and out-of-reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1976-09-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the generation and evolution of tritium and helium in lithium aluminate (LiAlO/sub 2/) and lithium silicate (Li/sub 2/SiO/sub 3/) by the reaction: Li/sup 6/ + n ..-->.. /sup 4/He + T. Targets were irradiated 4.4 days in the K-West Reactor snout facility. (Silicate GVR* approximately 2.0 cc/cc; aluminate GVR approximately 1.4 cc/cc.) Gas release in-reactor was determined by post-irradiation drilling experiments on aluminum ampoules containing silicate and aluminate targets. In-reactor tritium release (at approximately 100/sup 0/C) was found to decrease linearly with increasing target density. Tritium released in-reactor was primarily in the noncondensible form (HT and T/sub 2/), while in laboratory extractions (300-1300/sup 0/C), the tritium appeared primarily in the condensible form (HTO and T/sub 2/O). Concentrations of HT (and presumably HTO) were relatively high, indicating moisture pickup in canning operations or by inleakage of moisture after the capsule was welded. Impurities in extracted gases included H/sub 2/O, CO/sub 2/, CO, O/sub 2/, H/sub 2/, NO, SO/sub 2/, SiF/sub 4/ and traces of hydrocarbons.

  11. Tritium release from lithium silicate and lithium aluminate, in-reactor and out-of-reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1976-09-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the generation and evolution of tritium and helium in lithium aluminate (LiAlO 2 ) and lithium silicate (Li 2 SiO 3 ) by the reaction: Li 6 + n → 4 He + T. Targets were irradiated 4.4 days in the K-West Reactor snout facility. (Silicate GVR* approximately 2.0 cc/cc; aluminate GVR approximately 1.4 cc/cc.) Gas release in-reactor was determined by post-irradiation drilling experiments on aluminum ampoules containing silicate and aluminate targets. In-reactor tritium release (at approximately 100 0 C) was found to decrease linearly with increasing target density. Tritium released in-reactor was primarily in the noncondensible form (HT and T 2 ), while in laboratory extractions (300-1300 0 C), the tritium appeared primarily in the condensible form (HTO and T 2 O). Concentrations of HT (and presumably HTO) were relatively high, indicating moisture pickup in canning operations or by inleakage of moisture after the capsule was welded. Impurities in extracted gases included H 2 O, CO 2 , CO, O 2 , H 2 , NO, SO 2 , SiF 4 and traces of hydrocarbons

  12. Transfer of tritium released by nuclear facilities to the food supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovard, P.; Delmas, J.; Belot, Y.; Camus, H.; Grauby, A.; Hoek, J. van den

    1979-01-01

    The use for agricultural purposes of river waters receiving releases or discharges of tritium results in contamination of irrigated crops and of animals given such water to drink or consuming the contaminated crops. It therefore seemed of importance to assess the part played by tritium in the contamination of the food chain, together with its possible effects on organisms. With this in mind, French, Belgian and Netherlands laboratories have joined forces to study, more especially, the relationship between environmental contamination rates and those of produce harvested in the Mediterranean region and in a humid temperate climate, the transfer process in the chain: water - fodder - bovines - dairy produce, and the role of technology in the contamination of the food chain. The present status of research undertaken jointly by organizations in the three countries is reviewed. In the Atlantic environment the experiments involved four annual crops consumed on a large scale: potatoes, sugar beet, carrots and peas, and in the Mediterranean environment several perennial species such as vine, olive, orange and apple were studied. The results obtained relate to the residence time for tritium in the various organs of each species, the part played by evapotranspiration and the physiological functions of the different parts of the plants, the uptake of tritium by tissue water and organic matter, and the distribution of tritium in the soil profile. (author)

  13. An assessment of the tritium inventory in, permeation through and releases from the net plasma facing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.H.

    1987-01-01

    The tritium retention, permeation and release characteristics of D-T tokamaks are extremely important from both an environmental and a plasma physics point of view. Tokamak measurements have demonstrated that release of retained hydrogen isotopes by plasma-wall interactions play a dominant role in fuel recycling during a discharge. Austenitic and martenistic steels are being considered as first wall materials. By using a computer code, the tritium inventory in, permeation through and release from these materials have been calculated as functions of material thickness, temperature and impinging fluxes. From this study, it is shown that the tritium inventory in the first wall is strongly affected by the temperature gradient in the materials. It is evident that the tritium permeation as well as the tritium inventory can be reduced appropriately by controlling the temperatures at the plasma and cooling sides of the first wall. The results are discussed and the possible consequences are analysed

  14. Influence of start up and pulsed operation on tritium release and inventory of NET ceramic blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iseli, M.; Esser, B.

    1989-01-01

    A first estimate for the tritium release behaviour of a ceramic breeder blanket in pulsed operation is obtained by assuming a linear steady state temperature distribution and taking into account the time constant of the thermal behaviour. The release behaviour of the breeder exposed to consecutive periods of tritium generation is described with an analytical solution of the diffusion equation. The results are compared with a simple exponential approach valid for surfacte desorption controlled release. The exponential model is used to simulate a blanket with aluminate as breeder material, which takes longest to reach steady state. The simulation demonstrates that a significant fraction (>67%) of steady state can be achieved after a testing time of about one day. (author). 7 refs.; 8 figs.; 3 tabs

  15. The effect of oxygen on the release of tritium during baking of TFTR D-T tiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, W.M.; Gentile, C.A.; Skinner, C.H.; Langish, S.; Nishi, M.F.

    2002-01-01

    A series of tests involving 10 h baking under the current ITER design conditions (240 deg. C with 933 Pa O 2 ) was performed using a cube of a carbon fiber composite tile that had been used in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) during its deuterium-tritium burning operation. The removal rate of the codeposits was about 3 μm/h near the surface and 0.9 μm/h in the deeper region. Total amount of tritium released from the cube during 10 h baking was 202 MBq, while remaining tritium in the cube after baking was 403 MBq. Thus 10 h baking at 240 deg. C with 933 Pa O 2 removed 1/3 of tritium from the cube. After 10 h baking, the tritium concentration on the cube surface also dropped by about 1/3. In addition, some tritium was released from another cube of the tile during baking at 240 deg. C in pure Ar, and a rapid increase of tritium release was observed when the purging gas was shifted from pure Ar to Ar-1%O 2 . When a whole TFTR tile was baked in air at 350 deg. C for 1 h and then at 500 deg. C for 1 h, the ratios of tritium released were 53 and 47%, respectively. Oxygen reacted with carbon to produce carbon monoxide during baking in air

  16. Capture of Tritium Released from Cladding in the Zirconium Recycle Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Barry B [ORNL; Bruffey, Stephanie H [ORNL; DelCul, Guillermo Daniel [ORNL; Walker, Trenton Baird [ORNL

    2016-08-31

    Zirconium may be recovered from the Zircaloy® cladding of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for recycle or to reduce the quantities of high-level waste destined for a geologic repository. Recovery of zirconium using a chlorination process is currently under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The approach is to treat the cladding with chlorine gas to convert the zirconium in the alloy (~98 wt % of the alloy mass) to zirconium tetrachloride. A significant fraction of the tritium (0–96%) produced in nuclear fuel during irradiation may be found in zirconium-based cladding and could be released from the cladding when the solid matrix is destroyed by the chlorination reaction. To prevent uncontrolled release of radioactive tritium to other parts of the plant or to the environment, a method to recover the tritium may be required. The focus of this effort was to (1) identify potential methods for the recovery of tritium from the off-gas of the zirconium recycle process, (2) perform scoping tests on selected recovery methods using nonradioactive gas simulants, and (3) select a process design appropriate for testing on radioactive gas streams generated by the engineering-scale zirconium recycle demonstrations on radioactive used cladding.

  17. Capture of Tritium Released from Cladding in the Zirconium Recycle Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruffey, Stephanie H [ORNL; Spencer, Barry B [ORNL; DelCul, Guillermo Daniel [ORNL

    2016-08-31

    This report is issued as the first revision to FCRD-MRWFD-2016-000297. Zirconium may be recovered from the Zircaloy® cladding of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for recycle or to reduce the quantities of high-level waste destined for a geologic repository. Recovery of zirconium using a chlorination process is currently under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The approach is to treat the cladding with chlorine gas to convert the zirconium in the alloy (~98 wt % of the alloy mass) to zirconium tetrachloride. A significant fraction of the tritium (0–96%) produced in nuclear fuel during irradiation may be found in zirconium-based cladding and could be released from the cladding when the solid matrix is destroyed by the chlorination reaction. To prevent uncontrolled release of radioactive tritium to other parts of the plant or to the environment, a method to recover the tritium may be required. The focus of this effort was to (1) identify potential methods for the recovery of tritium from the off-gas of the zirconium recycle process, (2) perform scoping tests on selected recovery methods using non-radioactive gas simulants, and (3) select a process design appropriate for testing on radioactive gas streams generated by the engineering-scale zirconium recycle demonstrations on radioactive used cladding.

  18. Surface air pollution with oxidized tritium during its momentary fallout with atmospheric precipitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorontsov, A.I.; Koloskov, I.A.; Nekozyrev, A.F.; Pastukhov, B.V.

    1976-01-01

    Regularities of the behaviour of tritium fallen out to the surface of the Earth as a result of peaceful thermonuclear explosions and the operation of atomic power plants were studied. With this purpose in view determined was the velocity of the decnatural ontamination of the soil-vegetation cover contaminated with tritium oxide due to evapouration, in connection with the density of the area contamination and the tritium content in the near-ground layer of iar. The study was carried out by modelling a single fallout of tritium oxide with atmospheric precipita--tions in different seasons of the year. Fallouts were simulated by applying tritiated water to experimental plots located in the forest-and-steppe zone. It has been found out that the intensive evapouration of tritium occurs during the first day after the contamination. The content of oxidized tritium in the near-ground layer of air is determined by the density of the contamination of the upper layer of soil, depends on the size of the contaminated territory and meteorological conditions. A model of the moving out of oxidized tritium into the atmosphere is obtained after it has fallen out to the ground; this model quantitatively describes the process of its evapouration into the near-ground layer of air

  19. Effluent Treatment Facility tritium emissions monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    An Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved sampling and analysis protocol was developed and executed to verify atmospheric emissions compliance for the new Savannah River Site (SRS) F/H area Effluent Treatment Facility. Sampling equipment was fabricated, installed, and tested at stack monitoring points for filtrable particulate radionuclides, radioactive iodine, and tritium. The only detectable anthropogenic radionuclides released from Effluent Treatment Facility stacks during monitoring were iodine-129 and tritium oxide. This paper only examines the collection and analysis of tritium oxide

  20. Two investigations concerning the release of tritium. I. Tritium leakage from 3H(Sc) EC-detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, C.; Wesslen, E.

    1977-01-01

    Recently the manufacturers of EC-detectors for gas chromatographs introduced a new type of 3 H EC-detector where the tritium is bound to scandium instead of to titanium and has an activity up to 1 Ci. It is expected that the scandium-based detector will take a great part of the Swedish EC-detector market. The Swedish National Institute of Radiation Protection is anxious to make sure that the introduction of the new detector, which will be used at higher temperature, will not give rise to any increased risk of tritium intake to the personnel handling the chromatographs. The leakage of tritium from commercially available 3 H(Sc) EC-detectors containing 1 Ci of tritium was measured as a function of the detector temperature. Tritium appears both in the form of tritium gas dissolved in the scandium and in the form of tritide. The gas evaporates rather easily with increasing temperature while the dissociation of the tritide is a slower process. The evaporation of tritium due to the dissociation of the tritide was found to be negligible, less than 0.2 μCi/h at temperatures less than 100 0 C, but rises rapidly with temperature. The study also showed that even when the detector is stored at room temperature, a re-distribution of the tritium occures, from the tritide to the dissolved tritium gas, which then easily evaporates even at moderately elevated temperatures

  1. Lithium orthosilicate ceramics: sol-gel preparation, lithium dynamics and tritium release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smaihi, M.

    1990-12-01

    Ceramics based on the lithium orthosilicate (Li 4 SiO 4 ) are candidates as blanket materials for forthcoming fusion reactors. Lithium orthosilicate powders, with controlled stoichiometry, were prepared from sol-gel route. This method of processing powders makes possible the preparation of monophase ceramics with fine-grained uniform microstructure by sintering at 650-800 0 C, without prior calcination. Lithium transport properties were investigated from complex impedance spectroscopy and 7 Li NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements. The enhancement of the lithium conductivity in the orthosilicate type structure was realized by introducing mobile ion vacancies in the lithium sites, as noted in the Li 4 SiO 4 -Li 3 PO 4 system. Concerning tritium release properties, deduced from out-of-pile experiments, no relation was found between the tritium behavior and the lithium bulk-diffusion within the grains. However, a large effect of the microstructure was displayed. The release rate appeared much faster for microporous fine-grained ceramics than for dense coarse-grained ones. In fact, the tritium release is controlled, at least at low temperature, by water chemistry and can be very well described by OH - /OT - recombination and desorption [fr

  2. Tritium retention and release from beryllium metal (the beryllium experiment)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizane, G.; Tiliks, J.; Kolodinska, E.; Vitins, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The beryllium function in the blanket zone of a fusion reactor in future is neutron multiplication. He and T form in Be as a result of nuclear reactions. He and T accumulate both in the metal grain volume and into gas bubbles on grain boundaries. T and He release from Be pebbles starts only at 800-900 K, the release into the cooling gas (He) completes only at the Be melting point (1557 K). Therefore, a considerable T and He accumulation will take place in the Be pebbles at the operating temperature (900-1000 K) of the blanket zone. The T and He accumulation causes swelling of the Be pebbles, the radiation hazard both at uncontrolled increase of temperature and at keeping of used up blanket modules. In this study, an effect of intense magnetic field (MF) on the T release from the Be pebbles in a range of the blanket operating temperatures was evaluated. The Be pebbles (diameter ∼ 2 mm) irradiated at 790 K by fast neutrons, the fluence 1.0-1.24·10 25 n·m -2 , in 1994 in the BERYLLIUM experiment in HFR in Petten. The T content of the Be pebbles was 8 appm (1 GBq·g -1 ) in our experiments. Be pebbles were annealed both at a constant rate of temperature (β=5 K· min -1 ) and at a constant temperature (1023-1123 K) both without and in MF 2.35 T. The released T was measured by means of a gas-flow counter TMH 2, the retained T - after the dissolution of the pebble in solution of scavengers in the kinetic regime. The main results: T in the Be pebbles is localised as T 0 and T 2 , the abundance ratio of the charged forms T + or T - does not exceed 3-5% and is not affected by ML at the annealing. About 80% of T are localised in an inner part of the pebble (50% of diameter). The annealing in MF does not affect the T distribution in the pebble. Annealing the Be pebble to 1123 K without MF, (15±3)% T release, but in MF - only (8±3)%. The delaying MF effect could be related to dimerization of atomic T

  3. Tritium in the environment. Knowledge synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This report first presents the nuclear and physical-chemical properties of tritium and addresses the notions of bioaccumulation, bio-magnification and remanence. It describes and comments the natural and anthropic origins of tritium (natural production, quantities released in the environment in France by nuclear tests, nuclear plants, nuclear fuel processing plants, research centres). It describes how tritium is measured as a free element (sampling, liquid scintillation, proportional counting, enrichment method) or linked to organic matter (combustion, oxidation, helium-3-based measurement). It discusses tritium concentrations noticed in different parts of the environment (soils, continental waters, sea). It describes how tritium is transferred to ecosystems (transfer of atmospheric tritium to ground ecosystems, and to soft water ecosystems). It discusses existing models which describe the behaviour of tritium in ecosystems. It finally describes and comments toxic effects of tritium on living ground and aquatic organisms

  4. In-Pile Assemblies for Investigation of Tritium Release from Li2TiO3 Lithium Ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shestakov, V.; Tazhibayeva, I.; Kawamura, H.; Kenzhin, Y.; Kulsartov, T.; Chikhray, Y.; Kolbaenkov, A.; Arinkin, F.; Gizatulin, Sh.; Chakrov, P.

    2005-01-01

    The description of algorithm to design in-pipe experimental ampoule devices (IPAD) is presented here, including description of IPAD design for irradiation tests of highly enriched lithium ceramics at WWR-K reactor. The description of the system for registration of tritium release from ceramics during irradiation is presented as well. Typical curve of tritium release from the IPAD during irradiation under various temperatures of the samples is shown here

  5. An assessment of the tritium inventory in, permeation through and releases from the NET plasma facing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    The tritium retention, permeation and release characteristics of D-T tokamaks are extremely important from both an environmental and a plasma physics point of view. Tokamak measurements have demonstrated that release of retained hydrogen isotopes by plasma-wall interactions play a dominant role in fuel recycling during a discharge. In addition, retained tritium in the plasma facing materials may contribute substantially to the on-site tritium inventory of D-T devices. Austenitic and martensitic steels are being considered as first wall materials. Tungsten and molybdenum will be possibly used as divertor armour materials for NET. By using a computer code, the tritium inventory in, permeation through and release from these materials have been calculated as functions of material thickness, temperature and impinging fluxes. It is shown that the tritium inventory in the first wall will be strongly affected by the temperature gradient in the materials. It is evident, that the tritium permeation as well as the tritium inventory can be reduced appropriately by controlling the temperatures at the plasma and cooling sides of the first wall. The results are discussed and the possible consequences are analysed. (author)

  6. Modelling of the tritium dispersion from postulated accidental release of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Abner Duarte; Simoes Filho, Francisco Fernando Lamego; Cunha, Tatiana Santos da; Aguiar, Andre Silva de; Lapa, Celso Marcelo Franklin

    2011-01-01

    This study has the aim to assess the impact of accidental release of tritium postulate from a nuclear power reactor through environmental modeling of aquatic resources. In order to do that it was used computational models to simulation of tritium dispersion caused by an accident in a Candu reactor located in the ongoing Angra 3 site. The Candu reactor is one that uses heavy water (D 2 O) as moderator and coolant of the core. It was postulated, then, the LOCA accident (without fusion), where was lost 66 m3 of soda almost instantaneously. This inventory contained 35 P Bq and was released a load of 9.7 TBq/s in liquid form near the Itaorna beach, Angra dos Reis - RJ. The models mentioned above were applied in two scenarios (plant stopped or operating) and showed a tritium plume with specific activities larger than the reference level for seawater (1.1 MBq/m 3 ) during the first 14 days after the accident. (author)

  7. Tritium release from EXOTIC-7 orthosilicate pebbles. Effect of burnup and contact with beryllium during irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Werle, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik

    1998-03-01

    EXOTIC-7 was the first in-pile test with {sup 6}Li-enriched (50%) lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) pebbles and with DEMO representative Li-burnup. Post irradiation examinations of the Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} have been performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK), mainly to investigate the tritium release kinetics as well as the effect of Li-burnup and/or contact with beryllium during irradiation. The release rate of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} from pure Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} bed of capsule 28.1-1 is characterized by a broad main peak at about 400degC and by a smaller peak at about 800degC, and that from the mixed beds of capsule 28.2 and 26.2-1 shows again these two peaks, but most of the tritium is now released from the 800degC peak. This shift of release from low to high temperature may be due to the higher Li-burnup and/or due to contact with Be during irradiation. Due to the very difficult interpretation of the in-situ tritium release data, residence times have been estimated on the basis of the out-of-pile tests. The residence time for Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} from caps. 28.1-1 irradiated at 10% Li-burnup agrees quite well with that of the same material irradiated at Li-burnup lower than 3% in the EXOTIC-6 experiment. In spite of the observed shift in the release peaks from low to high temperature, also the residence time for Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} from caps. 26.2-1 irradiated at 13% Li-burnup agrees quite well with the data from EXOTIC-6 experiment. On the other hand, the residence time for Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} from caps. 28.2 (Li-burnup 18%) is about a factor 1.7-3.8 higher than that for caps. 26.2-1. Based on these data on can conclude that up to 13% Li-burnup neither the contact with beryllium nor the Li-burnup have a detrimental effect on the tritium release of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles, but at 18% Li-burnup the residence time is increased by about a factor three. (J.P.N.)

  8. Tobacco Xenobiotics Release Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam EWN

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many xenobiotic compounds exert their actions through the release of free radicals and related oxidants 12, bringing about unwanted biological effects 3. Indeed, oxidative events may play a significant role in tobacco toxicity from cigarette smoke. Here, we demonstrate the direct in vitro release of the free radical nitric oxide (•NO from extracts and components of smokeless tobacco, including nicotine, nitrosonornicotine (NNN and 4-(methyl-N-nitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK in phosphate buffered saline and human saliva using electron spin resonance and chemiluminescence detection. Our findings suggest that tobacco xenobiotics represent as yet unrecognized sources of •NO in the body.

  9. Non-labile tritium in Savannah River Plant pine trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, S.M. Jr.

    1976-06-01

    Non-labile tritium bound in cellulose of pine trees was measured to learn about the effects and fate of tritium contributed to the environment by the Savannah River Plant (SRP). An estimation of the regional inventory and the distance tritium can be observed from SRP was desired because tritium is a major component of the radioactivity released by SRP, and as the oxide, it readily disperses in the environment

  10. International comparison of computer codes for modelling the dispersion and transfer of tritium released to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, S.B.; Kempe, T.F.; Donnelly, K.J.

    1985-05-01

    Computer codes for modelling the dispersion and transfer of tritium released to the atmosphere were compared. The codes originated from Canada, the United States, Sweden and Japan. The comparisons include acute and chronic emissions of tritiated water vapour or elemental tritium from a hypothetical nuclear facility. Individual and collective doses to the population within 100 km of the site were calculated. The discrepancies among the code predictions were about one order of magnitude for the HTO emissions but were significantly more varied for the HT emissions. Codes that did not account for HT to HTO conversion and cycling of tritium in the environment predicted doses that were several orders of magnitude less than codes that incorporate this feature into the model. A field experiment consisting of the release of tritium gas and subsequent measurements of tritium concentrations in the environment has been recommended to validate the tritium transport models and code predictions and to refine the values of key parameters in the models. It is further recommended that the results from a field experiment be used in a follow-up code validation study to confirm which conceptual model and derived computer code provides the best representation of tritium transport in the real system

  11. Catalytic oxidation efficiencies for tritium and tritiated methane in a mature, industrial-scale decontamination system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mintz, J.M.; Gildea, P.D.

    1981-01-01

    Almost all tritium decontamination systems proposed for fusion facilities employ catalytic oxidation to water, followed by drying, to remove tritium and tritiated hydrocarbons from gas streams. One such large-scale system, the gas purification system (GPS), has been operating in the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL) at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA, since October 1977. A series of experiments have recently been conducted there to assesss the current operating characteristics of the GPS catalyst. The experiments used tritium and tritiated methane and covered a range of temperatures, flow rates, and concentration levels. When contrasted with 1977 data, the results indicate that no measurable degradation of catalyst function had occurred. However, some reduction in active metal surface area, as indicated by B.E.T. surface area measurements (approx. 100 → 90m 2 /g) and AES scans (approx. 1.4 → 0.9 at. % Pt), had occurred. Kinetic rate coefficients were also derived and a rough temperature dependence obtained

  12. Catalytic oxidation efficiencies for tritium and tritiated methane in a mature, industrial-scale decontamination system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mintz, J.M.; Gildea, P.D.

    1980-10-01

    Almost all tritium decontamination systems proposed for fusion facilities employ catalytic oxidation to water, followed by drying, to remove tritium and tritiated hydrocarbons from gas streams. One such large-scale system, the gas purification system (GPS), has been operating in the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL) at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA, since October 1977. A series of experiments have recently been conducted there to assess the current operating characteristics of the GPS catalyst. The experiments used tritium and tritiated methane and covered a range of temperatures, flow rates, and concentration levels. When contrasted with 1977 data, the results indicate that no measurable degradation of catalyst function had occurred. However, some reduction in active metal surface area, as indicated by B.E.T. surface area measurements (approx. 100 → 90 m 2 /g) and AES scans (approx. 1.4 → 0.9 at% Pt), had occurred. Kinetic rate coefficients were also derived and a rough temperature dependence obtained

  13. Modelization of tritium transfer into the organic compartments of algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonotto, S.; Gerber, G.B.; Arapis, G.; Kirchmann, R.

    1982-01-01

    Uptake of tritium oxide and its conversion into organic tritium was studied in four different types of algae with widely varying size and growth characteristics (Acetabularia acetabulum, Boergesenia forbesii, two strains of Chlamydomonas and Dunaliella bioculata). Water in the cell and the vacuales equilibrates rapidly with external tritium water. Tritium is actively incorporated into organically bound form as the organisms grow. During the stationary phase, incorporation of tritium is slow. There exists a discrimination against the incorporation of tritium into organically bound form. A model has been elaborated taking in account these different factors. It appears that transfer of organic tritium by algae growing near the sites of release would be significant only for actively growing algae. Algae growing slowly may, however, be useful as cumulative indicators of discontinuous tritium release. (author)

  14. Modelling of tritium dispersion from postulated accidental release of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Abner Duarte

    2010-01-01

    This study has the aim to assess the impact of accidental release of tritium postulate from a nuclear power reactor through environmental modeling of aquatic resources. In order to do that it was used computational models of hydrodynamics and transport for the simulation of tritium dispersion caused by an accident in a CANDU reactor located in the ongoing Angra 3 site. This exercise was accomplished with the aid of a code system (SisBAHIA) developed in the Rio de Janeiro Federal University (COPPE/UFRJ). The CANDU reactor is one that uses heavy water (D 2 O) as moderator and coolant of the core. It was postulated, then, the LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident) accident in the emergency cooling system of the nucleus (without fusion), where was lost 66 m 3 of soda almost instantaneously. This inventory contained 35 PBq and was released a load of 9.7 TBq/s in liquid form near the Itaorna beach, Angra dos Reis - RJ. The models mentioned above were applied in two scenarios (plant stopped and operating) and showed a tritium plume with specific activities larger than the reference level for seawater (1.1 MBq/m 3 ) during the first 14 days after the accident. The main difference between the scenario without and with seawater recirculation (pumping and discharge) is based on the enhancement of dilution of the highest concentrations in the last one. This dilution enhancement resulting in decreasing concentrations was observed only during the first two weeks, when they ranged from 1x10 9 to 5x10 5 Bq/m 3 close to the Itaorna beach spreading just to Sandri Island. After 180 days, the plume could not be detected anymore in the bay, because their activities would be lower than the minimum detectable value ( 3 ). (author)

  15. Modeling of the dispersion of tritium from postulated accidental releases from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, Andre Silva de; Simoes Filho, Francisco Fernando Lamego; Lapa, Celso Marcelo Franklin; Alvim, Antonio Carlos Marques; Soares, Abner Duarte

    2013-01-01

    This study has the aim to assess the impact of accidental release of tritium postulate from a nuclear power reactor through environmental modeling of aquatic resources. In order to do that it was used computational models of hydrodynamics and transport for the simulation of tritium dispersion caused by an accident in a CANDU reactor located in the ongoing Angra 3 site. It was postulated, then, the LOCA - Loss of Coolant Accident -, accident in the emergency cooling system of the nucleus ( without fusion), where was lost 66m 3 of soda almost instantaneously. This inventory contained 35 PBq and was released a load of 9.7 TBq/s in liquid form near the Itaorna beach, Angra dos Reis - RJ. The models mentioned above were applied in two scenarios ( plant stopped or operating) and showed a tritium plume with specific activities larger than the reference level for seawater (1.1MBq/m 3 ), during the first 14 days after the accident. The main difference between the scenario without and with seawater recirculation (pumping and discharge) is based on the enhancement of dilution of the highest concentrations in the last one. This dilution enhancement resulting in decreasing concentrations was observed only during the first two weeks, when they ranged from 1x10 9 to 5x10 5 Bq/m 3 close to the Itaorna beach spreading just to Sandri Island. After 180 days, the plume could not be detected anymore in the bay, because their activities would be lower than the minimum detectable value ( 3 ). (author)

  16. Mechanical properties and tritium release behavior of neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishitsuka, E.; Kawamura, H.

    2000-01-01

    Beryllium pebbles are expected as a neutron multiplier of a fusion reactor blanket. Mechanical properties and tritium release behaviors of the neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles were tested as a post irradiation examination (PIE). Two kinds of beryllium specimens (diameter:1 mm, grain size: about 0.5 mm), which were fabricated by the rotating electrode method (REM) and by the Mg reduction method (MRM), were irradiated with a total fast neutron fluence of 1.6 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E>0.1 MeV) at 673, 773 and 873 K. The estimated helium concentration and dpa value were about 1 x 10 3 appmHe and 10 dpa, respectively. Compression tests were carried out at the room temperature in the Beryllium PIE facility of JMTR (Japan materials testing reactor) hot laboratory. Compression speed was 0.2 mm/min in ten tests for each specimen. From the results of compression test, no significant difference in the compression strength was observed between two kinds of beryllium pebbles. Additionally, it was clear that not only helium concentration but also dpa value was an important factor on the mechanical properties, because the compression strength of the high dpa specimens (10 dpa) was smaller than that of the low dpa specimens (6 dpa) with similar helium concentration (about 1 x 10 3 appmHe). Also, the tritium release experiment will be carried out for these specimens, and results will be presented in this workshop. (orig.)

  17. Tritium effluent removal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamberger, P.H.; Gibbs, G.E.

    1978-01-01

    An air detritiation system has been developed and is in routine use for removing tritium and tritiated compounds from glovebox effluent streams before they are released to the atmosphere. The system is also used, in combination with temporary enclosures, to contain and decontaminate airborne releases resulting from the opening of tritium containment systems during maintenance and repair operations. This detritiation system, which services all the tritium handling areas at Mound Facility, has played an important role in reducing effluents and maintaining them at 2 percent of the level of 8 y ago. The system has a capacity of 1.7 m 3 /min and has operated around the clock for several years. A refrigerated in-line filtration system removes water, mercury, or pump oil and other organics from gaseous waste streams. The filtered waste stream is then heated and passed through two different types of oxidizing beds; the resulting tritiated water is collected on molecular sieve dryer beds. Liquids obtained from regenerating the dryers and from the refrigerated filtration system are collected and transferred to a waste solidification and packaging station. Component redundancy and by-pass capabilities ensure uninterrupted system operation during maintenance. When processing capacity is exceeded, an evacuated storage tank of 45 m 3 is automatically opened to the inlet side of the system. The gaseous effluent from the system is monitored for tritium content and recycled or released directly to the stack. The average release is less than 1 Ci/day. The tritium effluent can be reduced by isotopically swamping the tritium; this is accomplished by adding hydrogen prior to the oxidizer beds, or by adding water to the stream between the two final dryer beds

  18. Tritium release behavior from neutron-irradiated Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanifuji, Takaaki; Yamaki, Daiju; Noda, Kenji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Nasu, Shoichi

    1998-03-01

    Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} single-crystals with various size (1-2mm) were used as specimens. After the irradiation up to 4 x 10{sup 18} n/cm{sup 2} with thermal neutrons in JRR-2, tritium release from the Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} specimens in isothermal heating tests was continuously measured with a proportional counter. The tritium release in the range from 625K to 1373K seems to be controlled by bulk diffusion. The tritium diffusion coefficient (D{sub T}) in Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} was evaluated to be D{sub T}(cm{sup 2}/sec) = 0.100exp(-104(kJ/mol)/RT), 625Ktritium diffusion coefficients in Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} is almost equal to those of Li{sub 2}O irradiated with thermal neutrons up to 2 x 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}. It indicates that the tritium release performance of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} is essentially good as Li{sub 2}O. (author)

  19. Surface desorption and bulk diffusion models of tritium release from Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, R.E., E-mail: ravila@cchen.c [Departamento de Materiales Nucleares, Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Cas. 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Pena, L.A.; Jimenez, J.C. [Departamento de Produccion y Servicios, Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Cas. 188-D, Santiago (Chile)

    2010-10-30

    The release of tritium from Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} pebbles, in batch experiments, is studied by means of temperature programmed desorption. Data reduction focuses on the analysis of the non-oxidized and oxidized tritium components in terms of release limited by diffusion from the bulk of ceramic grains, or by first or second order surface desorption. By analytical and numerical methods the in-furnace tritium release is deconvoluted from the ionization chamber transfer functions, for which a semi-empirical form is established. The release from Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} follows second order desorption kinetics, requiring a temperature for a residence time of 1 day (T{sub 1dRes}) of 620 K, and 603 K, of the non-oxidized, and the oxidized components, respectively. The release from Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} appears as limited by either diffusion from the bulk of the ceramic grains, or by first order surface desorption, the first possibility being the more probable. The respective values of T{sub 1dRes} for the non-oxidized component are 661 K, according to the first order surface desorption model, and 735 K within the bulk diffusion limited model.

  20. Tritium removal from air streams by catalytic oxidation and water adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, A.E.

    1976-06-01

    An effective method of capturing tritium from air streams is by catalytic oxidation followed by water adsorption on a microporous solid adsorbent. Performance of a burner/dryer combination is illustrated by overall mass balance equations. Engineering design methods for packed bed reactors and adsorbers are reviewed, emphasizing the experimental data needed for design and the effect of operating conditions on system performance

  1. Coupling Tritium Release Data with Remotely Sensed Precipitation Data to Assess Model Uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avant, B. K.; Ignatius, A. R.; Rasmussen, T. C.; Grundstein, A.; Mote, T. L.; Shepherd, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    An accidental tritium release (570 L, 210 TBq) from the K-Reactor at the Savannah River Site (South Carolina, USA) occurred between December 22-25, 1991. Observed tritium concentrations in rivers and streams, as well as in the coastal estuary, are used to calibrate a hydrologic flow and transport model, BASINS 4.0 (Better Assessment Science Integrating Point and Non-Point Sources) environmental analysis system and the HSPF hydrologic model. The model is then used to investigate complex hydrometeorological and source attribution problems. Both source and meteorologic input uncertainties are evaluated with respect to model predictions. Meteorological inputs include ground-based rain gauges supplemented with radar along with several NASA products including TRMM 3B42, TRMM 3B42RT, and MERRA (Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications) reanalysis data. Model parameter uncertainties are evaluated using PEST (Model-Independent Parameter Estimation and Uncertainty Analysis) and coupled to meteorologic uncertainties to provide bounding estimates of model accuracy.

  2. Pantex Plant Cell 12-44-1 tritium release: Re-assessment of environmental doses for 1990 to 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, S.F.; Hwang, S.T.

    1994-03-01

    A release of tritium gas occurred within Cell 12-44-1 at the Pantex Plant on May 17, 1989. The release was the result of a nuclear component containment failure. This document summarizes past assessments and characterization of the release. From 1990 to 1992, the average annual dose to the offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI), re-assessed using updated methods and data, ranged from 9E-6 to 2E-4 mrem/y. Doses at this level are well below the regulatory dose limit and support the discontinuation of the distinct calculation of the MEI doses from the cell's tritium releases in future Pantex Annual Site Environmental Reports. Additional information provides guidance for the evaluation of similar releases in the future. Improved Environmental Protection Department sampling plans and assessment goals will increase the value of the data collected during future incidents

  3. Investigation of the tritium release from Building 324 in which the stack tritium sampler was off, April 14 through 17, 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.H.

    1998-01-01

    On April 14, 1998, a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researcher performing work in the Building 324 facility approached facility management and asked if facility management could turn off the tritium sampler in the main exhaust stack. The researcher was demonstrating the feasibility of treating components from dismantled nuclear weapons in a device called a plasma arc furnace and was concerned that the sampler would compromise classified information. B and W Hanford Company (BWHC) operated the facility, and PNNL conducted research as a tenant in the facility. The treatment of 200 components in the furnace would result in the release of up to about 20 curies of tritium through the facility stack. The exact quantity of tritium was calculated from the manufacturing data for the weapons components and was known to be less than 20 curies. The Notice of Construction (NOC) approved by the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) had been modified to allow releasing 20 curies of tritium through the stack in support of this research. However, there were irregularities in the way the NOC modification was processed. The researcher was concerned that data performed on the sampler could be used to back-calculate the tritium content of the components, revealing classified information about the design of nuclear weapons. He had discussed this with the PNNZ security organization, and they had told him that data from the sampler would be classified. He was also concerned that if he could not proceed with operation of the plasma arc furnace, the furnace would be damaged. The researcher told BWHC management that the last time the furnace was shut down and restarted it had cost $0.5 million and caused a six month delay in the project's schedule. He had already begun heating up the furnace before recognizing the security problem and was concerned that stopping the heatup could damage the furnace. The NOC that allowed the research did not have an explicit requirement to

  4. Assessment of radiological releases to the environment from a fusion reactor power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shank, K.E.; Oakes, T.W.; Easterly, C.E.

    1978-05-01

    This report summarizes the expected tritium and activation-product inventories and presents an assessment of the potential radiological releases from a fusion reactor power plant, hypothetically located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Routine tritium releases and the resulting dose assessment are discussed. Uncertainties associated with the conversion of tritium gas to tritium oxide and the global tritium cycling are evaluated. The difficulties of estimating releases of activated materials and the subsequent dose commitment are reviewed.

  5. Assessment of radiological releases to the environment from a fusion reactor power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shank, K.E.; Oakes, T.W.; Easterly, C.E.

    1978-05-01

    This report summarizes the expected tritium and activation-product inventories and presents an assessment of the potential radiological releases from a fusion reactor power plant, hypothetically located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Routine tritium releases and the resulting dose assessment are discussed. Uncertainties associated with the conversion of tritium gas to tritium oxide and the global tritium cycling are evaluated. The difficulties of estimating releases of activated materials and the subsequent dose commitment are reviewed

  6. Levels of tritium in soils and vegetation near Canadian nuclear facilities releasing tritium to the atmosphere: implications for environmental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, P A; Kwamena, N-O A; Ilin, M; Wilk, M; Clark, I D

    2015-02-01

    Concentrations of organically bound tritium (OBT) and tritiated water (HTO) were measured over two growing seasons in vegetation and soil samples obtained in the vicinity of four nuclear facilities and two background locations in Canada. At the background locations, with few exceptions, OBT concentrations were higher than HTO concentrations: OBT/HTO ratios in vegetation varied between 0.3 and 20 and values in soil varied between 2.7 and 15. In the vicinity of the four nuclear facilities OBT/HTO ratios in vegetation and soils deviated from the expected mean value of 0.7, which is used as a default value in environmental transfer models. Ratios of the OBT activity concentration in plants ([OBT]plant) to the OBT activity concentration in soils ([OBT]soil) appear to be a good indicator of the long-term behaviour of tritium in soil and vegetation. In general, OBT activity concentrations in soils were nearly equal to OBT activity concentrations in plants in the vicinity of the two nuclear power plants. [OBT]plant/[OBT]soil ratios considerably below unity observed at one nuclear processing facility represents historically higher levels of tritium in the environment. The results of our study reflect the dynamic nature of HTO retention and OBT formation in vegetation and soil during the growing season. Our data support the mounting evidence suggesting that some parameters used in environmental transfer models approved for regulatory assessments should be revisited to better account for the behavior of HTO and OBT in the environment and to ensure that modelled estimates (e.g., plant OBT) are appropriately conservative. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A study of wet deposition of atmospheric tritium releases at the Ontario Power Generation, Pickering Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crooks, G.; DeWilde, J.; Yu, L.

    2001-01-01

    The Ontario Power Generation,Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (PNGS) has been investigating deposition of atmospheric releases of tritium on their site. This study has included numerical dispersion modelling studies conducted over the past three years, as well as an ongoing field monitoring study. The following paper will present results of the field monitoring study and make comparisons to the numerical modelling. The results of this study could be of potential use to nuclear stations in quantifying tritium deposition in near field regions where building wake effects dominate pollutant dispersion

  8. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases at the National Tritium Labeling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Health and Ecological Assessment Div.; Shan, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

    1997-04-01

    This risk assessment calculates the probability of experiencing health effects, including cancer incidence due to tritium exposure for three groups of people: (1) LBNL workers near the LBNL facility--Building 75--that uses tritium; (2) other workers at LBNL and nearby neighbors; and (3) people who use the UC Berkeley campus area, and some Berkeley residents. All of these groups share the same probability of health effects from the background radiation from natural sources in the Berkeley area environment, including an increased risk of developing a cancer of 11,000 chances per million. In calculating risk the authors assumed continuous operation in Building 75 for at least a human lifetime. Under this assumption, LBNL workers located near Building 75 have an additional risk of 60 chances out of one million to suffer a cancer; other workers at LBNL and people who live near LBNL have an additional risk of six chances out of one million over a lifetime of exposure; and users of the UC Berkeley campus area and other residents of Berkeley have an additional risk of less than once chance out of one million over a lifetime.

  9. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases at the National Tritium Labeling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P.; Shan, C.

    1997-04-01

    This risk assessment calculates the probability of experiencing health effects, including cancer incidence due to tritium exposure for three groups of people: (1) LBNL workers near the LBNL facility--Building 75--that uses tritium; (2) other workers at LBNL and nearby neighbors; and (3) people who use the UC Berkeley campus area, and some Berkeley residents. All of these groups share the same probability of health effects from the background radiation from natural sources in the Berkeley area environment, including an increased risk of developing a cancer of 11,000 chances per million. In calculating risk the authors assumed continuous operation in Building 75 for at least a human lifetime. Under this assumption, LBNL workers located near Building 75 have an additional risk of 60 chances out of one million to suffer a cancer; other workers at LBNL and people who live near LBNL have an additional risk of six chances out of one million over a lifetime of exposure; and users of the UC Berkeley campus area and other residents of Berkeley have an additional risk of less than once chance out of one million over a lifetime

  10. Spherical diffusion of tritium from a point of release in a uniform unsaturated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smiles, D.E.; Gardner, W.R.; Schulz, R.K.

    1993-10-01

    Tritium (Tr), when released as tritiated water at a point in a uniform and relatively dry soil, redistributes in both the liquid and vapor phases. The flux density of Tr in the liquid will exceed that in the vapor phase provided the water content is greater than approximately 15% of the total soil porosity. Thus Tr redistribution must be modeled recognizing transfer ''in parallel'' in both phases. The authors use the diffusion equation cast in spherical coordinates to analyze this problem in order to provide a basis for design of field experiments, and to offer observations on the long term behavior of such systems. The solution of the diffusion equation permits calculation of the evolution of profiles of Tr concentration, within and external to the sphere of released solution, assuming the initial concentration within this sphere to be uniform. The authors also predict the rate of advance of the maximum of Tr as it advances, and attenuates, in the soil. Calculations for the case of 1 million Curies of Tr diluted in 1 liter of water and released at a depth of 20 meters, and 200 meters above the water table, are demonstrated. If the soil has an initial water volume fraction of 0.06 and total porosity of 0.3 they show, for example, that at 5 meters from the point of discharge, the Tr concentration increases to a maximum in 24 years and then slowly declines. That maximum is 1 Curie/liter. The concentration in the gas phase will be 5 orders-of-magnitude less than this. At 60 meters the maximum ever reached in the liquid phase is ca 10 -21 Ci/liter; that maximum will be achieved after 408 years. The authors discuss the effects of variation in the volume fractions of water and air originally present in the soil on the effective diffusion coefficient of Tr in soil, consider the effects of a net flux of water in the system, and identify questions to be answered to achieve safe systematic disposal of tritium in the deep unsaturated zone of desert soil

  11. A database on tritium behavior in the chronic HT release experiment. 1. Meteorological data and tritium concentrations in air and soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Sumi; Kinouchi, Nobuyuki; Murata, Mikio; Amano, Hikaru; Ando, Mariko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Fukutani, Satoshi

    1999-03-01

    This report comprises a database that can be used to develop and validate tritium models to assess doses to the general public due to HT continuously released from fusion facilities into the atmosphere. The data was collected in the 1994 chronic HT release experiment carried out at the Chalk River Laboratories in Canada. The data set include meteorological conditions such as solar radiation, net solar radiation, wind speed, air temperature and humidity, soil temperature and soil heat flux; soil conditions such as bulk density, water content and free pore volume fraction; HT and HTO concentrations in air, HTO concentrations in soil moisture and HTO deposition to water surface. Evapo-transpiration rates and turbulent diffusivity are estimated and tabulated. The report also contains experimental methods to observe meteorological conditions and take air and soil samples. (author)

  12. Accidental tritium release from nuclear technologies and a radiobiological survey of the impact of low dose tritium on the developing mouse brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Narendra; Bhatia, A.L.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The Atomic Energy Act, 1962 provides for the development of the peaceful uses of atomic energy for the welfare of the people in India. The licensing policy adopted for nuclear power stations in India requires that the plants meet stringent requirements based on the system of dose limitation, recommended by the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP). Currently, nuclear energy is contributing just 3% of the country's power generation. The share of nuclear power is proposed to be increased to 10% in the near future. With the introduction of nuclear energy, the need to assess the radioecological and radiobiological impact of radionuclides of long half- life existing in the environment for longer duration has appeared. Tritium, a radioactive by-product of power reactors is one of such major radionuclides of concern. In the world, routine releases and accidental spills of tritium from nuclear power plants pose a growing health and safety concern. Tritium has been observed in ground water in the vicinity of several nuclear stations. Exposure to tritium has been clinically proven to cause deleterious and detectable effects such as teratogenesis, cancer and life shortening in laboratory animals. There is, now, a growing emphasis on tritium in radiation protection as the challenge of nuclear fusion comes nearer. Present investigation is an attempt to elucidate the effects of low dose tritiated water exposure on developing mouse cerebellum. Pregnant Swiss albino mice (12-15 in number were given a priming injection 7.4 and 74 kBq/ml of body water) of tritiated water (HTO) on 16 th day of gestation. From the same day onward, through parturition, till the last interval studied, the pregnant females were continuously maintained respectively on 11.1 and 111 kBq/ml of tritiated drinking water provided ad libidum. After cervical dislocation the litters were autopsied on 1, 3, 5 and 6 weeks post- partum. Brains were fixed and then cerebellum from each

  13. Transfer of tritium released into the marine environment by French nuclear facilities bordering the English Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiévet, Bruno; Pommier, Julien; Voiseux, Claire; Bailly du Bois, Pascal; Laguionie, Philippe; Cossonnet, Catherine; Solier, Luc

    2013-06-18

    Controlled amounts of liquid tritium are discharged as tritiated water (HTO) by the nuclear industry into the English Channel. Because the isotopic discrimination between 3H and H is small, organically bound tritium (OBT) and HTO should show the same T/H ratio under steady-state conditions. We report data collected from the environment in the English Channel. Tritium concentrations measured in seawater HTO, as well as in biota HTO and OBT, confirm that tritium transfers from HTO to OBT result in conservation of the T/H ratio (ca. 1 × 10(-16)). The kinetics of the turnover of tritium between seawater HTO, biota HTO, and OBT was investigated. HTO in two algae and a mollusk is shown to exchange rapidly with seawater HTO. However, the overall tritium turnover between HTO and the whole-organism OBT is a slow process with a tritium biological half-life on the order of months. Nonsteady-state conditions exist where there are sharp changes in seawater HTO. As a consequence, for kinetic reasons, the T/H ratio in OBT may deviate transiently from that observed in HTO of samples from the marine ecosystem. Dynamic modeling is thus more realistic for predicting tritium transfers to biota OBT under nonsteady-state conditions.

  14. Properties of tritium and its compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belovodskij, L.F.; Gaevoj, V.K.; Grishmanovskij, V.I.

    1985-01-01

    Ways of tritium preparation and different aspects of its application are considered. Physicochemical properties of this isotope and some compounds of it - tritium oxides, lithium, titanium, zirconium, uranium tritides, tritium organic compounds - are discussed. In particular, diffusion of tritium and its oxide through different materials, tritium oxidation processes, decomposition of tritium-containing compounds under the action of self-radiation are considered. Main radiobiological tritium properties are described

  15. Oxidation of atmospheric molecular tritium in plant leaves, lichens and mosses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimasa, Michiko; Ichimasa, Yusuke; Yagi, Yoshimi; Ko, Rinkei; Suzuki, Masatomo; Akita, Yasukazu.

    1989-01-01

    The oxidation of atmospheric molecular tritium (HT) in vegetation was determined by in vitro experiments for pine needles, pine bark, lichens attached to pine trees, taken from a coastal pine forest in Ibaraki prefecture and comparison of such measurements was made with those in soil. The oxidation of HT in pine needles was extremely low, being only about 1/40000 that in the surface soil of a pine forest, whereas its oxidation in pine bark with a lichen was almost 1000-7000 times higher than that in pine needles. HT oxidation in pine bark, a lichen and a moss was determined in each case under light and dark conditions and was found to be essentially the same. All mosses and lichens examined in the present study were found to have unusually high levels of HT oxidation whether their habitat was tree or ground surface. (author)

  16. Tritium control in helium-cooled blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Maya, I.; Kessel, C.; Roelant, D.; Schultz, K.R.

    1985-06-01

    As a part of the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study (BCSS), GA Technologies was responsible for the design of helium-cooled, solid- and liquid-metal breeder blankets. Conceptual blanket designs were developed, including the consideration of the generation, transport, and extraction of tritium. Evaluations were made of the inventory and leakage of tritium for helium-cooled Li 2 O and LiAlO 2 and liquid lithium breeder blankets for tokamak and tandem mirror reactors. To facilitate the evaluation, a solid breeder tritium code TRIT4 was developed. The results from this study indicate that tritium inventories and leakages are acceptable for the proposed helium-cooled blankets. An assumption made in the tritium leakage calculations was that tritium is released to the helium purge and coolant streams as T 2 and remains in that form. If oxidation to T 2 O is possible, significant reduction in the tritium leakage will be possible. We conclude that more experimental data on breeder material properties and tritium permeation behavior are needed. However, we are certain that an adequate number of different techniques are available to control the breeder tritium inventory and leakage to an acceptable level in helium-cooled solid- and lithium-breeder blankets

  17. Tritium handling experience at TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.L.; Gentile, C.; Hosea, J.

    1994-01-01

    In December 1993 the high power D-T experimental program on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) began. The transit the TFTR from a DOE general use facility to a low hazard category III nuclear facility has been completed successfully. The low hazard nuclear facility designation that the allowable on-site tritium inventory not exceed 50,000 Curies (1 Ci = 37 GBq). This is a TFTR Technical Safety Requirement. Tritium sealed in approved shipping containers does riot count against this inventory limit A second Technical Safety Requirement at TFTR is to have no more than 25,000 Ci at risk in a single location. From December, 1993 through mid-August, 1994 about 20 grams of tritium have been used in two gas injector assemblies and twelve neutral beam tritium injectors. The gas injected into TFTR vacuum is pumped by helium cryo-panels in the four neutral beam boxes. During non-operating periods the cryo-panels are warmed and the hydrogen am released and pumped into gas holding tanks in the tritium area. Gas in the holding tanks is oxidized in the Torus Cleanup System (TCS) and the hydrogen isotopes are collected, as water, on disposable molecular sieve beds (DMSB). These beds are then removed from the system and shipped off-site for tritium recovery or for long-term storage. Several problems in the tritium cleanup systems have occurred following a leak of sulfur hexafluoride (SF 6 ) from a neutral hewn high voltage enclosure ion source and subsequent pumping to the gas holding tanks. These problems included failure of several-moisture sensors, false readings on tritium monitors and, partial loss of catalytic activity in the TCS recombiner. Procedures for dealing with and removing this contaminant gas had to be developed and implemented. The results from this occurrence provide valuable guidance for future tritium burning fusion machines

  18. Excretion of organic and inorganic tritiated compounds in cow's milk after ingestion of tritium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Hoek, J.; Gerber, G.B.; Kirchmann, R.

    1980-01-01

    The secretion of tritium in milk as water, casein and lipids was studied in cows given tritiated water to drink for 25 days. The parameters of the exponential functions describing the secretion of tritium as water, casein and lipid are determined during this 'loading phase' and also for a 'decay period' of 75 days after the tritiated water administration had been terminated. Secretion started after a short delay (0.5 day). Turnover of all three compounds was short (half time of about 5 days). Calculations of the dilution of the ingested water during metabolism showed that about 83% of the milk water secreted is found to originate from drinking water; the rest comes from water in food and from that formed in metabolism. The parameters of the decay phase indicated that the principle components of water, casein and lipids had about the same turnover rates as during the loading phase. Using the loading and decay phase data, calculations were performed to determine how much activity in each compound and in each metabolic component would be excreted after a single and after a continuous application of tritium oxide when integrated over infinite times. (UK)

  19. Tritium releases from the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station and birth defects and infant mortality in nearby communities 1971-1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, K.C.; Rouleau, J.

    1991-10-01

    This study was commissioned to examine whether there were elevated rates of stillbirth, birth defects, or death in the first year of life between 1971 and 1988 among offspring of residents of communities within a 25-kilometre radius of the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station. The study was also to investigate whether there were any statistical associations between the monthly airborne or waterborne tritium emissions from the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station and the rates of these reproductive outcomes. Overall analysis did not support a hypothesis of increased rates of stillbirths, neonatal mortality or infant mortality near the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station, or a hypothesis of increased birth prevalence of birth defects for 21 of 22 diagnostic categories. The prevalence of Down Syndrome was elevated in both Pickering and Ajax; however, there was no consistent pattern between tritium release levels and Down Syndrome prevalence, chance could not be ruled out for the associations between Down Syndrome and tritium releases or ground-monitored concentrations, the association was detected in an analysis where multiple testing was done which may turn up significant associations by change, and maternal residence at birth and early in pregnancy needs to be verified. The association between Down Syndrome and low-level radiation remains indeterminate when existing evidence from epidemiological studies is summed. The estimated radiation exposure from the nuclear plant for residents of Pickering and Ajax is lower by a factor of 100 than the normal natural background radiation. Further study is recommended. (21 tabs., 29 figs., 5 maps, 37 refs.)

  20. Tritium release from beryllium pebbles after high temperature irradiation up to 3000 appm He in the HIDOBE-01 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Til, S. van, E-mail: vantil@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Westerduinweg 3, Postbus 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Fedorov, A.V.; Stijkel, M.P.; Cobussen, H.L.; Mutnuru, R.K.; Idsert, P. van der [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Westerduinweg 3, Postbus 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Zmitko, M. [The European Joint Undertaking for ITER and The Development of Fusion Energy, c/ Josep Pla, no. 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-11-15

    In the HIDOBE (HIgh DOse irradiation of BEryllium) irradiation program, various grades of constrained and unconstrained beryllium pebbles, beryllium pellets and titanium-beryllide samples are irradiated in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten at four different temperatures (between 698 K and 1023 K) for 649 days [1]. The first of two HIDOBE irradiation experiments, HIDOBE-01, was completed after achieving a DEMO relevant helium production level of 3000 appm and the samples are retrieved for postirradiation examination (PIE). This work shows preliminary results of the out-of-pile tritium release analysis performed on different grades of irradiated beryllium pebbles (different in size). Relationships between irradiation temperature, tritium inventory and microstructural evolution have been observed by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

  1. Recovery of humoral immunity parameters in mice under a long-term action of tritium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirillova, E.N.; Man'ko, V.M.; Muksinova, K.N.

    1986-01-01

    Using the mice-males of the CBA line at the age of 10-12 weeks and body mass of 20-23 g the recovery value of quantitative and qualitative factors of humoral immunity under a long-term action of tritium oxide which has been injected during 6 months in the quantity of 370 kBq per 1g of body mass (cumulative dose 8.73 Gy). The long-term internal mice irradiation with tritium oxide resulted in marked devastation of central and peripheral organs of immune system. An earlier and complete recovery of cells quantity in the bone marrow and spleen, recover up to 50% in lymphnodes and minimum repopulation (from 10 to 20%) in thymus as compared with tested animals of the same age is pointed out. In experimental mice CFU 5 pool decrease in bone marrow and spleen is found. CFUs content in the spleen recovered up to the norm, whereas in the bone marrow it constituted not more than 55% of the control. Deep function injury of V-lymphocyte and T - helper precursors the activity of which has not recovered during the whole observation period. The long-term tritium oxide intake lead to antibodies production suppression (by 30-50%), the tendency to the decrease of antibody formation of these animals has been conserved up to the end of life. The functional activity of T - suppressors in humoral response to thymus-dependent antigen during the remote periods upon long-term irradiation decreased more than twice

  2. Environmental tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gans, I.

    1974-10-01

    The radioactive hydrogen isotope tritium can be found in all water occurrences. The concentration of natural tritium measured before 1954 amounts to 26 picocuries per liter in precipitation, 5 to 20 picocuries per liter in surface water, and 1 picocurie per liter in sea water. Since then, due to thermonuclear waepons tests in the atmosphere, considerably higher concentrations have been measured - 1963 the annual mean for precipitation went up to 10 4 picocuries per liter. Today in Middle Europe some hundred picocuries per liter are found in precipitation and surface water, less than 100 picocuries per liter in sea water, and in general less than 15 picocuries per liter in ground water. Artificial tritium today is applied in large scale in research and industry. It is of special importance as waste in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. In the future, however, tritium emissions from nuclear power plants are less important than releases from reprocessing plants. Estimations show that the global environmental impact is small. For regions with a large density of nuclear power installations, radiation exposures of the order of magnitude of 10 mrem are predicted with pessimistic assumptions. More realistic assumptions lead to dose values of about 0.1 mrem caused by the influence of tritium. This is 80% of the dose caused by the release of radioactive material from nuclear power installations. (orig.) [de

  3. The nucleic acid metabolism in rat liver after single and long-term administration of tritium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shorokhova, V.B.

    1984-01-01

    It was shown that after a single administration of tritiUm oxide in a dose of 22.2 MBq/g body mass the liver mass increased, the concentration of nucleic acids decreased and the biosynthesjs rate increased dUring a one-month observation. By the end of the observation period (the first year) the parameters under study were normalized. The long-term administration of tritium oxide in daily doses of 0.37, 0.925 and 1.85 MBq/g body mass caused changes in the nucleac acid metabolism which were less manifest (at early times), than in the case of a single injection. At the same time, the long-term administration of tritium oxide in the dose of 0.925 MBq/g caused a substantial disturbance of the nucleic acid metabolism at later times (after 2-9 months)

  4. Environmental aspects of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quisenberry, D.R.

    1979-01-01

    The potential radiological implications of environmental tritium releases must be determined in order to develop a programme for dealing with the tritium inventory predicted for the nuclear power industry which, though still in its infancy, produces tritium in megacurie quantities annually. Should the development of fusion power generation become a reality, it will create a potential source for large releases of tritium, much of it in the gaseous state. At present about 90% of the tritium produced enters the environment through gaseous and liquid effluents and is deposited in the hydrosphere as tritiated water. Tritium can be assimilated by plants and animals and organically bound, regardless of the exposure pathway. However, there appears to be no concentration factor relative to hydrogen at any level of food chains analysed to date. The body burden, for man, is dependent on the exposure pathway and tissue-bound fractions are primarily the result of organically bound tritium in food. (author)

  5. Comparison of the regulatory models assessing off-site radiological dose due to the routine releases of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, W. T.; Kim, E. H.; Han, M. H.; Choi, Y. H.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, C. W.

    2005-01-01

    Methodologies of NEWTRIT model, NRC model and AIRDOS-EPA model, which are off-site dose assessment models for regulatory compliance from routine releases of tritium into the environment, were investigated. Using the domestic data, if available, the predictive results of the models were compared. Among them, recently developed NEWTRIT model considers only doses from organically bounded tritium (OBT) due to environmental releases of tritiated water (HTO). A total dose from all exposure pathways predicted from AIRDOS-EPA model was 1.03 and 2.46 times higher than that from NEWTRIT model and NRC model, respectively. From above result, readers should not have an understanding that a predictive dose from NRC model may be underestimated compared with a realistic dose. It is because of that both mathematical models and corresponding parameter values for regulatory compliance are based on the conservative assumptions. For a dose by food consumption predicted from NEWTRIT model, the contribution of OBT was nearly equivalent to that of HTO due to relatively high consumption of grains in Korean. Although a total dose predicted from NEWTRIT model is similar to that from AIRDOS-EPA model, NEWTRIT model may be have a meaning in the understanding of phenomena for the behavior of HTO released into the environment

  6. Changes of medullary hemopoiesis produced by chronic exposure to tritium oxide and external γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murzina, L.D.; Muksinova, K.N.

    1982-01-01

    A comparative study of a chronic effect of tritium oxide ( 3 HOH) and external γ-radiation by 137 Cs on medullary hemopoiesis was conducted in experiments on Wistar rats. 3 HOH was administered for 3mos., 37x10 4 Bk per lg per of body mass daily (the absorbed dose 10.8 Gy), external irradiation was given in correlated values of dose rates and integral doses. Bone marrow depopulation was 1.9 times as deeper in rats exposed to 3 HOH as compared to that in irradiated rats. This difference is caused by early and stable inhibition of erythropoiesis with the administration of the radionuclide. The integral index showing the injuring effect of tritium on erythropoiesis was 4 times as high as compared to that of external γ-irradiation by 137 Cs. The time course of value of the proliferative pool of bone marrow granulocytes with the exposure to 2 types of radiation was monotypic. Differences in maturing and functioning granulocytic pools were marked in early time of the experiment

  7. Description of NORMTRI: a computer program for assessing the off-site consequences from air-borne releases of tritium during normal operation of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raskob, W.

    1994-10-01

    The computer program NORMTRI has been developed to calculate the behaviour of tritium in the environment released into the atmosphere under normal operation of nuclear facilities. It is possible to investigate the two chemical forms tritium gas and tritiated water vapour. The conversion of tritium gas into tritiated water followed by its reemission back to the atmosphere as well as the conversion into organically bound tritium is considered. NORMTRI is based on the statistical Gaussian dispersion model ISOLA, which calculates the activity concentration in air near the ground contamination due to dry and wet deposition at specified locations in a polar grid system. ISOLA requires a four-parametric meteorological statistics derived from one or more years synoptic recordings of 1-hour-averages of wind speed, wind direction, stability class and precipitation intensity. Additional features of NORMTRI are the possibility to choose several dose calculation procedures, ranging from the equations of the German regulatory guidelines to a pure specific equilibrium approach. (orig.)

  8. TFTR tritium handling concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garber, H.J.

    1976-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, to be located on the Princeton Forrestal Campus, is expected to operate with 1 to 2.5 MA tritium--deuterium plasmas, with the pulses involving injection of 50 to 150 Ci (5 to 16 mg) of tritium. Attainment of fusion conditions is based on generation of an approximately 1 keV tritium plasma by ohmic heating and conversion to a moderately hot tritium--deuterium ion plasma by injection of a ''preheating'' deuterium neutral beam (40 to 80 keV), followed by injection of a ''reacting'' beam of high energy neutral deuterium (120 to 150 keV). Additionally, compressions accompany the beam injections. Environmental, safety and cost considerations led to the decision to limit the amount of tritium gas on-site to that required for an experiment, maintaining all other tritium in ''solidified'' form. The form of the tritium supply is as uranium tritide, while the spent tritium and other hydrogen isotopes are getter-trapped by zirconium--aluminum alloy. The issues treated include: (1) design concepts for the tritium generator and its purification, dispensing, replenishment, containment, and containment--cleanup systems; (2) features of the spent plasma trapping system, particularly the regenerable absorption cartridges, their integration into the vacuum system, and the handling of non-getterables; (3) tritium permeation through the equipment and the anticipated releases to the environment; (4) overview of the tritium related ventilation systems; and (5) design bases for the facility's tritium clean-up systems

  9. Tritium fuel cycle modeling and tritium breeding analysis for CFETR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hongli; Pan, Lei; Lv, Zhongliang; Li, Wei; Zeng, Qin, E-mail: zengqin@ustc.edu.cn

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • A modified tritium fuel cycle model with more detailed subsystems was developed. • The mean residence time method applied to tritium fuel cycle calculation was updated. • Tritium fuel cycle analysis for CFETR was carried out. - Abstract: Attaining tritium self-sufficiency is a critical goal for fusion reactor operated on the D–T fuel cycle. The tritium fuel cycle models were developed to describe the characteristic parameters of the various elements of the tritium cycle as a tool for evaluating the tritium breeding requirements. In this paper, a modified tritium fuel cycle model with more detailed subsystems and an updated mean residence time calculation method was developed based on ITER tritium model. The tritium inventory in fueling system and in plasma, supposed to be important for part of the initial startup tritium inventory, was considered in the updated mean residence time method. Based on the model, the tritium fuel cycle analysis of CFETR (Chinese Fusion Engineering Testing Reactor) was carried out. The most important two parameters, the minimum initial startup tritium inventory (I{sub m}) and the minimum tritium breeding ratio (TBR{sub req}) were calculated. The tritium inventories in steady state and tritium release of subsystems were obtained.

  10. Tritium glovebox stripper system seismic design evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinnell, J. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Klein, J. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-01

    The use of glovebox confinement at US Department of Energy (DOE) tritium facilities has been discussed in numerous publications. Glovebox confinement protects the workers from radioactive material (especially tritium oxide), provides an inert atmosphere for prevention of flammable gas mixtures and deflagrations, and allows recovery of tritium released from the process into the glovebox when a glovebox stripper system (GBSS) is part of the design. Tritium recovery from the glovebox atmosphere reduces emissions from the facility and the radiological dose to the public. Location of US DOE defense programs facilities away from public boundaries also aids in reducing radiological doses to the public. This is a study based upon design concepts to identify issues and considerations for design of a Seismic GBSS. Safety requirements and analysis should be considered preliminary. Safety requirements for design of GBSS should be developed and finalized as a part of the final design process.

  11. Tritium permeation experiments using reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel tube and erbium oxide coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takumi Chikada; Masashi Shimada; Robert Pawelko; Takayuki Terai; Takeo Muroga

    2013-09-01

    Low concentration tritium permeation experiments have been performed on uncoated F82H and Er2O3-coated tubular samples in the framework of the Japan-US TITAN collaborative program. Tritium permeability of the uncoated sample with 1.2 ppm tritium showed one order of magnitude lower than that with 100% deuterium. The permeability of the sample with 40 ppm tritium was more than twice higher than that of 1.2 ppm, indicating a surface contribution at the lower tritium concentration. The Er2O3-coated sample showed two orders of magnitude lower permeability than the uncoated sample, and lower permeability than that of the coated plate sample with 100% deuterium. It was also indicated that the memory effect of ion chambers in the primary and secondary circuits was caused by absorption of tritiated water vapor that was generated by isotope exchange reactions between tritium and surface water on the coating.

  12. Tritium sampling and measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, M.J.; McElroy, R.G.; Surette, R.A.; Brown, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    Current methods for sampling and measuring tritium are described. Although the basic techniques have not changed significantly over the last 10 y, there have been several notable improvements in tritium measurement instrumentation. The design and quality of commercial ion-chamber-based and gas-flow-proportional-counter-based tritium monitors for tritium-in-air have improved, an indirect result of fusion-related research in the 1980s. For tritium-in-water analysis, commercial low-level liquid scintillation spectrometers capable of detecting tritium-in-water concentrations as low as 0.65 Bq L-1 for counting times of 500 min are available. The most sensitive method for tritium-in-water analysis is still 3He mass spectrometry. Concentrations as low as 0.35 mBq L-1 can be detected with current equipment. Passive tritium-oxide-in-air samplers are now being used for workplace monitoring and even in some environmental sampling applications. The reliability, convenience, and low cost of passive tritium-oxide-in-air samplers make them attractive options for many monitoring applications. Airflow proportional counters currently under development look promising for measuring tritium-in-air in the presence of high gamma and/or noble gas backgrounds. However, these detectors are currently limited by their poor performance in humidities over 30%. 133 refs

  13. Overview of tritium fast-fission yields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, J.E.

    1981-03-01

    Tritium production rates are very important to the development of fast reactors because tritium may be produced at a greater rate in fast reactors than in light water reactors. This report focuses on tritium production and does not evaluate the transport and eventual release of the tritium in a fast reactor system. However, if an order-of-magnitude increase in fast fission yields for tritium is confirmed, fission will become the dominant production source of tritium in fast reactors

  14. Uncertainties in modeling of consequences of tritium release from fusion reactors. Plasma Fusion Center No. PFC/TR-79-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piet, S.J.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1979-07-01

    The bases for various models concerned with all phases of estimating doses from routine tritium releases from fusion reactors have been examined. The implications of uncertainties in parameters and assumptions for the uncertainty of the calculated doses and resulting maximum permissible releases are presented. Global dispersion models are most affected by the assumptions made concerning movement, such as the role of the ocean as a sink. Dose models were generally found to agree within a factor of two, with the largest variation due to agricultural data. Plant tritium flow studies are the least developed and require substantial improvement in the data base. Based on two possible arbitrary global standards, the maximum allowable releases were found to range from 1.6 to 20,000 Ci/day. The local criteria imply releases between 5 and 20 Ci/day

  15. Uncertainties in modeling of consequences of tritium release from fusion reactors. Plasma Fusion Center No. PFC/TR-79-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piet, S.J.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1979-07-01

    The bases for various models concerned with all phases of estimating doses from routine tritium releases from fusion reactors have been examined. The implications of uncertainties in parameters and assumptions for the uncertainty of the calculated doses and resulting maximum permissible releases are presented. Global dispersion models are most affected by the assumptions made concerning movement, such as the role of the ocean as a sink. Dose models were generally found to agree within a factor of two, with the largest variation due to agricultural data. Plant tritium flow studies are the least developed and require substantial improvement in the data base. Based on two possible arbitrary global standards, the maximum allowable releases were found to range from 1.6 to 20,000 Ci/day. The local criteria imply releases between 5 and 20 Ci/day.

  16. Handling of tritium at TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, C.W.; Howe, H.J.; Yemin, L.; Lind, K.

    1977-01-01

    Some of the engineering approaches taken at TFTR for the tritium control systems are discussed as the requirements being placed on the tritium systems by the operating scenarios of the Tokamak. The tritium control systems presently being designed for TFTR will limit the annual release to the environment to less than 100 curies

  17. The determination of tritium contents in fuel cladding of the WWER-440 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babenko, A.G.; Mekhedov, B.N.; Popov, S.V.; Shalin, A.N.

    1991-01-01

    Determination of tritium spent fuel element cans from five fuel assemblies of the WWER-440 reactor was realized. The fuel can samples in the form of rings with 3-4 mm height were washed out in boiling nitric acid to remove fuel traces, dissolved in the 1:1 mixture of 5M ammonium fluoride and 63% nitric acid at 100 deg C in sealed system including the units of dissolving, oxidation and purification, in order to determine the tritium content. The tritium concentration in the tritium-containing water obtained was determined by the liquid-scintillation method. The analysis of the results have shown that almost total amount of tritium is released into fuel can from the fuel. Heterogeneity in tritium distribution can be explained by its concentrating near sections with failed zirconium oxide film in the form of hydrides

  18. RECOMMENDED TRITIUM OXIDE DEPOSITION VELOCITY FOR USE IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE SAFETY ANALYSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, P.; Murphy, C.; Viner, B.; Hunter, C.; Jannik, T.

    2012-04-03

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) has recently questioned the appropriate value for tritium deposition velocity used in the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System Ver. 2 (Chanin and Young 1998) code when estimating bounding dose (95th percentile) for safety analysis (DNFSB 2011). The purpose of this paper is to provide appropriate, defensible values of the tritium deposition velocity for use in Savannah River Site (SRS) safety analyses. To accomplish this, consideration must be given to the re-emission of tritium after deposition. Approximately 85% of the surface area of the SRS is forested. The majority of the forests are pine plantations, 68%. The remaining forest area is 6% mixed pine and hardwood and 26% swamp hardwood. Most of the path from potential release points to the site boundary is through forested land. A search of published studies indicate daylight, tritiated water (HTO) vapor deposition velocities in forest vegetation can range from 0.07 to 2.8 cm/s. Analysis of the results of studies done on an SRS pine plantation and climatological data from the SRS meteorological network indicate that the average deposition velocity during daylight periods is around 0.42 cm/s. The minimum deposition velocity was determined to be about 0.1 cm/s, which is the recommended bounding value. Deposition velocity and residence time (half-life) of HTO in vegetation are related by the leaf area and leaf water volume in the forest. For the characteristics of the pine plantation at SRS the residence time corresponding to the average, daylight deposition velocity is 0.4 hours. The residence time corresponding to the night-time deposition velocity of 0.1 cm/s is around 2 hours. A simple dispersion model which accounts for deposition and re-emission of HTO vapor was used to evaluate the impact on exposure to the maximally exposed offsite individual (MOI) at the SRS boundary (Viner 2012). Under conditions that produce the bounding, 95th percentile MOI exposure

  19. Tritium Removal by Laser Heating and Its Application to Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Gentile, C.A.; Guttadora, G.; Carpe, A.; Langish, S.; Young, K.M.; Nishi, M.; Shu, W.

    2001-01-01

    A novel laser heating technique has recently been applied to removing tritium from carbon tiles that had been exposed to deuterium-tritium (DT) plasmas in the Tokamak Test Fusion Reactor (TFTR). A continuous wave neodymium laser, of power up to 300 watts, was used to heat the surface of the tiles. The beam was focused to an intensity, typically 8 kW/cm 2 , and rapidly scanned over the tile surface by galvanometer-driven scanning mirrors. Under the laser irradiation, the surface temperature increased dramatically, and temperatures up to 2,300 degrees C were recorded by an optical pyrometer. Tritium was released and circulated in a closed-loop system to an ionization chamber that measured the tritium concentration. Most of the tritium (up to 84%) could be released by the laser scan. This technique appears promising for tritium removal in a next-step DT device as it avoids oxidation, the associated deconditioning of the plasma facing surfaces, and the expense of processing large quantities of tritium oxide. Some engineering aspects of the implementation of this method in a next-step fusion device will be discussed

  20. Tritium interactions with steel and construction materials in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, R.S.

    1990-11-01

    The literature on the interactions of tritium and tritiated water with metals, glasses, ceramics, concrete, paints, polymers and other organic materials is reviewed in this report Some of the processes affecting the amount of tritium found on various materials, such as permeation, sorption and the conversion of tritium found on various materials, such as permeation, sorption and conversion of elemental tritium (T 2 ) to tritiated water (HTO), are also briefly outlined. Tritium permeation in steels is fairly well understood, but effects of surface preparation and coatings on sorption are not yet clear. Permeation of T 2 into other metals with cleaned surfaces has been studied thoroughly at high temperature, and the effect of surface oxidation has also been explored. The room-temperature permeation rates of low-permeability metals with cleaned surfaces are much faster than indicated by high-temperature results, because of grain-boundary diffusion. Elastomers have been studied to a certain extent, but some mechanisms of interaction with tritium gas and sorbed tritium are unclear. Ceramics have some of the lowest sorption and permeation rates, but ceramic coatings on stainless steels do not lower permeation or tritium as effectively as coatings obtained by oxidation of the steel, probably because of cracking caused by differences in thermal expansion coefficient. Studies on concrete are in their early stages; they show that sorption of tritiated water on concrete is a major concern in cleanup of releases of elemental tritium into air in tritium handling facilities. Some of the codes for modelling releases and sorption of T 2 and HTO contain unproven assumptions about sorption and T 2 → HTO conversion. Several experimental programs will be required in order to clear up ambiguities in previous work and to determine parameters for materials which have not yet been investigated. (146 refs., tab.)

  1. Tritium emissions reduction facility (TERF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamberger, P.H.; Hedley, W.H.

    1993-01-01

    Tritium handling operations at Mound include production of tritium-containing devices, evaluation of the stability of tritium devices, tritium recovery and enrichment, tritium process development, and research. In doing this work, gaseous process effluents containing 400,000 to 1,000,000 curies per year of tritium are generated. These gases must be decontaminated before they can be discharged to the atmosphere. They contain tritium as elemental hydrogen, as tritium oxide, and as tritium-containing organic compounds at low concentrations (typically near one ppm). The rate at which these gases is generated is highly variable. Some tritium-containing gas is generated at all times. The systems used at Mound for capturing tritium from process effluents have always been based on the open-quotes oxidize and dryclose quotes concept. They have had the ability to remove tritium, regardless of the form it was in. The current system, with a capacity of 1.0 cubic meter of gas per minute, can effectively remove tritium down to part-per-billion levels

  2. Tritium Issues in Next Step Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.H. Skinner; G. Federici

    2001-09-05

    Tritium issues will play a central role in the performance and operation of next-step deuterium-tritium (DT) burning plasma tokamaks and the safety aspects associated with tritium will attract intense public scrutiny. The orders-of-magnitude increase in duty cycle and stored energy will be a much larger change than the increase in plasma performance necessary to achieve high fusion gain and ignition. Erosion of plasma-facing components will scale up with the pulse length from being barely measurable on existing machines to centimeter scale. Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) devices with carbon plasma-facing components will accumulate tritium by co-deposition with the eroded carbon and this will strongly constrain plasma operations. We report on a novel laser-based method to remove co-deposited tritium from carbon plasma-facing components in tokamaks. A major fraction of the tritium trapped in a co-deposited layer during the deuterium-tritium (DT) campaign on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) was released by heating with a scanning laser beam. This technique offers the potential for tritium removal in a next-step DT device without the use of oxidation and the associated deconditioning of the plasma-facing surfaces and expense of processing large quantities of tritium oxide. The operational lifetime of alternative materials such as tungsten has significant uncertainties due to melt layer loss during disruptions. Production of dust and flakes will need careful monitoring and minimization, and control and accountancy of the tritium inventory will be critical issues. Many of the tritium issues in Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) are similar to MFE, but some, for example those associated with the target factory, are unique to IFE. The plasma-edge region in a tokamak has greater complexity than the core due to lack of poloidal symmetry and nonlinear feedback between the plasma and wall. Sparse diagnostic coverage and low dedicated experimental run time has hampered the

  3. Tritium Issues in Next Step Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C.H. Skinner; G. Federici

    2001-01-01

    Tritium issues will play a central role in the performance and operation of next-step deuterium-tritium (DT) burning plasma tokamaks and the safety aspects associated with tritium will attract intense public scrutiny. The orders-of-magnitude increase in duty cycle and stored energy will be a much larger change than the increase in plasma performance necessary to achieve high fusion gain and ignition. Erosion of plasma-facing components will scale up with the pulse length from being barely measurable on existing machines to centimeter scale. Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) devices with carbon plasma-facing components will accumulate tritium by co-deposition with the eroded carbon and this will strongly constrain plasma operations. We report on a novel laser-based method to remove co-deposited tritium from carbon plasma-facing components in tokamaks. A major fraction of the tritium trapped in a co-deposited layer during the deuterium-tritium (DT) campaign on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) was released by heating with a scanning laser beam. This technique offers the potential for tritium removal in a next-step DT device without the use of oxidation and the associated deconditioning of the plasma-facing surfaces and expense of processing large quantities of tritium oxide. The operational lifetime of alternative materials such as tungsten has significant uncertainties due to melt layer loss during disruptions. Production of dust and flakes will need careful monitoring and minimization, and control and accountancy of the tritium inventory will be critical issues. Many of the tritium issues in Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) are similar to MFE, but some, for example those associated with the target factory, are unique to IFE. The plasma-edge region in a tokamak has greater complexity than the core due to lack of poloidal symmetry and nonlinear feedback between the plasma and wall. Sparse diagnostic coverage and low dedicated experimental run time has hampered the

  4. Tritium dynamics in soils and plants at a tritium processing facility in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihok, S.; St-Amanat, N.; Kwamena, N.O. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (Canada); Clark, I.; Wilk, M.; Lapp, A. [University of Ottawa (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The dynamics of tritium released as tritiated water (HTO) have been studied extensively with results incorporated into environmental models such as CSA N288.1 used for regulatory purposes in Canada. The dispersion of tritiated gas (HT) and rates of oxidation to HTO have been studied under controlled conditions, but there are few studies under natural conditions. HT is a major component of the tritium released from a gaseous tritium light manufacturing facility in Canada (CNSC INFO-0798). To support the improvement of models, a garden was set up in one summer near this facility in a spot with tritium in air averaging ∼ 5 Bq/m{sup 3} HTO (passive diffusion monitors). Atmospheric stack releases (575 GBq/week) were recorded weekly. HT releases occur mainly during working hours with an HT:HTO ratio of 2.6 as measured at the stack. Soils and plants (leaves/stems and roots/tubers) were sampled for HTO and organically-bound tritium (OBT) weekly. Active day-night monitoring of air was conducted to interpret tritium dynamics relative to weather and solar radiation. The experimental design included a plot of natural grass/soil, contrasted with grass (sod) and Swiss chard, pole beans and potatoes grown in barrels under different irrigation regimes (in local topsoil at 29 Bq/L HTO, 105 Bq/L OBT). All treatments were exposed to rain (80 Bq/L) and atmospheric releases of tritium (weekdays), and reflux of tritium from soils (initial conditions of 284 Bq/L HTO, 3,644 Bq/L OBT) from 20 years of operations. Three irrigation regimes were used for barrel plants to mimic home garden management: rain only, low tritium tap water (5 Bq/L), and high tritium well water (mean 10,013 Bq/L). This design provided a range of plants and starting conditions with contrasts in initial HTO/OBT activity in soils, and major tritium inputs from air versus water. Controls were two home gardens far from any tritium sources. Active air monitoring indicated that the plume was only occasionally present for

  5. Analysis of tritium release from LiAlO sub 2 in the TEQUILA experiment, using the MISTRAL code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badawi, A.; Raffray, A.R.; Abdou, M.A. (Univ. of California, Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1991-12-01

    The tritium release behavior from LiAlO{sub 2} samples in the TEQUILA experiment was analyzed using the MISTRAL code. This was done in order to benchmark the code for analyzing the performance of a LiAlO{sub 2} blanket test section under ITER-like conditions. Material property data available from the experimental sample microstructure characterization and from the literature were used as input to the code. The microstructure characterization was quite thorough and included the pore size distribution which was used to estimate the pore diffusion coefficient. In the case of the bulk diffusion coefficient, since single crystal experimental measurements are not available, two different values from different experimental data were used. The strategy was to model four different transients for the same sample and to use the property data, in particular the diffusion coefficient, which will better reproduce all four transients. The transients studied were: Two temperature transients, in which the temperature changed by +50deg C and -50deg C and two hydrogen concentration transients in the purge, in which the concentration changes from 0.1% to 1% and from 1% to 0.1%. The results showed that the assumed bulk diffusion coefficient can change the output substantially. For each case, the effects of other parameters, such as the adsorption activation and pore diffusion coefficient, were also considered. The results are discussed in the paper. (orig.).

  6. Conceptual design of an emergency tritium clean-up system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, M.E.

    1978-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has been selected to design, build, and operate a facility to demonstrate the operability of the tritium-related subsystems that would be required to successfully develop fusion reactor systems. Basically, these subsystems would consist of the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle and associated environmental control systems. An emergency tritium clean-up subsystem (ETC) for this facility will be designed to remove tritium from the cell atmosphere if an accident causes the primary and secondary tritium containment to be breached. Conceptually, the ETC will process cell air at the rate of 0.65 actual m 3 /s (1385 ACFM) and will achieve an overall decontamination factor of 10 6 for tritium oxide (T 2 O). Following the maximum credible release of 100 g of tritium, the ETC will restore the cell to operational status within 24 h without a significant release of tritium to the environment. The basic process will include compression of the air to 0.35 MPa (3.5 atm) in a reciprocating compressor followed by oxidation of the tritium to T 2 O in a catalytic reactor. The air will be cooled to 275 K (350 0 F) to remove most of the moisture, including T 2 O, as a condensate. The remaining moisture will be removed by molecular sieve dryer beds that incorporate a water-swamping step between beds, allowing greater T 2 O removal. A portion of the detritiated air will be recirculated to the cell; the remainder will be exhausted to the building ventilation stack to maintain a slight negative pressure in the cell. The ETC will be designed for maximum flexibility so that studies can be performed that involve various aspects of room air detritiation

  7. Tritium monitor with improved gamma-ray discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Samson A.; Bennett, Edgar F.; Yule, Thomas J.

    1985-01-01

    Apparatus and method for selective measurement of tritium oxide in an environment which may include other radioactive components and gamma radiation, the measurement including the selective separation of tritium oxide from a sample gas through a membrane into a counting gas, the generation of electrical pulses individually representative by rise times of tritium oxide and other radioactivity in the counting gas, separation of the pulses by rise times, and counting of those pulses representative of tritium oxide. The invention further includes the separate measurement of any tritium in the sample gas by oxidizing the tritium to tritium oxide and carrying out a second separation and analysis procedure as described above.

  8. Development of a code to simulate dispersion of atmospheric released tritium gas in the environmental media and to evaluate doses. TRIDOSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Mikio; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Sumi

    2000-11-01

    A computer code (TRIDOSE) was developed to assess the environmental impact of atmospheric released tritium gas (T 2 ) from nuclear fusion related facilities. The TRIDOSE simulates dispersion of T 2 and resultant HTO in the atmosphere, land, plant, water and foods in the environment, and evaluates contamination concentrations in the media and exposure doses. A part of the mathematical models in TRIDOSE were verified by comparison of the calculation with the results of the short range (400 m) dispersion experiment of HT gas performed in Canada postulating a short-time (30 minutes) accidental release. (author)

  9. Tritium in the aquatic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Hoffman, F.O.; Frank, M.L.

    1986-02-01

    Tritium is of environmental importance because it is released from nuclear facilities in relatively large quantities and because it has a half life of 12.26 y. Most of the tritium released into the atmosphere eventually reaches the aqueous environment, where it is rapidly taken up by aquatic organisms. This paper reviews the current literature on tritium in the aquatic environment. Conclusions from the review, which covered studies of algae, aquatic macrophytes, invertebrates, fish, and the food chain, were that aquatic organisms incorporate tritium into their tissue-free water very rapidly and reach concentrations near those of the external medium. The rate at which tritium from tritiated water is incorporated into the organic matter of cells is slower than the rate of its incorporation into the tissue-free water. If organisms consume tritiated food, incorporation of tritium into the organic matter is faster, and a higher tritium concentration is reached than when the organisms are exposed to only tritiated water alone. Incorporation of tritium bound to molecules into the organic matter depends on the chemical form of the ''carrier'' molecule. No evidence was found that biomagnification of tritium occurs at higher trophic levels. Radiation doses from tritium releases to large populations of humans will most likely come from the consumption of contaminated water rather than contaminated aquatic food products.

  10. Tritium in the aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Hoffman, F.O.; Frank, M.L.

    1986-02-01

    Tritium is of environmental importance because it is released from nuclear facilities in relatively large quantities and because it has a half life of 12.26 y. Most of the tritium released into the atmosphere eventually reaches the aqueous environment, where it is rapidly taken up by aquatic organisms. This paper reviews the current literature on tritium in the aquatic environment. Conclusions from the review, which covered studies of algae, aquatic macrophytes, invertebrates, fish, and the food chain, were that aquatic organisms incorporate tritium into their tissue-free water very rapidly and reach concentrations near those of the external medium. The rate at which tritium from tritiated water is incorporated into the organic matter of cells is slower than the rate of its incorporation into the tissue-free water. If organisms consume tritiated food, incorporation of tritium into the organic matter is faster, and a higher tritium concentration is reached than when the organisms are exposed to only tritiated water alone. Incorporation of tritium bound to molecules into the organic matter depends on the chemical form of the ''carrier'' molecule. No evidence was found that biomagnification of tritium occurs at higher trophic levels. Radiation doses from tritium releases to large populations of humans will most likely come from the consumption of contaminated water rather than contaminated aquatic food products

  11. Modelling of the tritium dispersion from postulated accidental release of nuclear power plants; Modelagem da dispersao de tritio a partir de liberacoes acidentais postuladas de centrais nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Abner Duarte; Simoes Filho, Francisco Fernando Lamego; Cunha, Tatiana Santos da [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Aguiar, Andre Silva de; Lapa, Celso Marcelo Franklin, E-mail: asoares@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: flamego@ien.gov.b, E-mail: lapa@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This study has the aim to assess the impact of accidental release of tritium postulate from a nuclear power reactor through environmental modeling of aquatic resources. In order to do that it was used computational models to simulation of tritium dispersion caused by an accident in a Candu reactor located in the ongoing Angra 3 site. The Candu reactor is one that uses heavy water (D{sub 2}O) as moderator and coolant of the core. It was postulated, then, the LOCA accident (without fusion), where was lost 66 m3 of soda almost instantaneously. This inventory contained 35 P Bq and was released a load of 9.7 TBq/s in liquid form near the Itaorna beach, Angra dos Reis - RJ. The models mentioned above were applied in two scenarios (plant stopped or operating) and showed a tritium plume with specific activities larger than the reference level for seawater (1.1 MBq/m{sup 3}) during the first 14 days after the accident. (author)

  12. Tritium pollution in the Swiss luminous compound industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krejci, K.; Zeller, Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The Swiss luminous compound industry is an important consumer of tritium. About 350kCi go into production of tritium gas-filled light sources and 40kCi into production of tritium luminous compound annually. To illustrate the pollution problem, a factory is mentioned that handles 200kCi annually and a chain of luminizers, processing 20kCi over the same period as tritium luminous compound. This material is manufactured by coating phosphors with tritiated polystyrene having a specific activity up to 200Ci/g. Because of the high specific activity, the radiation damage produces an average activity release of 5.2% annually, which is one of the main reasons for public and occupational exposure. The processing of large quantities of tritium gas requires special equipment, such as units made entirely of stainless steel for purification and hydrogenation, oxidation systems for highly contaminated air, glove boxes, ventilation and monitoring systems. Nevertheless, contamination of air, surfaces, water and workers cannot be avoided. Only in a few cases were MPC-values for tritium content in urine of workers exceeded. From these results, biological half-lives between 5-15 days were estimated. Regular medical examinations showed no significant influence in blood picture parameters, except in one single case with a tritium concentration in urine of 2.8mCi/litre. Entirely different problems arise in most luminizing factories where luminous paint is processed as an open radioactive source. (author)

  13. Tritium conference days; Journees tritium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnier-Laplace, J.; Lebaron-Jacobs, L.; Sene, M.; Devin, P.; Chretien, V.; Le Guen, B.; Guetat, Ph.; Baglan, N.; Ansoborlo, E.; Boyer, C.; Masson, M.; Bailly-Du-Bois, P.; Jenkinson, St.; Wakeford, R.; Saintigny, Y.; Romeo, P.H.; Thompson, P.; Leterq, D.; Chastagner, F.; Cortes, P.; Philippe, M.; Paquet, F.; Fournier, M.

    2009-07-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during this conference day. Twenty presentations out of 21 are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - tritium in the environment (J. Garnier-Laplace); 2 - status of knowledge about tritium impact on health (L. Lebaron-Jacobs); 3 - tritium, discrete but present everywhere (M. Sene); 4 - management of tritium effluents from Areva NC La Hague site - related impact and monitoring (P. Devin); 5 - tritium effluents and impact in the vicinity of EDF's power plants (V. Chretien and B. Le Guen); 6 - contribution of CEA-Valduc centre monitoring to the knowledge of atmospheric tritiated water transfers to the different compartments of the environment (P. Guetat); 7 - tritium analysis in environment samples: constraints and means (N. Baglan); 8 - organically-linked tritium: the analyst view (E. Ansoborlo); 9 - study of tritium transfers to plants via OBT/HTO{sub air} and OBT/HTO{sub free} (C. Boyer); 10 - tritium in the British Channel (M. Masson and P. Bailly-Du-Bois); 11 - tritium in British coastal waters (S. Jenkinson); 12 - recent results from epidemiology (R. Wakeford); 13 - effects of tritiated thymidine on hematopoietic stem cells (P.H. Romeo); 14 - tritium management issue in Canada: the point of view from authorities (P. Thompson); 15 - experience feedback of the detritiation process of Valduc centre (D. Leterq); 16 - difficulties linked with tritiated wastes confinement (F. Chastagner); 17 - optimisation of tritium management in the ITER project (P. Cortes); 18 - elements of thought about the management of tritium generated by nuclear facilities (M. Philippe); 19 - CIPR's position about the calculation of doses and risks linked with tritium exposure (F. Paquet); 20 - tritium think tanks (M. Fournier). (J.S.)

  14. Tritons and tritides as the solute and diffusing species in ceramic tritium breeders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, A.K.; Johnson, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    Intragranular diffusion of tritium is an inherent participant in the process of releasing tritium from lithium-containing ceramics that are used to breed tritium in a fusion reactor. The nature of this transport is reviewed in terms of the understanding established for the mechanism of hydrogen migration in other oxides, namely, that the diffusing species is the proton and that it moves from oxide ion to oxide ion, thereby giving rise to apparent hydroxide migration. Analogously, the triton, transiently bonded to successive oxides and forming successive tritoxides, is taken to be the dominant migrating species in ceramic breeders. In addition, tritide becomes a significant participant at low oxygen activity. The relationship of tritons and tritides as the migrating species to the observed release of both reduced and oxidized forms can be understood in terms of the thermodynamic conditions that prevail. Mechanisms exist that can be proposed to rationalize the participation of these species

  15. Tritium waste package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossmassler, Rich; Ciebiera, Lloyd; Tulipano, Francis J.; Vinson, Sylvester; Walters, R. Thomas

    1995-01-01

    A containment and waste package system for processing and shipping tritium xide waste received from a process gas includes an outer drum and an inner drum containing a disposable molecular sieve bed (DMSB) seated within outer drum. The DMSB includes an inlet diffuser assembly, an outlet diffuser assembly, and a hydrogen catalytic recombiner. The DMSB absorbs tritium oxide from the process gas and converts it to a solid form so that the tritium is contained during shipment to a disposal site. The DMSB is filled with type 4A molecular sieve pellets capable of adsorbing up to 1000 curies of tritium. The recombiner contains a sufficient amount of catalyst to cause any hydrogen add oxygen present in the process gas to recombine to form water vapor, which is then adsorbed onto the DMSB.

  16. Primer on tritium safe handling practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-01

    This Primer is designed for use by operations and maintenance personnel to improve their knowledge of tritium safe handling practices. It is applicable to many job classifications and can be used as a reference for classroom work or for self-study. It is presented in general terms for use throughout the DOE Complex. After reading it, one should be able to: describe methods of measuring airborne tritium concentration; list types of protective clothing effective against tritium uptake from surface and airborne contamination; name two methods of reducing the body dose after a tritium uptake; describe the most common method for determining amount of tritium uptake in the body; describe steps to take following an accidental release of airborne tritium; describe the damage to metals that results from absorption of tritium; explain how washing hands or showering in cold water helps reduce tritium uptake; and describe how tritium exchanges with normal hydrogen in water and hydrocarbons.

  17. Tritium removal and retention device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The patent discloses an apparatus comprising a two-layered composite with an internal core of zirconium or zirconium alloy which retains tritium, and an adherent nickel outer layer which acts as a protective and selective window for passage of the tritium. The invention provides a device to remove and store tritium from a gaseous medium as well as a method for manufacturing the device. It specifically provides a device which may be incorporated in the fuel rod of a nuclear reactor to minimize release of tritium to the reactor coolant

  18. A prototype wearable tritium monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surette, R. A.; Dubeau, J.

    2008-01-01

    Sudden unexpected changes in tritium-in-air concentrations in workplace air can result in significant unplanned exposures. Although fixed area monitors are used to monitor areas where there is a potential for elevated tritium in air concentrations, they do not monitor personnel air space and may require some time for acute tritium releases to be detected. There is a need for a small instrument that will quickly alert staff of changing tritium hazards. A moderately sensitive tritium instrument that workers could wear would bring attention to any rise in tritium levels that were above predetermined limits and help in assessing the potential hazard therefore minimizing absorbed dose. Hand-held instruments currently available can be used but require the assistance of a fellow worker or restrict the user to using only one hand to perform some duties. (authors)

  19. Development of an on-line tritium monitor with gamma-ray rejection and energy discrimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, S.A.; Yule, T.J.; Bennett, E.F.

    1981-01-01

    With the prospect of large fusion facilities coming on-line in the not-too-distant future, it is becoming increasingly important that an on-line tritium-monitoring system be developed which is capable of detecting small amounts of released tritium. Since tritium oxide is some 400 times as hazardous as elemental tritium, it is necessary to distinguish between the two in order to properly evaluate the hazard. Presently available on-line instrumentation has marginal sensitivity, is unable to distinguish between the two forms of tritium, and has poor discrimination against background gamma radiation and air activation products. The objective of our program is to develop a monitoring system with the capability of distinguishing between the two forms of tritium, detecting tritium with a sensitivity of a fraction of an MPC/sub a/ (1 MPC/sub a/ = 5. x 10 - 6 Ci/M 3 ) for the oxide, and discriminating against gamma activity and airborne activity other than tritium

  20. Modelling of tritium dispersion from postulated accidental release of nuclear power plants; Modelagem da dispersao de tritio a partir de liberacoes acidentais postuladas de centrais nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Abner Duarte

    2010-07-01

    This study has the aim to assess the impact of accidental release of tritium postulate from a nuclear power reactor through environmental modeling of aquatic resources. In order to do that it was used computational models of hydrodynamics and transport for the simulation of tritium dispersion caused by an accident in a CANDU reactor located in the ongoing Angra 3 site. This exercise was accomplished with the aid of a code system (SisBAHIA) developed in the Rio de Janeiro Federal University (COPPE/UFRJ). The CANDU reactor is one that uses heavy water (D{sub 2}O) as moderator and coolant of the core. It was postulated, then, the LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident) accident in the emergency cooling system of the nucleus (without fusion), where was lost 66 m{sup 3} of soda almost instantaneously. This inventory contained 35 PBq and was released a load of 9.7 TBq/s in liquid form near the Itaorna beach, Angra dos Reis - RJ. The models mentioned above were applied in two scenarios (plant stopped and operating) and showed a tritium plume with specific activities larger than the reference level for seawater (1.1 MBq/m{sup 3} ) during the first 14 days after the accident. The main difference between the scenario without and with seawater recirculation (pumping and discharge) is based on the enhancement of dilution of the highest concentrations in the last one. This dilution enhancement resulting in decreasing concentrations was observed only during the first two weeks, when they ranged from 1x10{sup 9} to 5x10{sup 5} Bq/m{sup 3} close to the Itaorna beach spreading just to Sandri Island. After 180 days, the plume could not be detected anymore in the bay, because their activities would be lower than the minimum detectable value (< 11 kBq/m{sup 3}). (author)

  1. Tritium sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glodic, S.; Boreli, F.

    1993-01-01

    Tritium is the only radioactive isotope of hydrogen. It directly follows the metabolism of water and it can be bound into genetic material, so it is very important to control levels of contamination. In order to define the state of contamination it is necessary to establish 'zero level', i.e. actual global inventory. The importance of tritium contamination monitoring increases with the development of fusion power installations. Different sources of tritium are analyzed and summarized in this paper. (author)

  2. Tritium storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hircq, B.

    1989-01-01

    A general synthesis about tritium storage is achieved in this paper and a particular attention is given to practical application in the Fusion Technology Program. Tritium, storage under gaseous form and solid form are discussed (characteristics, advantages, disadvantages and equipments). The way of tritium storage is then discussed and a choice established as a function of a logic which takes into account the main working parameters

  3. Metabolism of organically bound tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    The classic methodology for estimating dose to man from environmental tritium ignores the fact that organically bound tritium in foodstuffs may be directly assimilated in the bound compartment of tissues without previous oxidation. We propose a four-compartment model consisting of a free body water compartment, two organic compartments, and a small, rapidly metabolizing compartment. The utility of this model lies in the ability to input organically bound tritium in foodstuffs directly into the organic compartments of the model. We found that organically bound tritium in foodstuffs can increase cumulative total body dose by a factor of 1.7 to 4.5 times the free body water dose alone, depending on the bound-to-loose ratio of tritium in the diet. Model predictions are compared with empirical measurements of tritium in human urine and tissue samples, and appear to be in close agreement. 10 references, 4 figures, 3 tables

  4. Tritium trick

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, W. V.; Zukas, E. G.; Eash, D. T.

    1971-01-01

    Large controlled amounts of helium in uniform concentration in thick samples can be obtained through the radioactive decay of dissolved tritium gas to He3. The term, tritium trick, applies to the case when helium, added by this method, is used to simulate (n,alpha) production of helium in simulated hard flux radiation damage studies.

  5. Tritium monitor and collection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, G.L.; Meikrantz, D.H.; Ely, W.E.; Tuggle, D.G.; Grafwallner, E.G.; Wickham, K.L.; Maltrud, H.R.; Baker, J.D.

    1992-01-14

    This system measures tritium on-line and collects tritium from a flowing inert gas stream. It separates the tritium from other non-hydrogen isotope contaminating gases, whether radioactive or not. The collecting portion of the system is constructed of various zirconium alloys called getters. These alloys adsorb tritium in any of its forms at one temperature and at a higher temperature release it as a gas. The system consists of four on-line getters and heaters, two ion chamber detectors, two collection getters, and two guard getters. When the incoming gas stream is valved through the on-line getters, 99.9% of it is adsorbed and the remainder continues to the guard getter where traces of tritium not collected earlier are adsorbed. The inert gas stream then exits the system to the decay chamber. Once the on-line getter has collected tritium for a predetermined time, it is valved off and the next on-line getter is valved on. Simultaneously, the first getter is heated and a pure helium purge is employed to carry the tritium from the getter. The tritium loaded gas stream is then routed through an ion chamber which measures the tritium activity. The ion chamber effluent passes through a collection getter that readsorbs the tritium and is removable from the system once it is loaded and is then replaced with a clean getter. Prior to removal of the collection getter, the system switches to a parallel collection getter. The effluent from the collection getter passes through a guard getter to remove traces of tritium prior to exiting the system. The tritium loaded collection getter, once removed, is analyzed by liquid scintillation techniques. The entire sequence is under computer control except for the removal and analysis of the collection getter. 7 figs.

  6. Tritium Removal from Codeposits on Carbon Tiles by a Scanning Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C.H. Skinner; C.A. Gentile; A. Carpe; G. Guttadora; S. Langish; K.M. Young; W.M. Shu; H. Nakamura

    2001-01-01

    A novel method for tritium release has been demonstrated on codeposited layers on graphite and carbon-fiber-composite tiles from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). A scanning continuous wave Nd laser beam heated the codeposits to a temperature of 1200-2300 degrees C for 10 to 200 milliseconds in an argon atmosphere. The temperature rise of the codeposit was significantly higher than that of the manufactured tile material (e.g., 1770 degrees C cf. 1080 degrees C). A major fraction of tritium was thermally desorbed with minimal change to the surface appearance at a laser intensity of 8 kW/cm(superscript ''2''), peak temperatures above 1230 degrees C and heating duration 10-20 milliseconds. In two experiments, 46% and 84% of the total tritium was released during the laser scan. The application of this method for tritium removal from a tokamak reactor appears promising and has significant advantages over oxidative techniques

  7. Transfer of Tritium in the Environment after Accidental Releases from Nuclear Facilities. Report of Working Group 7 Tritium Accidents of EMRAS II Topical Heading Approaches for Assessing Emergency Situations. Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety (Emras II) Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    Environmental assessment models are used for evaluating the radiological impact of actual and potential releases of radionuclides to the environment. They are essential tools for use in the regulatory control of routine discharges to the environment and also in planning measures to be taken in the event of accidental releases. They are also used for predicting the impact of releases which may occur far into the future, for example, from underground radioactive waste repositories. It is important to verify, to the extent possible, the reliability of the predictions of such models by a comparison with measured values in the environment or with predictions of other models. The IAEA has been organizing programmes of international model testing since the 1980s. These programmes have contributed to a general improvement in models, in the transfer of data and in the capabilities of modellers in Member States. IAEA publications on this subject over the past three decades demonstrate the comprehensive nature of the programmes and record the associated advances which have been made. From 2009 to 2011, the IAEA organized a programme entitled Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II), which concentrated on the improvement of environmental transfer models and the development of reference approaches to estimate the radiological impacts on humans, as well as on flora and fauna, arising from radionuclides in the environment. Different aspects were addressed by nine working groups covering three themes: reference approaches for human dose assessment, reference approaches for biota dose assessment and approaches for assessing emergency situations. This publication describes the work of the Tritium Accidents Working Group

  8. Tritium practices past and present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gede, V.P.; Gildea, P.D.

    1980-01-01

    History of the production and use of tritium, as well as handling techniques, are reviewed. Handling techniques first used at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory made use of glass vacuum systems and relatively crude ion chambers for monitoring airborne activity. The first use of inert atmosphere glove boxes demonstrated that uptake through the skin could be a serious personnel exposure problem. Growing environmental concerns in the early 1970's resulted in the implementation by the Atomic Energy Commission of a new criteria to limit atmospheric tritium releases to levels as low as practicable. An important result of the new criteria was the development of containment and recovery systems to capture tritium rather than vent it to the atmosphere. The Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, Tritium Research Laboratory containment and decontamination systems are presented as a typical example of this technology. The application of computers to control systems is expected to provide the greatest potential for change in future tritium handling practices

  9. Thermosensitive liposomes entrapping iron oxide nanoparticles for controllable drug release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tai, L-A; Wang, Y-C; Wang, Y-J; Yang, C-S; Tsai, P-J; Lo, L-W

    2009-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles can serve as a heating source upon alternative magnetic field (AMF) exposure. Iron oxide nanoparticles can be mixed with thermosensitive nanovehicles for hyperthermia-induced drug release, yet such a design and mechanism may not be suitable for controllable drug release applications in which the tissues are susceptible to environmental temperature change such as brain tissue. In the present study, iron oxide nanoparticles were entrapped inside of thermosensitive liposomes for AMF-induced drug release while the environmental temperature was maintained at a constant level. Carboxyfluorescein was co-entrapped with the iron oxide nanoparticles in the liposomes as a model compound for monitoring drug release and environmental temperature was maintained with a water circulator jacket. These experiments have been successfully performed in solution, in phantom and in anesthetized animals. Furthermore, the thermosensitive liposomes were administered into rat forearm skeletal muscle, and the release of carboxylfluorescein triggered by the external alternative magnetic field was monitored by an implanted microdialysis perfusion probe with an on-line laser-induced fluorescence detector. In the future such a device could be applied to simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging and non-invasive drug release in temperature-sensitive applications.

  10. Review of tritium behavior in HTGR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gainey, B.W.

    1976-01-01

    The available experimental evidence from laboratory and reactor studies pertaining to tritium production, capture, release, and transport within an HTGR leading to release to the environment is reviewed. Possible mechanisms for release, capture, and transport are considered and a simple model was used to calculate the expected tritium release from HTGRs. Comparison with Federal regulations governing tritium release confirm that expected HTGR releases will be well within the allowable release limits. Releases from HTGRs are expected to be somewhat less than from LWRs based on the published LWR operating data. Areas of research deserving further study are defined but it is concluded that a tritium surveillance at Fort St. Vrain is the most immediate need

  11. A comparison of individual doses for continuous annual unit releases of tritium and activation products into brackish water and lake-river ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edlund, O.; Aquilonius, K.

    1995-12-31

    The annual effective doses to critical group from potential unit releases of tritium and activation products (32 nuclides) from a hypothetical fusion reactor into two aquatic environments, one with brackish water and the other with fresh water, are assessed. Unit continuous releases (1 Bq/year during 50 years) for each relevant activation product are analyzed, and the effective dose rate is calculated for each nuclide. The transfer of released activity is simulated by compartment models using first-order linear differential equations for the transport. The rate constants for the brackish-water ecosystem are based on measurements. Four exposure pathways are considered in the brackish water system, the Tvaeren Bay, (a) consumption of fish, (b) consumption of milk, (c) consumption of meat, and (d) exposure from swimming. For the freshwater system, five additional pathways are considered, namely consumption of (e) water, (f) vegetables, (g) cereals, and (h) root vegetables and (i) external exposure from contaminated ground. The paper presents the compartment models used and a description of how the exposure pathways are treated, especially the pathways via food consumption. The dominating exposure pathways are for most of the nuclides consumption of fish and water. For Ag-isotopes other exposure pathways, such as ground-shine, cereals and meat, are of importance. The results of this study show that individual annual effective doses attributed to unit releases of most of the nuclides to the lake-river system become 1.3-60 times lower than those released to the brackish-water system. The niobium isotopes, however, give a factor 2.5-4.8 higher dose. The reason to that is that the values of the bioaccumulation factor for these isotopes are higher in fresh water than in marine water. An uncertainty analysis is performed on each ecosystem and the results are obtained in the form of distributions. 38 refs, 29 tabs.

  12. A comparison of individual doses for continuous annual unit releases of tritium and activation products into brackish water and lake-river ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edlund, O.; Aquilonius, K.

    1995-01-01

    The annual effective doses to critical group from potential unit releases of tritium and activation products (32 nuclides) from a hypothetical fusion reactor into two aquatic environments, one with brackish water and the other with fresh water, are assessed. Unit continuous releases (1 Bq/year during 50 years) for each relevant activation product are analyzed, and the effective dose rate is calculated for each nuclide. The transfer of released activity is simulated by compartment models using first-order linear differential equations for the transport. The rate constants for the brackish-water ecosystem are based on measurements. Four exposure pathways are considered in the brackish water system, the Tvaeren Bay, (a) consumption of fish, (b) consumption of milk, (c) consumption of meat, and (d) exposure from swimming. For the freshwater system, five additional pathways are considered, namely consumption of e) water, f) vegetables, g) cereals, and h) root vegetables and i) external exposure from contaminated ground. The paper presents the compartment models used and a description of how the exposure pathways are treated, especially the pathways via food consumption. The dominating exposure pathways are for most of the nuclides consumption of fish and water. For Ag-isotopes other exposure pathways, such as ground-shine, cereals and meat, are of importance. The results of this study show that individual annual effective doses attributed to unit releases of most of the nuclides to the lake-river system become 1.3-60 times lower than those released to the brackish-water system. The niobium isotopes, however, give a factor 2.5-4.8 higher dose. The reason to that is that the values of the bioaccumulation factor for these isotopes are higher in fresh water than in marine water. An uncertainty analysis is performed on each ecosystem and the results are obtained in the form of distributions. 38 refs, 29 tabs

  13. New arrangement for the air cleanup system to recover tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Masabumi; Takahashi, Kohsaku; Munakata, Kenzo; Fukada, Satoshi; Kotoh, Kenji; Takeishi, Toshiharu

    1997-01-01

    At present, the standard arrangement of the air cleanup system responsible for emergency tritium recovery from room air is a catalytic oxidation bed with a heater followed by an adsorption bed with a cooler. One disadvantage of this arrangement is that trouble with the heater or the cooler could result in a loss of capacity to recover tritium. Another disadvantage of the catalyst-adsorption-bed arrangement is that tritiated water must be recovered with a high decontamination factor after dilution with a large amount of water vapor in the working atmosphere. The performance of a new arrangement for the air cleanup system, which consists of a precious metal catalyst bed preceded by an adsorption bed without heating equipment, is discussed. According to calculations, most of the tritium released to the room air is recovered in the catalyst bed through oxidation, adsorption, and isotope exchange reaction when the new arrangement is applied. The adsorption bed placed before the catalyst bed dehumidifies the process gas to such a degree that the oxidation reaction of tritium in the catalyst bed is not hindered by water vapor. 15 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs

  14. Limitation of tritium outgassing from tritiated solid waste drums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liger, K.; Trabuc, P.; Lefebvre, X.; Troulay, M.; Perrais, C. [CEA, Centre de Cadarache, DEN/DTN/STPA/LIPC, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2015-03-15

    In the framework of the development of fusion thermonuclear reactors, tritiated solid waste is foreseen and will have to be managed. The management of tritiated waste implies limitations in terms of activity and tritium degassing. The degassing tritium can be under the form of tritiated hydrogen, tritiated water and, in some specific cases, negligible amount of tritiated volatile organic compound. Hence, considering the major forms of degassing tritium, CEA has developed a mixed-compound dedicated to tritium trapping in drums. Based on several experiments, the foreseen mixed compound is composed of MnO{sub 2}, Ag{sub 2}O, Pt and molecular sieve, the three first species having the ability to convert tritiated hydrogen into tritiated water and the last one acting as a trap for tritiated water. To assess the performance of the trapping mixture, experimental tests were performed at room temperature on tritiated dust composed of beryllium and carbon. It was shown that the metallic oxides mixture used for tritiated hydrogen conversion is efficient and that tritiated water adsorption was limited due to an inefficient regeneration of the molecular sieve prior to its use. Apart from this point, the tritium release from waste was reduced by a factor of 5.5, which can be improved up to 87 if the adsorption step is efficient.

  15. Estimated radiological doses to the maximumly exposed individual and downstream populations from releases of tritium, strontium-90, ruthenium-106, and cesium-137 from White Oak Dam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, C.A.; Cotter, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    Concentrations of tritium, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 106/Ru, and /sup 137/Cs in the Clinch River for 1978 were estimated by using the known 1978 releases of these nuclides from the White Oak Dam and diluting them by the integrated annual flow rate of the Clinch River. Estimates of 50-year dose commitment to a maximumly exposed individual were calculated for both aquatic and terestrial pathways of exposure. The maximumly exposed individual was assumed to reside at the mouth of White Oak Creek where it enters the Clinch River and obtain all foodstuffs and drinking water at that location. The estimated total-body dose from all pathways to the maximumly exposed individual as a result of 1978 releases was less than 1% of the dose expected from natural background. Using appropriate concentrations of to subject radionuclides diluted downstream, the doses to populations residing at Harriman, Kingston, Rockwood, Spring City, Soddy-Daisy, and Chattanooga were calculated for aquatic exposure pathways. The total-body dose estimated for aquatic pathways for the six cities was about 0.0002 times the expected dose from natural background. For the pathways considered in this report, the nuclide which contributed the largest fraction of dose was /sup 90/Sr. The largest dose delivered by /sup 90/Sr was to the bone of the subject individual or community.

  16. Estimated radiological doses to the maximumly exposed individual and downstream populations from releases of tritium, strontium-90, ruthenium-106, and cesium-137 from White Oak Dam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, C.A.; Cotter, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    Concentrations of tritium, 90 Sr, 106 Ru, and 137 Cs in the Clinch River for 1978 were estimated by using the known 1978 releases of these nuclides from the White Oak Dam and diluting them by the integrated annual flow rate of the Clinch River. Estimates of 50-year dose commitment to a maximumly exposed individual were calculated for both aquatic and terestrial pathways of exposure. The maximumly exposed individual was assumed to reside at the mouth of White Oak Creek where it enters the Clinch River and obtain all foodstuffs and drinking water at that location. The estimated total-body dose from all pathways to the maximumly exposed individual as a result of 1978 releases was less than 1% of the dose expected from natural background. Using appropriate concentrations of to subject radionuclides diluted downstream, the doses to populations residing at Harriman, Kingston, Rockwood, Spring City, Soddy-Daisy, and Chattanooga were calculated for aquatic exposure pathways. The total-body dose estimated for aquatic pathways for the six cities was about 0.0002 times the expected dose from natural background. For the pathways considered in this report, the nuclide which contributed the largest fraction of dose was 90 Sr. The largest dose delivered by 90 Sr was to the bone of the subject individual or community

  17. TSOAK-M1: a computer code to determine tritium reaction/adsorption/release parameters from experimental results of air-detritiation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Land, R.H.; Maroni, V.A.; Minkoff, M.

    1979-01-01

    A computer code has been developed which permits the determination of tritium reaction (T 2 to HTO)/adsorption/release and instrument correction parameters from enclosure (building) - detritiation test data. The code is based on a simplified model which treats each parameter as a normalized time-independent constant throughout the data-unfolding steps. Because of the complicated four-dimensional mathematical surface generated by the resulting differential equation system, occasional local-minima effects are observed, but these effects can be overcome in most instances by selecting a series of trial guesses for the initial parameter values and observing the reproducibility of final parameter values for cases where the best overall fit to experimental data is achieved. The code was then used to analyze existing small-cubicle test data with good success, and the resulting normalized parameters were employed to evaluate hypothetical reactor-building detritiation scenarios. It was concluded from the latter evaluation that the complications associated with moisture formation, adsorption, and release, particularly in terms of extended cleanup times, may not be as great as was previously thought. It is recommended that the validity of the TSOAK-M1 model be tested using data from detritiation tests conducted on large experimental enclosures (5 to 10 cm 3 ) and, if possible, actual facility buildings

  18. Tritium processing in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miya, Naoyuki; Masaki, Kei

    1997-01-01

    Tritium retention analysis and tritium concentration measurement have been made during the large Tokamak JT-60U deuterium operations. This work has been carried out to evaluate the tritium retention for graphite tiles inside the vacuum vessel and tritium release characteristics in the tritium cleanup operations. JT-60U has carried out D-D experiments since July 1991. In the deuterium operations during the first two years, about 1.7 x 10 19 D-D fusion neutrons were produced by D (d, p) T reactions in plasma, which are expected to produce ∼31 GBq of tritium. The tritium produced is evacuated by a pumping system. A part of tritium is, however, trapped in the graphite tiles. Several sample tiles were removed from the vessel and the retained tritium Distribution in the tiles was measured using a liquid scintillator. The results of poloidal distribution showed that the tritium concentration in the divertor tiles was higher than that in the first wall tiles and it peaked in the tiles between two strike points of divertor magnetic lines. Tritium concentration in the exhaust gas from the vessel have also been measured with an ion chamber during the tritium cleanup operations with hydrogen divertor discharges and He-GDC. Total of recovered tritium during the cleanup operations was ∼ 7% of that generated. The results of these measurements showed that the tritium of 16-23 GBq still remained in the graphite tiles, which corresponded to about 50-70% of the tritium generated in plasma. The vessel is ventilated during the in-vessel maintenance works, then the atmosphere is always kept lower than the legal concentration guide level of 0.7 Bq/cm 3 for radiation work permit requirements. (author)

  19. Study of Oxidizing Agents for Tritium Removal in ITER -Compatible Conditions: Alternatives to Oxygen and Ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabares, F. L.; Tafalla, D.; Ferreira, J. A.; Gomez-Aleixandre, C.; Maria Albella, J.; Soria, J.; Rodriguez-Ramos, I.

    2007-01-01

    In the present report, the studies of tritiated carbon-film removal by oxidizing agents other than Oxygen and Ozone in ITER are described. Exposure of laboratory produced a-C:H/D films and tokamak flakes (Asdex Upgrade and Textor) to nitric oxide, water and hydrogen peroxide has been carried out. Temperatures of exposure up to 350 degree centigree were used, and thermal desorption of the samples at temperatures up to 750 degree centigree was performed for sample characterization prior to and after the treatment. Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA), Infrared Spectroscopy, XPS and Nano indentation hardness analysis were applied to the characterization of the physical and chemical changes of the samples. This work was done under the EFDA Task 04-1175. (Author) 8 refs

  20. Study of Oxidizing Agents for Tritium Removal in ITER -Compatible Conditions: Alternatives to Oxygen and Ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabares, F. L.; Tafalla, D.; Ferreira, J. A.; Gomez-Aleixandre, C.; Maria Albella, J.; Soria, J.; Rodriguez-Ramos, I.

    2007-07-20

    In the present report, the studies of tritiated carbon-film removal by oxidizing agents other than Oxygen and Ozone in ITER are described. Exposure of laboratory produced a-C:H/D films and tokamak flakes (Asdex Upgrade and Textor) to nitric oxide, water and hydrogen peroxide has been carried out. Temperatures of exposure up to 350 degree centigree were used, and thermal desorption of the samples at temperatures up to 750 degree centigree was performed for sample characterization prior to and after the treatment. Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA), Infrared Spectroscopy, XPS and Nano indentation hardness analysis were applied to the characterization of the physical and chemical changes of the samples. This work was done under the EFDA Task 04-1175. (Author) 8 refs.

  1. Tritium handling systems for TFTR and PITR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, K.E.; Yemin, L.; Rossmassler, R.; Phillips, H.O.; Youssef, N.S.; Levine, J.D.; Howe, H.J.; Pierce, C.W.

    1978-01-01

    Operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the proposed Princeton Ignition Test Reactor (PITR) will involve the generation and burning of a deuterium-tritium plasma. Systems associated with both the TFTR and PITR will be designed to minimize the potential release of tritium and other radioisotopes under both routine operational and accidental conditions. Systems have been proposed for the control and processing of large tritium inventories

  2. Tritium retention in candidate next-step protection materials: engineering key issues and research requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federici, G.; Andrew, P.L.; Wu, C.H.

    1995-01-01

    Although a considerable volume of valuable data on the behaviour of tritium in beryllium and carbon-based armours exposed to hydrogenic fusion plasmas has been compiled over the past years both from operation of present-day tokamaks and from laboratory simulations, knowledge is far from complete and tritium inventory predictions for these materials remain highly uncertain. In this paper we elucidate the main mechanisms responsible for tritium trapping and release in next-step D-T tokamaks, as well as the applicability of some of the presently known data bases for design purposes. Owing to their strong anticipated implications on tritium uptake and release, attention is focused mainly on the interaction of tritium with neutron damage induced defects, on tritium codeposition with eroded carbon and on the effects of oxide and surface contaminants. Some preliminary quantitative estimates are presented based on most recent experimental findings and latest modelling developments as well. The influence of important working conditions such as target temperature, loading particle fluxes, erosion and redeposition rates, as well as material characteristics such as the type of morphology of the protection material (i.e. amorphous plasma-sprayed beryllium vs. solid forms), and design dependent parameters are discussed in this paper. Remaining issues which require additional effort are identified. (orig.)

  3. Tritium management for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouyer, J.L.; Djerassi, H.

    1985-01-01

    To determine a waste management strategy, one has to identify first the wastes (quantities, activities, etc.), then to define options, and to compare these options by appropriate criteria and evaluations. Two European Associations are working together, i.e., Studsvik and CEA, on waste treatment and tritium problems. A contribution to fusion specific tritiated waste management strategy is presented. It is demonstrated that the best strategy is to retain tritium (outgas and recover, or immobilize it) so that residual tritium releases are kept to a minimum. For that, wastes are identified, actual regulations are described and judged inadequate without amendments for fusion problems. Appropriate criteria are defined. Options for treatment and disposal of tritiated wastes are proposed and evaluated. A tritium recovery solution is described

  4. Design options to minimize tritium inventories at Savannah River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, J.E.; Wilson, J.; Heroux, K.J.; Poore, A.S.; Babineau, D.W.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • La-Ni-Al alloys are used as tritium storage materials and retain He-3. • La-Ni-Al He-3 effects decrease useable process tritium inventory. • Use of Pd or depleted uranium beds decreases process tritium inventories. • Reduced inventory tritium facilities will lower public risk. - Abstract: Large quantities of tritium are stored and processed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Tritium Facilities. In many design basis accidents (DBAs), it is assumed the entire tritium inventory of the in-process vessels are released from the facility and the site for inclusion in public radiological dose calculations. Pending changes in public dose calculation methodologies are driving the need for smaller in-process tritium inventories to be released during DBAs. Reducing the in-process tritium inventory will reduce the unmitigated source term for public dose calculations and will also reduce the production demand for a lower inventory process. This paper discusses process design options to reduce in-process tritium inventories. A Baseline process is defined to illustrate the impact of removing or replacing La-Ni-Al alloy tritium storage beds with palladium (Pd) or depleted uranium (DU) storage beds on facility in-process tritium inventories. Elimination of La-Ni-Al alloy tritium storage beds can reduce in-process tritium inventories by over 1.5 kg, but alternate process technologies may needed to replace some functions of the removed beds.

  5. Behaviour of tritium in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Full text: There is considerable interest in the behaviour of radionuclides of global character that may be released to the environment through the development of nuclear power. Tritium is of particular interest due to its direct incorporation into water and organic tissue. Although there has been a large decrease (more than ten times) in tritium concentration since the stopping of nuclear weapons tests in the atmosphere, the construction in the near future of many water reactors and in the far future of fusion reactors could increase the present levels. Progress has been made during recent years in the assessment of tritium distribution, in detection methods and in biological studies While several meetings have given scientists an opportunity to present papers on tritium, no specific symposium on this topic has been organized by the IAEA since 1961. Thus the purpose of the meeting was to review recent advances and to report on the practical aspects of tritium utilization and monitoring. The symposium was jointly organized with OECD/NEA, in co-operation with the US Department of Energy and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Papers were presented on distribution of tritium, evaluation of future discharges, measurement of tritium, tritium in the aquatic environment, tritium in the terrestrial environment, tritium in man and monitoring of tritium Very interesting papers were given on distribution of tritium and participants got a good idea of the circulation of this radionuclide Some new data were provided on tritium pollution from luminous compounds and we learnt that the tritium release of the Swiss luminous compounds industry is of the same order of magnitude as the tritium release of Windscale. Projections indicate that, in the USA, the total quantity of tritium contained in discarded digital watches will be equal, approximately ten years in the future, to the release of nuclear power reactors Whereas nuclear reactor discharges are controlled there is no control

  6. Tritium behavior in the Caisson, a simulated fusion reactor room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Takumi; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Iwai, Yasunori; Yamada, Masayuki; Suzuki, Takumi; O'hira, Shigeru; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Shu, Weimin; Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Kawamura, Yoshinori; Isobe, Kanetsugu; Konishi, Satoshi; Nishi, Masataka

    2000-01-01

    In order to confirm tritium confinement ability in the deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion reactor, intentional tritium release experiments have been started in a specially fabricated test stand called 'Caisson', at Tritium Process Laboratory in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The Caisson is a stainless steel leak-tight vessel of 12 m 3 , simulating a reactor room or a tritium handling room. In the first stage experiments, about 260 MBq of pure tritium was put into the Caisson under simulated constant ventilation of four times air exchanges per h. The tritium mixing and migration in the Caisson was investigated with tritium contamination measurement and detritiation behavior measurement. The experimental tritium migration and removal behavior was almost perfectly reproduced and could almost be simulated by a three-dimensional flow analysis code

  7. Tritium in the environment: origins and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baglan, N.

    2009-01-01

    The author recalls the chemical reactions at the origin of tritium formation, that tritium has been introduced in the atmosphere by nuclear tests, and that it is now produced by nuclear reactors. He also outlines that tritium is mainly released in waters (oceans, seas, rivers) or in the atmosphere. Some high concentrations may therefore occur. He discusses measurements of activity in rain waters and surface waters, and outlines the impact of the end of atmospheric nuclear tests. He discusses the technical challenges of low level tritium analysis and activity measurement

  8. Nickel mobilization in a groundwater well field: Release by pyrite oxidation and desorption from manganese oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Dieke; Larsen, Flemming

    1997-01-01

    Processes controlling the nickel concentration in groundwater have been studied in a well field of a sandy aquifer capped by clayey till. The water table in the aquifer was lowered due to groundwater abstraction, and in association with pyrite oxidation in the unsaturated zone, nickel is released...... to the groundwater in concentrations of up to 4000 nM. The nickel concentration in pyrite was determined to be 40-140 x 10(-5) mol of Ni/mol of pyrite. Groundwater nickel concentrations are particularly high in the unsaturated zone and in the recently resubmerged uppermost saturated zone. The resubmerged zone...... is furthermore characterized by enhanced Mn2+ concentrations. Apparently nickel accumulates on manganese oxides during pyrite oxidation. When the water table rises again, partially oxidized pyritic layers are resubmerged, and due to an insufficient supply of oxygen, the oxidation of Fe2+ released during pyrite...

  9. Tritium Removal from Carbon Plasma Facing Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Coad, J.P.; Federici, G.

    2003-01-01

    Tritium removal is a major unsolved development task for next-step devices with carbon plasma-facing components. The 2-3 order of magnitude increase in duty cycle and associated tritium accumulation rate in a next-step tokamak will place unprecedented demands on tritium removal technology. The associated technical risk can be mitigated only if suitable removal techniques are demonstrated on tokamaks before the construction of a next-step device. This article reviews the history of codeposition, the tritium experience of TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) and JET (Joint European Torus) and the tritium removal rate required to support ITER's planned operational schedule. The merits and shortcomings of various tritium removal techniques are discussed with particular emphasis on oxidation and laser surface heating

  10. Tritium Permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip Winston; Pattrick Calderoni; Paul Humrickhouse

    2011-09-01

    Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor and its high-temperature components requires information regarding the permeation of fission generated tritium and hydrogen product through candidate heat exchanger alloys. Release of fission-generated tritium to the environment and the potential contamination of the helium coolant by permeation of product hydrogen into the coolant system represent safety basis and product contamination issues. Of the three potential candidates for high-temperature components of the NGNP reactor design, only permeability for Incoloy 800H has been well documented. Hydrogen permeability data have been published for Inconel 617, but only in two literature reports and for partial pressures of hydrogen greater than one atmosphere, far higher than anticipated in the NGNP reactor. To support engineering design of the NGNP reactor components, the tritium permeability of Inconel 617 and Incoloy 800H was determined using a measurement system designed and fabricated at Idaho National Laboratory. The tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617, was measured in the temperature range 650 to 950 C and at primary concentrations of 1.5 to 6 parts per million volume tritium in helium. (partial pressures of 10-6 atm) - three orders of magnitude lower partial pressures than used in the hydrogen permeation testing. The measured tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617 deviated substantially from the values measured for hydrogen. This may be due to instrument offset, system absorption, presence of competing quantities of hydrogen, surface oxides, or other phenomena. Due to the challenge of determining the chemical composition of a mixture with such a low hydrogen isotope concentration, no categorical explanation of this offset has been developed.

  11. Tritium Permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip Winston; Pattrick Calderoni; Paul Humrickhouse

    2012-07-01

    Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor and its high-temperature components requires information regarding the permeation of fission generated tritium and hydrogen product through candidate heat exchanger alloys. Release of fission-generated tritium to the environment and the potential contamination of the helium coolant by permeation of product hydrogen into the coolant system represent safety basis and product contamination issues. Of the three potential candidates for high-temperature components of the NGNP reactor design, only permeability for Incoloy 800H has been well documented. Hydrogen permeability data have been published for Inconel 617, but only in two literature reports and for partial pressures of hydrogen greater than one atmosphere, far higher than anticipated in the NGNP reactor. To support engineering design of the NGNP reactor components, the tritium permeability of Inconel 617 and Incoloy 800H was determined using a measurement system designed and fabricated at Idaho National Laboratory. The tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617, was measured in the temperature range 650 to 950°C and at primary concentrations of 1.5 to 6 parts per million volume tritium in helium. (partial pressures of 10-6 atm)—three orders of magnitude lower partial pressures than used in the hydrogen permeation testing. The measured tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617 deviated substantially from the values measured for hydrogen. This may be due to instrument offset, system absorption, presence of competing quantities of hydrogen, surface oxides, or other phenomena. Due to the challenge of determining the chemical composition of a mixture with such a low hydrogen isotope concentration, no categorical explanation of this offset has been developed.

  12. Tritium handling in vacuum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, J.T. [Monsanto Research Corp., Miamisburg, OH (United States). Mound Facility; Coffin, D.O. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1986-10-01

    This report provides a course in Tritium handling in vacuum systems. Topics presented are: Properties of Tritium; Tritium compatibility of materials; Tritium-compatible vacuum equipment; and Tritium waste treatment.

  13. Studies on steps affecting tritium residence time in solid blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Satoru

    1987-01-01

    For the self sustaining of CTR fuel cycle, the effective tritium recovery from blankets is essential. This means that not only tritium breeding ratio must be larger than 1.0, but also high recovering speed is required for the short residence time of tritium in blankets. Short residence time means that the tritium inventory in blankets is small. In this paper, the tritium residence time and tritium inventory in a solid blanket are modeled by considering the steps constituting tritium release. Some of these tritium migration processes were experimentally evaluated. The tritium migration steps in a solid blanket using sintered breeding materials consist of diffusion in grains, desorption at grain edges, diffusion and permeation through grain boundaries, desorption at particle edges, diffusion and percolation through interconnected pores to purging stream, and convective mass transfer to stream. Corresponding to these steps, diffusive, soluble, adsorbed and trapped tritium inventories and the tritium in gas phase are conceivable. The code named TTT was made for calculating these tritium inventories and the residence time of tritium. An example of the results of calculation is shown. The blanket is REPUTER-1, which is the conceptual design of a commercial reversed field pinch fusion reactor studied at the University of Tokyo. The experimental studies on the migration steps of tritium are reported. (Kako, I.)

  14. Management of Tritium in European Spallation Source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ene, Daniela; Andersson, Kasper Grann; Jensen, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) will produce tritium via spallation and activation processes during operational activities. Within the location of ESS facility in Lund, Sweden site it is mandatory to demonstrate that the management strategy of the produced tritium ensures the compliance...... with the country regulation criteria. The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the different aspects of the tritium management in ESS facility. Besides the design parameter study of the helium coolant purification system of the target the consequences of the tritium releasing into the environment were also...... analyzed. Calculations shown that the annual release of tritium during the normal operations represents a small fraction from the estimated total dose. However, more refined calculations of migration of activated-groundwater should be performed for higher hydraulic conductivities, with the availability...

  15. Universal tritium transmitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordaro, J. V.; Wood, M.

    2008-01-01

    At the Savannah River Site and throughout the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) tritium is measured using Ion or Kanne Chambers. Tritium flowing through an Ion Chamber emits beta particles generating current flow proportional to tritium radioactivity. Currents in the 1 x 10 -15 A to 1 x 10 -6 A are measured. The distance between the Ion Chamber and the electrometer in NNSA facilities can be over 100 feet. Currents greater than a few micro-amperes can be measured with a simple modification. Typical operating voltages of 500 to 1000 Volts and piping designs require that the Ion Chamber be connected to earth ground. This grounding combined with long cable lengths and low currents requires a very specialized preamplifier circuit. In addition, the electrometer must be able to supply 'fail safe' alarm signals which are used to alert personnel of a tritium leak, trigger divert systems preventing tritium releases to the environment and monitor stack emissions as required by the United States federal Government and state governments. Ideally the electrometer would be 'self monitoring'. Self monitoring would reduce the need for constant checks by maintenance personnel. For example at some DOE facilities monthly calibration and alarm checks must be performed to ensure operation. NNSA presently uses commercially available electrometers designed specifically for this critical application. The problems with these commercial units include: ground loops, high background currents, inflexibility and susceptibility to Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) which includes RF and Magnetic fields. Existing commercial electrometers lack the flexibility to accommodate different Ion Chamber designs required by the gas pressure, type of gas and range. Ideally the electrometer could be programmed for any expected gas, range and high voltage output. Commercially available units do not have 'fail safe' self monitoring capability. Electronics used to measure extremely low current must have

  16. Magmatic tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goff, F.; Aams, A.I.; McMurtry, G.M.; Shevenell, L.; Pettit, D.R.; Stimac, J.A.; Werner, C.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Detailed geochemical sampling of high-temperature fumaroles, background water, and fresh magmatic products from 14 active volcanoes reveal that they do not produce measurable amounts of tritium ( 3 H) of deep origin ( 2 O). On the other hand, all volcanoes produce mixtures of meteoric and magmatic fluids that contain measurable 3 H from the meteoric end-member. The results show that cold fusion is probably not a significant deep earth process but the samples and data have wide application to a host of other volcanological topics

  17. Tritium Room Air Monitor Operating Experience Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. C. Cadwallader; B. J. Denny

    2008-09-01

    Monitoring the breathing air in tritium facility rooms for airborne tritium is a radiological safety requirement and a best practice for personnel safety. Besides audible alarms for room evacuation, these monitors often send signals for process shutdown, ventilation isolation, and cleanup system actuation to mitigate releases and prevent tritium spread to the environment. Therefore, these monitors are important not only to personnel safety but also to public safety and environmental protection. This paper presents an operating experience review of tritium monitor performance on demand during small (1 mCi to 1 Ci) operational releases, and intentional airborne inroom tritium release tests. The tritium tests provide monitor operation data to allow calculation of a statistical estimate for the reliability of monitors annunciating in actual tritium gas airborne release situations. The data show a failure to operate rate of 3.5E-06/monitor-hr with an upper bound of 4.7E-06, a failure to alarm on demand rate of 1.4E-02/demand with an upper bound of 4.4E-02, and a spurious alarm rate of 0.1 to 0.2/monitor-yr.

  18. Tritium behaviour in ceramic breeder blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Tritium release from the candidate ceramic materials, Li 2 O, LiA10 2 , Li 2 SiO 3 , Li 4 SiO 4 and Li 2 ZrO 3 , is being investigated in many blanket programs. Factors that affect tritium release from the ceramic into the helium sweep gas stream include operating temperature, ceramic microstructure, tritium transport and solubility in the solid. A review is presented of the material properties studied and of the irradiation programs and the results are summarized. The ceramic breeder blanket concept is briefly reviewed

  19. 51Cr release and oxidative stress in the lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart-DeHaan, P.J.; Sanwal, M.; Creighton, M.O.; Inch, W.R.; Trevithick, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    Examination of the opaque areas of human cortical cataracts has shown that a large portion of the opacity could be attributed to the globules found there. We tested models involving globule formation as a result of oxidative damage to rat lens cells in culture and whole chick embryo lenses. When cell monolayers from a lens cell line were exposed to oxidizing conditions they developed globules on the cell surface. The cells were protected from damage by the addition of glutathione and vitamin C. Thirteen-day chick embryo lenses were also incubated in oxidizing conditions and the amount of cellular damage was assessed using a chromium-51 release assay we have developed. After 24 hr the percent 51Cr in the medium increased by an average of 20% as a result of 10 mM hydrogen peroxide treatment. The addition of the 10 mM vitamin C to the hydrogen peroxide significantly reduced the 51Cr leakage to the control level. Light microscopy of sections of the lens showed a breakdown of the equatorial fibre arrangement in the presence of H2O2, while addition of vitamin C restored the fibre organization to almost normal. The findings suggest that oxidative stress is an important step in cataractogenesis and point towards the use of water soluble antioxidants as protective agents

  20. Tritium Safety-Related Studies at TPL of JAERI

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'hira, S.; Hayashi, T.; Okuno, K.

    1997-09-01

    Activities regarding tritium safety technology in the Tritium Process Laboratory (TPL) at Tokai Establishment of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute are reviewed. Research and development of a new tritium removal system is being carried out by using a gas separation membrane which enable to make the ITER atmosphere detritiation system more compact and cost-effective. Techniques of gas flowing calorimetry and laser Raman spectroscopy are applied to develop new tritium accountancy methods. Studies of tritium-material interaction, such as plasma material interactions, radiochemical reaction of tritium in gas phase, radiolysis of tritiated water, and waste processing are being carried out under ITER/EDA and U.S.-Japan collaboration. Tritium release experiments for research of tritium behavior in confinements and environment and demonstration of safety related components are planned.

  1. Nitric oxide-releasing polymeric nanoparticles against Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabra, A. B.; Kitice, N. A.; Pelegrino, M. T.; Lancheros, C. A. C.; Yamauchi, L. M.; Pinge-Filho, P.; Yamada-Ogatta, S. F.

    2015-05-01

    Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, is a potentially life-threatening illness caused by the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), and the disease remains a major health problem in many Latin American countries. Several papers report that the killing of the parasite is dependent on the production of nitric oxide (NO). The endogenous free radical NO is an important cellular signalling molecule that plays a key role in the defense against pathogens, including T. cruzi. As T. cruzi is able to compromise host macrophages decreasing endogenous NO production, the administration of exogenous NO donors represents an interesting strategy to combat Chagas disease. Thus, the aims of this study were to prepare and evaluate the antimicrobial activity of NO-releasing polymeric nanoparticles against T. cruzi. Biocompatible polymeric nanoparticles composed of chitosan/sodium tripolyphosphate(TPP) were prepared and used to encapsulate mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA), which is a thiol-containing molecule. Nitrosation of free thiols (SH) groups of MSA were performed by the addition of equimolar amount of sodium nitrite (NaNO2), leading to the formation of S-nitroso-MSA-containing nanoparticles. These polymeric nanoparticles act as spontaneous NO donors, with free NO release. The results show the formation of nanoparticles with average hydrodynamic diameter ranging from 270 to 500 nm, average of polydispersity index of 0.35, and encapsulation efficiency in the range of 99%. The NO release kinetics from the S-nitroso-MSA-containing nanoparticles showed sustained and controlled NO release over several hours. The microbicidal activity of S-nitroso-MSA-containing nanoparticles was evaluated by incubating NO-releasing nanoparticles (200 - 600 μg/mL) with replicative and non-infective epimastigote, and non-replicative and infective trypomastigote forms of T. cruzi. In addition, a significant decrease in the percentage of macrophage-infected (with amastigotes) and

  2. Distribution of tritium in a chronically contaminated lake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.

    1978-01-01

    White Oak Lake located on the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation receives a continuous input of tritium from operating facilities and waste disposal operations at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The purpose of this paper was (1) to determine the distribution and concentration of tritium in an aquatic environment which has received releases of tritium significantly greater than expected releases from nuclear power plants, and (2) to determine the effect of fluctuating tritium concentrations in ambient water on the concentration of tritium in fish. Aquatic biota from White Oak Lake were analyzed for tissue water tritium and tissue bound tritium. Except for one plant species, the ratio of tissue water tritium to lake water tritium ranged from 0.80 to 1.02. The tissue water tritium in Gambusia affinis, the mosquito fish, followed closely the significant changes in tritium concentration in lake water. The turnover of tissue water tritium was very rapid; Gambusia from White Oak Lake eliminated 50% of their tissue water tritium in 14 min. The ratio of the specific activity of the tissue bound tritium to the specific activity of the lake water was greatest for the larger species of fish but never exceeded unity. The radiation dose to man from tritium which could be acquired through the aquatic food chain was relatively small when compared to other pathways. The whole body dose to a hypothetical individual taking in concentrations of tritium measured in White Oak Lake was 1.8 mrem/yr from eating fish and 10.0 mrem/yr from drinking water

  3. Decoding nitric oxide release rates of amine-based diazeniumdiolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Ni; Collins, Jack; Holland, Ryan J; Keefer, Larry K; Ivanic, Joseph

    2013-08-01

    Amine-based diazeniumdiolates (NONOates) have garnered widespread use as nitric oxide (NO) donors, and their potential for nitroxyl (HNO) release has more recently been realized. While NO release rates can vary significantly with the type of amine, half-lives of seconds to days under physiological conditions, there is as yet no way to determine a priori the NO or HNO production rates of a given species, and no discernible trends have manifested other than that secondary amines produce only NO (i.e., no HNO). As a step to understanding these complex systems, here we describe a procedure for modeling amine-based NONOates in water solvent that provides an excellent correlation (R(2) = 0.94) between experimentally measured dissociation rates of seven secondary amine species and their computed NO release activation energies. The significant difference in behavior of NONOates in the gas and solvent phases is also rigorously demonstrated via explicit additions of quantum mechanical water molecules. The presented results suggest that the as-yet unsynthesized simplest amine-based NONOate, the diazeniumdiolated ammonia anion [H2N-N(O)═NO(-)], could serve as an unperturbed HNO donor. These results provide a step forward toward the accurate modeling of general NO and/or HNO donors as well as for the identification of tailored prodrug candidates.

  4. Tritium loss in molten flibe systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Scott Willms, R.

    2000-01-01

    An emerging issue relative to beryllium technology in fusion involves tritium interactions with molten beryllium-bearing salts. Innovative designs for fusion reactors, both magnetic and inertially confined, feature the molten salt mixture 2LiF.BeF 2 , commonly called Flibe, as a tritium breeder and coolant. Tritium is bred in the Flibe as neutrons from the plasma are absorbed by Li atoms, which then transmute to tritium and helium. Transmutation of tritium from Be also occurs. Among the issues to be resolved for such coolant systems is the potential loss of tritium from the Flibe coolant to the walls of the system, particularly through heat exchanger tubes, and from there into secondary coolants or working fluids and the environment. Effectively removing tritium from Flibe in clean-up units is also important. In quiescent or low Reynolds number flow, tritium movement through Flibe is governed by diffusion. For Flibe in turbulent flow, as in heat exchanger tubes, transport is by turbulent mixing, and the same flow conditions and structural design features that maximize heat transfer to the heat exchanger walls will enhance the transport of tritium to those same surfaces. Analyses have been performed to estimate the fractional loss of tritium through heat exchanger tubes and release rates from Flibe droplets in vacuum disengagers in molten Flibe systems. The calculations suggest unacceptably large losses of tritium through heat exchanger tubes. The gravity of the implications of these estimates calls for experimental verification to determine if tritium losses through molten Flibe heat exchangers or other Flibe systems can really be so high and whether vacuum disengagers will really work. There is also a need for better information on evolution of tritium from Flibe droplets in a vacuum. Several experiments are presently being planned to address these issues and are discussed. These include experiments to induce tritium in Flibe using spontaneous fission neutrons

  5. Tritium Removal from JET and TFTR Tiles by a Scanning Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Bekris, N.; Coad, J.P.; Gentile, C.A.; Glugla, M.

    2002-01-01

    Fast and efficient tritium removal is needed for future D-T machines with carbon plasma-facing components. A novel method for tritium release has been demonstrated on co-deposited layers on tiles retrieved from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and from the Joint European Torus (JET). A scanning continuous wave neodymium laser beam was focused to =100 W/mm2 and scanned at high speed over the co-deposits, heating them to temperatures =2000 C for about 10 ms in either air or argon atmospheres. Fiber optic coupling between the laser and scanner was implemented. Up to 87% of the co-deposited tritium was thermally desorbed from the JET and TFTR samples. This technique appears to be a promising in-situ method for tritium removal in a next-step D-T device as it avoids oxidation, the associated de-conditioning of the plasma-facing surfaces, and the expense of processing large quantities of tritium oxide

  6. Tritium Removal from JET and TFTR Tiles by a Scanning Laser; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C.H. Skinner; N. Bekris; J.P. Coad; C.A. Gentile; M. Glugla

    2002-01-01

    Fast and efficient tritium removal is needed for future D-T machines with carbon plasma-facing components. A novel method for tritium release has been demonstrated on co-deposited layers on tiles retrieved from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and from the Joint European Torus (JET). A scanning continuous wave neodymium laser beam was focused to=100 W/mm2 and scanned at high speed over the co-deposits, heating them to temperatures=2000 C for about 10 ms in either air or argon atmospheres. Fiber optic coupling between the laser and scanner was implemented. Up to 87% of the co-deposited tritium was thermally desorbed from the JET and TFTR samples. This technique appears to be a promising in-situ method for tritium removal in a next-step D-T device as it avoids oxidation, the associated de-conditioning of the plasma-facing surfaces, and the expense of processing large quantities of tritium oxide

  7. Tritium accountancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avenhaus, R.; Spannagel, G.

    1995-01-01

    Conventional accountancy means that for a given material balance area and a given interval of time the tritium balance is established so that at the end of that interval of time the book inventory is compared with the measured inventory. In this way, an optimal effectiveness of accountancy is achieved. However, there are still further objectives of accountancy, namely the timely detection of anomalies as well as the localization of anomalies in a major system. It can be shown that each of these objectives can be optimized only at the expense of the others. Recently, Near-Real-Time Accountancy procedures have been studied; their methodological background as well as their merits will be discussed. (orig.)

  8. Magmatic tritium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, F.; Aams, A.I. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); McMurtry, G.M. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Shevenell, L. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Pettit, D.R. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration (United States); Stimac, J.A. [Union Geothermal Company (United States); Werner, C. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Detailed geochemical sampling of high-temperature fumaroles, background water, and fresh magmatic products from 14 active volcanoes reveal that they do not produce measurable amounts of tritium ({sup 3}H) of deep origin (<0.1 T.U. or <0.32 pCi/kg H{sub 2}O). On the other hand, all volcanoes produce mixtures of meteoric and magmatic fluids that contain measurable {sup 3}H from the meteoric end-member. The results show that cold fusion is probably not a significant deep earth process but the samples and data have wide application to a host of other volcanological topics.

  9. Antimicrobial Activity of Nitric Oxide-Releasing Ti-6Al-4V Metal Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reger, Nina A.; Meng, Wilson S.; Gawalt, Ellen S.

    2017-01-01

    Titanium and titanium alloy materials are commonly used in joint replacements, due to the high strength of the materials. Pathogenic microorganisms can easily adhere to the surface of the metal implant, leading to an increased potential for implant failure. The surface of a titanium-aluminum-vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V) metal oxide implant material was functionalized to deliver an small antibacterial molecule, nitric oxide. S-nitroso-penicillamine, a S-nitrosothiol nitric oxide donor, was covalently immobilized on the metal oxide surface using self-assembled monolayers. Infrared spectroscopy was used to confirm the attachment of the S-nitrosothiol donor to the Ti-Al-4V surface. Attachment of S-nitroso-penicillamine resulted in a nitric oxide (NO) release of 89.6 ± 4.8 nmol/cm2 under physiological conditions. This low concentration of nitric oxide reduced Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus epidermidis growth by 41.5 ± 1.2% and 25.3 ± 0.6%, respectively. Combining the S-nitrosothiol releasing Ti-6Al-4V with tetracycline, a commonly-prescribed antibiotic, increased the effectiveness of the antibiotic by 35.4 ± 1.3%, which allows for lower doses of antibiotics to be used. A synergistic effect of ampicillin with S-nitroso-penicillamine-modified Ti-6Al-4V against S. epidermidis was not observed. The functionalized Ti-6Al-4V surface was not cytotoxic to mouse fibroblasts. PMID:28635681

  10. The organic tritium in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchmann, R.

    1979-01-01

    Sources, organization process, and biological availability of organic tritium released in the environment, transfer of organic tritium in the environment from methane or soil to plants and from food to mammals, transfer of tritium in aquatic ecosystems, and dose to man resulting of the ingestion of tritiated food were reviewed and discussed. Some data about transfer of organic tritium in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems reported by literatures were summarized and were supplied with recent data on biological accumulation of organic tritium in the food chain. It was stressed that more research must be done in future because data available were still insufficient. Last, some research programs in progress or planned were stated. (Tsunoda, M.)

  11. Handling of tritium-bearing wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The generation of nuclear power and reprocessing of nuclear fuel results in the production of tritium and the possible need to control the release of tritium-contaminated effluents. In assessing the need for controls, it is necessary to know the production rates of tritium at different nuclear facilities, the technologies available for separating tritium from different gaseous and liquid streams, and the methods that are satisfactory for storage and disposal of tritiated wastes. The intention in applying such control technologies and methods is to avoid undesirable effects on the environment, and to reduce the radiation burden on operational personnel and the general population. This technical report is a result of the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Handling of Tritium-bearing Effluents and Wastes, which was held in Vienna, 4 - 8 December 1978. It summarizes the main topics discussed at the meeting and appends the more detailed reports on particular aspects that were prepared for the meeting by individual participants

  12. DOE handbook: Tritium handling and safe storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The DOE Handbook was developed as an educational supplement and reference for operations and maintenance personnel. Most of the tritium publications are written from a radiological protection perspective. This handbook provides more extensive guidance and advice on the null range of tritium operations. This handbook can be used by personnel involved in the full range of tritium handling from receipt to ultimate disposal. Compliance issues are addressed at each stage of handling. This handbook can also be used as a reference for those individuals involved in real time determination of bounding doses resulting from inadvertent tritium releases. This handbook provides useful information for establishing processes and procedures for the receipt, storage, assay, handling, packaging, and shipping of tritium and tritiated wastes. It includes discussions and advice on compliance-based issues and adds insight to those areas that currently possess unclear DOE guidance.

  13. DOE handbook: Tritium handling and safe storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-03-01

    The DOE Handbook was developed as an educational supplement and reference for operations and maintenance personnel. Most of the tritium publications are written from a radiological protection perspective. This handbook provides more extensive guidance and advice on the null range of tritium operations. This handbook can be used by personnel involved in the full range of tritium handling from receipt to ultimate disposal. Compliance issues are addressed at each stage of handling. This handbook can also be used as a reference for those individuals involved in real time determination of bounding doses resulting from inadvertent tritium releases. This handbook provides useful information for establishing processes and procedures for the receipt, storage, assay, handling, packaging, and shipping of tritium and tritiated wastes. It includes discussions and advice on compliance-based issues and adds insight to those areas that currently possess unclear DOE guidance

  14. Generation of gaseous tritium standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohorst, F.A.

    1994-09-01

    The determination of aqueous and non-aqueous tritium in gaseous samples is one type of determination often requested of radioanalytical laboratories. This determination can be made by introducing the sample as a gas into a sampling train containing two silica gel beds separated by.a catalytic oxidizer bed. The first bed traps tritiated water. The sample then passes into and through the oxidizer bed where non-aqueous tritium containing species are oxidized to water and other products of combustion. The second silica gel bed then traps the newly formed tritiated water. Subsequently, silica gel is removed to plastic bottles, deionized water is added, and the mixture is permitted to equilibrate. The tritium content of the equilibrium mixture is then determined by conventional liquid scintillation counting (LSC). For many years, the moisture content of inert, gaseous samples has been determined using monitors which quantitatively electrolyze the moisture present after that moisture has been absorbed by phosphorous pentoxide or other absorbents. The electrochemical reaction is quantitative and definitive, and the energy consumed during electrolysis forms the basis of the continuous display of the moisture present. This report discusses the experimental evaluation of such a monitor as the basis for a technique for conversion of small quantities of SRMs of tritiated water ( 3 HOH) into gaseous tritium standards ( 3 HH)

  15. Tritium sorption on protective coatings for concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.M.; Senohrabek, J.A.; Allsop, P.A.

    1992-11-01

    Because of the high sorption level of tritium on unprotected concrete, a program to examine the effectiveness of various concrete coatings and sealants in reducing tritium sorption was undertaken, and various exposure conditions were examined. Coatings of epoxy, polyurethane, bituminous sealant, bituminous sealant covered with polyvinylidene chloride wrap, alkyd paint, and sodium silicate were investigated with tritium (HTO) vapor concentration, humidity and contact time being varied. An exposure to HT was also carried out, and the effect of humidity on the tritium desorption rate was investigated. The relative effectiveness of the coatings was in the order of bituminous sealant + wrap > bituminous sealant > solvent-based epoxy > 100%-solids epoxy > alkyd paint > sodium silicate. The commercially available coatings for concrete resulted in tritium sorption being reduced to less than 7% of unprotected concrete. This was improved to ∼0.1% with the use of the Saran wrap (polyvinylidene chloride). The amount of tritium sorbed was proportional to tritium concentration. The total tritium sorbed decreased with an increase in humidity. A saturation effect was observed with increasing exposure time for both the coated and unprotected samples. Under the test conditions, complete saturation was not achieved within the maximum 8-hour contact time, except for the solvent-based epoxy. The desorption rate increased with a higher-humidity air purge stream. HT desorbed more rapidly than HTO, but the amount sorbed was smaller. The experimental program showed that HTO sorption by concrete can be significantly reduced with the proper choice of coating. However, tritium sorption on concrete and proposed coatings will continue to be a concern until the effects of the various conditions that affect the adsorption and desorption of tritium are firmly established for both chronic and acute tritium release conditions. Material sorption characteristics must also be considered in

  16. Risks of tritium and their mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimasa, Y.; Shiba, H.; Ichimasa, M.; Chikuuti, M.; Akita, Y.

    1992-01-01

    In this study, the effects of an antibacterial drug, norfloxacin, and an antibiotic, clindamycin, on in vivo oxidation of tritium gas in rats were investigated. Wistar strain male rats were used. They were provided with a standard diet, water ad libitum, and maintained in glass metabolic cages of approximately 20 liters capacity. The air flow and temperature were controlled. To investigate the availability of norfloxacin and clindamycin on the inhibition effects of the oxidation of tritium gas, two types of the experiments were conducted one was that, before the exposure to tritium gas for 2 hours, norfloxacin or clindamycin was administrated to rats three times a day for 4 days, and the other was administration of a drug after tritium gas exposure. After the exposure to tritium gas, blood, the liver, urine and feces samples were collected from rats and the radioactivity of them was determined after combustion using a sample oxidizer. In the case of norfloxacin, tritium concentration in rat body decreased one fifth of that in non-treated rats. On the other hand, administration of clindamycin shortened the biological half-life of tritium in urine to three fifth of that of non-treated rats. (author)

  17. Determination of low-level tritium concentrations in surface water and precipitation in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maresova, Diana; Hanslik, Eduard; Sedlarova, Barbora; Juranova, Eva; Charles University, Prague

    2017-01-01

    Past tests of nuclear weapons in the atmosphere, nuclear energy facilities and tritium of natural origin are main sources of tritium in the environment. Thanks to its presence in environment and its favourable properties, tritium is used as a radiotracer. Since stopping of atmospheric nuclear tests, tritium in precipitation has been decreasing towards natural levels below 1 Bq l -1 and precise analyses of low level tritium activities are necessary. This paper focuses on tritium development at sites not influenced by any technogenic release of tritium in Elbe River basin (Bohemia) in the Czech Republic using liquid scintillation measurement with electrolytic enrichment. (author)

  18. Antibacterial activity of nitric oxide releasing silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabra, Amedea B.; Manosalva, Nixson; de Araujo Lima, Bruna; Pelegrino, Milena T.; Brocchi, Marcelo; Rubilar, Olga; Duran, Nelson

    2017-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are well known potent antimicrobial agents. Similarly, the free radical nitric oxide (NO) has important antibacterial activity, and due to its instability, the combination of NO and nanomaterials has been applied in several biomedical applications. The aim of this work was to synthesize, characterize and evaluate the antibacterial activity of a new NO-releasing AgNPs. Herein, AgNPs were synthesized by the reduction of silver ions (Ag+) by catechin, a natural polyphenol and potent antioxidant agent, derived from green tea extract. Catechin acts as a reducing agent and as a capping molecule on the surface of AgNPs, minimizing particle agglomeration. The as-synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by different techniques. The results showed the formation of AgNPs with average hydrodynamic size of 44 nm, polydispersity index of 0.21, and zeta potential of -35.9 mV. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the presence of the AgNP core and cathecin as capping agent. The low molecular weight mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA), which contain free thiol group, was added on the surface of catechin-AgNPs, leading to the formation of MSA-catechin-AgNPs (the NO precursor nanoparticle). Free thiol groups of MSA-catechin-AgNPs were nitrosated leading to the formation of S-nitroso-mercaptosuccinic acid (S-nitroso-MSA), the NO donor. The amount of 342 ± 16 µmol of NO was released per gram of S-nitroso-MSA-catechin-AgNPs. The antibacterial activities of catechin-AgNPs, MSA-catechin-AgNPs, and S-nitroso-MSA-catechin-AgNPs were evaluated towards different resistant bacterial strains. The results demonstrated an enhanced antibacterial activity of the NO-releasing AgNP. For instance, the minimal inhibitory concentration values for Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853) incubated with AgNPs-catechin, AgNPs-catechin-MSA, and AgNPs-catechin-S-nitroso-MSA were found to be 62, 125 and 3 µg/mL, respectively. While in the case of

  19. Nitric oxide releasing Tygon materials: studies in donor leaching and localized nitric oxide release at a polymer-buffer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joslin, Jessica M; Lantvit, Sarah M; Reynolds, Melissa M

    2013-10-09

    Tygon is a proprietary plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) polymer that is used widely in bioapplications, specifically as extracorporeal circuits. To overcome issues with blood clot formation and infection associated with the failure of these medical devices upon blood contact, we consider a Tygon coating with the ability to release the natural anticlotting and antibiotic agent, nitric oxide (NO), under simulated physiological conditions. These coatings are prepared by incorporating 20 w/w% S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) donor into a Tygon matrix. These films release NO on the order of 0.64 ± 0.5 × 10(-10) mol NO cm(-2) min(-1), which mimics the lower end of natural endothelium NO flux. We use a combination of assays to quantify the amount of GSNO that is found intact at different time points throughout the film soak, as well as monitor the total thiol content in the soaking solution due to any analyte that has leached from the polymer film. We find that a burst of GSNO is released from the material surface within 5 min to 1 h of soaking, which only represents 0.25% of the total GSNO contained in the film. After 1 h of film soak, no additional GSNO is detected in the soaking solution. By further considering the total thiol content in solution relative to the intact GSNO, we demonstrate that the amount of GSNO leached from the material into the buffer soaking solution does not contribute significantly to the total NO released from the GSNO-incorporated Tygon film (leaching is experienced, and the lost GSNO is from the material surface. Varying the donor concentration from 5 to 30 w/w% GSNO within the film does not result in significantly different NO release profiles. Additionally, the steady NO flux associated with the system is predominantly due to localized release from the material, and not donor lost to soaking solution. The surface properties of these materials generally imply that they are useful for blood-contacting applications.

  20. Improving tritium exposure reconstructions using accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, J. R.; Vogel, J. S.; Knezovich, J. P.

    2010-01-01

    Direct measurement of tritium atoms by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) enables rapid low-activity tritium measurements from milligram-sized samples and permits greater ease of sample collection, faster throughput, and increased spatial and/or temporal resolution. Because existing methodologies for quantifying tritium have some significant limitations, the development of tritium AMS has allowed improvements in reconstructing tritium exposure concentrations from environmental measurements and provides an important additional tool in assessing the temporal and spatial distribution of chronic exposure. Tritium exposure reconstructions using AMS were previously demonstrated for a tree growing on known levels of tritiated water and for trees exposed to atmospheric releases of tritiated water vapor. In these analyses, tritium levels were measured from milligram-sized samples with sample preparation times of a few days. Hundreds of samples were analyzed within a few months of sample collection and resulted in the reconstruction of spatial and temporal exposure from tritium releases. Although the current quantification limit of tritium AMS is not adequate to determine natural environmental variations in tritium concentrations, it is expected to be sufficient for studies assessing possible health effects from chronic environmental tritium exposure. PMID:14735274

  1. The operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Tritium Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, C.A.; LaMarche, P.H.

    1995-01-01

    The TFTR tritium operations staff has successfully received, stored, handled, and processed over five hundred thousand curies of tritium for the purpose of supporting D-T (Deuterium-Tritium) operations at TFTR. Tritium operations personnel nominally provide continuous round the clock coverage (24 hours/day, 7 days/week) in shift complements consisting of I supervisor and 3 operators. Tritium Shift Supervisors and operators are required to have 5 years of operational experience in either the nuclear or chemical industry and to become certified for their positions. The certification program provides formal instruction, as well as on the job training. The certification process requires 4 to 6 months to complete, which includes an oral board lasting up to 4 hours at which time the candidate is tested on their knowledge of Tritium Technology and TFTR Tritium systems. Once an operator is certified, the training process continues with scheduled training weeks occurring once every 5 weeks. During D-T operations at TFTR the operators must evacuate the tritium area due to direct radiation from TFTR D-T pulses. During '' time operators maintain cognizance over tritium systems via a real time TV camera system. Operators are able to gain access to the Tritium area between TFTR D-T pulses, but have been excluded from die tritium area during D-T pulsing for periods up to 30 minutes. Tritium operators are responsible for delivering tritium gas to TFRR as well as processing plasma exhaust gases which lead to the deposition of tritium oxide on disposable molecular sieve beds (DMSB). Once a DMSB is loaded, the operations staff remove the expended DMSB, and replace it with a new DMSB container. The TFIR tritium system is operated via detailed procedures which require operator sign off for system manipulation. There are >300 procedures controlling the operation of the tritium systems

  2. The operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Tritium Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, C.A.; LaMarche, P.H. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Anderson, J.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-07-01

    The TFTR tritium operations staff has successfully received, stored, handled, and processed over five hundred thousand curies of tritium for the purpose of supporting D-T (Deuterium-Tritium) operations at TFTR. Tritium operations personnel nominally provide continuous round the clock coverage (24 hours/day, 7 days/week) in shift complements consisting of I supervisor and 3 operators. Tritium Shift Supervisors and operators are required to have 5 years of operational experience in either the nuclear or chemical industry and to become certified for their positions. The certification program provides formal instruction, as well as on the job training. The certification process requires 4 to 6 months to complete, which includes an oral board lasting up to 4 hours at which time the candidate is tested on their knowledge of Tritium Technology and TFTR Tritium systems. Once an operator is certified, the training process continues with scheduled training weeks occurring once every 5 weeks. During D-T operations at TFTR the operators must evacuate the tritium area due to direct radiation from TFTR D-T pulses. During `` time operators maintain cognizance over tritium systems via a real time TV camera system. Operators are able to gain access to the Tritium area between TFTR D-T pulses, but have been excluded from die tritium area during D-T pulsing for periods up to 30 minutes. Tritium operators are responsible for delivering tritium gas to TFRR as well as processing plasma exhaust gases which lead to the deposition of tritium oxide on disposable molecular sieve beds (DMSB). Once a DMSB is loaded, the operations staff remove the expended DMSB, and replace it with a new DMSB container. The TFIR tritium system is operated via detailed procedures which require operator sign off for system manipulation. There are >300 procedures controlling the operation of the tritium systems.

  3. Tritium in the Savannah River Site environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Bauer, L.R.; Hayes, D.W.; Marter, W.L.; Zeigler, C.C.; Stephenson, D.E.; Hoel, D.D.; Hamby, D.M.

    1991-05-01

    Tritium is released to the environment from many of the operations at the Savannah River Site. The releases from each facility to the atmosphere and to the soil and streams, both from normal operations and inadvertent releases, over the period of operation from the early 1950s through 1988 are presented. The fate of the tritium released is evaluated through environmental monitoring, special studies, and modeling. It is concluded that approximately 91% of the tritium remaining after decay is now in the oceans. A dose and risk assessment to the population around the site is presented. It is concluded that about 0.6 fatal cancers may be associated with the tritium released during all the years of operation to the population of about 625,000. This same population (based on the overall US cancer statistics) is expected to experience about 105,000 cancer fatalities from all types of cancer. Therefore, it is considered unlikely that a relationship between any of the cancer deaths occurring in this population and releases of tritium from the SRS will be found.

  4. Tritium in the Savannah River Site environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Bauer, L.R.; Hayes, D.W.; Marter, W.L.; Zeigler, C.C.; Stephenson, D.E.; Hoel, D.D.; Hamby, D.M.

    1991-05-01

    Tritium is released to the environment from many of the operations at the Savannah River Site. The releases from each facility to the atmosphere and to the soil and streams, both from normal operations and inadvertent releases, over the period of operation from the early 1950s through 1988 are presented. The fate of the tritium released is evaluated through environmental monitoring, special studies, and modeling. It is concluded that approximately 91% of the tritium remaining after decay is now in the oceans. A dose and risk assessment to the population around the site is presented. It is concluded that about 0.6 fatal cancers may be associated with the tritium released during all the years of operation to the population of about 625,000. This same population (based on the overall US cancer statistics) is expected to experience about 105,000 cancer fatalities from all types of cancer. Therefore, it is considered unlikely that a relationship between any of the cancer deaths occurring in this population and releases of tritium from the SRS will be found

  5. Oxidative Decontamination of Tritiated Materials Employing Ozone Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, Charles A.; Parker, John J.; Guttadora, Gregory L.

    2001-01-01

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has developed a process by which to significantly reduce surface and near surface tritium contamination from various materials. The Oxidative Tritium Decontamination System (OTDS) reacts gaseous state ozone (accelerated by presence of catalyst), with tritium entrained/deposited on the surface of components (stainless steel, copper, plastics, ceramics, etc.), for the purpose of activity reduction by means of oxidation-reduction chemistry. In addition to removing surface and near surface tritium contamination from (high monetary value) components for reuse in non-tritium environments, the OTDS has the capability of removing tritium from the surfaces of expendable items, which can then be disposed of in a less expensive fashion. The OTDS can be operated in a batch mode by which up to approximately 40 pounds of tritium contaminated (expendable) items can be processed and decontaminated to levels permissible for free release (less than1,000 dpm/100 cm 2). This paper will discuss the OTDS process, the level of tritium surface contamination removed from various materials, and a technique for ''deep scrubbing'' tritium from subsurface layers

  6. Tritium activities in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gierszewski, P.

    1995-01-01

    Canadian tritium activites comprise three major interests: utilites, light manufacturers, and fusion. There are 21 operating CANDU reactors in Canada; 19 with Ontario Hydro and one each with Hydro Quebec and New Brunswick Power. There are two light manufacturers, two primary tritium research facilities (at AECL Chalk River and Ontario Hydro Technologies), and a number of industry and universities involved in design, construction, and general support of the other tritium activities. The largest tritum program is in support of the CANDU reactors, which generate tritium in the heavy water as a by-product of normal operation. Currently, there are about 12 kg of tritium locked up in the heavy water coolant and moderator of these reactors. The fusion work is complementary to the light manufacturing, and is concerned with tritium handling for the ITER program. This included design, development and application of technologies related to Isotope Separation, tritium handling, (tritiated) gas separation, tritium-materials interaction, and plasma fueling

  7. The Tritium White Paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This publication proposes a synthesis of the activities of two work-groups between May 2008 and April 2010. It reports the ASN's (the French Agency for Nuclear Safety) point of view, describes its activities and actions, and gives some recommendations. It gives a large and detailed overview of the knowledge status on tritium: tritium source inventory, tritium origin, management processes, capture techniques, reduction, tritium metrology, impact on the environment, impacts on human beings

  8. Tritium in the Channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, M.; Fievet, B.; Bailly-Du-Bois, P.; Olivier, A.; Tenailleau, L.

    2009-01-01

    After having recalled that sea waters entering the Channel exhibit a natural concentration of tritium, the authors outline that spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plants are now the main sources of tritium for marine ecosystems as some oceanographic campaigns showed it. If data about the presence of tritium in water are numerous, data concerning the presence of tritiated water and of organically bound tritium in organisms are much less frequent. However, some surveys have been performed along the Channel French coasts

  9. Dependency of irradiation damage density on tritium migration behaviors in Li2TiO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Makoto; Toda, Kensuke; Oya, Yasuhisa; Okuno, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Tritium migration behaviors in Li 2 TiO 3 with the increase of irradiation damage density were investigated by means of electron spin resonance and thermal desorption spectroscopy. The irradiation damages of F + -centers and O − -centers were formed by neutron irradiation, and their damage densities were increased with increasing neutron fluence. Tritium release temperature was clearly shifted toward higher temperature side with increasing neutron fluence, i.e. increasing damage density. The rate determining process for tritium release was also clearly changed depending on the damage density. Tritium release was mainly controlled by tritium diffusion process in crystalline grain of Li 2 TiO 3 at lower neutron fluence. The apparent tritium diffusivity was reduced as the damage density in Li 2 TiO 3 increased due to the introduction of tritium trapping/detrapping sites for diffusing tritium. Then, tritium trapping/detrapping processes began to control the overall tritium release with further damage introductions as the amount of tritium trapping sites increased enough to trap most of tritium in Li 2 TiO 3 . The effects of water vapor in purge gas on tritium release behaviors were also investigated. It was considered that hydrogen isotopes in purge gas would be dissociated and adsorbed on the surface of Li 2 TiO 3 . Then, hydrogen isotopes diffused inward Li 2 TiO 3 would occupy the tritium trapping sites before diffusing tritium reaches to these sites, promoting apparent tritium diffusion consequently. Kinetics analysis of tritium release for highly damaged Li 2 TiO 3 showed that the rate determining process of tritium release was the detrapping process of tritium formed as hydroxyl groups. The rate of tritium detrapping as hydroxyl groups was determined by the kinetic analysis, and was comparable to tritium release kinetics for Li 2 O, LiOH and Li 4 TiO 4 . The dangling oxygen atoms (O − -centers) formed by neutron irradiation would contribute strongly on the

  10. Safe handling of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The main objective of this publication is to provide practical guidance and recommendations on operational radiation protection aspects related to the safe handling of tritium in laboratories, industrial-scale nuclear facilities such as heavy-water reactors, tritium removal plants and fission fuel reprocessing plants, and facilities for manufacturing commercial tritium-containing devices and radiochemicals. The requirements of nuclear fusion reactors are not addressed specifically, since there is as yet no tritium handling experience with them. However, much of the material covered is expected to be relevant to them as well. Annex III briefly addresses problems in the comparatively small-scale use of tritium at universities, medical research centres and similar establishments. However, the main subject of this publication is the handling of larger quantities of tritium. Operational aspects include designing for tritium safety, safe handling practice, the selection of tritium-compatible materials and equipment, exposure assessment, monitoring, contamination control and the design and use of personal protective equipment. This publication does not address the technologies involved in tritium control and cleanup of effluents, tritium removal, or immobilization and disposal of tritium wastes, nor does it address the environmental behaviour of tritium. Refs, figs and tabs

  11. Surface tritium contamination studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sienkiewicz, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    Glovebox wipe surveys were conducted to correlate surface tritium contamination with atmospheric tritium levels. Surface contamination was examined as a function of tritium concentration and limited to the HT/T 2 form. The previously predicted relationship between atmospheric HTO concentration and cleanup times was examined in order to predict a model for atmospheric detritiation of stainless steel enclosures. 2 figures, 2 tables

  12. Safety analysis of tritium processing system based on PHA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Wanfa; Luo Deli; Tang Tao

    2012-01-01

    Safety analysis on primary confinement of tritium processing system for TBM was carried out with Preliminary Hazard Analysis. Firstly, the basic PHA process was given. Then the function and safe measures with multiple confinements about tritium system were described and analyzed briefly, dividing the two kinds of boundaries of tritium transferring through, that are multiple confinement systems division and fluid loops division. Analysis on tritium releasing is the key of PHA. Besides, PHA table about tritium releasing was put forward, the causes and harmful results being analyzed, and the safety measures were put forward also. On the basis of PHA, several kinds of typical accidents were supposed to be further analyzed. And 8 factors influencing the tritium safety were analyzed, laying the foundation of evaluating quantitatively the safety grade of various nuclear facilities. (authors)

  13. Tritium burning in inertial electrostatic confinement fusion facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, Masami, E-mail: onishi@kansai-u.ac.jp [Department of Science and Engineering, Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Yamamoto, Yasushi; Osawa, Hodaka [Department of Science and Engineering, Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Hatano, Yuji; Torikai, Yuji [Hydrogen Isotope Science Center, University of Toyama, Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Murata, Isao [Faculty of Engineering Environment and Energy Department, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kamakura, Keita; Onishi, Masaaki; Miyamoto, Keiji; Konda, Hiroki [Department of Science and Engineering, Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Masuda, Kai [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hotta, Eiki [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuda-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • An experiment on tritium burning is conducted in an inertial electrostatic confinement fusion (IECF) facility. • A deuterium–tritium gas mixture with 93% deuterium and 7% tritium is used. • The neutron production rate is measured to be 5–8 times more than that of pure deuterium gas. • The neutron production rate of the D–T gas mixture in 1:1 ratio is expected to be more than 10{sup 8}(1/sec) in the present D–T experiment. - Abstract: An experiment on tritium burning is conducted to investigate the enhancement in the neutron production rate in an inertial electrostatic confinement fusion (IECF) facility. The facility is designed such that it is shielded from the outside for safety against tritium and a getter pump is used for evacuating the vacuum chamber and feeding the fuel gas. A deuterium–tritium gas mixture with 93% deuterium and 7% tritium is used, and its neutron production rate is measured to be 5–8 times more than that of pure deuterium gas. Moreover, the results show good agreement with those of a simplified theoretical estimation of the neutron production rate. After tritium burning, the exhausted fuel gas undergoes a tritium recovery procedure through a water bubbler device. The amount of gaseous tritium released by the developed IECF facility after tritium burning is verified to be much less than the threshold set by regulations.

  14. Tritium conference days

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnier-Laplace, J.; Lebaron-Jacobs, L.; Sene, M.; Devin, P.; Chretien, V.; Le Guen, B.; Guetat, Ph.; Baglan, N.; Ansoborlo, E.; Boyer, C.; Masson, M.; Bailly-Du-Bois, P.; Jenkinson, St.; Wakeford, R.; Saintigny, Y.; Romeo, P.H.; Thompson, P.; Leterq, D.; Chastagner, F.; Cortes, P.; Philippe, M.; Paquet, F.; Fournier, M.

    2009-01-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during this conference day. Twenty presentations out of 21 are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - tritium in the environment (J. Garnier-Laplace); 2 - status of knowledge about tritium impact on health (L. Lebaron-Jacobs); 3 - tritium, discrete but present everywhere (M. Sene); 4 - management of tritium effluents from Areva NC La Hague site - related impact and monitoring (P. Devin); 5 - tritium effluents and impact in the vicinity of EDF's power plants (V. Chretien and B. Le Guen); 6 - contribution of CEA-Valduc centre monitoring to the knowledge of atmospheric tritiated water transfers to the different compartments of the environment (P. Guetat); 7 - tritium analysis in environment samples: constraints and means (N. Baglan); 8 - organically-linked tritium: the analyst view (E. Ansoborlo); 9 - study of tritium transfers to plants via OBT/HTO air and OBT/HTO free (C. Boyer); 10 - tritium in the British Channel (M. Masson and P. Bailly-Du-Bois); 11 - tritium in British coastal waters (S. Jenkinson); 12 - recent results from epidemiology (R. Wakeford); 13 - effects of tritiated thymidine on hematopoietic stem cells (P.H. Romeo); 14 - tritium management issue in Canada: the point of view from authorities (P. Thompson); 15 - experience feedback of the detritiation process of Valduc centre (D. Leterq); 16 - difficulties linked with tritiated wastes confinement (F. Chastagner); 17 - optimisation of tritium management in the ITER project (P. Cortes); 18 - elements of thought about the management of tritium generated by nuclear facilities (M. Philippe); 19 - CIPR's position about the calculation of doses and risks linked with tritium exposure (F. Paquet); 20 - tritium think tanks (M. Fournier). (J.S.)

  15. TRIO-01 experiment: in-situ tritium-recovery results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemmer, R.G.; Finn, P.A.; Billone, M.C.; Misra, B.; Arons, R.M.; Poeppel, R.B.; Dyer, F.F.; Dudley, I.T.; Bate, L.C.; Clemmer, E.D.

    1983-08-01

    The TRIO-01 experiment is a test of in-situ tritium recovery from ..gamma..-LiAlO/sub 2/ with test conditions chosen to simulate those anticipated in fusion power reactors. A status report is presented which describes qualitatively the results observed during the irradiation phase of the experiment. Both the rate of tritium release and the chemical forms of tritium were measured using a helium sweep gas which flowed past the breeder material to a gas analysis system.

  16. Tritium pellet injector results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, P.W.; Bauer, M.L.; Baylor, L.R.; Deleanu, L.E.; Fehling, D.T.; Milora, S.L.; Whitson, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Injection of solid tritium pellets is considered to be the most promising way of fueling fusion reactors. The Tritium Proof-of- Principle (TPOP) experiment has demonstrated the feasibility of forming and accelerating tritium pellets. This injector is based on the pneumatic pipe-gun concept, in which pellets are formed in situ in the barrel and accelerated with high-pressure gas. This injector is ideal for tritium service because there are no moving parts inside the gun and because no excess tritium is required in the pellet production process. Removal of 3 He from tritium to prevent blocking of the cryopumping action by the noncondensible gas has been demonstrated with a cryogenic separator. Pellet velocities of 1280 m/s have been achieved for 4-mm-diam by 4-mm-long cylindrical tritium pellets with hydrogen propellant at 6.96 MPa (1000 psi). 10 refs., 10 figs

  17. Tritium and radon risks for humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauna, Traian; Mauna, Andriesica

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The gaseous and liquid releases into environment from the two CANDU type units of Cernavoda NPP now in operation has more tritium contents than other kind of western power reactors. CANDU type reactor uses heavy water as moderator and primary circuit heat transfer agent. In normal operation deuterium go to tritium by neutron capture, the molecule of tritiated heavy water can escape from nuclear systems in very small amounts and so it is released into environment. After release the tritium follows the way of water into environment. One year ago the antinuclear NGO led a hard attack against Units 3 and 4 during the procedure of public acceptance request. This attack tried to demonstrate the great risk for humans of the tritium released by Cernavoda NPP. Obviously this risk is very low as demonstrated by many years reactor operation. SNN as owner of Cernavoda NPP ensures by all kind of information channels about the radioactive potential risk for humans. By the other hand, ironically, the antinuclear NGO makes nothing to inform the people about radon risk magnitude in some areas. This is a well-known fact but the radon concentration in dwellings can be decreased by some improved building procedures. The radon is the first natural cause of lung cancer. The environmental NGO and Romanian authorities do not have an information service about radon hazard data neither in dwellings or in uranium mining areas. The paper compares the properties and risks for tritium and radon. (authors)

  18. Tritium handling safety and operating experience at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, R.V.

    1989-01-01

    The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory is a facility designed to develop and demonstrate, in full scale, technologies necessary for safe and efficient operation of tokamak fusion reactors. TSTA currently consists of systems for pumping DT gas mixtures; for removing impurities; for separating the isotopes of hydrogen; for storage of hydrogen isotopes; for gas analysis; and for assuring safety by the necessary control, monitoring, and detritiation of effluent gaseous streams. TSTA also has several small scale experiments to develop and test new equipment and processes necessary for fusion reactors. Tritium was introduced into TSTA in June 1984. Current inventory is approximately 100 grams. Approximately 10{sup 9} Curies of tritium have been processed in closed loop operation at TSTA. Total tritium releases from the facility stack have been less than 75 Curies. Total operating personnel exposures are less than 500 person-mrem. Exposures to the general public from TSTA tritium releases are extremely small (less than 10{sup {minus}2} mrem). Total tritium buried as waste is less than 36,000 Curies. In this paper, data on component reliability, failure types and rates, and waste quantities are presented. Operational experience under normal, abnormal, and emergency conditions is presented. The DOE requirements for the operation of a tritium facility like TSTA include personnel training, emergency preparedness, radiation protection, safety analysis, and preoperational appraisals. 4 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Effects of Oxide Layer Composition and Radial Compression on Nickel Release in Nitinol Stents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Stacey J. L.; Dreher, Maureen L.; Zheng, Jiwen; Chen, Lynn; Madamba, Daniel; Miyashiro, Katie; Trépanier, Christine; Nagaraja, Srinidhi

    2015-09-01

    There is a public health need to understand the effects of surface layer thickness and composition on corrosion in nickel-containing medical devices. To address this knowledge gap, five groups of Nitinol stents were manufactured by various processing methods that altered the titanium oxide layer. The following surfaces were created: >3500 nm thick mixed thermal oxide (OT), ~420 nm thick mixed thermal oxide (SP), ~130 nm thick mixed thermal oxide (AF), ~4 nm thick native oxide (MP), and an ~4 nm thick passivated oxide (EP). Radially compressed and not compressed devices were evaluated for nickel (Ni) ion release in a 60-day immersion test. The results indicated that OT stents released the most Ni, followed by stents in the SP and AF groups. For OT and SP stents, which exhibited the thickest oxide layers, radial compression significantly increased Ni release when compared to non-compressed stents. This result was not observed in AF, MP, SP stents indicating that the increased Ni release may be explained by cracking of the thicker oxide layers during crimping. Strong correlations were observed between oxide layer thickness and cumulative Ni release. These findings elucidate the importance of oxide layer thickness and composition on uniform corrosion of laser-cut Nitinol stents.

  20. Tritium in the environment. The IRSN's opinion on key issues and on research and development perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This report states the opinion of the IRSN on issues related to the behaviour of tritium in the environment, and to the associated risks. This report is based on a set of studies and researches performed on this radionuclide. Thus, the authors address the status of knowledge on the evolution of tritium released by nuclear activities (measurement techniques), the risk of bioaccumulation of tritium by living organisms within ecosystems (behaviour of tritium in the atmosphere, in soils, in ground plants, in continental and sea aquatic media), and the knowledge of risks due to tritium absorbed by living organisms (dose assessment, knowledge of tritium harmful effects and relative biological effectiveness)

  1. Elemental tritium deposition and conversion in the terrestrial environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunstall, T.G.; Ogram, G.L.; Spencer, F.S.

    1985-01-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine the deposition and conversion of atmospheric elemental tritium in soils and vegetation. In the field tritium deposition velocities ranged between 0.007 and 0.07 cm s -1 during the summer and autumn and were less than 0.0005 cm s -1 during the winter. Deposition velocity was found to depend significantly on soil water content, total pore space and organic content in controlled laboratory experiments. In contrast to soils, exposure of vegetation to atmospheric elemental tritium resulted in negligible uptake and conversion in foliage. These studies are of significance to the assessment of behaviour and impact of elemental tritium releases

  2. Using the Tritium Plasma Experiment to evaluate ITER PFC safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Bartlit, J.R.; Causey, R.A.; Haines, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Tritium Plasma Experiment was assembled at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore to investigate interactions between dense plasmas at low energies and plasma-facing component materials. This apparatus has the unique capability of replicating plasma conditions in a tokamak divertor with particle flux densities of 2 x 10 19 ions/cm 2 · s and a plasma temperature of about 15 eV using a plasma that includes tritium. With the closure of the Tritium Research Laboratory at Livermore, the experiment was moved to the Tritium Systems Test Assembly facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. An experimental program has been initiated there using the Tritium Plasma Experiment to examine safety issues related to tritium in plasma-facing components, particularly the ITER divertor. Those issues include tritium retention and release characteristics, tritium permeation rates and transient times to coolant streams, surface modification and erosion by the plasma, the effects of thermal loads and cycling, and particulate production. A considerable lack of data exists in these areas for many of the materials, especially beryllium, being considered for use in ITER. Not only will basic material behavior with respect to safety issues in the divertor environment be examined, but innovative techniques for optimizing performance with respect to tritium safety by material modification and process control will be investigated. Supplementary experiments will be carried out at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratory to expand and clarify results obtained on the Tritium Plasma Experiment

  3. Use of Tritium Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Tree Ring Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    LOVE, ADAM H.; HUNT, JAMES R.; ROBERTS, MARK L.; SOUTHON, JOHN R.; CHIARAPPA - ZUCCA, MARINA L.; DINGLEY, KAREN H.

    2010-01-01

    Public concerns over the health effects associated with low-level and long-term exposure to tritium released from industrial point sources have generated the demand for better methods to evaluate historical tritium exposure levels for these communities. The cellulose of trees accurately reflects the tritium concentration in the source water and may contain the only historical record of tritium exposure. The tritium activity in the annual rings of a tree was measured using accelerator mass spectrometry to reconstruct historical annual averages of tritium exposure. Milligram-sized samples of the annual tree rings from a Tamarix located at the Nevada Test Site are used for validation of this methodology. The salt cedar was chosen since it had a single source of tritiated water that was well-characterized as it varied over time. The decay-corrected tritium activity of the water in which the salt cedar grew closely agrees with the organically bound tritium activity in its annual rings. This demonstrates that the milligram-sized samples used in tritium accelerator mass spectrometry are suited for reconstructing anthropogenic tritium levels in the environment. PMID:12144257

  4. Tritium in groundwater investigation at the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWilde, J.; Yu, L.; Wootton, R.; Belanger, D.; Hansen, K.; McGurk, E.; Teare, A.

    2001-01-01

    Ontario Power Generation Inc. (OPG) investigated tritium in groundwater at the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (PNGS). The objectives of the study were to evaluate and define the extent of radionuclides, primarily tritium, in groundwater, investigate the causes or sources of contamination, determine impacts on the natural environment, and provide recommendations to prevent future discharges. This paper provides an overview of the investigations conducted in 1999 and 2000 to identity the extent of the tritium beneath the site and the potential sources of tritium released to the groundwater. The investigation and findings are summarized with a focus on unique aspects of the investigation, on lessons learned and benefits. Some of the investigative techniques discussed include process assessments, video inspections, hydrostatic and tracer tests, Helium 3 analysis for tritium age dating, deuterium and tritium in soil analysis. The investigative techniques have widespread applications to other nuclear generating stations. (author)

  5. Investigation of tritium in groundwater at Pickering NGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWilde, J.; Yu, L.; Belanger, D.; Wootton, R.; Hansen, K.; McGurk, E.; Teare, A.

    2001-01-01

    Ontario Power Generation Inc. (OPG) investigated tritium in groundwater at the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (PNGS). The objectives of the study were to evaluate and define the extent of radio-nuclides, primarily tritium, in groundwater, investigate the causes or sources of contamination, determine impacts on the natural environment, and provide recommendations to prevent future discharges. This paper provides an overview of the investigations conducted in 1999 and 2000 to identify the extent of the tritium beneath the site and the potential sources of tritium released to the groundwater. The investigation and findings are summarized with a focus on unique aspects of the investigation, on lessons learned and benefits. Some of the investigative techniques discussed include process assessments, video inspections, hydrostatic and tracer tests, Helium 3 analysis for tritium age dating, deuterium and tritium in soil analysis. The investigative techniques have widespread applications to other nuclear generating stations. (author)

  6. Tritium in the global atmosphere: distribution patterns and recent trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozanski, K.; Gonfiantini, R.; Araguas-Araguas, L.

    1991-01-01

    Temporal and spacial variations of tritium in the global atmosphere during the past three decades are discussed, with emphasis on the tritium content of monthly precipitation, as derived from the database of the IAEA/WMO global network ''Isotopes in Precipitation''. Whereas the tritium levels in precipitation have, in recent years, returned close to natural, pre-bomb values in most parts of the world, the technogenic emissions of tritium are becoming more and more visible. The most important sources of technogenic tritium are nuclear facilities as well as manufacturing and disposal of luminous consumer products. Examples of local and regional scale contamination of the lower troposphere due to ground-level tritium releases are presented. (author)

  7. Biokinetic aspects of tissue-bound tritium in algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strack, S.; Kistner, G.

    1978-01-01

    For the estimate of the radiation exposure of man and for the calculation of the risk of artificial tritium from nuclear power plants, organic tissue-bound tritium is of decisive importance. In model experiments, a tritium incorporation of 61 to 71% was found from tritiated water (HTO) into organic matter of planctonic algae under reproducible conditions and this was related to the theoretical value. In further experiments the tritium release from these high tritiated algae was of interest. Kept in darkness in tritium-free, non-sterile river water, so that autolytic processes and bacterial decomposition could occur, the concentration of HTO was measured over a period of three weeks. A relatively long half-life of tissue-bound tritium was found under various temperature conditions. Therefore it must be considered that a significant retention of tritium in biological matter has to be taken into account in a natural ecosystem. In streams into which the cooling water of a nuclear reactor is released all conditions are found already for a long turnover and cycling of artificial tritium in living organisms as well as the conditions for a favourable transport of tritium by food chains to man. (Auth.)

  8. Tritium contamination experience in an operational D-T fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, C.A.; Ascione, G.

    1994-01-01

    During December 1993, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) injected a mixture of deuterium and tritium in the TFTR vacuum vessel for the purpose of creating D-T plasmas. The tritium used in these D-T plasmas was stored, delivered and processed in the TFTR tritium facility that includes the tritium vault, waste handling area, clean-up area, and gas holding tank room. During this time period, several components in the tritium process system were found to have tritium leaks which led to tritium deposition on process skids, components and floor area. Radiological surveys of surfaces contaminated with tritium oxide indicate a decrease in surface contamination in time (on the order of 12 to 36 hours) as the result of room ventilation. In instances where the facility HVAC system was maintained in the purge mode, a dramatic decrease in surface contamination was observed. Areas contaminated with tritium oxide (> 16.6 Bq/100 cm 2 ) were found to be clean ( 2 ) after several hours of continuous purging by the facility HVAC system. In instances where relative humidity was not decreased, the tritium surface contamination was found to be attenuated. During the months of December 1993, January and February 1994 tritium leaking components were either replaced, redesigned or repaired. During this time period, data were collected in the form of contamination surveys, real time tritium monitor output, and HVAC configuration indicating the correlation of purge ventilation leading to a decrease in tritium oxide surface contamination

  9. Confinement and Tritium Stripping Systems for APT Tritium Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, R.H. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Heung, L.K.

    1997-10-20

    This report identifies functions and requirements for the tritium process confinement and clean-up system (PCCS) and provides supporting technical information for the selection and design of tritium confinement, clean-up (stripping) and recovery technologies for new tritium processing facilities in the Accelerator for the Production of Tritium (APT). The results of a survey of tritium confinement and clean-up systems for large-scale tritium handling facilities and recommendations for the APT are also presented.

  10. Environmental tritium in trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.M.

    1979-01-01

    The distribution of environmental tritium in the free water and organically bound hydrogen of trees growing in the vicinity of the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL) has been studied. The regional dispersal of HTO in the atmosphere has been observed by surveying the tritium content of leaf moisture. Measurement of the distribution of organically bound tritium in the wood of tree ring sequences has given information on past concentrations of HTO taken up by trees growing in the CRNL Liquid Waste Disposal Area. For samples at background environmental levels, cellulose separation and analysis was done. The pattern of bomb tritium in precipitation of 1955-68 was observed to be preserved in the organically bound tritium of a tree ring sequence. Reactor tritium was discernible in a tree growing at a distance of 10 km from CRNL. These techniques provide convenient means of monitoring dispersal of HTO from nuclear facilities. (author)

  11. NNSA TRITIUM SUPPLY CHAIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrick, Steven [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC, USA; Cordaro, Joseph [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC, USA; Founds, Nanette [National Nuclear Security Administration, Albuquerque, NM, USA; Chambellan, Curtis [National Nuclear Security Administration, Albuquerque, NM, USA

    2013-08-21

    Savannah River Site plays a critical role in the Tritium Production Supply Chain for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The entire process includes: • Production of Tritium Producing Burnable Absorber Rods (TPBARs) at the Westinghouse WesDyne Nuclear Fuels Plant in Columbia, South Carolina • Production of unobligated Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) at the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) in Portsmouth, Ohio • Irradiation of TPBARs with the LEU at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Watts Bar Reactor • Extraction of tritium from the irradiated TPBARs at the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) at Savannah River Site • Processing the tritium at the Savannah River Site, which includes removal of nonhydrogen species and separation of the hydrogen isotopes of protium, deuterium and tritium.

  12. High-pressure tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffin, D.O.

    1976-01-01

    Some solutions to problems of compressing and containing tritium gas to 200 MPa at 700 0 K are discussed. The principal emphasis is on commercial compressors and high-pressure equipment that can be easily modified by the researcher for safe use with tritium. Experience with metal bellows and diaphragm compressors has been favorable. Selection of materials, fittings, and gauges for high-pressure tritium work is also reviewed briefly

  13. Tritium in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schober, T.

    1990-01-01

    In this Chapter a review is given of some of the important features of metal tritides as opposed to hydrides and deuterides. After an introduction to the topics of tritium and tritium in metals information will be presented on a variety of metal-tritium systems. Of main interest here are the differences from the classic hydrogen behavior; the so called isotope effect. A second important topic is that of aging effects produced by the accumulation of 3 He in the samples. (orig.)

  14. FDMH - The tritium model in RODOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galeriu, D.; Mateescu, G.; Melintescu, A.; Turcanu, C.; Raskob, W.

    2000-01-01

    intensively use of interdisciplinary research. It is developed in a modular structure with a variable time grid according with the physical processes. During the release phase, the transfer processes are modelled with a half hour time step using real time meteorological data, whereas in the next few days weather forecast data are used at a 2-3 hour interval. In the long term prognosis, a site specific synoptic data file is used and the transfer rates are weekly or monthly averaged. Different from other models, using generic transfer parameters or parameters fitted on individual experiments, FDMH derives tritium transfer rates based on physical and physiological process analysis, using scientifically accepted results from interdisciplinary research on among others, land-atmosphere interaction, water cycle in the soil-plant-atmosphere system, plant physiology, photosynthesis and growth and hydrogen metabolism in mammals. A unique feature of FDMH is the coherent modelling of tritium uptake by plant canopies and its conversion to organic matter, using a physiological plant parameters data base which can reproduce plant growth under various pedo-climatic conditions. Furthermore, in order to predict tritium transfer in animal products, in the absence of a complete experimental data base, results from basic research on hydrogen metabolism in mammals is applied. Due to this novel approach, FDMH can be easily customised for any European site and can predict the time evolution of tritiated water or organically bound tritium in up to 22 plants, 12 animal products, 35 foodstuff and the public dose for 7 population groups. The code is developed not only under the HP-UNIX platform for RODOS but also as a stand alone PC version which can be easily upgraded for PSA studies in CANDU reactors. Preliminary validation tests of FDMH show remarkable agreement with recent experimental data on tritium transfer in cereals and potato as well as in cow's milk. Future effort is related to customise the

  15. A metabolic derivation of tritium transfer factors in animal products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galeriu, D.; Melintescu, A.; Crout, N. M. J.; Bersford, N. A.; Peterson, S. R.; Hess, M. van

    2001-01-01

    Tritium is a potentially important environmental contaminant arising from the nuclear industry. Because tritium is an isotope of hydrogen, its behaviour in the environment is controlled by the behaviour of hydrogen. Chronic releases of tritium to the atmosphere, in particular, will result in tritium-to-hydrogen (T/H) ratios in plants and animals that are more or less in equilibrium with T/H ratios in the air moisture. Tritium is thus a potentially important contaminant of plant and animal food products. The transfer of tritium from air moisture to plants is quite well understood. In contrast, although a number of regulatory agencies have published transfer coefficient values for diet tritium transfer for a limited number of animal products, a fresh evaluation of these transfers needs to be made In this paper we present an approach for the derivation of tritium transfer coefficients which is based on the metabolism of hydrogen in animals in conjunction with experimental data on tritium transfer. The derived transfer coefficients separately account for transfer to and from free (i.e. water) and organically bound tritium. The predicted transfer coefficients are compared to available data independent of model development. Agreement is good, with the exception of the transfer coefficient for transfer from tritiated water to organically bound tritium in ruminants, which may be attributable to the particular characteristics of ruminant digestion. We show that transfer coefficients will vary in response to the metabolic status of an animal (e.g. stage of lactation, digestibility of diet, etc.) and that the use of a single transfer coefficient from diet to animal product is not appropriate for tritium. It is possible to derive concentration ratio values which relate the concentration of tritiated water and organically bound tritium in an animal product to the corresponding concentrations in the animals diet. These concentration ratios are shown to be less subject to

  16. A model for global cycling of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killough, G.G.; Kocher, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    Dynamic compartment models are widely used to describe global cycling of radionuclides for purposes of dose estimation. In this paper, we present a new global tritium model that reproduces environmental time-series data on concentrations in precipitation, ocean surface waters, and surface fresh waters in the northern hemisphere, concentrations of atmospheric tritium in the soutehrn hemisphere, and the latitude dependence of tritium in both hemispheres. Named TRICYCLE for Tritium CYCLE, the model is based on the global hydrologic cycle and includes hemisphereic stratospheric compartments, disaggregation of the troposphere and ocean surface waters into eight latitudezones, consideration of the different concentrations of atmospheric tritium over land and over the ocean, and a diffusive model for transport in the ocean. TRICYCLE reproduces the environmental data if we assume that about 50% of the tritium from atmospheric weapons testing was injected directly into the northern stratosphere as HTO. The models latitudinal disaggregation permits taking into account the distribution of population. For a unfiormaly distributed release of HTO into the worldwide troposphere, TRICYCLE predicts a collective dose commitment to the world population that exceeds the corresponding prediction by the NCRP model by about a factor of 3. 11 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  17. Experimental study and phenomenological modeling of the hydrolysis of tritiated sodium: influence of experimental conditions on the tritium distribution in the effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chassery, Aurelien

    2014-01-01

    Within the framework of the decommissioning of fast reactors, several processes are under investigation regarding sodium disposal. One of them rests on the implementation of the sodium-water reaction (SWR), in a controlled and progressive way, to remove residual sodium containing impurities such as sodium hydrides, sodium oxides and tritiated sodium hydrides. Such a hydrolysis releases some amount of energy and produces a liquid effluent, composed of a solution of soda, and a gaseous effluent, composed of hydrogen, steam and an inert gas. The tritium, originally into the sodium as a soluble (T - ) or precipitate form (NaT), will be distributed between the liquid and gaseous effluent, and according to two chemical forms, the tritium hydride HT and the tritiated water HTO. HTO being 10,000 times more radio-toxic than HT, a precise knowledge of the mechanisms governing the distribution of tritium is necessary in order to estimate the exhaust gas releases and design the process needed to treat the off-gas before its release into the environment. An experimental study has been carried out in order to determine precisely the phenomena involved in the hydrolysis. The influence of the experimental conditions on the tritium distribution has been tested. The results of this study leaded to a phenomenological description of the tritiated sodium hydrolysis that will help to predict the composition of the effluents, regarding tritium. (author) [fr

  18. Apparent enrichment of organically bound tritium in rivers explained by the heritage of our past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyrolle-Boyer, Frédérique; Boyer, Patrick; Claval, David; Charmasson, Sabine; Cossonnet, Catherine

    2014-10-01

    The global inventory of naturally produced tritium (3H) is estimated at 2.65 kg, whereas more than 600 kg have been released during atmospheric nuclear tests (NCRP, 1979; UNSCEAR, 2000) constituting the main source of artificial tritium throughout the Anthropocene. The behaviour of this radioactive isotope in the environment has been widely studied since the 1950s, both through laboratory experiments and, more recently, through field observations (e.g., Cline, 1953; Kirchmann et al., 1979; Daillant et al., 2004; McCubbin et al., 2001; Kim et al., 2012). In its "free" forms, [i.e. 3H gas or 3H hydride (HT); methyl 3H gas (CH3T); tritiated H2O or 3H-oxide (HTO); and Tissue Free Water 3H (TFWT)], tritium closely follows the water cycle. However, 3H bound with organic compounds, mainly during the basic stages of photosynthesis or through weak hydrogen links, is less exchangeable with water, which explains its persistence in the carbon cycle as re underlined recently by Baglan et al. (2013), Jean-Batiste and Fourré (2013), Kim et al. (2013a,b). In this paper, we demonstrate that terrestrial biomass pools, historically contaminated by global atmospheric fallout from nuclear testing, have constituted a significant delayed source of organically bound tritium (OBT) for aquatic systems, resulting in an apparent enrichment of OBT as compared to HTO. This finding helps to explain concentration factors (tritium concentration in biota/concentration in water) greater than 1 observed in areas that are not directly affected by industrial radioactive wastes, and thus sheds light on the controversies regarding tritium 'bioaccumulation'. Such apparent enrichment of OBT is expected to be more pronounced in the Northern Hemisphere where fallout was most significant, depending on the nature and biodegradability of terrestrial biomass at the regional scale. We further believe that OBT transfers from the continent to oceans have been sufficient to affect tritium concentrations in

  19. Modeling of tritium behavior in Li2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billone, M.C.; Attaya, H.; Kopasz, J.P.

    1992-08-01

    The TIARA and DISPL2 codes are being developed at Argonne National Laboratory to predict tritium retention and release from lithium ceramics under steady-state and transient conditions, respectively. Tritium retention and release are important design and safety issues for tritium-breeding blankets of fusion reactors. Emphasis has been placed on tritium behavior in Li 2 O because of the selection of this ceramic as a first option for the ITER driver blanket and because of the relatively good material properties data base for Li 2 O. Models and correlations for diffusion, surface desorption/adsorption, and solubility/precipitation of tritium in Li 2 0 have been developed based on well-controlled laboratory data from as-fabricated and irradiated samples. With the models and correlations, the codes are validated to the results of in-reactor purge flow tests. The results of validation of TIARA to tritium retention data from VOM-15H, EXOTIC-2, and CRITIC-1 are presented, along with predictions of tritium retention in BEATRIX-II. For DISPL2, results are presented for tritium release predictions vs. data for MOZART, CRITIC-1, and BEATRIX-II. Recommendations are made for improving both the data base and the modeling to allow extrapolation with reasonable uncertainty levels to fusion reactor design conditions

  20. Pentobarbital decreased nitric oxide release in the rat striatum but ketamine increased the release independent of cholinergic regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura-Kuroiwa, Kaori; Adachi, Yushi U; Mimuro, Soichiro; Kawamata, Mikito; Sato, Shigehito; Matsuda, Naoyuki

    2012-01-01

    Pentobarbital (PB) and ketamine (Ket) influence the concentration of neurotransmitters in the brain. PB has been reported to decrease the extracellular nitric oxide (NO) concentration through a decrease in acetylcholine (ACh) release, while Ket has been shown to increase the NO concentration via an increase in ACh release. Here, we investigated effects of PB and Ket on NO release and the relationship between NO and ACh in the rat striatum by in vivo microdialysis experiments. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. A microdialysis probe was inserted into the right striatum and perfused with modified Ringer's solution. Samples were collected every 15 min and injected into an HPLC system. The rats were freely moving, and PB and Ket were administered intraperitoneally. Neostigmine (1 and 10 µM) and mecamylamine (100 µM) were added to the perfusate. Calcium and magnesium concentrations were modified for each anesthetic to influence ACh release. PB decreased NO products (NOx) while Ket increased them. While perfusion with neostigmine showed no effect on baseline NOx concentrations, it diminished the PB-induced NOx reduction at low concentrations and abolished it at high concentrations. Magnesium-free perfusion had no effect on baseline NOx concentrations, whereas perfusion at a low magnesium concentration antagonized the PB-induced NOx reduction. Mecamylamine and calcium-free perfusion had no effect on baseline NOx concentrations and Ket-induced NOx increases. PB may decrease NO release through reduction in ACh release, whereas Ket may increase NO release independent of ACh regulation.

  1. Tritium Research Laboratory safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, D.A.

    1979-03-01

    Design and operational philosophy has been evolved to keep radiation exposures to personnel and radiation releases to the environment as low as reasonably achievable. Each experiment will be doubly contained in a glove box and will be limited to 10 grams of tritium gas. Specially designed solid-hydride storage beds may be used to store temporarily up to 25 grams of tritium in the form of tritides. To evaluate possible risks to the public or the environment, a review of the Sandia Laboratories Livermore (SLL) site was carried out. Considered were location, population, land use, meteorology, hydrology, geology, and seismology. The risks and the extent of damage to the TRL and vital systems were evaluated for flooding, lightning, severe winds, earthquakes, explosions, and fires. All of the natural phenomena and human error accidents were considered credible, although the extent of potential damage varied. However, rather than address the myriad of specific individual consequences of each accident scenario, a worst-case tritium release caused indirectly by an unspecified natural phenomenon or human error was evaluated. The maximum credible radiological accident is postulated to result from the release of the maximum quantity of gas from one experiment. Thus 10 grams of tritium gas was used in the analysis to conservatively estimate the maximum whole-body dose of 1 rem at the site boundary and a maximum population dose of 600 man-rem. Accidental release of this amount of tritium implies simultaneous failure of two doubly contained systems, an occurrence considered not credible. Nuclear criticality is impossible in this facility. Based upon the analyses performed for this report, we conclude that the Tritium Research Laboratory can be operated without undue risk to employees, the general public, or the environment

  2. Tritium Research Laboratory safety analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, D.A.

    1979-03-01

    Design and operational philosophy has been evolved to keep radiation exposures to personnel and radiation releases to the environment as low as reasonably achievable. Each experiment will be doubly contained in a glove box and will be limited to 10 grams of tritium gas. Specially designed solid-hydride storage beds may be used to store temporarily up to 25 grams of tritium in the form of tritides. To evaluate possible risks to the public or the environment, a review of the Sandia Laboratories Livermore (SLL) site was carried out. Considered were location, population, land use, meteorology, hydrology, geology, and seismology. The risks and the extent of damage to the TRL and vital systems were evaluated for flooding, lightning, severe winds, earthquakes, explosions, and fires. All of the natural phenomena and human error accidents were considered credible, although the extent of potential damage varied. However, rather than address the myriad of specific individual consequences of each accident scenario, a worst-case tritium release caused indirectly by an unspecified natural phenomenon or human error was evaluated. The maximum credible radiological accident is postulated to result from the release of the maximum quantity of gas from one experiment. Thus 10 grams of tritium gas was used in the analysis to conservatively estimate the maximum whole-body dose of 1 rem at the site boundary and a maximum population dose of 600 man-rem. Accidental release of this amount of tritium implies simultaneous failure of two doubly contained systems, an occurrence considered not credible. Nuclear criticality is impossible in this facility. Based upon the analyses performed for this report, we conclude that the Tritium Research Laboratory can be operated without undue risk to employees, the general public, or the environment. (ERB)

  3. Anti-Biofilm Efficacy of Nitric Oxide-Releasing Silica Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Hetrick, Evan M.; Shin, Jae Ho; Paul, Heather S.; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    The ability of nitric oxide (NO)-releasing silica nanoparticles to kill biofilm-based microbial cells is reported. Biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Candida albicans were formed in vitro and exposed to NO-releasing silica nanoparticles. Replicative viability experiments revealed that ≥ 99% of cells from each type of biofilm were killed via NO release, with the greatest efficacy (≥ 99.999% killing) against gram-negative...

  4. Problems bound to the tritium in materials for the nuclear - some illustrations; Problematiques liees au tritium dans les materiaux dans le domaine nucleaire - quelques illustrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gastaldi, O. [CEA Cadarache (DTN/STPA/LPC), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2007-07-01

    The tritium control takes more and more importance in the nuclear industry because of the release more and more limited, in the environment. After a presentation on the tritium sources in the environment, the author presents the different ways of its production. Then for each reactor channel, the main problems are presented (fission and fusion). The last part deals with the behavior of the tritium in materials: the tritium inventory control in a fusion system, the tritium management after the reactor exploitation. (A.L.B.)

  5. Radionuclide Basics: Tritium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritium is a hydrogen atom that has two neutrons in the nucleus and one proton. It is radioactive and behaves like other forms of hydrogen in the environment. Tritium is produced naturally in the upper atmosphere and as a byproduct of nuclear fission.

  6. Protection against tritium radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bal, Georges

    1964-05-01

    This report presents the main characteristics of tritium, describes how it is produced as a natural or as an artificial radio-element. It outlines the hazards related to this material, presents how materials and tools are contaminated and decontaminated. It addresses the issue of permissible maximum limits: factors of assessment of the risk induced by tritium, maximum permissible activity in body water, maximum permissible concentrations in the atmosphere. It describes the measurement of tritium activity: generalities, measurement of gas activity and of tritiated water steam, tritium-induced ionisation in an ionisation chamber, measurement systems using ionisation chambers, discontinuous detection of tritium-containing water in the air, detection of surface contamination [fr

  7. Tritium: An analysis of key environmental and dosimetric questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, J.E.; Meyer, H.R.; Etnier, E.L.; Bomar, E.S.; Gentry, R.D.; Killough, G.G.; Rohwer, P.S.; Tennery, V.J.; Travis, C.C.

    1980-05-01

    This document summarizes new theoretical and experimental data that may affect the assessment of environmental releases of tritium and analyzes the significance of this information in terms of the dose to man. Calculated doses resulting from tritium releases to the environment are linearly dependent upon the quality factor chosen for tritium beta radiation. A reevaluation of the tritium quality factor by the ICRP is needed; a value of 1.7 would seem to be more justifiable than the old 1.0 value. A new exposure model is proposed, based primarily upon the approach recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Employing a /open quotes/typical/close quotes/ LMFBR reprocessing facility source term, a /open quotes/base case/close quotes/ dose commitment to total body (for a maximally exposed individual) was calculated to be 4.0 /times/ 10/sup /minus/2/ mSv, with 3.2 /times/ 10/sup /minus// mSv of the dose due to intake of tritium. The study analyzes models which exist for evaluating the buildup of global releases of tritium from man-made sources. Scenarios for the release of man-made tritium to the environment and prediction of collective dose commitment to future generations suggest that the dose from nuclear weapons testing will be less than that from nuclear energy even though the weapons source term is greater than that for any of our energy scenarios

  8. Tritium: An analysis of key environmental and dosimetric questions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Till, J E; Meyer, H R; Etnier, E L; Bomar, E S; Gentry, R D; Killough, G G; Rohwer, P S; Tennery, V J; Travis, C C

    1980-05-01

    This document summarizes new theoretical and experimental data that may affect the assessment of environmental releases of tritium and analyzes the significance of this information in terms of the dose to man. Calculated doses resulting from tritium releases to the environment are linearly dependent upon the quality factor chosen for tritium beta radiation. A reevaluation of the tritium quality factor by the ICRP is needed; a value of 1.7 would seem to be more justifiable than the old 1.0 value. A new exposure model is proposed, based primarily upon the approach recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Employing a /open quotes/typical/close quotes/ LMFBR reprocessing facility source term, a /open quotes/base case/close quotes/ dose commitment to total body (for a maximally exposed individual) was calculated to be 4.0 /times/ 10/sup /minus/2/ mSv, with 3.2 /times/ 10/sup /minus// mSv of the dose due to intake of tritium. The study analyzes models which exist for evaluating the buildup of global releases of tritium from man-made sources. Scenarios for the release of man-made tritium to the environment and prediction of collective dose commitment to future generations suggest that the dose from nuclear weapons testing will be less than that from nuclear energy even though the weapons source term is greater than that for any of our energy scenarios.

  9. Tritium in the environment: a critical synthesis of knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnier-Laplace, J.; Adam-Guillermin, C.; Antonelli, C.; Beaugelin-Seiller, K.; Boyer, P.; Bailly du Bois, P.; Fievet, B.; Masson, M.; Gariel, J.C.; Pierrard, O.; Renaud, P.; Roussel-Debet, S.; Gurrarian, R.; Le Dizes-Maurel, S.; Maro, D.

    2009-01-01

    The authors first outline that tritium is, along with carbon 14, the main radionuclide in France in terms of activity released by nuclear facilities, whatever it concerns gaseous or liquid releases. They describe its behaviour, its various forms in the atmosphere and in the ecosystems, its transfer to plants (results of surveys are evoked which seem to demonstrate that there is no significant bio-accumulation). They comment the current knowledge and results of surveys about the presence of tritium in land and sea animals, and about the toxicity of tritium for non-human organisms

  10. Tritium in the environment: a critical synthesis of knowledge; Le tritium dans l'environnement: synthese critique des connaissances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnier-Laplace, J.; Adam-Guillermin, C.; Antonelli, C.; Beaugelin-Seiller, K.; Boyer, P. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Direction de l' Environnement et de l' Intervention, 13 - Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Bailly du Bois, P.; Fievet, B.; Masson, M. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, LRC, 50 - Cherbourg Octeville (France); Gariel, J.C.; Pierrard, O.; Renaud, P.; Roussel-Debet, S. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, DEI, 78 - Le Vesinet (France); Gurrarian, R. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, DEI/STME/LMRE, 91 - Orsay (France); Le Dizes-Maurel, S.; Maro, D. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, DEI/SECRE/LME, 13 - Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2009-07-01

    The authors first outline that tritium is, along with carbon 14, the main radionuclide in France in terms of activity released by nuclear facilities, whatever it concerns gaseous or liquid releases. They describe its behaviour, its various forms in the atmosphere and in the ecosystems, its transfer to plants (results of surveys are evoked which seem to demonstrate that there is no significant bio-accumulation). They comment the current knowledge and results of surveys about the presence of tritium in land and sea animals, and about the toxicity of tritium for non-human organisms

  11. Study of tissue free water tritium and tissue bound tritium in neem tree leaves (Azadirachta indica) around Madras Atomic Power Station, Kalpakkam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thulasi Brindha, J.; Rajaram, S.; Kannan, V.; Hegde, A.G.; Kher, R.K.

    2008-01-01

    Tritium, one of the isotopes of hydrogen, is a pure beta emitter and is released as HTO through 100 metre stack during the operation of Madras Atomic Power Station at Kalpakkam, located in Tamilnadu state. Depending on the proximity and wind direction, the released tritium activity in the atmosphere gradually decreases with distance due to dilution and dispersion and has the ability to exchange with nearby surface soil water, vegetation etc. In the vegetation, tritium is present in two forms namely Tissue Free Water Tritium (TFWT) and Tissue Bound Tritium (TBT). This paper presents the level of TFWT and TBT in the neem tree leaves (Azadirachta indica) of Kalpakkam. Specific activity ratio (SAR) of TBT and TFWT for neem tree leaves was computed and is presented in this paper. It was mainly observed in the present study that high tritium activity in ground water plays a major role for the contribution of TBT. It was observed that SAR was greater than unity in a location where the ground water tritium was comparatively higher than atmospheric tritium, which may be due to dynamic tritium environment in both ground water as well as in atmosphere. In other locations where there was less or negligible tritium activity in the ground water, the observed SAR was less than 1 irrespective of atmospheric moisture tritium. (author)

  12. Investigations of the tritium recycling in TFTR using the DT neutron rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, S.E.; Callen, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    During deuterim-only neutral-beam-injected discharges, tritium from earlier deuterium-tritium discharges is released from the vessel limiters and walls to cause a deuterium-tritium neutron count rate comparable to the deuterium-deuterium neutron count rate. A measure of the tritium density in the plasma based on neutron rate measurements is defined and used to determine which parameters influence tritium influx to the plasma core. The tritium density is observed to decrease in a sequence of deuterium-only supershots and to depend on the amount of tritium injected in prior DT shots and the amount of tritium present in the limiter. A weak correlation is also observed with the plasma current, but not with beam power, hydrogen influx, carbon influx, visible bremsstrahlung, lithium pellet injection, blooms, nor disruptions

  13. Development of an environmental tritium model; ETDOSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andoh, Mariko; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Amano, Hikaru [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-03-01

    ETDOSE is a simple computer code to calculate atmospheric distribution patterns of tritium for an acute and a chronic release of HT and HTO. This code calculates tritium concentrations in air, soil, plant free water and OBT, and estimates dose impact by inhalation of air and ingestion of food. Participation in IAEA`s model validation program BIOMASS has been done using this code for BIOMASS Scenario 1. This paper shows the outline of ETDOSE and preliminary results of model comparison in BIOMASS program. (author)

  14. Tritium breeding in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.

    1982-10-01

    Key technological problems that influence tritium breeding in fusion blankets are reviewed. The breeding potential of candidate materials is evaluated and compared to the tritium breeding requirements. The sensitivity of tritium breeding to design and nuclear data parameters is reviewed. A framework for an integrated approach to improve tritium breeding prediction is discussed with emphasis on nuclear data requirements

  15. Fission gas release from oxide fuels at high burnups (AWBA development program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dollins, C.C.

    1981-02-01

    The steady state gas release, swelling and densification model previously developed for oxide fuels has been modified to accommodate the slow transients in temperature, temperature gradient, fission rate and pressure that are encountered in normal reactor operation. The gas release predictions made by the model were then compared to gas release data on LMFBR-EBRII fuels obtained by Dutt and Baker and reported by Meyer, Beyer, and Voglewede. Good agreement between the model and the data was found. A comparison between the model and three other sets of gas release data is also shown, again with good agreement

  16. Tritium permeation through iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagi, Hideki; Hayashi, Yasunori

    1989-01-01

    An experimental method for measuring diffusion coefficients and permeation rates of tritium in metals around room temperature has been established, and their values in iron have been obtained by using the method. Permeation rates of tritium and hydrogen through iron were measured by the electrochemical method in which a tritiated aqueous solution was used as a cathodic electrolyte. Tritium and hydrogen were introduced from one side of a membrane specimen by cathodic polarization, while at the other side of the specimen the permeating tritium and hydrogen were extracted by potentiostatical ionization. The amount of permeated hydrogen was obtained by integrating the anodic current, and that of tritium was determined by measuring the radioactivity of the electrolyte sampled from the extraction side. Diffusion coefficients of tritium (D T ) and hydrogen (D H ) were determined from the time lag of tritium and hydrogen permeation. D T =9x10 -10 m 2 /s and D H =4x10 -9 m 2 /s at 286 K for annealed iron specimens. These values of D T and D H were compared with the previous data of the diffusion coefficients of hydrogen and deuterium, and the isotope effect in diffusion was discussed. (orig.)

  17. Tritium technology. A Canadian overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemmings, R.L.

    2002-01-01

    An overview of the various tritium research and operational activities in Canada is presented. These activities encompass tritium processing and recovery, tritium interactions with materials, and tritium health and safety. Many of these on-going activities form a sound basis for the tritium use and handling aspects of the ITER project. Tritium management within the CANDU heavy water reactor, associated detritiation facilities, research and development facilities, and commercial industry and improving the understanding of tritium behaviour in humans and the environment remain the focus of a long-standing Canadian interest in tritium. While there have been changes in the application of this knowledge and experience over time, the operating experience and the supporting research and development continue to provide for improved plant and facility operations, an improved understanding of tritium safety issues, and improved products and tools that facilitate tritium management. (author)

  18. Nitric oxide synthesis and biological functions of nitric oxide released from ruthenium compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Pereira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available During three decades, an enormous number of studies have demonstrated the critical role of nitric oxide (NO as a second messenger engaged in the activation of many systems including vascular smooth muscle relaxation. The underlying cellular mechanisms involved in vasodilatation are essentially due to soluble guanylyl-cyclase (sGC modulation in the cytoplasm of vascular smooth cells. sGC activation culminates in cyclic GMP (cGMP production, which in turn leads to protein kinase G (PKG activation. NO binds to the sGC heme moiety, thereby activating this enzyme. Activation of the NO-sGC-cGMP-PKG pathway entails Ca2+ signaling reduction and vasodilatation. Endothelium dysfunction leads to decreased production or bioavailability of endogenous NO that could contribute to vascular diseases. Nitrosyl ruthenium complexes have been studied as a new class of NO donors with potential therapeutic use in order to supply the NO deficiency. In this context, this article shall provide a brief review of the effects exerted by the NO that is enzymatically produced via endothelial NO-synthase (eNOS activation and by the NO released from NO donor compounds in the vascular smooth muscle cells on both conduit and resistance arteries, as well as veins. In addition, the involvement of the nitrite molecule as an endogenous NO reservoir engaged in vasodilatation will be described.

  19. Tritium waste management on the La Hague AREVA NC site: associated impact and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devin, P.; Deguette, H.

    2009-01-01

    The authors propose an analysis of tritium behaviour in the nuclear fuel processed in the AREVA NC plant in La Hague, of its presence in the plant and in its wastes, and of the impact of these wastes and the tritium monitoring in the environment. First, they present the AREVA NC plant and evoke the legal context concerning the waste management. They report and discuss the analysis of the presence and behaviour of tritium in irradiated fuel, of its behaviour during spent fuel processing, the evolution of tritium releases (legal limitations, evolutions since 1992), of measurement of activity in effluents, and discuss a study of possible reductions of tritium releases by La Hague plants (mainly in sea waters). They also report the computational assessment of the dosimetric impact of tritium on neighbouring population. They describe how the presence of tritium in the environment is monitored within the annual radioactivity monitoring programme

  20. Nitric oxide and non-quantal acetylcholine release

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vyskočil, František

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 3 (2003), s. 241-243 ISSN 1211-7579. [Celostátní konference biologické psychiatrie /11./. Luhačovice, 11.06.2003-14.06.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/02/1333 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922; CEZ:MSM 113100003 Keywords : nitric oxide Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  1. Experience in handling concentrated tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtslander, W.J.

    1985-12-01

    The notes describe the experience in handling concentrated tritium in the hydrogen form accumulated in the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories Tritium Laboratory. The techniques of box operation, pumping systems, hydriding and dehydriding operations, and analysis of tritium are discussed. Information on the Chalk River Tritium Extraction Plant is included as a collection of reprints of papers presented at the Dayton Meeting on Tritium Technology, 1985 April 30 - May 2

  2. Problems of anthropogenic tritium limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kochetkov О.A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article contains the current situation in respect to the environmental concentrations of anthropogenic and natural tritium. There are presented and analyzed domestic standards for НТО of all Radiation Safety Standards (NRB, as well as the regulations analyzed for tritium in drinking water taken in other countries today. This article deals with the experience of limitation of tritium and focuses on the main problem of rationing of tritium — rationing of organically bound tritium.

  3. Tritium and helium-3 in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasser, R.

    1989-01-01

    The book surveys recent results on the behaviour of tritium and its decay product helium-3 metals. In contrast to many earlier books which discuss the properties of the stable hydrogen isotopes without mentioning tritium, this book reviews mainly the results on tritium in metals. Due to the difficulties in preparing metal tritide samples, very important quantities such as diffusivity, superconductivity, solubility, etc. have only been determined very recently. The book not only presents the measured tritium data, but also the isotopic dependency of the different physical properties by comparing H, D and T results. A chapter is devoted to helium-3 in metals. Aspects such as helium release, generation of helium bubbles, swelling, and change of the lattice parameter upon aging are discussed. The book provides the reader with up-to-date information and deep insight into the behaviour of H, D, T and He-3 in metals. Further important topics such a tritium production, its risks, handling and discharge to the environment are also addressed

  4. Tritium-management requirements for D-T fusion reactors (ETF, INTOR, FED)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, P.A.; Clemmer, R.G.; Misra, B.

    1981-10-01

    The successful operation of D-T fusion reactors will depend on the development of safe and reliable tritium-containment and fuel-recycle systems. The tritium handling requirements for D-T reactors were analyzed. The reactor facility was then designed from the viewpoint of tritium management. Recovery scenarios after a tritium release were generated to show the relative importance of various scenarios. A fusion-reactor tritium facility was designed which would be appropriate for all types of plants from the Engineering Test Facility (ETF), the International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR), and the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) to the full-scale power plant epitomized by the STARFIRE design

  5. Tritium protective clothing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, T. P.; Easterly, C. E.

    1979-06-01

    Occupational exposures to radiation from tritium received at present nuclear facilities and potential exposures at future fusion reactor facilities demonstrate the need for improved protective clothing. Important areas relating to increased protection factors of tritium protective ventilation suits are discussed. These areas include permeation processes of tritium through materials, various tests of film permeability, selection and availability of suit materials, suit designs, and administrative procedures. The phenomenological nature of film permeability calls for more standardized and universal test methods, which would increase the amount of directly useful information on impermeable materials. Improvements in suit designs could be expedited and better communicated to the health physics community by centralizing devlopmental equipment, manpower, and expertise in the field of tritium protection to one or two authoritative institutions.

  6. Tritium protective clothing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, T.P.; Easterly, C.E.

    1979-06-01

    Occupational exposures to radiation from tritium received at present nuclear facilities and potential exposures at future fusion reactor facilities demonstrate the need for improved protective clothing. Important areas relating to increased protection factors of tritium protective ventilation suits are discussed. These areas include permeation processes of tritium through materials, various tests of film permeability, selection and availability of suit materials, suit designs, and administrative procedures. The phenomenological nature of film permeability calls for more standardized and universal test methods, which would increase the amount of directly useful information on impermeable materials. Improvements in suit designs could be expedited and better communicated to the health physics community by centralizing devlopmental equipment, manpower, and expertise in the field of tritium protection to one or two authoritative institutions

  7. Influence of corium oxidation on fission product release from molten pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechta, S.V.; Krushinov, E.V.; Vitol, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    Release of low-volatile fission products and core materials from molten oxidic corium was investigated in the EVAN project under the auspices of ISTC. The experiments carried out in cold crucible with induction heating and RASPLAV test facility are described. The results are discussed in terms of reactor application; in particular, pool configuration, melt oxidation kinetics, critical influence of melt surface temperature and oxidation index on the fission product release rate and aerosol particle composition. The relevance of measured high release of Sr from the molten pool for the reactor application is highlighted. Comparisons of the experimental data with those from the COLIMA CA-U3 test and the VERCORS tests, as well as with predictions from IVTANTHERMO and GEMINI/NUCLEA are set. (author)

  8. PRODUCTION OF TRITIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, G.H.; Shapiro, E.M.; Elliott, N.; Cannon, C.V.

    1963-02-26

    This invention relates to a process for the production of tritium by subjecting comminuted solid lithium fluoride containing the lithium isotope of atomic mass number 6 to neutron radiation in a self-sustaining neutronic reactor. The lithium fiuoride is heated to above 450 deg C. in an evacuated vacuum-tight container during radiation. Gaseous radiation products are withdrawn and passed through a palladium barrier to recover tritium. (AEC)

  9. Design and operational experience with a portable tritium cleanup system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maienschein, J.L.; Wilson, S.W.; Garcia, F.

    1991-06-01

    We built a portable tritium cleanup system to scavenge tritium from contaminated gases in any tritium-containing system in the LLNL Tritium Facility. The cleanup system uses standard catalytic oxidation of tritium to water followed by water removal with a molecular sieve dryer. The cleanup unit, complete with instrumentation, is contained in a portable cart that is rolled into place and connected to the apparatus to be cleaned. The cleanup systems is effective, low-tech, simple, and reliable. The nominal flow rate of the system is 30 liters/minute, and the decontamination factor is > 1000. In this paper we will show design information on our portable cleanup system, and will discuss our operational experience with it over the past several years

  10. Aspirin induces nitric oxide release from vascular endothelium: a novel mechanism of action

    OpenAIRE

    Taubert, D; Berkels, R; Grosser, N; Schröder, H; Gründemann, D; Schömig, E

    2004-01-01

    The study was designed to test the hypothesis that aspirin may stimulate nitric oxide (NO) release from vascular endothelium, a pivotal factor for maintenance of vascular homeostasis.Clinical evidence suggests that low-dose aspirin may improve vascular endothelial function. Since other cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors showed no beneficial vascular effects, aspirin may exhibit a vasculoprotective, COX-independent mechanism.Luminal NO release was monitored in real time on dissected porcine coron...

  11. Tritium at Jefferson Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bane, Jason; Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Jefferson Lab's recently upgraded accelerator will provide the perfect opportunity to increase the quality and quantity of the electron scattering world data on tritium. Tritium, the radioactive isotope of hydrogen with a half-life of 12 years, was last used in a large scale electron scattering experiment a few decades ago. This Fall Jefferson Lab will play host to a set of very exciting electron scattering experiments involving tritium. A 25 cm aluminum cell will be filled with 1 kCi of tritium with an internal pressure of approximately 200 psi at 295 kelvin. The tritium target will first see a 10.6 GeV beam to probe the deep inelastic scattering region to study the down to up quark ratio and the EMC effect. Then the beam will be set to 4.3 GeV to investigate SRCs and momentum distributions in the quasi-elastic scattering regime. If time permits, elastic scattering will be used to extract the ratio of the charge radius of tritium and helium3.

  12. Heat release from B4C oxidation in steam and air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belovsky, L.

    1996-01-01

    BWR and some PWR cores contain boron carbide (B 4 C) as neutron absorber. During a severe accident, the B 4 C can potentially react with steam under release of heat and hydrogen. Although models for B 4 C oxidation already exist in MELCOR and SCDAP/RELAP5, a development of a new model for another computer code seems to be difficult due to a missing comprehensive description of the current modelling methodology and scarce experimental data. The aim of this paper is to highlight the key points of the B 4 C oxidation using the existing available experimental data and to perform a simple heat balance analysis of the B 4 C/steam and B 4 C/air chemical reactions. The analysis of literature data shows that the B 4 C oxidation phenomenon is qualitatively well described below 1000 deg. C. However, no reliable data exist for the reaction kinetics especially above this temperature. It was found that the experimental results strongly depend on the experimental arrangement. The reaction heats, calculated in this study, indicate that the B 4 C oxidation is an exothermic reaction, releasing more heat in air than in steam. The formation of boric acids from the boron oxide increases the heat release from B 4 C by ∼ 10%, in the worst case. Although the total heat, released in a PWR core from the B 4 C oxidation, is probably much smaller than the heat released from the Zr/steam reaction, it is not excluded that the B 4 C oxidation can locally contribute to the damage of the control elements due to local overheating. Modelling of these phenomena is, however, very difficult due to the complex geometry of the liquefied control elements and due to absence of suitable data on the reaction kinetics. (author). 25 refs, 2 figs, 3 tabs

  13. Metal release behavior of surface oxidized stainless steels into flowing high temperature pure water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Kazuo; Tomari, Haruo; Nakayama, Takenori; Shimogori, Kazutoshi; Ishigure, Kenkichi; Matsuura, Chihiro; Fujita, Norihiko; Ono, Shoichi.

    1987-01-01

    In order to clarify the effect of oxidation treatment of Type 304 SS on the inhibition of metal release into high temperature pure water, metal release rate of individual alloying element into flowing deionized water containing 50 ppb dissolved oxygen was measured as the function of exposure time on representative specimens oxidized in air and steam. The behavior of metal release was also discussed in relation to the structure of surface films. Among the alloying elements the amount of Fe ion, Cr ion and Fe crud in high temperature pure water tended to saturate with the exposure time and that of Ni ion and Co ion tended to increase monotonously with the exposure time for all specimens tested. And the treatment of steam-oxidation was the most effective to decrease the metal release of alloying elements and the treatment by air-oxidation also decreased the metal release. These tendencies were confirmed to correlate well with the structure of the surface films as it was in the results in the static autoclave test. (author)

  14. Tritium in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badyaev, V.V.; Egorov, Yu.A.; Sklyarov, V.P.; Stegachev, G.V.

    1981-01-01

    The problem of tritium formation during NPP operation is considered on the basis of available published data. Tritium characteristics are given, sources of the origin of natural and artificial tritium are described. NPP contribution to the total tritium amount in the environment is determined, as well as contribution of each process in the reactor to the quantity of tritium, produced at the NPP. Thermal- and fast-neutron reactions with tritium production are shown, their contribution to the total amount of tritium in a coolant is estimated, taking into account the type of reactor. Data on tritium content in NPP wastes and in the air of working premises are presented. Methods for sampling and sample preparation to measurements as well as the appropriate equipment are considered. Design of the gas-discharge counter of internal filling, used for measuring tritium activity in samples is described [ru

  15. Tritium application: self-luminous glass tube(SLGT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.; Lee, S.K.; Chung, E.S.; Kim, K.S.; Kim, W.S.; Nam, G.J.

    2005-01-01

    To manufacture SLGTs (self-luminous glass tubes), 4 core technologies are needed: coating technology, tritium injection technology, laser sealing/cutting technology and tritium handling technology. The inside of the glass tubes is coated with greenish ZnS phosphor particles with sizes varying from 4∝5 [μm], and Cu, and Al as an activator and a co-dopant, respectively. We also found that it would be possible to produce a phosphor coated glass tube for the SLGT using the well established cold cathode fluorescent lamp (CCFL) bulb manufacturing technology. The conceptual design of the main process loop (PL) is almost done. A delicate technique will be needed for the sealing/cutting of the glass tubes. Instead of the existing torch technology, a new technology using a pulse-type laser is under investigation. The design basis of the tritium handling facilities is to minimize the operator's exposure to tritium uptake and the emission of tritium to the environment. To fulfill the requirements, major tritium handling components are located in the secondary containment such as the glove boxes (GBs) and/or the fume hoods. The tritium recovery system (TRS) is connected to a GB and PL to minimize the release of tritium as well as to remove the moisture and oxygen in the GB. (orig.)

  16. Treatment of tritiated exhaust gases at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutter, E.; Besserer, U. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany); Jacqmin, G. [NUKEM GmbH, Industreistr, Alzenau (Germany)

    1995-02-01

    The Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK) accomplished commissioning; tritium involving activities will start this year. The laboratory is destined mainly to investigating processing of fusion reactor fuel and to developing analytic devices for determination of tritium and tritiated species in view of control and accountancy requirements. The area for experimental work in the laboratory is about 800 m{sup 2}. The tritium infrastructure including systems for tritium storage, transfer within the laboratory and processing by cleanup and isotope separation methods has been installed on an additional 400 m{sup 2} area. All tritium processing systems (=primary systems), either of the tritium infrastructure or of the experiments, are enclosed in secondary containments which consist of gloveboxes, each of them connected to the central depressurization system, a part integrated in the central detritiation system. The atmosphere of each glovebox is cleaned in a closed cycle by local detritiation units controlled by two tritium monitors. Additionally, the TLK is equipped with a central detritiation system in which all gases discharged from the primary systems and the secondary systems are processed. All detritiation units consist of a catalyst for oxidizing gaseous tritium or tritiated hydrocarbons to water, a heat exchanger for cooling the catalyst reactor exhaust gas to room temperature, and a molecular sieve bed for adsorbing the water. Experiments with tracer amounts of tritium have shown that decontamination factors >3000 can be achieved with the TLK detritiation units. The central detritiation system was carefully tested and adjusted under normal and abnormal operation conditions. Test results and the behavior of the tritium barrier preventing tritiated exhaust gases from escaping into the atmosphere will be reported.

  17. On spray drying of oxidized corn starch cross-linked gelatin microcapsules for drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Xugang; Yang, Mao; Shan, Zhihua; Mansouri, Shahnaz; May, Bee K; Chen, Xiaodong; Chen, Hui; Woo, Meng Wai

    2017-05-01

    Spray-dried gelatin/oxidized corn starch (G/OCS) microcapsules were produced for drug release application. The prepared microcapsules were characterized through a scanning electron microscope (SEM) picture and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The swelling characteristics of the G/OCS microcapsules and release properties of vitamin C were then investigated. The results from structural analysis indicated that the presence of miscibility and compatibility between oxidized corn starch and gelatin, and exhibits high thermal stability up to 326°C. The swelling of G/OCS microcapsules increased with increasing pH and reduced with decreasing ionic strength, attributed to the cross-linking between gelatin and oxidized corn starch, ionization of functional groups. Vitamin C release characteristic revealed controlled release behavior in the first 3h of contact with an aqueous medium. This release behavior was independent of the swelling behavior indicating the potential of the encapsulating matrix to produce controlled release across a spectrum of pH environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Tritium Assay and Dispensing of KEPRI Tritium Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, S. H.; Song, K. M.; Lee, S. K.; Lee, K.W.; Ko, B. W.

    2009-01-01

    The Wolsong Tritium Removal Facility(WTRF) has been constructed to reduce tritium levels in the heavy water systems and environmental emissions at the site. The WTRF was designed to process 100 kg/h of heavy water with the overall tritium extraction efficiency of 97% per single pass and to produce ∼700 g of tritium as T2 per year at the feed concentration of 0.37 TBq/kg. The high purity tritium greater than 99% is immobilized as a metal hydride to secure its long term storage. The recovered tritium will be made available for industrial uses and some research applications in the future. Then KEPRI is constructing the tritium lab. to build-up infrastructure to support tritium research activities and to support tritium control and accountability systems for tritium export. This paper describes the initial phases of the tritium application program including the laboratory infrastructure to support the tritium related R and D activities and the tritium controls in Korea

  19. Tritium in the burial ground of the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyder, M.L.

    1993-06-01

    This memorandum reviews the available information on tritium-contaminated material discarded to burial grounds. Tritium was the first isotope studied because it represents the most immediate concern with regard to release to the environment. Substantial amounts of tritium are known to be present in the ground water underneath the area, and outcropping of this ground water in springs and seeps has been observed. The response to this release of tritium from the burial ground is a current concern. The amount of tritium emplaced in the burial ground facilities is very uncertain, however, some general conclusions can be made. In particular, most of the tritium buried is associated with spent equipment and other waste, rather than spent melts. Correspondingly, most of the tritium in the ground water seems to be associated with burials of this type, rather than the spent melts. Maps are presented showing the location of burials of tritiated waste by type, and the location of the largest individual burials according to COBRA records

  20. An updated review on tritium in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyrolle, Frédérique; Ducros, Loïc; Le Dizès, Séverine; Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine; Charmasson, Sabine; Boyer, Patrick; Cossonnet, Catherine

    2018-01-01

    Various studies indicated more or less recently that organically bound tritium (OBT) formed from gaseous or liquid tritium releases into the environment potentially accumulates in organisms contradicting hypotheses associated to methods used to assess the biological impact of tritium on humans (ASN, 2010). Increasing research works were then performed during the last decade in order to gain knowledge on this radionuclide expected to be increasingly released by nuclear installations in the near future within the environment. This review focusses on publications of the last decade. New unpublished observations revealing the presence of technogenic tritium in a sedimentary archive collected in the upper reaches of the Rhône river and findings from the Northwestern Mediterranean revealing in all likelihood the impact of terrigenous tritium inputs on OBT levels recorded in living organisms are also presented. Identifying and understanding the physicochemical forms of tritium and the processes leading to its persistence in environmental compartments would explain most observations regarding OBT concentrations in organisms and definitively excludes that tritium would "bio accumulate" within living organisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Spatial distribution of tritium in the Rawatbhata Rajasthan site environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GilI, Rajpal; Tiwari, S.N.; Gocher, A.K.; Ravi, P.M.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Tritium is one of the most environmentally mobile radionuclides and hence has high potential for migration into the different compartments of environment. Tritium from nuclear facilities at RAPS site is released into the environment through 93 m and 100 m high stack mainly as tritiated water (HTO). The released tritium undergoes dilution and dispersion and then follows the ecological pathway of water molecule. Environmental Survey Laboratory of Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), located at Rajasthan Atomic Power Station (RAPS) site is continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in the environment to ensure the public safety. Atmospheric tritium activity during the period (2009-2013) was measured regularly around Rajasthan Atomic Power Station (RAPS). Data collected showed a large variation of H-3 concentration in air fluctuating in the range of 0.43 - 5.80 Bq.m -3 at site boundary of 1.6 km. This paper presents the result of analyses of tritium in atmospheric environment covering an area up to 20 km radius around RAPS site. Large number of air moisture samples were collected around the RAPS site, for estimating tritium in atmospheric environment to ascertain the atmospheric dispersion and computation of radiation dose to the public

  2. Research of CITP-II tritium production irradiation device design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhihua; Deng Yongjun; Mi Xiangmiao; Li Rundong; Liu Zhiyong

    2012-01-01

    As the core component of CITP-II, the online tritium production irradiation device is the pivotal equipment in the research on tritium production and release of tritium breeders. The design of CITP-II online tritium production irradiation device creatively makes replacing the breeders online come true; as tritium production capacity, the self-shielding factor of device, and neutron flux were studied. The influence of different load models and load thicknesses of breeders to tritium production capacity was calculated. The hydrodynamics parameters of device in solid-gas phase were computed. Thermal parameters, such as the heat power of breeders, hotspot, temperature grads distributions, utmost temperature, uneven factors, were analyzed. Creatively designed nonlinear electric heater equalized breeders' even heat power. The influence laws of the components, pressure of gap gas and carrier gas to the balance temperature were got. And the key thermal parameters were ascertained. The key thermal parameters and the changing laws were got and provide the basis for structural optimization and safety analysis. They can also be referenced for the study of breeders' tritium production and release. (authors)

  3. The design, fabrication and testing of the gas analysis system for the tritium recovery experiment, TRIO-01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, P.A.; Bowers, D.L.; Clemmer, E.D.; Clemmer, R.G.; Graczyk, D.G.; Homa, M.I.; Pappas, G.; Reedy, G.T.; Slawecki, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    The tritium recovery experiment, TRIO-01, required a gas analysis system which detected the form of tritium, the amount of tritium (differential and integral), and the presence and amount of other radioactive species. The system had to handle all contingencies and function for months at a time; unattended during weekend operation. The designed system, described herein, consisted of a train of components which could be grouped as desired to match tritium release behavior

  4. Glovebox stripper system tritium capture efficiency-literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, D. W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Poore, A. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-28

    Glovebox Stripper Systems (GBSS) are intended to minimize tritium emissions from glovebox confinement systems in Tritium facilities. A question was raised to determine if an assumed 99% stripping (decontamination) efficiency in the design of a GBBS was appropriate. A literature review showed the stated 99% tritium capture efficiency used for design of the GBSS is reasonable. Four scenarios were indicated for GBSSs. These include release with a single or dual stage setup which utilizes either single-pass or recirculation for stripping purposes. Examples of single-pass as well as recirculation stripper systems are presented and reviewed in this document.

  5. Tritium distribution in ground water around large underground fusion explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stead, F.W.

    1963-01-01

    Tritium will be released in significant amounts from large underground nuclear fusion explosions in the Plowshare Program. The tritium could become highly concentrated in nearby ground waters, and could be of equal or more importance as a possible contaminant than other long-lived fission-product and induced radionuclides. Behavior of tritiated water in particular hydrologic and geologic environments, as illustrated by hypothetical explosions in dolomite and tuff, must be carefully evaluated to predict under what conditions high groundwater concentrations of tritium might occur.

  6. Enhanced activities of organically bound tritium in biota samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetlik, I; Fejgl, M; Malátová, I; Tomaskova, L

    2014-11-01

    A pilot study aimed on possible occurrence of elevated activity of non-exchangable organically bound tritium (NE-OBT) in biota was performed. The first results showed a significant surplus of NE-OBT activity in biota of the valley of Mohelno reservoir and Jihlava river. The liquid releases of HTO from the nuclear power plant Dukovany is the source of tritium in this area. This area can be a source of various types of natural samples for future studies of tritium pathways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Tritium in the Savannah River Site environment. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Bauer, L.R.; Hayes, D.W.; Marter, W.L.; Zeigler, C.C.; Stephenson, D.E.; Hoel, D.D.; Hamby, D.M.

    1991-05-01

    Tritium is released to the environment from many of the operations at the Savannah River Site. The releases from each facility to the atmosphere and to the soil and streams, both from normal operations and inadvertent releases, over the period of operation from the early 1950s through 1988 are presented. The fate of the tritium released is evaluated through environmental monitoring, special studies, and modeling. It is concluded that approximately 91% of the tritium remaining after decay is now in the oceans. A dose and risk assessment to the population around the site is presented. It is concluded that about 0.6 fatal cancers may be associated with the tritium released during all the years of operation to the population of about 625,000. This same population (based on the overall US cancer statistics) is expected to experience about 105,000 cancer fatalities from all types of cancer. Therefore, it is considered unlikely that a relationship between any of the cancer deaths occurring in this population and releases of tritium from the SRS will be found.

  8. Tritium in the Channel; Le tritium en Manche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masson, M.; Fievet, B.; Bailly-Du-Bois, P. [Laboratoire de Radioecologie de Cherbourg-Octeville, IRSN /DEI /SECRE, 50 (France); Olivier, A.; Tenailleau, L. [Groupe d' Etudes Atomiques, EAMEA, 50 - Cherbourg (France)

    2009-07-01

    After having recalled that sea waters entering the Channel exhibit a natural concentration of tritium, the authors outline that spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plants are now the main sources of tritium for marine ecosystems as some oceanographic campaigns showed it. If data about the presence of tritium in water are numerous, data concerning the presence of tritiated water and of organically bound tritium in organisms are much less frequent. However, some surveys have been performed along the Channel French coasts

  9. Preparation and Characterization of Oxidized Starch Polymer Microgels for Encapsulation and Controlled Release of Functional Ingredients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Yuan; de Vries, Renko; Slaghek, Ted; Timmermans, Johan; Stuart, Martien A. Cohen; Norde, Willem

    A novel biocompatible and biodegradable microgel system has been developed for controlled uptake and release of especially proteins. It contains TEMPO-oxidized potato starch polymers, which are chemically cross-linked by sodium trimetaphosphate (STMP). Physical chemical properties have been

  10. Regulation of Ca2+ release from mitochondria by the oxidation-reduction state of pyridine nucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehninger, Albert L.; Vercesi, Anibal; Bababunmi, Enitan A.

    1978-01-01

    Mitochondria from normal rat liver and heart, and also Ehrlich tumor cells, respiring on succinate as energy source in the presence of rotenone (to prevent net electron flow to oxygen from the endogenous pyridine nucleotides), rapidly take up Ca2+ and retain it so long as the pyridine nucleotides are kept in the reduced state. When acetoacetate is added to bring the pyridine nucleotides into a more oxidized state, Ca2+ is released to the medium. A subsequent addition of a reductant of the pyridine nucleotides such as β-hydroxybutyrate, glutamate, or isocitrate causes reuptake of the released Ca2+. Successive cycles of Ca2+ release and uptake can be induced by shifting the redox state of the pyridine nucleotides to more oxidized and more reduced states, respectively. Similar observations were made when succinate oxidation was replaced as energy source by ascorbate oxidation or by the hydrolysis of ATP. These and other observations form the basis of a hypothesis for feedback regulation of Ca2+-dependent substrate- or energy-mobilizing enzymatic reactions by the uptake or release of mitochondrial Ca2+, mediated by the cytosolic phosphate potential and the ATP-dependent reduction of mitochondrial pyridine nucleotides by reversal of electron transport. Images PMID:25436

  11. [Release of iron ions from transferrin under the effect of nitric oxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhumabaeva, T T; Baĭder, L M; Kuropteva, Z V

    2000-01-01

    The dynamics of EPR signals from the iron-transporting blood protein Fe(3+)-transferrine after the administration of sodium nitrite and metronidazole to animals was studied. It was shown that exogenin nitric oxide produced by nitrocompounds resulted in the release of iron from Fe(3+)-transferrine.

  12. Preparation and characterization of oxidized starch polymer microgels for encapsulation and controlled release of functional ingredients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; Vries, R. de; Slaghek, T.; Timmermans, J.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Norde, W.

    2009-01-01

    A novel biocompatible and biodegradable microgel system has been developed for controlled uptake and release of especially proteins. It contains TEMPO-oxidized potato starch polymers, which are chemically cross-linked by sodium trimetaphosphate (STMP). Physical chemical properties have been

  13. Tritium Systems Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cafasso, F.A.; Maroni, V.A.; Smith, W.H.; Wilkes, W.R.; Wittenberg, L.J.

    1978-01-01

    This TSTF proposal has two principal objectives. The first objective is to provide by mid-FY 1981 a demonstration of the fuel cycle and tritium containment systems which could be used in a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor for operation in the mid-1980's. The second objective is to provide a capability for further optimization of tritium fuel cycle and environmental control systems beyond that which is required for the EPR. The scale and flow rates in TSTF are close to those which have been projected for a prototype experimental power reactor (PEPR/ITR) and will permit reliable extrapolation to the conditions found in an EPR. The fuel concentrations will be the same as in an EPR. Demonstrations of individual components of the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle and of monitoring, accountability and containment systems and of a maintenance methodology will be achieved at various times in the FY 1979-80 time span. Subsequent to the individual component demonstrations--which will proceed from tests with hydrogen (and/or deuterium) through tracer levels of tritium to full operational concentrations--a complete test and demonstration of the integrated fuel processing and tritium containment facility will be performed. This will occur near the middle of FY 1981. Two options were considered for the TSTF: (1) The modification of an existing building and (2) the construction of a new facility

  14. Tritium in the DIII-D carbon tiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, P.L.; Kellman, A.G.; Lee, R.L.

    1993-06-01

    The amount of tritium in the carbon tiles used as a first wall in the DIII-D tokamak was measured recently when the tiles were removed and cleaned. The measurements were made as part of the task of developing the appropriate safety procedures for processing of the tiles. The surface tritium concentration on the carbon tiles was surveyed and the total tritium released from tile samples was measured in test bakes. The total tritium in all the carbon tiles at the time the tiles were removed for cleaning is estimated to be 15 mCi and the fraction of tritium retained in the tiles from DIII-D operations has a lower bound of 10%. The tritium was found to be concentrated in a narrow surface layer on the plasma facing side of the tile, was fully released when baked to 1,000 degree C, and was released in the form of tritiated gas (DT) as opposed to tritiated water (DTO) when baked

  15. A study of the tritium behavior in coolant and moderator system of heavy water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. P.; Song, S. S.; Chae, K. S. and others [Chosun Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-12-15

    The objectives of this report is to present a regulatory policy on the environmental impact and personnel exposure by understanding the generation, accumulation, environmental release and management of tritium in heavy water reactors. By estimating the tritium concentration at Wolsong nuclear plant site by estimating and forecasting the generation and accumulation of tritium in coolant and moderator systems at Wolsong unit 1, we will study the management and release of tritium at Wolsong units 3 and 4 which are ready for construction. The major activities of this study are as follows : tritium generation and accumulation in heavy water reactor, a quantitative assessment of the accumulation and release of tritium at Wolsong nuclear plant site, heavy water management at Wolsong nuclear plants. The tritium concentration and accumulation trends in the systems at Wolsong unit 1 was estimated. A quantitative assessment of the tritium accumulation and release for Wolsong 2, 3 and 4 based on data from Wolsong 1 was performed. The tritium removal schemes and its long-term management plan were made.

  16. Tritium monitoring in the environment of the French territory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leprieur, F.; Roussel-Debet, S.; Pierrard, O.; Tournieux, D.; Boissieux, T.; Caldera-Ideias, P. [Institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire (France)

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: Radioactive releases in the environment from civilian and military nuclear facilities have significantly decreased over the last few decades, except for discharges of tritium which are forecast to increase due to changes in the fuel management in power plants and in the longer term by new tritium-emitting units (fusion reactors). In the aim to perform its radiological monitoring mission throughout the French territory, IRSN uses and develops advanced technology equipment to sample and to analyze tritium in the different environmental compartments. Methodology: IRSN uses bubblers to collect both tritium vapour (HTO) and gaseous tritium (mainly HT) in the air. Another method, developed by IRSN, consists in directly sampling the water vapour in the air by condensing in a cold trap and more recently with passive sampler. In continental and marine surface water, samples are usually collected by automatic water samplers. Instantaneous surface water samples are also collected by grab sample devices. In addition, IRSN conducts animal and plant samples near French nuclear facilities. Natural origin and tritium remaining from testing of nuclear weapons In the atmosphere, the background levels of tritium of 1 to 2 Bq/L measured in water vapour, equivalent to an activity of 0.01 to 0.02 Bq/m{sup 3} of air. In fresh waters, the tritium activity currently ranges between 1 and 3 Bq/L of water. In the marine environment, tritium emitted during nuclear weapon tests has been totally 'diluted' in cosmogenic tritium and concentration levels at the surface have remained around 0.1 to 0.2 Bq/L. In biological matrices, total tritium concentration range from 1 to 3 Bq/kg f.w. with a variable proportion of free and organically bounded forms. Tritium around nuclear facilities: Close to facilities releasing more than 2x10{sup 13} Bq/year of gaseous tritium, higher activity levels, ranging from a few tens to a few hundred Bq/L, are observed in the atmospheric and

  17. Enhancement of mite antigen-induced histamine release by deuterium oxide from leucocytes of chronic urticarial patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numata, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamura, T.

    1981-09-01

    The mite antigen-induced histamine release from leucocytes of chronic urticarial patients was enhanced in the presence of deuterium oxide, which stabilizes microtubules. This enhancing effect of deuterium oxide on the histamine release from leucocytes may provide a useful means for the detection of allergens in vitro in chronic urticaria.

  18. Process for recovering tritium from molten lithium metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroni, Victor A.

    1976-01-01

    Lithium tritide (LiT) is extracted from molten lithium metal that has been exposed to neutron irradiation for breeding tritium within a thermonuclear or fission reactor. The extraction is performed by intimately contacting the molten lithium metal with a molten lithium salt, for instance, lithium chloride - potassium chloride eutectic to distribute LiT between the salt and metal phases. The extracted tritium is recovered in gaseous form from the molten salt phase by a subsequent electrolytic or oxidation step.

  19. Development of tritium technology at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.L.; Bartlit, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is dedicated to the development, demonstration, and interfacing of technologies related to the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle for large scale fusion reactor systems starting with the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) or the International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR). This paper briefly describes the fuel cycle and safety systems at TSTA including the Vacuum Facility, Fuel Cleanup, Isotope Separation, Transfer Pumping, Emergency Tritium Cleanup, Tritium Waste Treatment, Tritium Monitoring, Data Acquisition and Control, Emergency Power and Gas Analysis systems. Discussed in further detail is the experimental program proposed for the startup and testing of these systems

  20. Monitoring of tritium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, James A.; Meacham, Sterling A.

    1981-01-01

    The fluid from a breeder nuclear reactor, which may be the sodium cooling fluid or the helium reactor-cover-gas, or the helium coolant of a gas-cooled reactor passes over the portion of the enclosure of a gaseous discharge device which is permeable to hydrogen and its isotopes. The tritium diffused into the discharge device is radioactive producing beta rays which ionize the gas (argon) in the discharge device. The tritium is monitored by measuring the ionization current produced when the sodium phase and the gas phase of the hydrogen isotopes within the enclosure are in equilibrium.

  1. Tritium. Today's and tomorrow's developments; Le tritium. Actualite d'aujourd'hui et de demain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazal, S. [Association nationale des Commissions Locales d' Information (ANCLI), 91 - Palaiseau (France); Toulouse 2 univ., UMR CNRS 5263 CLLE, laboratoire travail et cognition (France); Amiard, J.C. [Nantes univ., EA 2160 MMS, section ecotoxicologie (France); Caussade, Bernard [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - CNRS (France); Chenal, Christian [Rennes 1 univ., UMR CNRS 6553 ECOBIO, equipe radiations, environnement, adaptation (France); Hubert, Francoise; Sene, Monique [CNRS, physique nucleaire (France)

    2010-07-01

    Radioactive hydrogen isotope, tritium is one of the radionuclides which is the most released in the environment during the normal operation of nuclear facilities. The increase of nuclear activities and the development of future generations of reactors, like the EPR and ITER, would lead to a significant increase of tritium effluents in the atmosphere and in the natural waters, thus raising many worries and questions. Aware about the importance of this question, the national association of local information commissions (ANCLI) wished to make a status of the existing knowledge concerning tritium and organized in 2008 a colloquium at Orsay (France) with an inquiring approach. The scientific committee of the ANCLI, renowned for its expertise skills, mobilized several nuclear specialists to carry out this thought. This book represents a comprehensive synthesis of today's knowledge about tritium, about its management and about its impact on the environment and on human health. Based on recent scientific data and on precise examples, it treats of the overall questions raised by this radionuclide: 1 - tritium properties and different sources (natural and anthropic), 2 - the problem of tritiated wastes management; 3 - the bio-availability and bio-kinetics of the different tritium species; 4 - the tritium labelling of environments; 5 - tritium measurement and modeling of its environmental circulation; 6 - tritium radio-toxicity and its biological and health impacts; 7 - the different French and/or international regulations concerning tritium. (J.S.)

  2. Aquatic dispersion modelling of a tritium plume in Lake Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klukas, M.H.; Moltyaner, G.L.

    1996-05-01

    Approximately 2900 kg of tritiated water, containing 2.3E+15 Bq of tritium, were released to Lake Ontario via the cooling water discharge when a leak developed in a moderator heat exchanger in Unit 1 at the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (PNGS) on 1992 August 2. The release provided the opportunity to study the dispersion of a tritium plume in the coastal zone of Lake Ontario. Current direction over the two-week period following the release was predominantly parallel to the shore, and elevated tritium concentrations were observed up to 20 km east and 85 km west of the PNGS. Predictions of the tritium plume movement were made using current velocity measurements taken at 8-m depth, 2.5 km offshore from Darlington and using a empirical relationship where alongshore current speed is assumed to be proportional to the alongshore component of the wind speed. The tritium migration was best described using current velocity measurements. The tritium plume dispersion is modelled using the one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation. Transport parameters are the alongshore current speed and longitudinal dispersion coefficient. Longitudinal dispersion coefficients, estimated by fitting the solution of the advection-dispersion equation to measured concentration distance profiles ranged from 3.75 to 10.57 m 2 s -1 . Simulations using the fitted values of the dispersion coefficient were able to describe maximum tritium concentrations measured at water supply plants located within 25 km of Pickering to within a factor of 3. The dispersion coefficient is a function of spatial and temporal variability in current velocity and the fitted dispersion coefficients estimated here may not be suitable for predicting tritium plume dispersion under different current conditions. The sensitivity of the dispersion coefficient to variability in current conditions should be evaluated in further field experiments. (author). 13 refs., 7 tabs., 12 figs

  3. Preliminary Tritium Management Design Activities at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Thomas J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Felde, David K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Logsdon, Randall J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McFarlane, Joanna [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Qualls, A. L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Interest in salt-cooled and salt-fueled reactors has increased over the last decade (Forsberg et al. 2016). Several private companies and universities in the United States, as well as governments in other countries, are developing salt reactor designs and/or technology. Two primary issues for the development and deployment of many salt reactor concepts are (1) the prevention of tritium generation and (2) the management of tritium to prevent release to the environment. In 2016, the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a research project under the Advanced Reactor Technology Program to (1) experimentally assess the feasibility of proposed methods for tritium mitigation and (2) to perform an engineering demonstration of the most promising methods. This document describes results from the first year’s efforts to define, design, and build an experimental apparatus to test potential methods for tritium management. These efforts are focused on producing a final design document as the basis for the apparatus and its scheduled completion consistent with available budget and approvals for facility use.

  4. Controlled release of vanadium from titanium oxide coatings for improved integration of soft tissue implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrell, John D; Dolly, Brandon; Morgan, Jeffrey R

    2009-07-01

    This study evaluates the potential of titanium oxide coatings for short-term delivery of vanadium for improved wound healing around implants. Titanium and vanadium oxides are bioactive agents that elicit different bioresponses in cells, ranging from implant integration and reduction of inflammation to modulation of cell proliferation and morphology. These oxides were combined in biomaterial coatings using metal-organic precursors and rapidly screened in cell-culture microplates to establish how vanadium-loading influences cell proliferation and morphology. Twenty-eight-day elution studies indicated that there was a controlled release of vanadium from stable titanium oxide matrices. Elution profiles were mathematically modeled for vanadium loading of 20-1.25% up to a period of 28 days. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy of the coatings indicated that the vanadium was present as a nanoscale dispersion and not segregated micron-scale islands. The study confirmed that the observed bioresponse of cells was modulated by the soluble release of vanadium into the surrounding medium. Controlled release of vanadium from titania coatings may be used to influence soft-tissue integration of implants by modulating cell proliferation, attachment, inflammation, and wound healing dynamics.

  5. A model for the release of low-volatility fission products in oxidizing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, D.S.; Hunt, C.E.L.; Liu, Z.; Keller, N.A.; Barrand, R.D.; O'Connor, R.F.

    1991-07-01

    A thermodynamic and kinetic model has been developed for calculating low-volatility fission-product releases from UO 2 at high temperatures in oxidizing conditions. Volatilization of the UO 2 matrix is assumed to be the rate controlling process. Oxidation kinetics of the UO 2 are modelled by either interfacial rate control, gas phase oxidant transport control, or solid-state diffusion of oxygen. The vapour pressure of UO 3 in equilibrium with the oxidizing fuel is calculated from thermodynamic data, and volatilization rates are determined using a model for forced convective mass transport. Low-volatility fission-product releases are calculated from the volume of vapourized fuel. Model calculations are conservative compared to experimental data for Zr, La, Ce and Nb fission-product releases from irradiated UO 2 exposed to air at 1973-2350 K. The implications of this conservatism are discussed in terms of possible rate control by processes other than convective mass transport of UO 3 . Coefficients for effective surface area (based on experimental data) and for heterogeneous rate controlling reaction kinetics are introduced to facilitate agreement between calculations and the experimental data.

  6. Monsanto Mound Laboratory tritium waste control technology development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bixel, J.C.; Kershner, C.J.; Rhinehammer, T.B.

    1975-01-01

    Over the past four years, implementation of tritium waste control programs has resulted in a 30-fold reduction in the gaseous tritium effluents from Mound Laboratory. However, to reduce tritium waste levels to the ''as low as practicable'' guideline poses problems that are beyond ready solution with state-of-the-art tritium control technology. To meet this advanced technology need, a tritium waste control technology program was initiated. Although the initial thrust of the work under this program was oriented toward development of gaseous effluent treatment systems, its natural evolution has been toward the liquid waste problem. It is thought that, of all the possible approaches to disposal of tritiated liquid wastes, recovery offers the greatest advantages. End products of the recovery processes would be water detritiated to a level below the Radioactivity Concentration Guide (RCG) or detritiated to a level that would permit safe recycle in a closed loop operation and enriched tritium. The detritiated water effluent could be either recycled in a closed loop operation such as in a fuel reprocessing plant or safely released to the biosphere, and the recovered tritium could be recycled for use in fusion reactor studies or other applications

  7. Monsanto/Mound Laboratory tritium waste control technology development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bixel, J.C.; Kershner, C.J.; Rhinehammer, T.B.

    1975-01-01

    Over the past four years, implementation of tritium waste control programs has resulted in a 30-fold reduction in the gaseous tritium effluents from Mound Laboratory. However, to reduce tritium waste levels to the ''as low as practicable'' guideline poses problems that are beyond ready solution with state-of-the-art tritium control technology. To meet this advanced technology need, a tritium waste control technology program was initiated. Although the initial thrust of the work under this program was oriented toward development of gaseous effluent treatment systems, its natural evolution has been toward the liquid waste problem. We contend that, of all the possible approaches to disposal of tritiated liquid wastes, recovery offers the greatest advantages. End products of the recovery processes would be: (1) water detritiated to a level below the Radioactivity Concentration Guide or detritiated to a level that would permit safe recycle in a closed loop operation and, (2) enriched tritium. The detritiated water effluent could be either recycled in a closed loop operation such as in a fuel reprocessing plant or safely released to the biosphere, and the recovered tritium could be recycled for use in fusion reactor studies or other applications

  8. Accelerator Production of Tritium Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Input Submittal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, L.A.; Greene, G.A.; Boyack, B.E.

    1996-02-01

    The Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Tritium Supply and Recycling considers several methods for the production of tritium. One of these methods is the Accelerator Production of Tritium. This report summarizes the design characteristics of APT including the accelerator, target/blanket, tritium extraction facility, and the balance of plant. Two spallation targets are considered: (1) a tungsten neutron-source target and (2) a lead neutron-source target. In the tungsten target concept, the neutrons are captured by the circulating He-3, thus producing tritium; in the lead target concept, the tritium is produced by neutron capture by Li-6 in a surrounding lithium-aluminum blanket. This report also provides information to support the PEIS including construction and operational resource needs, waste generation, and potential routine and accidental releases of radioactive material. The focus of the report is on the impacts of a facility that will produce 3/8th of the baseline goal of tritium. However, some information is provided on the impacts of APT facilities that would produce smaller quantities

  9. Comparison of inventory of tritium in various ceramic breeder blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, M.; Beloglazov, S.; Nakashima, N.; Hashimoto, K.; Enoeda, M.

    2002-01-01

    It has been pointed out by the present authors that it is essential to understand such mass transfer steps as diffusion of tritium in the grain of breeder material, absorption of water vapor into bulk of the grain, and adsorption of water on surface of the grain, together with the isotope exchange reaction between hydrogen in purge gas and tritium on surface of breeder material and the isotope exchange reaction between water vapor in purge gas and tritium on surface, for estimation of the tritium inventory in a uniform ceramic breeder blanket under the steady-state condition. It has been also pointed out by the present authors that the water formation reaction on the surface of ceramic breeder materials at introduction of hydrogen can give effect on behavior of bred tritium and lithium transfer in blanket. The tritium inventory for various ceramic breeder blankets are compared in this study basing on adsorption capacity, absorption capacity, isotope exchange capacity, and isotope exchange reactions on the Li 2 O, LiAlO 2 , Li 2 ZrO 3 , Li 4 SiO 4 and Li 2 TiO 3 surface experimentally obtained by the present authors. Effect of each mass transfer steps on the shape of release curve of bred tritium at change of the operational conditions is also discussed from the observation at out pile experiment in KUR. (orig.)

  10. Environmental Aspects of Tritium Around the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miljevic, N.; Sipka, V.

    1995-01-01

    An overview of environmental distribution of tritium around the Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca during the period 1988-1994 is presented. Temporal and local variations of the specific tritium variations in precipitation (Usek, Zeleno Brdo), river waters (the Danube, the Sava and Mlaka Creek) as well as atmospheric water vapor are given. Estimates based on precipitation measurements have shown that 6.3 TBq of tritium activity should be released annually into the atmosphere from the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences. (author)

  11. ARIES-I tritium system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sze, D.K.; Tam, S.W.; Billone, M.C.; Hassanein, A.M.; Martin, R.

    1990-09-01

    A key safety concern in a D-T fusion reactor is the tritium inventory. There are three components in a fusion reactor with potentially large inventories, i.e., the blanket, the fuel processing system and the plasma facing components. The ARIES team selected the material combinations, decided the operating conditions and refined the processing systems, with the aiming of minimizing the tritium inventories and leakage. The total tritium inventory for the ARIES-I reactor is only 700 g. This paper discussed the calculations and assumptions we made for the low tritium inventory. We also addressed the uncertainties about the tritium inventory. 13 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Incorporation of zinc oxide to dispersions of biopolymers and release of the metallic ion in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreto, Marina S.R.; Ferreira, Willian H.; Andrade, Cristina T.

    2015-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles, obtained from a commercial product, were dispersed in different biopolymers, to be added to piglet feeds. The resulting products, prepared with sodium alginate (SA), chitosan (CH) and low methoxyl pectin (LMP) were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The release of Zn 2+ was investigated under simulated conditions of the gastrointestinal tract of piglets, and analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AA). The results showed that the structural factors, which have influence on the biopolymer/ZnO interactions, govern the behavior of Zn 2+ release. (author)

  13. Tritium contamination experience in an operational D-T fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, C.A.; Ascione, G. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Anderson, J.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    During December 1993, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) injected a mixture of deuterium and tritium in the TFTR vacuum vessel for the purpose of creating D-T plasmas. The tritium used in these D-T plasmas was stored, delivered and processed in the TFTR tritium facility that includes the tritium vault, waste handling area, clean-up area, and gas holding tank room. During this time period, several components in the tritium process system were found to have tritium leaks which led to tritium deposition on process skids, components and floor area. Radiological surveys of surfaces contaminated with tritium oxide indicate a decrease in surface contamination in time (on the order of 12 to 36 hours) as the result of room ventilation. In instances where the facility HVAC system was maintained in the purge mode, a dramatic decrease in surface contamination was observed. Areas contaminated with tritium oxide (> 16.6 Bq/100 cm{sup 2}) were found to be clean (< 16.6 Bq/100 cm{sub 2}) after several hours of continuous purging by the facility HVAC system. In instances where relative humidity was not decreased, the tritium surface contamination was found to be attenuated. During the months of December 1993, January and February 1994 tritium leaking components were either replaced, redesigned or repaired. During this time period, data were collected in the form of contamination surveys, real time tritium monitor output, and HVAC configuration indicating the correlation of purge ventilation leading to a decrease in tritium oxide surface contamination.

  14. Tritium contamination experience in an operational D-T fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, C.A. [Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Anderson, J.L. [Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)]|[Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ascione, G. [Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Carnevale, R.H. [Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Elwood, S. [Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Feury, T. [Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Grouss, J. [Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); LaMarche, P.H. [Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Rossmassler, R. [Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Rule, K. [Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Schobert, J. [Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Swanson, J. [Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)]|[Ebasco, Div. of Raytheon, 2 World Trade Center, New York, NY (United States); Tilson, C. [Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Watazychyn, J. [Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Walters, R.T. [Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Williams, S. [Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); TFTR Group

    1995-12-31

    During December 1993, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) injected a mixture of deuterium and tritium in the TFTR vacuum vessel for the purpose of creating D-T plasmas. The tritium used in these D-T plasmas was stored, delivered and processed in the TFTR tritium facility that includes the tritium vault, waste handling area, clean-up area, and gas holding tank room. During this time period, several components in the tritium process system were found to have tritium leaks which led to tritium deposition on process skids, components and floor area. Radiological surveys of surfaces contaminated with tritium oxide indicate a decrease in surface contamination in time (on the order of 12 to 36 hours) as the result of room ventilation. In instances where the facility HVAC system was maintained in the purge mode, a dramatic decrease in surface contamination was observed. Areas contaminated with tritium oxide (> 16.6 Bq/100 cm{sup 2}) were found to be clean (< 16.6 Bq/100 cm{sup 2}) after several hours of continuous purging by the facility HVAC system. In instances where relative humidity was not decreased, the tritium surface contamination was found to be attenuated. During the months of December 1993, January and February 1994 tritium leaking components were either replaced, redesigned or repaired. During this time period, data were collected in the form of contamination surveys, real time tritium monitor output, and HVAC configuration indicating the correlation of purge ventilation leading to a decrease in tritium oxide surface contamination. (orig.).

  15. Measurement of tritium in the Sava and Danube Rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahek, Željko; Breznik, Borut; Stojković, Ivana; Coha, Ivana; Nikolov, Jovana; Todorović, Nataša

    2016-10-01

    Two nuclear power plants (NPP), the KrškoNPP (Slovenia) on the Sava River and the Paks NPP (Hungary) on the Danube River, are located in the immediate vicinity of Croatia and Serbia. Some of the radioactivity monitoring around the NPPs involves measuring tritium activity in the waters of rivers and wells. The authors present the tritium measurement results taken over several years from the Sava and Danube Rivers, and groundwater. The measurements were carried out in two laboratories including an impact assessment of the tritium released into the rivers and groundwater. The routine methods for determining tritium (with/without electrolytic enrichment) were tested in two laboratories using two different instruments, a Tri-Carb 3180 and Quantulus 1220. Detection limits for routine measurements were calculated in compliance with ISO 11929 and Currie relations, and subsequently the results were compared with those determined experimentally. This has shown that tritium can be reliably determined within a reasonable period of time when its activity is close to the calculated detection limit. The Krško NPP discharged 62 TBq of tritium into the River Sava over a period of 6 years (23% of permitted activity, 45 TBq per year). The natural level of tritium in the Sava River and groundwater is 0.3-1 Bq/l and increases when discharges exceed 1 TBq per month. Usually, the average monthly activity in the Sava River and groundwater is maintained at a natural level. The maximum measured activity was 16 Bq/l in the Sava River and 9.5 Bq/l in groundwater directly linked to the river. In the majority of water samples from the Danube River, measured tritium activity ranged between 1 and 2 Bq/l. The increased tritium levels in the Danube River are more evident than in the Sava River because tritium activity above 1.5 Bq/l appears more frequently on the Danube River. All measured values were far below the allowed tritium limit in drinking water. Dose assessment has shown that

  16. Synthesis of hybrid inorganic/organic nitric oxide-releasing silica nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Alexis Wells

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an endogenously produced free radical involved in a number of physiological processes. Thus, much research has focused on developing scaffolds that store and deliver exogenous NO. Herein, the synthesis of N-diazeniumdiolate-modified silica nanoparticles of various physical and chemical properties for biomedical applications is presented. To further develop NO-releasing silica particles for antimicrobial applications, a reverse microemulsion synthesis was designed to achieve nanoparticles of distinct sizes and similar NO release characteristics. Decreasing scaffold size resulted in improved bactericidal activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Confocal microscopy revealed that the improved efficacy resulted from faster particle-bacterium association kinetics. To broaden the therapeutic potential of NO-releasing silica particles, strategies to tune NO release characteristics were evaluated. Initially, surface hydrophobicity and NO release kinetics were tuned by grafting hydrocarbon- and fluorocarbon-based silanes onto the surface of N-diazeniumdiolate-modified particles. The addition of fluorocarbons resulted in a 10x increase in the NO release half-life. The addition of short-chained hydrocarbons to the particle surface increased their stability in hydrophobic electrospun polyurethanes. Although NO release kinetics were longer than that of unmodified particles, durations were still limited to groups. O2-Methoxymethyl 1-(4-(3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl))piperazin-1-yl)diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (MOM-Pip/NO) was grafted onto mesoporous silica nanoparticles to yield scaffolds with an NO payload of 2.5 μmol NO/mg and an NO release half-life of 23 d. Doping the MOM-Pip/NO-modified particles into resin composites yielded antibacterial NO-releasing dental restorative materials. A 3-log reduction in viable adhered Streptococcus mutans was observed with the MOM-Pip/NO-doped composites compared to undoped controls. The greater chemical flexibility of

  17. Modeling tritium behavior in Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billone, M.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Fusion Power Program

    1998-03-01

    Lithium metazirconate (Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}) is a promising tritium breeder material for fusion reactors because of its excellent tritium release characteristics. In particular, for water-cooled breeding blankets (e.g., ITER), Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} is appealing from a design perspective because of its good tritium release at low operating temperatures. The steady-state and transient tritium release/retention database for Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} is reviewed, along with conventional diffusion and first-order surface desorption models which have been used to match the database. A first-order surface desorption model is recommended in the current work both for best-estimate and conservative (i.e., inventory upper-bound) predictions. Model parameters are determined and validated for both types of predictions, although emphasis is placed on conservative design predictions. The effects on tritium retention of ceramic microstructure, protium partial pressure in the purge gas and purge gas flow rate are discussed, along with other mechanisms for tritium retention which may not be dominant in the experiments, but may be important in blanket design analyses. The proposed tritium retention/release model can be incorporated into a transient thermal performance code to enable whole-blanket predictions of tritium retention/release during cyclic reactor operation. Parameters for the ITER driver breeding blanket are used to generate a numerical set of model predictions for steady-state operation. (author)

  18. [Oxidation of mercury by CuBr2 decomposition under controlled-release membrane catalysis condition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lin-Gang; Qu, Zan; Yan, Nai-Qiang; Guo, Yong-Fu; Xie, Jiang-Kun; Jia, Jin-Ping

    2014-02-01

    CuBr2 in the multi-porous ceramic membrane can release Br2 at high temperature, which was employed as the oxidant for Hg0 oxidation. Hg0 oxidation efficiency was studied by a membrane catalysis device. Meanwhile, a reaction and in situ monitoring device was designed to avoid the impact of Br2 on the downstream pipe. The result showed that the MnO(x)/alpha-Al2O3 catalysis membrane had a considerable "controlled-release" effect on Br2 produced by CuBr2 decomposition. The adsorption and reaction of Hg0 and Br2 on the surface of catalysis membrane obeyed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism. The removal efficiency of Hg0 increased with the rising of Br2 concentration. However, when Br2 reached a certain concentration, the removal efficiency was limited by adsorption rate and reaction rate of Hg0 and Br2 on the catalysis membrane. From 473 K to 573 K, the variation of Hg0 oxidation efficiency was relatively stable. SO2 in flue gas inhibited the oxidation of Hg0 while NO displayed no obvious effect.

  19. Tritium retention in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dylla, H.F.; Wilson, K.L. (eds.)

    1988-04-01

    This report discusses the materials physics related to D-T operation in TFTR. Research activities are described pertaining to basic studies of hydrogenic retention in graphite, hydrogen recycling phenomena, first-wall and limiter conditioning, surface analysis of TFTR first-wall components, and estimates of the tritium inventory.

  20. Stainless steel electrochemical behaviour - application to the decontamination of steel parts contaminated by tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellanger, G.

    1991-01-01

    This purpose of this work is the study of an electrochemical decontamination process of stainless steel in which tritium is present on the surface of the metal, in the oxide layer and in the metal. We have first investigated the behaviour of the oxide layer. Then we have studied the hydrogen evolution, its diffusion and retrodiffusion in the metal. The results are applied to the decontamination of steel parts contamined by tritium. Part of the tritium can be eliminated by reducing the oxyde layer, which contains large amounts of tritium. However, it is more beneficial to electrolyse at the potential at which the H + ions are reduced. The hydrogen on the steel surface enters in the metal and displaces most of tritium located in the metallic layers near the surface. The tritium surface elimination rate is about 95%. The tritium eliminated through electrolysis is only a small fraction of all the tritium contained in the metal. However, according to conservation experiments of parts after electrolysis, it can be concluded that hydrogen, probably more strongly bound than tritium to steel, forms near the surface a barrier that prevents tritium retrodiffusion. Electrolysis appears as a satisfactory process for the surface decontamination of slightly tritiated steel parts. A decontamination automaton based on the preceding results is described using a pad electrolyser. This type of decontamination is little polluting, and the parts can be recycled after the in situ treatment [fr

  1. Removal of tritium from gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieder, R.

    1976-01-01

    Tritium contained in the coolant gas in the primary circuit of a gas cooled nuclear reactor together with further tritium adsorbed on the graphite used as a moderator for the reactor is removed by introducing hydrogen or a hydrogen-containing compound, for example methane or ammonia, into the coolant gas. The addition of the hydrogen or hydrogen-containing compound to the coolant gas causes the adsorbed tritium to be released into the coolant gas and the tritium is then removed from the coolant gas by passing the mixture of coolant gas and hydrogen or hydrogen-containing compound through a gas purification plant before recirculating the coolant gas through the reactor. 14 claims, 1 drawing figure

  2. Assessment of tritium in the Savannah River Site environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlton, W.H.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Bauer, L.R. [and others

    1993-10-01

    This report is the first revision to a series of reports on radionuclides inn the SRS environment. Tritium was chosen as the first radionuclide in the series because the calculations used to assess the dose to the offsite population from SRS releases indicate that the dose due to tritium, through of small consequence, is one of the most important the radionuclides. This was recognized early in the site operation, and extensive measurements of tritium in the atmosphere, surface water, and ground water exist due to the effort of the Environmental Monitoring Section. In addition, research into the transport and fate of tritium in the environment has been supported at the SRS by both the local Department of Energy (DOE) Office and DOE`s Office of Health and Environmental Research.

  3. Tritium in the Savannah River estuary and adjacent marine waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, D.W.

    1979-01-01

    The tritium distribution in the Savannah River estuary and adjacent marine waters was measured to provide information on the dilution, mixing and movement of Savannah River water in this region. The Savannah River marine region was chosen because the average tritium concentration in this river is approximately 5 pCi/ml, whereas other rivers in the southeastern United States of America average less than 0.5 pCi/ml. The increased tritium concentration in the Savannah River is due to releases from the Savannah River Plant of the Department of Energy. Tritium measurements have proved particularly effective in estimating the flushing time of the Savannah River estuary (2.4 days) and in delineating the relative contribution to the water masses in Ossabaw and Port Royal Sounds from the river and from sea-water. Ossabaw and Port Royal Sounds are located approximately 20 km south and north of the Savannah River estuary respectively. (author)

  4. Evaluation model and experimental validation of tritium in agricultural plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hee Suk; Keum, Dong Kwon; Lee, Han Soo; Jun, In; Choi, Yong Ho; Lee, Chang Woo [KAERI, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-12-15

    This paper describes a compartment dynamic model for evaluating the contamination level of tritium in agricultural plants exposed by accidentally released tritium. The present model uses a time dependent growth equation of plant so that it can predict the effect of growth stage of plant during the exposure time. The model including atmosphere, soil and plant compartments is described by a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations, and is able to predict time-dependent concentrations of tritium in the compartments. To validate the model, a series of exposure experiments of HTO vapor on Chinese cabbage and radish was carried out at the different growth stage of each plant. At the end of exposure, the tissue free water(TFWT) and the organically bound tritium (OBT) were measured. The measured concentrations were agreed well with model predictions.

  5. Tritium Systems Test Assembly: design for major device fabrication review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.L.; Sherman, R.H.

    1977-06-01

    This document has been prepared for the Major Device Fabrication Review for the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA). The TSTA is dedicated to the development, demonstration, and interfacing of technologies related to the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle for fusion reactor systems. The principal objectives for TSTA are: (a) demonstrate the fuel cycle for fusion reactor systems; (b) develop test and qualify equipment for tritium service in the fusion program; (c) develop and test environmental and personnel protective systems; (d) evaluate long-term reliability of components; (e) demonstrate long-term safe handling of tritium with no major releases or incidents; and (f) investigate and evaluate the response of the fuel cycle and environmental packages to normal, off-normal, and emergency situations. This document presents the current status of a conceptual design and cost estimate for TSTA. The total cost to design, construct, and operate TSTA through FY-1981 is estimated to be approximately $12.2 M

  6. Environmental tritium transport model. Application to the dose evaluation for members of the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A model of tritium dispersion and cycling in terrestial ecosystems surrounding an atmospheric source of tritium is presented. The model structure is described. Results of simulations of three release cases are used to illustrate the dynamics of the model. The three cases are: a release of 100% TH, a release of 100% THO, and a release of 50% TH and 50% THO. The TH release is characterized by having a lower total retention of tritium in the ecosystem than the THO case. However, a greater fraction (but lower absolute amount) of the tritium in the TH release is found in the organic component of vegetation and the animals that feed on the vegetation. 24 references, 1 table

  7. Nanographene oxide as a switch for CW/pulsed NIR laser triggered drug release from liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Abhishek; Kim, Manse; Ryu, Jooyeon; Son, Joon-Gon; Lee, Eunji; Noh, Do Young; Tae, Giyoong

    2018-01-01

    The application of pulsed and continuous wave (CW) lasers in nanomedicine has increased significantly over the last decade. Near infrared (NIR) lasers can be used for the precise control of drug release at the target site in a non-invasive manner. In this study, we have prepared nanographene oxide (nGO, size ~40nm) integrated liposomes (size ~900nm). The nGOs were not simply adsorbed onto the liposome surface but was embedded inside the liposomes as characterized by cryo-TEM, selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and fluorescence quenching studies. The embedded nGOs could act as a molecular switch for NIR light controlled drug release from the liposomes. Calcein was encapsulated into the liposome as a model drug to evaluate the efficiency of light controlled release. An on-demand pulsatile drug release was achieved by irradiation of CW/pulsed NIR lasers into the nGO-liposome suspension. Triggering with a pulsed laser resulted in larger release of calcein with a minimal temperature increase (~2°C) of the liposome solution, compared to lower release rate and a significant temperature increase (~8°C) by a CW laser with the same light energy, suggesting two separate mechanisms and different potential applications depending on the laser type. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Release of free amino acids upon oxidation of peptides and proteins by hydroxyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fobang; Lai, Senchao; Tong, Haijie; Lakey, Pascale S J; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Weller, Michael G; Pöschl, Ulrich; Kampf, Christopher J

    2017-03-01

    Hydroxyl radical-induced oxidation of proteins and peptides can lead to the cleavage of the peptide, leading to a release of fragments. Here, we used high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) and pre-column online ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA) derivatization-based amino acid analysis by HPLC with diode array detection and fluorescence detection to identify and quantify free amino acids released upon oxidation of proteins and peptides by hydroxyl radicals. Bovine serum albumin (BSA), ovalbumin (OVA) as model proteins, and synthetic tripeptides (comprised of varying compositions of the amino acids Gly, Ala, Ser, and Met) were used for reactions with hydroxyl radicals, which were generated by the Fenton reaction of iron ions and hydrogen peroxide. The molar yields of free glycine, aspartic acid, asparagine, and alanine per peptide or protein varied between 4 and 55%. For protein oxidation reactions, the molar yields of Gly (∼32-55% for BSA, ∼10-21% for OVA) were substantially higher than those for the other identified amino acids (∼5-12% for BSA, ∼4-6% for OVA). Upon oxidation of tripeptides with Gly in C-terminal, mid-chain, or N-terminal positions, Gly was preferentially released when it was located at the C-terminal site. Overall, we observe evidence for a site-selective formation of free amino acids in the OH radical-induced oxidation of peptides and proteins, which may be due to a reaction pathway involving nitrogen-centered radicals.

  9. Nitric oxide-releasing polyacrylonitrile disperses biofilms formed by wound-relevant pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, M; Kasper, S H; Canfield, M J; Diaz-Morales, R R; Hrabie, J A; Cady, N C; Strickland, A D

    2016-04-01

    To test the antimicrobial and antibiofilm properties of a nitric oxide (NO)-releasing polymer against wound-relevant bacterial pathogens. Using a variety of 96-well plate assay systems that include standard well plates and the minimum biofilm eradication concentration biofilm assay well plate, a NO-releasing polymer based on (poly)acrylonitrile (PAN/NO) was studied for antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity against the common wound pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1), Staphylococcus aureus (Mu50) and Enterococcus faecalis (V583). The polymer was capable of dispersing single-species biofilms of Ps. aeruginosa as well as a more clinically relevant multispecies biofilm that incorporates Ps. aeruginosa along with Staph. aureus and Ent. faecalis. PAN/NO also synergistically enhanced the susceptibility of the multispecies biofilms to the common broad-spectrum antibiotic, ciprofloxacin. Multiple in vitro biocompatibility assays show that PAN/NO has limited potential for mammalian cytotoxicity. This study demonstrates the feasibility of utilizing the NO-releasing polymer, PAN/NO, to manage biofilms formed by wound-relevant pathogens, and provides proof-of-concept for use of this NO-releasing polymer platform across multiple disciplines where bacterial biofilms pose significant problems. In the clinical sector, bacterial biofilms represent a substantial treatment challenge for health care professionals and are widely recognized as a key factor in prolonging patient morbidity. This study highlights the potential role for the ubiquitous signalling molecule nitric oxide (NO) as an antibiofilm therapy. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Nitric oxide does not mediate promotion of cellular potassium release by phenolphthalein in COS-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Robert W; Hopp, Laszlo; Lloyd, John B

    2004-04-01

    1. It has been proposed that phenolphthalein exerts its laxative effect via an intracellular cascade that begins with the activation of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and ends with an inhibition of NaCl and water reabsorption from the colon. Phenolphthalein also promotes the release of potassium from cells, but it is not known how this is related to its effect on sodium and water uptake. 2. An established in vitro system was used to examine the role of nitric oxide (NO) in phenolphthalein-induced release of (86)Rb(+) from COS-7 cells. 3. Sodium nitroprusside, an NOS-independent NO source, was unable to mimic the effects of phenolphthalein and N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, an NOS inhibitor, was unable to block the effect of phenolphthalein. 4. It is concluded that NO generation is not required for phenolphthalein-stimulated potassium release. It is proposed that the effect of phenolphthalein on cellular potassium release is mechanistically distinct from the effect on NaCl and water uptake by colonocytes.

  11. Desorption of tritium and helium from high dose neutron irradiated beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupriyanov, I. B.; Nikolaev, G. N.; Vlasov, V. V.; Kovalev, A. M.; Chakin, V. P.

    2007-08-01

    The effect of high dose neutron irradiation on tritium and helium desorption in beryllium is described. Beryllium samples were irradiated in the SM and BOR-60 reactors to a neutron fluences ( E > 0.1 MeV) of (5-16) × 10 22 cm -2 at 70-100 °C and 380-420 °C. A mass-spectrometry technique was used in out of pile tritium release experiments during stepped annealing in the 250-1300 °C temperature range. The total amount of helium accumulated in irradiated beryllium samples varied from 6000 to 7200 appm. The first signs of tritium and helium release were detected at temperature of 312-445 °C and 500-740 °C, respectively. It is shown that most tritium (˜82%) from sample irradiated at 70-100 °C releases in temperature range of 312-700 °C before the beginning of helium release (740 °C). In the case of beryllium sample irradiated at 380-420 °C, tritium release starts at a higher temperature ( Ts > Tann = 445 °C) and most of the tritium (˜99.8%) is released concurrently with helium which could be considered as evidence of co-existence of partial amounts of tritium and helium in common bubbles. Both the Be samples differ little in the upper temperatures of gas release: 745 and 775 °C for tritium; 1140 and 1160 °C for helium. Swelling of beryllium starts to play a key role in accelerating tritium release at Tann > 600 °C and in helium release - at Tann > 750 °C.

  12. Nitric oxide donors enhance the frequency dependence of dopamine release in nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Henrike; Threlfell, Sarah; Cragg, Stephanie J

    2011-08-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is critically involved in normal as well as maladaptive motivated behaviors including drug addiction. Whether the striatal neuromodulator nitric oxide (NO) influences DA release in NAc is unknown. We investigated whether exogenous NO modulates DA transmission in NAc core and how this interaction varies depending on the frequency of presynaptic activation. We detected DA with cyclic voltammetry at carbon-fiber microelectrodes in mouse NAc in slices following stimuli spanning a full range of DA neuron firing frequencies (1-100 Hz). NO donors 3-morpholinosydnonimine hydrochloride (SIN-1) or z-1-[N-(3-ammoniopropyl)-N-(n-propyl)amino]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (PAPA/NONOate) enhanced DA release with increasing stimulus frequency. This NO-mediated enhancement of frequency sensitivity of DA release was not prevented by inhibition of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), DA transporters, or large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels, and did not require glutamatergic or GABAergic input. However, experiments to identify whether frequency-dependent NO effects were mediated via changes in powerful acetylcholine-DA interactions revealed multiple components to NO modulation of DA release. In the presence of a nicotinic receptor antagonist (dihydro-β-erythroidine), NO donors increased DA release in a frequency-independent manner. These data suggest that NO in the NAc can modulate DA release through multiple GC-independent neuronal mechanisms whose net outcome varies depending on the activity in DA neurons and accumbal cholinergic interneurons. In the presence of accumbal acetylcholine, NO promotes the sensitivity of DA release to presynaptic activation, but with reduced acetylcholine input, NO will promote DA release in an activity-independent manner through a direct action on dopaminergic terminals.

  13. Measurements of tritium for radiological protection purposes in dial painting industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawant, J.V.; Rudran, Kamala; Pillai, K.C.

    1990-01-01

    Tritium is used as the active component in self-luminous paint. During dial painting process luminous paints releases tritium in air, causing air contamination. In the present paper results of a preliminary study on air monitoring and estimation of air samples in a local watch industry are given. (author). 5 refs., 2 t abs

  14. Issues on the management of tritium produced by nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besnus, F.; Philippe, M.

    2009-01-01

    As tritiated waste management in research or industrial nuclear installations raises the question of the relevance of modes of management of tritium-containing effluents and solid wastes, and then of the interest and means to reduce releases in the environment of this radio-isotope, the authors discuss these issues with respect to the effluent nature (liquid or gaseous), to the factors governing environmental impact of such a release, and to the efficiency of means which can be implemented to capture and confine tritium

  15. Tritium distribution on plasma facing graphite tiles of JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, T.; Sugiyama, K.; Masaki, K.; Gotoh, Y.; Tobita, K.; Miya, N.

    2003-01-01

    Tritium distributions on the graphite divertor tiles, the dome units and the baffle plates of JT-60U were successfully measured. Poloidally, the highest tritium level was found at the dome top tiles and the outer baffle plates, where the plasma did not hit directly. On the other hand, although the toroidal tritium profiles on each tiles appeared uniform, detailed profiles in full toroidal direction clearly showed a periodic variation corresponding to the position of the magnetic field coils, indicating the ripple loss of high energy tritons as suggested by the OFMC code. Finally, the temperature increase owing to the plasma heat load was found to release the once retained tritium. (author)

  16. Tritium system for compact high field devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roccella, M.; Bonizzoni, G.; Chiesa, P.; Ghezzi, F.; Nassi, M.; Pavesi, U.; Amedeo, P.; Boschetti, G.; Giffanti, F.; Moriggio, A.

    1988-01-01

    Some theoretical results and the current status of the work on a prototype plant for the Tritium cycle of compact high-field tokamaks (such as, Ignitor, CIT, etc.), using the SAES Getter St 707 getter material, are described in this report. The schematics and present status of the main subplants of the cycle are reported together with some experimental results demostrating the possibility of utilizing the St 707 material to purify the inert atmosphere of the glove-boxes and the secondary containment of the double-containment metal canalization which is to eventually house the various parts of the plant. Finally, as an example, the FTU machine, under construction at ENEA Frascati, has been taken as a reference, and theoretical evaluations are given for the inventory, permeation and release of the Tritium from the first wall and the thermal shieldes of such a tokamak

  17. Tritium removal by CO2 laser heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Kugel, H.; Mueller, D.

    1997-01-01

    Efficient techniques for rapid tritium removal will be necessary for ITER to meet its physics and engineering goals. One potential technique is transient surface heating by a scanning CO 2 or Nd:Yag laser that would release tritium without the severe engineering difficulties of bulk heating of the vessel. The authors have modeled the heat propagation into a surface layer and find that a multi-kW/cm 2 flux with an exposure time of order 10 ms is suitable to heat a 50 micron co-deposited layer to 1,000--2,000 degrees. Improved wall conditioning may be a significant side benefit. They identify remaining issues that need to be addressed experimentally

  18. Tritium removal by CO2 laser heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Kugel, H.; Mueller, D.

    1997-10-01

    Efficient techniques for rapid tritium removal will be necessary for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) to meet its physics and engineering goals. One potential technique is transient surface heating by a scanning CO 2 or Nd:YAG laser that would release tritium without the severe engineering difficulties of bulk heating of the vessel. The authors have modeled the heat propagation into a surface layer and find that a multi-kW/cm 2 flux with an exposure time of order 10 msec is suitable to heat a 50 micron co-deposited layer to 1,000--2,000 degrees. Improved wall conditioning may be a significant side benefit. They identify remaining issues that need to be addressed experimentally

  19. Design Considerations for Silica-Particle-Doped Nitric-Oxide-Releasing Polyurethane Glucose Biosensor Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Robert J; Schofield, Jonathon B; Walter, Shaylyn E; Malone-Povolny, Maggie J; Schoenfisch, Mark H

    2017-01-27

    Nitric oxide (NO)-releasing polymers have proven useful for improving the biocompatibility of in vivo glucose biosensors. Unfortunately, leaching of the NO donor from the polymer matrix remains a critical design flaw of NO-releasing membranes. Herein, a toolbox of NO-releasing silica nanoparticles (SNPs) was utilized to systematically evaluate SNP leaching from a diverse selection of biomedical-grade polyurethane sensor membranes. Glucose sensor analytical performance and NO-release kinetics from the sensor membranes were also evaluated as a function of particle and polyurethane (PU) chemistries. Particles modified with N-diazeniumdiolate NO donors were prone to leaching from PU membranes due to the zwitterionic nature of the NO donor modification. Leaching was minimized (formulation (HP-93A-100 PU), while particles with greater degrees of thiol modification did not leach from any of the PUs tested. A functional glucose sensor was developed using an optimized HP-93A-100 PU membrane doped with RSNO-modified SNPs as the outer, glucose diffusion-limiting layer. The realized sensor design responded linearly to physiological concentrations of glucose (minimum 1-21 mM) over 2 weeks incubation in PBS and released NO at >0.8 pmol cm -2 s -1 for up to 6 days with no detectable (<0.6%) particle leaching.

  20. Discharges of tritium to the environment from unrestricted use of consumer products containing this radionuclide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehner, G.

    1979-01-01

    Not only nuclear installations but also consumer products containing tritium are an important source of man-made tritium discharge to the environment. In the Federal Republic of Germany about the same tritium activity is annually added to consumer products as is released each year from all nuclear installations. The total tritium activity distributed may rise considerably if devices with Gaseous Tritium Light Sources (GTLS) are permitted for large-scale unrestricted use and consequently also for large-scale uncontrolled disposal. The tritium added to consumer products and, at least partly, finally discharged to the environment is converted to HTO and participates in the normal water cycle of the earth. Therefore it would be very desirable to know how much tritium is used worldwide for such purposes, and it is proposed that the competent national authorities should report to an international organization the amount of tritium in consumer products permitted for unrestricted use and disposal. Finally a review of the normal waste management of tritium in the Federal Republic of Germany is given, and doses that could result from incineration and pyrolysis of waste contaminated with tritium are assessed. (author)

  1. Environmental monitoring for tritium at tritium separation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varlam, C.; Stefanescu, I.; Steflea, D.; Lazar, R.E.

    2001-01-01

    The Cryogenic Pilot is an experimental project in the nuclear energy national research program, which has the aim of developing technologies for tritium and deuterium separation by cryogenic distillation. The experimental installation is located 15 km near the highest city of the area and 1 km near Olt River. An important chemical activity is developed in the area and the Experimental Cryogenic Pilot's, almost the entire neighborhood are chemical plants. It is necessary to emphasize this aspect because the sewerage system is connected with the other three chemical plants from the neighborhood. This is the reason that we progressively established elements of an environmental monitoring program well in advance of tritium operation in order to determine baseline levels. The first step was the tritium level monitoring in environmental water and waste water of industrial activity from neighborhood. In this work, a low background liquid scintillation is used to determine tritium activity concentration according to ISO 9698/1998. We measured drinking water, precipitation, river water, underground water and waste water. The tritium level was between 10 TU and 27 TU that indicates there is no source of tritium contamination in the neighborhood of Cryogenic Pilot. In order to determine baseline levels we decide to monitories monthly each location. In this paper a standard method is presented which it is used for tritium determination in water sample, the precautions needed in order to achieve reliable results, and the evolution of tritium level in different location near the Experimental Pilot Tritium and Deuterium Cryogenic Separation.(author)

  2. Tritium concentration monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shono, Kosuke.

    1991-01-01

    A device for measuring the concentration of tritium in gaseous wastes in a power plant and a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant is reduced in the size and improved in performance. The device of the present invention pressurizes a sampling gas and cools it to a dew point. Water content in the sampling gas cooled to the dew point is condensated and recovered to a fine tube-like water content recovering container. The concentration of the recovered condensates is measured by a tritium density analyzer. With such procedures, since the specimen is pressurized, the dew point can be elevated. Accordingly, the size of the cooling device can be decreased, enabling to contribute to the reduction of the size of the entire device. Further, since the water content recovering device is formed as a fine tube, the area of contact between the specimen gas and the liquid condensated water can be reduced. Accordingly, evaporation of the liquid condensates can be prevented. (I.S.)

  3. Experimental contamination and decontamination studies on JET remote handling tools and materials when exposed to tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tesini, A.

    1988-01-01

    Tests were performed to investigate the tritium release processes occuring when using Remote Handling tools on tritium contaminated INCONEL 600 material. Tritium surface contamination of these tools after operation on tritium contaminated material and following exposure to HTO was also investigated. One Remote Handling tool, in particular, was decontaminated using high temperature technique. Additional tests were performed to evaluate the degree of contamination of materials including INCONEL 600, Aluminium alloy, PVC rigid and Stainless steel 316 and 304 exposed to tritium gas and/or tritiated water. Exposure time and temperature of exposure, post exposure off-gassing time and tritium concentration were varied during the experiments. The effectiveness of various decontamination techniques on materials exposed for different periods of time was also assessed. (author)

  4. Considerations on techniques for improving tritium confinement in helium-cooled ceramic breeder blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuetterer, M.A.; Raepsaet, X.; Proust, E.; Leger, D.

    1994-01-01

    Tritium control issues such as the development of permeation barriers and the choice of the coolant and purge-gas chemistry are of crucial importance for solid breeder blankets. In order to quantify these problems for the helium-cooled ceramic breeder-inside-tube (BIT) blanket concept, the tritium leakage into the coolant was evaluated and the consequent tritium losses into the steam circuit were determined. The results indicate that under certain specified conditions the total tritium release from the coolant can be limited to approximately 10 Ci/d, but only on the assumption that experimental data for tritium permeation barriers can be attained under realistic operating conditions. An experimental study on the impact of the gas chemistry on tritium losses is proposed. (author) 8 refs.; 2 figs

  5. Distribution of tritium in water vapour and precipitation around Wolsung nuclear power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Jung-Seok; Lee, Sang-Kuk; Kim, Yongjae; Lee, Jung-Min; Cho, Heung-Joon; Cho, Yong-Woo; Yun, Ju-Yong

    2011-07-01

    The distribution of tritium in water vapour and precipitation with discharge of tritiated water vapour and meteorological factors was studied around the Wolsung nuclear power plant (NPP) site during the period 2004-2008. The tritium concentrations in atmospheric water vapour and precipitation had a temporal variation with relatively high values in the early summer. Spatial distribution of tritium concentrations was affected by various factors such as distance from the NPP site, wind direction, tritium discharge into the atmosphere and atmospheric dispersion factor. The annual mean concentrations of atmospheric HTO and precipitation were correlated with the amount of gaseous tritium released from the Wolsung NPP. The tritium concentrations in precipitation decrease exponentially with an increase of the distance from the Wolsung NPP site.

  6. Improvement in energy release properties of boron-based propellant by oxidant coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Daolun; Liu, Jianzhong, E-mail: jzliu@zju.edu.cn; Chen, Binghong; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-08-20

    Highlights: • NH{sub 4}ClO{sub 4}, KNO{sub 3}, KClO{sub 4} and HMX coated B were used to prepare propellant samples. • FTIR, XRD and SEM were used for the microstructure analysis of the prepared B. • Thermal oxidation and combustion characteristics of the propellants were studied. • HMX coating was the most beneficial to the energy release of the samples. - Abstract: The energy release properties of a propellant can be improved by coating boron (B) particles with oxidants. In the study, B was coated with four different oxidants, namely, NH{sub 4}ClO{sub 4}, KNO{sub 3}, LiClO{sub 4}, and cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX), and the corresponding propellant samples were prepared. First, the structural and morphological analyses of the pretreated B were carried out. Then, the thermal analysis and laser ignition experiments of the propellant samples were carried out. Coating with NH{sub 4}ClO{sub 4} showed a better performance than mechanical mixing with the same component. Coating with KNO{sub 3} efficiently improved the ignition characteristics of the samples. Coating with LiClO{sub 4} was the most beneficial in reducing the degree of difficulty of B oxidation. Coating with HMX was the most beneficial in the heat release of the samples. The KNO{sub 3}-coated sample had a very high combustion intensity in the beginning, but then it rapidly became weak. Large amounts of sparks were ejected during the combustion of the LiClO{sub 4}-coated sample. The HMX-coated sample had the longest self-sustaining combustion time (4332 ms) and the highest average combustion temperature (1163.92 °C).

  7. Tritium monitoring : present status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathnakaran, M.; Singh, A.N.

    1993-01-01

    The report summarizes the present status of techniques employed for the monitoring of tritium in water, air and other samples. A brief mention of the work done by numerous workers in the field, critical comments about the work and a fairly exhaustive list of references about the work done during the last 4 decades has been presented. On-line monitoring on real time basis in nuclear reactors is also discussed. (author). 83 refs., 10 refs., 2 tabs

  8. Effects of tritium in elastomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapp, P.E.

    1982-01-01

    Elastomers are used as flange gaskets in the piping system of the Savannah River Plant tritium facilities. A number of elastomers is being examined to identify those compounds more radiation-resistant than the currently specified Buna-N rubber and to study the mechanism of tritium radiation damage. Radiation resistance is evaluated by compression set tests on specimens exposed to about 1 atm tritium for several months. Initial results show that ethylene-propylene rubber and three fluoroelastomers are superior to Buna-N. Off-gassing measurements and autoradiography show that retained surface absorption of tritium varies by more than an order of magnitude among the different elastomer compounds. Therefore, tritium solubility and/or exchange may have a role in addition to that of chemical structure in the damage process. Ongoing studies of the mechanism of radiation damage include: (1) tritium absorption kinetics, (2) mass spectroscopy of radiolytic products, and (3) infrared spectroscopy

  9. Effects of tritium in elastomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapp, P.E.

    1982-01-01

    Elastomers are used as flange gaskets in the piping system of the Savannah River Plant tritium facilities. A number of elastomers is being examined to identify those compounds more radiation-resistant than the currently specified Buna-N rubber and to study the mechanism of tritium radiation damage. Radiation resistance is evaluated by compression set tests on specimens exposed to about 1 atm tritium for several months. Initial results show that ethylene-propylene rubber and three fluoroelastomers are superior to Buna-N. Off-gassing measurements and autoradiography show that retained surface absorption of tritium varies by more than an order of magnitude among the different elastomer compounds. Therefore, tritium solubility and/or exchange may have a role in addition to that of chemical structure in the damage process. Ongoing studies of the mechanism of radiation damage include: (1) tritium absorption kinetics, (2) mass spectroscopy of radiolytic products, and (3) infrared spectroscopy.

  10. substantiation of the standards for tritium amino acids intake by human organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhesko, T.V.; Balonov, M.I.

    1984-01-01

    Calculated values of β-irradiation tissue doses of bound tritium and tritium oxide absorbed by animals treated with different amino acids are given. The obtained dose values are compared with tritium water doses. The data obtained in animal studies are extrapolated to man in order to determine the dose equivalent to the incorporated 3 H-amino acids dose. It is assumed that the dose equivalent to 3 H-amino acids radiation is three times as high as the equivalent amount of tritium oxide. 9 mCi/yr is established as the maximum allowable blood intake of 3 H-amino acids. Due to their metabolic characteristics, air permissible concentrations of 3 H-amino acids and tritium oxide have approximately the same values. The value of 30 nCi/cm 2 is recommended as a standard for work clothing contamination with 3 H-amino acids

  11. Toxicity of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobson, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Among radionuclides of importance in atomic energy, 3 H has relatively low toxicity. The main health and environmental worry is the possibility that significant biological effects may follow from protracted exposure to low concentrations in water. To examine this possible hazard and measure toxicity at low tritium concentrations, chronic exposure studies were done on mice and monkeys. During vulnerable developmental periods animals were exposed to 3 HOH, and mice were exposed also to 60 Co gamma irradiation and energy-related chemical agents. The biological endpoint measured was the irreversible loss of female germ cells. Effects from tritium were observed at surprisingly low concentrations where 3 H was found more damaging than previously thought. Comparisons between tritium and gamma radiation showed the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) to be greater than 1 and to reach approximately 3 at very low exposures. For perspective, other comparisons were made: between radiation and chemical agents, which revealed parallels in action on germ cells, and between pre- and postnatal exposure, which warn of possible special hazard to the fetus from both classes of energy-related byproducts

  12. Antimicrobial and wound healing properties of nitric oxide-releasing xerogels and silica nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetrick, Evan M.

    Indwelling medical devices continue to be plagued by the body's response to foreign materials and the ever-present threat of microbial infection. Endogenously-produced nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to play beneficial roles in both wound healing and the body's defense against infection. To exploit NO's favorable properties for biomaterials applications, previous studies have detailed the synthesis of xerogel polymers and silica nanoparticles capable of storing and releasing NO via diazeniumdiolate NO-donors. Here, the ability of NO-releasing materials to reduce bacterial adhesion under flow conditions, modulate the foreign body response, and kill microbial pathogens is described. To more thoroughly characterize the antibacterial properties of NO-releasing xerogels, studies were conducted with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a parallel plate flow cell. Xerogels modified to release NO reduced bacterial adhesion in a flux-dependent manner, with a NO flux of ˜21 pmol·cm -2·s-1 inhibiting P. aeruginosa adhesion by 65% compared to controls. Fluorescent viability probes indicated that bacteria adhered to NO-releasing xerogels were killed within 7 h of adhesion. In terms of tissue biocompatibility, the foreign body response was studied in an animal model at the site of subcutaneous implants coated with NO-releasing xerogels. Implant-derived NO reduced capsule thickness and the chronic inflammatory response by 50 and 30%, respectively, compared to controls. Additionally, 77% more blood vessels were observed in proximity to NO-releasing implants after 1 week compared to controls. Along with their ability to reduce bacterial adhesion and mitigate the foreign body response, NO-releasing materials may prove useful for treating infections due to the broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties of NO. Recently, silica nanoparticles have been developed that release micromolar quantities of NO, and here the efficacy of such nanoparticles was examined against both planktonic and biofilm

  13. Effect of aging treatment on the in vitro nickel release from porous oxide layers on NiTi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, Z.; Fratila-Apachitei, L. E.; Apachitei, I.; Duszczyk, J.

    2013-06-01

    Despite the ability of creating porous oxide layers on nickel-titanium alloy (NiTi) surface for biofunctionalization, the use of plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) has raised concerns over the possible increased levels of Ni release. Therefore, the primary aim of this study was to investigate the effect of aging in boiling water on Ni release from porous NiTi surfaces that have been formed by the PEO process. Based on different oxidation conditions, e.g. electrolyte composition and electrical parameters, three kinds of oxide layers with various characteristics were prepared on NiTi substrate. The process was followed by aging in boiling water for different durations. The Ni release was assessed by immersion tests in phosphate buffer saline and the Ni concentration was measured using the flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The results showed that aging in boiling water can significantly reduce the Ni release from oxidized porous samples, given that the duration of the treatment is finely adjusted according to the parameters of the as-formed oxide layer. Surface examination of the samples before and after aging in boiling water suggested that such a treatment is non-destructive while improving the corrosion resistance of oxidized samples, as evidenced by potentiodynamic polarization tests. The results of this study indicate that water boiling may be a suitable post-treatment required to minimize Ni release from porous oxides produced on NiTi by PEO for biomedical applications.

  14. Lenghty reverse poly(butylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(butylene oxide) polymeric micelles and gels for sustained release of antifungal drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Ochoa, Edgar B; Villar-Alvarez, Eva M; Cambón, Adriana; Mistry, Dharmista; Llovo, José; Attwood, David; Barbosa, Silvia; Soltero, J F Armando; Taboada, Pablo

    2016-08-20

    In this work, we present a detailed study of the potential application of polymeric micelles and gels of four different reverse triblock poly(butylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(butylene oxide) copolymers (BOnEOmBOn, where n denotes the respective block lengths), specifically BO8EO90BO8, BO14EO378BO14, BO20EO411BO20 and BO21EO385BO21, as effective drug transport nanocarriers. In particular, we tested the use of this kind of polymeric nanostructures as reservoirs for the sustained delivery of the antifungals griseofulvin and fluconazole for oral and topical administration. Polymeric micelles and gels formed by these copolymers were shown to solubilize important amounts of these two drugs and to have a good stability in physiologically relevant conditions for oral or topical administration. These polymeric micellar nanocarriers were able to release drugs in a sustained manner, being the release rate slower as the copolymer chain hydrophobicity increased. Different sustained drug release profiles were observed depending on the medium conditions. Gel nanocarriers were shown to display longer sustained release rates than micellar formulations, with the existence of a pulsatile-like release mode under certain solution conditions as a result of their inner network structure. Certain bioadhesive properties were observed for the polymeric physical gels, being moderately tuned by the length and hydrophobicity of the polymeric chains. Furthermore, polymeric gels and micelles showed activity against the yeast Candida albicans and the mould demartophytes (Trichophyton rubrum and Microsporum canis) and, thus, may be useful for the treatment of different cutaneous fungal infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Tritium inventory tracking and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichenberg, T.W.; Klein, A.C.

    1990-01-01

    This investigation has identified a number of useful applications of the analysis of the tracking and management of the tritium inventory in the various subsystems and components in a DT fusion reactor system. Due to the large amounts of tritium that will need to be circulated within such a plant, and the hazards of dealing with the tritium an electricity generating utility may not wish to also be in the tritium production and supply business on a full time basis. Possible scenarios for system operation have been presented, including options with zero net increase in tritium inventory, annual maintenance and blanket replacement, rapid increases in tritium creation for the production of additional tritium supplies for new plant startup, and failures in certain system components. It has been found that the value of the tritium breeding ratio required to stabilize the storage inventory depends strongly on the value and nature of other system characteristics. The real operation of a DT fusion reactor power plant will include maintenance and blanket replacement shutdowns which will affect the operation of the tritium handling system. It was also found that only modest increases in the tritium breeding ratio are needed in order to produce sufficient extra tritium for the startup of new reactors in less than two years. Thus, the continuous operation of a reactor system with a high tritium breeding ratio in order to have sufficient supplies for other plants is not necessary. Lastly, the overall operation and reliability of the power plant is greatly affected by failures in the fuel cleanup and plasma exhaust systems

  16. Tritium removal and retention device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, R.F.; Durigon, D.D.

    1980-01-01

    A device is provided for removing and retaining tritium from a gaseous medium, and also a method of manufacturing the device. The device, consists of an inner core of zirconium alloy, preferably Zircaloy-4, and an outer adherent layer of nickel which acts as a selective and protective window for passage of tritium. The tritium then reacts with or is absorbed by the zirconium alloy, and is retained until such time as it is desirable to remove it during reprocessing. (auth)

  17. An overview of tritium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Kaihui; Huang Jinghua; Feng Kaiming

    2002-01-01

    The characteristics of three types of proposed tritium production facilities, fissile type, accelerator production tritium (APT), and fusion type, are presented. The fissile reactors, especially commercial light water reactor, use comparatively mature technology and are designed to meet current safety and environmental guidelines. Conversely, APT shows many advantages except its rather high cost, while fusion reactors appear to offer improved safety and environmental impact, in particular, tritium production based on the fusion-based neutron source. However, its cost keeps unknown

  18. Suppression of grasshopper sound production by nitric oxide-releasing neurons of the central complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinrich, Anja; Kunst, Michael; Wirmer, Andrea; Holstein, Gay R.

    2008-01-01

    The central complex of acridid grasshoppers integrates sensory information pertinent to reproduction-related acoustic communication. Activation of nitric oxide (NO)/cyclic GMP-signaling by injection of NO donors into the central complex of restrained Chorthippus biguttulus females suppresses muscarine-stimulated sound production. In contrast, sound production is released by aminoguanidine (AG)-mediated inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the central body, suggesting a basal release of NO that suppresses singing in this situation. Using anti-citrulline immunocytochemistry to detect recent NO production, subtypes of columnar neurons with somata located in the pars intercerebralis and tangential neurons with somata in the ventro-median protocerebrum were distinctly labeled. Their arborizations in the central body upper division overlap with expression patterns for NOS and with the site of injection where NO donors suppress sound production. Systemic application of AG increases the responsiveness of unrestrained females to male calling songs. Identical treatment with the NOS inhibitor that increased male song-stimulated sound production in females induced a marked reduction of citrulline accumulation in central complex columnar and tangential neurons. We conclude that behavioral situations that are unfavorable for sound production (like being restrained) activate NOS-expressing central body neurons to release NO and elevate the behavioral threshold for sound production in female grasshoppers. PMID:18574586

  19. Effect of hydrophobic paints coating for tritium reduction in concrete materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edao, Y.; Fukada, S.; Nishimura, Y.; Katayama, K.; Takeishi, T.; Hatano, Y.; Taguchi, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Effects of hydrophobic paint coating in tritium transport are investigated. ► Two kinds of paints, acrylic-silicon resin and epoxy resin are used. ► The hydrophobic paints are effective to reduce tritium permeation. ► The effect of tritium reduction of epoxy paint is higher than that of silicon. - Abstract: The effects of hydrophobic paint coating on a concrete material of cement paste on the tritium transport are investigated. The cement paste is coated with two kinds of paints, acrylic-silicon resin paint and epoxy resin paint. We investigated the amount of tritium trapped in the samples exposed to tritiated water vapor by means of sorption and release. It was found that both the hydrophobic paints could reduce effectively tritium permeation during 50 days exposure of tritiated water vapor. The effect of tritium reduction of the epoxy paint was higher than that of silicon while the amount of tritium trapped in the epoxy paint was larger than that of silicon due to difference of the structure. Based on an analysis of a diffusion model, the rate-determining step of tritium migration through cement paste coated with the paints is diffusion through the paints respectively. It was found that tritium was easy to penetrate through silicon because there were many pores or voids in the silicon comparatively. In the case of tritium released from the epoxy paint, it is considered that tritium diffusion in epoxy is slow due to retardation by isotope exchange reaction to water included in epoxy paint.

  20. Tritium-assisted fusion breeders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.; Miley, G.H.

    1983-08-01

    This report undertakes a preliminary assessment of the prospects of tritium-assisted D-D fuel cycle fusion breeders. Two well documented fusion power reactor designs - the STARFIRE (D-T fuel cycle) and the WILDCAT (Cat-D fuel cycle) tokamaks - are converted into fusion breeders by replacing the fusion electric blankets with 233 U producing fission suppressed blankets; changing the Cat-D fuel cycle mode of operation by one of the several tritium-assisted D-D-based modes of operation considered; adjusting the reactor power level; and modifying the resulting plant cost to account for the design changes. Three sources of tritium are considered for assisting the D-D fuel cycle: tritium produced in the blankets from lithium or from 3 He and tritium produced in the client fission reactors. The D-D-based fusion breeders using tritium assistance are found to be the most promising economically, especially the Tritium Catalyzed Deuterium mode of operation in which the 3 He exhausted from the plasma is converted, by neutron capture in the blanket, into tritium which is in turn fed back to the plasma. The number of fission reactors of equal thermal power supported by Tritium Catalyzed Deuterium fusion breeders is about 50% higher than that of D-T fusion breeders, and the profitability is found to be slightly lower than that of the D-T fusion breeders

  1. Tritium control in a helium cooled ceramic blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Dorner, S.

    1984-01-01

    A study is made of the conceptual design of a helium cooled, poloidal ceramic blanket with beryllium multiplier for NET. To maintain the tritium losses from the plant below 10 curie/d, a separate helium purge flow is required. In the case of a high pressure purge flow, tritium containment requires an oxidizing atmosphere in the purge flow region. The consequences of the resulting T 2 O partial pressure on Li 2 O are assessed. A purge flow at 1 bar does not require an oxidizing atmosphere. (author)

  2. Concept of a tritium extraction facility for a reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunaboylu, K.; Paulovic, M.; Ulrich, D.

    1991-01-01

    There are several alternatives for reducing the release of tritium to the environment originating from the wastewater of a reprocessing plant. Such alternatives, which are applicable for sites not located by the sea or by large rivers, are limited to either injection of tritiated wastewater into suitable deep geological formations, or final disposal into a deep underground repository after adequate treatment similar to other low and intermediate active waste. Removal of tritium from the wastewater by enrichment represents a further feasible option of the second alternative, which allows reduction of the huge volume of tritiated water to be treated before disposal. A significant volume reduction increases the safety of the subsequent steps such as transport, interim storage and final disposal of tritiated waste, furthermore, decreases the corresponding overall waste management cost. The projected Wackersdorf reprocessing plant has been considered as a reference for assessing the permitted tritium releases and other site characteristics. (orig.)

  3. Tritium Concentration in Agricultural Plants Exposed to Atmospheric HTO Vapor for Short-term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keum, Dong Kwon; Lee, Han Soo; Kang, Hee Seok; Jun, In; Choi, Young Ho; Lee, Chang Woo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Tritium (as HTO) released from nuclear facilities is readily absorbed into plants by photosynthesis, and changes into a constituent tritium of organic compounds by metabolism. The organically bound tritium (OBT) is generally non exchangeable and remains in the tissue of a plant after the time of harvesting. Thus, the tritium level in the agricultural plants following an accidental release is essential to estimate a human ingestion dose. In spite of many studies on the movement of the tritium through the environment, additional studies are still necessary to establish the validity of the tritium models that is essential for a confident model prediction. This paper describes a dynamic compartment model for evaluating the tritium level in an agricultural plant by an acutely released tritium and its comparison to the experimental results to test the predictive accuracy of the model. Experimental results include time-series TFWT and OBT concentrations in four different agricultural plants: rice, soybean, cabbage, and radish, exposed to HTO vapor at different growth stages.

  4. Source term development for tritium at the Sheffield disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKenzie, D.R.; Barletta, R.E.; Smalley, J.F.; Kempf, C.R.; Davis, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    The Sheffield low-level radioactive waste disposal site, which ceased operation in 1978, has been the focus of modeling efforts by the NRC for the purpose of predicting long-term site behavior. To provide the NRC with the information required for its modeling effort, a study to define the source term for tritium in eight trenches at the Sheffield site has been undertaken. Tritium is of special interest since significant concentrations of the isotope have been found in groundwater samples taken at the site and at locations outside the site boundary. Previous estimates of tritium site inventory at Sheffield are in wide disagreement. In this study, the tritium inventory in the eight trenches was estimated by reviewing the radioactive shipping records (RSRs) for waste buried in these trenches. It has been found that the tritium shipped for burial at the site was probably higher than previously estimated. In the eight trenches surveyed, which amount to roughly one half the total volume and activity buried at Sheffield, approximately 2350 Ci of tritium from non-fuel cycle sources were identified. The review of RSRs also formed the basis for obtaining waste package descriptions and for contacting large waste generators to obtain more detailed information regarding these waste packages. As a result of this review and the selected generator contacts, the non-fuel cycle tritium waste was categorized. The tritium releases from each of these waste categories were modeled. The results of this modeling effort are presented for each of the eight trenches selected. 3 references, 2 figures

  5. Long Term Tritium Trapping in TFTR and JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Gentile, C.A.; Young, K.M.; Coad, J.P.; Hogan, J.T.; Penzhorn, R.-D.; Bekris, N.

    2001-01-01

    Tritium retention in TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] and JET [Joint European Torus] shows striking similarities and contrasts. In TFTR, 5 g of tritium were injected into circular plasmas over a 3.5 year period, mostly by neutral-beam injection. In JET, 35 g were injected into divertor plasmas over a 6 month campaign, mostly by gas puffing. In TFTR, the bumper limiter provided a large source of eroded carbon and a major part of tritium was co-deposited on the limiter and vessel wall. Only a small area of the co-deposit flaked off. In JET, the wall is a net erosion area, and co-deposition occurs principally in shadowed parts of the inner divertor, with heavy flaking. In both machines, the initial tritium retention, after a change from deuterium [D] to tritium [T] gas puffing, is high and is due to isotope exchange with deuterium on plasma-facing surfaces (dynamic inventory). The contribution of co-deposition is lower but cumulative, and is revealed by including periods of D fueling that reversed the T/D isotope exchange. Ion beam analysis of flakes from TFTR showed an atomic D/C ratio of 0.13 on the plasma facing surface, 0.25 on the back surface and 0.11 in the bulk. Data from a JET divertor tile showed a larger D/C ratio with 46% C, 30% D, 20% H and 4% O. Deuterium, tritium, and beryllium profiles have been measured and show a thin less than 50 micron co-deposited layer. Flakes retrieved from the JET vacuum vessel exhibited a high tritium release rate of 2e10 Bq/month/g. BBQ modeling of the effect of lithium on retention in TFTR showed overlapping lithium and tritium implantation and a 1.3x increase in local T retention

  6. Grafting of graphene oxide with stimuli-responsive polymers by using ATRP for drug release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shenmin; Li Jingbo; Chen Yuhang; Chen Zhixin; Chen Chenxin; Li Yao; Cui Zhaowen; Zhang Di

    2012-01-01

    A thermo-responsive drug delivery system was reported based on grafting of stimuli-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPA) on the surface of graphene oxide (GO) via atom transfer radical polymerization. The successful synthesis of PNIPA attached on GO (GO–PNIPA) was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectrum, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscope, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy measurements. Control of drug release through the composite GO–PNIPA was performed by measuring the uptake and release of ibuprofen (IBU). It was found the delivery system demonstrated a much high IBU storage of 280 wt%, attributing to the formation of the hydrogen bonding between the polymers on the GO surface and IBU as well as the large number of internal cavities of the PNIPA chains. In vitro test of IBU release exhibited a narrow pronounced transition at around 22 °C, indicating an attractive thermo-sensitive release property of this delivery system. The strategy may pave the way for the use of GO in numerous applications, from drug delivery to thermally responsive micro- and nano-devices.

  7. Enhancement of nitric oxide release and hemocompatibility by surface chirality of D-tartaric acid grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Honghong; Wang, Ke; Fan, Yonghong; Pan, Xiaxin; Huang, Nan; Weng, Yajun

    2017-12-01

    Nitric Oxide (NO) generation from endogenous NO-donors catalyzed by diselenide modified biomaterials has been reported. Here we reported surface chirality by L-tartaric acid and D-tartaric acid grafting on the outermost showed a significant impact on diselenide modified biomaterials, which modulated protein adsorption, NO release and anti-platelet adhesion properties. D-tartaric acid grafted surface showed more blood protein adsorption than that of L-surfaces by QCM analysis, however, ELISA analysis disclosed less fibrinogen denatured on the D surfaces. Due to the surface ratio of selenium decreasing, NO release catalyzed by L-tartaric acid grafting on the outermost significantly decreased in comparison to that of only selenocystamine immobilized surfaces. While NO release catalyzed by D-tartaric acid grafting on the outermost didn't decrease and was similar with that of selenocystamine immobilized surfaces. Surface chirality combined with NO release had synergetic effects on platelet adhesion, and it showed the lowest number of platelets adhered on the D-tartaric acid grafted surfaces. Thus surface chirality from D-tartaric acid grafting enhanced hemocompatibility of the surface in this study. Our work provides new insights into engineering novel blood contacting biomaterials by taking into account surface chirality.

  8. Grafting of graphene oxide with stimuli-responsive polymers by using ATRP for drug release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Shenmin, E-mail: smzhu@sjtu.edu.cn; Li Jingbo; Chen Yuhang [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Electronic, Information and Electrical Engineering (China); Chen Zhixin [University of Wollongong, Faculty of Engineering (Australia); Chen Chenxin; Li Yao; Cui Zhaowen; Zhang Di, E-mail: zhangdi@sjtu.edu.cn [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Electronic, Information and Electrical Engineering (China)

    2012-09-15

    A thermo-responsive drug delivery system was reported based on grafting of stimuli-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPA) on the surface of graphene oxide (GO) via atom transfer radical polymerization. The successful synthesis of PNIPA attached on GO (GO-PNIPA) was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectrum, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscope, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy measurements. Control of drug release through the composite GO-PNIPA was performed by measuring the uptake and release of ibuprofen (IBU). It was found the delivery system demonstrated a much high IBU storage of 280 wt%, attributing to the formation of the hydrogen bonding between the polymers on the GO surface and IBU as well as the large number of internal cavities of the PNIPA chains. In vitro test of IBU release exhibited a narrow pronounced transition at around 22 Degree-Sign C, indicating an attractive thermo-sensitive release property of this delivery system. The strategy may pave the way for the use of GO in numerous applications, from drug delivery to thermally responsive micro- and nano-devices.

  9. Modelling irradiation by EM waves of multifunctionalized iron oxide nanoparticles and subsequent drug release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Feng; Calvayrac, Florent; Montembault, Véronique; Fontaine, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Thermal transport in the environment close to the periphery of the nanoparticle, from a few angstroms to less than a nanometer scale, is becoming increasingly important with the advent of several biomedical applications of multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles, including drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging, and hyperthermia therapy. We present a multiscale and multiphysics model of the irradiation by electromagnetic waves of radiofrequency of iron oxide nanoparticles functionalized by drug-releasing polymers used as new multifunctional therapeutic compounds against tumors. We compute ab initio the thermal conductivity of the polymer chains as a function of the length, model the unfolding of the polymer after heat transfer from the nanoparticle by molecular mechanics, and develop a multiscale thermodynamic and heat transfer model including the surrounding medium (water) in order to model the drug release. (paper)

  10. Nitric Oxide Release for Improving Performance of Implantable Chemical Sensors - A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Kyoung Ha; Wang, Xuewei; Meyerhoff, Mark E

    2017-12-01

    Over the last three decades, there has been extensive interest in developing in vivo chemical sensors that can provide real-time measurements of blood gases (oxygen, carbon dioxide, and pH), glucose/lactate, and potentially other critical care analytes in the blood of hospitalized patients. However, clot formation with intravascular sensors and foreign body response toward sensors implanted subcutaneously can cause inaccurate analytical results. Further, the risk of bacterial infection from any sensor implanted in the human body is another major concern. To solve these issues, the release of an endogenous gas molecule, nitric oxide (NO), from the surface of such sensors has been investigated owing to NO's ability to inhibit platelet activation/adhesion, foreign body response and bacterial growth. This paper summarizes the importance of NO's therapeutic potential for this application and reviews the publications to date that report on the analytical performance of NO release sensors in laboratory testing and/or during in vivo testing.

  11. Tritium stripping in a nitrogen glove box using palladium/zeolite and SAES St 198 trademark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klien, J.E.; Wermer, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    Glove box clean-up experiments were conducted in a nitrogen glove box using palladium deposited on zeolite (Pd/z) and a SAES St 198 trademark getter as tritium stripping materials. Protium/deuterium samples spiked with tritium were released into a 620 liter glove box to simulate tritium releases in a 10,500 liter glove box. The Pd/z and the SAES St 198 trademark stripper beds produced a reduction in tritium activity of approximately two to three orders of magnitude and glove box clean-up was limited by a persistent background tritium activity level. Attempts to significantly reduce the glove box activity to lower levels without purging were unsuccessful

  12. JET experiments with tritium and deuterium–tritium mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horton, L.; Batistoni, P.; Boyer, H.; Challis, C.; Ciric, D.; Donne, A. J. H.; Eriksson, L. G.; Garcia, J.; Garzotti, L.; Gee, S.; Hobirk, J.; Joffrin, E.; Jones, T.; King, D. B.; Knipe, S.; Litaudon, X.; Matthews, G. F.; Monakhov, I.; Murari, A.; Nunes, I.; Riccardo, V.; Sips, A. C. C.; Warren, R.; Weisen, H.; Zastrow, K. D.

    2016-01-01

    Extensive preparations are now underway for an experiment in the Joint European Torus (JET) using tritium and deuterium–tritium mixtures. The goals of this experiment are described as well as the progress that has been made in developing plasma operational scenarios and physics reference pulses for

  13. Evaluation of the effects of nitric oxide-releasing nanoparticles on plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, A. E. S.; Narciso, A. M.; Seabra, A. B.; Fraceto, L. F.

    2015-05-01

    Nowadays, there are several commercially available products containing nanostructured materials. Meanwhile, despite the many benefits that can be obtained from nanotechnology, it is still necessary to understand the mechanisms in which nanomaterials interact with the environment, and to obtain information concerning their possible toxic effects. In agriculture, nanotechnology has been used in different applications, such as nanosensors to detect pathogens, nanoparticles as controlled release systems for pesticides, and biofilms to deliver nutrients to plants and to protect food products against degradation. Moreover, plants can be used as models to study the toxicity of nanoparticles. Indeed, phytotoxicity assays are required to identify possible negative effects of nanostructured systems, prior to their implementation in agriculture. Nitric oxide (NO) plays a key role in plant growth and defense, and recently, several papers described the beneficial effects due to application of exogenous NO donors in plants. The tripeptide glutathione (GSH) is an important anti-oxidant molecule and is the precursor of the NO donor, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). In this context, the present work investigates the effects of different concentrations of alginate/chitosan nanoparticles, containing either GSH or GSNO, on the development of two test species (Zea mays and Glycine sp.). The results showed that the alginate/chitosan nanoparticles present a size average range from 300 to 550 nm with a polydispersity index of 0.35, and encapsulation efficiency of GSH between 45 - 56%. The NO release kinetics from the alginate/chitosan nanoparticles containing GSNO showed sustained and controlled NO release over several hours. Plant assays showed that at the concentrations tested (1, 5 and 10 mM of GSH or GSNO), polymeric nanoparticles showed no significant inhibitory effects on the development of the species Zea mays and Glycine sp., considering the variables shoot height, root length, and

  14. Evaluation of the effects of nitric oxide-releasing nanoparticles on plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, A E S; Fraceto, L F; Narciso, A M; Seabra, A B

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, there are several commercially available products containing nanostructured materials. Meanwhile, despite the many benefits that can be obtained from nanotechnology, it is still necessary to understand the mechanisms in which nanomaterials interact with the environment, and to obtain information concerning their possible toxic effects. In agriculture, nanotechnology has been used in different applications, such as nanosensors to detect pathogens, nanoparticles as controlled release systems for pesticides, and biofilms to deliver nutrients to plants and to protect food products against degradation. Moreover, plants can be used as models to study the toxicity of nanoparticles. Indeed, phytotoxicity assays are required to identify possible negative effects of nanostructured systems, prior to their implementation in agriculture. Nitric oxide (NO) plays a key role in plant growth and defense, and recently, several papers described the beneficial effects due to application of exogenous NO donors in plants. The tripeptide glutathione (GSH) is an important anti-oxidant molecule and is the precursor of the NO donor, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). In this context, the present work investigates the effects of different concentrations of alginate/chitosan nanoparticles, containing either GSH or GSNO, on the development of two test species (Zea mays and Glycine sp.). The results showed that the alginate/chitosan nanoparticles present a size average range from 300 to 550 nm with a polydispersity index of 0.35, and encapsulation efficiency of GSH between 45 - 56%. The NO release kinetics from the alginate/chitosan nanoparticles containing GSNO showed sustained and controlled NO release over several hours. Plant assays showed that at the concentrations tested (1, 5 and 10 mM of GSH or GSNO), polymeric nanoparticles showed no significant inhibitory effects on the development of the species Zea mays and Glycine sp., considering the variables shoot height, root length, and

  15. Review Paper: Role of Nitric Oxide on Dopamine Release and Morphine-Dependency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Arash Motahari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The catastrophic effects of opioids use on public health and the economy are documented clearly in numerous studies. Repeated morphine administration can lead to either a decrease (tolerance or an increase (sensitization in its behavioral and rewarding effects. Morphine-induced sensitization is a major problem and plays an important role in abuse of the opioid drugs. Studies reported that morphine may exert its effects by the release of nitric oxide (NO. NO is a potent neuromodulator, which is produced by nitric oxide synthase (NOS. However, the exact role of NO in the opioid-induced sensitization is unknown. In this study, we reviewed the role of NO on opioid-induced sensitization in 2 important, rewarding regions of the brain: nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmentum. In addition, we focused on the contribution of NO on opioid-induced sensitization in the limbic system.

  16. Tritium contaminated waste management at the tritium systems test assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalbert, R.A.; Carlson, R.V.

    1987-01-01

    The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos continues to move toward full operation of an integrated, full-sized, computer-controlled fusion fuel processing loop. Concurrent nonloop experiments further the development of advanced tritium technologies and handling methods. Since tritium operations began in June 1984, tritium contaminated wastes have been produced at TSTA that are roughly typical in kind and amount of those to be produced by tritium fueling operations at fusion reactors. Methods of managing these wastes are described, including information on some methods of decontamination so that equipment can be reused. Data are given on the kinds and amounts of wastes and the general level of contamination. Also included are data on environmental emissions and doses to personnel that have resulted from TSTA operations. Particular problems in waste managements are discussed

  17. Radiation risk analysis of tritium in PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Maochun; Wang Shimin

    1999-03-01

    Tritium is a common radionuclide in PWR nuclear power plant. In the normal operation conditions, its radiation risk to plant workers is the internal radiation exposure when tritium existing in air as HTO (hydrogen tritium oxide) is breathed in. As the HTO has the same physical and chemical characteristics as water, the main way that HTO entering the air is by evaporation. There are few opening systems in Nuclear Power Plant, the radiation risk of tritium mainly exists near the area of spent fuel pit and reactor pit. The highest possible radiation risk it may cause--the maximum concentration in air is the level when equilibrium is established between water and air phases for tritium. The author analyzed the relationship among the concentration of HTO in water, in air and the water temperature when equilibrium is established, the equilibrated HTO concentration in air increases with HTO concentration in water and water temperature. The analysis revealed that at 30 degree C, the equilibrated HTO concentration in air might reach 1 DAC (derived air concentration) when the HTO concentration in water is 28 GBq/m 3 . Owing to the operation of plant ventilation systems and the existence of moisture in the input air of the ventilation, the practical tritium concentration in air is much lower than its equilibrated levels, the radiation risk of tritium in PWR plant is quite limited. In 1997, Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant's practical monitoring result of the HTO concentration in the air of the nuclear island and the urine of workers supported this conclusion. Based on this analysis, some suggestions to the reduction of tritium radiation risk were made

  18. Tritium dynamics in soils and plants grown under three irrigation regimes at a tritium processing facility in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihok, S.; Wilk, M.; Lapp, A.; St-Amant, N.; Kwamena, N.-O.A.; Clark, I.D.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of tritium released from nuclear facilities as tritiated water (HTO) have been studied extensively with results incorporated into regulatory assessment models. These models typically estimate organically bound tritium (OBT) for calculating public dose as OBT itself is rarely measured. Higher than expected OBT/HTO ratios in plants and soils are an emerging issue that is not well understood. To support the improvement of models, an experimental garden was set up in 2012 at a tritium processing facility in Pembroke, Ontario to characterize the circumstances under which high OBT/HTO ratios may arise. Soils and plants were sampled weekly to coincide with detailed air and stack monitoring. The design included a plot of native grass/soil, contrasted with sod and vegetables grown in barrels with commercial topsoil under natural rain and either low or high tritium irrigation water. Air monitoring indicated that the plume was present infrequently at concentrations of up to about 100 Bq/m 3 (the garden was not in a major wind sector). Mean air concentrations during the day on workdays (HTO 10.3 Bq/m 3 , HT 5.8 Bq/m 3 ) were higher than at other times (0.7–2.6 Bq/m 3 ). Mean Tissue Free Water Tritium (TFWT) in plants and soils and OBT/HTO ratios were only very weakly or not at all correlated with releases on a weekly basis. TFWT was equal in soils and plants and in above and below ground parts of vegetables. OBT/HTO ratios in above ground parts of vegetables were above one when the main source of tritium was from high tritium irrigation water (1.5–1.8). Ratios were below one in below ground parts of vegetables when irrigated with high tritium water (0.4–0.6) and above one in vegetables rain-fed or irrigated with low tritium water (1.3–2.8). In contrast, OBT/HTO ratios were very high (9.0–13.5) when the source of tritium was mainly from the atmosphere. TFWT varied considerably through time as a result of SRBT's operations; OBT/HTO ratios showed no

  19. Derived Intervention Levels for Tritium Based on Food and Drug Administration Methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, A.

    1998-01-01

    In 1998, the FDA released it recommendations for age-dependent derived intervention levels for several radionuclides involved in nuclear accidents. One radionuclide that is not included in that document is tritium

  20. Functional poly(ε-caprolactone)/chitosan dressings with nitric oxide-releasing property improve wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Wang, He; Zhang, Jimin; Li, Xuemei; Wu, Yifan; Wei, Yongzhen; Ji, Shenglu; Kong, Deling; Zhao, Qiang

    2017-05-01

    Wound healing dressings are increasingly needed clinically due to the large number of skin damage annually. Nitric oxide (NO) plays a key role in promoting wound healing, thus biomaterials with NO-releasing property receive increasing attention as ideal wound dressing. In present study, we prepared a novel functional wound dressing by combining electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nonwoven mat with chitosan-based NO-releasing biomaterials (CS-NO). As-prepared PCL/CS-NO dressing released NO sustainably under the physiological conditions, which was controlled by the catalysis of β-galactosidase. In vivo wound healing characteristics were further evaluated on full-thickness cutaneous wounds in mice. Results showed that PCL/CS-NO wound dressings remarkably accelerated wound healing process through enhancing re-epithelialization and granulation formation and effectively improved the organization of regenerated tissues including epidermal-dermal junction, which could be ascribed to the pro-angiogenesis, immunomodulation, and enhanced collagen synthesis provided by the sustained release of NO. Therefore, PCL/CS-NO may be a promising candidate for wound dressings, especially for the chronic wound caused by the ischemia. Serious skin damage caused by trauma, surgery, burn or chronic disease has become one of the most serious clinical problems. Therefore, there is an increasing demand for ideal wound dressing that can improve wound healing. Due to the vital role of nitric oxide (NO), we developed a novel functional wound dressing by combining electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) mat with NO-releasing biomaterial (CS-NO). The sustained release of NO from PCL/CS-NO demonstrated positive effects on wound healing, including pro-angiogenesis, immunomodulation, and enhanced collagen synthesis. Hence, wound healing process was remarkably accelerated and the organization of regenerated tissues was effectively improved as well. Taken together, PCL/CS-NO dressing may be a promising

  1. Novel Nitric Oxide (NO)-Releasing Polymers and Their Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisbois, Elizabeth J.

    Two common factors that can cause complications with indwelling biomedical devices are thrombus and infection. Nitric oxide (NO) is known to be a potent inhibitor of platelet activation and adhesion. Healthy endothelial cells exhibit a NO flux into the bloodstream of 0.5˜4x10-10 mol cm -2 min-1. In addition, NO that is released within the sinus cavities and by neutrophils/macrophages functions as a potent natural antimicrobial agent. Therefore, polymer materials that release NO are expected to have similar anti-thrombotic and antimicrobial properties. In this dissertation work, two novel approaches to achieving long-term NO release from polymers were studied and evaluated for their potential biomedical applications. In the first approach, S-nitroso-N -acetypenicillamine (SNAP)-doped polymers were studied for potential hemocompatibility. The SNAP-doped Elast-eon E2As (block copolymer of poly(dimethylsiloxane) and polyurethane) creates an inexpensive polymer that can locally deliver physiologically relevant levels of NO (via thermal and photochemical reactions). SNAP was also found to be surprisingly stable in the E2As polymer during shelf-life stability and ethylene oxide sterilization studies. The SNAP/E2As polymer was coated on the inner walls of extracorporeal circulation (ECC) circuits and was found to preserve the platelet count at ˜100% of baseline and reduce thrombus area after 4 h blood flow in a rabbit model. The SNAP/E2As polymer was also used to fabricate NO-releasing catheters that were implanted in sheep veins for 7 d. The SNAP/E2As catheters significantly reduced the amount of thrombus and bacterial adhesion (in comparison to E2As control catheters). In the second approach, the NO release from diazeniumdiolated dibutylhexanediamine (DBHD/N2 O 2)-doped polymers was significantly improved using various poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) additives. Using acid-capped PLGA additives was found to cause high initial bursts of NO, while using an ester

  2. Tritium transport and control in the FED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    The tritium systems for the FED have three primary purposes. The first is to provide tritium and deuterium fuel for the reactor. This fuel can be new tritium or deuterium delivered to the plant site, or recycled DT from the reactor that must be processed before it can be recycled. The second purpose of the FED tritium systems is to provide state-of-the-art tritium handling to limit worker radiation exposure and to minimize tritium losses to the environment. The final major objective of the FED tritium systems is to provide an integrated system test of the tritium handling technology necessary to support the fusion reactor program. Every effort is being made to incorporate available information from the Tritium System Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) tritium systems, and the tritium handling information generated within DOE for the past 20 years

  3. Ontario Hydro diversifies into tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    A report is given on a plant which is to be built at the Darlington Candu reactor site in Canada for the extraction of tritium from heavy water. As tritium is used as a fuel in fusion research the market for it is expected to grow. The design of the system is outlined with the help of a flow diagram. (U.K.)

  4. The tritium operations experience on TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Halle, A.; Gentile, C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Anderson, J.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) tritium gas system is administratively limited to 5 grains of tritium and provides the feedstock gas for the neutral beam and torus injection systems. Tritium operations on TFTR began with leak checking of gas handling systems, qualification of the gas injection systems, and high power plasma operations using using trace amounts of tritium in deuterium feedstock gas. Full tritium operation commenced with four highly diagnosed neutral beam pulses into a beamline calorimeter to verify planned tritium beam operating routines and to demonstrate the deuterium to tritium beam isotope exchange. Since that time, TFTR has successfully operated each of the twelve neutral beam ion sources in tritium during hundreds of tritium beam pulses and torus gas injections. This paper describes- the TFTR tritium gas handling systems and TFTR tritium operations of the gas injection systems and the neutral beam ion sources. Tritium accounting and accountability is discussed, including tritium retention issues of the torus limiters and beam impinged surfaces of the beamline components. Also included is tritium beam velocity analysis that compares the neutral beam extracted ion species composition for deuterium and tritium and that determines the extent of beam isotope exchange on subsequent deuterium and tritium beam pulses. The required modifications to TFTR operating routines to meet the US Department of Energy regulations for a low hazard nuclear facility and the problems encountered during initial tritium operations are described.

  5. Tritium behaviour in higher plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenot, J.

    1984-05-01

    Vine grapes and potato seedlings have been exposed in situ to tritiated water vapor and 14 C labeled carbon dioxide. Leaves sampling was done during and after the exposition. Measurements allowed to distinguish the three forms of tritium in leaves, i.e. tissue free water tritium (TFWT) and organically bound tritium (OBT), in exchangeable position or not. The results lead to a description of the dynamical behaviour of tritium between these three compartments. It has been shown that 20% of organically bound hydrogen is readily exchangeable thus being in permanent isotopic equilibium with tissue free water. Moreover, the activity of nonexchangeable OBT appears to be strongly related to the organic 14 C, which shows that photosynthesis is responsible of tritium incorporation in organic nonexchangeable position, and occurs with a 20% discrimination in favor of protium. In contrast with the other two compartments, this fixation is almost irreversible, which is a fact of importance from a radiological point of view [fr

  6. Tritium metabolism in rat tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, H.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a series of studies designed to evaluate the relative radiotoxicity of various tritiated compounds, metabolism of tritium in rat tissues was studied after administration of tritiated water, leucine, thymidine, and glucose. The distribution and retention of tritium varied widely, depending on the chemical compound administered. Tritium introduced as tritiated water behaved essentially as body water and became uniformly distributed among the tissues. However, tritium administered as organic compounds resulted in relatively high incorporation into tissue constituents other than water, and its distribution differed among the various tissues. Moreover, the excretion rate of tritium from tissues was slower for tritiated organic compounds than for tritiated water. Administrationof tritiated organic compounds results in higher radiation doses to the tissues than does administration of tritiated water. Among the tritiated compounds examined, for equal radioactivity administered, leucine gave the highest radiation dose, followed in turn by thymidine, glucose, and water. (author)

  7. Toxin release in response to oxidative stress and programmed cell death in the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Cliff [Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce, 701 Seaway Drive, Ft. Pierce, FL 34949 (United States)]. E-mail: Ross@sms.si.edu; Santiago-Vazquez, Lory [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431 (United States); Paul, Valerie [Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce, 701 Seaway Drive, Ft. Pierce, FL 34949 (United States)

    2006-06-10

    An unprecedented bloom of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa Kuetz. occurred in the St. Lucie Estuary, FL in the summer of 2005. Samples were analyzed for toxicity by ELISA and by use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with specific oligonucleotide primers for the mcyB gene that has previously been correlated with the biosynthesis of toxic microcystins. Despite the fact that secreted toxin levels were relatively low in dense natural assemblages (3.5 {mu}g l{sup -1}), detectable toxin levels increased by 90% when M. aeruginosa was stressed by an increase in salinity, physical injury, application of the chemical herbicide paraquat, or UV irradiation. The application of the same stressors caused a three-fold increase in the production of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} when compared to non-stressed cells. The application of micromolar concentrations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induced programmed cell death (PCD) as measured by a caspase protease assay. Catalase was capable of inhibiting PCD, implicating H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as the inducing oxidative species. Our results indicate that physical stressors induce oxidative stress, which results in PCD and a concomitant release of toxin into the surrounding media. Remediation strategies that induce cellular stress should be approached with caution since these protocols are capable of releasing elevated levels of microcystins into the environment.

  8. Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors Protect Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells Against Oxidation by Modulating Nitric Oxide Release and Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano De Cillà

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: the anti-vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF, Aflibercept and Ranibizumab, are used for the treatment of macular degeneration. Here we examined the involvement of nitric oxide (NO, mitochondria function and of apoptosis/autophagy in their antioxidant effects in human retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE. Methods: RPE were exposed to Ranibizumab/Aflibercept in the absence or presence of NO synthase (NOS inhibitor and of autophagy activator/blocker, rapamicyn/3-methyladenine. Specific kits were used for cell viability, NO and reactive oxygen species detection and mitochondrial membrane potential measurement, whereas Western Blot was performed for apoptosis/ autophagy markers and other kinases detection. Results: In RPE cultured in physiological conditions, Aflibercept/Ranibizumab increased NO release in a dose and time-dependent way. Opposite results were obtained in RPE pretreated with hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, both the anti-VEGF agents were able to prevent the fall of cell viability and of mitochondrial membrane potential. Those effects were reduced by the NOS inhibitor and 3-methyladenine and were potentiated by rapamycin. Finally, Aflibercept and Ranibizumab counteracted the changes of apoptosis/autophagy markers, NOS, Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase/Protein Kinase B and Extracellular signal–regulated kinases 1/2 caused by peroxidation. Conclusion: Aflibercept and Ranibizumab protect RPE against peroxidation through the modulation of NO release, apoptosis and autophagy.

  9. Evaluation of environmental tritium level in the area of Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paunescu, N.; Cotarlea, M.; Galeriu, D.; Margineanu, R.; Mocanu, N.

    1997-01-01

    This work is a continuation of the study entitled E valuation of environmental tritium levels before and after start of a new tritium source for model verification' that commenced two years ago as part of an European research contract having as objective the 'Investigations and Modelling of the Dynamics of Environmental HT/HTO/OBT Levels Resulting from the Tritium Releases'. The aim of this study was to evaluate the environmental tritium level in pre-operational stage of Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant and the dynamics of variation of tritium concentration in the first operational years of NPP, for determination of site-specific transfer parameters and model validation. Representative samples for Cernavoda area were analyzed; - air humidity; - water from Danube River, Danube-Black Sea Canal and lakes; - drinking, rain and snow water; - HTO concentration in soils at different depths; - tissue free water tritium in vegetal and animal foodstuffs relevant for human diets like cereals (wheat, maize, barley). vegetables (potatoes, tomato, cabbage, onion, bean), grapes and wine. The mean concentration of tritium obtained in 1996 for these types of measurements is presented. The values of tritium concentration in air, water, soil and plants are as low as for areas without contaminating sources. The operation in 1996 of the Cernavoda NPP did not modify the tritium environmental level. (authors)

  10. Nitric oxide gas phase release in human small airway epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Vinod

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthma is a chronic airway inflammatory disease characterized by an imbalance in both Th1 and Th2 cytokines. Exhaled nitric oxide (NO is elevated in asthma, and is a potentially useful non-invasive marker of airway inflammation. However, the origin and underlying mechanisms of intersubject variability of exhaled NO are not yet fully understood. We have previously described NO gas phase release from normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBEs, tracheal origin. However, smaller airways are the major site of morbidity in asthma. We hypothesized that IL-13 or cytomix (IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFN-γ stimulation of differentiated small airway epithelial cells (SAECs, generation 10–12 and A549 cells (model cell line of alveolar type II cells in culture would enhance NO gas phase release. Methods Confluent monolayers of SAECs and A549 cells were cultured in Transwell plates and SAECs were allowed to differentiate into ciliated and mucus producing cells at an air-liquid interface. The cells were then stimulated with IL-13 (10 ng/mL or cytomix (10 ng/mL for each cytokine. Gas phase NO release in the headspace air over the cells was measured for 48 hours using a chemiluminescence analyzer. Results In contrast to our previous result in NHBE, baseline NO release from SAECs and A549 is negligible. However, NO release is significantly increased by cytomix (0.51 ± 0.18 and 0.29 ± 0.20 pl.s-1.cm-2, respectively reaching a peak at approximately 10 hours. iNOS protein expression increases in a consistent pattern both temporally and in magnitude. In contrast, IL-13 only modestly increases NO release in SAECs reaching a peak (0.06 ± 0.03 pl.s-1.cm-2 more slowly (30 to 48 hours, and does not alter NO release in A549 cells. Conclusion We conclude that the airway epithelium is a probable source of NO in the exhaled breath, and intersubject variability may be due, in part, to variability in the type (Th1 vs Th2 and location (large vs small airway

  11. Tritium recovery and separation from CTR plasma exhausts and secondary containment atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrester, R.C. III; Watson, J.S.

    1975-01-01

    Recent experimental successes have generated increased interest in the development of thermonuclear reactors as power sources for the future. This paper examines tritium containment problems posed by an operating CTR and sets forth some processing schemes currently being evaluated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. An appreciation of the CTR tritium management problem can best be realized by recalling that tritium production rates for various fission reactors range from 2 x 10 4 to 9 x 10 5 Ci/yr per 1000 MW(e). Present estimates of tritium production in a CTR blanket exceed 10 9 Ci/yr for the same level of power generation, and tritium process systems may handle 10 to 20 times that amount. Tritium's high permeability through most materials of construction at high temperatures makes secondary containment mandatory for most piping. Processing of these containment atmospheres will probably involve conversion of the tritium to a nonpermeating form (T 2 O) followed by trapping on conventional beds of desiccant material. In a similar fashion, all purge streams and process fluid vent gases will be subjected to tritium recovery prior to atmospheric release. Two tritium process systems will be required, one to recover tritium produced by breeding in the blanket and another to recover unburned tritium in the plasma exhaust. Plasma exhaust processing will be unconventional since the exhaust gas pressure will lie between 10 -3 and 10 -6 torr. Treatment of this gas stream will entail the removal of small quantities of protium and helium from a much larger deuterium-tritium mixture which will be recycled. (U.S.)

  12. Core/shell poly(ethylene oxide)/Eudragit fibers for site-specific release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Dong; Gao, Yanshan; Williams, Gareth R

    2017-05-15

    Electrospinning was used to prepare core/shell fibers containing the active pharmaceutical ingredients indomethacin (IMC) or mebeverine hydrochloride (MB-HCl). The shell of the fibers was fabricated from the pH sensitive Eudragit S100 polymer, while the drug-loaded core was based on the mucoadhesive poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO). Three different drug loadings (from 9 to 23% (w/w) of the core mass) were prepared, and for MB-HCl two different molecular weights of PEO were explored. The resultant fibers generally comprise smooth cylinders, although in some cases defects such as surface particles or flattened or merged fibers were visible. Transmission electron microscopy showed all the systems to have clear core and shell compartments. The drugs are present in the amorphous physical form in the fibers. Dissolution tests found that the fibers can effectively prevent release in acidic conditions representative of the stomach, particularly for the acidic indomethacin. After transfer to a pH 7.4 medium, sustained release over between 6 and 22h is observed. Given the mucoadhesive nature of the PEO core, after dissolution of the shell the fibers will be able to adhere to the walls of the intestinal tract and give sustained local drug release. This renders them promising for the treatment of conditions such as irritable bowel disease and colon cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of Tritium Behavior in the Epoxy Painted Concrete Wall of ITER Hot Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hirofumi; Hayashi, Takumi; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Nishi, Masataka

    2005-01-01

    Tritium behavior released in the ITER hot cell has been investigated numerically using a combined analytical methods of a tritium transport analysis in the multi-layer wall (concrete and epoxy paint) with the one dimensional diffusion model and a tritium concentration analysis in the hot cell with the complete mixing model by the ventilation. As the results, it is revealed that tritium concentration decay and permeation issues are not serious problem in a viewpoint of safety, since it is expected that tritium concentration in the hot cell decrease rapidly within several days just after removing the tritium release source, and tritium permeation through the epoxy painted concrete wall will be negligible as long as the averaged realistic diffusion coefficient is ensured in the concrete wall. It is also revealed that the epoxy paint on the concrete wall prevents the tritium inventory increase in the concrete wall greatly (two orders of magnitudes), but still, the inventory in the wall is estimated to reach about 0.1 PBq for 20 years operation

  14. Tritium-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkaldy, J.S.

    1983-06-01

    The report deals broadly with tritium-surface interactions as they relate to a fusion power reactor enterprise, viz., the vacuum chamber, first wall, peripherals, pumping, fuel recycling, isotope separation, repair and maintenance, decontamination and safety. The main emphasis is on plasma-surface interactions and the selection of materials for fusion chamber duty. A comprehensive review of the international (particularly U.S.) research and development is presented based upon a literature review (about 1 000 reports and papers) and upon visits to key laboratories, Sandia, Albuquerque, Sandia, Livermore and EGβG Idaho. An inventory of Canadian expertise and facilities for RβD on tritium-surface interactions is also presented. A number of proposals are made for the direction of an optimal Canadian RβD program, emphasizing the importance of building on strength in both the technological and fundamental areas. A compendium of specific projects and project areas is presented dealing primarily with plasma-wall interactions and permeation, anti-permeation materials and surfaces and health, safety and environmental considerations. Potential areas of industrial spinoff are identified

  15. Tritium-fueled betacells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walko, R.J.; Lincoln, R.C.; Baca, W.E.; Goods, S.H.; Negley, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    Betavoltaic power sources operate by converting the nuclear decay energy of beta-emitting radioisotopes into electricity. Since they are not chemically driven, they could operate at temperatures which would either be too hot or too cold for typical chemical batteries. Further, for long lived isotopes, they offer the possibility of multi-decade active lifetimes. In this paper two approaches are investigated: direct and indirect conversion. Direct conversion cells consist of semiconductor diodes similar to photovoltaic cells. Beta particles directly bombard these cells, generating electron-hole pairs in the semiconductor which are converted to useful power. When using low power flux beta emitters, wide bandgap semiconductors are required to achieve useful power. When using low power flux beta emitters, wide bandgap semiconductors are required to achieve useful conversion efficiencies. The combination of tritium, as the beta emitter, and gallium phosphide (GaP), as the semiconductor converter, was evaluated. Indirect conversion betacells first convert the beta energy to light with a phosphor, and then to electricity with photovoltaic cells. An indirect conversion power source using a tritium radioluminescent (RL) light is being investigated. The authors analysis indicates that this approach has the potential for significant volume and cost savings over the direct conversion method

  16. Dose-to-risk conversion factors for low-level tritium exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straume, T.

    1992-01-01

    During the past decade, a large number of radiobiological studies have become available for tritium-many of them focusing on the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritium beta rays. These and previous studies indicate that tritium in body water produces the same spectrum of radiogenic effects, e.g., cancer, genetic effects, developmental abnormalities, and reproductive effects, observed following whole-body exposure to penetrating radiations such as gamma rays and x rays. The only significant difference in biological response between tritium beta-rays and the other common low linear-energy transfer (LET) radiations, such as gamma rays and x rays, appears to be the greater biological effectiveness of tritium beta rays. For example, tritium in the oxide form (HTO) is about 2 to 3 times more effective at low doses or low dose rates than gamma rays from 137 Cs or 60 CO (Straume, 1991). When tritium is bound to organic molecules, RBE values may be somewhat larger than those for HTO. It is now clear from the wealth of tritium data available that RBEs for tritium beta rays are higher than the quality factor of unity generally used in radiation protection

  17. Overview of the tritium system of Ignitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzello, C.; Tosti, S.

    2008-01-01

    Among the recent design activities of the Ignitor program, the analysis of the tritium system has been carried out with the aim to describe the main equipments and the operations needed for supplying the deuterium-tritium mixtures and recovering the plasma exhaust. In fact, the tritium system of Ignitor provides for injecting deuterium-tritium mixtures into the vacuum chamber in order to sustain the fusion reaction: furthermore, it generally manages and controls the tritium and the tritiated materials of the machine fuel cycle. Main functions consist of tritium storage and delivery, tritium injection, tritium recovery from plasma exhaust, treatment of the tritiated wastes, detritiation of the contaminated atmospheres, tritium analysis and accountability. In this work an analysis of the designed tritium system of Ignitor is summarized

  18. Reducing the tritium inventory in waste produced by fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pamela, J., E-mail: jerome.pamela@cea.fr [CEA, Agence ITER-France, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Decanis, C. [CEA, DEN, Centre de Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Canas, D. [CEA, DEN/DADN, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Liger, K.; Gaune, F. [CEA, DEN, Centre de Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Fusion devices including ITER will generate tritiated waste, some of which will need to be detritiated before disposal. • Interim storage is the reference solution offering an answer for all types of tritiated radwaste. • Incineration is very attractive for VLLW and possibly SL-LILW soft housekeeping waste, since it offers higher tritium and waste volume reduction than the alternative thermal treatment technique. • For metallic waste, further R&D efforts should be made to optimize tritium release management and minimize the need for interim storage. - Abstract: The specific issues raised by tritiated waste resulting from fusion machines are described. Of the several categories of tritium contaminated waste produced during the entire lifespan of a fusion facility, i.e. operating phase and dismantling phase, only two categories are considered here: metal components and solid combustible waste, especially soft housekeeping materials. Some of these are expected to contain a high level of tritium, and may therefore need to be processed using a detritiation technique before disposal or interim storage. The reference solution for tritiated waste management in France is a 50-year temporary storage for tritium decay, with options for reducing the tritium content as alternatives or complement. An overview of the strategic issues related to tritium reduction techniques is proposed for each radiological category of waste for both metallic and soft housekeeping waste. For this latter category, several options of detritiation techniques by thermal treatment like heating up or incineration are described. A comparison has been made between these various technical options based on several criteria: environment, safety, technical feasibility and costs. For soft housekeeping waste, incineration is very attractive for VLLW and possibly SL-LILW. For metallic waste, further R&D efforts should be conducted.

  19. A Selection of Nitric Oxide-Releasing Materials Incorporating S-Nitrosothiols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutzke, Alec

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a diatomic radical that occurs as a crucial component of mammalian biochemistry. As a signaling molecule, NO participates in the regulation of vascular tone and maintains the natural antithrombotic function of the healthy endothelium. Furthermore, NO is produced by phagocytes as part of the immune response, and exhibits both antimicrobial and wound-healing effects. In combination, these beneficial properties have led to the use of exogenous NO as a multifunctional therapeutic agent. However, the comparatively short half-life of NO under physiological conditions often renders systemic administration infeasible. This limitation is addressed by the use of NO-releasing polymeric materials, which permit the localized delivery of NO directly at the intended site of action. Such polymers have been utilized in the development of antithrombotic or antibacterial materials for biointerfacial applications, including tissue engineering and the fabrication of medical devices. NO release from polymers has most frequently been achieved through the incorporation of functional groups that are susceptible to NO-forming chemical decomposition in response to appropriate environmental stimuli. While numerous synthetic sources of NO are known, the S-nitrosothiol (RSNO) functional group occurs naturally in the form of S-nitrosocysteine residues in both proteins and small molecule species such as S-nitrosoglutathione. RSNOs are synthesized directly from thiol precursors, and their NO-forming decay has generally been established to produce the corresponding disulfide as a relatively benign organic byproduct. For these reasons, RSNOs have been conscripted as practical NO donors within a physiological environment. This dissertation describes the synthesis and characterization of RSNO-based NO-releasing polymers derived from the polysaccharides chitin and chitosan, as well as the development of amino acid ester-based NO-releasing biodegradable poly

  20. Tritium, biography of an element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, C.

    1980-01-01

    Tritium is the lightest radioactive atom, an isotope of hydrogen. In science it has many uses, particularly for marking organic molecules in order to find out about biochemical and medical processes. But also the traces of tritium contained in rain or sea water are used for investigations; they range from establishing the vintage of old wines to ascertaining sea water mixtures. Tritium will become important in large-scale technology if it should become possible to construct fusion reactors, since it is one of the fuels. (orig.) [de

  1. MISTRAL: A comprehensive model for tritium transport in lithium-base ceramics. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federici, G.; Raffray, A.R.; Abdou, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    A new tritium transport model called MISTRAL (Model for Investigative Studies of Tritium Release in Lithium Ceramics) has been developed to describe and predict the kinetics of tritium release in lithium ceramic materials for tritium breeding applications in fusion blankets. The model has transient capabilities and has been developed to analyze the full range of transient conditions produced in in-pile tritium recovery experiments and expected in fusion blankets. Calibration of the model against experiments has been done in parallel with its development in order to assess its predictive capabilities and to identify the ranges of potential applicability. The comparisons of the results available for lithium metasilicate and aluminate samples irradiated respectively in the two in-pile tritium recovery experiments LISA1 and MOZART are presented and discussed in this paper. They have been selected for the calibration of the codes as being good examples of various features relevant for tritium release analysis in ceramic breeders under different transient conditions such as change in temperature, purge gas composition and reactor power. (orig.)

  2. The organically bound tritium: an analyst vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansoborlo, E.; Baglan, N.

    2009-01-01

    The authors report the work of a work group on tritium analysis. They recall the different physical forms of tritium: gas (HT, hydrogen-tritium), water vapour (HTO or tritiated water) or methane (CH3T), but also in organic compounds (OBT, organically bound tritium) which are either exchangeable or non-exchangeable. They evoke measurement techniques and methods, notably to determine the tritium volume activity. They discuss the possibilities to analyse and distinguish exchangeable and non-exchangeable OBTs

  3. Dynamic model for tritium transfer in an aquatic food chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melintescu, A; Galeriu, D

    2011-08-01

    Tritium ((3)H) is released from some nuclear facilities in relatively large quantities. It is a ubiquitous isotope because it enters straight into organisms, behaving essentially identically to its stable analogue (hydrogen). Tritium is a key radionuclide in the aquatic environment, in some cases, contributing significantly to the doses received by aquatic, non-human biota and by humans. The updated model presented here is based on more standardized, comprehensive assessments than previously used for the aquatic food chain, including the benthic flora and fauna, with an explicit application to the Danube ecosystem, as well as an extension to the special case of dissolved organic tritium (DOT). The model predicts the organically bound tritium (OBT) in the primary producers (the autotrophs, such as phytoplankton and algae) and in the consumers (the heterotrophs) using their bioenergetics, which involves the investigation of energy expenditure, losses, gains and efficiencies of transformations in the body. The model described in the present study intends to be more specific than a screening-level model, by including a metabolic approach and a description of the direct uptake of DOT in marine phytoplankton and invertebrates. For a better control of tritium transfer into the environment, not only tritiated water must be monitored, but also the other chemical forms and most importantly OBT, in the food chain.

  4. Recent progress of China HCCB TBM tritium system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Deli, E-mail: luodeli2005@hotmail.com; Huang, Guoqiang; Huang, Zhiyong; Qin, Cheng; Song, Jiangfeng; He, Kanghao; Chen, Chang’an; Zhang, Guikai; Fu, Jun; Yao, Yong; An, Yongtao

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Comparing with our previous design, improvements have been made according to the up-to-date experiments and simulations: (1) The palladium alloy tube in the previous design is now removed in the upgraded one and the cryogenic molecular sieve bed is replaced by the getter bed to reduce tritium inventory; (2) Hot metal reduction bed is relocated from T-Plant to Port Cell; (3) TAS is now integrated into TES. • The proposed coolant purification is based on catalytic oxidation and molecular sieve bed adsorption for tritium removal, as well as hot metal adsorption for the elimination of non-tritium gaseous impurities. Some operation parameters and functional components are improved. The interface with the high pressure HCS and other plant systems was incorporated taking into account of the requirement from the ITER port management group meetings. - Abstract: China tritium system including Tritium Extraction System (TES) with Tritium Accountancy System (TAS) integrated in and Coolant Purification System (CPS), which is subordinate to Helium Coolant System (HCS), is of great importance for China Helium Cooled Ceramic Breeder Test Blanket Module (CN HCCB TBM). The purge gas (99.9% He + 0.1% H{sub 2}) carrying Q{sub 2}O (Q = H, D, T) and Q{sub 2} from Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} ceramic breeder flows through the reduction bed where Q{sub 2}O is reduced into Q{sub 2} and then absorbed by the getter bed. The HT/HTO ratio and the total tritium are determined by TAS. Catalytic oxidation combines with molecular sieve absorption and hot metal purification are applied to remove tritium and other impurities in helium coolant. A loop including depressurization, helium-sweeping assisted thermal desorption, and cold trapping for the regeneration of saturated molecular sieve bed until the concentration of the desorbed Q{sub 2}O is reduced to an acceptable level. This paper introduces the recent progress of China tritium system including updated conceptual designs of TES and

  5. Evaluation of retention and disposal options for tritium in fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, W.R.; Hampson, D.C.; Larkin, D.J.; Skolrud, J.O.; Benjamin, R.W.

    1982-08-01

    Five options were evaluated as means of retaining tritium released from light-water reactor or fast breeder reactor fuel during the head-end steps of a typical Purex reprocessing scheme. Cost estimates for these options were compared with a base case in which no retention of tritium within the facility was obtained. Costs were also estimated for a variety of disposal methods of the retained tritium. The disposal costs were combined with the retention costs to yield total costs (capital plus operating) for retention and disposal of tritium under the conditions envisioned. The above costs were converted to an annual basis and to a dollars per curie retained basis. This then was used to estimate the cost in dollars per man-rem saved by retaining the tritium. Only the options that used the least expensive disposal costs could approach the $1000/man-rem cost used as a guide by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission

  6. Tritium processing and containment technology for fusion reactors: perspective and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroni, V.A.

    1976-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of selected tritium processing and containment technologies that will be required to support the development of the fusion energy program. Considered in order are the fuel conditioning and recycle systems, the containment and cleanup systems, the blanket processing systems, and two unique problems relating to tritium interactions in neutral beam injectors and first wall coolant circuits. The major technical problem areas appear to lie in the development of (1) high-capacity, rapid recycle plasma chamber evacuation systems; (2) large-capacity (greater than or equal to 100,000 cfm) air handling and processing systems for atmospheric detritiation; (3) tritium recovery technology for liquid lithium blanket concepts; (4) tritium compatible neutral injector systems; and (5) an overall approach to tritium handling and containment that guarantees near zero release to the environment at a bearable cost

  7. Surface effects on tritium diffusion in materials in a radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Tritium transport and distribution in a material are controlled by chemical potential and thermal gradients and cross-coupling to impurities and defects. Surfaces influence tritium diffusion by acting as sources and sinks for defects and impurities, and surface films restricting tritium transfer between the solid and surrounding fluids. Radiation directly affects boundary processes such as dissociation or adsorption, may erode a surface film or the surface itself, and introduces defects and impurities into the solid by radiation damage, transmutation, or ion implantation, thereby modifying tritium transport within the solid and its transfer across external interfaces. There have been no definitive investigations of these effects, but their practical significance has been demonstrated in tritium release or absorption studies with stainless steel, Zircaloy, niobium, and other materials. (auth)

  8. Quantification of exchangeable and non-exchangeable organically bound tritium (OBT) in vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S B; Korolevych, V

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study is to quantify the relative amounts of exchangeable organically bound tritium (OBT) and non-exchangeable OBT in various vegetables. A garden plot at Perch Lake, where tritium levels are slightly elevated due to releases of tritium from a nearby nuclear waste management area and Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) operations, was used to cultivate a variety of vegetables. Five different kinds of vegetables (lettuce, cabbage, tomato, radish and beet) were studied. Exchangeable OBT behaves like tritium in tissue free water in living organisms and, based on past measurements, accounts for about 20% of the total tritium in dehydrated organic materials. In this study, the percentage of the exchangeable OBT was determined to range from 20% to 57% and was found to depend on the type of vegetables as well as the sequence of the plants exposure to HTO. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The valley system of the Jihlava river and Mohelno reservoir with enhanced tritium activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simek, P; Kořínková, T; Svetlik, I; Povinec, P P; Fejgl, M; Malátová, I; Tomaskova, L; Stepan, V

    2017-01-01

    The Dukovany nuclear power plant (NPP Dukovany) releases liquid effluents, including HTO, to the Mohelno reservoir, located in a deep valley. Significantly enhanced tritium activities were observed in the form of non-exchangeable organically bound tritium in the surrounding biota which lacks direct contact with the water body. This indicates a tritium uptake by plants from air moisture and haze, which is, besides the uptake by roots from soil, one of the most important mechanisms of tritium transfer from environment to plants. Results of a pilot study based on four sampling campaigns in 2011-2015 are presented and discussed, with the aim to provide new information on tritium transport in the Mohelno reservoir - Jihlava River - plants ecosystems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Biotemplated Synthesis and Characterization of Mesoporous Nitric Oxide-Releasing Diatomaceous Earth Silica Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grommersch, Bryan M; Pant, Jitendra; Hopkins, Sean P; Goudie, Marcus J; Handa, Hitesh

    2018-01-24

    Diatomaceous earth (DE), a nanoporous silica material composed of fossilized unicellular marine algae, possesses unique mechanical, molecular transport, optical, and photonic properties exploited across an array of biomedical applications. The utility of DE in these applications stands to be enhanced through the incorporation of nitric oxide (NO) technology shown to modulate essential physiological processes. In this work, the preparation and characterization of a biotemplated diatomaceous earth-based nitric oxide delivery scaffold are described for the first time. Three aminosilanes [(3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES), N-(6-aminohexyl)aminomethyltriethoxysilane (AHAMTES), and 3-aminopropyldimethylethoxysilane (APDMES)] were evaluated for their ability to maximize NO loading via the covalent attachment of N-acetyl-d-penicillamine (NAP) to diatomaceous earth. The use of APTES cross-linker resulted in maximal NAP tethering to the DE surface, and NAP-DE was converted to NO-releasing S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP)-DE by nitrosation. The total NO loading of SNAP-DE was determined by chemiluminescence to be 0.0372 ± 0.00791 μmol/mg. Retention of diatomaceous earth's unique mesoporous morphology throughout the derivatization was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. SNAP-DE exhibited 92.95% killing efficiency against Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus as compared to the control. The WST-8-based cytotoxicity testing showed no negative impact on mouse fibroblast cells, demonstrating the biocompatible potential of SNAP-DE. The development of NO releasing diatomaceous earth presents a unique means of delivering tunable levels of NO to materials across the fields of polymer chemistry, tissue engineering, drug delivery, and wound healing.

  11. Cold fusion produces more tritium than neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajagopalan, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    The results of the major cold fusion experiments performed in various laboratories of the world and attempts to explain them are reviewed in brief. Particular reference is made to the experiments carried out in the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Bombay. In BARC experiments, it is found that tritium is the primary product of cold fusion. Author has put forward two hypothetical pictures of D-D fusion. (1) When a metal like Pd or Ti is loaded with D 2 , a crack forms. Propogation of such a crack accelerates deuterons which bombard Pd D 2 /D held by Pd or Ti leading to neutron capture or tritium formation with the release of protons and energy. The released protons might transfer its energy to some other deuteron and a chain reaction is started. This chain reaction terminates when a substantial portion of D in the crack tip is transmuted. This picture explains fusion reaction bursts and the random distribution of reaction sites, but does not explain neutron emission. (2) The deuterons accelerated by a propogating crack may hit a Pd/Ti nucleus instead of a deuterium nucleus and may transmute Pd/Ti. (M.G.B.). 18 refs

  12. Growth inhibition and chemosensitization of exogenous nitric oxide released from NONOates in glioma cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyerbrock, Astrid; Baumer, Brunhilde; Papazoglou, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Exogenous nitric oxide (NO) from NO donors has cytotoxic, chemosensitizing, and radiosensitizing effects, and increases vascular permeability and blood flow in tumors. Yet little is known about whether these cytotoxic and chemosensitizing effects can be observed in glioma cells at doses that alter tumor physiological characteristics in vivo and whether these effects are tumor selective. The effect of NO released from proline NONOate, diethylamine NONOate, spermine NONOate, and sodium nitrite on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and chemosensitivity to carboplatin of cultured glioma cells was studied in C6, U87 glioma cells, human glioblastoma cells, and human astrocytes and fibroblasts. Although proline NONOate failed to induce cell death, the other NO donors induced growth arrest when present in high concentrations (10(-2) M) in all cell lines. Chemosensitization was observed after concomitant incubation with spermine NONOate and carboplatin in C6 and human glioblastoma cells. There is strong evidence that cell death occurs primarily by necrosis and to a lesser degree by apoptosis. The NO doses, which altered tumor physiology in vivo, were not cytotoxic, indicating that NO alters vascular permeability and cell viability in vivo by different mechanisms. The authors found that NO-generating agents at high concentrations are potent growth inhibitors and might also be useful as chemosensitizers in glioma cells. These data corroborate the theory that the use of NOgenerating agents may play a role in the multimodal treatment of malignant gliomas but that the NO release must be targeted more specifically to tumor cells to improve selectivity and efficacy.

  13. Nitric oxide-releasing prodrug triggers cancer cell death through deregulation of cellular redox balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna E. Maciag

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available JS-K is a nitric oxide (NO-releasing prodrug of the O2-arylated diazeniumdiolate family that has demonstrated pronounced cytotoxicity and antitumor properties in a variety of cancer models both in vitro and in vivo. The current study of the metabolic actions of JS-K was undertaken to investigate mechanisms of its cytotoxicity. Consistent with model chemical reactions, the activating step in the metabolism of JS-K in the cell is the dearylation of the diazeniumdiolate by glutathione (GSH via a nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction. The resulting product (CEP/NO anion spontaneously hydrolyzes, releasing two equivalents of NO. The GSH/GSSG redox couple is considered to be the major redox buffer of the cell, helping maintain a reducing environment under basal conditions. We have quantified the effects of JS-K on cellular GSH content, and show that JS-K markedly depletes GSH, due to JS-K's rapid uptake and cascading release of NO and reactive nitrogen species. The depletion of GSH results in alterations in the redox potential of the cellular environment, initiating MAPK stress signaling pathways, and inducing apoptosis. Microarray analysis confirmed signaling gene changes at the transcriptional level and revealed alteration in the expression of several genes crucial for maintenance of cellular redox homeostasis, as well as cell proliferation and survival, including MYC. Pre-treating cells with the known GSH precursor and nucleophilic reducing agent N-acetylcysteine prevented the signaling events that lead to apoptosis. These data indicate that multiplicative depletion of the reduced glutathione pool and deregulation of intracellular redox balance are important initial steps in the mechanism of JS-K's cytotoxic action.

  14. Effects of pore topology and iron oxide core on doxorubicin loading and release from mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronhovde, Cicily J.; Baer, John; Larsen, Sarah C.

    2017-06-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) have a network of pores that give rise to extremely high specific surface areas, making them attractive materials for applications such as adsorption and drug delivery. The pore topology can be readily tuned to achieve a variety of structures such as the hexagonally ordered Mobil Crystalline Material 41 (MCM-41) and the disordered "wormhole" (WO) mesoporous silica (MS) structure. In this work, the effects of pore topology and iron oxide core on doxorubicin loading and release were investigated using MSNs with pore diameters of approximately 3 nm and sub-100 nm particle diameters. The nanoparticles were loaded with doxorubicin, and the drug release into phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, 10 mM, pH 7.4) at 37 °C was monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy. The release profiles were fit using the Peppas model. The results indicated diffusion-controlled release for all samples. Statistically significant differences were observed in the kinetic host-guest parameters for each sample due to the different pore topologies and the inclusion of an iron oxide core. Applying a static magnetic field to the iron oxide core WO-MS shell materials did not have a significant impact on the doxorubicin release. This is the first time that the effects of pore topology and iron oxide core have been isolated from pore diameter and particle size for these materials.

  15. TFTR tritium inventory accountability system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saville, C.; Ascione, G.; Elwood, S.; Nagy, A.; Raftopoulos, S.; Rossmassler, R.; Stencel, J.; Voorhees, D.; Tilson, C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the program, PPPL (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory) Material Control and Accountability Plan, that has been implemented to track US Department of Energy's tritium and all other accountable source material. Specifically, this paper details the methods used to measure tritium in various systems at the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor; resolve inventory differences; perform inventory by difference inside the Tokamak; process and measure plasma exhaust and other effluent gas streams; process, measure and ship scrap or waste tritium on molecular sieve beds; and detail organizational structure of the Material Control and Accountability group. In addition, this paper describes a Unix-based computerized software system developed at PPPL to account for all tritium movements throughout the facility. 5 refs., 2 figs

  16. Radiotoxicity of tritium in mammals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silini, G.; Metalli, P.; Vulpis, G.

    1972-12-01

    Basic data relative to tritium, its physicochemical behaviour in environment, its major sources of contamination and its metabolism through the mammalian organisms are reviewed. After considering the radiotoxicity of tritium particularly at the cellular and whole-body level the conclusion is drawn that the major uncertainties regard the fraction of tritium incorporated into the nuclei of some tissues. This fraction is eliminated very slowly and is capable of modifying the genetic structures of the nucleus. A more refined analysis of radiobiological phenomena and a better knowledge of the dose effect relationship should permit the extrapolation of the data to the low doses of tritium contamination. This extrapolation is of great interest in the field of public health for the elaboration of the relevant radioprotection standards

  17. TFTR tritium inventory accountability system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saville, C.; Ascione, G.; Elwood, S.; Nagy, A.; Raftopoulos, S.; Rossmassler, R.; Stencel, J.; Voorhees, D.; Tilson, C. [Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This paper discusses the program, PPPL (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory) Material Control and Accountability Plan, that has been implemented to track US Department of Energy`s tritium and all other accountable source material. Specifically, this paper details the methods used to measure tritium in various systems at the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor; resolve inventory differences; perform inventory by difference inside the Tokamak; process and measure plasma exhaust and other effluent gas streams; process, measure and ship scrap or waste tritium on molecular sieve beds; and detail organizational structure of the Material Control and Accountability group. In addition, this paper describes a Unix-based computerized software system developed at PPPL to account for all tritium movements throughout the facility. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Tritium transport around nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Sweet, C.W.

    1981-01-01

    The transport and cycling of tritium around nuclear facilities is reviewed with special emphasis on studies at the Savannah River Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina. These studies have shown that the rate of deposition from the atmosphere, the site of deposition, and the subsequent cycling are strongly influenced by the compound with which the tritium is associated. Tritiated hydrogen is largely deposited in the soil, while tritiated water is deposited in the greatest quantity in the vegetation. Tritiated hydrogen is converted in the soil to tritiated water that leaves the soil slowly, through drainage and transpiration. Tritiated water deposited directly to the vegetation leaves the vegetation more rapidly after exposure. Only a small part of the tritium entering the vegetation becomes bound in organic molecules. However, it appears tht the existence of soil organic compounds with tritium concentrations greater than the equilibrium concentration in the associated water can be explained by direct metabolism of tritiated hydrogen in vegetation

  19. Tritium in fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, J.S.; Fisher, P.W.; Talbot, J.B.

    1980-01-01

    When tritium is used in a fusion energy experiment or reactor, several implications affect and usually restrict the design and operation of the system and involve questions of containment, inventory, and radiation damage. Containment is expected to be particularly important both for high-temperature components and for those components that are prone to require frequent maintenance. Inventory is currently of major significance in cases where safety and environmental considerations limit the experiments to very low levels of tritium. Fewer inventory restrictions are expected as fusion experiments are placed in more-remote locations and as the fusion community gains experience with the use of tritium. However, the advent of power-producing experiments with high-duty cycle will again lead to serious difficulties based principally on tritium availability; cyclic operations with significant regeneration times are the principal problems

  20. Measurement of Tritium Activity in Plants by Ice Extraction Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelled, O.; Ovad, S.; Tubul, Y.; Tsroya, S.; Gonen, R.; Abraham, A.; Weinstein, M.; German, U.

    2014-01-01

    Tritium is produced primarily by interactions of cosmic rays with the atmosphere. However, nuclear installations may add significantly tritium to the surroundings, increasing its concentration. The main sources of tritium released by man are linked to the nuclear power cycle: nuclear power stations, nuclear fuel reprocessing plants or tritium production plants. Tritium is found in the environment mainly as tritiated water, in gaseous or liquid form (HTO, T2O), in the surrounding air and in soil. It accumulates in plants, which may use as a measure to the level of tritium concentration in the environment. The most common routes of tritium uptake from the environment in plants are from atmospheric humidity and by precipitation water which entered the soil. The fraction of tritium bound to the plant tissue is small compared to that present as tritiated water in the plant (from 0.06% to 0.3% for growing crops). The tritiated water uptake is through the roots, as tritiated water from the soil follows a pathway similar to that of ordinary water. As most tritium in plants consists of tritiated water, the measurements of only the tissue free water tritium concentration (as HTO or T2O) gives an accurate estimate of the tritium content in the plant. Analyzing free tritium in biological matrices usually requires using the freeze-drying method to extract the water from the sample, and then measure the water collected in a cold trap with a Liquid Scintillation Counter (LSC). The 'freeze-drying' occurs because of the sublimation of the frozen water inside the plant, that takes place when the temperature is beneath the triple point and the vapour pressure is low. In the temperature range of -5° to -10° C the mechanism that plants use to avoid freezing is drawing of water from the cell protoplasm into the intercellular spaces. Changes in cell membrane permeability allow water to leave the cell and enter the spaces between the cells where it freezes instead of freezing within the

  1. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase-deficient mice have impaired Renin release but normal blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sällström, Johan; Carlström, Mattias; Jensen, Boye L

    2008-01-01

    NOS(-/-)) and wild-type (nNOS(+/+)) mice after 10 days of low (0.01% NaCl) and high (4% NaCl) sodium diets.ResultsThe resting heart rate was reduced in nNOS(-/-) mice, but the two genotypes had similar blood pressure during the low (nNOS(+/+) 104 +/- 2 mm Hg; nNOS(-/-) 103 +/- 2 mm Hg) and high (nNOS(+/+) 107 +/- 3...... for stimulation of renin in response to sodium restriction. Furthermore, nNOS(-/-) mice are normotensive, and their blood pressure responds normally to an increased dietary sodium intake, indicating that nNOS deficiency does not cause salt-sensitive hypertension.American Journal of Hypertension (2008) 21 111......BackgroundNitric oxide deficiency is involved in the development of hypertension, but the mechanisms are currently unclear. This study was conducted to further elucidate the role of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in blood pressure regulation and renin release in relation to different sodium...

  2. A study on the analysis of source term evaluation method and tritium behavior mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kun Jai; Hwang, Ki Ha; Kim, Sung Il; Lee, Chang Min; Yook, Dae Sik; Lee, Sang Chul; Lee, Yun Hi

    2006-03-01

    In this study, tritium diffusion and permeation at NHDD reactors, a 300 MWth Pebble and 600 MWth block type reactors, were evaluated with respect to the temperature distribution of the core. The annual release rate of tritium diffused from coated fuel to the primary helium coolant through the encapsulated graphite was evaluated as 0.47 percent in case of Pebble type and 10.1 percent in case of Block type compared with the generated tritium, respectively. And the annual release rate of the tritium from the reflector graphite was evaluated as about 8 percent in case of Pebble type and about 0.03 percent in case of Block type compared with the tritium attributed by 6Li as impurities of the reflector due to the relatively thick graphite, respectively. These results can be used for evaluating tritium amounts in the primary coolant of the both type reactor. The main contributions of the tritium amounts in the primary coolant are the 3He as isotope and 6Li as impurities of the reflector graphite. Even though the reactor type and thermal power of the HTTR hydrogen system is different from that of the NHDD plant, the similar result was derived. Based on the Siverts' law (Q∝p1/2), tritium permeation from the primary coolant to the hydrogen production system was also evaluated and the result is calculated as 5.04x107 Bq per year in case of Pebble type and 3.03x108 Bq per year in case of block type without considering the Permeation Reduction Factors (PRF), respectively. It means that the leakage ratio of tritium was only about 10-4∼10-5 percent into the hydrogen production system compared with the generated tritium amount

  3. Tritium distribution in the environment in the vicinity of a chronic atmospheric source-assessment of the steady state hypothesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Bauer, L.R.; Zeigler, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a major radionuclide production center. Tritium has been released to the atmosphere over the 36 year period of operation. The tritiated water concentration of the atmosphere, rain, vegetation and food have been routinely monitored during this period. Special studies have been made of tritium in soils and in the organic fractions of these same materials. The available data suggest that the average tritium concentration in the components of the terrestrial environment have approached a steady state with the two main sources of tritium, rainfall and atmospheric water vapor

  4. Design and test about de tritium system to filling tritium glove box

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Jiarong; Du, Yang; Yang, Yong

    2008-01-01

    In order to deal tritium permeated from inflating tritium system at the scene of inflating tritium, dealing waste tritium gas system was designed according to demand and action of dealing waste tritium gas from inflating tritium, and the data of character and volume about appliance of catalyst reaction and drying agent was calculated. Through the test at the scene of inflating tritium, it is result that dealing waste tritium gas system's efficiency reaches above 85% average in circulatory system, so that it can be used in practice extensively. (author)

  5. Potential for iron oxides to control metal releases in CO2 sequestration scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, P.M.; Roy, W.R.

    2011-01-01

    The potential for the release of metals into groundwater following the injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the subsurface during carbon sequestration projects remains an open research question. Changing the chemical composition of even the relatively deep formation brines during CO2 injection and storage may be of concern because of the recognized risks associated with the limited potential for leakage of CO2-impacted brine to the surface. Geochemical modeling allows for proactive evaluation of site geochemistry before CO2 injection takes place to predict whether the release of metals from iron oxides may occur in the reservoir. Geochemical modeling can also help evaluate potential changes in shallow aquifers were CO2 leakage to occur near the surface. In this study, we created three batch-reaction models that simulate chemical changes in groundwater resulting from the introduction of CO2 at two carbon sequestration sites operated by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC). In each of these models, we input the chemical composition of groundwater samples into React??, and equilibrated them with selected mineral phases and CO 2 at reservoir pressure and temperature. The model then simulated the kinetic reactions with other mineral phases over a period of up to 100 years. For two of the simulations, the water was also at equilibrium with iron oxide surface complexes. The first model simulated a recently completed enhanced oil recovery (EOR) project in south-central Illinois in which the MGSC injected into, and then produced CO2, from a sandstone oil reservoir. The MGSC afterwards periodically measured the brine chemistry from several wells in the reservoir for approximately two years. The sandstone contains a relatively small amount of iron oxide, and the batch simulation for the injection process showed detectable changes in several aqueous species that were attributable to changes in surface complexation sites. After using the batch reaction

  6. Tritium control and accountability instructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, W.R.

    1981-03-01

    This instruction describes the tritium accountability procedures practiced by the Tritium Research Laboratory, Building 968 at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. The accountability procedures are based upon the Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, Nuclear Materials Operations Manual, SAND78-8018. The Nuclear Materials Operations Manual describes accountability techniques which are in compliance with the Department of Energy Manual, Code of Federal Regulations, and Sandia National Laboratories Instructions

  7. Tritium control and accountability instructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, W.R.; Cruz, S.L.

    1985-08-01

    This instruction describes the tritium accountability procedures practiced by the Tritium Research Laboratory, at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. The accountability procedures are based upon the Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, Nuclear Materials Operations Manual, SAND83-8036. The Nuclear Materials Operations Manual describes accountability techniques which are in compliance with the Department of Energy 5630 series Orders, Code of Federal Regulations, and Sandia National Laboratories Instructions

  8. Tritium pellet injector for TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouge, M.J.; Baylor, L.R.; Cole, M.J.; Combs, S.K.; Dyer, G.R.; Fehling, D.T.; Fisher, P.W.; Foust, C.R.; Langley, R.A.; Milora, S.L.; Qualls, A.L.; Wilgen, J.B.; Schmidt, G.L.; Barnes, G.W.; Persing, R.G.

    1992-01-01

    The tritium pellet injector (TPI) for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) will provide a tritium pellet fueling capability with pellet speeds in the 1- to 3-km/s range for the TFTR deuterium-tritium (D-T) phase. The existing TFTR deuterium pellet injector (DPI) has been modified at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to provide a four-shot, tritium-compatible, pipe-gun configuration with three upgraded single-stage pneumatic guns and a two-stage light gas gun driver. The TPI was designed to provide pellets ranging from 3.3 to 4.5 mm in diameter in arbitrarily programmable firing sequences at speeds up to approximately 1.5 km/s for the three single-stage drivers and 2.5 to 3 km/s for the two-stage driver. Injector operation is controlled by a programmable logic controller. The new pipe-gun injector assembly was installed in the modified DPI guard vacuum box, and modifications were made to the internals of the DPI vacuum injection line, including a new pellet diagnostics package. Assembly of these modified parts with existing DPI components was then completed, and the TPI was tested at ORNL with deuterium pellet. Results of the limited testing program at ORNL are described. The TPI is being installed on TFTR to support the D-D run period in 1992. In 1993, the tritium pellet injector will be retrofitted with a D-T fuel manifold and secondary tritium containment systems and integrated into TFTR tritium processing systems to provide full tritium pellet capability

  9. Evaluation of the Fate and Transport of Tritium Contaminated Groundwater from the 618-11 Burial Ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermeul, Vince R.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Dresel, P EVAN.; Freeman, Eugene J.; Peterson, R E.; Thorne, Paul D.

    2005-01-01

    Tritium transport simulations were conducted to model the mechanisms associated with dilution, dispersion, and radioactive decay that attenuate the 618-11 Burial Ground tritium plume and limit the risk associated with exposure to the Columbia River and Energy Northwest water supply wells. A comparison of simulated and observed tritium concentrations at two downgradient monitoring wells indicated that the model was a reasonable representation of the tritium concentrations immediately downgradient of the site (699-13-3A) and near the leading edge of the plume (699-13-0A). This good match increased confidence in the conceptual model, its numeric implementation, and ultimately the validity of predictive simulations of tritium fate and transport. Three release scenarios were investigated to measure the impact of the tritium plume at primary receptor locations under different conditions. The three cases were (1) a pulse release of tritium from the burial ground that was the best fit between observed and simulated tritium concentrations; (2) a continuing, decaying source beneath the burial ground through 2015, the milestone for source removal under the River Corridor Closure Contract; and (3) a pulse release as in the best fit case but at twice the concentration. For the best fit case, the model predicts that the maximum tritium concentration will decline to below the drinking water standard by 2031 For the other two release scenarios, maximum tritium concentrations declined to below the drinking water standard by 2040 and 2037, respectively. Tritium from the 618-11 burial ground is not expected to migrate to the Columbia River or to the Energy Northwest water supply wells at concentrations that would pose a significant risk

  10. Evaluation of the Fate and Transport of Tritium Contaminated Groundwater from the 618-11 Burial Ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermeul, Vince R.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Dresel, P Evan; Freeman, Eugene J.; Peterson, R E.; Thorne, Paul D.

    2005-01-01

    Tritium transport simulations were conducted to model the mechanisms associated with dilution, dispersion, and radioactive decay that attenuate the 618-11 tritium plume and limit the risk associated with exposure to the Columbia River and Energy Northwest water supply wells. A comparison of simulated and observed tritium concentrations at two downgradient monitoring wells indicated that the model was a reasonable representation of the tritium concentrations immediately downgradient of the site (699-13-3A) and near the leading edge of the plume (699-13-0A). This good match increased confidence in the conceptual model, its numeric implementation, and ultimately, the validity of predictive simulations of tritium fate and transport. Three release scenarios were investigated to measure the impact of the tritium plume at primary receptor locations under different conditions. The three cases were (1) a pulse release of tritium from the burial ground that was the best fit between observed and simulated tritium concentrations; (2) a continuing, decaying source beneath the burial ground through 2015, the milestone for source removal under the River Corridor Closure Contract; and (3) a pulse release as in the best fit case but at twice the concentration. For the best fit case, the model predicts that the maximum tritium concentration will decline to below the drinking water standard by 2031 For the other two release scenarios, maximum tritium concentrations declined to below the drinking water standard by 2040 and 2037, respectively. Tritium from the 618-11 burial ground is not expected to migrate to the Columbia River or to the Energy Northwest water supply wells at concentrations that would pose a significant risk

  11. Catalyst study for the decontamination of glove-box atmospheres containing tritium at MPC levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chobot, J.; Montel, J.; Sannier, J.

    1988-01-01

    The BEATRICE loop was designed for studying the conversion of tritium at very low activity levels using catalytic oxidation followed by water trapping. The purpose is to study kinetic parameters required for the design of the NET tritium cleanup system with the two main objectives to operate without isotopic swamping and to determine the ability of efficient conversion at room temperature. From experiments carried out between 20 and 250 0 C it is concluded that two palladium/alumina and platinum/alumina catalysts are very efficient in removing tritium from contaminated gas mixtures down to a few MPC levels without isotopic swamping and even at room temperature. However at room temperature, in relation to tritium species trapped on the catalyst surface a progressive deactivation with time occurs. This phenomenon may be a concern for process efficiency and tritium inventory and regeneration conditions have to be determined in order to demonstrate industrial feasibility of operating at room temperature

  12. Catalyst study for the decontamination of glove-boxe atmospheres containing tritium at MPC levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabot, J.; Montel, J.; Sannier, J.

    1988-01-01

    The BEATRICE loop was designed for studying the conversion of tritium at very low activity levels using catalytic oxidation followed by water trapping. The purpose is to study kinetic parameters required for the design of the NET tritium clean-up system with the two main objectives to operate without isotopic swamping and to determine the ability of efficient conversion at room temperature. From experiments carried out between 20 and 250 0 C it is concluded that two palladium/alumina and platinum/alumina catalysts are very efficient in removing tritium from contaminated gas mixtures down to a few MPC levels without isotopic swamping and even at room temperature. However at room temperature, in relation to tritium species trapped on the catalyst surface a progressive deactivation with time occurs. This phenomenon may be a concern for process efficiency and tritium inventory and best regeneration conditions have to be determined in order to demonstrate industrial feasibility of operating at room temperature

  13. Tritium research activities in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Ki Jung, E-mail: kjjung@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Yusung-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Sei-Hun, E-mail: shyun@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Yusung-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Min Ho; Kang, Hyun-Goo; Chung, Dongyou; Cho, Seungyon; Lee, Hyeon Gon [National Fusion Research Institute, Yusung-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hongsuk; Choi, Woo-Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yusung-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Kyu-Min; Moon, Chang-Bae [Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Central Research Institute, Yusung-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Euy Soo [Dongguk University, Jung-gu, Seoul, 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jungho; Kim, Dong-Sun [Kongju National University, Cheonan, Chungnam, 330-717 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Hung-Man [Daesung Industrial Gases Co., Ltd., Danwon-gu, Ansan-si, Gyeonggi-do, 425-090 (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Seung Jeong [Dankook University, Suji-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do, 448-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ju, Hyunchul [Inha University, Nam-gu, Incheon, 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Tae-Whan [Korea National University of Transportation, Chungju, Chungbuk, 380-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • NFRI, KAERI and KHNP CRI are major leading group for the ITER tritium SDS design; studying engineering, simulation of hydride bed, risk analysis (on safety, HAZOP), basic study, control logic & sequential operation, and others. KHNP has WTRF which gives favorable experiences for collaboration researchers. • Supplementary research partners: Five Universities (Dongguk University and POSTECH, Inha University, Dankook University, Korea National Transport University, and Kongju National University) and one industrial company (Daesung Industrial Gases Co., Ltd.); studying on basic and engineering, programming & simulation on the various topics for ITER tritium SDS, TEP, ISS, ADS, and etc. - Abstract: Major progress in tritium research in the Republic of Korea began when Korea became responsible for ITER tritium Storage and Delivery System (SDS) procurement package which is part of the ITER Fuel Cycle. To deliver the tritium SDS package, a variety of research institutes, universities and industry have respectively taken roles and responsibilities in developing technologies that have led to significant progress. This paper presents the current work and status of tritium related technological research and development (R&D) in Korea and introduces future R&D plans in the area of fuel cycle systems for fusion power generation.

  14. Separation of Tritium from Wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JEPPSON, D.W.

    2000-01-01

    A proprietary tritium loading bed developed by Molecular Separations, Inc (MSI) has been shown to selectively load tritiated water as waters of hydration at near ambient temperatures. Tests conducted with a 126 (micro)C 1 tritium/liter water standard mixture showed reductions to 25 (micro)C 1 /L utilizing two, 2-meter long columns in series. Demonstration tests with Hanford Site wastewater samples indicate an approximate tritium concentration reduction from 0.3 (micro)C 1 /L to 0.07 (micro)C 1 /L for a series of two, 2-meter long stationary column beds Further reduction to less than 0.02 (micro)C 1 /L, the current drinking water maximum contaminant level (MCL), is projected with additional bed media in series. Tritium can be removed from the loaded beds with a modest temperature increase and the beds can be reused Results of initial tests are presented and a moving bed process for treating large quantities of wastewaters is proposed. The moving bed separation process appears promising to treat existing large quantities of wastewater at various US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The enriched tritium stream can be grouted for waste disposition. The separations system has also been shown to reduce tritium concentrations in nuclear reactor cooling water to levels that allow reuse. Energy requirements to reconstitute the loading beds and waste disposal costs for this process appear modest

  15. Synthesis and preliminary biologic activity evaluation of nitric oxide-releasing andrographolide derivatives in RIN-m cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhibin; Du, Enming; Xu, Lipeng; Sun, Yewei; Zhang, Gaoxiao; Yu, Pei; Wang, Yuqiang

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and death are important feature of diabetes mellitus. Beta-cell protection has demonstrated clinical benefits in the treatment of this disease. In the present study, andrographolide derivatives with nitric oxide (NO)-releasing capability were synthesized and their protective effects against tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP) induced cell damage were investigated in RIN-m cells. Compound 6b was found to release a moderate amount of NO and was more potent than its natural parent andrographolide in inhibiting cell apoptosis. These findings suggested that andrographolide derivatives with NO-releasing capacity may be a potential therapy for diabetes.

  16. Tritium in Japanese precipitation following the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant Accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Maruoka, Teruyuki; Shimoda, Gen; Obata, Hajime; Kagi, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Yamamoto, Koshi; Mitsuguchi, Takehiro; Hagino, Kyoko; Tomioka, Naotaka; Sambandam, Chinmaya; Brummer, Daniela; Klaus, Philipp Martin; Aggarwal, Pradeep

    2013-04-01

    We have measured the concentrations of tritium in Japanese precipitation samples collected after the March 2011 accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP1). Tritium concentrations exceeding the pre-accident background level were detected at three out of seven localities (Tsukuba, Kashiwa and Hongo) southwest of the FNPP1, with their distances varying between 170 and 220 km from the source. The highest tritium content was found in the first rainfall in Tsukuba after the accident, but its tritium content was about 500 times less than the regulatory limit for tritium in drinking water, so that the risk of radiation from tritium released in the accident can be considered negligible. Tritium levels at the localities studied here decreased steadily and rapidly with time and became indistinguishable from the pre-accident values within five weeks. The atmospheric tritium level in the vicinity of the FNPP1 during the earliest stage of the accident was roughly estimated to be 1.5 × 103 Bq/m3, which is potentially capable of producing rainwater exceeding the regulatory limit, but only in the immediate vicinity of the source.

  17. Evaluation of tritium transport in the biomass-fusion hybrid system and its environmental impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namba, Kyosuke [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Kasada, Ryuta, E-mail: r-kasada@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Konishi, Satoshi [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Yamamoto, Yasushi [Faculty of Engineering Science, Kansai University, Osaka (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We assumed that tritium migrates from biomass hybrid fusion system to fuel cell vehicles. • We developed a seven-compartment model to describe the water flow and tritium in an urban area Osaka. • Tritium concentration of surface soil water run by 4 Bq/L level after 60 years later. • The tritium does not deserve health hazard but easily detectable in the environment. - Abstract: The behavior of tritium contained in the biofuel produced by the fusion energy is analyzed. Hydrogen product is contaminated with tritium from breeding blanket of fusion plant within the regulation limit and released to atmosphere when used for fuel cell vehicles. In the model city, Osaka, seven-compartment model describes the behavior of exhausted tritium by adapting the environment water flow and its migration was analyzed with STELLA system dynamics code. Tritium (HTO) with a concentration of 5000 Bq//m{sup 3} exhausted from the running vehicle increases decades and reaches steady state after about 50 years, at around 40 Bq/m{sup 3} in atmosphere and 4 Bq/L in surface soil water that does not deserve health hazard, however causes contamination of large populated area.

  18. Estuarine sediment resuspension and acidification: Release behaviour of contaminants under different oxidation levels and acid sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Torre, M Camino; Cifrian, Eva; Ruiz, Gema; Galán, Berta; Viguri, Javier R

    2017-09-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) Capture and Storage (CCS) is a technology to reduce the emissions of this gas to the atmosphere by sequestering it in geological formations. In the case of offshore storage, unexpected CO 2 leakages will acidify the marine environment. Reductions of the pH might be also caused by anthropogenic activities or natural events such as acid spills and dredging operations or storms and floods. Changes in the pH of the marine environment will trigger the mobilisation of elements trapped in contaminated shallow sediments with unclear redox boundary. Trace element (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) release from anoxic and oxic estuarine sediment is analysed and modelled under different laboratory acidification conditions using HNO 3 (l) and CO 2 (g): acidification at pH = 6.5 as worst-case scenario in events of CO 2 leakages and acid spills, and acidification at pH = 7.0 as a seawater scenario under CO 2 leakages, acid spills, as well as sediment resuspension. The prediction of metal leaching behaviour appear to require sediment specific and site specific tools. In the present work it is demonstrated that the proposed three in-series reactions model predicts the process kinetics of the studied elements under different simulated environmental conditions (oxidation levels and acid sources). Differences between HNO 3 and CO 2 acidification are analysed through the influence of the CO 2 gas on the ionic competition of the medium. The acidification with CO 2 provokes higher released concentrations from the oxic sediment than from the anoxic sediment, except in the case of Zn, which influences the release of the other studied elements. Slight acidification can endanger the aquatic environment through an important mobilisation of contaminants. The obtained prediction of the contaminant release from sediment (kinetic parameters and maximum concentrations) can contribute to the exposure assessment stage for risk management and preincidental planning in

  19. A new combination of membranes and membrane reactors for improved tritium management in breeder blanket of fusion machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demange, D.; Staemmler, S.; Kind, M.

    2011-01-01

    Tritium used as fuel in future fusion machines will be produced within the breeder blanket. The tritium extraction system recovers the tritium to be routed into the inner-fuel cycle of the machine. Accurate and precise tritium accountancy between both systems is mandatory to ensure a reliable operation. Handling in the blanket huge helium flow rates containing tritium as traces in molecular and oxide forms is challenging both for the process and the accountancy. Alternative tritium processes based on combinations of membranes and membrane reactors are proposed to facilitate the tritium management. The PERMCAT process is based on counter-current isotope swamping in a palladium membrane reactor. It allows recovering tritium efficiently from any chemical species. It produces a pure hydrogen stream enriched in tritium of advantage for integration upstream of the accountancy stage. A pre-separation and pre-concentration stage using new zeolite membranes has been studied to optimize the whole process. Such a combination could improve the tritium processes and facilitate accountancy in DEMO.

  20. Distribution and behavior of tritium in the Coolant-Salt Technology Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mays, G.T.; Smith, A.N.; Engel, J.R.

    1977-04-01

    A 1000-MW(e) Molten-Salt Breeder Reactor (MSBR) is expected to produce 2420 Ci/day of tritium. As much as 60 percent of the tritium produced may be transported to the reactor steam system (assuming no retention by the secondary coolant salt), where it would be released to the environment. Such a release rate would be unacceptable. Experiments were conducted in an engineering-scale facility--the Coolant-Salt Technology Facility (CSTF)--to examine the potential of sodium fluoroborate, the proposed coolant salt for an MSBR, for sequestering tritium. The salt was believed to contain chemical species capable of trapping tritium. A series of 5 experiments--3 transient and 2 steady-state experiments--was conducted from July of 1975 through June of 1976 where tritium was added to the CSTF. The CSTF circulated sodium fluoroborate at temperatures and pressures typical of MSBR operating conditions. Results from the experiments indicated that over 90 percent of tritium added at steady-state conditions was trapped by sodium fluoroborate and appeared in the off-gas system in a chemically combined (water-soluble) form and that a total of approximately 98 percent of the tritium added at steady-state conditions was removed through the off-gas system overall

  1. Tritium recovery from tritiated water with a two-stage palladium membrane reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birdsell, S.A.; Willms, R.S.

    1997-04-01

    A process to recover tritium from tritiated water has been successfully demonstrated at TSTA. The 2-stage palladium membrane reactor (PMR) is capable of recovering tritium from water without generating additional waste. This device can be used to recover tritium from the substantial amount of tritiated water that is expected to be generated in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor both from torus exhaust and auxiliary operations. A large quantity of tritiated waste water exists world wide because the predominant method of cleaning up tritiated streams is to oxidize tritium to tritiated water. The latter can be collected with high efficiency for subsequent disposal. The PMR is a combined catalytic reactor/permeator. Cold (non-tritium) water processing experiments were run in preparation for the tritiated water processing tests. Tritium was recovered from a container of molecular sieve loaded with 2,050 g (2,550 std. L) of water and 4.5 g of tritium. During this experiment, 27% (694 std. L) of the water was processed resulting in recovery of 1.2 g of tritium. The maximum water processing rate for the PMR system used was determined to be 0.5 slpm. This correlates well with the maximum processing rate determined from the smaller PMR system on the cold test bench and has resulted in valuable scale-up and design information.

  2. Tritium incorporation in corn and bean after an accute contamination with tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, H.A.; Archundia, C.; Bravo, G.; Nulman, R.; Ortiz Magana, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    Tritium produced by natural or artificial processes is set free in the environment, generally as tritiated water, which the plants use to produce organic compounds such as proteins, fats and carbohidrates. The metabolism of tritium depends on the chemical form in which it is found, transport studies of tritium in different ecosystems, and in particular in food chains, gradually have become more important as a result of the tritium increase in the environment. In Mexico, corn and beans have been studied due to their great importance in the human food chain. The determination of tritium in organic compounds (bound tritium) requires an efficient conversion to tritiated water. For this reason, in this work we have detailed a dry oxidation method, which is a modification of the method of Schoniger, which consists of combustion in oxygen initiated by a simple electrical device using a disposable nichrome resistance, which is also used as a sample carrier. Tritium determination is done by a liquid scintillation counter with quenching correction using an internal standard. Graphs of tritium activity are shown plotted against the time between the application of tritiated water and the time of harvest. The highest activity is found about the 18th day for corn and the 16th day for beans. The calculated values for the half-lives for corn and beans are approximately 56 and 43 days respectively. (author)

  3. Applications of tritium in industry and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, T.S.; Iyengar, T.S.

    1990-01-01

    As a naturally occuring isotope and as an injected tracer tritium has been found to be useful in meteorology, cosmology, geohydrology, biology, agriculture, and medical sciences both in aqueous and organic forms. In selfluminous compounds, paints and plastics the radioisotopic power of tritium (0.26 w/g) is found to be useful. Several biochemically significant tritium labelled compounds have been produced for use in industry and research. Tritium loaded consumer products are extensively used all over the world. In gas chromatographs and for neutron research tritium targets are found to be useful. This review summarises the various aspects of tritium as a tracer. (author). 7 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  4. Sol-gel synthesis of lithium metatitanate as tritium breeding material under different sintering conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Wang, Jing; Pu, Wenjing; Li, Kaiping; Ma, Shubing; Wang, Weihua

    2018-04-01

    Lithium metatitanate (Li2TiO3) is a promising tritium breeding material candidate for solid blanket of D-T fusion reactors, due to its high mechanical strength, chemical stability, and tritium release rate. In this paper, Li2TiO3 powder with homogeneous crystal structure is synthesized by sol-gel method. The chemical reactions in gel thermal cracking and sintering process are studied by thermo gravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC). The relationship between the sintering condition and the particle/grain size is characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results show that below 673 K the gel precursor is completely decomposed and Li2TiO3 phase initially forms. The LiTiO2 by-product formed under the reductive atmosphere in muffle furnace, could be oxidized continually to Li2TiO3 at higher sintering temperature (≥1273 K) for longer sintering time (≥10 h). Both grain and particle sizes rely on a linear growth with the increase of sintering time at 1273 K. Over 1473 K, significant agglomerations exist among particles. The optimal sintering condition is selected as 1273 K for 10 h, for the purer Li2TiO3 phase (>99%), smaller grain and particle size.

  5. Oxidation of UO2 at 400 to 1000 degrees C in air and its relevance to fission product release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCracken, D.R.

    1985-07-01

    Currently there is great interest in the behaviour of UO 2 under oxidizing conditions because irradiated uranium dioxide fuel can conceivably be exposed to a hot oxidizing atmosphere as a result of accidents. The temperature range covered in this paper is 400 to 1000 degrees C. At these high temperatures, UO 2 in air can oxidize rapidly to U 3 O 8 via U 3 O 7 and/or U 4 O 9 . The accompanying volume increase and corresponding stresses lead to fragmentation of the fuel pellets. The purpose of this work was to investigate the dependence of UO 2 oxidation on temperature, rate of air supply and residence time at temperature; to determine the rate controlling steps and rate of oxygen penetration; and to characterize the oxidation products and size of fragments. In addition, detailed metallography was related to X-ray diffraction studies of the oxidized UO 2 to facilitate future study of irradiated fuel, which is easier to do by metallography in hot-cells than by X-ray diffraction. Samples were heated in argon, then once at temperature they were exposed to air at a controlled flow-rate. Studies of the oxidation of unirradiated UO 2 pellets in air show two distinct types of oxidation with a change in mechanism at 600-700 degrees C. At temperatures ≤ 600 degrees C fragmentation accompanies the formation of U 3 O 8 while at T ≥ 800 degrees C, rapid grain growth occurs. In the first temperature region, volatile fission product releases are small, while in the second region, 100% release can be correlated with U 3 O 8 formation. In the first region, only the grain boundary inventory is released while in the other, 100% of the Xe, Kr, Ru, Sb, Cs and I are released. It appears that, within the error of present measurements, burnup does not affect rates of fission product release and oxidation in air at 400 to 1000 degrees C, so that oxidation rate data gathered using unirradiated pellets can be applied to irradiated fuel. 33 refs

  6. Analysis of in-situ tritium recovery from solid fusion-reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Clemmer, R.G.; Jankus, V.Z.; Rest, J.

    1980-01-01

    The proposed concept for in-situ tritium recovery from the STARFIRE blanket involves circulation of a low pressure (approx. 0.05 MPa) helium through formed channels in the highly porous solid breeding material. Tritium generated within the grains must diffuse to the grain boundaries, migrate through the grain boundaries to the particle surface and then percolate through the packed bed to the helium purge channel. Highly porous α-LiAlO 2 with a bimodal pore distribution is proposed for the breeding material to facilitate the tritium release

  7. Distribution of tritium in a nuclear process heat plant with HTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinwarz, W.; Stoever, D.; Hecker, R.; Thiele, W.

    1984-01-01

    The application of HTR-process heat in chemical processes involves low contamination of the product by tritium permeation through the heat exchanger walls. According to conservative assumptions for the tritium release rate and based on experimental permeation data of the German R und D-program a tritium concentration in the PNP-product gas of about 10 pCi/g was calculated. The domestic use of the product gas in unvented kitchen ranges as the most important direct radiation exposure pathway then leads to an effective equivalent radiation dose of only 20 μrem/a. (orig.)

  8. HEAT TRANSFER AND TRITIUM PRODUCING SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E.F.

    1962-06-01

    This invention related to a circulating lithium-containing blanket system in a neution source hav'ing a magnetic field associated therewith. The blanket serves simultaneously and efficiently as a heat transfer mediunm and as a source of tritium. The blanket is composed of a lithium-6-enriched fused salt selected from the group consisting of lithium nitrite, lithium nitrate, a mixture of said salts, a mixture of each of said salts with lithium oxide, and a mixture of said salts with each other and with lithium oxide. The moderator, which is contained within the blanket in a separate conduit, can be water. A stellarator is one of the neutron sources which can be used in this invention. (AEC)

  9. Water quality - Determination of tritium activity concentration - Liquid scintillation counting method (International Standard Publication ISO 9698:1989)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanik, J.

    1999-01-01

    This International Standard specifies a method for the determination of tritiated water ([ 3 H]H 2 O) activity concentration in water by liquid scintillation counting. The method is applicable to all types of water including seawater with tritium activity concentrations of up to 10 6 Bq/m 3 when using 20 ml counting vials. Below tritium activity concentrations of about 5 x 10 4 Bq/m 3[ 8], a prior enrichment step and/or the measurement of larger sample volumes can significantly improve the accuracy of the determination and lower the limit of detection. Tritium activity concentrations higher than 10 6 Bq/m 3 may be determined after appropriate dilution with distilled water of proven low tritium content. An alternative method for the determination of these higher activities involves increasing the tritium activity concentrations of the internal standard solution. The method is not applicable to the analysis of organically bound tritium; its determination requires an oxidative digestion

  10. Effects of long-term inhibition of neuronal nitric oxide synthase on blood pressure and renin release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ollerstam, A.; Skøtt, O.; Ek, J.

    2001-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by neuronal NO-synthase (nNOS) in macula densa cells may be involved in the control of renin release. 7-Nitro indazole (7-NI) inhibits nNOS, and we investigated the effect of short- (4 days) and long-term (4 weeks) 7-NI treatment on blood pressure (BP), plasma renin...

  11. Uptake and Release of Cerium During Fe-Oxide Formation and Transformation in Fe(II) Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedel, Sorin; Dideriksen, Knud; Christiansen, Bo C.

    2010-01-01

    of trace components. Further, Fe(II)-Fe(III) (hydr)oxides are redox active. Cerium, a member of the lanthanide family, can be used as an analogue for the tri- and tetra-valent actinides found in radioactive waste, expected to be stored in subsurface repositories. In experiments with ferrihydrite, Ce...... microscopy revealed that it formed discrete nanocrystals of CeO2(s). These results demonstrate that Fe-oxide interaction with radionuclides is likely to depend strongly on the local redox conditions. By analogy with Ce, the trivalent actinides are not expected to be sequestered by preformed GR in anoxic...... environments. Our results also suggest that trivalent actinides and lanthanides are released when dissimilatory iron reduction of Fe(III)-oxides leads to GR formation However, under oxidizing conditions, GR may influence radionuclide mobility by catalyzing their transformation to a higher oxidation state....

  12. Nitric oxide-releasing nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and cytotoxicity to tumorigenic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelegrino, Milena T.; Silva, Letícia C.; Watashi, Carolina M.; Haddad, Paula S.; Rodrigues, Tiago; Seabra, Amedea B.

    2017-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in several biological processes, including toxicity against tumor cells. The aim of this study was to synthesize, characterize, and evaluate the cytotoxicity of NO-releasing chitosan nanoparticles. A thiol-containing molecule, mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA), was encapsulated (encapsulation efficiency of 99%) in chitosan/sodium tripolyphosphate nanoparticles (CS NPs). The obtained nanoparticles showed an average hydrodynamic size of 108.40 ± 0.96 nm and polydispersity index of 0.26 ± 0.01. MSA-CS NPs were nitrosated leading to S-nitroso-MSA-CS NPs, which act as NO donor. The cytotoxicity of CS NPs, MSA-CS NPs, and S-nitroso-MSA-CS NPs were evaluated in several tumor cells, including human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2), mouse melanoma (B16F10), and human chronic myeloid leukemia (K562) cell lines and Lucena-1, a vincristine-resistant K562 cell line. Both CS NPs and MSA-CS NPs did not cause toxic effects in these cells, whereas S-nitroso-MSA-CS NPs caused potent cytotoxic effects in all the tested tumor cell lines. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration values of S-nitroso-MSA-CS NPs were 19.7, 10.5, 22.8, and 27.8 μg·mL-1 for HepG2, B16F10, K562, and Lucena-1 cells, respectively. In contrast, S-nitroso-MSA-CS NPs exhibited lower cytotoxic to non-tumorigenic melanocytes (Melan-A) when compared with melanoma B16F10. Therefore, the results highlight the potential use of NO-releasing CS NPs in antitumor chemotherapy.

  13. Nitric oxide-releasing nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and cytotoxicity to tumorigenic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelegrino, Milena T. [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Exact and Earth Sciences Department (Brazil); Silva, Letícia C.; Watashi, Carolina M. [Universidade Federal do ABC, UFABC, Center of Natural and Human Sciences (Brazil); Haddad, Paula S. [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Exact and Earth Sciences Department (Brazil); Rodrigues, Tiago; Seabra, Amedea B., E-mail: amedea.seabra@ufabc.edu.br [Universidade Federal do ABC, UFABC, Center of Natural and Human Sciences (Brazil)

    2017-02-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in several biological processes, including toxicity against tumor cells. The aim of this study was to synthesize, characterize, and evaluate the cytotoxicity of NO-releasing chitosan nanoparticles. A thiol-containing molecule, mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA), was encapsulated (encapsulation efficiency of 99%) in chitosan/sodium tripolyphosphate nanoparticles (CS NPs). The obtained nanoparticles showed an average hydrodynamic size of 108.40 ± 0.96 nm and polydispersity index of 0.26 ± 0.01. MSA-CS NPs were nitrosated leading to S-nitroso-MSA-CS NPs, which act as NO donor. The cytotoxicity of CS NPs, MSA-CS NPs, and S-nitroso-MSA-CS NPs were evaluated in several tumor cells, including human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2), mouse melanoma (B16F10), and human chronic myeloid leukemia (K562) cell lines and Lucena-1, a vincristine-resistant K562 cell line. Both CS NPs and MSA-CS NPs did not cause toxic effects in these cells, whereas S-nitroso-MSA-CS NPs caused potent cytotoxic effects in all the tested tumor cell lines. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration values of S-nitroso-MSA-CS NPs were 19.7, 10.5, 22.8, and 27.8 μg·mL{sup −1} for HepG2, B16F10, K562, and Lucena-1 cells, respectively. In contrast, S-nitroso-MSA-CS NPs exhibited lower cytotoxic to non-tumorigenic melanocytes (Melan-A) when compared with melanoma B16F10. Therefore, the results highlight the potential use of NO-releasing CS NPs in antitumor chemotherapy.

  14. Studies on chemical phenomena of high concentration tritium water and organic compounds of tritium from viewpoint of the tritium confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Hayashi, Takumi; Iwai, Yasunori; Isobe, Kanetsugu; Hara, Masanori; Sugiyama, Takahiko; Okuno, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    As a part of the grant-in-aid for scientific research on priority areas entitled 'frontiers of tritium researches toward fusion reactors', coordinated two research programs on chemical phenomena of high concentration tritium water and organic compounds of tritium from view point of the tritium confinement have been conducted by the C01 team. The results are summarized as follows: (1) Chemical effects of the high concentration tritium water on stainless steels as structural materials of fusion reactors were investigated. Basic data on tritium behaviors at the metal-water interface and corrosion of metal in tritium water were obtained. (2) Development of the tritium confinement and extraction system for the circulating cooling water in the fusion reactor was studied. Improvement was obtained in the performance of a chemical exchange column and catalysts as major components of the water processing system. (J.P.N.)

  15. Aqueously Released Graphene Oxide Embedded in Epoxy Resin Exhibits Different Characteristics and Phytotoxicity of Chlorella vulgaris from the Pristine Form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiangang; Kang, Weilu; Mu, Li

    2017-05-16

    The environmental release of nanoparticles is attracting increasing attention. Graphene oxide (GO) embedded in epoxy resin (ER) is a popular composite that has been used in various fields, but the environmental release of GO-ER composites and the effects on organisms in the environment remain unknown. The present work found that GO-ER composites in water for 2-7 days resulted in the release of 0.3-2.1% GO-ER at nanoscale (2-3 nm thickness and approximately 70-130 nm lateral length). Interestingly, pristine GO quenched 30-45% hydroxyl and 12% nitroxide free radicals, whereas this capacity was not observed for the released particles from GO-ER. At environmentally relevant concentrations (μg/L), released GO-ER particles, but not GO or ER matrix, promoted algal reproduction by 34% and chlorophyll biosynthesis by 65-127% at 96 h. Released GO-ER entered algal cells and induced a slight increase in reactive oxygen species but did not elicit notable cell structure damage. The upregulated amino acids and phenylalanine metabolism, and the downregulated fatty acid biosynthesis contributed to algal growth promoted by released GO-ER. Previous studies of pristine nanoparticles were unable to reflect the environmental effects of released nanoparticles into the environment, and our research on the exposure-toxicological continuum adds important contributions to this field.

  16. Hydrogen release at metal-oxide interfaces: A first principle study of hydrogenated Al/SiO{sub 2} interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jianqiu, E-mail: jianqiu@vt.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Goodwin Hall, 635 Prices Fork Road - MC 0238, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Tea, Eric; Li, Guanchen [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Goodwin Hall, 635 Prices Fork Road - MC 0238, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Hin, Celine [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Goodwin Hall, 635 Prices Fork Road - MC 0238, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Department of Material Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Goodwin Hall, 635 Prices Fork Road-MC 0238, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • Hydrogen release process at the Al/SiO{sub 2} metal-oxide interface has been investigated. • A mathematical model that estimates the hydrogen release potential has been proposed. • Al atoms, Al−O bonds, and Si−Al bonds are the major hydrogen traps at the Al/SiO{sub 2} interface. • Hydrogen atoms are primarily release from Al−H and O−H bonds at the Al/SiO{sub 2} metal-oxide interface. - Abstract: The Anode Hydrogen Release (AHR) mechanism at interfaces is responsible for the generation of defects, that traps charge carriers and can induce dielectric breakdown in Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors. The AHR has been extensively studied at Si/SiO{sub 2} interfaces but its characteristics at metal-silica interfaces remain unclear. In this study, we performed Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations to study the hydrogen release mechanism at the typical Al/SiO{sub 2} metal-oxide interface. We found that interstitial hydrogen atoms can break interfacial Al−Si bonds, passivating a Si sp{sup 3} orbital. Interstitial hydrogen atoms can also break interfacial Al−O bonds, or be adsorbed at the interface on aluminum, forming stable Al−H−Al bridges. We showed that hydrogenated O−H, Si−H and Al−H bonds at the Al/SiO{sub 2} interfaces are polarized. The resulting bond dipole weakens the O−H and Si−H bonds, but strengthens the Al−H bond under the application of a positive bias at the metal gate. Our calculations indicate that Al−H bonds and O−H bonds are more important than Si−H bonds for the hydrogen release process.

  17. Airborne Nanoparticle Release and Toxicological Risk from Metal-Oxide-Coated Textiles: Toward a Multiscale Safe-by-Design Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantecca, Paride; Kasemets, Kaja; Deokar, Archana; Perelshtein, Ilana; Gedanken, Aharon; Bahk, Yeon Kyoung; Kianfar, Baharh; Wang, Jing

    2017-08-15

    Nano metal oxides have been proposed as alternatives to silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs) for antibacterial coatings. Here, cotton and polyester-cotton fabrics were sonochemically coated with zinc oxide (ZnO) and copper oxide (CuO) NPs. By varying the reaction solvent (water or ethanol), NPs with different sizes and shapes were synthesized. The cytotoxic and pro-inflammatory effects of studied NPs were investigated in vitro in human alveolar epithelial A549 and macrophage-like THP1 cells. To understand the potential respiratory impact of the NPs, the coated textiles were subjected to the abrasion tests, and the released airborne particles were measured. A very small amount of the studied metal oxides NPs was released from abrasion of the textiles coated by the ethanol-based sonochemical process. The release from the water-based coating was comparably higher. Lung and immune cells viability decreased after 24 h of exposure only at the highest studied NPs concentration (100 μg/mL). Different from the ZnO NPs, both formulations of CuO NPs induced IL-8 release in the lung epithelial cells already at subtoxic concentrations (1-10 μg/mL) but not in immune cells. All of the studied NPs did not induce IL-6 release by the lung and immune cells. Calculations revealed that the exposures of the NPs to human lung due to the abrasion of the textiles were lower or comparable to the minimum doses in the cell viability tests (0.1 μg/mL), at which acute cytotoxicity was not observed. The results alleviate the concerns regarding the potential risk of these metal oxide NPs in their applications for the textile coating and provide insight for the safe-by-design approach.

  18. Oxygen release technique as a method for the determination of "δ-pO2-T" diagrams for MIEC oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkov, Ilya; Bychkov, Sergey; Matvienko, Alexander; Nemudry, Alexander

    2014-03-28

    A new approach to the determination of oxygen nonstoichiometry (δ) of MIEC oxides as a continuous function of pO2 at high temperatures was developed. The description of the model allowing one to distinguish the contribution of oxygen released from the samples to the partial pressure of oxygen at the outlet of the continuous-flow fixed-bed reactor after the stepwise change of the oxygen partial pressure of inlet gas from 0.2 to 10(-5) atm and to calculate the dependence of δ on pO2 is presented. The criterion for assessing the achievement of quasi equilibrium release of oxygen from the MIEC oxides is proposed. The adequacy of the method was confirmed by comparing the obtained and published data for well-studied SrCo0.8Fe0.2O3-δ and SrFeO3-δ MIEC oxides.

  19. An evaluation of retention and disposal options for tritium in fuel reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjamin, R.W. [E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Lab.; Hampson, D.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1987-12-31

    This report assesses the possible options for retention of tritium and its ultimate disposal during future reprocessing of irradiated oxide fuels discharged from light water reactors (LWRs) and liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs). The assessment includes an appraisal of the state of the retention and disposal options, an estimate of the dose commitments to the general public, an estimation of the incremental costs of the several retention and disposal options, and the potential reduction of the dose commitments resulting from retention and disposal of the tritium. The assessment is based upon an extensive study of tritium retention in reprocessing completed in 1982 by Grimes et al. Two plants were assumed, one to process LWR oxide fuel and the other to process LMFBR fuel. In each base case plant the tritium was vaporized to the atmosphere. Each of the hypothetical plants was assumed to be constructed during the 1990`s and to operate for a 20-year lifetime beginning in the year 2000 at a rate of 1,500 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM) per 300-d year. In addition to the base case (Case 1), six other cases which included tritium retention options were examined. Although many of the features of the base-case plants remain unchanged in the tritium retention options, each case requires some additions, deletions, and modifications of portions of the plants. The retained tritium must also be managed and disposed of in a manner that is environmentally acceptable.

  20. Evaluation of tritium analysis techniques for a continuous tritium monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, S.J.; Girton, R.C.

    1978-04-01

    Present methods for tritium monitoring are evaluated and a program is proposed to modify the existing methods or develop new instrumentation to establish a state-of-the-art monitoring capability for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. The capabilities, advantages, and disadvantages of the most popular counting and separation techniques are described. The following criteria were used to evaluate present methods: specificity, selectivity, precision, insensitivity to gamma radiation, and economy. A novel approach is explored to continuously separate the tritium from a complex mixture of stack gases. This approach, based on the different permeabilities of the stack gas constituents, is integrated into a complete monitoring system. This monitoring system is designed to perform real time tritium analysis. A schedule is presented for development and demonstration of the completed system

  1. Turkey Point tritium. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostlund, H.G.; Dorsey, H.G.

    1976-01-01

    In 1972-73 the Florida Power and Light Company (FPL) began operation of two nuclear reactors at Turkey Point on lower Biscayne Bay. One radioactive by-product resulting from the operation of the nuclear reactors, tritium, provides a unique opportunity to study transport and exchange processes on a local scale. Since the isotope in the form of water is not removed from the liquid effluent, it is discharged to the cooling canal system. By studying its residence time in the canal and the pathways by which it leaves the canals, knowledge of evaporative process, groundwater movement, and bay exchange with the ocean can be obtained. Preliminary results obtained from measurement of tritium levels, both in the canal system and in the surrounding environment are discussed. Waters in lower Biscayne Bay and Card and Barnes Sounds receive only a small portion of the total tritium produced by the nuclear plant. The dominating tritium loss most likely is through evaporation from the canals. The capability of measuring extremely low HTO levels allows the determination of the evaporation rate experimentally by measuring the tritium levels of air after having passed over the canals

  2. Tritium Management Loop Design Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rader, Jordan D. [ORNL; Felde, David K. [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Greenwood, Michael Scott [ORNL; Qualls, A L. [ORNL; Calderoni, Pattrick [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2017-12-01

    This report summarizes physical, chemical, and engineering analyses that have been done to support the development of a test loop to study tritium migration in 2LiF-BeF2 salts. The loop will operate under turbulent flow and a schematic of the apparatus has been used to develop a model in Mathcad to suggest flow parameters that should be targeted in loop operation. The introduction of tritium into the loop has been discussed as well as various means to capture or divert the tritium from egress through a test assembly. Permeation was calculated starting with a Modelica model for a transport through a nickel window into a vacuum, and modifying it for a FLiBe system with an argon sweep gas on the downstream side of the permeation interface. Results suggest that tritium removal with a simple tubular permeation device will occur readily. Although this system is idealized, it suggests that rapid measurement capability in the loop may be necessary to study and understand tritium removal from the system.

  3. Recommended radiological controls for tritium operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfield, G.

    1992-01-01

    This informal report presents recommendations for an adequate radiological protection program for tritium operations. Topics include hazards analysis, facility design, personnel protection equipment, training, operational procedures, radiation monitoring, to include surface and airborne tritium contamination, and program management