WorldWideScience

Sample records for trials network experience

  1. Oversight and Management of a Cell Therapy Clinical Trial Network: Experience and Lessons Learned

    OpenAIRE

    Moyé, Lemuel A.; Sayre, Shelly L.; Westbrook, Lynette; Jorgenson, Beth C.; Handberg, Eileen; Anwaruddin, Saif; Wagner, Kristi A.; Skarlatos, Sonia I.

    2011-01-01

    The Cardiovascular Cell Therapy Research Network (CCTRN), sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), was established to develop, coordinate, and conduct multiple collaborative protocols testing the effects of cell therapy on cardiovascular diseases. The Network was born into a difficult political and ethical climate created by the recent removal of a dozen drugs from the US formulary and the temporary halting of 27 gene therapy trials due to safety concerns. This arti...

  2. Oversight and management of a cell therapy clinical trial network: experience and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyé, Lemuel A; Sayre, Shelly L; Westbrook, Lynette; Jorgenson, Beth C; Handberg, Eileen; Anwaruddin, Saif; Wagner, Kristi A; Skarlatos, Sonia I

    2011-09-01

    The Cardiovascular Cell Therapy Research Network (CCTRN), sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), was established to develop, coordinate, and conduct multiple collaborative protocols testing the effects of cell therapy on cardiovascular diseases. The Network was born into a difficult political and ethical climate created by the recent removal of a dozen drugs from the US formulary and the temporary halting of 27 gene therapy trials due to safety concerns. This article describes the Network's challenges as it initiated three protocols in a polarized cultural atmosphere at a time when oversight bodies were positioning themselves for the tightest vigilance of promising new therapies. Effective strategies involving ongoing education, open communication, and relationship building with the oversight community are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Appalachian Tri-State Node Experiences with the National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Thomas M; Daley, Dennis C; Byrne, Mimmie; Demarzo, Larry; Smith, Doris; Madl, Stephanie

    2011-07-01

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)-sponsored Clinical Trial Network (CTN) recently celebrated 10 years of conducting "real world" research into the treatment of addiction. This article reviews the history and results of the most recent CTN studies and describes the experiences of one of the 13 participating research affiliates, the Appalachian Tri-State (ATS) Node. We discuss our "bidirectional" collaboration with multiple community treatment programs (CTPs) on research and dissemination activities and include their experiences as a member of our ATS Node.Results of CTN clinical trials have found unexpectedly that treatment as usual (TAU) is often almost as good as evidence-based interventions such as Motivational Interviewing (MI), possibly due to the difficulty in implementing evidence-based practices most effectively among divergent treatment sites and heterogeneous clinical populations. Some expected findings from the reviewed research are that severity of addiction and comorbidity moderate treatment outcomes and must be accounted for in future CTN-sponsored studies. Notwithstanding these results, much has been learned and recommendations are suggested for changes in CTN research designs that will address methodological limitations and increase treatment effectiveness in future CTN studies.

  4. NCI National Clinical Trials Network Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about how the National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) is structured. The NCTN is a program of the National Cancer Institute that gives funds and other support to cancer research organizations to conduct cancer clinical trials.

  5. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Clinical Trial Network. Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    inherited orphan retinal degenerative diseases and dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) through the conduct of clinical trials and other...design and conduct of effective and efficient clinical trials for inherited orphan retinal degenerative diseases and dry AMD; • Limited number and...linica l trial in the NEER network for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa, and the ProgSTAR studies for Stargardt disease ) . As new interventions b

  6. AIDS Clinical Trials Group Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bylaws, SOPs, and Guidelines Leadership and Operations Center Network Coordinating Center Statistical and Data Management Center Performance ... Accessibility Our Mission The mission of the ACTG Network is to cure HIV infection and reduce the ...

  7. Canada-Africa Prevention Trials Network : Building African Capacity ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Canada-Africa Prevention Trials Network : Building African Capacity for HIV/AIDS Prevention Trials. The Canada-Africa Prevention Trials Network (CAPT Network) was formed through a capacity building grant from the Global Health Research Initiative (GHRI). The Network comprises eight African centres (four in Uganda, ...

  8. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Clinical Trial Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    clinical efforts that will impact the NEER network going forward and laid the ground work for the CTECs to participate in ongoing clinical trials for...Clinical Implications: • How will the proposed clinical trial have a significant impact on disease outcome? 34 • How will the clinical trial offer...was 0 041U>< for pat<t!nts NPtS and <H08, 0 4 1ux !01 Ct 110, 1nd 10.0 lux f01 < H13 OJ)Ilo •her on~tion are indiuttd AhtrNtor19 stimuli Wl’f1! pres

  9. Internet trials: participant experiences and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Erin; Barratt, Alexandra; Carter, Stacy M; Jamtvedt, Gro

    2012-10-23

    Use of the Internet to conduct randomised controlled trials is increasing, and provides potential to increase equity of access to medical research, increase the generalisability of trial results and decrease the costs involved in conducting large scale trials. Several studies have compared response rates, completeness of data, and reliability of surveys using the Internet and traditional methods, but very little is known about participants' attitudes towards Internet-based randomised trials or their experience of participating in an Internet-based trial. To obtain insights into the experiences and perspectives of participants in an Internet-based randomised controlled trial, their attitudes to the use of the Internet to conduct medical research, and their intentions regarding future participation in Internet research. All English speaking participants in a recently completed Internet randomised controlled trial were invited to participate in an online survey. 1246 invitations were emailed. 416 participants completed the survey between May and October 2009 (33% response rate). Reasons given for participating in the Internet RCT fell into 4 main areas: personal interest in the research question and outcome, ease of participation, an appreciation of the importance of research and altruistic reasons. Participants' comments and reflections on their experience of participating in a fully online trial were positive and less than half of participants would have participated in the trial had it been conducted using other means of data collection. However participants identified trade-offs between the benefits and downsides of participating in Internet-based trials. The main trade-off was between flexibility and convenience - a perceived benefit - and a lack connectedness and understanding - a perceived disadvantage. The other tradeoffs were in the areas of: ease or difficulty in use of the Internet; security, privacy and confidentiality issues; perceived benefits and

  10. Re-Engineering Alzheimer Clinical Trials: Global Alzheimer's Platform Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, J; Aisen, P; Barton, R; Bork, J; Doody, R; Dwyer, J; Egan, J C; Feldman, H; Lappin, D; Truyen, L; Salloway, S; Sperling, R; Vradenburg, G

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) drug development is costly, time-consuming, and inefficient. Trial site functions, trial design, and patient recruitment for trials all require improvement. The Global Alzheimer Platform (GAP) was initiated in response to these challenges. Four GAP work streams evolved in the US to address different trial challenges: 1) registry-to-cohort web-based recruitment; 2) clinical trial site activation and site network construction (GAP-NET); 3) adaptive proof-of-concept clinical trial design; and 4) finance and fund raising. GAP-NET proposes to establish a standardized network of continuously funded trial sites that are highly qualified to perform trials (with established clinical, biomarker, imaging capability; certified raters; sophisticated management system. GAP-NET will conduct trials for academic and biopharma industry partners using standardized instrument versions and administration. Collaboration with the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI) European Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease (EPAD) program, the Canadian Consortium on Neurodegeneration in Aging (CCNA) and other similar international initiatives will allow conduct of global trials. GAP-NET aims to increase trial efficiency and quality, decrease trial redundancy, accelerate cohort development and trial recruitment, and decrease trial costs. The value proposition for sites includes stable funding and uniform training and trial execution; the value to trial sponsors is decreased trial costs, reduced time to execute trials, and enhanced data quality. The value for patients and society is the more rapid availability of new treatments for AD.

  11. Laboratory Experiments for Network Security Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brustoloni, Jose Carlos

    2006-01-01

    We describe a sequence of five experiments on network security that cast students successively in the roles of computer user, programmer, and system administrator. Unlike experiments described in several previous papers, these experiments avoid placing students in the role of attacker. Each experiment starts with an in-class demonstration of an…

  12. Internet trials: participant experiences and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Use of the Internet to conduct randomised controlled trials is increasing, and provides potential to increase equity of access to medical research, increase the generalisability of trial results and decrease the costs involved in conducting large scale trials. Several studies have compared response rates, completeness of data, and reliability of surveys using the Internet and traditional methods, but very little is known about participants’ attitudes towards Internet-based randomised trials or their experience of participating in an Internet-based trial. Objective To obtain insights into the experiences and perspectives of participants in an Internet-based randomised controlled trial, their attitudes to the use of the Internet to conduct medical research, and their intentions regarding future participation in Internet research. Methods All English speaking participants in a recently completed Internet randomised controlled trial were invited to participate in an online survey. Results 1246 invitations were emailed. 416 participants completed the survey between May and October 2009 (33% response rate). Reasons given for participating in the Internet RCT fell into 4 main areas: personal interest in the research question and outcome, ease of participation, an appreciation of the importance of research and altruistic reasons. Participants’ comments and reflections on their experience of participating in a fully online trial were positive and less than half of participants would have participated in the trial had it been conducted using other means of data collection. However participants identified trade-offs between the benefits and downsides of participating in Internet-based trials. The main trade-off was between flexibility and convenience – a perceived benefit – and a lack connectedness and understanding – a perceived disadvantage. The other tradeoffs were in the areas of: ease or difficulty in use of the Internet; security, privacy and

  13. Internet trials: participant experiences and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Erin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of the Internet to conduct randomised controlled trials is increasing, and provides potential to increase equity of access to medical research, increase the generalisability of trial results and decrease the costs involved in conducting large scale trials. Several studies have compared response rates, completeness of data, and reliability of surveys using the Internet and traditional methods, but very little is known about participants’ attitudes towards Internet-based randomised trials or their experience of participating in an Internet-based trial. Objective To obtain insights into the experiences and perspectives of participants in an Internet-based randomised controlled trial, their attitudes to the use of the Internet to conduct medical research, and their intentions regarding future participation in Internet research. Methods All English speaking participants in a recently completed Internet randomised controlled trial were invited to participate in an online survey. Results 1246 invitations were emailed. 416 participants completed the survey between May and October 2009 (33% response rate. Reasons given for participating in the Internet RCT fell into 4 main areas: personal interest in the research question and outcome, ease of participation, an appreciation of the importance of research and altruistic reasons. Participants’ comments and reflections on their experience of participating in a fully online trial were positive and less than half of participants would have participated in the trial had it been conducted using other means of data collection. However participants identified trade-offs between the benefits and downsides of participating in Internet-based trials. The main trade-off was between flexibility and convenience – a perceived benefit – and a lack connectedness and understanding – a perceived disadvantage. The other tradeoffs were in the areas of: ease or difficulty in use of the Internet

  14. The UK clinical research network--has it been a success for dermatology clinical trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kim S; Koller, Karin; Foster, Katharine; Perdue, Jo; Charlesworth, Lisa; Chalmers, Joanne R

    2011-06-16

    Following the successful introduction of five topic-specific research networks in the UK, the Comprehensive Local Research Network (CLRN) was established in 2008 in order to provide a blanket level of support across the whole country regardless of the clinical discipline. The role of the CLRN was to facilitate recruitment into clinical trials, and to encourage greater engagement in research throughout the National Health Service (NHS). This report evaluates the impact of clinical research networks in supporting clinical trials in the UK, with particular reference to our experiences from two non-commercial dermatology trials. It covers our experience of engaging with the CLRN (and other research networks) using two non-commercial dermatology trials as case studies. We present the circumstances that led to our approach to the research networks for support, and the impact that this support had on the delivery of these trials. In both cases, recruitment was boosted considerably following the provision of additional support, although other factors such as the availability of experienced personnel, and the role of advertising and media coverage in promoting the trials were also important in translating this additional resource into increased recruitment. Recruitment into clinical trials is a complex task that can be influenced by many factors. A world-class clinical research infrastructure is now in place in England (with similar support available in Scotland and Wales), and it is the responsibility of the research community to ensure that this unique resource is used effectively and responsibly.

  15. Numerical experiments with neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Enrique.

    1990-01-01

    Neural networks are highly idealized models which, in spite of their simplicity, reproduce some key features of the real brain. In this paper, they are introduced at a level adequate for an undergraduate computational physics course. Some relevant magnitudes are defined and evaluated numerically for the Hopfield model and a short term memory model. (Author)

  16. Enabling software defined networking experiments in networked critical infrastructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béla Genge

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the fact that Networked Critical Infrastructures (NCI, e.g., power plants, water plants, oil and gas distribution infrastructures, and electricity grids, are targeted by significant cyber threats is well known. Nevertheless, recent research has shown that specific characteristics of NCI can be exploited in the enabling of more efficient mitigation techniques, while novel techniques from the field of IP networks can bring significant advantages. In this paper we explore the interconnection of NCI communication infrastructures with Software Defined Networking (SDN-enabled network topologies. SDN provides the means to create virtual networking services and to implement global networking decisions. It relies on OpenFlow to enable communication with remote devices and has been recently categorized as the “Next Big Technology”, which will revolutionize the way decisions are implemented in switches and routers. Therefore, the paper documents the first steps towards enabling an SDN-NCI and presents the impact of a Denial of Service experiment over traffic resulting from an XBee sensor network which is routed across an emulated SDN network.

  17. NETWORK UNIVERSITIES: INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE AND TRENDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Г А Краснова

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to networking foreign universities, in particular, it considers the experience of cooperation of Vietnamese and Chinese universities with the leading universities of the world and the implementation of joint educational projects. The article deals with the basic characteristics of university networks that emerged in the last decade in developing countries. The authors analyzed the model, sources of financing, the organization of educational process, teaching of languages and the number of students in the university network, as well as the main mechanisms that allow open network structure of education in different countries of the world. The authors also address the main reasons for encouraging networking of foreign universities.

  18. Distributed control network for optogenetic experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprowicz, G.; Juszczyk, B.; Mankiewicz, L.

    2014-11-01

    Nowadays optogenetic experiments are constructed to examine social behavioural relations in groups of animals. A novel concept of implantable device with distributed control network and advanced positioning capabilities is proposed. It is based on wireless energy transfer technology, micro-power radio interface and advanced signal processing.

  19. EDCTP regional networks of excellence: initial merits for planned clinical trials in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miiro, George M; Oukem-Boyer, Odile Ouwe Missi; Sarr, Ousmane; Rahmani, Maerangis; Ntoumi, Francine; Dheda, Keertan; Pym, Alexander; Mboup, Souleymane; Kaleebu, Pontiano

    2013-03-22

    Achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and combating hotspots with escalating but preventable communicable diseases remain major challenges in Africa. The European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (EDCTP) intervened to combat poverty-related diseases including malaria, tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS, and to conduct multi-centre clinical trials and multi-disciplinary health research through an innovative model of regional Networks of Excellence (NoEs). We participated in a quasi-formative evaluation between October and December 2011 on the 4 regional-led research networks. These included the: Central Africa Network on Tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS and Malaria (CANTAM); East African Consortium for Clinical Research (EACCR); West African Network of Excellence for TB, AIDS and Malaria (WANETAM), and the Trials of Excellence for Southern Africa (TESA) launched between 2009 and 2010. We shared a participatory appraisal of field reports, progress reports and presentations from each network to jointly outline the initial experiences of the merits, outputs and lessons learnt. The self-regulating democratic networks, with 64 institutions in 21 African countries, have trained over 1, 000 African scientists, upgraded 36 sites for clinical trials, leveraged additional € 24 million and generated 38 peer-reviewed publications through networking and partnerships. The shared initial merits and lessons learnt portray in part the strengthened capacity of these networks for improved research coordination and conduct of planned multi-center clinical trials in Africa. Increased funding by African agencies, governments and international health partners will ensure sustainability of these networks for research capacity development and demonstrate their commitment to achieving the MDGs in Africa.

  20. The UK clinical research network - has it been a success for dermatology clinical trials?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlesworth Lisa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following the successful introduction of five topic-specific research networks in the UK, the Comprehensive Local Research Network (CLRN was established in 2008 in order to provide a blanket level of support across the whole country regardless of the clinical discipline. The role of the CLRN was to facilitate recruitment into clinical trials, and to encourage greater engagement in research throughout the National Health Service (NHS. Methods This report evaluates the impact of clinical research networks in supporting clinical trials in the UK, with particular reference to our experiences from two non-commercial dermatology trials. It covers our experience of engaging with the CLRN (and other research networks using two non-commercial dermatology trials as case studies. We present the circumstances that led to our approach to the research networks for support, and the impact that this support had on the delivery of these trials. Results In both cases, recruitment was boosted considerably following the provision of additional support, although other factors such as the availability of experienced personnel, and the role of advertising and media coverage in promoting the trials were also important in translating this additional resource into increased recruitment. Conclusions Recruitment into clinical trials is a complex task that can be influenced by many factors. A world-class clinical research infrastructure is now in place in England (with similar support available in Scotland and Wales, and it is the responsibility of the research community to ensure that this unique resource is used effectively and responsibly.

  1. THE EXPERIENCE OF NETWORKING POSTGRADUATE TRAINING PROGRAMMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Teplyashina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Present scientific and innovative education programmes focus on the development of applied research in priority areas of industry, cross-industry and regional development. Implementation of such programs is most effective along with the network organization of the process of training. In accordance with the Federal Law on Education in the Russian Federation, this model of networking as «educational institution – educational organization» is a very convenient form of academic mobility realisation.The aim of the present paper is to analyse the model of interaction of the networking postgraduate training programmes at Krasnoyarsk State Medical University named after Prof. V. F. Voino-Yasenetsky and Medical School of Niigata University (Japan.Methodology and research methods involve theoretical analysis of the scientific outcomes of implementing a networking postgraduate training programme, comparative-teaching method, generalization, and pedagogical modeling.Results. The mechanisms of developing the partnership between universities of different countries are detailed. The experience of network international education in a postgraduate study is presented. The presented experience allowed the authors to develop an integrated strategy of cooperation with foreign colleagues in this direction. The advantages and problems of use of a network form of training of academic and teaching staff in a postgraduate school are revealed. The proposals and recommendations on optimization and harmonization of the purposes, tasks and programs of network interaction of the educational organizations are formulated.Practical significance. The proposed materials of the publication can form the base for creation and designing of an effective system of postgraduate education and competitiveness growth of the Russian universities. 

  2. First Lessons From The Biarritz Trial Network [1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touyarot, P.; Marc, B.; de Panafieu, A.

    1986-07-01

    Opened for commercial operation in 1984, the trial optical fiber network at Biarritz in south-west France gives 1,500 subscribers access to a whole range of broadband services - videophony, audiovisual databases, TV and stereo sound program distribution, and an on-line TV program library - in addition to conventional narrow-band services like telephony and videotex. The Biarritz network is an outstanding technology and engineering testbed. It is also a sociological testing ground for new services, unique in the world, with results of particular relevance to the interactive cable TV and visual communications networks of the future.

  3. Belle-II Experiment Network Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asner, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bell, Greg [ESnet; Carlson, Tim [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cowley, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dart, Eli [ESnet; Erwin, Brock [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Godang, Romulus [Univ. of South Alabama, Mobile, AL (United States); Hara, Takanori [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Johnson, Jerry [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Ron [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Johnston, Bill [ESnet; Dam, Kerstin Kleese-van [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kaneko, Toshiaki [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Kubota, Yoshihiro [NII; Kuhr, Thomas [Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology (KIT) (Germany); McCoy, John [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Miyake, Hideki [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Monga, Inder [ESnet; Nakamura, Motonori [NII; Piilonen, Leo [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Pordes, Ruth [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Ray, Douglas [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Russell, Richard [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schram, Malachi [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schroeder, Jim [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sevior, Martin [Univ. of Melbourne (Australia); Singh, Surya [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Suzuki, Soh [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Sasaki, Takashi [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Williams, Jim [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2013-05-28

    The Belle experiment, part of a broad-based search for new physics, is a collaboration of ~400 physicists from 55 institutions across four continents. The Belle detector is located at the KEKB accelerator in Tsukuba, Japan. The Belle detector was operated at the asymmetric electron-positron collider KEKB from 1999-2010. The detector accumulated more than 1 ab-1 of integrated luminosity, corresponding to more than 2 PB of data near 10 GeV center-of-mass energy. Recently, KEK has initiated a $400 million accelerator upgrade to be called SuperKEKB, designed to produce instantaneous and integrated luminosity two orders of magnitude greater than KEKB. The new international collaboration at SuperKEKB is called Belle II. The first data from Belle II/SuperKEKB is expected in 2015. In October 2012, senior members of the Belle-II collaboration gathered at PNNL to discuss the computing and neworking requirements of the Belle-II experiment with ESnet staff and other computing and networking experts. The day-and-a-half-long workshop characterized the instruments and facilities used in the experiment, the process of science for Belle-II, and the computing and networking equipment and configuration requirements to realize the full scientific potential of the collaboration's work.

  4. Learning in innovation networks: Some simulation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Nigel; Ahrweiler, Petra; Pyka, Andreas

    2007-05-01

    According to the organizational learning literature, the greatest competitive advantage a firm has is its ability to learn. In this paper, a framework for modeling learning competence in firms is presented to improve the understanding of managing innovation. Firms with different knowledge stocks attempt to improve their economic performance by engaging in radical or incremental innovation activities and through partnerships and networking with other firms. In trying to vary and/or to stabilize their knowledge stocks by organizational learning, they attempt to adapt to environmental requirements while the market strongly selects on the results. The simulation experiments show the impact of different learning activities, underlining the importance of innovation and learning.

  5. The child and adolescent psychiatry trials network (CAPTN: infrastructure development and lessons learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breland-Noble Alfiee

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2003, the National Institute of Mental Health funded the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Trials Network (CAPTN under the Advanced Center for Services and Intervention Research (ACSIR mechanism. At the time, CAPTN was believed to be both a highly innovative undertaking and a highly speculative one. One reviewer even suggested that CAPTN was "unlikely to succeed, but would be a valuable learning experience for the field." Objective To describe valuable lessons learned in building a clinical research network in pediatric psychiatry, including innovations intended to decrease barriers to research participation. Methods The CAPTN Team has completed construction of the CAPTN network infrastructure, conducted a large, multi-center psychometric study of a novel adverse event reporting tool, and initiated a large antidepressant safety registry and linked pharmacogenomic study focused on severe adverse events. Specific challenges overcome included establishing structures for network organization and governance; recruiting over 150 active CAPTN participants and 15 child psychiatry training programs; developing and implementing procedures for site contracts, regulatory compliance, indemnification and malpractice coverage, human subjects protection training and IRB approval; and constructing an innovative electronic casa report form (eCRF running on a web-based electronic data capture system; and, finally, establishing procedures for audit trail oversight requirements put forward by, among others, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA. Conclusion Given stable funding for network construction and maintenance, our experience demonstrates that judicious use of web-based technologies for profiling investigators, investigator training, and capturing clinical trials data, when coupled to innovative approaches to network governance, data management and site management, can reduce the costs and burden and improve the feasibility of

  6. Clinical trial network for the promotion of clinical research for rare diseases in Japan: muscular dystrophy clinical trial network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Reiko; Ogata, Katsuhisa; Tamaura, Akemi; Kimura, En; Ohata, Maki; Takeshita, Eri; Nakamura, Harumasa; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Komaki, Hirofumi

    2016-07-11

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most commonly inherited neuromuscular disease. Therapeutic agents for the treatment of rare disease, namely "orphan drugs", have recently drawn the attention of researchers and pharmaceutical companies. To ensure the successful conduction of clinical trials to evaluate novel treatments for patients with rare diseases, an appropriate infrastructure is needed. One of the effective solutions for the lack of infrastructure is to establish a network of rare diseases. To accomplish the conduction of clinical trials in Japan, the Muscular dystrophy clinical trial network (MDCTN) was established by the clinical research group for muscular dystrophy, including the National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, as well as national and university hospitals, all which have a long-standing history of research cooperation. Thirty-one medical institutions (17 national hospital organizations, 10 university hospitals, 1 national center, 2 public hospitals, and 1 private hospital) belong to this network and collaborate to facilitate clinical trials. The Care and Treatment Site Registry (CTSR) calculates and reports the proportion of patients with neuromuscular diseases in the cooperating sites. In total, there are 5,589 patients with neuromuscular diseases in Japan and the proportion of patients with each disease is as follows: DMD, 29 %; myotonic dystrophy type 1, 23 %; limb girdle muscular dystrophy, 11 %; Becker muscular dystrophy, 10 %. We work jointly to share updated health care information and standardized evaluations of clinical outcomes as well. The collaboration with the patient registry (CTSR), allows the MDCTN to recruit DMD participants with specific mutations and conditions, in a remarkably short period of time. Counting with a network that operates at a national level is important to address the corresponding national issues. Thus, our network will be able to contribute with international research activity, which can lead to

  7. Automatic generation of randomized trial sequences for priming experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihrke, Matthias; Behrendt, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    In most psychological experiments, a randomized presentation of successive displays is crucial for the validity of the results. For some paradigms, this is not a trivial issue because trials are interdependent, e.g., priming paradigms. We present a software that automatically generates optimized trial sequences for (negative-) priming experiments. Our implementation is based on an optimization heuristic known as genetic algorithms that allows for an intuitive interpretation due to its similarity to natural evolution. The program features a graphical user interface that allows the user to generate trial sequences and to interactively improve them. The software is based on freely available software and is released under the GNU General Public License.

  8. Guidance for Researchers Developing and Conducting Clinical Trials in Practice-based Research Networks (PBRNs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolor, Rowena J.; Schmit, Kristine M.; Graham, Deborah G.; Fox, Chester H.; Baldwin, Laura Mae

    2015-01-01

    Background There is increased interest nationally in multicenter clinical trials to answer questions about clinical effectiveness, comparative effectiveness, and safety in real-world community settings. Primary care practice-based research networks (PBRNs), comprising community- and/or academically affiliated practices committed to improving medical care for a range of health problems, offer ideal settings for these trials, especially pragmatic clinical trials. However, many researchers are not familiar with working with PBRNs. Methods Experts in practice-based research identified solutions to challenges that researchers and PBRN personnel experience when collaborating on clinical trials in PBRNs. These were organized as frequently asked questions in a draft document presented at a 2013 Agency for Health care Research and Quality PBRN conference workshop, revised based on participant feedback, then shared with additional experts from the DARTNet Institute, Clinical Translational Science Award PBRN, and North American Primary Care Research Group PBRN workgroups for further input and modification. Results The “Toolkit for Developing and Conducting Multi-site Clinical Trials in Practice-Based Research Networks” offers guidance in the areas of recruiting and engaging practices, budgeting, project management, and communication, as well as templates and examples of tools important in developing and conducting clinical trials. Conclusion Ensuring the successful development and conduct of clinical trials in PBRNs requires a highly collaborative approach between academic research and PBRN teams. PMID:25381071

  9. Complementary feeding: a Global Network cluster randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasha Omrana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inadequate and inappropriate complementary feeding are major factors contributing to excess morbidity and mortality in young children in low resource settings. Animal source foods in particular are cited as essential to achieve micronutrient requirements. The efficacy of the recommendation for regular meat consumption, however, has not been systematically evaluated. Methods/Design A cluster randomized efficacy trial was designed to test the hypothesis that 12 months of daily intake of beef added as a complementary food would result in greater linear growth velocity than a micronutrient fortified equi-caloric rice-soy cereal supplement. The study is being conducted in 4 sites of the Global Network for Women's and Children's Health Research located in Guatemala, Pakistan, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC and Zambia in communities with toddler stunting rates of at least 20%. Five clusters per country were randomized to each of the food arms, with 30 infants in each cluster. The daily meat or cereal supplement was delivered to the home by community coordinators, starting when the infants were 6 months of age and continuing through 18 months. All participating mothers received nutrition education messages to enhance complementary feeding practices delivered by study coordinators and through posters at the local health center. Outcome measures, obtained at 6, 9, 12, and 18 months by a separate assessment team, included anthropometry; dietary variety and diversity scores; biomarkers of iron, zinc and Vitamin B12 status (18 months; neurocognitive development (12 and 18 months; and incidence of infectious morbidity throughout the trial. The trial was supervised by a trial steering committee, and an independent data monitoring committee provided oversight for the safety and conduct of the trial. Discussion Findings from this trial will test the efficacy of daily intake of meat commencing at age 6 months and, if beneficial, will

  10. Are multiple-trial experiments appropriate for eyewitness identification studies? Accuracy, choosing, and confidence across trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, J K; Beaudry, J L; Lindsay, R C L

    2017-12-01

    Eyewitness identification experiments typically involve a single trial: A participant views an event and subsequently makes a lineup decision. As compared to this single-trial paradigm, multiple-trial designs are more efficient, but significantly reduce ecological validity and may affect the strategies that participants use to make lineup decisions. We examined the effects of a number of forensically relevant variables (i.e., memory strength, type of disguise, degree of disguise, and lineup type) on eyewitness accuracy, choosing, and confidence across 12 target-present and 12 target-absent lineup trials (N = 349; 8,376 lineup decisions). The rates of correct rejections and choosing (across both target-present and target-absent lineups) did not vary across the 24 trials, as reflected by main effects or interactions with trial number. Trial number had a significant but trivial quadratic effect on correct identifications (OR = 0.99) and interacted significantly, but again trivially, with disguise type (OR = 1.00). Trial number did not significantly influence participants' confidence in correct identifications, confidence in correct rejections, or confidence in target-absent selections. Thus, multiple-trial designs appear to have minimal effects on eyewitness accuracy, choosing, and confidence. Researchers should thus consider using multiple-trial designs for conducting eyewitness identification experiments.

  11. Incorporating alternative design clinical trials in network meta-analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorlund K

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Kristian Thorlund,1–3 Eric Druyts,1,4 Kabirraaj Toor,1,5 Jeroen P Jansen,1,6 Edward J Mills1,3 1Redwood Outcomes, Vancouver, BC, 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada; 3Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA; 4Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, 5School of Population and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 6Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA Introduction: Network meta-analysis (NMA is an extension of conventional pairwise meta-analysis that allows for simultaneous comparison of multiple interventions. Well-established drug class efficacies have become commonplace in many disease areas. Thus, for reasons of ethics and equipoise, it is not practical to randomize patients to placebo or older drug classes. Unique randomized clinical trial designs are an attempt to navigate these obstacles. These alternative designs, however, pose challenges when attempting to incorporate data into NMAs. Using ulcerative colitis as an example, we illustrate an example of a method where data provided by these trials are used to populate treatment networks. Methods: We present the methods used to convert data from the PURSUIT trial into a typical parallel design for inclusion in our NMA. Data were required for three arms: golimumab 100 mg; golimumab 50 mg; and placebo. Golimumab 100 mg induction data were available; however, data regarding those individuals who were nonresponders at induction and those who were responders at maintenance were not reported, and as such, had to be imputed using data from the rerandomization phase. Golimumab 50 mg data regarding responses at week 6 were not available. Existing relationships between the available components were used to impute the expected proportions in this missing subpopulation. Data for placebo maintenance

  12. Experiments with arbitrary networks in time-multiplexed delay systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Joseph D.; Schmadel, Don C.; Murphy, Thomas E.; Roy, Rajarshi

    2017-12-01

    We report a new experimental approach using an optoelectronic feedback loop to investigate the dynamics of oscillators coupled on large complex networks with arbitrary topology. Our implementation is based on a single optoelectronic feedback loop with time delays. We use the space-time interpretation of systems with time delay to create large networks of coupled maps. Others have performed similar experiments using high-pass filters to implement the coupling; this restricts the network topology to the coupling of only a few nearest neighbors. In our experiment, the time delays and coupling are implemented on a field-programmable gate array, allowing the creation of networks with arbitrary coupling topology. This system has many advantages: the network nodes are truly identical, the network is easily reconfigurable, and the network dynamics occur at high speeds. We use this system to study cluster synchronization and chimera states in both small and large networks of different topologies.

  13. Citation networks of related trials are often disconnected: implications for bidirectional citation searches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Karen A; Dunn, Adam G; Tsafnat, Guy; Glasziou, Paul

    2014-07-01

    Reports of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) should set findings within the context of previous research. The resulting network of citations would also provide an alternative search method for clinicians, researchers, and systematic reviewers seeking to base decisions on all available evidence. We sought to determine the connectedness of citation networks of RCTs by examining direct (referenced trials) and indirect (through references of referenced trials, etc) citation of trials to one another. Meta-analyses were used to create citation networks of RCTs addressing the same clinical questions. The primary measure was the proportion of networks where following citation links between RCTs identifies the complete set of RCTs, forming a single connected citation group. Other measures included the number of disconnected groups (islands) within each network, the number of citations in the network relative to the maximum possible, and the maximum number of links in the path between two connected trials (a measure of indirectness of citations). We included 259 meta-analyses with a total of 2,413 and a median of seven RCTs each. For 46% (118 of 259) of networks, the RCTs formed a single connected citation group-one island. For the other 54% of networks, where at least one RCT group was not cited by others, 39% had two citation islands and 4% (10 of 257) had 10 or more islands. On average, the citation networks had 38% of the possible citations to other trials (if each trial had cited all earlier trials). The number of citation islands and the maximum number of citation links increased with increasing numbers of trials in the network. Available evidence to answer a clinical question may be identified by using network citations created with a small initial corpus of eligible trials. However, the number of islands means that citation networks cannot be relied on for evidence retrieval. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Brookhaven Reactor Experiment Control Facility, a distributed function computer network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimmler, D.G.; Greenlaw, N.; Kelley, M.A.; Potter, D.W.; Rankowitz, S.; Stubblefield, F.W.

    1975-11-01

    A computer network for real-time data acquisition, monitoring and control of a series of experiments at the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor has been developed and has been set into routine operation. This reactor experiment control facility presently services nine neutron spectrometers and one x-ray diffractometer. Several additional experiment connections are in progress. The architecture of the facility is based on a distributed function network concept. A statement of implementation and results is presented

  15. A Mobile Satellite Experiment (MSAT-X) network definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Charles C.; Yan, Tsun-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The network architecture development of the Mobile Satellite Experiment (MSAT-X) project for the past few years is described. The results and findings of the network research activities carried out under the MSAT-X project are summarized. A framework is presented upon which the Mobile Satellite Systems (MSSs) operator can design a commercial network. A sample network configuration and its capability are also included under the projected scenario. The Communication Interconnection aspect of the MSAT-X network is discussed. In the MSAT-X network structure two basic protocols are presented: the channel access protocol, and the link connection protocol. The error-control techniques used in the MSAT-X project and the packet structure are also discussed. A description of two testbeds developed for experimentally simulating the channel access protocol and link control protocol, respectively, is presented. A sample network configuration and some future network activities of the MSAT-X project are also presented.

  16. Experiment in Collaborative Learning Network for Enhanced ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... process and results of collaborative networking in a particular region and on a specific theme. They will share knowledge in the form of thematic information, best practices, policy analysis, practical methodologies and tools, online courses and seminars, coaching and mentoring, face-to-face exchanges, and workshops.

  17. College Students' Social Networking Experiences on Facebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pempek, Tiffany A.; Yermolayeva, Yevdokiya A.; Calvert, Sandra L.

    2009-01-01

    Millions of contemporary young adults use social networking sites. However, little is known about how much, why, and how they use these sites. In this study, 92 undergraduates completed a diary-like measure each day for a week, reporting daily time use and responding to an activities checklist to assess their use of the popular social networking…

  18. Network Experiences Lead to the Adaption of a Firm’s Network Competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianka Kühne

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Networks become increasingly important as external sources of innovation for firms. Through networks firms get incontact with different actors with whom they can exchange information and collaborate. A firm’s ability to be asuccessful network actor depends on its network competence. This term can be defined as having the necessaryknowledge, skills and qualifications for networking as well as using them effectively. In this paper we investigate thelink between a firm’s network competence and the benefits resulting from it in a two‐way direction. First, thenetwork competence of the firm facilitates the adoption of information from other network actors which may leadto innovation success. Second the perceived network benefits shall in their turn influence the network competenceof the firm. Consequently, firms will adapt their network strategy corresponding their experiences. The objective ofthis paper is to investigate the dynamics of networking and its influence on the firm’s network competence. For thisexploratory research 3 Belgian networks are examined. In‐depth interviews are used in combination with semistructuredinterview guides to conduct the research. Our results indicate that some firms perceive benefits fromtheir network efforts, for others it is more a burden. Furthermore, in some of our cases we found that positiveexperiences with clear benefits motivate the firm to enhance its network competence. This is illustrated by the factthat collaborations are more frequently initiated, trust is more easily build, firms are more open to communicateinformation and the confidentiality threshold is overcome.

  19. Social Software: Participants' Experience Using Social Networking for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelder, Cecil W.

    2010-01-01

    Social networking tools used in learning provides instructional design with tools for transformative change in education. This study focused on defining the meanings and essences of social networking through the lived common experiences of 7 college students. The problem of the study was a lack of learner voice in understanding the value of social…

  20. The Design, Experience and Practice of Networked Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    . The Design, Experience and Practice of Networked Learning will prove indispensable reading for researchers, teachers, consultants, and instructional designers in higher and continuing education; for those involved in staff and educational development, and for those studying post graduate qualifications...

  1. Antenatal hypnosis training and childbirth experience: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Anette; Uldbjerg, Niels; Zachariae, Robert; Wu, Chun Sen; Nohr, Ellen A

    2013-12-01

    Childbirth is a demanding event in a woman's life. The aim of this study was to explore whether a brief intervention in the form of an antenatal course in self-hypnosis to ease childbirth could improve the childbirth experience. In a randomized, controlled, single-blinded trial, 1,222 healthy nulliparous women were allocated to one of three groups during pregnancy: A hypnosis group participating in three 1-hour sessions teaching self-hypnosis to ease childbirth, a relaxation group receiving three 1-hour lessons in various relaxation methods and Mindfulness, and a usual care group receiving ordinary antenatal care only. Wijmas Delivery Expectancy/Experience Questionnaire (W-DEQ) was used to measure the childbirth experience 6 weeks postpartum. The intention-to-treat analysis indicated that women in the hypnosis group experienced their childbirth as better compared with the other two groups (mean W-DEQ score of 42.9 in the Hypnosis group, 47.2 in the Relaxation group, and 47.5 in the Care as usual group (p = 0.01)). The tendency toward a better childbirth experience in the hypnosis group was also seen in subgroup analyses for mode of delivery and for levels of fear. In this large randomized controlled trial, a brief course in self-hypnosis improved the women's childbirth experience. © 2013, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Timing subsystem development: Network synchronization experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backe, K. R.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a program in which several experimental timing subsystem prototypes were designed, fabricated, and field tested using a small network of troposcatter and microwave digital communication links. This equipment was responsible for modem/radio interfacing, time interval measurement, clock adjustment and distribution, synchronization technique, and node to node information exchange. Presented are discussions of the design approach, measurement plan, and performance assessment methods. Recommendations are made based on the findings of the test program and an evaluation of the design of both the hardware and software elements of the timing subsystem prototypes.

  3. Pathways, Networks, and Systems: Theory and Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph H. Nadeau; John D. Lambris

    2004-10-30

    The international conference provided a unique opportunity for theoreticians and experimenters to exchange ideas, strategies, problems, challenges, language and opportunities in both formal and informal settings. This dialog is an important step towards developing a deep and effective integration of theory and experiments in studies of systems biology in humans and model organisms.

  4. What Online Networks Offer: "Online Network Compositions and Online Learning Experiences of Three Ethnic Groups"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecluijze, Suzanne Elisabeth; de Haan, Mariëtte; Ünlüsoy, Asli

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study examines ethno-cultural diversity in youth's narratives regarding their "online" learning experiences while also investigating how these narratives can be understood from the analysis of their online network structure and composition. Based on ego-network data of 79 respondents this study compared the…

  5. Understanding how social networking influences perceived satisfaction with conference experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Riper, Carena J.; van Riper, Charles; Kyle, Gerard T.; Lee, Martha E.

    2013-01-01

    Social networking is a key benefit derived from participation in conferences that bind the ties of a professional community. Building social networks can lead to satisfactory experiences while furthering participants' long- and short-term career goals. Although investigations of social networking can lend insight into how to effectively engage individuals and groups within a professional cohort, this area has been largely overlooked in past research. The present study investigates the relationship between social networking and satisfaction with the 10th Biennial Conference of Research on the Colorado Plateau using structural equation modelling. Results partially support the hypothesis that three dimensions of social networking – interpersonal connections, social cohesion, and secondary associations – positively contribute to the performance of various conference attributes identified in two focus group sessions. The theoretical and applied contributions of this paper shed light on the social systems formed within professional communities and resource allocation among service providers.

  6. Test experience on an ultrareliable computer communication network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    The dispersed sensor processing mesh (DSPM) is an experimental, ultra-reliable, fault-tolerant computer communications network that exhibits an organic-like ability to regenerate itself after suffering damage. The regeneration is accomplished by two routines - grow and repair. This paper discusses the DSPM concept for achieving fault tolerance and provides a brief description of the mechanization of both the experiment and the six-node experimental network. The main topic of this paper is the system performance of the growth algorithm contained in the grow routine. The characteristics imbued to DSPM by the growth algorithm are also discussed. Data from an experimental DSPM network and software simulation of larger DSPM-type networks are used to examine the inherent limitation on growth time by the growth algorithm and the relationship of growth time to network size and topology.

  7. Brain and Social Networks: Fundamental Building Blocks of Human Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Emily B; Bassett, Danielle S

    2017-09-01

    How do brains shape social networks, and how do social ties shape the brain? Social networks are complex webs by which ideas spread among people. Brains comprise webs by which information is processed and transmitted among neural units. While brain activity and structure offer biological mechanisms for human behaviors, social networks offer external inducers or modulators of those behaviors. Together, these two axes represent fundamental contributors to human experience. Integrating foundational knowledge from social and developmental psychology and sociology on how individuals function within dyads, groups, and societies with recent advances in network neuroscience can offer new insights into both domains. Here, we use the example of how ideas and behaviors spread to illustrate the potential of multilayer network models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Social Network Mixing Patterns In Mergers & Acquisitions - A Simulation Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Fabac

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the contemporary world of global business and continuously growing competition, organizations tend to use mergers and acquisitions to enforce their position on the market. The future organization’s design is a critical success factor in such undertakings. The field of social network analysis can enhance our uderstanding of these processes as it lets us reason about the development of networks, regardless of their origin. The analysis of mixing patterns is particularly useful as it provides an insight into how nodes in a network connect with each other. We hypothesize that organizational networks with compatible mixing patterns will be integrated more successfully. After conducting a simulation experiment, we suggest an integration model based on the analysis of network assortativity. The model can be a guideline for organizational integration, such as occurs in mergers and acquisitions.

  9. Teaching experience in university students using social networks

    OpenAIRE

    María del Rocío Carranza Alcántar; Nuria Salán Ballesteros; Claudia Islas Torres; Alma Azucena Jiménez Padilla; Rosa Elena Legaspi Barajas

    2016-01-01

    Social networks, specifically Facebook and Twitter, are currently one of the mainstream media in the world, yet its educational use for the dissemination of knowledge is not significantly evident, under this premise this report is presented, considering an experience in which teachers and university-level students used these networks as mediators of educational practices; such mediation was implemented in order to promote mobile learning as an option to facilitate the process of construction ...

  10. Neural network real time event selection for the DIRAC experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kokkas, P; Tauscher, Ludwig; Vlachos, S

    2001-01-01

    The neural network first level trigger for the DIRAC experiment at CERN is presented. Both the neural network algorithm used and its actual hardware implementation are described. The system uses the fast plastic scintillator information of the DIRAC spectrometer. In 210 ns it selects events with two particles having low relative momentum. Such events are selected with an efficiency of more than 0.94. The corresponding rate reduction for background events is a factor of 2.5. (10 refs).

  11. EXPERIENCE NETWORKING UNIVERSITY OF EDUCATION TRAINING MASTERS SAFETY OF LIFE

    OpenAIRE

    Elvira Mikhailovna Rebko

    2016-01-01

    The article discloses experience networking of universities (Herzen State Pedagogical University and Sakhalin State University) in the development and implementation of joint training programs for master’s education in the field of life safety «Social security in the urban environment». The novelty of the work is to create a schematic design of basic educational training program for master’s education in the mode of networking, and to identify effective instructional techniques and conditions...

  12. Integrated Networks: National and International Online Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Muniz-Solari

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing impression among online geography educators that interaction can be developed based on specific teaching and learning methods. The authors developed a practical research study to investigate this issue. The study was based on advanced graduate courses in geography at Beijing Normal University and Texas State University. International interaction was complemented by online collaboration among the US local group. Both synchronous and asynchronous communication systems were used, which spanned two platforms. Results of this experience indicate that teaching and learning methods must be enhanced by a flexible online learning model and extensive organizational support in order to increase interaction and reach a certain level of cooperation.

  13. A centralized informatics infrastructure for the National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jeng-Jong; Nahm, Meredith; Wakim, Paul; Cushing, Carol; Poole, Lori; Tai, Betty; Pieper, Carl F.

    2009-01-01

    Background Clinical trial networks were created to provide a sustaining infrastructure for the conduct of multisite clinical trials. As such, they must withstand changes in membership. Centralization of infrastructure including knowledge management, portfolio management, information management, process automation, work policies, and procedures in clinical research networks facilitates consistency and ultimately research. Purpose In 2005, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Clinical Trials Network (CTN) transitioned from a distributed data management model to a centralized informatics infrastructure to support the network’s trial activities and administration. We describe the centralized informatics infrastructure and discuss our challenges to inform others considering such an endeavor. Methods During the migration of a clinical trial network from a decentralized to a centralized data center model, descriptive data were captured and are presented here to assess the impact of centralization. Results We present the framework for the informatics infrastructure and evaluative metrics. The network has decreased the time from last patient-last visit to database lock from an average of 7.6 months to 2.8 months. The average database error rate decreased from 0.8% to 0.2%, with a corresponding decrease in the interquartile range from 0.04%–1.0% before centralization to 0.01%–0.27% after centralization. Centralization has provided the CTN with integrated trial status reporting and the first standards-based public data share. A preliminary cost-benefit analysis showed a 50% reduction in data management cost per study participant over the life of a trial. Limitations A single clinical trial network comprising addiction researchers and community treatment programs was assessed. The findings may not be applicable to other research settings. Conclusions The identified informatics components provide the information and infrastructure needed for our clinical trial

  14. UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network's STOP GAP trial (a multicentre trial of prednisolone versus ciclosporin for pyoderma gangrenosum): protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Fiona F; Thomas, Kim S; Mitchell, Eleanor J; Williams, Hywel C; Norrie, John; Mason, James M; Ormerod, Anthony D

    2012-04-28

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a rare inflammatory skin disorder characterised by painful and rapidly progressing skin ulceration. PG can be extremely difficult to treat and patients often require systemic immunosuppression. Recurrent lesions of PG are common, but the relative rarity of this condition means that there is a lack of published evidence regarding its treatment. A systematic review published in 2005 found no randomised controlled trials (RCTs) relating to the treatment of PG. Since this time, one small RCT has been published comparing infliximab to placebo, but none of the commonly used systemic treatments for PG have been formally assessed. The UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network's STOP GAP Trial has been designed to address this lack of trial evidence. The objective is to assess whether oral ciclosporin is more effective than oral prednisolone for the treatment of PG. The trial design is a two-arm, observer-blind, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial comparing ciclosporin (4 mg/kg/day) to prednisolone (0.75 mg/kg/day). A total of 140 participants are to be recruited over a period of 4 years, from up to 50 hospitals in the UK and Eire. Primary outcome of velocity of healing at 6 weeks is assessed blinded to treatment allocation (using digital images of the ulcers). Secondary outcomes include: (i) time to healing; (ii) global assessment of improvement; (iii) PG inflammation assessment scale score; (iv) self-reported pain; (v) health-related quality of life; (vi) time to recurrence; (vii) treatment failures; (viii) adverse reactions to study medications; and (ix) cost effectiveness/utility. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of PG (excluding granulomatous PG); measurable ulceration (that is, not pustular PG); and patients aged over 18 years old who are able to give informed consent are included in the trial. Randomisation is by computer generated code using permuted blocks of randomly varying size, stratified by lesion size, and

  15. An electronic regulatory document management system for a clinical trial network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenle; Durkalski, Valerie; Pauls, Keith; Dillon, Catherine; Kim, Jaemyung; Kolk, Deneil; Silbergleit, Robert; Stevenson, Valerie; Palesch, Yuko

    2010-01-01

    A computerized regulatory document management system has been developed as a module in a comprehensive Clinical Trial Management System (CTMS) designed for an NIH-funded clinical trial network in order to more efficiently manage and track regulatory compliance. Within the network, several institutions and investigators are involved in multiple trials, and each trial has regulatory document requirements. Some of these documents are trial specific while others apply across multiple trials. The latter causes a possible redundancy in document collection and management. To address these and other related challenges, a central regulatory document management system was designed. This manuscript shares the design of the system as well as examples of it use in current studies. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. EXPERIENCE NETWORKING UNIVERSITY OF EDUCATION TRAINING MASTERS SAFETY OF LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Mikhailovna Rebko

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The article discloses experience networking of universities (Herzen State Pedagogical University and Sakhalin State University in the development and implementation of joint training programs for master’s education in the field of life safety «Social security in the urban environment». The novelty of the work is to create a schematic design of basic educational training program for master’s education in the mode of networking, and to identify effective instructional techniques and conditions of networking.Purpose – present the results of the joint development of a network of the basic educational program (BEP, to identify the stages of networking, to design a generalized scheme of development and implementation of a network of educational training program for master’s education in the field of life safety.Results generalized model of networking partner institutions to develop and implement the basic educational program master.Practical implications: the education process for Master of Education in the field of health and safety in Herzen State Pedagogical University and Sakhalin State University.

  17. Brain Connectivity Networks and the Aesthetic Experience of Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reybrouck, Mark; Vuust, Peter; Brattico, Elvira

    2018-06-12

    Listening to music is above all a human experience, which becomes an aesthetic experience when an individual immerses himself/herself in the music, dedicating attention to perceptual-cognitive-affective interpretation and evaluation. The study of these processes where the individual perceives, understands, enjoys and evaluates a set of auditory stimuli has mainly been focused on the effect of music on specific brain structures, as measured with neurophysiology and neuroimaging techniques. The very recent application of network science algorithms to brain research allows an insight into the functional connectivity between brain regions. These studies in network neuroscience have identified distinct circuits that function during goal-directed tasks and resting states. We review recent neuroimaging findings which indicate that music listening is traceable in terms of network connectivity and activations of target regions in the brain, in particular between the auditory cortex, the reward brain system and brain regions active during mind wandering.

  18. Long-Term Collaboration Network Based on ClinicalTrials.gov Database in the Pharmaceutical Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heyoung Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing costs, risks, and productivity problems in the pharmaceutical industry are important recent issues in the biomedical field. Open innovation is proposed as a solution to these issues. However, little statistical analysis related to collaboration in the pharmaceutical industry has been conducted so far. Meanwhile, not many cases have analyzed the clinical trials database, even though it is the information source with the widest coverage for the pharmaceutical industry. The purpose of this study is to test the clinical trials information as a probe for observing the status of the collaboration network and open innovation in the pharmaceutical industry. This study applied the social network analysis method to clinical trials data from 1980 to 2016 in ClinicalTrials.gov. Data were divided into four time periods—1980s, 1990s, 2000s, and 2010s—and the collaboration network was constructed for each time period. The characteristic of each network was investigated. The types of agencies participating in the clinical trials were classified as a university, national institute, company, or other, and the major players in the collaboration networks were identified. This study showed some phenomena related to the pharmaceutical industry that could provide clues to policymakers about open innovation. If follow-up studies were conducted, the utilization of the clinical trial database could be further expanded, which is expected to help open innovation in the pharmaceutical industry.

  19. Teaching Experience in University Students Using Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántar, María del Rocío Carranza; Ballesteros, Nuria Salán; Torres, Claudia Islas; Padilla, Alma Azucena Jiménez; Barajas, Rosa Elena Legaspi

    2016-01-01

    Social networks, specifically Facebook and Twitter, are currently one of the most mainstream forms of media in the world. Yet, its educational use for the dissemination of knowledge is not significantly evident. Under this premise, this report is presented, considering an experience in which teachers and university-level students used these…

  20. Application of design of experiments and artificial neural networks ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper discusses the use of Distance based optimal designs in the design of experiments (DOE) and artificial neural networks (ANN) in optimizing the stacking sequence for simply supported laminated composite plate under uniformly distributed load (UDL) for minimizing the deflections and stresses. A number of finite ...

  1. Dasatinib first-line: Multicentric Italian experience outside clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breccia, Massimo; Stagno, Fabio; Luciano, Luigiana; Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Annunziata, Mario; D'Adda, Mariella; Maggi, Alessandro; Sgherza, Nicola; Russo-Rossi, Antonella; Pregno, Patrizia; Castagnetti, Fausto; Iurlo, Alessandra; Latagliata, Roberto; Cedrone, Michele; Di Renzo, Nicola; Sorà, Federica; Rege-Cambrin, Giovanna; La Nasa, Giorgio; Scortechini, Anna Rita; Greco, Giovanna; Franceschini, Luca; Sica, Simona; Bocchia, Monica; Crugnola, Monica; Orlandi, Esther; Guarini, Attilio; Specchia, Giorgina; Rosti, Gianantonio; Saglio, Giuseppe; Alimena, Giuliana

    2016-01-01

    Dasatinib was approved for the treatment of chronic phase (CP) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients in first line therapy based on the demonstration of efficacy and safety reported in patients enrolled in clinical trials. We describe a multicentric Italian "real-life" experience of dasatinib used as frontline treatment outside clinical trials. One hundred and nine patients (median age 54 years) were treated from January 2012 to December 2013. Increased incidence of high risk patients were detected according to stratification (26% according to Sokal score, 19% according to Euro score and 16% according to EUTOS) when compared to company sponsored studies. Median time from diagnosis to start of dasatinib was 18 days. Ten patients received unscheduled starting dose (6 patients 50mg and 4 patients 80 mg QD), whereas 99 patients started with 100mg QD. At 3 months, 92% of patients achieved a BCR-ABL ratio less than 10%. At 6 months, the rate of CCyR was 91% and the rate of MR3 was 40%, with 8% of the patients reaching MR4.5. Ninety-three patients were evaluable at 12 months: the rate of MR3 was 62%, with MR4.5 being achieved by 19% of the patients. At a median follow-up of 12 months, 27 patients (24.7%) were receiving the drug at reduced dose. Two patients (1.8%) experienced a lymphoid blast crisis and the overall incidence of resistance was 8%. As regards safety, the major side effects recorded were thrombocytopenia, neutropenia and pleural effusions, which occurred in 22%, 10% and 8% of patients, respectively. Present results, achieved in a large cohort of patients treated outside clinical trials, further confirm the efficacy and safety of dasatinib as firstline treatment in CML. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Measuring Networking as an Outcome Variable in Undergraduate Research Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauer, David I; Hatfull, Graham

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose, present, and validate a simple survey instrument to measure student conversational networking. The tool consists of five items that cover personal and professional social networks, and its basic principle is the self-reporting of degrees of conversation, with a range of specific discussion partners. The networking instrument was validated in three studies. The basic psychometric characteristics of the scales were established by conducting a factor analysis and evaluating internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha. The second study used a known-groups comparison and involved comparing outcomes for networking scales between two different undergraduate laboratory courses (one involving a specific effort to enhance networking). The final study looked at potential relationships between specific networking items and the established psychosocial variable of project ownership through a series of binary logistic regressions. Overall, the data from the three studies indicate that the networking scales have high internal consistency (α = 0.88), consist of a unitary dimension, can significantly differentiate between research experiences with low and high networking designs, and are related to project ownership scales. The ramifications of the networking instrument for student retention, the enhancement of public scientific literacy, and the differentiation of laboratory courses are discussed. © 2015 D. I. Hanauer and G. Hatfull. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2015 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  3. Aversive Peer Experiences on Social Networking Sites: Development of the Social Networking-Peer Experiences Questionnaire (SN-PEQ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landoll, Ryan R; La Greca, Annette M; Lai, Betty S

    2013-12-01

    Cyber victimization is an important research area; yet, little is known about aversive peer experiences on social networking sites (SNSs), which are used extensively by youth and host complex social exchanges. Across samples of adolescents ( n =216) and young adults ( n =214), we developed the Social Networking-Peer Experiences Questionnaire ( SN-PEQ ), and examined its psychometric properties, distinctiveness from traditional peer victimization, and associations with internalized distress. The SN-PEQ demonstrated strong factorial invariance and a single factor structure that was distinct from other forms of peer victimization. Negative SNS experiences were associated with youths' symptoms of social anxiety and depression, even when controlling for traditional peer victimization. Findings highlight the importance of examining the effects of aversive peer experiences that occur via social media.

  4. Aversive Peer Experiences on Social Networking Sites: Development of the Social Networking-Peer Experiences Questionnaire (SN-PEQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landoll, Ryan R.; La Greca, Annette M.; Lai, Betty S.

    2012-01-01

    Cyber victimization is an important research area; yet, little is known about aversive peer experiences on social networking sites (SNSs), which are used extensively by youth and host complex social exchanges. Across samples of adolescents (n=216) and young adults (n=214), we developed the Social Networking-Peer Experiences Questionnaire (SN-PEQ), and examined its psychometric properties, distinctiveness from traditional peer victimization, and associations with internalized distress. The SN-PEQ demonstrated strong factorial invariance and a single factor structure that was distinct from other forms of peer victimization. Negative SNS experiences were associated with youths’ symptoms of social anxiety and depression, even when controlling for traditional peer victimization. Findings highlight the importance of examining the effects of aversive peer experiences that occur via social media. PMID:24288449

  5. Methods for the Design of Vasomotor Symptom Trials: The MsFLASH Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Katherine M.; Carpenter, Janet S.; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Anderson, Garnet L.; Caan, Bette; Cohen, Lee S.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; Freeman, Ellen W.; Joffe, Hadine; Sternfeld, Barbara; Reed, Susan D.; Sherman, Sheryl; Sammel, Mary D.; Kroenke, Kurt; Larson, Joseph C.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This report describes the "Menopausal Strategies: Finding Lasting Answers to Symptoms and Health” (MsFLASH) network and methodological issues addressed in designing and implementing vasomotor symptom trials. Methods Established in response to a National Institute of Health request for applications, the network was charged with conducting rapid throughput randomized trials of novel and understudied available interventions postulated to alleviate vasomotor and other menopausal symptoms. Included are descriptions of and rationale for criteria used for interventions and study selection, common eligibility and exclusion criteria, common primary and secondary outcome measures, consideration of placebo response, establishment of a biorepository, trial duration, screening and recruitment, statistical methods, and quality control. All trial designs are presented including: 1) a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial designed to evaluate effectiveness of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor escitalopram in reducing vasomotor symptom frequency and severity; 2) a 2×3 factorial design trial to test three different interventions (yoga, exercise, and omega-3 supplementation) for improvement of vasomotor symptom frequency and bother; and 3) a three-arm comparative efficacy trial of the serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor venlafaxine and low-dose oral estradiol versus placebo for reducing vasomotor symptom frequency compared to placebo. The network’s structure and governance are also discussed. Conclusions The methods used and lessons learned in the MsFLASH trials are shared to encourage and support the conduct of similar trials and encourage collaborations with other researchers. PMID:23760428

  6. The Study of Indoor and Field Trials on 2×8 MIMO Architecture in TD-LTE Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    the networks are based on frequency division duplexing (FDD. In this paper, measurement methods of four MIMO transmission modes (TMs in time division-LTE (TD-LTE are studied and analyzed. Link level simulation is carried out to evaluate the downlink throughput for different signal-to-noise ratios and parameter settings. Furthermore, indoor and field tests are also presented in the paper to investigate how real-world propagation affects the capacity and the error performance of MIMO transmission scheme. For the indoor test, radio channel emulators are applied to generate realistic wireless fading channel, while in the field trials, a live TD-LTE experiment cellular network is built, which contains several evolved nodeBs (eNBs and a precommercial user equipment (UE. It is shown from both simulation and tests results that MIMO deployment gives a substantial performance improvement compared with the third generation wireless networks.

  7. Mathematical inference and control of molecular networks from perturbation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed-Rasheed, Mohammed

    One of the main challenges facing biologists and mathematicians in the post genomic era is to understand the behavior of molecular networks and harness this understanding into an educated intervention of the cell. The cell maintains its function via an elaborate network of interconnecting positive and negative feedback loops of genes, RNA and proteins that send different signals to a large number of pathways and molecules. These structures are referred to as genetic regulatory networks (GRNs) or molecular networks. GRNs can be viewed as dynamical systems with inherent properties and mechanisms, such as steady-state equilibriums and stability, that determine the behavior of the cell. The biological relevance of the mathematical concepts are important as they may predict the differentiation of a stem cell, the maintenance of a normal cell, the development of cancer and its aberrant behavior, and the design of drugs and response to therapy. Uncovering the underlying GRN structure from gene/protein expression data, e.g., microarrays or perturbation experiments, is called inference or reverse engineering of the molecular network. Because of the high cost and time consuming nature of biological experiments, the number of available measurements or experiments is very small compared to the number of molecules (genes, RNA and proteins). In addition, the observations are noisy, where the noise is due to the measurements imperfections as well as the inherent stochasticity of genetic expression levels. Intra-cellular activities and extra-cellular environmental attributes are also another source of variability. Thus, the inference of GRNs is, in general, an under-determined problem with a highly noisy set of observations. The ultimate goal of GRN inference and analysis is to be able to intervene within the network, in order to force it away from undesirable cellular states and into desirable ones. However, it remains a major challenge to design optimal intervention strategies

  8. A Global Remote Laboratory Experimentation Network and the Experiment Service Provider Business Model and Plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tor Ivar Eikaas

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results from the IST KAII Trial project ReLAX - Remote LAboratory eXperimentation trial (IST 1999-20827, and contributes with a framework for a global remote laboratory experimentation network supported by a new business model. The paper presents this new Experiment Service Provider business model that aims at bringing physical experimentation back into the learning arena, where remotely operable laboratory experiments used in advanced education and training schemes are made available to a global education and training market in industry and academia. The business model is based on an approach where individual experiment owners offer remote access to their high-quality laboratory facilities to users around the world. The usage can be for research, education, on-the-job training etc. The access to these facilities is offered via an independent operating company - the Experiment Service Provider. The Experiment Service Provider offers eCommerce services like booking, access control, invoicing, dispute resolution, quality control, customer evaluation services and a unified Lab Portal.

  9. Quality of Experience on Smartphones : Network, Application, and Energy Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Ickin, Selim

    2015-01-01

    Smartphones have become crucial enablers for users to exploit online services such as learning, leisure, communicating, and socializing. The user-perceived quality of applications and services is an important factor to consider, in order to achieve lean resource management, to prevent user churn and revenue depletion of service or network providers. This is often studied within the scope of Quality of Experience (QoE), which has attracted researchers both in academia and industry. The objecti...

  10. Neural network and area method interpretation of pulsed experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dulla, S.; Picca, P.; Ravetto, P. [Politecnico di Torino, Dipartimento di Energetica, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 24 - 10129 Torino (Italy); Canepa, S. [Lab of Reactor Physics and Systems Behaviour LRS, Paul Scherrer Inst., 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    The determination of the subcriticality level is an important issue in accelerator-driven system technology. The area method, originally introduced by N. G. Sjoestrand, is a classical technique to interpret flux measurement for pulsed experiments in order to reconstruct the reactivity value. In recent times other methods have also been developed, to account for spatial and spectral effects, which were not included in the area method, since it is based on the point kinetic model. The artificial neural network approach can be an efficient technique to infer reactivities from pulsed experiments. In the present work, some comparisons between the two methods are carried out and discussed. (authors)

  11. Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet--an international collaborative clinical trials network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyler, Jay S; Greenbaum, Carla J; Lachin, John M; Leschek, Ellen; Rafkin-Mervis, Lisa; Savage, Peter; Spain, Lisa

    2008-12-01

    Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet is an international consortium of clinical research centers aimed at the prevention or delay of type 1 diabetes (T1D). The fundamental goal of TrialNet is to counter the T1D disease process by immune modulation and/or enhancement of beta cell proliferation and regeneration. To achieve this goal, TrialNet researchers are working to better understand the natural history of the disease, to identify persons at risk, and to clinically evaluate novel therapies that balance potential risks and benefits. The particular focus is on studies of preventive measures. In addition, TrialNet evaluates therapies in individuals with newly diagnosed T1D with preserved beta cell function to help determine the risk/benefit profile and gain an initial assessment of potential efficacy in preservation of beta cell function, so that promising agents can be studied in prevention trials. In addition, TrialNet evaluates methodologies that enhance the conduct of its clinical trials, which includes tests of outcome assessment methodology, the evaluation of surrogate markers, and mechanistic studies laying the foundation for future clinical trials.

  12. Lung-MAP Launches: First Precision Medicine Trial From National Clinical Trials Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    A unique public-private collaboration today announced the initiation of the Lung Cancer Master Protocol (Lung-MAP) trial, a multi-drug, multi-arm, biomarker-driven clinical trial for patients with advanced squamous cell lung cancer. Squamous cell carcinom

  13. Phased Array Radar Network Experiment for Severe Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushio, T.; Kikuchi, H.; Mega, T.; Yoshikawa, E.; Mizutani, F.; Takahashi, N.

    2017-12-01

    Phased Array Weather Radar (PAWR) was firstly developed in 2012 by Osaka University and Toshiba under a grant of NICT using the Digital Beamforming Technique, and showed a impressive thunderstorm behavior with 30 second resolution. After that development, second PAWR was installed in Kobe city about 60 km away from the first PAWR site, and Tokyo Metropolitan University, Osaka Univeristy, Toshiba and the Osaka Local Government started a new project to develop the Osaka Urban Demonstration Network. The main sensor of the Osaka Network is a 2-node Phased Array Radar Network and lightning location system. Data products that are created both in local high performance computer and Toshiba Computer Cloud, include single and multi-radar data, vector wind, quantitative precipitation estimation, VIL, nowcasting, lightning location and analysis. Each radar node is calibarated by the baloon measurement and through the comparison with the GPM (Global Precipitation Measurement)/ DPR (Dual Frequency Space borne Radar) within 1 dB. The attenuated radar reflectivities obtained by the Phased Array Radar Network at X band are corrected based on the bayesian scheme proposed in Shimamura et al. [2016]. The obtained high resolution (every 30 seconds/ 100 elevation angles) 3D reflectivity and rain rate fields are used to nowcast the surface rain rate up to 30 minutes ahead. These new products are transferred to Osaka Local Government in operational mode and evaluated by several section in Osaka Prefecture. Furthermore, a new Phased Array Radar with polarimetric function has been developed in 2017, and will be operated in the fiscal year of 2017. In this presentation, Phased Array Radar, network architecuture, processing algorithm, evalution of the social experiment and first Multi-Prameter Phased Array Radar experiment are presented.

  14. The UK clinical research network - has it been a success for dermatology clinical trials?

    OpenAIRE

    Charlesworth Lisa; Perdue Jo; Foster Katharine; Koller Karin; Thomas Kim S; Chalmers Joanne R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Following the successful introduction of five topic-specific research networks in the UK, the Comprehensive Local Research Network (CLRN) was established in 2008 in order to provide a blanket level of support across the whole country regardless of the clinical discipline. The role of the CLRN was to facilitate recruitment into clinical trials, and to encourage greater engagement in research throughout the National Health Service (NHS). Methods This report evaluates the imp...

  15. Genotype by environment interaction in sunflower (Helianthus annus L.) to optimize trial network efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Barrios, P.; Castro, M.; Pérez, O.; Vilaró, D.; Gutiérrez, L.

    2017-07-01

    Modeling genotype by environment interaction (GEI) is one of the most challenging aspects of plant breeding programs. The use of efficient trial networks is an effective way to evaluate GEI to define selection strategies. Furthermore, the experimental design and the number of locations, replications, and years are crucial aspects of multi-environment trial (MET) network optimization. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency and performance of a MET network of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). Specifically, we evaluated GEI in the network by delineating mega-environments, estimating genotypic stability and identifying relevant environmental covariates. Additionally, we optimized the network by comparing experimental design efficiencies. We used the National Evaluation Network of Sunflower Cultivars of Uruguay (NENSU) in a period of 20 years. MET plot yield and flowering time information was used to evaluate GEI. Additionally, meteorological information was studied for each sunflower physiological stage. An optimal network under these conditions should have three replications, two years of evaluation and at least three locations. The use of incomplete randomized block experimental design showed reasonable performance. Three mega-environments were defined, explained mainly by different management of sowing dates. Late sowings dates had the worst performance in grain yield and oil production, associated with higher temperatures before anthesis and fewer days allocated to grain filling. The optimization of MET networks through the analysis of the experimental design efficiency, the presence of GEI, and appropriate management strategies have a positive impact on the expression of yield potential and selection of superior cultivars.

  16. Disruption Tolerant Networking Flight Validation Experiment on NASA's EPOXI Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Jay; Burleigh, Scott; Jones, Ross; Torgerson, Leigh; Wissler, Steve

    2009-01-01

    In October and November of 2008, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory installed and tested essential elements of Delay/Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN) technology on the Deep Impact spacecraft. This experiment, called Deep Impact Network Experiment (DINET), was performed in close cooperation with the EPOXI project which has responsibility for the spacecraft. During DINET some 300 images were transmitted from the JPL nodes to the spacecraft. Then they were automatically forwarded from the spacecraft back to the JPL nodes, exercising DTN's bundle origination, transmission, acquisition, dynamic route computation, congestion control, prioritization, custody transfer, and automatic retransmission procedures, both on the spacecraft and on the ground, over a period of 27 days. All transmitted bundles were successfully received, without corruption. The DINET experiment demonstrated DTN readiness for operational use in space missions. This activity was part of a larger NASA space DTN development program to mature DTN to flight readiness for a wide variety of mission types by the end of 2011. This paper describes the DTN protocols, the flight demo implementation, validation metrics which were created for the experiment, and validation results.

  17. Online social networking and the experience of cyber-bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dea, Bridianne; Campbell, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Online social networking sites (SNS) are popular social tools used amongst adolescents and account for much of their daily internet activity. Recently, these sites have presented opportunities for youth to experience cyber-bullying. Often resulting in psychological distress, cyber-bullying is a common experience for many young people. Continual use of SNS signifies the importance of examining its links to cyber-bullying. This study examined the relationship between online social networking and the experience of cyber-bullying. A total of 400 participants (Mage=14.31 years) completed an online survey which examined the perceived definitions and frequency of cyber-bullying. Users of SNS reported significantly higher frequencies of stranger contact compared to non-users. Spearman's rho correlations determined no significant relationship between daily time on SNS and the frequency of stranger contact. This suggests that ownership of a SNS profile may be a stronger predictor of some cyber-bullying experiences compared to time spent on these sites. Findings encourage continued research on the nature of internet activities used by young adolescents and the possible exposure to online victimization.

  18. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Experiences of HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Trial Participants in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Lauren; McLellan-Lemal, Eleanor; Henderson, Faith L; Kebaabetswe, Poloko M

    2015-03-01

    Recent clinical trials have shown that a daily dose of oral TDF/FTC pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is effective in reducing human immunodeficiency (HIV) risk. Understanding trial participants' perspectives about retention and PrEP adherence is critical to inform future PrEP trials and the scale-up and implementation of PrEP programs. We analyzed 53 in-depth interviews conducted in April 2010 with participants in the TDF2 study, a Phase 3, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of daily oral TDF/FTC with heterosexual men and women in Francistown and Gaborone, Botswana. We examined participants' knowledge, attitudes, and experiences of the trial, identified facilitators and barriers to enrollment and retention, and compared participant responses by study site, sex, and study drug adherence. Our findings point to several factors to consider for participant retention and adherence in PrEP trials and programs, including conducting pre-enrollment education and myth reduction counseling, providing accurate estimates of participant obligations and side effect symptoms, ensuring participant understanding of the effects of non-adherence, gauging personal commitment and interest in study outcomes, and developing a strong external social support network for participants.

  19. A natural experiment of social network formation and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Tuan Q; Airoldi, Edoardo M

    2015-05-26

    Social networks affect many aspects of life, including the spread of diseases, the diffusion of information, the workers' productivity, and consumers' behavior. Little is known, however, about how these networks form and change. Estimating causal effects and mechanisms that drive social network formation and dynamics is challenging because of the complexity of engineering social relations in a controlled environment, endogeneity between network structure and individual characteristics, and the lack of time-resolved data about individuals' behavior. We leverage data from a sample of 1.5 million college students on Facebook, who wrote more than 630 million messages and 590 million posts over 4 years, to design a long-term natural experiment of friendship formation and social dynamics in the aftermath of a natural disaster. The analysis shows that affected individuals are more likely to strengthen interactions, while maintaining the same number of friends as unaffected individuals. Our findings suggest that the formation of social relationships may serve as a coping mechanism to deal with high-stress situations and build resilience in communities.

  20. Teaching experience in university students using social networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Rocío Carranza Alcántar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Social networks, specifically Facebook and Twitter, are currently one of the mainstream media in the world, yet its educational use for the dissemination of knowledge is not significantly evident, under this premise this report is presented, considering an experience in which teachers and university-level students used these networks as mediators of educational practices; such mediation was implemented in order to promote mobile learning as an option to facilitate the process of construction and socialization of knowledge; In this sense, the research presented aimed to identify the experience and opinion of students regarding the influence of this strategy in achieving their learning. The quantitative methodology was applied through the application type of a survey of students who participated and realized the importance of socialization of knowledge. The results showed favorable opinions regarding the use of these networks, highlighting the benefits of mobile learning as a way to streamline the training process. The proposal is to continue this type of strategies to promote flexible teaching-learning options.

  1. Photovoltaics for telecommunications networks in Libya, uses and experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Ibrahim M. Saleh; Adam, M. S.; Ben-Hamed, Khalifa

    2006-01-01

    The use of photovoltaic systems as a stand-alone power supply in Libyan telecommunication networks has been in use since 1980. It was proved that PV generators are reliable and cost effective in this type of applications in comparison with diesel generators. In Libya about 100 photovoltaic systems were put into work to supply electricity for repeater stations instead of diesel generators, these PV systems proved to be reliable, very low or no communication stops, and and more economical in comparison with stations running by diesel generators, a wide knowledge of experience has been built of using photovoltaic systems in this applications. This paper is focusing on the role of stand-alone PV systems in communication networks of Libya, as a stand alone power source for telecommunication repeater stations. We will evaluate some of these systems after ten years of work, discuss the past experience, their reliability, and running cost, Stand-alone systems can be used in telecommunication networks, and in general the experienced advantages of using PV solar generators can be summarized as low running cost, high reliability, fewer services visits,, low maintenance cost, less number of thefts, no communication stops.(Author)

  2. Deep Space Networking Experiments on the EPOXI Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ross M.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Space Communications & Navigation Program within the Space Operations Directorate is operating a program to develop and deploy Disruption Tolerant Networking [DTN] technology for a wide variety of mission types by the end of 2011. DTN is an enabling element of the Interplanetary Internet where terrestrial networking protocols are generally unsuitable because they rely on timely and continuous end-to-end delivery of data and acknowledgments. In fall of 2008 and 2009 and 2011 the Jet Propulsion Laboratory installed and tested essential elements of DTN technology on the Deep Impact spacecraft. These experiments, called Deep Impact Network Experiment (DINET 1) were performed in close cooperation with the EPOXI project which has responsibility for the spacecraft. The DINET 1 software was installed on the backup software partition on the backup flight computer for DINET 1. For DINET 1, the spacecraft was at a distance of about 15 million miles (24 million kilometers) from Earth. During DINET 1 300 images were transmitted from the JPL nodes to the spacecraft. Then, they were automatically forwarded from the spacecraft back to the JPL nodes, exercising DTN's bundle origination, transmission, acquisition, dynamic route computation, congestion control, prioritization, custody transfer, and automatic retransmission procedures, both on the spacecraft and on the ground, over a period of 27 days. The first DINET 1 experiment successfully validated many of the essential elements of the DTN protocols. DINET 2 demonstrated: 1) additional DTN functionality, 2) automated certain tasks which were manually implemented in DINET 1 and 3) installed the ION SW on nodes outside of JPL. DINET 3 plans to: 1) upgrade the LTP convergence-layer adapter to conform to the international LTP CL specification, 2) add convergence-layer "stewardship" procedures and 3) add the BSP security elements [PIB & PCB]. This paper describes the planning and execution of the flight experiment and the

  3. Engineering Online and In-Person Social Networks for Physical Activity: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovniak, Liza S; Kong, Lan; Hovell, Melbourne F; Ding, Ding; Sallis, James F; Ray, Chester A; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L; Matthews, Stephen A; Kiser, Elizabeth; Chinchilli, Vernon M; George, Daniel R; Sciamanna, Christopher N

    2016-12-01

    Social networks can influence physical activity, but little is known about how best to engineer online and in-person social networks to increase activity. The purpose of this study was to conduct a randomized trial based on the Social Networks for Activity Promotion model to assess the incremental contributions of different procedures for building social networks on objectively measured outcomes. Physically inactive adults (n = 308, age, 50.3 (SD = 8.3) years, 38.3 % male, 83.4 % overweight/obese) were randomized to one of three groups. The Promotion group evaluated the effects of weekly emailed tips emphasizing social network interactions for walking (e.g., encouragement, informational support); the Activity group evaluated the incremental effect of adding an evidence-based online fitness walking intervention to the weekly tips; and the Social Networks group evaluated the additional incremental effect of providing access to an online networking site for walking as well as prompting walking/activity across diverse settings. The primary outcome was mean change in accelerometer-measured moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), assessed at 3 and 9 months from baseline. Participants increased their MVPA by 21.0 min/week, 95 % CI [5.9, 36.1], p = .005, at 3 months, and this change was sustained at 9 months, with no between-group differences. Although the structure of procedures for targeting social networks varied across intervention groups, the functional effect of these procedures on physical activity was similar. Future research should evaluate if more powerful reinforcers improve the effects of social network interventions. The trial was registered with the ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01142804).

  4. Informed consent in clinical trials: Perceptions and experiences of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is recommended that more recognition be given to the important role of trial counsellors in clinical trials, and that they be given more formal training, support and ... Daar word aanbeveel dat meer erkenning gegee word aan die rol van proefvoorligters in kliniese proewe, dat hulle meer formele opleiding ondergaan, dat ...

  5. Network Performance and Quality of Experience of Remote Access Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Kist

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Remote Access Laboratories (RAL have become important learning and teaching tools. This paper presents a performance study that targets a specific remote access architecture implemented within a universities operational environment. This particular RAL system provides globally authenticated and arbitrated remote access to virtualized computers as well as computer controlled hardware experiments. This paper presents system performance results that have been obtained utilizing both a set of automated and human subject tests. Principle objectives of the study were: To gain a better understanding of the nature of network traffic caused by experimental activity usage; to obtain an indication of user expectations of activity performance; and to develop a measure to predict Quality of Experience, based on easily measurable Quality of Service parameters. The study emulates network layer variation of access-bandwidth and round-trip-time of typical usage scenarios and contrasts against user perception results that allow classifying expected user performance. It demonstrates that failure rate is excellent measure of usability, and that round-trip-time predominantly affects user experience. Thin-client and remote desktop architectures are popular to separate the location of users and the actual data processing and use similar structures, hence results of this study to be applied in these application areas as well.

  6. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Clinical Trial Network. Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Stargardt disease, and Usher syndrome represent the predominant forms of inherited orphan retinal degenerative diseases and are estimated to affect...working with Oxford Biomedica and a separate project with academic investigators on gene therapy for Usher lb syndrome (deaf-blindness due to a gene...s. The NEER Network will also develop standard protocols for data collection, mainta i n and expand patient databases, classified by genotype and

  7. Establishing HIV treatment as prevention in the HIV Prevention Trials Network 052 randomized trial: an ethical odyssey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Myron S; McCauley, Marybeth; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2012-06-01

    Obtaining the definitive data necessary to determine the safety and efficacy of using antiretroviral treatment (ART) to reduce the sexual transmission of HIV in heterosexual couples encountered an array of ethical challenges that threatened to compromise HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) 052, the multinational clinical trial addressing this issue that has profound public health implications. To describe and analyze the major ethical challenges faced in HPTN 052. The ethical issues and modifications of HPTN 052 in response to these issues were cataloged by the principal investigator, the lead coordinator, and the ethicist working on the trial. The major ethical issues that were unique to the trial were then described and analyzed in light of the published literature as well as guidances and policies. The ethical challenges that must be addressed in many clinical trials, such as those related to obtaining informed consent and making provisions for ancillary care, are not described. When HPTN 052 was being designed, ethical questions emerged related to the relevance of the research question itself given data from observational research and a range of beliefs about the appropriate means of preventing and treating HIV infection and AIDS. Furthermore, ethical challenges were faced regarding site selection since there was a scientific need to conduct the research in settings where HIV incidence was high, but alternatives to study participation should be available. As in most HIV-prevention research, ethical questions surrounded the determination of the appropriate prevention package for all of those enrolled. During the course of the trial, guidance documents and policies emerged that were of direct relevance to the research questions, calling for a balancing of concerns for the research subjects and trial integrity. When the study results were made public, there was a need to ensure access to the treatment shown to be effective that in some cases differed from the

  8. Brief Report: HIV Drug Resistance in Adults Failing Early Antiretroviral Treatment: Results From the HIV Prevention Trials Network 052 Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Jessica M; Hudelson, Sarah E; Ou, San-San; Hart, Stephen; Wallis, Carole; Morgado, Mariza G; Saravanan, Shanmugam; Tripathy, Srikanth; Hovind, Laura; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Sabin, Devin; McCauley, Marybeth; Gamble, Theresa; Zhang, Xinyi C; Eron, Joseph J; Gallant, Joel E; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Makhema, Joseph; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Hakim, James; Badal-Faesen, Sharlaa; Akelo, Victor; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Santos, Breno R; Godbole, Sheela V; Pilotto, Jose H; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Panchia, Ravindre; Mayer, Kenneth H; Chen, Ying Q; Cohen, Myron S; Eshleman, Susan H

    2016-07-01

    Early initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART) reduces HIV transmission and has health benefits. HIV drug resistance can limit treatment options and compromise use of ART for HIV prevention. We evaluated drug resistance in 85 participants in the HIV Prevention Trials Network 052 trial who started ART at CD4 counts of 350-550 cells per cubic millimeter and failed ART by May 2011; 8.2% had baseline resistance and 35.3% had resistance at ART failure. High baseline viral load and less education were associated with emergence of resistance at ART failure. Resistance at ART failure was observed in 7 of 8 (87.5%) participants who started ART at lower CD4 cell counts.

  9. Argonne National Laboratory high performance network support of APS experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knot, M.J.; McMahon, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is currently positioned to provide access to high performance regional and national networks. Much of the impetus for this effort is the anticipated needs of the upcoming experimental program at the APS. Some APS collaborative access teams (CATs) are already pressing for network speed improvements and security enhancements. Requirements range from the need for high data rate, secure transmission of experimental data, to the desire to establish a open-quote open-quote virtual experimental environment close-quote close-quote at their home institution. In the near future, 155 megabit/sec (Mb/s) national and regional asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) networks will be operational and available to APS users. Full-video teleconferencing, virtual presence operation of experiments, and high speed, secure transmission of data are being tested and, in some cases, will be operational. We expect these efforts to enable a substantial improvement in the speed of processing experimental results as well as an increase in convenience to the APS experimentalist. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  10. Utilizing HPC Network Technologies in High Energy Physics Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2088631; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Because of their performance characteristics high-performance fabrics like Infiniband or OmniPath are interesting technologies for many local area network applications, including data acquisition systems for high-energy physics experiments like the ATLAS experiment at CERN. This paper analyzes existing APIs for high-performance fabrics and evaluates their suitability for data acquisition systems in terms of performance and domain applicability. The study finds that existing software APIs for high-performance interconnects are focused on applications in high-performance computing with specific workloads and are not compatible with the requirements of data acquisition systems. To evaluate the use of high-performance interconnects in data acquisition systems a custom library, NetIO, is presented and compared against existing technologies. NetIO has a message queue-like interface which matches the ATLAS use case better than traditional HPC APIs like MPI. The architecture of NetIO is based on a interchangeable bac...

  11. Qualitative reasoning for biological network inference from systematic perturbation experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badaloni, Silvana; Di Camillo, Barbara; Sambo, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The systematic perturbation of the components of a biological system has been proven among the most informative experimental setups for the identification of causal relations between the components. In this paper, we present Systematic Perturbation-Qualitative Reasoning (SPQR), a novel Qualitative Reasoning approach to automate the interpretation of the results of systematic perturbation experiments. Our method is based on a qualitative abstraction of the experimental data: for each perturbation experiment, measured values of the observed variables are modeled as lower, equal or higher than the measurements in the wild type condition, when no perturbation is applied. The algorithm exploits a set of IF-THEN rules to infer causal relations between the variables, analyzing the patterns of propagation of the perturbation signals through the biological network, and is specifically designed to minimize the rate of false positives among the inferred relations. Tested on both simulated and real perturbation data, SPQR indeed exhibits a significantly higher precision than the state of the art.

  12. Turning Failure into Success: Trials of the Heart Failure Clinical Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Emer; Givertz, Michael M

    2016-12-01

    The Heart Failure Clinical Research Network (HFN) was established in 2008 on behalf of the NIH National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, with the primary goal of improving outcomes in heart failure (HF) by designing and conducting high-quality concurrent clinical trials testing interventions across the spectrum of HF. Completed HFN trials have answered several important and relevant clinical questions concerning the safety and efficacy of different decongestive and adjunctive vasodilator therapies in hospitalized acute HF, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibition and nitrate therapies in HF with preserved ejection fraction, and the role of xanthine oxidase inhibition in hyperuricemic HF. These successes, independent of the "positive" or "negative" result of each individual trial, have helped to shape the current clinical care of HF patients and serve as a platform to inform future research directions and trial designs.

  13. Wireless Power Transfer Protocols in Sensor Networks: Experiments and Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotiris Nikoletseas

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Rapid technological advances in the domain of Wireless Power Transfer pave the way for novel methods for power management in systems of wireless devices, and recent research works have already started considering algorithmic solutions for tackling emerging problems. In this paper, we investigate the problem of efficient and balanced Wireless Power Transfer in Wireless Sensor Networks. We employ wireless chargers that replenish the energy of network nodes. We propose two protocols that configure the activity of the chargers. One protocol performs wireless charging focused on the charging efficiency, while the other aims at proper balance of the chargers’ residual energy. We conduct detailed experiments using real devices and we validate the experimental results via larger scale simulations. We observe that, in both the experimental evaluation and the evaluation through detailed simulations, both protocols achieve their main goals. The Charging Oriented protocol achieves good charging efficiency throughout the experiment, while the Energy Balancing protocol achieves a uniform distribution of energy within the chargers.

  14. Exploration in free word association networks: models and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludueña, Guillermo A; Behzad, Mehran Djalali; Gros, Claudius

    2014-05-01

    Free association is a task that requires a subject to express the first word to come to their mind when presented with a certain cue. It is a task which can be used to expose the basic mechanisms by which humans connect memories. In this work, we have made use of a publicly available database of free associations to model the exploration of the averaged network of associations using a statistical and the adaptive control of thought-rational (ACT-R) model. We performed, in addition, an online experiment asking participants to navigate the averaged network using their individual preferences for word associations. We have investigated the statistics of word repetitions in this guided association task. We find that the considered models mimic some of the statistical properties, viz the probability of word repetitions, the distance between repetitions and the distribution of association chain lengths, of the experiment, with the ACT-R model showing a particularly good fit to the experimental data for the more intricate properties as, for instance, the ratio of repetitions per length of association chains.

  15. A precise clock distribution network for MRPC-based experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.; Cao, P.; Shang, L.; An, Q.

    2016-01-01

    In high energy physics experiments, the MRPC (Multi-Gap Resistive Plate Chamber) detectors are widely used recently which can provide higher-resolution measurement for particle identification. However, the application of MRPC detectors leads to a series of challenges in electronics design with large number of front-end electronic channels, especially for distributing clock precisely. To deal with these challenges, this paper presents a universal scheme of clock transmission network for MRPC-based experiments with advantages of both precise clock distribution and global command synchronization. For precise clock distributing, the clock network is designed into a tree architecture with two stages: the first one has a point-to-multipoint long range bidirectional distribution with optical channels and the second one has a fan-out structure with copper link inside readout crates. To guarantee the precision of clock frequency or phase, the r-PTP (reduced Precision Time Protocol) and the DDMTD (digital Dual Mixer Time Difference) methods are used for frequency synthesis, phase measurement and adjustment, which is implemented by FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) in real-time. In addition, to synchronize global command execution, based upon this clock distribution network, synchronous signals are coded with clock for transmission. With technique of encoding/decoding and clock data recovery, signals such as global triggers or system control commands, can be distributed to all front-end channels synchronously, which greatly simplifies the system design. The experimental results show that both the clock jitter (RMS) and the clock skew can be less than 100 ps.

  16. First field trial of Virtual Network Operator oriented network on demand (NoD) service provisioning over software defined multi-vendor OTN networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yajie; Zhao, Yongli; Zhang, Jie; Yu, Xiaosong; Chen, Haoran; Zhu, Ruijie; Zhou, Quanwei; Yu, Chenbei; Cui, Rui

    2017-01-01

    A Virtual Network Operator (VNO) is a provider and reseller of network services from other telecommunications suppliers. These network providers are categorized as virtual because they do not own the underlying telecommunication infrastructure. In terms of business operation, VNO can provide customers with personalized services by leasing network infrastructure from traditional network providers. The unique business modes of VNO lead to the emergence of network on demand (NoD) services. The conventional network provisioning involves a series of manual operation and configuration, which leads to high cost in time. Considering the advantages of Software Defined Networking (SDN), this paper proposes a novel NoD service provisioning solution to satisfy the private network need of VNOs. The solution is first verified in the real software defined multi-domain optical networks with multi-vendor OTN equipment. With the proposed solution, NoD service can be deployed via online web portals in near-real time. It reinvents the customer experience and redefines how network services are delivered to customers via an online self-service portal. Ultimately, this means a customer will be able to simply go online, click a few buttons and have new services almost instantaneously.

  17. Engineering Online and In-person Social Networks for Physical Activity: A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovniak, Liza S.; Kong, Lan; Hovell, Melbourne F.; Ding, Ding; Sallis, James F.; Ray, Chester A.; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Matthews, Stephen A.; Kiser, Elizabeth; Chinchilli, Vernon M.; George, Daniel R.; Sciamanna, Christopher N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Social networks can influence physical activity, but little is known about how best to engineer online and in-person social networks to increase activity. Purpose To conduct a randomized trial based on the Social Networks for Activity Promotion model to assess the incremental contributions of different procedures for building social networks on objectively-measured outcomes. Methods Physically inactive adults (n = 308, age, 50.3 (SD = 8.3) years, 38.3% male, 83.4% overweight/obese) were randomized to 1 of 3 groups. The Promotion group evaluated the effects of weekly emailed tips emphasizing social network interactions for walking (e.g., encouragement, informational support); the Activity group evaluated the incremental effect of adding an evidence-based online fitness walking intervention to the weekly tips; and the Social Networks group evaluated the additional incremental effect of providing access to an online networking site for walking, and prompting walking/activity across diverse settings. The primary outcome was mean change in accelerometer-measured moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), assessed at 3 and 9 months from baseline. Results Participants increased their MVPA by 21.0 mins/week, 95% CI [5.9, 36.1], p = .005, at 3 months, and this change was sustained at 9 months, with no between-group differences. Conclusions Although the structure of procedures for targeting social networks varied across intervention groups, the functional effect of these procedures on physical activity was similar. Future research should evaluate if more powerful reinforcers improve the effects of social network interventions. Trial Registration Number NCT01142804 PMID:27405724

  18. Australasian Experience and Trials in Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy: The RACS SNAC Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen A. Ung

    2004-10-01

    Conclusions: The SNAC trial is one of the fastest accruing clinical trials in Australasia. It is on track to determine whether differences in morbidity, with equivalent cancer-related outcomes, exist between SLNB and AC for women with early breast cancer.

  19. The Veterinary Clinical Trials Network - a Pragmatic Approach to Filling the Evidence Gaps for Veterinary Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Doit

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Including current published evidence is vital as part of evidence-based decision making in veterinary practice. Sometimes there is no published evidence which is relevant or applicable to the clinical situation.This can be either because it refers to patients with experimentally induced conditions, from a referral population or who lack the co-morbities often seen outside of the experimental context. The Veterinary Clinical Trials Network is unique. It is a rapidly expanding network of veterinary practices, with whom we are working to establish methods for running prospective, pragmatic, practical clinical trials in veterinary practice.Data is extracted from the patient record using an XML Schema. The data extracted is already captured by the Practice Management Software (PMS system as part of the consultation, no extra information is required, and the extraction method is automated. This improves participation as it minimises the time input required from vets and vet nurses. Other data is obtained directly from owners of the animals involved.By working with a large number of first opinion veterinary practices we are able to include enough patients to ensure that our trials are suitably powered, and the participants will be representative of the wider vet-visiting pet population. The research generated from this clinical trials network will help strengthen the evidence base to aid decision making by veterinary practitioners.

  20. How do parents experience being asked to enter a child in a randomised controlled trial?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Bridget

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the number of randomised controlled trials of medicines for children increases, it becomes progressively more important to understand the experiences of parents who are asked to enrol their child in a trial. This paper presents a narrative review of research evidence on parents' experiences of trial recruitment focussing on qualitative research, which allows them to articulate their views in their own words. Discussion Parents want to do their best for their children, and socially and legally their role is to care for and protect them yet the complexities of the medical and research context can challenge their fulfilment of this role. Parents are simultaneously responsible for their child and cherish this role yet they are dependent on others when their child becomes sick. They are keen to exercise responsibility for deciding to enter a child in a trial yet can be fearful of making the 'wrong' decision. They make judgements about the threat of the child's condition as well as the risks of the trial yet their interpretations often differ from those of medical and research experts. Individual pants will experience these and other complexities to a greater or lesser degree depending on their personal experiences and values, the medical situation of their child and the nature of the trial. Interactions at the time of trial recruitment offer scope for negotiating these complexities if practitioners have the flexibility to tailor discussions to the needs and situation of individual parents. In this way, parents may be helped to retain a sense that they have acted as good parents to their child whatever decision they make. Summary Discussing randomised controlled trials and gaining and providing informed consent is challenging. The unique position of parents in giving proxy consent for their child adds to this challenge. Recognition of the complexities parents face in making decisions about trials suggests lines for future

  1. How do parents experience being asked to enter a child in a randomised controlled trial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilling, Valerie; Young, Bridget

    2009-02-16

    As the number of randomised controlled trials of medicines for children increases, it becomes progressively more important to understand the experiences of parents who are asked to enroll their child in a trial. This paper presents a narrative review of research evidence on parents' experiences of trial recruitment focussing on qualitative research, which allows them to articulate their views in their own words. Parents want to do their best for their children, and socially and legally their role is to care for and protect them yet the complexities of the medical and research context can challenge their fulfillment of this role. Parents are simultaneously responsible for their child and cherish this role yet they are dependent on others when their child becomes sick. They are keen to exercise responsibility for deciding to enter a child in a trial yet can be fearful of making the 'wrong' decision. They make judgements about the threat of the child's condition as well as the risks of the trial yet their interpretations often differ from those of medical and research experts. Individual parents will experience these and other complexities to a greater or lesser degree depending on their personal experiences and values, the medical situation of their child and the nature of the trial. Interactions at the time of trial recruitment offer scope for negotiating these complexities if practitioners have the flexibility to tailor discussions to the needs and situation of individual parents. In this way, parents may be helped to retain a sense that they have acted as good parents to their child whatever decision they make. Discussing randomised controlled trials and gaining and providing informed consent is challenging. The unique position of parents in giving proxy consent for their child adds to this challenge. Recognition of the complexities parents face in making decisions about trials suggests lines for future research on the conduct of trials, and ultimately, may help

  2. Patterned feeding experience for preterm infants: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickler, Rita H; Wetzel, Paul A; Meinzen-Derr, Jareen; Tubbs-Cooley, Heather L; Moore, Margo

    2015-06-04

    Neurobehavioral disabilities occur in 5-15% of preterm infants with an estimated 50-70% of very low birth weight preterm infants experiencing later dysfunction, including cognitive, behavioral, and social delays that often persist into adulthood. Factors implicated in poor neurobehavioral and developmental outcomes are hospitalization in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and inconsistent caregiving patterns. Although much underlying brain damage occurs in utero or shortly after birth, neuroprotective strategies can stop lesions from progressing, particularly when these strategies are used during the most sensitive periods of neural plasticity occurring months before term age. The purpose of this randomized trial is to test the effect of a patterned feeding experience on preterm infants' neurobehavioral organization and development, cognitive function, and clinical outcomes. This trial uses an experimental, longitudinal, 2-group design with 120 preterm infants. Infants are enrolled within the first week of life and randomized to an experimental group receiving a patterned feeding experience from the first gavage feeding through discharge or to a control group receiving usual feeding care experience. The intervention involves a continuity of tactile experiences associated with feeding to train and build neuronal networks supportive of normal infant feeding experience. Primary outcomes are neurobehavioral organization as measured by Neurobehavioral Assessment of the Preterm Infant at 3 time points: the transition to oral feedings, NICU discharge, and 2 months corrected age. Secondary aims are cognitive function measured using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition at 6 months corrected age, neurobehavioral development (sucking organization, feeding performance, and heart rate variability), and clinical outcomes (length of NICU stay and time to full oral feeding). The potential effects of demographic and biobehavioral factors

  3. Controller tuning of district heating networks using experiment design techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobos, Laszlo; Abonyi, Janos

    2011-01-01

    There are various governmental policies aimed at reducing the dependence on fossil fuels for space heating and the reduction in its associated emission of greenhouse gases. DHNs (District heating networks) could provide an efficient method for house and space heating by utilizing residual industrial waste heat. In such systems, heat is produced and/or thermally upgraded in a central plant and then distributed to the end users through a pipeline network. The control strategies of these networks are rather difficult thanks to the non-linearity of the system and the strong interconnection between the controlled variables. That is why a NMPC (non-linear model predictive controller) could be applied to be able to fulfill the heat demand of the consumers. The main objective of this paper is to propose a tuning method for the applied NMPC to fulfill the control goal as soon as possible. The performance of the controller is characterized by an economic cost function based on pre-defined operation ranges. A methodology from the field of experiment design is applied to tune the model predictive controller to reach the best performance. The efficiency of the proposed methodology is proven throughout a case study of a simulated NMPC controlled DHN. -- Highlights: → To improve the energetic and economic efficiency of a DHN an appropriate control system is necessary. → The time consumption of transitions can be shortened with the proper control system. → A NLMPC is proposed as control system. → The NLMPC is tuned by utilization of simplex methodology, using an economic oriented cost function. → The proposed NLMPC needs a detailed model of the DHN based on the physical description.

  4. Large Scale Experiments of Multihop Networks in Mobile Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacine Benchaïb

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the latest advances in our research work focused on VIRMANEL and SILUMOD, a couple of tools developed for research in wireless mobile multihop networks. SILUMOD is a domain specific language dedicated to the definition of mobility models. This language contains key- words and special operators that make it easy to define a mobility model and calculate the positions of a trajectory. These positions are sent to VIRMANEL, a tool that man- ages virtual machines corresponding to mobile nodes, emu- lates their movements and the resulting connections and dis- connections, and displays the network evolution to the user, thanks to its graphical user interface. The virtualization ap- proach we take here allows to run real code and to test real protocol implementations without deploying an important experimental platform. For the experimentation of a large number of virtual mobile nodes, we defined and implemented a new algorithm for the nearest neighbor search to find the nodes that are within communication range. We then car- ried out a considerable measurement campaign in order to evaluate the performance of this algorithm. The results show that even with an experiment using a large number of mobile nodes, our algorithm make it possible to evaluate the state of connectivity between mobile nodes within a reasonable time and number of operations.

  5. Analysis, Synthesis and Experiments of Networked Platoons with Communication Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligang Wu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the analysis and synthesis of networked vehicle platoons with communication delays, packet dropouts and disorders. In order to deal with the effects of the communication constraints, we introduce a novel Smart Data Processor (SDP for each vehicle, by which the latest data packets from logic Data Packet Processor and the matched data packet from its Buffer can be obtained. Based on this mechanism, a leader-predecessor-follower control strategy is proposed. In order to guarantee the asymptotic and string stability, the platoon control problem is transformed into a multi-objective H∞-type synthesis problem with the multiple time-varying delays. A sufficient condition for designing the controller gain is derived by solving a set of linear matrix inequalities. Numerous simulations and experiments with laboratory scale Arduino cars show the efficiency of the proposed methods.

  6. PV-Diesel Hybrid SCADA Experiment Network Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalu, Alex; Durand, S.; Emrich, Carol; Ventre, G.; Wilson, W.; Acosta, R.

    1999-01-01

    The essential features of an experimental network for renewable power system satellite based supervisory, control and data acquisition (SCADA) are communication links, controllers, diagnostic equipment and a hybrid power system. Required components for implementing the network consist of two satellite ground stations, to satellite modems, two 486 PCs, two telephone receivers, two telephone modems, two analog telephone lines, one digital telephone line, a hybrid-power system equipped with controller and a satellite spacecraft. In the technology verification experiment (TVE) conducted by Savannah State University and Florida Solar Energy Center, the renewable energy hybrid system is the Apex-1000 Mini-Hybrid which is equipped with NGC3188 for user interface and remote control and the NGC2010 for monitoring and basic control tasks. This power system is connected to a satellite modem via a smart interface, RS232. Commands are sent to the power system control unit through a control PC designed as PC1. PC1 is thus connected to a satellite model through RS232. A second PC, designated PC2, the diagnostic PC is connected to both satellite modems via separate analog telephone lines for checking modems'health. PC2 is also connected to PC1 via a telephone line. Due to the unavailability of a second ground station for the ACTS, one ground station is used to serve both the sending and receiving functions in this experiment. Signal is sent from the control PC to the Hybrid system at a frequency f(sub 1), different from f(sub 2), the signal from the hybrid system to the control PC. f(sub l) and f(sub 2) are sufficiently separated to avoid interference.

  7. Identifying a system of predominant negative symptoms: Network analysis of three randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Stephen Z; Leucht, Stefan

    2016-12-01

    Reasons for the recent mixed success of research into negative symptoms may be informed by conceptualizing negative symptoms as a system that is identifiable from network analysis. We aimed to identify: (I) negative symptom systems; (I) central negative symptoms within each system; and (III) differences between the systems, based on network analysis of negative symptoms for baseline, endpoint and change. Patients with chronic schizophrenia and predominant negative symptoms participated in three clinical trials that compared placebo and amisulpride to 60days (n=487). Networks analyses were computed from the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS) scores for baseline and endpoint for severity, and estimated change based on mixed models. Central symptoms to each network were identified. The networks were contrasted for connectivity with permutation tests. Network analysis showed that the baseline and endpoint symptom severity systems formed symptom groups of Affect, Poor responsiveness, Lack of interest, and Apathy-inattentiveness. The baseline and endpoint networks did not significantly differ in terms of connectivity, but both significantly (Psymptom group split into three other groups. The most central symptoms were Decreased Spontaneous Movements at baseline and endpoint, and Poverty of Speech for estimated change. Results provide preliminary evidence for: (I) a replicable negative symptom severity system; and (II) symptoms with high centrality (e.g., Decreased Spontaneous Movement), that may be future treatment targets following replication to ensure the curent results generalize to other samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Action Video Game Experience Related to Altered Large-Scale White Matter Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Diankun; Ma, Weiyi; Gong, Jinnan; He, Hui; Dong, Li; Zhang, Dan; Li, Jianfu; Luo, Cheng; Yao, Dezhong

    2017-01-01

    With action video games (AVGs) becoming increasingly popular worldwide, the cognitive benefits of AVG experience have attracted continuous research attention over the past two decades. Research has repeatedly shown that AVG experience can causally enhance cognitive ability and is related to neural plasticity in gray matter and functional networks in the brain. However, the relation between AVG experience and the plasticity of white matter (WM) network still remains unclear. WM network modulates the distribution of action potentials, coordinating the communication between brain regions and acting as the framework of neural networks. And various types of cognitive deficits are usually accompanied by impairments of WM networks. Thus, understanding this relation is essential in assessing the influence of AVG experience on neural plasticity and using AVG experience as an interventional tool for impairments of WM networks. Using graph theory, this study analyzed WM networks in AVG experts and amateurs. Results showed that AVG experience is related to altered WM networks in prefrontal networks, limbic system, and sensorimotor networks, which are related to cognitive control and sensorimotor functions. These results shed new light on the influence of AVG experience on the plasticity of WM networks and suggested the clinical applicability of AVG experience.

  9. Action Video Game Experience Related to Altered Large-Scale White Matter Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diankun Gong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With action video games (AVGs becoming increasingly popular worldwide, the cognitive benefits of AVG experience have attracted continuous research attention over the past two decades. Research has repeatedly shown that AVG experience can causally enhance cognitive ability and is related to neural plasticity in gray matter and functional networks in the brain. However, the relation between AVG experience and the plasticity of white matter (WM network still remains unclear. WM network modulates the distribution of action potentials, coordinating the communication between brain regions and acting as the framework of neural networks. And various types of cognitive deficits are usually accompanied by impairments of WM networks. Thus, understanding this relation is essential in assessing the influence of AVG experience on neural plasticity and using AVG experience as an interventional tool for impairments of WM networks. Using graph theory, this study analyzed WM networks in AVG experts and amateurs. Results showed that AVG experience is related to altered WM networks in prefrontal networks, limbic system, and sensorimotor networks, which are related to cognitive control and sensorimotor functions. These results shed new light on the influence of AVG experience on the plasticity of WM networks and suggested the clinical applicability of AVG experience.

  10. Assessing sample representativeness in randomized controlled trials: application to the National Institute of Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susukida, Ryoko; Crum, Rosa M; Stuart, Elizabeth A; Ebnesajjad, Cyrus; Mojtabai, Ramin

    2016-07-01

    To compare the characteristics of individuals participating in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of treatments of substance use disorder (SUD) with individuals receiving treatment in usual care settings, and to provide a summary quantitative measure of differences between characteristics of these two groups of individuals using propensity score methods. Design Analyses using data from RCT samples from the National Institute of Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network (CTN) and target populations of patients drawn from the Treatment Episodes Data Set-Admissions (TEDS-A). Settings Multiple clinical trial sites and nation-wide usual SUD treatment settings in the United States. A total of 3592 individuals from 10 CTN samples and 1 602 226 individuals selected from TEDS-A between 2001 and 2009. Measurements The propensity scores for enrolling in the RCTs were computed based on the following nine observable characteristics: sex, race/ethnicity, age, education, employment status, marital status, admission to treatment through criminal justice, intravenous drug use and the number of prior treatments. Findings The proportion of those with ≥ 12 years of education and the proportion of those who had full-time jobs were significantly higher among RCT samples than among target populations (in seven and nine trials, respectively, at P difference in the mean propensity scores between the RCTs and the target population was 1.54 standard deviations and was statistically significant at P different from individuals receiving treatment in usual care settings. Notably, RCT participants tend to have more years of education and a greater likelihood of full-time work compared with people receiving care in usual care settings. © 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  11. Experience of the international network in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Gironzini, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    With the aim of exchanging information on various subjects about radiation protection and designing a site where the members can send and receive information on courses, scientific activities, articles, technical opinions, commentaries and everything that promotes the communication, collaboration and integration, the 15th March 2002 the networking: 'radioproteccion' is created with 11 persons from 11 countries. The number of members had been increased. By the first month it had 117 members and by the end of the year 2002 it had already 179 members, 315 messages were send by then. By December 2007, there were 726 members from 28 countries mainly from Latin America: Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela. There were also members from Austria, Canada, France, Israel, Italy, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom and United States. There have been distributed 2049 messages about Congress, courses and activities on national and international radiation protection and related issues which initially were in Latin American and the Caribbean. This has allowed diverse specialists that work in different themes to interchange experiences and information about subjects of common interest. This objective is the continuation of the spreading of activities that since 1991 and for 10 consecutive years had been made through the Bulletin 'Proteccion Radiologica', from which 65000 samples were published and distributed to specialists from 40 countries thanks to the support of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO). This idea is complemented by the Web: www.radioproteccion.org. Interesting topics have been discussed in the network for example: Pregnancy and medical radiation, emergency response, occupational exposure, radiation protection responsibilities, lessons learned from accidental

  12. Experiment of Wireless Sensor Network to Monitor Field Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang Sik Kim

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently the mobile wireless network has been drastically enhanced and one of the most efficient ways to realize the ubiquitous network will be to develop the converged network by integrating the mobile wireless network with other IP fixed network like NGN (Next Generation Network. So in this paper the term of the wireless ubiquitous network is used to describe this approach. In this paper, first, the wireless ubiquitous network architecture is described based on IMS which has been standardized by 3GPP (3rd Generation Partnership Program. Next, the field data collection system to match the satellite data using location information is proposed based on the concept of the wireless ubiquitous network architecture. The purpose of the proposed system is to provide more accurate analyzing method with the researchers in the remote sensing area.

  13. Asian Americans and Cancer Clinical Trials: A Mixed-Methods Approach to Understanding Awareness and Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterniti, Debora A.; Chen, Moon S.; Chiechi, Christine; Beckett, Laurel A.; Horan, Nora; Turrell, Corinne; Smith, Ligaya; Morain, Claudia; Montell, Lisa; Gonzalez, Jose Luis; Davis, Sharon; Lara, Primo N.

    2006-01-01

    Cancer clinical trials have been based on low accrual rates. Barriers to recruitment of minority populations affect the generalizability and impact of trial findings for those populations. The authors undertook a mixed-methods approach to understanding levels of awareness and experiences with cancer clinical trials. A survey was administered to new cancer patients and their caretakers (family, close friends, or other social support) at outpatient oncology clinics. Field observations of the trial accrual process also were conducted by employing the grounded theory approach in qualitative methods. Comparison of survey results for Asian-American respondents and non-Asian respondents indicated that Asians were less likely to have heard the term “clinical trial” and were more likely to define a clinical trial as “an experiment” or “a test procedure in a clinic” than non-Asians. Asians were more likely to have employer-based insurance and to report understanding issues related to cost reimbursement. Asians were less likely to have been involved in or to know someone in a trial and reported less willingness than white respondents to consider trial participation. Qualitative observations suggested that Asians who presented for a potential trial were interested in the availability of a novel cancer therapy but were not eligible for available trials. Multiple strategies will be necessary to enhance awareness of and experience with accrual to cancer clinical trials for Asians, including richer understanding and increased involvement of Asians in cancer clinical trials and greater attention to the location and diversity of the Asian population in structuring study centers and evaluating trial results. PMID:16247795

  14. Network performance analysis of the Limpopo TV white space (TVWS) trial network

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masonta, MT

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Singapore with new com- mercial pilots. United Kingdom, Office of Communications State- ment, Available online at: http://news.microsoft.com/ensg/2013/06/16/ crossingthechasmando/. [Accessed: 21-Feb-2015], 2013. [19] NICT. Trials of TV white space... commercial pilot study in Singapore [18], started in 2013 considered a variety of commercial services that could be deployed using TVWS technology in a terrain where traditional wireless deployment would be difficult. These included various monitoring appli...

  15. The Planeterrella experiment: from individual initiative to networking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garnier Pierre

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Space weather is a relatively new discipline, which is still largely unknown amongst the wider public despite its increasing importance in all of our daily lives. Outreach activities can promote awareness of space weather. In particular the visual beauty and excitement of the aurora make these lights a wonderful inspirational hook to enhance understanding of space weather in a general audience. A century ago, the Norwegian experimental physicist Kristian Birkeland, one of the founding fathers of modern space science, demonstrated with his Terrella experiment the formation of the aurora. Recently, a modernized version of the Terrella has been designed. This “Planeterrella” experiment allows the visualization of many phenomena that occur in our space environment. Although the Planeterrella was originally a local project, it has developed to become a very successful international public outreach experiment. We believe that its success is due to mainly two factors (i the Planeterrella is not patented and the plans are free to any public institute and (ii the project is widely advertised using national and European scientific networks such as COST ES 0803, as well as press releases, books and web sites. Today, seven Planeterrellas are in operation, four more are under construction in four different countries and several more are being planned. During the last five years, about 50 000 people in Europe have attended live Planeterrella demonstration on the formation of auroral light, the space environment and space weather. Many more have seen the Planeterrella being demonstrated on TV. The Planeterrella received the first international prize for outreach activities from the Europlanet Framework 7 program in 2010 and the French Ministry of Science outreach prize “Le goût des sciences” in November 2012. This paper describes the process that led to the construction of the first Planeterrella and discusses how the Planeterrella project developed

  16. The Planeterrella experiment: from individual initiative to networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilensten, J.; Provan, G.; Barthelemy, M.; Simon Wedlund, C.; Gronoff, G.; Vanlommel, P.; Brekke, A.; Garnier, P.; Grimald Rochel, S.

    2013-12-01

    Space weather is a relatively new discipline, which is still largely unknown amongst the wider public despite its increasing importance in all of our daily lives. Outreach activities can promote awareness of space weather. In particular the visual beauty and excitement of the aurora make these lights a wonderful inspirational hook to enhance understanding of space weather in a general audience. A century ago, the Norwegian experimental physicist Kristian Birkeland, one of the founding fathers of modern space science, demonstrated with his Terrella experiment the formation of the aurora. Recently, a modernized version of the Terrella has been designed in France. This ';';Planeterrella'' experiment allows the visualization of many phenomena that occur in our space environment. Although the Planeterrella was originally a local project, it has developed to become a very successful international public outreach experiment. We believe that its success is due to mainly two factors (i) the Planeterrella is not patented and the plans are free to any public institute and (ii) the project is widely advertised using national and scientific networks, as well as press releases, books and web sites. Today, nine Planeterrellas are in operation, six more are under construction in five different countries including in the US and several more are being planned. During the last five years, about 55 000 people in Europe have attended live Planeterrella demonstration on the formation of auroral light, the space environment and space weather. Many more have seen the Planeterrella being demonstrated on TV. It is now used for education, outreach, scientific, and artistic purposes. We will describes this process and discuss how the Planeterrella project developed to become an international public outreach phenomenon. We also examine some of the lessons learnt along the way such as patented or not, big or small, automatized or hand-operated, and the cost of the overall project. A star (close

  17. A BEFORE AND AFTER TRIAL OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF NETWORK ANALYSIS IN HEALTH OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalwar, R; Srivastava, M; Verma, S S; Vaze, M; Tilak, V W

    1996-10-01

    An intervention trial using "before-and-after" approach was undertaken to address the question whether network analysis as a health managerial tool of control can favourably affect the delays that occur in planning and executing the antimalaria operations of a Station Health Organization in a large military station. Exposure variable of interest was intervention with a network diagram, by which the potential causes of delay along the various activities were assessed and remedial measures were introduced during the second year. Sample size was calculated using conventional alpha and beta error levels. The study indicated that there was a definite beneficial outcome in that the operations could be started as well as completed in time during the intervention year. There was reduction in time requirement in 5 out of the 9 activities, the exact 'p' value being 0.08, by both parametric and non-parametric tests. The use of network analysis in health care management has been recommended.

  18. Structural Network Position and Performance of Health Leaders Within an HIV Prevention Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulawa, Marta I; Yamanis, Thespina J; Kajula, Lusajo J; Balvanz, Peter; Maman, Suzanne

    2018-04-28

    The effectiveness of peer leaders in promoting health may depend on the position they occupy within their social networks. Using sociocentric (whole network) and behavioral data from the intervention arm of a cluster-randomized HIV prevention trial in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, we used generalized linear models with standardized predictors to examine the association between heath leaders' baseline structural network position (i.e., in-degree and betweenness centrality) and their 12-month self-reported (1) confidence in educating network members about HIV and gender-based violence (GBV) and (2) number of past-week conversations about HIV and GBV. As in-degree centrality increased, leaders reported fewer HIV-related conversations. As betweenness centrality increased, leaders reported greater number of conversations about GBV. Network position was not significantly associated with confidence in discussing either topic. Our results suggest that peer leaders who occupy spaces between sub-groups of network members may be more effective in engaging their peers in sensitive or controversial topics like GBV than more popular peer leaders.

  19. Network-Centric Maritime Radiation Awareness and Interdiction Experiments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bordetsky, Alex; Dougan, Arden D; Nekoogar, Faranak

    2006-01-01

    .... This joint NPS-LLNL project is based on the NPS Tactical Network Topology (TNT) comprised of long-haul OFDM networks combined with self-forming wireless mesh links to air, surface, ground, and underwater unmanned vehicles...

  20. Researching Design, Experience and Practice of Networked Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hodgson, Vivien; de Laat, Maarten; McConnell, David

    2014-01-01

    and final section draws attention to a growing topic of interest within networked learning: that of networked learning in informal practices. In addition, we provide a reflection on the theories, methods and settings featured in the networked learning research of the chapters. We conclude the introduction...

  1. The Septic Shock 3.0 Definition and Trials: A Vasopressin and Septic Shock Trial Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, James A; Lee, Terry; Singer, Joel; Boyd, John H; Walley, Keith R

    2017-06-01

    The Septic Shock 3.0 definition could alter treatment comparisons in randomized controlled trials in septic shock. Our first hypothesis was that the vasopressin versus norepinephrine comparison and 28-day mortality of patients with Septic Shock 3.0 definition (lactate > 2 mmol/L) differ from vasopressin versus norepinephrine and mortality in Vasopressin and Septic Shock Trial. Our second hypothesis was that there are differences in plasma cytokine levels in Vasopressin and Septic Shock Trial for lactate less than or equal to 2 versus greater than 2 mmol/L. Retrospective analysis of randomized controlled trial. Multicenter ICUs. We compared vasopressin-to-norepinephrine group 28- and 90-day mortality in Vasopressin and Septic Shock Trial in lactate subgroups. We measured 39 cytokines to compare patients with lactate less than or equal to 2 versus greater than 2 mmol/L. Patients with septic shock with lactate greater than 2 mmol/L or less than or equal to 2 mmol/L, randomized to vasopressin or norepinephrine. Concealed vasopressin (0.03 U/min.) or norepinephrine infusions. The Septic Shock 3.0 definition would have decreased sample size by about half. The 28- and 90-day mortality rates were 10-12 % higher than the original Vasopressin and Septic Shock Trial mortality. There was a significantly (p = 0.028) lower mortality with vasopressin versus norepinephrine in lactate less than or equal to 2 mmol/L but no difference between treatment groups in lactate greater than 2 mmol/L. Nearly all cytokine levels were significantly higher in patients with lactate greater than 2 versus less than or equal to 2 mmol/L. The Septic Shock 3.0 definition decreased sample size by half and increased 28-day mortality rates by about 10%. Vasopressin lowered mortality versus norepinephrine if lactate was less than or equal to 2 mmol/L. Patients had higher plasma cytokines in lactate greater than 2 versus less than or equal to 2 mmol/L, a brisker cytokine response to infection. The Septic

  2. Video-based peer feedback through social networking for robotic surgery simulation: a multicenter randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Stacey C; Chiang, Alexander; Shah, Galaxy; Kwan, Lorna; Montgomery, Jeffrey S; Karam, Amer; Tarnay, Christopher; Guru, Khurshid A; Hu, Jim C

    2015-05-01

    To examine the feasibility and outcomes of video-based peer feedback through social networking to facilitate robotic surgical skill acquisition. The acquisition of surgical skills may be challenging for novel techniques and/or those with prolonged learning curves. Randomized controlled trial involving 41 resident physicians performing the Tubes (Da Vinci Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA) simulator exercise with versus without peer feedback of video-recorded performance through a social networking Web page. Data collected included simulator exercise score, time to completion, and comfort and satisfaction with robotic surgery simulation. There were no baseline differences between the intervention group (n = 20) and controls (n = 21). The intervention group showed improvement in mean scores from session 1 to sessions 2 and 3 (60.7 vs 75.5, P feedback subjects were more comfortable with robotic surgery than controls (90% vs 62%, P = 0.021) and expressed greater satisfaction with the learning experience (100% vs 67%, P = 0.014). Of the intervention subjects, 85% found that peer feedback was useful and 100% found it effective. Video-based peer feedback through social networking appears to be an effective paradigm for surgical education and accelerates the robotic surgery learning curve during simulation.

  3. Randomized Trial of a Social Networking Intervention for Cancer-Related Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Jason E; O'Carroll Bantum, Erin; Pagano, Ian S; Stanton, Annette

    2017-10-01

    Web and mobile technologies appear to hold promise for delivering evidence-informed and evidence-based intervention to cancer survivors and others living with trauma and other psychological concerns. Health-space.net was developed as a comprehensive online social networking and coping skills training program for cancer survivors living with distress. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a 12-week social networking intervention on distress, depression, anxiety, vigor, and fatigue in cancer survivors reporting high levels of cancer-related distress. We recruited 347 participants from a local cancer registry and internet, and all were randomized to either a 12-week waiting list control group or to immediate access to the intervention. Intervention participants received secure access to the study website, which provided extensive social networking capabilities and coping skills training exercises facilitated by a professional facilitator. Across time, the prevalence of clinically significant depression symptoms declined from 67 to 34 % in both conditions. The health-space.net intervention had greater declines in fatigue than the waitlist control group, but the intervention did not improve outcomes for depression, trauma-related anxiety symptoms, or overall mood disturbance. For those with more severe levels of anxiety at baseline, greater engagement with the intervention was associated with higher levels of symptom reduction over time. The intervention resulted in small but significant effects on fatigue but not other primary or secondary outcomes. Results suggest that this social networking intervention may be most effective for those who have distress that is not associated with high levels of anxiety symptoms or very poor overall psychological functioning. The trial was registered with the ClinicalTrials.gov database ( ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT01976949).

  4. Networks as Drivers for Innovation – Experiences from Food Networks in Canada and New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Hamann

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A common feature among networks is the focus on innovation but the approach to driving innovation and to supporting companies’ innovation work differs widely between networks. Some networks strive to be THE forum of an industry, andthese networks generally focus on promoting innovations that are market‐ready. Networks with a defined objective of promoting research‐driven innovation must have different network organisations from the forum‐oriented networks. Research shows that networks promoting research‐driven innovation also lead to patent applications and should have activities towards commercialisation support. This paper compares four networks from Canada and New Zealand in order to identify examples of how networks with different structures and objectives can support innovation in agri‐food companies. The paper is an empirical contribution to the research area of networks and innovation.

  5. Communication is the key to success in pragmatic clinical trials in Practice-based Research Networks (PBRNs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Susan; Graham, Deborah; Kurland, Marge; Pace, Wilson; Madison, Suzanne; Yawn, Barbara P

    2013-01-01

    Effective communication is the foundation of feasibility and fidelity in practice-based pragmatic research studies. Doing a study with practices spread over several states requires long-distance communication strategies, including E-mails, faxes, telephone calls, conference calls, and texting. Compared with face-to-face communication, distance communication strategies are less familiar to most study coordinators and research teams. Developing and ensuring comfort with distance communications requires additional time and use of different talents and expertise than those required for face-to-face communication. It is necessary to make sure that messages are appropriate for the medium, clearly crafted, and presented in a manner that facilitates practices receiving and understanding the information. This discussion is based on extensive experience of 2 groups who have worked collaboratively on several large, federally funded, pragmatic trials in a practice-based research network. The goal of this article is to summarize lessons learned to facilitate the work of other research teams.

  6. Accelerating Innovation Through Coopetition: The Innovation Learning Network Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Chris; Ford Carleton, Penny; Krumpholz, Elizabeth; Chow, Marilyn P

    Coopetition, the simultaneous pursuit of cooperation and competition, is a growing force in the innovation landscape. For some organizations, the primary mode of innovation continues to be deeply secretive and highly competitive, but for others, a new style of shared challenges, shared purpose, and shared development has become a superior, more efficient way of working to accelerate innovation capabilities and capacity. Over the last 2 decades, the literature base devoted to coopetition has gradually expanded. However, the field is still in its infancy. The majority of coopetition research is qualitative, primarily consisting of case studies. Few studies have addressed the nonprofit sector or service industries such as health care. The authors believe that this article may offer a unique perspective on coopetition in the context of a US-based national health care learning alliance designed to accelerate innovation, the Innovation Learning Network or ILN. The mission of the ILN is to "Share the joy and pain of innovation," accelerating innovation by sharing solutions, teaching techniques, and cultivating friendships. These 3 pillars (sharing, teaching, and cultivating) form the foundation for coopetition within the ILN. Through the lens of coopetition, we examine the experience of the ILN over the last 10 years and provide case examples that illustrate the benefits and challenges of coopetition in accelerating innovation in health care.

  7. Context-specific metabolic networks are consistent with experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A Becker

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Reconstructions of cellular metabolism are publicly available for a variety of different microorganisms and some mammalian genomes. To date, these reconstructions are "genome-scale" and strive to include all reactions implied by the genome annotation, as well as those with direct experimental evidence. Clearly, many of the reactions in a genome-scale reconstruction will not be active under particular conditions or in a particular cell type. Methods to tailor these comprehensive genome-scale reconstructions into context-specific networks will aid predictive in silico modeling for a particular situation. We present a method called Gene Inactivity Moderated by Metabolism and Expression (GIMME to achieve this goal. The GIMME algorithm uses quantitative gene expression data and one or more presupposed metabolic objectives to produce the context-specific reconstruction that is most consistent with the available data. Furthermore, the algorithm provides a quantitative inconsistency score indicating how consistent a set of gene expression data is with a particular metabolic objective. We show that this algorithm produces results consistent with biological experiments and intuition for adaptive evolution of bacteria, rational design of metabolic engineering strains, and human skeletal muscle cells. This work represents progress towards producing constraint-based models of metabolism that are specific to the conditions where the expression profiling data is available.

  8. [Local public health networks. Apropos of an experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guix, Joan; Bocio, Ana; Ferràs, Joaquim; Margalef, Jordi; Osanz, Anna C; Serrano, Mónica; Sentenà, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Public health action on a territory is complex and requires the involvement of multiple actors, who do not always act coordinately. Networks of organizations structures including the whole of the local actors facilitate the generation of synergies and enable greater effectiveness and efficiency of the joint action from the different actors on a same landscape. We present 3 years experience of four Public Health Committees in a region of Catalonia (Spain), composed by the main actors in public health planning. Each of the committees is organized on a plenary and working groups on issues arising from the regional health diagnosis, and coincident with the Health Plan of the Region. Coordination in no case implies the loss or dilution of the firm of the actor generator of intervention initiative in public health, but their empowerment and collaboration by the other actors. In conclusion welcomes the creation of a culture of collaboration and synergies between the different organizations concerned. Lack of specificity is observed in establishing operational objectives, and the need for greater coordination and involvement of the components of the various working groups. Copyright © 2012 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Japanese experience with clinical trials of fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunemoto, H.; Arai, T.; Morita, S.; Ishikawa, T.; Aoki, Y.; Takada, N.; Kamata, S.

    1982-01-01

    Between November, 1975 and November, 1981, 825 patients were treated with 30 MeV (d-Be) neutrons at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba. At the Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, 302 patients were referred to the Radiation Therapy department and were treated with 16 MeV (d-Be) neutrons. The emphasis of these clinical trials with fast neutrons was placed on the estimation of the effect of fast neutrons for locally advanced cancers or radioresistant cancers, and on evaluation of the rate of complication of normal tissues following irradiation with fast neutrons. Results were evaluated for patients with previously untreated cancer; local control of the tumor was observed in 59.1%. Complications requiring medical care developed in only 32 patients. Late reaction of soft tissue seemed to be more severe than that observed with photon beams. The results also suggest that for carcinoma of the larynx, esophagus, uterine cervix, Pancoast's tumor of the lung and osteosarcoma, fast neutrons were considered to be effectively applied in this randomized clinical trial. For carcinoma of the larynx, a fast neutron boost was effectively delivered, although an interstitial implant was necessarily combined with fast neutrons for carcinoma of the tongue. The cumulative survival rate of the patients with carcinoma of the esophagus treated with fast neutrons of 26% compared to the survival rate of 10.5% obtained using photons. The results also indicate that local control and relief of the symptom related to Pancoast's tumor of the lung seemed to be better with neutrons than with photons. For patients suffering from osteosarcoma, the surgical procedures preserving the function of the leg and arm were studied according to the better local control rate of the tumor following fast neutron beam therapy

  10. Special features of health services and register based trialsexperiences from a randomized trial of childbirth classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevón Tiina

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evaluating complex interventions in health services faces various difficulties, such as making practice changes and costs. Ways to increase research capacity and decrease costs include making research an integral part of health services and using routine data to judge outcomes. The purpose of this article is to report the feasibility of a pilot trial relying solely on routinely collected register data and being based on ordinary health services. Methods The example intervention was education to public health nurses (PHN (childbirth classes to reduce caesarean section rates via pre-delivery considerations of pregnant women. 20 maternity health centers (MHC were paired and of each 10 pairs, one MHC was randomly allocated to an intervention group and the other to a control; 8 pairs with successful intervention were used in the analyses (1601 mothers. The women visiting to the study maternity centers were identified from the Customer Register of Helsinki City. A list of the study women was made using the mother's personal identification number, visit date, the maternity center code, birth date and gestation length. The mode of delivery and health outcomes were retrieved from the Finnish Medical Birth Register (MBR. Process data of the intervention are based on observations, written feedback and questionnaires from PHNs, and project correspondence. Results It took almost two years to establish how to obtain permissions and to actually obtain it for the trial. Obtaining permissions for the customer and outcome data and register linkages was unproblematic and the cluster randomization provided comparable groups. The intervention did not succeed well. Had the main aim of the trial been to cause a change in PHNs behavior, we would have very likely intensified the intervention during the trial. Conclusion Our experiences encourage the use of trials that obtain their outcomes from registers. Changing the behavior of ordinary health

  11. APS ACTION--AntiPhospholipid Syndrome Alliance For Clinical Trials and InternatiOnal Networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkan, D; Lockshin, M D

    2012-06-01

    AntiPhospholipid Syndrome Alliance For Clinical Trials and InternatiOnal Networking (APS ACTION) is the first-ever international research network that has been created specifically to design and conduct well-designed, large-scale, multi-center clinical trials in persistently antiphospholipid antibody (aPL)-positive patients. The founding principle of the APS ACTION is that it is an internationally collaborative effort, open to qualified investigators across the globe who are committed to furthering our understanding of APS and its management. Due to the hard work and collaborative spirit of APS ACTION members, in early 2012, APS ACTION launched two important collaborative international projects: 1) a randomized controlled trial of hydroxychloroquine in the primary thrombosis prevention of persistently aPL-positive but thrombosis-free patients without other systemic autoimmune diseases; and 2) a web-based registry of aPL-positive patients with or without systemic autoimmune diseases, which will also include annual blood collection for aPL-testing and future basic science studies. In the end, we hope to find better treatments for antiphospholipid syndrome, which is a leading cause of thrombosis, pregnancy morbidity and other life-altering consequences, and to heighten awareness about this life-threatening, autoimmune condition.

  12. Participant Recruitment and Engagement in Automated eHealth Trial Registration: Challenges and Opportunities for Recruiting Women Who Experience Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Christine; Rohan, Maheswaran; Sisk, Rose; Dobbs, Terry; Nada-Raja, Shyamala; Wilson, Denise; Vandal, Alain C

    2016-01-01

    Background Automated eHealth Web-based research trials offer people an accessible, confidential opportunity to engage in research that matters to them. eHealth trials may be particularly useful for sensitive issues when seeking health care may be accompanied by shame and mistrust. Yet little is known about people’s early engagement with eHealth trials, from recruitment to preintervention autoregistration processes. A recent randomized controlled trial that tested the effectiveness of an eHealth safety decision aid for New Zealand women in the general population who experienced intimate partner violence (isafe) provided the opportunity to examine recruitment and preintervention participant engagement with a fully automated Web-based registration process. The trial aimed to recruit 340 women within 24 months. Objective The objective of our study was to examine participant preintervention engagement and recruitment efficiency for the isafe trial, and to analyze dropout through the registration pathway, from recruitment to eligibility screening and consent, to completion of baseline measures. Methods In this case study, data collection sources included the trial recruitment log, Google Analytics reports, registration and program metadata, and costs. Analysis included a qualitative narrative of the recruitment experience and descriptive statistics of preintervention participant engagement and dropout rates. A Koyck model investigated the relationship between Web-based online marketing website advertisements (ads) and participant accrual. Results The isafe trial was launched on September 17, 2012. Placement of ads in an online classified advertising platform increased the average number of recruited participants per month from 2 to 25. Over the 23-month recruitment period, the registration website recorded 4176 unique visitors. Among 1003 women meeting eligibility criteria, 51.55% (517) consented to participate; among the 501 women who enrolled (consented, validated

  13. Wide Area Network Monitoring System for HEP Experiments at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, M.

    2004-11-23

    Large, distributed High Energy Physics (HEP) collaborations, such as D0, CDF and US-CMS, depend on stable and robust network paths between major world research centres. The evolving emphasis on data and compute Grids increases the reliance on network performance. Fermilab's experimental groups and network support personnel identified a critical need for WAN monitoring to ensure the quality and efficient utilization of such network paths. This has led to the development of the Network Monitoring system we will present in this paper. The system evolved from the IEPM-BW project, started at SLAC three years ago. At Fermilab this system has developed into a fully functional infrastructure with bi-directional active network probes and path characterizations. It is based on the Iperf achievable throughput tool, Ping and Synack to test ICMP/TCP connectivity. It uses Pipechar and Traceroute to test, compare and report hop-by-hop network path characterization. It also measures real file transfer performance by BBFTP and GridFTP. The Monitoring system has an extensive web-interface and all the data is available through standalone SOAP web services or by a MonaLISA client. Also in this paper we will present a case study of network path asymmetry and abnormal performance between FNAL and SDSC, which was discovered and resolved by utilizing the Network Monitoring system.

  14. Wide area network monitoring system for HEP experiments at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoriev, Maxim; Fermilab; Cottrell, Les; Logg, Connie; SLAC

    2004-01-01

    Large, distributed High Energy Physics (HEP) collaborations, such as D0, CDF and US-CMS, depend on stable and robust network paths between major world research centres. The evolving emphasis on data and compute Grids increases the reliance on network performance. Fermilab's experimental groups and network support personnel identified a critical need for WAN monitoring to ensure the quality and efficient utilization of such network paths. This has led to the development of the Network Monitoring system we will present in this paper. The system evolved from the IEPM-BW project, started at SLAC three years ago. At Fermilab this system has developed into a fully functional infrastructure with bi-directional active network probes and path characterizations. It is based on the Iperf achievable throughput tool, Ping and Synack to test ICMP/TCP connectivity. It uses Pipechar and Traceroute to test, compare and report hop-by-hop network path characterization. It also measures real file transfer performance by BBFTP and GridFTP. The Monitoring system has an extensive web-interface and all the data is available through standalone SOAP web services or by a MonaLISA client. Also in this paper we will present a case study of network path asymmetry and abnormal performance between FNAL and SDSC, which was discovered and resolved by utilizing the Network Monitoring system

  15. Wide Area Network Monitoring System for HEP Experiments at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoriev, M.

    2004-01-01

    Large, distributed High Energy Physics (HEP) collaborations, such as D0, CDF and US-CMS, depend on stable and robust network paths between major world research centres. The evolving emphasis on data and compute Grids increases the reliance on network performance. Fermilab's experimental groups and network support personnel identified a critical need for WAN monitoring to ensure the quality and efficient utilization of such network paths. This has led to the development of the Network Monitoring system we will present in this paper. The system evolved from the IEPM-BW project, started at SLAC three years ago. At Fermilab this system has developed into a fully functional infrastructure with bi-directional active network probes and path characterizations. It is based on the Iperf achievable throughput tool, Ping and Synack to test ICMP/TCP connectivity. It uses Pipechar and Traceroute to test, compare and report hop-by-hop network path characterization. It also measures real file transfer performance by BBFTP and GridFTP. The Monitoring system has an extensive web-interface and all the data is available through standalone SOAP web services or by a MonaLISA client. Also in this paper we will present a case study of network path asymmetry and abnormal performance between FNAL and SDSC, which was discovered and resolved by utilizing the Network Monitoring system

  16. Proactive recruitment of cancer patients’ social networks into a smoking cessation trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Lori A.; Fish, Laura J.; Peterson, Bercedis L.; Biddle, Andrea K.; Garst, Jennifer; Lyna, Pauline; Molner, Stephanie; Bepler, Gerold; Kelley, Mike; Keefe, Francis J.; McBride, Colleen M.

    2011-01-01

    Background This report describes the characteristics associated with successful enrollment of smokers in the social networks (i.e., family and close friends) of patients with lung cancer into a smoking cessation intervention. Methods Lung cancer patients from four clinical sites were asked to complete a survey enumerating their family members and close friends who smoke, and provide permission to contact these potential participants. Family members and close friends identified as smokers were interviewed and offered participation in a smoking cessation intervention. Repeated measures logistic regression model examined characteristics associated with enrollment. Results A total of 1,062 eligible lung cancer patients were identified and 516 patients consented and completed the survey. These patients identified 1,325 potentially eligible family and close friends. Of these, 496 consented and enrolled in the smoking cessation program. Network enrollment was highest among patients who were white and had late-stage disease. Social network members enrolled were most likely to be female, a birth family, immediate family, or close friend, and live in close geographic proximity to the patient. Conclusions Proactive recruitment of smokers in the social networks of lung cancer patients is challenging. In this study, the majority of family members and friends declined to participate. Enlisting immediate female family members and friends, who live close to the patient as agents to proactively recruit other network members into smoking cessation trials could be used to extend reach of cessation interventions to patients’ social networks. Moreover, further consideration should be given to the appropriate timing of approaching network smokers to consider cessation. PMID:21382509

  17. Social network among young adults with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders: results from the Danish OPUS trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Anne; Petersen, Lone; Jeppesen, Pia

    2006-01-01

    Social network has considerable impact on physical and mental health. Patients experiencing first-episode psychosis early in adult life may experience severe problems concerning development and maintenance of their social network.......Social network has considerable impact on physical and mental health. Patients experiencing first-episode psychosis early in adult life may experience severe problems concerning development and maintenance of their social network....

  18. Social network among young adults with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders: Results from the Danish OPUS trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, A; Petersen, L; Jeppesen, P

    2006-01-01

    Social network has considerable impact on physical and mental health. Patients experiencing first-episode psychosis early in adult life may experience severe problems concerning development and maintenance of their social network.......Social network has considerable impact on physical and mental health. Patients experiencing first-episode psychosis early in adult life may experience severe problems concerning development and maintenance of their social network....

  19. Cardiac dysfunction in the trastuzumab clinical trials experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidman, Andrew; Hudis, Clifford; Pierri, Mary Kathryn; Shak, Steven; Paton, Virginia; Ashby, Mark; Murphy, Maureen; Stewart, Stanford J; Keefe, Deborah

    2002-03-01

    This study sought to estimate cardiac dysfunction (CD) risk for patients receiving trastuzumab; to characterize observed CD by severity, treatment, and clinical outcome; to assess effects of baseline clinical risk factors on CD; and to assess effects of cumulative doses of anthracyclines and trastuzumab on CD. A retrospective review of records for patients enrolled onto any of seven phase II and III trastuzumab clinical trials was performed. Predefined criteria were used for the diagnosis, and the New York Heart Association functional classification system was used to document CD severity. Product-limit estimates were used to summarize the cumulative anthracycline and trastuzumab doses at the time of CD onset. Patients treated with trastuzumab were found to be at an increased risk for CD. The incidence was greatest in patients receiving concomitant trastuzumab and anthracycline plus cyclophosphamide (27%). The risk was substantially lower in patients receiving paclitaxel and trastuzumab (13%) or trastuzumab alone (3% to 7%); however, most of these patients had received prior anthracycline therapy. CD was noted in 8% of patients receiving anthracycline plus cyclophosphamide and 1% receiving paclitaxel alone. Most trastuzumab-treated patients developing CD were symptomatic (75%), and most improved with standard treatment for congestive heart failure (79%). Trastuzumab is associated with an increased risk of CD, which is greatest in patients receiving concurrent anthracyclines. In most patients with metastatic breast cancer, the risk of CD can be justified given the improvement in overall survival previously reported with trastuzumab.

  20. Creating an African HIV clinical research and prevention trials network: HIV prevalence, incidence and transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoli Kamali

    Full Text Available HIV epidemiology informs prevention trial design and program planning. Nine clinical research centers (CRC in sub-Saharan Africa conducted HIV observational epidemiology studies in populations at risk for HIV infection as part of an HIV prevention and vaccine trial network. Annual HIV incidence ranged from below 2% to above 10% and varied by CRC and risk group, with rates above 5% observed in Zambian men in an HIV-discordant relationship, Ugandan men from Lake Victoria fishing communities, men who have sex with men, and several cohorts of women. HIV incidence tended to fall after the first three months in the study and over calendar time. Among suspected transmission pairs, 28% of HIV infections were not from the reported partner. Volunteers with high incidence were successfully identified and enrolled into large scale cohort studies. Over a quarter of new cases in couples acquired infection from persons other than the suspected transmitting partner.

  1. Creating an African HIV Clinical Research and Prevention Trials Network: HIV Prevalence, Incidence and Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, Anatoli; Price, Matt A.; Lakhi, Shabir; Karita, Etienne; Inambao, Mubiana; Sanders, Eduard J.; Anzala, Omu; Latka, Mary H.; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Asiki, Gershim; Ssetaala, Ali; Ruzagira, Eugene; Allen, Susan; Farmer, Paul; Hunter, Eric; Mutua, Gaudensia; Makkan, Heeran; Tichacek, Amanda; Brill, Ilene K.; Fast, Pat; Stevens, Gwynn; Chetty, Paramesh; Amornkul, Pauli N.; Gilmour, Jill

    2015-01-01

    HIV epidemiology informs prevention trial design and program planning. Nine clinical research centers (CRC) in sub-Saharan Africa conducted HIV observational epidemiology studies in populations at risk for HIV infection as part of an HIV prevention and vaccine trial network. Annual HIV incidence ranged from below 2% to above 10% and varied by CRC and risk group, with rates above 5% observed in Zambian men in an HIV-discordant relationship, Ugandan men from Lake Victoria fishing communities, men who have sex with men, and several cohorts of women. HIV incidence tended to fall after the first three months in the study and over calendar time. Among suspected transmission pairs, 28% of HIV infections were not from the reported partner. Volunteers with high incidence were successfully identified and enrolled into large scale cohort studies. Over a quarter of new cases in couples acquired infection from persons other than the suspected transmitting partner. PMID:25602351

  2. Business communication in social networks: Content management and experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Nicolás

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Currently, management of communication in social networks has become an indispensable strategic activity and contributes directly to change the mode of relationship between business and its stakeholders. The first section of this paper presents a brief analysis of the results reported in different specialized national studies in social networks. We analyse the general activities that users prefer to do and activities that users value most brands on networks. If an organization wants to successfully manage their communication in social networks is very important to know the behaviour of the users and design strategies based on their status and economic activity. This paper presents a brief analysis of social branding through the classification of different corporate content posted on their networks.

  3. Participant Recruitment and Engagement in Automated eHealth Trial Registration: Challenges and Opportunities for Recruiting Women Who Experience Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziol-McLain, Jane; McLean, Christine; Rohan, Maheswaran; Sisk, Rose; Dobbs, Terry; Nada-Raja, Shyamala; Wilson, Denise; Vandal, Alain C

    2016-10-25

    Automated eHealth Web-based research trials offer people an accessible, confidential opportunity to engage in research that matters to them. eHealth trials may be particularly useful for sensitive issues when seeking health care may be accompanied by shame and mistrust. Yet little is known about people's early engagement with eHealth trials, from recruitment to preintervention autoregistration processes. A recent randomized controlled trial that tested the effectiveness of an eHealth safety decision aid for New Zealand women in the general population who experienced intimate partner violence (isafe) provided the opportunity to examine recruitment and preintervention participant engagement with a fully automated Web-based registration process. The trial aimed to recruit 340 women within 24 months. The objective of our study was to examine participant preintervention engagement and recruitment efficiency for the isafe trial, and to analyze dropout through the registration pathway, from recruitment to eligibility screening and consent, to completion of baseline measures. In this case study, data collection sources included the trial recruitment log, Google Analytics reports, registration and program metadata, and costs. Analysis included a qualitative narrative of the recruitment experience and descriptive statistics of preintervention participant engagement and dropout rates. A Koyck model investigated the relationship between Web-based online marketing website advertisements (ads) and participant accrual. The isafe trial was launched on September 17, 2012. Placement of ads in an online classified advertising platform increased the average number of recruited participants per month from 2 to 25. Over the 23-month recruitment period, the registration website recorded 4176 unique visitors. Among 1003 women meeting eligibility criteria, 51.55% (517) consented to participate; among the 501 women who enrolled (consented, validated, and randomized), 412 (82.2%) were

  4. Multibeam smart antenna field trial experiments in mobile radio environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perini, Patrick

    1996-01-01

    Several types of high gain multibeam antennas were tested and compared to traditional sector and omni antennas in various mobile radio environments. A vehicle equipped with a mobile transmitter drove in several mobile radio environments while the received signal strength (RSS) was recorded on multiple antenna channels attached to multibeam, sector and omni directional antennas. The RSS data recorded included the fast (rayleigh) fading and was averaged into local means based on the mobile's position/speed. Description of the experiment and analysis of the gain improvement, average RSS, diversity gain are presented.

  5. Multimedia over cognitive radio networks algorithms, protocols, and experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Fei

    2014-01-01

    PrefaceAbout the EditorsContributorsNetwork Architecture to Support Multimedia over CRNA Management Architecture for Multimedia Communication in Cognitive Radio NetworksAlexandru O. Popescu, Yong Yao, Markus Fiedler , and Adrian P. PopescuPaving a Wider Way for Multimedia over Cognitive Radios: An Overview of Wideband Spectrum Sensing AlgorithmsBashar I. Ahmad, Hongjian Sun, Cong Ling, and Arumugam NallanathanBargaining-Based Spectrum Sharing for Broadband Multimedia Services in Cognitive Radio NetworkYang Yan, Xiang Chen, Xiaofeng Zhong, Ming Zhao, and Jing WangPhysical Layer Mobility Challen

  6. Technology transfer for the implementation of a clinical trials network on drug abuse and mental health treatment in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horigian, Viviana E; Marín-Navarrete, Rodrigo A; Verdeja, Rosa E; Alonso, Elizabeth; Perez, María A; Fernández-Mondragón, José; Berlanga, Carlos; Medina-Mora, María Elena; Szapocznik, José

    2015-09-01

    Low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) lack the research infrastructure and capacity to conduct rigorous substance abuse and mental health effectiveness clinical trials to guide clinical practice. A partnership between the Florida Node Alliance of the United States National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network and the National Institute of Psychiatry in Mexico was established in 2011 to improve substance abuse practice in Mexico. The purpose of this partnership was to develop a Mexican national clinical trials network of substance abuse researchers and providers capable of implementing effectiveness randomized clinical trials in community-based settings. A technology transfer model was implemented and ran from 2011-2013. The Florida Node Alliance shared the "know how" for the development of the research infrastructure to implement randomized clinical trials in community programs through core and specific training modules, role-specific coaching, pairings, modeling, monitoring, and feedback. The technology transfer process was bi-directional in nature in that it was informed by feedback on feasibility and cultural appropriateness for the context in which practices were implemented. The Institute, in turn, led the effort to create the national network of researchers and practitioners in Mexico and the implementation of the first trial. A collaborative model of technology transfer was useful in creating a Mexican researcher-provider network that is capable of changing national practice in substance abuse research and treatment. Key considerations for transnational technology transfer are presented.

  7. Application of local computer networks in nuclear-physical experiments and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foteev, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    The bases of construction, comparative performance and potentialities of local computer networks with respect to their application in physical experiments are considered. The principle of operation of local networks is shown on the basis of the Ethernet network and the results of analysis of their operating performance are given. The examples of operating local networks in the area of nuclear-physics research and nuclear technology are presented as follows: networks of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, California University and Los Alamos National Laboratory, network realization according to the DECnet and Fast-bus programs, home network configurations of the USSR Academy of Sciences and JINR Neutron Physical Laboratory etc. It is shown that local networks allows significantly raise productivity in the sphere of data processing

  8. Comparative effectiveness of injection therapies in lateral epicondylitis: a systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogh, Thøger Persson; Bartels, Else Marie; Ellingsen, Torkell; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Fredberg, Ulrich; Bliddal, Henning; Christensen, Robin

    2013-06-01

    Injection therapy with glucocorticoids has been used since the 1950s as a treatment strategy for lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow). Lately, several novel injection therapies have become available. To assess the comparative effectiveness and safety of injection therapies in patients with lateral epicondylitis. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Randomized controlled trials comparing different injection therapies for lateral epicondylitis were included provided they contained data for change in pain intensity (primary outcome). Trials were assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Network (random effects) meta-analysis was applied to combine direct and indirect evidence within and across trial data using the final end point reported in the trials, and results for the arm-based network analyses are reported as standardized mean differences (SMDs). Seventeen trials (1381 participants; 3 [18%] at low risk of bias) assessing injection with 8 different treatments-glucocorticoid (10 trials), botulinum toxin (4 trials), autologous blood (3 trials), platelet-rich plasma (2 trials), and polidocanol, glycosaminoglycan, prolotherapy, and hyaluronic acid (1 trial each)-were included. Pooled results (SMD [95% confidence interval]) showed that beyond 8 weeks, glucocorticoid injection was no more effective than placebo (-0.04 [-0.45 to 0.35]), but only 1 trial (which did not include a placebo arm) was at low risk of bias. Although botulinum toxin showed marginal benefit (-0.50 [-0.91 to -0.08]), it caused temporary paresis of finger extension, and all trials were at high risk of bias. Both autologous blood (-1.43 [-2.15 to -0.71]) and platelet-rich plasma (-1.13 [-1.77 to -0.49]) were also statistically superior to placebo, but only 1 trial was at low risk of bias. Prolotherapy (-2.71 [-4.60 to -0.82]) and hyaluronic acid (-5.58 [-6.35 to -4.82]) were both more efficacious than placebo, whereas polidocanol (0.39 [-0.42 to 1.20]) and glycosaminoglycan (-0.32 [-1.02 to 0

  9. Student Experience of Oral Communication Assessment Tasks Online from a Multi-Disciplinary Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBain, Bonnie; Drew, Antony; James, Carole; Phelan, Liam; Harris, Keith M; Archer, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the experiences of tertiary students learning oral presentation skills in a range of online and blended learning contexts across diverse disciplines. Design/methodology/approach: The research was designed as a "federation" of trials of diverse online oral communications assessment tasks…

  10. A randomized controlled trial testing a social network intervention to promote physical activity among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Woudenberg, Thabo J; Bevelander, Kirsten E; Burk, William J; Smit, Crystal R; Buijs, Laura; Buijzen, Moniek

    2018-04-23

    The current study examined the effectiveness of a social network intervention to promote physical activity among adolescents. Social network interventions utilize peer influence to change behavior by identifying the most influential individuals within social networks (i.e., influence agents), and training them to promote the target behavior. A total of 190 adolescents (46.32% boys; M age = 12.17, age range: 11-14 years) were randomly allocated to either the intervention or control condition. In the intervention condition, the most influential adolescents (based on peer nominations of classmates) in each classroom were trained to promote physical activity among their classmates. Participants received a research smartphone to complete questionnaires and an accelerometer to measure physical activity (steps per day) at baseline, and during the intervention one month later. A multilevel model tested the effectiveness of the intervention, controlling for clustering of data within participants and days. No intervention effect was observed, b = .04, SE = .10, p = .66. This was one of the first studies to test whether physical activity in adolescents could be promoted via influence agents, and the first social network intervention to use smartphones to do so. Important lessons and implications are discussed concerning the selection criterion of the influence agents, the use of smartphones in social network intervention, and the rigorous analyses used to control for confounding factors. Dutch Trial Registry (NTR): NTR6173 . Registered 5 October 2016 Study procedures were approved by the Ethics Committee of the Radboud University (ECSW2014-100614-222).

  11. A conceptual model for the development process of confirmatory adaptive clinical trials within an emergency research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawocha, Samkeliso C; Fetters, Michael D; Legocki, Laurie J; Guetterman, Timothy C; Frederiksen, Shirley; Barsan, William G; Lewis, Roger J; Berry, Donald A; Meurer, William J

    2017-06-01

    Adaptive clinical trials use accumulating data from enrolled subjects to alter trial conduct in pre-specified ways based on quantitative decision rules. In this research, we sought to characterize the perspectives of key stakeholders during the development process of confirmatory-phase adaptive clinical trials within an emergency clinical trials network and to build a model to guide future development of adaptive clinical trials. We used an ethnographic, qualitative approach to evaluate key stakeholders' views about the adaptive clinical trial development process. Stakeholders participated in a series of multidisciplinary meetings during the development of five adaptive clinical trials and completed a Strengths-Weaknesses-Opportunities-Threats questionnaire. In the analysis, we elucidated overarching themes across the stakeholders' responses to develop a conceptual model. Four major overarching themes emerged during the analysis of stakeholders' responses to questioning: the perceived statistical complexity of adaptive clinical trials and the roles of collaboration, communication, and time during the development process. Frequent and open communication and collaboration were viewed by stakeholders as critical during the development process, as were the careful management of time and logistical issues related to the complexity of planning adaptive clinical trials. The Adaptive Design Development Model illustrates how statistical complexity, time, communication, and collaboration are moderating factors in the adaptive design development process. The intensity and iterative nature of this process underscores the need for funding mechanisms for the development of novel trial proposals in academic settings.

  12. A network-base analysis of CMIP5 "historical" experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracco, A.; Foudalis, I.; Dovrolis, C.

    2012-12-01

    In computer science, "complex network analysis" refers to a set of metrics, modeling tools and algorithms commonly used in the study of complex nonlinear dynamical systems. Its main premise is that the underlying topology or network structure of a system has a strong impact on its dynamics and evolution. By allowing to investigate local and non-local statistical interaction, network analysis provides a powerful, but only marginally explored, framework to validate climate models and investigate teleconnections, assessing their strength, range, and impacts on the climate system. In this work we propose a new, fast, robust and scalable methodology to examine, quantify, and visualize climate sensitivity, while constraining general circulation models (GCMs) outputs with observations. The goal of our novel approach is to uncover relations in the climate system that are not (or not fully) captured by more traditional methodologies used in climate science and often adopted from nonlinear dynamical systems analysis, and to explain known climate phenomena in terms of the network structure or its metrics. Our methodology is based on a solid theoretical framework and employs mathematical and statistical tools, exploited only tentatively in climate research so far. Suitably adapted to the climate problem, these tools can assist in visualizing the trade-offs in representing global links and teleconnections among different data sets. Here we present the methodology, and compare network properties for different reanalysis data sets and a suite of CMIP5 coupled GCM outputs. With an extensive model intercomparison in terms of the climate network that each model leads to, we quantify how each model reproduces major teleconnections, rank model performances, and identify common or specific errors in comparing model outputs and observations.

  13. French network and acquired experience on record strong ground motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrieux, H.; Mohammadioun, G.

    1988-03-01

    The network intended to record strong ground motion in continental France is composed for the most part of instrument packages incorporated into nuclear installations, which are supplemented by a certain number of accelerometers placed in the most highly seismic areas. In a country where the level of seismicity is relatively modest, such a network is not conductive to the acquisition of new data, which, instead, is obtained through spot studies of limited duration using more sensitive instruments or through the recording of strong ground motion in neighbouring countries [fr

  14. A reverse engineering approach to optimize experiments for the construction of biological regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Shao, Bin; Wu, Yangle; Qi, Ouyang

    2013-01-01

    One of the major objectives in systems biology is to understand the relation between the topological structures and the dynamics of biological regulatory networks. In this context, various mathematical tools have been developed to deduct structures of regulatory networks from microarray expression data. In general, from a single data set, one cannot deduct the whole network structure; additional expression data are usually needed. Thus how to design a microarray expression experiment in order to get the most information is a practical problem in systems biology. Here we propose three methods, namely, maximum distance method, trajectory entropy method, and sampling method, to derive the optimal initial conditions for experiments. The performance of these methods is tested and evaluated in three well-known regulatory networks (budding yeast cell cycle, fission yeast cell cycle, and E. coli. SOS network). Based on the evaluation, we propose an efficient strategy for the design of microarray expression experiments.

  15. Social Networking Sites' Influence on Travelers' Authentic Experience a Case Study of Couch Surfing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao

    2013-01-01

    This study explored travelers' experiences in the era of network hospitality 2.0 using CouchSurfing.org as a case study. The following research questions guided this study: 1) what experience does CouchSurfing create for travelers before, during and after their travel? 2) how does couch surfers' experience relate to authenticity in context of…

  16. Trial of a small image network system in a radiology department of an university hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasuga, Toshio; Sone, Shusuke; Izuno, Itaru; Oguchi, Kazuhiro; Aoki, Jun; Sakai, Fumikazu; Takizawa, Masaomi; Hosoba, Minoru; Yamaguchi, Kenji.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the construction of an image network system in Shinshu University Hospital, and some of its current issues and advantages. Our discussion is based on our experience with a PACS system. SAIPACS, which was installed in 1990 for use in clinical conferencing and pre- and post-graduate education, and with a new CT and MRI network, which was subsequently introduced in 1993. The SAIPACS interconnects eight digital imaging modalities, including CT, MRI, XTV-DR (including digital tomosynthesis), FCR, nuclear medicine (RI), DSA, US, and a film digitizer (FD), with a workstation. Transmission time from the magnetic disk of each imaging modality to the SAIPACS image disk is not rapid enough. Therefore, we need to select image for transfer that are pertinent to our specific purpose, to complete image transmission within a practically acceptable period of time. The new CT/MRI network is composed of two CT units, two MRI systems, an image processing unit and a Universal Gateway. It provides faster image transmission than the SAIPACS system, because there is no need to reform image data to send them in a reversible compressed form. A versatile network system connected to the SAIPACS and CT/MRI network enables digital image data to be processed and edited and images to be transferred back to SAIPACS for clinical or educational use. (author)

  17. Women's experiences of participating in the early external cephalic version 2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray-Davis, Beth; Marion, Anya; Malott, Anne; Reitsma, Angela; Hutton, Eileen K

    2012-03-01

    The international, multicenter External Cephalic Version 2 (ECV2) Trial compared early external cephalic version at 34(0/7) to 35(6/7) weeks with that at greater than 37 weeks. A total of 1,543 women were randomized from 68 centers in 21 countries. The goal of this component of the trial was to understand women's views about participation in a research trial and timing of external cephalic version. A postpartum questionnaire was completed containing a 5-point Likert scale examining contact and availability of staff, choice of timing of external cephalic version, preference of randomization, convenience of participating, and overall satisfaction. Participants also completed two open-ended questions related to timing of external cephalic version and satisfaction with the trial. Descriptive statistics and content analysis were used to analyze data. A total of 1,458 women completed the questionnaire, of whom 86 percent said "yes"-they would participate in the trial again. Themes influencing decisions about participating were perceptions of the external cephalic version experience, preferred mode of delivery, preferred timing of external cephalic version, and perceptions of the effectiveness of external cephalic version and of the trial environment. Many participants preferred the early timing of the procedure offered through the trial because of perceived advantages of a smaller baby being easier to turn and the opportunity for repeat procedures. Women were positive about their participation in the trial. Early external cephalic version was preferred over the traditional timing as it was perceived to afford both physiologic and practical advantages. © 2012, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Memory in cultured cortical networks: experiment and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, Tim; van Veenendaal, Tamar; le Feber, Jakob; Sergeev, A.

    The mechanism behind memory is one of the mysteries in neuroscience. Here we unravel part of the mechanism by showing that cultured neuronal networks develop an activity connectivity balance. External inputs disturb this balance and induce connectivity changes. The new connectivity is no longer

  19. CORPORATE SOCIAL NETWORKS IN EDUCATION: EXPERIENCE OF USE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lytvynova S.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses methods, forms and safety issues of social network usage for school students. Taking into consideration the growing interest of students to electronic communication in social networks (ESN, their place in the information educational environment is described. The classification of objects and use of ESNs was made to help teachers and school authority to teach students in the corporate social network. The basic components of corporate social networks (СESN were revealed: forms of learning activity (individual, group, and collective, forms of learning organization (quiz, debates, discussions, photo-story, essay contest, a virtual tour, mini design web quest, and conference video-lesson, and database. Particular aspects of the use of certain forms for students training in ESN aсcording to the type of social objects (messages, individual messages, video files, photos, audio files, documents, comments, and blitz-survey were defined. Student safety when using ESN and СESN impact on a student social and cultural intelligence development are discussed as well.

  20. Interim Service ISDN Satellite (ISIS) network model for advanced satellite designs and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Gerard R.; Hager, E. Paul

    1991-01-01

    The Interim Service Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) Satellite (ISIS) Network Model for Advanced Satellite Designs and Experiments describes a model suitable for discrete event simulations. A top-down model design uses the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) as its basis. The ISDN modeling abstractions are added to permit the determination and performance for the NASA Satellite Communications Research (SCAR) Program.

  1. Phonological experience modulates voice discrimination: Evidence from functional brain networks analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xueping; Wang, Xiangpeng; Gu, Yan; Luo, Pei; Yin, Shouhang; Wang, Lijun; Fu, Chao; Qiao, Lei; Du, Yi; Chen, Antao

    2017-10-01

    Numerous behavioral studies have found a modulation effect of phonological experience on voice discrimination. However, the neural substrates underpinning this phenomenon are poorly understood. Here we manipulated language familiarity to test the hypothesis that phonological experience affects voice discrimination via mediating the engagement of multiple perceptual and cognitive resources. The results showed that during voice discrimination, the activation of several prefrontal regions was modulated by language familiarity. More importantly, the same effect was observed concerning the functional connectivity from the fronto-parietal network to the voice-identity network (VIN), and from the default mode network to the VIN. Our findings indicate that phonological experience could bias the recruitment of cognitive control and information retrieval/comparison processes during voice discrimination. Therefore, the study unravels the neural substrates subserving the modulation effect of phonological experience on voice discrimination, and provides new insights into studying voice discrimination from the perspective of network interactions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. A novel experience-based internet intervention for smoking cessation: feasibility randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Powell

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The internet is frequently used to share experiences of health and illness, but this phenomenon has not been harnessed as an intervention to achieve health behaviour change. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of a randomised trial assessing the effects of a novel, experience-based website as a smoking cessation intervention. The secondary aim was to measure the potential impact on smoking behaviour of both the intervention and a comparator website. Methods A feasibility randomised controlled single-blind trial assessed a novel, experience-based website containing personal accounts of quitting smoking as a cessation intervention, and a comparator website providing factual information. Feasibility measures including recruitment, and usage of the interventions were recorded, and the following participant-reported outcomes were also measured: Smoking Abstinence Self-Efficacy Questionnaire, the single-item Motivation to Stop Scale, self-reported abstinence, quit attempts and health status outcomes. Eligible smokers from two English regions were entered into the trial and given access to their allocated website for two weeks. Results Eighty-seven smokers were randomised, 65 completed follow-up (75 %. Median usage was 15 min for the intervention, and 5 min for the comparator (range 0.5–213 min. Median logins for both sites was 2 (range 1–20. All participant-reported outcomes were similar between groups. Conclusions It was technically feasible to deliver a novel intervention harnessing the online sharing of personal experiences as a tool for smoking cessation, but recruitment was slow and actual use was relatively low, with attrition from the trial. Future work needs to maximize engagement and to understand how best to assess the value of such interventions in everyday use, rather than as an isolated ‘dose of information’. Trial registration ISRCTN29549695 DOI 10.1186/ISRCTN29549695 . Registered 17/05/2013.

  3. Mindfulness Meditation Training and Executive Control Network Resting State Functional Connectivity: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taren, Adrienne A; Gianaros, Peter J; Greco, Carol M; Lindsay, Emily K; Fairgrieve, April; Brown, Kirk Warren; Rosen, Rhonda K; Ferris, Jennifer L; Julson, Erica; Marsland, Anna L; Creswell, J David

    Mindfulness meditation training has been previously shown to enhance behavioral measures of executive control (e.g., attention, working memory, cognitive control), but the neural mechanisms underlying these improvements are largely unknown. Here, we test whether mindfulness training interventions foster executive control by strengthening functional connections between dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC)-a hub of the executive control network-and frontoparietal regions that coordinate executive function. Thirty-five adults with elevated levels of psychological distress participated in a 3-day randomized controlled trial of intensive mindfulness meditation or relaxation training. Participants completed a resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan before and after the intervention. We tested whether mindfulness meditation training increased resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) between dlPFC and frontoparietal control network regions. Left dlPFC showed increased connectivity to the right inferior frontal gyrus (T = 3.74), right middle frontal gyrus (MFG) (T = 3.98), right supplementary eye field (T = 4.29), right parietal cortex (T = 4.44), and left middle temporal gyrus (T = 3.97, all p < .05) after mindfulness training relative to the relaxation control. Right dlPFC showed increased connectivity to right MFG (T = 4.97, p < .05). We report that mindfulness training increases rsFC between dlPFC and dorsal network (superior parietal lobule, supplementary eye field, MFG) and ventral network (right IFG, middle temporal/angular gyrus) regions. These findings extend previous work showing increased functional connectivity among brain regions associated with executive function during active meditation by identifying specific neural circuits in which rsFC is enhanced by a mindfulness intervention in individuals with high levels of psychological distress. Clinicaltrials.gov,NCT01628809.

  4. Project connect online: randomized trial of an internet-based program to chronicle the cancer experience and facilitate communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Annette L; Thompson, Elizabeth H; Crespi, Catherine M; Link, John S; Waisman, James R

    2013-09-20

    Evidence suggests that expressing emotions related to cancer and receiving interpersonal support can promote psychological and physical health in women diagnosed with breast cancer. However, adaptive expression of feelings and communication with one's social network can pose challenges for patients with cancer. We report on a randomized controlled trial of an intervention, Project Connect Online, for patients with breast cancer to create personal Web sites to chronicle their experience and communicate with their social network. Women (N = 88) diagnosed with breast cancer (any stage, any interval since diagnosis) were randomly assigned to participate in a 3-hour workshop for hands-on creation of personal Web sites with a follow-up call to facilitate Web site use, or to a waiting-list control. Assessed before randomization and 6 months after the intervention, dependent variables included depressive symptoms, positive and negative mood, cancer-related intrusive thoughts, and perceived cancer-related benefits in life appreciation and strengthened relationships. Relative to control participants, women randomly assigned to Project Connect Online evidenced significant benefit 6 months later on depressive symptoms, positive mood, and life appreciation, but not negative mood, perceived strengthened relationships, or intrusive thoughts. Treatment status moderated the intervention effects, such that women currently undergoing medical treatment for cancer benefitted significantly more from the intervention on depressive symptoms and positive mood than did women not receiving treatment. Findings suggest the promise of an intervention to facilitate the ability of women diagnosed with breast cancer to chronicle their experience and communicate with their social network via the Internet.

  5. Operational experiences with automated acoustic burst classification by neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olma, B.; Ding, Y.; Enders, R.

    1996-01-01

    Monitoring of Loose Parts Monitoring System sensors for signal bursts associated with metallic impacts of loose parts has proved as an useful methodology for on-line assessing the mechanical integrity of components in the primary circuit of nuclear power plants. With the availability of neural networks new powerful possibilities for classification and diagnosis of burst signals can be realized for acoustic monitoring with the online system RAMSES. In order to look for relevant burst signals an automated classification is needed, that means acoustic signature analysis and assessment has to be performed automatically on-line. A back propagation neural network based on five pre-calculated signal parameter values has been set up for identification of different signal types. During a three-month monitoring program of medium-operated check valves burst signals have been measured and classified separately according to their cause. The successful results of the three measurement campaigns with an automated burst type classification are presented. (author)

  6. Exploring Young People's Experiences on Social Networking Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Rehim, Shrehan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract\\ud Online Social Networking Sites (SNS) are a ubiquitous platform for communication and have been considered as one of the most significant changes to how young people interact today. Whilst SNS bring many opportunities, they have also been used as a tool for harassment and abuse online. The term ‘cyberbullying’, is most widely used to describe this phenomenon. A growing body of research demonstrates that cyberbullying has the potential to detrimentally impact young people’s wellbein...

  7. Federated software defined network operations for LHC experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongkyun; Byeon, Okhwan; Cho, Kihyeon

    2013-09-01

    The most well-known high-energy physics collaboration, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which is based on e-Science, has been facing several challenges presented by its extraordinary instruments in terms of the generation, distribution, and analysis of large amounts of scientific data. Currently, data distribution issues are being resolved by adopting an advanced Internet technology called software defined networking (SDN). Stability of the SDN operations and management is demanded to keep the federated LHC data distribution networks reliable. Therefore, in this paper, an SDN operation architecture based on the distributed virtual network operations center (DvNOC) is proposed to enable LHC researchers to assume full control of their own global end-to-end data dissemination. This may achieve an enhanced data delivery performance based on data traffic offloading with delay variation. The evaluation results indicate that the overall end-to-end data delivery performance can be improved over multi-domain SDN environments based on the proposed federated SDN/DvNOC operation framework.

  8. Brain network segregation and integration during an epoch-related working memory fMRI experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransson, Peter; Schiffler, Björn C; Thompson, William Hedley

    2018-05-17

    The characterization of brain subnetwork segregation and integration has previously focused on changes that are detectable at the level of entire sessions or epochs of imaging data. In this study, we applied time-varying functional connectivity analysis together with temporal network theory to calculate point-by-point estimates in subnetwork segregation and integration during an epoch-based (2-back, 0-back, baseline) working memory fMRI experiment as well as during resting-state. This approach allowed us to follow task-related changes in subnetwork segregation and integration at a high temporal resolution. At a global level, the cognitively more taxing 2-back epochs elicited an overall stronger response of integration between subnetworks compared to the 0-back epochs. Moreover, the visual, sensorimotor and fronto-parietal subnetworks displayed characteristic and distinct temporal profiles of segregation and integration during the 0- and 2-back epochs. During the interspersed epochs of baseline, several subnetworks, including the visual, fronto-parietal, cingulo-opercular and dorsal attention subnetworks showed pronounced increases in segregation. Using a drift diffusion model we show that the response time for the 2-back trials are correlated with integration for the fronto-parietal subnetwork and correlated with segregation for the visual subnetwork. Our results elucidate the fast-evolving events with regard to subnetwork integration and segregation that occur in an epoch-related task fMRI experiment. Our findings suggest that minute changes in subnetwork integration are of importance for task performance. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Art reaches within: aesthetic experience, the self and the default mode network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward A Vessel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In a task of rating images of artworks in an fMRI scanner, regions in the medial prefrontal cortex that are known to be part of the default mode network (DMN were positively activated on the highest-rated trials. This is surprising given the DMN's original characterization as the set of brain regions that show greater fMRI activity during rest periods than during performance of tasks requiring focus on external stimuli. But further research showed that DMN regions could be positively activated also in structured tasks, if those tasks involved self-referential thought or self-relevant information. How may our findings be understood in this context? Although our task had no explicit self-referential aspect and the stimuli had no a priori self-relevance to the observers, the experimental design we employed emphasized the personal aspects of aesthetic experience. Observers were told that we were interested in their individual tastes, and asked to base their ratings on how much each artwork "moved" them. Moreover, we used little-known artworks that covered a wide range of styles, which led to high individual variability: each artwork was rated highly by some observers and poorly by others. This means that rating-specific neural responses cannot be attributed to the features of any particular artworks, but rather to the aesthetic experience itself. The DMN activity therefore suggests that certain artworks, albeit unfamiliar, may be so well-matched to an individual’s unique makeup that they obtain access to the neural substrates concerned with the self – access which other external stimuli normally do not get. This mediates a sense of being moved, or touched from within. This account is consistent with the modern notion that individuals’ taste in art is linked with their sense of identity, and suggests that DMN activity may serve to signal self-relevance in a broader sense than has been thought so far.

  10. Exercise for lower limb osteoarthritis: systematic review incorporating trial sequential analysis and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthman, Olalekan A; van der Windt, Danielle A; Jordan, Joanne L; Dziedzic, Krysia S; Healey, Emma L; Peat, George M; Foster, Nadine E

    2014-11-01

    Which types of exercise intervention are most effective in relieving pain and improving function in people with lower limb osteoarthritis? As of 2002 sufficient evidence had accumulated to show significant benefit of exercise over no exercise. An approach combining exercises to increase strength, flexibility, and aerobic capacity is most likely to be effective for relieving pain and improving function. Current international guidelines recommend therapeutic exercise (land or water based) as "core" and effective management of osteoarthritis. Evidence from this first network meta-analysis, largely based on studies in knee osteoarthritis, indicates that an intervention combining strengthening exercises with flexibility and aerobic exercise is most likely to improve outcomes of pain and function. Further trials of exercise versus no exercise are unlikely to overturn this positive result. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Polymerization speed and diffractive experiments in polymer network LC test cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Larissa; Gong, Zhen; Habibpourmoghadam, Atefeh; Schafforz, Samuel L.; Wolfram, Lukas; Lorenz, Alexander

    2018-02-01

    Polymer-network liquid crystals (LCs), where the response properties of a LC can be enhanced by the presence of a porous polymer network, are investigated. In the reported experiments, liquid crystals were doped with a small amount (situ generated polymer network, the electro-optic response properties of photo cured samples were enhanced. For example, their continuous phase modulation properties led to more localized responses in samples with interdigitated electrodes, which caused suppression of selected diffraction orders in the diffraction patterns recorded in polymer network LC samples. Moreover, capacitance changes were investigated during photopolymerization of a blue phase LC.

  12. The effect of tracking network configuration on GPS baseline estimates for the CASA Uno experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, S. Kornreich; Dixon, T. H.; Freymueller, J. T.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of the tracking network on long (greater than 100 km) GPS baseline estimates was estimated using various subsets of the global tracking network initiated by the first Central and South America (CASA Uno) experiment. It was found that best results could be obtained with a global tacking network consisting of three U.S. stations, two sites in the southwestern Pacific, and two sites in Europe. In comparison with smaller subsets, this global network improved the baseline repeatability, the resolution of carrier phase cycle ambiguities, and formal errors of the orbit estimates.

  13. Recruitment of ethnic minorities into cancer clinical trials: experience from the front lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symonds, R P; Lord, K; Mitchell, A J; Raghavan, D

    2012-09-25

    Throughout the world there are problems recruiting ethnic minority patients into cancer clinical trials. A major barrier to trial entry may be distrust of research and the medical system. This may be compounded by the regulatory framework governing research with an emphasis on written consent, closed questions and consent documentation, as well as fiscal issues. The Leicester UK experience is that trial accrual is better if British South Asian patients are approached by a senior doctor rather than someone of perceived lesser hierarchical status and a greater partnership between the hospital and General Practitioner may increase trial participation of this particular ethnic minority. In Los Angeles, USA, trial recruitment was improved by a greater utilisation of Hispanic staff and a Spanish language-based education programme. Involvement of community leaders is essential. While adhering to national, legal and ethnical standards, information sheets and consent, it helps if forms can be tailored towards the local ethnic minority population. Written translations are often of limited value in the recruitment of patients with no or limited knowledge of English. In some cultural settings, tape-recorded verbal consent (following approval presentations) may be an acceptable substitute for written consent, and appropriate legislative changes should be considered to facilitate this option. Approaches should be tailored to specific minority populations, taking consideration of their unique characteristics and with input from their community leadership.

  14. Improving agricultural knowledge management: The AgTrials experience [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Hyman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Opportunities to use data and information to address challenges in international agricultural research and development are expanding rapidly. The use of agricultural trial and evaluation data has enormous potential to improve crops and management practices. However, for a number of reasons, this potential has yet to be realized. This paper reports on the experience of the AgTrials initiative, an effort to build an online database of agricultural trials applying principles of interoperability and open access. Methods: Our analysis evaluates what worked and what did not work in the development of the AgTrials information resource. We analyzed data on our users and their interaction with the platform. We also surveyed our users to gauge their perceptions of the utility of the online database. Results: The study revealed barriers to participation and impediments to interaction, opportunities for improving agricultural knowledge management and a large potential for the use of trial and evaluation data. Conclusions: Technical and logistical mechanisms for developing interoperable online databases are well advanced.  More effort will be needed to advance organizational and institutional work for these types of databases to realize their potential.

  15. Improving agricultural knowledge management: The AgTrials experience [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Hyman

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Opportunities to use data and information to address challenges in international agricultural research and development are expanding rapidly. The use of agricultural trial and evaluation data has enormous potential to improve crops and management practices. However, for a number of reasons, this potential has yet to be realized. This paper reports on the experience of the AgTrials initiative, an effort to build an online database of agricultural trials applying principles of interoperability and open access. Methods: Our analysis evaluates what worked and what did not work in the development of the AgTrials information resource. We analyzed data on our users and their interaction with the platform. We also surveyed our users to gauge their perceptions of the utility of the online database. Results: The study revealed barriers to participation and impediments to interaction, opportunities for improving agricultural knowledge management and a large potential for the use of trial and evaluation data. Conclusions: Technical and logistical mechanisms for developing interoperable online databases are well advanced.  More effort will be needed to advance organizational and institutional work for these types of databases to realize their potential.

  16. Experiences of randomization: interviews with patients and clinicians in the SPCG-IV trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill-Axelson, Anna; Christensson, Anna; Carlsson, Marianne; Norlén, Bo Johan; Holmberg, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Recruitment of both patients and clinicians to randomized trials is difficult. Low participation carries the risk of terminating studies early and making them invalid owing to insufficient statistical power. This study investigated patients' and clinicians' experiences of randomization with the aim of facilitating trial participation in the future. This was a qualitative study using content analysis. Patients offered to participate in a randomized trial and randomizing clinicians were interviewed. Five participants, four non-participants and five randomizing clinicians were interviewed, 2-8 years from randomization. Clinicians used strategies in interaction with the patients to facilitate decision making. Patients' attitudes differed and experiences of relatives or friends were often stated as reasons for treatment preferences. Patients described that letting chance decide treatment was a difficult barrier to overcome for randomization. The clinicians used a number of different strategies perceived to make randomization more acceptable to their patients. The clinicians' own motivation for randomizing patients for trials depended on the medical relevance of the study question and the clinicians' major obstacle was to maintain equipoise over time. Regular meetings with the study group helped to maintain equipoise and motivation. To establish a good platform for randomization the clinician needs to know about the patient's treatment preferences and the patient's attitude concerning the role of the clinician to facilitate decision making. The strategies used by the clinicians were perceived as helpful and could be tested in an intervention study.

  17. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: from clinical trials to real-life experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Harari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Randomised controlled clinical trials are fundamental in medicine to develop new effective drugs and new therapeutic regimens and are the strength of evidence-based medicine. These studies allow us to avoid the repetition of misleading experiences that have been reported in the past, where drugs or associations were utilised without compelling evidence and ultimately proven to be ineffective. In recent years, randomised clinical trials have been conducted and concluded for many rare diseases, including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. However, clinical trials do not always reflect the real-life scenario. Patients selected for clinical trials present fewer comorbidities, they fall between certain age limits, and the severity of their disease is defined; therefore, they do not always reflect the whole of the population affected by a specific disease. These are the reasons why we also need data that mirror real-life experience. The limitations that these kind of studies present are always several and the studies should be interpreted with caution, although they can fill the important gap between efficacy and effectiveness. In this article, we will review the existing clinical data on real-life treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  18. Cooperation and contagion in web-based, networked public goods experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Suri

    Full Text Available A longstanding idea in the literature on human cooperation is that cooperation should be reinforced when conditional cooperators are more likely to interact. In the context of social networks, this idea implies that cooperation should fare better in highly clustered networks such as cliques than in networks with low clustering such as random networks. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a series of web-based experiments, in which 24 individuals played a local public goods game arranged on one of five network topologies that varied between disconnected cliques and a random regular graph. In contrast with previous theoretical work, we found that network topology had no significant effect on average contributions. This result implies either that individuals are not conditional cooperators, or else that cooperation does not benefit from positive reinforcement between connected neighbors. We then tested both of these possibilities in two subsequent series of experiments in which artificial seed players were introduced, making either full or zero contributions. First, we found that although players did generally behave like conditional cooperators, they were as likely to decrease their contributions in response to low contributing neighbors as they were to increase their contributions in response to high contributing neighbors. Second, we found that positive effects of cooperation were contagious only to direct neighbors in the network. In total we report on 113 human subjects experiments, highlighting the speed, flexibility, and cost-effectiveness of web-based experiments over those conducted in physical labs.

  19. A Mixed-Methods Randomized Controlled Trial of Financial Incentives and Peer Networks to Promote Walking among Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullgren, Jeffrey T.; Harkins, Kristin A.; Bellamy, Scarlett L.; Gonzales, Amy; Tao, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Jingsan; Volpp, Kevin G.; Asch, David A.; Heisler, Michele; Karlawish, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Background: Financial incentives and peer networks could be delivered through eHealth technologies to encourage older adults to walk more. Methods: We conducted a 24-week randomized trial in which 92 older adults with a computer and Internet access received a pedometer, daily walking goals, and weekly feedback on goal achievement. Participants…

  20. Grain Yield Variation in Malting Barley Cultivars in Uruguay and Its Consequences for the Design of a Trials Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceretta, S.S.E.; Eeuwijk, van F.A.

    2008-01-01

    The efficiency of cultivar trial networks is an important subject in official cultivar testing. We investigated this efficiency for malting barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) in Uruguay, using data on 213 cultivars tested across an eight-year period at six locations. The variance-components approach was

  1. European Nuclear Education Network ENEN, Ten years of experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosini, W.; Dies, J.; Dieguez, P.

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Networking between European Universities based on mutual recognition (ECTS Bologna system) enabled: • Development of new academic programmes at a Master level; • Mobility of students to hosting universities, members of ENEN; • Mobility of Professors to teach in other Universities, when needed; • Maintain the quality of the educational programmes; • Joint and successful organisation of activities in the fields of: Education, Training and Knowledge Management; • The establishment of bridges between the Universities and the end-users (industries, regulatory bodies, research centres, etc.)

  2. A longitudinal study of organizational formation, innovation adoption, and dissemination activities within the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Paul M; Abraham, Amanda J; Rothrauff, Tanja C; Knudsen, Hannah K

    2010-06-01

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse established the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN) to conduct trials of promising substance abuse treatment interventions in diverse clinical settings and to disseminate results of these trials. This article focuses on three dimensions of CTN's organizational functioning. First, a longitudinal dataset is used to examine CTN's formation as a network of interorganizational interaction among treatment practitioners and researchers. Data indicate strong relationships of interaction and trust, but a decline in problem-centered interorganizational interaction over time. Second, adoption of buprenorphine and motivational incentives among CTN's affiliated community treatment programs (CTPs) is examined over three waves of data. Although adoption is found to increase with CTPs' CTN participation, there is only modest evidence of widespread penetration and implementation. Third, CTPs' pursuit of the CTN's dissemination goals are examined, indicating that such organizational outreach activities are underway and likely to increase innovation diffusion in the future.

  3. A novel experience-based internet intervention for smoking cessation: feasibility randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, John; Newhouse, Nikki; Martin, Angela; Jawad, Sena; Yu, Ly-Mee; Davoudianfar, Mina; Locock, Louise; Ziebland, Sue

    2016-11-11

    The internet is frequently used to share experiences of health and illness, but this phenomenon has not been harnessed as an intervention to achieve health behaviour change. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of a randomised trial assessing the effects of a novel, experience-based website as a smoking cessation intervention. The secondary aim was to measure the potential impact on smoking behaviour of both the intervention and a comparator website. A feasibility randomised controlled single-blind trial assessed a novel, experience-based website containing personal accounts of quitting smoking as a cessation intervention, and a comparator website providing factual information. Feasibility measures including recruitment, and usage of the interventions were recorded, and the following participant-reported outcomes were also measured: Smoking Abstinence Self-Efficacy Questionnaire, the single-item Motivation to Stop Scale, self-reported abstinence, quit attempts and health status outcomes. Eligible smokers from two English regions were entered into the trial and given access to their allocated website for two weeks. Eighty-seven smokers were randomised, 65 completed follow-up (75 %). Median usage was 15 min for the intervention, and 5 min for the comparator (range 0.5-213 min). Median logins for both sites was 2 (range 1-20). All participant-reported outcomes were similar between groups. It was technically feasible to deliver a novel intervention harnessing the online sharing of personal experiences as a tool for smoking cessation, but recruitment was slow and actual use was relatively low, with attrition from the trial. Future work needs to maximize engagement and to understand how best to assess the value of such interventions in everyday use, rather than as an isolated 'dose of information'. ISRCTN29549695 DOI 10.1186/ISRCTN29549695 . Registered 17/05/2013.

  4. Experience Corps: A dual trial to promote the health of older adults and children's academic success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Linda P.; Carlson, Michelle C.; McGill, Sylvia; Seeman, Teresa; Xue, Qian-Li; Frick, Kevin; Tan, Erwin; Tanner, Elizabeth K.; Barron, Jeremy; Frangakis, Constantine; Piferi, Rachel; Martinez, Iveris; Gruenewald, Tara; Martin, Barbara K.; Berry-Vaughn, Laprisha; Stewart, John; Dickersin, Kay; Willging, Paul R.; Rebok, George W.

    2014-01-01

    Background As the population ages, older adults are seeking meaningful, and impactful, post-retirement roles. As a society, improving the health of people throughout longer lives is a major public health goal. This paper presents the design and rationale for an effectiveness trial of Experience Corps™, an intervention created to address both these needs. This trial evaluates (1) whether senior volunteer roles within Experience Corps™ beneficially impact children's academic achievement and classroom behavior in public elementary schools and (2) impact on the health of volunteers. Methods Dual evaluations of (1) an intention-to-treat trial randomizing eligible adults 60 and older to volunteer service in Experience Corps™, or to a control arm of usual volunteering opportunities, and (2) a comparison of eligible public elementary schools receiving Experience Corps™ to matched, eligible control schools in a 1:1 control:intervention school ratio. Outcomes For older adults, the primary outcome is decreased disability in mobility and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL). Secondary outcomes are decreased frailty, falls, and memory loss; slowed loss of strength, balance, walking speed, cortical plasticity, and executive function; objective performance of IADLs; and increased social and psychological engagement. For children, primary outcomes are improved reading achievement and classroom behavior in Kindergarten through the 3rd grade; secondary outcomes are improvements in school climate, teacher morale and retention, and teacher perceptions of older adults. Summary This trial incorporates principles and practices of community-based participatory research and evaluates the dual benefit of a single intervention, versus usual opportunities, for two generations: older adults and children. PMID:23680986

  5. Hardware realization of a fast neural network algorithm for real-time tracking in HEP experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leimgruber, F.R.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Steinacher, M.; Tauscher, L.; Vlachos, S.; Wendler, H.

    1995-01-01

    A fast pattern recognition system for HEP experiments, based on artificial neural network algorithms (ANN), has been realized with standard electronics. The multiplicity and location of tracks in an event are determined in less than 75 ns. Hardware modules of this first level trigger were extensively tested for performance and reliability with data from the CPLEAR experiment. (orig.)

  6. Project Leadership Lived Experiences with Web-Based Social Networking: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scroggins, Charles W.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the lived experiences of project leaders adopting and using Web-2.0 social networking collaboration applications for their project leadership activities. The experiences of 20 project leaders in a Fortune 500 aerospace and defense enterprise in the northeastern United States of America were explored using a qualitative…

  7. Critical periods after stroke study: translating animal stroke recovery experiments into a clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dromerick, Alexander W.; Edwardson, Matthew A.; Edwards, Dorothy F.; Giannetti, Margot L.; Barth, Jessica; Brady, Kathaleen P.; Chan, Evan; Tan, Ming T.; Tamboli, Irfan; Chia, Ruth; Orquiza, Michael; Padilla, Robert M.; Cheema, Amrita K.; Mapstone, Mark E.; Fiandaca, Massimo S.; Federoff, Howard J.; Newport, Elissa L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Seven hundred ninety-five thousand Americans will have a stroke this year, and half will have a chronic hemiparesis. Substantial animal literature suggests that the mammalian brain has much potential to recover from acute injury using mechanisms of neuroplasticity, and that these mechanisms can be accessed using training paradigms and neurotransmitter manipulation. However, most of these findings have not been tested or confirmed in the rehabilitation setting, in large part because of the challenges in translating a conceptually straightforward laboratory experiment into a meaningful and rigorous clinical trial in humans. Through presentation of methods for a Phase II trial, we discuss these issues and describe our approach. Methods: In rodents there is compelling evidence for timing effects in rehabilitation; motor training delivered at certain times after stroke may be more effective than the same training delivered earlier or later, suggesting that there is a critical or sensitive period for strongest rehabilitation training effects. If analogous critical/sensitive periods can be identified after human stroke, then existing clinical resources can be better utilized to promote recovery. The Critical Periods after Stroke Study (CPASS) is a phase II randomized, controlled trial designed to explore whether such a sensitive period exists. We will randomize 64 persons to receive an additional 20 h of upper extremity therapy either immediately upon rehab admission, 2–3 months after stroke onset, 6 months after onset, or to an observation-only control group. The primary outcome measure will be the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) at 1 year. Blood will be drawn at up to 3 time points for later biomarker studies. Conclusion: CPASS is an example of the translation of rodent motor recovery experiments into the clinical setting; data obtained from this single site randomized controlled trial will be used to finalize the design of a Phase III trial. PMID

  8. Critical Periods after Stroke Study: Translating animal stroke recovery experiments into a clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander W Dromerick

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: 795,000 Americans will have a stroke this year, and half will have a chronic hemiparesis. Substantial animal literature suggests that the mammalian brain has much potential to recover from acute injury using mechanisms of neuroplasticity, and that these mechanisms can be accessed using training paradigms and neurotransmitter manipulation. However, most of these findings have not been tested or confirmed in the rehabilitation setting, in large part because of the challenges in translating a conceptually straightforward laboratory experiment into a meaningful and rigorous clinical trial in humans. Through presentation of methods for a Phase II trial, we discuss these issues and describe our approach. Methods: In rodents there is compelling evidence for timing effects in rehabilitation; motor training delivered at certain times after stroke may be more effective than the same training delivered earlier or later, suggesting that there is a critical or sensitive period for strongest rehabilitation training effects. If analogous critical/sensitive periods can be identified after human stroke, then existing clinical resources can be better utilized to promote recovery. The Critical Periods after Stroke Study (CPASS is a phase II randomized, controlled trial designed to explore whether such a sensitive period exists. We will randomize 64 persons to receive an additional 20 hours of upper extremity therapy either immediately upon rehab admission, 2-3 months after stroke onset, 6 months after onset, or to an observation-only control group. The primary outcome measure will be the Action Research Arm Test at one year. Blood will be drawn at up to 3 time points for later biomarker studies. Conclusion: CPASS is an example of the translation of rodent motor recovery experiments into the clinical setting; data obtained from this single site randomized controlled trial will be used to finalize the design of a Phase III trial.

  9. [Teleconsultation network for ophthalmology--experiences and results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahlmann, G; Walther, H D; Liesenfeld, B; Kaatz, H; Kluthe, S; Fabian, E; Klaas, D; Schnarr, K D; Neubauer, L; Obermaier, M; Wegner, A; Mertz, M; Mann, G

    1998-02-01

    Telemedical services for ophthalmology are developed within the OPHTEL project, which has been funded by the European Union and by the Bavarian government in the Bavaria-online initiative. Seven private ophthalmologists, one university eye clinic, one clinical Diabetes center and an informatics research institute are connected within a teleconsultation network. Asynchronous (based on Internet E-Mail) and synchronous (based on ISDN-mediated videoconferencing tools) types of teleconsultations are realized. 86 teleconsultations (62 asynchronous, 23 synchronous) took place within the first 10 months. Complex and rare eye diseases as well as interdisciplinary questions (ophthalmology--diabetology) are the main area of medical communication interest. Legal and security problems are discussed. Telemedical services must be understood as a complete process of medical care on the basis of modern communication technologies, which influences also the management of this process.

  10. Support to women who denounce experiences of violence based on her social network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Becker Vieira

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the possibilities of help/support through the mapping and acknowledgement of the social network of women who denounce experiences of violence at a Police Precinct for Women.Method: qualitative study based on the theoretical-methodological framework of Lia Sanicola's Social Network, through interviews with 19 women.Results: the analysis of the network maps evidenced that the primary social network was more present than the secondary on and, despite consisting of significant relations, it demonstrates limitations. The women access the secondary network occasionally in the violence problem and/or its repercussions in their life and health. The discrete presence of the health network in the composition of the social network was revealed and, when mentioned, the relation between the health professional and the woman was characterized as fragile.Conclusion: the importance of the social network relates to the creation of spaces of help/support for the women beyond the moment of the aggression, which accompany them throughout their process of emancipation from an experience annulled by violence, considering that each woman acts and makes decisions in the relational context when she is ready for it.

  11. Brain networks of the imaginative mind: Dynamic functional connectivity of default and cognitive control networks relates to openness to experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaty, Roger E; Chen, Qunlin; Christensen, Alexander P; Qiu, Jiang; Silvia, Paul J; Schacter, Daniel L

    2018-02-01

    Imagination and creative cognition are often associated with the brain's default network (DN). Recent evidence has also linked cognitive control systems to performance on tasks involving imagination and creativity, with a growing number of studies reporting functional interactions between cognitive control and DN regions. We sought to extend the emerging literature on brain dynamics supporting imagination by examining individual differences in large-scale network connectivity in relation to Openness to Experience, a personality trait typified by imagination and creativity. To this end, we obtained personality and resting-state fMRI data from two large samples of participants recruited from the United States and China, and we examined contributions of Openness to temporal shifts in default and cognitive control network interactions using multivariate structural equation modeling and dynamic functional network connectivity analysis. In Study 1, we found that Openness was related to the proportion of scan time (i.e., "dwell time") that participants spent in a brain state characterized by positive correlations among the default, executive, salience, and dorsal attention networks. Study 2 replicated and extended the effect of Openness on dwell time in a correlated brain state comparable to the state found in Study 1, and further demonstrated the robustness of this effect in latent variable models including fluid intelligence and other major personality factors. The findings suggest that Openness to Experience is associated with increased functional connectivity between default and cognitive control systems, a connectivity profile that may account for the enhanced imaginative and creative abilities of people high in Openness to Experience. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The European Nuclear Society Young Generation Network: Five years of networking experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meskens, Gaston

    2000-01-01

    In 1995, Mr Jan Runermark (Sweden), aware of a need for an exchange of knowledge from the older to the younger generation, came up with the idea of starting a European Nuclear Society Young Generation Network. A first network was formed with Sweden, the Netherlands, Spain, Finland, Germany and Belgium. The ENSYGN is now affiliated to the European Nuclear Society and brings together young students and professionals from 21 member countries Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Russia, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Ukraine, and United Kingdom, The ENSYGN Core group meets (at least) twice a year and elects its own chair and co chair for a term of two years. The ENSYGN chair has a seat in the ENS Steering Committee and in the ENS Board. The ENSYGN works closely together with other young generation networks from the US, Australia, Japan and South America. ENSYGN organises workshops and courses on European level, takes part in international meetings (fl. UNFCCC, OECD) and stimulates networking on national level

  13. Central coordination as an alternative for local coordination in a multicenter randomized controlled trial: the FAITH trial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zielinski Stephanie M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgeons in the Netherlands, Canada and the US participate in the FAITH trial (Fixation using Alternative Implants for the Treatment of Hip fractures. Dutch sites are managed and visited by a financed central trial coordinator, whereas most Canadian and US sites have local study coordinators and receive per patient payment. This study was aimed to assess how these different trial management strategies affected trial performance. Methods Details related to obtaining ethics approval, time to trial start-up, inclusion, and percentage completed follow-ups were collected for each trial site and compared. Pre-trial screening data were compared with actual inclusion rates. Results Median trial start-up ranged from 41 days (P25-P75 10-139 in the Netherlands to 232 days (P25-P75 98-423 in Canada (p = 0.027. The inclusion rate was highest in the Netherlands; median 1.03 patients (P25-P75 0.43-2.21 per site per month, representing 34.4% of the total eligible population. It was lowest in Canada; 0.14 inclusions (P25-P75 0.00-0.28, representing 3.9% of eligible patients (p Conclusions In this trial, a central financed trial coordinator to manage all trial related tasks in participating sites resulted in better trial progression and a similar follow-up. It is therefore a suitable alternative for appointing these tasks to local research assistants. The central coordinator approach can enable smaller regional hospitals to participate in multicenter randomized controlled trials. Circumstances such as available budget, sample size, and geographical area should however be taken into account when choosing a management strategy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00761813

  14. Targeted drugs for pulmonary arterial hypertension: a network meta-analysis of 32 randomized clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao XF

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Xiao-Fei Gao,1 Jun-Jie Zhang,1,2 Xiao-Min Jiang,1 Zhen Ge,1,2 Zhi-Mei Wang,1 Bing Li,1 Wen-Xing Mao,1 Shao-Liang Chen1,2 1Department of Cardiology, Nanjing First Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, 2Department of Cardiology, Nanjing Heart Center, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Background: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a devastating disease and ultimately leads to right heart failure and premature death. A total of four classical targeted drugs, prostanoids, endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors (PDE-5Is, and soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator (sGCS, have been proved to improve exercise capacity and hemodynamics compared to placebo; however, direct head-to-head comparisons of these drugs are lacking. This network meta-analysis was conducted to comprehensively compare the efficacy of these targeted drugs for PAH.Methods: Medline, the Cochrane Library, and other Internet sources were searched for randomized clinical trials exploring the efficacy of targeted drugs for patients with PAH. The primary effective end point of this network meta-analysis was a 6-minute walk distance (6MWD.Results: Thirty-two eligible trials including 6,758 patients were identified. There was a statistically significant improvement in 6MWD, mean pulmonary arterial pressure, pulmonary vascular resistance, and clinical worsening events associated with each of the four targeted drugs compared with placebo. Combination therapy improved 6MWD by 20.94 m (95% confidence interval [CI]: 6.94, 34.94; P=0.003 vs prostanoids, and 16.94 m (95% CI: 4.41, 29.47; P=0.008 vs ERAs. PDE-5Is improved 6MWD by 17.28 m (95% CI: 1.91, 32.65; P=0.028 vs prostanoids, with a similar result with combination therapy. In addition, combination therapy reduced mean pulmonary artery pressure by 3.97 mmHg (95% CI: -6.06, -1.88; P<0.001 vs prostanoids, 8.24 mmHg (95% CI: -10.71, -5.76; P<0.001 vs ERAs, 3.38 mmHg (95% CI: -6.30, -0.47; P=0.023 vs

  15. Integrated monitoring of multi-domain backbone connections Operational experience in the LHC optical private network

    CERN Document Server

    Marcu, Patricia; Fritz, Wolfgang; Yampolskiy, Mark; Hommel, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Novel large scale research projects often require cooperation between various different project partners that are spread among the entire world. They do not only need huge computing resources, but also a reliable network to operate on. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is a representative example for such a project. Its experiments result in a vast amount of data, which is interesting for researchers around the world. For transporting the data from CERN to 11 data processing and storage sites, an optical private network (OPN) has been constructed. As the experiment data is highly valuable, LHC defines very high requirements to the underlying network infrastructure. In order to fulfil those requirements, the connections have to be managed and monitored permanently. In this paper, we present the integrated monitoring solution developed for the LHCOPN. We first outline the requirements and show how they are met on the single network layers. After that, we describe, how those single measurements can be comb...

  16. Note: Design and development of wireless controlled aerosol sampling network for large scale aerosol dispersion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalakrishnan, V.; Subramanian, V.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2015-01-01

    Wireless based custom built aerosol sampling network is designed, developed, and implemented for environmental aerosol sampling. These aerosol sampling systems are used in field measurement campaign, in which sodium aerosol dispersion experiments have been conducted as a part of environmental impact studies related to sodium cooled fast reactor. The sampling network contains 40 aerosol sampling units and each contains custom built sampling head and the wireless control networking designed with Programmable System on Chip (PSoC™) and Xbee Pro RF modules. The base station control is designed using graphical programming language LabView. The sampling network is programmed to operate in a preset time and the running status of the samplers in the network is visualized from the base station. The system is developed in such a way that it can be used for any other environment sampling system deployed in wide area and uneven terrain where manual operation is difficult due to the requirement of simultaneous operation and status logging

  17. Application of neural network technology to setpoint control of a simulated reactor experiment loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordes, G.A.; Bryan, S.R.; Powell, R.H.; Chick, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the design, implementation, and application of artificial neural networks to achieve temperature and flow rate control for a simulation of a typical experiment loop in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The goal of the project was to research multivariate, nonlinear control using neural networks. A loop simulation code was adapted for the project and used to create a training set and test the neural network controller for comparison with the existing loop controllers. The results for the best neural network design are documented and compared with existing loop controller action. The neural network was shown to be as accurate at loop control as the classical controllers in the operating region represented by the training set. 5 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Note: Design and development of wireless controlled aerosol sampling network for large scale aerosol dispersion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopalakrishnan, V.; Subramanian, V.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B. [Radiation Impact Assessment Section, Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)

    2015-07-15

    Wireless based custom built aerosol sampling network is designed, developed, and implemented for environmental aerosol sampling. These aerosol sampling systems are used in field measurement campaign, in which sodium aerosol dispersion experiments have been conducted as a part of environmental impact studies related to sodium cooled fast reactor. The sampling network contains 40 aerosol sampling units and each contains custom built sampling head and the wireless control networking designed with Programmable System on Chip (PSoC™) and Xbee Pro RF modules. The base station control is designed using graphical programming language LabView. The sampling network is programmed to operate in a preset time and the running status of the samplers in the network is visualized from the base station. The system is developed in such a way that it can be used for any other environment sampling system deployed in wide area and uneven terrain where manual operation is difficult due to the requirement of simultaneous operation and status logging.

  19. Sacubitril/Valsartan: From Clinical Trials to Real-world Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Joanna M; Desai, Akshay S

    2018-04-23

    Compared to enalapril, use of angiotensin-receptor blocker and neprilysin inhibitor sacubitril/valsartan to treat patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) is associated with substantial reductions in both cardiovascular mortality and heart failure progression. The purpose of this review is to discuss the real-world experience of sacubitril/valsartan. In the years following the publication of the landmark PARADIGM-HF trial in 2014 and its subsequent FDA approval, a growing evidence base supports the safety and efficacy of sacubitril/valsartan in a broad spectrum of patients with HFrEF. Updated clinical practice guidelines have embraced the use of sacubitril/valsartan in preference to ACE inhibitors or ARBs in selected patients. In this review, we highlight the clinical trials that led to these key updates to clinical guidelines, offer practical strategies for patient selection and utilization in clinical practice, and identify important areas of uncertainty that require future research.

  20. Inactive experiments for advanced separation processes prior to high activity trials in ATALANTE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duhamet, Jean; Lanoe, Jean-Yves; Rivalier, Patrick; Borda, Gilles

    2008-01-01

    Many trials have been performed in ATALANTE's shielded cells to demonstrate the technical feasibility of processes involving minor actinide separation. They required developments of new extractors as well as a step by step procedure have been used to lower the risks of malfunction during high active operation. The design of the extractors developed by Cea has included shielded cells restrictions, miniaturization to lower the quantity of high active material and wastes and the care for being representative of industrial equipment. After individual shake down inactive tests, with actual phases, each process experiment scheduled in ATALANTE has been tested at G1 Facility in Marcoule. The objective was to reproduce as much as possible all the equipment chosen for active tests. This procedure has demonstrated its efficiency to detect many problems that would have heavy impact if they have been discovered during active trials. It was also used for operators'training. (authors)

  1. Surgical interventions to treat humerus shaft fractures: A network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Guo Zhao

    Full Text Available There are three main surgical techniques to treat humeral shaft fractures: open reduction and plate fixation (ORPF, intramedullary nail (IMN fixation, and minimally invasive percutaneous osteosynthesis (MIPO. We performed a network meta-analysis to compare three surgical procedures, including ORPF, IMN fixation, and MIPO, to provide the optimum treatment for humerus shaft fractures.MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, and Cochrane library were researched for reports published up to May 2016. We only included randomized controlled trials (RCTs comparing two or more of the three surgical procedures, including the ORPF, IMN, and MIPO techniques, for humeral shaft fractures in adults. The methodological quality was evaluated based on the Cochrane risk of bias tool. We used WinBUGS1.4 to conduct this Bayesian network meta-analysis. We used the odd ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs to calculate the dichotomous outcomes and analyzed the percentages of the surface under the cumulative ranking curve.Seventeen eligible publications reporting 16 RCTs were included in this study. Eight hundred and thirty-two participants were randomized to receive one of three surgical procedures. The results showed that shoulder impingement occurred more commonly in the IMN group than with either ORPF (OR, 0.13; 95% CI, 0.03-0.37 or MIPO fixation (OR, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.00-0.69. Iatrogenic radial nerve injury occurred more commonly in the ORPF group than in the MIPO group (OR, 11.09; 95% CI, 1.80-124.20. There were no significant differences among the three procedures in nonunion, delayed union, and infection.Compared with IMN and ORPF, MIPO technique is the preferred treatment method for humeral shaft fractures.

  2. Support or competition? How online social networks increase physical activity: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwen Zhang, PhD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To identify what features of online social networks can increase physical activity, we conducted a 4-arm randomized controlled trial in 2014 in Philadelphia, PA. Students (n = 790, mean age = 25.2 at an university were randomly assigned to one of four conditions composed of either supportive or competitive relationships and either with individual or team incentives for attending exercise classes. The social comparison condition placed participants into 6-person competitive networks with individual incentives. The social support condition placed participants into 6-person teams with team incentives. The combined condition with both supportive and competitive relationships placed participants into 6-person teams, where participants could compare their team's performance to 5 other teams' performances. The control condition only allowed participants to attend classes with individual incentives. Rewards were based on the total number of classes attended by an individual, or the average number of classes attended by the members of a team. The outcome was the number of classes that participants attended. Data were analyzed using multilevel models in 2014. The mean attendance numbers per week were 35.7, 38.5, 20.3, and 16.8 in the social comparison, the combined, the control, and the social support conditions. Attendance numbers were 90% higher in the social comparison and the combined conditions (mean = 1.9, SE = 0.2 in contrast to the two conditions without comparison (mean = 1.0, SE = 0.2 (p = 0.003. Social comparison was more effective for increasing physical activity than social support and its effects did not depend on individual or team incentives.

  3. Regulatory approvals in a large multinational clinical trial: the ESPRIT experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNay, Laura A; Tavel, Jorge A; Oseekey, Karen; McDermott, Cathy M; Mollerup, David; Bebchuk, Judith D

    2002-02-01

    While accepted as serving an important function to safeguard human subjects, the process of obtaining regulatory approvals to conduct clinical trials is generally regarded as cumbersome and time-consuming. For large multinational trials, U.S. federally sponsored human subject research abroad involves specific U.S. regulatory requirements, in addition to those of the host country, that act as further hurdles. These requirements may include obtaining an Assurance of Protection for Human Subjects from the Office of Human Research Protection of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, maintaining specific Ethics Committee/Institutional Review Board (EC/IRB) composition, and incorporating mandated elements in informed consents, all of which may differ from local policies and guidelines. Specific examples of issues that led to delays in regulatory approvals for sites participating in the multinational clinical trial entitled Evaluation of Subcutaneous Proleukin in a Randomized International Trial (ESPRIT) are presented here. While the goal of these requirements is to protect the rights and welfare of human subjects, they may create substantial delays and engender resentment over the notion of lack of respect for individual country sovereignty. Substudies within ESPRIT have been undertaken to obtain feedback from EC/IRB chairpersons, site personnel responsible for processing the required assurances, ESPRIT investigators, and study participants regarding aspects of current U.S. regulatory requirements related to human subject protection and ethical issues in multinational research. The purpose of these substudies is to compare the attitudes and experiences across countries regarding important ethical issues associated with conducting ESPRIT. One objective of the substudies is to gather additional insight to the impact of U.S. regulatory processes. Another is to help to inform the debate about how to best maximize the rights and welfare of clinical trial

  4. Contributions of a global network of tree diversity experiments to sustainable forest plantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheyen, Kris; Vanhellemont, Margot; Auge, Harald; Baeten, Lander; Baraloto, Christopher; Barsoum, Nadia; Bilodeau-Gauthier, Simon; Bruelheide, Helge; Castagneyrol, Bastien; Godbold, Douglas; Haase, Josephine; Hector, Andy; Jactel, Hervé; Koricheva, Julia; Loreau, Michel; Mereu, Simone; Messier, Christian; Muys, Bart; Nolet, Philippe; Paquette, Alain; Parker, John; Perring, Mike; Ponette, Quentin; Potvin, Catherine; Reich, Peter; Smith, Andy; Weih, Martin; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael

    2016-02-01

    The area of forest plantations is increasing worldwide helping to meet timber demand and protect natural forests. However, with global change, monospecific plantations are increasingly vulnerable to abiotic and biotic disturbances. As an adaption measure we need to move to plantations that are more diverse in genotypes, species, and structure, with a design underpinned by science. TreeDivNet, a global network of tree diversity experiments, responds to this need by assessing the advantages and disadvantages of mixed species plantations. The network currently consists of 18 experiments, distributed over 36 sites and five ecoregions. With plantations 1-15 years old, TreeDivNet can already provide relevant data for forest policy and management. In this paper, we highlight some early results on the carbon sequestration and pest resistance potential of more diverse plantations. Finally, suggestions are made for new, innovative experiments in understudied regions to complement the existing network.

  5. Women's views and experiences of two alternative consent pathways for participation in a preterm intrapartum trial: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Alexandra; Chhoa, Celine; Ayers, Susan; Pushpa-Rajah, Angela; Duley, Lelia

    2017-09-09

    The Cord Pilot Trial compared alternative policies for timing of cord clamping at very preterm birth at eight UK hospitals. In addition to standard written consent, an oral assent pathway was developed for use when birth was imminent. The aim of this study was to explore women's views and experiences of two alternative consent pathways to participate in the Cord Pilot Trial. We conducted a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews. A total of 179 participants in the Cord Pilot Trial were sent a postal invitation to take part in interviews. Women who agreed were interviewed in person or by telephone to explore their experiences of two consent pathways for a preterm intrapartum trial. Data were analysed using inductive systematic thematic analysis. Twenty-three women who gave either written consent (n = 18) or oral assent followed by written consent (n = 5) to participate in the trial were interviewed. Five themes were identified: (1) understanding of the implications of randomisation, (2) importance of staff offering participation, (3) information about the trial and time to consider participation, (4) trial secondary in women's minds and (5) reasons for agreeing to take part in the trial. Experiences were similar for the two consent pathways. Women recruited by the oral assent pathway reported being given less information about the trial but felt it was sufficient to make a decision regarding participation. There were gaps in women's understanding of the trial and intervention, regardless of the consent pathway. Overall, women were positive about their experiences of being invited to participate in the trial. The oral assent pathway seems an acceptable option for women if the intervention is low-risk and time is limited. ISRCTN Registry, ISRCTN21456601 . Registered on 28 February 2013.

  6. Variety in emotional life: within-category typicality of emotional experiences is associated with neural activity in large-scale brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Mendenhall, Christine D; Barrett, Lisa Feldman; Barsalou, Lawrence W

    2015-01-01

    The tremendous variability within categories of human emotional experience receives little empirical attention. We hypothesized that atypical instances of emotion categories (e.g. pleasant fear of thrill-seeking) would be processed less efficiently than typical instances of emotion categories (e.g. unpleasant fear of violent threat) in large-scale brain networks. During a novel fMRI paradigm, participants immersed themselves in scenarios designed to induce atypical and typical experiences of fear, sadness or happiness (scenario immersion), and then focused on and rated the pleasant or unpleasant feeling that emerged (valence focus) in most trials. As predicted, reliably greater activity in the 'default mode' network (including medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate) was observed for atypical (vs typical) emotional experiences during scenario immersion, suggesting atypical instances require greater conceptual processing to situate the socio-emotional experience. During valence focus, reliably greater activity was observed for atypical (vs typical) emotional experiences in the 'salience' network (including anterior insula and anterior cingulate), suggesting atypical instances place greater demands on integrating shifting body signals with the sensory and social context. Consistent with emerging psychological construction approaches to emotion, these findings demonstrate that is it important to study the variability within common categories of emotional experience. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Lessons for successful study enrollment from the Veterans Affairs/National Institutes of Health Acute Renal Failure Trial Network Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Susan T; Chertow, Glenn M; Vitale, Joseph; O'Connor, Theresa; Zhang, Jane; Schein, Roland M H; Choudhury, Devasmita; Finkel, Kevin; Vijayan, Anitha; Paganini, Emil; Palevsky, Paul M

    2008-07-01

    Design elements of clinical trials can introduce recruitment bias and reduce study efficiency. Trials involving the critically ill may be particularly prone to design-related inefficiencies. Enrollment into the Veterans Affairs/National Institutes of Health Acute Renal Failure Trial Network Study was systematically monitored. Reasons for nonenrollment into this study comparing strategies of renal replacement therapy in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury were categorized as modifiable or nonmodifiable. 4339 patients were screened; 2744 fulfilled inclusion criteria. Of these, 1034 were ineligible by exclusion criteria. Of the remaining 1710 patients, 1124 (65.7%) enrolled. Impediments to informed consent excluded 21.4% of potentially eligible patients. Delayed identification of potential patients, physician refusal, and involvement in competing trials accounted for 4.4, 2.7, and 2.3% of exclusions. Comfort measures only status, chronic illness, chronic kidney disease, and obesity excluded 11.8, 7.8, 7.6, and 5.9% of potential patients. Modification of an enrollment window reduced the loss of patients from 6.6 to 2.3%. The Acute Renal Failure Trial Network Study's enrollment efficiency compared favorably with previous intensive care unit intervention trials and supports the representativeness of its enrolled population. Impediments to informed consent highlight the need for nontraditional acquisition methods. Restrictive enrollment windows may hamper recruitment but can be effectively modified. The low rate of physician refusal acknowledges clinical equipoise in the study design. Underlying comorbidities are important design considerations for future trials that involve the critically ill with acute kidney injury.

  8. Effect of an Immersive Preoperative Virtual Reality Experience on Patient Reported Outcomes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelis, Kimon; Calnan, Daniel; Simmons, Nathan; MacKenzie, Todd A; Kakoulides, George

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the effect of exposure to a virtual reality (VR) environment preoperatively on patient-reported outcomes for surgical operations. There is a scarcity of well-developed quality improvement initiatives targeting patient satisfaction. We performed a randomized controlled trial of patients undergoing cranial and spinal operations in a tertiary referral center. Patients underwent a 1:1 randomization to an immersive preoperative VR experience or standard preoperative experience stratified on type of operation. The primary outcome measures were the Evaluation du Vecu de l'Anesthesie Generale (EVAN-G) score and the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information (APAIS) score, as markers of the patient's experience during the surgical encounter. During the study period, a total of 127 patients (mean age 55.3 years, 41.9% females) underwent randomization. The average EVAN-G score was 84.3 (standard deviation, SD, 6.4) after VR, and 64.3 (SD, 11.7) after standard preoperative experience (difference, 20.0; 95% confidence interval, CI, 16.6-23.3). Exposure to an immersive VR experience also led to higher APAIS score (difference, 29.9; 95% CI, 24.5-35.2). In addition, VR led to lower preoperative VAS stress score (difference, -41.7; 95% CI, -33.1 to -50.2), and higher preoperative VAS preparedness (difference, 32.4; 95% CI, 24.9-39.8), and VAS satisfaction (difference, 33.2; 95% CI, 25.4-41.0) scores. No association was identified with VAS stress score (difference, -1.6; 95% CI, -13.4 to 10.2). In a randomized controlled trial, we demonstrated that patients exposed to preoperative VR had increased satisfaction during the surgical encounter. Harnessing the power of this technology, hospitals can create an immersive environment that minimizes stress, and enhances the perioperative experience.

  9. Remote source document verification in two national clinical trials networks: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith Mealer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Barriers to executing large-scale randomized controlled trials include costs, complexity, and regulatory requirements. We hypothesized that source document verification (SDV via remote electronic monitoring is feasible. METHODS: Five hospitals from two NIH sponsored networks provided remote electronic access to study monitors. We evaluated pre-visit remote SDV compared to traditional on-site SDV using a randomized convenience sample of all study subjects due for a monitoring visit. The number of data values verified and the time to perform remote and on-site SDV was collected. RESULTS: Thirty-two study subjects were randomized to either remote SDV (N=16 or traditional on-site SDV (N=16. Technical capabilities, remote access policies and regulatory requirements varied widely across sites. In the adult network, only 14 of 2965 data values (0.47% could not be located remotely. In the traditional on-site SDV arm, 3 of 2608 data values (0.12% required coordinator help. In the pediatric network, all 198 data values in the remote SDV arm and all 183 data values in the on-site SDV arm were located. Although not statistically significant there was a consistent trend for more time consumed per data value (minutes +/- SD: Adult 0.50 +/- 0.17 min vs. 0.39 +/- 0.10 min (two-tailed t-test p=0.11; Pediatric 0.99 +/- 1.07 min vs. 0.56 +/- 0.61 min (p=0.37 and time per case report form: Adult: 4.60 +/- 1.42 min vs. 3.60 +/- 0.96 min (p=0.10; Pediatric: 11.64 +/- 7.54 min vs. 6.07 +/- 3.18 min (p=0.10 using remote SDV. CONCLUSIONS: Because each site had different policies, requirements, and technologies, a common approach to assimilating monitors into the access management system could not be implemented. Despite substantial technology differences, more than 99% of data values were successfully monitored remotely. This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility of remote monitoring and the need to develop consistent access policies for remote study

  10. Hypervisibility and self-disclosure: new textures of social experience in the social networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla de Abreu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of social networks has changed the forms of expression and socialization in contemporary societies, influencing the ways in which we relate to the other and to the visualities. Today, people are learning to manage qualitatively aspects of their identity to be posted in social interfaces and experimenting new placements of gender and sexuality. The reflections of the article come from the partial results of the doctoral research. The article examines the practices of see and be seen in social networks, in particular, focusing on two vital issues in order to understand the experiences from the digital perspective: hypervisibility and self-disclosure.

  11. Collaborating on Facebook: Teachers Exchanging Experiences Through Social Networking Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Cunha Júnior F.,

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the use of Facebook for educational purposes, as a collaborative online space for enabling communication among teachers from different schools. The article describes how a group of 43 teachers on Facebook, from various schools in the southeast region of Brazil used a group on Facebook as a collaborative space for communicating among each other. On the group, these teachers shared experiences about the use of digital technologies in their secondary education classes. This study is based on Cultural Historical Activity Theory, considering the group on Facebook as a tool for mediating communication . The objective of this study is to explore why and how teachers collaborated with each other on Facebook, and to study how communication among them evolved in the process. We examined the posts on that group from 2012 to 2014, and two questionnaires responded online by the teachers in June 2012 and in December 2013. Our findings suggest that teachers tend to critically collaborate in smaller groups and that further online communication evolved outside the group of teachers, with the creation of smaller groups on Facebook inside their schools.

  12. Punishment diminishes the benefits of network reciprocity in social dilemma experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuelong; Jusup, Marko; Wang, Zhen; Li, Huijia; Shi, Lei; Podobnik, Boris; Stanley, H Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2018-01-02

    Network reciprocity has been widely advertised in theoretical studies as one of the basic cooperation-promoting mechanisms, but experimental evidence favoring this type of reciprocity was published only recently. When organized in an unchanging network of social contacts, human subjects cooperate provided the following strict condition is satisfied: The benefit of cooperation must outweigh the total cost of cooperating with all neighbors. In an attempt to relax this condition, we perform social dilemma experiments wherein network reciprocity is aided with another theoretically hypothesized cooperation-promoting mechanism-costly punishment. The results reveal how networks promote and stabilize cooperation. This stabilizing effect is stronger in a smaller-size neighborhood, as expected from theory and experiments. Contrary to expectations, punishment diminishes the benefits of network reciprocity by lowering assortment, payoff per round, and award for cooperative behavior. This diminishing effect is stronger in a larger-size neighborhood. An immediate implication is that the psychological effects of enduring punishment override the rational response anticipated in quantitative models of cooperation in networks. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  13. Long-running telemedicine networks delivering humanitarian services: experience, performance and scientific output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissbuhler, Antoine; Jethwani, Kamal; Kovarik, Carrie; Person, Donald A; Vladzymyrskyy, Anton; Zanaboni, Paolo; Zolfo, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To summarize the experience, performance and scientific output of long-running telemedicine networks delivering humanitarian services. Methods Nine long-running networks – those operating for five years or more– were identified and seven provided detailed information about their activities, including performance and scientific output. Information was extracted from peer-reviewed papers describing the networks’ study design, effectiveness, quality, economics, provision of access to care and sustainability. The strength of the evidence was scored as none, poor, average or good. Findings The seven networks had been operating for a median of 11 years (range: 5–15). All networks provided clinical tele-consultations for humanitarian purposes using store-and-forward methods and five were also involved in some form of education. The smallest network had 15 experts and the largest had more than 500. The clinical caseload was 50 to 500 cases a year. A total of 59 papers had been published by the networks, and 44 were listed in Medline. Based on study design, the strength of the evidence was generally poor by conventional standards (e.g. 29 papers described non-controlled clinical series). Over half of the papers provided evidence of sustainability and improved access to care. Uncertain funding was a common risk factor. Conclusion Improved collaboration between networks could help attenuate the lack of resources reported by some networks and improve sustainability. Although the evidence base is weak, the networks appear to offer sustainable and clinically useful services. These findings may interest decision-makers in developing countries considering starting, supporting or joining similar telemedicine networks. PMID:22589567

  14. Adolescent Problematic Social Networking and School Experiences: The Mediating Effects of Sleep Disruptions and Sleep Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Lynette; Barber, Bonnie L; Modecki, Kathryn L

    2015-07-01

    An important developmental task for adolescents is to become increasingly responsible for their own health behaviors. Establishing healthy sleep routines and controlling media use before bedtime are important for adequate, quality sleep so adolescents are alert during the day and perform well at school. Despite the prevalence of adolescent social media use and the large percentage of computers and cell phones in adolescents' bedrooms, no studies to date have investigated the link between problematic adolescent investment in social networking, their sleep practices, and associated experiences at school. A sample of 1,886 students in Australia aged between 12 and 18 years of age completed self-report data on problematic social networking use, sleep disturbances, sleep quality, and school satisfaction. Structural equation modeling (SEM) substantiated the serial mediation hypothesis: for adolescents, problematic social networking use significantly increased sleep disturbances, which adversely affected perceptions of sleep quality that, in turn, lowered adolescents' appraisals of their school satisfaction. This significant pattern was largely driven by the indirect effect of sleep disturbances. These findings suggest that adolescents are vulnerable to negative consequences from social networking use. Specifically, problematic social networking is associated with poor school experiences, which result from poor sleep habits. Promoting better sleep routines by minimizing sleep disturbances from social media use could improve school experiences for adolescents with enhanced emotional engagement and improved subjective well-being.

  15. Differences in Friendship Networks and Experiences of Cyberbullying Among Korean and Australian Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee Young; Kwon, Yeji; Yang, Soeun; Park, Sora; Kim, Eun-Mee; Na, Eun-Yeong

    2017-01-01

    Cyberbullying is one of the negative consequences of online social interaction. The digital environment enables adolescents to engage in online social interaction beyond the traditional physical boundaries of families, neighborhoods, and schools. The authors examined connections to friendship networks in both online and offline settings are related to their experiences as victims, perpetrators, and bystanders of cyberbullying. A comparative face-to-face survey of adolescents (12-15-year-olds) was conducted in Korea (n = 520) and Australia (n = 401). The results reveal that online networks are partially related to cyberbullying in both countries, showing the size of social network sites was significantly correlated with experience cyberbullying among adolescents in both countries. However there were cultural differences in the impact of friendship networks on cyberbullying. The size of the online and offline networks has a stronger impact on the cyberbullying experiences in Korea than it does in Australia. In particular, the number of friends in cliques was positively related to both bullying and victimization in Korea.

  16. Undergraduate students' development of social, cultural, and human capital in a networked research experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jennifer Jo; Conaway, Evan; Dolan, Erin L.

    2016-12-01

    Recent calls for reform in undergraduate biology education have emphasized integrating research experiences into the learning experiences of all undergraduates. Contemporary science research increasingly demands collaboration across disciplines and institutions to investigate complex research questions, providing new contexts and models for involving undergraduates in research. In this study, we examined the experiences of undergraduates participating in a multi-institution and interdisciplinary biology research network. Unlike the traditional apprenticeship model of research, in which a student participates in research under the guidance of a single faculty member, students participating in networked research have the opportunity to develop relationships with additional faculty and students working in other areas of the project, at their own and at other institutions. We examined how students in this network develop social ties and to what extent a networked research experience affords opportunities for students to develop social, cultural, and human capital. Most studies of undergraduate involvement in science research have focused on documenting student outcomes rather than elucidating how students gain access to research experiences or how elements of research participation lead to desired student outcomes. By taking a qualitative approach framed by capital theories, we have identified ways that undergraduates utilize and further develop various forms of capital important for success in science research. In our study of the first 16 months of a biology research network, we found that undergraduates drew upon a combination of human, cultural, and social capital to gain access to the network. Within their immediate research groups, students built multidimensional social ties with faculty, peers, and others, yielding social capital that can be drawn upon for information, resources, and support. They reported developing cultural capital in the form of learning to

  17. The impact of public housing on social networks: a natural experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Craig E; Green, Harold D; Kennedy, David P; Griffin, Beth Ann; Kennedy-Hendricks, Alene; Burkhauser, Susan; Schwartz, Heather

    2014-09-01

    We assessed whether 2 types of public housing-scattered among market-rate housing developments or clustered in small public housing projects-were associated with the perceived health and health behaviors of residents' social networks. Leveraging a natural experiment in Montgomery County, Maryland, in which residents were randomly assigned to different types of public housing, we surveyed 453 heads of household in 2011. We asked residents about their own health as well as the perceived health of their network members, including their neighbors. Residents in scattered-site public housing perceived that their neighbors were more likely to exercise than residents of clustered public housing (24.7% of network members vs 14.0%; P housing have a modest impact on the health composition of one's social network, suggesting the importance of housing policy for health.

  18. A Wireless Sensor Network for Structural Health Monitoring: Performance and Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Paek, Jeongyeup; Chintalapudi, Krishna; Caffrey, John; Govindan, Ramesh; Masri, Sami

    2005-01-01

    While sensor network research has made significant strides in the past few years, the literature has relatively few examples of papers that have evaluated and validated a complete experimental system. In this paper we discuss our deployment experiences and evaluate the performance of a multi-hop wireless data acquisition system (called Wisden) for structural health monitoring (SHM) on a large seismic test structure used by civil engineers. Our experiments indicate that, with the latest sensor...

  19. OSCAR experiment high-density network data report: Event 3 - April 16-17, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dana, M.T.; Easter, R.C.; Thorp, J.M.

    1984-12-01

    The OSCAR (Oxidation and Scavenging Characteristics of April Rains) experiment, conducted during April 1981, was a cooperative field investigation of wet removal in cyclonic storm systems. The high-density component of OSCAR was located in northeast Indiana and included sequential precipitation chemistry measurements on a 100 by 100 km network, as well as airborne air chemistry and cloud chemistry measurements, surface air chemistry measurements, and supporting meteorological measurements. Four separate storm events were studied during the experiment. This report summarizes data taken by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) during the third storm event, April 16-17. The report contains the high-density network precipitation chemistry data, air chemistry and cloud chemistry data from the PNL aircraft, and meteorological data for the event, including standard National Weather Service products and radar and rawindsonde data from the network. 4 references, 76 figures, 6 tables.

  20. OSCAR experiment high-density network data report: Event 1 - April 8-9, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dana, M.T.; Easter, R.C.; Thorp, J.M.

    1984-12-01

    The OSCAR (Oxidation and Scavenging Characteristics of April Rains) experiment, conducted during April 1981, was a cooperative field investigation of wet removal in cyclonic storm systems. The high-densiy component of OSCAR was located in northeast Indiana and included sequential precipitation chemistry measurements on a 100 by 100 km network, as well as airborne air chemistry and cloud chemistry measurements, surface air chemistry measurements, and supporting meteorological measurements. Four separate storm events were studied during the experiment. This report summarizes data taken by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) during the first storm event, April 8-9. The report contains the high-density network precipitation chemistry data, air chemistry data from the PNL aircraft, and meteorological data for the event, including standard National Weather Service products and radar data from the network. 4 references, 72 figures, 5 tables.

  1. Experiences of persons with spinal cord injury undertaking a physical activity programme as part of the SCIPA 'Full-On' randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Allyson; Nunnerley, Jo; Mulligan, Hilda; Ahmad Ali, Nordawama; Kensington, Gemma; McVicar, Tim; van Schaik, Olivia

    2018-04-01

    For individuals with spinal cord injury the long term benefits of physical activity are well documented, however the majority of this population report inactivity secondary to participatory barriers. Research investigating physically intensive exercise programs for people with spinal cord injury is limited, with even less attention paid to the experience of the participants. To explore the experiences of persons with spinal cord injury of their participation in the New Zealand arm of the Spinal Cord Injury and Physical Activity (SCIPA) 'Full-On' randomized controlled trial. Eight participants recruited to SCIPA Full-On completed individual virtual video diary interviews three times across the duration of their twelve week Full-On trial. Expectations and highs and lows of the program were recorded via a webcam. The video diary data were transcribed verbatim and analyzed inductively for themes. Three independent themes were identified from the data: the participants' excitement of opportunity to participate in SCIPA Full-On' randomized controlled trial, personal rewards from participation and also the frustrations to participation they experienced. This study provides valuable information on factors that motivate participation in physical activity for individuals with spinal cord injury, within a research setting. The findings highlighted the importance of accessibility and a supportive network which may be a way to provide individuals with spinal cord injury the means to become self-efficacious to participate in community physical activity outside of the research environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Using Social Networks to Enhance Teaching and Learning Experiences in Higher Learning Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Vimala

    2014-01-01

    The paper first explores the factors that affect the use of social networks to enhance teaching and learning experiences among students and lecturers, using structured questionnaires prepared based on the Push-Pull-Mooring framework. A total of 455 students and lecturers from higher learning institutions in Malaysia participated in this study.…

  3. Information Networks and Integration: Institutional Influences on Experiences and Persistence of Beginning Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Melinda Mechur; Hughes, Katherine L.

    2008-01-01

    This article uses data from a qualitative exploratory study at two urban community colleges to examine experiences of beginning students, paying close attention to the influence that institutional information networks have on students' perceptions and persistence. The authors find that students' reported integration, or sense of belonging in the…

  4. The Student Experience of Learning Using Networked Technologies: An Emergent Progression of Expanding Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutajar, Maria

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on phenomenographic research which explored the qualitative differences in post-secondary students' accounts of their networked learning experiences. Data was generated using semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of participants. Phenomenographic analysis led to a configuration of variation in students' accounts…

  5. On the use of neural networks in high-energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humpert, B.

    1990-01-01

    We investigate the possibilities for applying neutral networks in high-energy physics experiments. After a survey of the main 'intelligent behavior paradigms', we discuss a number of possibilities where this new technology finds its application in particle detectors and particle accelerators. Finally, we comment on commercially available NN-tools, point to their limitations and extrapolate into the future. (orig.)

  6. Experiences from Implementing a Mobile Multiplayer Real-Time Game for Wireless Networks with High Latency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alf Inge Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes results and experiences from designing, implementing, and testing a multiplayer real-time game over mobile networks with high latency. The paper reports on network latency and bandwidth measurements from playing the game live over GPRS, EDGE, UMTS, and WLAN using the TCP and the UDP protocols. These measurements describe the practical constraints of various wireless networks and protocols when used for mobile multiplayer game purposes. Further, the paper reports on experiences from implementing various approaches to minimize issues related to high latency. Specifically, the paper focuses on a discussion about how much of the game should run locally on the client versus on the server to minimize the load on the mobile device and obtain sufficient consistency in the game. The game was designed to reveal all kinds of implementation issues of mobile network multiplayer games. The goal of the game is for a player to push other players around and into traps where they loose their lives. The game relies heavily on collision detection between the players and game objects. The paper presents experiences from experimenting with various approaches that can be used to handle such collisions, and highlights the advantages and disadvantages of the various approaches.

  7. Breast Cancer Chemoprevention: A Network Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone; Pilati, Pierluigi; Briarava, Marta; Nitti, Donato

    2016-02-01

    Several agents have been advocated for breast cancer primary prevention. However, few of them appear effective, the associated severe adverse effects limiting their uptake. We performed a comprehensive search for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) reporting on the ability of chemoprevention agents (CPAs) to reduce the incidence of primary breast carcinoma. Using network meta-analysis, we ranked CPAs based simultaneously on efficacy and acceptability (an inverse measure of toxicity). All statistical tests were two-sided. We found 48 eligible RCTs, enrolling 271 161 women randomly assigned to receive either placebo or one of 21 CPAs. Aromatase inhibitors (anastrozole and exemestane, considered a single CPA class because of the lack of between-study heterogeneity; relative risk [RR] = 0.468, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.346 to 0.634), arzoxifene (RR = 0.415, 95% CI = 0.253 to 0.682), lasofoxifene (RR = 0.208, 95% CI = 0.079 to 0.544), raloxifene (RR = 0.572, 95% CI = 0.372 to 0.881), tamoxifen (RR = 0.708, 95% CI = 0.595 to 0.842), and tibolone (RR = 0.317, 95% CI = 0.127 to 0.792) were statistically significantly associated with a therapeutic effect, which was restricted to estrogen receptor-positive tumors of postmenopausal women (except for tamoxifen, which is active also during premenopause). Network meta-analysis ranking showed that the new selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) arzoxifene, lasofoxifene, and raloxifene have the best benefit-risk ratio. Aromatase inhibitors and tamoxifen ranked second and third, respectively. These results provide physicians and health care regulatory agencies with RCT-based evidence on efficacy and acceptability of currently available breast cancer CPAs; at the same time, we pinpoint how much work still remains to be done before pharmacological primary prevention becomes a routine option to reduce the burden of this disease. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For

  8. Evaluating research and impact: a bibliometric analysis of research by the NIH/NIAID HIV/AIDS clinical trials networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott R Rosas

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Evaluative bibliometrics uses advanced techniques to assess the impact of scholarly work in the context of other scientific work and usually compares the relative scientific contributions of research groups or institutions. Using publications from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID HIV/AIDS extramural clinical trials networks, we assessed the presence, performance, and impact of papers published in 2006-2008. Through this approach, we sought to expand traditional bibliometric analyses beyond citation counts to include normative comparisons across journals and fields, visualization of co-authorship across the networks, and assess the inclusion of publications in reviews and syntheses. Specifically, we examined the research output of the networks in terms of the a presence of papers in the scientific journal hierarchy ranked on the basis of journal influence measures, b performance of publications on traditional bibliometric measures, and c impact of publications in comparisons with similar publications worldwide, adjusted for journals and fields. We also examined collaboration and interdisciplinarity across the initiative, through network analysis and modeling of co-authorship patterns. Finally, we explored the uptake of network produced publications in research reviews and syntheses. Overall, the results suggest the networks are producing highly recognized work, engaging in extensive interdisciplinary collaborations, and having an impact across several areas of HIV-related science. The strengths and limitations of the approach for evaluation and monitoring research initiatives are discussed.

  9. Synchronous Databus Network in ITER: Open source real-time network for the next nuclear fusion experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boncagni, L.; Centioli, C.; Iannone, F.; Neri, C.; Panella, M.; Pangione, L.; Riva, M.; Scappaticci, M.; Vitale, V.; Zaccarian, L.

    2008-01-01

    The next nuclear fusion experiment, ITER, is providing the infrastructure for the optimal operation of a burning plasma, requiring feedback control of discharge parameters and on-line evaluation of computationally intensive models running in a cluster of controller nodes. Thus, the synchronization of the available information on the plasma and plant state variables among the controller nodes is a key issue for ITER. The ITER conceptual design aims to perform feedback control on a cluster of distributed controllers connected by a Synchronous Databus Network (SDN). Therefore it is mandatory to achieve a deterministic data exchange among the controller nodes with a refresh rate of at least 1 kHz and a jitter of at least 50 μs. Thus, a conservative estimate of the data flow within the controller network can be 3 kSample/ms. In this paper the open source RTnet project is evaluated to meet the requirements of the SDN of ITER. A testbed involving a cluster of eight nodes connected over a standard ethernet network has been set up to simulate a distributed real-time control system. The main goal of the test is to verify the compliance of the performance with the ITER SDN requirements

  10. Experiences of a long-term randomized controlled prevention trial in a maiden environment: Estonian Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahu Mati

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preventive drugs require long-term trials to show their effectiveness or harms and often a lot of changes occur during post-marketing studies. The purpose of this article is to describe the research process in a long-term randomized controlled trial and discuss the impact and consequences of changes in the research environment. Methods The Estonian Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy trial (EPHT, originally planned to continue for five years, was planned in co-operation with the Women's International Study of Long-Duration Oestrogen after Menopause (WISDOM in the UK. In addition to health outcomes, EPHT was specifically designed to study the impact of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT on health services utilization. Results After EPHT recruited in 1999–2001 the Women's Health Initiative (WHI in the USA decided to stop the estrogen-progestin trial after a mean of 5.2 years in July 2002 because of increased risk of breast cancer and later in 2004 the estrogen-only trial because HT increased the risk of stroke, decreased the risk of hip fracture, and did not affect coronary heart disease incidence. WISDOM was halted in autumn 2002. These decisions had a major influence on EPHT. Conclusion Changes in Estonian society challenged EPHT to find a balance between the needs of achieving responses to the trial aims with a limited budget and simultaneously maintaining the safety of trial participants. Flexibility was the main key for success. Rapid changes are not limited only to transiting societies but are true also in developed countries and the risk must be included in planning all long-term trials. The role of ethical and data monitoring committees in situations with emerging new data from other studies needs specification. Longer funding for preventive trials and more flexibility in budgeting are mandatory. Who should prove the effectiveness of an (old drug for a new preventive indication? In preventive drug trials companies may

  11. Network-Centric Maritime Radiation Awareness and Interdiction Experiments: C2 Experimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordetsky, A; Dougan, A D; Nekoogar, F

    2006-01-01

    The paper addresses technological and operational challenges of developing a global plug-and-play Maritime Domain Security testbed for the Global War on Terrorism mission. This joint NPS-LLNL project is based on the NPS Tactical Network Topology (TNT) composed of long-haul OFDM networks combined with self-forming wireless mesh links to air, surface, ground, and underwater unmanned vehicles. This long-haul network is combined with ultra-wideband (UWB) communications systems for wireless communications in harsh radio propagation channels. LLNL's UWB communication prototypes are designed to overcome shortcomings of the present narrowband communications systems in heavy metallic and constricted corridors inside ships. In the center of our discussion are networking solutions for the Maritime Interdiction Operation (MIO) Experiments in which geographically distributed command centers and subject matter experts collaborate with the Boarding Party in real time to facilitate situational understanding and course of action selection. The most recent experiment conducted via the testbed extension to the Alameda Island exercised several key technologies aimed at improving MIO. These technologies included UWB communications from within the ship to Boarding Party leader sending data files and pictures, advanced radiation detection equipment for search and identification, biometric equipment to record and send fingerprint files to facilitate rapid positive identification of crew members, and the latest updates of the NPS Tactical Network Topology facilitating reachback to LLNL, Biometric Fusion Center, USCG, and DTRA experts

  12. Network-Centric Maritime Radiation Awareness and Interdiction Experiments: C2 Experimentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordetsky, A; Dougan, A D; Nekoogar, F

    2006-08-07

    The paper addresses technological and operational challenges of developing a global plug-and-play Maritime Domain Security testbed for the Global War on Terrorism mission. This joint NPS-LLNL project is based on the NPS Tactical Network Topology (TNT) composed of long-haul OFDM networks combined with self-forming wireless mesh links to air, surface, ground, and underwater unmanned vehicles. This long-haul network is combined with ultra-wideband (UWB) communications systems for wireless communications in harsh radio propagation channels. LLNL's UWB communication prototypes are designed to overcome shortcomings of the present narrowband communications systems in heavy metallic and constricted corridors inside ships. In the center of our discussion are networking solutions for the Maritime Interdiction Operation (MIO) Experiments in which geographically distributed command centers and subject matter experts collaborate with the Boarding Party in real time to facilitate situational understanding and course of action selection. The most recent experiment conducted via the testbed extension to the Alameda Island exercised several key technologies aimed at improving MIO. These technologies included UWB communications from within the ship to Boarding Party leader sending data files and pictures, advanced radiation detection equipment for search and identification, biometric equipment to record and send fingerprint files to facilitate rapid positive identification of crew members, and the latest updates of the NPS Tactical Network Topology facilitating reachback to LLNL, Biometric Fusion Center, USCG, and DTRA experts.

  13. High-accuracy local positioning network for the alignment of the Mu2e experiment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hejdukova, Jana B. [Czech Technical Univ., Prague (Czech Republic)

    2017-06-01

    This Diploma thesis describes the establishment of a high-precision local positioning network and accelerator alignment for the Mu2e physics experiment. The process of establishing new network consists of few steps: design of the network, pre-analysis, installation works, measurements of the network and making adjustments. Adjustments were performed using two approaches. First is a geodetic approach of taking into account the Earth’s curvature and the metrological approach of a pure 3D Cartesian system on the other side. The comparison of those two approaches is performed and evaluated in the results and compared with expected differences. The effect of the Earth’s curvature was found to be significant for this kind of network and should not be neglected. The measurements were obtained with Absolute Tracker AT401, leveling instrument Leica DNA03 and gyrotheodolite DMT Gyromat 2000. The coordinates of the points of the reference network were determined by the Least Square Meth od and the overall view is attached as Annexes.

  14. A fast and efficient gene-network reconstruction method from multiple over-expression experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thurner Stefan

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reverse engineering of gene regulatory networks presents one of the big challenges in systems biology. Gene regulatory networks are usually inferred from a set of single-gene over-expressions and/or knockout experiments. Functional relationships between genes are retrieved either from the steady state gene expressions or from respective time series. Results We present a novel algorithm for gene network reconstruction on the basis of steady-state gene-chip data from over-expression experiments. The algorithm is based on a straight forward solution of a linear gene-dynamics equation, where experimental data is fed in as a first predictor for the solution. We compare the algorithm's performance with the NIR algorithm, both on the well known E. coli experimental data and on in-silico experiments. Conclusion We show superiority of the proposed algorithm in the number of correctly reconstructed links and discuss computational time and robustness. The proposed algorithm is not limited by combinatorial explosion problems and can be used in principle for large networks.

  15. Instructor Experiences with a Social Networking Site in a Higher Education Setting: Expectations, Frustrations, Appropriation, and Compartmentalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veletsianos, George; Kimmons, Royce; French, Karen D.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and practitioners have suggested that the use of social networking sites in formal education may be a worthwhile endeavor. Toward this goal, emerging learning platforms have included social networking features. Nevertheless, empirical literature examining user experiences, and more specifically instructor experiences, with these tools…

  16. 'We knew it was a totally at random thing': parents' experiences of being part of a neonatal trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Merryl; Nongena, Phumza; Edwards, David; Redshaw, Maggie

    2017-08-01

    Studies exploring parents' trial experiences generally relate to their understanding of the consent process and the development of researcher strategies to facilitate recruitment and retention. The aim was to better understand parents' experience of being part of a trial at the time and their perceptions of trial participation in retrospect. Data were collected in a number of ways: from recorded discussions between parents and clinicians about the MRI or ultrasound, in open-text responses to questionnaires and in qualitative interviews at 1 and 2 years after participation. Thematic analysis was undertaken using NVivo10. Key themes identified were 'deciding to take part', with subthemes associated with 'benefitting self', 'benefitting others' and 'being prepared'; 'the randomisation process' with subthemes relating to 'acceptance' and 'understanding' and 'actual engagement' with subthemes of 'practicalities' and 'care from responsive staff'. Parents' perspectives on the trial and the processes and information received reflect their understanding and experience of the trial and the value of parent-friendly information-giving about participation, randomisation and follow-up. The practical and logistical points raised confirm the key issues and parents' need for sensitive care and support in the course of a trial. Looking back, almost all parents were positive about their experience and felt that the family had benefitted from participation in the trial and follow-up studies, even when the developmental outcomes were poor. ClinicalTrials.gov, ID: NCT01049594. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01049594 . Registered on 13 January 2010. EudraCT: EudraCT: 2009-011602-42. https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu/ .

  17. AntiPhospholipid Syndrome Alliance for Clinical Trials and InternatiOnal Networking (APS ACTION): 5-Year Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbhaiya, Medha; Andrade, Danieli; Erkan, Doruk

    2016-10-01

    Antiphospholipid Syndrome Alliance for Clinical Trials and International Networking (APS ACTION) is the first-ever international network created to design and conduct large-scale, multicenter clinical trials and research in persistently antiphospholipid antibody (aPL)-positive patients. Since its inception in 2010, the APS ACTION has made important strides toward our goal of international research collaboration and data sharing. Through the dedication and hard work of 50 APS ACTION members, collaborative international projects are currently underway including a multicenter web-based registry and repository of aPL-positive patients, a randomized controlled clinical trial assessing the efficacy of hydroxychloroquine for primary thrombosis prevention in persistently aPL-positive but thrombosis-free patients, standardization of aPL testing through the use of core laboratories worldwide, identification of the limitations in the existing aPL/APS literature, and conducting observational research studies to further our understanding of the disease. Thus far, APS ACTION has held annual workshops and summits with the aim of facilitating international collaboration and developing initiatives to recruit young scholars to APS research. This paper describes updates related to the organization's structure, ongoing research efforts, and recent accomplishments and discusses future directions.

  18. A pilot feasibility randomised controlled trial of an adjunct brief social network intervention in opiate substitution treatment services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Ed; Copello, Alex; Seddon, Jennifer L; Christie, Marilyn; Bamber, Deborah; Powell, Charlotte; Bennett, Carmel; Akhtar, Shabana; George, Sanju; Ball, Andrew; Frew, Emma; Goranitis, Ilias; Freemantle, Nick

    2018-01-15

    Approximately 3% of people receiving opioid substitution therapy (OST) in the UK manage to achieve abstinence from prescribed and illicit drugs within three years of commencing treatment. Involvement of families and wider social networks in supporting psychological treatment may be an effective strategy in facilitating recovery, and this pilot study aimed to evaluate the impact of a social network-focused intervention for patients receiving OST. A two-site, open feasibility trial randomised patients receiving OST for at least 12 months but still reporting illicit opiate use in the past 28 days to one of three treatments: 1) treatment as usual (TAU), 2) Brief Social Behaviour and Network Therapy (B-SBNT) + TAU, or 3) Personal Goal Setting (PGS) + TAU. The two active interventions consisted of 4 sessions. There were 3 aims: 1) test the feasibility of recruiting OST patients to a trial of B-SBNT, and following them up over 12 months; 2) test the feasibility of training clinicians to deliver B-SBNT; 3) test whether B-SBNT reduces heroin use 3 and 12 months after treatment, and to explore potential mediating factors. The primary outcome for aim 3 was number of days of heroin use in the past month, and a range of secondary outcome measures were specified in advance (level of drug dependence, mental health, social satisfaction, therapist rapport, treatment satisfaction, social network size and support). A total of 83 participants were randomised, and 70 (84%) were followed-up at 12 months. Fidelity analysis of showed that B-SBNT sessions were clearly distinguishable from PGS and TAU sessions, suggesting it was possible to train clinical staff to an adequate level of competence. No significant differences were found between the 3 intervention arms in the primary or secondary outcome measures. Attendance at psychosocial treatment intervention sessions was low across all three arms (44% overall). Patients receiving OST can be recruited into a trial of a social

  19. Omalizumab in children with uncontrolled allergic asthma: Review of clinical trial and real-world experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipps, Bradley E; Lanier, Bob; Milgrom, Henry; Deschildre, Antoine; Hedlin, Gunilla; Szefler, Stanley J; Kattan, Meyer; Kianifard, Farid; Ortiz, Benjamin; Haselkorn, Tmirah; Iqbal, Ahmar; Rosén, Karin; Trzaskoma, Benjamin; Busse, William W

    2017-05-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases of childhood. Allergen sensitization and high frequencies of comorbid allergic diseases are characteristic of severe asthma in children. Omalizumab, an anti-IgE mAb, is the first targeted biologic therapeutic approved for the treatment of moderate-to-severe persistent allergic asthma (AA) that remains uncontrolled despite high-dose inhaled corticosteroids plus other controller medications. Since its initial licensing for use in adults and adolescents 12 years of age and older, the clinical efficacy, safety, and tolerability of omalizumab have been demonstrated in several published clinical trials in children aged 6 to less than 12 years with moderate-to-severe AA. These studies supported the approval of the pediatric indication (use in children aged ≥6 years) by the European Medicines Agency in 2009 and the US Food and Drug Administration in 2016. After this most recent change in licensing, we review the outcomes from clinical trials in children with persistent AA receiving omalizumab therapy and observational studies from the past 7 years of clinical experience in Europe. Data sources were identified by using PubMed in 2016. Guidelines and management recommendations and materials from the recent US Food and Drug Administration's Pediatric Advisory Committee meeting are also reviewed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Changing climates of conflict: A social network experiment in 56 schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluck, Elizabeth Levy; Shepherd, Hana; Aronow, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Theories of human behavior suggest that individuals attend to the behavior of certain people in their community to understand what is socially normative and adjust their own behavior in response. An experiment tested these theories by randomizing an anticonflict intervention across 56 schools with 24,191 students. After comprehensively measuring every school’s social network, randomly selected seed groups of 20–32 students from randomly selected schools were assigned to an intervention that encouraged their public stance against conflict at school. Compared with control schools, disciplinary reports of student conflict at treatment schools were reduced by 30% over 1 year. The effect was stronger when the seed group contained more “social referent” students who, as network measures reveal, attract more student attention. Network analyses of peer-to-peer influence show that social referents spread perceptions of conflict as less socially normative. PMID:26729884

  1. Changing climates of conflict: A social network experiment in 56 schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluck, Elizabeth Levy; Shepherd, Hana; Aronow, Peter M

    2016-01-19

    Theories of human behavior suggest that individuals attend to the behavior of certain people in their community to understand what is socially normative and adjust their own behavior in response. An experiment tested these theories by randomizing an anticonflict intervention across 56 schools with 24,191 students. After comprehensively measuring every school's social network, randomly selected seed groups of 20-32 students from randomly selected schools were assigned to an intervention that encouraged their public stance against conflict at school. Compared with control schools, disciplinary reports of student conflict at treatment schools were reduced by 30% over 1 year. The effect was stronger when the seed group contained more "social referent" students who, as network measures reveal, attract more student attention. Network analyses of peer-to-peer influence show that social referents spread perceptions of conflict as less socially normative.

  2. The Cervix Cancer Research Network (CCRN: Increasing access to cancer clinical trials in low- and middle-income countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gita eSuneja

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The burden of cervical cancer is large and growing in developing countries, due in large part to limited access to screening services and lack of human papillomavirus (HPV vaccination. In spite of modern advances in diagnostic and therapeutic modalities, outcomes from cervical cancer have not markedly improved in recent years. Novel clinical trials are urgently needed to improve outcomes from cervical cancer worldwide. Methods: The Cervix Cancer Research Network (CCRN, a subsidiary of the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup (GCIG, is a multi-national, multi-institutional consortium of physicians and scientists focused on improving cervical cancer outcomes worldwide by making cancer clinical trials available in low-, middle-, and high-income countries. Standard operating procedures for participation in CCRN include a pre-qualifying questionnaire to evaluate clinical activities and research infrastructure, followed by a site visit. Once a site is approved, they may choose to participate in one of four currently accruing clinical trials.Results: To date, 13 different CCRN site visits have been performed. Of these 13 sites visited, 10 have been approved as CCRN sites including Tata Memorial Hospital, India; Bangalore, India; Trivandrum, India; Ramathibodi, Thailand; Siriaj, Thailand; Pramongkutklao, Thailand; Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam; Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center; the Hertzen Moscow Cancer Research Institute; and the Russian Scientific Center of Roentgenoradiology. The four currently accruing clinical trials are TACO, OUTBACK, INTERLACE, and SHAPE.Discussion: The CCRN has successfully enrolled 10 sites in developing countries to participate in four randomized clinical trials. The primary objectives are to provide novel therapeutics to regions with the greatest need and to improve the validity and generalizability of clinical trial results by enrolling a diverse sample of patients.

  3. Influences on recruitment to randomised controlled trials in mental health settings in England: a national cross-sectional survey of researchers working for the Mental Health Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borschmann, Rohan; Patterson, Sue; Poovendran, Dilkushi; Wilson, Danielle; Weaver, Tim

    2014-02-17

    Recruitment to trials is complex and often protracted; selection bias may compromise generalisability. In the mental health field (as elsewhere), diverse factors have been described as hindering researcher access to potential participants and various strategies have been proposed to overcome barriers. However, the extent to which various influences identified in the literature are operational across mental health settings in England has not been systematically examined. A cross-sectional, online survey of clinical studies officers employed by the Mental Health Research Network in England to recruit to trials from National Health Service mental health services. The bespoke questionnaire invited participants to report exposure to specified influences on recruitment, the perceived impact of these on access to potential participants, and to describe additional positive or negative influences on recruitment. Analysis employed descriptive statistics, the framework approach and triangulation of data. Questionnaires were returned by 98 (58%) of 170 clinical studies officers who reported diverse experience. Data demonstrated a disjunction between policy and practice. While the particulars of trial design and various marketing and communication strategies could influence recruitment, consensus was that the culture of NHS mental health services is not conducive to research. Since financial rewards for recruitment paid to Trusts and feedback about studies seldom reaching frontline services, clinicians were described as distanced from research. Facing continual service change and demanding clinical workloads, clinicians generally did not prioritise recruitment activities. Incentives to trial participants had variable impact on access but recruitment could be enhanced by engagement of senior investigators and integrating referral with routine practice. Comprehensive, robust feasibility studies and reciprocity between researchers and clinicians were considered crucial to

  4. Microbicide trials for preventing HIV/AIDS in South Africa: phase II trial partricipants' experiences and psychological needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pistorius, A. G.; van de Wijgert, J. H. H. M.; Sebola, M.; Friedland, B.; Nagel, E.; Bokaba, C.; Hoosen, A. A.

    2004-01-01

    The Microbicide Division of the Department of Medical Microbiology at MEDUNSA, South Africa, recently completed a phase II expanded safety trial of the candidate microbicide Carraguard. A microbicide is a vaginal product that women might use, if proven safe and effective, to protect themselves from

  5. Special Issue on 5G Communications and Experimental Trials with Heterogeneous and Agile Mobile networks

    OpenAIRE

    Sejun Song; KyungHi Chang; Chanho Yoon; Jong‐Moon Chung

    2018-01-01

    5th generation mobile networks, 5G, are the proposed next‐generation communication network standards. In addition to providing more than 1 Gb per second faster speeds, 5G will be a global game changer from technological, economic, societal, and environmental perspectives by integrating multiple networks in diverse sectors for various up to date applications such as the Internet of Things (IoT), device‐to‐device direct communication (D2D), vehicular communications (V2X), and disaster resilient...

  6. Artificial neural network applied to ONB in vertical narrow annulus experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun Guo; Guanghui Su; Dounan Jia; Jiaqiang Wang

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: It is very important to study the onset of nucleate boiling (ONB) in narrow channel. Engineering applications of the narrow channel are used more and more widely. The narrow channel is used in microelectronics. Narrow annular channel is also adopted to design the new type of heat exchanger. The ONB is usually regarded as the point of demarcation between the single-phase flow and two phase flow. So it is significant to study the onset of nucleate boiling in the judgment of the flow pattern and engineering design. Although the researches showed that the ONB in narrow space channel were different from that in common pipe, most of them did not study the bilateral heated effect on the ONB. The ONB was investigated for water flowing in the annular channel which gap is 1.2 mm at the pressure range from 0.10 to 5.0 MPa. The effect of some parameters on the ONB, such as the mass flux, pressure, inlet subcooled temperature, bilateral heating was analyzed. But the experiment has not been carried in great wide range of the pressure and flow flux. So the artificial neural networks were used to predict the ONB at wide range parameter. Recently artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been used widely in the field of reactor thermal-hydraulics because they can solve very complex multivariable and high non-linearity problems. The researchers can pay attention to the output results and be unaware of the inside characters of the networks. Most of them are used to predict the critical heat flux and some other accident problems. In fact some small-scale artificial neural networks can be used in thermal-hydraulic experiments easily. Based on the ONB experimental data, an artificial neural network (BP) is built to specify the ONB. According to a lot of experiments data another middle scale ANN is built to predict the ONB of narrow gap annular channels. The results are compared with other correlations. It was concluded that the power density of ONB in the

  7. CONCERNING THE NETWORKING INTERACTION EXPERIENCE OF TEACHERS AND STUDENTS OF PEDAGOGICAL UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Dmitrieva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research is to identify the possibilities for the formation knowledge and practical skills related to the use of the professional activity of software and network resource of teaching communities in the pedagogical sphere.Methods. The methods involve the analysis of the literary sources, regulatory documents, Internet resources within the researched problem; an analysis of the practical experience of teachers of secondary schools, work of high school teachers and establishment of training teachers on the research problem; the experimental work and monitoring the learning process.Results. The process of teachers’ training inYaroslavl, in particular preparation of students-biologists at theYaroslavlStatePedagogicalUniversityis reflected. Activity of network pedagogical community of Yaroslavl is considered as a platform for network interaction; the analysis of such platform, use of its resources, and also conversations with subject teachers and students have shown that the given electronic and communication resources cause a great interest for practicing teachers and future experts, however, they not always possess necessary knowledge and abilities concerning its operation.Scientific novelty. The author describes in detail the process of forming a competence of networking of professional interaction in terms of its methodological support that is relevant to the educational process, both in the high school, and post-graduate education.Practical significance. The research implementations can be useful while developing specific guidelines to explain the content and methodology of the training network of professional interaction with examples of practicing teachers and students ofPedagogicalUniversity– future teachers of biology.The article is addressed to researchers, dealing with networking, specialists of teaching service centers (institutions of educational development, the practicing subject teachers and teachers of high

  8. The Building Wealth and Health Network: methods and baseline characteristics from a randomized controlled trial for families with young children participating in temporary assistance for needy families (TANF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Sun

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Families with children under age six participating in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program (TANF must participate in work-related activities for 20 h per week. However, due to financial hardship, poor health, and exposure to violence and adversity, families may experience great difficulty in reaching self-sufficiency. The purpose of this report is to describe study design and baseline findings of a trauma-informed financial empowerment and peer support intervention meant to mitigate these hardships. Methods We conducted a randomized controlled trial of a 28-week intervention called Building Wealth and Health Network to improve financial security and maternal and child health among caregivers participating in TANF. Participants, recruited from County Assistance offices in Philadelphia, PA, were randomized into two intervention groups (partial and full and one control group. Participants completed questionnaires at baseline to assess career readiness, economic hardship, health and wellbeing, exposure to adversity and violence, and interaction with criminal justice systems. Results Baseline characteristics demonstrate that among 103 participants, there were no significant differences by group. Mean age of participants was 25 years, and youngest child was 30 months. The majority of participants were women (94.2 %, never married (83.5 %, unemployed (94.2 %, and without a bank account (66.0 %. Many reported economic hardship (32.0 % very low household food secure, 65.0 % housing insecure, and 31.1 % severe energy insecure, and depression (57.3 %. Exposure to adversity was prevalent, where 38.8 % reported four or more Adverse Childhood Experiences including abuse, neglect and household dysfunction. In terms of community violence, 64.7 % saw a seriously wounded person after an incident of violence, and 27.2 % had seen someone killed. Finally, 14.6 % spent time in an adult correctional institution, and 48

  9. Building a Governance Strategy for CER: The Patient Outcomes Research to Advance Learning (PORTAL) Network Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolino, Andrea R; McGlynn, Elizabeth A; Lieu, Tracy; Nelson, Andrew F; Prausnitz, Stephanie; Horberg, Michael A; Arterburn, David E; Gould, Michael K; Laws, Reesa L; Steiner, John F

    2016-01-01

    for adaptation by other networks. As a result of identifying project-based governance priorities (IRB approval, subcontracting, selection of new research including lead PI and participating sites, and authorship) and data governance priorities (reciprocal data use agreement, analytic plan procedures, and other tools for data governance), PORTAL established most of its governance structure by Month 6 of the 18 month project. This allowed science to progress and collaborators to experience first-hand how the structures and procedures functioned in the remaining 12 months of the project, leaving ample time to refine them and to develop new structures or processes as necessary. The use of procedures and processes with which participating investigators and their home institutions were already familiar allowed project and regulatory requirements to be established quickly to protect patients, their data, and the health care systems that act as stewards for both. As the project progressed, PORTAL was able to test and adjust the structures it put place, and to make substantive revisions by Month 17. As a result, priority processes have been predictable, transparent and effective. Strong governance practices are a stewardship responsibility of research networks to justify the trust of patients, health plan members, health care delivery organizations, and other stakeholders. Well-planned governance can reduce the time necessary to initiate the scientific activities of a network, a particular concern when the time frame to complete research is short. Effective network and data governance structures protect patient and institutional data as well as the interests of investigators and their institutions, and assures that the network has built an environment to meet the goals of the research.

  10. Detailed review and analysis of complex radiotherapy clinical trial planning data: Evaluation and initial experience with the SWAN software system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, Martin A.; Haworth, Annette; Kearvell, Rachel; Hooton, Ben; Coleman, Rhonda; Spry, Nigel; Bydder, Sean; Joseph, David

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Contemporary radiotherapy clinical trials typically require complex three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning. This produces large amounts of data relating technique and dose delivery for correlation with patient outcomes. Assessment of the quality of this information is required to ensure protocol compliance, to quantify the variation in treatments given to patients and to enhance the power of studies to determine correlates of patient outcomes. Materials and methods: A software system ('SWAN') was developed to facilitate the objective analysis, quality-assurance and review of digital treatment planning data from multi-centre radiotherapy trials. The utility of this system was assessed on the basis of its functionality and our experience of its use in the context of multi-centre clinical trials and trials-support activities. Results: The SWAN system has been shown to have the functionality required for use in several multi-centre trials, including automated review and archive processes. Approximately 800 treatment plans from over 30 participating institutions have so far been assessed with the system for several treatment planning scenarios. To illustrate this we include a description of the use of the system for a large-recruitment prostate radiotherapy trial being undertaken in Australasia, including examples of how the review process has changed clinical practice. Conclusion: The successful implementation of SWAN has been demonstrated in a number of clinical trials. The software provides an opportunity for comprehensive review of treatment parameters that could impact on clinical outcomes and trial results. Such quality-assurance (QA) has previously been difficult or impossible to achieve, particularly for a clinical trial involving large numbers of patients. Such reviews have highlighted inconsistencies in clinical practice that have since been addressed through feedback from the review process. The process of data collection and review should be

  11. Nonintrusive Method Based on Neural Networks for Video Quality of Experience Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego José Luis Botia Valderrama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The measurement and evaluation of the QoE (Quality of Experience have become one of the main focuses in the telecommunications to provide services with the expected quality for their users. However, factors like the network parameters and codification can affect the quality of video, limiting the correlation between the objective and subjective metrics. The above increases the complexity to evaluate the real quality of video perceived by users. In this paper, a model based on artificial neural networks such as BPNNs (Backpropagation Neural Networks and the RNNs (Random Neural Networks is applied to evaluate the subjective quality metrics MOS (Mean Opinion Score and the PSNR (Peak Signal Noise Ratio, SSIM (Structural Similarity Index Metric, VQM (Video Quality Metric, and QIBF (Quality Index Based Frame. The proposed model allows establishing the QoS (Quality of Service based in the strategy Diffserv. The metrics were analyzed through Pearson’s and Spearman’s correlation coefficients, RMSE (Root Mean Square Error, and outliers rate. Correlation values greater than 90% were obtained for all the evaluated metrics.

  12. Refrigerant flow through electronic expansion valve: Experiment and neural network modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Xiang; Li, Ze-Yu; Shao, Liang-Liang; Zhang, Chun-Lu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Experimental data from different sources were used in comparison of EEV models. • Artificial neural network in EEV modeling is superior to literature correlations. • Artificial neural network with 4-4-1 structure and S function is recommended. • Artificial neural network is flexible for EEV mass flow rate and opening prediction. - Abstract: Electronic expansion valve (EEV) plays a crucial role in controlling refrigerant mass flow rate of refrigeration or heat pump systems for energy savings. However, complexities in two-phase throttling process and geometry make accurate modeling of EEV flow characteristics more difficult. This paper developed an artificial neural network (ANN) model using refrigerant inlet and outlet pressures, inlet subcooling, EEV opening as ANN inputs, refrigerant mass flow rate as ANN output. Both linear and nonlinear transfer functions in hidden layer were used and compared to each other. Experimental data from multiple sources including in-house experiments of one EEV with R410A were used for ANN training and test. In addition, literature correlations were compared with ANN as well. Results showed that the ANN model with nonlinear transfer function worked well in all cases and it is much accurate than the literature correlations. In all cases, nonlinear ANN predicted refrigerant mass flow rates within ±0.4% average relative deviation (A.D.) and 2.7% standard deviation (S.D.), meanwhile it predicted the EEV opening at 0.1% A.D. and 2.1% S.D.

  13. Additive Routes to Action Learning: Layering Experience Shapes Engagement of the Action Observation Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Louise P; Cross, Emily S

    2015-12-01

    The way in which we perceive others in action is biased by one's prior experience with an observed action. For example, we can have auditory, visual, or motor experience with actions we observe others perform. How action experience via 1, 2, or all 3 of these modalities shapes action perception remains unclear. Here, we combine pre- and post-training functional magnetic resonance imaging measures with a dance training manipulation to address how building experience (from auditory to audiovisual to audiovisual plus motor) with a complex action shapes subsequent action perception. Results indicate that layering experience across these 3 modalities activates a number of sensorimotor cortical regions associated with the action observation network (AON) in such a way that the more modalities through which one experiences an action, the greater the response is within these AON regions during action perception. Moreover, a correlation between left premotor activity and participants' scores for reproducing an action suggests that the better an observer can perform an observed action, the stronger the neural response is. The findings suggest that the number of modalities through which an observer experiences an action impacts AON activity additively, and that premotor cortical activity might serve as an index of embodiment during action observation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  14. Forensic age estimation in anti-piracy trials in Seychelles: Experiences and challenges faced.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardena, S A; Liyanage, U A; Weeratna, J B; Mendis, N D N A; Perera, H J M; Jayasekara, R W; Fernando, R

    2017-01-01

    Forensic age estimation (FAE) was conducted using a multifactorial method on thirteen Somali detainees claiming juvenile status during the anti-piracy trials of the Seychelles Supreme Court in 2014/2015. A multidisciplinary team, comprising of four of the authors covering specialties in forensic medicine, forensic odontology and radiology, conducted the FAE using a five-stage protocol. Each detainee was interviewed with an interpreter and examined for disorders affecting dental/skeletal development and for assessment of genital development through Tanner staging. Dental maturity was assessed clinically and radiologically. Eruption stage was assessed using Olze et al. and mandibular third-molar maturity was assessed using Demirjian's classification. Skeletal maturity was assessed from hand-wrist X-rays according to Greulich & Pyle and from CT-clavicle according to Kellinghaus et al. and Schultz et al. Interpretation of findings was done using reference population data from similar ethnic and social backgrounds wherever possible. Final age-ranges were calculated by combining dental and clavicle maturity stages using the regression formula developed by Bassed et al. followed by a 10% correction factor. The team later testified on their findings under cross-examination. The protocol adopted by the authors increased the scientific validity of the findings and was useful in addressing cross-examination queries on exclusion of developmental disorders, ethnic/socioeconomic variability and maintaining chain of custody. Unforeseen jurisdictional and practical limitations were experienced but did not affect the outcome. Combining dental and clavicle developmental data provided the court with a much clearer picture on the likelihood of the detainees' juvenile status which emphasizes the importance of conducting more population studies using combinations of different developmental sites. The authors note that available reference data is mostly from affluent populations whereas

  15. A neural network device for on-line particle identification in cosmic ray experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scrimaglio, R.; Finetti, N.; D'Altorio, L.; Rantucci, E.; Raso, M.; Segreto, E.; Tassoni, A.; Cardarilli, G.C.

    2004-01-01

    On-line particle identification is one of the main goals of many experiments in space both for rare event studies and for optimizing measurements along the orbital trajectory. Neural networks can be a useful tool for signal processing and real time data analysis in such experiments. In this document we report on the performances of a programmable neural device which was developed in VLSI analog/digital technology. Neurons and synapses were accomplished by making use of Operational Transconductance Amplifier (OTA) structures. In this paper we report on the results of measurements performed in order to verify the agreement of the characteristic curves of each elementary cell with simulations and on the device performances obtained by implementing simple neural structures on the VLSI chip. A feed-forward neural network (Multi-Layer Perceptron, MLP) was implemented on the VLSI chip and trained to identify particles by processing the signals of two-dimensional position-sensitive Si detectors. The radiation monitoring device consisted of three double-sided silicon strip detectors. From the analysis of a set of simulated data it was found that the MLP implemented on the neural device gave results comparable with those obtained with the standard method of analysis confirming that the implemented neural network could be employed for real time particle identification

  16. Functional connectivity in task-negative network of the Deaf: effects of sign language experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evie Malaia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Prior studies investigating cortical processing in Deaf signers suggest that life-long experience with sign language and/or auditory deprivation may alter the brain’s anatomical structure and the function of brain regions typically recruited for auditory processing (Emmorey et al., 2010; Pénicaud et al., 2013 inter alia. We report the first investigation of the task-negative network in Deaf signers and its functional connectivity—the temporal correlations among spatially remote neurophysiological events. We show that Deaf signers manifest increased functional connectivity between posterior cingulate/precuneus and left medial temporal gyrus (MTG, but also inferior parietal lobe and medial temporal gyrus in the right hemisphere- areas that have been found to show functional recruitment specifically during sign language processing. These findings suggest that the organization of the brain at the level of inter-network connectivity is likely affected by experience with processing visual language, although sensory deprivation could be another source of the difference. We hypothesize that connectivity alterations in the task negative network reflect predictive/automatized processing of the visual signal.

  17. The national drug abuse treatment clinical trials network data share project: website design, usage, challenges, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmueli-Blumberg, Dikla; Hu, Lian; Allen, Colleen; Frasketi, Michael; Wu, Li-Tzy; Vanveldhuisen, Paul

    2013-01-01

    There are many benefits of data sharing, including the promotion of new research from effective use of existing data, replication of findings through re-analysis of pooled data files, meta-analysis using individual patient data, and reinforcement of open scientific inquiry. A randomized controlled trial is considered as the 'gold standard' for establishing treatment effectiveness, but clinical trial research is very costly, and sharing data is an opportunity to expand the investment of the clinical trial beyond its original goals at minimal costs. We describe the goals, developments, and usage of the Data Share website (http://www.ctndatashare.org) for the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN) in the United States, including lessons learned, limitations, and major revisions, and considerations for future directions to improve data sharing. Data management and programming procedures were conducted to produce uniform and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)-compliant de-identified research data files from the completed trials of the CTN for archiving, managing, and sharing on the Data Share website. Since its inception in 2006 and through October 2012, nearly 1700 downloads from 27 clinical trials have been accessed from the Data Share website, with the use increasing over the years. Individuals from 31 countries have downloaded data from the website, and there have been at least 13 publications derived from analyzing data through the public Data Share website. Minimal control over data requests and usage has resulted in little information and lack of control regarding how the data from the website are used. Lack of uniformity in data elements collected across CTN trials has limited cross-study analyses. The Data Share website offers researchers easy access to de-identified data files with the goal to promote additional research and identify new findings from completed CTN studies. To maximize the utility of the website

  18. "Open mesh" or "strictly selected population" recruitment? The experience of the randomized controlled MeMeMe trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cortellini M

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mauro Cortellini, Franco Berrino, Patrizia Pasanisi Department of Preventive & Predictive Medicine, Foundation IRCCS National Cancer Institute of Milan, Milan, Italy Abstract: Among randomized controlled trials (RCTs, trials for primary prevention require large samples and long follow-up to obtain a high-quality outcome; therefore the recruitment process and the drop-out rates largely dictate the adequacy of the results. We are conducting a Phase III trial on persons with metabolic syndrome to test the hypothesis that comprehensive lifestyle changes and/or metformin treatment prevents age-related chronic diseases (the MeMeMe trial, EudraCT number: 2012-005427-32, also registered on ClinicalTrials.gov [NCT02960711]. Here, we briefly analyze and discuss the reasons which may lead to participants dropping out from trials. In our experience, participants may back out of a trial for different reasons. Drug-induced side effects are certainly the most compelling reason. But what are the other reasons, relating to the participants’ perception of the progress of the trial which led them to withdraw after randomization? What about the time-dependent drop-out rate in primary prevention trials? The primary outcome of this analysis is the point of drop-out from trial, defined as the time from the randomization date to the withdrawal date. Survival functions were non-parametrically estimated using the product-limit estimator. The curves were statistically compared using the log-rank test (P=0.64, not significant. Researchers involved in primary prevention RCTs seem to have to deal with the paradox of the proverbial “short blanket syndrome”. Recruiting only highly motivated candidates might be useful for the smooth progress of the trial but it may lead to a very low enrollment rate. On the other hand, what about enrolling all the eligible subjects without considering their motivation? This might boost the enrollment rate, but it can lead to biased

  19. "Open mesh" or "strictly selected population" recruitment? The experience of the randomized controlled MeMeMe trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortellini, Mauro; Berrino, Franco; Pasanisi, Patrizia

    2017-01-01

    Among randomized controlled trials (RCTs), trials for primary prevention require large samples and long follow-up to obtain a high-quality outcome; therefore the recruitment process and the drop-out rates largely dictate the adequacy of the results. We are conducting a Phase III trial on persons with metabolic syndrome to test the hypothesis that comprehensive lifestyle changes and/or metformin treatment prevents age-related chronic diseases (the MeMeMe trial, EudraCT number: 2012-005427-32, also registered on ClinicalTrials.gov [NCT02960711]). Here, we briefly analyze and discuss the reasons which may lead to participants dropping out from trials. In our experience, participants may back out of a trial for different reasons. Drug-induced side effects are certainly the most compelling reason. But what are the other reasons, relating to the participants' perception of the progress of the trial which led them to withdraw after randomization? What about the time-dependent drop-out rate in primary prevention trials? The primary outcome of this analysis is the point of drop-out from trial, defined as the time from the randomization date to the withdrawal date. Survival functions were non-parametrically estimated using the product-limit estimator. The curves were statistically compared using the log-rank test ( P =0.64, not significant). Researchers involved in primary prevention RCTs seem to have to deal with the paradox of the proverbial "short blanket syndrome". Recruiting only highly motivated candidates might be useful for the smooth progress of the trial but it may lead to a very low enrollment rate. On the other hand, what about enrolling all the eligible subjects without considering their motivation? This might boost the enrollment rate, but it can lead to biased results on account of large proportions of drop-outs. Our experience suggests that participants do not change their mind depending on the allocation group (intervention or control). There is no single

  20. Networked Memory Project: A Policy Thought Experiment for the Archiving of Social Networks by the Library of Congress of the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloé S. Georas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the challenges posed by an archival interest in the broad palimpsest of daily life left on social networks that are controlled by private corporations. It addresses whether social networks should be archived for the benefit of future generations and proposes a policy thought experiment to help grapple with these questions, namely, the proposal for the formation of the public interest-oriented Networked Memory Project by the Library of Congress for the archiving of social networks. My discussion of the challenges posed by this thought experiment will focus on the U.S. legal framework within which the Library of Congress operates and take Facebook. To the extent that social networks have user-generated contents that range from the highly “private” to “public” as opposed to other networked platforms that contain materials that are considered “public”, the bar for the historical archival of social networks is much higher. Almost every archival effort must contend with the legal hurdle of copyright, but the archiving of social networks must also address how to handle the potentially sensitive nature of materials that are considered “private” from the perspective of the social and legal constructions of privacy. My theoretical exercise of proposing the formation of the Networked Memory Project by the Library of Congress responds to the need to consider the benefits of a public interest-oriented archive of social networks that can counter the drawbacks of the incidental corporate archiving taking place on social networks.

  1. Preliminary - discrete fracture network modelling of tracer migration experiments at the SCV site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dershowitz, W.S.; Wallmann, P.; Geier, J.E.; Lee, G.

    1991-09-01

    This report describes a numerical modelling study of solute transport within the Site Characterization and Validation (SCV) block at the Stripa site. The study was carried out with the FracMan/MAFIC package, utilizing statistics from stages 3 and 4 of the Stripa phase 3 Site Characterization and Validation project. Simulations were carried out to calibrate fracture solute transport properties against observations in the first stage of saline injection radar experiments. These results were then used to predict the performance of planned tracer experiments, using both particle tracking network solute transport, and pathways analysis approaches. Simulations were also carried out to predict results of the second stage of saline injection radar experiments. (au) (34 refs.)

  2. Multistatic Wireless Fidelity Network Based Radar – Results of the Chrcynno Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rzewuski

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the theory and experimental result of passive radar using WIFI transmitters as illuminators of opportunity. As a result of experiments conducted on 17th August 2013 at airfield Chrcynno a Cessna C208 airplane was detected and tracked using multistatic passive radar system based on low power signal from WIFI network nodes, which were acting as non cooperative illuminators of opportunity. In the experiment 3 wireless access points were communicating with each other and illuminating the radar scene (airfield. The direct reference and reflected (surveillance signals have been acquired and processed using specially developed algorithm presented in the paper. After signal processing using Passive Coherent Location methods target has been detected. This paper describes in details the algorithms and the results of the experiment for the multistatic passive radar based on the WIFI signal.

  3. EDITORIAL Wireless sensor networks: design for real-life deployment and deployment experiences Wireless sensor networks: design for real-life deployment and deployment experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaura, Elena; Roedig, Utz; Brusey, James

    2010-12-01

    modalities and (iv) system solutions with high end-user added value and cost benefits. The common thread is deployment and deployment evaluation. In particular, satisfaction of application requirements, involvement of the end-user in the design and deployment process, satisfactory system performance and user acceptance are concerns addressed in many of the contributions. The contributions form a valuable set, which help to identify the priorities for research in this burgeoning area: Robust, reliable and efficient data collection in embedded wireless multi-hop networks are essential elements in creating a true deploy-and-forget user experience. Maintaining full connectivity within a WSN, in a real world environment populated by other WSNs, WiFi networks or Bluetooth devices that constitute sources of interference is a key element in any application, but more so for those that are safety-critical, such as disaster response. Awareness of the effects of wireless channel, physical position and line-of-sight on received signal strength in real-world, outdoor environments will shape the design of many outdoor applications. Thus, the quantification of such effects is valuable knowledge for designers. Sensors' failure detection, scalability and commercialization are common challenges in many long-term monitoring applications; transferable solutions are evidenced here in the context of pollutant detection and water quality. Innovative, alternative thinking is often needed to achieve the desired long-lived networks when power-hungry sensors are foreseen components; in some instances, the very problems of wireless technology, such as RF irregularity, can be transformed into advantages. The importance of an iterative design and evaluation methodology—from analysis to simulation to real-life deployment—should be well understood by all WSN developers. The value of this is highlighted in the context of a challenging WPAN video-surveillance application based on a novel Nomadic Access

  4. A Web-Based, Social Networking Physical Activity Intervention for Insufficiently Active Adults Delivered via Facebook App: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Carol; Ferguson, Monika; Vandelanotte, Corneel; Plotnikoff, Ron; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Thomas, Samantha; Nelson-Field, Karen; Olds, Tim

    2015-07-13

    Online social networks offer considerable potential for delivery of socially influential health behavior change interventions. To determine the efficacy, engagement, and feasibility of an online social networking physical activity intervention with pedometers delivered via Facebook app. A total of 110 adults with a mean age of 35.6 years (SD 12.4) were recruited online in teams of 3 to 8 friends. Teams were randomly allocated to receive access to a 50-day online social networking physical activity intervention which included self-monitoring, social elements, and pedometers ("Active Team" Facebook app; n=51 individuals, 12 teams) or a wait-listed control condition (n=59 individuals, 13 teams). Assessments were undertaken online at baseline, 8 weeks, and 20 weeks. The primary outcome measure was self-reported weekly moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Secondary outcomes were weekly walking, vigorous physical activity time, moderate physical activity time, overall quality of life, and mental health quality of life. Analyses were undertaken using random-effects mixed modeling, accounting for potential clustering at the team level. Usage statistics were reported descriptively to determine engagement and feasibility. At the 8-week follow-up, the intervention participants had significantly increased their total weekly MVPA by 135 minutes relative to the control group (P=.03), due primarily to increases in walking time (155 min/week increase relative to controls, Plife or mental health quality of life at either time point. High levels of engagement with the intervention, and particularly the self-monitoring features, were observed. An online, social networking physical activity intervention with pedometers can produce sizable short-term physical activity changes. Future work is needed to determine how to maintain behavior change in the longer term, how to reach at-need populations, and how to disseminate such interventions on a mass scale. Australian New Zealand

  5. Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Fornaro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mental Retardation (MR is a developmental disability characterized by impairments in adaptive daily life skills and difficulties in social and interpersonal functioning. Since multiple causes may contribute to MR, associated clinical pictures may vary accordingly. Nevertheless, when psychiatric disorders as Treatment Resistant Depression (TRD and/or alcohol abuse co-exist, their proper detection and management is often troublesome, essentially due to a limited vocabulary MR people could use to describe their symptoms, feelings and concerns, and the lack of reliable screening tools. Furthermore, MR people are among the most medicated subjects, with (over prescription of antidepressants and/or typical antipsychotics being the rule rather than exception. Thus, treatment resistance or even worsening of depression, constitute frequent occurrences. This report describes the case of a person with MR who failed to respond to repetitive trials of antidepressant monotherapies, finally recovering using aripiprazole to fluvoxamine augmentation upon consideration of a putative bipolar diathesis for “agitated” TRD. Although further controlled investigations are needed to assess a putative bipolar diathesis in some cases of MR associated to TRD, prudence is advised in the long-term prescription of antidepressant monotherapies in such conditions.

  6. Methodological issues for designing and conducting a multicenter, international clinical trial in Acute Stroke: Experience from ARTSS-2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbar, Mohammad H; Dickerson, Aisha S; Cai, Chunyan; Pedroza, Claudia; Hessabi, Manouchehr; Shen, Loren; Pandurengan, Renganayaki; Jacobs, Amber Nicole M; Indupuru, Hari; Sline, Melvin R; Delgado, Rigoberto I; Macdonald, Claire; Ford, Gary A; Grotta, James C; Barreto, Andrew D

    2015-09-01

    We describe innovations in the study design and the efficient data coordination of a randomized multicenter trial of Argatroban in Combination with Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Acute Stroke (ARTSS-2). ARTSS-2 is a 3-arm, multisite/multiregional randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of two doses of Argatroban injection (low, high) in combination with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) in acute ischemic stroke patients and rt-PA alone. We developed a covariate adaptive randomization program that balanced the study arms with respect to study site as well as hemorrhage after thrombolysis (HAT) score and presence of distal internal carotid artery occlusion (DICAO). We used simulation studies to validate performance of the randomization program before making any adaptations during the trial. For the first 90 patients enrolled in ARTSS-2, we evaluated performance of our randomization program using chi-square tests of homogeneity or extended Fisher's exact test. We also designed a four-step partly Bayesian safety stopping rule for low and high dose Argatroban arms. Homogeneity of the study arms was confirmed with respect to distribution of study site (UK sites vs. US sites, P=0.98), HAT score (0-2 vs. 3-5, P=1.0), and DICAO (N/A vs. No vs. Yes, P=0.97). Our stopping thresholds for safety of low and high dose Argatroban were not crossed. Despite challenges, data quality was assured. We recommend adaptive designs for randomization and Bayesian safety stopping rules for multisite Phase I/II RCTs for maintaining additional flexibility. Efficient data coordination could lead to improved data quality. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Acupuncture-Related Techniques for Psoriasis: A Systematic Review with Pairwise and Network Meta-Analyses of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Mei-Ling; Ko, Shu-Hua; Wang, Mei-Hua; Chi, Ching-Chi; Chung, Yu-Chu

    2017-12-01

    There has be a large body of evidence on the pharmacological treatments for psoriasis, but whether nonpharmacological interventions are effective in managing psoriasis remains largely unclear. This systematic review conducted pairwise and network meta-analyses to determine the effects of acupuncture-related techniques on acupoint stimulation for the treatment of psoriasis and to determine the order of effectiveness of these remedies. This study searched the following databases from inception to March 15, 2016: Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EBSCO (including Academic Search Premier, American Doctoral Dissertations, and CINAHL), Airiti Library, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effects of acupuncture-related techniques on acupoint stimulation as intervention for psoriasis were independently reviewed by two researchers. A total of 13 RCTs with 1,060 participants were included. The methodological quality of included studies was not rigorous. Acupoint stimulation, compared with nonacupoint stimulation, had a significant treatment for psoriasis. However, the most common adverse events were thirst and dry mouth. Subgroup analysis was further done to confirm that the short-term treatment effect was superior to that of the long-term effect in treating psoriasis. Network meta-analysis identified acupressure or acupoint catgut embedding, compared with medication, and had a significant effect for improving psoriasis. It was noted that acupressure was the most effective treatment. Acupuncture-related techniques could be considered as an alternative or adjuvant therapy for psoriasis in short term, especially of acupressure and acupoint catgut embedding. This study recommends further well-designed, methodologically rigorous, and more head-to-head randomized trials to explore the effects of acupuncture-related techniques for treating psoriasis.

  8. Identification of Jets Containing b-Hadrons with Recurrent Neural Networks at the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    A novel b-jet identification algorithm is constructed with a Recurrent Neural Network (RNN) at the ATLAS Experiment. This talk presents the expected performance of the RNN based b-tagging in simulated $t \\bar t$ events. The RNN based b-tagging processes properties of tracks associated to jets which are represented in sequences. In contrast to traditional impact-parameter-based b-tagging algorithms which assume the tracks of jets are independent from each other, RNN based b-tagging can exploit the spatial and kinematic correlations of tracks which are initiated from the same b-hadrons. The neural network nature of the tagging algorithm also allows the flexibility of extending input features to include more track properties than can be effectively used in traditional algorithms.

  9. Extensive video-game experience alters cortical networks for complex visuomotor transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granek, Joshua A; Gorbet, Diana J; Sergio, Lauren E

    2010-10-01

    Using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we examined the effect of video-game experience on the neural control of increasingly complex visuomotor tasks. Previously, skilled individuals have demonstrated the use of a more efficient movement control brain network, including the prefrontal, premotor, primary sensorimotor and parietal cortices. Our results extend and generalize this finding by documenting additional prefrontal cortex activity in experienced video gamers planning for complex eye-hand coordination tasks that are distinct from actual video-game play. These changes in activation between non-gamers and extensive gamers are putatively related to the increased online control and spatial attention required for complex visually guided reaching. These data suggest that the basic cortical network for processing complex visually guided reaching is altered by extensive video-game play. Crown Copyright © 2009. Published by Elsevier Srl. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular Correlates of Cortical Network Modulation by Long-Term Sensory Experience in the Adult Rat Barrel Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallès, Astrid; Granic, Ivica; De Weerd, Peter; Martens, Gerard J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of cortical network connectivity is crucial for an adaptive response to experience. In the rat barrel cortex, long-term sensory stimulation induces cortical network modifications and neuronal response changes of which the molecular basis is unknown. Here, we show that long-term somatosensory stimulation by enriched environment…

  11. Immune-directed therapy for type 1 diabetes at the clinical level: the Immune Tolerance Network (ITN) experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Mario R; Nepom, Gerald T

    2012-01-01

    Reestablishing immune tolerance in type 1 diabetes (T1D), a chronic autoimmune disease, is a major goal. The Immune Tolerance Network (ITN) has initiated eight clinical trials of immunomodulatory therapies in recent-onset T1D over the past decade. Results have been mixed in terms of clinical efficacy, but the studies have provided valuable mechanistic insight that are enhancing our understanding of the disease and guiding the design of future trials. Trials of non-Fc-binding anti-CD3 mAbs have revealed that modulation of this target leads to partial responses, and ITN's AbATE trial led to identification of a robust responder group that could be distinguished from non-responders by baseline metabolic and immunologic features. A pilot study of the combination of IL-2 and rapamycin gave the first demonstration that frequency and function of regulatory T cells (Tregs) can be enhanced in T1D subjects, although the therapy triggered the activation of effectors with transient β-cell dysfunction. Similarly, therapy with anti-thymocyte globulin led to substantial lymphocyte depletion, but also to the activation of the acute-phase response with no clinical benefit during preliminary analyses. These and other results provide mechanistic tools that can be used as biomarkers for safety and efficacy in future trials. Furthermore, our results, together with those of other organizations, notably TrialNet, delineate the roles of the major components of the immune response in T1D. This information is setting the stage for future combination therapy trials. The development of disease-relevant biomarkers will also enable the implementation of innovative trial designs, notably adaptive trials, which will increase efficiencies in terms of study duration and sample size, and which will expedite the conduct of trials in which there are uncertainties about dose response and effect size.

  12. Recruiting South Asians to a lifestyle intervention trial: experiences and lessons from PODOSA (Prevention of Diabetes & Obesity in South Asians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuomilehto Jaakko

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the growing emphasis on the inclusion of ethnic minority patients in research, there is little published on the recruitment of these populations especially to randomised, community based, lifestyle intervention trials in the UK. Methods We share our experience of recruitment to screening in the PODOSA (Prevention of Diabetes and Obesity in South Asians trial, which screened 1319 recruits (target 1800 for trial eligibility. A multi-pronged recruitment approach was used. Enrolment via the National Health Service included direct referrals from health care professionals and written invitations via general practices. Recruitment within the community was carried out by both the research team and through our partnerships with local South Asian groups and organisations. Participants were encouraged to refer friends and family throughout the recruitment period. Results Health care professionals referred only 55 potential participants. The response to written invitations via general practitioners was 5.2%, lower than reported in other general populations. Community orientated, personal approaches for recruitment were comparatively effective yielding 1728 referrals (82% to the screening stage. Conclusions The PODOSA experience shows that a community orientated, personal approach for recruiting South Asian ethnic minority populations can be successful in a trial setting. We recommend that consideration is given to cover recruitment costs associated with community engagement and other personalised approaches. Researchers should consider prioritising approaches that minimise interference with professionals' work and, particularly in the current economic climate, keep costs to a minimum. The lessons learned in PODOSA should contribute to future community based trials in South Asians. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN25729565

  13. Healthy Foundations Study: a randomised controlled trial to evaluate biological embedding of early-life experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Andrea; Catherine, Nicole; Boyle, Michael; Jack, Susan M; Atkinson, Leslie; Kobor, Michael; Sheehan, Debbie; Tonmyr, Lil; Waddell, Charlotte; MacMillan, Harriet L

    2018-01-26

    Adverse early experiences are associated with long-lasting disruptions in physiology, development and health. These experiences may be 'biologically embedded' into molecular and genomic systems that determine later expressions of vulnerability. Most studies to date have not examined whether preventive interventions can potentially reverse biological embedding. The Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) is an evidence-based intervention with demonstrated efficacy in improving prenatal health, parenting and child functioning. The Healthy Foundations Study is an innovative birth cohort which will evaluate the impact of the NFP on biological outcomes of mothers and their infants. Starting in 2013, up to 400 pregnant mothers and their newborns were recruited from the British Columbia Healthy Connections Project-a randomised controlled trial of the NFP, and will be followed to child aged 2 years. Women were recruited prior to 28 weeks' gestation and then individually randomised to receive existing services (comparison group) or NFP plus existing services (intervention group). Hair samples are collected from mothers at baseline and 2 months post partum to measure physiological stress. Saliva samples are collected from infants during all visits for analyses of stress and immune function. Buccal swabs are collected from infants at 2 and 24 months to assess DNA methylation. Biological samples will be related to child outcome measures at age 2 years. The study received ethical approval from seven research ethics boards. Findings from this study will be shared broadly with the research community through peer-reviewed publications, and conference presentations, as well as seminars with our policy partners and relevant healthcare providers. The outcomes of this study will provide all stakeholders with important information regarding how early adversity may lead to health and behavioural disparities and how these may be altered through early interventions. NCT01672060; Pre-results.

  14. The Brain on Art: Intense Aesthetic Experience Activates the Default Mode Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward A Vessel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetic responses to visual art comprise multiple types of experiences, from sensation and perception to emotion and self-reflection. Moreover, aesthetic experience is highly individual, with observers varying significantly in their responses to the same artwork. Combining fMRI and behavioral analysis of individual differences in aesthetic response, we identify two distinct patterns of neural activity exhibited by different subnetworks. Activity increased linearly with observers’ ratings (4-level scale in sensory (occipito-temporal regions. Activity in the striatum also varied linearly with ratings, with below-baseline activations for low-rated artworks. In contrast, a network of frontal regions showed a step-like increase only for the most moving artworks (4 ratings and non-differential activity for all others. This included several regions belonging to the default mode network previously associated with self-referential mentation. Our results suggest that aesthetic experience involves the integration of sensory and emotional reactions in a manner linked with their personal relevance.

  15. Network meta-analysis of randomized trials in multiple myeloma: efficacy and safety in relapsed/refractory patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, Cirino; Ciliberto, Domenico; Rossi, Marco; Staropoli, Nicoletta; Cucè, Maria; Galeano, Teresa; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco

    2017-02-28

    Despite major therapeutic advancements, multiple myeloma (MM) is still incurable and relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM) remains a challenge; the rational choice of the most appropriate regimen in this setting is currently undefined. We performed a systematic review and 2 standard pairwise meta-analyses to evaluate the efficacy of regimens that have been directly compared with bortezomib or immunomodulatory imide drugs (IMiDs) in head-to-head clinical trials and a network meta-analysis (NMA) to determine the relevance of each regimen on the basis of all the available direct and indirect evidence. Sixteen trials were included in the pairwise meta-analyses, and 18 trials were included in the NMA. Pairwise meta-analyses showed that a 3-drug regimen (bortezomib- or IMiD-based) was superior to a 2-drug regimen in progression-free-survival (PFS) and overall response rate (ORR). NMA showed that an IMiD backbone associated with anti-MM monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) (preferably) or proteasome inhibitors had the highest probability of being the most effective regimen with the lowest toxicity. The combination of daratumumab, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone ranked as the first regimen in terms of activity, efficacy, and tolerability according to the average value between surface under the cumulative ranking curve of PFS, overall survival, ORR, complete response rate, and safety. This is the first NMA comparing all currently available regimens evaluated in published randomized trials for the treatment of RRMM, but our results need to be interpreted taking into account differences in their patient populations. Our analysis suggests that IMiDs plus new anti-MM mAb-containing regimens are the most active therapeutic option in RRMM.

  16. Fluctuations of Attentional Networks and Default Mode Network during the Resting State Reflect Variations in Cognitive States: Evidence from a Novel Resting-state Experience Sampling Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Calster, Laurens; D'Argembeau, Arnaud; Salmon, Eric; Peters, Frédéric; Majerus, Steve

    2017-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have revealed the recruitment of a range of neural networks during the resting state, which might reflect a variety of cognitive experiences and processes occurring in an individual's mind. In this study, we focused on the default mode network (DMN) and attentional networks and investigated their association with distinct mental states when participants are not performing an explicit task. To investigate the range of possible cognitive experiences more directly, this study proposes a novel method of resting-state fMRI experience sampling, informed by a phenomenological investigation of the fluctuation of mental states during the resting state. We hypothesized that DMN activity would increase as a function of internal mentation and that the activity of dorsal and ventral networks would indicate states of top-down versus bottom-up attention at rest. Results showed that dorsal attention network activity fluctuated as a function of subjective reports of attentional control, providing evidence that activity of this network reflects the perceived recruitment of controlled attentional processes during spontaneous cognition. Activity of the DMN increased when participants reported to be in a subjective state of internal mentation, but not when they reported to be in a state of perception. This study provides direct evidence for a link between fluctuations of resting-state neural activity and fluctuations in specific cognitive processes.

  17. Applying Bayesian neural networks to event reconstruction in reactor neutrino experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Ye; Xu Weiwei; Meng Yixiong; Zhu Kaien; Xu Wei

    2008-01-01

    A toy detector has been designed to simulate central detectors in reactor neutrino experiments in the paper. The electron samples from the Monte-Carlo simulation of the toy detector have been reconstructed by the method of Bayesian neural networks (BNNs) and the standard algorithm, a maximum likelihood method (MLD), respectively. The result of the event reconstruction using BNN has been compared with the one using MLD. Compared to MLD, the uncertainties of the electron vertex are not improved, but the energy resolutions are significantly improved using BNN. And the improvement is more obvious for the high energy electrons than the low energy ones

  18. Incentive regulation of electricity distribution networks: Lessons of experience from Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamasb, Tooraj; Pollitt, Michael

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent experience of the UK electricity distribution sector under incentive regulation. The UK has a significant and transparent history in implementing incentive regulation in the period since 1990. We demonstrate the successes of this period in reducing costs, prices, and energy losses while maintaining quality of service. We also draw out the lessons for other countries in implementing distribution sector reform. We conclude by discussing the place of incentive regulation of networks within the wider reform context, the required legislative framework, the need for appropriate unbundling, the importance of quality of service incentives, the regulatory information requirements, and the role of sector rationalisation. (author)

  19. Expanding the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network to address the management of substance use disorders in general medical settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai B

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Betty Tai, Steven Sparenborg, Udi E Ghitza, David Liu Center for the Clinical Trials Network, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA Abstract: The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (2010 and the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (2008 expand substance use disorder (SUD care services in the USA into general medical settings. Care offered in these settings will engage substance-using patients in an integrated and patient-centered environment that addresses physical and mental health comorbidities and follows a chronic care model. This expansion of SUD services presents a great need for evidence-based practices useful in general medical settings, and reveals several research gaps to be addressed. The National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network of the National Institute on Drug Abuse can serve an important role in this endeavor. High-priority research gaps are highlighted in this commentary. A discussion follows on how the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network can transform to address changing patterns in SUD care to efficiently generate evidence to guide SUD treatment practice within the context of recent US health care legislation. Keywords: Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network, substance use disorders, practice-based research network, electronic health records

  20. Experience gained during commissioning and trial operation of Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GaL, P.; Adamica, T.; Marosik, V.; Rehak, A.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper authors describe the experience gained during commissioning and trial operation of Mochovce NPP (EMO). The first year of EMO operation from the point of view of safety and reliability was successful. Evidently we were challenged with certain problems characteristic to this stage of operation which resulted in automatic reactor shutdown. There were 11 automatic shutdowns in 1998 by action of the quick emergency protection AO-1 and two manual shutdowns by the AO-1 key. In 1999, there were 6 automatic shutdowns by action of the quick emergency protection AO-1. Three of them was connected to the falsely activated binary signal of MCP switch of, in two cases the reason came out from the turbo-generator (TG) cooling water system. Very positive trend in the operation of both units shows the fact that during all commissioning period of the second unit there were only three automatic reactor shutdowns by the signal AO-1. All these actions were done in frame of commissioning tests. All causes which activated the automatic unit shutdowns were found out and rectified, the overall tuning of the cooling water system is on the process now. The solution of this problem is possible only power commissioning, and in the stage of the trial operation had no direct impacts on the nuclear, radiation, or technical safety respectively. In 1998 two events according to the INES scale after second unit commissioning because of two unit links of the cooling water system. The operational events during the commissioning tests, start-up tests, physical commissioning, were ranked the category 1 ('Action of SIS U040 p po <8,34 MPa at the system 2 and 3' and 'Breaching the L and C'). In 1999 only events occurred that were ranked in the category safety insignificant events and lower (category 0, or off the scale respectively). In the frame of the safety culture principles adopted, such as critical attitude, exact and careful approach, and communication, these problems were given the

  1. Network meta-analysis incorporating randomized controlled trials and non-randomized comparative cohort studies for assessing the safety and effectiveness of medical treatments: challenges and opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron, Chris; Fireman, Bruce; Hutton, Brian; Clifford, Tammy; Coyle, Doug; Wells, George; Dormuth, Colin R.; Platt, Robert; Toh, Sengwee

    2015-01-01

    Network meta-analysis is increasingly used to allow comparison of multiple treatment alternatives simultaneously, some of which may not have been compared directly in primary research studies. The majority of network meta-analyses published to date have incorporated data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) only; however, inclusion of non-randomized studies may sometimes be considered. Non-randomized studies can complement RCTs or address some of their limitations, such as short follow-up...

  2. Dialysis dose in acute kidney injury: no time for therapeutic nihilism – a critical appraisal of the Acute Renal Failure Trial Network study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronco, Claudio; Cruz, Dinna; van Straaten, Helen Oudemans; Honore, Patrick; House, Andrew; Bin, Du; Gibney, Noel

    2008-01-01

    The optimal dialysis dose for acute kidney injury is a matter of great controversy. Clinical trials, predominantly single-center studies, have shown conflicting results. The Acute Renal Failure Trial Network (ATN) Study was designed to compare clinical outcomes between patients allocated to an intensive dose versus a less-intensive dose of renal replacement therapy. Recently, the results of this large randomized controlled multicenter study were published. The present article will discuss certain aspects of this trial: the overall design, the baseline patient characteristics, and comparison of the results with earlier studies. Finally, the article will address the implications of the ATN Study results for clinical practice. PMID:18983695

  3. Dialysis dose in acute kidney injury: no time for therapeutic nihilism--a critical appraisal of the Acute Renal Failure Trial Network study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronco, Claudio; Cruz, Dinna; Oudemans van Straaten, Helen; Honore, Patrick; House, Andrew; Bin, Du; Gibney, Noel

    2008-01-01

    The optimal dialysis dose for acute kidney injury is a matter of great controversy. Clinical trials, predominantly single-center studies, have shown conflicting results. The Acute Renal Failure Trial Network (ATN) Study was designed to compare clinical outcomes between patients allocated to an intensive dose versus a less-intensive dose of renal replacement therapy. Recently, the results of this large randomized controlled multicenter study were published. The present article will discuss certain aspects of this trial: the overall design, the baseline patient characteristics, and comparison of the results with earlier studies. Finally, the article will address the implications of the ATN Study results for clinical practice.

  4. Young People's Experiences of Participation in Clinical Trials : Reasons for Taking Part

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luchtenberg, Malou; Maeckelberghe, Els; Locock, Louise; Powell, Lesley; Verhagen, A. A. Eduard

    2015-01-01

    Given the lack of knowledge about safety and efficacy of many treatments for children, pediatric clinical trials are important, but recruitment for pediatric research is difficult. Little is known about children's perspective on participating in trials. The purpose of this study was to understand

  5. A Progress Review on Soot Experiments and Modeling in the Engine Combustion Network (ECN)

    KAUST Repository

    Skeen, Scott A.

    2016-04-05

    The 4th Workshop of the Engine Combustion Network (ECN) was held September 5-6, 2015 in Kyoto, Japan. This manuscript presents a summary of the progress in experiments and modeling among ECN contributors leading to a better understanding of soot formation under the ECN “Spray A” configuration and some parametric variants. Relevant published and unpublished work from prior ECN workshops is reviewed. Experiments measuring soot particle size and morphology, soot volume fraction (fv), and transient soot mass have been conducted at various international institutions providing target data for improvements to computational models. Multiple modeling contributions using both the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) Equations approach and the Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) approach have been submitted. Among these, various chemical mechanisms, soot models, and turbulence-chemistry interaction (TCI) methodologies have been considered.

  6. Applying Bayesian neural networks to separate neutrino events from backgrounds in reactor neutrino experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Y; Meng, Y X; Xu, W W

    2008-01-01

    A toy detector has been designed to simulate central detectors in reactor neutrino experiments in the paper. The samples of neutrino events and three major backgrounds from the Monte-Carlo simulation of the toy detector are generated in the signal region. The Bayesian Neural Networks (BNN) are applied to separate neutrino events from backgrounds in reactor neutrino experiments. As a result, the most neutrino events and uncorrelated background events in the signal region can be identified with BNN, and the part events each of the fast neutron and 8 He/ 9 Li backgrounds in the signal region can be identified with BNN. Then, the signal to noise ratio in the signal region is enhanced with BNN. The neutrino discrimination increases with the increase of the neutrino rate in the training sample. However, the background discriminations decrease with the decrease of the background rate in the training sample

  7. Isotachophoresis of proteins in a networked microfluidic chip: experiment and 2-D simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Huanchun; Dutta, Prashanta; Ivory, Cornelius F

    2007-04-01

    This paper reports both the experimental application and 2-D simulation of ITP of proteins in a networked microfluidic chip. Experiments demonstrate that a mixture of three fluorescent proteins can be concentrated and stacked into adjacent zones of pure protein under a constant voltage of 100 V over a 2 cm long microchannel. Measurements of the isotachophoretic velocity of the moving zones demonstrates that, during ITP under a constant voltage, the zone velocity decreases as more of the channel is occupied by the terminating electrolyte. A 2-D ITP model based on the Nernst-Planck equations illustrates the stacking and separation features of ITP using simulations of three virtual proteins. The self-sharpening behavior of ITP zones dispersed by a T-junction is clearly demonstrated both by experiment and by simulation. Comparison of 2-D simulations of ITP and zone electrophoresis (ZE) confirms that ZE lacks the ability to resharpen protein zones after they pass through a T-junction.

  8. A Progress Review on Soot Experiments and Modeling in the Engine Combustion Network (ECN)

    KAUST Repository

    Skeen, Scott A.; Manin, Julien; Pickett, Lyle M.; Cenker, Emre; Bruneaux, Gilles; Kondo, Katsufumi; Aizawa, Tets; Westlye, Fredrik; Dalen, Kristine; Ivarsson, Anders; Xuan, Tiemin; Garcia-Oliver, Jose M; Pei, Yuanjiang; Som, Sibendu; Hu, Wang; Reitz, Rolf D.; Lucchini, Tommaso; D'Errico, Gianluca; Farrace, Daniele; Pandurangi, Sushant S.; Wright, Yuri M.; Chishty, Muhammad Aqib; Bolla, Michele; Hawkes, Evatt

    2016-01-01

    The 4th Workshop of the Engine Combustion Network (ECN) was held September 5-6, 2015 in Kyoto, Japan. This manuscript presents a summary of the progress in experiments and modeling among ECN contributors leading to a better understanding of soot formation under the ECN “Spray A” configuration and some parametric variants. Relevant published and unpublished work from prior ECN workshops is reviewed. Experiments measuring soot particle size and morphology, soot volume fraction (fv), and transient soot mass have been conducted at various international institutions providing target data for improvements to computational models. Multiple modeling contributions using both the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) Equations approach and the Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) approach have been submitted. Among these, various chemical mechanisms, soot models, and turbulence-chemistry interaction (TCI) methodologies have been considered.

  9. Konsep Pelayanan Garuda Indonesia Experience dan Konstruksi Makna dalam Network Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Sriherlambang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available As one of the largest airlines in Indonesia, Garuda Indonesia Airlines has launched a service concept of the Garuda Indonesia Experience. The paradigm shifting of the society has lead into high interconnection among people through the development of technology. Network society starts to emerge as the interconnection of the people starts to grow. How this shift will affect patterns of human behavior into an observed phenomenon that needs to be maximized positively. The shift that will be observed is a focus on process consumption on a product or service. As a company that has to maintain their sustainable growth, it is important for Garuda Indonesia to understands the relationship between this shift in society with their new service concept, the Garuda Indonesia Experience. This study reviewed the literature to find linkages and opportunities in the future so that an organization can continue to run in any changes to the consumer.  

  10. Unifying Pore Network Modeling, Continuous Time Random Walk Theory and Experiment - Accomplishments and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijeljic, B.

    2008-05-01

    This talk will describe and highlight the advantages offered by a methodology that unifies pore network modeling, CTRW theory and experiment in description of solute dispersion in porous media. Solute transport in a porous medium is characterized by the interplay of advection and diffusion (described by Peclet number, Pe) that cause spreading of solute particles. This spreading is traditionally described by dispersion coefficients, D, defined by σ 2 = 2Dt, where σ 2 is the variance of the solute position and t is the time. Using a pore-scale network model based on particle tracking, the rich Peclet- number dependence of dispersion coefficient is predicted from first principles and is shown to compare well with experimental data for restricted diffusion, transition, power-law and mechanical dispersion regimes in the asymptotic limit. In the asymptotic limit D is constant and can be used in an averaged advection-dispersion equation. However, it is highly important to recognize that, until the velocity field is fully sampled, the particle transport is non-Gaussian and D possesses temporal or spatial variation. Furthermore, temporal probability density functions (PDF) of tracer particles are studied in pore networks and an excellent agreement for the spectrum of transition times for particles from pore to pore is obtained between network model results and CTRW theory. Based on the truncated power-law interpretation of PDF-s, the physical origin of the power-law scaling of dispersion coefficient vs. Peclet number has been explained for unconsolidated porous media, sands and a number of sandstones, arriving at the same conclusion from numerical network modelling, analytic CTRW theory and experiment. Future directions for further applications of the methodology presented are discussed in relation to the scale- dependent solute dispersion and reactive transport. Significance of pre-asymptotic dispersion in porous media is addressed from pore-scale upwards and the impact

  11. Shedding light on research participation effects in behaviour change trials: a qualitative study examining research participant experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia MacNeill

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sequence of events in a behaviour change trial involves interactions between research participants and the trial process. Taking part in such a study has the potential to influence the behaviour of the participant, and if it does, this can engender bias in trial outcomes. Since participants’ experience has received scant attention, the aim of this study is thus to generate hypotheses about which aspects of the conduct of behaviour change trials might matter most to participants, and thus have potential to alter subsequent behaviours and bias trial outcomes Methods Twenty participants were opportunistically screened for a health compromising behaviour (unhealthy diet, lack of exercise, smoking or alcohol consumption and recruited if eligible. Semi structured face to face interviews were conducted, after going through the usual processes involved in trial recruitment, baseline assessment and randomisation. Participants were given information on the contents of an intervention or control condition in a behaviour change trial, which was not actually implemented. Three months later they returned to reflect on these experiences and whether they had any effect on their behaviour during the intervening period. Data from the latter interview were analysed thematically using a modified grounded theory approach. Results The early processes of trial participation raised awareness of unhealthy behaviours, although most reported having had only fleeting intentions to change their behaviour as a result of taking part in this study, in the absence of interventions. However, careful examination of the accounts revealed evidence of subtle research participation effects, which varied according to the health behaviour, and its perceived social acceptability. Participants’ relationships with the research study were viewed as somewhat important in stimulating thinking about whether and how to make lifestyle changes. Conclusion These

  12. Shedding light on research participation effects in behaviour change trials: a qualitative study examining research participant experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeill, Virginia; Foley, Marian; Quirk, Alan; McCambridge, Jim

    2016-01-29

    The sequence of events in a behaviour change trial involves interactions between research participants and the trial process. Taking part in such a study has the potential to influence the behaviour of the participant, and if it does, this can engender bias in trial outcomes. Since participants' experience has received scant attention, the aim of this study is thus to generate hypotheses about which aspects of the conduct of behaviour change trials might matter most to participants, and thus have potential to alter subsequent behaviours and bias trial outcomes Twenty participants were opportunistically screened for a health compromising behaviour (unhealthy diet, lack of exercise, smoking or alcohol consumption) and recruited if eligible. Semi structured face to face interviews were conducted, after going through the usual processes involved in trial recruitment, baseline assessment and randomisation. Participants were given information on the contents of an intervention or control condition in a behaviour change trial, which was not actually implemented. Three months later they returned to reflect on these experiences and whether they had any effect on their behaviour during the intervening period. Data from the latter interview were analysed thematically using a modified grounded theory approach. The early processes of trial participation raised awareness of unhealthy behaviours, although most reported having had only fleeting intentions to change their behaviour as a result of taking part in this study, in the absence of interventions. However, careful examination of the accounts revealed evidence of subtle research participation effects, which varied according to the health behaviour, and its perceived social acceptability. Participants' relationships with the research study were viewed as somewhat important in stimulating thinking about whether and how to make lifestyle changes. These participants described no dramatic impacts attributable to taking part in

  13. Functional coupling networks inferred from prefrontal cortex activity show experience-related effective plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaia Tavoni

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Functional coupling networks are widely used to characterize collective patterns of activity in neural populations. Here, we ask whether functional couplings reflect the subtle changes, such as in physiological interactions, believed to take place during learning. We infer functional network models reproducing the spiking activity of simultaneously recorded neurons in prefrontal cortex (PFC of rats, during the performance of a cross-modal rule shift task (task epoch, and during preceding and following sleep epochs. A large-scale study of the 96 recorded sessions allows us to detect, in about 20% of sessions, effective plasticity between the sleep epochs. These coupling modifications are correlated with the coupling values in the task epoch, and are supported by a small subset of the recorded neurons, which we identify by means of an automatized procedure. These potentiated groups increase their coativation frequency in the spiking data between the two sleep epochs, and, hence, participate to putative experience-related cell assemblies. Study of the reactivation dynamics of the potentiated groups suggests a possible connection with behavioral learning. Reactivation is largely driven by hippocampal ripple events when the rule is not yet learned, and may be much more autonomous, and presumably sustained by the potentiated PFC network, when learning is consolidated. Cell assemblies coding for memories are widely believed to emerge through synaptic modification resulting from learning, yet their identification from activity is very arduous. We propose a functional-connectivity-based approach to identify experience-related cell assemblies from multielectrode recordings in vivo, and apply it to the prefrontal cortex activity of rats recorded during a task epoch and the preceding and following sleep epochs. We infer functional couplings between the recorded cells in each epoch. Comparisons of the functional coupling networks across the epochs allow us

  14. Pneumonia After Cardiac Surgery: Experience of the NIH/CIHR Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailawadi, Gorav; Chang, Helena L.; O’Gara, Patrick T.; O'sullivan, Karen; Woo, Y. Joseph; DeRose, Joseph J.; Parides, Michael K.; Thourani, Vinod H.; Robichaud, Sophie; Gillinov, A. Marc; Taddei-Peters, Wendy C.; Miller, Marissa A.; Perrault, Louis P.; Smith, Robert L.; Goldsmith, Lyn; Horvath, Keith A.; Doud, Kristen; Baio, Kim; Gelijns, Annetine C.; Moskowitz, Alan J.; Bagiella, Emilia; Alexander, John H.; Iribarne, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Rationale Pneumonia remains the most common major infection after cardiac surgery despite numerous preventive measures. Objectives To prospectively examine the timing, pathogens, and risk factors, including modifiable management practices, for post-operative pneumonia and estimate its impact on clinical outcomes. Methods 5,158 adult cardiac surgery patients were prospectively enrolled in a cohort study across 10 centers. All infections were adjudicated by an independent committee. Competing risk models were used to assess the association of patient characteristics and management practices with pneumonia within 65 days of surgery. Mortality was assessed by Cox proportional hazards model, and length of stay using a multi-state model. Measurements and Main Results The cumulative incidence of p neumonia was 2.4% ,33% of which occurred after discharge. Older age, lower hemoglobin level, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, steroid use, operative time and left ventricular assist device/heart transplant were risk factors. Ventilation time (24–48 vs ≤24 hours;HR,2·83; 95% CI,1·72–4·66; >48 hours HR,4·67; 95% CI,2·70–8·08), nasogastric tubes (HR,1·80; 95% CI,1·10–2·94), and each unit of blood cells transfused (HR,1·16; 95% CI,1·08–1·26) increased pneumonia risk. Prophylactic use of second-generation cephalosporins (HR,0·66; 95% CI, 0·45–0·97) and platelet transfusions (HR, 0·49, 95% CI, 0·30–0·79) were protective. Pneumonia was associated with a marked increase in mortality (HR,8·89; 95% CI,5·02–15·75), and longer LOS of 13·55 ± 1·95 days (bootstrap 95% CI,10·31–16·58). Conclusions Pneumonia continues to impose a major impact on the health of patients after cardiac surgery. Adjusting for baseline risk, several specific management practices were associated with pneumonia, which offer targets for quality improvement and further research. PMID:28341473

  15. Event classification with the electronic detectors of the OPERA experiment using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hierholzer, Martin C.

    2012-02-01

    The OPERA experiment searches for ν μ ν τ oscillations in appearance mode. It uses the emulsion cloud chamber (ECC) technique for a high spatial resolution combined with on-line components for event localisation and muon identification. The analysis of events in an ECC detector takes considerable time, especially in case of ν τ /ν e candidate events. A ranking of events by a probability for being a ν τ /ν e event can speed up the analysis of the OPERA experiment. An algorithm for such an event ranking based on a classification-type neural network is presented in this thesis. Almost all candidate events can be found within the first 30% of the analysed events if the described ranking is applied. This event ranking is currently applied for testing purposes by the OPERA collaboration, a decision on a full application for the whole analysis is pending. A similar neural network is used for discrimination between neutral and charged current events. This is used to observe neutrino oscillations in disappearance mode with the on-line components of the OPERA detector by measuring the energy dependence of the fraction of neutral current interactions. The confidence level of the observed oscillation effect is 87%. Assuming full mixing, the mass splitting has been determined to vertical stroke Δm 2 32 vertical stroke =2.8 -1.7 +1.4 .10 -3 eV 2 .

  16. Field Trial of 40 Gb/s Optical Transport Network using Open WDM Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagertun, Anna Manolova; Ruepp, Sarah Renée; Petersen, Martin Nordal

    2013-01-01

    An experimental field-trail deployment of a 40Gb/s open WDM interface in an operational network is presented, in cross-carrier interconnection scenario. Practical challenges of integration and performance measures for both native and alien channels are outlined....

  17. The interaction of social networks and child obesity prevention program effects: the pathways trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hee-Sung; Valente, Thomas W; Riggs, Nathaniel R; Huh, Jimi; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Chou, Chih-Ping; Ann Pentz, Mary

    2014-06-01

    Social network analysis was used to examine whether peer influence from one's social networks moderates obesity prevention program effects on obesity-related behaviors: healthful and unhealthful. Participants included 557 children residing in Southern California. The survey assessed health-promoting behaviors (i.e., physical activity at school, physical activity outside of school, and fruit and vegetable intake), as well as unhealthful behaviors (high-calorie, low-nutrient intake and sedentary activity), and peer exposure calculated from social network nominations as indicators of peer influence. Multilevel models were conducted separately on outcomes predicted by program participation, peer exposure, and program participation by peer exposure. Results indicated that peer exposure was positively associated with one's own healthful and unhealthful behaviors. Program participation effects were moderated by peer influence, but only when unhealthful peer influence was present. Results suggest that peer influence can diminish or amplify prevention programs Future interventions should consider peer-led components to promote healthful influence of peers on healthful and unhealthful behaviors, and programs should be mindful that their effects are moderated by social networks. Copyright © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  18. Special Issue on 5G Communications and Experimental Trials with Heterogeneous and Agile Mobile networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sejun Song

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available 5th generation mobile networks, 5G, are the proposed next‐generation communication network standards. In addition to providing more than 1 Gb per second faster speeds, 5G will be a global game changer from technological, economic, societal, and environmental perspectives by integrating multiple networks in diverse sectors for various up to date applications such as the Internet of Things (IoT, device‐to‐device direct communication (D2D, vehicular communications (V2X, and disaster resilient communication. Currently, millimeter‐wave (mmWave radio spectrum between 30 GHz and 300 GHz is critical for 5G rollout. Regulatory bodies around the world are now working towards opening up new spectrum bands from 6 GHz–100 GHz, and new technologies to overcome the challenges of these mmWave bands have been developed. It is envisioned that advanced 5G network infrastructure includes ultra‐broadband access, high‐speed backhaul and relay, softwarized flexible evolved packet core solutions for efficient system management, and satellite communications as an inherent component of 5G systems.

  19. Chiaro Networks' Enstara IP/MPLS platform selected by CERN for trans-Atlantic trial

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    "Chiaro Networks, the developer of true infrastructure-class Internet Protocol/Multi-Protocol Label Switching (IP/MPLS) platforms, today announced that its Enstara router has been selected by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) for its DataTAG project" (1 page)

  20. Effects of frequent hemodialysis on perceived caregiver burden in the Frequent Hemodialysis Network trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Rita S; Larive, Brett; Hall, Yoshio; Kimmel, Paul L; Kliger, Alan S; Levin, Nathan; Tamura, Manjula Kurella; Chertow, Glenn M

    2014-05-01

    Patients receiving hemodialysis often perceive their caregivers are overburdened. We hypothesize that increasing hemodialysis frequency would result in higher patient perceptions of burden on their unpaid caregivers. In two separate trials, 245 patients were randomized to receive in-center daily hemodialysis (6 days/week) or conventional hemodialysis (3 days/week) while 87 patients were randomized to receive home nocturnal hemodialysis (6 nights/week) or home conventional hemodialysis for 12 months. Changes in overall mean scores over time in the 10-question Cousineau perceived burden scale were compared. In total, 173 of 245 (70%) and 80 of 87 (92%) randomized patients in the Daily and Nocturnal Trials, respectively, reported having an unpaid caregiver at baseline or during follow-up. Relative to in-center conventional dialysis, the 12-month change in mean perceived burden score with in-center daily hemodialysis was -2.1 (95% confidence interval, -9.4 to +5.3; P=0.58). Relative to home conventional dialysis, the 12-month change in mean perceived burden score with home nocturnal dialysis was +6.1 (95% confidence interval, -0.8 to +13.1; P=0.08). After multiple imputation for missing data in the Nocturnal Trial, the relative difference between home nocturnal and home conventional hemodialysis was +9.4 (95% confidence interval, +0.55 to +18.3; P=0.04). In the Nocturnal Trial, changes in perceived burden were inversely correlated with adherence to dialysis treatments (Pearson r=-0.35; P=0.02). Relative to conventional hemodialysis, in-center daily hemodialysis did not result in higher perceptions of caregiver burden. There was a trend to higher perceived caregiver burden among patients randomized to home nocturnal hemodialysis. These findings may have implications for the adoption of and adherence to frequent nocturnal hemodialysis.

  1. Optimization of brain PET imaging for a multicentre trial: the French CATI experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habert, Marie-Odile; Marie, Sullivan; Bertin, Hugo; Reynal, Moana; Martini, Jean-Baptiste; Diallo, Mamadou; Kas, Aurélie; Trébossen, Régine

    2016-12-01

    CATI is a French initiative launched in 2010 to handle the neuroimaging of a large cohort of subjects recruited for an Alzheimer's research program called MEMENTO. This paper presents our test protocol and results obtained for the 22 PET centres (overall 13 different scanners) involved in the MEMENTO cohort. We determined acquisition parameters using phantom experiments prior to patient studies, with the aim of optimizing PET quantitative values to the highest possible per site, while reducing, if possible, variability across centres. Jaszczak's and 3D-Hoffman's phantom measurements were used to assess image spatial resolution (ISR), recovery coefficients (RC) in hot and cold spheres, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). For each centre, the optimal reconstruction parameters were chosen as those maximizing ISR and RC without a noticeable decrease in SNR. Point-spread-function (PSF) modelling reconstructions were discarded. The three figures of merit extracted from the images reconstructed with optimized parameters and routine schemes were compared, as were volumes of interest ratios extracted from Hoffman acquisitions. The net effect of the 3D-OSEM reconstruction parameter optimization was investigated on a subset of 18 scanners without PSF modelling reconstruction. Compared to the routine parameters of the 22 PET centres, average RC in the two smallest hot and cold spheres and average ISR remained stable or were improved with the optimized reconstruction, at the expense of slight SNR degradation, while the dispersion of values was reduced. For the subset of scanners without PSF modelling, the mean RC of the smallest hot sphere obtained with the optimized reconstruction was significantly higher than with routine reconstruction. The putamen and caudate-to-white matter ratios measured on 3D-Hoffman acquisitions of all centres were also significantly improved by the optimization, while the variance was reduced. This study provides guidelines for optimizing quantitative

  2. The Building Wealth and Health Network: methods and baseline characteristics from a randomized controlled trial for families with young children participating in temporary assistance for needy families (TANF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Patel, Falguni; Kirzner, Rachel; Newton-Famous, Nijah; Owens, Constance; Welles, Seth L; Chilton, Mariana

    2016-07-16

    Families with children under age six participating in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program (TANF) must participate in work-related activities for 20 h per week. However, due to financial hardship, poor health, and exposure to violence and adversity, families may experience great difficulty in reaching self-sufficiency. The purpose of this report is to describe study design and baseline findings of a trauma-informed financial empowerment and peer support intervention meant to mitigate these hardships. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of a 28-week intervention called Building Wealth and Health Network to improve financial security and maternal and child health among caregivers participating in TANF. Participants, recruited from County Assistance offices in Philadelphia, PA, were randomized into two intervention groups (partial and full) and one control group. Participants completed questionnaires at baseline to assess career readiness, economic hardship, health and wellbeing, exposure to adversity and violence, and interaction with criminal justice systems. Baseline characteristics demonstrate that among 103 participants, there were no significant differences by group. Mean age of participants was 25 years, and youngest child was 30 months. The majority of participants were women (94.2 %), never married (83.5 %), unemployed (94.2 %), and without a bank account (66.0 %). Many reported economic hardship (32.0 % very low household food secure, 65.0 % housing insecure, and 31.1 % severe energy insecure), and depression (57.3 %). Exposure to adversity was prevalent, where 38.8 % reported four or more Adverse Childhood Experiences including abuse, neglect and household dysfunction. In terms of community violence, 64.7 % saw a seriously wounded person after an incident of violence, and 27.2 % had seen someone killed. Finally, 14.6 % spent time in an adult correctional institution, and 48.5 % of the fathers of the youngest child spent

  3. Experiences in conducting multiple community-based HIV prevention trials among women in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moodley Jothi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background South Africa, with its scientific capacity, good infrastructure and high HIV incidence rates, is ideally positioned to conduct large-scale HIV prevention trials. The HIV Prevention Research Unit of the South African Medical Research Council conducted four phase III and one phase IIb trials of women-initiated HIV prevention options in KwaZulu-Natal between 2003 and 2009. A total of 7046 women participated, with HIV prevalence between 25% and 45% and HIV incidence ranging from 4.5-9.1% per year. Unfortunately none of the interventions tested had any impact on reducing the risk of HIV acquisition; however, extremely valuable experience was gained, lessons learned and capacity built, while the communities gained associated benefits. Experience Our experience in conducting these trials ranged from setting up community partnerships to developing clinical research sites and dissemination of trial results. Community engagement included setting up community-based research sites with approval from both political and traditional leaders, and developing community advisory groups to assist with the research process. Community-wide education on HIV/sexually transmitted infection prevention, treatment and care was provided to over 90 000 individuals. Myths and misconceptions were addressed through methods such as anonymous suggestion boxes in clinic waiting areas and intensive education and counselling. Attempts were made to involve male partners to foster support and facilitate recruitment of women. Peer educator programmes were initiated to provide ongoing education and also to facilitate recruitment of women to the trials. Recruitment strategies such as door-to-door recruitment and community group meetings were initiated. Over 90% of women enrolled were retained. Community benefits from the trial included education on HIV prevention, treatment and care and provision of ancillary care (such as Pap smears, reproductive health care and

  4. "It is better to die": experiences of traditional health practitioners within the HIV treatment as prevention trial communities in rural South Africa (ANRS 12249 TasP trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshabela, Mosa; Zuma, Thembelihle; Orne-Gliemann, Joanna; Iwuji, Collins; Larmarange, Joseph; McGrath, Nuala

    2016-01-01

    The ANRS 12249 Treatment-as-Prevention (TasP) cluster-randomized trial in rural South Africa uses a "test and treat" approach. Home-based testing services and antiretroviral treatment initiation satellite clinics were implemented in every cluster as part of the trial. A social science research agenda was nested within TasP with the aim of understanding the social, economic and contextual factors that affect individuals, households, communities and health systems with respect to TasP. Considering the rural nature of the trial setting, we sought to understand community perceptions and experiences of the TasP Trial interventions as seen through the eyes of traditional health practitioners (THPs). A qualitative study design was adopted using four repeat focus group discussions conducted with nine THPs, combined with community walks and photo-voice techniques, over a period of 18 months. A descriptive, interpretive and explanatory approach to analysis was adopted. Findings indicate that THPs engaged with the home-based testing services and HIV clinics established for TasP. Specifically, home-based testing services were perceived as relatively successful in increasing access to HIV testing. A major gap observed by THPs was linkage to HIV clinics. Most of their clients, and some of the THPs themselves, found it difficult to use HIV clinics due to fear of labelling, stigma and discrimination, and the ensuing personal implications of unsolicited disclosure. On the one hand, a growing number of patients diagnosed with HIV have found sanctuary with THPs as alternatives to clinics. On the other hand, THPs in turn have been struggling to channel patients suspected of HIV into clinics through referrals. Therefore, acceptability of the TasP test and treat approach by THPs is a major boost to the intervention, but further success can be achieved through strengthened ties with communities to combat stigma and effectively link patients into HIV care, including partnerships with THPs

  5. Clinicians’ views and experiences of offering two alternative consent pathways for participation in a preterm intrapartum trial: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Chhoa, C. Y.; Sawyer, A.; Ayers, S.; Pushpa-Rajah, A.; Duley, L.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Cord Pilot Trial compared alternative policies for timing of cord clamping at very preterm birth at eight UK hospitals. Preterm birth can be rapid and unexpected, allowing little time for the usual consent process. Therefore, in addition to the usual procedure for written consent, a two-stage pathway for consent for use when birth was imminent was developed. The aims of this study were to explore clinicians’ views and experiences of offering two consent pathways for recruit...

  6. Clinicians? views and experiences of offering two alternative consent pathways for participation in a preterm intrapartum trial: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Chhoa, Celine Y.; Sawyer, Alexandra; Ayers, Susan; Pushpa-Rajah, Angela; Duley, Lelia

    2017-01-01

    Background The Cord Pilot Trial compared alternative policies for timing of cord clamping at very preterm birth at eight UK hospitals. Preterm birth can be rapid and unexpected, allowing little time for the usual consent process. Therefore, in addition to the usual procedure for written consent, a two-stage pathway for consent for use when birth was imminent was developed. The aims of this study were to explore clinicians? views and experiences of offering two consent pathways for recruitment...

  7. Challenges with participant reimbursement: experiences from a post-trial access study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mngadi, Kathryn Therese; Frohlich, Janet; Montague, Carl; Singh, Jerome; Nkomonde, Nelisiwe; Mvandaba, Nomzamo; Ntombeka, Fanelesibonge; Luthuli, Londiwe; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha; Mansoor, Leila

    2015-11-01

    Reimbursement of trial participants remains a frequently debated issue, with specific guidance lacking. Trials combining post-trial access and implementation science may necessitate new strategies and models. CAPRISA 008, a post-trial access study testing the feasibility of using family planning services to rollout a prelicensure HIV prevention intervention, tried to balance the real-life scenario of no reimbursement for attendance at public sector clinics with that of a trial including some visits that focused on research procedures and others that focused on standard of care procedures. A reduced reimbursement was offered for 'standard of care' visits, meant primarily to cover transport costs to and from the clinic only. This impacted negatively on accrual, retention and participant morale, primarily due to the protracted delay in regulatory approval, during which time, the costs of living, including travel costs had increased. Relevant guidelines were reviewed and institutional policy was updated to incorporate the South African National Health Research Ethics Committee guidelines on reimbursement (taking into account participant time, travel and inconvenience). The reimbursement amount for 'standard of care' visits was increased accordingly. The question remains whether a trial that combines post-trial access with implementation science, with clear benefits for the participants and the provision of above standard medical care, should have reimbursement rates that approach those of a proof-of-concept trial, for 'standard of care' visits. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. Efficacy of Supplementation with B Vitamins for Stroke Prevention: A Network Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hongli; Pi, Fuhua; Ding, Zan; Chen, Wei; Pang, Shaojie; Dong, Wenya; Zhang, Qingying

    2015-01-01

    Supplementation with B vitamins for stroke prevention has been evaluated over the years, but which combination of B vitamins is optimal for stroke prevention is unclear. We performed a network meta-analysis to assess the impact of different combinations of B vitamins on risk of stroke. A total of 17 trials (86 393 patients) comparing 7 treatment strategies and placebo were included. A network meta-analysis combined all available direct and indirect treatment comparisons to evaluate the efficacy of B vitamin supplementation for all interventions. B vitamin supplementation was associated with reduced risk of stroke and cerebral hemorrhage. The risk of stroke was lower with folic acid plus vitamin B6 as compared with folic acid plus vitamin B12 and was lower with folic acid plus vitamin B6 plus vitamin B12 as compared with placebo or folic acid plus vitamin B12. The treatments ranked in order of efficacy for stroke, from higher to lower, were folic acid plus vitamin B6 > folic acid > folic acid plus vitamin B6 plus vitamin B12 > vitamin B6 plus vitamin B12 > niacin > vitamin B6 > placebo > folic acid plus vitamin B12. B vitamin supplementation was associated with reduced risk of stroke; different B vitamins and their combined treatments had different efficacy on stroke prevention. Folic acid plus vitamin B6 might be the optimal therapy for stroke prevention. Folic acid and vitamin B6 were both valuable for stroke prevention. The efficacy of vitamin B12 remains to be studied.

  9. A Data Management System Integrating Web-based Training and Randomized Trials: Requirements, Experiences and Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroff, Jordana; Amodeo, Maryann; Larson, Mary Jo; Carey, Margaret; Loftin, Ralph D

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a data management system (DMS) developed to support a large-scale randomized study of an innovative web-course that was designed to improve substance abuse counselors' knowledge and skills in applying a substance abuse treatment method (i.e., cognitive behavioral therapy; CBT). The randomized trial compared the performance of web-course-trained participants (intervention group) and printed-manual-trained participants (comparison group) to determine the effectiveness of the web-course in teaching CBT skills. A single DMS was needed to support all aspects of the study: web-course delivery and management, as well as randomized trial management. The authors briefly reviewed several other systems that were described as built either to handle randomized trials or to deliver and evaluate web-based training. However it was clear that these systems fell short of meeting our needs for simultaneous, coordinated management of the web-course and the randomized trial. New England Research Institute's (NERI) proprietary Advanced Data Entry and Protocol Tracking (ADEPT) system was coupled with the web-programmed course and customized for our purposes. This article highlights the requirements for a DMS that operates at the intersection of web-based course management systems and randomized clinical trial systems, and the extent to which the coupled, customized ADEPT satisfied those requirements. Recommendations are included for institutions and individuals considering conducting randomized trials and web-based training programs, and seeking a DMS that can meet similar requirements.

  10. View of physicians on and barriers to patient enrollment in a multicenter clinical trial: experience in a Japanese rural area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanagawa Hiroaki

    2010-06-01

    informed consent (58%, cumbersome procedures (58%, difficulty in long-term follow up (33%, and insufficient tools for explanation and obtaining informed consent (8%. Conclusion This survey showed that successful physician recruiters consider a support system with CRC of value, and that they are skillful in obtaining informed consent. These views and attitudes may have originated from past experience involving clinical trials. In this regard, we need to develop an infrastructure to enlighten physicians on this support system for the promotion of clinical trials.

  11. Precision Medicine in NCI’s National Clinical Trials Network: Progress and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI’s Jeff Abrams, M.D., Acting Director for Clinical Research in the Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis (DCTD) and Associate Director of the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) and Nita Seibel, M.D., Head of the Pediatric Solid Tumor Therapeutics in the Clinical Investigations Branch of CTEP, DCTD will host a Google Hangout on Air. The discussion will be moderated by Andrea Denicoff, R.N., N.P, Head, NCTN Clinical Trials Operations in the Investigational Drug Branch of CTEP, DCTD.

  12. Somatisation in primary care: experiences of primary care physicians involved in a training program and in a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salazar Agustín

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new intervention aimed at managing patients with medically unexplained symptoms (MUS based on a specific set of communication techniques was developed, and tested in a cluster randomised clinical trial. Due to the modest results obtained and in order to improve our intervention we need to know the GPs' attitudes towards patients with MUS, their experience, expectations and the utility of the communication techniques we proposed and the feasibility of implementing them. Physicians who took part in 2 different training programs and in a randomised controlled trial (RCT for patients with MUS were questioned to ascertain the reasons for the doctors' participation in the trial and the attitudes, experiences and expectations of GPs about the intervention. Methods A qualitative study based on four focus groups with GPs who took part in a RCT. A content analysis was carried out. Results Following the RCT patients are perceived as true suffering persons, and the relationship with them has improved in GPs of both groups. GPs mostly valued the fact that it is highly structured, that it made possible a more comfortable relationship and that it could be applied to a broad spectrum of patients with psychosocial problems. Nevertheless, all participants consider that change in patients is necessary; GPs in the intervention group remarked that that is extremely difficult to achieve. Conclusion GPs positively evaluate the communication techniques and the interventions that help in understanding patient suffering, and express the enormous difficulties in handling change in patients. These findings provide information on the direction in which efforts for improving intervention should be directed. Trial registration US ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00130988

  13. “Evaluation of a peer network intervention trial among young methamphetamine users in Chiang Mai, Thailand”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutcliffe, Catherine; Srirojn, Bangorn; Latkin, Carl A; Aramratanna, Ajpinun; Sherman, Susan G

    2009-01-01

    Since the 1990s, there has been a proliferation of methamphetamine use in Thailand, particularly among young people. Simultaneously, risky sexual behaviors among this population have increased. This study examined the effects of a peer network intervention and a life skills intervention on methamphetamine and HIV risk behaviors among 18–25 year olds in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Between April 2005 and June 2007, we conducted a randomized behavioral trial to compare the efficacy of a peer educator, network-oriented intervention with a best practice, life-skills curriculum on methamphetamine use, sexual behaviors, and incident sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Follow-up occurred at three, six, nine, and twelve months. Both conditions consisted of seven, two hour, small group sessions. Longitudinal analyses of the three outcomes were conducted by fitting repeated measures logistic regression models using generalized estimating equations. Participants (N=983) attended a median of six sessions, with no differences between arms. At each follow-up visit, retention was greater than 85%. Participants were 75% male and were a median of 19 years old. Over time, participants in both conditions showed a significant and dramatic decline in self-reported methamphetamine use (99% at baseline versus 53% at 12-months, p<0.0001) and significant increase in consistent condom use (32% baseline versus 44% at 12 months, p<0.0001). Incident STIs were common, with no differences between arms. Chlamydia had the highest incidence rate, 9.85/100 person-years and HIV had a low incidence rate of 0.71/100 person-years. Among young Thais, we found that a peer educator, network-oriented intervention was associated with reductions in methamphetamine use, increases in condom use, and reductions in incident STIs over 12 months. We also found parallel reductions with the life skills condition. To our knowledge, this is the first such trial targeting this population. Small group interventions are an

  14. Using the OASES-A to illustrate how network analysis can be applied to understand the experience of stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siew, Cynthia S Q; Pelczarski, Kristin M; Yaruss, J Scott; Vitevitch, Michael S

    Network science uses mathematical and computational techniques to examine how individual entities in a system, represented by nodes, interact, as represented by connections between nodes. This approach has been used by Cramer et al. (2010) to make "symptom networks" to examine various psychological disorders. In the present analysis we examined a network created from the items in the Overall Assessment of the Speaker's Experience of Stuttering-Adult (OASES-A), a commonly used measure for evaluating adverse impact in the lives of people who stutter. The items of the OASES-A were represented as nodes in the network. Connections between nodes were placed if responses to those two items in the OASES-A had a correlation coefficient greater than ±0.5. Several network analyses revealed which nodes were "important" in the network. Several centrally located nodes and "key players" in the network were identified. A community detection analysis found groupings of nodes that differed slightly from the subheadings of the OASES-A. Centrally located nodes and "key players" in the network may help clinicians prioritize treatment. The different community structure found for people who stutter suggests that the way people who stutter view stuttering may differ from the way that scientists and clinicians view stuttering. Finally, the present analyses illustrate how the network approach might be applied to other speech, language, and hearing disorders to better understand how those disorders are experienced and to provide insights for their treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Numerical Experiments on Advective Transport in Large Three-Dimensional Discrete Fracture Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makedonska, N.; Painter, S. L.; Karra, S.; Gable, C. W.

    2013-12-01

    Modeling of flow and solute transport in discrete fracture networks is an important approach for understanding the migration of contaminants in impermeable hard rocks such as granite, where fractures provide dominant flow and transport pathways. The discrete fracture network (DFN) model attempts to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. An integrated DFN meshing [1], flow, and particle tracking [2] simulation capability that enables accurate flow and particle tracking simulation on large DFNs has recently been developed. The new capability has been used in numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs with tens of thousands of fractures and millions of computational cells. The modeling procedure starts from the fracture network generation using a stochastic model derived from site data. A high-quality computational mesh is then generated [1]. Flow is then solved using the highly parallel PFLOTRAN [3] code. PFLOTRAN uses the finite volume approach, which is locally mass conserving and thus eliminates mass balance problems during particle tracking. The flow solver provides the scalar fluxes on each control volume face. From the obtained fluxes the Darcy velocity is reconstructed for each node in the network [4]. Velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest, thus enabling random walk particle tracking. In order to describe the flow field on fractures intersections, the control volume cells on intersections are split into four planar polygons, where each polygon corresponds to a piece of a fracture near the intersection line. Thus

  16. Biosphere 2, a nexus of partner networks that improve student experiences and outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dontsova, K.; Bonine, K. E.; Batchelor, R. L.; Brinkworth, C.; Keller, J. M.; Hogan, D.; Treloar, D.

    2017-12-01

    University of Arizona (UA) Biosphere 2 co-convenes several internship opportunities for undergraduate students, including 1) NSF-funded Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Site: "Biosphere 2 Earth Systems Research for Environmental Solutions", 2) NSF-funded INCLUDES program "Collaborative Research: Integrating Indigenous and Western Knowledge to Transform Learning and Discovery in the Geosciences" executed in collaboration with the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), and 3) STEM Teacher and Researcher (STAR) Fellows Program in partnership with California Polytechnic State University - San Luis Obispo. In addition, the B2 REU Site partners with several UA organizations linking research to stakeholders, such as UA Cooperative Extension, Institute of the Environment, and the Water Resources Research Center, and with the UA Graduate College's Undergraduate Research Opportunities Consortium (UROC), which connects a diverse portfolio of summer research programs across the UA campus. Connections among these programs and organizations allow us to improve student experiences and outcomes by leveraging organizational, mentor, and peer diversity and expertise. Each partnership brings unique benefits for the students - from access to teaching experience and perspectives that STAR Fellows provide, to a multitude of professional development programs made possible by pooled resources of UROC participants, to access to networks and knowledge from our outreach partners, to opportunities for continued multi-year learning and support with INCLUDES and UCAR. Coming together allows all partners to better apply outside resources, expertise, and knowledge to bring more value to the students and to help students enrich themselves as well as partner organizations and program participants.

  17. Artificial neural networks for automation of Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy experiments and data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barradas, N.P.; Vieira, A.; Patricio, R.

    2002-01-01

    We present an algorithm based on artificial neural networks able to determine optimized experimental conditions for Rutherford backscattering measurements of Ge-implanted Si. The algorithm can be implemented for any other element implanted into a lighter substrate. It is foreseeable that the method developed in this work can be applied to still many other systems. The algorithm presented is a push-button black box, and does not require any human intervention. It is thus suited for automated control of an experimental setup, given an interface to the relevant hardware. Once the experimental conditions are optimized, the algorithm analyzes the final data obtained, and determines the desired parameters. The method is thus also suited for automated analysis of the data. The algorithm presented can be easily extended to other ion beam analysis techniques. Finally, it is suggested how the artificial neural networks required for automated control and analysis of experiments could be automatically generated. This would be suited for automated generation of the required computer code. Thus could RBS be done without experimentalists, data analysts, or programmers, with only technicians to keep the machines running

  18. The AGING Initiative experience: a call for sustained support for team science networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Tullika; Anzuoni, Kathryn; Landyn, Valentina; Hajduk, Alexandra; Waring, Stephen; Hanson, Leah R; Whitson, Heather E

    2018-05-18

    Team science, defined as collaborative research efforts that leverage the expertise of diverse disciplines, is recognised as a critical means to address complex healthcare challenges, but the practical implementation of team science can be difficult. Our objective is to describe the barriers, solutions and lessons learned from our team science experience as applied to the complex and growing challenge of multiple chronic conditions (MCC). MCC is the presence of two or more chronic conditions that have a collective adverse effect on health status, function or quality of life, and that require complex healthcare management, decision-making or coordination. Due to the increasing impact on the United States society, MCC research has been identified as a high priority research area by multiple federal agencies. In response to this need, two national research entities, the Healthcare Systems Research Network (HCSRN) and the Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Centers (OAIC), formed the Advancing Geriatrics Infrastructure and Network Growth (AGING) Initiative to build nationwide capacity for MCC team science. This article describes the structure, lessons learned and initial outcomes of the AGING Initiative. We call for funding mechanisms to sustain infrastructures that have demonstrated success in fostering team science and innovation in translating findings to policy change necessary to solve complex problems in healthcare.

  19. Experiences with a Decade of Wireless Sensor Networks in Mountain Cryosphere Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutel, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Research in geoscience depends on high-quality measurements over long periods of time in order to understand processes and to create and validate models. The promise of wireless sensor networks to monitor autonomously at unprecedented spatial and temporal scale motivated the use of this novel technology for studying mountain permafrost in the mid 2000s. Starting from a first experimental deployment to investigate the thermal properties of steep bedrock permafrost in 2006 on the Jungfraujoch, Switzerland at 3500 m asl using prototype wireless sensors the PermaSense project has evolved into a multi-site and multi-discipline initiative. We develop, deploy and operate wireless sensing systems customized for long-term autonomous operation in high-mountain environments. Around this central element, we develop concepts, methods and tools to investigate and to quantify the connection between climate, cryosphere (permafrost, glaciers, snow) and geomorphodynamics. In this presentation, we describe the concepts and system architecture used both for the wireless sensor network as well as for data management and processing. Furthermore, we will discuss the experience gained in over a decade of planning, installing and operating large deployments on field sites spread across a large part of the Swiss and French Alps and applications ranging from academic, experimental research campaigns, long-term monitoring and natural hazard warning in collaboration with government authorities and local industry partners. Reference http://www.permasense.ch Online Open Data Access http://data.permasense.ch

  20. Omalizumab management beyond clinical trials: the added value of a network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminati, Marco; Senna, Gianenrico; Chieco Bianchi, Fulvia; Marchi, Maria Rita; Vianello, Andrea; Micheletto, Claudio; Pomari, Carlo; Tognella, Silvia; Savoia, Francesca; Mirisola, Valentina; Rossi, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    Omalizumab is effective and safe in severe allergic asthma. Few data are available about its impact on lung function and on asthma comorbidities, long-term follow-up of treated patients, adherence, non-responders profile, and optimal treatment duration. We aimed at evaluating omalizumab-related clinical outcomes and unmet needs in a real-life setting. We created a collaborative network (NEONet - North East Omalizumab Network) involving 9 Allergy and Respiratory referral centres for severe asthma placed in the North-East of Italy. Patients' data were entered into a common study database shared by all the participating physicians. A preliminary retrospective analysis was performed. Patients come from a common well-defined geographical and environmental district providing a homogeneous population sample. A moderate but statistically significant improvement of the FEV1, and an increasing proportion of exacerbations-free patients were observed since the treatment start. These findings were independent of the baseline severity of bronchial obstruction. A positive impact of omalizumab on rhinitis in patients with both asthma and rhinitis was detected. Moreover the efficacy of omalizumab on asthma seemed not to be affected by the baseline severity of rhinitis. Our retrospective analysis represents a preliminary report from the NEONet activity. It confirmed omalizumab efficacy and provided some new insights about its impact on lung function and on comorbid rhinitis. The network approach, under a prospective view, allows creating a large uniform database, by means of a standardized shared tool for data collecting, and joining a multidisciplinary expertise. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessing computational genomics skills: Our experience in the H3ABioNet African bioinformatics network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Victor Jongeneel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The H3ABioNet pan-African bioinformatics network, which is funded to support the Human Heredity and Health in Africa (H3Africa program, has developed node-assessment exercises to gauge the ability of its participating research and service groups to analyze typical genome-wide datasets being generated by H3Africa research groups. We describe a framework for the assessment of computational genomics analysis skills, which includes standard operating procedures, training and test datasets, and a process for administering the exercise. We present the experiences of 3 research groups that have taken the exercise and the impact on their ability to manage complex projects. Finally, we discuss the reasons why many H3ABioNet nodes have declined so far to participate and potential strategies to encourage them to do so.

  2. Realization of a second level neural network trigger for the H1 experiment at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehne, J.K.; Fent, J.; Froechtenicht, W.; Gaede, F.; Gruber, A.; Haberer, W.; Kiesling, C.; Kobler, T.; Moeck, J.; Wegner, A.; Goldner, D.; Kraemerkaemper, T.; Kolander, M.; Kolanoski, H.

    1997-01-01

    Since 1996 the H1 experiment is fully equipped with two independent fast pattern recognition systems operating as second level triggers (L2). The decision time is 20 μs. One of the two is the neural network trigger. It runs an array of presently ten VME-boards with CNAPS 1064 chips (20 MHz, 128 Mcps) by adaptive solutions. The input trigger data from the detector components arrive in various formats on a 8 x 16 bit wide 10 MHz bus. Before usable as 8-bit input values to the CNAPS they are preprocessed by several bit-manipulating algorithms and arithmetic functions implemented on XILINX 4008 field programmable gate arrays (FPGA). The startup strategy for the new system is to concentrate on photoproduction channels or low multiplicity final states which so far could only be efficiently triggered with unacceptable high rates. (orig.)

  3. Language experience differentiates prefrontal and subcortical activation of the cognitive control network in novel word learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Kailyn A L; King, Kelly E; Hernandez, Arturo E

    2013-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the cognitive control mechanisms in adult English speaking monolinguals compared to early sequential Spanish-English bilinguals during the initial stages of novel word learning. Functional magnetic resonance imaging during a lexico-semantic task after only 2h of exposure to novel German vocabulary flashcards showed that monolinguals activated a broader set of cortical control regions associated with higher-level cognitive processes, including the supplementary motor area (SMA), anterior cingulate (ACC), and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), as well as the caudate, implicated in cognitive control of language. However, bilinguals recruited a more localized subcortical network that included the putamen, associated more with motor control of language. These results suggest that experience managing multiple languages may differentiate the learning strategy and subsequent neural mechanisms of cognitive control used by bilinguals compared to monolinguals in the early stages of novel word learning. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessing computational genomics skills: Our experience in the H3ABioNet African bioinformatics network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongeneel, C Victor; Achinike-Oduaran, Ovokeraye; Adebiyi, Ezekiel; Adebiyi, Marion; Adeyemi, Seun; Akanle, Bola; Aron, Shaun; Ashano, Efejiro; Bendou, Hocine; Botha, Gerrit; Chimusa, Emile; Choudhury, Ananyo; Donthu, Ravikiran; Drnevich, Jenny; Falola, Oluwadamila; Fields, Christopher J; Hazelhurst, Scott; Hendry, Liesl; Isewon, Itunuoluwa; Khetani, Radhika S; Kumuthini, Judit; Kimuda, Magambo Phillip; Magosi, Lerato; Mainzer, Liudmila Sergeevna; Maslamoney, Suresh; Mbiyavanga, Mamana; Meintjes, Ayton; Mugutso, Danny; Mpangase, Phelelani; Munthali, Richard; Nembaware, Victoria; Ndhlovu, Andrew; Odia, Trust; Okafor, Adaobi; Oladipo, Olaleye; Panji, Sumir; Pillay, Venesa; Rendon, Gloria; Sengupta, Dhriti; Mulder, Nicola

    2017-06-01

    The H3ABioNet pan-African bioinformatics network, which is funded to support the Human Heredity and Health in Africa (H3Africa) program, has developed node-assessment exercises to gauge the ability of its participating research and service groups to analyze typical genome-wide datasets being generated by H3Africa research groups. We describe a framework for the assessment of computational genomics analysis skills, which includes standard operating procedures, training and test datasets, and a process for administering the exercise. We present the experiences of 3 research groups that have taken the exercise and the impact on their ability to manage complex projects. Finally, we discuss the reasons why many H3ABioNet nodes have declined so far to participate and potential strategies to encourage them to do so.

  5. An Ensemble of Neural Networks for Online Electron Filtering at the ATLAS Experiment.

    CERN Document Server

    Da Fonseca Pinto, Joao Victor; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    In 2017 the ATLAS experiment implemented an ensemble of neural networks (NeuralRinger algorithm) dedicated to improving the performance of filtering events containing electrons in the high-input rate online environment of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva. The ensemble employs a concept of calorimetry rings. The training procedure and final structure of the ensemble are used to minimize fluctuations from detector response, according to the particle energy and position of incidence. A detailed study was carried out to assess profile distortions in crucial offline quantities through the usage of statistical tests and residual analysis. These details and the online performance of this algorithm during the 2017 data-taking will be presented.

  6. Identification of Jets Containing $b$-Hadrons with Recurrent Neural Networks at the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A novel $b$-jet identification algorithm is constructed with a Recurrent Neural Network (RNN) at the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The RNN based $b$-tagging algorithm processes charged particle tracks associated to jets without reliance on secondary vertex finding, and can augment existing secondary-vertex based taggers. In contrast to traditional impact-parameter-based $b$-tagging algorithms which assume that tracks associated to jets are independent from each other, the RNN based $b$-tagging algorithm can exploit the spatial and kinematic correlations between tracks which are initiated from the same $b$-hadrons. This new approach also accommodates an extended set of input variables. This note presents the expected performance of the RNN based $b$-tagging algorithm in simulated $t \\bar t$ events at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV.

  7. Social Networks and Externalities from Gift Exchange: Evidence from A Field Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Janet; Lin, Wanchuan; Meng, Juanjuan

    2013-11-01

    This paper asks whether gift exchange generates externalities for people outside of the bilateral relationship between the gift giver and recipient, and whether the nature of this relationship is affected by social networks. We examine this question in the context of a field experiment in urban Chinese hospital outpatient clinics. We first show that when patients give a small gift, doctors reciprocate with better service and a fewer unnecessary prescriptions of antibiotics. We then show that gift giving creates externalities for third parties. If two patients, A and B are perceived as unrelated, B receives worse care when A gives a gift. However, if A identifies B as a friend, then both A and B benefit from A's gift giving. Hence, we show that gift giving can create positive or negative externalities, depending on the giver's social distance to the third party.

  8. Integrating atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, experiments, and network analysis to study protein dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papaleo, Elena

    2015-01-01

    that we observe and the functional properties of these important cellular machines. To make progresses in this direction, we need to improve the physical models used to describe proteins and solvent in molecular dynamics, as well as to strengthen the integration of experiments and simulations to overcome...... with the possibility to validate simulation methods and physical models against a broad range of experimental observables. On the other side, it also allows a complementary and comprehensive view on protein structure and dynamics. What is needed now is a better understanding of the link between the dynamic properties...... simulations with attention to the effects that can be propagated over long distances and are often associated to important biological functions. In this context, approaches inspired by network analysis can make an important contribution to the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations....

  9. Visual Experience Shapes the Neural Networks Remapping Touch into External Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crollen, Virginie; Lazzouni, Latifa; Rezk, Mohamed; Bellemare, Antoine; Lepore, Franco; Collignon, Olivier

    2017-10-18

    Localizing touch relies on the activation of skin-based and externally defined spatial frames of reference. Psychophysical studies have demonstrated that early visual deprivation prevents the automatic remapping of touch into external space. We used fMRI to characterize how visual experience impacts the brain circuits dedicated to the spatial processing of touch. Sighted and congenitally blind humans performed a tactile temporal order judgment (TOJ) task, either with the hands uncrossed or crossed over the body midline. Behavioral data confirmed that crossing the hands has a detrimental effect on TOJ judgments in sighted but not in early blind people. Crucially, the crossed hand posture elicited enhanced activity, when compared with the uncrossed posture, in a frontoparietal network in the sighted group only. Psychophysiological interaction analysis revealed, however, that the congenitally blind showed enhanced functional connectivity between parietal and frontal regions in the crossed versus uncrossed hand postures. Our results demonstrate that visual experience scaffolds the neural implementation of the location of touch in space. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In daily life, we seamlessly localize touch in external space for action planning toward a stimulus making contact with the body. For efficient sensorimotor integration, the brain has therefore to compute the current position of our limbs in the external world. In the present study, we demonstrate that early visual deprivation alters the brain activity in a dorsal parietofrontal network typically supporting touch localization in the sighted. Our results therefore conclusively demonstrate the intrinsic role that developmental vision plays in scaffolding the neural implementation of touch perception. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/3710097-07$15.00/0.

  10. OPERATING SYSTEM FOR WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS AND AN EXPERIMENT OF PORTING CONTIKIOS TO MSP430 MICROCONTROLLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thang Vu Chien

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs consist of a large number of sensor nodes, and are used for various applications such as building monitoring, environment control, wild-life habitat monitoring, forest fire detection, industry automation, military, security, and health-care. Each sensor node needs an operating system (OS that can control the hardware, provide hardware abstraction to application software, and fill in the gap between applications and the underlying hardware. In this paper, researchers present OS for WSNs and an experiment of porting contikiOS to MSP430 microcontroller which is very popular in many hardware platforms for WSNs. Researchers begin by presenting the major issues for the design of OS for WSNs. Then, researchers examine some popular operating systems for WSNs including TinyOS, ContikiOS, and LiteOS. Finally, researchers present an experiment of porting ContikiOS to MSP430 microcontroller. Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs terdiri dari sejumlah besar sensor nodes, dan digunakan untuk berbagai aplikasi seperti pemantauan gedung, pengendalian lingkungan, pemantauan kehidupan habitat liar, deteksi kebakaran hutan, otomatisasi industri, militer, keamanan, dan kesehatan. Setiap sensor nodememerlukan sistem operasi (SO yang dapat mengontrol hardware, menyediakan abstraksi hardware untuk aplikasi perangkat lunak, dan mengisi kesenjangan antara aplikasi dan hardware. Dalam penelitian ini, peneliti menyajikan SO untuk WSNs dan percobaan dari port contikiOS untuk MSP430 mikrokontroler yang sangat populer di platformhardware untuk WSNs. Peneliti memulai dengan menghadirkan isu utama yaitu desain SO untuk WSNs. Lalu, penelitimemeriksa beberapa sistem operasi populer untuk WSNs, termasuk TinyOS, ContikiOS, dan LiteOS. Akhirnya penelitimenyajikan sebuah percobaan dari port ContikiOS untuk MSP430 mikrokontroler.

  11. Event classification with the electronic detectors of the OPERA experiment using neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hierholzer, Martin C.

    2012-02-15

    The OPERA experiment searches for {nu}{sub {mu}} <-> {nu}{sub {tau}} oscillations in appearance mode. It uses the emulsion cloud chamber (ECC) technique for a high spatial resolution combined with on-line components for event localisation and muon identification. The analysis of events in an ECC detector takes considerable time, especially in case of {nu}{sub {tau}}/{nu}{sub e} candidate events. A ranking of events by a probability for being a {nu}{sub {tau}}/{nu}{sub e} event can speed up the analysis of the OPERA experiment. An algorithm for such an event ranking based on a classification-type neural network is presented in this thesis. Almost all candidate events can be found within the first 30% of the analysed events if the described ranking is applied. This event ranking is currently applied for testing purposes by the OPERA collaboration, a decision on a full application for the whole analysis is pending. A similar neural network is used for discrimination between neutral and charged current events. This is used to observe neutrino oscillations in disappearance mode with the on-line components of the OPERA detector by measuring the energy dependence of the fraction of neutral current interactions. The confidence level of the observed oscillation effect is 87%. Assuming full mixing, the mass splitting has been determined to vertical stroke {delta}m{sup 2}{sub 32} vertical stroke =2.8{sub -1.7}{sup +1.4}.10{sup -3}eV{sup 2}.

  12. Using Web2.0 social network technology for sampling framework identification and respondent recruitment: experiences with a small-scale experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigolon, A.B.; Kemperman, A.D.A.M.; Timmermans, H.J.P.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we report the results of a small–scale experiment to explore the potential of using social network technology for respondent recruitment. Of particular interest are the following questions (i) can social media be used for the identification of sampling frames, (ii) what response rates

  13. Are Clinical Trial Experiences Utilized?: A Differentiated Model of Medical Sites’ Information Transfer Ability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smed, Marie; Schultz, Carsten; Getz, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    The collaboration with medical professionals in pharmaceutical clinical trials facilitates opportunities to gain valuable market information concerning product functionality issues, as well as issues related to market implementation and adoption. However, previous research on trial management lacks......’ information transfer ability, their methods of communicating, are included. The model is studied on a unique dataset of 395 medical site representatives by applying Rasch scale modeling to differentiate the stickiness of the heterogenic information issues. The results reveal that economic measures...... a differentiated perspective on the potential for information transfer from site to producer. An exploration of the variation in stickiness of information, and therefore the complexity of information transfer in clinical trials, is the main aim of this study. To further enrich the model of the dispersed sites...

  14. VRML metabolic network visualizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojdestvenski, Igor

    2003-03-01

    A successful date collection visualization should satisfy a set of many requirements: unification of diverse data formats, support for serendipity research, support of hierarchical structures, algorithmizability, vast information density, Internet-readiness, and other. Recently, virtual reality has made significant progress in engineering, architectural design, entertainment and communication. We experiment with the possibility of using the immersive abstract three-dimensional visualizations of the metabolic networks. We present the trial Metabolic Network Visualizer software, which produces graphical representation of a metabolic network as a VRML world from a formal description written in a simple SGML-type scripting language.

  15. Building a Multi-centre Clinical Research Facilitation Network: The ARC Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Nicholson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In order to practice evidence-based veterinary medicine, good quality clinical evidence needs to be produced, in order that it can be apprasied systematically by the EBVM network, and used by vets. There is very little good-quality veterinary evidence for most of the veterinary procedures carried out every day across the world. Very few, if any, individuals have all the necessary qualities (case-load, time, research expertise, financial support to be able to systematically produce good-quality, and relevant, clinical research on their own, in a timely manner. The Association for Veterinary Soft Tissue Surgery (AVSTS www.avsts.org.uk is an affiliate group with the British Small Animal Veterinary Association (BSAVA, and functions as a clinical network of like-minded individuals. In 2013 AVSTS sought to create a role for itself in facilitating the production (by its members of multi-centre clinical research of relevance to its members.Materials and methods: Members of AVSTS were asked to join the AVSTS Research Cooperative (ARC, with a veterinary epidemiologist and an experienced multi-centre veterinary clinical researcher (to help with study design and statistical planning, and the Animal Health Trust clinical research ethics committee. An email list was established, and a page was set up on the AVSTS website, to allow information to be disseminated. The AVSTS spring and autumn meetings were used as a regular forum by ARC, to discuss its direction, to generate interest, to create and promote specific studies (in order to widen participation amongst different centres, and to update members about previous studies.Results: Membership of ARC has grown to 224 people, although the epidemiologist left. One multi-centre study has been published, two have been presented and await publication, one has been accepted for presentation, two other studies are gathering data at present, and further studies are in the pipeline. There has been

  16. Influence network linkages across implementation strategy conditions in a randomized controlled trial of two strategies for scaling up evidence-based practices in public youth-serving systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palinkas, Lawrence A; Holloway, Ian W; Rice, Eric; Brown, C Hendricks; Valente, Thomas W; Chamberlain, Patricia

    2013-11-14

    Given the importance of influence networks in the implementation of evidence-based practices and interventions, it is unclear whether such networks continue to operate as sources of information and advice when they are segmented and disrupted by randomization to different implementation strategy conditions. The present study examines the linkages across implementation strategy conditions of social influence networks of leaders of youth-serving systems in 12 California counties participating in a randomized controlled trial of community development teams (CDTs) to scale up use of an evidence-based practice. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 38 directors, assistant directors, and program managers of county probation, mental health, and child welfare departments. A web-based survey collected additional quantitative data on information and advice networks of study participants. A mixed-methods approach to data analysis was used to create a sociometric data set (n = 176) to examine linkages between treatment and standard conditions. Of those network members who were affiliated with a county (n = 137), only 6 (4.4%) were directly connected to a member of the opposite implementation strategy condition; 19 (13.9%) were connected by two steps or fewer to a member of the opposite implementation strategy condition; 64 (46.7%) were connected by three or fewer steps to a member of the opposite implementation strategy condition. Most of the indirect steps between individuals who were in different implementation strategy conditions were connections involving a third non-county organizational entity that had an important role in the trial in keeping the implementation strategy conditions separate. When these entities were excluded, the CDT network exhibited fewer components and significantly higher betweenness centralization than did the standard condition network. Although the integrity of the RCT in this instance was not compromised by study participant influence

  17. Small-scale medical waste incinerators: experiences and trials in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rogers, DEC

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available incineration units. The trials showed that all of the units could be used to render medical waste non-infectious, and to destroy syringes or render needles unsuitable for reuse. Emission loads from the incinerators are higher than large-scale commercial...

  18. When referring physicians and researchers disagree on equipoise : the TOTAL trial experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, H. C. M. L.; Deprest, J.; v. d. Berg, P. P.

    Objective In this article, we reflect on whether randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are adequate for the clinical evaluation of maternal-fetal surgery for congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), focusing on the role of patients' preferences in the setting up of research protocols, on the requirement

  19. A FPGA-based Network Interface Card with GPUDirect enabling realtime GPU computing in HEP experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Lonardo, Alessandro; Ammendola, Roberto; Biagioni, Andrea; Cotta Ramusino, Angelo; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Frezza, Ottorino; Lamanna, Gianluca; Lo Cicero, Francesca; Martinelli, Michele; Neri, Ilaria; Paolucci, Pier Stanislao; Pastorelli, Elena; Pontisso, Luca; Rossetti, Davide; Simeone, Francesco; Simula, Francesco; Sozzi, Marco; Tosoratto, Laura; Vicini, Piero

    2015-01-01

    The capability of processing high bandwidth data streams in real-time is a computational requirement common to many High Energy Physics experiments. Keeping the latency of the data transport tasks under control is essential in order to meet this requirement. We present NaNet, a FPGA-based PCIe Network Interface Card design featuring Remote Direct Memory Access towards CPU and GPU memories plus a transport protocol offload module characterized by cycle-accurate upper-bound handling. The combination of these two features allows to relieve almost entirely the OS and the application from data tranfer management, minimizing the unavoidable jitter effects associated to OS process scheduling. The design currently supports one GbE (1000Base-T) and three custom 34 Gbps APElink I/O channels, but four-channels 10GbE (10Base-R) and 2.5 Gbps deterministic latency KM3link versions are being implemented. Two use cases of NaNet will be discussed: the GPU-based low level trigger for the RICH detector in the NA62 experiment an...

  20. SHAME EXPERIENCES AND PROBLEMATIC SOCIAL NETWORKING SITES USE: AN UNEXPLORED ASSOCIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Casale

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The current study investigates the main and indirect effects of shame experiences and perceived benefits of computer-mediated communication (CMC compared with face-to-face communication, on Problematic Social Networking Sites Use (PSNSU. In particular, a model in which perceived benefits of CMC (i.e. escapism, control over self-presentation, and approval/acceptance mediate the association between shame and PSNSU was tested. Method: A sample of 590 undergraduate students (mean age = 22.29 + 2.079; females = 53.2% completed measures of shame experiences, perceived benefits of CMC and PSNSU. Results: The assessed structural model produced adequate fit to the data (χ2= 352.99; df = 92; p <.001; RMSEA [90% CI] =.07 [.06-.08]; CFI = .97; SRMR = .06. Variables accounted for 50% of the variance in PSNSU. A partial mediation model in which shame predicted PSNSU levels through the perceived benefits of CMC was found. A direct relationship between shame and PSNSU was also detected. Conclusions: The current study highlights how feelings of shame can contribute to problematic use of SNS and emphasizes the necessity of taking into account the perceived benefits of CMC when exploring psychological risk factors for PSNSU.

  1. [Networks of experiences on community health as an information system in health promotion: lessons learned in Aragon (Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gállego-Diéguez, Javier; Aliaga Traín, Pilar; Benedé Azagra, Carmen Belén; Bueno Franco, Manuel; Ferrer Gracia, Elisa; Ipiéns Sarrate, José Ramón; Muñoz Nadal, Pilar; Plumed Parrilla, Manuela; Vilches Urrutia, Begoña

    2016-11-01

    Networks of community health experiences promote interaction and knowledge management in health promotion among their participants. These networks integrate both professionals and social agents who work directly on the ground in small environments, with defined objectives and inclusion criteria and voluntary participation. In this article, networks in Aragon (Spain) are reviewed in order to analyse their role as an information system. The Health Promotion Projects Network of Aragon (Red Aragonesa de Proyectos de Promoción de la Salud, RAPPS) was launched in 1996 and currently includes 73 projects. The average duration of projects is 12.7 years. RAPPS interdisciplinary teams involve 701 people, of which 89.6% are professionals and 10.6% are social agents. The Aragon Health Promoting Schools Network (Red Aragonesa de Escuelas Promotoras de Salud, RAEPS) integrates 134 schools (24.9% of Aragon). The schools teams involve 829 teachers and members of the school community, students (35.2%), families (26.2%) and primary care health professionals (9.8%). Experiences Networks boost citizen participation, have an influence in changing social determinants and contribute to the formulation of plans and regional strategies. Networks can provide indicators for a health promotion information and monitoring system on: capacity building services in the territory, identifying assets and models of good practice, cross-sectoral and equity initiatives. Experiences Networks represent an opportunity to create a health promotion information system, systematising available information and establishing quality criteria for initiatives. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Reconciling research and implementation in micro health insurance experiments in India: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doyle Conor

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microinsurance or Community-Based Health Insurance is a promising healthcare financing mechanism, which is increasingly applied to aid rural poor persons in low-income countries. Robust empirical evidence on the causal relations between Community-Based Health Insurance and healthcare utilisation, financial protection and other areas is scarce and necessary. This paper contains a discussion of the research design of three Cluster Randomised Controlled Trials in India to measure the impact of Community-Based Health Insurance on several outcomes. Methods/Design Each trial sets up a Community-Based Health Insurance scheme among a group of micro-finance affiliate families. Villages are grouped into clusters which are congruous with pre-existing social groupings. These clusters are randomly assigned to one of three waves of implementation, ensuring the entire population is offered Community-Based Health Insurance by the end of the experiment. Each wave of treatment is preceded by a round of mixed methods evaluation, with quantitative, qualitative and spatial evidence on impact collected. Improving upon practices in published Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial literature, we detail how research design decisions have ensured that both the households offered insurance and the implementers of the Community-Based Health Insurance scheme operate in an environment replicating a non-experimental implementation. Discussion When a Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial involves randomizing within a community, generating adequate and valid conclusions requires that the research design must be made congruous with social structures within the target population, to ensure that such trials are conducted in an implementing environment which is a suitable analogue to that of a non-experimental implementing environment.

  3. Cigarette Smoking During Substance Use Disorder Treatment: Secondary Outcomes from a National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Erin A; Campbell, Aimee N C; Pavlicova, Martina; Hu, Meichen; Winhusen, Theresa; Vandrey, Ryan G; Ruglass, Lesia M; Covey, Lirio S; Stitzer, Maxine L; Kyle, Tiffany L; Nunes, Edward V

    2015-06-01

    The majority of patients enrolled in treatment for substance use disorders (SUDs) also use tobacco. Many will continue to use tobacco even during abstinence from other drugs and alcohol, often leading to smoking-related illnesses. Despite this, little research has been conducted to assess the influence of being a smoker on SUD treatment outcomes and changes in smoking during a treatment episode. In this secondary analysis, cigarette smoking was evaluated in participants completing outpatient SUD treatment as part of a multi-site study conducted by the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network. Analyses included the assessment of changes in smoking and nicotine dependence via the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence during the 12-week study among all smokers (aim #1), specifically among those in the experimental treatment group (aim #2), and the moderating effect of being a smoker on treatment outcomes (aim #3). Participants generally did not reduce or quit smoking throughout the course of the study. Among a sub-set of participants with higher baseline nicotine dependence scores randomized to the control arm, scores at the end of treatment were lower compared to the experimental arm, though measures of smoking quantity did not appear to decrease. Further, being a smoker was associated with poorer treatment outcomes compared to non-smokers enrolled in the trial. This study provides evidence that patients enrolled in community-based SUD treatment continue to smoke, even when abstaining from drugs and alcohol. These results add to the growing literature encouraging the implementation of targeted, evidence-based interventions to promote abstinence from tobacco among SUD treatment patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Youth social behaviour and network therapy (Y-SBNT): adaptation of a family and social network intervention for young people who misuse alcohol and drugs - a randomised controlled feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Judith; Toner, Paul; Day, Ed; Back, Donna; Brady, Louca-Mai; Fairhurst, Caroline; Renwick, Charlotte; Templeton, Lorna; Akhtar, Shabana; Lloyd, Charlie; Li, Jinshuo; Cocks, Kim; Ambegaokar, Sangeeta; Parrott, Steve; McArdle, Paul; Gilvarry, Eilish; Copello, Alex

    2017-03-01

    Family interventions appear to be effective at treating young people's substance misuse. However, implementation of family approaches in UK services is low. This study aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of recruiting young people to an intervention based on an adaptation of adult social behaviour and network therapy. It also sought to involve young people with experience of using substance misuse services in the research process. To demonstrate the feasibility of recruiting young people to family and social network therapy and to explore ways in which young people with experience of using substance misuse services could be involved in a study of this nature. A pragmatic, two-armed, randomised controlled open feasibility trial. Two UK-based treatment services for young people with substance use problems, with recruitment taking place from May to November 2014. Young people aged 12-18 years, newly referred and accepted for structured interventions for drug and/or alcohol problems. A remote, web-based computer randomisation system allocated young people to adapted youth social behaviour and network therapy (Y-SBNT) or treatment as usual (TAU). Y-SBNT participants were intended to receive up to six 50-minute sessions over a maximum of 12 weeks. TAU participants continued to receive usual care delivered by their service. Feasibility was measured by recruitment rates, retention in treatment and follow-up completion rates. The main clinical outcome was the proportion of days on which the main problem substance was used in the preceding 90-day period as captured by the Timeline Follow-Back interview at 3 and 12 months. In total, 53 young people were randomised (Y-SBNT, n  = 26; TAU, n  = 27) against a target of 60 (88.3%). Forty-two young people attended at least one treatment session [Y-SBNT 22/26 (84.6%); TAU 20/27 (74.1%)]; follow-up rates were 77.4% at month 3 and 73.6% at month 12. Data for nine young people were missing at both months 3 and 12, so the main

  5. Efficacy of community-based physiotherapy networks for patients with Parkinson's disease: a cluster-randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munneke, Marten; Nijkrake, Maarten J; Keus, Samyra Hj; Kwakkel, Gert; Berendse, Henk W; Roos, Raymund Ac; Borm, George F; Adang, Eddy M; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2010-01-01

    Many patients with Parkinson's disease are treated with physiotherapy. We have developed a community-based professional network (ParkinsonNet) that involves training of a selected number of expert physiotherapists to work according to evidence-based recommendations, and structured referrals to these trained physiotherapists to increase the numbers of patients they treat. We aimed to assess the efficacy of this approach for improving health-care outcomes. Between February, 2005, and August, 2007, we did a cluster-randomised trial with 16 clusters (defined as community hospitals and their catchment area). Clusters were randomly allocated by use of a variance minimisation algorithm to ParkinsonNet care (n=8) or usual care (n=8). Patients were assessed at baseline and at 8, 16, and 24 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was a patient preference disability score, the patient-specific index score, at 16 weeks. Health secondary outcomes were functional mobility, mobility-related quality of life, and total societal costs over 24 weeks. Analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered, number NCT00330694. We included 699 patients. Baseline characteristics of the patients were comparable between the ParkinsonNet clusters (n=358) and usual-care clusters (n=341). The primary endpoint was similar for patients within the ParkinsonNet clusters (mean 47.7, SD 21.9) and control clusters (48.3, 22.4). Health secondary endpoints were also similar for patients in both study groups. Total costs over 24 weeks were lower in ParkinsonNet clusters compared with usual-care clusters (difference euro727; 95% CI 56-1399). Implementation of ParkinsonNet networks did not change health outcomes for patients living in ParkinsonNet clusters. However, health-care costs were reduced in ParkinsonNet clusters compared with usual-care clusters. ZonMw; Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research; Dutch Parkinson's Disease Society; National Parkinson Foundation; Stichting Robuust

  6. Comparison of the efficacy and safety of thrombectomy devices in acute stroke : a network meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, Hamidreza; Rajah, Gary B; Kherallah, Riyad Y; Jadhav, Ashutosh P; Narayanan, Sandra

    2017-12-15

    Mechanical thrombectomy (MT) is increasingly used for large-vessel occlusions (LVO), but randomized clinical trial (RCT) level data with regard to differences in clinical outcomes of MT devices are limited. We conducted a network meta-analysis (NMA) that enables comparison of modern MT devices (Trevo, Solitaire, Aspiration) and strategies (stent retriever vs aspiration) across trials. Relevant RCTs were identified by a systematic review. The efficacy outcome was 90-day functional independence (modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score 0-2). Safety outcomes were 90-day catastrophic outcome (mRS 5-6) and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH). Fixed-effect Bayesian NMA was performed to calculate risk estimates and the rank probabilities. In a NMA of six relevant RCTs (SWIFT, TREVO2, EXTEND-IA, SWIFT-PRIME, REVASCAT, THERAPY; total of 871 patients, 472 Solitaire vs medical-only, 108 Aspiration vs medical-only, 178 Trevo vs Merci, and 113 Solitaire vs Merci) with medical-only arm as the reference, Trevo had the greatest functional independence (OR 4.14, 95% credible interval (CrI) 1.41-11.80; top rank probability 92%) followed by Solitaire (OR 2.55, 95% CrI 1.75-3.74; top rank probability 72%). Solitaire and Aspiration devices had the greatest top rank probability with respect to low sICH and catastrophic outcomes (76% and 91%, respectively), but without significant differences between each other. In a separate network of seven RCTs (MR-CLEAN, ESCAPE, EXTEND-IA, SWIFT-PRIME, REVASCAT, THERAPY, ASTER; 1737 patients), first-line stent retriever was associated with a higher top rank probability of functional independence than aspiration (95% vs 54%), with comparable safety outcomes. These findings suggest that Trevo and Solitaire devices are associated with a greater likelihood of functional independence whereas Solitaire and Aspiration devices appear to be safer. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights

  7. GPON FTTH trial: lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Erik; Hölzl, Rainer; Breuer, Dirk; Lange, Christoph

    2009-11-01

    This paper reports on a FTTH field trial with GPON (Gigabit-capable passive optical network) technology in the network of Deutsche Telekom in the region of the cities of Berlin and Potsdam. Focus of this trial was to gain practical experience regarding GPON technology, fibre installation in existing ducts with micro duct technology, fibre cabling in customer buildings and impact on operational processes. Furthermore it is reported on an initial Deutsche Telekom FTTB deployment based on GPON technology in the city of Dresden with the main targets to obtain practical deployment and operation experiences with fibre-based access networks and to provide broadband access to a part of the city formerly not servable by DSL (digital subscriber line) technology.

  8. Preventing Obesity in the Military Community (POMC): The Development of a Clinical Trials Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieker, Elena A.; Sbrocco, Tracy; Theim, Kelly R.; Maurer, Douglas; Johnson, Dawn; Bryant, Edny; Bakalar, Jennifer L.; Schvey, Natasha A.; Ress, Rachel; Seehusen, Dean; Klein, David A.; Stice, Eric; Yanovski, Jack A.; Chan, Linda; Gentry, Shari; Ellsworth, Carol; Hill, Joanne W.; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Stephens, Mark B.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity impacts the U.S. military by affecting the health and readiness of active duty service members and their families. Preventing Obesity in Military Communities (POMC) is a comprehensive research program within Patient Centered Medical Homes (PCMHs) in three Military Training Facilities. This paper describes three pilot randomized controlled trials that target critical high risk periods for unhealthy weight gain from birth to young adulthood: (1) pregnancy and early infancy (POMC-Mother-Baby), (2) adolescence (POMC-Adolescent), and (3) the first tour of duty after boot camp (POMC-Early Career). Each study employs a two-group randomized treatment or prevention program with follow up. POMC offers a unique opportunity to bring together research and clinical expertise in obesity prevention to develop state-of-the-art programs within PCMHs in Military Training Facilities. This research builds on existing infrastructure that is expected to have immediate clinical benefits to DoD and far-reaching potential for ongoing collaborative work. POMC may offer an economical approach for widespread obesity prevention, from conception to young adulthood, in the U.S. military as well as in civilian communities. PMID:25648176

  9. Efficacy of Supplementation with B Vitamins for Stroke Prevention: A Network Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongli Dong

    Full Text Available Supplementation with B vitamins for stroke prevention has been evaluated over the years, but which combination of B vitamins is optimal for stroke prevention is unclear. We performed a network meta-analysis to assess the impact of different combinations of B vitamins on risk of stroke.A total of 17 trials (86 393 patients comparing 7 treatment strategies and placebo were included. A network meta-analysis combined all available direct and indirect treatment comparisons to evaluate the efficacy of B vitamin supplementation for all interventions.B vitamin supplementation was associated with reduced risk of stroke and cerebral hemorrhage. The risk of stroke was lower with folic acid plus vitamin B6 as compared with folic acid plus vitamin B12 and was lower with folic acid plus vitamin B6 plus vitamin B12 as compared with placebo or folic acid plus vitamin B12. The treatments ranked in order of efficacy for stroke, from higher to lower, were folic acid plus vitamin B6 > folic acid > folic acid plus vitamin B6 plus vitamin B12 > vitamin B6 plus vitamin B12 > niacin > vitamin B6 > placebo > folic acid plus vitamin B12.B vitamin supplementation was associated with reduced risk of stroke; different B vitamins and their combined treatments had different efficacy on stroke prevention. Folic acid plus vitamin B6 might be the optimal therapy for stroke prevention. Folic acid and vitamin B6 were both valuable for stroke prevention. The efficacy of vitamin B12 remains to be studied.

  10. Localized reactive flow in carbonate rocks: Core-flood experiments and network simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haoyue; Bernabé, Yves; Mok, Ulrich; Evans, Brian

    2016-11-01

    We conducted four core-flood experiments on samples of a micritic, reef limestone from Abu Dhabi under conditions of constant flow rate. The pore fluid was water in equilibrium with CO2, which, because of its lowered pH, is chemically reactive with the limestone. Flow rates were between 0.03 and 0.1 mL/min. The difference between up and downstream pore pressures dropped to final values ≪1 MPa over periods of 3-18 h. Scanning electron microscope and microtomography imaging of the starting material showed that the limestone is mostly calcite and lacks connected macroporosity and that the prevailing pores are few microns large. During each experiment, a wormhole formed by localized dissolution, an observation consistent with the decreases in pressure head between the up and downstream reservoirs. Moreover, we numerically modeled the changes in permeability during the experiments. We devised a network approach that separated the pore space into competing subnetworks of pipes. Thus, the problem was framed as a competition of flow of the reactive fluid among the adversary subnetworks. The precondition for localization within certain time is that the leading subnetwork rapidly becomes more transmissible than its competitors. This novel model successfully simulated features of the shape of the wormhole as it grew from few to about 100 µm, matched the pressure history patterns, and yielded the correct order of magnitude of the breakthrough time. Finally, we systematically studied the impact of changing the statistical parameters of the subnetworks. Larger mean radius and spatial correlation of the leading subnetwork led to faster localization.

  11. Networking

    OpenAIRE

    Rauno Lindholm, Daniel; Boisen Devantier, Lykke; Nyborg, Karoline Lykke; Høgsbro, Andreas; Fries, de; Skovlund, Louise

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to examine what influencing factor that has had an impact on the presumed increasement of the use of networking among academics on the labour market and how it is expressed. On the basis of the influence from globalization on the labour market it can be concluded that the globalization has transformed the labour market into a market based on the organization of networks. In this new organization there is a greater emphasis on employees having social qualificati...

  12. Knowledge sharing Network analysis and its relationship with the experience and education of librarians at Ferdowsi University of Mashhad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Salami

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available As human resources are important resources in organization, it is important for organizations to use knowledge organization of human resources. Thus managing and sharing knowledge in organizations is so important. Libraries as well service-oriented and knowledge-based organizations, librarians’ contribution of knowledge management is important. The study tries to determine Ferdowsi University of Mashhad librarians’ participation in the process of knowledge sharing by knowledge sharing network analysis method. The application used for social network analysis is UCINET6. Determining the degree of centralization in the network of knowledge sharing can also help to detect factors may influence it. In this study, the degree of centralization in the network of knowledge sharing communicating with the librarians' qualifications and work experiences were tested. It is also determined the degree centralization of the whole of the knowledge sharing network with 26.76% that is not so satisfactory.  The results show that despite the positive relationship between level of education and the centrality of people, the experience no significant relationship. Statistically, there is also no significant difference between men and women in knowledge sharing degrees of librarians in Ferdowsi University of Mashhad. At the end, according to the results of this research some suggestions are given to increase degrees of knowledge sharing of librarians and generally knowledge sharing degree of the network knowledge sharing.

  13. The role of autobiographical memory networks in the experience of negative emotions: how our remembered past elicits our current feelings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Frederick L; Koestner, Richard; Lecours, Serge; Beaulieu-Pelletier, Genevieve; Bois, Katy

    2011-12-01

    The present research examined the role of autobiographical memory networks on negative emotional experiences. Results from 2 studies found support for an active but also discriminant role of autobiographical memories and their related networked memories on negative emotions. In addition, in line with self-determination theory, thwarting of the psychological needs for competence, autonomy, and relatedness was found to be the critical component of autobiographical memory affecting negative emotional experiences. Study 1 revealed that need thwarting in a specific autobiographical memory network related to the theme of loss was positively associated with depressive negative emotions, but not with other negative emotions. Study 2 showed within a prospective design a differential predictive validity between 2 autobiographical memory networks (an anger-related vs. a guilt-related memory) on situational anger reactivity with respect to unfair treatment. All of these results held after controlling for neuroticism (Studies 1 and 2), self-control (Study 2), and for the valence (Study 1) and emotions (Study 2) found in the measured autobiographical memory network. These findings highlight the ongoing emotional significance of representations of need thwarting in autobiographical memory networks. (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

  14. Network Supervision of Adult Experience and Learning Dependent Sensory Cortical Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, David T

    2017-06-18

    The brain is capable of remodeling throughout life. The sensory cortices provide a useful preparation for studying neuroplasticity both during development and thereafter. In adulthood, sensory cortices change in the cortical area activated by behaviorally relevant stimuli, by the strength of response within that activated area, and by the temporal profiles of those responses. Evidence supports forms of unsupervised, reinforcement, and fully supervised network learning rules. Studies on experience-dependent plasticity have mostly not controlled for learning, and they find support for unsupervised learning mechanisms. Changes occur with greatest ease in neurons containing α-CamKII, which are pyramidal neurons in layers II/III and layers V/VI. These changes use synaptic mechanisms including long term depression. Synaptic strengthening at NMDA-containing synapses does occur, but its weak association with activity suggests other factors also initiate changes. Studies that control learning find support of reinforcement learning rules and limited evidence of other forms of supervised learning. Behaviorally associating a stimulus with reinforcement leads to a strengthening of cortical response strength and enlarging of response area with poor selectivity. Associating a stimulus with omission of reinforcement leads to a selective weakening of responses. In some preparations in which these associations are not as clearly made, neurons with the most informative discharges are relatively stronger after training. Studies analyzing the temporal profile of responses associated with omission of reward, or of plasticity in studies with different discriminanda but statistically matched stimuli, support the existence of limited supervised network learning. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:977-1008, 2017. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Interfacing with in-Situ Data Networks during the Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, M.; Griffith, P. C.; Duffy, D.; Hoy, E.; Schnase, J. L.; Sinno, S.; Thompson, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) is designed to improve understanding of the causes and impacts of ecological changes in Arctic/boreal regions, and will integrate field-based studies, modeling, and data from airborne and satellite remote sensing. ABoVE will result in a fuller understanding of ecosystem vulnerability and resilience to environmental change in the Arctic and boreal regions of western North America, and provide scientific information required to develop options for societal responses to the impacts of these changes. The studies sponsored by NASA during ABoVE will be coordinated with research and in-situ monitoring activities being sponsored by a number of national and international partners. The NASA Center for Climate Simulation at the Goddard Space Flight Center has partnered with the NASA Carbon Cycle & Ecosystems Office to create a science cloud designed for this field campaign - the ABoVE Science Cloud (ASC). The ASC combines high performance computing with emerging technologies to create an environment specifically designed for large-scale modeling, analysis of remote sensing data, copious disk storage with integrated data management, and integration of core variables from in-situ networks identified by the ABoVE Science Definition Team. In this talk, we will present the scientific requirements driving the development of the ABoVE Science Cloud, discuss the necessary interfaces, both computational and human, with in-situ monitoring networks, and show examples of how the ASC is being used to meet the needs of the ABoVE campaign.

  16. SU-F-T-237: The Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC) Cooperatives Activities Supporting the NCI’s National Clinical Trial Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Galvin, J [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Newtown, PA (United States); Michalski, J [Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO (United States); Rosen, M [University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); FitzGerald, T [University of Massachusetts Medical School, Lincoln, RI (United States); Knopp, M [The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC) Cooperative has been active for the past two years supporting the National Clinical Trial Network and the details of that support are reported. Methods: There are six QA centers (Houston, Ohio, Philadelphia-RT, Philadelphia-DI, Rhode Island, St. Louis) providing an integrated RT and DI quality control program in support of the NCI’s clinical trials. The QA Center’s efforts are focused on assuring high quality data for clinical trials designed to improve the clinical outcomes for cancer patients worldwide. This program is administered through five core services: site qualification, trial design support, credentialing, data management, and case review. Results: IROC currently provides core support for 172 NCTN trials with RT, DI and RT/DI components. Many of these trials were legacy trial from the previous cooperative group program. IROC monitors nearly 1800 RT photon and 20 proton institutions. Over 28,000 beams outputs were monitored with 8% of the sites requiring repeat audits due to beam out of criteria. As part of credentialing, 950 QA phantoms have been irradiated, 515 imaging modalities evaluated and almost 4000 credentialing letters have been issued. In just year 2, 5290 RT and 4934 DI patient datasets were received (many using TRIAD) by IROC QA Centers to be prepared for review. During the past 2 years, a total of 6300 RT cases and 19,000 DI image sets were reviewed by IROC technical staff. To date, IROC has published 36 manuscripts. Conclusion: The QA services provided by IROC are numerous and are continually being evaluated for effectiveness, harmonized across all NCTN Groups and administered in an efficient and timely manner to enhance accurate and per protocol trial data submission. These efforts increase each NCTN Group’s ability to derive meaningful outcomes from their clinical trials. This work was supported by DHHS NIH grant 5U24CA180803.

  17. Selective Narrowing of Social Networks across Adulthood is Associated with Improved Emotional Experience in Daily Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Tammy; Carstensen, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    Past research has documented age differences in the size and composition of social networks that suggest that networks grow smaller with age and include an increasingly greater proportion of well-known social partners. According to socioemotional selectivity theory, such changes in social network composition serve an antecedent emotion regulatory…

  18. Preoperative airway assessment - experience gained from a multicentre cluster randomised trial and the Danish Anaesthesia Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Anders Kehlet

    2016-01-01

    difficult intubation compared with usual care for airway assessment. This thesis is based on data from the Danish Anaesthesia Database (DAD). Paper 1 presents an observational cohort study on 188,064 patients who underwent tracheal intubation from 2008 to 2011. Data on the anaesthesiologists' preoperative...... to the DIFFICAIR trial described in Paper 4. The trial was designed to randomise anaesthesia department to either thorough education in, and subsequent use of the SARI for preoperative airway assessment or to continue usual care. Registration of the SARI in DAD was made mandatory in SARI departments and impossible...... unanticipated. Furthermore, 94% of all difficult mask ventilations were unanticipated. In Paper 4, 59,514 patients were included in the primary analyses. The proportion of unanticipated difficult intubations was 2.38% (696/29,209) in SARI departments and 2.39% (723/30,305) in usual care departments...

  19. Sharing for Health: A Study of Chinese Adolescents' Experiences and Perspectives on Using Social Network Sites to Share Health Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ni; Teti, Michele; Stanfield, Kellie; Campo, Shelly

    2017-07-01

    This exploratory qualitative study examines Chinese adolescents' health information sharing habits on social network sites. Ten focus group meetings with 76 adolescents, ages 12 to 17 years, were conducted at community-based organizations in Chicago's Chinatown. The research team transcribed the recording and analyzed the transcripts using ATLAS.ti. Chinese adolescents are using different social network sites for various topics of health information including food, physical activity, and so on. Adolescents would share useful and/or interesting health information. Many adolescents raised credibility concerns regarding health information and suggested evaluating the information based on self-experience or intuition, word-of-mouth, or information online. The findings shed lights on future intervention using social network sites to promote health among Chinese adolescents in the United States. Future interventions should provide adolescents with interesting and culturally sensitive health information and educate them to critically evaluate health information on social network sites.

  20. Russian experience with injectable chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine sulfate: a review of clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Karateev

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The widespread use of parenteral chondroprotectors is a feature of Russian medical practice. There are many drugs of this series in a Russian physician's arsenal, including chondroitin sulfate (CS,  glucosamine sulfate (GS, glycosaminoglycan-peptide complex, and  bioactive concentrate from small sea fish for intramuscular  injections. The paper analyzes Russian trials of the efficacy and  safety of two injectable formulations of CS and GS (ICS and IGS.  ICS was tested in 17 articles containing a total of 1639 patients with  osteoarthritis (OA, non-specific back pain (NBP, or shoulder  fractures and pain after stroke. Standard therapy (NSAIDs +  physiotherapy served as a control in the majority of the paper. In  these trials, the reductions in visual analog scale (VAS and WOMAC pain in OA treated with ICS averaged 58.2±22.3% and those were 26.1±14.7% in the control groups; the reductions in VAS NBP  reached an average of 87.1±16.8 and 62.2±21.7%, respectively.  ICS also showed a good effect in shoulder fractures and pain after a  stroke. The number of local adverse reactions after injections was  insignificant (4.4%; they did not threaten the health of patients and they caused ICS to be discontinued only in 3 cases. IGS was  investigated in two trials (n=154, which confirmed its efficacy (total pain relief >50% and relative safety. Thus, the data of Russian trials suggest that ICS and IGS have good therapeutic potential and favorable tolerance.

  1. Experience with low-cost telemedicine in three different settings. Recommendations based on a proposed framework for network performance evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, Richard; Vladzymyrskyy, Anton; Zolfo, Maria; Bonnardot, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Background Telemedicine has been used for many years to support doctors in the developing world. Several networks provide services in different settings and in different ways. However, to draw conclusions about which telemedicine networks are successful requires a method of evaluating them. No general consensus or validated framework exists for this purpose. Objective To define a basic method of performance measurement that can be used to improve and compare teleconsultation networks; to employ the proposed framework in an evaluation of three existing networks; to make recommendations about the future implementation and follow-up of such networks. Methods Analysis based on the experience of three telemedicine networks (in operation for 7–10 years) that provide services to doctors in low-resource settings and which employ the same basic design. Findings Although there are many possible indicators and metrics that might be relevant, five measures for each of the three user groups appear to be sufficient for the proposed framework. In addition, from the societal perspective, information about clinical- and cost-effectiveness is also required. The proposed performance measurement framework was applied to three mature telemedicine networks. Despite their differences in terms of activity, size and objectives, their performance in certain respects is very similar. For example, the time to first reply from an expert is about 24 hours for each network. Although all three networks had systems in place to collect data from the user perspective, none of them collected information about the coordinator's time required or about ease of system usage. They had only limited information about quality and cost. Conclusion Measuring the performance of a telemedicine network is essential in understanding whether the network is working as intended and what effect it is having. Based on long-term field experience, the suggested framework is a practical tool that will permit

  2. Experience with low-cost telemedicine in three different settings. Recommendations based on a proposed framework for network performance evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Wootton

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Telemedicine has been used for many years to support doctors in the developing world. Several networks provide services in different settings and in different ways. However, to draw conclusions about which telemedicine networks are successful requires a method of evaluating them. No general consensus or validated framework exists for this purpose.To define a basic method of performance measurement that can be used to improve and compare teleconsultation networks; to employ the proposed framework in an evaluation of three existing networks; to make recommendations about the future implementation and follow-up of such networks.Analysis based on the experience of three telemedicine networks (in operation for 7–10 years that provide services to doctors in low-resource settings and which employ the same basic design.Although there are many possible indicators and metrics that might be relevant, five measures for each of the three user groups appear to be sufficient for the proposed framework. In addition, from the societal perspective, information about clinical- and cost-effectiveness is also required. The proposed performance measurement framework was applied to three mature telemedicine networks. Despite their differences in terms of activity, size and objectives, their performance in certain respects is very similar. For example, the time to first reply from an expert is about 24 hours for each network. Although all three networks had systems in place to collect data from the user perspective, none of them collected information about the coordinator's time required or about ease of system usage. They had only limited information about quality and cost.Measuring the performance of a telemedicine network is essential in understanding whether the network is working as intended and what effect it is having. Based on long-term field experience, the suggested framework is a practical tool that will permit organisations to assess the performance of

  3. Engaging veterans with substance abuse disorders into a research trial: success with study branding, networking, and presence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalek, Anne Kathryn; Kan, David; Prochaska, Judith

    2015-06-01

    Recruiting and retaining clients in health interventions can be challenging especially when targeting multiple behavior change in high-risk populations. To inform the methods of trials working with similarly complex clinical populations, we describe multi-pronged efforts to recruit and retain a representative sample. In a two-group RCT, veterans were recruited from a Veteran Affairs Medical Center. The goal was to enroll 200 participants over a 25-month period, and to exceed 70 % follow-up for all treatment arms. To meet these goals, a four-pronged strategy was developed: branding, outreach/networking, onsite presence, and incentives. In month 1, 32 % of the proposed sample size was met (n = 64), and by month 2, 45 % (n = 90); the recruitment goal (n = 200) was achieved 13 months ahead of schedule. Retention exceeds 90 % at all time points out to 18 months. The multipronged recruitment and retention plan was efficient, cost effective, and may generalize to other health promotion initiatives.

  4. Integrating a suicide prevention program into the primary health care network: a field trial study in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakouti, Seyed Kazem; Nojomi, Marzieh; Poshtmashadi, Marjan; Hakim Shooshtari, Mitra; Mansouri Moghadam, Fariba; Rahimi-Movaghar, Afarin; Afghah, Susan; Bolhari, Jafar; Bazargan-Hejazi, Shahrzad

    2015-01-01

    To describe and evaluate the feasibility of integrating a suicide prevention program with Primary Health Care services and evaluate if such system can improve screening and identification of depressive disorder, reduce number of suicide attempters, and lower rate of suicide completion. This was a quasi-experimental trial in which one community was exposed to the intervention versus the control community with no such exposure. The study sites were two counties in Western Iran. The intervention protocol called for primary care and suicide prevention collaboration at different levels of care. The outcome variables were the number of suicides committed, the number of documented suicide attempts, and the number of identified depressed cases. We identified a higher prevalence of depressive disorders in the intervention site versus the control site (χ (2) = 14.8, P suicide completion in the intervention region compared to the control, but a higher prevalence of suicide attempts in both the intervention and the control sites. Integrating a suicide prevention program with the Primary Health Care network enhanced depression and suicide surveillance capacity and subsequently reduced the number of suicides, especially in rural areas.

  5. Integrating a Suicide Prevention Program into the Primary Health Care Network: A Field Trial Study in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Kazem Malakouti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To describe and evaluate the feasibility of integrating a suicide prevention program with Primary Health Care services and evaluate if such system can improve screening and identification of depressive disorder, reduce number of suicide attempters, and lower rate of suicide completion. Methodology. This was a quasi-experimental trial in which one community was exposed to the intervention versus the control community with no such exposure. The study sites were two counties in Western Iran. The intervention protocol called for primary care and suicide prevention collaboration at different levels of care. The outcome variables were the number of suicides committed, the number of documented suicide attempts, and the number of identified depressed cases. Results. We identified a higher prevalence of depressive disorders in the intervention site versus the control site (χ2=14.8, P<0.001. We also found a reduction in the rate of suicide completion in the intervention region compared to the control, but a higher prevalence of suicide attempts in both the intervention and the control sites. Conclusion. Integrating a suicide prevention program with the Primary Health Care network enhanced depression and suicide surveillance capacity and subsequently reduced the number of suicides, especially in rural areas.

  6. In-beam experience with a highly granular DAQ and control network: TrbNet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, J; Korcyl, G; Maier, L; Traxler, M

    2013-01-01

    Virtually all Data Acquisition Systems (DAQ) for nuclear and particle physics experiments use a large number of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) for data transport and more complex tasks as pattern recognition and data reduction. All these FPGAs in a large system have to share a common state like a trigger number or an epoch counter to keep the system synchronized for a consistent event/epoch building. Additionally, the collected data has to be transported with high bandwidth, optionally via the ubiquitous Ethernet protocol. Furthermore, the FPGAs' internal states and configuration memories have to be accessed for control and monitoring purposes. Another requirement for a modern DAQ-network is the fault-tolerance for intermittent data errors in the form of automatic retransmission of faulty data. As FPGAs suffer from Single Event Effects when exposed to ionizing particles, the system has to deal with failing FPGAs. The TrbNet protocol was developed taking all these requirements into account. Three virtual channels are merged on one physical medium: The trigger/epoch information is transported with the highest priority. The data channel is second in the priority order, while the control channel is the last. Combined with a small frame size of 80 bit this guarantees a low latency data transport: A system with 100 front-ends can be built with a one-way latency of 2.2 us. The TrbNet-protocol was implemented in each of the 550 FPGAs of the HADES upgrade project and has been successfully used during the Au+Au campaign in April 2012. With 2⋅10 6 /s Au-ions and 3% interaction ratio the accepted trigger rate is 10 kHz while data is written to storage with 150 MBytes/s. Errors are reliably mitigated via the implemented retransmission of packets and auto-shut-down of individual links. TrbNet was also used for full monitoring of the FEE status. The network stack is written in VHDL and was successfully deployed on various Lattice and Xilinx devices. The TrbNet is also

  7. In-beam experience with a highly granular DAQ and control network: TrbNet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, J.; Korcyl, G.; Maier, L.; Traxler, M.

    2013-02-01

    Virtually all Data Acquisition Systems (DAQ) for nuclear and particle physics experiments use a large number of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) for data transport and more complex tasks as pattern recognition and data reduction. All these FPGAs in a large system have to share a common state like a trigger number or an epoch counter to keep the system synchronized for a consistent event/epoch building. Additionally, the collected data has to be transported with high bandwidth, optionally via the ubiquitous Ethernet protocol. Furthermore, the FPGAs' internal states and configuration memories have to be accessed for control and monitoring purposes. Another requirement for a modern DAQ-network is the fault-tolerance for intermittent data errors in the form of automatic retransmission of faulty data. As FPGAs suffer from Single Event Effects when exposed to ionizing particles, the system has to deal with failing FPGAs. The TrbNet protocol was developed taking all these requirements into account. Three virtual channels are merged on one physical medium: The trigger/epoch information is transported with the highest priority. The data channel is second in the priority order, while the control channel is the last. Combined with a small frame size of 80 bit this guarantees a low latency data transport: A system with 100 front-ends can be built with a one-way latency of 2.2 us. The TrbNet-protocol was implemented in each of the 550 FPGAs of the HADES upgrade project and has been successfully used during the Au+Au campaign in April 2012. With 2ṡ106/s Au-ions and 3% interaction ratio the accepted trigger rate is 10 kHz while data is written to storage with 150 MBytes/s. Errors are reliably mitigated via the implemented retransmission of packets and auto-shut-down of individual links. TrbNet was also used for full monitoring of the FEE status. The network stack is written in VHDL and was successfully deployed on various Lattice and Xilinx devices. The TrbNet is also

  8. Experience of a Neural Network Imitator Applied to Diagnosis of Pre-pathological Conditions in Humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyashov, D.N.; Emelyanova, I.V.; Tichshenko, A.V.; Makarenko, N.G.; Sultanova, B.G.

    1998-01-01

    The Governmental Resolution of the RK 'Program of Medical Rehabilitation for People Influenced by Nuclear Tests at STS in 1949-1990' was published in March 1997. Implementation of the program requires first of all to create the effective methods of operative diagnostics of arid zones' population. To our mind, for this aims systems analysis with elements of neural network classification is more effective. We demonstrate such an approach using the example of the modem diagnostics system creating to detect the pre-pathological states among population by express analysis and personal particulars. The following considerations were used in the base of the training set: 1) any formalism must be based oneself upon wealth of phenomenology (experience, intuition, the presence of symptoms); 2) typical attributes of disease can be divided on 2 groups - subjective and objective. The common state of patient is characterised by the first group and it can have no intercommunication with disease. The second one is obtained by laboratory inspection and it is not connected with patient sensations. Each of the objective at-tributes can be the attribute of several illnesses at once. In this case both the subjective and objective features must be used together; 3) acceptability of any scheme can be substantiated only statistically. The question about justifiability and sufficiency of training set always demands separate discussion. Personal particulars are more available for creating training set. The set must be professionally oriented in order to reduce of selection effects. For our experiment the fully-connected neural network ( computer software, imitating the work of neural computer) 'Multi Neuron' was chosen. Feature space using for the net work was created from the 206 personal particulars. The research aimed to determine pre-pathological states of the urinary system organs among industrial, office and professional workers in the mining industry connected with phosphorus

  9. Randomised controlled trial evaluation of Tweet2Quit: a social network quit-smoking intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechmann, Cornelia; Delucchi, Kevin; Lakon, Cynthia M; Prochaska, Judith J

    2017-03-01

    We evaluated a novel Twitter-delivered intervention for smoking cessation, Tweet2Quit, which sends daily, automated communications to small, private, self-help groups to encourage high-quality, online, peer-to-peer discussions. A 2-group randomised controlled trial assessed the net benefit of adding a Tweet2Quit support group to a usual care control condition of nicotine patches and a cessation website. Participants were 160 smokers (4 cohorts of 40/cohort), aged 18-59 years, who intended to quit smoking, used Facebook daily, texted weekly, and had mobile phones with unlimited texting. All participants received 56 days of nicotine patches, emails with links to the smokefree.gov cessation website, and instructions to set a quit date within 7 days. Additionally, Tweet2Quit participants were enrolled in 20-person, 100-day Twitter groups, and received daily discussion topics via Twitter, and daily engagement feedback via text. The primary outcome was sustained abstinence at 7, 30 and 60 days post-quit date. Participants (mean age 35.7 years, 26.3% male, 31.2% college degree, 88.7% Caucasian) averaged 18.0 (SD=8.2) cigarettes per day and 16.8 (SD=9.8) years of smoking. Participants randomised to Tweet2Quit averaged 58.8 tweets/participant and the average tweeting duration was 47.4 days/participant. Tweet2Quit doubled sustained abstinence out to 60 days follow-up (40.0%, 26/65) versus control (20.0%, 14/70), OR=2.67, CI 1.19 to 5.99, p=0.017. Tweeting via phone predicted tweet volume, and tweet volume predicted sustained abstinence (p<0.001). The daily autocommunications caused tweeting spikes accounting for 24.0% of tweets. Tweet2Quit was engaging and doubled sustained abstinence. Its low cost and scalability makes it viable as a global cessation treatment. NCT01602536. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Effects of a Social Network HIV/STD Prevention Intervention for Men Who Have Sex with Men in Russia and Hungary: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirkhanian, Yuri A.; Kelly, Jeffrey A.; Takacs, Judit; McAuliffe, Timothy L.; Kuznetsova, Anna V.; Toth, Tamas P.; Mocsonaki, Laszlo; DiFranceisco, Wayne J.; Meylakhs, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test a novel social network HIV risk reduction intervention for MSM in Russia and Hungary, where same-sex behavior is stigmatized and men may best be reached through their social network connections. Design A 2-arm trial with 18 sociocentric networks of MSM randomized to the social network intervention or standard HIV/STD testing/counseling. Setting St. Petersburg, Russia and Budapest, Hungary. Participants 18 “seeds” from community venues invited the participation of their MSM friends who, in turn, invited their own MSM friends into the study, a process that continued outward until eighteen 3-ring sociocentric networks (mean size=35 members, n=626) were recruited. Intervention Empirically-identified network leaders were trained and guided to convey HIV prevention advice to other network members. Main Outcome and Measures Changes in sexual behavior from baseline to 3- and 12-month followup, with composite HIV/STD incidence measured at 12-months to corroborate behavior changes. Results There were significant reductions between baseline, first followup, and second followup in the intervention versus comparison arm for proportion of men engaging in any unprotected anal intercourse (P=.04); UAI with a nonmain partner (P=.04); and UAI with multiple partners (P=.002). The mean percentage of unprotected AI acts significantly declined (P=.001), as well as the mean number of UAI acts among men who initially had multiple partners (P=.05). Biological HIV/STD incidence was 15% in comparison condition networks and 9% in intervention condition networks. Conclusions Even where same-sex behavior is stigmatized, it is possible to reach MSM and deliver HIV prevention through their social networks. PMID:25565495

  11. Security of social network credentials for accessing course portal: Users' experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katuk, Norliza; Fong, Choo Sok; Chun, Koo Lee

    2015-12-01

    Social login (SL) has recently emerged as a solution for single sign-on (SSO) within the web and mobile environments. It allows users to use their existing social network credentials (SNC) to login to third party web applications without the need to create a new identity in the intended applications' database. Although it has been used by many web application providers, its' applicability in accessing learning materials is not yet fully investigated. Hence, this research aims to explore users' (i.e., instructors' and students') perception and experience on the security of SL for accessing learning contents. A course portal was developed for students at a higher learning institution and it provides two types of user authentications (i) traditional user authentication, and (ii) SL facility. Users comprised instructors and students evaluated the login facility of the course portal through a controlled lab experimental study following the within-subject design. The participants provided their feedback in terms of the security of SL for accessing learning contents. The study revealed that users preferred to use SL over the traditional authentication, however, they concerned on the security of SL and their privacy.

  12. Integrating atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, experiments and network analysis to study protein dynamics: strength in unity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena ePapaleo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, we have been observing remarkable improvements in the field of protein dynamics. Indeed, we can now study protein dynamics in atomistic details over several timescales with a rich portfolio of experimental and computational techniques. On one side, this provides us with the possibility to validate simulation methods and physical models against a broad range of experimental observables. On the other side, it also allows a complementary and comprehensive view on protein structure and dynamics. What is needed now is a better understanding of the link between the dynamic properties that we observe and the functional properties of these important cellular machines. To make progresses in this direction, we need to improve the physical models used to describe proteins and solvent in molecular dynamics, as well as to strengthen the integration of experiments and simulations to overcome their own limitations. Moreover, now that we have the means to study protein dynamics in great details, we need new tools to understand the information embedded in the protein ensembles and in their dynamic signature. With this aim in mind, we should enrich the current tools for analysis of biomolecular simulations with attention to the effects that can be propagated over long distances and are often associated to important biological functions. In this context, approaches inspired by network analysis can make an important contribution to the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations.

  13. Can virtual nature improve patient experiences and memories of dental treatment? A study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanja-Dijkstra, Karin; Pahl, Sabine; White, Mathew P; Andrade, Jackie; May, Jon; Stone, Robert J; Bruce, Malcolm; Mills, Ian; Auvray, Melissa; Gabe, Rhys; Moles, David R

    2014-03-22

    Dental anxiety and anxiety-related avoidance of dental care create significant problems for patients and the dental profession. Distraction interventions are used in daily medical practice to help patients cope with unpleasant procedures. There is evidence that exposure to natural scenery is beneficial for patients and that the use of virtual reality (VR) distraction is more effective than other distraction interventions, such as watching television. The main aim of this randomized controlled trial is to determine whether the use of VR during dental treatment can improve the overall dental experience and recollections of treatment for patients, breaking the negative cycle of memories of anxiety leading to further anxiety, and avoidance of future dental appointments. Additionally, the aim is to test whether VR benefits dental patients with all levels of dental anxiety or whether it could be especially beneficial for patients suffering from higher levels of dental anxiety. The third aim is to test whether the content of the VR distraction can make a difference for its effectiveness by comparing two types of virtual environments, a natural environment and an urban environment. The effectiveness of VR distraction will be examined in patients 18 years or older who are scheduled to undergo dental treatment for fillings and/or extractions, with a maximum length of 30 minutes. Patients will be randomly allocated into one of three groups. The first group will be exposed to a VR of a natural environment. The second group will be exposed to a VR of an urban environment. A third group consists of patients who receive standard care (control group). Primary outcomes relate to patients' memories of the dental treatment one week after treatment: (a) remembered pain, (b) intrusive thoughts and (c) vividness of memories. Other measures of interest are the dental experience, the treatment experience and the VR experience. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN41442806.

  14. Clinical Interpretations of Patient Experience in a Trial of Psilocybin-Assisted Psychotherapy for Alcohol Use Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Bogenschutz

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available After a hiatus of some 40 years, clinical research has resumed on the use of classic hallucinogens to treat addiction. Following completion of a small open-label feasibility study, we are currently conducting a double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial of psilocybin-assisted treatment of alcohol use disorder. Although treatment effects cannot be analyzed until the study is complete, descriptive case studies provide a useful window into the therapeutic process of psychedelic-assisted treatment of addiction. Here we describe treatment trajectories of three participants in the ongoing trial to illustrate the range of experiences and persisting effects of psilocybin treatment. Although it is difficult to generalize from a few cases, several qualitative conclusions can be drawn from the data presented here. Although participants often find it difficult to describe much of their psilocybin experience, pivotal moments tend to be individualized, extremely vivid, and memorable. Often, the qualitative content extends beyond the clinical problem that is being addressed. The participants discussed in this paper experienced acute and lasting alterations in their perceptions of self, in the quality of their baseline consciousness, and in their relationship with alcohol and drinking. In these cases, experiences of catharsis, forgiveness, self-compassion, and love were at least as salient as classic mystical content. Finally, feelings of increased “spaciousness” or mindfulness, and increased control over choices and behavior were reported following the drug administration sessions. Ultimately, psilocybin-assisted treatment appears to elicit experiences that are extremely variable, yet seem to meet the particular needs of the individual.

  15. Clinical Interpretations of Patient Experience in a Trial of Psilocybin-Assisted Psychotherapy for Alcohol Use Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogenschutz, Michael P; Podrebarac, Samantha K; Duane, Jessie H; Amegadzie, Sean S; Malone, Tara C; Owens, Lindsey T; Ross, Stephen; Mennenga, Sarah E

    2018-01-01

    After a hiatus of some 40 years, clinical research has resumed on the use of classic hallucinogens to treat addiction. Following completion of a small open-label feasibility study, we are currently conducting a double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial of psilocybin-assisted treatment of alcohol use disorder. Although treatment effects cannot be analyzed until the study is complete, descriptive case studies provide a useful window into the therapeutic process of psychedelic-assisted treatment of addiction. Here we describe treatment trajectories of three participants in the ongoing trial to illustrate the range of experiences and persisting effects of psilocybin treatment. Although it is difficult to generalize from a few cases, several qualitative conclusions can be drawn from the data presented here. Although participants often find it difficult to describe much of their psilocybin experience, pivotal moments tend to be individualized, extremely vivid, and memorable. Often, the qualitative content extends beyond the clinical problem that is being addressed. The participants discussed in this paper experienced acute and lasting alterations in their perceptions of self, in the quality of their baseline consciousness, and in their relationship with alcohol and drinking. In these cases, experiences of catharsis, forgiveness, self-compassion, and love were at least as salient as classic mystical content. Finally, feelings of increased "spaciousness" or mindfulness, and increased control over choices and behavior were reported following the drug administration sessions. Ultimately, psilocybin-assisted treatment appears to elicit experiences that are extremely variable, yet seem to meet the particular needs of the individual.

  16. Phytostabilization of a Pb-contaminated mine tailing by various tree species in pot and field trial experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeinkuirt, Weeradej; Pokethitiyook, Prayad; Kruatrachue, Maleeya; Tanhan, Phanwimol; Chaiyarat, Rattanawat

    2012-10-01

    The potential of 6 tree species (Leucaena leucocephala, Acacia mangium, Peltophorum pterocarpum, Pterocarpus macrocarpus, Lagerstroemia floribunda, Eucalyptus camaldulensis) for phytoremediation of Pb in sand tailings (total Pb >9850 mg kg(-1)) from KEMCO Pb mine in Kanchanaburi province, Thailand, were investigated employing a pot experiment (3 months) and field trial experiment (12 months). In pot study E. camaldulensis treated with Osmocote fertilizer attained the highest total biomass (15.3 g plant(-1)) followed by P. pterocarpum (12.6 g plant(-1)) and A. mangium (10.8 g plant(-1)) both treated with cow manure. Cow manure application resulted in the highest root Pb accumulation (>10000 mg kg(-1)) in L. floribunda and P. macrocarpus. These two species also exhibited the highest Pb uptake (85-88 mg plant(-1)). Results from field trial also showed that Osmocote promoted the best growth performance in E. camaldulensis (biomass 385.7 g plant(-1), height 141.7 cm) followed by A. mangium (biomass 215.9 g plant(-1), height 102.7 cm), and they also exhibited the highest Pb uptake (600-800 microg plant(-1)). A. mangium with the addition of organic fertilizer was the best option for phytostabilization of Pb-contaminated mine tailing because it retained higher Pb concentration in the roots.

  17. Network based on statistical multiplexing for event selection and event builder systems in high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvet, D.

    2000-03-01

    Systems for on-line event selection in future high energy physics experiments will use advanced distributed computing techniques and will need high speed networks. After a brief description of projects at the Large Hadron Collider, the architectures initially proposed for the Trigger and Data AcQuisition (TD/DAQ) systems of ATLAS and CMS experiments are presented and analyzed. A new architecture for the ATLAS T/DAQ is introduced. Candidate network technologies for this system are described. This thesis focuses on ATM. A variety of network structures and topologies suited to partial and full event building are investigated. The need for efficient networking is shown. Optimization techniques for high speed messaging and their implementation on ATM components are described. Small scale demonstrator systems consisting of up to 48 computers (∼1:20 of the final level 2 trigger) connected via ATM are described. Performance results are presented. Extrapolation of measurements and evaluation of needs lead to a proposal of implementation for the main network of the ATLAS T/DAQ system. (author)

  18. Social Networking and Social Support in Tourism Experience: The Moderating Role of Online Self-Presentation Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jeongmi; Tussyadiah, Iis

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide an understanding of how tourists' self-presentation is managed on social networking sites (SNS). Specifically, the study investigated the effects of SNS use on social support and tourism experience and the moderating role of the different tourists' self......-presentation strategies. The results emphasize the importance of SNS use for tourists to seek support from their social network while traveling. The study clarifies the importance of SNS use for tourism experience, in that the more tourists are engaged in social activities through SNS while traveling, the more social...... support they will get, which will contribute positively to their tourism experience. Also, it is argued that social support does not always directly result from the intense SNS use, but rather moderated by tourists' self-presentation strategies....

  19. Small-scale medical waste incinerators - experiences and trials in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, David E.C.; Brent, Alan C.

    2006-01-01

    Formal waste management services are not accessible for the majority of primary healthcare clinics on the African continent, and affordable and practicable technology solutions are required in the developing country context. In response, a protocol was established for the first quantitative and qualitative evaluation of relatively low cost small-scale incinerators for use at rural primary healthcare clinics. The protocol comprised the first phase of four, which defined the comprehensive trials of three incineration units. The trials showed that all of the units could be used to render medical waste non-infectious, and to destroy syringes or render needles unsuitable for reuse. Emission loads from the incinerators are higher than large-scale commercial incinerators, but a panel of experts considered the incinerators to be more acceptable compared to the other waste treatment and disposal options available in under-serviced rural areas. However, the incinerators must be used within a safe waste management programme that provides the necessary resources in the form of collection containers, maintenance support, acceptable energy sources, and understandable operational instructions for the incinerators, whilst minimising the exposure risks to emissions through the correct placement of the units in relation to the clinic and the surrounding communities. On-going training and awareness building are essential in order to ensure that the incinerators are correctly used as a sustainable waste treatment option

  20. Controlled trials to improve antibiotic utilization: a systematic review of experience, 1984-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrino, Thomas A

    2005-02-01

    To review the effectiveness of interventions designed to improve antibiotic prescribing patterns in clinical practice and to draw inferences about the most practical methods for optimizing antibiotic utilization in hospital and ambulatory settings. A literature search using online databases for the years 1975-2004 identified controlled trials of strategies for improving antibiotic utilization. Due to variation in study settings and design, quantitative meta-analysis was not feasible. Therefore, a qualitative literature review was conducted. Forty-one controlled trials met the search criteria. Interventions consisted of education, peer review and feedback, physician participation, rewards and penalties, administrative methods, and combined approaches. Social marketing directed at patients and prescribers was effective in varying contexts, as was implementation of practice guidelines. Authorization systems with structured order entry, formulary restriction, and mandatory consultation were also effective. Peer review and feedback were more effective when combined with dissemination of relevant information or social marketing than when used alone. Several practices were effective in improving antibiotic utilization: social marketing, practice guidelines, authorization systems, and peer review and feedback. Online systems providing clinical information, structured order entry, and decision support may be the most promising approach. Further studies, including economic analyses, are needed to confirm or refute this hypothesis.

  1. When referring physicians and researchers disagree on equipoise: the TOTAL trial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, H C M L; Deprest, J; v d Berg, P P

    2011-06-01

    In this article, we reflect on whether randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are adequate for the clinical evaluation of maternal-fetal surgery for congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), focusing on the role of patients' preferences in the setting up of research protocols, on the requirement of equipoise and on the concept of therapeutic misconception (TM). We describe the conception and setting up of the tracheal occlusion (TO) to accelerate lung growth trial and analyze the ethical dilemmas faced by the research team during that time. Depending on the view adopted regarding the scope of equipoise, there are two ways of dealing with patient's preferences concerning fetoscopic endoluminal TO and expectant management during pregnancy for CDH. The solution adopted for fetoscopic endoluminal tracheal occlusion (FETO) is justified by the extended period of time it has been available to patients before the start of the RCT. Strong patient and referring physician preferences do not entail a right to have FETO, since it is a procedure of yet unproven efficacy and safety. In the future, to avoid the dilemmas posed by the TM and in name of the right of future generations of patients to have access to treatment of proven safety and efficacy, researchers must be able to plan RCT in due time. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Stent Thrombosis With Drug-Eluting Stents and Bioresorbable Scaffolds: Evidence From a Network Meta-Analysis of 147 Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Si-Hyuck; Chae, In-Ho; Park, Jin-Joo; Lee, Hak Seung; Kang, Do-Yoon; Hwang, Seung-Sik; Youn, Tae-Jin; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2016-06-27

    This study sought to perform a systematic review and network meta-analysis to compare the relative safety and efficacy of contemporary DES and BVS. To improve outcomes of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary revascularization, there have been advances in the design of drug-eluting stents (DES), including the development of drug-eluting bioresorbable vascular scaffolds (BVS). Prospective, randomized, controlled trials comparing bare-metal stents (BMS), paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES), sirolimus-eluting stents (SES), Endeavor zotarolimus-eluting stents (E-ZES), cobalt-chromium (CoCr) everolimus-eluting stents (EES), platinum-chromium (PtCr)-EES, biodegradable polymer (BP)-EES, Resolute zotarolimus-eluting stents (R-ZES), BP biolimus-eluting stents (BP-BES), hybrid sirolimus-eluting stents (H [Orsiro]-SES), polymer-free sirolimus- and probucol-eluting stents, or BVS were searched in online databases. The primary endpoint was definite or probable stent thrombosis at 1 year. A total of 147 trials including 126,526 patients were analyzed in this study. All contemporary DES were superior to BMS and PES in terms of definite or probable stent thrombosis at 1 year. CoCr-EES, PtCr-EES, and H-SES were associated with significantly lower risk than BVS. CoCr-EES and H-SES were superior to SES and BP-BES. The risk of myocardial infarction was significantly lower with H-SES than with BVS. There were no significant differences regarding all-cause or cardiac mortality. Contemporary devices including BVS showed comparably low risks of repeat revascularization. Contemporary DES, including biocompatible DP-DES, BP-DES, and polymer-free DES, showed a low risk of definite or probable stent thrombosis at 1 year. BVS had an increased risk of device thrombosis compared with CoCr-EES, PtCr-EES, and H-SES. Data from extended follow-up are warranted to confirm the long-term safety of contemporary coronary devices. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by

  3. Recruiting pregnant smokers into a clinical trial: using a network-model managed care organization versus community-based practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Elyse R; Quinn, Virginia P; Chang, Yuchiao; Regan, Susan; Loudin, Beverly; Cummins, Sharon; Perry, Kristin; Rigotti, Nancy A

    2007-03-01

    Recruiting pregnant smokers into smoking cessation intervention trials is challenging. Changes in health care systems offer new opportunities to overcome many of the obstacles encountered by researchers attempting to address the significant harm from maternal smoking. Investigators could facilitate smoking cessation study recruitment by collaborating with health care systems that systematically collect patient smoking status and record it in a centralized, retrievable fashion. This paper reports the results of utilizing this novel approach and compares it with a typical decentralized practice-based recruitment strategy. The study was conducted at Massachusetts General Hospital, in Boston, Massachusetts, from 2000 to 2005. Four hundred forty-two pregnant smokers were recruited for a randomized controlled trial of telephone-delivered smoking counseling from two sources: a network-model managed care health plan and community-based practices (CBP). At the health plan, study recruitment was built on an existing system that permitted pregnant smokers to be identified centrally. At the CBPs, identification and referral systems had to be developed at each practice specifically for the study. The two strategies were compared on the efficiency of recruitment, characteristics of enrollees, and study outcome and process measures. The health plan strategy generated referrals nearly twice as fast as the CBP strategy (30.4 vs. 17.0 per month), but because referrals were not timely, a large proportion of women from the plan were too advanced in pregnancy to be eligible to enroll in the study. As a result, the two strategies yielded a comparable enrollment rate. Participants from the health plan were older, better educated, less racially diverse, more likely to be living with the baby's father, and less likely to have smokers in their environment. These differences were largely explained by the socioeconomic diversity of women recruited from the CBPs. Smoking cessation outcomes did

  4. Selective Narrowing of Social Networks Across Adulthood is Associated With Improved Emotional Experience in Daily Life

    OpenAIRE

    English, Tammy; Carstensen, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    Past research has documented age differences in the size and composition of social networks that suggest that networks grow smaller with age and include an increasingly greater proportion of well-known social partners. According to socioemotional selectivity theory, such changes in social network composition serve an antecedent emotion regulatory function that supports an age-related increase in the priority that people place on emotional well-being. The present study employed a longitudinal ...

  5. Trans-European transport networks influence on the regional development and urban systems: Serbian experience

    OpenAIRE

    Maksin-Mićić Marija

    2004-01-01

    The trans-European transport network has different effects at macro-regional, mezzo-regional and micro-regional level, and on urban systems development, and its effectiveness rises at the lower regional levels. Possible approaches to the trans-European transport network impact and effect survey and policy options have been pointed out. The importance of increased accessibility and mobility for regional expansion and for more balanced and polycentric system of city networks has been underlined...

  6. Deep Sea Shell Taphonomy: Interactive benthic experiments in hydrate environments of Barkley Canyon, Ocean Networks Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Mairi; Purser, Autun

    2015-04-01

    In order to quantify and track the rates and processes of modification of biogenic carbonate in gas hydrate environments, and their possible environmental/ecological correlates, ongoing observations of experimentally deployed specimens are being made using a remotely controlled crawler with camera and sensors. The crawler is connected to NEPTUNE Canada, an 800km, 5-node, regional cabled ocean network across the northern Juan de Fuca Plate, northeastern Pacific, part of Ocean Networks Canada. One of 15 study areas is an environment of exposed hydrate mounds along the wall of Barkley Canyon, at ˜865m water depth. This is the home of a benthic crawler developed by Jacobs University of Germany, who is affectionately known as Wally. Wally is equipped with a range of sensors including cameras, methane sensor, current meter, fluorometer, turbidity meter, CTD, and a sediment microprofiler with probes for oxygen, methane, sulphide, pH, temperature, and conductivity. In conjunction with this sensor suite, a series of experiments have been designed to assess the cycling of biogenic carbon and carbonate in this complex environment. The biota range from microbes, to molluscs, to large fish, and therefore the carbon inputs include both a range of organic carbon compounds as well as the complex materials that are "biogenic carbonate". Controlled experimental specimens were deployed of biogenic carbonate (Mytilus edulis fresh shells) and cellulose (pieces of untreated pine lumber) that had been previously well characterized (photographed, weighed, and numbered, matching valves and lumber kept as controls). Deployment at the sediment/water interface was in such a way to maximize natural burial exhumation cycles but to minimize specimen interaction. 10 replicate specimens of each material were deployed in two treatments: 1) adjacent to a natural life and death assemblage of chemosynthetic bivalves and exposed hydrate on a hydrate mound and 2) on the muddy seafloor at a distance

  7. The AlpArray Seismic Network: A Large-Scale European Experiment to Image the Alpine Orogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetényi, György; Molinari, Irene; Clinton, John; Bokelmann, Götz; Bondár, István; Crawford, Wayne C.; Dessa, Jean-Xavier; Doubre, Cécile; Friederich, Wolfgang; Fuchs, Florian; Giardini, Domenico; Gráczer, Zoltán; Handy, Mark R.; Herak, Marijan; Jia, Yan; Kissling, Edi; Kopp, Heidrun; Korn, Michael; Margheriti, Lucia; Meier, Thomas; Mucciarelli, Marco; Paul, Anne; Pesaresi, Damiano; Piromallo, Claudia; Plenefisch, Thomas; Plomerová, Jaroslava; Ritter, Joachim; Rümpker, Georg; Šipka, Vesna; Spallarossa, Daniele; Thomas, Christine; Tilmann, Frederik; Wassermann, Joachim; Weber, Michael; Wéber, Zoltán; Wesztergom, Viktor; Živčić, Mladen

    2018-04-01

    The AlpArray programme is a multinational, European consortium to advance our understanding of orogenesis and its relationship to mantle dynamics, plate reorganizations, surface processes and seismic hazard in the Alps-Apennines-Carpathians-Dinarides orogenic system. The AlpArray Seismic Network has been deployed with contributions from 36 institutions from 11 countries to map physical properties of the lithosphere and asthenosphere in 3D and thus to obtain new, high-resolution geophysical images of structures from the surface down to the base of the mantle transition zone. With over 600 broadband stations operated for 2 years, this seismic experiment is one of the largest simultaneously operated seismological networks in the academic domain, employing hexagonal coverage with station spacing at less than 52 km. This dense and regularly spaced experiment is made possible by the coordinated coeval deployment of temporary stations from numerous national pools, including ocean-bottom seismometers, which were funded by different national agencies. They combine with permanent networks, which also required the cooperation of many different operators. Together these stations ultimately fill coverage gaps. Following a short overview of previous large-scale seismological experiments in the Alpine region, we here present the goals, construction, deployment, characteristics and data management of the AlpArray Seismic Network, which will provide data that is expected to be unprecedented in quality to image the complex Alpine mountains at depth.

  8. Software-Enabled Distributed Network Governance: The PopMedNet Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Melanie; Erickson, Kyle; Wyner, Zachary; Malenfant, Jessica; Rosen, Rob; Brown, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The expanded availability of electronic health information has led to increased interest in distributed health data research networks. The distributed research network model leaves data with and under the control of the data holder. Data holders, network coordinating centers, and researchers have distinct needs and challenges within this model. The concerns of network stakeholders are addressed in the design and governance models of the PopMedNet software platform. PopMedNet features include distributed querying, customizable workflows, and auditing and search capabilities. Its flexible role-based access control system enables the enforcement of varying governance policies. Four case studies describe how PopMedNet is used to enforce network governance models. Trust is an essential component of a distributed research network and must be built before data partners may be willing to participate further. The complexity of the PopMedNet system must be managed as networks grow and new data, analytic methods, and querying approaches are developed. The PopMedNet software platform supports a variety of network structures, governance models, and research activities through customizable features designed to meet the needs of network stakeholders.

  9. No Man is an Island: Social Distance, Network Flow, and Other-Regarding Behaviors in a Natural Field Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XIAOYE LI

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A natural field experiment is designed to explore the impacts of social distanceand network flow on other-regarding behaviors. A greater degree ofcommunication between the voluntary organization and volunteers was found toreduce their social distance and thereby improve volunteering commitment. Theimprovement was even more notable if the party initiating communication was thevoluntary organization. Two other practical means of lessening social distancewere for volunteers to learn more about other volunteers, and for informationtobe dispersed throughout the organization more rapidly. Additionally, this studyshows a reversed “U-shaped” relationship between network flow and volunteeringcommitment.

  10. A social network-based intervention stimulating peer influence on children's self-reported water consumption: A randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Crystal R; de Leeuw, Rebecca N H; Bevelander, Kirsten E; Burk, William J; Buijzen, Moniek

    2016-08-01

    The current pilot study examined the effectiveness of a social network-based intervention using peer influence on self-reported water consumption. A total of 210 children (52% girls; M age = 10.75 ± SD = 0.80) were randomly assigned to either the intervention (n = 106; 52% girls) or control condition (n = 104; 52% girls). In the intervention condition, the most influential children in each classroom were trained to promote water consumption among their peers for eight weeks. The schools in the control condition did not receive any intervention. Water consumption, sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption, and intentions to drink more water in the near future were assessed by self-report measures before and immediately after the intervention. A repeated measure MANCOVA showed a significant multivariate interaction effect between condition and time (V = 0.07, F(3, 204) = 5.18, p = 0.002, pη(2) = 0.07) on the dependent variables. Further examination revealed significant univariate interaction effects between condition and time on water (p = 0.021) and SSB consumption (p = 0.015) as well as water drinking intentions (p = 0.049). Posthoc analyses showed that children in the intervention condition reported a significant increase in their water consumption (p = 0.018) and a decrease in their SSB consumption (p  0.05). The children who were exposed to the intervention did not report a change in their water drinking intentions over time (p = 0.576) whereas the nonexposed children decreased their intentions (p = 0.026). These findings show promise for a social network-based intervention using peer influence to positively alter consumption behaviors. This RCT was registered in the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12614001179628). Study procedures were approved by the Ethics Committee of the Faculty of Social Sciences at Radboud University (ECSW2014-1003-203). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effectiveness of multi-drug regimen chemotherapy treatment in osteosarcoma patients: a network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojie; Zheng, Hong; Shou, Tao; Tang, Chunming; Miao, Kun; Wang, Ping

    2017-03-29

    Osteosarcoma is the most common malignant bone tumour. Due to the high metastasis rate and drug resistance of this disease, multi-drug regimens are necessary to control tumour cells at various stages of the cell cycle, eliminate local or distant micrometastases, and reduce the emergence of drug-resistant cells. Many adjuvant chemotherapy protocols have shown different efficacies and controversial results. Therefore, we classified the types of drugs used for adjuvant chemotherapy and evaluated the differences between single- and multi-drug chemotherapy regimens using network meta-analysis. We searched electronic databases, including PubMed (MEDLINE), EmBase, and the Cochrane Library, through November 2016 using the keywords "osteosarcoma", "osteogenic sarcoma", "chemotherapy", and "random*" without language restrictions. The major outcome in the present analysis was progression-free survival (PFS), and the secondary outcome was overall survival (OS). We used a random effect network meta-analysis for mixed multiple treatment comparisons. We included 23 articles assessing a total of 5742 patients in the present systematic review. The analysis of PFS indicated that the T12 protocol (including adriamycin, bleomycin, cyclophosphamide, dactinomycin, methotrexate, cisplatin) plays a more critical role in osteosarcoma treatment (surface under the cumulative ranking (SUCRA) probability 76.9%), with a better effect on prolonging the PFS of patients when combined with ifosfamide (94.1%) or vincristine (81.9%). For the analysis of OS, we separated the regimens to two groups, reflecting the disconnection. The T12 protocol plus vincristine (94.7%) or the removal of cisplatinum (89.4%) is most likely the best regimen. We concluded that multi-drug regimens have a better effect on prolonging the PFS and OS of osteosarcoma patients, and the T12 protocol has a better effect on prolonging the PFS of osteosarcoma patients, particularly in combination with ifosfamide or vincristine

  12. Clinicians' views and experiences of offering two alternative consent pathways for participation in a preterm intrapartum trial: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhoa, Celine Y; Sawyer, Alexandra; Ayers, Susan; Pushpa-Rajah, Angela; Duley, Lelia

    2017-04-26

    The Cord Pilot Trial compared alternative policies for timing of cord clamping at very preterm birth at eight UK hospitals. Preterm birth can be rapid and unexpected, allowing little time for the usual consent process. Therefore, in addition to the usual procedure for written consent, a two-stage pathway for consent for use when birth was imminent was developed. The aims of this study were to explore clinicians' views and experiences of offering two consent pathways for recruitment to a randomised trial of timing of cord clamping at very preterm birth. This was a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews. Clinicians from eight hospitals in the UK who had been involved in offering consent to the Cord Pilot Trial were invited to take part in an interview. Clinicians were interviewed in person or by telephone. Interviews were analysed using inductive systematic thematic analysis. Seventeen clinicians who had either offered usual written consent only (n = 6) or both the two-stage pathway (with oral assent before the birth and written consent after the birth) and usual written consent (n = 11) were interviewed. Six themes were identified: (1) team approach to offering participation; (2) consent form as a record; (3) consent and participation as a continual process; (4) different consent pathways for different trials; (5) balance between time, information, and understanding; and (6) validity of consent. Overall, clinicians were supportive of the two-stage consent pathway. Some clinicians felt that in time-critical situations oral assent presented an advantage over the usual written consent as they provided information on a "need to know" basis. However, there was some concern about how much information should be given for oral assent, and how this is understood by women when birth is imminent. The two-stage pathway for consent developed for use in the Cord Pilot Trial when birth was imminent was acceptable to clinicians for comparable low-risk studies

  13. Can Facebook Be Used for Research? Experiences Using Facebook to Recruit Pregnant Women for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Laura M; Manca, Donna P

    2016-01-01

    Background Recruitment is often a difficult and costly part of any human research study. Social media and other emerging means of mass communication hold promise as means to complement traditional strategies used for recruiting participants because they can reach a large number of people in a short amount of time. With the ability to target a specified audience, paid Facebook advertisements have potential to reach future research participants of a specific demographic. This paper describes the experiences of a randomized controlled trial in Edmonton, Alberta, attempting to recruit healthy pregnant women between 8 and 20 weeks’ gestation for participation in a prenatal study. Various traditional recruitment approaches, in addition to paid Facebook advertisements were trialed. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of paid advertisements on Facebook as a platform for recruiting pregnant women to a randomized controlled trial in comparison with traditional recruitment approaches. Methods Recruitment using traditional approaches occurred for 7 months, whereas Facebook advertisements ran for a total of 26 days. Interested women were prompted to contact the study staff for a screening call to determine study eligibility. Costs associated with each recruitment approach were recorded and used to calculate the cost to recruit eligible participants. Performance of Facebook advertisements was monitored using Facebook Ads Manager. Results Of the 115 women included, 39.1% (n=45) of the women who contacted study staff heard about the study through Facebook, whereas 60.9% (n=70) of them heard about it through traditional recruitment approaches. During the 215 days (~7 months) that the traditional approaches were used, the average rate of interest was 0.3 (0.2) women/day, whereas the 26 days of Facebook advertisements resulted in an average rate of interest of 2.8 (1.7) women/day. Facebook advertisements cost Can $506.91 with a cost per eligible participant of Cad $20.28. In

  14. A Peer-Educator Network HIV Prevention Intervention Among Injection Drug Users: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial in St. Petersburg, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latkin, Carl A.; Kukhareva, Polina V.; Malov, Sergey V.; Batluk, Julia V.; Shaboltas, Alla V.; Skochilov, Roman V.; Sokolov, Nicolay V.; Verevochkin, Sergei V.; Hudgens, Michael G.; Kozlov, Andrei P.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of a peer-educator network intervention as a strategy to reduce HIV acquisition among injection drug users (IDUs) and their drug and/or sexual networks. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in St. Petersburg, Russia among IDU index participants and their risk network participants. Network units were randomized to the control or experimental intervention. Only the experimental index participants received training sessions to communicate risk reduction techniques to their network members. Analysis includes 76 index and 84 network participants who were HIV uninfected. The main outcome measure was HIV sero-conversion. The incidence rates in the control and experimental groups were 19.57 (95 % CI 10.74–35.65) and 7.76 (95 % CI 3.51–17.19) cases per 100 p/y, respectively. The IRR was 0.41 (95 % CI 0.15–1.08) without a statistically significant difference between the two groups (log rank test statistic X2 = 2.73, permutation p value = 0.16). Retention rate was 67 % with a third of the loss due to incarceration or death. The results show a promising trend that this strategy would be successful in reducing the acquisition of HIV among IDUs. PMID:23881187

  15. Comparing energy sources for surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation: a Bayesian network meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Kevin; Xie, Ashleigh; Kumar, Narendra; Wong, Sophia; Medi, Caroline; La Meir, Mark; Yan, Tristan D

    2015-08-01

    Simplified maze procedures involving radiofrequency, cryoenergy and microwave energy sources have been increasingly utilized for surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation as an alternative to the traditional cut-and-sew approach. In the absence of direct comparisons, a Bayesian network meta-analysis is another alternative to assess the relative effect of different treatments, using indirect evidence. A Bayesian meta-analysis of indirect evidence was performed using 16 published randomized trials identified from 6 databases. Rank probability analysis was used to rank each intervention in terms of their probability of having the best outcome. Sinus rhythm prevalence beyond the 12-month follow-up was similar between the cut-and-sew, microwave and radiofrequency approaches, which were all ranked better than cryoablation (respectively, 39, 36, and 25 vs 1%). The cut-and-sew maze was ranked worst in terms of mortality outcomes compared with microwave, radiofrequency and cryoenergy (2 vs 19, 34, and 24%, respectively). The cut-and-sew maze procedure was associated with significantly lower stroke rates compared with microwave ablation [odds ratio <0.01; 95% confidence interval 0.00, 0.82], and ranked the best in terms of pacemaker requirements compared with microwave, radiofrequency and cryoenergy (81 vs 14, and 1, <0.01% respectively). Bayesian rank probability analysis shows that the cut-and-sew approach is associated with the best outcomes in terms of sinus rhythm prevalence and stroke outcomes, and remains the gold standard approach for AF treatment. Given the limitations of indirect comparison analysis, these results should be viewed with caution and not over-interpreted. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  16. Therapist experience and knowledge acquisition in internet-delivered CBT for social anxiety disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Andersson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Guided internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT has been tested in several trials on social anxiety disorder (SAD with moderate to large effects. The aims of this study were threefold. First, to compare the effects of ICBT including online discussion forum with a moderated online discussion forum only. Second, to investigate if knowledge about SAD increased following treatment and third to compare the effects of inexperienced versus experienced therapists on patient outcomes. METHODS: A total of 204 participants with a primary diagnosis of SAD were included and randomized to either guided ICBT or the control condition. ICBT consisted of a 9-week treatment program which was guided by either psychology students at MSc level (n = 6 or by licensed psychologists with previous experience of ICBT (n = 7. A knowledge test dealing with social anxiety was administered before and after treatment. Measures of social anxiety and secondary outcomes dealing with general anxiety, depression, and quality of life were administered before and after treatment. In addition, a 1-year follow-up was conducted on the treated individuals. RESULTS: Immediately following treatment, the ICBT group showed superior outcome on the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale self-report version with a between group posttreatment Hedges g effect size of g = 0.75. In addition, significant differences on all the secondary outcomes were observed. Gains were well maintained one year later. Knowledge, as assessed by the knowledge test, increased following treatment with little gain in the control group. Therapist experience did not result in different outcomes, but experienced therapists logged in less frequently compared to the inexperienced therapists, suggesting that they needed less time to support patients. DISCUSSION: We conclude that guided ICBT reduce symptoms of SAD, increase knowledge about SAD and that therapist experience does not make a difference

  17. The Impact of Network Relationships, Prison Experiences, and Internal Transformation on Women's Success after Prison Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Hoan N.; Morash, Merry

    2010-01-01

    Using data obtained from retrospective, in-depth interviews with 20 successful female parolees, the present study examines the effects of women offenders' relationships with people in their social networks (i.e., their network relationships) before, during, and after incarceration on their postrelease desistence from crime. Because women's social…

  18. New grid based test bed environment for carrying out ad-hoc networking experiments

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Johnson, D

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available and the third is to do analysis on a real test bed network which has implemented the ad-hoc networking protocol. This paper concerns the third option. Most researchers who have done work on test bed environments have used either indoor Wifi inter-office links...

  19. Passive Optical Networks for the Distribution of Timed Signals in Particle Physics Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Papakonstantinou, I; Papadopoulos,S; Troska, J; Vasey, F; Baron, S; Santos, L; Silva, S; Stejskal, P; Sigaud, C; Detraz, S; Moreira, P; Darwazeh, I

    2009-01-01

    A passive optical network for timing distribution applications based on FPGAs has been successfully demonstrated. Deterministic latency was achieved in the critical downstream direction where triggers are distributed while a burst mode receiver was successfully implemented in the upstream direction. Finally, a simple and efficient protocol was introduced for the communication between the OLT and the ONUs in the network that maximizes bandwidth utilization.

  20. Issues and Challenges With Integrating Patient-Reported Outcomes in Clinical Trials Supported by the National Cancer Institute–Sponsored Clinical Trials Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Deborah Watkins; Bryan, Charlene J.; Aaronson, Neil; Blackmore, C. Craig; Brundage, Michael; Cella, David; Ganz, Patricia A.; Gotay, Carolyn; Hinds, Pamela S.; Kornblith, Alice B.; Movsas, Benjamin; Sloan, Jeff; Wenzel, Lari; Whalen, Giles

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this report is to provide a historical overview of and the issues and challenges inherent in the incorporation of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) into multinational cancer clinical trials in the cancer cooperative groups. Methods An online survey of 12 cancer cooperative groups from the United States, Canada, and Europe was conducted between June and August of 2006. Each of the cooperative groups designated one respondent, who was a member of one of the PRO committees within the cooperative group. Results There was a 100% response rate, and all of the cancer clinical trial cooperative groups reported conducting PRO research. PRO research has been conducted in the cancer cooperative groups for an average of 15 years (range, 6 to 30 years), and all groups had multidisciplinary committees focused on the design of PRO end points and the choice of appropriate PRO measures for cancer clinical trials. The cooperative groups reported that 5% to 50% of cancer treatment trials and an estimated 50% to 75% of cancer control trials contained PRO primary and secondary end points. There was considerable heterogeneity among the cooperative groups with respect to the formal and informal policies and procedures or cooperative group culture towards PROs, investigator training/mentorship, and resource availability for the measurement and conduct of PRO research within the individual cooperatives. Conclusion The challenges faced by the cooperative groups to the incorporation of PROs into cancer clinical trials are varied. Some common opportunities for improvement include the adoption of standardized training/mentorship mechanisms for investigators for the conduct of PRO assessments and data collection and the development of minimal criteria for PRO measure acceptability. A positive cultural shift has occurred in most of the cooperative groups related to the incorporation of PROs in clinical trials; however, financial and other resource barriers remain and need

  1. Regional seismic observations of the Non-Proliferation Experiment at the Livermore NTS Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, W.R.; Mayeda, K.; Patton, H.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    The Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE), a 1-kiloton chemical explosion in N-tunnel at Rainier Mesa on the Nevada Test Site (NTS), was recorded by the four station, regional seismic Livermore NTS Network, (LNN). In this study we compare the NPE`s seismic yield, frequency content, and discrimination performance with other NTS events recorded at LNN. Preliminary findings include: The NPE LNN average magnitudes are 4.16 for m{sub b}(P{sub n}) and 4.59 for m{sub b}(L{sub g}). Using published magnitude-yield relations gives nuclear equivalent yields of 2.3 and 2.2 kilotons respectively, implying enhanced coupling of chemical relative to nuclear explosions. A comparison of the NPE seismograms with those with similar magnitude N-tunnel nuclear explosions shows remarkable similarity over the frequency band 0.5 to 5.0 Hz. Outside this band the explosions show more variability, with the NPE having the least relative energy below 0.5 Hz and the most energy above 5 Hz when scaled by magnitude. Considering the variability within the N-tunnel nuclear explosions, these low- and high-frequency NPE-nuclear differences may not reflect chemical-nuclear source differences. The NPE was compared to a large number of NTS nuclear explosions and earthquakes as part of an ongoing short-period discrimination study of P{sub N}/L{sub g},P{sub g}/L{sub g}, and spectral ratios in the P{sub n}, P{sub g},L{sub g}, and coda phases. For these discriminants, the NPE looks very similar to N-tunnel nuclear explosions and other NTS nuclear explosions, implying seismic identification of contained, non-ripple-fired, chemical explosions as non-nuclear may not be possible. However, such blasts might serve as surrogate nuclear explosions when calibrating seismic discriminants in regions where nuclear testing has not occurred.

  2. Developing Preceptors through Virtual Communities and Networks: Experiences from a Pilot Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackman, Margaret L; Romanick, Marcel

    2011-11-01

    Supporting preceptors is critical to the expansion of experiential learning opportunities for the pharmacy profession. Informal learning opportunities within communities of practitioners are important for hospital preceptors. However, such communities may be limited by geographic separation of preceptors from peers, faculty members, and supports within the pharmacy services department. To use computer-mediated conferencing to create a sense of community among preceptors, specifically by using this medium to provide initial development of and continuing support for preceptors, and to examine preceptors' satisfaction with this approach. Thirty-nine preceptors who had completed a day-long face-to-face preceptor development workshop and who were supervising students in 1 of 2 specific rotation blocks were invited to participate in the study. The pharmacists used computer-mediated conferencing to meet for virtual networking about specific topics. They met once before the student rotation to receive instructions about the technology and to discuss student orientation and scheduling, and 3 times during the student rotation for open discussion of specific topics. Evaluation and feedback were solicited by means of an electronic survey and virtual (i.e., computer-based) feedback sessions with an independent facilitator. The response rate was 66% (26/39) for the electronic survey, but only 15% (6/39) for the virtual feedback sessions. All of the respondents were experienced preceptors, but for 92% (22/24), this was their first experience with computer-mediated conferencing. Overall, the sessions had a positive reception, and participants found it useful to share information and experiences with other preceptors. The main challenges were related to the technology, perceived lack of support for their participation in the sessions, and inconvenience related to the timing of sessions. Computer-mediated conferencing allowed preceptors to learn from and to support each other

  3. Experience with PACS in an ATM/Ethernet switched network environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelikan, E; Ganser, A; Kotter, E; Schrader, U; Timmermann, U

    1998-03-01

    Legacy local area network (LAN) technologies based on shared media concepts are not adequate for the growth of a large-scale picture archiving and communication system (PACS) in a client-server architecture. First, an asymmetric network load, due to the requests of a large number of PACS clients for only a few main servers, should be compensated by communication links to the servers with a higher bandwidth compared to the clients. Secondly, as the number of PACS nodes increases, the network throughout should not measurably cut production. These requirements can easily be fulfilled using switching technologies. Here asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) is clearly one of the hottest topics in networking because the ATM architecture provides integrated support for a variety of communication services, and it supports virtual networking. On the other hand, most of the imaging modalities are not yet ready for integration into a native ATM network. For a lot of nodes already joining an Ethernet, a cost-effective and pragmatic way to benefit from the switching concept would be a combined ATM/Ethernet switching environment. This incorporates an incremental migration strategy with the immediate benefits of high-speed, high-capacity ATM (for servers and high-sophisticated display workstations), while preserving elements of the existing network technologies. In addition, Ethernet switching instead of shared media Ethernet improves the performance considerably. The LAN emulation (LANE) specification by the ATM forum defines mechanisms that allow ATM networks to coexist with legacy systems using any data networking protocol. This paper points out the suitability of this network architecture in accordance with an appropriate system design.

  4. Research Areas - Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about NCI programs and initiatives that sponsor, conduct, develop, or support clinical trials, including NCI’s Clinical Trial Network (NCTN) and NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) initiatives.

  5. Cingulo-opercular network efficiency mediates the association between psychotic-like experiences and cognitive ability in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, Julia M; Kandala, Sridhar; Burgess, Gregory C; Harms, Michael P; Barch, Deanna M

    2016-11-01

    Psychosis is hypothesized to occur on a spectrum between psychotic disorders and healthy individuals. In the middle of the spectrum are individuals who endorse psychotic-like experiences (PLEs) that may not impact daily functioning or cause distress. Individuals with PLEs show alterations in both cognitive ability and functional connectivity of several brain networks, but the relationship between PLEs, cognition, and functional networks remains poorly understood. We analyzed resting-state fMRI data, a range of neuropsychological tasks, and questions from the Achenbach Adult Self Report (ASR) in 468 individuals from the Human Connectome Project. We aimed to determine whether global efficiency of specific functional brain networks supporting higher-order cognition (the fronto-parietal network (FPN), cingulo-opercular network (CON), and default mode network (DMN)) was associated with PLEs and cognitive ability in a non-psychiatric sample. 21.6% of individuals in our sample endorsed at least one PLE. PLEs were significantly negatively associated with higher-order cognitive ability, CON global efficiency, and DMN global efficiency, but not crystallized knowledge. Higher-order cognition was significantly positively associated with CON and DMN global efficiency. Interestingly, the association between PLEs and cognitive ability was partially mediated by CON global efficiency and, in a subset of individuals who tested negative for drugs (N=405), the participation coefficient of the right anterior insula (a hub within the CON). These findings suggest that CON integrity may represent a shared mechanism that confers risk for psychotic experiences and the cognitive deficits observed across the psychosis spectrum.

  6. Patients' experiences of intervention trials on the treatment of myocardial infarction: is it time to adjust the informed consent procedure to the patient's capacity?

    OpenAIRE

    Agard, A; Hermeren, G; Herlitz, J

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate how patients included in trials on treatment in the early phase of acute myocardial infarction experience the consent procedure.
DESIGN—A combined qualitative and quantitative interview concerning the patients' knowledge of the trial, their feelings about being asked to participate, and their attitudes towards the consent procedure.
SETTING—Tertiary referral centre.
PATIENTS—31 patients who had given written informed consent for their participation in randomised inter...

  7. Patients' experiences of breathing retraining for asthma: a qualitative process analysis of participants in the intervention arms of the BREATHE trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Arden-Close, E; Yardley, L; Kirby, S; Thomas, M; Bruton, A

    2017-01-01

    Poor symptom control and impaired quality of life are common in adults with asthma, and breathing retraining exercises may be an effective method of self-management. This study aimed to explore the experiences of participants in the intervention arms of the BREATHE trial, which investigated the effectiveness of breathing retraining as a mode of asthma management. Sixteen people with asthma (11 women, 8 per group) who had taken part in the intervention arms of the BREATHE trial (breathing retr...

  8. Experiments in Neural-Network Control of a Free-Flying Space Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Edward

    1995-01-01

    Four important generic issues are identified and addressed in some depth in this thesis as part of the development of an adaptive neural network based control system for an experimental free flying space robot prototype. The first issue concerns the importance of true system level design of the control system. A new hybrid strategy is developed here, in depth, for the beneficial integration of neural networks into the total control system. A second important issue in neural network control concerns incorporating a priori knowledge into the neural network. In many applications, it is possible to get a reasonably accurate controller using conventional means. If this prior information is used purposefully to provide a starting point for the optimizing capabilities of the neural network, it can provide much faster initial learning. In a step towards addressing this issue, a new generic Fully Connected Architecture (FCA) is developed for use with backpropagation. A third issue is that neural networks are commonly trained using a gradient based optimization method such as backpropagation; but many real world systems have Discrete Valued Functions (DVFs) that do not permit gradient based optimization. One example is the on-off thrusters that are common on spacecraft. A new technique is developed here that now extends backpropagation learning for use with DVFs. The fourth issue is that the speed of adaptation is often a limiting factor in the implementation of a neural network control system. This issue has been strongly resolved in the research by drawing on the above new contributions.

  9. Randomized Controlled Trial of Teaching Methods: Do Classroom Experiments Improve Economic Education in High Schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenkopf, Gerald; Sulser, Pascal A.

    2016-01-01

    The authors present results from a comprehensive field experiment at Swiss high schools in which they compare the effectiveness of teaching methods in economics. They randomly assigned classes into an experimental and a conventional teaching group, or a control group that received no specific instruction. Both teaching treatments improve economic…

  10. Experiences with using information and communication technology to build a multi-municipal support network for informal carers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torp, Steffen; Bing-Jonsson, Pia C; Hanson, Elizabeth

    2013-09-01

    This multi-municipal intervention study explored whether informal carers of frail older people and disabled children living at home made use of information and communication technology (ICT) to gain knowledge about caring and to form informal support networks, thereby improving their health. Seventy-nine informal carers accessed web-based information about caring and an e-based discussion forum via their personal computers. They were able to maintain contact with each other using a web camera and via normal group meetings. After the first 12 months, 17 informal carers participated in focus group interviews and completed a short questionnaire. Four staff members were also interviewed. Participant carers who had prior experiences with a similar ICT-based support network reported greater satisfaction and more extensive use of the network than did participants with no such prior experience. It seems that infrequent usage of the service may be explained by too few other carers to identify with and inappropriate recruitment procedures. Nevertheless, carers of disabled children reported that the intervention had resulted in improved services across the participant municipalities. To achieve optimal effects of an ICT-based support network due attention must be given to recruitment processes and social environment building for which care practitioners require training and support.

  11. General-purpose computer networks and resource sharing in ERDA. Volume 3. Remote resource-sharing experience and findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-07-15

    The investigation focused on heterogeneous networks in which a variety of dissimilar computers and operating systems were interconnected nationwide. Homogeneous networks, such as MFE net and SACNET, were not considered since they could not be used for general purpose resource sharing. Issues of privacy and security are of concern in any network activity. However, consideration of privacy and security of sensitive data arise to a much lesser degree in unclassified scientific research than in areas involving personal or proprietary information. Therefore, the existing mechanisms at individual sites for protecting sensitive data were relied on, and no new protection mechanisms to prevent infringement of privacy and security were attempted. Further development of ERDA networking will need to incorporate additional mechanisms to prevent infringement of privacy. The investigation itself furnishes an excellent example of computational resource sharing through a heterogeneous network. More than twenty persons, representing seven ERDA computing sites, made extensive use of both ERDA and non-ERDA computers in coordinating, compiling, and formatting the data which constitute the bulk of this report. Volume 3 analyzes the benefits and barriers encountered in actual resource sharing experience, and provides case histories of typical applications.

  12. Study and development of the data transfer for the NA50 experiment: transputer network of the multiplicity detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capony, V.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis presents the works performed for the experiment NA50 at CERN, in he framework of the development of its multiplicity detector. The two first chapters describe the physical aims of the experiment and the apparatus used. The remaining part of this document shows the data readout device, developed for the multiplicity detector. Built on a T8 transputer network, this system is able to treat 8 Mbytes of data at each SPS accelerator cycle. It integrates an on-line event-builder. A filtering algorithm estimates the validity of the information and allows the flagging of all the data. The last function of this transputers network is to transfer data from the detector to the data acquisition system. Our system is able to control a data rate transfer of 35 Gbytes per day. (author)

  13. The "Measuring Outcomes of Clinical Connectivity" (MOCC) trial: investigating data entry errors in the Electronic Primary Care Research Network (ePCRN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Patricia; Mendenhall, Tai J; Peterson, Kevin; Speedie, Stuart M

    2007-01-01

    The electronic Primary Care Research Network (ePCRN) enrolled PBRN researchers in a feasibility trial to test the functionality of the network's electronic architecture and investigate error rates associated with two data entry strategies used in clinical trials. PBRN physicians and research assistants who registered with the ePCRN were eligible to participate. After online consent and randomization, participants viewed simulated patient records, presented as either abstracted data (short form) or progress notes (long form). Participants transcribed 50 data elements onto electronic case report forms (CRFs) without integrated field restrictions. Data errors were analyzed. Ten geographically dispersed PBRNs enrolled 100 members and completed the study in less than 7 weeks. The estimated overall error rate if field restrictions had been applied was 2.3%. Participants entering data from the short form had a higher rate of correctly entered data fields (94.5% vs 90.8%, P = .004) and significantly more error-free records (P = .003). Feasibility outcomes integral to completion of an Internet-based, multisite study were successfully achieved. Further development of programmable electronic safeguards is indicated. The error analysis conducted in this study will aid design of specific field restrictions for electronic CRFs, an important component of clinical trial management systems.

  14. Can Facebook Be Used for Research? Experiences Using Facebook to Recruit Pregnant Women for a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Laura M; Manca, Donna P; Bell, Rhonda C

    2016-09-21

    Recruitment is often a difficult and costly part of any human research study. Social media and other emerging means of mass communication hold promise as means to complement traditional strategies used for recruiting participants because they can reach a large number of people in a short amount of time. With the ability to target a specified audience, paid Facebook advertisements have potential to reach future research participants of a specific demographic. This paper describes the experiences of a randomized controlled trial in Edmonton, Alberta, attempting to recruit healthy pregnant women between 8 and 20 weeks' gestation for participation in a prenatal study. Various traditional recruitment approaches, in addition to paid Facebook advertisements were trialed. To evaluate the effectiveness of paid advertisements on Facebook as a platform for recruiting pregnant women to a randomized controlled trial in comparison with traditional recruitment approaches. Recruitment using traditional approaches occurred for 7 months, whereas Facebook advertisements ran for a total of 26 days. Interested women were prompted to contact the study staff for a screening call to determine study eligibility. Costs associated with each recruitment approach were recorded and used to calculate the cost to recruit eligible participants. Performance of Facebook advertisements was monitored using Facebook Ads Manager. Of the 115 women included, 39.1% (n=45) of the women who contacted study staff heard about the study through Facebook, whereas 60.9% (n=70) of them heard about it through traditional recruitment approaches. During the 215 days (~7 months) that the traditional approaches were used, the average rate of interest was 0.3 (0.2) women/day, whereas the 26 days of Facebook advertisements resulted in an average rate of interest of 2.8 (1.7) women/day. Facebook advertisements cost Can $506.91 with a cost per eligible participant of Cad $20.28. In comparison, the traditional approaches

  15. Linking experiment and theory for three-dimensional networked binary metal nanoparticle–triblock terpolymer superstructures

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Zihui; Hur, Kahyun; Sai, Hiroaki; Higuchi, Takeshi; Takahara, Atsushi; Jinnai, Hiroshi; Gruner, Sol M.; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    the intimate coupling of synthesis, in-depth electron tomographic characterization and theory enables exquisite control of superstructure in highly ordered porous three-dimensional continuous networks from single and binary mixtures of metal nanoparticles

  16. Innovation in Innovation Management: The Experience of Petrobras Centers and Networks of Excellence Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria de Britto Pires

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Since 1996, Petrobras – Petróleo Brasileiro S.A., the biggest company in Latin America, has supported the development of a method to structure networks of partnerships called Centers and Networks of Excellence Practice (PCREX. It aims to support the establishment of centers and networks of excellence in areas in which innovation depends heavily on the articulation of various players from outside the company and different internal areas. This article presents the results of the analysis of the PCREX method, including its characterization and field research carried out in eight Centers and Networks of Excellence developed by Petrobras. The field research and subsequent analysis helped identify (i the alignment between the PCREX method and the best innovation management practices and (ii the difficulties faced by new management models based on resource and knowledge sharing, which highlights that organizational innovations need to be able to count on strong institutional support to succeed.

  17. Experiments in Neural-Network Control of a Free-Flying Space Robot

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilson, Edward

    1995-01-01

    Four important generic issues are identified and addressed in some depth in this thesis as part of the development of an adaptive neural network based control system for an experimental free flying space robot prototype...

  18. Experience of wireless local area network in a radiation oncology department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Abhijit; Asthana, Anupam Kumar; Aggarwal, Lalit Mohan

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a wireless local area network (LAN) between different types of users (Radiation Oncologists, Radiological Physicists, Radiation Technologists, etc) for efficient patient data management and to made easy the availability of information (chair side) to improve the quality of patient care in Radiation Oncology department. We have used mobile workstations (Laptops) and stationary workstations, all equipped with wireless-fidelity (Wi-Fi) access. Wireless standard 802.11g (as recommended by Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ) has been used. The wireless networking was configured with the Service Set Identifier (SSID), Media Access Control (MAC) address filtering, and Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) network securities. We are successfully using this wireless network in sharing the indigenously developed patient information management software. The proper selection of the hardware and the software combined with a secure wireless LAN setup will lead to a more efficient and productive radiation oncology department.

  19. Information Assurance in Networked Enterprises: MICSS Class Experiments and Industry Survey Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ray, Parbati

    2001-01-01

    .... The surveys give an insight into how inter-networked companies use their ERP systems, whet their current policies maybe with respect to information management, and what their security and assurance problems maybe...

  20. Experience and Lessons learnt from running High Availability Databases on Network Attached Storage

    CERN Document Server

    Guijarro, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    The Database and Engineering Services Group of CERN's Information Technology Department supplies the Oracle Central Database services used in many activities at CERN. In order to provide High Availability and ease management for those services, a NAS (Network Attached Storage) based infrastructure has been setup. It runs several instances of the Oracle RAC (Real Application Cluster) using NFS (Network File System) as shared disk space for RAC purposes and Data hosting. It is composed of two private LANs (Local Area Network), one to provide access to the NAS filers and a second to implement the Oracle RAC private interconnect, both using Network Bonding. NAS filers are configured in partnership to prevent having single points of failure and to provide automatic NAS filer fail-over.

  1. Experience and lessons learnt from running high availability databases on network attached storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guijarro, M; Gaspar, R

    2008-01-01

    The Database and Engineering Services Group of CERN's Information Technology Department supplies the Oracle Central Database services used in many activities at CERN. In order to provide High Availability and ease management for those services, a NAS (Network Attached Storage) based infrastructure has been setup. It runs several instances of the Oracle RAC (Real Application Cluster) using NFS (Network File System) as shared disk space for RAC purposes and Data hosting. It is composed of two private LANs (Local Area Network), one to provide access to the NAS filers and a second to implement the Oracle RAC private interconnect, both using Network Bonding. NAS filers are configured in partnership to prevent having single points of failure and to provide automatic NAS filer fail-over

  2. The photoelectric effect and study of the diffraction of light: Two new experiments in UNILabs virtual and remote laboratories network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez, Juan Pedro; Carreras, Carmen; Yuste, Manuel; Dormido, Sebastián; Sáenz, Jacobo; De la Torre, Luis; Rubén, Heradio

    2015-01-01

    This work describes two experiments: 'study of the diffraction of light: Fraunhofer approximation' and 'the photoelectric effect'. Both of them count with a virtual, simulated, version of the experiment as well as with a real one which can be operated remotely. The two previous virtual and remote labs (built using Easy Java(script) Simulations) are integrated in UNILabs, a network of online interactive laboratories based on the free Learning Management System Moodle. In this web environment, students can find not only the virtual and remote labs but also manuals with related theory, the user interface description for each application, and so on.

  3. The clinical trial of TOMOTRON - a new electronic device - and eight months' clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroepelin, T.; Billmann, P.; Wenz, W.; Baumann, H.

    1985-01-01

    We have been using digital tomography (TOMOTRON) clinically for eight months. Its advantages include savings in both time and dose, good image quality throug increased contrast, and improved magnification and image postprocessing compared with conventional tomography. However, lower image resolution and small image sections are the disadvantages of digital tomography. Weighing these advantages and disadvantages by our experience, the diagnostic accuracy of digital tomography is higher than conventional tomography, particularly in skeletal studies. (author)

  4. Effect of correlating adjacent neurons for identifying communications: Feasibility experiment in a cultured neuronal network

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshi Nishitani; Chie Hosokawa; Yuko Mizuno-Matsumoto; Tomomitsu Miyoshi; Shinichi Tamura

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal networks have fluctuating characteristics, unlike the stable characteristics seen in computers. The underlying mechanisms that drive reliable communication among neuronal networks and their ability to perform intelligible tasks remain unknown. Recently, in an attempt to resolve this issue, we showed that stimulated neurons communicate via spikes that propagate temporally, in the form of spike trains. We named this phenomenon “spike wave propagation”. In these previous studies, using ...

  5. Research network on capital markets and financial integration in Europe : results and experience after two years

    OpenAIRE

    European Central Bank ; Center for Financial Studies (CFS)

    2008-01-01

    In April 2002 the European Central Bank (ECB) and the Center for Financial Studies (CFS) launched the ECB-CFS Research Network to promote research on “Capital Markets and Financial Integration in Europe”. The ECB-CFS research network aims at stimulating top-level and policy-relevant research, significantly contributing to the understanding of the current and future structure and integration of the financial system in Europe and its international linkages with the United States and Japan. This...

  6. Full Service ISDN Satellite (FSIS) network model for advanced ISDN satellite design and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Gerard R.

    1992-01-01

    The Full Service Integrated Services Digital Network (FSIS) network model for advanced satellite designs describes a model suitable for discrete event simulations. A top down model design uses the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) as its basis. The ACTS and the Interim Service ISDN Satellite (ISIS) perform ISDN protocol analyses and switching decisions in the terrestrial domain, whereas FSIS makes all its analyses and decisions on-board the ISDN satellite.

  7. Network access charges, vertical integration, and property rights structure - experiences from the German electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growitsch, C.; Wein, T.

    2005-01-01

    After the deregulation of the German electricity markets in 1998, the German government opted for a regulatory regime called negotiated third party access, which would be subject to ex-post control by the federal cartel office. Network access charges for new competitors are based on contractual arrangements between energy producers and industrial consumers. As the electricity networks are incontestable natural monopolies, the local and regional network operators are able to set (monopolistic) charges at their own discretion, restricted only by the possible interference of the federal cartel office (Bundeskartellamt). In this paper we analyze if there is evidence for varying charging behaviour depending on the supplier's economic independence (structure of property rights) or its level of vertical integration. For this purpose, we hypothesise that incorporated and vertically integrated suppliers set different charges than independent utility companies. Multivariate estimations show a relation between network access charges and the network operator's economic independence as well as level of vertical integration: on the low voltage level for an estimated annual consumption of 1700 kW/h, vertically integrated firms set-in accordance with our hypothesis-significantly lower access charges than vertically separated suppliers, whereas incorporated network operators charge significantly higher charges compared to independent suppliers. These results could not have been confirmed for other consumptions or voltage levels. (author)

  8. A local area network for medical research; planning, realization and experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schosser, R; Weiss, C; Messmer, K

    1991-01-01

    This report focuses on the planning and realization of an interdisciplinary local area network (LAN) for medical research at the University of Heidelberg. After a detailed requirements analysis, several networks were evaluated by means of a test installation, and a cost-performance analysis was carried out. At present, the LAN connects 45 (IBM-compatible) PCs, several heterogeneous mainframes (IBM, DEC and Siemens) and provides access to the public X.25 network and to wide-area networks for research (EARN, BITNET). The network supports application software that is frequently needed in medical research (word processing, statistics, graphics, literature databases and services, etc.). Compliance with existing "official" (e.g., IEEE 802.3) and "de facto" standards (e.g., PostScript) was considered to be extremely important for the selection of both hardware and software. Customized programs were developed to improve access control, user interface and on-line help. Wide acceptance of the LAN was achieved through extensive education and maintenance facilities, e.g., teaching courses, customized manuals and a hotline service. Since requirements of clinical routine differ substantially from medical research needs, two separate networks (with a gateway in between) are proposed as a solution to optimally satisfy the users' demands.

  9. Well-Child Care Redesign: A Mixed Methods Analysis of Parent Experiences in the PARENT Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimila, Naomi A; Chung, Paul J; Elliott, Marc N; Bethell, Christina D; Chacon, Sandra; Biely, Christopher; Contreras, Sandra; Chavis, Toni; Bruno, Yovana; Moss, Tanesha; Coker, Tumaini R

    Parent-focused Redesign for Encounters, Newborns to Toddlers (PARENT), is a well-child care (WCC) model that has demonstrated effectiveness in improving the receipt of comprehensive WCC services and reducing emergency department utilization for children aged 0 to 3 in low-income communities. PARENT relies on a health educator ("parent coach") to provide WCC services; it utilizes a Web-based previsit prioritization/screening tool (Well-Visit Planner) and an automated text message reminder/education service. We sought to assess intervention feasibility and acceptability among PARENT trial intervention participants. Intervention parents completed a survey after a 12-month study period; a 26% random sample of them were invited to participate in a qualitative interview. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using the constant comparative method of qualitative analysis; survey responses were analyzed using bivariate methods. A total of 115 intervention participants completed the 12-month survey; 30 completed a qualitative interview. Nearly all intervention participants reported meeting with the coach, found her helpful, and would recommend continuing coach-led well visits (97-99%). Parents built trusting relationships with the coach and viewed her as a distinct and important part of their WCC team. They reported that PARENT well visits more efficiently used in-clinic time and were comprehensive and family centered. Most used the Well-Visit Planner (87%), and found it easy to use (94%); a minority completed it at home before the visit (18%). Sixty-two percent reported using the text message service; most reported it as a helpful source of new information and a reinforcement of information discussed during visits. A parent coach-led intervention for WCC for young children is a model of WCC delivery that is both acceptable and feasible to parents in a low-income urban population. Copyright © 2017 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  10. Development of a checklist of quality indicators for clinical trials in resource-limited countries: the French National Agency for Research on AIDS and Viral Hepatitis (ANRS) experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Mina; Minga, Albert; Fao, Paulin; Borand, Laurence; Diouf, Assane; Mben, Jean-Marc; Gad, Rita R; Anglaret, Xavier; Bazin, Brigitte; Chene, Geneviève

    2013-04-01

    consideration, that is, in the case of vulnerable participants (children, pregnant women). Proposed indicators are the result of expert consensus and reflect their experience in the HIV field. Relevance to existing trials and extrapolation to other fields must be assessed. This innovative program allowed ANRS sites located in RLCs to share their GCP implementation experiences in order to build a list of relevant indicators for clinical trials. The next step is to collect data from ongoing HIV and hepatitis C trials in these settings and will assess the relevance of these indicators to document current quality of performance among trials in resource-limited settings.

  11. File management for experiment control parameters within a distributed function computer network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubblefield, F.W.

    1976-10-01

    An attempt to design and implement a computer system for control of and data collection from a set of laboratory experiments reveals that many of the experiments in the set require an extensive collection of parameters for their control. The operation of the experiments can be greatly simplified if a means can be found for storing these parameters between experiments and automatically accessing them as they are required. A subsystem for managing files of such experiment control parameters is discussed. 3 figures

  12. Stress dependent fluid flow in porous rock: experiments and network modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flornes, Olav

    2005-07-01

    permeability change was the same in the two directions. When a rock is subjected to sufficiently high stresses, permanent damage, or failure, occurs and we expect a more drastic change in its properties. In a series of experiments on three different materials, we study how permeability is changed by different failure modes. We observed that permeability followed the volumetric strain independent of failure mode in two of the materials, Saltwash and Tuffeau de Maastricht, while for Red Wildmoor, the permeability changed in a more complex manner. We present two numerical models that study how deformation and fluid flow are related. While they are both network models, one is focused on the effect of changed porosity on permeability, and tries to give some insight to the experimental results described above. The other one is more theoretical, and investigates some universal properties associated with hydraulic fracturing using a Biot-Cosserat model (author) (ml)

  13. Facilitating efficient augmentation of transmission networks to connect renewable energy generation: the Australian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, Glen

    2012-01-01

    Australia is heavily dependent on coal for electricity generation. The Renewable Energy Target has spurred growth in the utilization of renewable energy sources, with further growth expected into the future. Australia's strongest renewable energy sources are generally distant from the transmission network in resource ‘basins’. Investment is needed to augment the transmission network to enable delivery of electricity from these sources to consumers. Considerable economies of scale flow from anticipating the connection of numerous generators in an area over time and sizing augmentations accordingly. Following a lengthy rulemaking process, the National Electricity Rules were recently amended by a new rule, designed to facilitate the construction of such efficiently sized augmentations. However, the new rule is more conservative than initially envisaged, making little substantive change to the current frameworks for augmentation and connection. This paper outlines these frameworks and the rulemaking process and identifies the key debates surrounding the rule change are identified. This paper then provides a detailed analysis of the new rule, concluding that it is defective in a number of respects and is unlikely to result in the efficient and timely augmentation of the network needed to unlock the potential of Australia's strongest renewable energy resources. - Highlights: ► Remoteness of renewable energy sources is a barrier to greater renewable energy utilization. ► Significant economies of scale flow from efficiently-sized transmission network augmentation. ► Current frameworks in Australia do not incentivise efficiently-sized network augmentations. ► The lack of property rights in an augmentation is particularly problematic. ► The new Scale Efficient Network Extensions rule is not apt to facilitate efficiently-sized network augmentations.

  14. Exploring the Potential of Generative Adversarial Networks for Synthesizing Radiological Images of the Spine to be Used in In Silico Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Galbusera

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In silico trials recently emerged as a disruptive technology, which may reduce the costs related to the development and marketing approval of novel medical technologies, as well as shortening their time-to-market. In these trials, virtual patients are recruited from a large database and their response to the therapy, such as the implantation of a medical device, is simulated by means of numerical models. In this work, we propose the use of generative adversarial networks to produce synthetic radiological images to be used in in silico trials. The generative models produced credible synthetic sagittal X-rays of the lumbar spine based on a simple sketch, and were able to generate sagittal radiological images of the trunk using coronal projections as inputs, and vice versa. Although numerous inaccuracies in the anatomical details may still allow distinguishing synthetic and real images in the majority of cases, the present work showed that generative models are a feasible solution for creating synthetic imaging data to be used in in silico trials of novel medical devices.

  15. Maximizing Effectiveness Trials in PTSD and SUD Through Secondary Analysis: Benefits and Limitations Using the National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network "Women and Trauma" Study as a Case Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hien, Denise A; Campbell, Aimee N C; Ruglass, Lesia M; Saavedra, Lissette; Mathews, Abigail G; Kiriakos, Grace; Morgan-Lopez, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    Recent federal legislation and a renewed focus on integrative care models underscore the need for economical, effective, and science-based behavioral health care treatment. As such, maximizing the impact and reach of treatment research is of great concern. Behavioral health issues, including the frequent co-occurrence of substance use disorders (SUD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), are often complex, with a myriad of factors contributing to the success of interventions. Although treatment guides for comorbid SUD/PTSD exist, most patients continue to suffer symptoms following the prescribed treatment course. Further, the study of efficacious treatments has been hampered by methodological challenges (e.g., overreliance on "superiority" designs (i.e., designs structured to test whether or not one treatment statistically surpasses another in terms of effect sizes) and short term interventions). Secondary analyses of randomized controlled clinical trials offer potential benefits to enhance understanding of findings and increase the personalization of treatment. This paper offers a description of the limits of randomized controlled trials as related to SUD/PTSD populations, highlights the benefits and potential pitfalls of secondary analytic techniques, and uses a case example of one of the largest effectiveness trials of behavioral treatment for co-occurring SUD/PTSD conducted within the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (NIDA CTN) and producing 19 publications. The paper concludes with implications of this secondary analytic approach to improve addiction researchers' ability to identify best practices for community-based treatment of these disorders. Innovative methods are needed to maximize the benefits of clinical studies and better support SUD/PTSD treatment options for both specialty and non-specialty healthcare settings. Moving forward, planning for and description of secondary analyses in randomized trials should be given equal

  16. How informed is consent in vulnerable populations? Experience using a continuous consent process during the MDP301 vaginal microbicide trial in Mwanza, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavit Natujwa

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV prevention trials conducted among disadvantaged vulnerable at-risk populations in developing countries present unique ethical dilemmas. A key concern in bioethics is the validity of informed consent for trial participation obtained from research subjects in such settings. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a continuous informed consent process adopted during the MDP301 phase III vaginal microbicide trial in Mwanza, Tanzania. Methods A total of 1146 women at increased risk of HIV acquisition working as alcohol and food vendors or in bars, restaurants, hotels and guesthouses have been recruited into the MDP301 phase III efficacy and safety trial in Mwanza. During preparations for the trial, participatory community research methods were used to develop a locally-appropriate pictorial flipchart in order to convey key messages about the trial to potential participants. Pre-recorded audio tapes were also developed to facilitate understanding and compliance with gel-use instructions. A comprehension checklist is administered by clinical staff to all participants at screening, enrolment, 12, 24, 40 and 50 week follow-up visits during the trial. To investigate women's perceptions and experiences of the trial, including how well participants internalize and retain key messages provided through a continuous informed consent process, a random sub-sample of 102 women were invited to participate in in-depth interviews (IDIs conducted immediately after their 4, 24 and 52 week follow-up visits. Results 99 women completed interviews at 4-weeks, 83 at 24-weeks, and 74 at 52 weeks (a total of 256 interviews. In all interviews there was evidence of good comprehension and retention of key trial messages including that the gel is not currently know to be effective against HIV; that this is the key reason for conducting the trial; and that women should stop using gel in the event of pregnancy. Conclusions

  17. Selective adaptation in networks of heterogeneous populations: model, simulation, and experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avner Wallach

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Biological systems often change their responsiveness when subject to persistent stimulation, a phenomenon termed adaptation. In neural systems, this process is often selective, allowing the system to adapt to one stimulus while preserving its sensitivity to another. In some studies, it has been shown that adaptation to a frequent stimulus increases the system's sensitivity to rare stimuli. These phenomena were explained in previous work as a result of complex interactions between the various subpopulations of the network. A formal description and analysis of neuronal systems, however, is hindered by the network's heterogeneity and by the multitude of processes taking place at different time-scales. Viewing neural networks as populations of interacting elements, we develop a framework that facilitates a formal analysis of complex, structured, heterogeneous networks. The formulation developed is based on an analysis of the availability of activity dependent resources, and their effects on network responsiveness. This approach offers a simple mechanistic explanation for selective adaptation, and leads to several predictions that were corroborated in both computer simulations and in cultures of cortical neurons developing in vitro. The framework is sufficiently general to apply to different biological systems, and was demonstrated in two different cases.

  18. Comparative Effectiveness of Nonoperative Treatments for Chronic Calcific Tendinitis of the Shoulder: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi-Cheng; Tsai, Wen-Chung; Tu, Yu-Kung; Yu, Tung-Yang

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of various nonoperative treatments for chronic calcific tendinitis of the shoulder, a systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomized trials was performed to evaluate changes in pain reduction, functional improvements in patients with calcific tendinitis, and the ratio of complete resolution of calcific deposition. Studies were comprehensively searched, without language restrictions, on PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane, and other databases. The reference lists of articles and reviews were cross-checked for possible studies. Randomized controlled trials from before August 2016 were included. Study selection was conducted by 2 reviewers independently. The quality of studies was assessed and data extracted by 2 independent reviewers. Disagreements were settled by consulting a third reviewer to reach a consensus. Fourteen studies with 1105 participants were included in the network meta-analysis that used a random-effect model to investigate the mean difference of pooled effect sizes of the visual analog scale, Constant-Murley score, and the ratio of complete resolution of calcific deposition on native radiographs. The present network meta-analysis demonstrates that ultrasound-guided needling (UGN), radial extracorporeal shockwave therapy (RSW), and high-energy focused extracorporeal shockwave therapy (H-FSW) alleviate pain and achieve complete resolution of calcium deposition. Compared with low-energy focused extracorporeal shockwave therapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and ultrasound therapy, H-FSW is the best therapy for providing functional recovery. Physicians should consider UGN, RSW, and H-FSW as alternative effective therapies for chronic calcific tendinitis of the shoulder when initial conservative treatment fails. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials for comparing the effectiveness and safety profile of treatments with marketing authorization for relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjigeorgiou, G M; Doxani, C; Miligkos, M; Ziakas, P; Bakalos, G; Papadimitriou, D; Mprotsis, T; Grigoriadis, N; Zintzaras, E

    2013-12-01

    The relative effectiveness and safety profile of the treatments with marketing authorization for relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS) are not well known because randomized controlled trials with head-to-head comparisons between these treatments do not exist. Thus, a network of multiple-treatments meta-analysis was performed using four clinical outcomes: 'patients free of relapse', 'patients without disease progression', 'patients without MRI progression' and 'patients with adverse events'. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on MS were systematically searched in PubMed and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trial. The network analysis performed pairwise comparisons between the marketed treatments (Betaferon 250mcg, Avonex 30mcg, Rebif 44mcg, Rebif 22mcg, Aubagio 7 mg, Aubagio 14 mg, Copaxone 20 mg, Tysabri 300 mg, Gilenya 0·5 mg and Novantrone 12 mg/m(2)) using direct and indirect analyses. The analysis included 48 articles, involving 20 455 patients with MS. The direct analysis showed better response for more than one outcome for Gilenya compared with Avonex ('patients free of relapse' and 'patients without MRI progression') and for Betaferon compared with Avonex ('patients without disease progression' and 'patients without MRI progression'). The indirect analysis indicated that Tysabri may have better relative effectiveness compared with the other treatments for two outcomes: 'patients free of relapse' and 'patients without MRI progression'. Regarding 'patients with adverse events', no data were available for all comparisons to make fair inferences. This was an attempt, for the first time, to compare the efficacy and safety profile of existing approved treatments for relapsing MS. Although some treatments have shown better response, the results of the network analysis should be interpreted with caution because of the lack of RCTs with head-to-head comparisons between treatments. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Contraceptive use in women enrolled into preventive HIV vaccine trials: experience from a phase I/II trial in East Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Kibuuka

    Full Text Available HIV vaccine trials generally require that pregnant women are excluded from participation, and contraceptive methods must be used to prevent pregnancy during the trial. However, access to quality services and misconceptions associated with contraceptive methods may impact on their effective use in developing countries. We describe the pattern of contraceptive use in a multi-site phase I/IIa HIV Vaccine trial in East Africa (Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania and factors that may have influenced their use during the trial.Pregnancy prevention counseling was provided to female participants during informed consent process and at each study visit. Participants' methods of contraception used were documented. Methods of contraceptives were provided on site. Pregnancy testing was done at designated visits during the trial. Obstacles to contraceptive use were identified and addressed at each visit.Overall, 103 (31.8% of a total of 324 enrolled volunteers were females. Female participants were generally young with a mean age of 29(+/-7.2, married (49.5% and had less than high school education (62.1%. Hormonal contraceptives were the most common method of contraception (58.3% followed by condom use (22.3%. The distribution of methods of contraception among the three sites was similar except for more condom use and less abstinence in Uganda. The majority of women (85.4% reported to contraceptive use prior to screening. The reasons for not using contraception included access to quality services, insufficient knowledge of certain methods, and misconceptions.Although hormonal contraceptives were frequently used by females participating in the vaccine trial, misconceptions and their incorrect use might have led to inconsistent use resulting in undesired pregnancies. The study underscores the need for an integrated approach to pregnancy prevention counseling during HIV vaccine trials.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00123968.

  1. Automatic data-acquisition and communications computer network for fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemper, C.O.

    1981-01-01

    A network of more than twenty computers serves the data acquisition, archiving, and analysis requirements of the ISX, EBT, and beam-line test facilities at the Fusion Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The network includes PDP-8, PDP-12, PDP-11, PDP-10, and Interdata 8-32 processors, and is unified by a variety of high-speed serial and parallel communications channels. While some processors are dedicated to experimental data acquisition, and others are dedicated to later analysis and theoretical work, many processors perform a combination of acquisition, real-time analysis and display, and archiving and communications functions. A network software system has been developed which runs in each processor and automatically transports data files from point of acquisition to point or points of analysis, display, and storage, providing conversion and formatting functions are required

  2. Building and interconnecting hydrogen networks: Insights from the electricity and gas experience in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bento, Nuno

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate the transition to a new energy system based on hydrogen in the European liberalized framework. After analyzing the literature on the hydrogen infrastructure needs in Europe, we estimate the size and scope of the transition challenge. We take the theoretical framework of network economics to analyze early hydrogen infrastructure needs. Therefore, several concepts are applied to hydrogen economics such as demand club effects, scale economies on large infrastructures, scope economies, and positive socio-economical externalities. Based on the examples of the electricity and natural gas industry formation in Europe, we argue for public intervention in order to create conditions to reach more rapidly the critical size of the network and to prompt network externalities, allowing for the market diffusion of and, thus, an effective transition to the new energy system

  3. Linking experiment and theory for three-dimensional networked binary metal nanoparticle–triblock terpolymer superstructures

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Zihui

    2014-02-21

    © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. Controlling superstructure of binary nanoparticle mixtures in three dimensions from self-assembly opens enormous opportunities for the design of materials with unique properties. Here we report on how the intimate coupling of synthesis, in-depth electron tomographic characterization and theory enables exquisite control of superstructure in highly ordered porous three-dimensional continuous networks from single and binary mixtures of metal nanoparticles with a triblock terpolymer. Poly(isoprene-block-styrene-block-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) is synthesized and used as structure-directing agent for ligand-stabilized platinum and gold nanoparticles. Quantitative analysis provides insights into short-and long-range nanoparticle-nanoparticle correlations, and local and global contributions to structural chirality in the networks. Results provide synthesis criteria for next-generation mesoporous network superstructures from binary nanoparticle mixtures for potential applications in areas including catalysis.

  4. Similarity facilitates relationships on social networks: a field experiment on facebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Angélique; Jacob, Céline; Guéguen, Nicolas

    2013-08-01

    People interact more readily with someone with whom they think they have something in common, but the effect of an incidental similarity has never been examined on social networks. Facebook users were contacted by a stranger who also possessed a Facebook page and who asked them to become his friend. The request message contained one item of similarity, two items of similarity, or none. Compliance to the request was the dependent variable. Increased compliance to the request was found when comparing the two similarity conditions with the control no-similarity condition. However, no difference was found between the two similarity conditions. Similarity appears to foster relationships on social networks.

  5. First results of registering ionospheric disturbances obtained with SibNet network of GNSS receivers in active space experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishin, Artem; Perevalova, Natalia; Voeykov, Sergey; Khakhinov, Vitaliy

    2017-12-01

    Global and regional networks of GNSS receivers have been successfully used for geophysical research for many years; the number of continuous GNSS stations in the world is steadily growing. The article presents the first results of the use of a new regional network of GNSS stations (SibNet) in active space experiments. The Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics of Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences (ISTP SB RAS) has established this network in the South Baikal region. We describe in detail SibNet, characteristics of receivers in use, parameters of antennas and methods of their installation. We also present the general structure of observation site and the plot of coverage of the receiver operating zone at 50-55° latitudes by radio paths. It is shown that the selected location of receivers allows us to detect ionospheric irregularities of various scales. The purpose of the active space experiments was to reveal and record parameters of the ionospheric irregu larities caused by effects from jet streams of Progress cargo spacecraft. The mapping technique enabled us to identify weak, vertically localized ionospheric irregularities and associate them with the Progress spacecraft engine impact. Thus, it has been shown that SibNet deployed in the Southern Baikal region is an effective instrument for monitoring ionospheric conditions.

  6. Quality assurance experience with the randomized neuropathic bone pain trial (Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group, 96.05)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, Daniel E.; Davis, Sidney R.; Turner, Sandra L.; O'Brien, Peter C.; Spry, Nigel A.; Burmeister, Bryan H.; Hoskin, Peter J.; Ball, David L.

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 96.05 is a prospective randomized controlled trial comparing a single 8 Gy with 20 Gy in five fractions of radiotherapy (RT) for neuropathic pain due to bone metastases. This paper summarizes the quality assurance (QA) activities for the first 234 patients (accrual target 270). Materials and methods: Independent audits to assess compliance with eligibility/exclusion criteria and appropriateness of treatment of the index site were conducted after each cohort of approximately 45 consecutive patients. Reported serious adverse events (SAEs) in the form of cord/cauda equina compression or pathological fracture developing at the index site were investigated and presented in batches to the Independent Data Monitoring Committee. Finally, source data verification of the RT prescription page and treatment records was undertaken for each of the first 234 patients to assess compliance with the protocol. Results: Only one patient was found conclusively not to have genuine neuropathic pain, and there were no detected 'geographical misses' with RT fields. The overall rate of detected infringements for other eligibility criteria over five audits (225 patients) was 8% with a dramatic improvement after the first audit. There has at no stage been a statistically significant difference in SAEs by randomization arm. There was a 22% rate of RT protocol variations involving ten of the 14 contributing centres, although the rate of major dose violations (more than ±10% from protocol dose) was only 6% with no statistically significant difference by randomization arm (P=0.44). Conclusions: QA auditing is an essential but time-consuming component of RT trials, including those assessing palliative endpoints. Our experience confirms that all aspects should commence soon after study activation

  7. Strength in Numbers: Opportunities for Enhancing the Development of Effective Treatments for Type 1 Diabetes-The TrialNet Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Carla J; Speake, Cate; Krischer, Jeffrey; Buckner, Jane; Gottlieb, Peter A; Schatz, Desmond A; Herold, Kevan C; Atkinson, Mark A

    2018-07-01

    The early to mid-1980s were an inflection point in the history of type 1 diabetes research. Two landmark events occurred: the initiation of immune-based interventions seeking to prevent type 1 diabetes and the presentation of an innovative model describing the disorder's natural history. Both formed the basis for hundreds of subsequent studies designed to achieve a dramatic therapeutic goal-a means to prevent and/or reverse type 1 diabetes. However, the need to screen large numbers of individuals and prospectively monitor them using immunologic and metabolic tests for extended periods of time suggested such efforts would require a large collaborative network. Hence, the National Institutes of Health formed the landmark Diabetes Prevention Trial-Type 1 (DPT-1) in the mid-1990s, an effort that led to Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet. TrialNet studies have helped identify novel biomarkers; delineate type 1 diabetes progression, resulting in identification of highly predictable stages defined by the accumulation of autoantibodies (stage 1), dysglycemia (stage 2), and disease meeting clinical criteria for diagnosis (stage 3); and oversee numerous clinical trials aimed at preventing disease progression. Such efforts pave the way for stage-specific intervention trials with improved hope that a means to effectively disrupt the disorder's development will be identified. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  8. Effects of mindfulness on maternal stress, depressive symptoms and awareness of present moment experience: A pilot randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Jill; Hall, Helen; Biro, Mary Anne; East, Christine; Lau, Rosalind

    2017-07-01

    To determine the feasibility and acceptability and measure the effects of a mindfulness intervention compared to a pregnancy support program on stress, depressive symptoms and awareness of present moment experience. A pilot randomised trial using mixed methods. Forty-eight women attending a maternity service were randomly allocated to a mindfulness-based or pregnancy support program. Perceived Stress Scale, Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, Mindfulness Attention Awareness Scale, and Birth Outcomes. Women's perceptions of the impact of the programs were examined via summative evaluation, interviews, diaries and facilitator field notes. Nine women in the mindfulness program and 11 in the pregnancy support program completed post-program measures. There were no statistically significant differences between groups. Of practical significance, was an improvement in measures for both groups with a greater improvement in awareness of present moment experience for the intervention group. The intervention group reported learning how to manage stressors, fear, anxiety, and to regulate their attention to be more present. The control group reported learning how to calm down when stressed which increased their confidence. Intervention group themes were: releasing stress, becoming aware, accepting, having options and choices, connecting and being compassionate. Control group themes were:managing stress, increasing confidence, connecting, focussing, being accepted, preparing. The feasibility and acceptability of the intervention was confirmed. Programs decreased women's self-reported stress in different ways. Women in the mindfulness program accepted themselves and their experiences as they arose and passed in the present moment, while those in the control group gained acceptance primarily from external sources such as peers. Mindfulness programs can foster an internalised locus of self-acceptance which may result in woman becoming less dependent on others for their wellbeing

  9. An Integrated Online Library System as a Node in a Local Area Network: The Mitre Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, Mary Coyle

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the Mitre Corporation's implementation of OCLC's LS/2000 integrated library system using a local area network (LAN). LAN issues--requirements, equipment, reliability, growth, security, and traffic--are covered in general and as they relate to Mitre. Installation of the LAN/system interface and benefits and drawbacks of using a LAN for…

  10. Trans-European transport networks influence on the regional development and urban systems: Serbian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksin-Mićić Marija

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The trans-European transport network has different effects at macro regional mezzo-regional and micro-regional level, and its effectiveness rises with the lower regional levels. Possible approaches to the trans-European transport network impact and effect survey and policy options have been pointed out. The importance of increased accessibility and mobility for regional expansion and for a more balanced and polycentric system of city networks has been underlined. Changes in the spatial organization utilization and structure of cities, as well as in social benefits and losses subsequent to impacts of trans-European transport corridor "X" section Belgrade-Niš have been analyzed. The new trans-European or major transport infrastructure does not per se create regional and urban system network development, although it can affect the conditions for the processes that create growth and development. The effects can be increased by co-ordination of measures of regional, spatial and urban policy, land use transport, environmental and other policies. The necessary measure is the introduction of spatial impact assessment as sartorial policy instrument for the large transport infrastructure plans and projects.

  11. Wireless Sensor Networks--A Hands-On Modular Experiments Platform for Enhanced Pedagogical Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taslidere, E.; Cohen, F. S.; Reisman, F. K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the use of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) in educational research as a platform for enhanced pedagogical learning. The aim here with the use of a WSN platform was to go beyond the implementation stage to the real-life application stage, i.e., linking the implementation to real-life applications, where abstract theory and…

  12. Connected to Learn: Teachers' Experiences with Networked Technologies in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew; Riel, Richard; Germain-Froese, Bernie

    2016-01-01

    To get a better understanding of how networked technologies are impacting teachers and their teaching practices, in 2015 MediaSmarts partnered with the Canadian Teachers' Federation to survey 4,043 K-12 teachers and school administrators who were teaching in classroom settings across the country. The survey explored the extent to which networked…

  13. The College Football Student-Athlete's Academic Experience: Network Analysis and Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Kyle McLendon

    2010-01-01

    A grounded theory research study employing network analysis as a means of facilitating the latter stages of the coding process was conducted at a selective university that competes at the highest level of college football. The purpose of the study was to develop a better understanding of how interactive dynamics and controlling mechanisms, such as…

  14. EXPERIMENT BASED FAULT DIAGNOSIS ON BOTTLE FILLING PLANT WITH LVQ ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa DEMETGÜL

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an artificial neural network is developed to find an error rapidly on pneumatic system. Also the ANN prevents the system versus the failure. The error on the experimental bottle filling plant can be defined without any interference using analog values taken from pressure sensors and linear potentiometers. The sensors and potentiometers are placed on different places of the plant. Neural network diagnosis faults on plant, where no bottle, cap closing cylinder B is not working, bottle cap closing cylinder C is not working, air pressure is not sufficient, water is not filling and low air pressure faults. The fault is diagnosed by artificial neural network with LVQ. It is possible to find an failure by using normal programming or PLC. The reason offing Artificial Neural Network is to give a information where the fault is. However, ANN can be used for different systems. The aim is to find the fault by using ANN simultaneously. In this situation, the error taken place on the pneumatic system is collected by a data acquisition card. It is observed that the algorithm is very capable program for many industrial plants which have mechatronic systems.

  15. Trans-European transport networks influence on the regional development and urban systems: Serbian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksin-Mićić Marija

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The trans-European transport network has different effects at macro-regional, mezzo-regional and micro-regional level, and on urban systems development, and its effectiveness rises at the lower regional levels. Possible approaches to the trans-European transport network impact and effect survey and policy options have been pointed out. The importance of increased accessibility and mobility for regional expansion and for more balanced and polycentric system of city networks has been underlined. The question is how the new major transport infrastructure affects the development of functional complementarity between cities and regions. Changes of the spatial organization, utilization and structure of cities, as well as of social benefits and losses subsequent to impacts of trans-European transport corridor "X" on urban system Ćuprija-Jagodina-Paraćin at section Belgrade-Nis have been analysed. The new trans-European or major transport infrastructure does not per se create regional and urban system network development, although it can affect the conditions for the processes that create growth and development. The effects can be increased by co-ordination of measures of regional and urban policy, land use, transport and other policies. The guidances and options of urban systems and urban centres development policies in trans-European transport corridor, as well as possibilities to improve our planning system have been given. The necessary measure is the introduction of spatial impact assessment as sectorial policy instrument for the large transport infrastructure projects.

  16. Modernization of the french early warning network in IRSN, experience feedback and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debayle, C.; Bardet, A.; Beguin-Leprieur, M.; Chevreuil, M.; Malfait, V.; Mechenet, V. [PRP-ENV/SESURE/LS2A (France)

    2014-07-01

    Developed few years after the Chernobyl accident in 1991, the French early warning network, Teleray, composed by 160 ambient dose equivalent rate probes, had operated for 15 years. It was decided in 2007 to modernize this facility in order to keep the infrastructure up-to-date. The sensors, the data transmission network and the supervising system were considered separately, but each development took care about the modularity of the final IT system. After a benchmarking period and technical choices, a five years project started with the aim to increase the number of probes to 420, especially around the French nuclear facilities, to change the technology and the IT system including a new data transmission network. The project kick-off was planned in june 2011, but due to the Fukushima accident, the French government asked IRSN to implement a probe on the roof of the French embassy in Tokyo on March 18, 2011. Results and feedback will be discussed, focusing on new approach about data analysis purpose. In 2014, the modernization of this network will be finished one year before it was expected and with significant cost savings. All the relevant phase of the project will be described, including time schedule and economical aspects, with the aim to describe how it is now considered fundamental to have complementary mobile systems in case of nuclear crisis. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  17. Ethernet Networks for Real-Time Use in the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Meirosu, C; Martin, B

    2005-01-01

    Ethernet became today's de-facto standard technology for local area networks. Defined by the IEEE 802.3 and 802.1 working groups, the Ethernet standards cover technologies deployed at the first two layers of the OSI protocol stack. The architecture of modern Ethernet networks is based on switches. The switches are devices usually built using a store-and-forward concept. At the highest level, they can be seen as a collection of queues and mathematically modelled by means of queuing theory. However, the traffic profiles on modern Ethernet networks are rather different from those assumed in classical queuing theory. The standard recommendations for evaluating the performance of network devices define the values that should be measured but do not specify a way of reconciling these values with the internal architecture of the switches. The introduction of the 10 Gigabit Ethernet standard provided a direct gateway from the LAN to the WAN by the means of the WAN PHY. Certain aspects related to the actual use of WAN ...

  18. A novel use of a statewide telecolposcopy network for recruitment of participants in a Phase I clinical trial of a human papillomavirus therapeutic vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Shawna L; Spencer, Horace J; Greenfield, William W; Low, Gordon; Hitt, Wilbur C; Quick, Charles M; Jeffus, Susanne K; Blackmon, Victoria; Nakagawa, Mayumi

    2015-06-01

    Historically, recruitment and retention of young women in intervention-based clinical trials have been challenging. In August 2012, enrollment for a clinical trial testing of an investigational human papillomavirus therapeutic vaccine called PepCan was opened at our institution. This study was an open-label, single-arm, single-institution, dose-escalation Phase I clinical trial. Women with recent Papanicolaou smear results showing high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions or results that could not rule out high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion were eligible to enroll. Patients with biopsy-confirmed high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion were also eligible. Colposcopy was performed at the screening visit, and participants became eligible for vaccination when the diagnosis of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion was confirmed with biopsy and other inclusion criteria were met. The aim of this study was to identify strategies and factors effective in recruitment and retention of study participants. Potential vaccine candidates were recruited through direct advertisement as well as referrals, including referrals through the Arkansas telecolposcopy network. The network is a federally funded program, administered by physicians and advanced practice nurses. The network telemedically links rural health sites and allows physician-guided colposcopy and biopsies to be conducted by advanced practice nurses. A variety of strategies were employed to assure good retention, including face-to-face contact with the study coordinator at the time of consent and most of study visits; frequent contact using text messaging, phone calls, and e-mails; and creation of a private Facebook page to improve communication among research staff and study participants. A questionnaire, inquiring about motivation for joining the study, occupation, education, household income, number of children, and number of sexual partners, was administered at the screening visit with the intent of

  19. Low percolation transitions in carbon nanotube networks dispersed in a polymer matrix: dielectric properties, simulations and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes, Ricardo; Silva, Jaime; Vaia, Richard; Sencadas, Vítor; Costa, Pedro; Gomes, João; Lanceros-Méndez, Senentxu

    2009-01-21

    The low concentration behaviour and the increase of the dielectric constant in carbon nanotubes/polymer nanocomposites near the percolation threshold are still not well understood. In this work, a numerical model has been developed which focuses on the effect of the inclusion of conductive fillers in a dielectric polymer matrix on the dielectric constant and the dielectric strength. Experiments have been carried out in carbon nanotubes/poly(vinylidene fluoride) nanocomposites in order to compare to the simulation results. This work shows how the critical concentration is related to the formation of capacitor networks and that these networks give rise to high variations in the electrical properties of the composites. Based on numerical studies, the dependence of the percolation transition on the preparation of the nanocomposite is discussed. Finally, based on numerical and experimental results, both ours and from other authors, the causes of anomalous percolation behaviour of the dielectric constant are identified.

  20. Left atrial appendage occlusion for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation: a systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif, Hasib; Belley-Cote, Emilie P; Alotaibi, Abdullah; Dvirnik, Nazari; Neupane, Binod; Beyene, Joseph; Eikelboom, John W; Holmes, David; Whitlock, Richard P

    2018-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is one of the leading causes of stroke. Risks associated with oral anticoagulation (OAC) limit adherence to recommended therapy. Left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion is a treatment alternative in patients with AF. We performed a network meta-analysis (NMA) of randomized trials evaluating the efficacy of LAA occlusion compared with oral anticoagulant, antiplatelet, and placebo for stroke prevention. We also assessed the impact of LAA occlusion on mortality, major bleeding, and operative time. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, and Cochrane Library for randomized trials comparing percutaneous or surgical LAA occlusion with standard of care in AF patients. Conventional meta-analysis found no difference between groups for stroke (5 trials, 1285 patients;RR 0.78, 95% CI 0.47-1.29), and a significant reduction in mortality (5 trials, 1285 patients; RR 0.71, 95% CI 0.51-0.99) favouring LAA occlusion. NMA demonstrated a trend towards reduction in stroke (OR 0.84, 95% CrI 0.47-1.55) and mortality (OR 0.69, 95% CrI 0.44-1.10) for LAA occlusion versus warfarin, but no statistically significant effect. Statistical ranking curves placed LAA occlusion as the most efficacious treatment on the outcomes of stroke and mortality when compared to warfarin, aspirin, or placebo. No significant differences between groups were seen in major bleeding or operative time for surgical trials. The overall quality of the evidence was low as assessed by GRADE. LAA occlusion appears to preserve the benefits of OAC therapy for stroke prevention in patients with AF, but the current evidence is of low quality.

  1. Peru Subduction Zone Seismic Experiment (PeruSZE): Preliminary Results From a Seismic Network Between Mollendo and Lake Titicaca, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, R.; Stubailo, I.; Skinner, S.; Phillips, K.; Foote, E.; Lukac, M.; Aguilar, V.; Tavera, H.; Audin, L.; Husker, A.; Clayton, R.; Davis, P. M.

    2008-12-01

    This work describes preliminary results from a 50 station broadband seismic network recently installed from the coast to the high Andes in Peru. UCLA's Center for Embedded Network Sensing (CENS) and Caltech's Tectonic Observatory are collaborating with the IRD (French L'Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement) and the Institute of Geophysics, in Lima Peru in a broadband seismic experiment that will study the transition from steep to shallow slab subduction. The currently installed line has stations located above the steep subduction zone at a spacing of about 6 km. In 2009 we plan to install a line of 50 stations north from this line along the crest of the Andes, crossing the transition from steep to shallow subduction. A further line from the end of that line back to the coast, completing a U shaped array, is in the planning phase. The network is wirelessly linked using multi-hop network software designed by computer scientists in CENS in which data is transmitted from station to station, and collected at Internet drops, from where it is transmitted over the Internet to CENS each night. The instrument installation in Peru is almost finished and we have been receiving data daily from 10 stations (out of total 50) since June 2008. The rest are recording on-site while the RF network is being completed. The software system provides dynamic link quality based routing, reliable data delivery, and a disruption tolerant shell interface for managing the system from UCLA without the need to travel to Peru. The near real-time data delivery also allows immediate detection of any problems at the sites. We are building a seismic data and GPS quality control toolset that would greatly minimize the station's downtime by alerting the users of any possible problems.

  2. Percutaneous placed bioprosthetic venous valve in the treatment of deep vein reflux: animal experiments and clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Wei; Li Yanhao; Dusan Pavcnik

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficiency of percutaneously placed bioprosthetic bicuspid venous valve (BVV) in the treatment of deep vein insufficiency in animal experiments and clinical trials. Methods: BVV was made of two pieces of lyophilized porcine small intestinal submucosa(SIS) which were attached to a stent frame. Three kinds of BVVs (BVV1, BVV2, BVV3) was developed using different kinds of stent frames and different methods of attachment. BVV1, BVV2 and BVV3 were percutaneously placed into ovine's jugular veins acrossed the nature valves. Ascending and descending angiography were performed before and after' BVVs placement. The patency of veins and the function of valves was evaluated during 5 weeks to 6 months follow-up. In clinical trial, BVV1 and BVV3 were percutaneously placed into 3 and 15 patients with chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) respectively. The patency of veins and the function of valves was also evaluated during 1 to 3 years' follow-up. Results: In animal experiment, BVV1, BVV2, and BVV3 were placed to 24, 26 and 12 ovine's jugular veins respectively. During 5 weeks to 6 months follow- up period, 22 (88.0%), 24(92.3%) and 12 of the BVVs exhibited good function. Endothelium of both surfaces of SIS leaflets was complete in approximately 3 months. SIS was gradually reabsorbed and replaced by the host's own cells. Three BVV1 were placed into 3 patients with CVI. At the third years follow-up, symptoms relieved in 2 cases and no change of clinical symptoms was found in 1 patient. BVV3 were percutaneously placed into 15 patients with advanced symptomatic CVI. At one month and 3 months' follow- up after BVV3 placement, all BVV3 functioned well. However, BVV3 were flexible and functioned well in only 4 cases at 1 year' s follow-up. Intravascular ultrasound revealed thickened rigid cusps with valve leakage of different levels and no symptom resolved in 11 cases. Conclusions: Percutaneous implantation of bioprosthetic BVV is a promising method in the

  3. The effect of the publication of a major clinical trial in a high impact journal on clinical practise: the ORACLE Trial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Sara; Taylor, David J

    2002-12-01

    To estimate the short term effect of the publication of a major clinical trial on clinical practise. Questionnaire survey of clinical practise. UK. All maternity units in the UK. A self-administered questionnaire completed by lead consultants on delivery suite of maternity units. Changes in antibiotic prescription. Within six months of publication, approximately 50% of maternity units had changed their guidelines for the care of women with preterm prelabour rupture of the fetal membranes. Publication of a major clinical trial does impact on clinical practise but the impact is heterogeneous in terms of time and consistency.

  4. Expert Game experiment predicts emergence of trust in professional communication networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendtsen, Kristian Moss; Uekermann, Florian; Haerter, Jan O

    2016-10-25

    Strong social capital is increasingly recognized as an organizational advantage. Better knowledge sharing and reduced transaction costs increase work efficiency. To mimic the formation of the associated communication network, we propose the Expert Game, where each individual must find a specific expert and receive her help. Participants act in an impersonal environment and under time constraints that provide short-term incentives for noncooperative behavior. Despite these constraints, we observe cooperation between individuals and the self-organization of a sustained trust network, which facilitates efficient communication channels with increased information flow. We build a behavioral model that explains the experimental dynamics. Analysis of the model reveals an exploitation protection mechanism and measurable social capital, which quantitatively describe the economic utility of trust.

  5. Experience and Lessons learnt from running high availability databases on Network Attached Storage

    CERN Document Server

    Guijarro, Juan Manuel; Segura Chinchilla, Nilo

    2008-01-01

    The Database and Engineering Services Group of CERN's Information Technology Department provides the Oracle based Central Data Base services used in many activities at CERN. In order to provide High Availability and ease management for those services, a NAS (Network Attached Storage) based infrastructure has been set up. It runs several instances of the Oracle RAC (Real Application Cluster) using NFS as share disk space for RAC purposes and Data hosting. It is composed of two private LAN's to provide access to the NAS file servers and Oracle RAC interconnect, both using network bonding. NAS nodes are configured in partnership to prevent having single points of failure and to provide automatic NAS fail-over. This presentation describes that infrastructure and gives some advice on how to automate its management and setup using a Fabric Management framework such as Quattor. It also covers aspects related with NAS Performance and Monitoring as well Data Backup and Archive of such facility using already existing i...

  6. Very late stent thrombosis with second generation drug eluting stents compared to bare metal stents: Network meta-analysis of randomized primary percutaneous coronary intervention trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Femi; Stewart, Susan; Southard, Jeffrey A

    2016-07-01

    The relative safety of drug-eluting stents (DES) and bare-metal stents (BMS) in primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) in ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) continues to be debated. The long-term clinical outcomes between second generation DES and BMS for primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) using network meta-analysis were compared. Randomized controlled trials comparing stent types (first generation DES, second generation DES, or BMS) were considered for inclusion. A search strategy used Medline, Embase, Cochrane databases, and proceedings of international meetings. Information about study design, inclusion criteria, and sample characteristics were extracted. Network meta-analysis was used to pool direct (comparison of second generation DES to BMS) and indirect evidence (first generation DES with BMS and second generation DES) from the randomized trials. Twelve trials comparing all stents types including 9,673 patients randomly assigned to treatment groups were analyzed. Second generation DES was associated with significantly lower incidence of definite or probable ST (OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.39-0.89), MI (OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.39-0.89), and TVR at 3 years (OR 0.50: 95% CI 0.31-0.81) compared with BMS. In addition, there was a significantly lower incidence of MACE with second generation DES versus BMS (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.34-0.74) at 3 years. These were driven by a higher rate of TVR, MI and stent thrombosis in the BMS group at 3 years. There was a non-significant reduction in the overall and cardiac mortality [OR 0.83, 95% CI (0.60-1.14), OR 0.88, 95% CI (0.6-1.28)] with the use of second generation DES versus BMS at 3 years. Network meta-analysis of randomized trials of primary PCI demonstrated lower incidence of MACE, MI, TVR, and stent thrombosis with second generation DES compared with BMS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. European experience on air and water pollution control: monitoring network and warning station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aflalo, Sergio S. [Groupe Environnement S.A., Poissy (France)

    1993-12-31

    After a review of the energy consumption and pollutants emitted in the European Community, especially those concerning the `green house effect`, the author proceeded a summary of the actual legislation and Europeans directives, and also, the Best Available Technology for reducing air pollution is discussed. Original Air Quality monitoring networks performed by Environnement SA are described including measurements obtained around Paris and other areas of France. 7 refs., 11 figs.

  8. Establishment of Virtual Policy Based Network Management Scheme By Load Experiments in Virtual Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Kazuya Odagiri; Shogo Shimizu; Naohiro Ishii

    2016-01-01

    In the current Internet-based systems, there are many problems using anonymity of the network communication such as personal information leak and crimes using the I