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Sample records for trial botulinum toxin

  1. Botulinum toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigam P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin, one of the most poisonous biological substances known, is a neurotoxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. C. botulinum elaborates eight antigenically distinguishable exotoxins (A, B, C 1 , C 2 , D, E, F and G. All serotypes interfere with neural transmission by blocking the release of acetylcholine, the principal neurotransmitter at the neuromuscular junction, causing muscle paralysis. The weakness induced by injection with botulinum toxin A usually lasts about three months. Botulinum toxins now play a very significant role in the management of a wide variety of medical conditions, especially strabismus and focal dystonias, hemifacial spasm, and various spastic movement disorders, headaches, hypersalivation, hyperhidrosis, and some chronic conditions that respond only partially to medical treatment. The list of possible new indications is rapidly expanding. The cosmetological applications include correction of lines, creases and wrinkling all over the face, chin, neck, and chest to dermatological applications such as hyperhidrosis. Injections with botulinum toxin are generally well tolerated and side effects are few. A precise knowledge and understanding of the functional anatomy of the mimetic muscles is absolutely necessary to correctly use botulinum toxins in clinical practice.

  2. Treatment of chronic tension-type headache with botulinum toxin: a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Padberg, M.; de Bruijn, S. F. T. M.; de Haan, R. J.; Tavy, D. L. J.

    2004-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is increasingly advocated as effective treatment in chronic tension-type headache. We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial to prove efficacy of botulinum toxin in chronic tension-type headache. Patients were randomly assigned to receive botulinum toxin (maximum

  3. Botulinum Toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    show inconsistent and erroneous results. In vivo experiments using the rat extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle assay showed sensitivities of rat... digitorum longus muscle paralyzed by local injection of botulinum neurotoxin. Toxicon 34: 237--49. Amon, S. (1995). Botulism as an intestinal...BoNT -induced paralysis. References Adler, M., MacDonald, D.A., Sellin, L.C., Parker, G.W. (1996). Effect of 3,4-diaminopyridine on rat extensor

  4. Botulinum toxin versus trihexyphenidyl in cervical dystoni - A prospective, randomized, double-blind controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brans, JWM; Lindeboom, R; Snoek, JW; Zwarts, MJ; vanWeerden, TW; Brunt, ERP; vanHilten, JJ; vanderKamp, W; Prins, MH; Speelman, J.D.

    Background: Botulinum toxin type A (BTA) is replacing trihexyphenidyl as the treatment of choice for idiopathic cervical dystonia (ICD), but there has never been a direct comparative study. Methods: This trial compares the effectiveness of BTA with that of trihexyphenidyl in a prospective,

  5. Botulinum toxin versus trihexyphenidyl in cervical dystonia: a prospective, randomized, double-blind controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brans, J. W.; Lindeboom, R.; Snoek, J. W.; Zwarts, M. J.; van Weerden, T. W.; Brunt, E. R.; van Hilten, J. J.; van der Kamp, W.; Prins, M. H.; Speelman, J. D.

    1996-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BTA) is replacing trihexyphenidyl as the treatment of choice for idiopathic cervical dystonia (ICD), but there has never been a direct comparative study. This trial compares the effectiveness of BTA with that of trihexyphenidyl in a prospective, randomized, double-blind

  6. Botulinum Toxin for Rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Cengiz; Ismi, Onur

    2016-08-01

    Rhinitis is a common clinical entity. Besides nasal obstruction, itching, and sneezing, one of the most important symptoms of rhinitis is nasal hypersecretion produced by nasal glands and exudate from the nasal vascular bed. Allergic rhinitis is an IgE-mediated inflammatory reaction of nasal mucosa after exposure to environmental allergens. Idiopathic rhinitis describes rhinitis symptoms that occur after non-allergic, noninfectious irritants. Specific allergen avoidance, topical nasal decongestants, nasal corticosteroids, immunotherapy, and sinonasal surgery are the main treatment options. Because the current treatment modalities are not enough for reducing rhinorrhea in some patients, novel treatment options are required to solve this problem. Botulinum toxin is an exotoxin generated by Clostridium botulinum. It disturbs the signal transmission at the neuromuscular and neuroglandular junction by inhibiting the acetylcholine release from the presynaptic nerve terminal. It has been widely used in neuromuscular, hypersecretory, and autonomic nerve system disorders. There have been a lot of published articles concerning the effect of this toxin on rhinitis symptoms. Based on the results of these reports, intranasal botulinum toxin A administration appears to be a safe and effective treatment method for decreasing rhinitis symptoms in rhinitis patients with a long-lasting effect. Botulinum toxin type A will be a good treatment option for the chronic rhinitis patients who are resistant to other treatment methods.

  7. Anticholinergic versus botulinum toxin A comparison trial for the treatment of bothersome urge urinary incontinence: ABC trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visco, Anthony G; Brubaker, Linda; Richter, Holly E; Nygaard, Ingrid; Paraiso, Marie Fidela; Menefee, Shawn A; Schaffer, Joseph; Wei, John; Chai, Toby; Janz, Nancy; Spino, Cathie; Meikle, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This trial compares the change in urgency urinary incontinence episodes over 6 months, tolerability and cost effectiveness between women receiving daily anticholinergic therapy plus a single intra-detrusor injection of saline versus a single intra-detrusor injection of 100 U of botulinum toxin A plus daily oral placebo tablets. We present the rationale and design of a randomized-controlled trial, Anticholinergic versus Botulinum Toxin, Comparison Trial for the Treatment of Bothersome Urge Urinary Incontinence: ABC trial, conducted by the NICHD-funded Pelvic Floor Disorders Network. We discuss the innovative nature of this trial and the challenges related to choice of patient population, maintaining masking, cost effectiveness, ethical considerations, measuring adherence, and placebo development and testing. Enrollment began in April, 2010. 242 participants will be randomized and primary outcome data analysis is anticipated to begin in mid 2012. Several challenges in the trial design are discussed. Randomization to placebo intra-detrusor injections may limit recruitment, potentially impacting generalizability. Other challenges included the heavy marketing of drugs for overactive bladder which could impact recruitment of drug-naïve women. In addition, anticholinergic medications often cause dry mouth, making masking difficult. Finally, adverse reporting of transient urinary retention is challenging as there is no standardized definition; yet this is the most common adverse event following intra-detrusor botulinum toxin injection. The ABC trial will help women with urgency urinary incontinence balance efficacy, side effects and cost of anticholinergic medication versus botulinum toxin intra-detrusor injection. The results have the potential to fundamentally change the therapeutic approach to this condition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Botulinum toxin for the treatment of strabismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Fiona J; Noonan, Carmel P

    2017-03-02

    The use of botulinum toxin as an investigative and treatment modality for strabismus is well reported in the medical literature. However, it is unclear how effective it is in comparison to other treatment options for strabismus. The primary objective was to examine the efficacy of botulinum toxin therapy in the treatment of strabismus compared with alternative conservative or surgical treatment options. This review sought to ascertain those types of strabismus that particularly benefit from the use of botulinum toxin as a treatment option (such as small angle strabismus or strabismus with binocular potential, i.e. the potential to use both eyes together as a pair). The secondary objectives were to investigate the dose effect and complication rates associated with botulinum toxin. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register) (2016, Issue 6), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to July 2016), Embase (January 1980 to July 2016), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to July 2016), the ISRCTN registry (www.isrctn.com/editAdvancedSearch), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 11 July 2016. We handsearched the British and Irish Orthoptic Journal, Australian Orthoptic Journal, proceedings of the European Strabismological Association (ESA), International Strabismological Association (ISA) and International Orthoptic Association (IOA) (www.liv.ac.uk/orthoptics/research/search.htm) and American Academy of Paediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus meetings (AAPOS). We contacted researchers who are active in this field for information about further

  9. Botulinum toxin for the treatment of bruxism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinastepe, Neslihan; Küçük, Burcu Bal; Oral, Koray

    2015-10-01

    Botulinum toxin, the most potent biological toxin, has been shown to be effective for a variety of disorders in several medical conditions, when used both therapeutically and cosmetically. In recent years, there has been a rising trend in the use of this pharmacological agent to control bruxing activity, despite its reported adverse effects. The aim of this review was to provide a brief overview to clarify the underlying essential ideas for the use of botulinum toxin in bruxism based on available scientific papers. An electronic literature search was performed to identify publications related to botulinum toxin and its use for bruxism in PubMed. Hand searching of relevant articles was also made to identify additional studies. Of the eleven identified studies, only two were randomized controlled trials, compared with the effectiveness of botulinum toxins on the reduction in the frequency of bruxism events and myofascial pain after injection. The authors of these studies concluded that botulinum toxin could be used as an effective treatment for reducing nocturnal bruxism and myofascial pain in patients with bruxism. Evidence-based research was limited on this topic. More randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm that botulinum toxin is safe and reliable for routine clinical use in bruxism.

  10. Botulinum toxin for masseter hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorowicz, Zbys; van Zuuren, Esther J; Schoones, Jan

    2013-09-09

    Benign masseter muscle hypertrophy is an uncommon clinical phenomenon of uncertain aetiology which is characterised by a soft swelling near the angle of the mandible. The swelling may on occasion be associated with facial pain and can be prominent enough to be considered cosmetically disfiguring. Varying degrees of success have been reported for some of the treatment options for masseter hypertrophy, which range from simple pharmacotherapy to more invasive surgical reduction. Injection of botulinum toxin type A into the masseter muscle is generally considered a less invasive modality and has been advocated for cosmetic sculpting of the lower face. Botulinum toxin type A is a powerful neurotoxin which is produced by the anaerobic organism Clostridium botulinum and when injected into a muscle causes interference with the neurotransmitter mechanism producing selective paralysis and subsequent atrophy of the muscle.This review is an update of a previously published Cochrane review. To assess the efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin type A compared to placebo or no treatment, for the management of benign bilateral masseter hypertrophy. We searched the following databases from inception to April 2013: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); MEDLINE (via PubMed); EMBASE (via embase.com); Web of Science; CINAHL; Academic Search Premier (via EBSCOhost); ScienceDirect; LILACS (via BIREME); PubMed Central and Google Scholar (from 1700 to 19 April 2013). We searched two bibliographic databases of regional journals (IndMED and Iranmedex) which were expected to contain relevant trials. We also searched reference lists of relevant articles and contacted investigators to identify additional published and unpublished studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) comparing intra-masseteric injections of botulinum toxin versus placebo administered for cosmetic facial sculpting in individuals of any age with bilateral benign

  11. Cost-Effectiveness of Treating Upper Limb Spasticity Due to Stroke with Botulinum Toxin Type A: Results from the Botulinum Toxin for the Upper Limb after Stroke (BoTULS Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Steen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Stroke imposes significant burdens on health services and society, and as such there is a growing need to assess the cost-effectiveness of stroke treatment to ensure maximum benefit is derived from limited resources. This study compared the cost-effectiveness of treating post-stroke upper limb spasticity with botulinum toxin type A plus an upper limb therapy programme against the therapy programme alone. Data on resource use and health outcomes were prospectively collected for 333 patients with post-stroke upper limb spasticity taking part in a randomized trial and combined to estimate the incremental cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY gained of botulinum toxin type A plus therapy relative to therapy alone. The base case incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER of botulinum toxin type A plus therapy was £93,500 per QALY gained. The probability of botulinum toxin type A plus therapy being cost-effective at the England and Wales cost-effectiveness threshold value of £20,000 per QALY was 0.36. The point estimates of the ICER remained above £20,000 per QALY for a range of sensitivity analyses, and the probability of botulinum toxin type A plus therapy being cost-effective at the threshold value did not exceed 0.39, regardless of the assumptions made.

  12. Randomised double blind placebo controlled trial of the effect of botulinum toxin on walking in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubhi, T; Bhakta, B B; Ives, H L; Allgar, V; Roussounis, S H

    2000-12-01

    Cerebral palsy is the commonest cause of severe physical disability in childhood. For many years treatment has centred on the use of physiotherapy and orthotics to overcome the problems of leg spasticity, which interferes with walking and can lead to limb deformity. Intramuscular botulinum toxin (BT-A) offers a targeted form of therapy to reduce spasticity in specific muscle groups. To determine whether intramuscular BT-A can improve walking in children with cerebral palsy. Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial. Forty patients with spastic diplegia or hemiplegia were enrolled. Twenty two received botulinum toxin and 18 received placebo. The primary outcome measure was video gait analysis and secondary outcome measures were gross motor function measure (GMFM), physiological cost index (PCI), and passive ankle dorsiflexion. Video gait analysis showed clinically and statistically significant improvement in initial foot contact following BT-A at six weeks and 12 weeks compared to placebo. Forty eight per cent of BT-A treated children showed clinical improvement in VGA compared to 17% of placebo treated children. The GMFM (walking dimension) showed a statistically significant improvement in favour of the botulinum toxin treated group. Changes in PCI and passive ankle dorsiflexion were not statistically significant. The study gives further support to the use of intramuscular botulinum toxin type A as an adjunct to conventional physiotherapy and orthoses to reduce spasticity and improve functional mobility in children with spastic diplegic or hemiplegic cerebral palsy.

  13. A double-blind, randomised, crossover trial of two botulinum toxin type a in patients with spasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Coelho Guarany

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin type A (btxA is one of the main treatment choices for patients with spasticity. Prosigne® a new released botulinum toxin serotype A may have the same effectiveness as Botox® in focal dystonia. However, there are no randomized clinical trials comparing these formulations in spasticity treatment. The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy and safety of Prosigne® with Botox® in the treatment of spasticity.We performed a double-blind, randomized, crossover study consisting of 57 patients with clinically meaningful spasticity. The patients were assessed at baseline, 4 and 12 weeks after Prosigne® or Botox® administration. The main outcomes were changes in the patients' Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS, Functional Independence Measure (FIM and Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI scores and adverse effects related to the botulinum toxin. Both of the toxins were significantly effective in relieving the level of spasticity in adults and children. There were no significant differences found between the Prosigne® and Botox® treatments regarding their MAS, FIM and PEDI scores. Likewise, the incidence of adverse effects was similar between the two groups.Our results suggest that Prosigne® and Botox® are both efficient and comparable with respect to their efficacy and safety for the three month treatment of spasticity.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00819065.

  14. Botulinum toxin to improve results in cleft lip repair: a double-blinded, randomized, vehicle-controlled clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Shin Chang

    Full Text Available Most patients with facial scarring would value even a slight improvement in scar quality. Botulinum toxin A is widely used to alleviate facial dynamic rhytides but is also believed to improve scar quality by reducing wound tension during healing. The main objective was to assess the effect of Botulinum toxin on scars resultant from standardized upper lip wounds.In this double-blinded, randomized, vehicle-controlled, prospective clinical trial, 60 consecutive consenting adults undergoing cleft lip scar revision (CLSR surgery between July 2010 and March 2012 were randomized to receive botulinum toxin A (n = 30 or vehicle (normal saline; n = 30 injections into the subjacent orbicularis oris muscle immediately after wound closure. Scars were independently assessed at 6-months follow-up in blinded fashion using: Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and photographic plus ultrasound measurements of scar widths.58 patients completed the trial. All scar assessment modalities revealed statistically significantly better scars in the experimental than the vehicle-control group.Quality of surgical upper lip scars, which are oriented perpendicular to the direction of pull of the underlying orbicularis oris muscle, is significantly improved by its temporary paralysis during wound healing.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01429402.

  15. Injection frequency of botulinum toxin A for spastic equinus: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings-Ison, Tandy; Blackburn, Christine; Rawicki, Barry; Fahey, Michael; Simpson, Pam; Baker, Richard; Graham, Kerr

    2016-07-01

    We compared two botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) injection frequency regimens, 12-monthly versus 4-monthly, for spastic equinus in a randomized clinical trial. The primary outcome measure was passive ankle dorsiflexion. Forty-two ambulant children with spastic equinus, secondary to cerebral palsy (23 males and 19 females; mean age 3y 6mo, SD 13mo; GMFCS levels I [n=20], II [n=19], III [n=3]) were randomized to receive either 12-monthly or 4-monthly BoNT-A injections to the calf, over a 26-month period. Twenty-one children had spastic hemiplegia, 21 children had spastic diplegia. A fixed 6U/kg dose of Botox was injected into the gastrocnemius muscle of both limbs in children with diplegia and the gastrocsoleus of the affected limb in children with hemiplegia, under mask anaesthesia. Forty-two children entered the trial with 21 participants randomized to each group. There were three withdrawals and two children received serial casting midway through the trial. There was no significant difference in passive dorsiflexion between 12-monthly and 4-monthly regimens (p=0.41). There were also no significant between group differences on secondary outcome measures. There were no serious adverse events - the rate was 1.2 adverse events per child per year in the 12-monthly group and 2.2 adverse events per child per year in the 4-monthly group. Subgroup analysis revealed a significant difference in passive dorsiflexion between children with hemiplegia and diplegia (p=0.01). There was no significant difference between 12-monthly and 4-monthly injection regimens on passive dorsiflexion or secondary outcome measures. BoNT-A injections for spastic equinus may be recommended on a 12-monthly basis. © 2015 Mac Keith Press.

  16. Botulinum toxin for treatment of glandular hypersecretory disorders.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Laing, T A

    2012-02-03

    SUMMARY: The use of botulinum toxin to treat disorders of the salivary glands is increasing in popularity in recent years. Recent reports of the use of botulinum toxin in glandular hypersecretion suggest overall favourable results with minimal side-effects. However, few randomised clinical trials means that data are limited with respect to candidate suitability, treatment dosages, frequency and duration of treatment. We report a selection of such cases from our own department managed with botulinum toxin and review the current data on use of the toxin to treat salivary gland disorders such as Frey\\'s syndrome, excessive salivation (sialorrhoea), focal and general hyperhidrosis, excessive lacrimation and chronic rhinitis.

  17. Botulinum toxin — therapeutic effect in cosmetology

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison A.V.; Bocharova Y.M.; Morrison V.V.

    2016-01-01

    This review presents the data from published literatures and the research works conducted by the authors about mechanisms of action of botulinum toxin and its use in the practical medicine (particularly in dermatology and cosmetology). Indications and contraindications of botulinum toxin use in cosmetology are also considered in this work.

  18. Persistence of Upper Blepharoptosis After Cosmetic Botulinum Toxin Type A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinsapir, Kenneth D; Groth, Michael J; Boxrud, Cynthia A

    2015-07-01

    Upper eyelid ptosis after cosmetic botulinum toxin is generally considered short-lived and responsive to apraclonidine ophthalmic drops. The authors present a series with persistent ptosis. To report a series of patients with persistent upper eyelid ptosis after cosmetic botulinum toxin. A retrospective case review series of 7 patients referred for management after developing visually significant upper eyelid ptosis after cosmetic botulinum toxin type A treatment. Patients in this series experienced persistent visually significant ptosis after cosmetic botulinum toxin lasting from 6 weeks to 13 months. Six of the 7 patients were treated with apraclonidine ophthalmic solution. Apraclonidine drops appeared to be clinically effective within 4 to 6 weeks of the resolution of ptosis. Upper eyelid ptosis after cosmetic botulinum toxin can persist for many months after treatment. Based on this series, the authors propose that apraclonidine drops can be used at the time of initial assessment to predict the relative longevity of ptosis after cosmetic botulinum toxin treatment (Level 4 evidence recommendation). After a 1-week trial, responders can be advised that ptosis is likely to resolve in 4 to 6 weeks. Nonresponders should be counseled that resolution may take longer than 6 weeks.

  19. Botulinum toxin A for the Treatment of Overactive Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Fan Hsieh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The standard treatment for overactive bladder starts with patient education and behavior therapies, followed by antimuscarinic agents. For patients with urgency urinary incontinence refractory to antimuscarinic therapy, currently both American Urological Association (AUA and European Association of Urology (EAU guidelines suggested that intravesical injection of botulinum toxin A should be offered. The mechanism of botulinum toxin A includes inhibition of vesicular release of neurotransmitters and the axonal expression of capsaicin and purinergic receptors in the suburothelium, as well as attenuation of central sensitization. Multiple randomized, placebo-controlled trials demonstrated that botulinum toxin A to be an effective treatment for patients with refractory idiopathic or neurogenic detrusor overactivity. The urinary incontinence episodes, maximum cystometric capacity, and maximum detrusor pressure were improved greater by botulinum toxin A compared to placebo. The adverse effects of botulinum toxin A, such as urinary retention and urinary tract infection, were primarily localized to the lower urinary tract. Therefore, botulinum toxin A offers an effective treatment option for patients with refractory overactive bladder.

  20. The Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin in Patients with Cervicogenic Headache: a Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeki Odabaşı

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Botulinum toxin type-A (BoNTA has been considered a treatment option for CH. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of BoNTA treatment in patients with medically resistant CH.Materials and Methods: Forty patients with CH were included in the study. Patients in the BoNTA group (n=20 were administered 10 U of BoNTA bilaterally to the frontal muscles, 20 U to the temporal muscles, 15 U to the semispinalis capitis, 15 U to the splenius capitis, and 15 U to the trapezius muscles (total: 150 U. Patients in the placebo group (n=20 received 0.2 mL of saline administrated to the same sites. All participations were evaluated 6 and 12 weeks after treatment; side effects, the number of painful days, severity (by visual analogue scale, VAS and frequency of pain were evaluated.Results: In the BoNTA group, the severity and frequency of pain 6 and 12 weeks post treatment were significantly lower than pre-treatment levels (p<0.05. At 12 weeks post treatment, the severity and frequency of pain in the BoNTA group were lower than in the placebo group (p<0.05. Conclusion: The findings suggest that BoNTA was an effective treatment for CH.

  1. A prospective crossover trial of botulinum toxin chemodenervation versus injection augmentation for essential voice tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Christine; Sadoughi, Babak; Coleman, Rachel; Sarva, Harini; Mauer, Elizabeth; Sulica, Lucian

    2018-02-01

    Botulinum toxin chemodenervation (BTX) is used to treat essential voice tremor (EVT), but results are not uniformly satisfactory. This study sought to assess the comparative utility of injection augmentation (IA) for EVT. Prospective crossover treatment study. Patients with EVT underwent BTX. After washout patients underwent IA. Multidimensional assessment carried out prior to and 30 days after each treatment included 1) videostroboscopy graded by the Vocal Tremor Scoring System (VTSS), 2) acoustic and aerodynamic assessment (cepstral peak prominence, cepstral spectral index of dysphonia, cepstral peak prominence fundamental frequency, airflow, peak air pressure and intensity, maximum phonation time, and amplitude/frequency of tremor), 3) audio-perceptual assessment via Consensus Audio-Perceptual Evaluation of Voice (CAPE-V), and 4) patient self-assessment via Voice Handicap Index-10 (VHI-10) and Percent of Normal Function (PNF) scale. Findings were analyzed via paired t tests and Wilcoxon rank sum tests. Seven patients (five female and two male; mean age 67 years old; range, 46-82 years old) participated. VTSS grading showed divergent outcomes for certain individual sites of tremor, but without significant differences. Airflow increased following BTX and decreased following IA, and VHI-10 scores indicated slight improvement post-BTX (26.29-23.57), and decline post-IA (25.86-29.86), although differences were not significant. Only changes in audio-perceptual ratings of loudness achieved significance, which decreased with BTX and increased with IA. Five patients chose to resume BTX; two elected long-term IA. No findings supported patient preferences. IA demonstrated no advantage over BTX in the treatment of EVT. 2b. Laryngoscope, 128:437-446, 2018. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. Botulinum A toxin utilizations in obstetric palsy

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    Atakan Aydin

    2012-12-01

    Conclusion: We conclude that with the help of botulinum A toxin and physyotherapy, obstetrical palsy patient with cocontractions can significantly improve movements and may have less surgery. [Hand Microsurg 2012; 1(3.000: 89-94

  3. Botulinum toxin A treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Matthew L; Masden, Derek L; Higgins, James P

    2012-02-01

    Botulinum toxin A has conventionally been used in the upper extremity to treat spasticity resulting from stroke, paraplegia, and dystonia. Recently, it has been used to relieve symptoms of vasospasm in Raynaud's phenomenon. This review summarizes the current literature on botulinum toxin A in the treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon and examines the proposed mechanisms of action, suggested techniques of administration, and clinical efficacy. An Ovid MEDLINE search from 1950 to September 2010 was performed to identify any reports on the use of Botulinum toxin in the treatment of Raynaud's disease or associated vasoconstrictive disorders. All studies pertaining to "Raynaud's disease," "Raynaud's," or "vasoconstriction" were queried and meshed with a secondary search of studies pertaining to "botox" or "botulinum toxin type A." These reports were meshed and subsequently limited to human studies. All studies that met criteria were included and their outcomes evaluated and summarized. Since 2004, there have been 5 studies that have evaluated the use of Botulinum Toxin A for the treatment of Raynaud's. In each study, patients received a range of botulinum toxin injections (10-100 units) in their fingers and hands. The studies have many limitations (lack of controls, variable severity of disease, variability of dosing) but all report favorable clinical results. All showed overall improvement in patient pain as well as a reduction in soft tissue ulceration. Initial reports on the use of botulinum toxin A for Raynaud's phenomenon are promising. Larger controlled trials with improved study design are warranted. A better understanding of the mechanism of action, appropriate dose and dose frequency, and the efficacy relative to other medical and surgical treatments requires investigation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Botulinum toxin for motor and phonic tics in Tourette's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sanjay; Srivanitchapoom, Prachaya; Kirubakaran, Richard; Berman, Brian D

    2018-01-05

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome, or Tourette's syndrome, is defined as the presence of both motor and vocal (phonic) tics for more than 12 months, that manifest before the age of 18 years, in the absence of secondary causes. Treatment of motor and phonic tics is difficult and challenging. To determine the safety and effectiveness of botulinum toxin in treating motor and phonic tics in people with Tourette's syndrome, and to analyse the effect of botulinum toxin on premonitory urge and sensory tics. We searched the Cochrane Movement Disorders Group Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and two trials registers to 25 October 2017. We reviewed reference lists of relevant articles for additional trials. We considered all randomised, controlled, double-blind studies comparing botulinum toxin to placebo or other medications for the treatment of motor and phonic tics in Tourette's syndrome for this review. We sought both parallel group and cross-over studies of children or adults, at any dose, and for any duration. We followed standard Cochrane methods to select studies, assess risk of bias, extract and analyse data. All authors independently abstracted data onto standardized forms; disagreements were resolved by mutual discussion. Only one randomised placebo-controlled, double-blind cross-over study met our selection criteria. In this study, 20 participants with motor tics were enrolled over a three-year recruitment period; 18 (14 of whom had a diagnosis of Tourette's syndrome) completed the study; in total, 21 focal motor tics were treated. Although we considered most bias domains to be at low risk of bias, the study recruited a small number of participants with relatively mild tics and provided limited data for our key outcomes. The effects of botulinum toxin injections on tic frequency, measured by videotape or rated subjectively, and on premonitory urge, are uncertain (very low-quality evidence). The quality of evidence for adverse events following botulinum toxin was

  5. [Botulinum toxin therapy for spasticity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masakado, Yoshihisa

    2014-09-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) administered as an adjunct to other interventions for spasticity can act as a useful and effective therapeutic tool for treating patients disabled by spasticity. Presence of other non-reflex motor disorders (muscle stiffness, shortness, and contracture) can complicate the clinical course and disturb rehabilitative process of patients with spasticity. Treatment of spasticity using BTX can improve paralysis by correcting muscular imbalance that follows these diseases. In patients with chronic severe spasticity, we also have to address unique and difficult-to-treat clinical conditions such as abnormal posture and movement disorders. The effectiveness of BTX in treating some of these conditions is discussed. Because patients with neurological disabilities can show complex dysfunctions, specific functional limitations, goals, and expected outcomes of treatment should be evaluated and discussed with the patient, family members, and caregivers, prior to initiating BTX therapy. BTX therapy might improve not only care, passive function, but also motor functions in these patients by supplementing intensive rehabilitation with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcranial direct-current stimulation, peripheral electrical stimulation, muscle stretching, and other rehabilitation strategies.

  6. Toxin yet not toxic: Botulinum toxin in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana M.S.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Paracelsus contrasted poisons from nonpoisons, stating that “All things are poisons, and there is nothing that is harmless; the dose alone decides that something is a poison”. Living organisms, such as plants, animals, and microorganisms, constitute a huge source of pharmaceutically useful medicines and toxins. Depending on their source, toxins can be categorized as phytotoxins, mycotoxins, or zootoxins, which include venoms and bacterial toxins. Any toxin can be harmful or beneficial. Within the last 100 years, the perception of botulinum neurotoxin (BTX has evolved from that of a poison to a versatile clinical agent with various uses. BTX plays a key role in the management of many orofacial and dental disorders. Its indications are rapidly expanding, with ongoing trials for further applications. However, despite its clinical use, what BTX specifically does in each condition is still not clear. The main aim of this review is to describe some of the unclear aspects of this potentially useful agent, with a focus on the current research in dentistry.

  7. Botulinum toxin type A for cephalic cutaneous allodynia in chronic migraine: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial

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    Luciano Hollanda

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cephalic allodynia (CA can be observed in 50-70% of patients with chronic migraine (CM. The aim of this trial was to assess the efficacy of botulinum toxin type A (Botx-A in the treatment of CA associated with CM. In this placebo-controlled trial, patients were randomized either into Botx-A or 0.9% saline injections and efficacy measures were assessed every 4 weeks for 3 months. Efficacy endpoints were number of migraine episodes associated with CA, changes from baseline in visual analogical scale scores for pain (VAS and frequency of common analgesics use for migraine. A total of 38 subjects were randomized to saline (n=18 or Botx-A (n=20. There were no significant differences in baseline between active intervention or placebo groups regarding mean age, number of headache episodes [mean 12.1 (9.22 and 17.00 (9.69 respectively; P=0.12], pain severity as measured by the VAS or frequency of analgesic use for headache episodes. Efficacy analysis showed that Botx-A injections led to an important decrease from baseline in the mean migraine episodes associated with CA after 12 weeks (5.20 versus 11.17; P=0.01. Also, VAS scores and frequency of analgesics use for headache were significantly reduced in the Botx-A group. This study suggests that Botx-A injections are superior to saline in the treatment of CA associated with CM, with mild self limited side effects.

  8. Botulinum toxin, a new treatment modality for chronic idiopathic constipation in children: long-term follow-up of a double-blind randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshtgar, Alireza S; Ward, Harry C; Sanei, Ahmad; Clayden, Graham S

    2007-04-01

    Myectomy of the internal anal sphincter (IAS) has been performed on some children after failure of medical treatment to treat idiopathic constipation. The aim of this study was to compare botulinum toxin injection with myectomy of the IAS in the treatment of chronic idiopathic constipation and soiling in children. This was a double-blind randomized trial. Patients between 4 and 16 years old were included in the study if they had failed to respond to laxative treatment and anal dilatation for chronic idiopathic constipation. All study patients had anorectal manometry and anal endosonography under ketamine anesthesia. Outcome was measured using a validated symptom severity (SS) scoring system, with scores ranging from 0 to 65. Of 42 children, 21 were randomized to the botulinum group and 21 were randomized to the myectomy group. At the 3-month follow-up, the median preoperative SS score improved from 34 (range = 19-47) to 20 (range = 2-43) in the botulinum group (P 41) for the botulinum group and the myectomy group, respectively (P IAS for chronic idiopathic constipation and fecal incontinence in children.

  9. Emerging treatments for overactive bladder: clinical potential of botulinum toxins

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    Tincello DG

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Douglas G Tincello,1,2 Tina Rashid,2 Vladimir Revicky21Reproductive Sciences Section, Cancer Studies and Molecular Medicine, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK; 2Urogynecology Unit, Women's and Children's Clinical Business Unit, University Hospitals of Leicester National Health Service Trust, Leicester, UKAbstract: Overactive bladder (OAB is a symptom syndrome including urgency, frequency, and nocturia – with or without incontinence. It is a common manifestation of detrusor overactivity (DO. DO is a urodynamic observation of spontaneous or provoked contractions of the detrusor muscle is seen during the filling phase of the micturition cycle. OAB is, therefore, both a motor and sensory disorder. Botulinum toxin is a purified form of the neurotoxin from Clostridium botulinum and has been used in medicine for many years. Over the last 10 years, it has been used for the treatment of DO and OAB when standard treatments, such as bladder training and oral anticholinergic medication, have failed to provide symptom relief. Botulinum toxin acts by irreversibly preventing neurotransmitter release from the neurons in the motor end plate and also at sensory synapses, although the clinical effect is not permanent due to the growth of new connections within treated tissues. It is known that botulinum toxin modulates vanillioid, purinergic, capsaicin, and muscarinic receptor expression within the lamina propria, returning them to levels seen in normal bladders. Clinically, the effect of botulinum toxin on symptoms of OAB and DO is profound, with large effects upon the symptom of urgency, and also large effects on frequency, nocturia, leakage episodes, and continence rates. These effects have been seen consistently within eight randomized trials and numerous case series. Botulinum toxin appears safe, with the only common side effect being that of voiding difficulty, occurring in up to 10% of treated patients. Dosing regimens are variable, depending on

  10. Keratoconus progression is not inhibited by reducing eyelid muscular force with botulinum toxin A treatment: a randomized trial

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    Adimara da Candelaria Renesto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate whether reducing eyelid muscular force through the administration of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A to the orbicularis oculi muscles of patients with keratoconus affected corneal parameters indicative of disease progression. Methods: In this prospective parallel randomized clinical trial, 40 eyes of 40 patients with keratoconus were randomized into equally sized control and BTX-A groups. Patients in the BTX-A group received subcutaneous BTX-A injections into the orbicularis muscle. The control group received no intervention. Palpebral fissure height, best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA, and corneal topographic parameters were evaluated at baseline and at 3-, 6-, 12-, and 18-month follow-ups. Results: The mean ± standard deviation vertical palpebral fissure heights were 9.74 ± 1.87 mm and 9.45 ± 1.47 mm at baseline in the control and BTX-A groups, respectively, and 10.0 ± 1.49 mm and 9.62 ± 1.73 mm at 18 months, with no significant difference between the groups (p=0.337. BSCVA values were 0.63 ± 0.56 and 0.60 ± 0.27 at baseline in the control and BTX-A groups (p=0.643, and 0.52 ± 0.59 and 0.45 ± 0.26 at 18 months, again with no significant difference between the groups (p=0.452. In addition, there were no statistical differences between the groups at 18 months for the three keratometry topographic parameters: flattest (K1, steepest (K2, and mean (Km keratometry (p=0.562. Conclusion: BTX-A inhibition of eyelid force generation did not result in detectable changes in corneal parameters in keratoconic patients during 18 months of follow-up.

  11. A comparative trial of ice application versus EMLA cream in alleviation of pain during botulinum toxin injections for palmar hyperhidrosis.

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    Alsantali, Adel

    2018-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is a safe and effective therapy for palmar hyperhidrosis, but the associated pain from injections limits the usefulness of this method of treatment. To evaluate the efficacy of Eutectic Mixture of Local Anesthetics (EMLA) cream versus ice application in alleviation of pain during botulinum toxin injections for palmar hyperhidrosis. In this prospective study, 23 patients underwent palm Botox injections to treat their excessive sweating. In each patient, EMLA cream was applied to one palm and ice was applied directly before the injections in the other palm. Pain was evaluated using a Visual Analog Scale. Statistically, there was a significant difference in pain control between EMLA cream group and ice application group ( p cream was applied was 8.9 (SD=0.81), whereas it was 4.8 (±0.9) in the ice group. In this study, the successful use of ice application in reducing pain by 40% in comparison to EMLA cream during Botox toxin injection for palmar hyperhidrosis is demonstrated.

  12. Effect of Botulinum Toxin and Surgery among Spasmodic Dysphonia Patients.

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    van Esch, Babette F; Wegner, Inge; Stegeman, Inge; Grolman, Wilko

    2017-02-01

    Objective The effect of botulinum toxin among patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (AdSD) is temporary. To optimize long-term treatment outcome, other therapy options should be evaluated. Alternative treatment options for AdSD comprise several surgical treatments, such as thyroarytenoid myotomy, thyroplasty, selective laryngeal adductor denervation-reinnervation, laryngeal nerve crush, and recurrent laryngeal nerve resection. Here, we present the first systematic review comparing the effect of botulinum toxin with surgical treatment among patients diagnosed with AdSD. Data Sources MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library. Methods Articles were reviewed by 2 independent authors, and data were compiled in tables for analysis of the objective outcome (voice expert evaluation after voice recording), the subjective outcome (patient self-assessment scores), and voice-related quality of life (Voice Health Index scores). Results No clinical trials comparing both treatment modalities were identified. Single-armed studies evaluated either the effect of botulinum toxin or surgical treatment. Thirteen studies reported outcomes after botulinum toxin treatment (n = 419), and 9 studies reported outcomes after surgical treatment (n = 585 patients). A positive effect of bilateral botulinum toxin injections was found for the objective voice outcome, subjective voice outcome, and quality of life. The duration of the beneficial effect ranged from 15 to 18 weeks. Surgical treatment had an overall positive effect on objective voice improvement, subjective voice improvement, and quality of live. Conclusion No preference for one treatment could be demonstrated. Prospective clinical trials comparing treatment modalities are recommended to delineate the optimal outcomes by direct comparison.

  13. Botulinum Toxin in Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity

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    Carlos Arturo Levi D'Ancona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To evaluate the effects of botulinum toxin on urodynamic parameters and quality of life in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity. Methods Thirty four adult patients with spinal cord injury and detrusor overactivity were selected. The patients received 300 units of botulinum toxin type A. The endpoints evaluated with the episodes of urinary incontinence and measured the maximum cystometric capacity, maximum amplitude of detrusor pressure and bladder compliance at the beginning and end of the study (24 weeks and evaluated the quality of life by applying the Qualiveen questionnaire. Results A significant decrease in the episodes of urinary incontinence was observed. All urodynamic parameters presented a significant improvement. The same was observed in the quality of life index and the specific impact of urinary problems scores from the Qualiveen questionnaire. Six patients did not complete the study, two due to incomplete follow-up, and four violated protocol and were excluded from the analyses. No systemic adverse events of botulinum toxin type A were reported. Conclusions A botulinum toxin type A showed a significantly improved response in urodynamics parameters and specific and general quality of life.

  14. Surgery and botulinum toxin in congenital esotropia.

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    Ruiz, Miguel F; Alvarez, María T; Sánchez-Garrido, Carmen M; Hernáez, José M; Rodríguez, José M

    2004-10-01

    In a previous study we investigated the advantages and drawbacks of early and delayed injection of botulinum toxin as primary treatment of infantile esotropia with nystagmus in abduction (IENA). We carried out a further study to investigate the role and efficacy of surgery in this condition and to determine the possible effect of previous injection of both medial recti with botulinum toxin in patients requiring a final horizontal surgical correction. Review of the records of 44 patients (24 girls and 20 boys) with IENA seen between 1979 and 1998 who had undergone at least one horizontal surgical procedure. The outcomes in the 16 patients who had previously received botulinum toxin were compared with those in the 28 patients for whom surgery was the primary treatment. There was a negative correlation between the pretreatment esotropic angle and age (Pearson's r = -0.45, p IENA with delayed diagnosis and in cases associated with unsteadiness of binocular vision or with nonhorizontal deviations. Initial treatment with botulinum toxin, injected into both medial recti, is effective, reducing the amount of further horizontal surgery and favouring postoperative stability, except in children under 18 months, in whom injection of 5 units induces unbalanced dissociated vertical deviation.

  15. Botulinum Toxin for the Treatment of Tremor and Tics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotia, Mitesh; Jankovic, Joseph

    2016-02-01

    The therapeutic applications of botulinum toxin (BoNT) have grown manifold since its initial approval in 1989 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of strabismus, blepharospasm, and other facial spasms. Although it is the most potent biologic toxin known to man, long-term studies have established its safety in the treatment of a variety of neurologic and nonneurologic disorders. Despite a paucity of randomized controlled trials, BoNT has been found to be beneficial in treating a variety of tremors and tics when used by clinicians skilled in the administration of the drug for these hyperkinetic movement disorders. Botulinum toxin injections can provide meaningful improvement in patients with localized tremors and tics; in some cases, they may be an alternative to other treatments with more undesirable adverse effects. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. A randomized, placebo controlled pilot trial of botulinum toxin for paratonic rigidity in people with advanced cognitive impairment.

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    Galit Kleiner-Fisman

    Full Text Available Evaluate safety and efficacy of Incobotulinumtoxin A in elderly patients with dementia and paratonia.University-affiliated hospital, spasticity management Clinic.Ten subjects were enrolled.1 severe cognitive impairment 2 diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, or frontotemporal dementia, and 3 score >3 on the paratonic assessment instrument, with posture in an arm(s interfering with provision of care.1 alternate etiologies for increased tone and 2 injection with botulinum toxin within the 6 months preceding the study.Single center, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial with two treatment cycles of 16 weeks. Assessments occurred at 2, 6, 12 and16 weeks following injections. Subjects received up to 300 U of Incobotulinumtoxin A in arm(s.Primary outcome measure was the modified caregiver burden scale (mCBS; exploratory secondary outcome measures were also performed. Analysis of variance and mixed modeling techniques were used to evaluate treatment effects.Incobotulinumtoxin A treatment produced significant improvement in mCBS total score -1.11 (-2.04 to -0.18 (Treatment effect and 95% CI, dressing sub-score -0.36 (-0.59 to 0.12, and cleaning under the left and right armpits sub-score -0.5 (-0.96 to -0.04, -0.41 (-0.79 to -0.04 respectively. PROM in the left and right elbow increased by 27.67 degrees (13.32-42.02 and 22.07 degrees (9.76-34.39 respectively. PROM in the left and right shoulder increased by 11.92 degrees (5.46-18.38 and 8.58 degrees (3.73-13.43 respectively. No significant treatment effect was found for GAS, VAS and PAINAD scales or change in time to perform care. No adverse drug reactions occurred.Administration of Incobotulinumtoxin A in elderly people with advanced dementia and paratonia may be an efficacious and safe treatment to increase range of motion and reduce functional burden. Further studies are needed to confirm results.ClinicalTrials.Gov NCT02212119.

  17. Botulinum toxin injection into the forearm muscles for wrist and fingers spastic overactivity in adults with chronic stroke: a randomized controlled trial comparing three injection techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picelli, Alessandro; Lobba, Davide; Midiri, Alessandro; Prandi, Paolo; Melotti, Camilla; Baldessarelli, Silvia; Smania, Nicola

    2014-03-01

    To compare the outcome of manual needle placement, electrical stimulation and ultrasonography-guided techniques for botulinum toxin injection into the forearm muscles of adults with arm spasticity. Randomized controlled trial. University hospital. Sixty chronic stroke patients with wrist and fingers spasticity. After randomization into three groups, each patient received botulinum toxin type A in at least two of these muscles: flexor carpi radialis and ulnaris, flexor digitorum superficialis and profundus (no fascicles selection). The manual needle placement group underwent injections using palpation; the electrical stimulation group received injections with electrical stimulation guidance; the ultrasonography group was injected under sonographic guidance. A sole injector was used. All patients were evaluated at baseline and four weeks after injection. Modified Ashworth Scale; Tardieu Scale; wrist and fingers passive range of motion. One month after injection, Modified Ashworth Scale scores improved more in the electrical stimulation group than the manual needle placement group (wrist: P = 0.014; fingers: P = 0.011), as well as the Tardieu angle (wrist: P = 0.008; fingers: P = 0.015) and passive range of motion (wrist: P = 0.004). Furthermore, Modified Ashworth Scale scores improved more in the ultrasonography group than in the manual needle placement group (wrist: P = 0.001; fingers: P = 0.003), as well as the Tardieu angle (wrist: P = 0.010; fingers: P = 0.001) and passive range of motion (wrist: P < 0.001; proximal interphalangeal joints: P = 0.009). No difference was found between the ultrasonography and electrical stimulation groups. Instrumental guidance may improve the outcome of botulinum toxin injections into the spastic forearm muscles of stroke patients.

  18. Efficacy of botulinum toxins on bruxism: an evidence-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Hu; Liao, Zhengyu; Wang, Yan; Liao, Lina; Lai, Wenli

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of botulinum toxins on bruxism. Electronic databases (PubMed, Embase and Science Citation Index), websites (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and ClinicalTrials.gov) and the literature database of SIGLE (System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe) were searched from January 1990 to April 2011 for randomised controlled trials or nonrandomised studies assessing the efficacy of botulinum toxins on bruxism. There was no language restriction. Through a predefined search strategy, we retrieved 28 studies from PubMed, 94 from Embase, 60 from the Science Citation Index, two ongoing clinical trials and two from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Of these, only four studies met our inclusion criteria and were finally included. Of the four included studies, two were randomised controlled trials and two were controlled before-and-after studies. These studies showed that botulinum toxin injections can reduce the frequency of bruxism events, decrease bruxism-induced pain levels and satisfy patients' self-assessment with regard to the effectiveness of botulinum toxins on bruxism. In comparison with oral splint, botulinum toxins are equally effective on bruxism. Furthermore, botulinum toxin injections at a dosage of bruxism and are safe to use. Therefore, they can be used clinically for otherwise healthy patients with bruxism. © 2012 FDI World Dental Federation.

  19. Characterization of Hemagglutinin Negative Botulinum Progenitor Toxins

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    Suzanne R. Kalb

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Botulism is a disease involving intoxication with botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs, toxic proteins produced by Clostridium botulinum and other clostridia. The 150 kDa neurotoxin is produced in conjunction with other proteins to form the botulinum progenitor toxin complex (PTC, alternating in size from 300 kDa to 500 kDa. These progenitor complexes can be classified into hemagglutinin positive or hemagglutinin negative, depending on the ability of some of the neurotoxin-associated proteins (NAPs to cause hemagglutination. The hemagglutinin positive progenitor toxin complex consists of BoNT, nontoxic non-hemagglutinin (NTNH, and three hemagglutinin proteins; HA-70, HA-33, and HA-17. Hemagglutinin negative progenitor toxin complexes contain BoNT and NTNH as the minimally functional PTC (M-PTC, but not the three hemagglutinin proteins. Interestingly, the genome of hemagglutinin negative progenitor toxin complexes comprises open reading frames (orfs which encode for three proteins, but the existence of these proteins has not yet been extensively demonstrated. In this work, we demonstrate that these three proteins exist and form part of the PTC for hemagglutinin negative complexes. Several hemagglutinin negative strains producing BoNT/A, /E, and /F were found to contain the three open reading frame proteins. Additionally, several BoNT/A-containing bivalent strains were examined, and NAPs from both genes, including the open reading frame proteins, were associated with BoNT/A. The open reading frame encoded proteins are more easily removed from the botulinum complex than the hemagglutinin proteins, but are present in several BoNT/A and /F toxin preparations. These are not easily removed from the BoNT/E complex, however, and are present even in commercially-available purified BoNT/E complex.

  20. Beneficial effects of botulinum toxin type A in trigeminal neuralgia

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    Zúñiga,Carlos; Díaz,Sergio; Piedimonte,Fabián; Micheli,Federico

    2008-01-01

    Botulinum toxin has been thoroughly studied as a potential tool in the treatment of several pain syndromes. Therefore, we assessed the clinical effects of botulinum toxin type A injections in 12 patients with otherwise unresponsive idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia. Patients were infiltrated with 20-50 units of botulinum toxin in trigger zones. Those who presented with mandibular involvement were also infiltrated in the masseter muscle. The patients were assessed on a weekly basis using the Vis...

  1. Study design and methods of the BoTULS trial: a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the clinical effect and cost effectiveness of treating upper limb spasticity due to stroke with botulinum toxin type A

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    Graham Laura

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following a stroke, 55–75% of patients experience upper limb problems in the longer term. Upper limb spasticity may cause pain, deformity and reduced function, affecting mood and independence. Botulinum toxin is used increasingly to treat focal spasticity, but its impact on upper limb function after stroke is unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical and cost effectiveness of botulinum toxin type A plus an upper limb therapy programme in the treatment of post stroke upper limb spasticity. Methods Trial design : A multi-centre open label parallel group randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation. Participants : Adults with upper limb spasticity at the shoulder, elbow, wrist or hand and reduced upper limb function due to stroke more than 1 month previously. Interventions : Botulinum toxin type A plus upper limb therapy (intervention group or upper limb therapy alone (control group. Outcomes : Outcome assessments are undertaken at 1, 3 and 12 months. The primary outcome is upper limb function one month after study entry measured by the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT. Secondary outcomes include: spasticity (Modified Ashworth Scale; grip strength; dexterity (Nine Hole Peg Test; disability (Barthel Activities of Daily Living Index; quality of life (Stroke Impact Scale, Euroqol EQ-5D and attainment of patient-selected goals (Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Health and social services resource use, adverse events, use of other antispasticity treatments and patient views on the treatment will be compared. Participants are clinically reassessed at 3, 6 and 9 months to determine the need for repeat botulinum toxin type A and/or therapy. Randomisation : A web based central independent randomisation service. Blinding : Outcome assessments are undertaken by an assessor who is blinded to the randomisation group. Sample size : 332 participants provide 80% power to detect a 15% difference in treatment

  2. Adhesive taping vs. daily manual muscle stretching and splinting after botulinum toxin type A injection for wrist and fingers spastic overactivity in stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamato, Andrea; Micello, Maria Francesca; Panza, Francesco; Fortunato, Francesca; Picelli, Alessandro; Smania, Nicola; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Fiore, Pietro; Ranieri, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of two procedures increasing the botulinum toxin type A effect for wrist and finger flexor spasticity after stroke. A single-blind randomized trial. Seventy patients with upper limb post-stroke spasticity. Adults with wrist and finger flexor muscles spasticity after stroke were submitted to botulinum toxin type A therapy. After the treatment, the subjects injected were randomly divided into two groups and submitted to adhesive taping (Group A) or daily muscle manual stretching, passive articular mobilization of wrist and fingers, and palmar splint (Group B) for 10 days. We measured spasticity with Modified Ashworth Scale, related disability with Disability Assessment Scale, and fingers position at rest. The measurements were done at baseline, after two weeks, and after one month from the treatment session. After two weeks, subjects in Group A reported a significantly greater decrease in spasticity scores (Modified Ashworth Scale fingers: mean (standard deviation) 1.3±0.6 vs. 2.1±0.6; Modified Ashworth Scale wrist: 1.7 ±0.6 vs. 2.3 ±0.8), and after one month in spasticity and disability scores (Modified Ashworth Scale fingers: mean (standard deviation) 1.9 ±0.7 vs. 2.5 ±0.6; Modified Ashworth Scale wrist: 2.0 ±0.7 vs. 2.6 ±0.6; Disability Assessment Scale: 1.6 ±0.7 vs. 2.1 ±0.7) compared with Group B subjects. Subjects in Group A reported also a significantly improved fingers position at rest compared with Group B subjects after two weeks (2.8 ±0.9 vs. 2.1 ±0.7) and one month (2.3 ±0.7 vs. 1.5 ±0.6). Adhesive taping of wrist and finger flexor muscles appeared to enhance the effect of botulinum toxin type A therapy more than daily manual muscle stretching combined with passive articular mobilization and palmar splint. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin injections

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    S. E. Khatkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the key conditions for achieving the desirable result during botulinum toxin therapy for muscular dystonia, spasticity, and other diseases accompanied by spasm, pain, and autonomic dysfunction (dystonias, spasticity, etc. is the proper administration of the agent into the muscles directly involved in the pathological process. The exact entry of botulinum toxin into the target muscles is essential for successful and safe treatment because its injection into a normal muscle may cause side effects. The most common errors are the incorrect depth and incorrect direction of a needle on insertion. Therefore, the exact injection of the agent particularly into the shallow and deep muscles is a difficult task even for an experienced specialist and requires the use of controlling methods.The European Consensus on Botulinum Toxin Therapy points out that various injection techniques are needed for the better identification of necessary muscles. However, there are currently no reports on the clear advantage of any technique. In our country, injections using palpation and anatomical landmarks have been widely used in routine practice so far; electromyographic monitoring and electrostimulation have been less frequently applied. In recent years, the new method ultrasound-guided injection has continued to grow more popular. This effective, accessible, and easy-to-use method makes it possible to manage a real-time injection process and to ensure the exact entry of the agent into the muscle. This paper is dedicated to a comparative analysis of different injection methods and to a description of the ultrasound-guided technique and its advantages over others. 

  4. Botulinum toxin A injections and occupational therapy in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidman, Git; Nachemson, Ann; Peny-Dahlstrand, Marie; Himmelmann, Kate

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the effects of repeated botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) injections combined with occupational therapy, including a splint, compared with occupational therapy alone on hand function in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (USCP), in all International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) domains. This was a randomized controlled study, population-based and evaluator-blinded for primary outcome (October 2004 to September 2010). Twenty children (14 males; median age 3y 1mo) with USCP, recruited at a rehabilitation centre in Sweden, were assigned to one of two parallel groups using concealed allocation. In the course of one year, 10 children received occupational therapy, while 10 received repeated BoNT-A plus occupational therapy (BoNT-A/OT). Primary outcome (Assisting Hand Assessment [AHA]), and secondary outcome measures (range of movement [ROM], and Canadian Occupational Performance Measure), were measured at baseline, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. AHA revealed a superior effect in the BoNT-A/OT group at 12 months: 6 out of 10 improved compared with 1 out of 10 in the occupational therapy group (poccupational therapy alone for bimanual performance in young children with USCP. Active ROM and goal performance improved in both groups. © 2015 Mac Keith Press.

  5. A randomized controlled trial of botulinum toxin A for treating neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Lv, Chang-An; Tian, Li; Jin, Lian-Jin; Sun, Ping; Zhao, Wei

    2017-05-01

    To assess the effect of botulinum toxin A (BTA) for treating neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). A total of 44 patients with SCI with neuropathic pain were randomly divided into the intervention group and the placebo group, each group 21 patients. The subjects in the intervention group received BTA (200 U subcutaneous injection, once daily) at the painful area, whereas those in the placebo group were administered a saline placebo. This study was conducted from December 2014 to November 2016. The primary outcome was measured using the visual analog scale (VAS). The secondary outcomes were measured using the short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ), and World Health Organization quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF) questionnaire. All outcome measurements were performed before and after 4 and 8 weeks of intervention. Forty-one participants completed the study. The intervention with BTA showed greater efficacy than placebo in decreasing the VAS score after week 4 and week 8 of treatment. Significant differences in the SF-MPQ and WHOQOL-BREF were also found between the 2 groups. The results of this study demonstrated that BTA might decrease intractable neuropathic pain for patients with SCI.

  6. Use of botulinum toxin for voiding dysfunction

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    Dasgupta, Prokar

    2017-01-01

    The use of botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) has expanded across a range of lower urinary tract conditions. This review provides an overview of the current indications for BoNT-A in the lower urinary tract and critically evaluates the published evidence within each area. The classic application of BoNT-A has been in the management of refractory neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) and overactive bladder (OAB). There is a large volume of high-quality evidence, including numerous randomized placebo-controlled trials, which demonstrate the efficacy of BoNT-A over a long follow-up period. The culmination of this robust evidence-base has led to onabotulinumtoxin A (onaBoNT-A) receiving regulatory approval as a second-line treatment for NDO at a dose of 200 U and OAB at dose of 100 U. Other applications for BoNT-A are used on an off-license basis and include interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and detrusor sphincter dyssynergia (DSD). These applications are associated with a less mature evidence-base although the literature is rapidly evolving. At present, the results for painful bladder syndrome (PBS) are promising and BoNT-A injections are recommended as a fourth line option in recent international guidelines, although larger randomized study with longer follow-up are required to confirm the initial findings. As a treatment for DSD, BoNT-A injections have shown potential but only in a small number of trials of limited quality. No definite recommendation can be made based on the current evidence. Finally, the results for the treatment of BPH have been variable and recent high quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have suggested no benefit over placebo so at present it cannot be recommended for routine clinical practice. Future advances of BoNT-A include liposome encapsulated formulations which are being developed as an alternative to intravesical injections. PMID:28540231

  7. Sphincter of Oddi botulinum toxin injection to prevent pancreatic fistula after distal pancreatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackert, Thilo; Klaiber, Ulla; Hinz, Ulf; Kehayova, Tzveta; Probst, Pascal; Knebel, Phillip; Diener, Markus K; Schneider, Lutz; Strobel, Oliver; Michalski, Christoph W; Ulrich, Alexis; Sauer, Peter; Büchler, Markus W

    2017-05-01

    Postoperative pancreatic fistula represents the most important complication after distal pancreatectomy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a preoperative endoscopic injection of botulinum toxin into the sphincter of Oddi to prevent postoperative pancreatic fistula (German Clinical Trials Register number: DRKS00007885). This was an investigator-initiated, prospective clinical phase I/II trial with an exploratory study design. We included patients who underwent preoperative endoscopic sphincter botulinum toxin injection (100 units of Botox). End points were the feasibility, safety, and postoperative outcomes, including postoperative pancreatic fistula within 30 days after distal pancreatectomy. Botulinum toxin patients were compared with a control collective of patients undergoing distal pancreatectomy without botulinum toxin injection by case-control matching in a 1:1 ratio. Between February 2015 and February 2016, 29 patients were included. All patients underwent successful sphincter of Oddi botulinum toxin injection within a median of 6 (range 0-10) days before operation. One patient had an asymptomatic, self-limiting (48 hours) increase in serum amylase and lipase after injection. Distal pancreatectomy was performed in 24/29 patients; 5 patients were not resectable. Of the patients receiving botulinum toxin, 7 (29%) had increased amylase levels in drainage fluid on postoperative day 3 (the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery definition of postoperative pancreatic fistula grade A) without symptoms or need for reintervention. Importantly, no clinically relevant fistulas (International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery grades B/C) were observed in botulinum toxin patients compared to 33% postoperative pancreatic fistula grade B/C in case-control patients (P pancreatectomy. The results of the present trial suggest its efficacy in the prevention of clinically relevant postoperative pancreatic fistula and are validated currently in the

  8. Botulinum toxin injection in laryngeal dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woisard, Virginie; Liu, Xuelai; Bes, Marie Christine Arné; Simonetta-Moreau, Marion

    2017-02-01

    Data, regarding the use of botulinum toxin (BT-A) in laryngeal dyspnea, are scarce, coming from some cases reports in the literature, including Vocal fold paralysis, laryngeal dystonia, vocal cord dysfunction also called paradoxical motion of the vocal fold (PMVF), and post-neuroleptic laryngeal dyskinesia. There is no consensus regarding the muscles and the doses to inject. The aim of this study is to present a retrospective review of patients treated in our ENT Department by BT-A injection in this indication. This study is a retrospective study describing patients who underwent an injection of botulinum toxin for laryngeal dyspnea in the ENT Department from 2005 to 2015 years. The inclusion criteria were a dyspnea associated with a laryngeal dysfunction, confirmed by flexible fiberoptic nasopharyngolaryngoscopy. Information concerning the causes of the dyspnea, the botulinum toxin BT-A injections procedure, post-injection follow-up, and respiratory outcome were collected for all patients included. In the group of 13 patients included, the main cause identified as principal factor linked with the short breath was: a bilateral VF paralysis (Patel et al., Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 130:686-689, 7), laryngeal dystonia (Balkissoon and Kenn, Semin Respir Crit Care Med 33:595-605, 2), Anxiety syndrome associated with unilateral vocal fold paralysis or asthma (Marcinow et al., Laryngoscope 124:1425-1430, 3), and an isolated asthma (Zwirner et al., Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 254:242-245, 1). Nine out of the thirteen patients were improved by the injections. A BT-A-induced stable benefit for four patients led them to stop the injections in the follow-up. Good outcome was observed in five other patients (main cause: bilateral VP paralysis), allowing a progressive lengthening of the delay between BT-A injections. Four patients did not report a positive risk/benefit ratio after BT-A injections; two of them (with bilateral VF paralysis), because of respiratory side effects and

  9. Treatment diary for botulinum toxin spasticity treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Bo; Iversen, Helle K; Frederiksen, Inge M S

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a treatment diary for patients receiving spasticity treatment including botulinum toxin injection and physiotherapy and/or occupational therapy. The diary focuses on problems triggered by skeletal muscle overactivity; agreed goals for treatment and the patient......'s self-evaluation of achievement on the Goal Attainment Scale; which skeletal muscles were injected; physiotherapists' and occupational therapists' evaluation of the patients' achievement of objectives on the Goal Attainment Scale; and proposals for optimization of treatment and changing goals....... The evaluation included a satisfaction questionnaire and the WHO-QoL BREF and WHO-5 well-being score. Overall, 10 patients were enrolled in the pilot study. The patients were generally satisfied with the diary, found that it involved them more in their treatment and made it easier to set personal goals...

  10. Treatment diary for botulinum toxin spasticity treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Bo; Iversen, Helle K; Frederiksen, Inge M S

    2017-01-01

    's self-evaluation of achievement on the Goal Attainment Scale; which skeletal muscles were injected; physiotherapists' and occupational therapists' evaluation of the patients' achievement of objectives on the Goal Attainment Scale; and proposals for optimization of treatment and changing goals......The aim of this study is to develop a treatment diary for patients receiving spasticity treatment including botulinum toxin injection and physiotherapy and/or occupational therapy. The diary focuses on problems triggered by skeletal muscle overactivity; agreed goals for treatment and the patient....... The evaluation included a satisfaction questionnaire and the WHO-QoL BREF and WHO-5 well-being score. Overall, 10 patients were enrolled in the pilot study. The patients were generally satisfied with the diary, found that it involved them more in their treatment and made it easier to set personal goals...

  11. Botulinum toxin drugs: brief history and outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, D

    2016-03-01

    The global botulinum toxin (BT) market is currently undergoing rapid changes: this may be the time to review the history and the future of BT drug development. Since the early 1990s Botox(®) and Dysport(®) dominated the international BT market. Later, Myobloc(®)/NeuroBloc(®), a liquid BT type B drug, came out, but failed. Xeomin(®) is the latest major BT drug. It features removal of complexing proteins and improved neurotoxin purity. Several new BT drugs are coming out of Korea, China and Russia. Scientific challenges for BT drug development include modification of BT's duration of action, its transdermal transport and the design of BT hybrid drugs for specific target tissues. The increased competition will change the global BT market fundamentally and a re-organisation according to large indication groups, such as therapeutic and cosmetic applications, might occur.

  12. [Botulinum toxin and facial palsy. Our experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete Alvaro, María Luisa; Junyent, Josefina; Torrent, Luisa

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic indication of peripheral facial paralysis depends on the degree of nerve injury. Severe facial palsy (electroneuronographic study less than or equal to 10%) leads to healing with sequelae. The sequelae of facial paralysis are contractures, hemifacial spasm and synkinesis.Our purpose was to demonstrate that these patients could benefit from rehabilitation treatment. We present a study of 48 patients with severe peripheral facial paralysis. They were treated from the beginning of reinnervation with botulinum toxin and facial exercises according to the Wisconsin School. The subjective efficacy of rehabilitation is high. Rehabilitation treatment can inform patients about their chances of recovery, give them control over and quality of facial expression and help to achieve greater facial symmetry. These factors provide better functionality and quality of life. Copyright 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. A pilot study to evaluate effectiveness of botulinum toxin in treatment of androgenetic alopecia in males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehdev Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Androgenetic alopecia is a common form of alopecia with multifactorial etiology. Finasteride and minoxidil are approved by the FDA for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia. Balding scalp is believed to have relative microvascular insufficiency. Blood vessels in the scalp travel through the intramuscular plane. Intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin relaxes muscles and thereby increases blood flow in balding scalp. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of botulinum toxin in androgenetic alopecia management. Material and Methods: The study was conducted in a tertiary care center. A total of 10 male patients with androgenetic alopecia meeting inclusion criteria of the study were included. In the scalp, 30 sites were injected with 5 U of botulinum toxin in each site. Preprocedure photograph taken and evaluation was done, which was repeated after 24 weeks. Efficacy was assessed by photography and self-assessment scoring was done by patients. Results: Of 10 patients, 8 had good to excellent response on photographic assessment. At the end of 24 weeks, 1 patient showed poor and 1 showed fair response to treatment. As per self-assessment, 7of 10 patients showed good to excellent response. Two patients had fair response and 1 patient showed poor response to treatment. Conclusion: Botulinum toxin was found to be safe and effective therapy for the management of androgenetic alopecia in this pilot study. Studies with larger sample size and randomized controlled trials are required to establish the role of botulinum toxin in the management of androgenetic alopecia.

  14. Does giving segmental muscle vibration alter the response to botulinum toxin injections in the treatment of spasticity in people with multiple sclerosis? A single-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoloni, Marco; Giovannelli, Morena; Mangone, Massimiliano; Leonardi, Laura; Tavernese, Emanuela; Di Pangrazio, Elisabetta; Bernetti, Andrea; Santilli, Valter; Pozzilli, Carlo

    2013-09-01

    To determine if segmental muscle vibration and botulinum toxin-A injection, either alone or in combination, reduces spasticity in a sample of patients with multiple sclerosis. Single-blind, randomized controlled trial. Physical medicine and rehabilitation outpatients service. Forty-two patients affected by the secondary progressive form of multiple sclerosis randomized to group A (30 minutes of 120 Hz segmental muscle vibration over the rectus femoris and gastrocnemius medial and lateral, three per week, over a period of four weeks), group B (botulinum toxin in the rectus femoris, gastrocnemius medial and lateral and soleus, and segmental muscle vibration) and group C (botulinum toxin). Modified Ashworth Scale at knee and ankle, and Fatigue Severity Scale. All the measurements were performed at baseline (T0), 10 weeks (T1) and 22 weeks (T2) postallocation. Modified Ashworth Scale at knee and ankle significantly decreased over time (p spasticity at T2 when compared with T1 (p spasticity and improves fatigue in the medium-term follow-up in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  15. Repeated botulinum toxin A injections in the treatment of spastic equinus foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metaxiotis, Dimitrios; Siebel, Andrea; Doederlein, Leonhard

    2002-01-01

    Equinus foot disorder is a common problem for patients with cerebral palsy who are able to ambulate. Botulinum toxin A is a recommended method of treatment for temporary reduction of muscle tone. The efficacy of repeated botulinum toxin A injections in the calf muscles was evaluated in a clinical trial involving 21 children with cerebral palsy and dynamic equinus foot deformity who were able to ambulate. The mean age of the children was 5.7 years. All patients received at least two injections, six patients received at least three injections, and three patients received four injections. The outcome was evaluated using observational and three-dimensional instrumented gait analysis. Significant improvements of the gait parameters were observed at 6 and 18 weeks after the first and second injections. Botulinum toxin A injections in gastrocnemius and soleus muscles may change the natural history of equinus foot deformity in patients with spastic diplegia. Orthopaedic surgery may be postponed or avoided.

  16. Effect of multilevel botulinum toxin A and comprehensive rehabilitation on gait in cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtes, Vanessa A.; Dallmeijer, Annet J.; Knol, Dirk L.; Speth, Lucianne A.; Maathuis, Carel G.; Jongerius, Peter H.; Becher, Jules G.

    To evaluate the effect of multilevel botulinum toxin A and comprehensive rehabilitation on gait pattern, muscle length, and spasticity, a multicenter randomized trial was performed in 46 children with spastic cerebral palsy who walk with flexed knees. Their mean age was 8.0 years (range 4 to 11

  17. Botulinum toxin treatment of lower extremity spasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Khat’kova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the current concept of lower extremity spasticity, which is a frequent disabling consequence of stroke. Gait biomechanics, step cycle and main pathologic patterns of lower extremity are described (hip adduction, knee flexion, knee extension, foot plantar flexion, equinovarus foot position, toes flexion, hallux extension, including muscles involved in the pathological process. Additionally the article contains detailed information on pathologic principles of lower extremity spasticity development. Special focus is given to sarcomeregenesis as an essential element of the development of potential conditions for muscle tissue adaptation to a new state and restoration of muscle length and strength. At present Botulinum toxin A (BTA is used in a complex spasticity management programs. The results of clinical studies performed in the last decade supporting the efficacy of Botox® (Onabotulinumtoxin A in the treatment of spasticity are reviewed. Effective BTA doses are proposed. Authors came to the conclusion that BTA as a part of complex rehabilitation in patients with poststroke spasticity of lower extremity promotes treatment efficacy due to a decrease of muscle tone and increase of range of movements in the joints. BTA should be regarded as an essential part of standard rehabilitation programs. Further studies to define optimal muscles for intervention, BTA doses and rehabilitation schemes are still needed. 

  18. Why do females use botulinum toxin injections?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Botulinum toxin (BT use for enhancing the facial features has become a commonly accepted form of aesthetic intervention. This study conducted a self-report survey of female BT users in order to explore the motivating factors in its use (cost-benefit analysis. Settings and Design: This is a cross-sectional exploratory pilot study. Materials and Methods: Self-report questionnaires were administered to 41 consecutive clients attending an independent medical practice for BT injections for cosmetic purposes. All the participants were females and represented a range of age groups from the 20s to above 60s. Items in the nonstandardized questionnaire elicited questions relating to the reasons for and against BT use. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive analysis was used rather than inferential statistics, and involved ranking the responses according to the most likely reasons for using BT and disadvantages of its use. Results: In general, the primary motivating factor for BT use was to improve self-esteem, and the greatest disadvantage involved financial costs associated with the procedure. Conclusions: The main findings of this study suggest that females who use BT for aesthetic purposes are motivated by personal psychological gains (intrapersonal attributes rather than social gains (interpersonal factors. In other words, they do not believe that having BT will equate to being treated any better by other people but would rather provide them with confidence and satisfaction regarding their self-image.

  19. Treatment of palatal myoclonus with botulinum toxin injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anis, Mursalin M; Pollak, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    Palatal myoclonus is a rare cause of pulsatile tinnitus in patients presenting to the otolaryngology office. Rhythmic involuntary contractions of the palatal muscles produce the pulsatile tinnitus in these patients. Treatment of this benign but distressing condition with anxiolytics, anticonvulsants, and surgery has been largely unsuccessful. A few investigators have obtained promising results with botulinum toxin injection into the palatal muscles. We present a patient with palatal myoclonus who failed conservative treatment with anxiolytics. Unilateral injection of botulinum toxin into her tensor veli palatini muscle under electromyographic guidance resolved pulsatile tinnitus in her ipsilateral ear and unmasked pulsatile tinnitus in the contralateral ear. A novel method of following transient postinjection symptoms using a diary is presented in this study. Botulinum toxin dose must be titrated to achieve optimal results in each individual patient, analogous to titrations done for spasmodic dysphonia. Knowledge of the temporal onset of postinjection side effects and symptomatic relief may aid physicians in dose titration and surveillance. We present suggestions on titrating the botulinum toxin dose to optimal levels. A review of the literature on the use of botulinum toxin for palatal myoclonus and some common complications are discussed.

  20. Development of a quail embryo model for the detection of botulinum toxin type A activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clostridium botulinum is a ubiquitous microorganism which under certain anaerobic conditions can produce botulinum toxins. Due to concerns in regards to both food-borne illness and the potential use of botulinum toxin as a biological weapon, the capability to assess the amount of toxin in a food or...

  1. The therapeutic use of botulinum toxin in cervical and maxillofacial conditions: an evidence-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihde, Stefan K A; Konstantinovic, Vitomir S

    2007-08-01

    The role of botulinum toxin as a therapeutic agent for several conditions is expanding. We sought to determine if botulinum toxin is safe and effective in treating patients with cervical dystonia and maxillofacial conditions. Our purpose was to establish a safety and efficacy profile to determine whether or not this treatment may be used prophylactically in patients undergoing dental implant therapy. We performed a systematic search of the literature to identify randomized clinical trials evaluating patients treated with botulinum toxin as an adjunct to dental implant therapy, maxillofacial conditions including temporomandibular disorders (TMD), and cervical dystonia. Four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) met our search criteria in the area of cervical dystonia and chronic facial pain. No RCTs were identified evaluating dental implant therapy. Patients with cervical dystonia exhibited significant improvements in baseline functional, pain, and global assessments compared to placebo. Adverse events were mild and transient with numbers needed to harm (NNH) ranging from 12 to 17. Patients with chronic facial pain improved significantly from baseline in terms of pain compared to placebo. Rates of adverse events were less than 1%. Botulinum toxin appears relatively safe and effective in treating cervical dystonia and chronic facial pain associated with masticatory hyperactivity. No literature exists evaluating its use in dental implantology. Randomized clinical trials are warranted to determine its safety and efficacy in dental implantology and other maxillofacial conditions such as bruxism.

  2. Sixth nerve palsy following botulinum toxin injection for facial rejuvenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolar Bilge, Ayse; Sadigov, Fariz; Salar-Gomceli, Senem

    2017-06-01

    Botulinum toxin A (BTX) has been widely used for a variety of facial esthetic procedures within the last couple of decades. Efficacy and safety of BTX for facial rejuvenation has been extensively studied in multiple randomized prospective controlled trials. Focal weakness is among the most commonly reported adverse effects. Adverse reactions tend to occur most commonly due to errors in dosing formulation and errors with the techniques of the application. No serious long-term complications have been reported. We present the case of a 52-year-old female presenting with diplopia one week following the injection of BTX for facial rejuvenation at glabella, forehead and crow's feet areas. Injection of BTX adjacent to periorbital area may be associated with extra-ocular muscle paralysis.

  3. Application of Botulinum toxin Type A: An arsenal in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmana B Rao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An extremely effective way of preventing damage to and enhancing treatment of dental hard tissues and restorations would be to ′′de-programme′′ the muscles responsible for excessive destructive forces and other gnathological-related diseases. The new paradigm is the intramuscular injection of Botulinum toxin type A (BOTOX into the affected muscles. It is a natural protein produced by anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium botulinum. The toxin inhibits the release of acetylcholine (ACH, a neurotransmitter responsible for the activation of muscle contraction and glandular secretion, and its administration results in reduction of tone in the injected muscle. There are seven distinct serotypes of Botulinum toxin, viz., A, B, C, D, E, F, and G, which differ in their potency, duration of action, and cellular target sites. This paper describes the different applications of BOTOX in dentistry.

  4. The Therapeutic Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin in Treating Scleroderma-Associated Raynaud's Phenomenon: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Ricardo J; Cooney, Carisa M; Melamed, Eitan; Follmar, Keith; Yenokyan, Gayane; Leatherman, Gwendolyn; Shah, Ami A; Wigley, Fredrick M; Hummers, Laura K; Lifchez, Scott D

    2017-08-01

    To assess the therapeutic efficacy of local injections of botulinum toxin type A (Btx-A) in improving blood flow to the hands of patients with Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) secondary to scleroderma. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, patients with scleroderma-associated RP received Btx-A (50 units in 2.5 ml sterile saline) in one randomly selected hand and sterile saline (2.5 ml) in the opposite hand. Follow-up at 1 and 4 months postinjection included laser Doppler imaging of hands, patient-reported outcomes, and physical examination. We compared outcomes using paired t-tests and population-average generalized models with generalized estimating equations. Of 40 patients enrolled, 25 had limited scleroderma and 15 had diffuse scleroderma. From baseline to 1-month follow-up, there was a greater reduction in average blood flow in Btx-A-treated hands compared to placebo-treated hands. The model estimated that this difference was statistically significant (average difference -30.08 flux units [95% confidence interval -56.19, -3.98], P for interaction = 0.024). This difference was mainly influenced by patients with longstanding RP and diffuse scleroderma. Change in blood flow at 4-month follow-up was not significantly different between groups. Clinical measures (QuickDASH, McCabe Cold Sensitivity Score, pain on a visual analog scale, and Raynaud's Condition Score) improved slightly for Btx-A-treated hands. Our laboratory-based laser Doppler imaging flow data do not support using Btx-A to treat RP in all scleroderma patients. The secondary clinical outcomes suggest some positive effect, but its clinical meaningfulness is questionable. The role of Btx-A in treating RP should be further studied with more homogeneous patient populations and in unique clinical situations such as acute digital ischemia. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  5. Therapeutic efficacy and safety of various botulinum toxin A doses and concentrations in spastic foot after stroke: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available No recommended guidelines currently exist for the therapeutic concentration or dose of botulinum toxin type A (BTXA injected into the muscle to treat limb spasticity. Therefore, in this randomized controlled trial, we explored the safety and efficacy of two concentrations and two doses of BTXA in the treatment of spastic foot after stroke to optimize this treatment in these patients. Eligible patients (n = 104 were randomized into four groups. The triceps surae and tibialis posterior on the affected side were injected with BTXA at one of two doses (200 U or 400 U and two concentrations (50 U/mL or 100 U/mL. The following assessments were conducted before as well as 4 days and 1, 2, 4, and 12 weeks after treatment: spasticity, assessed using the modified Ashworth scale; basic functional mobility, assessed using a timed up and go test; pace, assessed using a 10-meter timed walking test; and the ability to walk, assessed using Holden's graded scale and a visual analog scale. The reported results are based on the 89 patients that completed the study. We found significant differences for the two doses and concentrations of BTXA to improve the ability of patients to walk independently, with the high-dose/low-concentration combination providing the best effect. Onset and duration of the ameliorating effects of BTXA were 4–7 days and 12 weeks, respectively. Thus, BTXA effectively treated foot spasms after stroke at an optimal dose of 400 U and concentration of 50 U/mL.

  6. Interaction of Botulinum Toxin with the Epithelial Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukako Fujinaga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT is a protein toxin (~150 kDa, which possesses a metalloprotease activity. Food-borne botulism is manifested when BoNT is absorbed from the digestive tract to the blood stream and enters the peripheral nerves, where the toxin cleaves core proteins of the neuroexocytosis apparatus and elicits the inhibition of neurotransmitter release. The initial obstacle to orally ingested BoNT entering the body is the epithelial barrier of the digestive tract. Recent cell biology and molecular biology studies are beginning to elucidate the mechanism by which this large protein toxin crosses the epithelial barrier. In this review, we provide an overview of the structural features of botulinum toxins (BoNT and BoNT complex and the interaction of these toxins with the epithelial barrier.

  7. Bupivacaine and botulinum toxin to treat comitant strabismus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Moreira Hopker

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the change in ocular motility and muscle thickness measured with ultrasonography after intramuscular injection of bupivacaine and botulinum toxin A. METHODS: Eight patients (five female were enrolled to measure ocular motility prior and 1, 7, 30 and 180 days after one injection of 2 ml of 1.5% bupivacaine and 2.5 U of botulinum toxin A in agonist and antagonist muscles, respectively, of eight amblyopic eyes. Muscle thickness was measured prior and on days 1, 7 and 30 after injection using 10-MHz ultrasonography (eyelid technique. RESULTS: Mean change in alignment was 10 prism diopters after 180 days (n=6. An average increase of 1.01 mm in muscle thickness was observed after 30 days of bupivacaine injection and 0.28 mm increase was observed after botulinum toxin A injection, as measured by ultrasonography. Lateral rectus muscles injected with bupivacaine had a mean increase of 1.5 mm in muscle thickness. CONCLUSION: In this study, a change in ocular motility was observed after 180 days of intramuscular injection of bupivacaine and botulinum toxin in horizontal extraocular muscles. Overall, there was an increase of muscle thickness in both botulinum toxinum A and bupivacaine injected muscles after 30 days of injection when measured by ultrasonography. This change was more pronounced on lateral rectus muscles after bupivacaine injection.

  8. Regulation of toxin synthesis in Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium tetani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connan, Chloé; Denève, Cécile; Mazuet, Christelle; Popoff, Michel R

    2013-12-01

    Botulinum and tetanus neurotoxins are structurally and functionally related proteins that are potent inhibitors of neuroexocytosis. Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) associates with non-toxic proteins (ANTPs) to form complexes of various sizes, whereas tetanus toxin (TeNT) does not form any complex. The BoNT and ANTP genes are clustered in a DNA segment called the botulinum locus, which has different genomic localization (chromosome, plasmid, phage) in the various Clostridium botulinum types and subtypes. The botulinum locus genes are organized in two polycistronic operons (ntnh-bont and ha/orfX operons) transcribed in opposite orientations. A gene called botR lying between the two operons in C. botulinum type A encodes an alternative sigma factor which regulates positively the synthesis of BoNT and ANTPs at the late exponential growth phase and beginning of the stationary phase. In Clostridium tetani, the gene located immediately upstream of tent encodes a positive regulatory protein, TetR, which is related to BotR. C. botulinum and C. tetani genomes contain several two-component systems and predicted regulatory orphan genes. In C. botulinum type A, four two-component systems have been found that positively or negatively regulate the synthesis of BoNT and ANTPs independently of BotR/A. The synthesis of neurotoxin in Clostridia seems to be under the control of complex network of regulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. TREATMENT OF LARYNGEAL DYSTONIA WITH BOTULINUM TOXIN: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Hočevar-Boltežar

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Laryngeal dystonia (LD is a form of focal dystonia, involving laryngeal muscles and causing disturbed phonation. Adductor, abductor and mixed forms of LD are described.Methods. Largely unsuccessful treatments include voice therapy, psychotherapy, biofeedback, section of the laryngeal recurrent nerve, laryngeal framework surgery and the use of centrally acting drugs. Botulinum toxin proved to be the most efficient treatment of LD; it acts by chemically denervating hyperactive laryngeal muscles.Case report. Authors report on the first use of botulinum toxin in a patient with LD in Slovenia. A female patient with a degenerative disease of extrapyramidal, cerebellar and autonomous system (probable multiple system atrophy and severe adductor form of LD is presented. By gradually increasing dose, the optimal dosage of botulinum has been established that greatly improves the patient’s speech for four months and causes transient mild adverse effects (dysphagia. Botulinum is injected percutaneously under endoscopic control, using the method, which has been described in literature for the first time.Conclusions. Treatment of LD with botulinum toxin demonstrated good results. It improves patient’s communication with others and the quality of his/her life.

  10. Botulinum toxin A in the treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żebryk, Paweł; Puszczewicz, Mariusz J

    2016-08-01

    The management of Raynaud's phenomenon in its most severe form is challenging, and current medical and surgical treatment methods frequently do not lead to optimal symptom control and prevention of ischemic complications. The aim of the study was to critically evaluate all existing evidence on the use of botulinum toxin A in the management of Raynaud's phenomenon. We adopted the PRISMA methodology and searched Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, SCOPUS, EULAR and ACR congresses abstract archives for Raynaud* AND botulinum toxin OR onabotulinum. All studies that contained reports of botulinum toxin A use and its outcome in Raynaud's phenomenon were included in the review. Eleven studies met our inclusion criteria and involved a total of 125 patients. Two reviewers extracted data from the studies under review and achieved a consensus in their selection. The main outcomes measured were pain reduction and healing of digital ulcers. The level of evidence across studies was very low to moderate. There is insufficient evidence to assess the efficacy of botulinum toxin A in Raynaud's phenomenon. Despite many promising reports, further research in the form of randomized controlled trials is warranted in order to investigate this new treatment method for Raynaud's phenomenon.

  11. The WE-Study: does botulinum toxin A make walking easier in children with cerebral palsy?: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brændvik, Siri Merete; Roeleveld, Karin; Andersen, Guro Lillemoen; Raftemo, Anne Elisabeth Ross; Ramstad, Kjersti; Majkic-Tajsic, Jasmina; Lamvik, Torarin; Lund, Bendik; Follestad, Turid; Vik, Torstein

    2017-02-06

    Intramuscular injections of botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) have been a cornerstone in the treatment of spasticity for the last 20 years. In Norway, the treatment is now offered to two out of three children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). However, despite its common use, the evidence for its functional effects is limited and inconclusive. The objective of this study is to determine whether BoNT-A makes walking easier in children with CP. We hypothesize that injections with BoNT-A in the calf muscles will reduce energy cost during walking, improve walking capacity, increase habitual physical activity, reduce pain and improve self-perceived performance and satisfaction. This randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial is conducted in a clinical setting involving three health regions in Norway. Ninety-six children with spastic CP, referred for single-level injections with BoNT-A in the calf muscles, will be invited to participate. Those who are enrolled will be randomized to receive either injections with BoNT-A (Botox®) or 0.9% saline in the calf muscles. Stratification according to age and study center will be made. The allocation ratio will be 1:1. Main inclusion criteria are (1) age 4 - 17.5 years, (2) Gross Motor Function Classification System levels I and II, (3) no BoNT-A injections in the lower limbs during the past 6 months and (4) no orthopedic surgery to the lower limbs during the past 2 years. The outcome measures will be made at baseline and 4, 12 (primary endpoint) and 24 weeks after injections. Primary outcome is change in energy cost during walking. Secondary outcomes are change in walking capacity, change in activity, perceived change in performance and satisfaction in mobility tasks, and pain. The primary analysis will use a linear mixed model to test for difference in change in the outcome measures between the groups. The study is approved by the Regional Ethical Committee and The Norwegian Medicines Agency. Recruitment

  12. Botulinum toxin in cervical dystonia: low dosage with electromyographic guidance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brans, J. W.; de Boer, I. P.; Aramideh, M.; Ongerboer de Visser, B. W.; Speelman, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    Sixty patients with idiopathic cervical dystonia were treated a total of 240 times with botulinum toxin type A (BTA). Selected muscles were injected with BTA under electromyographic (EMG) guidance. The clinical effect was measured on the Tsui scale and a 10-point anchored visual analogue scale. A

  13. Pretarsal application of botulinum toxin for treatment of blepharospasm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aramideh, M.; Ongerboer de Visser, B. W.; Brans, J. W.; Koelman, J. H.; Speelman, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    The response to botulinum toxin type A was compared after two injection techniques in 45 patients with blepharospasm. Initially, patients were treated according to a triple injection technique; two injections into the upper eyelid and one injection into the lower eyelid. Subsequently, without

  14. Does motor performance matter in botulinum toxin efficacy for drooling?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erasmus, C.E.; Scheffer, A.R.T.; Hulst, K. van; Limbeek, J. van; Hoogen, F.J.A. van den; Rotteveel, J.J.; Jongerius, P.H.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define factors that influence therapy outcome of submandibular botulinum toxin injections for drooling in children with cerebral palsy or mental disability. We postulated that differences in response may be explained by the variation of dysfunctions in the various

  15. [Treatment of severe bruxism with botulinum toxin type A].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix J; Plaza-Nieto, José F; Pilo-De la Fuente, Belén; Navacerrada, Francisco; Arroyo-Solera, Margarita; Calleja, Marisol

    2011-07-16

    The possible usefulness of botulinum toxin type A in the treatment of bruxism has not been studied exhaustively, being limited to some isolated case reports, two short case-series and a double-blind study involving a small number or patients. This article report our long-term experience in the treatment of bruxism with botulinum toxin type A. The outcome of 19 patients with severe bruxism who underwent periodical treatment with botulinum toxin A infiltrations in both temporal and masseter muscles, using initial doses of 25 IU per muscle, during a follow-up period ranging from 0.5 to 11 years, is described. Doses were adjusted in follow-up visits according the response degree. None of the patients reported side-effects. Final doses ranged from 25 to 40 IU per muscle (mean: 29.7 ± 4.9 UI), and duration of the effect from 13 to 26 weeks (mean: 16.7 ± 5.1 weeks). Botulinum toxin A infiltrations are a safe and useful treatment for patients with severe bruxism.

  16. Intramural injection with botulinum toxin significantly elongates the pig esophagus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Heidi Fhær; Jensen, Thorbjørn Søren Rønn; Rasmussen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Surgical treatment of long-gap esophageal atresia (LGEA) is challenging. Methods which facilitate stretching of the esophageal pouches may allow primary anastomosis. Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) blocks acetylcholine release in neuromuscular junctions, thereby causing muscle relaxation. We...

  17. Experience with botulinum toxin in the treatment of cerebral palsy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fifteen children with cerebral palsy: 5 with dynamic spasticity, 5 with dystonia and 5 with a mixed picture. Results. On a standard scoring system, 13 of the children showed improved function at reassessment. Conclusion. Intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin is effective in the treatment of selected children with spastic.

  18. Botulinum Toxin – Treatment Of Choice For Primary Hyperhidrosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The term Botulinum toxin encompasses a group of seven (A – G) immunologically distinct Zinc-dependent endoproteases that act primarily at peripheral cholinergic synapses. By blocking synaptic vesicle trafficking they effectively block the release of Acetylcholine inducing muscle paralysis. This property is utilized in the ...

  19. Calf muscle volume estimates: Implications for Botulinum toxin treatment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandholm, Thomas; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Thomsen, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    An optimal botulinum toxin dose may be related to the volume of the targeted muscle. We investigated the suitability of using ultrasound and anthropometry to estimate gastrocnemius and soleus muscle volume. Gastrocnemius and soleus muscle thickness was measured in 11 cadaveric human legs, using...... the volume of individual plantar flexor muscles using ultrasound and anthropometry. This possibility should be investigated further in living humans....

  20. Botulinum toxin for treating muscular temporomandibular disorders: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Machado

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study, through a systematic literature review, aims to analyze the effectiveness of Botulinum Toxin as a treatment for masticatory myofascial pain and muscles temporomandibular disorders (TMD. METHODS: Survey in research bases: MEDLINE, Cochrane, EMBASE, Pubmed, Lilacs and BBO, between the years of 1966 and April 2011, with focus in randomized or quasi-randomized controlled clinical trials, blind or double-blind. RESULTS: After applying the inclusion criteria, 4 articles comprised the final sample: 3 were double-blind randomized controlled clinical trials and 1 was single-blind randomized controlled clinical trial. CONCLUSIONS: According to the literature, there is lack of evidence about the real effectiveness of botulinum toxin in the treatment of masticatory myofascial pain and muscular TMD. Thus, further randomized controlled clinical trials, with representative samples and longer follow-up time, to assess the real effectiveness of the technique are needed.OBJETIVO: este trabalho, por meio de uma revisão sistemática da literatura, teve como objetivo analisar a efetividade da toxina botulínica como tratamento para dor miofascial mastigatória e disfunções temporomandibulares (DTM musculares. MÉTODOS: pesquisa nas bases de dados Medline, Cochrane, Embase, Pubmed, Lilacs e BBO, no período entre 1966 e abril de 2011, com enfoque em estudos clínicos controlados randomizados ou quase-randomizados, cegos ou duplo-cegos. RESULTADOS: após a aplicação dos critérios de inclusão, chegou-se a 4 artigos, sendo que 3 eram estudos clínicos controlados randomizados duplo-cego e 1 era estudo clínico controlado randomizado simples-cego. CONCLUSÕES: pela análise da literatura, verificou-se um número reduzido de evidências significativas sobre a real efetividade da toxina botulínica no tratamento da dor miofascial e de DTM musculares. Assim, são necessários novos estudos clínicos controlados randomizados, com amostras

  1. Does botulinum toxin injection site determine outcome in post-stroke plantarflexion spasticity? Comparison study of two injection sites in the gastrocnemius muscle: a randomized double-blind controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Sun; Park, Joo Hyun; Son, Seong Kon; Shin, Jae-Eun; Cho, Sae Hoon; Park, Geun-Young

    2014-06-01

    To determine if botulinum toxin type A injection at the proximal 2/10 and 3/10 of calf length, where the intramuscular nerve endings of the gastrocnemius muscle are densely distributed, is more efficacious in controlling plantarflexion spasticity than injection at distant sites within the same muscle. A double-blind randomized controlled trial. Two rehabilitation centres. Forty stroke patients were randomly allocated to two groups. Group A received injection at the proximal 2/10 and 3/10 of calf length, group B at and below the midbelly of the muscle. Both groups received 200 IU of botulinum toxin A and were followed up to eight weeks. Primary variables were the surface electromyography values recorded during plantarflexion; secondary variables were the Modified Ashworth Scale, Modified Tardieu Scale, clonus scale, 10-metre walking test, ABILOCO and Functional Ambulation Categories. At baseline, the median Modified Ashworth Scale was 2.0 (range,1+ -3.0), and there were no significant differences between the two groups in all the parameters, including spasticity. Compared to baseline, no significant differences between the two groups were detected in all the surface electromyography and clinical parameters at week 8 (P > 0.05). Both groups showed significant improvement of spasticity with a median Modified Ashworth Scale of 1+ (range, 0.0-2.0) at eight weeks. Botulinum toxin A injection was associated with a significant improvement from baseline to week 8 in both treatment groups, however, no significant difference between the 2 groups was observed, based on the electrophysiological and clinical parameters employed in this study. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Guidelines on the use of botulinum toxin Type A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shetty M

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin is available as types A and B. These two different forms need different dosages and hence, the physician needs to be familiar with the formulations. A thorough knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the muscles in the area to be injected is essential. Indications for botulinum toxin: Dynamic wrinkles caused by persistent muscular contractions are the main aesthetic indications for the use of Botulinum toxin. These include forehead lines, glabellar lines, crow′s feet, bunny lines, perioral wrinkles, and platysmal bands. Non-aesthetic indications include hyperhidrosis of the palms, soles and axillae. Physicians′ qualifications : Any qualified dermatologist may practice the technique after receiving adequate training in the field. This may be obtained either during post-graduation or at any workshops dedicated to this subject. Facility: Botulinum toxin can be administered in the dermatologist′s minor procedure room. Preoperative counseling and informed consent Detailed counseling with respect to the treatment, desired effects, and longevity of the results should be discussed with the patient. The patient should be given brochures to study and adequate opportunity to seek information. A detailed consent form needs to be completed by the patient. The consent form should include the type of botulinum toxin, longevity expected and possible postoperative complications. Pre- and postoperative photography is recommended. Dosage depends on the area, muscle mass, gender and other factors outlined in these guidelines. It is recommended that beginners should focus on the basic indications in the upper third of the face and that they treat the middle and lower parts of the face only after garnering adequate experience.

  3. Botulinum toxin type a for dysthyroid upper eyelid retraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, K E; Evanchan, J; Foster, J A; Cahill, K V; Burns, J A; Holck, D E E; Perry, J D; Wulc, A E

    2004-05-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin type A for treatment of eyelid retraction resulting from thyroid eye disease (TED) during the inflammatory phase of the condition. In this prospective, nonrandomized case series, 18 patients with inflammatory eyelid retraction caused by active TED received botulinum toxin type A injection (10, 5, or 2.5 U) for treatment of upper eyelid retraction. Botulinum toxin type A (Allergan, Irvine, CA, U.S.A.) was injected transconjunctivally just above the superior tarsal border in the elevator complex of the upper eyelid. Seventeen of 18 patients (94%) demonstrated a reduced marginal reflex distance (MRD1) after botulinum toxin injection. The average change in MRD1 of the treated eyelid after injection was -2.35 mm (range, 0 to -8.0 mm). Of the 27 eyelids injected, 33% had a 0- to 1-mm drop in eyelid height, 30% had a 1.5- to 2-mm decrease, 22% had a 2.5- to 3-mm decrease, and 15% had a greater than 3-mm decrease in eyelid height. None of the treated eyelids were noted to increase in height. One patient showed no alteration inafter treatment. One patient had clinically MRD1 significant ptosis and one patient reported worsening of preexisting diplopia after injection. Three patients undergoing unilateral injection had relative contralateral eyelid elevation. All untoward effects resolved spontaneously without sequelae. : Botulinum toxin type A may be used in the inflammatory stage of thyroid eye disease to improve upper eyelid retraction. Individual response to treatment is variable, but this modality should be considered as a temporizing measure until stability for surgery is reached.

  4. [Botulinum toxin: An important complement for facial rejuvenation surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Louarn, C

    2017-10-01

    The improved understanding of the functional anatomy of the face and of the action of the botulinum toxin A leads us to determine a new injection procedure which consequently decreases the risk of eyebrow and eyelid ptosis and increases the toxin's injection possibilities and efficiencies. With less units of toxin, the technique herein described proposes to be more efficient on more muscles: variable toxin injections concentration adapted to each injected muscle are used. Thanks to a new procedure in the upper face, toxin A injection can be quite close to an endoscopic surgical action. In addition, interesting results are achievable to rejuvenate the lateral canthus with injection on the upper lateral tarsus, to rejuvenate the nose with injection at the alar base, the jawline and the neck region. Lastly, a smoothing effect on the skin (meso botox) is obtained by the anticholinergic action of the toxin A on the dermal receptors. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  5. Botulinum toxin A for trismus in cephalic tetanus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Augusto F. Andrade

    1994-09-01

    Full Text Available Cephalic tetanus is a localized form of tetanus. As in generalized forms , trismus is a prominent feature of the disease, leading to considerable difficulty in feeding, swallowing of the saliva and mouth hygiene. These difficulties often precede respiratory problems and aspiration bronchopneumonia is a frequent life-threatening complication. Muscle relaxants other than curare drugs may show a limited benefit for relieving trismus. Tetanospasmin, the tetanic neurotoxin, and botulinum toxin share many similarities, having a closely related chemical structure, an origin from related microorganisms (Clostridium tetani and Clostridium botulinum, respectively, and presumably, the same mechanisms of action in the neuron. The difference between the two lies in their peculiar neurospecificity, acting in different neurons. Injection of minute doses of botulinum toxin in the muscles involved in focal dystonias or other localized spastic disorders have proved to be very effective in these conditions. We describe the use of botulinum toxin A in the successful treatment of trismus in a patient suffering from cephalic tetanus. We believe that this form of treatment may be of value in lowering the risk of pulmonary complications in tetanic patients.

  6. Botulinum Toxin for the Treatment of Myofascial Pain Syndromes Involving the Neck and Back: A Review from a Clinical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Climent

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Botulinum toxin inhibits acetylcholine (ACh release and probably blocks some nociceptive neurotransmitters. It has been suggested that the development of myofascial trigger points (MTrP is related to an excess release of ACh to increase the number of sensitized nociceptors. Although the use of botulinum toxin to treat myofascial pain syndrome (MPS has been investigated in many clinical trials, the results are contradictory. The objective of this paper is to identify sources of variability that could explain these differences in the results. Material and Methods. We performed a content analysis of the clinical trials and systematic reviews of MPS. Results and Discussion. Sources of differences in studies were found in the diagnostic and selection criteria, the muscles injected, the injection technique, the number of trigger points injected, the dosage of botulinum toxin used, treatments for control group, outcome measures, and duration of followup. The contradictory results regarding the efficacy of botulinum toxin A in MPS associated with neck and back pain do not allow this treatment to be recommended or rejected. There is evidence that botulinum toxin could be useful in specific myofascial regions such as piriformis syndrome. It could also be useful in patients with refractory MPS that has not responded to other myofascial injection therapies.

  7. A novel strain of Clostridium botulinum that produces type B and type H botulinum toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barash, Jason R; Arnon, Stephen S

    2014-01-15

    Clostridium botulinum strain IBCA10-7060, isolated from a patient with infant botulism, produced botulinum neurotoxin type B (BoNT/B) and another BoNT that, by use of the standard mouse bioassay, could not be neutralized by any of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-provided monovalent polyclonal botulinum antitoxins raised against BoNT types A-G.  The combining of antitoxins to neutralize the toxicity of known bivalent C. botulinum strains Ab, Ba, Af, and Bf also failed to neutralize the second BoNT. Analysis of culture filtrate by double immunodiffusion yielded a single line of immunoprecipitate with anti-A, anti-B, and anti-F botulinum antitoxins but not with anti-E antitoxin. A heptavalent F(ab')2 botulinum antitoxin A-G obtained from the US Army also did not neutralize the second BoNT. An antitoxin raised against IBCA10-7060 toxoid protected mice against BoNT/B (Okra) and against the second BoNT but did not protect mice against BoNT/A (Hall) or BoNT/F (Langeland). The second BoNT thus fulfilled classic criteria for being designated BoNT/H. IBCA10-7060 is the first C. botulinum type Bh strain to be identified. BoNT/H is the first new botulinum toxin type to be recognized in >40 years, and its recognition could not have been accomplished without the availability of the mouse bioassay.

  8. Botulinum toxin type A as an effective prophylactic treatment in primary headache disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenfeld, Andrew

    2003-09-01

    To measure the effect of botulinum toxin type A (Botox, Allergan, Inc, Irvine, CA) treatment in 271 patients diagnosed with headache in accordance with International Headache Society (IHS) criteria. Botulinum toxin type A has shown promise for the treatment of headache in several clinical trials, but uncertainty remains as to how botulinum toxin type A optimally should be used for treating headache and which patients are best suited for this treatment. This was a retrospective chart review of all patients who received botulinum toxin type A for the treatment of headache from January 1999 to February 2002. Patients were injected with an average dose of 63.2 U (SD, 14.5) of botulinum toxin type A on 2 or more visits, with treatments involving a "fixed-site" or a "follow-the-pain" (or a combination of both) approach. In the fixed-site approach, botulinum toxin type A was injected into the procerus, corrugator, frontalis, and temporalis muscles. In the follow-the-pain approach, botulinum toxin type A was injected into a combination of the procerus, corrugator, frontalis, temporalis, occipitalis, trapezius, and/or semispinalis capitis muscles. The primary outcomes for the trial were the reduction in headache days per month or headache intensity (0 to 3 scale) (or both) from baseline. Patients were diagnosed according to IHS criteria and subsequently classified into the following categories: chronic daily headache (more than 15 headache days per month), episodic tension-type headache, episodic migraine, and "mixed" HA (less than 15 headache days per month, combination of migraine and tension-type headache). Treatment period was an average of 8.6 months (SD, 6.4); patients received an average of 3.4 doses (SD, 1.6) 3 months apart. Of the 271 patients, 29 (10.7%) had episodic migraine, 17 (6.3%) had episodic tension-type headache, 71 (26.2%) had mixed headache, and 154 (56.8%) had chronic daily headache. Two-hundred fifty-six patients had data for the number of headache

  9. Use of intradermal botulinum toxin to reduce sebum production and facial pore size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Anil R

    2008-09-01

    Review the safety profile and subjective efficacy of intradermal botulinum toxin type A in facial pore size and sebum production. Retrospective analysis of 20 patients. Twenty consecutive patients with a single application of intradermal botulinum toxin type A were examined: Patients (17/20) noted an improvement in sebum production and a decrease in pores size at 1 month after injection. No complications were observed, and 17/20 patients were satisfied with the procedure. Preliminary data suggests that intradermal botulinum toxin may play a role in decreasing sebum production. Further quantitive study may be necessary to determine effects of intradermal botulinum toxin on pore size.

  10. Affinity chromatography of tetanus toxin, tetanus toxoid, and botulinum A toxin on synaptosomes, and differentiation of their acceptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habermann, E.

    1976-01-01

    125 I-labelled tetanus toxin and 125 I-labelled botulinum A neurotoxin are known to be specifically bound to brain synaptosomes. In order to discriminate between active toxin and inactive admixtures present in the starting material or arising during iodination, synaptosome columns were prepared using bromacetylcellulose and/or kieselgur (Celite) as carriers. Both types of columns adsorb the toxins from low ionic strength medium and release them if the pH and ionic strength are raised. Botulinum toxin was eluted with lower ionic strength than tetanus toxin, and could be freed from nontoxic admixtures. Analysis by affinity chromatography disclosed partially toxoided tetanus toxin in both labelled and unlabelled toxin samples. High concentrations of formaldehyde (0.5%) destroyed both toxicity and affinity to the synaptosomes of tetanus toxin. Low concentrations of formaldehyde (0.05%) yielded a derivative of low toxicity which was still, however less firmly, bound to synaptosomes. Tetanus and botulinum toxin differ by their acceptors. Whereas unlabelled botulinum toxin is unable to compete with labelled tetanus toxin, unlabelled tetanus toxin slightly competes with botulinum toxin. Both labelled toxins display anomalous binding behaviour in that they cannot be displaced completely even with a large excess of unlabelled toxin. (orig.) [de

  11. Botulinum toxin: An emerging therapy in female bladder outlet obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya A Pradhan

    2009-01-01

    Discussion: There is a gradual improvement in symptoms over time and the maximal effect occurred at 10-14 days. The duration of improvement was approximately 16.8 weeks. All patients were satisfied by the degree of improvement felt. Conclusions: Botulinum toxin proved successful in improving the voiding characteristics. It possibly acts at the zone of hypertonicity at the bladder neck or midurethra. The only disadvantage is the high cost of the drug.

  12. Botulinum toxin injection of spastic finger flexors in hemiplegic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriquez, A A; McGinn, M; Chappell, R

    2000-01-01

    To assess the outcomes of botulinum toxin injection of spastic finger flexors followed by intensive training of finger extensors. Fourteen subjects with chronic hemiplegia spasticity of the upper limb had electromyographic-guided botulinum toxin injection into the long finger flexors. All patients presented with minimal active finger extension with the wrist flexed, sustained clonus of the finger flexors, functional proximal arm function, and absence of fixed contracture. Cadaver dissections directed selection of two injection sites: the flexor digitorum sublimis and the flexor digitorum profundus. Fifty mouse units of botulinum toxin were injected into each muscle. After injection, the subjects were instructed in a home program of stretching the long finger flexors, upper limb weight bearing with a weight-bearing splint, and exercise to improve finger extension control. Compared with preinjection measures, assessment the first week after the initial injection showed significantly reduced tone, reduced clonus, and greater active finger extension with the wrist in the neutral position. Four months later, the Ashworth scale increased to preinjection levels in the six subjects with repeated injections but was again decreased postinjection. Active finger extension with the wrist in the neutral position and clonus showed a statistically nonsignificant trend toward cumulative improvement after the second injection. The greatest change in finger extension and spasticity reduction occurred after the first injection. Continued significant improvement in finger extension was not observed.

  13. Strategies to decrease injection site pain in botulinum toxin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paracka, Lejla; Kollewe, Katja; Wegner, Florian; Dressler, Dirk

    2017-10-01

    Botulinum toxin is now used for numerous indications including dystonias, spasticity, cerebral palsy, hyperhidrosis, cosmetics and chronic migraine. It has to be injected into its target tissues thus causing injection site pain. We wanted to compare the efficacy of various analgesic interventions suggested for reduction of injection site pain. In 13 healthy controls, pain thresholds in the fingertips II and III bilaterally were determined by the Mechanical Pain Threshold Test and the Repetitive Pain Stimulation Test at baseline and under nitrous oxide/oxygen, ice spray, local anaesthetic cream and forearm ischaemia. All interventions studied produce statistically significant and robust elevations of the pain threshold in both tests. Nitrous oxide/oxygen had stronger effects than the other interventions, although this superiority was statistically significant only in the Repetitive Pain Stimulation Test and not against ice spray. Also considering duration, localisation and penetration depth of analgesic effects, hyperhidrosis treatment may benefit from nitrous oxide/oxygen, ice spray and local anaesthetic cream. In palmar hyperhidrosis, forearm ischaemia is possible and also reduces botulinum toxin washout. Cosmetic indications may also benefit from nitrous oxide/oxygen and local anaesthetic cream. For botulinum toxin therapy of spasticity, dystonia and tremor, only nitrous oxide/oxygen may offer intramuscular analgesic effect. Its systemic and prolonged effect is also an advantage in injections in several body parts. Future studies are necessary to test the influence of penetration depth and combinations of analgesic interventions.

  14. [Botulinum toxin injection for refractory non-neurogenic overactive bladder. Systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriet, B; Roumeguère, T

    2015-01-01

    OAB is common with a potential negative impact on quality of life. Anticholinergics and β3-mimetics are the first-line medical treatment. This treatment meets only 50% of patients given a lack of efficacy and adverse effects. Used in the treatment of neurogenic overactive bladder, botulinum toxin is now evaluated for the treatment of refractory non-neurogenic overactive bladder. The objective of this work is to review the literature data concerning the efficacy and safety of intradetrusor botulinum toxin injections to treat refractory idiopathic overactive bladder. A systematic literature review was conducted to identify articles published between May 1988 and April 2013 in Medline for the treatment of refractory idiopathic overactive bladder with botulinum toxin. 37 studies with original samples were selected including 8 randomized controlled trials against placebo. The effectiveness of intra- detrusor injections is demonstrated to reduce the frequency, urgency, nighttime urination, incontinence episodes and to improve bladder capacity and quality of life. The most common side effects are incomplete bladder emptying, intermittent catheterization and increased risk of urinary tract infection. A dose of 100 to 150 U of onabotulinumtoxinA allows the best compromise between efficiency and tolerance. Duration of the effects varies between 3 to 12 months and repeating the injections did not seem to affect the efficiency. Injections including the trigone zone do not cause vesicoureteral reflux. The absence of detrusor hyperactivity does not alter the clinical response. The detrusor injections of botulinum toxin can be considered as an effective second-line treatment for refractory non-neurogenic overactive bladder. Information on intermittent catheterization risk must be provided. The very long-term effectiveness and the absence of urothelium alterations are still outstanding issues.

  15. Acute deterioration of bulbar function after botulinum toxin treatment for sialorrhoea in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, J.W.; Kuijk, A.A. van; Geurts, A.C.H.; Schelhaas, H.J.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Transcutaneous botulinum toxin injection in the salivary glands was introduced in 2000 as a new treatment for sialorrhoea in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We describe an ALS patient who developed serious complications of botulinum toxin treatment for sialorrhoea, and we review the relevant

  16. Review article: botulinum toxin in the therapy of gastrointestinal motility disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, D; Rossi, S; Runfola, M; Magalini, S C

    2003-07-01

    Since 1980, botulinum toxin has been employed for the treatment of various voluntary muscle spastic disorders in the fields of neurology and ophthalmology. More recently, botulinum toxin has been proved to be effective in the therapy of dyskinetic smooth muscle disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Achalasia and anal fissure are the gastrointestinal disorders in which botulinum toxin therapy has been most extensively investigated. Botulinum toxin is the best treatment option for achalasia in patients whose condition makes them unfit for pneumatic dilation or surgery. In anal fissure, botulinum toxin is highly effective and may become the treatment of choice. In the future, botulinum toxin application in the gastrointestinal tract will be extended to many other gastrointestinal disorders, such as non-achalasic motor disorders of the oesophagus, dysfunction of Oddi's sphincter, achalasia of the internal anal sphincter and others. This article describes the mechanism of action, rationale of employment, indications and side-effects of botulinum toxin application in smooth muscle disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, and compares the results of different techniques of botulinum toxin therapeutic application.

  17. Cellular Entry of Clostridium perfringens Iota-Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaya Takehara

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens iota-toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin are composed of two non-linked proteins, one being the enzymatic component and the other being the binding/translocation component. These latter components recognize specific receptors and oligomerize in plasma membrane lipid-rafts, mediating the uptake of the enzymatic component into the cytosol. Enzymatic components induce actin cytoskeleton disorganization through the ADP-ribosylation of actin and are responsible for cell rounding and death. This review focuses upon the recent advances in cellular internalization of clostridial binary toxins.

  18. An overview of botulinum toxins: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartee, Todd V; Monheit, Gary D

    2011-07-01

    Although the mechanism of action of botulinum toxin (BTX) has been intensively studied, many unanswered questions remain regarding the composition and clinical properties of the two formulations of BTX currently approved for cosmetic use. In the first half of this review, these questions are explored in detail, with emphasis on the most pertinent and revelatory studies in the literature. The second half delineates most of the common and some not so common uses of BTX in the face and neck, stressing important patient selection and safety considerations. Complications from neurotoxins at cosmetic doses are generally rare and usually technique dependent. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Advances in Assays and Analytical Approaches for Botulinum Toxin Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grate, Jay W.; Ozanich, Richard M.; Warner, Marvin G.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Marks, James D.

    2010-08-04

    Methods to detect botulinum toxin, the most poisonous substance known, are reviewed. Current assays are being developed with two main objectives in mind: 1) to obtain sufficiently low detection limits to replace the mouse bioassay with an in vitro assay, and 2) to develop rapid assays for screening purposes that are as sensitive as possible while requiring an hour or less to process the sample an obtain the result. This review emphasizes the diverse analytical approaches and devices that have been developed over the last decade, while also briefly reviewing representative older immunoassays to provide background and context.

  20. In Silico Analysis for the Study of Botulinum Toxin Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tomonori; Miyazaki, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play many important roles in biological function. Knowledge of protein-protein complex structure is required for understanding the function. The determination of protein-protein complex structure by experimental studies remains difficult, therefore computational prediction of protein structures by structure modeling and docking studies is valuable method. In addition, MD simulation is also one of the most popular methods for protein structure modeling and characteristics. Here, we attempt to predict protein-protein complex structure and property using some of bioinformatic methods, and we focus botulinum toxin complex as target structure.

  1. A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial Investigating the Most Efficacious Dose of Botulinum Toxin-A for Sialorrhea Treatment in Asian Adults with Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazlina Mazlan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the most efficacious dose of Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT-A in reducing sialorrhea in Asian adults with neurological diseases. A prospective, double-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted over 24 weeks. Thirty patients with significant sialorrhea were randomly assigned to receive a BoNT-A (Dysport® injection into the submandibular and the parotid glands bilaterally via an ultrasound guidance. The total dose given per patient was either BoNT-A injection of (i 50 U; (ii 100 U; or (iii 200 U. The primary outcome was the amount of saliva reduction, measured by the differential weight (wet versus dry of intraoral dental gauze at baseline and at 2, 6, 12, and 24 weeks after injection. The secondary outcome was the subjective report of drooling using the Drooling Frequency and Severity Scale (DFS. Saliva reduction was observed in response to all BoNT-A doses in 17 patients who completed the assessments. Although no statistically significant difference among the doses was found, the measured reduction was greater in groups that received higher doses (100 U and 200 U. The group receiving 200 U of Dysport® showed the greatest reduction of saliva until 24 weeks and reported the most significant improvement in the DFS score.

  2. Use of Botulinum toxin in 55 children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi M

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin A (BTA inhibits presynaptic release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction and has reportedly been successful in the treatment of spastic disorders.To evaluate the effect of botulinum toxin on cerebral palsied children with spastic or mixed type of the disease, especially those patiens having spasticity as a cardinal symptom without joint contracture, we designed the following study. Ninety-one cases (55 of referred patients to pediatic Neurology outpatient clinics of children’s Medical Center were given BTA injections in affected muscles of the lower limb. They were reevaluating 3 to 5 weeks and 3 months later for type of walking and range of affected joints’ movement. The study showed a clinically significant gait improvement in 71.2% of patients (P<0.0005 and also an overall increased range of motion in affected limbs after BTA injection (P<0.04. Side effects occurred only in two cases as transient generalized weakness, gent recurvatum and ptosis. Drug effectiveness was time-limited, lasting abot 3 months in all patients ( a golden time for rehabilitation therapists to improve the patients’ condition. Overall, BTA has improved both the type of walking as well as the range of joints motion in our patients. So its’ administration is suggested in cerebral palsied children if the spasticity is a major and disabling sign

  3. Pneumatic dilation and botulinum toxin: when and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzi, Rosamaria; Di Martino, Vincenzo; Inzirillo, Antonio; D'Avenia, Eugenio; Inzirillo, Maurizio; Cattaneo, Fabio; Cattaneo, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Pneumatic dilation and botulinum toxin:when and why? The endoscopic treatment options of achalasia include botulinum toxin (BT) injection and pneumatic dilation (PD) of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). BT can reduce the LES pressure by blocking the release of acetylcoline from presynaptic cholinergic nerve terminals in the myenteric plexus. Although the procedure is safe and good initial response is reported, there is a wide variability in the duration of the response and the effect tends to decrease over time. BT is usually recommended for elderly patients or patients with comorbid illnesses, who are poor candidates for more invasive procedures. PD aims at tearing the muscle fibers of the LES and is considered the most effective nonsurgical treatment for achalasia. Technical details of the procedure vary in different institutions and in many clinical settings the choice between PD or minimally invasive surgical myotomy depends upon local expertise in the procedures. Further endoscopic treatment options such as submucosal esophageal myotomy or self-expanding metallic stents are being studied.

  4. Botulinum toxin (Botox) to enhance facial macroesthetics: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastoor, Sarosh F; Misch, Carl E; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2007-01-01

    Dental implants have emerged as a predictable treatment option for partial edentulism. Their ability to preserve bone and soft tissue yields highly esthetic results in the long term. Increasingly, patients are demanding not only enhancements to their dental (micro) esthetics but also to their overall facial (macro) esthetics. Dynamic wrinkles (caused by hyperfunctional muscles) in the perioral, glabellar, and forehead regions can cause a patient's expressions to be misinterpreted as angry, anxious, fearful, or fatigued. An emerging treatment option to address these issues is the use of a paralyzing material such as botulinum toxin A (Botox) to decrease the appearance of the wrinkles, which yields a more esthetic and youthful facial appearance. Botox is a deadly poison that is produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum and causes muscle paralysis by inhibiting acetylcholine release at the neuromuscular junction. When used in areas of hyperfunctional muscles, a transient partial paralysis occurs that diminishes the appearances of wrinkles, Therefore, wrinkles not attributable to hyperfunctional muscles (e.g., wrinkles caused by aging, gravity, photodamage, trauma, and scarring) will not be amenable to treatment with the toxin. As a result, proper case selection is essential. A thorough understanding of the indications, techniques, dosages, and complications and their management is imperative to achieve a satisfactory result. This article will review the pathogenesis of facial wrinkles as well as the history, techniques, clinical controversies, and other important considerations for successful treatment of facial wrinkles with Botox.

  5. Characterisation of botulinum toxins type A and B, by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation and electrospray mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, B.L.M. van; Hulst, A.G.; Jong, A.L. de; Wils, E.R.J.

    2002-01-01

    A method earlier developed for the mass spectrometric (MS) identification of tetanus toxin (TTx) was applied to botulinum toxins type A and B (BTxA and BTxB). Botulinum toxins are extremely neurotoxic bacterial toxins, likely to be used as biological warfare agent. Biologically active BTxA and BTxB

  6. Experience with botulinum toxin type A in medically intractable pediatric chronic daily headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Karman; Oas, Kimberly Hall; Mack, Kenneth J; Garza, Ivan

    2010-11-01

    In adults, botulinum toxin type A has been studied as a potentially effective treatment for chronic daily headache. For pediatric chronic daily headache, the literature evaluating efficacy of botulinum toxin type A is sparse, with no studies assessing tolerability. The purpose of this retrospective case series study was to assess tolerability and efficacy of botulinum toxin type A in the treatment of pediatric chronic daily headache. The series comprises 10 patients (ages 11-17 years) who received a standard 100-unit dose of onabotulinumtoxinA (trade name, Botox) for refractory chronic daily headache. Attention was given to therapeutic history, efficacy, and tolerability. The patients had attempted an average of 8.0 ± 2.40 S.D. therapies prior to botulinum toxin type A. Most patients reported adverse events from at least one of these prior medications. With botulinum toxin type A, four patients (40%) reported subjective but clinically meaningful relief, consisting of a decrease in headache intensity, and two patients additionally noted a decrease in headache frequency. The four responders noted improvements in quality of life. Three patients experienced minor adverse events from botulinum toxin type A. This case series suggests that botulinum toxin type A can be well tolerated and may be a useful therapeutic in pediatric patients with highly medically intractable chronic daily headache. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Botulinum toxin for spasticity in children with cerebral palsy: a comprehensive evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornson, Kristie; Hays, Ross; Graubert, Cathy; Price, Robert; Won, Francine; McLaughlin, John F; Cohen, Morty

    2007-07-01

    Spasticity is a prevalent disabling clinical symptom for children with cerebral palsy. Treatment of spasticity with botulinum toxin in children with cerebral palsy was first reported in 1993. Botulinum toxin provides a focal, controlled muscle weakness with reduction in spasticity. Interpretation of the literature is difficult because of the paucity of reliable measures of spasticity and challenges with measuring meaningful functional changes in children with disabilities. This study documents the effects of botulinum toxin A injections into the gastrocnemius muscles in children with spastic diplegia. Outcomes are evaluated across all 5 domains of the National Centers for Medical and Rehabilitation Research domains of medical rehabilitation. A randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled design was applied to 33 children with spastic diplegia with a mean age of 5.5 and Gross Motor Function Classification System Levels of I through III. Participants received either 12 U/kg botulinum toxin A or placebo saline injections to bilateral gastrocnemius muscles. Outcomes were measured at baseline and 3, 8, 12, and 24 weeks after injection. Significant decreases in the electromyographic representation of spasticity were documented 3 weeks after botulinum toxin A treatment. A significant decrease in viscoelastic aspects of spasticity was present at 8 weeks, and subsequent increases in dorsiflexion range were documented at 12 weeks for the botulinum toxin A group. Improvement was found in performance goals at 12 weeks and in maximum voluntary torque and gross motor function at 24 weeks for the botulinum toxin A. There were no significant differences between groups in satisfaction with performance goals, energy expenditure, Ashworth scores, or frequency of adverse effects. The safety profile of 12 U/kg of botulinum toxin A is excellent. Although physiologic and mechanical effects of treatment with botulinum toxin A were documented with functional improvement at 6 months

  8. Botulinum toxin for subacute/chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, Pierre; Peloso, Paul Michael J; Lowcock, Janet; Nolan, May; Weber, Jeff; Gross, Anita; Roberts, John; Goldsmith, Charles H; Graham, Nadine; Burnie, Stephen J; Haines, Ted

    2011-07-06

    Neck disorders are common, disabling and costly. Botulinum toxin (BoNT) intramuscular injections are often used with the intention of treating neck pain. To systematically evaluate the literature on the treatment effectiveness of BoNT for neck pain, disability, global perceived effect and quality of life in adults with neck pain with or without associated cervicogenic headache, but excluding cervical radiculopathy and whiplash associated disorder. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, AMED, Index to Chiropractic Literature, CINAHL, LILACS, and EMBASE from their origin to 20 September 2010. We included randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials in which BoNT injections were used to treat subacute or chronic neck pain. A minimum of two review authors independently selected articles, abstracted data, and assessed risk of bias, using the Cochrane Back Review Group criteria. In the absence of clinical heterogeneity, we calculated standardized mean differences (SMD) and relative risks, and performed meta-analyses using a random-effects model. The quality of the evidence and the strength of recommendations were assigned an overall grade for each outcome. We included nine trials (503 participants). Only BoNT type A (BoNT-A) was used in these studies.High quality evidence suggests there was little or no difference in pain between BoNT-A and saline injections at four weeks (five trials; 252 participants; SMD pooled -0.07 (95% confidence intervals (CI) -0.36 to 0.21)) and six months for chronic neck pain. Very low quality evidence indicated little or no difference in pain between BoNT-A combined with physiotherapeutic exercise and analgesics and saline injection with physiotherapeutic exercise and analgesics for patients with chronic neck pain at four weeks (two trials; 95 participants; SMD pooled 0.09 (95% CI -0.55 to 0.73)) and six months (one trial; 24 participants; SMD -0.56 (95% CI -1.39 to 0.27)). Very low quality evidence from one trial (32 participants) showed little

  9. Off Label Use of Botulinum Toxin in Children under Two Years of Age: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Druschel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of children with cerebral palsy with Botulinum Toxin is considered safe and effective, but is only approved for children older than two years of age. The effect of BoNT-A injection on juvenile skeletal muscle especially on neuromuscular junction density, distribution and morphology is poorly delineated and concerns of irreversible damage to the motor endplates especially in young children exist. In contrast, earlier treatment could be appropriate to improve the attainment of motor milestones and general motor development. This review systematically analyzes the evidence regarding this hypothesis. A database search, including PubMed and Medline databases, was performed and all randomized controlled trials (RCTs comparing the efficacy of Botulinum Toxin in children younger than two years were identified. Two authors independently extracted the data and the methods of all identified trials were assessed. Three RCTs met the inclusion criteria. The results of the analysis revealed an improvement in spasticity of the upper and lower extremities as well as in the range of motion in the joints of the lower limbs. However, evidence of an improvement of general motor development could not be found, as the assessment of this area was not completely specified for this patient group. Based on available evidence it can not be concluded that Botulinum Toxin treatment in children younger than two years improves the achievement of motor milestones. However, there is evidence for the reduction of spasticity, avoiding contractures and delaying surgery. Due to some limitations, the results of this review should be cautiously interpreted. More studies, long-term follow up independent high-quality RCTs with effectiveness analyses are needed.

  10. Primary treatment of early fistula of parotid duct with botulinum toxin type A injection*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferron, Camila; Cernea, Selma Schuartz; de Almeida, Ada Regina Trindade; Cesar, Denise Vieira Galvão

    2017-01-01

    Salivary duct injury can be idiopathic, iatrogenic, or post-trauma and may result in sialocele or fistula. Most injuries regress spontaneously and botulinum toxin A is one of several therapeutic possibilities. We report a case of iatrogenic injury to the parotid duct after Mohs' micographic surgery for a squamous cell carcinoma excision in the left jaw region, treated by injection of botulinum toxin type A. Although the fistula by duct injury can be self-limiting, botulinum toxin injection by promoting the inactivity of the salivary gland allows rapid healing of the fistula. PMID:29364451

  11. Systematic review of adjunct therapies to improve outcomes following botulinum toxin injection for treatment of limb spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Patricia Branco; Finlayson, Heather; Sudol, Malgorzata; O'Connor, Russell

    2016-06-01

    To determine the quality of evidence from randomized controlled trials on the efficacy of adjunct therapies following botulinum toxin injections for limb spasticity. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials electronic databases were searched for English language human studies from 1980 to 21 May 2015. Randomized controlled trials assessing adjunct therapies postbotulinum toxin injection for treatment of spasticity were included. Of the 268 studies screened, 17 met selection criteria. Two reviewers independently assessed risk of bias using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale and graded according to Sackett's levels of evidence. Ten adjunct therapies were identified. Evidence suggests that adjunct use of electrical stimulation, modified constraint-induced movement therapy, physiotherapy (all Level 1), casting and dynamic splinting (both Level 2) result in improved Modified Ashworth Scale scores by at least 1 grade. There is Level 1 and 2 evidence that adjunct taping, segmental muscle vibration, cyclic functional electrical stimulation, and motorized arm ergometer may not improve outcomes compared with botulinum toxin injections alone. There is Level 1 evidence that casting is better than taping, taping is better than electrical stimulation and stretching, and extracorporeal shock wave therapy is better than electrical stimulation for outcomes including the Modified Ashworth Scale, range of motion and gait. All results are based on single studies. There is high level evidence to suggest that adjunct therapies may improve outcomes following botulinum toxin injection. No results have been confirmed by independent replication. All interventions would benefit from further study. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. RESISTANCE OF GUINEA PIGS IMMUNIZED WITH BOTULINUM TOXOIDS TO AEROGENIC CHALLENGE WITH TOXIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    guinea pigs with botulinum toxoids afforded a high level of protection to challenge with botulinum toxins by the respiratory route. Resistance to challenge by this route was similar to resistance afforded to challenge by the parenteral and oral routes. The high survival percentages obtained in these studies made it impossible to establish any relationship between serum antitoxin titer and resistance to challenge. This report presents results of some studies to determine resistance afforded actively immunized guinea pigs to challenge with botulinum

  13. The Structure of the Neurotoxin- Associated Protein HA33/A from Clostridium botulinum Suggests a Reoccurring Beta-Trefoil Fold in the Progenitor Toxin Complex

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arndt, Joseph W; Gu, Jenny; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Schwarzenbacher, Robert; Hanson, Michael A; Lebeda, Frank L; Stevens, Raymond C

    2004-01-01

    The hemagglutinating protein HA33 from Clostridium botulinum is associated with the large botulinum neurotoxin secreted complexes and is critical in toxin protection, internalization, and possibly activation...

  14. Botulinum toxin type A in the healing of chronic lesion following bilateral spasticity of gluteus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigna, Emanuele; Maruccia, Michele; Fanelli, Benedetta; Scuderi, Nicolò

    2014-08-01

    Use of botulinum toxin is expanding as the clinical studies demonstrate new potential therapeutic applications. In rehabilitation, botulinum toxin is above all used as adjunct therapy for the treatment of spasticity, but it may prove useful for other atypical clinical situations. A 17-year-old man had a sub-arachnoid haemorrhage following the rupture of cerebral aneurism. The patient presented gluteus maximus and medius bilaterally spasticity that produced a chronic lesion in the intergluteal cleft, a flexed wrist and a flexed elbow. As treatment for this spasticity, a total of 100 U botulinum toxin type A were injected into the glutei muscles. This treatment allowed for application of topical medication and subsequently, chronic lesion healing. Botulinum toxin A may be an important therapeutic aid for clinicians faced with treating persistent pathological conditions caused by spasticity. © 2012 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2012 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Correction of glabellar protrusion after botulinum toxin injection for forehead wrinkles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Woo Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin blocks the release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine and helps to treat wrinkles. The efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin injection for upper facial wrinkles were established in several previous studies. Common side effects include transient headache, bruising, eyebrow ptosis and eyelid swelling. No adverse life threatening events or long-term complications have been reported. However, there have been a few reports on site-specific side effects, except for eyebrow ptosis or eyelid swelling. Two previous cases showing exaggerated glabellar wrinkles after botulinum toxin injection for forehead horizontal lines reported that no specific treatment for the exaggeration of wrinkles were done and it was left to slowly recede. In the present report, we highlighted a patient, whose significant glabellar protrusion was rapidly and effectively corrected with the use of botulinum toxin injection.

  16. Botulinum toxin treatment for limb spasticity in childhood cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito ePavone

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available CP is the most common cause of chronic disability in childhood occurring in 2 to 2.5/1000 births. It is a severe disorder and a significant number of patients present cognitive delay and difficulty in walking. The use of botulinum toxin (BTX has become a popular treatment for CP especially for spastic and dystonic muscles while avoiding deformity and pain. Moreover, the combination of physiotherapy, casting, orthotics and injection of BTX may delay or decrease the need for surgical intervention while reserving single-event, multi-level surgery for fixed musculotendinous contractures and bony deformities in older children. This report highlights the utility of BTX in the treatment of cerebral palsy in children. We include techniques for administration, side effects and possible resistance as well as specific use in the upper and lower limbs muscles

  17. Botulinum toxin type B blocks sudomotor function effectively: a 6 month follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birklein, Frank; Eisenbarth, Gabi; Erbguth, Frank; Winterholler, Martin

    2003-12-01

    This study analyzes the suppression of sweat gland activity by botulinum toxin type B. We injected botulinum toxin type B (between 2 and 1000 mouse units subcutaneously) in the lateral side of both lower legs in 15 healthy volunteers. Sweat tests were carried out before botulinum toxin type B injections, and at 3 wk, 3 mo, and 6 mo. We studied focal anhidrosis by iodine-starch staining and by capacitance hygrometry after carbachol iontophoresis, according to the quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test (QSART). Iodine starch staining indicated that a threshold dose of 8 mouse units botulinum toxin type B leads to anhidrotic skin spots (>4 cm2) after 3 wk. Duration of anhidrosis was prolonged for 3 mo when 15 mouse units and for 6 mo when 125 mouse units botulinum toxin type B were injected. The size of the anhidrotic area decreased with time (piodine-starch staining and QSART indicated that botulinum toxin type B suppresses sudomotor function effectively, in a concentration-dependent manner.

  18. A Medical Research and Evaluation Facility (MREF) and Studies Supporting the Medical Chemical Defense Program. Evaluation of the Passive Protection Against Five Serotypes of Botulinum Toxin Provided by Botulinum Human Immune Globulin in an Animal Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olson, Carl

    1998-01-01

    Pentavalent (ABCDE) botulinum toxoid vaccine is intended for use as a prophylactic measure to protect combat troops against the lethal effects of botulinum toxins A-E, a group of toxins considered to be a serious biological warfare threat...

  19. Evidence to Use Botulinum Toxin Injections in Tension-Type Headache Management: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieckiewicz, Mieszko; Grychowska, Natalia; Zietek, Marek; Wieckiewicz, Gniewko; Smardz, Joanna

    2017-11-15

    Tension-type headache (TTH) is the most common type of chronic recurring head pain. It can occur twice as often in women as in men. It is the most common type of headache. Its lifetime prevalence is 30% to 78% in the general population. TTH treatment should be multilevel. It often consists of taking pain medication, muscle relaxants, antidepressants, using biofeedback therapy, acupuncture, and attending behavioral therapy. Several clinical trials also suggest that botulinum toxin (BTX) may be an effective treatment option for such patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate if BTX can be used as a treatment method in TTH in the light of current medical literature. The authors searched the PubMed, EBSCOhost, OVID, Web of Knowledge, Cochrane Library and CINAHL databases to identify relevant publications. The authors finally included 11 papers-prospective and retrospective cohort studies. Among most of the selected studies, there was a significant correlation between using BTX and reduction of TTH pain intensity and severity. By analyzing qualified studies, it can be concluded that botulinum toxin seems to be effective in TTH management.

  20. Effect of botulinum toxin A on proliferation and apoptosis in the T47D breast cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandala, Cindy; Perez-Santos, Jose Luis Martin; Lara-Padilla, Eleazar; Delgado Lopez, Guadalupe; Anaya-Ruiz, Maricruz

    2013-01-01

    The present study was performed to assess the activity of the botulinum toxin A on breast cancer cells. The T47D cell line was exposed to diverse concentrations of the botulinum toxin A and cell viability and apoptosis were estimated using MTT and propidium iodine/annexin V methods, respectively. Botulinum toxin A exerted greater cytotoxic activity in T47D cells in comparison with MCF10A normal cells; this appeared to be via apoptotic processes caspase-3 and -7. In conclusion, botulinum toxin A induces caspase-3 and -7 dependent apoptotic processes in the T47D breast cancer cell line.

  1. Safety and Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin to Preserve Gland Function after Radiotherapy in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: A Prospective, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blinded Phase I Clinical Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Teymoortash

    Full Text Available This prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded phase I clinical trial investigates safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin (BoNT to preserve gland function after radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer. Twelve patients with advanced head and neck cancer were injected with BoNT into the submandibular glands prior to primary radiochemotherapy. Six patients received BoNT/A and 6 patients BoNT/A and B, half of each subgroup into their left and the other half into their right gland. As an internal control, sodium chloride was injected into the respective contralateral gland (placebo. For the evaluation of the salivary gland function, technetium pertechnetate salivary gland scintigraphy was performed before and after the end of radiotherapy. BoNT/A and B were well tolerated. Analysis of the scintigraphic data revealed no statistically significant difference between BoNT and placebo regarding the scintigraphic uptake difference (pBoNT/A = 0.84 and pBoNT/A-B = 0.56 for BoNT/A vs. placebo and BoNT/A-B vs. placebo, respectively. We also found no significant difference in treatment between BoNT and placebo in terms of salivary excretion fraction (pBoNT/A = 0.44; pBoNT/A-B = 0.44. This study demonstrates that BoNT can be safely combined with radiochemotherapy. Dosing and timing of BoNT injection should be further investigated for efficacy analysis. Trial Registration German Registry for Clinical Trails DRKS00004595.

  2. Safety and Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin to Preserve Gland Function after Radiotherapy in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: A Prospective, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blinded Phase I Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teymoortash, Afshin; Pfestroff, Andreas; Wittig, Andrea; Franke, Nora; Hoch, Stephan; Harnisch, Susanne; Schade-Brittinger, Carmen; Hoeffken, Helmut; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Brugger, Markus; Strauch, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    This prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded phase I clinical trial investigates safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin (BoNT) to preserve gland function after radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer. Twelve patients with advanced head and neck cancer were injected with BoNT into the submandibular glands prior to primary radiochemotherapy. Six patients received BoNT/A and 6 patients BoNT/A and B, half of each subgroup into their left and the other half into their right gland. As an internal control, sodium chloride was injected into the respective contralateral gland (placebo). For the evaluation of the salivary gland function, technetium pertechnetate salivary gland scintigraphy was performed before and after the end of radiotherapy. BoNT/A and B were well tolerated. Analysis of the scintigraphic data revealed no statistically significant difference between BoNT and placebo regarding the scintigraphic uptake difference (pBoNT/A = 0.84 and pBoNT/A-B = 0.56 for BoNT/A vs. placebo and BoNT/A-B vs. placebo, respectively). We also found no significant difference in treatment between BoNT and placebo in terms of salivary excretion fraction (pBoNT/A = 0.44; pBoNT/A-B = 0.44). This study demonstrates that BoNT can be safely combined with radiochemotherapy. Dosing and timing of BoNT injection should be further investigated for efficacy analysis. Trial Registration German Registry for Clinical Trails DRKS00004595 PMID:26991494

  3. Dynamic Model of Applied Facial Anatomy with Emphasis on Teaching of Botulinum Toxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggio, Ricardo Frota

    2017-11-01

    The use of botulinum toxin type A is considered one of the most revolutionary and promising face rejuvenation methods. Although rare, most of the complications secondary to the use of botulinum toxin A are technician dependent. Among the major shortcomings identified in the toxin administration education is unfamiliarity with applied anatomy. This article proposes the use of body painting as an innovative method of teaching the application of botulinum toxin A. Using the body painting technique, facial anatomy was represented on the face of a model showing the major muscle groups of botulinum toxin A targets. Photographic records and films were made for documentation of represented muscles at rest and contraction. Using the body painting technique, each of the muscles involved in facial expression and generation of hyperkinetic wrinkles can be faithfully reproduced on the model's face. The documentation of the exact position of the points of application, the distribution of the feature points in the muscular area, the proper angulation and syringe grip, as well as the correlation of the points of application with the presence of hyperkinetic wrinkles, could be properly registered, providing professional training with information of great practical importance, development of highly effective treatments, and low complication rates. By making it possible to interrelate anatomy of a function, body painting is proposed in the present study as an innovative method, which in a demonstrative and highly didactic manner presents great potential as a teaching tool in the application of botulinum toxin A.

  4. USE OF BOTULINUM TOXIN TYPE A IN THE TREATMENT OF SPASTICITY IN CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Lazić

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy has an incidence of about 1-2 per 1000 live births, and in spite of the progress of neonatal medicine, it seems that the incidence will not subside in the near future. The most important characteristic of cerebral palsy is movement abnormality: spasticity, chorea, athetosis, ataxia, dystonia, as well as their different combinations. About 70% of children who suffer from cerebral palsy also suffer from some form of spasticity. Spasticity is a type of muscle hypertonicity characterized by rapid increase in resistance to passive stretching of muscles. The interest for botulinum toxin application in the treatment of spasticity has dramatically increased in the last 10 years. Botulinum toxin is the most powerful neurotoxin that is found in nature. It is produced by anaerobic bacteria – clostridium botulinum. It is produced in eight serotypes of which type A is the most commonly used. Botulinum toxin blocks neuromuscular transmission and causes irreversible weakness of the treated muscle. It has been used since 1993 in the treatment of cerebral palsy in children. The toxin effect is permanent and it results in irreversible denervation. Functional recovery is possible after 2-4 months, due to sprouting of nerve endings and the formation of new synaptic contacts. Treatment with botulinum toxin is safe. Adverse effects are rare, temporary and completely reversible. Application of botulinum toxin prevents or reduces contractures and deformities, and thus delays or avoids surgical treatment. Yet, physical therapy, which prolongs and improves the effects of botulinum toxin, remains an essential and most important form of therapy in the treatment of children with cerebral palsy.

  5. Susceptibility of Skeletal Muscle to Coxsackie A2 Virus Infection: Effects of Botulinum Toxin and Denervation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Clifford G.; Drachman, Daniel B.; Pestronk, Alan; Narayan, Opendra

    1984-02-01

    Coxsackie A viruses can infect denervated but not innervated mature skeletal muscles. The role of synaptic transmission in preventing susceptibility to Coxsackievirus infection was studied by surgically denervating leg muscles of mice or injecting the muscles with botulinum toxin to block quantal release of acetylcholine. Control muscles were injected with heat-inactivated toxin. Subsequent injection of Coxsackie A2 virus resulted in extensive virus replication and tissue destruction in the denervated and botulinum toxin-treated muscles, while the control muscles showed only minimal changes. This suggests that the susceptibility of skeletal muscle to Coxsackievirus infection is regulated by synaptic transmission.

  6. Kinematic aiming task: measuring functional changes in hand and arm movements after botulinum toxin-A injections in children with spastic hemiplegia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rameckers, E.A.A.; Speth, L.A.; Duysens, J.E.J.; Vles, J.S.; Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe different aspects of a kinematic aiming task (KAT) as a quantitative way to assess changes in arm movements within 2 wks after botulinum toxin-A (BTX-A) injections in children with spastic hemiplegia. DESIGN: Intervention study randomized clinical trial; follow-up within 4 wks

  7. Botulinum Toxin Treatment of Spasticity in Adults and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeini-Naghani, Iman; Hashemi-Zonouz, Taraneh; Jabbari, Bahman

    2016-02-01

    Spasticity is a frequent symptom in stroke, multiple sclerosis, cerebral or spinal trauma, and cerebral palsy that affects and disables a large number of adults and children. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology and nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic treatments of spasticity with emphasis on the role of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs). The world literature is reviewed on double-blind and placebo-controlled clinical trials reporting safety and efficacy of BoNT treatment in adult spasticity and spasticity of children with cerebral palsy. The evidence for efficacy is presented from recommendations of the Assessment and Therapeutics subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology. A technical section describes the techniques and recommended doses of BoNTs in spasticity. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  8. Modified constraint-induced movement therapy or bimanual occupational therapy following injection of Botulinum toxin-A to improve bimanual performance in young children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy: a randomised controlled trial methods paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Use of Botulinum toxin-A (BoNT-A) for treatment of upper limb spasticity in children with cerebral palsy has become routine clinical practice in many paediatric treatment centres worldwide. There is now high-level evidence that upper limb BoNT-A injection, in combination with occupational therapy, improves outcomes in children with cerebral palsy at both the body function/structure and activity level domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Investigation is now required to establish what amount and specific type of occupational therapy will further enhance functional outcomes and prolong the beneficial effects of BoNT-A. Methods/Design A randomised, controlled, evaluator blinded, prospective parallel-group trial. Eligible participants were children aged 18 months to 6 years, diagnosed with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy and who were able to demonstrate selective motor control of the affected upper limb. Both groups received upper limb injections of BoNT-A. Children were randomised to either the modified constraint-induced movement therapy group (experimental) or bimanual occupational therapy group (control). Outcome assessments were undertaken at pre-injection and 1, 3 and 6 months following injection of BoNT-A. The primary outcome measure was the Assisting Hand Assessment. Secondary outcomes included: the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test; Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory; Canadian Occupational Performance Measure; Goal Attainment Scaling; Pediatric Motor Activity Log; modified Ashworth Scale and; the modified Tardieu Scale. Discussion The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology of a randomised controlled trial comparing the effects of modified constraint-induced movement therapy (a uni-manual therapy) versus bimanual occupational therapy (a bimanual therapy) on improving bimanual upper limb performance of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy following upper limb injection of Bo

  9. Modified constraint-induced movement therapy or bimanual occupational therapy following injection of Botulinum toxin-A to improve bimanual performance in young children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy: a randomised controlled trial methods paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imms Christine

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of Botulinum toxin-A (BoNT-A for treatment of upper limb spasticity in children with cerebral palsy has become routine clinical practice in many paediatric treatment centres worldwide. There is now high-level evidence that upper limb BoNT-A injection, in combination with occupational therapy, improves outcomes in children with cerebral palsy at both the body function/structure and activity level domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Investigation is now required to establish what amount and specific type of occupational therapy will further enhance functional outcomes and prolong the beneficial effects of BoNT-A. Methods/Design A randomised, controlled, evaluator blinded, prospective parallel-group trial. Eligible participants were children aged 18 months to 6 years, diagnosed with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy and who were able to demonstrate selective motor control of the affected upper limb. Both groups received upper limb injections of BoNT-A. Children were randomised to either the modified constraint-induced movement therapy group (experimental or bimanual occupational therapy group (control. Outcome assessments were undertaken at pre-injection and 1, 3 and 6 months following injection of BoNT-A. The primary outcome measure was the Assisting Hand Assessment. Secondary outcomes included: the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test; Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory; Canadian Occupational Performance Measure; Goal Attainment Scaling; Pediatric Motor Activity Log; modified Ashworth Scale and; the modified Tardieu Scale. Discussion The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology of a randomised controlled trial comparing the effects of modified constraint-induced movement therapy (a uni-manual therapy versus bimanual occupational therapy (a bimanual therapy on improving bimanual upper limb performance of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy following

  10. Treatment diary for botulinum toxin spasticity treatment: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Helle K.; Frederiksen, Inge M.S.; Vilhelmsen, Jeanet R.; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a treatment diary for patients receiving spasticity treatment including botulinum toxin injection and physiotherapy and/or occupational therapy. The diary focuses on problems triggered by skeletal muscle overactivity; agreed goals for treatment and the patient’s self-evaluation of achievement on the Goal Attainment Scale; which skeletal muscles were injected; physiotherapists’ and occupational therapists’ evaluation of the patients’ achievement of objectives on the Goal Attainment Scale; and proposals for optimization of treatment and changing goals. The evaluation included a satisfaction questionnaire and the WHO-QoL BREF and WHO-5 well-being score. Overall, 10 patients were enrolled in the pilot study. The patients were generally satisfied with the diary, found that it involved them more in their treatment and made it easier to set personal goals, and found it worth the time spent using it. However, no clear advantage in relation to their quality of life (WHO-QoL BREF and WHO-5 well-being score) was reported. PMID:28225535

  11. Adverse event reporting for botulinum toxin type A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, R Sonia; Dover, Jeffrey S; Arndt, Kenneth A

    2005-12-01

    A recent article published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology reviewed adverse events regarding botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) reported to the Food and Drug Administration between 1989 and 2003. Although postmarketing surveillance is a vital mechanism to ensure drug safety, the events reported in this paper must be considered in context to be appropriately interpreted. The majority of data was related to therapeutic rather than cosmetic use. The proportion of serious adverse events was 33-fold higher for therapeutic use and no deaths were reported after cosmetic use. The data were derived from a spontaneous reporting system and do not include assessments of causality between the BTX-A and purported adverse events. The report notes that over a third of these events were related to off-label use of BTX-A, a common practice in dermatology, yet no significant differences were reported in rates of adverse events between on-label and off-label use. The report reflects a favorable safety profile for cosmetic use of BTX-A, and if misinterpreted, could lead to unreasonable conclusions regarding a product considered to be highly safe and effective.

  12. Unilateral transient mydriasis and ptosis after botulinum toxin injection for a cosmetic procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akkaya S

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sezen Akkaya,1 Hatice Kübra Kökcen,1 Tuğba Atakan2 1Fatih Sultan Mehmet Education and Training Hospital, Ophthalmology Clinics, Bostanci, Istanbul, 2Aksaray Hospital, Ophthalmology Clinics, Konya, Turkey Abstract: We report a case of unilateral transient mydriasis and ptosis after botulinum toxin injection applied by a medical doctor for a cosmetic procedure. A 36-year-old nurse was referred to our eye clinic with unilateral mydriasis and ptosis in the right eye 3 days after botulinum toxin injection for a cosmetic procedure. Botulinum toxin was applied to her eye by a doctor at her hospital who was not an ophthalmologist. She was treated with topical apraclonidine 0.5% ophthalmic solution. Her ptosis decreased to 2 mm with apraclonidine and her visual axis improved. Mydriasis was present for 3 weeks and then disappeared. Mild ptosis continued for 3 months, then resolved completely. Patients seeking treatment with botulinum toxin A for cosmetic purposes should be warned about the possibility of ptosis and mydriasis after injection. If these side effects are seen, the patient must be referred to an ophthalmologist for appropriate management. Keywords: botulinum toxin, mydriasis, ptosis

  13. The innovative therapeutic application of botulinum toxin type A in urology patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrysoula Belai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the history of medical science the use of botulinum toxin was impressive. In the early 18th century it was defined as the neurotoxin implicated in the deadly disease botulism. Today, despite the toxic action finds application in the treatment of various diseases in a wide range of Medicine. Its use in urology was revolutionary in the treatment of neurogenic bladder, refractory idiopathic detrusor overactivity and other painful syndromes. The purpose of this review was to describe the treatment option of intravesical injection of botulinum toxin, in diseases of the urinary tract. The review showed that after many test applications under the experimental studies, the botulinum toxin type A has already established itself as the new treatment of choice after failure of conservative drug dealing in patients with neuro-urological symptoms of lower urinary tract. Cases of application of botulinum toxin in Urology are related to overactive bladder, neurogenic or idiopathic etiology, as bladder pain syndrome and chronic pelvic pain syndrome. According to the guidelines of the European Union directives Urology, the intravesical botulinum toxin injections are the most effective, minimally invasive treatment which results in reducing neurogenic hyperactivity of detrusor. In conclusion, this is a safe, easy and effective method that can be applied by health professionals, helping improve patients’ quality of life with neuro-urological diseases.

  14. In situ detection of the Clostridium botulinum type C1 toxin gene in wetland sediments with a nested PCR assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Judy L.; Rocke, Tonie E.; Aiken, Judd M.

    1999-01-01

    A nested PCR was developed for detection of the Clostridium botulinum type C1 toxin gene in sediments collected from wetlands where avian botulism outbreaks had or had not occurred. The C1 toxin gene was detected in 16 of 18 sites, demonstrating both the ubiquitous distribution of C. botulinum type C in wetland sediments and the sensitivity of the detection assay.

  15. Hemagglutinin gene shuffling among Clostridium botulinum serotypes C and D yields distinct sugar recognition of the botulinum toxin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Keita; Suzuki, Tomonori; Hayashi, Shintaro; Miyashita, Shin-Ichiro; Ohyama, Tohru; Niwa, Koichi; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Sagane, Yoshimasa

    2015-10-01

    Clostridium botulinum strains produce a large-sized toxin complex (TC) that is composed of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), non-toxic non-hemagglutinin and three different hemagglutinins (HA-70, HA-33 and HA-17). HA components enhance toxin delivery across the intestinal cell wall in a sugar chain-dependent manner. Here we characterized the sugar recognition of serotype D strain 1873 (D-1873) botulinum L-TC. Most L-TCs produced by serotype C and D strains bind to cells via interactions between HA-33 and cell surface sialo-oligosaccharides. However, like the previously reported L-TC produced by serotype C strain Yoichi (C-Yoichi), D-1873 L-TC binds only to cells that have been treated with neuraminidase, indicating that they recognize asialo-oligosaccharides. The D-1873 HA-33 amino acid sequence is similar to that of C-Yoichi, but had lower similarity to the majority of serotype C and D HA-33s. A comparison of TC component primary structures for 12 serotype C and D strains suggested that at least three types of HA-33 genes exist, and these are shuffled among the serotype C and D strains independently of BoNT serotype. This shuffling produces the distinct sugar recognition of serotype C and D botulinum TCs. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Use of botulinum toxin-A for musculoskeletal pain in patients with whiplash associated disorders [ISRCTN68653575

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Francisco J

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whiplash associated disorder is commonly linked to motor vehicle accidents and sports injuries. Cervical injury is attributed to rapid extension followed by neck flexion. The exact pathophysiology of whiplash is uncertain but probably involves some degree of aberrant muscle spasms and may produce a wide range of symptoms. The most commonly prescribed pharmacological agents for initial treatment of whiplash-associated pain are oral muscle relaxants and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. However, potential systemic adverse effects limit these agents. Physical interventions such as mobilization, manipulation, and exercises have proved beneficial for pain and dysfunction but only on a time-limited basis. Little evidence suggests that physical therapy specifically aimed at the musculature (e.g., transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, ultrasonography, heat, ice, and acupuncture improves prognosis in acute whiplash associated disorder. A new approach to treatment is the use of botulinum toxin, which acts to reduce muscle spasms. Methods/design This is a prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial and botulinum toxin-A (Botox® injections will be compared with placebo injections. The primary objective is to determine the efficacy of Botox® in the management of musculoskeletal pain in whiplash associated disorders. Discussion Botulinum toxin type-A toxin has been studied in small trials on whiplash associated disorder patients and has generally been found to relieve pain and improve range of motion. Specifically, we seek to assess the efficacy of Botox® in reducing pain and to improve the cervical spine range of movement, during the 6-month trial period.

  17. The use of botulinum toxin for the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Orasanu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 50 years, botulinum toxin has been transformed from a cause of life-threatening disease to an effective medical therapy. It has been used in a variety of specialties for different indications, significantly improving patient quality of life. A recent growing body of evidence suggests that intra-detrusor injection of botulinum toxin may have beneficial effects in patients with medication refractory detrusor overactivity and may offer a new minimally invasive alternative to patients with severe overactive bladder symptoms. To review current data regarding the effects of botulinum toxin in patients with overactive bladder, a MEDLINE® /PubMed® literature search was carried out. The mechanism of action, clinical usage, adverse effects, and treatment efficacy were reviewed and the results are presented in this paper.

  18. Botulinum toxin in the management of sialorrhoea in acquired brain injury

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, A

    2016-06-01

    Sialorrhoea as a consequence of severe acquired brain injury can significantly negatively impact on quality of life. Medications used in its management have many side effects which can cause problems in the severely disabled. Botulinum toxin is an effective treatment of sialorrhoea in a number of neurological conditions but may also have a role to play in the management of sialorrhoea following severe ABI. We report on 4 cases of sialorrhoea following acquired brain injury causing a variety of problems, whose parotid glands were injected with Botulinum toxin type A (Dysport) 50mu each, under ultrasound guidance. All cases had a clinically and statistically significant reduction in drooling as measured by the teacher drooling scale (p=0.005) and carers Visual Analogue Scale (p=0.012). There were no side effects reported. Botulinum toxin is an effective treatment for sialorrhoea associated with acquired brain injury.

  19. Arrangement of the Clostridium baratii F7 toxin gene cluster with identification of a σ factor that recognizes the botulinum toxin gene cluster promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dover, Nir; Barash, Jason R; Burke, Julianne N; Hill, Karen K; Detter, John C; Arnon, Stephen S

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is the most poisonous substances known and its eight toxin types (A to H) are distinguished by the inability of polyclonal antibodies that neutralize one toxin type to neutralize any of the other seven toxin types. Infant botulism, an intestinal toxemia orphan disease, is the most common form of human botulism in the United States. It results from swallowed spores of Clostridium botulinum (or rarely, neurotoxigenic Clostridium butyricum or Clostridium baratii) that germinate and temporarily colonize the lumen of the large intestine, where, as vegetative cells, they produce botulinum toxin. Botulinum neurotoxin is encoded by the bont gene that is part of a toxin gene cluster that includes several accessory genes. We sequenced for the first time the complete botulinum neurotoxin gene cluster of nonproteolytic C. baratii type F7. Like the type E and the nonproteolytic type F6 botulinum toxin gene clusters, the C. baratii type F7 had an orfX toxin gene cluster that lacked the regulatory botR gene which is found in proteolytic C. botulinum strains and codes for an alternative σ factor. In the absence of botR, we identified a putative alternative regulatory gene located upstream of the C. baratii type F7 toxin gene cluster. This putative regulatory gene codes for a predicted σ factor that contains DNA-binding-domain homologues to the DNA-binding domains both of BotR and of other members of the TcdR-related group 5 of the σ70 family that are involved in the regulation of toxin gene expression in clostridia. We showed that this TcdR-related protein in association with RNA polymerase core enzyme specifically binds to the C. baratii type F7 botulinum toxin gene cluster promoters. This TcdR-related protein may therefore be involved in regulating the expression of the genes of the botulinum toxin gene cluster in neurotoxigenic C. baratii.

  20. The Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin A Intramuscular Injections in After-Stroke Spasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek Karaçam

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Spasticity is a common dysfunction in stroke patients. It hinders the performance of everyday living activities and lowers the quality of life. In this study, it was aimed to investigate the effects of botulinum toxin A therapy on various aspects, such as muscle tone, pain, daily living activities and disability. METHODS: Fifteen patients with stroke presenting with focal spasticity in the botulinum toxin outpatient unit were evaluated. Results before and after treatment were evaluated by applying different scales. Modified Ashworth Scale was applied for the severity of spasticity. The Medical Council Research Scale was used to test muscle power, and the disability scoring scale, Visual Analogue Pain Scale and Barthel index were the other measures tested. RESULTS: It was found that therapy with botulinum toxin A was effective in spasticity. The increased muscle tone and the disability scores decreased prominently after the treatment (p< 0.05. Lower values in pain scores (p< 0.05 also contributed to better functional outcome (p< 0.01. Along with the significantly good outcome according to the scales, the higher scores in quality of life, feeling of well-being, good performance during the physiotherapy sessions, and less medications needed for spasticity were also indications in commencing the therapy of botulinum toxin A in spasticity. CONCLUSION: Spasticity is a complicated condition causing serious disability. Botulinum toxin A is a preferred therapy when there is an increased motor activity. The effects of the agent are reversible and reliable. The duration of the treatment is long-lasting. Since botulinum toxin A is easily applied and the outcome in focal spasticity is favorable, it is recommended as the first-line choice in the treatment of focal spasticity.

  1. The Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin A Intramuscular Injections in After-Stroke Spasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek Karaçam

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Spasticity is a common dysfunction in stroke patients. It hinders the performance of everyday living activities and lowers the quality of life. In this study, it was aimed to investigate the effects of botulinum toxin A therapy on various aspects, such as muscle tone, pain, daily living activities and disability. METHODS: Fifteen patients with stroke presenting with focal spasticity in the botulinum toxin outpatient unit were evaluated. Results before and after treatment were evaluated by applying different scales. Modified Ashworth Scale was applied for the severity of spasticity. The Medical Council Research Scale was used to test muscle power, and the disability scoring scale, Visual Analogue Pain Scale and Barthel index were the other measures tested. RESULTS: It was found that therapy with botulinum toxin A was effective in spasticity. The increased muscle tone and the disability scores decreased prominently after the treatment (p< 0.05. Lower values in pain scores (p< 0.05 also contributed to better functional outcome (p< 0.01. Along with the significantly good outcome according to the scales, the higher scores in quality of life, feeling of well-being, good performance during the physiotherapy sessions, and less medications needed for spasticity were also indications in commencing the therapy of botulinum toxin A in spasticity. CONCLUSION: Spasticity is a complicated condition causing serious disability. Botulinum toxin A is a preferred therapy when there is an increased motor activity. The effects of the agent are reversible and reliable. The duration of the treatment is long-lasting. Since botulinum toxin A is easily applied and the outcome in focal spasticity is favorable, it is recommended as the first-line choice in the treatment of focal spasticity

  2. Botulinum Toxin for the Treatment of Gummv Smile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fouzan, Afnan F; Mokeem, Lamia S; Al-Saqat, Reem T; Alfalah, Maisa A; Alharbi, Mana A; Al-Samary, Abdullah E

    2017-06-01

    The aim was to evaluate the effect of botulinum toxin (Botox) injections as a conservative treatment for gummy smile. An experimental in vivo study was conducted at a dermatology clinic in Riyadh in January 2016. The study included 23 female patients who ranged from 20 to 50 years and were treated with Botox injections due to excessive maxillary gingival display. The patients with short clinical crowns or long maxilla, those who were pregnant or breastfeeding, and patients with neuromuscular disorders were excluded. Patients received Botox type I, injected 3 mm lateral to the alar-fascial groove at the level of the nostril opening at the insertion of the levator labii superioris alaeque nasi muscle. Photos were taken of the patient's smile before and after the treatment and were then uploaded to the SketchUp program to calculate improvements in gingival display. The distance from the lower margin of the upper lip to the gingival margin was calculated pre- and posttreatment. The amount of improvement was calculated as (pre-Botox treatment - post-Botox treatment/pre-Botox treatment × 100). The mean percentage of the total improvement was analyzed. A total of 23 female patients received treatment to improve their gummy smile. Improvement was clear 2 weeks after Botox injection. The mean percentage of improvement in the gingival display was 99.6%. Botox type I is an effective conservative technique to improve gummy smile caused by muscular hyperfunction. Patients' retention highly indicated that they were satisfied with the provided treatment by Botox injections. Improving the quality of life with least painful experience and immediate results was the major advantage for Botox type I.

  3. Factors influencing botulinum toxin dose instability in spasmodic dysphonia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosow, David E; Pechman, Amanda; Saint-Victor, Sandra; Lo, Kaming; Lundy, Donna S; Casiano, Roy R

    2015-05-01

    Many patients with spasmodic dysphonia (SD) see consistent effects from botulinum toxin (BTX) injections of the same dose, whereas others require dosage changes over time. We sought to determine whether demographics (age and gender) or environmental factors (smoking) affect the long-term stability of BTX dosing in these patients. Retrospective review. Charts of all patients undergoing BTX injection for adductor SD were reviewed. Dosage change, defined as whether there was any difference in total dosage used between two beneficial injections, was used as a measure of dosing stability. Beneficial injections were indicated by a voice rating score of at least three of four and any non-zero duration of improved voice. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine whether age, gender, smoking status, or duration of treatment correlated with odds of having a dosage change. A total of 211 patients were ultimately included. Age, gender, and smoking status were all found to have no correlative effect on dosing stability. The only factor that was predictive of dose stability was the number of previous beneficial injections, as every additional injection led to decreased odds of a change in dosage for the next injection (odds ratio=0.964; 95% confidence interval=0.947-0.981). Dosage of BTX injections for long-term treatment of SD has a significant propensity to remain stable over time. Factors such as age, gender, and smoking status do not appear to influence the dosage stability. These findings should allow for better patient counseling regarding expectations for their long-term treatment. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Botulinum Toxin Type A as a Therapeutic Agent against Headache and Related Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siro Luvisetto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A is a toxin produced by the naturally-occurring Clostridium botulinum that causes botulism. The potential of BoNT/A as a useful medical intervention was discovered by scientists developing a vaccine to protect against botulism. They found that, when injected into a muscle, BoNT/A causes a flaccid paralysis. Following this discovery, BoNT/A has been used for many years in the treatment of conditions of pathological muscle hyperactivity, like dystonias and spasticities. In parallel, the toxin has become a “glamour” drug due to its power to ward off facial wrinkles, particularly frontal, due to the activity of the mimic muscles. After the discovery that the drug also appeared to have a preventive effect on headache, scientists spent many efforts to study the potentially-therapeutic action of BoNT/A against pain. BoNT/A is effective at reducing pain in a number of disease states, including cervical dystonia, neuropathic pain, lower back pain, spasticity, myofascial pain and bladder pain. In 2010, regulatory approval for the treatment of chronic migraine with BoNT/A was given, notwithstanding the fact that the mechanism of action is still not completely elucidated. In the present review, we summarize experimental evidence that may help to clarify the mechanisms of action of BoNT/A in relation to the alleviation of headache pain, with particular emphasis on preclinical studies, both in animals and humans. Moreover, we summarize the latest clinical trials that show evidence on headache conditions that may obtain benefits from therapy with BoNT/A.

  5. Progress on Botulinum Toxin Type A-Induced Pain Relief in the Field of Plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaona; Chen, Guocheng; Ren, Pengjie; Yang, Yan; Fan, Fei

    2017-11-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the effectiveness of Botulinum Toxin Type A (BTX-A) injections relieve pain in the field of plastic surgery and postoperative rehabilitation, and discuss the analgesic mechanism of BTX- A in plastics and related research progress. From appearance to September 1, 2016, PUBMED, EMBASE, and Web of Science were searched, using the key words related to "Botulinum Toxin Type A" and "Pain." Furtherly, nonplastic surgery-related literature was excluded by manual screening. Eleven literatures met the inclusion criteria, including 6 prospective controlled cohorts, 4 patient series, and 1 retrospective cohort. These studies involved Lower Limb, Breast, Hallux, Amputees, and Temporomandibular joint disk disfigurement and enrolled 402 patients. Among the patients, 360 received intraoperative BTX-A injection at the time of the main surgical procedure, 16 injected postoperatively and 26 did not undergo surgery. And 85.32% reported pain alleviation and 69.96% got favorable side effects and no one occurred major adverse effects. But 1.83% accepted injections more than once. Mechanism analysis explained these studies' results and demonstrated the analgesic effectiveness of BTX-A in plastics with nociceptive pain, inflammatory pain, and neuropathic pain. The results suggest that BTX-A may induce postoperative pain associated with plastic surgeries relief. But the available data of outcome assessment involved in this review are inconsistent and failed to meet methodological rigor. And pain alleviations are influenced by many factors. So further randomized controlled clinical trials with large sample sizes are needed to support this practice, determine standard usage methods, and establish corresponding specification systems.

  6. Attempts to identify Clostridium botulinum toxin in milk from three experimentally intoxicated Holstein cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, R.B.; Puschner, B.; Walker, R.L.; Rocke, T.E.; Smith, S.R.; Cullor, J.S.; Ardans, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Three adult lactating Holstein cows were injected in the subcutaneous abdominal vein with 175 ng/kg of body weight of Clostridium botulinum type C toxin (451 cow median toxic doses) to determine if this botulinum toxin crosses the blood–milk barrier. Whole blood (in sodium heparin) and clotted blood serum samples were taken at 0 min, 10 min, and 3, 6, 9, and 12 h postinoculation. Milk samples were taken at 0 min and at 3, 6, 9 and 12 h postinoculation. All samples were tested for the presence of the toxin using the mouse bioassay and immunostick ELISA test. The immunostick ELISA identified the toxin in whole blood and the mouse bioassay identified the toxin in serum at all times examined in all 3 animals. Toxin was not identified by either detection method in milk samples collected from the 3 animals. From these results, it appears that Clostridium botulinum type C toxin does not cross from the blood to the milk in detectable concentrations.

  7. Evaluation of neutralizing antibodies to type A, B, E, and F botulinum toxins in sera from human recipients of botulinum pentavalent (ABCDE) toxoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, L S

    1989-08-01

    Twenty-five serum specimens from personnel immunized with botulinum pentavalent toxoid (ABCDE) had titers of neutralizing antibodies to type A (5.7 to 51.6 IU/ml), type B (0.75 to 18 IU/ml), and type E (0.61 to 10 IU/ml) botulinum toxins. Titers for one type could not be used to predict titers for another type in individuals receiving the toxoid. Cross-neutralizing antibodies to type F botulinum toxin were not detected (less than 0.0125 IU/ml).

  8. A simplified method for smile enhancement: botulinum toxin injection for gummy smile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucupira, Eduardo; Abramovitz, Abraham

    2012-09-01

    The authors studied and provided treatment to patients with the complaint of gummy smile. Between October of 2009 and January of 2011, 52 unaesthetic smiles were evaluated and treated with onabotulinum toxin A. Botulinum toxin injection was an effective treatment, with an average satisfaction level of 9.75 on a 10-point scale. The levator labii superioris alaeque nasi is the ideal muscle for injection, and lopsided smiles could be resolved also with onabotulinum toxin A asymmetric injection. Gummy smile treatment with onabotulinum toxin A into the levator labii superioris alaeque nasi muscle is an effective method, with minimum risk of complications and very high patient satisfaction.

  9. Tetanus: Pathophysiology, Treatment, and the Possibility of Using Botulinum Toxin against Tetanus-Induced Rigidity and Spasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørnar Hassel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetanus toxin, the product of Clostridium tetani, is the cause of tetanus symptoms. Tetanus toxin is taken up into terminals of lower motor neurons and transported axonally to the spinal cord and/or brainstem. Here the toxin moves trans-synaptically into inhibitory nerve terminals, where vesicular release of inhibitory neurotransmitters becomes blocked, leading to disinhibition of lower motor neurons. Muscle rigidity and spasms ensue, often manifesting as trismus/lockjaw, dysphagia, opistotonus, or rigidity and spasms of respiratory, laryngeal, and abdominal muscles, which may cause respiratory failure. Botulinum toxin, in contrast, largely remains in lower motor neuron terminals, inhibiting acetylcholine release and muscle activity. Therefore, botulinum toxin may reduce tetanus symptoms. Trismus may be treated with botulinum toxin injections into the masseter and temporalis muscles. This should probably be done early in the course of tetanus to reduce the risk of pulmonary aspiration, involuntary tongue biting, anorexia and dental caries. Other muscle groups are also amenable to botulinum toxin treatment. Six tetanus patients have been successfully treated with botulinum toxin A. This review discusses the use of botulinum toxin for tetanus in the context of the pathophysiology, symptomatology, and medical treatment of Clostridium tetani infection.

  10. Tetanus: Pathophysiology, Treatment, and the Possibility of Using Botulinum Toxin against Tetanus-Induced Rigidity and Spasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, Bjørnar

    2013-01-01

    Tetanus toxin, the product of Clostridium tetani, is the cause of tetanus symptoms. Tetanus toxin is taken up into terminals of lower motor neurons and transported axonally to the spinal cord and/or brainstem. Here the toxin moves trans-synaptically into inhibitory nerve terminals, where vesicular release of inhibitory neurotransmitters becomes blocked, leading to disinhibition of lower motor neurons. Muscle rigidity and spasms ensue, often manifesting as trismus/lockjaw, dysphagia, opistotonus, or rigidity and spasms of respiratory, laryngeal, and abdominal muscles, which may cause respiratory failure. Botulinum toxin, in contrast, largely remains in lower motor neuron terminals, inhibiting acetylcholine release and muscle activity. Therefore, botulinum toxin may reduce tetanus symptoms. Trismus may be treated with botulinum toxin injections into the masseter and temporalis muscles. This should probably be done early in the course of tetanus to reduce the risk of pulmonary aspiration, involuntary tongue biting, anorexia and dental caries. Other muscle groups are also amenable to botulinum toxin treatment. Six tetanus patients have been successfully treated with botulinum toxin A. This review discusses the use of botulinum toxin for tetanus in the context of the pathophysiology, symptomatology, and medical treatment of Clostridium tetani infection. PMID:23299659

  11. Neurorehabilitation with versus without resistance training after botulinum toxin treatment in children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandholm, Thomas Quaade; Jensen, Bente Rona; Nielsen, Lone M

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of physical rehabilitation with (PRT) and without (CON) progressive resistance training following treatment of spastic plantarflexors with botulinum toxin type A (BoNT) in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Methods: Fourteen children with CP performed supervised...

  12. European consensus table on the use of botulinum toxin type A in adult spasticity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissel, J.; Ward, A.B.; Erztgaard, P.; Bensmail, D.; Hecht, M.J.; Lejeune, T.M.; Schnider, P.; Altavista, M.C.; Cavazza, S.; Deltombe, T.; Duarte, E.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Gracies, J.M.; Haboubi, N.H.; Juan, F.J.; Kasch, H.; Katterer, C.; Kirazli, Y.; Manganotti, P.; Parman, Y.; Paternostro-Sluga, T.; Petropoulou, K.; Prempeh, R.; Rousseaux, M.; Slawek, J.; Tieranta, N.

    2009-01-01

    A group of clinicians from across Europe experienced in the use of botulinum toxin type A for the treatment of spasticity following acquired brain injury gathered to develop a consensus statement on best practice in managing adults with spasticity. This consensus table summarizes the current

  13. Effect of a clown's presence at botulinum toxin injections in children: a randomized, prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kjaersgaard; Kibæk, Maria; Martinussen, Torben

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the presence of a hospital clown during pediatric procedures has rarely been evaluated. In a pediatric ward, botulinum toxin injection is a painful procedure and a stressful experience for the child. We undertook a study of the effect of the presence of a hospital clown on children...

  14. Effect of Botulinum Toxin and Surgery among Spasmodic Dysphonia Patients : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Esch, Babette F; Wegner, Inge; Stegeman, Inge; Grolman, Wilko

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The effect of botulinum toxin among patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (AdSD) is temporary. To optimize long-term treatment outcome, other therapy options should be evaluated. Alternative treatment options for AdSD comprise several surgical treatments, such as thyroarytenoid

  15. Sensory integration in writer's cramp: comparison with controls and evaluation of botulinum toxin effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Contarino, M. F.; Kruisdijk, J. J. M.; Koster, L.; Ongerboer de Visser, B. W.; Speelman, J. D.; Koelman, J. H. T. M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Abnormal temporal and spatial sensory integration have been described in mixed groups of dystonic patients. We tested somatosensory integration and the effect of botulinum toxin (BoNT) in patients with writer's cramp (WC). METHODS: Median and ulnar SEPs were recorded in 29 WC patients and

  16. Cellular uptake of Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin requires oligomerization and acidification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barth, H; Blocker, D; Behlke, J; Bergsma-Schutter, W; Brisson, A; Benz, R; Aktories, K

    2000-01-01

    The actin-ADP-ribosylating binary Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin consists of two individual proteins, the binding/translocation component C2II and the enzyme component C2I. To elicit its cytotoxic action, C2II binds to a receptor on the cell surface and mediates cell entry of C2I via

  17. Age-related botulinum toxin effects on muscle fiber conduction velocity in non-injected muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, Fiete; van Weerden, Tiemen W.; van der Hoeven, Johannes H.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: We studied systemic effects of botulinum toxin (BTX) treatment on muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) and possible effects of age. Methods: MFCV was determined by an invasive EMG method in the biceps brachii muscle. Seventeen BTX treated patients and 58 controls were investigated. BTX

  18. Comparative observation of type A botulinum toxin inhibiting the postoperative scar formation of epicanthus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hong Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To study the efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin type A in inhibiting scar formation of epicanthus. METHODS: Patients with epicanthus received by our plastic department from March 2012 to March 2014 were chosen and randomly divided into two groups: Treatment group, 39 patients injected botulinum toxin immediately after surgery; Control group, 42 patients received correction of epicanthus without injection of botulinum toxin. Two experienced plastic surgeons evaluate the scar of patients in each group 6mo after the surgery by using internationally recommended OSAS scar evaluation questionnaire from color, smoothness, elasticity and scar width. The scar of two groups in 1 and 6mo after surgery were assessed respectively and statistical analysis was done. RESULTS: Four patients in the treatment group and 6 patients in the control group were lost to follow-up, while the others were on regular follow-up and evaluation. The postoperative scar scoring in color, smoothness, elasticity and scar width had statistical significance compared to the control group in 1mo after surgery(PP>0.05, but in the smoothness and scar width(PPCONCLUSION: Botulinum toxin can not only reduce the short-term postoperative scar formation and inflammatory reaction itching and pain to a certain extent, but also achieve long-term flat appearance of incision and reduce the risk of scarring, which deserves an application in clinical practice.

  19. Comparison of Effects of Botulinum Toxin Injection Between Subacute and Chronic Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Young-Ho; Choi, Eun-Hi; Lim, Jong Youb

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of botulinum toxin injection between subacute and chronic stroke patients. Eighteen stroke patients (9 subacute and 9 chronic) with spasticity of 1+ or higher in the hemiplegic elbow or wrist joint, based on the modified Ashworth scale were recruited. Modified Ashworth scale, modified Tardieu scale, manual muscle testing, passive range of motion, Brunnstrom stage, modified Barthel index, and Fugl-Meyer scale evaluations of the hemiplegic upper extremity were performed just before the injection and 4 weeks later. A total dose of 200 U of botulinum toxin type A was injected into each patient. One or more of the elbow flexor muscles and one or more of the wrist flexor or finger flexor muscles were included. Modified Ashworth scale, manual muscle testing, passive range of motion, and modified Barthel index results were improved in subacute patients only. However, modified Tardieu scale for the elbow and Fugl-Meyer scale results were improved in both groups, and the improvement was comparable. In conclusion, botulinum toxin injection in subacute patients was more helpful for spasticity, contracture, and function than in chronic patients. However, beneficial effects of botulinum toxin injection on spasticity and function in chronic patients were found in the assessments of the modified Tardieu scale and Fugl-Meyer scale.

  20. Detection of botulinum toxin types A, B, E, and F activity using the quail embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    We recently demonstrated an effective new model for the detection of botulinum toxin type A using quail embryos in place of the mouse model. These experiments demonstrated that the Japanese quail embryo at 15 days of incubation was an effective vertebrate animal model to detect the activity of botu...

  1. Dynamic Model of Applied Facial Anatomy with Emphasis on Teaching of Botulinum Toxin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Frota Boggio, MD, PhD

    2017-11-01

    Conclusion:. By making it possible to interrelate anatomy of a function, body painting is proposed in the present study as an innovative method, which in a demonstrative and highly didactic manner presents great potential as a teaching tool in the application of botulinum toxin A.

  2. The use of botulinum toxin type A in cosmetic facial procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers, G. W. C.; Pijpe, J.; Jansma, J.

    Over the past decade, facial cosmetic procedures have become more commonplace ill dentistry and oral and maxillofacial surgery. An increasing number of patients seek minimal invasive procedures. One of the most requested procedures is treatment with botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA). Treatment of

  3. Thickened Saliva after Effective Management of Drooling with Botulinum Toxin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasmus, Corrie E.; van Hulst, Karen; van den Hoogen, Frank J. A.; van Limbeek, Jacques; Roeleveld, Nel; Veerman, Enno C. I.; Rotteveel, Jan J.; Jongerius, Peter H.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the rheological properties of saliva after submandibular botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injections. Method: We enrolled 15 children (11 males and six females; age range 3-17y, mean age 9y 10mo) diagnosed with spastic (n=9) or dyskinetic (n=6) quadriplegic cerebral palsy (CP); Gross Motor Function…

  4. The Mechanism of the Beneficial Effect of Botulinum Toxin Type a Used in the Treatment of Temporomandibular Joints Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malgorzata, Pihut; Piotr, Ceranowicz; Edward, Kijak

    2017-01-01

    In the course of temporomandibular joint, dysfunctions very often occur to the excessive increase in tension of masticatory muscles, so the main aim of the treatment is reduction of this hypertension of muscles. For this reason, we use botulinum toxin type A, which is produced by Grampositive Clostridium bacteria. There are six serotypes of the toxin: A, B, C, D, E, F, and G. The botulinum toxin type A was first isolated in 1920s. Today, botulinum toxin type A is used increasingly more often as an efficient and patient-friendly therapy in neurology, ophthalmology, neurology, urology and laryngology. The aim of the article was to review the literature and description of the current knowledge concerned with mechanism of action of botulinum toxin type A, clinical applications and metabolic determinants of muscle contraction and the beneficial effect of this drug on the state of muscle tension. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Botulinum Toxin-induced Muscle Paralysis Inhibits Heterotopic Bone Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausk, Brandon J; Gross, Ted S; Bain, Steven D

    2015-09-01

    Short-term muscle atrophy induced by botulinum toxin A (BTxA) has been observed to impair osteogenesis in a rat closed femur fracture model. However, it is unclear whether the underlying mechanism is a direct effect of BTxA on muscle-bone interactions or an indirect effect that is driven by skeletal unloading. Because skeletal trauma in the closed fracture model also leads to disuse atrophy, we sought to mitigate this confounding variable by examining BTxA effects on muscle-bone interactions in two complementary in vivo models in which osteogenesis is induced in the absence of skeletal unloading. The overall aim of this study was to identify a potential strategy to inhibit pathological bone formation and heterotopic ossification (HO). (1) Does muscle paralysis inhibit periosteal osteogenesis induced by a transcortical defect? (2) Does muscle paralysis inhibit heterotopic bone formation stimulated by intramuscular bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) injection? Focal osteogenesis was induced in the right hindlimb of mice through surgical initiation of a small transcortical defect in the tibia (fracture callus; n = 7/group) or intramuscular injection of BMP-2 (HO lesion; n = 6/group), both in the presence/absence of adjacent calf paralysis. High-resolution micro-CT images were obtained in all experimental groups 21 days postinduction and total volume (ie, perimeter of periosteal callus or HO lesion) and bone volume (calcified tissue within the total volume) were quantified as primary outcome measures. Finally, these outcome measures were compared to determine the effect of muscle paralysis on inhibition of local osteogenesis in both studies. After a transcortical defect, BTxA-treated mice showed profound inhibition of osteogenesis in the periosteal fracture callus 21 days postsurgery compared with saline-treated mice (total volume: 0.08 ± 0.06 versus 0.42 ± 0.11 mm(3), p paralysis at the same time point (total volume: 1.42 ± 0.31 versus 3.42 ± 2.11 mm(3), p = 0

  6. Botulinum Toxin Confers Radioprotection in Murine Salivary Glands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeidan, Youssef H., E-mail: zeidan@miami.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Xiao, Nan; Cao, Hongbin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Kong, Christina [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu; Sirjani, Davud [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: Xerostomia is a common radiation sequela, which has a negative impact on the quality of life of patients with head and neck cancer. Current treatment strategies offer only partial relief. Botulinum toxins (BTX) have been successfully used in treating a variety of radiation sequelae such as cystitis, proctitis, fibrosis, and facial pain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of BTX on radiation-induced salivary gland damage. Methods and Materials: We used a previously established model for murine salivary gland irradiation (IR). The submandibular glands (SMGs) of C5BL/6 mice (n=6/group) were injected with saline or BTX 72 hours before receiving 15 Gy of focal irradiation. Saliva flow was measured 3, 7, and 28 days after treatment. The SMGs were collected for immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy, and Western blotting. A cytokine array consisting of 40 different mouse cytokines was used to evaluate cytokine profiles after radiation treatment. Results: Irradiated mice showed a 50% reduction in saliva flow after 3 days, whereas mice preinjected with BTX had 25% reduction in saliva flow (P<.05). Cell death detected by TUNEL staining was similar in SMG sections of both groups. However, neutrophil infiltrate, detected by myeloperoxidase staining, was 3-fold lower for the BTX treated mice. A cytokine array showed a 2-fold upregulation of LPS-induced chemokine (LIX/CXCL5) 3 days after IR. BTX pretreatment reduced LIX levels by 40%. At 4 weeks after IR, the saline (control) group showed a 40% reduction in basal SMG weight, compared with 20% in the BTX group. Histologically, BTX-pretreated glands showed relative preservation of acinar structures after radiation. Conclusions: These data suggest that BTX pretreatment ameliorates radiation-induced saliva dysfunction. Moreover, we demonstrate a novel role for CXCL5 in the acute phase of salivary gland damage after radiation. These results carry important clinical implications for the treatment of

  7. Regulation of Botulinum Neurotoxin Synthesis and Toxin Complex Formation by Arginine and Glucose in Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrick, Chase M; Lin, Guangyun; Johnson, Eric A

    2017-07-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), produced by neurotoxigenic clostridia, is the most potent biological toxin known and the causative agent of the paralytic disease botulism. The nutritional, environmental, and genetic regulation of BoNT synthesis, activation, stability, and toxin complex (TC) formation is not well studied. Previous studies indicated that growth and BoNT formation were affected by arginine and glucose in Clostridium botulinum types A and B. In the present study, C. botulinum ATCC 3502 was grown in toxin production medium (TPM) with different levels of arginine and glucose and of three products of arginine metabolism, citrulline, proline, and ornithine. Cultures were analyzed for growth (optical density at 600 nm [OD 600 ]), spore formation, and BoNT and TC formation by Western blotting and immunoprecipitation and for BoNT activity by mouse bioassay. A high level of arginine (20 g/liter) repressed BoNT production approximately 1,000-fold, enhanced growth, slowed lysis, and reduced endospore production by greater than 1,000-fold. Similar effects on toxin production were seen with equivalent levels of citrulline but not ornithine or proline. In TPM lacking glucose, levels of formation of BoNT/A1 and TC were significantly decreased, and extracellular BoNT and TC proteins were partially inactivated after the first day of culture. An understanding of the regulation of C. botulinum growth and BoNT and TC formation should be valuable in defining requirements for BoNT formation in foods and clinical samples, improving the quality of BoNT for pharmaceutical preparations, and elucidating the biological functions of BoNTs for the bacterium. IMPORTANCE Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is a major food safety and bioterrorism concern and is also an important pharmaceutical, and yet the regulation of its synthesis, activation, and stability in culture media, foods, and clinical samples is not well understood. This paper provides insights into the effects of critical

  8. Channels Formed by Botulinum, Tetanus, and Diphtheria Toxins in Planar Lipid Bilayers: Relevance to Translocation of Proteins across Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, David H.; Romero-Mira, Miryam; Ehrlich, Barbara E.; Finkelstein, Alan; Dasgupta, Bibhuti R.; Simpson, Lance L.

    1985-03-01

    The heavy chains of both botulinum neurotoxin type B and tetanus toxin form channels in planar bilayer membranes. These channels have pH-dependent and voltage-dependent properties that are remarkably similar to those previously described for diphtheria toxin. Selectivity experiments with anions and cations show that the channels formed by the heavy chains of all three toxins are large; thus, these channels could serve as ``tunnel proteins'' for translocation of active peptide fragments. These findings support the hypothesis that the active fragments of botulinum neurotoxin and tetanus toxin, like that of diphtheria toxin, are translocated across the membranes of acidic vesicles.

  9. Primary hyperhidrosis: Implications on symptoms, daily life, health and alcohol consumption when treated with botulinum toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayesteh, Alexander; Boman, Jens; Janlert, Urban; Brulin, Christine; Nylander, Elisabet

    2016-08-01

    Primary hyperhidrosis affects approximately 3% of the population and reduces quality of life in affected persons. Few studies have investigated the symptoms of anxiety, depression and hazardous alcohol consumption among those with hyperhidrosis and the effect of treatment with botulinum toxin. The first aim of this study was to investigate the effect of primary hyperhidrosis on mental and physical health, and alcohol consumption. Our second aim was to study whether and how treatment with botulinum toxin changed these effects. One hundred and fourteen patients answered questionnaires regarding hyperhidrosis and symptoms, including hyperhidrosis disease severity scale (HDSS), visual analog scale (VAS) 10-point scale for hyperhidrosis symptoms, hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS), alcohol use disorder identification test (AUDIT) and short-form health survey (SF-36) before treatment with botulinum toxin and 2 weeks after. The age of onset of hyperhidrosis was on average 13.4 years and 48% described heredity for hyperhidrosis. Significant improvements were noted in patients with axillary and palmar hyperhidrosis regarding mean HDSS, VAS 10-point scale, HADS, SF-36 and sweat-related health problems 2 weeks after treatment with botulinum toxin. Changes in mean AUDIT for all participants were not significant. Primary hyperhidrosis mainly impairs mental rather than physical aspects of life and also interferes with specific daily activities of the affected individuals. Despite this, our patients did not show signs of anxiety, depression or hazardous alcohol consumption. Treatment with botulinum toxin reduced sweat-related problems and led to significant improvements in HDSS, VAS, HADS and SF-36 in our patients. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  10. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-04-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins.

  11. Successful use of botulinum toxin a in intractable, severe muscle spasms in spinal cord injury: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri A Lokapur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin is a protein produced by Clostridium botulinum, which inhibits muscle contraction by transiently blocking the release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction. At a neuromuscular junction, the toxin inactivates some of the fusion proteins, such as SNAP-25, syntaxin, or synaptobrevin, which are essential for cellular function. This process involves the temporary inhibition of presynaptic acetylcholine release; consequently, its effects are restricted to motor neurons that depend on the cholinergic transmission (muscular plate, gland innervating cells. Injections of botulinum toxin A have been shown to be useful in the treatment of etiologically diverse types of muscle spasms. Ultrasonography (USG has been used as a guide for confirming muscle fasciculations and also is an effective tool for confirming precise needle positioning and correct drug placement. We describe a case of a 25-year-old man with meningomyelocele and paraparesis with painful muscle spasms in bilateral thighs treated by USG-guided botulinum toxin injection.

  12. Study on PotentialClostridium BotulinumGrowth and Toxin Production in Parma Ham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merialdi, Giuseppe; Ramini, Mattia; Parolari, Giovanni; Barbuti, Silvana; Frustoli, Maria Angela; Taddei, Roberta; Pongolini, Stefano; Ardigò, Paolo; Cozzolino, Paolo

    2016-04-19

    The objective of this study was to investigate Clostridium botulinum growth and toxin production in the industrially manufactured Italian Parma ham. The study focuses on the Parma ham production phase identified as maximum risk to C. botulinum proliferation, i.e . the transition from cold phase (salting and resting) to a phase carried out at temperature between 15 and 23°C (drying). A preliminary in vitro test was carried out in order to verify the capability of 6 C. botulinum strains (1 type A, 4 type B, and 1 type E strains) to grow in conditions of temperature, pH and NaCl concentration comparable to those of the beginning stage of ham drying. Five C. botulinum strains grew at 20°C and pH 6, four strains produced toxin when inoculated at a concentration equal to 10 3 cfu/mL at NaCl concentration of 4%, while when the inoculum concentration was 10 cfu/mL, NaCl concentration of 3% resulted the toxin-genesis limiting factor. An experimental contamination with a mixture of the 5 C. botulinum strains selected by the preliminary in vitro test was performed on 9 thighs inoculated at the end of the resting phase. The study was designed to evaluate the potential growth and toxin production in extremely favourable conditions for the bacterium. Type B proteolytic C. botulinum toxin was produced after 14 days of incubation at 20°C in 2 thighs characterised by high weight, low number of days of resting and anomalous physiochemical characteristics [one for very low NaCl concentration (1.59%), the other for elevated pH (6.27) and both for high water activity values (>0.970)]. The results of this research confirm that the cold resting step is a critical phase in the production process of Parma ham for the investigated hazard. Based on the present study, the long resting phase adopted in the manufacturing of Parma ham is proven effective to prevent the growth of C. botulinum , an event which could not otherwise be excluded if the hams were processed under less stringent

  13. Multipoint and multilevel injection technique of botulinum toxin A in facial aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iozzo, Ivano; Tengattini, Vera; Antonucci, Valentina A

    2014-06-01

    Botulinum toxin represents one of the most frequently requested cosmetic procedures. We treated 223 patients with facial wrinkles using a new technique of injection of botulinum toxin A (BTA) called multipoint and multilevel injection technique (MMIT). The aim of MMIT was to relax the muscle and not paralyze it. Patient satisfaction was evaluated by Facial Line Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (FTSQ). Treatment with botulinum toxin determined a good response in all patients. Facial rhytids were completely resolved in case of young skin and well reduced in case of aged skin, leaving a natural aspect both in static and dynamic wrinkles. Patient mean overall satisfaction evaluated with FTSQ was 6.4 ± 1.1. In our experience, the use of botulin toxin by MMIT consents a better calibration of action with a soft and natural result. This can be achieved by distributing the BTA dose through various injection points for each area ("multipoint injections"). Furthermore, injections can be performed at different levels ("multilevel injections"). The level of injections regulates the potency of effect on the muscle: if the level is deep (intramuscular), the effect will be strong while if it is medium or superficial (subcutaneous and intradermal), the effect will be soft. This consents a fine calibration of action on muscle activity with a personal aesthetic result. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Botulinum toxin injection for restrictive myopathy of thyroid-associated orbitopathy: success rate and predictive factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Mohammad Reza; Ameri, Ahmad; Keshtkar Jaafari, Ali Reza; Mirmohammadsadeghi, Arash

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the rate of and predictive factors for successful treatment of restrictive myopathy in thyroid-associated orbitopathy (TAO) using botulinum toxin injection. Twenty patients with restrictive myopathy of TAO were enrolled in the study. Abnormal thyroid function test results were not a prerequisite for inclusion. In each extraocular muscle 25 units of botulinum toxinA were injected. The success rate, calculated at 2 years or last follow-up before surgery, was defined as proportion of the cases with esotropia of extorsion (P = 0.01). In the multivariate logistic regression, only lower amount of hypotropia was significantly associated with the success (P = 0.09, OR = 1.36). Botulinum toxin injection can be an effective alternative for the treatment of the restrictive myopathy in TAO. The best candidates for injection of the toxin are patients with esotropia, smaller angle of horizontal and vertical deviations, and lower degree of extorsion. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Potential therapeutic effect of intravesical botulinum toxin type A on bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhang, Jia-Fong; Jiang, Yuan-Hong; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2014-04-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is characterized by bladder pain associated with urgency, frequency, nocturia, dysuria and sterile urine. Recent studies have shown that these bladder dysfunctions could originate from chronic inflammation or urothelial insult and proceed to a cascade of tissue reactions, which finally ascends to the central nervous system. Pilot studies of intravesical injection of botulinum toxin type A for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis had been introduced since 2005 with a promising result. Recent evidence suggests that botulinum toxin type A could significantly improve symptoms such as daytime frequency, nocturia, pain, quality of life and bladder capacity in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis patients. Single injection of botulinum toxin could not achieve long-term successful therapeutic result, and repeat injections could provide a better long-term success rate. However, patients with ulcer type bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis might not gain a benefit from botulinum toxin type A injection. Laboratory evidence showed that botulinum toxin type A for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis injection could induce peripheral desensitization, reduces bladder chronic inflammation and decreases apoptotic signal molecules in the urothelium. The present article reviewed the recent advances of botulinum toxin type A on bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  16. Treatment Efficacy of Electromyography versus Fiberscopy-Guided Botulinum Toxin Injection in Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia Patients: A Prospective Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Wook; Park, Jae Hong; Park, Ki Nam; Lee, Seung Won

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. This study prospectively evaluates and compares the treatment efficacy of botulinum toxin injection under electromyography guidance (EMG group) and percutaneous botulinum toxin injection under flexible fiberscopic guidance (fiberscopy group). Methods. Thirty patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD), who had never received treatment, were randomly allocated into EMG- or fiberscopy-guided botulinum toxin injections between March 2008 and February 2010. We assessed acoustic and aerodynamic voice parameters, and the voice handicap index (VHI) before injection and at 1, 3, and 6 months after injection. Results. The mean total dosage of botulinum toxin was similar for both groups: 1.7 ± 0.5 U for the EMG group and 1.8 ± 0.4 U for the fiberscopy group (P > 0.05). There were no significant differences in outcomes between the two groups in either the duration of effectiveness or complications such as breathy voice and aspiration. Conclusion. Botulinum toxin injection under fiberscopic guidance is a viable alternative to EMG-guided botulinum toxin injection for the treatment of adductor spasmodic dysphonia when EMG equipment is unavailable. PMID:25383369

  17. Treatment Efficacy of Electromyography versus Fiberscopy-Guided Botulinum Toxin Injection in Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia Patients: A Prospective Comparative Study

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    Jae Wook Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study prospectively evaluates and compares the treatment efficacy of botulinum toxin injection under electromyography guidance (EMG group and percutaneous botulinum toxin injection under flexible fiberscopic guidance (fiberscopy group. Methods. Thirty patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD, who had never received treatment, were randomly allocated into EMG- or fiberscopy-guided botulinum toxin injections between March 2008 and February 2010. We assessed acoustic and aerodynamic voice parameters, and the voice handicap index (VHI before injection and at 1, 3, and 6 months after injection. Results. The mean total dosage of botulinum toxin was similar for both groups: 1.7 ± 0.5 U for the EMG group and 1.8 ± 0.4 U for the fiberscopy group (P>0.05. There were no significant differences in outcomes between the two groups in either the duration of effectiveness or complications such as breathy voice and aspiration. Conclusion. Botulinum toxin injection under fiberscopic guidance is a viable alternative to EMG-guided botulinum toxin injection for the treatment of adductor spasmodic dysphonia when EMG equipment is unavailable.

  18. Effect of Cultured Celery Juice, Temperature, and Product Composition on the Inhibition of Proteolytic Clostridium botulinum Toxin Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Max C; Wanless, Brandon J; David, Jairus R D; Kottapalli, Bala; Lineback, D Scott; Talley, Ryan J; Glass, Kathleen A

    2017-08-01

    Clostridium botulinum may be of concern in prepared refrigerated meals, for which strict cold chain management cannot be guaranteed. This study evaluated the effect of temperature, product composition, and cultured celery juice powder (CCJP) as a source of nitrite on the inhibition of botulinum toxin formation in two experimental (meat- and vegetable-based) prepared meals. Data obtained from the challenge study were compared with a published mathematical model to determine whether the model is fail-safe with regard to the tested meals. Treatments were inoculated with proteolytic C. botulinum, vacuum packaged, cooked at 90°C for 10 min, and assayed for botulinum toxin at appropriate intervals in samples stored at 10, 15, or 20°C for up to 8 weeks. None of the treatments stored at 10°C for 8 weeks supported toxin production by proteolytic C. botulinum. The addition of CCJP delayed toxin production by 1 and 3 weeks in cauliflower potatoes and in Dijon pork, respectively, stored at 15°C. Toxin production was delayed by 1 week at 20°C when CCJP was added to the cauliflower potatoes. This study found that the predictive model was fail-safe but was overly conservative for the experimental meals described. Finally, this study confirms that product composition, the addition of nitrite via CCJP, storage time, and temperature play important roles in the inhibition of toxin formation by proteolytic C. botulinum.

  19. Characterisation of botulinum toxins type C, D, E, and F by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation and electrospray mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, B.L.M. van; Hulst, A.G.; Jong, A.L. de; Wils, E.R.J.

    2004-01-01

    In a follow-up of the earlier characterisation of botulinum toxins type A and B (BTxA and BTxB) by mass spectrometry (MS), types C, D, E, and F (BTxC, BTxD, BTxE, BTxF) were now investigated. Botulinum toxins are extremely neurotoxic bacterial toxins, likely to be used as biological warfare agent.

  20. A Monoclonal Antibody Based Capture ELISA for Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype B: Toxin Detection in Food

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    Larry H. Stanker

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Botulism is a serious foodborne neuroparalytic disease, caused by botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT, produced by the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Seven toxin serotypes (A–H have been described. The majority of human cases of botulism are caused by serotypes A and B followed by E and F. We report here a group of serotype B specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs capable of binding toxin under physiological conditions. Thus, they serve as capture antibodies for a sandwich (capture ELISA. The antibodies were generated using recombinant peptide fragments corresponding to the receptor-binding domain of the toxin heavy chain as immunogen. Their binding properties suggest that they bind a complex epitope with dissociation constants (KD’s for individual antibodies ranging from 10 to 48 × 10−11 M. Assay performance for all possible combinations of capture-detector antibody pairs was evaluated and the antibody pair resulting in the lowest level of detection (L.O.D., ~20 pg/mL was determined. Toxin was detected in spiked dairy samples with good recoveries at concentrations as low as 0.5 pg/mL and in ground beef samples at levels as low as 2 ng/g. Thus, the sandwich ELISA described here uses mAb for both the capture and detector antibodies (binding different epitopes on the toxin molecule and readily detects toxin in those food samples tested.

  1. Botulinum Toxin Treatment of Autonomic Disorders: Focal Hyperhidrosis and Sialorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosp, Christine; Naumann, Markus K; Hamm, Henning

    2016-02-01

    Primary focal hyperhidrosis is a common autonomic disorder that significantly impacts quality of life. It is characterized by excessive sweating confined to circumscribed areas, such as the axillae, palms, soles, and face. Less frequent types of focal hyperhidrosis secondary to underlying causes include gustatory sweating in Frey's syndrome and compensatory sweating in Ross' syndrome and after sympathectomy. Approval of onabotulinumtoxinA for severe primary axillary hyperhidrosis in 2004 has revolutionized the treatment of this indication. Meanwhile further type A botulinum neurotoxins like abobotulinumtoxinA and incobotulinumtoxinA, as well as the type B botulinum neurotoxin rimabotulinumtoxinB are successfully used off-label for axillary and various other types of focal hyperhidrosis. For unexplained reasons, the duration of effect differs considerably at different sites. Beside hyperhidrosis, botulinum neurotoxin is also highly valued for the treatment of sialorrhea affecting patients with Parkinson's disease, cerebral palsy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, motor neuron disease, and other neurologic conditions. With correct dosing and application, side effects are manageable and transient. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. Combined Effect Of Botulinum Toxin And Splinting On Motor Components And Function Of People With Stroke

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    Aryan Shamili

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Spasticity is one of the problems following stroke. Due to this increase in muscle tone, patients are confronted to problems in motor control and difficulties in activities of daily living and complications such as shortness and contracture. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of Simultaneous use of both splint and botulinum toxin-A (BTX-A injection on spasticity, range of motion and upper extremity function in a 3-month period. Methods: The design of this study was a comparison between 3 groups of interventions, conducted in rehabilitation clinics in Tehran. Sixty people with chronic stroke were recruited. Based on the inclusion criteria, a total of 39 stroke patients after completing the consent forms were entered to intervention groups; splint or botulinum toxin injection or combined splint/botulinum toxin injection. They were followed up about 3 months and the evaluations were done monthly. Goniometry was the method to measure range of motion, and Modified Ashworth scale was used to examine the spasticity and the upper extremity function was scored based on Fugl-Meyer assessment.   Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 17. And ANOVAs was used for comparison between groups and times.  Significance was set at 0.05. Results: All outcome measures improved within each group but the differences between splint group and BTX-A group and the BTX-A-splint group was not significant in most outcomes during 3 periods (first evaluation until end of the first month, the end of first month until the end of second month, the end of second month until the end of the third month (p> 0 / 05. The results also showed that the changes in elbow`s spasticity {p= 0.05} and wrist`s spasticity {p= 0.007} and upper extremity function { p = 0.04} were obvious between the three groups over the 3-months and the difference in the group of combined use of botulinum toxin and splint was more than other groups. Conclusion: In this

  3. Botulinum toxin for treating unilateral apraxia of eyelid opening in a patient with congenital myotonia

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    Estrella Fernández

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT A 37-year-old female presented with severe apraxia of lid opening (ALO affecting the right upper lid associated with Becker congenital myotonia (MC. The patient had a history of right upper lid ptosis for 25 years that was exacerbated over the previous month with severe incapacity to open her right eye. No other associated neurological or ophthalmic symptoms were observed. The patient was treated with botulinum toxin (BoNT-A injection into the pretarsal and lateral canthus region of the orbicularis oculi of the affected eyelid. Treatment with BoNT-A is an effective method of managing ALO in Becker MC. This is the first case of unilateral ALO in the course of Becker MC that was successfully treated with injections of botulinum toxin.

  4. Botulinum toxin for treating unilateral apraxia of eyelid opening in a patient with congenital myotonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Estrella; Latasiewicz, Marta; Pelegrin, Laura; Romera, Manuel; Schellini, Silvana; Galindo-Ferreiro, Alicia

    2017-01-01

    A 37-year-old female presented with severe apraxia of lid opening (ALO) affecting the right upper lid associated with Becker congenital myotonia (MC). The patient had a history of right upper lid ptosis for 25 years that was exacerbated over the previous month with severe incapacity to open her right eye. No other associated neurological or ophthalmic symptoms were observed. The patient was treated with botulinum toxin (BoNT-A) injection into the pretarsal and lateral canthus region of the orbicularis oculi of the affected eyelid. Treatment with BoNT-A is an effective method of managing ALO in Becker MC. This is the first case of unilateral ALO in the course of Becker MC that was successfully treated with injections of botulinum toxin.

  5. The use of botulinum toxin in head and face medicine: An interdisciplinary field

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    Laskawi Rainer

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this review article different interdisciplinary relevant applications of botulinum toxin type A (BTA in the head and face region are demonstrated. Patients with head and face disorders of different etiology often suffer from disorders concerning their musculature (example: synkinesis in mimic muscles or gland-secretion. This leads to many problems and reduces their quality of life. The application of BTA can improve movement disorders like blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm, synkinesis following defective healing of the facial nerve, palatal tremor, severe bruxism, oromandibular dystonias hypertrophy of the masseter muscle and disorders of the autonomous nerve system like hypersalivation, hyperlacrimation, pathological sweating and intrinsic rhinitis. Conclusion The application of botulinum toxin type A is a helpful and minimally invasive treatment option to improve the quality of life in patients with head and face disorders of different quality and etiology. Side effects are rare.

  6. BOTULINUM TOXIN A FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF INTERSTITIAL CYSTITIS/BLADDER PAIN SYNDROME

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    V. L. Medvedev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome is a chronic and debilitating condition that negatively impacts quality of life. Several causes have been postulated in the pathogenesis of this condition; however, the etiology remains unknown. Interstitial сystitis may go undiagnosed for many years because the condition often co-exists with other chronic pain syndromes. Furthermore, the symptoms of Bladder Pain Syndrome vary considerably across patients, therefore no one treatment has shown to be consistently effective in providing relief. Thus, the goal of management of interstitial сystitis remains to provide relief of symptoms in order to improve a patient’s quality of life. intravesical Botulinum toxin A is emerging as a potential new pharmacologic treatment for interstitial сystitis refractory to conventional treatment modalities. The aim of our short review is to assess the efficacy of intravesical Botulinum toxin A in Bladder Pain Syndrome.

  7. Management of gummy smile with Botulinum Toxin Type-A: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinker, Sudeeptha; Anitha, A; Sorake, Abhinay; Kumar, Kishore

    2014-02-01

    A 23 year old female patient presented with the chief complaint of gummy smile after previously undergoing Orthodontic treatment. Patient had a straight profile with competent lips and during posed and unposed smile the patient exhibited excessive gingival display. Since the patient was unwilling to undergo Orthodontic treatment and apprehensive about surgical procedures, this problem was addressed by injecting Botulinum toxin type-A as an alternative treatment approach. Two weeks post treatment; on follow up examination, improved results were seen without any side effects. As a result, an attractive and confident smile was perceived by the patient. How to cite the article: Dinker S, Anitha A, Sorake A, Kumar K. Management of gummy smile with Botulinum Toxin Type-A: A case report. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):111-5.

  8. The botulinum toxin legend of Reinhard Heydrich's death: The end of "Himmler's brain".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatu, Laurent; Jost, Wolfgang; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2017-07-04

    The high-ranking German Nazi Reinhard Heydrich (1904-1942) was one of the main organizers of the mass murder of Jews during the Second World War. He died on June 4, 1942, in Prague after having been wounded in Operation Anthropoid planned by the British intelligence services. Since the 1970s and 1980s, Heydrich's death has been frequently presented in British, American, and French literature as the consequence of a bacteriologic attack. Botulinum toxin would have been used in the grenades or ammunition. We discuss the botulinum toxin hypothesis using the now declassified British archives of Operation Anthropoid and of the chemical and bacteriologic warfare centers to assess this hypothesis. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  9. Efficacy and Safety of IncobotulinumtoxinA in Subjects Previously Treated with Botulinum Toxin versus Toxin-Naïve Subjects with Cervical Dystonia

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    Hubert Fernandez

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: To determine whether botulinum toxin treatment history affected the outcomes of a study comparing the safety and efficacy of incobotulinumtoxinA with placebo in subjects with cervical dystonia (CD.Methods: This was a prospective, double‐blind, randomized, placebo‐controlled, multicenter trial in botulinum toxin‐treated or toxin‐naïve CD subjects. Subjects received a fixed dose of either 120 U or 240 U of incobotulinumtoxinA or placebo. The primary outcome measure was change from baseline to Week 4 in the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS total score. Treatment‐emergent adverse events (TEAEs were also evaluated. This report represents a subgroup analysis of botulinum toxin‐treated or toxin‐naïve subjects.Results: Participants (N = 233; 38.6% toxin‐naïve had a mean age of 52.8 years. IncobotulinumtoxinA significantly improved TWSTRS total scores from baseline to Week 4 in both dose groups versus placebo, and the improvement persisted through the end of the study (≤20 weeks. Both the previously toxin‐treated and toxin‐naïve subjects demonstrated significant improvements in TWSTRS total scores at Week 4 compared to baseline. The most frequent TEAEs in the incobotulinumtoxinA groups were dysphagia, neck pain, and muscular weakness, which were generally mild. TEAEs were more common in the 240 U group and toxin‐naïve subjects. Discussion: Overall, incobotulinumtoxinA was safe and effective in CD, regardless of toxin therapy history. A lower starting dose may be better tolerated among toxin‐naïve subjects without sacrificing efficacy.

  10. An Open Study of Botulinum-A Toxin Treatment of Idiopathic Trigeminal Neuralgia

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    Karim Nikkhah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Trigeminal Neuralgia (TN is a unilateral, recurrent, sharp facial pain disorder that is limited to the distribution of divisions of the trigeminal nerve. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BTX-A for alleviating the frequency and severity of TN pain. Materials and Methods: This trial was performed as a before and after study. We treated 31 patients (15 male and 16 female with mean age of 52 year old that their diagnosis was made at least 4.5 years before. We injected BTX-A in various parts of face and particularly in the origin of mandibular and maxillary branches of trigeminal nerve. Injection volume was determined by the necessity and pain intensity measured with visual analog scale up to 100U. Patients were evaluated before and after the injection and were followed after week, and each month, for a three months period. Other related variables were recorded such as: toxin complications, pain status variations by brushing, chewing, cold weather and patient’s satisfaction with their therapy. Results: showed that after injection, pain intensity and frequency decreased after tooth brushing, chewing and cold weather (P

  11. Effects of botulinum toxin A therapy with electrical stimulation on spastic calf muscles in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Bo-Sung; Bang, Moon Suk; Jung, Se Hee

    2007-11-01

    To assess the additive effect of adjuvant electrical stimulation on botulinum toxin A injection in children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy. Eighteen children with dynamic foot equinus deformity were treated with botulinum toxin A injection into the calf muscles. Seven children were assigned to a treatment group who received botulinum toxin A and adjuvant electrical stimulation, and 11 children were assigned to a control group with botulinum toxin injection only. Before botulinum injection, and at 2 wks and 3 mos after injection, the Physician Rating Scale, passive ranges of ankle and knee motion, and the modified Ashworth scale were measured. A significant increase in passive range of ankle motion was observed at 2 wks after injection in the treatment group and at 3 mos after injection in both groups. Both groups showed significant improvements by the modified Ashworth scale at 2 wks after injection. Subscales of the Physician Rating Scale (equinus foot, crouched gait) and total Physician Rating Scale scores were significantly improved in the treatment group at 3 mos after injection, but this was not observed in the control group. Adjuvant electrical stimulation for a short period after botulinum toxin A injection was found to benefit early improvement of range of motion and maintenance of gait improvement in children with spastic diplegia cerebral palsy showing dynamic equinus.

  12. Increased botulinum toxin type A dosage is more effective in patients with Frey's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2002-04-01

    To compare the duration of effect of two dosage regimes of botulinum toxin A to treat patients with Frey's syndrome. Prospective study of two unselected cohorts of 20 patients each. The dimension of the affected skin area was determined with Minors iodine-starch test. The skin was infiltrated with botulinum toxin type A (Dysport, Ipsen Pharma, Ettlingen, Germany) using an interinjection distance of 1 cm. In the first group, a concentration of 10 mount units (MU)/0.1 mL and in the second group a concentration of 20 MU/0.1 mL was used. At each injection site, 0.1 mL of the respective solution was injected. The outcome measures were the time of reappearance of gustatory sweating, and the results of an iodine-starch test 10 and 20 months after treatment. Using the lower concentration, the mean duration of effectiveness was 8.3 +/- 2 months (mean +/- standard deviation). Using the higher concentration, the effect was much longer at 16.5 +/- 6 months. Eighty-five percent of the first group but only 5% of the second had a positive Minor's iodine-starch test 10 months after treatment. After 20 months four patients in the second group still had a negative iodine-starch test. In both groups, the amount of required botulinum toxin for the second treatment after recurrence of Frey's syndrome was the same as for the first treatment. Using a higher concentration of botulinum toxin type A (20 MU Dysport/0.1 mL) is more effective than a lower concentration (10 MU Dysport/0.1 mL) in the treatment of Frey's syndrome.

  13. Preliminary Experience with Botulinum Toxin Type A Intracutaneous Injection for Frey's Syndrome

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    Chen-Chi Wang

    2005-10-01

    Conclusion: Intracutaneous injection of botulinum toxin type A is a highly reliable, effective, safe, and minimally invasive treatment for gustatory sweating. Some patients had long-lasting therapeutic results. We recommend it as a valuable treatment option for severe cases of gustatory sweating. However, in our experience, it had no effect on facial skin flushing. Therefore, in addition to acetylcholine, there might be other neurotransmitters that are responsible for skin vasodilatation.

  14. Improvement of diabetic autonomic gustatory sweating by botulinum toxin type A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restivo, D A; Lanza, S; Patti, F; Giuffrida, S; Marchese-Ragona, R; Bramanti, P; Palmeri, A

    2002-12-24

    Fourteen diabetic subjects with gustatory sweating were treated by intracutaneous injections of botulinum toxin type A into the affected facial skin areas. In all subjects, sweating (measured by Minor starch iodine test) ceased within 4 days, with the maximal follow-up time lasting 24 weeks. This therapeutic approach, which could be used to reduce the severity of diabetic gustatory sweating, appears to be long lasting, adverse effect free, and minimally invasive.

  15. Intramuscular nerve distribution patterns of anterior forearm muscles in children: a guide for botulinum toxin injection

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Fangjiu; Zhang, Xiaoming; Xie, Xiadan; Yang, Shengbo; Xu, Yan; Xie, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BoNT) can relieve muscle spasticity by blocking axon terminals acetylcholine release at the motor endplate (MEP) and is the safest and most effective agent for the treatment of muscle spasticity in children with cerebral palsy. In order to achieve maximum effect with minimum effective dose of BoNT, one needs to choose an injection site as near to the MEP zone as possible. This requires a detailed understanding about the nerve terminal distributions within the muscles targeted...

  16. The swallowing side effects of botulinum toxin type A injection in spasmodic dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, S E; Ludlow, C L

    1996-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BOTOX) injection of the thyroarytenoid muscle is used to control speech symptoms in patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia. Transient difficulty in swallowing liquids is a common treatment side effect. Laryngeal movement durations were measured during swallowing in 13 adductor spasmodic dysphonia patients undergoing treatment and in 6 normal control subjects in order to determine the following: 1. whether, prior to the injection, laryngeal movement durations were longer in the spasmodic dysphonia patients than in the control subjects; 2. whether movement durations increased following the injections; 3. whether preinjection swallowing difficulties related to postinjection swallowing measurements and postinjection patient reports of swallowing problems. A piezoelectric movement transducer was shown to be accurate for noninvasive measurement of laryngeal movement duration in relation to muscle onset and offset for hyoid elevation and relaxation. Before botulinum toxin type A injection, no significant differences in swallowing duration were found between the patient and control groups. Four patients with swallowing complaints prior to injection had longer laryngeal movement durations than the other spasmodic dysphonia patients and the control subjects. Following injection, laryngeal movement durations increased in the patients with spasmodic dysphonia, and eight patients reported dysphagia for an average of 2 weeks. Relationships were found between the patients' initial reports of swallowing problems and increased laryngeal movement durations before and after botulinum toxin type A injection. Those patients initially reporting swallowing difficulties had severe dysphagia for 2 weeks after the injection. Patient reports of dysphagia prior to injection may indicate a greater likelihood of significant dysphagia following thyroarytenoid injection with botulinum toxin type A.

  17. Comparison of Effects of Botulinum Toxin Injection Between Subacute and Chronic Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Young-Ho; Choi, Eun-Hi; Lim, Jong Youb

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to compare the effects of botulinum toxin injection between subacute and chronic stroke patients. Eighteen stroke patients (9 subacute and 9 chronic) with spasticity of 1+ or higher in the hemiplegic elbow or wrist joint, based on the modified Ashworth scale were recruited. Modified Ashworth scale, modified Tardieu scale, manual muscle testing, passive range of motion, Brunnstrom stage, modified Barthel index, and Fugl-Meyer scale evaluations of the hemipleg...

  18. Diagnosis and management with botulinum toxin in 11 cases of laryngeal synkinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekue, Asier; García-López, Isabel; Santiago, Susana; Del Palacio, Antonio; Gavilán, Javier

    2015-09-01

    Laryngeal synkinesis is a vocal fold movement disorder produced by a misdirected reinnervation after a recurrent laryngeal nerve injury. Its symptoms differ greatly between patients, requiring diverse therapeutical approaches. We aim to describe our experience in the diagnosis and treatment of different laryngeal synkinesis presentations. 11 patients diagnosed between 2011 and 2014 in a tertiary referral center with laryngeal synkinesis confirmed by laryngeal electromyography were included in our study. All medical records and laryngoscopic and electromyographic data were reviewed retrospectively. Four patients had previous unilateral vocal fold palsy and seven had a bilateral palsy with different degrees of clinical involvement. All of them showed paradoxical movements during inhalation in videofibrolaryngoscopic examination. Laryngeal electromyography confirmed the diagnosis of laryngeal synkinesis. Dyspnea was the main presentation symptom. Three patients with mild symptoms were not treated. Patients with unilateral vocal fold immobility were successfully treated with periodic botulinum toxin injections. Patients with bilateral immobility had a good initial response to botulinum toxin, although in some of them, a posterior cordectomy had to be finally performed. In conclusion, laryngeal synkinesis is a heterogeneous clinic entity that appears in patients with unilateral or bilateral vocal fold paralysis. Videofibrolaryngoscopy and laryngeal electromyography are essential to a correct diagnosis. Botulinum toxin injections are the main treatment for symptomatic cases, even if in bilateral palsy cases more aggressive treatments are often required.

  19. A Beautician’s Dystonia: Long-Lasting Effect of Botulinum Toxin

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    Siria Di Martino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment options for dystonia are not curative but symptomatic; the treatment of choice for focal dystonias is repeated botulinum toxin injections. Here, we present the case of a 46-year-old beautician with focal dystonia in her left hand that affected her ability to work. Pharmacological treatment with clonazepam and gabapentin failed to resolve her symptoms and was discontinued due to side effects (sleepiness, gastrointestinal disorders. Intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin (incobotulinumtoxinA, Xeomin into the extensor digitorum communis (35 U, flexor carpi radialis (35 U, and flexor digitorum superficialis (30 U muscles resulted in complete resolution of symptoms at clinical assessments at 1, 3, 6, and 10 months after the injections, confirmed by the results of surface electromyography 10 months after treatment. The patient was able to work again 1 month after treatment. No reinjection has been necessary at the last evaluation (12 months after treatment. In conclusion, botulinum toxin is an effective treatment for focal dystonia that can have long-lasting effects and can improve patients’ ability to work and quality of life.

  20. Intravesical Botulinum Toxin for Persistent Autonomic Dysreflexia in a Pediatric Patient

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    Gina Lockwood

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We present a novel case of persistent autonomic dysreflexia in a pediatric spinal cord injury patient treated successfully with intravesical botulinum toxin. Study Design. A retrospective chart review of one patient seen at the Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin from 2006 to 2012 was performed. Results. A pediatric spinal cord injury patient with known neurogenic bladder presented with severe hypertension consistent with autonomic dysreflexia. His symptoms and hypertension did not improve with conservative measures, and he necessitated ICU admission and antihypertensive drips. He was taken to the operating room for intravesical botulinum toxin for refractory bladder spasms. Following this, his symptoms abated, and he was weaned off IV antihypertensives and returned to his baseline state. His symptoms were improved for greater than six months. Conclusions. There are few treatment options for the management of refractory autonomic dysreflexia. Intravesical botulinum toxin has never been reported for this use. Dedicated research is warranted to assess its efficacy, as it was used successfully to abort autonomic dysreflexia in this patient.

  1. Effectiveness of botulinum toxin A, in unraveling gummy smile: A prospective clinical study

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    M K Sanju Somaiah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Gummy smile is a problem in dynamic relationship of the lips to the upper incisors. Different treatment modalities have been used in the past for its correction, which were invasive and time consuming. Recently botulinum toxin A injection has been used as an alternative. This study was aimed at assessing the effect of botulinum toxin type A in the correction of gummy smile. Materials and Methods: Ten patients with the gingival display of more than 3 mm were selected. Photographs were recorded just before the injection, on 14 th , 30 th , 60 th , and 90 th day. 2.5 units of BTX-A was injected under sterile conditions at four sites, two on each side of the face. Software-based measurements were done to minimize errors. Results: Average preinjection gingival display was 4.7+/-1.05 mm. At 2 weeks postinjection, mean gingival display had declined to 0.9+/-0.7 mm, which was statistically very significant; it gradually increased to the average of 3.7 mm on day 90. Discussion: From the study it was inferred that botulinum toxin was very effective in eliminating gummy smile even though the effect was temporary; the effect persisted for only about 3 months.

  2. Association of toxin-producing Clostridium botulinum with the macroalga Cladophora in the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Chan Lan; Ochsner, Urs; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Whitman, Richard L.; Tepp, William H.; Lin, Guangyun; Johnson, Eric A.; Peller, Julie; Sadowsky, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Avian botulism, a paralytic disease of birds, often occurs on a yearly cycle and is increasingly becoming more common in the Great Lakes. Outbreaks are caused by bird ingestion of neurotoxins produced by Clostridium botulinum, a spore-forming, gram-positive, anaerobe. The nuisance, macrophytic, green alga Cladophora (Chlorophyta; mostly Cladophora glomerata L.) is a potential habitat for the growth of C. botulinum. A high incidence of botulism in shoreline birds at Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore (SLBE) in Lake Michigan coincides with increasingly massive accumulations of Cladophora in nearshore waters. In this study, free-floating algal mats were collected from SLBE and other shorelines of the Great Lakes between June and October 2011. The abundance of C. botulinum in algal mats was quantified and the type of botulism neurotoxin (bont) genes associated with this organism were determined by using most-probable-number PCR (MPN-PCR) and five distinct bont gene-specific primers (A, B, C, E, and F). The MPN-PCR results showed that 16 of 22 (73%) algal mats from the SLBE and 23 of 31(74%) algal mats from other shorelines of the Great Lakes contained the bont type E (bont/E) gene. C. botulinum was present up to 15 000 MPN per gram dried algae based on gene copies of bont/E. In addition, genes for bont/A and bont/B, which are commonly associated with human diseases, were detected in a few algal samples. Moreover, C. botulinum was present as vegetative cells rather than as dormant spores in Cladophora mats. Mouse toxin assays done using supernatants from enrichment of Cladophora containing high densities of C. botulinum (>1000 MPN/g dried algae) showed that Cladophora-borne C. botulinum were toxin-producing species (BoNT/E). Our results indicate that Cladophora provides a habitat for C. botulinum, warranting additional studies to better understand the relationship between this bacterium and the alga, and how this interaction potentially contributes to botulism

  3. Studies on the irradiation of toxins of Clostridium botulinum and Staphylococcus aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, S.A.; Bailey, N.E.; Stringer, M.F.; Modi, N.K.; Tranter, H.S.; Hambleton, P.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of irradiation of Clostridium botulinum neutotoxin type A (BNTA) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) in gelatin phosphate buffer and cooked mince beef slurries were investigated. Estimation of toxins by immunoassays showed that in buffer, toxins were destroyed by irradiation at 8.0 kGy; in mince slurries however, 45% of BTNA and 27-34% of SEA remained after this level of irradiation. At 23.7 kGy, over twice the dose of irradiation proposed for legal acceptance in the UK, 15% of BNTA and 16-26% of SEA still remained. Increasing concentrations of mince conferred increased protection against the effect of irradiation on both toxins. The biological activity of BNTA was more sensitive to irradiation than the immunological activity. Staphylococcal enterotoxin was more resistant to irradiation than BNTA. Irradiation should therefore only be used in conjunction with good manufacturing practices to prevent microbial proliferation and toxin production prior to irradiation. (author)

  4. Studies on the irradiation of toxins of Clostridium botulinum and Staphylococcus aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, S.A.; Bailey, N.E.; Stringer, M.F.; Modi, N.K.; Tranter, H.S.; Hambleton, P.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of irradiation of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin type A (BNTA) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) in gelatin phosphate buffer and cooked mince beef slurries were investigated. Estimation of toxins by immunoassays showed that in buffer, toxins were destroyed by irradiation at 8.0 kGy; in mince slurries however, 45% of BTNA and 27-34% of SEA remained after this level of irradiation. At 23.7 kGy, over twice the dose of irradiation proposed for legal acceptance in the UK, 15% of BNTA and 16-26% of SEA still remained. Increasing concentrations of mince conferred increased protection against the effect of irradiation on both toxins. The biological activity of BNTA was more sensitive to irradiation than the immunological activity. Staphylococcal enterotoxin was more resistant to irradiation than BNTA. Irradiation should therefore only be used in conjunction with good manufacturing practices to prevent microbial proliferation and toxin production prior to irradiation. (author)

  5. Construction of "Toxin Complex" in a Mutant Serotype C Strain of Clostridium botulinum Harboring a Defective Neurotoxin Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tomonori; Nagano, Thomas; Niwa, Koichi; Uchino, Masataka; Tomizawa, Motohiro; Sagane, Yoshimasa; Watanabe, Toshihiro

    2017-01-01

    A non-toxigenic mutant of the toxigenic serotype C Clostridium botulinum strain Stockholm (C-St), C-N71, does not produce the botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT). However, the original strain C-St produces botulinum toxin complex, in which BoNT is associated with non-toxic non-hemagglutinin (NTNHA) and three hemagglutinin proteins (HA-70, HA-33, and HA-17). Therefore, in this study, we aimed to elucidate the effects of bont gene knockout on the formation of the "toxin complex." Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that a premature stop codon was introduced in the bont gene, whereas other genes were not affected by this mutation. Moreover, we successfully purified the "toxin complex" produced by C-N71. The "toxin complex" was identified as a mixture of NTNHA/HA-70/HA-17/HA-33 complexes with intact NTNHA or C-terminally truncated NTNHA, without BoNT. These results indicated that knockout of the bont gene does not affect the formation of the "toxin complex." Since the botulinum toxin complex has been shown to play an important role in oral toxin transport in the human and animal body, a non-neurotoxic "toxin complex" of C-N71 may be valuable for the development of an oral drug delivery system.

  6. Botulinum Toxin for Neuropathic Pain: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Mi Oh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT, derived from Clostridium botulinum, has been used therapeutically for focal dystonia, spasticity, and chronic migraine. Its spectrum as a potential treatment for neuropathic pain has grown. Recent opinions on the mechanism behind the antinociceptive effects of BoNT suggest that it inhibits the release of peripheral neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators from sensory nerves. There is some evidence showing the axonal transport of BoNT, but it remains controversial. The aim of this review is to summarize the experimental and clinical evidence of the antinociceptive effects, mechanisms, and therapeutic applications of BoNT for neuropathic pain conditions, including postherpetic neuralgia, complex regional pain syndrome, and trigeminal neuralgia. The PubMed and OvidSP databases were searched from 1966 to May 2015. We assessed levels of evidence according to the American Academy of Neurology guidelines. Recent studies have suggested that BoNT injection is an effective treatment for postherpetic neuralgia and is likely efficient for trigeminal neuralgia and post-traumatic neuralgia. BoNT could also be effective as a treatment for diabetic neuropathy. It has not been proven to be an effective treatment for occipital neuralgia or complex regional pain syndrome.

  7. Botulinum Toxin A for Bladder Pain Syndrome/Interstitial Cystitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Chiu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT-A, derived from Clostridium botulinum, has been used clinically for several diseases or syndrome including chronic migraine, spasticity, focal dystonia and other neuropathic pain. Chronic pelvic or bladder pain is the one of the core symptoms of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC. However, in the field of urology, chronic bladder or pelvic pain is often difficult to eradicate by oral medications or bladder instillation therapy. We are looking for new treatment modality to improve bladder pain or associated urinary symptoms such as frequency and urgency for patients with BPS/IC. Recent studies investigating the mechanism of the antinociceptive effects of BoNT A suggest that it can inhibit the release of peripheral neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators from sensory nerves. In this review, we will examine the evidence supporting the use of BoNTs in bladder pain from basic science models and review the clinical studies on therapeutic applications of BoNT for BPS/IC.

  8. Botulinum Toxin A for Bladder Pain Syndrome/Interstitial Cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Bin; Tai, Huai-Ching; Chung, Shiu-Dong; Birder, Lori A

    2016-07-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT-A), derived from Clostridium botulinum, has been used clinically for several diseases or syndrome including chronic migraine, spasticity, focal dystonia and other neuropathic pain. Chronic pelvic or bladder pain is the one of the core symptoms of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC). However, in the field of urology, chronic bladder or pelvic pain is often difficult to eradicate by oral medications or bladder instillation therapy. We are looking for new treatment modality to improve bladder pain or associated urinary symptoms such as frequency and urgency for patients with BPS/IC. Recent studies investigating the mechanism of the antinociceptive effects of BoNT A suggest that it can inhibit the release of peripheral neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators from sensory nerves. In this review, we will examine the evidence supporting the use of BoNTs in bladder pain from basic science models and review the clinical studies on therapeutic applications of BoNT for BPS/IC.

  9. Use of botulinum toxin in individuals with neurogenic detrusor overactivity: State of the art review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsenmeyer, Todd A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) injection into the bladder wall has been shown to be an effective alternative to anticholinergic (antimuscarinic) medications and more invasive surgery in those with multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) and urinary incontinence who are not tolerating anticholinergic medications. In August 2011, Botox® (onabotulinumtoxinA) received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for this use. Clinically, intradetrusor injection of BoNT has been found to decrease urinary incontinence and improve quality of life. Its impact on urodynamic parameters is an increase in the maximum cystometric (bladder) capacity and decrease in the maximum detrusor pressures. The most common side effects are urinary tract infections and urinary retention. There have been rare reports and a black box warning of distant spread of BoNT. BoNT has gained popularity because of its effectiveness and long duration of action, relative ease of administration, easy learning curve, reproducibility of results on repeated administration, and low incidence of complications. Objective To discuss the structure and function, mechanisms of action, clinical and urodynamic studies, injection technique, potential beneficial and adverse effects, and potential areas of research of BoNT. Methods Literature search focused on botulinum toxin in MEDLINE/PubMed. Search terms included botulinum toxin, neurogenic bladder, NDO, botox bladder, botox spinal cord injury, botox, FDA, botox side effects. All papers identified were English language, full-text papers. In addition, English abstracts of non-English papers were noted. The reference list of identified articles was also searched for further papers. Conclusion Botulinum toxin is an alternative treatment for individuals with NDO who fail to tolerate anticholinergic medications. Its popularity has increased because of the literature, which has supported its effectiveness, safety, easy

  10. Notice of CDC's discontinuation of investigational pentavalent (ABCDE) botulinum toxoid vaccine for workers at risk for occupational exposure to botulinum toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    Effective November 30, 2011, CDC will no longer provide investigational pentavalent (ABCDE) botulinum toxoid (PBT) for vaccination of workers at risk for occupational exposure to botulinum serotypes A, B, C, D, and E. This change might affect persons working in public health laboratories, research facilities, and manufacturing institutions who work with botulinum toxin or neurotoxin-producing species of Clostridium. CDC's decision is based on an assessment of the available data, which indicate a decline in immunogenicity of some of the toxin serotypes. The occurrence of moderate local reactions related to annual booster doses also has increased, which was noted in the 1990s at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute for Infectious Diseases and resulted in a change in boosting from an annual requirement to only boosting when antibody titers have declined significantly. Additionally, the PBT was manufactured more than 30 years ago. CDC, therefore, has decided not to continue offering this investigational product.

  11. A pilot study of delayed versus immediate serial casting after botulinum toxin injection for partially reducible spastic equinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Christopher John; Kennedy, Ann; Walsh, Michael; O'Brien, Timothy; Lynch, Bryan; Hensey, Owen

    2007-12-01

    Serial casting is often prescribed after botulinum toxin injections to improve joint ranges of motion and to potentiate the decrease in hypertonia. The aim of this study was to compare delayed versus immediate serial casting as an adjunct to botulinum toxin therapy for partially reducible spastic equinus. Twelve children who presented spastic equinus associated with mild gastrosoleus contracture took part. Five of them had a diagnosis of spastic diplegia, whereas 7 had a diagnosis of congenital hemiplegia. Children were randomized to immediate serial casting (same day) or delayed serial casting (4 weeks later) after botulinum toxin injection to their gastrosolei. Casts were replaced weekly for 3 weeks. Three children complained of pain that required recasting in the immediate casting group versus none in the delayed casting group (P = 0.08). At 3 months, there was a 27-degree improvement in the fast dorsiflexion angle (Tardieu R1) in the delayed casting group versus 17 degrees in the immediate casting group (P = 0.029). At 6 months, a 19-degree improvement persisted in the delayed group compared with 11 degrees in the immediate group (P = 0.010). There is a clear benefit in delaying serial casting after the injection of botulinum toxin in the recurrence of spasticity at the gastrosoleus that may also offer an advantage regarding the incidence of painful episodes associated with casting. Most importantly, reducing the recurrence of spasticity by delayed serial casting may offer the possibility of decreasing the frequency of botulinum toxin reinjections.

  12. Botulinum toxin efficacy in the treatment of patients with spasmodic dysphonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetel Marina

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Spasmodic dysphonia (DS is a disabling speech disturbance appearing as the consequence of dystonic vocal folds contraction. Its intermittent appearance in the laryngeal muscles causes vocal function discontinuation. The quality of life of these patients is significantly disturbed. Surgical and a medical therapy appear to be inadequate and unsuccessful ones of no steady improvement. It is the botulinum toxin therapy that proved to be highly efficacious one, with the established improvement in 80−100% of patients. The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of botulinum toxin therapy in patients with SD and to show our preliminary results. Methods. The study included 10 patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia. After diagnostic procedures, botulinum toxin was applied either in one or both vocal folds, in doses of 12−16 units each. In our study we applied indirect technique originally developed by Hočevar and Pirtošek. Perceptive voice and speech analysis was performed prior to and after the instillation of botuline toxin as per structured Scale of pathological characteristics of voice and speech appearing in the spasmodic dysphonia. Results. The majority of our patients experienced both subjective improvement and the improvement in the terms of the quality of life, Voice Henolicap Index − (VHI that was rated as rather significant one (t = 3.562; p = 0.006. Conclusion. Regardless unquestionable improvement of definite phonation, further function restitution requires individual vocal therapy and psychotherapy. Vocal therapy includes structural vocal techniques which reduce degree of vocal tension and rapid changes in the power and the height of voice. Further investigations are necessary for the scope of the definition of a standardized therapeutically procedure for spasmodic dysphonia treatment which comprises multidisciplinary approach in diagnosis, therapy and treatment efficacy evaluation.

  13. The susceptibility of the mallard duck (Anas platyrhynchos) to Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Wayne I.; Duncan, Ruth M.

    1980-01-01

    Most strains of Clostridium botulinum type C, after having lost their capacity to produce their dominant toxin (C1) as a result of being“cured”of their prophages, continue to produce C2, a trypsin-activable toxin reported by other investigators. While of relatively low toxicity when administered perorally to the adult mallard duck (Anas platyrhynchos), it was highly toxic when given parenterally. By the intravenous route, for example, it was more than 1, 000 times as toxic as C1 toxin by the same route, when compared on the basis of mouse intraperitoneal toxicity. The cause of death in every instance was massive pulmonary edema and hemorrhage rather than the respiratory paralysis that occurs in C1 intoxication.抄録

  14. Transient erectile dysfunction associated with intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin type A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadonikolakis, Anastasios S; Vekris, Marios D; Kostas, John P; Korompilias, Anastasios V; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2002-01-01

    Autonomic nervous system dysfunction occurs rarely after botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) intramuscular injections. We report a case of a 23-year-old man with spastic diplegia who had transient erectile dysfunction after intramuscular injection of BTX-A (total dosage, 300 IU, body weight 95 kg) in both hamstring muscles. Some investigators believe that the local spread of the toxin is responsible for autonomic dysfunction, while others believe that the transportation of the toxin to the spinal cord via retrograde flow or via the blood flow after entering the circulation are possible mechanisms of neurologic side effects. On the basis of our case, a retrograde axoplasmic flow to the spinal cord could probably occur because the spinal cord level of hamstring muscles is close to spinal cord levels responsible for erection control.

  15. Use of a botulinum toxin A in dentistry and oral and maxillofacial surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Chi-Heun

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BT) was the first toxin to be used in the history of human medicine. Among the eight known serotypes of this toxin, those currently used in medicine are types A and B. This review article mainly discusses BT type A (BTA) because it is usually used in dentistry including dental anesthesiology and oral and maxillofacial surgery. BTA has been used mainly in the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) and hypertrophy and hyperactivity of the masticatory muscles, along with being a therapeutic option to relieve pain and help in functional recovery from dental and oral and maxillofacial surgery. However, it is currently used broadly for cosmetic purposes such as reducing facial wrinkles and asymmetry. Although the therapeutic effect of BTA is temporary and relatively safe, it is essential to have knowledge about related anatomy, as well as the systemic and local adverse effects of medications that are applied to the face. PMID:28884147

  16. An Integrative Approach to Computational Modelling of the Gene Regulatory Network Controlling Clostridium botulinum Type A1 Toxin Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihekwaba, Adaoha E C; Mura, Ivan; Walshaw, John; Peck, Michael W; Barker, Gary C

    2016-11-01

    Clostridium botulinum produces botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), highly potent substances responsible for botulism. Currently, mathematical models of C. botulinum growth and toxigenesis are largely aimed at risk assessment and do not include explicit genetic information beyond group level but integrate many component processes, such as signalling, membrane permeability and metabolic activity. In this paper we present a scheme for modelling neurotoxin production in C. botulinum Group I type A1, based on the integration of diverse information coming from experimental results available in the literature. Experiments show that production of BoNTs depends on the growth-phase and is under the control of positive and negative regulatory elements at the intracellular level. Toxins are released as large protein complexes and are associated with non-toxic components. Here, we systematically review and integrate those regulatory elements previously described in the literature for C. botulinum Group I type A1 into a population dynamics model, to build the very first computational model of toxin production at the molecular level. We conduct a validation of our model against several items of published experimental data for different wild type and mutant strains of C. botulinum Group I type A1. The result of this process underscores the potential of mathematical modelling at the cellular level, as a means of creating opportunities in developing new strategies that could be used to prevent botulism; and potentially contribute to improved methods for the production of toxin that is used for therapeutics.

  17. Residual Limb Hyperhidrosis Managed by Botulinum Toxin Injections, Enhanced by the Iodine-Starch Test: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Colby R; Godfrey, Bradeigh

    2017-04-01

    Hyperhidrosis of the residual limb is a common condition affecting patients with amputations. The iodine-starch test is used by dermatologists to identify focal areas of hyperhidrosis before treatment with botulinum toxin. Here, we describe a case of a patient with a transtibial amputation with moderate-to-severe hyperhidrosis who received intradermal botulinum toxin injections to treat residual limb hyperhidrosis, with particular emphasis given to the utility of the iodine-starch test in managing this common condition. The iodine-starch test successfully identified hyperhidrotic areas before treatment as well as confirmed the physiologic anhidrotic effect of the botulinum toxin treatment. V. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Is there enough evidence to use botulinum toxin injections for bruxism management? A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Torre Canales, Giancarlo; Câmara-Souza, Mariana Barbosa; do Amaral, Camilla Fraga; Garcia, Renata Cunha Matheus Rodrigues; Manfredini, Daniele

    2017-04-01

    The objective of the study was to conduct a systematic review of the literature assessing the effects of botulinum toxin (BoNT-A) injections in the management of bruxism. Search for articles involved the PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, Embase, Cochrane, Scielo and Lilacs databases. Specific terms were used and the search carried out from 1980 to March 2016 by three independent researchers. Randomized controlled studies (RCTs), prospective and before-after studies that applied BoNT-A at the masseter and/or temporalis muscles were included. Three RCTs and two uncontrolled before-after studies out of 904 identified citations were included in this review. All five articles dealt with sleep bruxism and featured a small sample size. None of them was about awake bruxism. Two randomized clinical trials were double-blinded, with a control group using saline solution. Two studies used polysomnography/electromyography for sleep bruxism diagnosis, whilst others were based on history taking and clinical examination. All studies using subjective evaluations for pain and jaw stiffness showed positive results for the BoNT-A treatment. In contrast, the two studies using objective evaluations did not demonstrate any reduction in bruxism episodes, but a decrease in the intensity of muscles contractions. Despite the paucity of works on the topic, BoNT-A seems to be a possible management option for sleep bruxism, minimizing symptoms and reducing the intensity of muscle contractions, although further studies are necessary especially as far as the treatment indications for bruxism itself is concerned. BoNT-A has been increasingly diffused in dentistry over recent years, being also used for pain management in patients with bruxism. Nonetheless, there is no consensus about its effects in this disorder.

  19. Efficacy of Botulinum toxin type A in treatment of different forms of focal dystonias in the Serbian population: Experience of the Botulinum Toxin Outpatients Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomić Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Botulinum toxin (BTX irreversibly inhibits presynaptic acetylcholine release with subsequent relaxation of abnormally contracting muscles. It is an effective and well tolerated treatment with long-term benefit in a variety of movement disorders and other neurological and non-neurological disturbances. The aim of our study was to present our experience with BTX type A in treatment of different forms of focal dystonias. Мethods. А hundred of patients with different focal dystonias (spastic torticollis, blepharospasm and graphospasm from the Botulinum Toxin Outpatients Department, Clinic for Neurology, Clinical Center of Serbia, were included in the study. All the patients were examined and rated at baseline visit prior to BTX application and on the following visit, after 3-4 months, using self-assessment improvement questionnaire and standardized rating scales. Results. The improvement of ≥ 50% was presented in 68.2% of all (199 the analyzed applications. Independent predictors of good response to the therapy (improvement ≥ 50% were male sex (p = 0.011, the presence of sensory trick (p = 0.013 and the total number of BTX applications (p = 0.002. The patients with spastic torticollis and blepharospasm showed a statistically significantly better BTX effect (improvement 57.3 ± 27.5% and 54.1 ± 28.3%, respectively than the graphospasm group (26.7 ± 25.6%. Most of the patients did not have therapy complications (81.4% and 72% in two applications. Side effects in the remaining patients (muscle weakness, dysphagia, ptosis, double vision, neck weakness and lacrimal dysfunction lasted for 28.3 ± 18.6 days after the first treatment and 32.5 ± 36.2 days after the second one. Conclusion. BTX is safe and highly effective in long-term treatment of patients with different forms of focal dystonia, with only mild and well-tolerated side-effects. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175090

  20. An evidence-based review of botulinum toxin (Botox) applications in non-cosmetic head and neck conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persaud, Ricardo; Garas, George; Silva, Sanjeev; Stamatoglou, Constantine; Chatrath, Paul; Patel, Kalpesh

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (Botox) is an exotoxin produced from Clostridium botulinum. It works by blocking the release of acetylcholine from the cholinergic nerve end plates leading to inactivity of the muscles or glands innervated. Botox is best known for its beneficial role in facial aesthetics but recent literature has highlighted its usage in multiple non-cosmetic medical and surgical conditions. This article reviews the current evidence pertaining to Botox use in the head and neck. A literature review was conducted using The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, Medline and EMBASE databases limited to English Language articles published from 1980 to 2012. The findings suggest that there is level 1 evidence supporting the efficacy of Botox in the treatment of spasmodic dysphonia, essential voice tremor, headache, cervical dystonia, masticatory myalgia, sialorrhoea, temporomandibular joint disorders, bruxism, blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm and rhinitis. For chronic neck pain there is level 1 evidence to show that Botox is ineffective. Level 2 evidence exists for vocal tics, trigeminal neuralgia, dysphagia and post-laryngectomy oesophageal speech. For stuttering, ‘first bite syndrome’, facial nerve paresis, Frey's syndrome, oromandibular dystonia and palatal/stapedial myoclonus the evidence is level 4. Thus, the literature highlights a therapeutic role for Botox in a wide range of non-cosmetic conditions pertaining to the head and neck (mainly level 1 evidence). With ongoing research, the spectrum of clinical applications and number of people receiving Botox will no doubt increase. Botox appears to justify its title as ‘the poison that heals’. PMID:23476731

  1. Effect of headspace CO2 concentration on toxin production by Clostridium botulinum in MAP, irradiated fresh pork

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, A.D.; Smith, J.P.; Dodds, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of five initial levels of CO2 (15, 30, 45, 60, and 75%) and three irradiation doses (0, 0.5, and 1.0 kGy) on toxin production by Clostridium botulinum in inoculated fresh pork were studied using factorial design experiments. Headspace CO2 levels increased in all samples during storage at 15 degrees C. In most treatments, spoilage preceded toxigenesis. Toxin production occurred faster in samples initially packaged with 15 to 30% of CO2 while higher levels of CO2 (45-75%) delayed toxin production. Low-dose irradiation delayed toxin production at all levels of CO2 in the package headspace. Contrary to expectations, including a CO2 absorbent in the package enhanced toxin production by C. botulinum. This was attributed to production of H2 by the CO2 absorbent, possibly resulting in a decrease in the oxido-reduction potential of the meat

  2. Gummy smile and botulinum toxin: a new approach based on the gingival exposure area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzuco, Rosemarie; Hexsel, Dóris

    2010-12-01

    Gummy smile (GS) is an aesthetic disorder for some patients, which can be corrected by injection of botulinum toxin. We sought to classify GS according to the area of gingival exposure and the respective muscles involved in order to perfect the botulinum toxin injection technique for each patient. Sixteen patients with GS were evaluated before receiving botulinum toxin injections. Based on the area of excessive gum displayed and identification of the muscles involved, 4 different types of GS were identified: anterior, posterior, mixed, and asymmetric. AbobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport, Ipsen Biopharm Limited, Wrexham, UK) was injected using a different injection technique for each type of GS, based on the main muscles involved. With the aid of two computer programs, the area of gum exposed was measured before and after the application of abobotulinumtoxinA, to evaluate the level of improvement. There was a decrease in the degree of gum display in all patients. The general average improvement achieved was 75.09%. Two patients showed slight adverse effects that were easily corrected with additional doses of abobotulinumtoxinA. For this study, there was no sample size calculation and no statistical analysis of the cases. The authors conclude that it is important to identify the type of GS and therefore the main muscles involved, so that the correct injection technique can be used. AbobotulinumtoxinA was shown to be effective and safe for use in all types of GS in the present sample. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Treatment of severe drooling with botulinum toxin in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease: Efficacy and possible mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Eigild; Karlsborg, Merete; Jensen, Allan Bardow

    2011-01-01

    Drooling in neurodegenerative diseases is associated with social impediment. Previous treatments of drooling have little effect or are effective but with severe side effects. Therefore, there is a need to test new methods such as the use of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A).......Drooling in neurodegenerative diseases is associated with social impediment. Previous treatments of drooling have little effect or are effective but with severe side effects. Therefore, there is a need to test new methods such as the use of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A)....

  4. Injection of Botulinum Toxin a to Upper Esophageal Sphincter for Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Two Patients with Inclusion Body Myositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis WC Liu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Inclusion body myositis (IBM is a progressive degenerative skeletal muscle disease leading to weakening and atrophy of both proximal and distal muscles. Dysphagia is reported in up to 86% of IBM patients. Surgical cricopharyngeal myotomy may be effective for cricopharyngeal dysphagia and there is one published report that botulinum toxin A, injected into the cricopharyngeus muscle using a hypopharyngoscope under general anesthesia, relieved IBM-associated dysphagia. This report presents the first documentation of botulinum toxin A injection into the upper esophageal sphincter using a flexible esophagogastroduodenoscope under conscious sedation, to reduce upper esophageal sphincter pressure and successfully alleviate oropharyngeal dysphagia in two IBM patients.

  5. Clinical and image improvement of Raynaud's phenomenon after botulinum toxin type A treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, HongMei; Lian, YaJun

    2015-08-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon is often accompanied by pain, digital ulceration and compromised daily activities. Pharmacological therapy or sympathectomies have been administered to diminish these symptoms but existing treatments are not invariably efficacious. A recent case series has described the use of botulinum toxin type A in the treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon. We report two patients with severe or mild Raynaud's phenomenon who were injected with BTX-A; both of whom experienced clinical and image improvement after treatment. © 2015 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  6. Spotlight on botulinum toxin and its potential in the treatment of stroke-related spasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaku, Michelle; Simpson, David M

    2016-01-01

    Poststroke spasticity affects up to one-half of stroke patients and has debilitating effects, contributing to diminished activities of daily living, quality of life, pain, and functional impairments. Botulinum toxin (BoNT) is proven to be safe and effective in the treatment of focal poststroke spasticity. The aim of this review is to highlight BoNT and its potential in the treatment of upper and lower limb poststroke spasticity. We review evidence for the efficacy of BoNT type A and B formulations and address considerations of optimal injection technique, patient and caregiver satisfaction, and potential adverse effects of BoNT. PMID:27022247

  7. Development of Treatment Concepts for the Use of Botulinum Toxin A in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia F. Funk

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of children with cerebral palsy with Botulinum toxin A injections is well established, safe and effective. However, a standardized injection strategy is still missing and the used dosage has escalated over the years. In the recent past, the recommended dosages in Europe were, however, reduced due to a better understanding of the relationship between dosage, severe side effects and the kind of anesthesia used. To combine safety and efficacy, the trend tends to a lower dosage, but combined with a more specific selection of injected muscles. The treatment of these key-muscles takes into account the best support for motor development to attain each individual motor milestone.

  8. Pseudoaneurysm of the thoracic aorta following botulinum toxin injection to the esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy P. Shiraev, MB, BS (Hons, BSc (Hons

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aortic pseudoaneurysms are uncommon and are usually secondary to penetrating trauma. We describe the presentation and management of an elderly woman who suffered a pseudoaneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta several days after receiving botulinum toxin injection to the esophagus. Urgent thoracic endovascular aortic repair was performed, and long-term antibiotic therapy was commenced. Despite a slow initial clinical recovery, she returned to an independent lifestyle, with radiographic resolution of the pseudoaneurysm seen at follow-up. This case illustrates that endovascular aortic repair is a suitable and safe treatment option for this unusual presentation.

  9. Adductor laryngeal breathing dystonia in NBIA treated with botulinum toxin-A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Rai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA presented with episodic inspiratory stridor. A 10-year-old boy presented with 3-year history of gradually progressive spastic gait and generalized dystonia (involving all four limbs, neck, jaw, and speech. MRI brain showed "Eye of Tiger" sign. He recently developed severe inspiratory stridor associated with almost gasping respiration. Direct video laryngoscopy showed paradoxical vocal cord closure during inspiration. He was treated with EMG-guided botulinum toxin-A injection given into bilateral thyroarytenoid muscles, resulting in dramatic response with complete disappearance of the stridor within a week. The effect lasted 18 months.

  10. Clonazepam and botulinum toxin for the treatment of alien limb phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Ihtsham U; Malaty, Irene A; Okun, Michael S; Jacobson, Charles E; Fernandez, Hubert H; Rodriguez, Ramon R

    2010-03-01

    We discuss a patient who developed an "alien limb" on her right side after brain herniation. She reported feeling as though her arm movements were controlled by a stranger and displayed limb levitation and groping behaviors. She received 0.5 mg clonazepam b.i.d. This was followed by a limb levitation frequency reduction of 73%. Discontinuation and retrial of clonazepam verified this response. She suffered a psychotic episode that she attributed to clonazepam. Clonazepam was discontinued. She received botulinum toxin injections to her arm that reduced her limb levitation by 84%. This is the first report of response to medication in alien limb syndrome.

  11. GRIN: “GRoup versus INdividual physiotherapy following lower limb intra-muscular Botulinum Toxin-A injections for ambulant children with cerebral palsy: an assessor-masked randomised comparison trial”: study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of physical disability in childhood. Spasticity is a significant contributor to the secondary impairments impacting functional performance and participation. The most common lower limb spasticity management is focal intramuscular injections of Botulinum Toxin-Type A accompanied by individually-delivered (one on one) physiotherapy rehabilitation. With increasing emphasis on improving goal-directed functional activity and participation within a family-centred framework, it is timely to explore whether physiotherapy provided in a group could achieve comparable outcomes, encouraging providers to offer flexible models of physiotherapy delivery. This study aims to compare individual to group-based physiotherapy following intramuscular Botulinum Toxin-A injections to the lower limbs for ambulant children with cerebral palsy aged four to fourteen years. Methods/Design An assessor-masked, block randomised comparison trial will be conducted with random allocation to either group-based or individual physiotherapy. A sample size of 30 (15 in each study arm) will be recruited. Both groups will receive six hours of direct therapy following Botulinum Toxin-A injections in either an individual or group format with additional home programme activities (three exercises to be performed three times a week). Study groups will be compared at baseline (T1), then at 10 weeks (T2, efficacy) and 26 weeks (T3, retention) post Botulinum Toxin-A injections. Primary outcomes will be caregiver/s perception of and satisfaction with their child’s occupational performance goals (Canadian Occupational Performance Measure) and quality of gait (Edinburgh Visual Gait Score) with a range of secondary outcomes across domains of the International Classification of Disability, Functioning and Health. Discussion This paper outlines the study protocol including theoretical basis, study hypotheses and outcome measures for this assessor-masked, randomised

  12. [Intravesical botulinum toxin under local anestesia as ambulatory procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabuel Alcañiz, José Javier; Martínez Arcos, Laura; Jimenez Cidre, Miguel; Burgos Revilla, Francisco Javier

    2017-09-01

    Bladder hyperactivity is described as the presence of "voiding urgency, generally associated with increased daytime frequency and nocturia, with or without urinary incontinence, in the absence of urinary tract infection or other obvious pathology". Onabotulinum toxin A (BTA) is a recommendable therapeutic option in case of failure, contraindication or refusal of the conservative therapy or other non-pharmacological therapies. The injection of BTA in the detrusor has been performed under local, regional or general anesthesia either in the conventional or major ambulatory surgery operative room or in the cystoscopy room. The objective of this paper is to describe the procedure to perform BTA therapy as an ambulatory operation under intravesical local anesthesia in the cystoscopy room, describing its advantages and limitations.

  13. Prevalence of toxin-producing Clostridium botulinum associated with the macroalga Cladophora in three Great Lakes: growth and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Chan Lan; Kahn, Chase I.; Borchert, Andrew J.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Whitman, Richard L.; Peller, Julie R.; Pier, Christina; Lin, Guangyun; Johnson, Eric A.; Sadowsky, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The reemergence of avian botulism caused by Clostridium botulinum type E has been observed across the Great Lakes in recent years. Evidence suggests an association between the nuisance algae, Cladophoraspp., and C. botulinum in nearshore areas of the Great Lakes. However, the nature of the association between Cladophora and C. botulinum is not fully understood due, in part, to the complex food web interactions in this disease etiology. In this study, we extensively evaluated their association by quantitatively examining population size and serotypes of C. botulinum in algal mats collected from wide geographic areas in lakes Michigan, Ontario, and Erie in 2011–2012 and comparing them with frequencies in other matrices such as sand and water. A high prevalence (96%) of C. botulinum type E was observed inCladophora mats collected from shorelines of the Great Lakes in 2012. Among the algae samples containing detectable C. botulinum, the population size of C. Botulinum type E was 100–104 MPN/g dried algae, which was much greater (up to 103 fold) than that found in sand or the water column, indicating thatCladophora mats are sources of this pathogen. Mouse toxinantitoxin bioassays confirmed that the putativeC. botulinum belonged to the type E serotype. Steam treatment was effective in reducing or eliminating C. botulinum type E viable cells in Cladophora mats, thereby breaking the potential transmission route of toxin up to the food chain. Consequently, our data suggest that steam treatment incorporated with a beach cleaning machine may be an effective treatment of Cladophora-borne C. botulinum and may reduce bird mortality and human health risks.

  14. Structure, Function and Evolution of Clostridium botulinum C2 and C3 Toxins: Insight to Poultry and Veterinary Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellapandi, Paulchamy; Prisilla, Arokiyasamy

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum group III strains are able to produce cytotoxins, C2 toxin and C3 exotoxin, along with botulinum neurotoxin types C and D. C2 toxin and C3 exotoxin produced by this organism are the most important members of bacterial ADP-ribosyltransferase superfamily. Both toxins have distinct pathophysiological functions in the avian and mammalian hosts. The members of this superfamily transfer an ADP-ribose moiety of NAD+ to specific eukaryotic target proteins. The present review describes the structure, function and evolution aspects of these toxins with a special emphasis to the development of veterinary vaccines. C2 toxin is a binary toxin that consists of a catalytic subunit (C2I) and a translocation subunit (C2II). C2I component is structurally and functionally similar to the VIP2 and iota A toxin whereas C2II component shows a significant homology with the protective antigen from anthrax toxin and iota B. Unlike C2 toxin, C3 toxin is devoid of translocation/binding subunit. Extensive studies on their sequence-structure-function link spawn additional efforts to understand the catalytic mechanisms and target recognition. Structural and functional relationships with them are often determined by using evolutionary constraints as valuable biological measures. Enzyme-deficient mutants derived from these toxins have been used as drug/protein delivery systems in eukaryotic cells. Thus, current knowledge on their molecular diversity is a well-known perspective to design immunotoxin or subunit vaccine for C. botulinum infection. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Effect of botulinum toxin concentration on reduction in sweating: a randomized, double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rystedt, Alma; Karlqvist, Mattias; Bertilsson, Maria; Naver, Hans; Swartling, Carl

    2013-11-01

    Dose-response studies of botulinum toxin for reduction of sweating are sparse in the literature. The aim of this study was to determine the most appropriate concentrations of Botox®, Dysport®, Xeomin® and NeuroBloc®, respectively, in order to achieve the greatest reduction in sweating, thus reducing the costs and increasing the safety of treatment. Four concentrations of each product were investigated. Intradermal injections of all products and concentrations were applied to the backs of 20 consenting subjects, in a randomized, double-blind manner. Areas of anhidrotic and hypohidrotic skin were measured with an iodine-starch test after 4, 8 and 12 weeks, respectively. Optimal concentrations were found to be 25 U/ml for Botox and Xeomin, approximately 100 U/ml for Dysport, and 50 U/ml for NeuroBloc. When comparing the mean anhidrotic area per unit for 100 U/ml of each product, the calculated dose conversion ratios were 1:1.6:1.2:1.3 (Botox:Dysport:Xeomin:NeuroBloc). If, instead, the optimal concentration for each product was compared, the dose conversion ratios were 1:4.8:1.3:2.2. Thus, it is crucial to consider botulinum toxin concentration in a treatment regimen.

  16. The novel use of botulinum toxin A for the treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon in the toes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaliwal, Kiran; Griffin, Michelle; Denton, Christopher P; Butler, Peter E M

    2018-03-09

    Raynaud's phenomenon is a vasospastic disorder of the digital vessels triggered by exposure to cold or stress. It is most commonly observed in the hands, but also frequently affects the toes. We present three cases of patients with severe Raynaud's phenomenon in the toes, secondary to scleroderma. The diagnosis of Raynaud's syndrome and scleroderma was established according to the 2010 American College of Rheumatology and European League Against Rheumatism criteria. Patients were treated with 10 units of botulinum toxin injected into each foot. Two millilitres was injected into the base of each toe in both the left and right feet. Six weeks postinjection into the toes, patients reported an improvement of cold intolerance, colour change and frequency and severity of Raynaud's attacks. The effects were reported to last up to 5 months. To our knowledge, these are the first reported cases of the treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon in the toes with botulinum toxin A. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. [Treatment of spasticity after traumatic brain injury in children: the role of botulinum toxin therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klochkova, O A; Kurenkov, A L; Mamontova, N A

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the main reasons of death and disability in children and adolescents in Russia and abroad. Spasticity is a frequent outcome of the TBI that influences on the rehabilitation prognosis, degree of movement disorders and quality of life after trauma. Early spasticity correction and complex rehabilitation lead to the optimal recovery and prevent secondary complications. This review presents the current data about the prognostic role of the spasticity in children after TBI, methods of its correction and their scientific evidence. Limitations and challenges of per-oral antispastic agents are described especially for the patients with local spasticity. Attention is focused on the methods of treatment of local hypertonus, in particular botulinum toxin A (BTA) injections proved to be effective in adults with acquired brain injury. The article summarizes the results of international investigations, systematic reviews and consensus statements about the efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin treatment in children after the TBI. The authors describe an algorithm of the optimal patient selection and goal setting for BTA injections in children with acquired brain injury.

  18. Botulinum toxin in post-stroke patients: stiffness modifications and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miscio, Giacinta; Del Conte, Carmen; Pianca, Danilo; Colombo, Roberto; Panizza, Marcela; Schieppati, Marco; Pisano, Fabrizio

    2004-02-01

    To objectively quantify stiffness and clinical changes in the upper limb of poststroke patients following botulinum toxin (BT) injection. Eighteen consecutive chronic post-stroke spastic patients were injected Botulinum toxin A in the forearm flexor spastic muscles. Spasticity was clinically evaluated with the Ashworth scale. Stiffness was measured with indices (passive stiffness index (ISI) and total stiffness index (TSI) obtained by mechanical wrist displacements induced by a torque motor,which could also provide the stretch reflex threshold speed (SRTS) from flexor muscles. Functional status was measured with the Barthel index and a specific hand ability scale, pain with a visual analogue scale (VAS). The ranges of voluntary wrist extension (EROM) and flexion (FROM) and wrist isometric extension and flexion (IE-IF) strength were also calculated. IE and EROM significantly increased, being respectively p < 0.01 and p < 0.05; also SRTS was augmented (p < 0.001),while TSI showed lower values (p < 0.001); the Ashworth score decreased at least one point. Hand function for selected tasks improved in 50% of patients, the Barthel index only in 4 (22 %), forearm pain was completely relieved in 3 patients (17 %). BT can be considered a valid therapeutic tool in all spastic patients, because of immediate advantages: reduction of muscle hypertonia, pain relief, improvement in selected motor performances.

  19. Attomolar detection of botulinum toxin type A in complex biological matrices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Bagramyan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A highly sensitive, rapid and cost efficient method that can detect active botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT in complex biological samples such as foods or serum is desired in order to 1 counter the potential bioterrorist threat 2 enhance food safety 3 enable future pharmacokinetic studies in medical applications that utilize BoNTs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe a botulinum neurotoxin serotype A assay with a large immuno-sorbent surface area (BoNT/A ALISSA that captures a low number of toxin molecules and measures their intrinsic metalloprotease activity with a fluorogenic substrate. In direct comparison with the "gold standard" mouse bioassay, the ALISSA is four to five orders of magnitudes more sensitive and considerably faster. Our method reaches attomolar sensitivities in serum, milk, carrot juice, and in the diluent fluid used in the mouse assay. ALISSA has high specificity for the targeted type A toxin when tested against alternative proteases including other BoNT serotypes and trypsin, and it detects the holotoxin as well as the multi-protein complex form of BoNT/A. The assay was optimized for temperature, substrate concentration, size and volume proportions of the immuno-sorbent matrix, enrichment and reaction times. Finally, a kinetic model is presented that is consistent with the observed improvement in sensitivity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The sensitivity, specificity, speed and simplicity of the BoNT ALISSA should make this method attractive for diagnostic, biodefense and pharmacological applications.

  20. Intravesical Botulinum Toxin A Injections for Bladder Pain Syndrome/Interstitial Cystitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Controlled Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Junpeng; Wang, Qiang; Wu, Qinghui; Chen, Yang; Wu, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of intravesical botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injections in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) has not been clearly defined. The aim of this study was to evaluate high-level evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of BTX-A injections for BPS/IC. Material/Methods We conducted a comprehensive search of PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science, and conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of all available randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled st...

  1. Purification and characterization of neurotoxin complex from a dual toxin gene containing Clostridium Botulinum Strain PS-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajay K; Sachdeva, Amita; Degrasse, Jeffrey A; Croley, Timothy R; Stanker, Larry H; Hodge, David; Sharma, Shashi K

    2013-04-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are produced as a toxin complex (TC) which consists of neurotoxin (NT) and neurotoxin associated proteins. The characterization of NT in its native state is an essential step for developing diagnostics and therapeutic countermeasures against botulism. The presence of NT genes was validated by PCR amplification of toxin specific fragments from genomic DNA of Clostridium botulinum strain PS-5 which indicated the presence of both serotype A and B genes on PS-5 genome. Further, TC was purified and characterized by Western blotting, Digoxin-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, endopeptidase activity assay, and Liquid chromatography-Mass spectrometry. The data showed the presence of serotype A specific neurotoxin. Based on the analysis of neurotoxin genes and characterization of TC, PS-5 strain appears as a serotype A (B) strain of C. botulinum which produces only serotype A specific TC in the cell culture medium.

  2. The Use of Botulinum Toxin for the Treatment of Muscle Spasticity in the First 2 Years of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakheit, Abdel Magid

    2010-01-01

    Although there are sound theoretical reasons for the use of botulinum toxin (Btx) as early as possible in the management of severe childhood muscle spasticity, the experience with its safety in children younger than 2 years of age is limited and information about its possible effects on the development and maturation of the human motor system…

  3. Purification and characterization of neurotoxin complex from a dual toxin gene containing Clostridium botulinum strain PS-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are produced as a toxin complex (TC) which consists of neurotoxin (NT) and neurotoxin associated proteins (NAPs). The characterization of NT in its native state is an essential step for developing diagnostics and therapeutic countermeasures against botulism. The presenc...

  4. Influence of Botulinum Toxin Therapy on Postural Control and Lower Limb Intersegmental Coordination in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degelaen, Marc; de Borre, Ludo; Kerckhofs, Eric; de Meirleir, Linda; Buyl, Ronald; Cheron, Guy; Dan, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum toxin injections may significantly improve lower limb kinematics in gait of children with spastic forms of cerebral palsy. Here we aimed to analyze the effect of lower limb botulinum toxin injections on trunk postural control and lower limb intralimb (intersegmental) coordination in children with spastic diplegia or spastic hemiplegia (GMFCS I or II). We recorded tridimensional trunk kinematics and thigh, shank and foot elevation angles in fourteen 3–12 year-old children with spastic diplegia and 14 with spastic hemiplegia while walking either barefoot or with ankle-foot orthoses (AFO) before and after botulinum toxin infiltration according to a management protocol. We found significantly greater trunk excursions in the transverse plane (barefoot condition) and in the frontal plane (AFO condition). Intralimb coordination showed significant differences only in the barefoot condition, suggesting that reducing the degrees of freedom may limit the emergence of selective coordination. Minimal relative phase analysis showed differences between the groups (diplegia and hemiplegia) but there were no significant alterations unless the children wore AFO. We conclude that botulinum toxin injection in lower limb spastic muscles leads to changes in motor planning, including through interference with trunk stability, but a combination of therapies (orthoses and physical therapy) is needed in order to learn new motor strategies. PMID:23344454

  5. Botulinum toxin injection causes hyper-reflexia and increased muscle stiffness of the triceps surae muscle in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Wienecke, Jacob; Lorentzen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    received injection of botulinum toxin in the left triceps surae muscle. Control measurements were performed on the non-injected contralateral side in all rats. Acute experiments were performed 1, 2, 4 and 8 weeks following injection. The triceps surae muscle was dissected free, the Achilles tendon was cut...

  6. Intramural Injection with Botulinum Toxin Type A in Piglet Esophagus. The Influencer on Maximum Load and Elongation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mark Ellebæk; Qvist, Niels; Schrøder, Henrik Daa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The treatment of esophageal atresia (OA) is challenging. The main goal is to achieve primary anastomosis. We have previously demonstrated in a pig model that intramural injection of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) resulted in significant elongation of the esophagus during tensioning...

  7. The utility of EMG interference pattern analysis in botulinum toxin treatment of torticollis: A randomised, controlled and blinded study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werdelin, L; Dalager, T; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The significance of electromyography (EMG) guidance in botulinum toxin (BT) treatment has been much debated. The aim of this study was to evaluate if EMG guidance in the treatment of torticollis in BT-naive patients had a better outcome than treatment after clinical evaluation alone. M...

  8. Achieving Ideal Lower Face Aesthetic Contours: Combination of Tridimensional Fat Grafting to the Chin with Masseter Botulinum Toxin Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Shin; Kang, Gavin Chun-Wui

    2016-11-01

    Lower face aesthetic contouring is in high demand among Asians with wide and short faces desiring a slim lower face. For this purpose invasive mandible angle reduction and genioplasty are complex procedures with significant risks and downtime. Non-invasive botulinum toxin A injection into bilateral masseters - while popular for lower face contouring - does not address facial length deficiency in wide and short faces. Autologous chin fat grafting is a simple minimally-invasive technique for facial lengthening. We present our experience pairing chin fat grafting and masseteric botulinum toxin injection for effective lower face contouring. Thirteen consecutive patients with relatively wide and short faces underwent chin fat grafting and 1 to 3 serial masseteric botulinum toxin A injections. Mean follow up after final intervention was 20 months (range, 6 months to 3 years). The postoperative mean ratio of bigonial distance to total facial height improved from 0.599 to 0.569 (P tridimensional chin fat grafting and botulinum toxin masseteric injection is an effective, simple, fast, inexpensive, safe, and minimally-invasive strategy for aesthetic lower face contouring of short and wide faces, with short downtime, long-lasting results, and high patient satisfaction. 4 Therapeutic. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Influence of botulinum toxin therapy on postural control and lower limb intersegmental coordination in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degelaen, Marc; de Borre, Ludo; Kerckhofs, Eric; de Meirleir, Linda; Buyl, Ronald; Cheron, Guy; Dan, Bernard

    2013-01-11

    Botulinum toxin injections may significantly improve lower limb kinematics in gait of children with spastic forms of cerebral palsy. Here we aimed to analyze the effect of lower limb botulinum toxin injections on trunk postural control and lower limb intralimb (intersegmental) coordination in children with spastic diplegia or spastic hemiplegia (GMFCS I or II). We recorded tridimensional trunk kinematics and thigh, shank and foot elevation angles in fourteen 3-12 year-old children with spastic diplegia and 14 with spastic hemiplegia while walking either barefoot or with ankle-foot orthoses (AFO) before and after botulinum toxin infiltration according to a management protocol. We found significantly greater trunk excursions in the transverse plane (barefoot condition) and in the frontal plane (AFO condition). Intralimb coordination showed significant differences only in the barefoot condition, suggesting that reducing the degrees of freedom may limit the emergence of selective coordination. Minimal relative phase analysis showed differences between the groups (diplegia and hemiplegia) but there were no significant alterations unless the children wore AFO. We conclude that botulinum toxin injection in lower limb spastic muscles leads to changes in motor planning, including through interference with trunk stability, but a combination of therapies (orthoses and physical therapy) is needed in order to learn new motor strategies.

  10. Influence of Botulinum Toxin Therapy on Postural Control and Lower Limb Intersegmental Coordination in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Dan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin injections may significantly improve lower limb kinematics in gait of children with spastic forms of cerebral palsy. Here we aimed to analyze the effect of lower limb botulinum toxin injections on trunk postural control and lower limb intralimb (intersegmental coordination in children with spastic diplegia or spastic hemiplegia (GMFCS I or II. We recorded tridimensional trunk kinematics and thigh, shank and foot elevation angles in fourteen 3–12 year-old children with spastic diplegia and 14 with spastic hemiplegia while walking either barefoot or with ankle-foot orthoses (AFO before and after botulinum toxin infiltration according to a management protocol. We found significantly greater trunk excursions in the transverse plane (barefoot condition and in the frontal plane (AFO condition. Intralimb coordination showed significant differences only in the barefoot condition, suggesting that reducing the degrees of freedom may limit the emergence of selective coordination. Minimal relative phase analysis showed differences between the groups (diplegia and hemiplegia but there were no significant alterations unless the children wore AFO. We conclude that botulinum toxin injection in lower limb spastic muscles leads to changes in motor planning, including through interference with trunk stability, but a combination of therapies (orthoses and physical therapy is needed in order to learn new motor strategies.

  11. Dynamic computerised hand dynamometry: measuring outcomes following upper limb botulinum toxin-A injections in adults with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barden, Hannah L; Baguley, Ian J; Nott, Melissa T; Chapparo, Chrisine

    2014-04-01

    Evaluate upper limb performance in adults receiving botulinum toxin-A injections for upper limb spasticity using Dynamic Computerised Hand Dynamometry and current clinical measures. Pre-test/post-test clinical intervention study. Twenty-eight participants with spasticity following acquired brain injury. Botulinum toxin-A effects were measured 4 weeks post-injection using Dynamic Computerised Dynamometry. Current clinical upper limb performance measures spanning the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health domains were also conducted at the Body Function and Structure (Modified Ashworth Scale; Tardieu Scale) and Activity (Action Research Arm Test; Goal Attainment Scaling; patient disability and carer burden scales) domains. Dynamic Computerised Dynamometry hand performance measures were correlated with performance on current clinical measures. Significant post botulinum toxin-A changes were identified on current clinical measures and the Dynamic Computerised Dynamometry. Dynamic Computerised Dynamometry results correlated with current clinical measures demonstrating functional upper limb change across the Body Function and Structure and Activity domains. Dynamic Computerised Dynamometry sensitively assesses the effects of botulinum toxin-A on upper limb spasticity during a simple, functionally based, grasp and release task. Unlike current measures, the Dynamic Computerised Dynamometry provides information across the Body Function and Structure and Activity domains of the International Classification of Function.

  12. Single-fiber electromyography analysis of botulinum toxin diffusion in patients with fatigue and pseudobotulism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruet, Alexis; Durand, Marie Christine; Denys, Pierre; Lofaso, Frederic; Genet, François; Schnitzler, Alexis

    2015-06-01

    To characterize electromyographic abnormalities according to symptoms (asymptomatic, fatigue, pseudobotulism) reported 1 month after botulinum toxin injection. Retrospective, single-center study comparing single-fiber electromyography (SFEMG) in the extensor digitorum communis (EDC) or orbicularis oculi (OO) muscles. Hospital. Four groups of adults treated for spasticity or neurologic bladder hyperactivity (N=55): control group (asymptomatic patients: n=17), fatigue group (unusual fatigue with no weakness: n=15), pseudobotulism group (muscle weakness and/or visual disturbance: n=20), and botulism group (from intensive care unit of the same hospital: n=3). Not applicable. Mean jitter, percentage of pathologic fibers, and percentage of blocked fibers were compared between groups. SFEMG was abnormal for 17.6% of control patients and 75% of patients in the pseudobotulism group. There were no differences between the control and fatigue groups. Mean jitter, percentage of pathologic fibers, and percentage of blocked fibers of the EDC muscle were significantly higher in the pseudobotulism group than in the fatigue and control groups. There were no differences between groups for the OO muscle. The SFEMG results in the botulism group were qualitatively similar to those of the pseudobotulism group. SFEMG of the EDC muscle confirmed diffusion of the toxin into muscles distant from the injection site in the pseudobotulism group. SFEMG in the OO muscle is not useful for the diagnosis of diffusion. No major signs of diffusion of botulinum toxin type A were found away from the injection site in patients with fatigue but no motor weakness. Such fatigue may be related to other mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Food safety objective approach for controlling Clostridium botulinum growth and toxin production in commercially sterile foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, N M; Larkin, J W; Cole, M B; Skinner, G E; Whiting, R C; Gorris, L G M; Rodriguez, A; Buchanan, R; Stewart, C M; Hanlin, J H; Keener, L; Hall, P A

    2011-11-01

    As existing technologies are refined and novel microbial inactivation technologies are developed, there is a growing need for a metric that can be used to judge equivalent levels of hazard control stringency to ensure food safety of commercially sterile foods. A food safety objective (FSO) is an output-oriented metric that designates the maximum level of a hazard (e.g., the pathogenic microorganism or toxin) tolerated in a food at the end of the food supply chain at the moment of consumption without specifying by which measures the hazard level is controlled. Using a risk-based approach, when the total outcome of controlling initial levels (H(0)), reducing levels (ΣR), and preventing an increase in levels (ΣI) is less than or equal to the target FSO, the product is considered safe. A cross-disciplinary international consortium of specialists from industry, academia, and government was organized with the objective of developing a document to illustrate the FSO approach for controlling Clostridium botulinum toxin in commercially sterile foods. This article outlines the general principles of an FSO risk management framework for controlling C. botulinum growth and toxin production in commercially sterile foods. Topics include historical approaches to establishing commercial sterility; a perspective on the establishment of an appropriate target FSO; a discussion of control of initial levels, reduction of levels, and prevention of an increase in levels of the hazard; and deterministic and stochastic examples that illustrate the impact that various control measure combinations have on the safety of well-established commercially sterile products and the ways in which variability all levels of control can heavily influence estimates in the FSO risk management framework. This risk-based framework should encourage development of innovative technologies that result in microbial safety levels equivalent to those achieved with traditional processing methods.

  14. Botulinum Toxin Type A for the Treatment of Neuropathic Pain in Neuro-Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Intiso

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pain is a natural protective mechanism and has a warning function signaling imminent or actual tissue damage. Neuropathic pain (NP results from a dysfunction and derangement in the transmission and signal processing along the nervous system and it is a recognized disease in itself. The prevalence of NP is estimated to be between 6.9% and 10% in the general population. This condition can complicate the recovery from stroke, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord lesions, and several neuropathies promoting persistent disability and poor quality of life. Subjects suffering from NP describe it as burning, itching, lancing, and numbness, but hyperalgesia and allodynia represent the most bothersome symptoms. The management of NP is a clinical challenge and several non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions have been proposed with variable benefits. Botulinum toxin (BTX as an adjunct to other interventions can be a useful therapeutic tool for the treatment of disabled people. Although BTX-A is predominantly used to reduce spasticity in a neuro-rehabilitation setting, it has been used in several painful conditions including disorders characterized by NP. The underlying pharmacological mechanisms that operate in reducing pain are still unclear and include blocking nociceptor transduction, the reduction of neurogenic inflammation by inhibiting neural substances and neurotransmitters, and the prevention of peripheral and central sensitization. Some neurological disorders requiring rehabilitative intervention can show neuropathic pain resistant to common analgesic treatment. This paper addresses the effect of BTX-A in treating NP that complicates frequent disorders of the central and peripheral nervous system such as spinal cord injury, post-stroke shoulder pain, and painful diabetic neuropathy, which are commonly managed in a rehabilitation setting. Furthermore, BTX-A has an effect in relief pain that may characterize less common neurological disorders

  15. Toxin occurrence time in relation to sensorial changes in meat cans contaminated with Clostridium botulinum type B endospores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palec, W

    1996-01-01

    The study concerning dissemination and expansion of spore-forming rods and the possibility of botulinum toxin occurrence was performed on meat cans model contaminated experimentally with Clostridium botulinum type B366 toxigenic strain endospores. Meat cans were contaminated with the spore suspension of 4 x 10(3) spores per can and they were stored at 30 degrees C. Methodically visible toxigenicity (biological assay performed on white mice) took place in 84.3% cases by the time deformation of contaminated cans took place. When the first can bulging occurred almost 50% of contaminated cans were sensorially estimated as useful for consumption but almost 40% of them already contained toxin. In comparison to contaminated cans estimated sensorially as useful for consumption (in each experimental group) the percentage was established where the presence of toxin was determined as "consumer's risk". The mean value of those percentages was 76.4% for all experimental groups. In the studies on the vegetation dynamics and C. botulinum rods and toxin expansion in contaminated cans, we demonstrated the spore-forming rods dissemination, as well as limited range of toxin occurrence. Undertaken studies demonstrate that the process of toxigenicity often precede of accumulation of metabolic gases responsible for cans' deformation, as well as generation of visible sensorial changes which disqualified the contaminated cans for consumption.

  16. Physical therapies as an adjunct to Botulinum toxin-A injection of the upper or lower limb in adults following neurological impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinnear Bianca Z

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spasticity of muscles is a common consequence of central nervous system impairment. Traditionally, neurological rehabilitation for spasticity has involved occupational and physical therapy; however, increasingly Botulinum toxin–A injections may be provided. Injection effects are temporary. Consequently, understanding the effect of adjunct physical therapies will help inform multimodal rehabilitation decisions. Presently, these effects are not known. This systematic review will identify and summarize evidence on physical therapies used after Botulinum toxin-A injection to improve motor function in adults with neurological impairments. Method Systematic searching of seven electronic databases will occur to identify relevant randomized trials. Available trial data will be extracted into a list of pre-defined primary outcomes, including range of movement, spasticity and functional limb use. Pre-defined secondary outcomes will also be reviewed where trials have these data available for reporting. Effects will be expressed as mean differences or standardized mean differences with 95% confidence intervals (CI. Where possible, comparable results will be meta-analyzed, and a summary of the available pool of evidence produced. All randomized controlled trials will be rated using the PEDro methodological quality scale. Where possible, study data will be meta-analyzed using RevMan 5 Software. The protocol was registered in PROSPERO international prosepective register of systematic reviews (PROSPERO 2011:CRD42011001491. Discussion Review results will be the most comprehensive answer available to the following question: Are physical therapies clinically effective after Botulinum toxin-A injections in adults with neurological spasticity? Results will inform healthcare providers and managers who determine who gets access to and provision of Botulinum toxin-A injection and whether this is done with or without physical therapies. Results

  17. Growth of and toxin production by nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum in cooked puréed vegetables at refrigeration temperatures.

    OpenAIRE

    Carlin, F; Peck, M W

    1996-01-01

    Seven strains of nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum (types B, E, and F) were each inoculated into a range of anaerobic cooked puréed vegetables. After incubation at 10 degrees C for 15 to 60 days, all seven strains formed toxin in mushrooms, five did so in broccoli, four did so in cauliflower, three did so in asparagus, and one did so in kale. Growth kinetics of nonproteolytic C. botulinum type B in cooked mushrooms, cauliflower, and potatoes were determined at 16, 10, 8, and 5 degrees C. G...

  18. Comparison of Efficacy and Side Effects of Oral Baclofen Versus Tizanidine Therapy with Adjuvant Botulinum Toxin Type A in Children With Cerebral Palsy and Spastic Equinus Foot Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Alper I; Aksoy, Sefika N; Demiryürek, Abdullah T

    2016-02-01

    This retrospective study aimed to compare the therapeutic response, including side effects, for oral baclofen versus oral tizanidine therapy with adjuvant botulinum toxin type A in a group of 64 pediatric patients diagnosed with static encephalopathy and spastic equinus foot deformity. Following botulinum toxin A treatment, clinical improvement led to the gradual reduction of baclofen or tizanidine dosing to one-third of the former dose. Gross Motor Functional Measure and Caregiver Health Questionnaire scores were markedly elevated post-botulinum toxin A treatment, with scores for the tizanidine (Gross Motor Functional Measure: 74.45 ± 3.72; Caregiver Health Questionnaire: 72.43 ± 4.29) group significantly higher than for the baclofen group (Gross Motor Functional Measure: 68.23 ± 2.66; Caregiver Health Questionnaire: 67.53 ± 2.67, P effective and has fewer side effects versus baclofen with adjuvant botulinum toxin A. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. A Case of Painful Hemimasticatory Spasm with Masseter Muscle Hypertrophy Responsive to Botulinum Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Hyuck Kim

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Hemimasticatory spasm (HMS is a rare disorder of the trigeminal nerve characterized by paroxysmal involuntary contractions of the unilateral jaw-closing muscles. HMS has been frequently described in association with facial hemiatrophy or localized scleroderma. A 42-year-old female presented with involuntary paroxysmal spasms of the left face, of 6 months duration. Her lower face on the left was markedly hypertrophied without skin lesions. An electrophysiological study indicated that the masseter reflexes and masseteric silent period were attenuated on the affected side. Surface electromyography demonstrated irregular bursts of motor unit potentials at high frequencies up to 200 Hz. Magnetic resonance imaging of the head showed marked hypertrophy of the left masseter muscle. Biopsy of the hypertrophied masseter muscle was normal. Repeated local injections of botulinum toxin noticeably reduced the size of the hypertrophied muscle as well as improved the patient’s symptoms.

  20. Effects of botulinum toxin type A on healing of injured skeletal muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokravi Ramin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: (1 Evaluation of microscopic healing of skeletal muscle fibers after injuries, especially the arrangement of new muscle fibers and scar tissue diameter in the injury region. (2 Evaluation of alterations in microscopy of the healing procedure within skeletal muscles after injury following botulinum toxin type A (BTX -A induced muscle immobilization. Materials and Methods: The study was done on 12 white lab rabbits of either sex in a 6-month period. Results: The immobilization of skeletal muscle fibers as a result of the use of BTX-A after injury caused a qualitative increase in fibrous tissue formation in the area of injury, and the BTX-A-induced immobilization for a period of 6 months led to muscle atrophy.

  1. Role of medical thermography in treatment of Frey's syndrome with botulinum toxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Richard James; Endersby, Simon; Allen, John; Adams, James

    2014-01-01

    Frey syndrome classically causes gustatory sweating and facial flushing. We describe 2 cases in which medical thermography was used to investigate the symptoms. Images were taken after patients chewed a sialagogue and 2 weeks later they were given injections of botulinum toxin A. Images taken 4 weeks after treatment showed a considerable reduction in sweating and facial flushing, which was supported by the results of quality of life questionnaires completed before and after treatment. Medical thermography is much cleaner than the Minor's starch iodine test. It identifies areas of gustatory sweating, changes in temperature, and vascular changes, which potentially enable treatment to be targeted accurately. Copyright © 2013 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Tetanus toxin : primary structure, expression in E. coli, and homology with botulinum toxins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisel, Ulrich; Jarausch, Wolfgang; Goretzki, Karin; Henschen, Agnes; Engels, Joachim; Weller, Ulrich; Hudel, Martina; Habermann, Ernst; Niemann, Heiner; Rott, R.

    1986-01-01

    A pool of synthetic oligonucleotides was used to identify the gene encoding tetanus toxin on a 75-kbp plasmid from a toxigenic non-sporulating strain of Clostridium tetani. The nucleotide sequence contained a single open reading frame coding for 1315 amino acids corresponding to a polypeptide with a

  3. Diffusion of two botulinum toxins type A on the forehead: double-blinded, randomized, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hai-Yan; Chen, Shujun; Zhou, Jun; Leung, Kong Kwok; Yu, Peiying

    2014-02-01

    Different diffusion of different botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) preparations may account for differences in outcomes in cosmetic clinical practice. A double-blind, randomized, self-controlled study was performed to evaluate the diffusion characteristics of onabotulinumtoxinA and a Chinese type A botulinum toxin (CBTX-A). Healthy volunteers (N = 20) were recruited to receive a 0.05-mL (2 U) injection of BoTNA at four forehead sites (medial forehead (subcutaneous (SC)) and temporal forehead (intradermal (ID))). On day 14, the Minor's iodine starch test was performed and photographs were taken for calculating the area and dimensions of anhydrotic area. When BoNTAs were different, the anhidrosis ID area was significantly greater with CBTX-A than onabotulinumtoxinA, the vertical dimension was significantly longer with CBTX-A ID than onabotulinumtoxinA ID and the horizontal dimension was significantly greater with CBTX-A ID than onabotulinumtoxinA ID. The area of anhidrosis SC was significantly greater with CBTX-A than onabotulinumtoxinA. When injection depths were different, the mean horizontal dimension was significantly greater with onabotulinumtoxinA SC than ID. Comparing the dimension of the same BoNTA and injection method, the vertical dimension was significantly greater than the horizontal dimension. OnabotulinumtoxinA diffuses less than CBTX-A. ID injection technique may result in less diffusion than SC. © 2013 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Experience with different botulinum toxins for the treatment of refractory neurogenic detrusor overactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano M. Gomes

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To report our experience with the use of the botulinum toxin-A (BoNT/A formulations Botox® and Prosigne® in the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO. MATERIALS AND METHODS: At a single institution, 45 consecutive patients with refractory urinary incontinence due to NDO received a single intradetrusor (excluding the trigone treatment with botulinum toxin type A 200 or 300 units. Botox was used for the first 22 patients, and Prosigne for the subsequent 23 patients. Evaluations at baseline and week 12 included assessment of continence and urodynamics. Safety evaluations included monitoring of vital signs, hematuria during the procedure, hospital stay, and spontaneous adverse event reports. RESULTS: A total of 42 patients were evaluated (74% male; mean age, 34.8 years. Significant improvements from baseline in maximum cystometric capacity (MCC, maximum detrusor pressure during bladder contraction, and compliance were observed in both groups (P < 0.05. Improvement in MCC was significantly greater with Botox versus Prosigne (+103.3% vs. +42.2%; P = 0.019. Continence was achieved by week 12 in 16 Botox recipients (76.2% and 10 Prosigne recipients (47.6%; P = 0.057. No severe adverse events were observed. Mild adverse events included 2 cases of transient hematuria on the first postoperative day (no specific treatment required, and 3 cases of afebrile urinary tract infection. CONCLUSIONS: Botox and Prosigne produce distinct effects in patients with NDO, with a greater increase in MCC with Botox. Further evaluation will be required to assess differences between these formulations.

  5. Long-term results of vertical rectus muscle transposition and botulinum toxin for sixth nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiba, Hana; Wirth, Gabriela M; Amstutz, Christoph; Landau, Klara

    2010-12-01

    To report the long-term outcome of full-tendon vertical rectus muscle transposition combined with chemodenervation of the ipsilateral medial rectus muscle for acquired chronic sixth (abducens) nerve palsy. A retrospective study of all patients treated for severe abduction deficit with transposition plus botulinum toxin over the course of 11 years. Minimum follow-up was 12 months. Main outcome measures were the surgical result and its stability. A total of 22 patients were included. Mean age at the time of surgery was 41.7 ± 19.1 years (range, 4.5-69). The etiologies for the palsy were head trauma (11), tumor (10), and idiopathic (1). Mean follow-up time was 44.2 ± 37.4 months (range, 12-123). The average distance deviation was 38.1(Δ) ± 11.6(Δ) preoperatively, 4.0(Δ) ± 16.1(Δ) 3 months after the operation (p = 0.0004), and 7.9(Δ) ± 8.8(Δ) at 12 months (p = 0.0003), with no subsequent change. At the final examination, on average 44.2 months after the operation, 13 patients (59%) were within 10(Δ) of alignment, 2 (1%) were overcorrected, and 7 (32%) had vertical deviations. The majority of patients (73%) had no double vision in the primary position. No patient developed anterior segment ischemia. Vertical rectus muscle transposition combined with intraoperative botulinum toxin injection into the ipsilateral medial rectus muscle improved alignment in patients with complete chronic sixth nerve palsy. While the effects of treatment may have diminished slightly during the first year after surgery, they remained stable thereafter. Copyright © 2010 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Severity of cerebral palsy and likelihood of adverse events after botulinum toxin A injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinney, Caitlyn M; Bau, Karen; Burton, Karen L Oakley; O'Flaherty, Stephen J; Bear, Natasha L; Paget, Simon P

    2018-05-01

    To determine the incidence of common adverse events after botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) injections in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and to identify whether the severity of CP influences the incidence of adverse events. This was an observational study of patients attending a BoNT-A clinic at a tertiary paediatric hospital (2010-2014). Data examined included procedural adverse events at the time of injection and at follow-up. Systemic adverse events were defined as lower respiratory tract illnesses, generalized weakness, dysphagia, and death. Severity of CP was categorized by the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS). The relationships between GMFCS and adverse events were analysed using negative binomial regression models. In total, 591 children underwent 2219 injection episodes. Adverse events were reported during the procedure (130 [6%] injection episodes) and at follow-up (492 [22%] injection episodes). There were significantly increased rates of systemic adverse events in injection episodes involving children in GMFCS level IV (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 3.92 [95% confidence interval] 1.45-10.57]) and GMFCS level V (IRR 7.37 [95% confidence interval 2.90-18.73]; p<0.001). Adverse events after BoNT-A injections are common but mostly mild and self-limiting. Children in GMFCS levels IV and V are at increased risk of systemic adverse events. The relationship between CP severity and BoNT-A adverse events is complex and further research is required to better understand this relationship. Adverse events reported at the time of botulinum toxin A injection occurred in 6% of injection episodes. Adverse events were reported at follow-up in 22% of injection episodes. Children in Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels IV and V have increased rates of systemic adverse events. Children in GMFCS levels IV and V report less local weakness and pain. © 2018 Mac Keith Press.

  7. Experience with botulinum toxin therapy for axillary hyperhidrosis and comparison to modelled data for endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy - A quality of life and cost effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, John P; Nugent, Emmeline; O'Donohoe, Nollaig; Maher, Barry; Egan, Bridget; Feeley, Martin; Tierney, Sean

    2016-10-01

    To estimate cost-effectiveness of botulinum toxin therapy for axillary hyperhidrosis compared to the standard surgical intervention of endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS). The validated dermatology life quality index questionnaire was given to patients attending for treatment over a 4 month period, to assess their quality of life (QoL) over the preceding week (n = 44). Follow-up was performed 4-6 weeks later by telephone using the same questionnaire to validate the effectiveness of the treatment. The duration of effect of the botulinum toxin treatment was also recorded and this data was used as the basis for cost effectiveness analysis. Using HIPE data, the baseline cost for single intervention using botulinum toxin and ETS was retrieved. Using figures provided by HIPE and expert opinion of the costs of complications, a stochastic model for 10,000 patients was used to evaluate the total costs for ETS including the complications. The results from the QoL analysis show that botulinum toxin therapy is a successful therapy for improvement of symptoms. It was revealed that the mean interval before recurrence of original symptoms after botulinum toxin therapy was 5.6 months. The baseline cost for both treatments are €389 for botulinum toxin and €9389 for uncomplicated ETS. The stochastic model yields a mean cost of €11,390 for ETS including complications. Treatments reached cost equivalence after 13.3 years. However, given the efficacy of the botulinum toxin therapy and the low risk we propose that botulinum toxin therapy for hyperhidrosis should be considered the gold standard. Copyright © 2015 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Structural constraints-based evaluation of immunogenic avirulent toxins from Clostridium botulinum C2 and C3 toxins as subunit vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisilla, A; Prathiviraj, R; Sasikala, R; Chellapandi, P

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium botulinum (group-III) is an anaerobic bacterium producing C2 and C3 toxins in addition to botulinum neurotoxins in avian and mammalian cells. C2 and C3 toxins are members of bacterial ADP-ribosyltransferase superfamily, which modify the eukaryotic cell surface proteins by ADP-ribosylation reaction. Herein, the mutant proteins with lack of catalytic and pore forming function derived from C2 (C2I and C2II) and C3 toxins were computationally evaluated to understand their structure-function integrity. We have chosen many structural constraints including local structural environment, folding process, backbone conformation, conformational dynamic sub-space, NAD-binding specificity and antigenic determinants for screening of suitable avirulent toxins. A total of 20 avirulent mutants were identified out of 23 mutants, which were experimentally produced by site-directed mutagenesis. No changes in secondary structural elements in particular to α-helices and β-sheets and also in fold rate of all-β classes. Structural stability was maintained by reordered hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding patterns. Molecular dynamic studies suggested that coupled mutations may restrain the binding affinity to NAD(+) or protein substrate upon structural destabilization. Avirulent toxins of this study have stable energetic backbone conformation with a common blue print of folding process. Molecular docking studies revealed that avirulent mutants formed more favorable hydrogen bonding with the side-chain of amino acids near to conserved NAD-binding core, despite of restraining NAD-binding specificity. Thus, structural constraints in the avirulent toxins would determine their immunogenic nature for the prioritization of protein-based subunit vaccine/immunogens to avian and veterinary animals infected with C. botulinum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of a Botulinum Neurotoxin-like Toxin in a Commensal Strain of Enterococcus faecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sicai; Lebreton, Francois; Mansfield, Michael J; Miyashita, Shin-Ichiro; Zhang, Jie; Schwartzman, Julia A; Tao, Liang; Masuyer, Geoffrey; Martínez-Carranza, Markel; Stenmark, Pål; Gilmore, Michael S; Doxey, Andrew C; Dong, Min

    2018-02-14

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), produced by various Clostridium strains, are a family of potent bacterial toxins and potential bioterrorism agents. Here we report that an Enterococcus faecium strain isolated from cow feces carries a BoNT-like toxin, designated BoNT/En. It cleaves both VAMP2 and SNAP-25, proteins that mediate synaptic vesicle exocytosis in neurons, at sites distinct from known BoNT cleavage sites on these two proteins. Comparative genomic analysis determines that the E. faecium strain carrying BoNT/En is a commensal type and that the BoNT/En gene is located within a typical BoNT gene cluster on a 206 kb putatively conjugative plasmid. Although the host species targeted by BoNT/En remains to be determined, these findings establish an extended member of BoNTs and demonstrate the capability of E. faecium, a commensal organism ubiquitous in humans and animals and a leading cause of hospital-acquired multi-drug-resistant (MDR) infections, to horizontally acquire, and possibly disseminate, a unique BoNT gene cluster. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the HA3 component of Clostridium botulinum type C progenitor toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Toshio; Tonozuka, Takashi; Kotani, Mao; Obata, Kanae [Department of Applied Biological Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Oguma, Keiji [Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Nishikawa, Atsushi, E-mail: nishikaw@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Department of Applied Biological Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan)

    2007-12-01

    HA3, a 70 kDa haemagglutinating protein, is a precursor form of HA3a and HA3b, the subcomponents of Clostridium botulinum type C 16S progenitor toxin. In this report, recombinant HA3 protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. HA3, a 70 kDa haemagglutinating protein, is a precursor form of HA3a and HA3b, the subcomponents of Clostridium botulinum type C 16S progenitor toxin. In this report, recombinant HA3 protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.6 Å resolution and the crystal belonged to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 3}. Matthews coefficient and self-rotation function calculations indicate that there is probably one molecule of HA3 in the asymmetric unit. A search for heavy-atom derivatives has been undertaken.

  11. Muscle disuse caused by botulinum toxin injection leads to increased central gain of the stretch reflex in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Hultborn, Hans; Naslund-Koch, Lui

    2017-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (Btx) is used in children with cerebral palsy and other neurological patients to diminish spasticity and reduce the risk of development of contractures. Here, we investigated changes in the central gain of the stretch reflex circuitry in response to botulinum toxin injection...... in the triceps surae muscle in rats. Experiments were performed in 21 rats. 8 rats were in a control group and 13 rats were injected with 6 IU of Btx in the left triceps surae muscle. Two weeks after Btx injection larger monosynaptic reflexes (MSR) were recorded from the left (injected) than the right (non....... However, significant changes were also observed in post-activation depression of the MSR suggesting that plastic changes in transmission from Ia afferent to the motor neurons may also be involved. The data demonstrate that muscle paralysis induced by Btx injection is accompanied by plastic adaptations...

  12. Side effects and potential risk factors of botulinum toxin type A intramuscular injections in knee flexion contractures of hemophiliacs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos; De la Corte-Rodriguez, Hortensia

    2017-07-01

    Knee flexion contracture (KFC) is a common complication of recurrent hemarthrosis in children and young adults with hemophilia. If the KFC is not prevented (by means of primary prophylaxis) and treated properly and early (be means of physical medicine and rehabilitation), it will become fixed. Areas covered: The aim of this article is to review the potential role of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) intramuscular injections for the treatment of KFC in people with hemophilia (PWH). Expert commentary: Although two recent reports have mentioned the benefits of intramuscular injections of BTX-A in PWH with KFC, the data are still scant and too preliminary. The use of intramuscular injections of BTX-A in PWH today should not be recommended until more case studies/small series (ideally well-designed clinical trials) fully demonstrate that this is safe and effective. The risks of intramuscular injections to a hemophilia patient cannot be underestimated (iatrogenic muscle hematomas and pseudotumors). This paper calls the attention of hemophilia treaters on the potential risks of this apparently interesting technique. The current use of BTX-A intramuscular injections in KFC of PWH could make no sense. Raising false expectations in these patients should be avoided.

  13. A Review of Thoracic Outlet Syndrome and the Possible Role of Botulinum Toxin in the Treatment of This Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Travlos

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to discuss the classification, diagnosis, pathophysiology and management of Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS. Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS is a complex entity that is characterized by different neurovascular signs and symptoms involving the upper limb. TOS is defined as upper extremity symptoms due to compression of the neurovascular bundle in the area of the neck just above the first rib. Compression is thought to occur at one or more of the three anatomical compartments: the interscalene triangle, the costoclavicular space and the retropectoralis minor spaces. The clinical presentation can include both neurogenic and vascular symptoms. TOS can be difficult to diagnose because there is no standardized objective test that can be used and the clinician must rely on history and several positive findings on physical exam. The medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve conduction may be a sensitive way to detect pathology in the lower trunks of the brachial plexus which is promising for future research. Treatment options continue to be conservative and surgical. However, for those who have failed physical therapy there is research to suggest that botulinum toxin may help with symptom relief. However, given that there has been conflicting evidence, further research is required using randomized controlled trials.

  14. Electrical Stimulation Following Botulinum Toxin A in Children With Spastic Diplegia: A Within-Participant Randomized Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudge, Anita; Harvey, Lisa A; Lancaster, Ann; Lowe, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether electrical stimulation (ES) following botulinum toxin A (BoNT/A) injection increases passive extensibility of the hamstring muscles in children with spastic diplegia. Six children undergoing bilateral BoNT/A injections to the hamstrings participated in this within-participant single blind randomized controlled trial. One leg of each child was randomised to the experimental condition and the other to the control condition. The experimental leg received daily stretch and ES to the hamstrings for 12 weeks, while the control leg received only daily stretch. The primary outcome was passive hamstring extensibility reflected by popliteal angle measured with a standardised torque. Secondary outcomes were two goniometric measures of popliteal angle using the Modified Tardieu Scale (R1 and R2), and parents' perceptions of treatment effectiveness. Outcomes were measured at baseline, 4 weeks, 12 weeks and 6 months. The mean between-group difference (95% CI) at 4 weeks was 2° (-2 to 5) for popliteal angle measured with a standardised torque, favouring the experimental leg. Tardieu results for R1 and R2 were 0° (-4 to 3) and 7° (0 to 14), respectively. ES does not improve passive extensibility of the hamstring muscles at 4 weeks over any possible effects of BoNT/A alone.

  15. Comparison of microwave ablation, botulinum toxin injection, and liposuction-curettage in the treatment of axillary hyperhidrosis: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Marwan W; Jabbour, Samer F; Haber, Roger N; Kechichian, Elio G; El Hachem, Lena

    2017-02-01

    Primary focal axillary hyperhidrosis is a disorder of excessive sweating that can strongly impact quality of life. The objective if this study was to compare microwave ablation (MA), botulinum toxin (BT) injection, and liposuction-curettage (LC) in the treatment of primary axillary hyperhidrosis based on subjective and objective criteria. A systematic review of the literature published in French or English between 1 January 1991 and 1 February 2015 was completed using PubMed and Embase databases. 16 of 775 articles were selected based on relevance and criteria of inclusion and exclusion. The three methods proved to be efficient and safe; however, MA and BT had better results when compared to LC in the short term. Both MA and LC showed longer lasting results when compared to BT. However, in the long term, MA was superior to LC. MA, LC, and BT injections are safe and efficient minimally invasive alternatives for the treatment of axillary hyperhidrosis. Well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to further compare the efficacy of these techniques.

  16. Comparison of different antibiotic protocols for asymptomatic bacteriuria in patients with neurogenic bladder treated with botulinum toxin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia Paradella

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Intravesical botulinum toxin A (BoNTA injection has been widely used for the treatment of detrusor overactivity in patients with neurogenic bladder due to spinal cord injury who do not respond to conventional treatment. There is no consensus about antibiotic prophylaxis for this procedure. We conducted a retrospective analysis of medical records of adult patients with spinal cord injury who underwent detrusor BoNTA injection between January of 2007 and December of 2013 in a rehabilitation hospital. Occurrence of symptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI was assessed in 3 groups in accordance with their use of antibiotics (prophylactic dosage, 3 days, more than 3 days for the treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria. All patients were performing self or assisted clean intermittent bladder catheterization and underwent a rigid cystoscopy, under general or regional anesthesia with sedation, and the drug used was Botox®. A total of 616 procedures were performed during the study period. There were 11 identified cases of UTI (1.8% with a trend to a higher rate in the group that used antibiotics for longer time. This report shows that a single dose of antibiotics before the detrusor BoNTA injection is enough to prevent UTI. Randomized clinical trial should be conducted for definitive conclusions.

  17. Comparison of different antibiotic protocols for asymptomatic bacteriuria in patients with neurogenic bladder treated with botulinum toxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradella, Ana Claudia; Musegante, André Ferraz de Arruda; Brites, Carlos

    Intravesical botulinum toxin A (BoNTA) injection has been widely used for the treatment of detrusor overactivity in patients with neurogenic bladder due to spinal cord injury who do not respond to conventional treatment. There is no consensus about antibiotic prophylaxis for this procedure. We conducted a retrospective analysis of medical records of adult patients with spinal cord injury who underwent detrusor BoNTA injection between January of 2007 and December of 2013 in a rehabilitation hospital. Occurrence of symptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI) was assessed in 3 groups in accordance with their use of antibiotics (prophylactic dosage, 3 days, more than 3 days) for the treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria. All patients were performing self or assisted clean intermittent bladder catheterization and underwent a rigid cystoscopy, under general or regional anesthesia with sedation, and the drug used was Botox ® . A total of 616 procedures were performed during the study period. There were 11 identified cases of UTI (1.8%) with a trend to a higher rate in the group that used antibiotics for longer time. This report shows that a single dose of antibiotics before the detrusor BoNTA injection is enough to prevent UTI. Randomized clinical trial should be conducted for definitive conclusions. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Botulinum Toxin Type a Injection, Followed by Home-Based Functional Training for Upper Limb Hemiparesis after Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takekawa, Toru; Kakuda, Wataru; Taguchi, Kensuke; Ishikawa, Atsushi; Sase, Yousuke; Abo, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been reported to be an effective treatment for limb spasticity after stroke. However, the reduction in the spasticity after BoNT-A injection alone does not ensure an improvement in the active motor function of the affected limb. The aim of this study was to clarify the clinical effects of a BoNT-A injection,…

  19. Physical Therapy for an Adult with Chronic Stroke after Botulinum Toxin Injection for Spasticity: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Gallagher, Shannon; Phadke, Chetan P.; Ismail, Farooq; Boulias, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In this case report, we describe the type and duration of a physical therapy and botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) intervention directed at lower limb spasticity and the gait and balance improvement in a patient post-stroke. Treatment of focal spasticity with BoNTA intramuscular injections combined with physical therapy is recommended by rehabilitation experts. However, the optimal type and duration of physical therapy intervention to optimize any functional gains that follow chemodener...

  20. A literature review on the efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin: An injection in post-stroke spasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Majid Ghasemi; Mehri Salari; Fariborz Khorvash; Vahid Shaygannejad

    2013-01-01

    Background: A variety of techniques for the management of spasticity have been suggested, including positioning, cryotherapy, splinting and casting, biofeedback, electrical stimulation, and medical management by pharmacological agents, Botulinum toxin A (BTA) is now the pharmacological treatment of choice in focal spasticity. BTA by blocking acetylcholine release at neuromuscular junctions accounts for its therapeutic action to relieve spasticity. Methods: A computerized search of Pub Me...

  1. Minimal Essential Domains Specifying Toxicity of the Light Chains of Tetanus Toxin and Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurazono, Hisao; Mochida, Sumiko; Binz, Thomas; Eisel, Ulrich; Quanz, Martin; Grebenstein, Oliver; Wernars, Karel; Poulain, Bernard; Tauc, Ladislav; Niemann, Heiner

    1992-01-01

    To define conserved domains within the light (L) chains of clostridial neurotoxins, we determined the sequence of botulinum neurotoxin type B (BoNT/B) and aligned it with those of tetanus toxin (TeTx) and BoNT/A, BoNT/Cl, BoNT/D, and BoNT/E. The L chains of BoNT/B and TeTx share 51.6% identical

  2. [Usefulness of botulinum toxin injections in the treatment of postoperative pain after cervical spine surgery: Preliminary results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finiels, P-J; Batifol, D

    2010-10-01

    Postoperative neck pain after cervical spinal surgery is a common occurrence, the prevalence of which can reach up to 60%. Since 2005 a prospective study, still in progress, is attempting to show the efficacy of botulinum toxin injections in its treatment. Two hundred and fifteen patients operated on in the same institution for cervical spondylotic myelopathy were prospectively followed-up; 38 of them presented postoperative neck pain and were enrolled either in a course of botulinum toxin injections (19) or in conservative treatment (19). The muscles injected, in descending order, were: trapezius, supraspinalis, splenius capitis, and rhomboids. Injections were made using Type A-botulinum toxin (Botox*-Allergan Pharmaceuticals, Westport, Ireland), increasing from 20 to 100U Botox* without exceeding 300U once in the same patient, performed every 3 months if necessary. The conservative treatment consisted of a course of thiocolchicoside (16mg/day) and physical rehabilitation. The lordosis angle was calculated on lateral sitting radiographs in the neutral position immediately postoperatively and 1.5 months after injection and correlated to pain improvement evaluated by the visual analogic scale (VAS). No visible improvement was found on x-rays in three patients after injection, and in 11 after conservative treatment. In 16 cases, after an average of three injections, the gain in lordosis averaged 11.3° and the VAS score was decreased by 4.6 points versus 4.7° and a decrease of 0.6 points after conservative treatment. Regardless of its limitations, the present study would seem to show potential value in the use of botulinum toxin in the treatment of postoperative pain after cervical spinal surgery. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. A prospective study of the use of botulinum toxin injections in the treatment of Raynaud's syndrome associated with scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, L; Dhaliwal, K; Butler, P E

    2014-10-01

    Raynaud's syndrome contributes to the pain, paraesthesia, ulceration, and gangrene of scleroderma. Botulinum toxin has been shown to improve digital perfusion in patients with Raynaud's. This is the first study to objectively assess hand function following this treatment in patients with scleroderma. Twenty patients were treated with 100 units of botulinum toxin injected into the hand. An assessment of hand function and symptoms was performed prior to injection and then 8-12 weeks later. The outcomes assessed were change in pain, appearance, cold intolerance, pinch and power grip, ranges of movement, and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score. In total, 80% of patients reported an overall improvement in their symptoms, reduction in pain, and improved DASH score and 65% reported improvement in cold intolerance. Overall, 90% showed an improvement in pinch grip and 65% an improvement in power grip. Objective parameters were statistically significantly improved; however, subjective outcomes only showed a trend. We have found botulinum toxin to be an effective treatment for Raynaud's syndrome secondary to scleroderma. © The Author(s) 2013.

  4. Long-term sequelae treatment of peripheral facial paralysis with botulinum toxin type A: Repartition and kinetics of doses used.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risoud, M; Aljudaibi, N; Duquennoy-Martinot, V; Guerreschi, P

    2016-02-01

    Botulinum toxin is a key therapeutic tool in the comprehensive treatment of peripheral facial paralysis. It fights spasms, synkinesis and overactivity of the different skin muscles responsible of facial expressions. Even though injection techniques as well as target muscles have been well identified, doses used remain quite imprecise and often not detailed muscle by muscle, further more dosage progression has not been monitored over time. Our retrospective study is the first one to refine the repartition of botulinum toxin doses on each of the relevant skin muscles and assess dosage kinetics. Thirty patients were included since 2008 with a mean follow-up of 2.3years. Each patient had at least 3 injections, with a delay of 4 to 6months between each injection. Mean doses are indicated for each muscle injected on the paralyzed and healthy sides. Dose kinetics suggests an initial dosage increase after the first injection followed by a decrease over time. No treatment resistance was observed. Our study represents a didactic help in using botulinum toxin for sequelae of peripheral facial paralysis by providing more details on the effective mean doses for each muscle and their progression over time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin A Treatment for Pes Varus during Gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanikawa, Hiroki; Kagaya, Hitoshi; Saitoh, Eiichi; Ozaki, Kenichi; Hirano, Satoshi; Itoh, Norihide; Yamada, Junya; Kanada, Yoshikiyo

    2015-10-01

    The efficacy of botulinum toxin A (BoNTA) injection on spasticity is usually measured using Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), but this only evaluates muscle tone at rest and has poor reliability. There are no reports that quantitatively evaluate pes varus during walking after botulinum treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of BoNTA injection on pes varus during gait using 3-dimensional motion analysis. Twenty-four hemiplegic patients with spastic pes varus deformity during gait received BoNTA injection into lower limb muscles. MAS score, comfortable overground gait velocity, and pes varus angle during treadmill walking were evaluated before, 2, 6, and 12 weeks after the injection. Five healthy subjects were also recruited to develop the pes varus/valgus angle as a normal reference. The median MAS scores were significantly lower at 2 and 6 weeks after the injection. The maximum pes varus angle during the swing phase was significantly lower at 2, 6, and 12 weeks after the injection. It was significantly lower at 6 weeks after the injection during stance phase. The comfortable overground gait velocity was also improved after the injection. However, 2 patients experienced pain during gait and their pes varus angle increased during the follow-up period. BoNTA injection improved pes varus angle during gait. Evaluating motion in addition to spasticity at rest is recommended because improvements in limb function do not always parallel improvements in spasticity at rest. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Botulinum toxin type A products are not interchangeable: a review of the evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brin MF

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitchell F Brin,1,2 Charmaine James,3 John Maltman1 1Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA, USA; 2Department of Neurology, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA; 3Allergan, Marlow, UKAbstract: Botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA products are injectable biologic medications derived from Clostridium botulinum bacteria. Several different BoNTA products are marketed in various countries, and they are not interchangeable. Differences between products include manufacturing processes, formulations, and the assay methods used to determine units of biological activity. These differences result in a specific set of interactions between each BoNTA product and the tissue injected. Consequently, the products show differences in their in vivo profiles, including preclinical dose response curves and clinical dosing, efficacy, duration, and safety/adverse events. Most, but not all, published studies document these differences, suggesting that individual BoNTA products act differently depending on experimental and clinical conditions, and these differences may not always be predictable. Differentiation through regulatory approvals provides a measure of confidence in safety and efficacy at the specified doses for each approved indication. Moreover, the products differ in the amount of study to which they have been subjected, as evidenced by the number of publications in the peer-reviewed literature and the quantity and quality of clinical studies. Given that BoNTAs are potent biological products that meet important clinical needs, it is critical to recognize that their dosing and product performance are not interchangeable and each product should be used according to manufacturer guidelines.Keywords: onabotulinumtoxinA, abobotulinumtoxinA, incobotulinumtoxinA, glabellar lines, non-interchangeability

  7. Multidisciplinary rehabilitation following botulinum toxin and other focal intramuscular treatment for post-stroke spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetrios, Marina; Khan, Fary; Turner-Stokes, Lynne; Brand, Caroline; McSweeney, Shane

    2013-06-05

    Spasticity may affect stroke survivors by contributing to activity limitations, caregiver burden, pain and reduced quality of life (QoL). Spasticity management guidelines recommend multidisciplinary (MD) rehabilitation programmes following botulinum toxin (BoNT) treatment for post-stroke spasticity. However, the evidence base for the effectiveness of MD rehabilitation is unclear. To assess the effectiveness of MD rehabilitation, following BoNT and other focal intramuscular treatments such as phenol, in improving activity limitations and other outcomes in adults and children with post-stroke spasticity. To explore what settings, types and intensities of rehabilitation programmes are effective. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (February 2012), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 12), MEDLINE (1948 to December 2011), EMBASE (1980 to January 2012), CINAHL (1982 to January 2012), AMED (1985 to January 2012), LILACS (1982 to September 2012), PEDro, REHABDATA and OpenGrey (September 2012). In an effort to identify further published, unpublished and ongoing trials we searched trials registries and reference lists, handsearched journals and contacted authors. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared MD rehabilitation (delivered by two or more disciplines in conjunction with medical input) following BoNT and other focal intramuscular treatments for post-stroke spasticity with placebo, routinely available local services, or lower levels of intervention; or studies that compared MD rehabilitation in different settings, of different types, or at different levels of intensity. We excluded RCTs that assessed the effectiveness of unidisciplinary therapy (for example physiotherapy only) or a single modality (for example stretching, casting, electrical stimulation or splinting only). The primary outcomes were validated measures of activity level (active and passive function

  8. The impact of botulinum toxin A and abduction bracing on long-term hip development in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Kate; Ang, Soon Ghee; Thomason, Pam; Graham, H Kerr

    2012-08-01

    To study the long-term impact of 3 years of botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) injections and abduction bracing on hip development in children with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy (CP). We wanted to know if early treatment improved hip development and reduced the need for surgery. A long-term review of hip morphology and surgery requirements in children who participated in a multicentre, randomized controlled trial. The trial investigated short-term effects of BoNT-A injections combined with an abduction brace, compared with usual care, on hip displacement in children with bilateral spastic CP. Forty-six children with bilateral spastic CP (31 males, 15 females; 10 with diplegia, 36 with quadriplegia; mean age at enrolment of 3 y 2 mo, mean age at most recent clinical review 13 y 11 mo [range 10 y 6 mo-16 y 8 mo]; three children in Gross Motor Function Classification System level II, 11 in level III, 20 in level IV, 12 in level V) were followed for a mean of 10 years 10 months from recruitment to the trial. Mean migration percentage was 15.9% in the BoNT-A group and 15.2% in the comparison group (t = 0.26, p = 0.79). Eighty-nine percent of hips in the treatment group and 91% hips in the comparison group had satisfactory development, using a valid scale (Mann-Whitney U test = 867.50, z = -1.59, p = 0.11). Forty children had preventive surgery (21 treatment group, 19 comparison group) and 18 children had reconstructive surgery (10 treatment, 8 comparison). In children with bilateral spastic CP, early treatment with BoNT-A and hip abduction bracing does not reduce the need for surgery or improve hip development at skeletal maturity. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2012 Mac Keith Press.

  9. Duration of efficacy increases with the repetition of botulinum toxin A injections in primary palmar hyperhidrosis: a study of 28 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecouflet, Marie; Leux, Christophe; Fenot, Marion; Célerier, Philippe; Maillard, Hervé

    2014-06-01

    Intradermal injections of botulinum toxin are effective but transitory in primary palmar hyperhidrosis. These injections are repeated when the symptoms recur. We do not know how the duration of efficacy changes when injections are repeated. In this retrospective study, we aimed to investigate the change in the duration of efficacy of botulinum toxin A (Dysport, Ipsen, Boulogne-Billancourt, France) with the repetition of injections in patients with primary palmar hyperhidrosis. From May 2001 to April 2012, 28 patients were treated with a dose of 250 U of botulinum toxin A per palm. We compared the duration of efficacy of the first and last toxin injections. The median duration of efficacy was 7 months for the first injection and 9.5 months for the last, the difference being statistically significant (P = .0002). Study limitations include a relatively small number of patients treated at a single center and evaluated retrospectively. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report a significant increase in the duration of efficacy of botulinum toxin A injections with the repetition of injections in patients with primary palmar hyperhidrosis. The reasons for this effect may be linked to the mechanism of action of botulinum toxin, and may improve our understanding of its pharmacologic effects. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Botulinum toxin type a for the treatment of spasticity in children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Lidija

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Cerebral palsy (CP is the most common physical disability in childhood. Children have problems with motor functions as a result of limbs spasticity, which leads to severe contractures and limbs deformity. There is a growing interest in the therapeutic role of botulinum toxin type A (BTA in CP. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of BTA on spasticity, active range of motion and functional motor outcomes in children with CP. Methods. This study included 42 children of both sexes, aged 2−6 years, with spastic CP, divided into two groups: group I (21 child treated with BTA and physical therapy, and group II (21 child treated with physical therapy only. The following parameters were analyzed: spasticity; active range of motion of the hip, knee and ankle, and functional motor outcome. These parameters measurements were carried out four times in both groups: before the treatment, three, eight and 16 weeks after the beginning of the treatment. The obtained results were statistically processed and compared. Results. There was no evidence of any significant difference between the groups before the treatment. After eight weeks there was a remarkable difference concerning spasticity reducing on behalf of the group I (group I - 0.76±0.51 vs. II group - 2.17±0.64; p < 0.0001. There was statistically significant difference concerning active range of motion increasing on behalf of the group I (hip abduction: group I - 44.37±1.130 vs. group II - 32.61±8,070, p < 0,01; knee extension: group I - 0,77±1.820 vs. II group - 14.99±7.610, p < 0.01; dorsiflexion of the foot: group I - 11.50±6.080 vs. group II - 8.98±7.850, p < 0,01. A statistically significant difference was found after 16 weeks in functional motor outcome as well, on behalf of the group I: functional motor abilities level in the group I was 1.86 vs. 2.71 in the group II, p < 0.05. Conclusion. Botulinum toxin type A application leads to an important spasticity

  11. Application of botulinum toxin to treat sialorrhea in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ademar Francisco de; Silva, Gêssyca Adryene de Menezes; Almeida, Débora Milenna Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by the degeneration of motor neurons, which are the central nervous system cells that control voluntary muscle movements. The excessive salivation (sialorrhea) is present in approximately 50% of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cases. Thus, some alternative therapeutic methods are sought, such as anticholinergic drugs and surgery. Recently the use of botulinum toxin applied at a midpoint of the salivary glands, often guided by ultrasound, have demonstrated positive results. The objective was to review the literature to demonstrate an alternative method to treatments of sialorrhea in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In recent studies, the efficacy of botulinum toxin is confirmed, although new applications are required. Since the side effects are negligible, this is an alternative to treat amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and other patients with diseases that present sialorrhea. RESUMO Esclerose lateral amiotrófica é uma doença neurodegenerativa progressiva e fatal, caracterizada pela degeneração dos neurônios motores, as células do sistema nervoso central que controlam os movimentos voluntários dos músculos. A salivação excessiva (sialorreia) está presente em cerca de 50% dos casos de esclerose lateral amiotrófica. Dessa forma, surgem medidas terapêuticas alternativas como drogas anticolinérgicas e cirurgia, e recentemente, o uso da toxina botulínica, aplicada em um ponto central das glândulas salivares, muitas vezes guiado por ultrassonografia, demostrou resultados positivos. Objetivou-se revisar a literatura no intuito de demonstrar um método alternativo aos tratamentos de sialorreia em pacientes com esclerose lateral amiotrófica. Em estudos recentes, a eficácia do tratamento com toxina botulínica foi confirmada e, mesmo requerendo novas aplicações, os efeitos colaterais são ínfimos. Ela surge então como alternativa não só ao

  12. Case Report: Impact of Botulinum Toxin Injection on Function of Affected Upper Extremity in A Patient, 16 Years after Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malek Amini

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Case report Impact of Botulinum Toxin injection on function of affected upper extremity in a patient after 16 years since stroke (CVA. Botulinum toxin injection is one the treatments in spasticity reduction and consequently in recovery of upper limb function in stroke patients. The purpose of this case study is to report the effect of Botulinum toxin injection on upper extremity function after 16 years of stroke. Materials & Methods: The patient was a 63-year-old man who has had a cerebrovascular accident that happened in the left hemisphere about 16 years ago, and as a result, a paresis in dominant hand and arm. Although the patient was able to perform simple movements but he was complaining about the slowness and stiffness in the movements. To treat spasticity the Botulinum toxin type A was used. Injection into selected muscles of hemiparetic upper limb was done by a specialist physician and was between 50-150IU based on specific volume of each muscle. After injection, the patient was monitored for 3 months and at the end of each month, the assessments were reevaluated. During this period, although research team suggested the patient to continue the rehabilitation but for personal reasons he didn’t participate in any treatment and didn`t receive any other antispasmodic medications. Results: An increase in range of motion was seen in all joints but this improvement was not significant. The greatest improvement in passive and active range of motion was seen in Metacarpophalengeal joints. At the end of each month, compared to the first month the recovery of function in upper extremity was significant. Maximum recovery of upper extremity function was related to the hand section of fugl-meyer assessment. At the end of the first month, spasticity significantly decreased so that the patient was able to extend all his joints more easily than before injection. Although spasticity never reached zero. Conclusion: Botulinum toxin injection

  13. Hyperhidrosis: Anatomy, Pathophysiology and Treatment with Emphasis on the Role of Botulinum Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakraj, Amanda-Amrita D.; Moghimi, Narges; Jabbari, Bahman

    2013-01-01

    Clinical features, anatomy and physiology of hyperhidrosis are presented with a review of the world literature on treatment. Level of drug efficacy is defined according to the guidelines of the American Academy of Neurology. Topical agents (glycopyrrolate and methylsulfate) are evidence level B (probably effective). Oral agents (oxybutynin and methantheline bromide) are also level B. In a total of 831 patients, 1 class I and 2 class II blinded studies showed level B efficacy of OnabotulinumtoxinA (A/Ona), while 1 class I and 1 class II study also demonstrated level B efficacy of AbobotulinumtoxinA (A/Abo) in axillary hyperhidrosis (AH), collectively depicting Level A evidence (established) for botulinumtoxinA (BoNT-A). In a comparator study, A/Ona and A/Inco toxins demonstrated comparable efficacy in AH. For IncobotulinumtoxinA (A/Inco) no placebo controlled studies exist; thus, efficacy is Level C (possibly effective) based solely on the aforementioned class II comparator study. For RimabotulinumtoxinB (B/Rima), one class III study has suggested Level U efficacy (insufficient data). In palmar hyperhidrosis (PH), there are 3 class II studies for A/Ona and 2 for A/Abo (individually and collectively level B for BoNT-A) and no blinded study for A/Inco (level U). For B/Rima the level of evidence is C (possibly effective) based on 1 class II study. Botulinum toxins (BoNT) provide a long lasting effect of 3–9 months after one injection session. Studies on BoNT-A iontophoresis are emerging (2 class II studies; level B); however, data on duration and frequency of application is inconsistent. PMID:23612753

  14. Building-block architecture of botulinum toxin complex: Conformational changes provide insights into the hemagglutination ability of the complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonori Suzuki

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium botulinum produces the botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT. Previously, we provided evidence for the “building-block” model of botulinum toxin complex (TC. In this model, a single BoNT is associated with a single nontoxic nonhemagglutinin (NTNHA, yielding M-TC; three HA-70 molecules are attached and form M-TC/HA-70, and one to three “arms” of the HA-33/HA-17 trimer (two HA-33 and one HA-17 further bind to M-TC/HA-70 via HA-17 and HA-70 binding, yielding one-, two-, and three-arm L-TC. Of all TCs, only the three-arm L-TC caused hemagglutination. In this study, we determined the solution structures for the botulinum TCs using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS. The mature three-arm L-TC exhibited the shape of a “bird spreading its wings”, in contrast to the model having three “arms”, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. SAXS images indicated that one of the three arms of the HA-33/HA-17 trimer bound to both HA-70 and BoNT. Taken together, these findings regarding the conformational changes in the building-block architecture of TC may explain why only three-arm L-TC exhibited hemagglutination.

  15. YouTube Videos on Botulinum Toxin A for Wrinkles: A Useful Resource for Patient Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Katharine; Doong, Judy; Trang, Trinh; Joo, Sarah; Chien, Anna L

    2017-09-01

    Patients interested in botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) for wrinkles search for videos on YouTube, but little is known about the quality and reliability of the content. The authors examined the quality, reliability, content, and target audience of YouTube videos on BTX for wrinkles. In this cross-sectional study, the term "Botox" was searched on YouTube. Sixty relevant videos in English were independently categorized by 2 reviewers as useful informational, misleading informational, useful patient view, or misleading patient view. Disagreements were settled by a third reviewer. Videos were rated on the Global Quality Scale (GQS) (1 = poor, 5 = excellent). Sixty-three percent of the BTX YouTube videos were useful informational (GQS = 4.4 ± 0.7), 33% as useful patient view (GQS = 3.21 ± 1.2), 2% as misleading informational (GQS = 1), and 2% as misleading patient view (GQS = 2.5). The large number of useful videos, high reliability, and the wide range of content covered suggests that those who search for antiwrinkle BTX videos on YouTube are likely to view high-quality content. This suggests that YouTube may be a good source of videos to recommend for patients interested in BTX.

  16. Dose thresholds and duration of the local anhidrotic effect of botulinum toxin injections: measured by sudometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braune, C; Erbguth, F; Birklein, F

    2001-01-01

    Local injections of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) have been used successfully to treat focal hyperhidrosis, but because experimental data were lacking, doses have been chosen arbitrarily or empirically. To analyse dose dependency and duration of BTX-A-derived suppression of sweat gland activity. Employing a standardized scheme (four injections, square 2 x 2 cm), different doses of BTX-A [Dysport(R); 2.5-120 mouse units (MU)] were injected subcutaneously at the lateral aspects of both of the lower legs in 15 healthy volunteers. Sweat tests were performed before, and 3 weeks and 6 months after, BTX-A injections. Sweating was visualized by staining with iodine starch, and quantified by capacitance hygrometry after carbachol iontophoresis, the quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test (QSART). Iodine starch staining indicated a threshold dose of 10 MU (2.5 MU cm-2) leading to visible anhidrotic skin spots after 3 weeks in all subjects. This was maintained for 6 months with doses of 50 MU (12.5 MU cm-2) or higher, but the size of the anhidrotic skin area decreased over time (P iodine starch staining: r = 0.74, P testing sudomotor function. For the first time threshold doses for the suppression of sweating have been defined.

  17. [Botulinum toxin type A contribution in the treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon due to systemic sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serri, J; Legré, R; Veit, V; Guardia, C; Gay, A-M

    2013-12-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon is a vasospastic disorder of the extremities that can lead, in the hands, to pain, disability, ischemic ulcers and digital chronic ischemia. Medical and surgical current treatments are not fully effective while causing side effects. Recent studies have emphasized the value of botulinum toxin type A (BTX A) in the management of primary Raynaud's phenomenon. The originality of Raynaud's syndrome secondary to systemic sclerosis is to combine both arterial vasospasm and sclerosis of the arterial wall, what is supposed to reduce BTX A effects. The purpose of this work is to evaluate BTX A efficiency in patients with Raynaud's phenomenon secondary to systemic sclerosis. We performed a prospective study for 12 months. Patients with severe Raynaud's phenomenon due to systemic sclerosis were injected with BTX A in the two hands. Evolution of ischemic ulcers, QuickDASH Score, O2 partial pressure, pain were measured before and 30 days after injection. We treated 18 patients. Thirty days after injection, we noticed a complete healing of ulcers, QuickDASH Score was improved from 39.4 to 20, as the O2 partial pressure from 16 to 42 mmHg and the pain from VNS from 6/10 to 2/10. BTX A appears to improve significantly Raynaud's phenomenon symptomatology in patients with systemic sclerosis despite the component of arterial sclerosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. East-west differences in the organization of botulinum toxin use in nine Central European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homann, C N; Suppan, K; Wenzel, K; Homann, B; Pluta-Fürst, A; Crevenna, R; Schinagl, D; Ruzicka, E; Dressle, D; Ivanic, G

    2003-05-01

    Availability and quality of expensive treatment modalities such as botulinum toxin (BTX) largely depend on organizational aspects such as costs, reimbursement by insurance companies, expertise and facilities for expert training, and the propagation of research. To investigate which determinants influence the organization of BTX' use throughout nine Central European countries (Austria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Slovakia, Slovenia and Switzerland) we sent out questionnaires to leading BTX experts and consulted data banks of manufacturers and bulletins of international organizations. In Western European countries, there is a tendency for users to organize themselves in formal groups and to concentrate on research whereas the way how BTX is provided is diverse regarding qualifications of specialists and institutions. In the post-communist Eastern European countries, we found a tendency towards a centralized system of reimbursement and BTX treatment seems to be more in the hands of neurologists than any other specialists. Strong correlations were observed between the number of BTX centres, degree of organization of user groups and number of scientific publications, on the one hand, and parameters of healthcare performance and socioeconomic determinants, on the other. Our study suggests that in the nine countries surveyed, organizational aspects of BTX use vary considerably, whilst similarities are based mainly on socioeconomic rather than socio-demographic determinants.

  19. [Botulinum toxin--the dose controls the poison. A historical sketch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homann, C N; Wenzel, K; Kriechbaum, N; Suppan, K; Crevenna, R; Ivanic, G; Dressler, D

    2002-06-01

    Botulism, a potentially lethal form of paralytic food poisoning, was described as early as 1793. Basic research, especially in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, revealed that botulism is caused by exotoxins. Further biochemical work around and after the Second World War gave insight into the molecular structure of seven different serotypes of botulinum toxin (BT/A-G) as well as into its acetylcholine blocking mode of action. In 1977, Scott treated patients with strabism by injecting minute amounts of purified BT/A. In short sequence, BT proved effective in blepharospasm, cervical dystonia, and various off-label indications. In the near future, registration of these new indications, marketing of new serotypes (BT/B), and availability of more practical antibody tests can be expected. The first applications of BT were performed by Roggenkaemper, Dressler, and Benecke in Germany and by Poewe and Auff in Austria. According to a worldwide trend, a rapid expansion regarding BT users and indications followed. Formation of BT competence centers in both countries aims at maintaining high standards in BT research and education.

  20. Relationship Between Botulinum Toxin, Spasticity, and Pain: a Survey of Patient Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Adil; Phadke, Chetan P; Ismail, Farooq; Boulias, Chris

    2016-03-01

    To assess the prevalence of pain in adults with spasticity and to assess the association between the subjective experience of pain and spasticity. Cross-sectional study. outpatient spasticity management clinic of a rehabilitation centre. Patients with upper motor neuron lesions and spasticity (n=131) were recruited. We assessed pain intensity and location, relationship between spasticity and pain perception, and perception of pain relief from botulinum toxin type-A (BoNTA) injections. Pain perception rated on a 10-point numerical rating scale and pain quality. 65% of the patients with spasticity reported presence of pain and 60% described it as an aching pain. More patients reported pain with movement (34%) compared to rest (21%). There was a statistically poor correlation between the severity of pain and spasticity (r=0.16; p>0.05). Most patients (80%) believed that their pain was related to spasticity and 62% reported that BoNTA injections decreased their pain. The high incidence of pain noted within our sample suggests that physicians may have to consider pain management as part of spasticity treatment. Participants reported that their pain was related to their spasticity, and that it decreased after BoNTA treatment. Further study is needed to explore the relationships between objective measures of spasticity and pain.

  1. Botulinum toxin type A chemodenervation treatment in spastic forms of cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Kurenkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy (CP is one of the most serious outcomes of the perinatal lesion of central nervous system and the most common reason for neurological disability in children. Being the key cause of pathological dynamic stereotypes that frequently result in pathological posture and contractures, spasticity is critically important for CP. The use of botulinum toxin type A (BTA in complex treatment 2-6 years old CP patients allows significantly to improve motor abilities, help to change the surgical procedure, delay or even avoid some types of surgery. For elder children the use of BTA allows to improve local motor impairment. The treatment of spasticity in CP with BTA is safe (evidence level A and highly effective (evidence level A. It leads to the positive change of pathological dynamic stereotype, significantly improves gait, decreases muscle tone with Ashworth and Tardeu scales and rises the gross motor function score. Our own experience of onabotulinumtoxinA treatment as a part of complex therapy in 68 patients with spastic forms of CP demonstrates the significant improvement of motor function, most noticeable in younger patients(early pre-school age with GMFS I-III.

  2. Botulinum toxin type A and cervical dystonia: a seven-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique F. Camargo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Most cases of cervical dystonia (CD are idiopathic, and focal injections of botulinum toxin A (BoNT/A are the treatment of choice. The objective of our study was to document the effects of long-term BoNT/A treatment in idiopathic CD patients. Fifty-eight patients with idiopathic CD were recruited from March 2001 to May 2002. Twenty-eight of the subjects were available for reassessment after seven years. During this period, all had received regular treatment with BoNT/A injections. Clinical information about patients and the severity of CD (TWSTRS and VAPS at baseline assessment (2001-2002 and follow-up (2008-2009 was compared. Significant motor improvement was detected based on TWSTRS scale scores, which were used to analyze clinical severity (19.6±6.6 and 17.7±4.8; p<0.05. There was no improvement in the severity of cervical pain (p=0.43. In conclusion, BoNT/A was a safe and effective long-term therapy for CD.

  3. No change in calf muscle passive stiffness after botulinum toxin injection in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhusaini, Adel A A; Crosbie, Jack; Shepherd, Roberta B; Dean, Catherine M; Scheinberg, Adam

    2011-06-01

    Stiffness and shortening of the calf muscle due to neural or mechanical factors can profoundly affect motor function. The aim of this study was to investigate non-neurally mediated calf-muscle tightness in children with cerebral palsy (CP) before and after botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injection. Sixteen children with spastic CP (seven females, nine males; eight at Gross Motor Function Classification System level I, eight at level II; age range 4-10 y) and calf muscle spasticity were tested before and during the pharmaceutically active phase after injection of BoNT-A. Measures of passive muscle compliance and viscoelastic responses, hysteresis, and the gradient of the torque-angle curve were computed and compared before and after injection. Although there was a slight, but significant increase in ankle range of motion after BoNT-A injection and a small, significant decrease in the torque required to achieve plantigrade and 5° of dorsiflexion, no significant difference in myotendinous stiffness or hysteresis were detected after BoNT-A injection. Despite any effect on neurally mediated responses, the compliance of the calf muscle was not changed and the muscle continued to offer significant resistance to passive motion of the ankle. These findings suggest that additional treatment approaches are required to supplement the effects of BoNT-A injections when managing children with calf muscle spasticity. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2011 Mac Keith Press.

  4. Motor function following multilevel botulinum toxin type A treatment in children with cerebral palsy.

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    Desloovere, Kaat; Molenaers, Guy; De Cat, Jos; Pauwels, Petra; Van Campenhout, Anja; Ortibus, Els; Fabry, Guy; De Cock, Paul

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of multilevel botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) treatments on the gait pattern of children with spastic cerebral palsy (Gross Motor Function Classification System Levels I-III). In this nested case-control design, 30 children (mean age 6y 11mo [SD 1y 5mo]; 21 males, nine females; 19 with hemiplegia, 11 with diplegia) were treated according to best practice guidelines in paediatric orthopaedics, including BTX-A injections. A matched control group of 30 children (mean age 7y 8mo [SD 1y 10mo]; 13 males, 17 females; 19 with hemiplegia, 11 with diplegia) were treated identically, but without BTX-A. Motor development status at 5 to 10 years of age was assessed by means of three-dimensional gait analysis at a mean time of 1 year 10 months (SD 10mo) after the last BTX-A treatment. The control group showed a significantly more pronounced pathological gait pattern than the BTX-A group. Major differences were found for pelvic anterior tilt, maximum hip and knee extension, and internal hip rotation. These results provide evidence for a prolonged effect of BTX-A and suggest that BTX-A injections, in combination with common conservative treatment options, result in a gait pattern that is less defined by secondary problems (e.g. bony deformities) at 5 to 10 years of age, minimizing the need for complex surgery at a later age and enhancing quality of life.

  5. Clinical effects of botulinum toxin A and phenol block on gait in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Alice M K; Chen, Chia-Ling; Chen, Carl P C; Chou, Shih-Wei; Chung, Chia-Ying; Chen, Max J L

    2004-04-01

    To compare the treatment effectiveness of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) and phenol blocks in managing lower limb spasticity and gait dysfunction in children with cerebral palsy. This is a case-controlled study that took place in a tertiary center's gait laboratory. A total of 27 ambulatory children with cerebral palsy spastic diplegia, aged from 3 to 7 yrs, and 20 normal children were recruited into this study. Sixteen children with cerebral palsy received BTX-A injections, and 11 received phenol motor point blocks. Gait analyses were assessed by a portable computer-assisted system (Computer DynoGraphy, Infotronic, The Netherlands). Both the BTX-A and phenol groups received gait analysis at 1 wk before and 2 mos after injection treatments. Significant improvements in gait variables of velocity and cadence were noted in children with cerebral palsy after BTX-A injections as compared with the phenol block group. Gaitline and cyclogram patterns also improved significantly in the BTX-A group. The adverse clinical effects of BTX-A injections were less severe as compared with phenol injections. BTX-A injections demonstrated superior treatment effects in improving gait variables and patterns in children with spastic diplegia as compared with phenol blocks. BTX-A injections also revealed fewer clinical side effects and were well tolerated by children with cerebral palsies.

  6. The effect of botulinum toxin A on gastrocnemius length: magnitude and duration of response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eames, N W; Baker, R; Hill, N; Graham, K; Taylor, T; Cosgrove, A

    1999-04-01

    Thirty-nine ambulant children (22 with hemiplegia, 17 with diplegia) with spastic cerebral palsy receiving isolated gastrocnemius muscle injection with botulinum toxin A were studied prospectively. The children had a mean age of 6 years (range 3 to 13 years). Measurement of gastrocnemius muscle length was used to estimate the dynamic component of each child's spasticity and to quantify the response. There was a strong correlation between the dynamic component of spasticity before injection and the corresponding magnitude of the response after injection. Children undergoing repeated injections showed similar correlations. A strong correlation was found between the duration of response and the dynamic component. Children with hemiplegia showed twice the duration for a given dynamic component compared with those with diplegia when injected with the same total dose per unit body weight. Long-term lengthening did not occur for the cohort, although some patients showed a response at a 12-month follow-up. By delaying shortening, the injections may have a role in delaying the need for surgery. Injections were well tolerated with few side effects.

  7. Efficacy of botulinum toxin A, serial casting, and combined treatment for spastic equinus: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanzman, Allan M; Kim, Heakyung; Swaminathan, Kartik; Beck, Teresa

    2004-12-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A), serial casting, and combined treatment for spastic equinus were compared by chart review. Fifty-five patients with diplegia (n=21), hemiplegia (n=17), quadriplegia (n=6), and other diagnoses (n=11) were reviewed. Thirty-one patients had Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) scores of I or II, 10 had a GMFCS score of III, and eight had GMFCS scores of IV or V (for six there were no available data). Mean age was 7 years 1 month (SD 4 y 8mo). The combined group showed a significantly greater increase in passive range of motion (ROM) of the ankle joint in comparison with BTX-A alone (p=0.0002), with a mean of 17 degrees (SD 11.2) versus 5 degrees (SD 6.7), and casting alone showed a significantly greater increase in comparison with BTX-A alone (p=0.0001), with a mean of 15 degrees (SD 4.5) versus 5 degrees (SD 6.7). With cast number controlled, change in ROM after casting with and without BTX-A was not significantly different (p=0.37). There was no significant difference between casting with or without BTX-A, and both improved ROM to a greater degree than BTX-A alone. Casting demonstrated a significantly more robust impact on range of motion than BTX-A alone.

  8. Unilateral versus bilateral thyroarytenoid Botulinum toxin injections in adductor spasmodic dysphonia: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abiola Jesuloba

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives In this preliminary prospective study, we compared unilateral and bilateral thyroarytenoid muscle injections of Botulinum toxin (Dysport in 31 patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia, who had undergone more than 5 consecutive Dysport injections (either unilateral or bilateral and had completed 5 concomitant self-rated efficacy and complication scores questionnaires related to the previous injections. We also developed a Neurophysiological Scoring (NPS system which has utility in the treatment administration. Method and materials Data were gathered prospectively on voice improvement (self-rated 6 point scale, length of response and duration of complications (breathiness, cough, dysphagia and total voice loss. Injections were performed under electromyography (EMG guidance. NPS scale was used to describe the EMG response. Dose and unilateral/bilateral injections were determined by clinical judgment based on previous response. Time intervals between injections were patient driven. Results Low dose unilateral Dysport injection was associated with no significant difference in the patient's outcome in terms of duration of action, voice score (VS and complication rate when compared to bilateral injections. Unilateral injections were not associated with any post treatment total voice loss unlike the bilateral injections. Conclusion Unilateral low dose Dysport injections are recommended in the treatment of adductor spasmodic dysphonia.

  9. Botulinum toxin A for palmar hyperhidrosis: assessment with sympathetic skin responses evoked by train of stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hashel, J Y; Youssry, D; Rashaed, H M; Shamov, T; Rousseff, R T

    2016-07-01

    Objective assessment of the effect of botulinum toxin A (BT) treatment in primary palmar hyperhidrosis (PH) is attempted by different methods. We decided to use for this purpose sympathetic skin responses evoked by train of stimuli (TSSR). Twenty patients with severe PH (five female, median age 24, range 18-36) were examined regularly over 3 months after receiving 50 UI BT in each palm. TSSR were recorded from the palms after sensory stimulation by a train of three supramaximal electric pulses 3 millisecond apart. Results were compared to longitudinally studied TSSR of 20 healthy sex- and age-matched control subjects. All hyperhidrosis patients reported excellent improvement. TSSR amplitudes decreased at week 1 (mean 54% range 48%-67%) and over the following months in a clinically significant trend (slope R=-.82, P<.0001). TSSR in controls changed insignificantly (±13% from the baseline). The difference between patients and controls was highly significant at any time point (P<.001). This study suggests that TSSR may help in assessment of treatments in PH. It confirms objectively the efficacy of BT in PH. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Prediction of compensatory hyperhidrosis with botulinum toxin A and local anesthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jin Yong; Park, Soo Seog; Sim, Sung Bo; Jo, Keon Hyon; Lee, Jongho; Oh, Saecheol; Shin, Jae Seong

    2015-08-01

    Compensatory hyperhidrosis (CH) is one of the most problematic complications of sympathectomy, which occurs often and is hard to treat. A predictive procedure (PP) for CH can help patients experience compensatory sweating before sympathectomy to determine whether or not to perform sympathectomy. Our study aimed to evaluate the CH after the PP and sympathectomy in patients with primary palmar hyperhidrosis using multiple drugs. We reviewed 83 patients who underwent a PP between July 2009 and August 2013 with primary palmar hyperhidrosis. In group A, we used levobupivacaine (n = 39). In group B, we used botulinum toxin A plus ropivacaine for the PP in group B (n = 44). The CH rate after the PP was 44 % (group A) and 25 % (group B), and after sympathectomy 80 % (group A) and 75 % (group B). The prediction value between the PP and the sympathectomy was statistically significant in group A (p < 0.05). The positive prediction rate was 73 % and the negative prediction rate was 27 % in group A. Local anesthetic alone has a better predictive value. From our finding, patients should be made aware that CH after sympathectomy is less severe in 73 % of cases than that experienced in the PP.

  11. Strain sonoelastographic evaluation of biceps muscle intrinsic stiffness after botulinum toxin-A injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aşkın, Ayhan; Kalaycı, Özlem Tuğçe; Bayram, Korhan Barış; Tosun, Aliye; Demirdal, Ümit Seçil; Atar, Emel; İnci, Mehmet Fatih

    2017-01-01

    The most commonly used clinical tools for measuring spasticity are modified Ashworth scale (MAS) and Tardieu scale but both yield subjective rather than objective results. Ultrasound elastography (EUS) provides information on tissue stiffness and allows the qualitative or quantitative measurements of the mechanical properties of tissues. To assess the stiffness of biceps brachialis muscles in stroke patients by strain EUS and to investigate the sonoelastographic changes and its correlations with clinical evaluation parameters after botulinum toxin-A (BTA) injections. This is a prospective study. A total of 48 chronic stroke patients requiring BTA injections to biceps brachialis muscles were included in the study. All patients received injections with BTA to biceps brachialis muscles under ultrasound guidance. MAS, goniometric measurements, and strain EUS assessments were performed at preintervention and at 4-week postintervention. Strain index values of biceps muscle on the affected side were significantly increased compared with those on the unaffected side (p < 0.01). At 4 weeks after BTA injection, significant improvements were observed in MAS grades and goniometric measurements (p < 0.05). Statistically significant differences were also found between the MAS grades and strain index values in both pre-/postintervention period (p < 0.01). No significant correlations were observed between clinical parameters and strain EUS findings. Strain EUS is a promising diagnostic tool for assessing stiffness in spastic muscles, in establishing the treatment plan and monitoring the effectiveness of the therapeutic modality.

  12. Factors that influence the urodynamic results of botulinum toxin in the treatment of neurogenic hyperactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Martín, P; Vírseda-Chamorro, M; Salinas Casado, J; Gómez-Rodríguez, A; Esteban-Fuertes, M

    2015-05-01

    To determine the urodynamic efficacy and factors that influence the urodynamic results of treatment of neurogenic detrusor hyperactivity with intradetrusor injection of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). A retrospective study was conducted with a cohort of 70 patients composed of 40 men and 30 women with stable SCI (mean age, 39 ± 13.3 years) who underwent an intradetrusor injection of 300 IUs of BTX-A. A urodynamic study was conducted prior to the injection and 6 ± 4.3 months after the treatment. New urodynamic studies were subsequently performed up to an interval of 16 ± 12.2 months. The BTX-A significantly increased (p bladder capacity, the bladder volume of the first involuntary contraction of the detrusor and the postvoid residue. We observed a decrease that tended towards statistical significance (p bladder accommodation nor the urethral resistance index (bladder outlet obstruction index) varied significantly. The increase in vesical capacity was maintained in 50% of the sample for more than 32 months. Age, sex, anticholinergic treatment and lesion age showed no influence in terms of the increase in bladder capacity. The indwelling urinary catheter (IUC) was the only statistically significant negative factor. The urodynamic effect of BTX-A is maintained for a considerable time interval. The IUC negatively influences the result of the treatment. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Improvement in both Raynaud disease and hyperhidrosis in response to botulinum toxin type A treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossintseva, Iràn; Barankin, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    A patient with concurrent Raynaud disease presented for hyperhidrosis of the axillae and palms. After a positive response to botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) for axillary hyperhidrosis, she returned requesting palmar treatment. Our goal was to investigate the effect of BoNTA on Raynaud disease in concurrent hyperhidrosis with respect to color change, swelling, and digital pain. The patient had treatment with 100 units of BoNTA to one hand at first, with the other being a negative control, followed by treatment of the second hand 1 week later. After the injection into the first palm, the patient demonstrated an 85% reduction in palmar hyperhidrosis and a significant improvement in her Raynaud symptoms. Specifically, the BoNTA-treated hand had reduced swelling, color change, and pain, whereas the untreated control hand remained affected. After the second hand was treated, it, too, demonstrated the same positive results. Our case report of concurrent Raynaud disease and palmar hyperhidrosis shows significant improvement in both conditions to BoNTA administration. The physiology is multifactorial and relates to BoNTA's effect on acetylcholine, noradrenaline, substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, and glutamate release from nerve terminals. These results present an encouraging novel treatment option in dermatology for patients with Raynaud disease.

  14. Effect of repetitive arm cycling following botulinum toxin injection for poststroke spasticity: evidence from FMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diserens, Karin; Ruegg, Dieter; Kleiser, Raimund; Hyde, Sandrine; Perret, Nicolas; Vuadens, Philippe; Fornari, Eleonora; Vingerhoets, Francois; Seitz, Rüdiger J

    2010-10-01

    Investigations were performed to establish if repetitive arm cycling training enhances the antispastic effect of intramuscular botulinum toxin (BTX) injections in postischemic spastic hemiparesis. Effects on cerebral activation were evaluated by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Eight chronic spastic hemisyndrome patients (49 ± 10 years) after middle cerebral artery infarction (5.5 ± 2.7 years) were investigated. BTX was injected into the affected arm twice, 6 months apart. Spasticity was assessed using the Ashworth Scale and range of motion before and 3 months after BTX injections. Images were analyzed using Brain Voyager QX 1.8, and fMRI signal changes were corrected for multiple comparisons. During passive movements of affected and nonaffected hands, fMRI activity was increased bilaterally in the sensorimotor cortex (MISI), secondary somatosensory areas (SII), and supplementary motor area predominantly in the contralesional hemisphere, compared with the rest. Following repetitive arm cycling, fMRI activity increased further in MISI of the lesioned hemisphere and SII of the contralesional hemisphere. For patients with residual motor activity, treatment-related fMRI activity increases were associated with reduced spasticity; in completely plegic patients, there was no fMRI activity change in SII but increased spasticity after training. Increased activity in SII of the contralesional hemisphere and in MISI of the lesioned hemisphere reflect a treatment-induced effect in the paretic arm. It is hypothesized that the increased BOLD activity results from increased afferent information related to the antispastic BTX effect reinforced by training.

  15. Augmented vertical recti transposition with intraoperative botulinum toxin for complete and chronic sixth nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabie, R; Andalib, D

    2017-01-01

    PurposeTo evaluate the results of augmented vertical rectus muscle transposition (VRT) with intraoperative botulinum toxin (BTX) for complete and chronic sixth nerve palsy.MethodsDuring a 10-year period (2004-2014) all patients with chronic and complete sixth nerve palsy and contracted medial rectus (MR) who underwent augmented VRT and BTX injection into the MR enrolled in this study.ResultsIn total, 29 patients (5 bilateral) were enrolled in this study. Preoperative deviation was 45±17.5 Prism Diopter (PD), which was improved to -3.1±13.2 after the operation (P<0.001). Mean preoperative and postoperative abduction limitation was -4.4±1.1 and -1.8±0.9, respectively (P<0.001). The success rate was 76% (deviation within 10 PD of orthotropia). Four patients (13.7%) had hypotropia. In 19 patients with preoperative deviation ≤45 PD, four patients had consecutive exotropia.ConclusionIntraoperative BTX injection with augmented vertical rectus transposition is an effective procedure. In deviation ≤45 there is a risk of overcorrection.

  16. Tridimensional assessment of adductor spasmodic dysphonia pre- and post-treatment with Botulinum toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejonckere, P H; Neumann, K J; Moerman, M B J; Martens, J P; Giordano, A; Manfredi, C

    2012-04-01

    Spasmodic dysphonia voices form, in the same way as substitution voices, a particular category of dysphonia that seems not suited for a standardized basic multidimensional assessment protocol, like the one proposed by the European Laryngological Society. Thirty-three exhaustive analyses were performed on voices of 19 patients diagnosed with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (SD), before and after treatment with Botulinum toxin. The speech material consisted of 40 short sentences phonetically selected for constant voicing. Seven perceptual parameters (traditional and dedicated) were blindly rated by a panel of experienced clinicians. Nine acoustic measures (mainly based on voicing evidence and periodicity) were achieved by a special analysis program suited for strongly irregular signals and validated with synthesized deviant voices. Patients also filled in a VHI-questionnaire. Significant improvement is shown by all three approaches. The traditional GRB perceptual parameters appear to be adequate for these patients. Conversely, the special acoustic analysis program is successful in objectivating the improved regularity of vocal fold vibration: the basic jitter remains the most valuable parameter, when reliably quantified. The VHI is well suited for the voice-related quality of life. Nevertheless, when considering pre-therapy and post-therapy changes, the current study illustrates a complete lack of correlation between the perceptual, acoustic, and self-assessment dimensions. Assessment of SD-voices needs to be tridimensional.

  17. [The central action of botulinum toxin type A assessed by brain auditory and somatosensory evoked potentials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sławek, Jarosław; Recławowicz, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) acts as a neuromuscular blocker in the release of acetylcholine. Nevertheless, some clinical effects and side effects are difficult to explain only due to the peripheral mode of action. The aim of the study was to assess the central effects of BTX-A by measuring the two modalities of evoked potentials (somatosensory and brain-stem auditory). In 23 patients (13 females, 10 males, mean age of 46, range of 25-71) with idiopathic cervical dystonia (never treated with BTX-A) brainstem auditory evoked responses (BAER) and somatosensory evoked potentials from upper extremities (SEP) were performed before and 4-6 weeks after BTX-A administration. BTX-A (Botox in 14 patients, Dysport in 9 patients) was injected into neck muscles: sternocleidomastoideus, splenius capitis, trapezius and levator scapulae. The authors did not find any statistically significant differences in basic parameters (latency and interlatency of I, III, V in BAER and N9, N13, N20 and P25 responses in SEP) before and after BTX-A administration. It seems that BTX-A does not have any direct central effect or the methods are not sensitive enough to detect them. Remote (anatomically distant) clinical effects seen by other authors or side effects may be explained by indirect mechanism due to deafferentation of stimuli from muscle spindles after BTX-A injection and thus modifying the central loops of reflexes or due to unpredictable hematogenous spread of BTX-A to distant muscles.

  18. A case report of the beneficial effects of botulinum toxin type A on Raynaud phenomenon in a patient with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Lei, Qi-Song; Liu, Yu-Ying; Song, Guan-Jie; Song, Chun-Ling

    2016-10-01

    Raynaud phenomenon is a vasospastic disorder affecting the hands and feet, and the efficacies of traditional treatments, such as pharmacological therapies and sympathectomy, are not uniform. Patients with paraneoplastic Raynaud phenomenon do not benefit from the traditional treatments. The use of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) for Raynaud phenomenon has been reported for several years; however, there are few reports regarding botulinum toxin type A in the treatment of paraneoplastic Raynaud phenomenon. We describe a case report of the beneficial effects of botulinum toxin type A on Raynaud phenomenon in a patient with lung cancer. A 63-year-old male complained of pain and discoloration of his fingers and indicated that oral nifedipine and low-dose aspirin were not effective. After approximately 8 months, he was diagnosed with lung cancer. Chemotherapy partially reduced the pain and discoloration of his fingers; however, no significant changes occurred in his fingers after the fourth cycle. We used BTX-A to treat this patient with paraneoplastic RP. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to assess the clinical response. After approximately 2 months, the patient reported relief from pain, stiffness, numbness, and cold sensation. Furthermore, no local or general adverse effects were exhibited by the patient. This study used botulinum toxin type A for a patient with paraneoplastic Raynaud phenomenon. Botulinum toxin type A significantly improved the patient's clinical symptoms without significant complications. These findings suggest that BTX-A may represent a good option for the treatment of paraneoplastic RP.

  19. Effect of botulinum toxin type A in lateral abdominal wall muscles thickness and length of patients with midline incisional hernia secondary to open abdomen management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra-Hurtado, T R; Nuño-Guzmán, C M; Miranda-Díaz, A G; Troyo-Sanromán, R; Navarro-Ibarra, R; Bravo-Cuéllar, L

    2014-10-01

    Abdominal wall hernia secondary to open abdomen management represents a surgical challenge. The hernia worsens due to lateral muscle retraction. Our objective was to evaluate if Botulinum Toxin Type A (BTA) application in lateral abdominal wall muscles modifies its thickness and length. A clinical trial of male trauma patients with hernia secondary to open abdomen management was performed from January 2009 to July 2011. Thickness and length of lateral abdominal muscles were measured by a basal Computed Tomography and 1 month after BTA application. A dosage of 250 units of BTA was applied at five points at each side between the external and internal oblique muscles under ultrasonographic guidance. Statistical analysis for differences between basal and after BTA application measures was performed by a paired Student's t test (significance: p abdominal muscles decreases its thickness and increases its length in abdominal wall hernia patients secondary to open abdomen management.

  20. Striving for more good days: patient perspectives on botulinum toxin for the treatment of cervical dystonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliziani M

    2016-08-01

    flexible treatment. Conclusion: The high burden of recurring primary and secondary symptoms of CD considerably affects patients’ quality of life. Patient-led assessments of disease burden revealed that personalized, more flexible, and/or shorter BoNT injection intervals may reduce the day-to-day impact of CD. Collaboration between patients, clinicians, and health care systems may effect change and improve treatment for patients with CD. Keywords: botulinum toxin type A, cervical dystonia, patient survey, spasmodic torticollis, treatment satisfaction

  1. Effect of Equilibrated pH and Indigenous Spoilage Microorganisms on the Inhibition of Proteolytic Clostridium botulinum Toxin Production in Experimental Meals under Temperature Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Max C; Wanless, Brandon J; David, Jairus R D; Lineback, D Scott; Talley, Ryan J; Kottapalli, Bala; Glass, Kathleen A

    2017-08-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a foreseeable biological hazard in prepared refrigerated meals that needs to be addressed in food safety plans. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of product composition and storage temperature on the inhibition of botulinum toxin formation in nine experimental meals (meat, vegetable, or carbohydrate based). Treatments were inoculated with proteolytic C. botulinum, vacuum packaged, cooked at 90°C for 10 min, and assayed for botulinum toxin in samples stored at 25°C for up to 96 h for phase 1, or at 25°C for 12 h and then transferred to 12.5°C for up to 12 and 6 weeks in phases 1 and 2, respectively. For phase 1, none of the treatments (equilibrated pH 5.8) supported toxin production when stored at 25°C for 48 h, but toxin production was observed in all treatments at 72 h. For the remaining experiments with storage at 12.5°C, toxin production was dependent on equilibrated pH, storage time, and growth of indigenous spoilage microorganisms. In phase 1, no gross spoilage and no botulinum toxin was detected for any treatment (pH ≤5.8) stored at 12.5°C for 12 weeks. In phase 2, gross spoilage varied by commodity, with the brussels sprouts meal with pH 6.5 showing the most rapid spoilage within 2 weeks and botulinum toxin detected at 5 and 6 weeks for the control and cultured celery juice treatments, respectively. In contrast, spoilage microbes decreased the pH of a pH 5.9 beef treatment by 1.0 unit, potentially inhibiting C. botulinum through 6 weeks at 12.5°C. None of the other treatments with pH 5.8 or below supported toxin production or spoilage. This study provides validation for preventive controls in refrigerated meals. These include equilibrated product pH and storage temperature and time to inhibit toxin formation by proteolytic C. botulinum, but the impact of indigenous microflora on safety and interpretation of challenge studies is also highlighted.

  2. Is repeat Botulinum Toxin A injection valuable for neurogenic detrusor overactivity-A systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Ni, Jianshu; Wang, Xiaohu; Cao, Nailong; Si, Jiemin; Gu, Baojun

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the value of repeat botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injections in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, and EBSCO databases for articles published until June 2016. Studies that reported the efficacy and safety of repeat BTX-A injections for adult patients with NDO were eligible. The effect size for each outcome was calculated as the standardized mean difference ± standard error and 95% confidence interval, and was graded as small, >0.2; moderate, >0.5; or large, >0.8. The outcomes included maximum cystometric capacity (MCC), maximum detrusor pressure (MDP), reflex volume (RV), bladder compliance (BC), quality of life (QOL), and injection interval. Descriptive reviews were performed for urinary incontinence (UI) and adverse events (AEs). Eighteen studies involving 1533 patients whose level of evidence ranged from 3 to 4 were included in this study. We noted non-significant changes in MCC, MDP, RV, and BC between the first and last injections. Patients who had received ≤4 injections were found to have stable QOL improvements after the first and last injections, whereas patients who had received ≥5 injections were found to have a significant decrease in QOL after the last injection. No significant differences in injection intervals were noted after repeat BTX-A injections, and the repeat injection failure rate was low. Our study demonstrated that repeat BTX-A injections allow sustained improvements in patients with NDO. The rate of AEs was stable and low. However, additional high-quality, large-scale, and long-term trials are necessary to establish the efficacy and safety of ≥5 repeat BTX-A injections. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Time course analysis of the effects of botulinum toxin type a on elbow spasticity based on biomechanic and electromyographic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsin-Min; Chen, Jia-Jin Jason; Wu, Yi-Ning; Wang, Yu-Lin; Huang, Sheng-Chih; Piotrkiewicz, Maria

    2008-04-01

    To quantify changes of elbow spasticity over time after botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) injection in the upper extremity of stroke patients. Before-after trial in which the therapeutic effects were followed up at 2, 6, and 9 weeks after the BTX-A injection (Botox). Hospital. Chronic stroke patients (N=8) with upper-limb spasticity. BTX-A was injected in upper-limb muscles, including the biceps brachii. Treatment effects were quantified as the changes in the velocity and the length dependence of hyperexcitable stretch reflexes. Manual sinusoid stretches of the elbow joint at 4 frequencies (1/3, 1/2, 1, 3/2Hz) over a movement range of 60 degrees were performed on patients by using a portable device. The Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), biomechanic viscosity, and the reflexive electromyography threshold (RET) of the biceps brachii were used to evaluate the degree of hypertonia. The statistical analyses of the MAS score, biomechanic viscosity, and RET revealed a significant decrease in spasticity after the injection (all Pbiomechanic viscosity, RET) revealed small changes in spasticity after the BTX-A injection that could not be observed from clinical MAS evaluations. Five of 8 subjects showed a maximal reduction in spasticity (in terms of biomechanic viscosity value) within 6 weeks after the injection, whereas it was notable that all subjects exhibited peak RET values at either 2 or 6 weeks after the injection with variable degrees of relapse of spasticity. Early relapse of spasticity (within 9 weeks of the injection) can be detected from biomechanic and neurophysiologic assessments in a clinical setup. These quantitative indices provide valuable information for clinicians when making decisions to perform additional rehabilitation interventions or another BTX-A injection in the early stages of treatment.

  4. The effects of intradermal botulinum toxin type a injections on pain symptoms of patients with diabetic neuropathy

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    Majid Ghasemi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering the dramatic increasing rate of diabetes and consequently its related complications, most importantly diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN, challenges regarding proper treatment of DPN and its effect on the quality-of-life and care of diabetic patients, the aim of this current study is to evaluate the effect of intradermal botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A injections on pain symptoms of patients with diabetic neuropathic pain. Materials and Methods: In this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial study, diabetic patients aged <70 years with neuropathic pain in both feet were enrolled. Diabetic neuropathy (DN in selected patients was diagnosed using DN4 questionnaire and nerve conduction velocity examinations. They randomized in two intervention (BTX-A injection/100 unit, N = 20 and placebo groups (normal saline injection, N = 20. The outcome of injection on diabetic neuropathic pain was assessed using neuropathy pain scale (NPS and visual analog scale (VAS score and compared in two studied groups. Results: There was no significant difference in DN4, NPS and VAS scales of studied population after intervention in the placebo group. Intradermal injection of BTX-A reduced NPS scores for all items except cold sensation (P = 0.05. It reduced DN4 scores for electric shocks, burning, pins and needles and brushing (P < 0.05. According to VAS scale 30% and 0% of patients in intervention and placebo groups have no pain after intervention (P = 0.01. Conclusion: Intradermal injection of BTX-A is a well-tolerated agent that has a significant effect on DPN pain.

  5. More than a black box of rehabilitation: Characterizing therapy programmes following botulinum toxin injections for spasticity in adults with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetrios, Marina; Brand, Caroline; Louie, Julie; Khan, Fary

    2016-04-28

    To describe ambulatory rehabilitation programmes (physical and occupational therapy activities and interventions) following botulinum toxin injections for post-stroke spasticity using a stroke rehabilitation taxonomy. To explore the relationship between therapy provided and injected limb/s and treatment goals. Prospective, observational cohort study. Stroke survivors (n = 47) participating in ambulatory rehabilitation programmes following botulinum toxin injections for upper limb, lower limb or upper and lower limb spasticity. Standardized therapy documentation forms were completed prospectively for each occupational and physical therapy session. Main outcomes were the proportion of total therapy time spent in various therapeutic activities; total sessions during which each intervention was used to facilitate the activities most time was spent in; and goals related to each activity category. Sub-analysis was carried out for participants, based on limb/s injected. Most time was spent in "upper extremity control" activities as the upper limb was more often injected. A large proportion of therapy time was spent in activities remediating "performance skills or body structure and function impairments". In the upper and lower limb, and upper limb groups 38.7% and 46.2% of goals, respectively, related to this activity category, but less than 10% in the lower limb group. Little time was spent in community participation and leisure activities, whilst over one-third of lower limb group goals related to this category. Ambulatory rehabilitation programmes following botulinum toxin injections for post-stroke spasticity varied depending on limb/s injected and reflected treatment goals to some extent.

  6. Botulinum toxin type A injections for the management of muscle tightness following total hip arthroplasty: a case series

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    Delanois Ronald E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of hip adductor, tensor fascia lata, and rectus femoris muscle contractures following total hip arthroplasties are quite common, with some patients failing to improve despite treatment with a variety of non-operative modalities. The purpose of the present study was to describe the use of and patient outcomes of botulinum toxin injections as an adjunctive treatment for muscle tightness following total hip arthroplasty. Methods Ten patients (14 hips who had hip adductor, abductor, and/or flexor muscle contractures following total arthroplasty and had been refractory to physical therapeutic efforts were treated with injection of botulinum toxin A. Eight limbs received injections into the adductor muscle, 8 limbs received injections into the tensor fascia lata muscle, and 2 limbs received injection into the rectus femoris muscle, followed by intensive physical therapy for 6 weeks. Results At a mean final follow-up of 20 months, all 14 hips had increased range in the affected arc of motion, with a mean improvement of 23 degrees (range, 10 to 45 degrees. Additionally all hips had an improvement in hip scores, with a significant increase in mean score from 74 points (range, 57 to 91 points prior to injection to a mean of 96 points (range, 93 to 98 at final follow-up. There were no serious treatment-related adverse events. Conclusion Botulinum toxin A injections combined with intensive physical therapy may be considered as a potential treatment modality, especially in difficult cases of muscle tightness that are refractory to standard therapy.

  7. Botulinum toxin type A injection for refractory interstitial cystitis: A randomized comparative study and predictors of treatment response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Yoshiyuki; Nomiya, Akira; Niimi, Aya; Yamada, Yukio; Fujimura, Tetsuya; Nakagawa, Tohru; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Kume, Haruki; Igawa, Yasuhiko; Homma, Yukio

    2015-09-01

    To determine whether botulinum toxin type A can represent an alternative treatment option for patients with interstitial cystitis refractory to conventional therapies. This is a single-center, prospective, open labeled, randomized comparative study. Patients with refractory interstitial cystitis were randomly divided into two groups: immediate injection (group A) or 1-month delayed injection (group B) of botulinum toxin type A after allocation. The rate of treatment response (global response assessment ≥+1: slightly improved), and changes in symptom scores and frequency volume chart variables were compared between groups 1 month after allocation. Using subjects of both groups as a single cohort, predictive factors for treatment response at 1 month post-injection and the duration of response were explored. A total of 34 patients (group A n = 18, group B n = 16) were allocated. The response rate was significantly higher in group A than group B (72.2% vs 25.0%, P = 0.01). All symptom measures showed significant improvement in group A than group B. When both groups were combined as a single cohort, the response rate was 73.5% at 1 month, 58.8% at 3 months, 38.2% at 6 months and 20.6% at 12 months. The mean duration of response was 5.4 months. Multivariate analysis showed that past exposure to hydrodistension more than three times correlated with better outcomes. Botulinum toxin type A injection could be an alternative treatment option for patients with interstitial cystitis refractory to conventional therapies, especially for those who have received repeated hydrodistensions and transurethral fulguration. © 2015 The Japanese Urological Association.

  8. A literature review on the efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin: an injection in post-stroke spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Majid; Salari, Mehri; Khorvash, Fariborz; Shaygannejad, Vahid

    2013-05-01

    A variety of techniques for the management of spasticity have been suggested, including positioning, cryotherapy, splinting and casting, biofeedback, electrical stimulation, and medical management by pharmacological agents, Botulinum toxin A (BTA) is now the pharmacological treatment of choice in focal spasticity. BTA by blocking acetylcholine release at neuromuscular junctions accounts for its therapeutic action to relieve spasticity. A computerized search of Pub Med was carried out to find the latest result about efficacy of BTA in management of post stroke spasticity. Among 84 articles were found, frothy of them included in this review and divided to lower and upper extremity. BTA is a treatment choice in reducing tone and managing post stroke spasticity .

  9. Potential Effect of Liposomes and Liposome-Encapsulated Botulinum Toxin and Tacrolimus in the Treatment of Bladder Dysfunction

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    Joseph J. Janicki

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bladder drug delivery via catheter instillation is a widely used treatment for recurrence of superficial bladder cancer. Intravesical instillation of liposomal botulinum toxin has recently shown promise in the treatment of overactive bladder and interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, and studies of liposomal tacrolimus instillations show promise in the treatment of hemorrhagic cystitis. Liposomes are lipid vesicles composed of phospholipid bilayers surrounding an aqueous core that can encapsulate hydrophilic and hydrophobic drug molecules to be delivered to cells via endocytosis. This review will present new developments on instillations of liposomes and liposome-encapsulated drugs into the urinary bladder for treating lower urinary tract dysfunction.

  10. The Effect of Intramural Botulinum Toxin Injections on the Elongation of the Piglet Oesophagus Is Time Dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakholdt Dibbern, Christian; Rose, Morten; Ellebæk, Mark Bremholm

    2017-01-01

    Introduction One in 4,000 infants is born with oesophageal atresia. Approximately 15% of these have a long gap oesophageal atresia, where primary anastomosis is difficult or impossible. Previous studies have shown an effect of intramural botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) injections on the elongation.......16%) and the placebo group (13.77 mm, 39.92%). Conclusion Elongation of the piglet esophagus was significantly improved with a 2-hour waiting period after BTX-A injection. Injections with BTX-A could be useful in oesophageal atresia, where primary anastomosis is not possible....

  11. Botulinum toxin type A for neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zee-A; Song, Dae Heon; Oh, Hyun-Mi; Chung, Myung Eun

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the analgesic effect of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) on patients with spinal cord injury-associated neuropathic pain. The effect of BTX-A on 40 patients with spinal cord injury-associated neuropathic pain was investigated using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design. A 1-time subcutaneous BTX-A (200U) injection was administered to the painful area. Visual analogue scale (VAS) scores (0-100mm), the Korean version of the short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire, and the World Health Organization WHOQOL-BREF quality of life assessment were evaluated prior to treatment and at 4 and 8 weeks after the injection. At 4 and 8 weeks after injection, the VAS score for pain was significantly reduced by 18.6 ± 16.8 and 21.3 ± 26.8, respectively, in the BTX-A group, whereas it was reduced by 2.6 ± 14.6 and 0.3 ± 19.5, respectively, in the placebo group. The pain relief was associated with preservation of motor or sensory function below the neurological level of injury. Among the responders in the BTX-A group, 55% and 45% reported pain relief of 20% or greater at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively, after the injection, whereas only 15% and 10% of the responders in the placebo group reported a similar level of pain relief. Improvements in the score for the physical health domain of the WHOQOL-BREF in the BTX-A group showed a marginal trend toward significance (p = 0.0521) at 4 weeks after the injection. These results indicate that BTX-A may reduce intractable chronic neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury. © 2016 The Authors. Annals of Neurology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Neurological Association.

  12. Treatment of gustatory sweating with low-dose botulinum toxin A: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakke, Merete; Max Thorsen, Niels; Bardow, Allan; Dalager, Torben; Eckhart Thomsen, Carsten; Regeur, Lisbeth

    2006-06-01

    Frey's syndrome, gustatory sweating in the preauricular area, is an unpleasant phenomenon occurring during meals after surgery on the parotid gland. Recently, botulinum toxin A (BTX) has been shown to reduce the symptoms, but the variation in the reported doses is large. To quantify the effect of treatment with low-dose BTX in a case of Frey's syndrome over a period of 6 months. A 56-year-old woman was treated with 10 U Botox given as 20 single, intracutaneous injections of 0.5 U, one for each cm(2), 3 years after resection of the parotid gland. Before treatment and repeatedly during the 6-month period, the sweating was rated subjectively on a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS) and by a severity index, and objectively by assessment of the extent of the involved skin area using Minor's iodine-starch test, staining the area of sweating dark. The treatment decreased the involved area from 20 to 5 cm(2) and the VAS ratings from 98 to 8 mm. The index showed that treatment affected the sweating intensity, not the frequency. After the 6-month period the patient was still satisfied, but the involved skin area had increased; however, not entirely to pretreatment values. The effect of BTX injections for gustatory sweating obtained in this case was comparable to results reported using higher doses. Low doses of BTX can therefore be used in the treatment of Frey's syndrome, but studies to clarify the dose-response relationship, in terms of both time-course and obtained effect, are needed.

  13. Botulinum Toxin Induces Muscle Paralysis and Inhibits Bone Regeneration in Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recidoro, Anthony M.; Roof, Amanda C.; Schmitt, Michael; Worton, Leah E.; Petrie, Timothy; Strand, Nicholas; Ausk, Brandon J.; Srinivasan, Sundar; Moon, Randall T.; Gardiner, Edith M.; Kaminsky, Werner; Bain, Steven D.; Allan, Christopher H.; Gross, Ted S.; Kwon, Ronald Y.

    2016-01-01

    Intramuscular administration of Botulinum toxin (BTx) has been associated with impaired osteogenesis in diverse conditions of bone formation (e.g., development, growth, and healing), yet the mechanisms of neuromuscular-bone crosstalk underlying these deficits have yet to be identified. Motivated by the emerging utility of zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a rapid, genetically tractable, and optically transparent model for human pathologies (as well as the potential to interrogate neuromuscular-mediated bone disorders in a simple model that bridges in vitro and more complex in vivo model systems), in this study we developed a model of BTx-induced muscle paralysis in adult zebrafish, and examined its effects on intramembranous ossification during tail fin regeneration. BTx administration induced rapid muscle paralysis in adult zebrafish in a manner that was dose-dependent, transient, and focal, mirroring the paralytic phenotype observed in animal and human studies. During fin regeneration, BTx impaired continued bone ray outgrowth, morphology, and patterning, indicating defects in early osteogenesis. Further, BTx significantly decreased mineralizing activity and crystalline mineral accumulation, suggesting delayed late-stage osteoblast differentiation and/or altered secondary bone apposition. Bone ray transection proximal to the amputation site focally inhibited bone outgrowth in the affected ray, implicating intra- and/or inter-ray nerves in this process. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the potential to interrogate pathological features of BTx-induced osteoanabolic dysfunction in the regenerating zebrafish fin, define the technological toolbox for detecting bone growth and mineralization deficits in this process, and suggest that pathways mediating neuromuscular regulation of osteogenesis may be conserved beyond established mammalian models of bone anabolic disorders. PMID:24806738

  14. Using family and staff experiences of a botulinum toxin-A service to improve service quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, K L O; Bau, K; Lewis, J; Aroyan, K R; Botha, B; Botman, A G M; Stewart, K; Waugh, M-C A; Paget, S P

    2017-11-01

    The decision for families to proceed with botulinum toxin-A (BoNT-A) injections for managing childhood conditions involving hypertonia can be complex. Family-centred care is a service model that facilitates supporting families in this decision-making process. Understanding families' experiences of services is critical to developing family-centred care. The aim of this project was therefore to increase understanding of the experiences of families of children attending a BoNT-A service in order to improve the service and its family-centred approach to care. Sixteen staff of a BoNT-A service participated in a patient journey mapping exercise. Nine families of the service participated in in-depth interviews. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data from the staff session and interviews were analysed independently using grounded, hermeneutic thematic analysis. Staff sessions revealed 5 core themes that related to impacting on the family experience. Family interviews revealed 4 core themes, with 7 subthemes and 1 latent theme. Areas of importance identified by families relating to BoNT-A treatment included acknowledgement of individual needs, care coordination, empowerment of families and patients, consistency in service delivery, and the distressing nature of appointment and decision-making. Comparison of the data from the staff patient journey mapping and family interviews suggested that staff have a good but incomplete understanding of the factors important to families, highlighting the need for consumer engagement in establishing family-centred care. The themes identified can guide the provision of family-centred BoNT-A injection clinics. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The efficiency of high dose botulinum toxin type-A in the treatment of cerebral palsy

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    Alper İbrahim Dai

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of severe physical disability in childhood. Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A, has rapidly gained acceptance as a different treatment for spasticity. However, no consensus exists among clinicians about optimal dose of BTX-A in pediatric patients. Doses of 2-6 U/ kg bodyweight with a maximum total dose of 29U/kg have been reported. This study was conducted due to uncertain dosage rage in pediatric use. Method: In this study, 12 patients with cerebral palsy and spastic eqinus foot deformity who referred to our center, were treated with BTX-A in the dosage of 25 U/kg. After treatment of BTX-A, patients were followed up total of 6 months. Three months after treatment, Gross motor functional measurement (GMFM and Modified Ashwort scale (MAS were done. At the same time, questionnaires (PCQ were filled for possible side effects. Results: Average age of 6 girls and 6 boys were 4.5 ± 2.8 years. GMFM and MAS were done before and 3 months after treatment and were found statistically significant (p<0.05. Muscle soreness was the most common symptom at PCQ forms. Conclusion: Using these two objective scales and PCQ form, high dose of BTX-A treatment was found statistically successful. Larger dose of BTX-A was used which was considered safe, effective and better tolerated by children. Titration of the dose of BTX-A, should be individualized for each patient due to different level of spasticity affecting patients in different ways. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (1: 93-97

  16. Upper limb spasticity management for patients who have received Botulinum Toxin A injection: Australian therapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusick, Anne; Lannin, Natasha; Kinnear, Bianca Zoe

    2015-02-01

    To describe Australian physiotherapy and occupational therapy practice for patients who receive upper-limb Botulinum Toxin-A (BoNT-A). Anonymous online survey asking about practice experience. Convenience sample of 128 BoNT-A experienced occupational therapists and physiotherapists. The primary work setting was multidisciplinary inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation services where therapists had automatic referral to BoNT-A patients. Patients expected BoNT-A to improve functional movement, reduce hypertonicity, increase passive range, reduce pain, improve appearance and hand hygiene. Most patients were injected in multidisciplinary public hospital clinics and had median 2 pre-injection (range 0-30) and 8 post-injection (range 0-50) therapy sessions. Biceps, flexor digitorum profundus/superficialis and brachoradialis were most frequently injected. Injectors used therapist assessment information to select sites 68% of the time; only 44% of services had assessment protocols. Standardised therapy assessments examined motor performance, pain and function in that order of frequency. The greater the awareness and perceived relevance of an assessment the more often therapists used it. All therapists set goals, most collaboratively, and these mirrored patient expectations. The most common treatments were stretch, task-specific functional training, strength training and home programmes. While trends in Australian assessment, goals and treatment practice were observed, greater consistency could be achieved if therapy practice guidelines existed. The gap is exacerbated by the absence of Australian BoNT-A organisation and process of care spasticity management guidelines. This creates an environment where practice variability is inevitable. Recommendations to improve local service quality are made. © 2015 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  17. Preoperative progressive pneumoperitoneum and botulinum toxin type A in patients with large incisional hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno-Lledó, J; Torregrosa, A; Ballester, N; Carreño, O; Carbonell, F; Pastor, P G; Pamies, J; Cortés, V; Bonafé, S; Iserte, J

    2017-04-01

    Combination of preoperative progressive pneumoperitoneum (PPP) and botulinum toxin type A (BT) has not been previously reported in the management of large incisional hernia (LIH). Observational study of 45 consecutive patients with LIH between June 2010 and July 2014. The diameters of the hernia sac, the volumes of the incisional hernia (VIH) and the abdominal cavity (VAC), and the VIH/VAC ratio were measured before and after PPP and BT using abdominal CT scan data. We indicated the combination of both techniques when the volume of the incisional hernia (VIH)/volume of the abdominal cavity (VAC) ratio was >20%. The median insufflated volume of air for PPP was 8.600 ± 3.200 cc (4.500-13.250), over a period of 14.3 ± 1.3 days (13-16). BT administration time was 40.2 ± 3.3 days (37-44). We obtained an average value of reduction of 14% of the VIH/VAC ratio after PPP and BT (p < 0.05). Complications associated with PPP were 15.5%, and with surgical technique, 26.6%. No complications occurred during the BT administration. Reconstructive technique was anterior CST and primary fascial closure was achieved in all patients. Median follow-up was 40.5 ± 19 months (12-60) and we reported 2 cases of hernia recurrence (4.4%). Preoperative combination of PPP and BT is feasible and a useful tool in the surgical management of LIH, although at the cost of some specific complications.

  18. Best Clinical Practice in Botulinum Toxin Treatment for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Strobl

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A is considered a safe and effective therapy for children with cerebral palsy (CP, especially in the hands of experienced injectors and for the majority of children. Recently, some risks have been noted for children with Gross Motor Classification Scale (GMFCS of IV and the risks are substantial for level V. Recommendations for treatment with BoNT-A have been published since 1993, with continuous optimisation and development of new treatment concepts. This leads to modifications in the clinical decision making process, indications, injection techniques, assessments, and evaluations. This article summarises the state of the art of BoNT-A treatment in children with CP, based mainly on the literature and expert opinions by an international paediatric orthopaedic user group. BoNT-A is an important part of multimodal management, to support motor development and improve function when the targeted management of spasticity in specific muscle groups is clinically indicated. Individualised assessment and treatment are essential, and should be part of an integrated approach chosen to support the achievement of motor milestones. To this end, goals should be set for both the long term and for each injection cycle. The correct choice of target muscles is also important; not all spastic muscles need to be injected. A more focused approach needs to be established to improve function and motor development, and to prevent adverse compensations and contractures. Furthermore, the timeline of BoNT-A treatment extends from infancy to adulthood, and treatment should take into account the change in indications with age.

  19. Botulinum Toxin Type A Injections as Monotherapy for Upper Limb Essential Tremor Using Kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samotus, Olivia; Kumar, Niraj; Rizek, Philippe; Jog, Mandar

    2018-01-01

    There is a significant need for a targeted therapy for essential tremor (ET), as medications have not been developed specifically for ET, and the ones prescribed are often not well-tolerated, so that many patients remain untreated. Recent work has shown that, unlike previous experience, kinematically guided individualized botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injections provide benefit along with minimal weakness. Ours is the first long-term (96-week) safety and efficacy study of BoNT-A as monotherapy for ET using kinematically driven injection parameters. Ten ET patients were administered six serial BoNT-A treatments every 16 weeks and were assessed at 6 weeks following treatment. During each study visit, the Fahn-Tolosa-Marin (FTM) scale, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, and the Quality of Life for Essential Tremor Questionnaire (QUEST) were administered along with kinematic assessment of the treated limb. Participants performed scripted tasks with motion sensors placed over each arm joint. Dosing patterns were determined using the movement disorder neurologist's interpretation of muscles contributing to the kinematically analyzed upper limb tremor biomechanics. There was a 33.8% (pfunctional improvement (FTM part C) and a 39.8% (ptremor score was reduced by 62.9% (p=0.001) in the treated and by 44.4% (p=0.03) in the untreated arm at week 96 compared to week 48. Individualized BoNT-A dosing patterns to each individual's tremor biomechanics provided an effective monotherapy for ET as function improved without functionally limiting muscle weakness.

  20. Botulinum toxin abolishes sweating via impaired sweat gland responsiveness to exogenous acetylcholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, M; Davis, S L; Cui, J; Low, D A; Keller, D M; Crandall, C G

    2009-10-01

    Botulinum toxin A (BTX) disrupts neurotransmitter release from cholinergic nerves. The effective duration of impaired sweat secretion with BTX is longer relative to that of impaired muscle contraction, suggesting different mechanisms in these tissues. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that BTX is capable of altering sweating by reducing the responsiveness of the sweat gland to acetylcholine. BTX was injected into the dorsal forearm skin of healthy subjects at least 3 days before subsequent assessment. On the day of the experiment, intradermal microdialysis probes were placed within the BTX-treated area and in an adjacent untreated area. Incremental doses of acetylcholine were administered through the microdialysis membranes while the sweat rate (protocol 1; n = 8) or a combination of sweat rate and skin blood flow (protocol 2; n = 8) were assessed. A relative absence of sweating was observed at the BTX site for both protocols (protocol 1: 0.05 +/- 0.09 mg cm(-2) min(-1); protocol 2: 0.03 +/- 0.04 mg cm(-2) min(-1), both at the highest dose of acetylcholine), while the sweat rate increased appropriately at the control sites (protocol 1: 0.90 +/- 0.46 mg cm(-2) min(-1); protocol 2: 1.07 +/- 0.67 mg cm(-2) min(-1)). Cutaneous vascular conductance increased to a similar level at both the BTX and control sites. These results demonstrate that BTX is capable of inhibiting sweat secretion by reducing the responsiveness of the sweat gland to acetylcholine, while not altering acetylcholine-mediated cutaneous vasodilatation.

  1. A successful management of sever gummy smile using gingivectomy and botulinum toxin injection: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Diana

    2018-01-01

    A gummy smile (GS) affects the esthetic and the psychological status as it usually decreases the self-confidence leading to hidden or controlling the smile. A smile with more than 2 mm exposed gingiva is called gummy smile. It may be due to one or more of the following etiologies; altered passive eruption of teeth, dentoalveolar extrusion, vertical maxillary excess, and short or hyperactive lip muscles. The treatment of gummy smile should be planned according to its cause/causes. The purpose of this case report was to highlight the ability of combined treatment of gingivectomy and Botox injection technique in managing a severe gummy smile. Also, techniques, advantages, disadvantages, indication and contraindications of Botulinum toxin (BT) are discussed at the literacy. A 24 year old female patient with a severe gummy smile was refereed to the periodontal clinics of our institution. Clinical examination revealed that she has a GS of an 11-12 mm gingival exposed area that was indicated for orthognathic surgery. The GS was treated by a gingivectomy surgery to increase the clinical crowns of upper anterior teeth and the use of Botox injections. The treatment showed remarkable and satisfactory results instead of doing extensive surgery. It is important to assess the patients' esthetic expectations and show the possible therapeutic solutions that fit him. We revealed that BT is considered as one of the minimally invasive, quick and affordable modalities that can replace extensive surgical procedures for corrections of sever GS. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Botulinum Toxin Dosing Trends in Spasmodic Dysphonia Over a 20-year Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namin, Arya W; Christopher, Kara M; Eisenbeis, John F

    2017-01-01

    The study aims to (1) identify the botulinum toxin (BTX) dosing trend in a cohort of patients who received at least 20 injections for the treatment of adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD), (2) describe two distinct BTX dosing trends in treating ADSD (a "classic" dosing trend that initially decreases before stabilizing, and a "fluctuating" dosing trend), and (3) determine if patients with the "classic" dosing trend differed in age or in dosing intervals from those with the "fluctuating" dosing trend. This is a retrospective case series. Of 149 patients who received a total of 2484 BTX injections for the treatment of spasmodic dysphonia in 1993-2013, 49 patients received at least 20 injections. The BTX dose and the interval between doses were recorded. The mean dose of injections 1-20 was determined. The age at initial injection, initial dose, and interval in days between treatments were compared for the "fluctuating" and "classic" groups. The cohort exhibits a significant decrease in dose during the first 10-15 injections. The "fluctuating" group had a significantly shorter interval between injections (mean interval = 97.09 days, SD = 29.41; mean interval = 136.90 days, SD = 43.76, P = 0.002). The mean age at initial dose was not significantly different between the "classic" and "fluctuating" groups. The average BTX dose of patients with ADSD who receive long-term injections significantly decreases during the initial 10-15 injections before stabilizing. Patients who exhibit the "fluctuating" dosing pattern have a significantly shorter interval between injections than those with the "classic" dosing pattern. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Short-term effects of botulinum toxin on the lateral rectus muscle of the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Diana M; Shall, Mary S; Goldberg, Stephen J

    2002-12-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BTX) is often used as an alternative to surgery for the treatment of strabismus and many other motor or cosmetic problems. Although numerous studies established BTX as a powerful transmission-blocking agent at the neuromuscular junction, no evaluation of extraocular muscle (EOM) contractile properties after administration of BTX exists. Some anatomical studies on EOM fiber types suggested a long-term preferential effect of BTX on orbital layer, singly innervated muscle fibers. In this study, we examined the short-term effects of BTX on the contractile properties of normal lateral rectus muscle to determine the functional effect of BTX on muscle-force output over time. Measurements of muscle tension and the corresponding EMG evoked by stimulation of nerve VI were made hourly for up to 18 h following BTX administration. An intramuscular BTX injection of 2 U caused a dramatic decrease in maximum twitch and tetanic tension of the muscle in response to different frequencies of stimulation. This suppression developed gradually over time, with a concomitant reduction of EMG amplitude. No significant changes in muscle-speed-related characteristics (e.g., twitch contraction time, fusion frequency) were found. The results suggest a functional effect of BTX on all muscle fiber types, although, with the dose used, we did not observe complete muscle paralysis within the time of recording. The time course of muscle tension suppression by BTX also was frequency dependent, with the lower stimulation frequencies being more affected, suggesting that implementation of higher frequencies could still produce adequate eye movements.

  4. Results of botulinum toxin: an application to blepharospasm Schwartz-Jampel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargel, Ibrahim; Canter, Halil Ibrahim; Topaloglu, Haluk; Erk, Yucel

    2006-07-01

    Schwartz-Jampel syndrome (SJS) is a rare congenital disorder of continuous myotonia, causing visual and eyelid problems such as blepharospasm, acquired ptosis, and blepharophimosis. We report the management of blepharospasm in two sisters with Schwartz-Jampel syndrome with application of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A), as an alternative to the surgical treatments, such as orbicularis oculi myectomy, levator aponeurosis resection, and lateral canthopexy as described in the literature. Three consequent doses of commercially available BTX-A (Botox-Allergan, Inc. 100 u/via) were injected to orbicularis oculi muscle in two sisters with Schwartz-Jampel syndrome. At the least, the authors waited for a six-month interval to prevent development of sensitivity to BTX-A in patients. No significant improvement was observed after the injection of first dose of BTX-A, with the total dose of 25 units of BTX-A to each orbicularis oculi muscle of the eyes. The muscle tone weakened after the second dose, which was the twice as such of the first applied total dose (50 units of BTX-A to each orbicularis oculi muscle of the eyes) and significant functional and cosmetic improvements were achieved after injection of the third dose, in which the total applied dose was the same as the one applied in second dose. The blepharospasm and eyelid alterations caused by Schwartz-Jampel syndrome should be treated to provide functional and cosmetic improvements. Application of BTX-A to orbicularis oculi muscle for the treatment of blepharospasm could be considered as an alternative to levator resection, and lateral canthopexy in Schwartz-Jampel syndrome.

  5. Surface anatomy of the lip elevator muscles for the treatment of gummy smile using botulinum toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Woo-Sang; Hur, Mi-Sun; Hu, Kyung-Seok; Song, Wu-Chul; Koh, Ki-Seok; Baik, Hyoung-Seon; Kim, Seong-Taek; Kim, Hee-Jin; Lee, Kee-Joon

    2009-01-01

    To propose a safe and reproducible injection point for botulinum toxin-A (BTX-A) as a supplementary method for the treatment of gummy smile, as determined by assessment of the morphologic characteristics of three lip elevator muscles. A total of 50 hemi-faces from 25 adult cadavers (male 13, female 12; ages, 47 to 88 years) were used in this study. Topographic relations and the directions of the lip elevator muscles (ie, levator labii superioris [LLS], levator labii superioris alaeque nasi [LLSAN], and zygomaticus minor [ZMi]), were investigated. Possible injection points were examined through the study of predetermined surface landmarks. The insertion of the LLS was covered partially or entirely by the LLSAN and the ZMi, and the three muscles converged on the area lateral to the ala. The mean angle between the facial midline and each muscle vector was 25.8 +/- 4.8 degrees for the LLS, 55.7 +/- 6.4 degrees for the ZMi, and -20.2 +/- 3.2 degrees for the LLSAN; no significant differences were noted between male and female subjects or between left and right sides. The three vectors passed near a triangular region formed by three surface landmarks. The center of this triangle, named the "Yonsei point", was suggested as an appropriate injection point for BTX-A. The clinical effectiveness of the injection point was demonstrated in selected cases with or without orthodontic treatment. Under careful case selection, BTX-A may be an effective treatment alternative for patients with excessive gingival display caused by hyperactive lip elevator muscles.

  6. Preoperative abdominal muscle elongation with botulinum toxin A for complex incisional ventral hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooque, Faisal; Jacombs, Anita S W; Roussos, Emmanouel; Read, John W; Dardano, Anthony N; Edye, Michael; Ibrahim, Nabeel

    2016-01-01

    Surgical repair of recurrent abdominal incisional hernia(s) can be challenging due to complex operative conditions, intense post-operative pain, potential respiratory compromise and lateral muscle traction predisposing to early recurrence. We report our preliminary results with botulinum toxin A (BTA) injection causing flaccid paralysis (relaxation) of the lateral abdominal wall muscles prior to surgery. A prospective pilot study measured the effect of preoperative BTA prior to elective repair of recurrent abdominal hernias. Under ultrasound control, 2 weeks prior to surgery, 50 units of BTA was injected into the external oblique, internal oblique and transversus abdominis muscles at three sites on each side of the lateral abdominal wall (total dose 300 units). Pre- and post-BTA abdominal computed tomography measured changes in abdominal wall muscle thickness and length. All hernias were repaired with laparoscopic or laparoscopic-assisted mesh techniques in a single or two-staged procedure. Eight patients received BTA injections which were tolerated with no complications. Post-BTA preoperative computed tomography showed a significant increase in mean length of lateral abdominal wall from 18.5 cm pre-BTA to 21.3 cm post-BTA (P = 0.017) with a mean unstretched length gain of 2.8 cm per side (range 0.8-6.0 cm). All hernias were surgically reduced with mesh with no early recurrence. Preoperative BTA injection prior to complex abdominal hernia repair is a safe procedure that causes flaccid relaxation, elongation and thinning of the lateral abdominal muscles and decrease in hernia defect. Although further evaluation is required, BTA injections may be a useful adjunct to surgical repair of complex incisional hernias. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  7. Occurrence of Dysphagia Following Botulinum Toxin Injection in Parkinsonism-related Cervical Dystonia: A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Addie Patterson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim was to compare the occurrence of post-injection dysphagia in parkinsonism-related cervical dystonia (PRCD versus cervical dystonia (CD of other etiologies (non-PRCD. A secondary objective was to explore potential clinical differences between PRCD and non-PRCD and their respective responses to botulinum toxin (BoNT. Methods: A cross-sectional chart review was carried out of patients treated for CD with Onabotulinumtoxin A at the University of Florida. We collected demographic information, dose of BoNT injected, patient-reported presence of dysphagia as a side effect, patient-perceived duration of benefit and efficacy according to the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGIS. Results: Of the 144 patients included, 24 patients were diagnosed with PRCD and 120 were diagnosed as non-PRCD. Data analysis showed no significant differences in number of weeks of benefit from BoNT (PRCD 9.1±3.7 versus non-PRCD 9.4±3.7 weeks, p = 0.830, BoNT dosage (PRCD 235.0±95.6 versus non-PRCD 263.7±101.3 units, p = 0.181, median CGIS score (median = 2 or “much improved” for both groups, p = 0.88, or the presence of dysphagia after BoNT (PRCD 17% versus non-PRCD 19 %, p = 0.753, n = 132. In a subgroup analysis of the non-PRCD group, patients who experienced dysphagia were older than those who did not (63.9±8.9 years versus 58.1±14.4 years, p = 0.02. Discussion: Despite an increased baseline risk of dysphagia in patients with PRCD, BoNT appears to be equally safe and equally beneficial in PRCD and non-PRCD patients.

  8. Cellular and Matrix Response of the Mandibular Condylar Cartilage to Botulinum Toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane H Dutra

    Full Text Available To evaluate the cellular and matrix effects of botulinum toxin type A (Botox on mandibular condylar cartilage (MCC and subchondral bone.Botox (0.3 unit was injected into the right masseter of 5-week-old transgenic mice (Col10a1-RFPcherry at day 1. Left side masseter was used as intra-animal control. The following bone labels were intraperitoneally injected: calcein at day 7, alizarin red at day 14 and calcein at day 21. In addition, EdU was injected 48 and 24 hours before sacrifice. Mice were sacrificed 30 days after Botox injection. Experimental and control side mandibles were dissected and examined by x-ray imaging and micro-CT. Subsequently, MCC along with the subchondral bone was sectioned and stained with tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP, EdU, TUNEL, alkaline phosphatase, toluidine blue and safranin O. In addition, we performed immunohistochemistry for pSMAD and VEGF.Bone volume fraction, tissue density and trabecular thickness were significantly decreased on the right side of the subchondral bone and mineralized cartilage (Botox was injected when compared to the left side. There was no significant difference in the mandibular length and condylar head length; however, the condylar width was significantly decreased after Botox injection. Our histology showed decreased numbers of Col10a1 expressing cells, decreased cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis in the subchondral bone and mandibular condylar cartilage, decreased TRAP activity and mineralization of Botox injected side cartilage and subchondral bone. Furthermore, we observed reduced proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan distribution and decreased expression of pSMAD 1/5/8 and VEGF in the MCC of the Botox injected side in comparison to control side.Injection of Botox in masseter muscle leads to decreased mineralization and matrix deposition, reduced chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation and increased cell apoptosis in the MCC and subchondral bone.

  9. A Medical Research and Evaluation Facility (MREF) and Studies Supporting the Medical Chemical Defense Program: Task 95-39: Methods Development and Validation of Two Mouse Bioassays for Use in Quantifying Botulinum Toxins (A, B, C, D and E) and Toxin Antibody Titers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olson, Carl

    1997-01-01

    Ths task was conducted for the U.S. Army Medical Materiel Development Activity (USAMMDA) to validate two mouse bioassays for quantify botulinum toxin potency and neutralizing antibodies to botulimun toxins...

  10. Muscle disuse caused by botulinum toxin injection leads to increased central gain of the stretch reflex in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingel, Jessica; Hultborn, Hans; Näslund-Koch, Lui; Jensen, Dennis B; Wienecke, Jacob; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2017-10-01

    Botulinum toxin (Btx) is used in children with cerebral palsy and in other neurological patients to diminish spasticity and reduce the risk of development of contractures. We investigated changes in the central gain of the stretch reflex circuitry in response to Btx injection in the triceps surae muscle in rats. Experiments were performed in 21 rats. Eight rats were a control group, and 13 rats were injected with 6 IU of Btx in the left triceps surae muscle. Two weeks after Btx injection, larger monosynaptic reflexes (MSR) were recorded from the left (injected) than the right (noninjected) L4 + L5 ventral roots following stimulation of the corresponding dorsal roots. A similar increase on the left side was observed in response to stimulation of descending motor tracts, suggesting that increased excitability of spinal motor neurons may at least partly explain the increased reflexes. However, significant changes were also observed in postactivation depression of the MSR, suggesting that plastic changes in transmission from Ia afferent to the motor neurons also may be involved. The data demonstrate that muscle paralysis induced by Btx injection is accompanied by plastic adaptations in the central stretch reflex circuitry, which counteract the antispastic effect of Btx. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Injection of botulinum toxin into ankle muscles causes increased gain of stretch reflex. This is caused by adaptive changes in regulation of transmitter release from Ia afferents and increased excitability of spinal motor neurons. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Effective treatment of ketamine-associated cystitis with botulinum toxin type a injection combined with bladder hydrodistention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jianfeng; Lai, Haibiao; Zheng, Dongxiang; Zhong, Liang; Huang, Zhifeng; Wang, Shanyun; Zou, Weiwei

    2017-01-01

    Objective Ketamine-associated cystitis (KAC) has been described in a few case reports, but its treatment in a relatively large number of patients has not been documented. This study aimed to describe our experience of treatment of 36 patients with KAC. Methods Thirty-six patients (30 males and 6 females, aged 19–38 years) with KAC, who had previously taken a muscarinic receptor blocker and/or antibiotics, but without symptomatic relief, were treated with botulinum toxin A injection combined with bladder hydrodistention. Urodynamic testing, and the O’Leary–Sant interstitial cystitis symptom index (ICSI) and problem index (ICPI) were used to evaluate baseline values and improvement before and after the treatment. Results One month post-treatment, all patients achieved marked relief of symptoms. The nocturia time was markedly reduced, while bladder capacity, the interval between micturition, the void volume, and the maximum flow rate were remarkably increased at 1 month. Additionally, the ICSI and ICPI were significantly improved. Conclusion Botulinum toxin A injection along with bladder hydrodistention is effective for managing KAC. PMID:28415952

  12. Effective treatment of ketamine-associated cystitis with botulinum toxin type a injection combined with bladder hydrodistention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jianfeng; Lai, Haibiao; Zheng, Dongxiang; Zhong, Liang; Huang, Zhifeng; Wang, Shanyun; Zou, Weiwei; Wei, Lianbo

    2017-04-01

    Objective Ketamine-associated cystitis (KAC) has been described in a few case reports, but its treatment in a relatively large number of patients has not been documented. This study aimed to describe our experience of treatment of 36 patients with KAC. Methods Thirty-six patients (30 males and 6 females, aged 19-38 years) with KAC, who had previously taken a muscarinic receptor blocker and/or antibiotics, but without symptomatic relief, were treated with botulinum toxin A injection combined with bladder hydrodistention. Urodynamic testing, and the O'Leary-Sant interstitial cystitis symptom index (ICSI) and problem index (ICPI) were used to evaluate baseline values and improvement before and after the treatment. Results One month post-treatment, all patients achieved marked relief of symptoms. The nocturia time was markedly reduced, while bladder capacity, the interval between micturition, the void volume, and the maximum flow rate were remarkably increased at 1 month. Additionally, the ICSI and ICPI were significantly improved. Conclusion Botulinum toxin A injection along with bladder hydrodistention is effective for managing KAC.

  13. Factors predicting the efficacy of botulinum toxin-A treatment of the lower limb in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzi, Elisa; Maraucci, Ilaria; Torrielli, Simona; Motta, Francesco; Lanzi, Giovanni

    2005-08-01

    Botulinum toxin A is widely used for spasticity management in children with cerebral palsy, although outcomes are unpredictable. The aim of this study was to identify criteria for selecting patients most likely to benefit from botulinum toxin A treatment. Fifty-five subjects, aged 2.5 to 18 years, were recruited. The assessment covered measures of spasticity (Modified Ashworth Scale), function (using the Gross Motor Function Measure and the Physician's Rating Scale), selective motor control, static range of motion at the ankle with knee extended and flexed, range of motion of the knee flexors, central and peripheral vision, and cognitive ability. Outcomes at 3 months were compared with baseline values. All of the scales showed significant differences between pre- and postinjection values. Significantly increased Gross Motor Function Measure scores were found in children aged 48 months or under and in those able to walk with support. Greater improvements in selective motor control and Physician's Rating Scale were seen in those with a less severe pattern of paralysis, lower levels of impairment, the ability to walk (with or without support), normal visual acuity, and normal or borderline cognition. We identified factors that mark out patients as most likely to achieve functional gains: young age, hemiplegia or diplegia, slight to moderate disability, walking with support, normal or borderline cognition, and normal or borderline visual acuity.

  14. Botulinum Toxin-A Dosing Trends for Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia at a Single Institution Over 10 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Joseph P; Barrow, Emily M; Hapner, Edie R; Klein, Adam M; Johns, Michael M

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to identify the changes in dosing of botulinum toxin-A for adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD) over a prolonged period. This is a retrospective chart review. One hundred thirteen subjects treated for ADSD from 2003 to 2013 were identified from a clinical database. Subject age, gender, and total injection dose amount were all recorded for all subjects who had at least 10 injections. Fifty-four subjects met criteria for inclusion. There were no age or gender differences in the starting dose for subjects. Dosing decreased significantly compared with the second dose (5.05 ± 1.623 Units), by the sixth dose (4.26 ± 1.698 Units), and continued through the 10th dose (4.08 ± 2.019 Units) (P < 0.005 for all). Botulinum toxin-A dosing for ADSD decreases consistently over subsequent injections after the initial two dose titrations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. [Bacterial ecology and resistance to antibiotics in patients with neurogenic overactive bladder treated with intravesical botulinum toxin injections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, J; Le Breton, F; Jousse, M; Haddad, R; Verollet, D; Guinet-Lacoste, A; Amarenco, G

    2014-10-01

    For the last ten years, botulinum neurotoxin type A has become the gold standard for the treatment of neurogenic overactive detrusor. Bacterial colonization is common for these patients using clean intermittent self-catheterization, and toxin injections are at risk of urinary tract infections. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of different germs and their resistance to antibiotics in patients with neurogenic bladder, treated with intravesical botulinum toxin injections. This epidemiologic study took place from September to October 2012 in a urodynamic and neurourology unit in a teaching hospital in Paris, France. Eighty patients with a valid urine culture according to our protocol, were included. Fourty-four culture were positive with 45 bacteria. We found an Escherichia coli in 42.5%, a Klebsiella pneumoniae in 7.5%, a Citrobacter freundii and an enterococcus in 2.5%, and a Staphylococcus aureus in 1.25%. Penicillin resistance were found in 51.11%, 3rd generation cephalosporins in 8.89%, quinolones in 28.89% and sulfamids in 24.44%. None were resistant to fosfomycin. E. coli was the most frequent bacterium. No resistance to fosfomycin was found. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Long lasting dysautonomia due to botulinum toxin B poisoning: clinical-laboratory follow up and difficulties in initial diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potulska-Chromik, Anna; Zakrzewska-Pniewska, Beata; Szmidt-Sałkowska, Elżbieta; Lewandowski, Jacek; Siński, Maciej; Przyjałkowski, Witold; Kostera-Pruszczyk, Anna

    2013-10-30

    Botulism is an acute form of poisoning caused by one of four types (A, B, E, F) toxins produced by Clostridium botulinum, ananaerobic, spore forming bacillus. Usually diagnosis of botulism is considered in patients with predominant motor symptoms: muscle weakness with intact sensation and preserved mental function. We report a case of 56-year-old Caucasian female with a history of arterial hypertension, who presented with acute respiratory failure and bilateral ptosis misdiagnosed as brainstem ischemia. She had severe external and internal ophtalmoplegia, and autonomic dysfunction with neither motor nor sensory symptoms from upper and lower limbs. Diagnosis of botulinum toxin poisoning was made and confirmed by serum antibody testing in the mouse inoculation test. Ophtalmoplegia, autonomic dysfunction and respiratory failure can be caused by botulism. Early treatment and intensive care is essential for survival and recovery. The electrophysiological tests are crucial to correct and rapid diagnosis. Botulism (especially type B) should be considered in any case of acute or predominant isolated autonomic dysfunction.

  17. Intravesical botulinum toxin-A injections reduce bladder pain of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome refractory to conventional treatment - A prospective, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Hann-Chorng; Jiang, Yuan-Hong; Tsai, Yao-Chou; Kuo, Yuh-Chen

    2016-06-01

    Intravesical onabotulinumtoxinA (BoNT-A) injection is a beneficial treatment for interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS), yet its therapeutic efficacy remains to be validated. This study tests efficacy and safety of intravesical BoNT-A injections for treatment of IC/BPS. A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in patients with IC/BPS refractory to conventional treatment. Patients were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to hydrodistention plus suburothelial injections of BoNT-A 100 U (Botox group) or the equivalent amount of normal saline (N/S group). The primary endpoint was a decrease in pain assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS) at week 8 after treatment. Secondary endpoints included voiding diary and urodynamic variables. The Wilcoxon sign rank and rank sum tests were used for statistical analyses. A total of 60 patients (8 males, 52 females, age 50.8 ± 13.9 years) including 40 in the Botox and 20 in the N/S groups were enrolled. At week 8, a significantly greater reduction of pain was observed in the Botox group compared to the N/S group (-2.6 ± 2.8 vs. -0.9 ±  2.2, P = 0.021). The other variables did not differ significantly between groups except for cystometric bladder capacity, which was increased significantly in the Botox group. The overall success rates were 63% (26/40) in the Botox group and 15% (3/20) in the N/S group (P = 0.028). Adverse events did not differ between the groups. Intravesical injections of 100 U of BoNT-A effectively reduced bladder pain symptoms in patients with IC/BPS. The adverse events were acceptable. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:609-614, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The Profile of Patients and Current Practice of Treatment of Upper Limb Muscle Spasticity with Botulinum Toxin Type A: An International Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakheit, Abdel Magid

    2010-01-01

    To document the current practice in relation with the treatment of patients with upper limb spasticity with botulinum toxin type A to inform future research in this area. We designed an international, cross-sectional, noninterventional survey of current practice. Nine hundred and seventy-four patients from 122 investigational centres in 31…

  19. Functional effects of botulinum toxin type-A treatment and subsequent stretching of spastic calf muscles: a study in patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niet, M. de; Bot, S.T. de; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Although calf muscle spasticity is often treated with botulinum toxin type-A, the effects on balance and gait are ambiguous. Hereditary spastic paraplegia is characterized by progressive spasticity and relatively mild muscle weakness of the lower limbs. It is therefore a good model to

  20. Functional effects of botulinum toxin type-A treatment and subsequent stretching of spastic calf muscles: a study in patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Niet, Mark; de Bot, Susanne T; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C; Weerdesteyn, Vivian; Geurts, Alexander C

    2015-02-01

    Although calf muscle spasticity is often treated with botulinum toxin type-A, the effects on balance and gait are ambiguous. Hereditary spastic paraplegia is characterized by progressive spasticity and relatively mild muscle weakness of the lower limbs. It is therefore a good model to evaluate the functional effects of botulinum toxin type-A. Explorative pre-post intervention study. Fifteen subjects with pure hereditary spastic paraplegia. Patients with symptomatic calf muscle spasticity and preserved calf muscle strength received botulinum toxin type-A injections in each triceps surae (Dysport®, 500-750 MU) followed by daily stretching exercises (18 weeks). Before intervention (T0), and 4 (T1) and 18 (T2) weeks thereafter, gait, balance, motor selectivity, calf muscle tone and strength were tested. Mean comfortable gait velocity increased from T0 (0.90 m/s (standard deviation (SD) 0.18)) to T1 (0.98 m/s (SD 0.20)), which effect persisted at T2, whereas balance and other functional measures remained unchanged. Calf muscle tone declined from T0 (median 2; range 1-2) to T1 (median 0; range 0-1), which effect partially persisted at T2 (median 1; range 0-2). Calf muscle strength did not change. Botulinum toxin type-A treatment and subsequent muscle stretching of the calves improved comfortable gait velocity and reduced muscle tone in patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia, while preserving muscle strength. Balance remained unaffected.

  1. Alterations in CNS Activity Induced by Botulinum Toxin Treatment in Spasmodic Dysphonia: An H[subscript 2][superscript 15]O PET Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, S. Omar; Thomassen, Michael; Schulz, Geralyn M.; Hosey, Lara A.; Varga, Mary; Ludlow, Christy L.; Braun, Allen R.

    2006-01-01

    Speech-related changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were measured using H[subscript 2][superscript 15]O positron-emission tomography in 9 adults with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD) before and after botulinum toxin (BTX) injection and 10 age- and gender-matched volunteers without neurological disorders. Scans were acquired at rest…

  2. Ocular Neuromyotonia Noted after Recent Botulinum Toxin Injection for Sixth Nerve Palsy Following Resection of a Posterior Fossa Skull Base Meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daubert, Jacquelyn; Hariharan, Luxme; Pasol, Joshua; McKeown, Craig; Cavuoto, Kara

    2015-02-01

    A 56-year-old female complained of diplopia immediately after surgical excision of a recurrent left skull base tuberculum meningioma. She was found to have a left sixth nerve palsy, which was subsequently treated with botulinum toxin injection to the medial rectus muscle. Three months post injection, the patient had partial recovery of the sixth nerve palsy and new-onset ocular neuromyotonia.

  3. Feasibility of a Day-Camp Model of Modified Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy with and without Botulinum Toxin A Injection for Children with Hemiplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasson, Ann-Christin; Shaw, Karin; Ponten, Eva; Boyd, Roslyn; Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the feasibility of modified constraint-induced (CI) therapy provided in a 2-week day-camp model with and without intramuscular botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injections for children with congenital cerebral palsy. Sixteen children with congenital hemiplegia, Manual Ability Classification System (MACS)…

  4. Botulinum toxin-induced acute anterior uveitis in a patient with Behçet's disease under infliximab treatment: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasajima, Hirofumi; Yagi, Syunsuke; Osada, Hiromu; Zako, Masahiro

    2017-05-04

    Injections of lipopolysaccharide in animal models generate acute anterior uveitis (also known as endotoxin-induced uveitis), but the effects of lipopolysaccharide injection are unknown in humans. We describe an unusual case in which acute anterior uveitis was dramatically activated subsequent to botulinum toxin injection in a patient with Behçet's disease but the acute anterior uveitis was satisfactorily attenuated by infliximab. A 53-year-old Japanese man had normal ocular findings at his regularly scheduled appointment. He had been diagnosed as having incomplete-type Behçet's disease 11 years before. Three years after the diagnosis he was given systemic infusions of 5 mg/kg infliximab every 8 weeks and he had not experienced a uveitis attack for 8 years with no treatment other than infliximab. Two days after the eye examination, he received intracutaneous botulinum toxin injections to treat axillary hyperhidrosis on both sides. Three hours after the injections, he noted rapidly increasing floaters in his right eye. Four days after the injections, his right eye showed severe acute anterior uveitis with deteriorated aqueous flare and anterior vitreous opacity. He received his scheduled infliximab injection, and the right acute anterior uveitis immediately attenuated. Botulinum toxin may have clinical effects similar to those of lipopolysaccharide in endotoxin-induced uveitis models. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to suggest that botulinum toxin may trigger acute anterior uveitis, although the precise mechanism is still unclear.

  5. Preoperative Botulinum toxin A enabling defect closure and laparoscopic repair of complex ventral hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Acevedo, Omar; Elstner, Kristen E; Jacombs, Anita S W; Read, John W; Martins, Rodrigo Tomazini; Arduini, Fernando; Wehrhahm, Michael; Craft, Colette; Cosman, Peter H; Dardano, Anthony N; Ibrahim, Nabeel

    2018-02-01

    Operative management of complex ventral hernia still remains a significant challenge for surgeons. Closure of large defects in the unprepared abdomen has serious pathophysiological consequences due to chronic contraction and retraction of the lateral abdominal wall muscles. We report outcomes of 56 consecutive patients who had preoperative Botulinum toxin A (BTA) abdominal wall relaxation facilitating closure and repair. This was a prospective observational study of 56 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided BTA into the lateral abdominal oblique muscles prior to elective ventral hernia repair between November 2012 and January 2017. Serial non-contrast abdominal CT imaging was performed to evaluate changes in lateral oblique muscle length and thickness. All hernias were repaired laparoscopically, or laparoscopic-open-laparoscopic (LOL) using intraperitoneal onlay mesh. 56 patients received BTA injections at predetermined sites to the lateral oblique muscles, which were well tolerated. Mean patient age was 59.7 years, and mean BMI was 30.9 kg/m 2 (range 21.8-54.0). Maximum defect size was 24 × 27 cm. A subset of 18 patients underwent preoperative pneumoperitoneum as an adjunct procedure. A comparison of pre-BTA to post-BTA imaging demonstrated an increase in mean lateral abdominal wall length from 16.1 cm to 20.1 cm per side, a mean gain of 4.0 cm/side (range 1.0-11.7 cm/side) (p LOL primary closure was achieved in all cases, with no clinical evidence of raised intra-abdominal pressures. One patient presented with a new fascial defect 26 months post-operative. Preoperative BTA to the lateral abdominal wall muscles is a safe and effective technique for the preparation of patients prior to operative management of complex ventral hernias. BTA temporary flaccid paralysis relaxes, elongates and thins the chronically contracted abdominal musculature. This in turn reduces lateral traction forces facilitating laparoscopic repair and fascial closure of large

  6. Liquid-type Botulinum Toxin Type A in Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia: A Prospective Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Wonjae; Jang, Jeon Yeob; Wang, Soo-Geun; Kang, Ji-Heon; Jo, Min-Gyu

    2017-05-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) has been widely used to treat adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD). Most commercially available forms of BTX require reconstitution before use, which may increase the risk of contamination and requires careful titration. Recently, a liquid-type BTX type A (BTX-A) has been developed, which should simplify the procedure and enhance its efficacy. Herein, we present a prospective pilot study to investigate the efficacy and safety of liquid-type BTX-A in the treatment of ADSD. Twenty-six consecutive liquid-type BTX-A injections were performed in 12 patients with ADSD. We included as a control group 34 consecutive patients with ADSD who had previously undergone 52 vocal fold injection procedures with freeze-dried-type BTX-A. All patients in both groups had improvement of symptoms related to ADSD and period of normal voice. Most patients experienced breathiness, and the onset time, the peak response time, and the duration of breathiness were similar in both groups. The duration of effect (days) was 96.96 ± 18.91 and 77.38 ± 18.97 in the freeze-dried-type and the liquid-type groups, and the duration of benefit (days) was 80.02 ± 18.24 and 62.69 ± 19.73 in the freeze-dried-type and the liquid-type groups. To compare the efficacy between the freeze-dried-type and the liquid-type BTX-A, the sessions of the unilateral vocal fold injection were included and were categorized as group A (1 ~ 2 units BTX-A) and group B (2 ~ 3 units BTX-A), according to the dose per vocal fold. There was no significant difference of effect time between freeze-dried-type and liquid-type BTX-A groups. No adverse events related to BTX or vocal fold injection were reported. Liquid-type BTX-A is safe and effective for the treatment of spasmodic dysphonia. With the advantages of simple preparation, storage, and reuse and animal protein-free constituents, liquid-type BTX-A may be a good option in the treatment of spasmodic dysphonia. Copyright © 2017 The

  7. Intravesical botulinum toxin a injections do not benefit patients with ulcer type interstitial cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheng-Ling; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2013-01-01

    Ulcer type and non-ulcer type interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndromes (IC/BPS) are considered different disease entities. Thus, intravesical botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) treatment outcomes could differ for each entity. To evaluate and compare the treatment outcomes of BoNT-A injections for treatment of each IC/BPS type. Prospective interventional study. Tertiary medical center affiliated with Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital and Tzu Chi University, Taiwan. Forty-four consecutive patients with IC/BPS for whom conventional treatments failed were prospectively enrolled in this study. Patients were classified as having ulcer (n = 10) or non-ulcer (n = 30) IC/BPS based on their previous cystoscopic findings. All patients received 4 sets of intravesical BoNT-A injections (100 U in 40 suburothelial injections) every 6 months. The primary end-point was the global response assessment (GRA) 6 months after the fourth set of BoNT-A injections. Secondary end-points included the O'Leary-Sant score (OSS) including symptom indexes (ICSI) and problem indexes (ICPI), visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, voiding diary, and urodynamics variables. After 4 sets of BoNT-A injections, 15 patients with non-ulcer IC/BPS had GRA scores >= 2, while the other 15 had GRA scores ulcer IC/BPS had GRA scores ulcer IC/BPS had significantly higher daytime frequency, nocturia, smaller functional bladder capacity, smaller voided volume, greater VAS, smaller maximal bladder capacity, and greater glomerulation grade than did patients with non-ulcer IC/BPS. After 4 sets of BoNT-A injections, patients with non-ulcer IC/BPS and GRA scores >= 2 or ulcer IC/BPS showed no significant change in any clinical or urodynamic variable. After failure of repeated BoNT-A injections, all 10 patients with ulcer IC/BPS underwent transurethral electrocauterization of their ulcers, which resulted in immediate pain relief. Lack of a control arm in this study. Repeated intravesical BoNT-A injections provided effective

  8. Effect of Fill Temperature on Clostridium botulinum Type A Toxin Activity during the Hot Filling of Juice Bottles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Guy E; Fleischman, Gregory J; Balster, Fran; Reineke, Karl; Reddy, N Rukma; Larkin, John W

    2015-08-01

    The potential threat of terrorist attacks against the United States food supply using neurotoxin produced by Clostridium botulinum (BoNT) has resulted in the need for studying the effect of various food process operations on the bioavailability of this toxin. The objective of this study was to evaluate C. botulinum type A neurotoxin bioavailability after a simulated hot fill juice bottling operation. C. botulinum type A acid mud toxin (∼10(6) mouse lethal dose [MLD50]/ml) was deposited into juice bottles at an experimentally determined fastest cooling spot. Bottles (12 or 20 oz [355 and 592 ml]) were filled with either apple juice or an orange drink, at 80 or 85°C, in either upright or inverted orientations. Toxicity of the juice was evaluated as a function of holding time (1 to 2 min) by the mouse bioassay. The fastest cooling point in the upright orientation was determined to be at a bottle's bottom rim. In the inverted orientation, the fastest cooling point was in the bottle cap region. With respect to these two points, the upright bottle cooled faster than the inverted bottle, which was reflected in a higher inactivation of BoNT in the latter. For the orange drink (pH 2.9) toxicity was reduced by 0.5 × 10(6) MLD50/ml to a nondetectable level after 1 min in all bottle sizes, orientations, and temperatures as measured by the mouse bioassay. This indicates that there was at least a 0.5 × 10(6) MLD50/ml reduction in activity. Inactivation in apple juice (pH 4.0), to the same degree as in the orange drink, was found only for the inverted orientation at 85°C. Complete inactivation in apple juice for all conditions was found at a lower added toxin level of 0.25 × 10(5) MLD50/ml. In general, bottle inversion and filling at 85°C provided complete inactivation of BoNT to the 0.5 × 10(6) MLD50/ml level. All experiments resulted in the inactivation of 2.5 × 10(4) MLD50/ml of BoNT regardless of juice type, fill temperature, or bottle orientation and size.

  9. A survey of the current practice of intramuscular Botulinum toxin injections for hemiplegic shoulder pain in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Richard J; Connell, Louise A

    2017-11-10

    To describe the current UK practice for the use of intramuscular Botulinum Toxin type A injections to treat hemiplegic shoulder pain. A UK-based cross-sectional study using an online survey. Participants (n = 68) were medical and non-medical practitioners recruited via the membership of the British Society for Rehabilitation Medicine and the British Neurotoxin Network. Data was analysed using descriptive statistics and content analysis. The majority of respondents would consider Botulinum Toxin type A for hemiplegic shoulder pain (86.8%), though most of these respondents inject for this goal infrequently (83.1%). Pectoralis major was most commonly selected to achieve this goal. Barriers to this intervention included difficulties determining the cause of pain (29.4%), difficulty isolating muscles (27.9%), and a lack of evidence (25%). The doses reported regularly deviated from guidelines and a substantial range in the volumes suggested was observed. Clinicians were mostly reliant on unstandardised measures to assess outcomes. Current UK practice of Botulinum Toxin type A injections for hemiplegic shoulder pain associated with spasticity is highly variable. There are large gaps between current practice and available evidence with regards to muscle selection and doses used. A number of areas for further investigation have been identified to progress current understanding of this intervention. Implications for rehabilitation There are wide variations in practice for this complex intervention and clinicians should consider that their individual decision-making could be based on their own beliefs rather than available evidence. Pectoralis major is most commonly injected to treat hemiplegic shoulder pain, but further evaluation is required to address whether it is the most effective. Clinicians most often use a limitation of shoulder abduction and external rotation, flexor patterning of the upper limb, and pain on passive movement to identify when hemiplegic shoulder

  10. Toxina botulínica y su empleo en la patología oral y maxilofacial Botulinum toxin and its use in oral and maxillofacial pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Martínez-Pérez

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: Las toxinas botulínicas son exotoxinas de la bacteria formadora de esporas Clostridim botulinum y los agentes causantes del botulismo. Cuando se inyecta en el músculo produce una parálisis flácida. El efecto clínico está directamente relacionado con la dosis y debe ajustarse para cada caso concreto. La Toxina botulínica ha demostrado en los más de veinte años en que se está utilizando que es un fármaco seguro. Las indicaciones de la toxina botulínica en la actualidad incluyen todas aquellas patologías que resultan de la hiperfunción muscular y la disfunción autonómica.Abstract: Botilinum toxins are exotoxins of the bacteria that form the Clostridium botulinum spores and the causative agents of botulism. When injected into the muscle flaccid paralysis is produced. The clinical effect is directly related with the dose and is should be adjusted for each particular case. over the last twenty years that it has been in use, the botulinum toxin has shown itself to be a reliable drug. Current indications for the use of botulinum toxin include all those pathologies which are the results of muscle hyperfunction and autonomic dysfunction.

  11. The therapeutic usage of botulinum toxin (Botox in non-cosmetic head and neck conditions – An evidence based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Habib Awan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin (Botox is an exotoxin produced from Clostridium botulinum. It blocks the release of acetylcholine from the cholinergic nerve end plates resulting in inactivity of the muscles or glands innervated. The efficacy of Botox in facial aesthetics is well established; however, recent literature has highlighted its utilization in multiple non-cosmetic medical and surgical conditions. The present article reviews the current evidence pertaining to Botox use in the non-cosmetic head and neck conditions. A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science and the Cochrane databases limited to English Language articles published from January 1980 to December 2014. The findings showed that there is level 1 evidence supporting the efficacy of Botox in the treatment of laryngeal dystonia, headache, cervical dystonia, masticatory myalgia, sialorrhoea, temporomandibular joint disorders, bruxism, blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm and rhinitis. For chronic neck pain there is level 1 evidence to show that Botox is ineffective. Level 2 evidence exists for vocal tics and trigeminal. For stuttering, facial nerve paresis, Frey’s syndrome and oromandibular dystonia the evidence is level 4. Thus, there is compelling evidence in the published literature to demonstrate the beneficial role of Botox in a wide range of non-cosmetic conditions pertaining to the head and neck (mainly level 1 evidence. With more and more research, the range of clinical applications and number of individuals getting Botox will doubtlessly increase. Botox appears to justify its title as ‘the poison that heals’.

  12. Pré-compostagem de cadáveres de bovinos acometidos pelo botulismo The effect of composting cattle carcasses on botulinum spores and toxin content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera C.L.M. Curci

    2007-04-01

    of botulinum toxin. The diagnosis of botulinum poisoning was based on clinical and pathological, epidemic and/or laboratorial characteristics. Of the five bovines with clinical signs of chronic botulism, three were affected by the type D toxin, one by the CD complex, and one was negative for toxin and spores of C. botulinum in the viscera using a mouse bioassay. The composting process was carried out in beds with carcasses cut up and mixed with sawdust as a carbon source. They were kept anaerobic under a plastic sheet for 50 days. The temperature of the beds was monitored during the period and oscillated from 40.5 to 52.4ºC. After this time, soft tissue had complete decomposed with a significant loss of weight (26.5-44.5%. The remaining bones no longer contained spores or botulinum toxin in the 5 samples taken from each carcass. Only 2 of the 200 samples of homogenized remaining (40 for each carcass contained spores of C. botulinum type C. All samples were negative for botulinum toxin using the mouse bioassay. Composting carcasses of cattle that died from botulism eliminated botulinum spores and toxin from the remains.

  13. Anterior knee pain caused by patellofemoral pain syndrome can be relieved by Botulinum toxin type A injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, John Tzu-Ning; Tang, Alice Chu-Wen; Lin, Shih-Cherng; Tang, Simon Fuk-Tan

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the therapeutic effects of Botulinum toxin type A (BTA) for anterior knee pain caused by patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Prospective case control study for intervention. A tertiary hospital rehabilitation center. Twelve bilateral PFPS patients with anterior knee pain were recruited. The worse pain knee was selected for injection, and the counterpart was left untreated. Injection of BTA to vastus lateralis (VL) muscle. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) was used to assess pain, stiffness, and functional status of the knee, and CYBEX isokinetic dynamometer to assess isokinetic muscle force before and after BTA application to VL. Remarkable improvement after receiving BTA injection was obtained not only in the questionnaire of WOMAC (pknee flexion torque (pknee extension torque was noted (p=0.682). BTA injection is a good alternative treatment to improve anterior knee pain, knee function and isokinetic flexion torque. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of botulinum toxin type A for spastic foot in post-stroke patients enrolled in a rehabilitation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Halley Carvalho Pimentel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A on spastic foot in stroke patients in a rehabilitation program. Method: Hemiparetic stroke patients (n=21 enrolled in a rehabilitation program were divided into two groups. The first group (n=11 received a total of 300UI BTX-A, and the second group (n=10 received 100 UI BTX-A. All patients were assessed at baseline and 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after injection for Modified Ashworth Score, time walking 10 meters, and the Functional Independence Measure (mFIM motor score. Results: The higher-dose group exhibited a significant improvement in spasticity, and both groups showed an improvement in time walking 10 meters and mFIM, with no significant differences between them. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that gains in gait velocity and functional independence were not correlated to BTX-A dose.

  15. A literature review on the efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin: An injection in post-stroke spasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Ghasemi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A variety of techniques for the management of spasticity have been suggested, including positioning, cryotherapy, splinting and casting, biofeedback, electrical stimulation, and medical management by pharmacological agents, Botulinum toxin A (BTA is now the pharmacological treatment of choice in focal spasticity. BTA by blocking acetylcholine release at neuromuscular junctions accounts for its therapeutic action to relieve spasticity. Methods: A computerized search of Pub Med was carried out to find the latest result about efficacy of BTA in management of post stroke spasticity. Result: Among 84 articles were found, frothy of them included in this review and divided to lower and upper extremity. Conclusions: BTA is a treatment choice in reducing tone and managing post stroke spasticity .

  16. Sensation of Cold during the Ice Water Test Corresponds to the Perception of Pain during Botulinum Toxin Bladder Wall Injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, André; Hüsch, Tanja; Doggweiler, Regula; Buse, Stephan; Haferkamp, Axel

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the association of bladder cold sensation (BCS) during the ice water test (IWT) and pain perception when botulinum toxin injections (BTI) are administered into the bladder wall. In 86 patients with idiopathic overactive bladder, the BCS during the IWT was investigated. Patients were divided into 2 groups: with and without BCS. During subsequent administration of BTI, the number of perceived and painful injections as well as the pain levels on a 0-100 pain scale were compared in both groups using Student t test. Thirty-five patients reported a BCS, while 51 did not. After 10 BTI, the mean number of perceived injections was 7.9 in patients with and 2.4 in patients without BCS (p sensation (p perceptions of cold and pain in the urinary bladder may use similar receptors and neuronal pathways. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Hyperhidrosis Substantially Reduces Quality of Life in Children: A Retrospective Study Describing Symptoms, Consequences and Treatment with Botulinum Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkovic, Sandra Eriksson; Rystedt, Alma; Balling, Mie; Swartling, Carl

    2018-01-12

    Studies on children with hyperhidrosis are sparse. This retrospective study presents clinical data and quality of life, along with treatment effect and safety of botulinum toxin (BTX). Case reports from 366 children were included to capture the medical history of hyperhidrosis. The total median score of the Dermatology Life Quality Index before treatment was 11 for children aged 16-17 years and 12 for children younger than 16 years. The children described physical, psychosocial and consequence-related symptoms. More than 70% had multifocal hyperhidrosis. BTX-A and/or BTX-B were given to 323 children, 193 of whom received repeated treatments. The highest score in a 5-grade scale concerning treatment effect was reported by 176/193 children, i.e. their "sweating disappeared completely". No severe adverse events occurred. Focal and multifocal hyperhidrosis in children reduces quality of life considerably. Treatment with BTX-A and/or BTX-B has been performed with success.

  18. Outcomes of Botulinum Toxin Type A Injection Followed by Rehabilitation in Cases of Cerebral Palsy With Upper Extremity Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Burcu; Ünlü, Ece; Köse, Gülşen; Gönen, Emel; Çakcı, Aytül

    2016-03-01

    We evaluated the efficiency of botulinum toxin type A injection followed by a rehabilitation program including individual therapy, group therapy, and occupational therapy in cases of cerebral palsy with upper extremity involvement. A total of 29 injections were performed on 25 patients, and the patients were placed on rehabilitation program. At 3-month and 6-month assessments, there was a significant improvement in lateral grip strength, 9 Hole Peg test, Upper Limb Physician's Rating Scale and pediatric functional independence measure total scores. There were significant decreases in active range of motion in elbow extension, supination, and wrist extension, and Modified Ashworth Scale in elbow flexion, elbow pronation, and wrist flexion at 6-week, 3-month, and 6-month assessments. Combination of group therapy with traditional therapy methods after injection is effective in cases of cerebral palsy with upper extremity involvement. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. What Clinical Strategies Are Applied for Botulinum Toxin Injection in the Oromandibular Region?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, Merete; Dalager, Torben; Møller, Eigild

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) inhibits the release of acetylcholine from cholinergic nerve terminals in muscles or salivary glands. With reduced activation, the muscle activity or secretion decreases. Indications for medical, non‐cosmetic use of BoNT in the orofacial area include among others...

  20. The influence of botulinum toxin A injections into the calf muscles on genu recurvatum in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Matthias C M; Wolf, Sebastian I; Heitzmann, Daniel; Gantz, Simone; Braatz, Frank; Dreher, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    With cerebral palsy (CP), an equinus deformity may lead to genu recurvatum. Botulinum toxin A (BtA) injection into the calf muscles is a well-accepted treatment for dynamic equinus deformity. The purpose of this study was to determine whether BtA injections into the calf muscles to decrease equinus would decrease coexisting genu recurvatum in children with diplegic CP. In a retrospective study, 13 children (mean age, 5 years) with spastic diplegic CP showing equinus and coexisting primary genu recurvatum, who were treated with BtA injections into the calf muscles, were included. Evaluations were done before and 6 and 18 weeks after intervention using three-dimensional gait analysis and clinical examinations according to a standardized protocol. Basic statistical analyses (power analysis, ANOVA) were performed to compare genu recurvatum before treatment and at 6 and 18 weeks after injection with BtA. During stance phase, maximum ankle dorsiflexion was increased substantially from -3.0° ± 14.3° before to 6.2° ± 14.2° 6 weeks after the injections. Despite this, with the numbers available, the amount of recurvatum in stance did not improve with treatment at either 6 or 18 weeks. There was significant improvement of knee hyperextension during stance phase of 6.2° between baseline and 18 weeks after BtA injection, but a genu recurvatum was still present in most patients. Despite improvement of ankle dorsiflexion after injection with BtA, genu recurvatum did not show relevant improvement at 6 or 18 weeks after injection with the numbers available. Because knee hyperextension remained in most patients, other factors leading to genu recurvatum should be taken into consideration. In addition, a botulinum toxin-induced weakness of the gastrocnemius may explain why recurvatum gait was not significantly reduced. Level IV, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  1. Quantitative evaluation for spasticity of calf muscle after botulinum toxin injection in patients with cerebral palsy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Ching; Lin, I-Ling; Chou, Te-Feng Arthur; Lee, Hsin-Min

    2016-03-12

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common pediatric disease to cause motor disability. Two common symptoms in CP are spasticity and contracture. If this occurred in the ankle plantar flexors of children with CP, it will impair their gait and active daily living profoundly. Most children with CP receive botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injection to reduce muscle tone, but a knowledge gap exists in the understanding of changes of neural and non-neural components of spasticity after injection. The purpose of this study was to determine if our device for quantitative modified Tardieu approach (QMTA) is a valid method to assess spasticity of calf muscles after botulinum toxin injection. In this study, we intended to develop a device for quantitative measurement of spasticity in calf muscles based on the modified Tardieu scale (MTS) and techniques of biomedical engineering. Our QMTA measures the angular displacement and resistance of stretched joint with a device that is light, portable and can be operated similar to conventional approaches for MTS. The static (R2), dynamic (R1) and R2-R1 angles derived from the reactive signals collected by the miniature sensors are used to represent the non-neural and neural components of stretched spastic muscles. Four children with CP were recruited to assess the change in spasticity in their gastrocnemius muscles before and 4 weeks after BoNT-A injection. A simulated ankle model validated the performance of our device in measuring joint displacement and estimating the angle of catch. Data from our participants with CP showed that R2 and R2-R1 improved significantly after BoNT-A administration. It indicates both neural and non-neural components of the spastic gastrocnemius muscles improved at four weeks after BoNT-A injection in children with CP. Our device for QMTA can objectively measure the changes in spasticity of the gastrocnemius muscle in children with cerebral palsy after BoNT-A injection.

  2. Intra-Detrusor Injections of Botulinum Toxin Type a in Children with Spina Bifida: a Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hascoet, Juliette; Peyronnet, Benoit; Forin, Véronique; Baron, Maximilien; Capon, Grégoire; Prudhomme, Thomas; Allenet, Clément; Tournier, Simon; Maurin, Charlotte; Cornu, Jean-Nicolas; Bouali, Ourdia; Peycelon, Matthieu; Arnaud, Alexis; Renaux-Petel, Mariette; Liard, Agnès; Karsenty, Gilles; Manunta, Andrea; Game, Xavier

    2018-03-06

    To assess the effectiveness of Intradetrusor injections of botulinum toxin type A (IDBTX-A) in children with spina bifida. All patients aged under 16 year-old who underwent IDBTX-A between 2002 and 2016 at six institutions were included in a retrospective study. Our primary endpoint was the success rate of IDBTX-A defined as both clinical improvement (no incontinence episodes between clean-intermittent catheterization (CIC), absence of urgency, less than 8 CIC per day)) and urodynamic improvement (resolution of derusor overactivity, normal bladder compliance for age) lasting ≥ 12 weeks. Predictive factors of success were assessed through univariate analysis. Fifty-three patients with a mean age of 8.5 years were included. All patients were under CIC and 88.7% had received anticholinergics with either poor efficacy or bothersome adverse events The global success rate of the first injection (clinical and urodynamic) was 30%. Patients with closed spinal dysraphism had a significantly better success rate than patients with myelomeningocele (p=0.002). The clinical success rate was 66% and was significantly associated with maximum urethral closure pressure (34 vs. 54.4 cm H 2 O; p=0.02). The urodynamic success rate was 34%. Maximum cystometric capacity (p<0.0001) and compliance (p=0.01) significantly improved after the first IDBTX-A and maximum detrusor pressure tended to decrease (p=0.09) except in the subgroup of patients with poor compliance. After a mean follow up of 3.7 years, 23 patients (43.4%) required augmentation cystoplasty. Excluding six patients lost to follow-up, 38.3% of patients were still undergoing botulinum toxin injections at last follow-up. In this series, despite IBTX-A enabled clinical improvement in 66% patients urodynamic outcomes were poor resulting in a low global success rate (30%). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Considerations on patient-related outcomes with the use of botulinum toxins: is switching products safe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraint A

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Avram Fraint,1 Padmaja Vittal,2 Cynthia Comella2 1Department of Neurological Sciences, 2Section of Movement Disorders, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA Introduction: Botulinum toxin (BoNT is the treatment of choice for many neurologic movement disorders, including blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm, and cervical dystonia. There are two serotypes approved for use by the US Food and Drug Administration: three brands of serotype A and one of serotype B. Many attempts have been made at establishing dose conversion ratios between brands and serotypes. This review focuses on the existing data comparing different formulations of the same BoNT serotypes as well as that comparing different serotypes with one another. We focus on existing data regarding switching from one formulation or serotype to another and will also discuss the issue of immunogenicity of BoNT. With this information as a foundation, recommendations on safety of switching agents are addressed. Method: Literature review searching PubMed and Google Scholar using the search terms “switching botox”, “dosing equivalency in botox”, and “comparing botox”. Results/conclusion: Overall, there are many studies that demonstrate the efficacy and safety of each of the brands of BoNTs used in clinical practice. However, determination of dosing equivalencies among these brands and serotypes is complex with inconsistencies among the studies. When switching from one brand to another, the clinician should be aware of these issues, and not make the assumption that such ratios exist. Tailoring the dosage of each brand of BoNT to the clinical situation is the most prudent treatment strategy rather than focusing closely on conversion factors and concerns for immunogenicity. Keywords: botulinum toxin, BoNT, abobotulinumtoxin A, onabotulinumtoxin A, incobotulinumtoxin A, rimabotulinumtoxin B

  4. GUMMY SMILE TREATMENT WITH BOTULINUM TOXIN AND REVIEW OF LITERATURE- A CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZTÜRK, Melike; ÖZKAN, Yerda; ORBAK, Recep

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: In this case report, Botulinum Toxin’s application methods, advantages, disadvantages,indications and contraindications are discussed at the literacy. Case and Method: A 29-year-old woman came to our clinic with the complain of excessive gingival display on smiling. She was systemically healthy and she had no drug usage. 5 mm of gingival displayWhen smiling was diagnosed. After clinical examination, it was recorded that her gummy smile was due to hyperactive lip elevator muscles...

  5. Botulinum toxin therapy for treatment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis: review and recommendations of the IAB-Interdisciplinary Working Group for Movement Disorders task force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, Dirk; Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Bohlega, Saeed; Chahidi, Abderrahmane; Chung, Tae Mo; Ebke, Markus; Jacinto, L Jorge; Kaji, Ryuji; Koçer, Serdar; Kanovsky, Petr; Micheli, Federico; Orlova, Olga; Paus, Sebastian; Pirtosek, Zvezdan; Relja, Maja; Rosales, Raymond L; Sagástegui-Rodríguez, José Alberto; Schoenle, Paul W; Shahidi, Gholam Ali; Timerbaeva, Sofia; Walter, Uwe; Saberi, Fereshte Adib

    2017-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BT) therapy is an established treatment of spasticity due to stroke. For multiple sclerosis (MS) spasticity this is not the case. IAB-Interdisciplinary Working Group for Movement Disorders formed a task force to explore the use of BT therapy for treatment of MS spasticity. A formalised PubMed literature search produced 55 publications (3 randomised controlled trials, 3 interventional studies, 11 observational studies, 2 case studies, 35 reviews, 1 guideline) all unanimously favouring the use of BT therapy for MS spasticity. There is no reason to believe that BT should be less effective and safe in MS spasticity than it is in stroke spasticity. Recommendations include an update of the current prevalence of MS spasticity and its clinical features according to classifications used in movement disorders. Immunological data on MS patients already treated should be analysed with respect to frequencies of MS relapses and BT antibody formation. Registration authorities should expand registration of BT therapy for spasticity regardless of its aetiology. MS specialists should consider BT therapy for symptomatic treatment of spasticity.

  6. [Clinical research of electroacupuncture combined with acupoint-injection of botulinum toxin A in treating the muscle spasticity by spinal cord injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Shi-Tong; Wang, Dan; Wen, Xiao-Hong; Wu, Zhong-Qing; Sun, Qi; Zhang, Dong-Wei; Cheng, Yi; Yan, Dong; Yu, Fei

    2010-05-01

    To explore clinical safety and efficiency of electroacupuncture combined with acupoint-injection of botulinum toxin A for the treatment of muscle spasticity by spinal cord injury. Thirty-eight patients with muscle spasticity by spinal cord injury were treated from December 2006 to December 2009 including 26 males and 12 females, with an average age of 45.4 years old ranging from 21 to 68 years. The patients were randomly divided into 3 groups according to admission time, 13 patients in group A were treated with electroacupuncture combined with acupoint-injection of botulinum toxin A, and 13 patients in group B were treated with acupoint-injection botulinum toxin A and 12 patients in group C were treated with electroacupuncture. After 6 months these patients were evaluated by improved muscle Ashworth scoring (MAS) and clinical spasticity index (SCI). Thirty-eight patients were followed-up at 6 months after the treatment. The result showed that the MAS scores of group A, B, C before treatment were (3.10 +/- 0.14), (3.20 +/- 0.17), (3.10 +/- 0.16) respectively and the CSI scores were (14.10 +/- 0.14), (14.30 +/- 0.11), (14.20 +/- 0.12) respectively; there were no statistical different among the three groups (P > 0.05). After 6 months of treatment, the MAS scores were (1.10 +/- 0.16), (2.10 +/- 0.13), (2.00 +/- 0.14) respectively and the CSI scores were (9.10 +/- 0.11), (12.10 +/- 0.14), (13.10 +/- 0.12) respectively. The MAS scores and CSI scores of group A were better than the other two groups (P treatment and reduce pain and improve life quality quickly. The electroacupuncture combined with acupoint-inject botulinum toxin A is a noval safe and effective technique for the treatment of muscle spasticity by spinal cord injury.

  7. Comparative Study of Efficacy and Safety of Botulinum Toxin a Injections and Subcutaneous Curettage in the Treatment of Axillary Hyperhidrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budamakuntla, Leelavathy; Loganathan, Eswari; George, Anju; Revanth, BN; Sankeerth, V; Sarvjnamurthy, Sacchidananda Aradhya

    2017-01-01

    Background: Primary focal axillary hyperhidrosis is a chronic distressing disorder affecting both the sexes. When the condition is refractory to conservative management, we should go for more promising therapies like intradermal botulinum toxin A (BtxA) injections in the axilla, and surgical therapies like subcutaneous curettage of sweat glands. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study is to compare the efficacy, safety and duration of action of intradermal BtxA injections in one axilla and subcutaneous curettage of sweat glands in the other axilla of the same patient with axillary hyperhidrosis. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients (40 axillae) received intradermal BtxA injections on the right side (20 axillae) and underwent tumescent subcutaneous curettage of sweat glands on the left side (20 axillae). Sweat production rate was measured using gravimetry analyses at baseline and at 3 months after the procedure. Subjective analyses were done using hyperhidrosis disease severity scale (HDSS) score at baseline, at 3rd and 6th month after the procedure. Results: At 3 months post-treatment, the resting sweat rate in the toxin group improved by 80.32% versus 79.79% in the subcutaneous curettage method (P = 0.21). Exercise-induced sweat rate in the toxin group improved by 88.76% versus 88.8% in the subcutaneous curettage group (P = 0.9). There was a significant difference in the HDSS score after treatment with both the modalities. There were no adverse events with BtxA treatment compared to very minor adverse events with the surgical method. Conclusion: Both intradermal BtxA injections and tumescent subcutaneous curettage of sweat glands had a significant decrease in the sweat rates with no significant difference between the two modalities. Hence, in resource poor settings where affordability of BtxA injection is a constraint, subcutaneous curettage of sweat glands can be preferred which has been found equally effective with no or minimal adverse events. PMID

  8. Ultrasonographic Evaluation of Botulinum Toxin Injection Site for the Medial Approach to Tibialis Posterior Muscle in Chronic Stroke Patients with Spastic Equinovarus Foot: An Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Picelli

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The tibialis posterior muscle is a frequent target for injection of botulinum toxin during the management of spastic equinovarus foot in adults with post-stroke spasticity. Although it is deep-seated, the needle insertion into the tibialis posterior muscle is usually performed using anatomical landmarks and safety information obtained from healthy subjects and cadavers. Our aim was to evaluate the botulinum toxin injection site for the medial approach to the tibialis posterior muscle in chronic stroke patients with spastic equinovarus foot. Forty-six patients were evaluated at the affected middle lower leg medial surface with ultrasonography according to the following parameters: tibialis posterior muscle depth, thickness, and echo intensity. As to the spastic tibialis posterior, we found a mean muscle depth of 26.5 mm and a mean muscle thickness of 10.1 mm. Furthermore we observed a median tibialis posterior muscle echo intensity of 3.00 on the Heckmatt scale. The tibialis posterior muscle thickness was found to be inversely associated with its depth (p < 0.001 and echo intensity (p = 0.006. Furthermore, tibialis posterior muscle depth was found to be directly associated with its echo intensity (p = 0.004. Our findings may usefully inform manual needle placement into the tibialis posterior for the botulinum toxin treatment of spastic equinovarus foot in chronic stroke patients.

  9. Results of zone II flexor tendon repair in children younger than age 6 years: botulinum toxin type A administration eased cooperation during the rehabilitation and improved outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüzüner, Serdar; Balci, Nilüfer; Ozkaynak, Sibel

    2004-01-01

    The inability of young children with a zone II flexor tendon repair to cooperate in postoperative care and rehabilitation may represent a high risk for medical and surgical complications. To forestall that risk, botulinum toxin type A (2.5 U/kg, 7 U/kg) injection was used during surgery to induce forearm flexor muscle relaxation in seven children under 6 years old with zone 2 flexor tendon repairs. Patients received a controlled passive motion regimen after surgery. Results were evaluated on the basis of the acquisition of muscle tone and active finger movements, total range of motion of affected joints, postoperative grip strength, muscle atrophy, and phalangeal length. In this prospective clinical study, the mean follow-up was 18 months. All the children had good and excellent results based on the Strickland criteria. As for postoperative complications, one patient had bowstring and another had poor finger sensibility and first web space contracture that required Z-plasty. The selective use of botulinum toxin type A to weaken the targeted muscles generated a sufficient reduction in spontaneous activity of the fingers, permitting an improved rehabilitation program. Botulinum toxin type A administration could be an effective form of therapy, serving as an alternative or adjunct to conventional rehabilitation modalities in these children.

  10. Gangliosides in human, cow and goat milk, and their abilities as to neutralization of cholera toxin and botulinum type A neurotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamori, Masao; Takamizawa, Kotarou; Momoeda, Mikio; Iwamori, Yuriko; Taketani, Yuji

    2008-10-01

    To elucidate the potential of mammalian milk as to protection of infants from infections, we determined the ganglioside compositions of human, cow and goat milk in relation with cholera toxin and botulinum type A neurotoxin-receptors. Gangliosides accounted for 1 to 2 micromol of lipid-bound sialic acid (LSA) in 100 ml of milk, and GD3 comprised about 69% of LSA in all milk samples. Among the milk samples examined, goat milk was found to contain an amount of gangliosides belonging to the b-pathway representing 15.8% of the total LSA. Accordingly, botulinum neurotoxin bound to GT1b and GQ1b in goat milk, but not to any gangliosides in human or cow milk. On the other hand, GM1, the cholera toxin receptor, was found to be present in all milk samples at concentrations of 0.02% to 0.77% of the total LSA and to be maintained at a relatively constant level in human milk during the postpartum period. Gangliosides from 1 ml of pooled human milk exhibited the ability to attenuate the binding of cholera toxin (30 ng) to GM1 by 93%, and those from 500 microl of goat milk completely inhibited the binding of botulinum type A neurotoxin 1.5 microg to GT1b.

  11. Strategy for Treating Motor Neuron Diseases Using a Fusion Protein of Botulinum Toxin Binding Domain and Streptavidin for Viral Vector Access: Work in Progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Balasubramanian

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Although advances in understanding of the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA have suggested attractive treatment strategies, delivery of agents to motor neurons embedded within the spinal cord is problematic. We have designed a strategy based on the specificity of botulinum toxin, to direct entry of viral vectors carrying candidate therapeutic genes into motor neurons. We have engineered and expressed fusion proteins consisting of the binding domain of botulinum toxin type A fused to streptavidin (SAv. This fusion protein will direct biotinylated viral vectors carrying therapeutic genes into motor nerve terminals where they can enter the acidified endosomal compartments, be released and undergo retrograde transport, to deliver the genes to motor neurons. Both ends of the fusion proteins are shown to be functionally intact. The binding domain end binds to mammalian nerve terminals at neuromuscular junctions, ganglioside GT1b (a target of botulinum toxin, and a variety of neuronal cells including primary chick embryo motor neurons, N2A neuroblastoma cells, NG108-15 cells, but not to NG CR72 cells, which lack complex gangliosides. The streptavidin end binds to biotin, and to a biotinylated Alexa 488 fluorescent tag. Further studies are in progress to evaluate the delivery of genes to motor neurons in vivo, by the use of biotinylated viral vectors.

  12. The efficiency of botulinum toxin type A for the treatment of masseter muscle pain in patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction and tension-type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihut, Malgorzata; Ferendiuk, Ewa; Szewczyk, Michal; Kasprzyk, Katarzyna; Wieckiewicz, Mieszko

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint dysfunction are often accompanied by symptoms of headache such as tension-type headache which is the most frequent spontaneous primary headache. Masseter muscle pain is commonly reported in this group. The purpose of the study was to assess the efficiency of intramuscular botulinum toxin type A injections for treating masseter muscle pain in patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction and tension-type headache. This prospective outcome study consisted of 42 subjects of both genders aged 19-48 years diagnosed with masseter muscle pain related to temporomandibular joint dysfunction and tension-type headache. The subjects were treated by the intramuscular injection of 21 U (mice units) of botulinum toxin type A (Botox, Allergan) in the area of the greatest cross-section surface of both masseter bellies. Pain intensity was evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS) and verbal numerical rating scale (VNRS) 1 week before the treatment and 24 weeks after the treatment. The obtained data were analyzed using the Wilcoxon matched pairs test (p ≤ 0,005). The results of this study showed a decrease in the number of referred pain episodes including a decrease in pain in the temporal region bilaterally, a reduction of analgesic drugs intake as well as a decrease in reported values of VAS and VNRS after injections (p = 0,000). The intramuscular botulinum toxin type A injections have been an efficient method of treatment for masseter muscle pain in patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction and tension-type headache.

  13. ADP-ribosylation of actins in fibroblasts and myofibroblasts by botulinum C2 toxin: Influence on microfilament morphology and migratory behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønnov-Jessen, Lone; Petersen, Ole William

    1996-01-01

    ., Petersen, O. W. J. Cell Biol. 1996, 134, 67-80). In the present study we have expanded on the functional significance of actin isotypes in fibroblasts from the opposite point of view, namely filamentous nonmuscle actin. Nonmuscle actins in fibroblasts and myofibroblasts were ADP-ribosylated by Clostridium...... botulinum C2 toxin. The substrate for C2 toxin is globular actin, which upon ribosylation cannot incorporate into microfilaments. The pattern of actin ADP-ribosylation in (myo)fibroblasts in the presence of [32P]NAD was analyzed by isoelectric focusing, fluorography and immunoblotting. The influence of C2...

  14. Studies on growth and toxin production of C. botulinum type E on cod homogenate treated with a combination of spices, sodium chloride and gamma-radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqui, A.K. (Atomic Energy Centre, Dacca (Bangladesh)); Ando, Y.; Karashimada, T.; Kameyama, K.

    1979-09-01

    Cod homogenates inoculated with spores of C. botulinum type E strain Erimo at 10/sup 2/ and 10/sup 4//g were treated with 1% and 2% sodium chloride, 0.25% each of mustard, garlic and turmeric and 0.3 Mrad ..gamma..-radiation either in single or combination treatments. The growth and toxin production of type E spores in the inoculated homogenates were followed at incubation temperatures of 30/sup 0/, 10/sup 0/ and 5/sup 0/C for 7, 28 and 56 days respectively. Growth and gas formation were noted in all the samples but type E toxin could not be detected. The reason for the absence of toxin in both the untreated and treated homogenates could not be ascertained. Inadequate detection method, unfavourable growth conditions in the homogenate and weak toxigenicity of the strain employed have been advanced as probable factors that contributed to the negative results on the toxin assay.

  15. Studies on growth and toxin production of C. botulinum type E on cod homogenate treated with a combination of spices, sodium chloride and gamma-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, A.K.; Ando, Y.; Karashimada, T.; Kameyama, K.

    1979-01-01

    Cod homogenates inoculated with spores of C. botulinum type E strain Erimo at 10 2 and 10 4 /g were treated with 1% and 2% sodium chloride, 0.25% each of mustard, garlic and turmeric and 0.3 Mrad ν-radiation either in single or combination treatments. The growth and toxin production of type E spores in the inoculated homogenates were followed at incubation temperatures of 30 0 , 10 0 and 5 0 C for 7, 28 and 56 days respectively. Growth and gas formation were noted in all the samples but type E toxin could not be detected. The reason for the absence of toxin in both the untreated and treated homogenates could not be ascertained. Inadequate detection method, unfavourable growth conditions in the homogenate and weak toxigenicity of the strain employed have been advanced as probable factors that contributed to the negative results on the toxin assay. (author)

  16. Effect of electrical stimulation as an adjunct to botulinum toxin type A in the treatment of adult spasticity: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intiso, Domenico; Santamato, Andrea; Di Rienzo, Filomena

    2017-10-01

    To investigate whether electrical stimulation (ES) as an adjunct to BTX-A boosts botulinum activity and whether the combined therapeutic procedure is more effective than BTX-A alone in reducing spasticity in adult subjects. A search was conducted in PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register, and CINAHL from January 1966 to January 2016. Only randomized controlled studies (RCT) involving the combination of BTX-A and ES were considered. RCTs were excluded if BTX plus ES was investigated in animals or healthy subjects; certain techniques were used as an adjunct to BTX-A, but ES was not used; BTX-A or ES were compared but were not used in combination. ES was divided into neuromuscular stimulation (NMS), functional electrical stimulation (FES), and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). Two authors independently screened all search results and reviewed study characteristics using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale. Fifteen RCTs were pinpointed and nine studies were included. Trials varied in methodological quality, size, and outcome measures used. ES was used in the form of NMS and FES in seven and two studies, respectively. No study investigating BTX-A plus TENS was found. BTX-A plus ES produced significant reduction in spasticity on the Ashworth Scale (AS) and on the modified AS in seven studies, but only four showed high quality on the PEDro scale. Significant reduction in compound muscular action potential (CMAP) amplitude was detected after BTX-A plus ES in two studies. ES as an adjunctive therapy to BTX-A may boost BTX-A action in reducing adult spasticity, but ES variability makes it difficult to recommend the combined therapy in clinical practice. Implications for rehabilitation Electrical stimulation (ES) as adjunct to botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) injections may boost neurotoxin action in treating adult spasticity. Given the variability of ES characteristics and the paucity of high-quality trials, it is difficult to support

  17. Efecto protector de la toxina botulínica en colgajos cutáneos The protective effect of botulinum toxin on skin flaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.X. Astudillo Carrera

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Los colgajos cutáneos de patrón vascular randomizado son de gran utilidad en Cirugía Reconstructiva; un aporte vascular adecuado es el factor más importante para la supervivencia de los mismos. Realizamos un estudio experimental levantando un total de 36 colgajos en el dorso de 9 conejos (4 en cada conejo: a 9 controles, b 9 con aplicación de toxina botulínica tipo A transoperatoria a lo largo del colgajo, c 9 con toxina botulínica tipo A aplicada 7 días antes del procedimiento quirúrgico, y, d 9 con aplicación de toxina botulínica tipo A transoperatoria más epinefrina. El análisis de los colgajos se realizó a través de imágenes digitales que se examinaron con el programa ImageJ. Efectuamos el análisis estadístico con la prueba T de Student. La evaluación final de los colgajos se realizó al séptimo día, tiempo en el cual se obtuvo: a una media de área necrótica en los controles del 72.17 ± 3.9% ; b en los que se aplicó toxina botulínica transoperatoria el porcentaje de aérea necrótica fue del 5.09 ± 1.2% p = 0.032; c en aquellos en los que la toxina botulínica se aplicó 7 días antes del procedimiento se reportó necrosis del 24.97 ± 2.7% p = 0.041 y d en los que se aplicó toxina botulínica transoperatoria más epinefrina el porcentaje de necrosis fue del 23.90 ± 3.9% p = 0.045. Concluimos que la toxina botulínica tipo A actúa como protector contra el proceso de sufrimiento-isquemia de los tejidos, debido a su acción vasodilatadora, recomendando su aplicación al inicio del procedimiento quirúrgico.Random-pattern cutaneous flaps are very useful in Reconstructive Surgery; an adequate vascular contribution is an important factor for the survival of the flaps. We designed an experimental study elevating a total of 36 dorsal flaps, divided in 4 groups: a 9 were controls, to which 0.9% physiological solution was applied, b 9 with a transoperatory application of type A botulinum toxin throughout the length of

  18. Global Aesthetics Consensus: Hyaluronic Acid Fillers and Botulinum Toxin Type A—Recommendations for Combined Treatment and Optimizing Outcomes in Diverse Patient Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Steven; Signorini, Massimo; Vieira Braz, André; Fagien, Steven; Swift, Arthur; De Boulle, Koenraad L.; Raspaldo, Hervé; Trindade de Almeida, Ada R.; Monheit, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Background: Combination of fillers and botulinum toxin for aesthetic applications is increasingly popular. Patient demographics continue to diversify, and include an expanding population receiving maintenance treatments over decades. Methods: A multinational panel of plastic surgeons and dermatologists convened the Global Aesthetics Consensus Group to develop updated guidelines with a worldwide perspective for hyaluronic acid fillers and botulinum toxin. This publication considers strategies for combined treatments, and how patient diversity influences treatment planning and outcomes. Results: Global Aesthetics Consensus Group recommendations reflect increased use of combined treatments in the lower and upper face, and some midface regions. A fully patient-tailored approach considers physiologic and chronologic age, ethnically associated facial morphotypes, and aesthetic ideals based on sex and culture. Lower toxin dosing, to modulate rather than paralyze muscles, is indicated where volume deficits influence muscular activity. Combination of toxin with fillers is appropriate for several indications addressed previously with toxin alone. New scientific data regarding hyaluronic acid fillers foster an evidence-based approach to selection of products and injection techniques. Focus on aesthetic units, rather than isolated rhytides, optimizes results from toxin and fillers. It also informs longitudinal treatment planning, and analysis of toxin nonresponders. Conclusions: The emerging objective of injectable treatment is facial harmonization rather than rejuvenation. Combined treatment is now a standard of care. Its use will increase further as we refine the concept that aspects of aging are intimately related, and that successful treatment entails identifying and addressing the primary causes of each. CLINICAL QUESTION/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic, V. PMID:27119917

  19. Mechanical principles of effects of botulinum toxin on muscle length-force characteristics: an assessment by finite element modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkoglu, Ahu N; Huijing, Peter A; Yucesoy, Can A

    2014-05-07

    Recent experiments involving muscle force measurements over a range of muscle lengths show that effects of botulinum toxin (BTX) are complex e.g., force reduction varies as a function of muscle length. We hypothesized that altered conditions of sarcomeres within active parts of partially paralyzed muscle is responsible for this effect. Using finite element modeling, the aim was to test this hypothesis and to study principles of how partial activation as a consequence of BTX affects muscle mechanics. In order to model the paralyzing effect of BTX, only 50% of the fascicles (most proximal, or middle, or most distal) of the modeled muscle were activated. For all muscle lengths, a vast majority of sarcomeres of these BTX-cases were at higher lengths than identical sarcomeres of the BTX-free muscle. Due to such "longer sarcomere effect", activated muscle parts show an enhanced potential of active force exertion (up to 14.5%). Therefore, a muscle force reduction originating exclusively from the paralyzed muscle fiber populations, is compromised by the changes of active sarcomeres leading to a smaller net force reduction. Moreover, such "compromise to force reduction" varies as a function of muscle length and is a key determinant of muscle length dependence of force reduction caused by BTX. Due to longer sarcomere effect, muscle optimum length tends to shift to a lower muscle length. Muscle fiber-extracellular matrix interactions occurring via their mutual connections along full peripheral fiber lengths (i.e., myofascial force transmission) are central to these effects. Our results may help improving our understanding of mechanisms of how the toxin secondarily affects the muscle mechanically. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Botulinum toxin with and without casting in ambulant children with spastic diplegia: a clinical and functional assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottos, M; Benedetti, M G; Salucci, P; Gasparroni, V; Giannini, S

    2003-11-01

    This study compared clinical and functional outcomes after treatment with botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) and BTX-A with casting in children with dynamic equinus foot. Ten children (seven males, three females; mean age 6 years 4 months, SD 2 years 7 months; range 4 to 11 years) with mild spastic diplegia and independent walking were divided into two groups: group 1, BTX-A and group 2, BTX-A plus casting. BTX-A was injected in the triceps surae bilaterally at multiple sites while the children were sedated with mask anaesthesia. Dysport toxin was used, 15 to 20 IU/kg in each muscle. Immediately after injection an ankle-foot orthosis was applied to children in group 1 and a cast to children in group 2. Clinical assessment using the Ashworth scale, Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM), range of movement measurement, and gait analysis was performed before treatment and 1, 4, and 12 months after treatment. Spasticity decreased significantly at 1-month examination in both groups (p = 0.002), at 4-month examinations (Wilcoxon test p = 0.003), and 12 month (p = 0.052) examinations in group 2. GMFM highlighted a significant improvement in group 2 at the 4-month examination (p = 0.052 for standing,p = 0.007 for walking). Gait analysis showed a significant increase in the walking speed in group 2 (p = 0.04). No change was detected in ankle kinematics and kinetics or in muscular activity during the gait cycle. We confirmed that BTX-A reduces spasticity and improves functional performance in standing and walking; association with casting provides more marked and enduring results.

  1. The Role of Botulinum Toxin A in the Treatment of Raynaud Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segreto, Francesco; Marangi, Giovanni Francesco; Cerbone, Vincenzo; Persichetti, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Raynaud phenomenon (RP) is a transient digital ischemia that occurs after exposure to cold temperature or emotional distress. It presents with a triphasic course: the initial white phase is followed by cyanotic discoloration and, subsequently, erythema. The attacks may be associated with pain, paresthesia, and complicate with nonhealing ulceration often leading to amputation. To date, there are no clear-cut therapeutic guidelines and many medications are used off-label. Encouraging results were reported with the use of botulinum neurotoxin-A (BoNT-A). However, there is still ongoing debate regarding indications, contraindications, best injection technique, and mechanism of action. The aim of this study was to address these issues by providing an up-to-date and detailed overview of the use of BoNT-A in RP.A PubMed database search was conducted. The available studies and techniques were evaluated and compared.The search yielded a total of 29 studies. Ten papers, published between 2004 and 2014, were considered relevant. A total of 128 patients underwent BoNT-A injections. Seventy-five percent to 100 % of the patients reported pain reduction after treatment. Healing of ulcers was reported in 75% to 100% of the affected patients. The most common complication was temporary hand weakness, with an average incidence of 14.1%. Injections targeting the neurovascular bundle at or slightly proximal to the A1 pulley were the most commonly performed.Botulinum neurotoxin-A injection proved to be a valid approach in both primary and secondary RP. The available evidence shows the achievement of both symptomatic and functional improvements in this debilitating condition. However, the patient should be adequately informed about the risk of transient hand weakness.

  2. Use of Botulinum Toxin A in the Treatment of Lower Urinary Tract Disorders: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C. Moore

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT is used to treat a variety of ailments, and its therapeutic application in lower urinary tract disorders (LUTDs is well studied. Robust evidence supporting the efficacy and tolerability of BoNT in the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO and non-neurogenic overactive bladder (OAB has led to regulatory approval for these conditions. Use of BoNT in the treatment of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, chronic pelvic pain, and detrusor sphincter dyssynergia has demonstrated some promise, but is still evolving and off-label for these indications. Trials to date do not support the use of BoNT for benign prostatic hyperplasia. This comprehensive review outlines the mechanisms of BoNT in the treatment of LUTDs in adults and presents background and updated data examining the efficacy and adverse events associated with the use of BoNT in common urologic applications.

  3. Use of Botulinum Toxin A in the Treatment of Lower Urinary Tract Disorders: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, David C.; Cohn, Joshua A.; Dmochowski, Roger R.

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is used to treat a variety of ailments, and its therapeutic application in lower urinary tract disorders (LUTDs) is well studied. Robust evidence supporting the efficacy and tolerability of BoNT in the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) and non-neurogenic overactive bladder (OAB) has led to regulatory approval for these conditions. Use of BoNT in the treatment of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, chronic pelvic pain, and detrusor sphincter dyssynergia has demonstrated some promise, but is still evolving and off-label for these indications. Trials to date do not support the use of BoNT for benign prostatic hyperplasia. This comprehensive review outlines the mechanisms of BoNT in the treatment of LUTDs in adults and presents background and updated data examining the efficacy and adverse events associated with the use of BoNT in common urologic applications. PMID:27023601

  4. Focal treatment of spasticity using botulinum toxin A in cerebral palsy cases of GMFCS level V: evaluation of adverse effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Tedesco

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To report on the experience of injections of botulinum toxin A (BTA in a series of patients with cerebral palsy of Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS level V.Methods:This was a retrospective case series study on 33 patients with cerebral palsy of GMFCS level V who received 89 sessions of BTA application (of which 84 were Botox® and five were other presentations, in which the basic aim was to look for adverse effects.Results:The mean number of application sessions per patient was three, and the mean age at the time of each injection was 4 + 6 years (range: 1.6–13 years. The muscles that most frequently received injections were the gastrocnemius, hamstrings, hip adductors, biceps brachii and finger flexors. The mean total dose was 193 U and the mean dose per weight was 12.5 U/kg. Only one patient received anesthesia for the injections and no sedation was used in any case. No local or systemic adverse effects were observed within the minimum follow-up of one month.Conclusion:The absence of adverse effects in our series was probably related to the use of low doses and absence of sedation or anesthesia. According to our data, BTA can be safely used for patients with cerebral palsy of GMFCS level V, using low doses and preferably without sedation or anesthesia.

  5. Botulinum toxin type A-a novel treatment for provoked vestibulodynia? Results from a randomized, placebo controlled, double blinded study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Christina Damsted; Giraldi, Annamaria; Lundvall, Lene

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Vestibulodynia is an increasingly recognized problem among women and is often difficult to treat. AIM: This randomized, double blinded, placebo-controlled study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of Botox in the treatment of vestibulodynia. METHODS: Sixty-four women were randomized to r...... follow up. Women with vestibulodynia have difficulty with sexual function and present with sexual distress, which has to be addressed in conjunction with pain to eliminate the disorder.......INTRODUCTION: Vestibulodynia is an increasingly recognized problem among women and is often difficult to treat. AIM: This randomized, double blinded, placebo-controlled study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of Botox in the treatment of vestibulodynia. METHODS: Sixty-four women were randomized...... to receive Botox (N = 32) or saline placebo (N = 32). Botulinum toxin A (20 I.E.) diluted in 0.5 mL saline or 0.5 mL saline was injected in the musculus bulbospongiosus at baseline. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pain was measured monthly on a visual analog scale (VAS) Likert scale. Sexual function was measured...

  6. Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin B Injection for Raynaud's Phenomenon and Digital Ulcers in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motegi, Sei-Ichiro; Uehara, Akihito; Yamada, Kazuya; Sekiguchi, Akiko; Fujiwara, Chisako; Toki, Sayaka; Date, Yuki; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2017-07-06

    The efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin B (BTX-B) for treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon and digital ulcers in patients with systemic sclerosis was assessed. A total of 45 patients with systemic sclerosis who had Raynaud's phenomenon were blinded and divided randomly into 4 groups: a no-treatment control group, and 3 treatment groups, using 250, 1,000 or 2,000 international units (U) of BTX-B injections in the hand with more severe symptoms. Four weeks after injection, pain/numbness visual analogue scale scores and Raynaud's score in the groups treated with 1,000 and 2,000 U BTX-B were significantly lower than in the control group and the group treated with 250 U BTX-B. These beneficial effects were sustained until 16 weeks after the single injection. At 4 weeks after injection skin temperature recovery in the group treated with 2,000 U BTX-B was significantly improved. The numbers of digital ulcers in the groups treated with 1,000 and 2,000 U BTX-B were significantly lower than in the control group. In conclusion, 1,000 and 2,000 U BTX-B injections significantly suppressed the activity of Raynaud's phenomenon and digital ulcers in patients with SSc without serious adverse events.

  7. Patient-Identified Factors That Influence Spasticity in People with Stroke and Multiple Sclerosis Receiving Botulinum Toxin Injection Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Janice; Rancourt, Amanda; Di Poce, Stephanie; Levine, Amy; Hoang, Jessica; Ismail, Farooq; Boulias, Chris

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To describe the nature, extent, and impact of spasticity; determine factors that are perceived to influence its severity; and examine the relationship between time since diagnosis and impact of spasticity on daily activities in people with stroke and multiple sclerosis (MS) who are receiving botulinum toxin injection treatments. Methods: After a cross-sectional telephone survey, descriptive statistics and correlations were analyzed separately for the stroke and MS groups. Results: A total of 29 people with stroke and 10 with MS were surveyed. Both groups perceived increased spasticity with outdoor cold (69% stroke, 60% MS), muscle fatigue (59% stroke, 80% MS), and mental stress (59% stroke, 90% MS). No statistically significant correlations were found between time since diagnosis and perceived impact of spasticity on function in the stroke (r=0.07, p=0.37) or MS (r=0.16, p=0.33) groups. The MS group experienced bilateral and more severe perception of spasticity in the legs than the stroke group and identified more factors as worsening their spasticity (pspasticity was significantly correlated with severity of impact of the following factors in the MS group only: lying on the back (r=0.70, pspasticity differently depending on individual factors, severity, location (arm vs. leg), and distribution of spasticity (unilateral vs. bilateral). Clinicians can use the findings to better understand, educate, and treat people with stroke and MS. PMID:25931667

  8. Analgesic Effect of Botulinum Toxin A in Myofascial Pain Syndrome Patients Previously Treated with Local Infiltration of Anesthetic and Steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartagena-Sevilla, Joaquín; García-Fernández, María R; Vicente-Villena, Juan P

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the analgesic effect of botulinum toxin A (BoNTA) injections in patients with myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) who were previously treated with the local infiltration of anesthetic and steroids (LIAS). The study included a retrospective phase and a longitudinal open-label prospective phase, which were conducted on consecutive patients with MPS previously treated with the local infiltration of anesthetic (levobupivacaíne 0.25%) and steroids (triamcinolone 40 mg). Eligible patients were treated with a single intramuscular injection of BoNTA (Botox; Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA). The treatment efficacy was determined according to the degree of pain relief obtained. Eighty-two patients met the inclusion/exclusion criteria and were included in the study. Successful results were obtained for 32 (39.0%) and 30 (36.6%) patients, during treatment with BoNTA and LIAS, respectively. The mean (standard deviation) length of the analgesic effect was significantly longer with BoNTA (29.6 [SD = 17.7] weeks) than with LIAS (8.5 [SD = 6.4] weeks), P local infiltration of anesthetic and steroids who then received a single injection of BoNTA experienced significantly reduced pain for a relatively long time.

  9. Treatment of chronic daily headache with comorbid anxiety and depression using botulinum toxin A: a prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongwei; Zhang, Haifeng; Wei, Yingjie; Lian, Yajun; Chen, Yuan; Zheng, Yake

    2017-04-01

    Psychiatric comorbidities, including depression and anxiety, are clinical entities associated with chronic daily headache (CDH). Botulinum toxin A (BTA) is a Food and Drug Administration approved drug for the treatment of chronic migraine, a subtype form of CDH. This study aimed to investigate the potential efficacy and safety of BTA for controlling psychiatric symptoms in CDH patients. A prospective, open-label, pilot study (n = 30; 7 males, 23 females) was performed. A single low-dose of BTA (40-120 U) was injected into the pericranial muscle at multiple sites. Participants were evaluated before and 1, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24 weeks after BTA treatment. Primary outcomes included: (1) headache severity, determined by a visual analog scale; (2) depression and anxiety severity, assessed via the Hamilton Depression and Anxiety Rating Scales (HAM-D and HAM-A, respectively); (3) headache frequency per month and (4) single headache episode duration. Headache severity was significantly ameliorated one week after treatment. Depression and anxiety symptoms were significantly reduced one month after treatment. At month four, the headache incidence per month decreased from 28.83 ± 2.95 to 17.57 ± 11.30 d (p CDH, with improvements in depression and anxiety. These novel findings indicate that BTA may represent an effective and safe intervention to target psychiatric comorbidities in CDH.

  10. Preoperative combination of progressive pneumoperitoneum and botulinum toxin type A in patients with loss of domain hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno-Lledó, José; Torregrosa, Antonio; Jiménez, Raquel; Pastor, Providencia García

    2018-02-15

    Preoperative progressive pneumoperitoneum (PPP) and botulinum toxin type A (BT) are tools in the surgical preparation of patients with loss of domain hernias (LODH). The aim of this paper is to report our experience with these preoperative techniques in 70 patients with LODH. Observational study of 70 consecutive patients with LODH was conducted between May 2010 and May 2016. Diameters of the hernia sac, incisional hernia (VIH), and abdominal cavity (VAC) volumes, and VIH/VAC ratio were measured before and after PPP and BT, using abdominal CT scan data. Combination of both techniques was performed when the VIH/VAC ratio was > 20%. Median insufflated volume of air for PPP was 8450 ± 3400 cc (4500-13,450), over a period of 11.3 ± 2.3 days (9-16). BT administration time was 38.1 ± 3.7 days (35-44). An average reduction of 16.6% of the VIH/VAC ratio after PPP and BT was obtained (p VIH/VAC ratio and hernia defect diameters, which constitutes a key factor in the treatment of LODH.

  11. Physical therapy for an adult with chronic stroke after botulinum toxin injection for spasticity: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Shannon; Phadke, Chetan P; Ismail, Farooq; Boulias, Chris

    2015-01-01

    In this case report, we describe the type and duration of a physical therapy and botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) intervention directed at lower limb spasticity and the gait and balance improvement in a patient post-stroke. Treatment of focal spasticity with BoNTA intramuscular injections combined with physical therapy is recommended by rehabilitation experts. However, the optimal type and duration of physical therapy intervention to optimize any functional gains that follow chemodenervation induced by BoNTA has not been established. One individual with chronic stroke who received BoNTA injections for upper and lower extremity spasticity was included. Physical therapy intervention consisted of 45- to 60-min sessions twice weekly for 12 weeks, based on the Bobath-neurodevelopmental therapy approach, and an activity-based home program. After BoNTA injections and physical therapy, the patient made clinically significant improvements in balance and gait speed and became more independent with his ambulation. This case report demonstrates that physical therapy after BoNTA injections can result in significant functional improvements for individuals with spasticity after chronic stroke that may not be possible with BoNTA injections alone.

  12. Transduced PEP-1-FK506BP ameliorates corneal injury in Botulinum toxin A-induced dry eye mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Won Kim

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available FK506 binding protein 12 (FK506BP belongs to a family ofimmunophilins, and is involved in multiple biologicalprocesses. However, the function of FK506BP in cornealdisease remains unclear. In this study, we examined theprotective effects on dry eye disease in a Botulinum toxin A(BTX-A induced mouse model, using a cell-permeablePEP-1-FK506BP protein. PEP-1-FK506BP efficiently transducedinto human corneal epithelial cells in a time- anddose-dependent manner, and remained stable in the cells for48 h. In addition, we demonstrated that topical application ofPEP-1-FK506BP was transduced into mouse cornea andconjunctiva by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, topicalapplication of PEP-1-FK506BP to BTX-A-induced mouse modelmarkedly inhibited expression levels of pro-inflammatorycytokines such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β, tumor necrosisfactor-α (TNF-α and macrophage inhibitory factor (MIF incorneal and conjunctival epithelium. These results suggestPEP-1-FK506BP as a potential therapeutic agent for dry eyediseases. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(2: 124-129

  13. Intravesical treatment of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis: from the conventional regimens to the novel botulinum toxin injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellis, Athanasios; Papatsoris, Athanasios G

    2014-06-01

    Bladder pain syndrome (BPS) includes interstitial cystitis (IC) and is often used as a synonym of it (i.e., BPS/IC). It is associated with lower urinary tract symptoms as well as with negative cognitive, behavioral, sexual and/or emotional consequences. Unfortunately, none of the numerous existing oral and intravesical treatments have been effective for all of the BPS subtypes and therefore relevant research is ongoing. In this review, the authors analyze the existing literature for the intravesical treatment of BPS/IC with focus on the novel administration of botulinum toxin (BTX). Several intravesical drugs have been studied in the past, including lidocaine, heparin, pentosan polysulfate sodium, dimethyl sulfoxide, chondroitin sulfate, hyaluronic acid as well as investigational drugs such as GM-0111. Recently, intravesical submucosal injections of BTX have been studied in patients with BPS/IC. Most of the recent studies use BTX-A with no serious adverse effects and with satisfactory results in patients who do not respond to oral or standard intravesical therapy. Nevertheless, there is no consensus regarding the best dosage scheme of BTX, the injection sites and the treatment intervals. BTX intravesical administration in patients with BPS/IC is a safe and efficient treatment option; yet the level of evidence of the initial studies is not high. There is still the need for large randomized controlled studies so that a consensus can be reached for the ideal BTX dosage, injection sites and intervals between treatments.

  14. Botulinum toxin type A in simple motor tics: short-term and long-term treatment-effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Judith J G; Tavy, Dénes L J; Wertenbroek, Agnes A A C M; van Woerkom, Theodoor C A M; de Bruijn, Sebastiaan F T M

    2010-08-01

    To determine the short-term and long-term treatment-effects of botulinum toxin type A in simple motor tics, we analyzed 15 consecutive patients (18 tics) with simple motor tics that were treated every 3 months with injections of BTX-A. Efficacy (rated on a 4-level scale) and duration of effect of the first 2 and last 2 (if treated 5 times or more) treatments were recorded, as well as latency of response, changes of premonitory urges (PMUs) and possible side effects. Total number of treatments for each tic varied from 2 to 50 (mean 11, median 6). In 16 of 18 tics (89%) short-term efficacy was reported successful (good or moderate). Long-term efficacy was reported in 12 tics of which 11 showed similar or even increased beneficial effects. Premonitory urge (PMU) was reported in 8 patients (53%). PMU, if present, lessened or disappeared after treatment with BTX-A. A permanent remission of the treated tic was seen in 3 patients with a maximum follow-up of 10 years. BTX-A appears a safe and effective treatment for simple motor tics and retains its efficacy after long-term treatment. BTX may also induce permanent remission of the treated tics and effects of BTX are not restricted to merely motor behaviour.

  15. Botulinum toxin type A (Botox) for the neuromuscular correction of excessive gingival display on smiling (gummy smile).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, Mario

    2008-02-01

    Previously, botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) (Botox; Allergan, Irvine, Calif) was shown to be effective in reducing excessive gingival display in 5 patients with gummy smiles. This study was conducted to determine whether the doses and the primary injection sites used in the pilot study for the correction of gummy smiles provide consistent, statistically significant, and esthetically pleasing results. Thirty patients received BTX-A injections to reduce excessive gingival display. Gingival display was defined as the difference between the lower margin of the upper lip and the superior margin of the right incisor. Patients were followed at 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 weeks postinjection, with changes documented by photographs and videos. At week 2, the patients rated the effects of BTX-A. A group of specialty clinicians also evaluated the effects of BTX-A. Preinjection gingival display averaged 5.2 +/- 1.4 mm in the 30 patients. At 2 weeks postinjection, mean gingival display had declined to 0.09 mm (+/- 1.06 mm) in 30 patients (t = 26.01, P gummy smiles caused by hyperfunctional upper lip elevator muscles was effective and statistically superior to baseline smiles, although the effect is transitory.

  16. The Use of Botulinum Toxin Injection for Brachial Plexus Birth Injuries: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Patrick J; Grossman, John A I; Price, Andrew E; Reddy, Chandan; Chopan, Mustafa; Chim, Harvey

    2018-03-01

    Most brachial plexus birth injuries (BPBI) are caused by traction on the brachial plexus during a difficult delivery. Fortunately, the possibility of complete recovery from such an incident is relatively high, with only 10% to 30% of patients having prolonged and persistent disability. These patients have muscle imbalances and co-contractions typically localized around the shoulder and elbow. These imbalances and co-contractures cause abnormal motor performances and bone/joint deformities. Typically, physical/occupational therapies are the conventional therapeutic modalities but are often times inadequate. Botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injections into targeted muscles have been used to combat the muscular imbalances and co-contractions. With compliance to PRISMA guidelines, a systematic review was performed to identify studies published between 2000 and 2017 that used BTX-A to treat neonatal brachial plexus palsies. Ten studies were included, involving 325 patients. Three groups of indications for the use of BTX-A were identified: (1) internal rotation/adduction contracture of the shoulder; (2) elbow flexion lag/elbow extension lag; and (3) forearm pronation contracture. The included studies show an overall beneficial effect of BTX-A in treating co-contractures seen in patients with BPBI. Specifically, BTX-A is shown to reduce internal rotation/adduction contractures of the shoulder, elbow flexion/extension contractures, and forearm pronation contractures. These beneficial effects are blunted when used in older patients. Nevertheless, BTX-A is a useful treatment for BPBI with a relatively low-risk profile.

  17. British Neurotoxin Network recommendations for managing cervical dystonia in patients with a poor response to botulinum toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Marie-Helene; Humberstone, Miles; Grunewald, Richard; Wimalaratna, Sunil

    2016-08-01

    Botulinum toxin (BoNT) injections are an effective treatment for cervical dystonia. Approximately 20% of patients eventually stop BoNT treatment, mostly because of treatment failure. These recommendations review the different therapeutic interventions for optimising the treatment in secondary poor responder patients. Immunoresistance has become less common over the years, but the diagnosis has to be addressed with a frontalis test or an Extensor Digitorum Brevis test. In case of immunoresistance to BoNT-A, we discuss the place the different therapeutic options (BoNT-A holidays, BoNT-B injections, alternative BoNT-A injections, deep brain stimulation). When poor responders are not immunoresistant, they benefit from reviewing (1) injections technique with electromyography or ultrasound guidance, (2) muscles selection and (3) dose of BoNT. In addition, in both scenarios, a holistic approach including drug treatment, retraining and psychological support is valuable in the management of these complex and severe cervical dystonia. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Intraprostatic injection of botulinum toxin type- A relieves bladder outlet obstruction in human and induces prostate apoptosis in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimura Naoki

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the increasing interest with botulinum toxin – A (BTX-A application in the lower urinary tract, we investigated the BTX-A effects on the canine prostate and also in men with bladder outlet obstruction (BOO due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. Methods Transperineal injection into the prostate using transrectal ultrasound (TRUS was performed throughout the study. Saline with or without 100 U of BTX-A was injected into mongrel dogs prostate. One or 3 months later, the prostate was harvested for morphologic and apoptotic study. In addition, eight BPH patients refractory to α-blockers were treated with ultrasound guided intraprostatic injection of 200 U of BTX-A. Results In the BTX-A treated dogs, atrophy and diffuse apoptosis was observed with H&E stain and TUNEL stain at 1 and 3 months. Clinically, the mean prostate volume, symptom score, and quality of life index were significantly reduced by 18.8%, 73.1%, and 61.5% respectively. Maximal flow rate significantly increased by 72.0%. Conclusion Intraprostatic BTX-A injection induces prostate apotosis in dogs and relieves BOO in humans. It is therefore a promising alternative treatment for refractory BOO due to BPH.

  19. Physical Therapy for an Adult with Chronic Stroke after Botulinum Toxin Injection for Spasticity: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phadke, Chetan P.; Ismail, Farooq; Boulias, Chris

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: In this case report, we describe the type and duration of a physical therapy and botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) intervention directed at lower limb spasticity and the gait and balance improvement in a patient post-stroke. Treatment of focal spasticity with BoNTA intramuscular injections combined with physical therapy is recommended by rehabilitation experts. However, the optimal type and duration of physical therapy intervention to optimize any functional gains that follow chemodenervation induced by BoNTA has not been established. Method: One individual with chronic stroke who received BoNTA injections for upper and lower extremity spasticity was included. Physical therapy intervention consisted of 45- to 60-min sessions twice weekly for 12 weeks, based on the Bobath–neurodevelopmental therapy approach, and an activity-based home program. Results: After BoNTA injections and physical therapy, the patient made clinically significant improvements in balance and gait speed and became more independent with his ambulation. Conclusions: This case report demonstrates that physical therapy after BoNTA injections can result in significant functional improvements for individuals with spasticity after chronic stroke that may not be possible with BoNTA injections alone. PMID:25931655

  20. Botulinum toxin A (Botox) for treatment of proximal myofascial pain in complex regional pain syndrome: two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarpour, Delaram; Jabbari, Bahman

    2010-09-01

    To describe development of myofascial pain syndrome (MFPS) with trigger points in the proximal muscles of the patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS1) and improvement of distal symptoms of CRPS 1 after successful treatment of proximal MFPS. In our practice, we frequently encounter patients in whom a proximal myofascial pain syndrome develops ipsilateral to the distal limb of CRPS1 patients. We describe two such patients in detail with their treatment. PATIENT 1: A 48-year-old woman experienced severe allodynia, swelling and autonomic changes in the right hand after surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome. Over the succeeding months, she developed painful trigger points in the right trapezius and upper back muscles which was treated with administration of botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) into the trigger points (20 unit/point). PATIENT 2: A 41-year-old woman following a traumatic forearm injury suffered from CRPS1 affecting the left hand and forearm. Proximal MFPS gradually developed on the same side over 12 months and was treated with administration of BoNT-A into the trapezius, splenius capitis, and rhomboid muscle trigger points. In both patients treatment with BoNT-A improved the proximal pain of MFPS and the distal symptoms of CRPS1. proximal MFPS develops ipsilateral to the distal painful limb in patients with CRPS1. Administration of BoNT-A into the affected proximal muscles may alleviate both MFPS and the distal allodynia, discoloration and, tissue swelling of CRPS. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Effects of botulinum toxin A therapy and multidisciplinary rehabilitation on upper and lower limb spasticity in post-stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Takatoshi; Abo, Masahiro; Hara, Hiroyoshi; Kobayashi, Kazushige; Shimamoto, Yusuke; Samizo, Yuta; Sasaki, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Naoki; Niimi, Masachika

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of combined botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) and inpatient multidisciplinary (MD) rehabilitation therapy on the improvement of upper and lower limb function in post-stroke patients. In this retrospective study, a 12-day inpatient treatment protocol was implemented on 51 post-stroke patients with spasticity. Assessments were performed on the day of admission, at discharge, and at 3 months following discharge. At the time of discharge, all of the evaluated items showed a statistically significant improvement. Only the Functional Reach Test (FRT) showed a statistically significant improvement at 3 months. In subgroup analyses, the slowest walking speed group showed a significantly greater change ratio of the 10 Meter Walk Test relative to the other groups, from the time of admission to discharge. This group showed a greater FRT change ratio than the other groups from the time of admission to the 3-month follow-up. Inpatient combined therapy of simultaneous injections of BoNT-A to the upper and lower limbs and MD may improve motor function.

  2. Questionnaire about the Adverse Events and Side Effects Following Botulinum Toxin A Treatment in Patients with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Blaszczyk

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A injections for treatment of spasticity in patients with cerebral palsy (CP have been used for about two decades. The treatment is considered safe but a low frequency of adverse events (AE has been reported. A good method to report AEs is necessary to verify the safety of the treatment. We decided to use an active surveillance of treatment-induced harm using a questionnaire we created. We studied the incidence of reported AEs and side effects in patients with CP treated with BoNT-A. We investigated the relationship between the incidence of AEs or side effects and gender, age, weight, total dose, dose per body weight, Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS and number of treated body parts. Seventy-four patients with CP participated in our study. In 54 (51% of 105 BoNT-A treatments performed in 45 (61% patients, there were 95 AEs and side effects reported, out of which 50 were generalized and/or focal distant. Severe AEs occurred in three patients (4%, and their BoNT-A treatment was discontinued. Consecutive collection of the AE and side-effect incidence using our questionnaire can increase the safety of BoNT-A treatment in patients with CP.

  3. Clostridium botulinum Toxin Production in Relation to Spoilage of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) Packaged in Films of Varying Oxygen Permeabilities and with Different Atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Marilyn C; Ma, Li M; Doyle, Michael P

    2015-11-01

    Shelf life of fish packaged under modified atmosphere (MA) is extended, but within the United States, commercial application of MA with impermeable packaging films is restricted due to concerns that botulinum toxin production would precede spoilage when contaminated fish are held at abusive storage temperatures. Use of semipermeable packaging films has been advocated; however, previous studies are inconclusive in determining the oxygen transmission rate (OTR) of a film that is needed to achieve an acceptable margin of safety (i.e., toxin production occurs only after spoilage). This study was conducted to determine the influence of OTR (target OTRs of 3 to 15,000) on the development of spoilage volatiles and toxin in salmon inoculated with type E Clostridium botulinum and subjected to air, vacuum, or 75:25 CO2:N2 MA and storage temperatures of 4, 8, 12, or 16°C. The most dominant headspace volatile peak that was produced during spoilage of samples at 4, 8 or 12°C was a peak, having a Kovats retention index (KI) of 753, and at which external standards of 2- or 3-methyl 1-butanol also eluted. Under anaerobic conditions, both the aerobic microbial populations and the size of the KI 753 spoilage peak were less in inoculated samples compared with uninoculated samples. C. botulinum-inoculated samples that were stored at 12 or 16°C under conditions favorable for anaerobic growth were also characterized by a KI 688 peak. Using a previously developed model that related the percentage of elderly consumers who would prepare a sample having the KI 753 spoilage peak of a specific size, it was determined that for salmon packaged with 3 or 3,000 OTR films under any atmosphere and stored at 12 or 16°C, 2 to 61% of the consumers could potentially prepare toxin-contaminated samples. Hence, when abusive storage conditions are suspected, the fish should not be consumed.

  4. [Botulinum neurotoxin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulain, B

    2010-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is a multi-molecular complex comprised of a neuro-active moiety (i.e. botulinum neurotoxin) and several associated non-toxic proteins. The toxin dissociates rapidly at plasmatic pH, thereby releasing neurotoxin. Nerve terminals only take up the neurotoxin. In the peripheral nerve system, the neurotoxin mainly blocks acetylcholine release. When acting at the neuromuscular junctions, this results in paralysis of the muscle fibers. The duration of the neurotoxin action is mainly determined by the life-time of neurotoxin molecules inside the nerve terminals. Inhibition of cholinergic transmission induces rapid atrophy of the muscle fibres, and, sometimes, sprouting from poisoned nerve terminals. These effects, as well as the acetylcholine release blockade are entirely reversible. When injected in the periphery, a direct action of botulinum neurotoxin in the central nervous system remains unlikely despite its retrograde ascent demonstrated in animal models. However, indirect effects are numerous. The constituting proteins of the toxin complex can lead to immunisation against the non-toxic associated proteins and neurotoxin. Only the antibodies directed against neurotoxin are potentially neutralizing. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Snake and Spider Toxins Induce a Rapid Recovery of Function of Botulinum Neurotoxin Paralysed Neuromuscular Junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Duregotti

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs and some animal neurotoxins (β-Bungarotoxin, β-Btx, from elapid snakes and α-Latrotoxin, α-Ltx, from black widow spiders are pre-synaptic neurotoxins that paralyse motor axon terminals with similar clinical outcomes in patients. However, their mechanism of action is different, leading to a largely-different duration of neuromuscular junction (NMJ blockade. BoNTs induce a long-lasting paralysis without nerve terminal degeneration acting via proteolytic cleavage of SNARE proteins, whereas animal neurotoxins cause an acute and complete degeneration of motor axon terminals, followed by a rapid recovery. In this study, the injection of animal neurotoxins in mice muscles previously paralyzed by BoNT/A or /B accelerates the recovery of neurotransmission, as assessed by electrophysiology and morphological analysis. This result provides a proof of principle that, by causing the complete degeneration, reabsorption, and regeneration of a paralysed nerve terminal, one could favour the recovery of function of a biochemically- or genetically-altered motor axon terminal. These observations might be relevant to dying-back neuropathies, where pathological changes first occur at the neuromuscular junction and then progress proximally toward the cell body.

  6. Snake and Spider Toxins Induce a Rapid Recovery of Function of Botulinum Neurotoxin Paralysed Neuromuscular Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duregotti, Elisa; Zanetti, Giulia; Scorzeto, Michele; Megighian, Aram; Montecucco, Cesare; Pirazzini, Marco; Rigoni, Michela

    2015-12-08

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) and some animal neurotoxins (β-Bungarotoxin, β-Btx, from elapid snakes and α-Latrotoxin, α-Ltx, from black widow spiders) are pre-synaptic neurotoxins that paralyse motor axon terminals with similar clinical outcomes in patients. However, their mechanism of action is different, leading to a largely-different duration of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) blockade. BoNTs induce a long-lasting paralysis without nerve terminal degeneration acting via proteolytic cleavage of SNARE proteins, whereas animal neurotoxins cause an acute and complete degeneration of motor axon terminals, followed by a rapid recovery. In this study, the injection of animal neurotoxins in mice muscles previously paralyzed by BoNT/A or /B accelerates the recovery of neurotransmission, as assessed by electrophysiology and morphological analysis. This result provides a proof of principle that, by causing the complete degeneration, reabsorption, and regeneration of a paralysed nerve terminal, one could favour the recovery of function of a biochemically- or genetically-altered motor axon terminal. These observations might be relevant to dying-back neuropathies, where pathological changes first occur at the neuromuscular junction and then progress proximally toward the cell body.

  7. Is there any Relationship Between Bladder Trabeculation and Efficacy and Safety of Intravesical Botulinum Toxin A Injection in Refractory Idiopathic Overactive Bladder Women?

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    Mahtab Zargham

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intradetrusor injection of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A might serve as a minimally invasive substitute in patients with refractory idiopathic overactive bladder (RIOAB. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes related to two different doses of abo-BTX-A (AboBTX-A in patients with RIOAB. Materials and Methods: This prospective clinical trial was performed on 55 women with RIOAB. After determination of trabeculation grade, 300 (no or mild or 500 (moderate or severe unit of AboBTX-A (Dysport was intravesicaly injected. Before 1, 3, and 6 months after intervention, lower urinary tract symptoms during 24 h were recorded. Results: Of the study population, 62% had severe bladder trabeculation. The mean duration of overactive bladder (OAB was 1.76 versus 5.85 years, for no or mild versus severe trabeculation, respectively. After injections of 300- and 500-unit dosage, there were 19% and 26% early complications such as urinary retention. There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups in OAB score after 1 month (P < 0.001 and duration of OAB symptoms, over three follow-up times (P < 0.001. The mean preinjection OAB scores between patients with and without recurrence were statistically significant (29.36 vs. 25.07; P < 0.03. Urinary tract infection as a late complication was distinguished in four patients. Conclusion: In RIOAB, by adjusted dosage of AboBTX-A related to the grade of bladder trabeculation, in addition to maintain efficacy, consequent complications might not be affected by dosage and the drug dosage could be increased to nearly 60% with less concern associated to complication

  8. The Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin Type a Injection in the Hamstring and Calf Muscles With and Without Serial Foot Casting in Gait Improvement in Children With Cerebral Palsy

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    Shamsodini A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The goal of this study was to compare the efficacy of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A injection in the hamstring and calf muscles with and without ankle serial casting in the improvement of gait in children with cerebral palsy (CP.Methods : This double-blind prospective clinical trial was performed on 25, 2 to 8-year-old children with hemiplegic or diplegic CP in Tehran, Iran in 2010. The participants were chosen by simple randomized sampling and were matched for age, gross motor function classification system (GMFCS and type of CP and were randomly divided into two groups: children in the first group (13 only received BTX-A injection, but the second group (12 received BTX-A and serial foot casting starting one week after the injection.Results : Comparison of the gross motor function, right and left knee spasticities and passive ROM of both knees between the two groups before and 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after the injections were not statistically significant (P>0.1. Furthermore, comparison of the right and left ankle spasticities and passive ROM before the injections and in1 and 3-month follow-ups did not show a statistically significant difference (P>0.1, but the differences were significant in 6 and 12-month follow-ups (P<0.05.Conclusion: BTX-A injection with serial foot casting vs. BTX-A alone was more effective in decreasing spasticity and improving passive ROM in the ankle of children with CP, but such injections in the hamstrings were not useful in these regards.

  9. Efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin A intradetrusor injections in adults with neurogenic detrusor overactivity/neurogenic overactive bladder: a systematic review.

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    Soljanik, Irina

    2013-07-01

    Botulinum toxin A (BoNTA) is increasingly used for therapy of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) refractory to antimuscarinics or where patients are experiencing antimuscarinic-related side effects. The objective was to compare and critically discuss the reported efficacy and safety of BoNTA in adults with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. Studies published between January 1985 and July 2012 were identified in the MEDLINE (PubMed) and SCOPUS databases. A search for studies with onabotulinumtoxinA--the only formulation of BoNTA approved by the US FDA in adults with NDO--was performed. Exclusion criteria were urethral sphincter injection, no separate analysis between onabotulinumtoxinA and other formulations of BoNTA, mean follow-up ≤ 4 weeks and studies with ten or fewer patients. Clinical and urodynamic parameters for efficacy, adverse events (AEs) and tolerability were reviewed to offer recommendations for practice and future research. A total of 28 included studies revealed superior effects of onabotulinumtoxinA compared with placebo in achieving continence, reducing incontinence episodes, improving urodynamic parameters and health-related quality of life. The most frequently reported AEs were de novo intermittent catheterization, urinary retention and asymptomatic urinary infection. Limitations of this review are the inclusion of studies with the level-3 evidence (22/28 studies), the heterogenicity of outcome parameters and time points chosen for follow-up reported in the reviewed studies. OnabotulinumtoxinA therapy is effective, safe and well tolerated in adults with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. Further high-quality prospective trial data are required to determine the optimal dose, injection technique, long-term safety, favourable timing, indications for re-injections, and the impact of concomitant antimuscarinics on onabotulinumtoxinA therapy.

  10. Impact of Injection-Guiding Techniques on the Effectiveness of Botulinum Toxin for the Treatment of Focal Spasticity and Dystonia: A Systematic Review.

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    Grigoriu, Anca-Irina; Dinomais, Mickael; Rémy-Néris, Olivier; Brochard, Sylvain

    2015-11-01

    To conduct a systematic review of the impact of different injection-guiding techniques on the effectiveness of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) for the treatment of focal spasticity and dystonia. MEDLINE via PubMed, Academic Search Premier, PASCAL, The Cochrane Library, Scopus, SpringerLink, Web of Science, EM Premium, and PsycINFO. Two reviewers independently selected studies based on predetermined inclusion criteria. Data relating to the aim were extracted. Methodological quality was graded independently by 2 reviewers using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database assessment scale for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and the Downs and Black evaluation tool for non-RCTs. Level of evidence was determined using the modified Sackett scale. Ten studies were included. Seven were randomized. There was strong evidence (level 1) that instrumented guiding (ultrasonography [US], electrical stimulation [ES], electromyogram [EMG]) was more effective than manual needle placement for the treatment of spasmodic torticollis, upper limb spasticity, and spastic equinus in patients with stroke, and spastic equinus in children with cerebral palsy. Three studies provided strong evidence (level 1) of similar effectiveness of US and ES for upper and lower limb spasticity in patients with stroke, and spastic equinus in children with cerebral palsy, but there was poor evidence or no available evidence for EMG or other instrumented techniques. These results strongly recommend instrumented guidance of BoNT-A injection for the treatment of spasticity in adults and children (ES or US), and of focal dystonia such as spasmodic torticollis (EMG). No specific recommendations can be made regarding the choice of instrumented guiding technique, except that US appears to be more effective than ES for spastic equinus in adults with stroke. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of botulinum toxin A injection on healing and tensile strength of ruptured rabbit Achilles tendons.

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    Tuzuner, Serdar; Özkan, Özlenen; Erin, Nuray; Özkaynak, Sibel; Cinpolat, An; Özkan, Ömer

    2015-04-01

    Tendon lacerations are most commonly managed with surgical repair. Postoperative complications such as adhesions and ruptures often occur with immobilization. Early postoperative mobilization is therefore advised to minimize complications and time required to return to daily life. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether botulinum neurotoxin type-A (BoNT-A) can be used to enhance healing and prevent rupture in mobilized animals with Achilles tenotomy. Twenty-seven rabbits were divided into 3 groups, namely, I, II, and III, after surgical 1-sided Achilles tenotomy and end-to-end repair. The control group for biomechanical comparisons consisted of randomly selected contralateral (unoperated) healthy Achilles tendons. Group I received BoNT-A (4 U/kg) injection into the calf muscles. One week later, electromyographical confirmation was performed to establish the effects of injection. Surgery was then performed. Animals in the second group (n = 9, group II) were immobilized with a cast postoperatively. The third group (n = 9, group III) was mobilized immediately with no cast or BoNT-A. Tendons were harvested and gap formation or ruptures as well as strength of the repaired tendon were assessed 6 weeks after surgery. Achilles tendons healed in all animals injected with BoNT-A, whereas all were ruptured in group III. All Achilles tendons of animals in groups I and II healed. However, group I repaired tendons were biomechanically equivalent to healthy tendons, whereas group II repaired tendons demonstrated significantly decreased tensile strength (P = 0.009). The present study suggests that local injection of BoNT-A can be used for treatment of tendon rupture and may replace the use of cast for immobilization. However, further studies are needed to determine whether BoNT-A injection can have a beneficial effect on the healing of tendon repairs in humans.

  12. MOLECULAR-BIOLOGY OF CLOSTRIDIAL TOXINS - EXPRESSION OF MESSENGER-RNAS ENCODING TETANUS AND BOTULINUM NEUROTOXINS IN APLYSIA NEURONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOCHIDA, S; POULAIN, B; EISEL, U; BINZ, T; KURAZONO, H; NIEMANN, H; TAUC, L

    1990-01-01

    mRNAs encoding the light chain of tetanus and botulinum neurotoxins were transcribed, in vitro, from the cloned and specifically truncated genes of Clostridium tetani and Clostridium botulinum, respectively, and injected into presynaptic identified cholinergic neurons of the buccal ganglia of

  13. Botox facial slimming/facial sculpting: the role of botulinum toxin-A in the treatment of hypertrophic masseteric muscle and parotid enlargement to narrow the lower facial width.

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    Wu, Woffles T L

    2010-02-01

    Botulinum toxin A is a highly efficacious and cost-effective, nonsurgical option for reducing the width and shape of the lower face and jawline. The results can vary from the subtlest thinning of the face to an extremely thin, cachectic appearance. Many nuances can be achieved. The administration is simple, and the process takes barely 5 minutes in an office setting. Botulinum toxin A can also be effectively used to reduce the bulk of an enlarged parotid gland without affecting saliva production. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Evaluating the functional outcomes of ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin type A injections using the Euro-musculus approach for upper limb spasticity treatment in post-stroke patients; an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyukavci, Raikan; Akturk, Semra; Ersoy, Yüksel

    2018-02-07

    Ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin type A injection is an effective treatment for spasticity. Euro-musculus spasticity approach is a new method for administering injections to the correct point of the correct muscle. The clinical outcomes of this practical approach is not yet available in the literature. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects on spasticity and the functional outcomes of ultrasound guided botulinum toxin type A injections via the Euro-musculus spasticity approach to treat upper limb spasticity in post-stroke patients. An observational study. Inpatient post-stroke patients. Twenty five post-stroke patients with post-stroke upper limb spasticity were recruited. The ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin type A injections were administered into the spastic target muscles using the Euro-musculus spasticity approach, and all of the patients were enrolled in rehabilitation programmes after the injections. This research included the innervation zone and injection site figures and ultrasound images of each muscle in the upper limb. The degree of spasticity was assessed via the Modified Ashworth Scale and the upper limb motor function via the Fugl Meyer Upper Extremity Scale at the baseline and 4 and 12 weeks after the botulinum toxin type A injection. Significant decreases in the Modified Ashworth Scale scores of the upper limb flexor muscle tone measured 4 and 12 weeks after the botulinum toxin type A injection were found when compared to the baseline scores (pFugl Meyer Upper Extremity subgroup scores, the sitting position, wrist and total scores at 4 and 12 weeks were significantly improved (pFugl Meyer Upper Extremity hand scores were significantly improved 12 weeks after the injection (p<0.025). Ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin type A injection via the Euro- musculus spasticity approach is a practical and effective method for administering injections to the correct point of the correct muscle. Ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin type A

  15. The use of botulinum toxin and epidural analgesia for the treatment of spasticity and pain in a patient with maple syrup urine disease

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    Abdullah M Kaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 7-year-old boy, weighing 18 kg, was diagnosed with maple syrup urine disease (MSUD. He suffered from spasticity of the lower limbs and pain that did not respond to oral medications. Injections of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A at 10 sites and epidural analgesia with 0.125% bupivacaine were used to treat spasticity with good results. We conclude that BTX-A combined with epidural analgesia may be a useful treatment option for incapacitating, painful spasticity related to MSUD. This treatment modality allowed a comprehensive rehabilitation program to be completed and it lasted longer than 9 months.

  16. Different formulations of botulinum toxin type A have different migration characteristics: a double-blind, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, Sandeep H; Judodihardjo, Harryono; Eltringham, Elizabeth

    2008-03-01

    Different formulations of botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) are not identical and may behave differently in clinical practice. The reportedly lower incidence of adverse effects with one formulation (from Allergan, Ltd.) relative to another (from Ipsen, Ltd.) may be due to differences in the degree of migration of the neurotoxin-protein complex from its injection site. A double-blind, randomized, within-subject pilot study was performed to compare the migration characteristics of each formulation. Twelve healthy volunteers were randomly assigned to receive three 0.1 mL intradermal injections in their forehead: 4 U BoNTA (Allergan) on one side, 12 U BoNTA (Ipsen) on the contralateral side, and saline in the center. At day 14, Minor's iodine starch test was performed, and the subjects walked around a hot room to induce sweating. The appearance of each forehead was documented using Canfield photography and the area of each anhidrotic halo calculated using software. Overall, the area of anhidrosis was significantly larger with BoNTA (Ipsen) than BoNTA (Allergan) - mean +/- SD of 2.7 +/- 0.78 cm(2) vs. 1.8 +/- 0.65 cm(2) (P = 0.005) - with the area of anhidrosis being greater with BoNTA (Ipsen) than BoNTA (Allergan) in 11 of the 12 subjects. Across all subjects, the area of anhidrosis was greater with BoNTA (Ipsen) than BoNTA (Allergan) by a mean of 77%. BoNTA (Ipsen) migrates more than BoNTA (Allergan) under the conditions described. The lower potential of BoNTA (Allergan) to migrate promotes more precise localization of clinical effects, thereby helping to optimize the risk/benefit ratio.

  17. Beneficial effect of botulinum toxin A on Raynaud's phenomenon in Japanese patients with systemic sclerosis: A prospective, case series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motegi, Sei-ichiro; Yamada, Kazuya; Toki, Sayaka; Uchiyama, Akihiko; Kubota, Yuka; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is no satisfactory treatment for Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Recently, it has been reported that botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injection was effective for the treatment of RP in SSc patients. The objective was to assess the efficacy and safety of BTX-A on RP in Japanese SSc patients. In the prospective, case series study, 10 Japanese SSc patients with RP received 10 U of BTX-A injections into the hand. The change in severity of RP, including the frequency of attacks/pain, color changes, duration time of RP and the severity of pain, was assessed by Raynaud's score and pain visual analog scale (VAS) at each visit during 16 weeks. The recovery of skin temperature 20 min after cold water stimulation was examined by thermography at baseline and 4 weeks after injection. The number of digital ulcers (DU) and adverse effects were assessed at each visit. BTX-A injection decreased Raynaud's score and pain VAS from 2 weeks after injection, and the suppressive effect was continued until 16 weeks after injection. Skin temperature recovery after cold water stimulation at 4 weeks after injection was significantly enhanced compared with that before injection. All DU in five patients were healed within 12 weeks after injection. Neither systemic nor local adverse effects were observed in all cases. We conclude that BTX-A injection significantly improved the activity of RP in SSc patients without any adverse events, suggesting that BTX-A may have possible long-term preventive and therapeutic potentials for RP in Japanese SSc patients. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  18. Botulinum Toxin Type A Inhibits α-Smooth Muscle Actin and Myosin II Expression in Fibroblasts Derived From Scar Contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minliang; Yan, Tongtong; Ma, Kui; Lai, Linying; Liu, Chang; Liang, Liming; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-09-01

    Scar contracture (SC) is one of the most common complications resulting from major burn injuries. Numerous treatments are currently available but they do not always yield excellent therapeutic results. Recent reports suggest that botulinum toxin type A (BTXA) is effective at reducing SC clinically, but the molecular mechanism for this action is unknown. α-Smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and myosin II are the main components of stress fibers, which are the contractile structures of fibroblasts. The effects of BTXA on α-SMA and myosin II in SC are still unknown. This study aimed to explore the effect of BTXA on α-SMA and myosin II expression in fibroblasts derived from SC and to elucidate its actual mechanism further. Fibroblasts were isolated from tissue specimens of SC. Fibroblasts were cultured in Dulbecco modified Eagle medium with different concentrations of BTXA and their proliferation was analyzed through the tetrazolium-based colorimetric method at 1, 4, and 7 days. Proteins of α-SMA and myosin II were checked using Western blot in fibroblasts treated with different concentrations of BTXA at 1, 4, and 7 days. Fibroblasts without BTXA treatment had a higher proliferation than that in other groups, which indicated that the proliferation of fibroblasts was significantly inhibited by BTXA (P < 0.05). Proteins of α-SMA and myosin II between fibroblasts with BTXA and fibroblasts without BTXA are statistically significant (P < 0.05). These results suggest that BTXA effectively inhibited the growth of fibroblasts derived from SC and reduced the expression of α-SMA and myosin II, which provided theoretical support for the application of BTXA to control SC.

  19. Long-term effect of botulinum toxin (A) in the management of calf spasticity in children with diplegic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawamdeh, Z M; Ibrahim, A I; Al-Qudah, A A

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine possible long-term effects of multi-injections of botulinum toxin A (BT-A) on muscle tone and functional abilities in children with cerebral palsy. A randomized, single blind study was carried out. Sixty patients with spastic diplegia were enrolled; 40 received 3 successive doses of BT-A to the calf muscle bilaterally at intervals of 3 to 4 months; 20 received no injections and were considered the control group. Evaluation included measurement of muscle tone, passive ankle dorsiflexion range of motion, and gross motor function. The children in the study group were assessed at entry into the study, at 3 months, and at 18 months after the last injection. An identical assessment protocol was applied to the control group, with measurements taken at entry into the study, at 12 to 15 months, and then at 27 to 30 months, roughly corresponding to the time periods set for the study group. Muscle tone and passive ankle dorsiflexion range showed clinically and statistically significant improvement following BT-A injection at 3 months (P=0.000, P=0.04, respectively) and at 18 months (P=0.005, P=0.007, respectively) compared to the control group, but gross motor function showed significant improvement only at 18 months (P=0.02). Comparison between the first and second evaluations after the last injection in the study group showed a significant improvement in gross motor function and ankle dorsiflexion range (P=0.000 for both parameters); however, muscle tone was significantly increased (P=0.002). This study gives support to a possible prolonged effect of intramuscular BT-A as an adjunct to conventional physiotherapy to reduce spasticity and improve functional mobility in children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy.

  20. Pedobarometric evaluation of equinus foot disorder after injection of botulinum toxin A in children with cerebral palsy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falso, M; Fiaschi, A; Manganotti, P

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the effect of treatment with botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injections on function in children with cerebral palsy (CP) using pedobarometric data collected in a standing position. Ten children with CP (seven males, three females) participated, five with diplegia and five with hemiplegia. All children exhibited signs of unilateral dynamic equinus foot disorder and were community ambulators. Age range at the time of treatment was 6 to 13 years (mean age 9 y, SD 2.5). A comprehensive clinical examination and a pedobarometric evaluation were performed before and after BTX-A injection. All children received at least one injection in each spastic muscle. BTX-A was given to eight children unilaterally and to two children bilaterally. A maximum dose of 4 to 8 units of BTX-A per kilogram body weight was administered. In comparison with pretreatment values, the pedobarometric evaluation revealed a significant increase in the whole plantar surface area on the affected side (p < 0.05), an increase in the peak pressure value at the hindfoot on the affected side (p < 0.05), and a significant shift in the body centre of mass to the affected limb (p < 0.05) 1 month after treatment with BTX-A. A significant decrease in the peak pressure value at the hindfoot on the unaffected side was also observed. Similarly, a decrease in the modified Ashworth scale and an increase in the range of motion were observed. Thus, BTX-A produces a significant plantar surface modification and a significant shift of the body centre of mass which represents an indirect measure of postural attitude. Pedobarometric evaluation can also be useful in quantifying clinical changes after treatment with BTX-A.

  1. Determinants of responsiveness to botulinum toxin, casting, and bracing in the treatment of spastic equinus in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Rita; Majnemer, Annette; Benaroch, Thierry; Cantin, Marie-Andree

    2010-02-01

    The objective was to determine whether specific intrinsic (age, pattern of cerebral palsy [CP], child's motivation) and extrinsic (number of treatments, parenting stress) characteristics were associated with responsiveness to botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) injections in children with CP 3 months after injection into the gastrocnemius muscle. Children with hemiplegia or diplegia recruited from a BoNT-A programme were evaluated before and 3 months following injection of BoNT-A into the gastrocnemius. Outcome measures included muscle tone, range of motion, gait pattern, level of ambulation, gross motor function, and functional independence. Determinants of responsiveness to BoNT-A considered were age, number of treatments, distribution of CP, parenting stress, and motivation. Thirty-one children were recruited (17 males, 14 females)--22 with hemiplegia and nine with diplegia. Twenty-eight were classified at Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level I and three at level III. The mean age was 6 years 4 months (SD 2y 11mo). Younger age (p=0.015) and fewer number (p=0.024) of BoNT-A treatments were associated with greater change in gross motor function. Child's motivation and parenting stress were significantly associated with improvements in muscle tone (p=0.006-0.017), passive range of motion (p=0.008-0.033), gait pattern (p=0.005-0.042), level of ambulation (p=0.001-0.043), and functional independence (p=0.004-0.027). The results indicate that child, family, and treatment characteristics influence the degree of responsiveness to BoNT-A treatment. The contribution of contextual factors (personal and environmental) on responsiveness may be underappreciated in children with CP.

  2. The Effect of Botulinum Toxin Type A on Expression Profiling of Long Noncoding RNAs in Human Dermal Fibroblasts

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    Ying-ying Miao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study was aimed at analyzing the expressions of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs in Botulinum Toxin Type A (BoNTA treated human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs in vitro. Methods. We used RNA sequencing to characterize the lncRNAs and mRNAs transcriptome in the control and BoNTA treated group, in conjunction with application of GO (gene ontology analysis and KEGG (kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes analysis to delineate the alterations in gene expression. We also obtained quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR to confirm some differentially expressed genes. Results. Numerous differentially expressed genes were observed by microarrays between the two groups. qRT-PCR confirmed the changes of six lncRNAs (RP11-517C16.2-001, FR271872, LOC283352, RP11-401E9.3, FGFR3P, and XXbac-BPG16N22.5 and nine mRNAs (NOS2, C13orf15, FOS, FCN2, SPINT1, PLAC8, BIRC5, NOS2, and COL19A1. Farther studies indicated that the downregulating effect of BoNTA on the expression of FGFR3P was time-related and the dosage of BoNTA at a range from 2.5 U/106 cells to 7.5 U/106 cells increased the expression of FGFR3P and COL19A1 in HDFs as well. Conclusion. The expression profiling of lncRNAs was visibly changed in BoNTA treated HDFs. Further studies should focus on several lncRNAs to investigate their functions in BoNTA treated HDFs and the underlying mechanisms.

  3. [Botulinum neuro-toxin aype-A in the treatment of chronic tension type headache associated with pericranial tenderness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadaş, Omer; Ipekdal, Ilker Hüseyin; Ulaş, Umit Hidir; Kütükçü, Yaşar; Odabaşi, Zeki

    2012-01-01

    Both peripheral and central nociceptive mechanisms are responsible in chronic TTH. Analgegics are used in the acute treatment of chronic TTH and antidepressants are used in prophylactic treatment. However, further studies are needed to bring out new treatment options. The aim of our study is to investigate the effectiveness of Botulinum Neuro-toxin Type-A (BoNTA) in the treatment of chronic TTH associated with pericranial tenderness (PT). 14 patients with chronic TTH with PT were included in the study. 50 units Botox(®) injection was applied to the pericranial muscles (5 units for each muscles bilaterally: frontal, temporal, semispinalis capitis, spenius capitis and trapezius muscles) for each patient. Severity of headache was evaluated by VAS (Visual Analogue Scale) and number of days with headache per month were recorded before treatment and 2nd and 4th months after treatment. Number of days with headache per month were 19.57 ± 3.25 before treatment, 15.28 ± 4.37 at the 2nd month after treatment and 15.78 ± 3.90 at the 4th month after treatment. Severity of headache was 65.71 ± 9.16 before the treatment, 50.71 ± 13.56 at the 2nd month after treatment and 54.28 ± 10.35 at the 4th month after treatment (p<0.05). Frequency and severity of headache before treatment were significantly decreased at the 2nd month after treatment and this significance continued at the 4th month after treatment (p<0.05). BoNTA treatment may be usefull in the treatment of patients with chronic TTH associated with PT.

  4. Multilevel botulinum toxin type a as a treatment for spasticity in children with cerebral palsy: a retrospective study

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    Ece Unlu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of physical disability in children. Spasticity is a disabling clinical symptom that is prevalent among patients suffering from cerebral palsy. The treatment of spasticity with botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A is a well-established option in the interdisciplinary management of spasticity, providing focal reductions in muscle tone in cerebral palsy patients. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this retrospective study was to describe the effect of multilevel BTX-A injections in the lower extremities, focusing mainly on gross motor function and functional status in cerebral palsy patients. METHODS: Data from 71 cerebral palsy patients (64% male, 36% female, mean age 6.7 ±3.2 years were analyzed retrospectively. We used the Ashworth and Tardieu scales to evaluate the degree of spasticity. Motor function was measured by the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM-88, and functional status was classified by the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS I-V. Multilevel BTX-A injections were applied after sedation and with electrostimulation guidance. The evaluations were repeated every three months, and the patients were followed for six months. RESULTS: We found that the Ashworth and Tardieu scores decreased significantly at the three-month evaluation (p0.05. Although the improvement in spasticity was not maintained at the six-month evaluation, GMFM-88 scores increased significantly at the three- and six-month assessments. GMFSC levels showed no change in the three- and six-month assessments. CONCLUSION: We believe that a single multilevel BTX-A injection reduces spasticity and improves motor function in children with cerebral palsy.

  5. The efficacy of two formulations of botulinum toxin type A for masseter reduction: a split-face comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanitphakdeedecha, Rungsima; Ungaksornpairote, Chanida; Kaewkes, Arisa; Sathaworawong, Angkana; Lektrakul, Nittaya; Manuskiatti, Woraphong

    2017-08-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BTA) is now extensively used to address cosmetic concerns. OnabotulinumtoxinA (ONA, Botox; Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA) received FDA approval for upper face rejuvenation, including glabella frown lines and crow's-feet lines. The other off-label uses for lower face conditions have been utilized for contouring purposes, especially masseter hypertrophy. Recently, a new Daewoong BTA, (NABOTA ® , NBT, Daewoong Pharmaceutical, Seoul, Korea), was recently introduced. To compare efficacy and safety of ONA and NBT for masseter reduction. Thirty-five subjects with masseter hypertrophy were randomly injected with 25 units of ONA on one side and 25 units of NBT on the other side into masseter. Standardized photographic documentation was obtained at baseline, 1, 3 and 6 months after treatment. The mean volume of masseter was acquired by using three-dimensional computed tomography (3-D CT) at baseline, 3-, and 6-month follow-up visits. In addition, patients' satisfaction and side effects were also record at every follow-up visits. The mean masseter volume on the sides treated with ONA and NBT at baseline were 21.20 ± 4.23 cm 3 and 21.26 ± 4.58 cm 3 , respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean volume of both sides (p= 0.827). The mean masseter volume at 3- and 6-month follow-up visits reduced significantly on both ONA and NBT sides (pNBT sides at 3 and 6 months after treatment (p= 0.769 and p = 0.346, respectively). There was also no statistically significant difference in masseter reduction when compared between ONA and NBT sides evaluated by physicians and patients at each follow-up visit. No side effect on both sides was reported after injection. This study demonstrated that ONA and NBT provided comparable efficacy and safety for masseter reduction.

  6. Three-dimensional CT might be a potential evaluation modality in correction of asymmetrical masseter muscle hypertrophy by botulinum toxin injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    No, Yeon A; Ahn, Byeong Heon; Kim, Beom Joon; Kim, Myeung Nam; Hong, Chang Kwon

    2016-01-01

    For correction of this asymmetrical hypertrophy, botulinum toxin type A (BTxA) injection is one of convenient treatment modalities. Unfortunately, physical examination of masseter muscle is not enough to estimate the exact volume of muscle hypertrophy difference. Two Koreans, male and female, of bilateral masseter hypertrophy with asymmetricity were evaluated. BTxA (NABOTA(®), Daewoong, Co. Ltd., Seoul, Korea) was injected at master muscle site with total 50 U (25 U at each side) and volume change was evaluated with three-dimensional (3D) CT image analysis. Maximum reduction of masseter hypertrophy was recognized at 2-month follow-up and reduced muscle size started to restore after 3 months. Mean reduction of masseter muscle volume was 36% compared with baseline. More hypertrophied side of masseter muscle presented 42% of volume reduction at 2-month follow-up but less hypertrophied side of masseter muscle showed 30% of volume shrinkage. In conclusion, 3D CT image analysis might be the exact evaluation tool for correction of asymmetrical masseter hypertrophy by botulinum toxin injection.

  7. Localization of the motor endplate zone in human skeletal muscles of the lower limb: anatomical guidelines for injection with botulinum toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Campenhout, Anja; Molenaers, Guy

    2011-02-01

    Botulinum toxin gives a local tone reduction by blocking neurotransmission at the motor endplate (MEP). The importance of using MEP-targeted injections is demonstrated in animal models and in a clinical human study. The goal of this review is to present the available data on the localization of the MEP zone of frequently injected muscles of the lower limb and to compare this with current practice. Current knowledge on the localization of the MEP zone is based on some older histological studies, and for some of the more frequently injected muscles also on more recent anatomical dissection. We find that for some muscles the MEP zone can be more precisely demarcated, and for many other muscles that its location is somewhat different than the currently injected areas in clinical practice. Optimal injection sites are presented for gastrocnemius, soleus, tibialis posterior, semitendinosus, semimembranosus, gracilis, biceps femoris, rectus femoris, adductor longus, brevis and magnus, and psoas muscles. We propose optimal injection sites in relation to external anatomical landmarks for the frequently injected muscles of the human lower limb to facilitate the efficiency of botulinum toxin injections. © The Authors. Journal compilation © Mac Keith Press 2010.

  8. Intradetrusorial Botulinum Toxin in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis: A Neurophysiological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Conte

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS often complain of urinary disturbances characterized by overactive bladder syndrome and difficulties in bladder emptying. The aim of the study was to investigate the pathophysiology of bladder dysfunction and the neurophysiological effects of intradetrusorial incobotulinum toxin A (BoNT/A in patients with MS having both brain and spinal MS-related lesions. Twenty-five MS patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO underwent clinical evaluation and soleus Hoffmann reflex (H reflex study during urodynamics. Of the 25 patients, 14 underwent a further session one month after intradetrusorial BoNT/A injection. Eighteen healthy subjects acted as the control. In healthy subjects, the H reflex size significantly decreased at maximum cystometric capacity (MCC, whereas in MS patients with NDO, the H reflex remained unchanged. In the patients who received intradetrusorial BoNT/A, clinical and urodynamic investigations showed that NDO improved significantly. Volumes at the first, normal and strong desire to void and MCC increased significantly. Despite its efficacy in improving bladder symptoms and in increasing volumes for first desire, normal and strong desire to void, BoNT/A left the H reflex modulation during bladder filling unchanged. In the MS patients we studied having both brain and spinal MS-related lesions, the H reflex size remained unchanged at maximum bladder filling. Since this neurophysiological pattern has been previously found in patients with spinal cord injury, we suggest that bladder dysfunction arises from the MS-related spinal lesions. BoNT/A improves bladder dysfunction by changing bladder afferent input, as shown by urodynamic findings on bladder filling sensations, but its effects on H reflex modulation remain undetectable.

  9. Safety and efficacy of multiuse botulinum toxin vials for intralaryngeal injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Emily M; Rosen, Clark A; Hapner, Edie R; Smith, Sarah; Hatcher, Jeanne L; Simpson, Blake; Johns, Michael M

    2015-05-01

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines maintain that single-use vials cannot be used for multiple patients. Botox product labeling states that the reconstituted toxin should be used within 4 hours on a single patient based on concerns of reduced potency, contamination, and consequent infections. The purpose of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of using single-use vials in a multidose fashion. Prospective study and cohort chart review. A multi-institutional three-part study was performed between May 2013 and October 2013: 1) a summation of subjects' recall of their past experiences (symptoms/response) with previous multidose Botox injections, 2) a prospective study of intralaryngeal injections, and 3) a chart review of injection responses in a subset of the cohort. Seven hundred forty-three subjects receiving 6,216 injections demonstrated zero infection-related complications on retrospective chart review. One hundred seventy-nine subjects recalled 24.0% overall adverse events, 10.6% redness, 7.3% pain and swelling at the injection site, and 0% fever. One hundred seventy-four subjects prospectively reported 12.6% overall adverse events. The self-reported efficacy rate of Botox injection was 96.6%. The low rates of adverse events following the use of Botox in a multipatient fashion are consistent with other percutaneous injections. No evidence of infection was found with multidose Botox use. Given the low incidence of side effects and high success rate, Botox can be used both safely and effectively in a multipatient fashion. 4 © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  10. The Effect of Total Cumulative Dose, Number of Treatment Cycles, Interval between Injections, and Length of Treatment on the Frequency of Occurrence of Antibodies to Botulinum Toxin Type A in the Treatment of Muscle Spasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakheit, Abdel Magid O.; Liptrot, Anthea; Newton, Rachel; Pickett, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    A large cumulative dose of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A), frequent injections, a short interval between treatment cycles, and a long duration of treatment have all been suggested, but not confirmed, to be associated with a high incidence of neutralizing antibodies to the neurotoxin. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these…

  11. Botulinum toxin type A reduces histamine-induced itch and vasomotor responses in human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gazerani, Parisa; Pedersen, N. S.; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2009-01-01

    of subcutaneous administration of BoNT/A on experimentally histamine-induced itch in human skin. METHODS: In this double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 14 healthy men (mean +/- SD age 26.3 +/- 2.6 years) received BoNT/A (Botox; Allergan, Irvine, CA, U.S.A.; 5 U) and isotonic saline on the volar surface.......001) and temperature measurements (F(1,26) = 27.6, P skin...... temperature (thermographic images) were measured over the course of the trials. RESULTS: BoNT/A reduced the histamine-induced itch intensity (F(1,39) = 30.2, P

  12. Botulinum Toxin Injection for Internal Rotation Contractures in Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy. A Minimum 5-Year Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijnisveld, Bouke J; van Wijlen-Hempel, Marie S; Hogendoorn, Simone; de Boer, Kees S; Malessy, Martijn J A; Keurentjes, J Christiaan; Nagels, Jochem; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    Brachial plexus birth palsy is frequently associated with internal rotation contractures of the shoulder as a result of muscle imbalance. The purpose of this study is to assess the effect of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injection in the subscapular (SC) muscle on external rotation and the need for tendon transfer for external rotation of the shoulder. A prospective comparative study was performed including 15 consecutive patients treated with BTX-A and a historic control group of 67 patients with mean age 30 months (SD 10). The BTX-A injection (2 IU/kg body weight) was performed immediately following MRI under general anesthesia in the SC muscle. Passive external rotation, the need for tendon transfer surgery, glenohumeral deformity, and muscle degeneration were evaluated. The hazard ratio for no relapse of internal rotation contracture after BTX-A injection compared with no BTX-A injection was calculated. In the BTX-A group, the passive external rotation in adduction increased from -1 degree (95% CI, -10 to 8) to 32 degrees (95% CI, 17-46) at 3 months and 6 patients were indicated for surgery compared with a decline from -2 degrees (95% CI, -7 to 3) to -11 degrees (95% CI, -17 to -6) in the control group with 66 indications for surgery. At 5 years of follow-up, 10 patients in the BTX-A group were indicated for surgery with a hazard ratio of 4.0 (95% CI, 1.9 to 8.4). BTX-A injection in the SC muscle of brachial plexus birth palsy patients can reduce internal rotation contractures and subsequently the need for tendon transfer surgery. At 5 years of follow-up a relapse was seen in 67% of the patients treated with BTX-A. Because at MRI less SC degeneration was found in the good responders on BTX-A treatment, this group seems to be the best target group. Further research is needed on patient selection for BTX-A injection including glenohumeral deformity, SC degeneration, as well as doses of BTX-A to be used. Level II-prospective comparative study.

  13. Long-term tremor therapy for Parkinson and essential tremor with sensor-guided botulinum toxin type A injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samotus, Olivia; Lee, Jack; Jog, Mandar

    2017-01-01

    Objective Current pharmacological agents used to treat Parkinson disease (PD) tremor and essential tremor (ET) provide suboptimal benefit and are commonly associated with significant adverse effects. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been shown to be effective for wrist tremor though functionally bothersome muscle weakness frequently occurs. This is the longest study to date demonstrating that BoNT-A therapy coupled with kinematic guidance can provide efficacious outcomes for upper limb tremor with minimized unwanted weakness. Methods A total of 28 PD and 24 ET participants with bothersome, disabling tremor, received six serial BoNT-A treatments every 16 weeks starting at week 0 with a follow-up visit 6 weeks following a treatment, totaling 96 weeks. Clinical scales, including Fahn-Tolosa-Marin tremor rating scale (FTM), and sensor-based tremor assessments were conducted at each visit. Kinematics was utilized to identify which arm muscles contributed to the tremulous movements and the experienced injector used clinical expertise in determining BoNT-A dosages. Results Following BoNT-A treatment, clinical ratings of tremor severity and functional ability (FTM) showed significant improvements following the first treatment which was maintained up to week 96 in PD and ET. Kinematics detected a significant reduction in PD and ET tremor amplitudes by 70% and 76% over the treatment course, respectively. By objectively distinguishing tremulous muscles and tremor severity, adverse effects were limited to mild perceived weakness by participants in injected muscles during follow-ups. Following the fourth treatment, BoNT-A dosages in flexor and extensor wrist muscles and biceps were reduced for those experiencing residual weakness which ultimately did not interfere with tremor relief or arm function. Conclusions Kinematics is an objective method that can aid clinicians in assessing and determining optimal BoNT-A parameters to alleviate both PD and ET tremor. BoNT-A injections

  14. A preliminary study of painless and effective transdermal botulinum toxin A delivery by jet nebulization for treatment of primary hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannitti, Tommaso; Palmieri, Beniamino; Aspiro, Anna; Di Cerbo, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Hyperhidrosis is a chronic disease characterized by increased sweat production. Local injections of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) have been extensively used for treatment of primary hyperhidrosis (idiopathic). The current treatment for this condition involves several intradermal injections, resulting in poor patient compliance due to injection-related pain. Therefore, new protocols, including an improved anesthetic regimen, are required. We designed the present study to determine whether JetPeel™-3, a medical device used for transdermal delivery of drugs by jet nebulization, could be used to deliver lidocaine prior to the standard multiple BTX-A injections or deliver lidocaine together with BTX-A in order to determine the protocol giving better results in terms of procedure-related pain, sweating, and patient satisfaction in subjects affected by primary axillary, palmar or plantar hyperhidrosis. Twenty patients with a visual analog scale (VAS) sweating score ≥ 8 cm were randomized to receive lidocaine 2% (5 mL) delivered by JetPeel™-3 followed by multiple injections of BTX-A (100 units) or lidocaine 2% (5 mL) and BTX-A (50 units) delivered together by JetPeel™-3. Effect of treatment on sweating was measured by VAS (0= minimum sweating; 10= maximum sweating) at 3-month follow-up. Pain induced by the procedure was assessed by VAS (0= minimum pain; 10= maximum pain) immediately after the procedure. Patient satisfaction was assessed at 3-month follow-up using a 5-point scale (1= not at all satisfied; 2= not satisfied; 3= partially satisfied; 4= satisfied; 5= highly satisfied). Both treatment modalities reduced sweating at 3-month follow-up, if compared with baseline (all Phyperhidrosis, resulting in lower procedure-related pain, improved sweating and higher patient satisfaction, if compared with lidocaine delivered by JetPeel™-3 followed by standard BTX-A injection therapy. Our protocol delivering lidocaine and BTX-A together by JetPeel™-3 requires a reduced

  15. [Therapeutic effects of different doses of botulinum toxin A injection on tiptoe deformation in children with cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Guo-Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Zhu, Deng-Na; Cai, Zhi-Jun; Li, San-Song; Zhang, Wei

    2014-07-01

    To study the therapeutic effects of different doses of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injection on tiptoe deformation in children with cerebral palsy. A total of 256 children with tiptoe deformation due to spastic cerebral palsy were classified into group A (muscle tension levels I-II, n=147) and group B (muscle tension levels III-IV, n=109). Group A was randomly divided into group A1 (injected with high-dose BTX-A, n=73) and group A2 (injected with low-dose BTX-A, n=74). Group B was randomly divided into group B1 (injected with high-dose BTX-A, n=55) and group B2 ( injected with low-dose BTX-A, n=54). The dose of BTX-A was 6 U/kg for groups A1 and B1 and was 3 U/kg for groups A2 and B2. Before the injection and at 1,2,6, and 12 months after injection, the muscle tension of limbs was evaluated with the modified Ashworth Scale, and the recovery of motor function of lower limbs was assessed with the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM). Before and after treatment, there were no significant differences in Ashworth and GMFM scores between groups A1 and A2 (P>0.05). After treatment, group B1 had a significantly reduced Ashworth score and a significantly increased GMFM score, and group B1 had a significantly lower Ashworth score and a significantly higher GMFM score compared with group B2 (PAshworth score gradually declined post-treatment, reached the lowest point at 3 months after treatment, and returned to the level before treatment at 12 months after treatment; GMFM score gradually increased post-treatment and reached the peak level at 12 months after treatment (P<0.05). The level of muscle tension should be considered when BTX-A injection is used for treating tiptoe deformation in children with cerebral palsy. It makes no difference to use high- or low-dose BTX-A when the muscle tension level is within I-II, but high-dose BTX-A has a better performance in reducing muscle tension and improving motor function when the muscle tension level is within III-IV.

  16. Intra-articular injection of Botulinum toxin A reduces neurogenic inflammation in CFA-induced arthritic rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Wang, Kaile; Chu, Xiao; Li, Tieshan; Shen, Nana; Fan, Chenglei; Niu, Zhenyuan; Zhang, Xiaochen; Hu, Luoman

    2017-02-01

    Currently, administration of Botulinum toxin Type A (BoNT/A) to treat arthritic pain has promising efficacy in clinical research. However, the mechanisms underlying anti-neurogenic inflammation mediated by BoNT/A remains unclear. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the effectiveness in macro and micro levels and to explore the causal mechanism of BoNT/A. Wistar rats (n = 60) were injected with 50ul complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in the left ankle joint capsule to establish a model of chronic monoarthritis. Pain behaviour (Evoked pain assessment) and infrared thermal imaging testing were performed at the macroscopic level to assess the effectiveness of analgesia and anti-inflammation. Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining were used at the microscopic level in an attempt to determine the mechanisms of anti-nociceptive or anti-inflammatory effects of BoNT/A. Additionally, hematoxylin-eosin staining was also used to visualise the cartilage and the synovial degenerative conditions of arthritis. By comparing the outcome of the evoked pain test and immunofluorescence staining, there was a significant improvement in BoNT/A compared with the normal saline (NS) injected control group. In addition, thermal variations showed that the temperature of ipsilateral ankle joint increased between 1 and 2 weeks following injection of CFA, but decreased after 3 weeks (still above the contralateral side). However, the temperature showed no difference between the BoNT/A group and NS group after treatment. The expression of IL-1β or TNF-α in the ankle synovial tissue was significantly decreased in the BoNT/A group compared to the NS group (p < 0.05). Based on the HE assessment, cartilage degeneration and infiltration of inflammatory cells in the BoNT/A group was alleviated compared to the NS group after treatment. In conclusion, we proposed the hypothesis that intra-articular BoNT/A administration does play an important role in anti-neurogenic inflammation. The

  17. Restriction of Postoperative Joint Loading in a Murine Model of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Botulinum Toxin Paralysis and External Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebaschi, Amir; Deng, Xiang-Hua; Coleman, Nathan W; Camp, Christopher L; Zong, Jianchun; Carbone, Andrew; Carballo, Camila B; Cong, Guang-Ting; Album, Zoe M; Rodeo, Scott A

    2017-09-01

    Control of knee motion in small animal models is necessary to study the effect of mechanical load on the healing process. This can be especially challenging in mice, which are being increasingly used for various orthopedic reconstruction models. We explored the feasibility of botulinum toxin (Botox; Allergan, Dublin, Ireland) paralysis and a newly designed external fixator to restrict motion of the knee in mice undergoing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Nineteen C57BL/6 mice were allocated to two groups: (1) Botox group ( n  = 9) and (2) external fixator group ( n  = 10). Mice in Botox group received two different doses of Botox: 0.25 unit ( n  = 3) and 0.5 unit ( n  = 6). Injection was performed 72 hours prior to ACL reconstruction into the quadriceps, hamstring, and calf muscles of the right hind leg. Mice in external fixator group received an external fixator following ACL reconstruction. Mice were monitored for survival, tolerance, and achievement of complete knee immobilization. All mice were meant for sacrifice on day 14 postoperatively. No perceptible change in gait was observed with 0.25 unit of Botox. All mice that received 0.5 unit of Botox had complete hind limb paralysis documented by footprint analysis 2 days after injection but failed to tolerate anesthesia and were euthanized 24 hours after operation due to their critical condition. In contrast, the external fixator was well tolerated and effectively immobilized the limb. There was a single occurrence of intraoperative technical error in the external fixator group that led to euthanasia. No mechanical failure or complication was observed. Botox paralysis was not a viable option for postoperative restriction of motion and joint loading in mice. However, external fixation was an effective method for complete knee immobilization and can be used in murine models requiring postoperative control of knee loading. This study introduces a robust research tool to allow control

  18. A Single-blind, Split-face, Randomized, Pilot Study Comparing the Effects of Intradermal and Intramuscular Injection of Two Commercially Available Botulinum Toxin A Formulas to Reduce Signs of Facial Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapra, Priya; Sapra, Sheetal; Khanna, Julie; Mraud, Kelli; Bonadonna, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effectiveness of intradermal botulinum toxin type A injection in improving skin texture and midface lift while reducing pore size and sebum production, as well as investigate the differences in effectiveness between onabotulinumtoxinA and abobotulinumtoxinA using intradermal and intramuscular injection methods. Design: A 16-week, single-blind, split-face, randomized study. Each patient served as their own control, receiving onabotulinumtoxinA and abobotulinumtoxinA randomized to either the left or right side of the face. Patients received intradermal botulinum toxin type A injections at Week 0 and intramuscular botulinum toxin type A injections at Week 2. Participants: Ten women aged 35 to 65 years who exhibited static rhytids in the glabellar and periorbital area. Measurements: The primary endpoint was efficacy of split-face treatment of intradermal and intramuscular onabotulinumtoxinA and abobotulinumtoxinA as assessed by a blinded evaluator using baseline and post-treatment photographs. The secondary endpoints included safety as assessed by adverse events and patient satisfaction measured by questionnaires completed at baseline and post-treatment. Results: Intradermal injection of botulinum toxin type A led to a statistically significant improvement in skin texture (p=0.004) while also resulting in mild midface lift (p=0.024), but did not provide a significant reduction of pore size and sebum production. There was no statistically significant difference between onabotulinumtoxinA and abobotulinumtoxinA when injected intradermally or intramuscularly. Conclusion: Intradermal injection of botulinum toxin type A appears to be a safe and effective therapy that provides an improvement in facial skin texture and midface lift. Registry: clinicaltrials.gov (ID#: NCT02907268). PMID:28367260

  19. [Effect of botulinum toxin type B on residual limb sweating and pain. Is there a chance for indirect phantom pain reduction by improved prosthesis use?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, K-U; Kohl, M; Seifert, U; Schlereth, T

    2012-04-01

    Hyperhidrosis of a residual limb after amputation is one of the most common reasons for impaired prosthesis use and quality of life and affects 30-50% of all amputees causing skin irritation in about 25%. Thus the probability of residual limb pain increases in addition to an increased likelihood of phantom pain due to shorter duration of prothesis use. Development of both types of pain was studied following treatment of hyperhidrosis in 9 amputees. A total of 9 lower limb amputees received injections of 1750 units of botulinum toxin type B (BTX-B) for the treatment of hyperhidrosis of a residual limb (20 intracutaneous injections each). Prior to injections and 4 weeks and 3 months afterwards, patients rated the impairments regarding residual limb pain, phantom pain and sweating of the residual limb. Furthermore the duration of use of the prosthetic device and quality of life were rated on a numeric rating scale (NRS 0-10). Stump pain (n=9) was highly significantly reduced after 3 months (baseline: NRS 5; 4 weeks: NRS 4, p=0.109; 3 months: NRS 3, p=0.008) and also a tendency for phantom pain after 3 months (baseline NRS 5; 3 months: NRS 3; p=0.109). Sweating of the residual limb prior to BTX-B application was rated as a median 7 on the NRS scale with significant improvements after 4 weeks (NRS 3, p=0.027) and 3 months (NRS 3, p=0.020). Impaired duration of prothesis use improved from NRS 8 to NRS 2 (4 weeks; p=0.023) and NRS 3 (3 months; p=0.023) as well as the quality of life (p=0.016, p=0.023, respectively). Residual limb pain improved 3 months after intracutaneous, low-dose BTX-B in a trial with 9 patients and also phantom pain by tendency. Sweating of the residual limb was significantly reduced, probably thereby improving the duration of prothesis use. Larger studies should confirm these findings and conclusions.

  20. Intravesical Botulinum Toxin A Injections for Bladder Pain Syndrome/Interstitial Cystitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Controlled Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junpeng; Wang, Qiang; Wu, Qinghui; Chen, Yang; Wu, Peng

    2016-09-14

    BACKGROUND The role of intravesical botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injections in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) has not been clearly defined. The aim of this study was to evaluate high-level evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of BTX-A injections for BPS/IC. MATERIAL AND METHODS We conducted a comprehensive search of PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science, and conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of all available randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled studies assessing BTX-A injections for BPS/IC. RESULTS Seven RCTs and 1 retrospective study were identified based on the selection criteria. Pooled analyses showed that although BTX-A was associated with a slightly larger volume of post-void residual urine (PVR) (weighted mean difference [WMD] 10.94 mL; 95% confidence intervals [CI] 3.32 to 18.56; p=0.005), patients in this group might benefit from greater reduction in pelvic pain (WMD -1.73; 95% CI -3.16 to -0.29; p=0.02), Interstitial Cystitis Problem Index (ICPI) scores (WMD -1.25; 95% CI -2.20 to -0.30; p=0.01), and Interstitial Cystitis Symptom Index (ICSI) scores (WMD -1.16; 95% CI -2.22 to -0.11; p=0.03), and significant improvement in daytime frequency of urination (WMD -2.36; 95% CI -4.23 to -0.49; p=0.01) and maximum cystometric capacity (MCC) (WMD 50.49 mL; 95% CI 25.27 to 75.71; p<0.00001). Nocturia, maximal urinary flow rate, dysuria, and urinary tract infection did not differ significantly between the 2 groups. CONCLUSIONS Intravesical BTX-A injections might offer significant improvement in bladder pain symptoms, daytime urination frequency, and MCC for patients with refractory BPS/IC, with a slightly larger PVR. Further well-designed, large-scale RCTs are required to confirm the findings of this analysis.

  1. Intravesical Botulinum Toxin A Injections for Bladder Pain Syndrome/Interstitial Cystitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Controlled Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junpeng; Wang, Qiang; Wu, Qinghui; Chen, Yang; Wu, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of intravesical botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injections in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) has not been clearly defined. The aim of this study was to evaluate high-level evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of BTX-A injections for BPS/IC. Material/Methods We conducted a comprehensive search of PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science, and conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of all available randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled studies assessing BTX-A injections for BPS/IC. Results Seven RCTs and 1 retrospective study were identified based on the selection criteria. Pooled analyses showed that although BTX-A was associated with a slightly larger volume of post-void residual urine (PVR) (weighted mean difference [WMD] 10.94 mL; 95% confidence intervals [CI] 3.32 to 18.56; p=0.005), patients in this group might benefit from greater reduction in pelvic pain (WMD −1.73; 95% CI −3.16 to −0.29; p=0.02), Interstitial Cystitis Problem Index (ICPI) scores (WMD −1.25; 95% CI −2.20 to −0.30; p=0.01), and Interstitial Cystitis Symptom Index (ICSI) scores (WMD −1.16; 95% CI −2.22 to −0.11; p=0.03), and significant improvement in daytime frequency of urination (WMD −2.36; 95% CI −4.23 to −0.49; p=0.01) and maximum cystometric capacity (MCC) (WMD 50.49 mL; 95% CI 25.27 to 75.71; p<0.00001). Nocturia, maximal urinary flow rate, dysuria, and urinary tract infection did not differ significantly between the 2 groups. Conclusions Intravesical BTX-A injections might offer significant improvement in bladder pain symptoms, daytime urination frequency, and MCC for patients with refractory BPS/IC, with a slightly larger PVR. Further well-designed, large-scale RCTs are required to confirm the findings of this analysis. PMID:27624897

  2. Effectiveness of resistance training in combination with botulinum toxin-A on hand and arm use in children with cerebral palsy: a pre-post intervention study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvrum Ann-Kristin G

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this pilot study was to examine the effects of additional resistance training after use of Botulinum Toxin-A (BoNT-A on the upper limbs in children with cerebral palsy (CP. Methods Ten children with CP (9–17 years with unilaterally affected upper limbs according to Manual Ability Classification System II were assigned to two intervention groups. One group received BoNT-A treatment (group B, the other BoNT-A plus eight weeks resistance training (group BT. Hand and arm use were evaluated by means of the Melbourne assessment of unilateral upper limb function (Melbourne and Assisting Hand Assessment (AHA. Measures of muscle strength, muscle tone, and active range of motion were used to assess neuromuscular body function. Measurements were performed before and two and five months after intervention start. Change scores and differences between the groups in such scores were subjected to Mann–Whitney U and Wilcoxon Signed Rank tests, respectively. Results Both groups had very small improvements in AHA and Melbourne two months after BoNT-A injections, without differences between groups. There were significant, or close to significant, short-term treatment effects in favour of group BT for muscle strength in injected muscles (elbow flexion strength, p = .08 and non-injected muscles (elbow extension and supination strength, both p = .05, without concomitant increases in muscle tone. Active supination range improved in both groups, but more so in group BT (p = .09. There were no differences between the groups five months after intervention start. Conclusions Resistance training strengthens non-injected muscles temporarily and may reduce short-term strength loss that results from BoNT-A injections without increasing muscle tone. Moreover, additional resistance training may increase active range of motion to a greater extent than BoNT-A alone. None of the improvements in neuromuscular impairments further

  3. Botulinum toxin type A potentiates the effect of neuromotor rehabilitation of Pisa syndrome in Parkinson disease: a placebo controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassorelli, C; De Icco, R; Alfonsi, E; Bartolo, M; Serrao, M; Avenali, M; De Paoli, I; Conte, C; Pozzi, N G; Bramanti, P; Nappi, G; Sandrini, G

    2014-11-01

    Pisa syndrome (PS) is a tonic lateral flexion of trunk that represents a disabling complication of advanced Parkinson disease (PD). Conventional rehabilitation treatment (CT) ameliorates axial posture and trunk mobility in PD patients, but the improvement tends to wane in 4-6 months. Botulin toxin (BT) may reduce muscle hyperactivity, therefore improving CT effectiveness. We evaluated whether the injection of incabotulinum toxin type A (iBTA) into the hyperactive trunk muscles might improve the effectiveness of rehabilitation in a group of PD patients with PS. Twenty-six PD patients were enrolled in a randomized placebo-controlled trial. Group A was treated with iBTA before undergoing CT (a 4-week intensive programme), while Group B received saline before the 4-week CT treatment. Patients were evaluated at baseline, at the end of the rehabilitative period, 3 and 6 months with kinematic analysis of movement, UPDRS, Functional Independence Measure and Visual Analog Scale for pain. At the end of the rehabilitation period, both groups improved significantly in terms of static postural alignment and of range of motion. Group A showed a significantly more marked reduction in pain score as compared with Group B and a more prolonged efficacy on several clinical and kinematic variables. Our preliminary data suggest that BT may be considered an important addition to the rehabilitation programme for PD subjects with PS for improving axial posture and trunk mobility, as well as for a better control of pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Botulinum Toxin A and Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction: Pathophysiology and Mechanisms of Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Fong Jhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of onabotulinumtoxinA (BoNT-A for the treatment of lower urinary tract diseases (LUTD has increased markedly in recent years. The indications for BoNT-A treatment of LUTD now include neurogenic or idiopathic detrusor overactivity, interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and voiding dysfunction. The mechanisms of BoNT-A action on LUTDs affect many different aspects. Traditionally, the effects of BoNT-A were believed to be attributable to inhibition of acetylcholine release from the presynaptic efferent nerves at the neuromuscular junctions in the detrusor or urethral sphincter. BoNT-A injection in the bladder also regulated sensory nerve function by blocking neurotransmitter release and reducing receptor expression in the urothelium. In addition, recent studies revealed an anti-inflammatory effect for BoNT-A. Substance P and nerve growth factor in the urine and bladder tissue decreased after BoNT-A injection. Mast cell activation in the bladder also decreased. BoNT-A-induced improvement of urothelium function plays an important mitigating role in bladder dysfunction. Vascular endothelial growth factor expression in urothelium decreased after BoNT-A injection, as did apoptosis. Studies also revealed increased apoptosis in the prostate after BoNT-A injection. Although BoNT-A injection has been widely used to treat different LUTDs refractory to conventional treatment, currently, onabotulinumtoxinA has been proven effective only on urinary incontinence due to IDO and NDO in several large-scale clinical trials. The effects of onabotulinumtoxinA on other LUTDs such as interstitial cystitis, benign prostatic hyperplasia, dysfunctional voiding or detrusor sphincter dyssynergia have not been well demonstrated.

  5. Efficacy of Botulinum toxin A for the treatment of Bladder pain syndrome: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa Vargas, D C; García Perdómo, H A

    2017-07-04

    To determine the efficacy and safety of BTX-A, compared with other interventions for the treatment of BPS to improve quality of life. This systematic review fulfils all the requirements of the Cochrane manual and PRISMA reporting guidelines. The PROSPERO registration number is: CRD42016039480.Clinical trials without language discrimination were included. BPS patients over 18 y/o that were treated with BTX-A were included. Studies were searched in published databases and no published literature from inception to the present day. Risk of bias analysis was done using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. 88 articles were found with the designed search strategies. After exclusions, four studies were included in the qualitative analyses. Kasyan et al., 2012 compared BTX-A with hydrodistention. Manning et al., 2014 compared the injection of BTX-A with the injection of normal saline in previously hydrodistended bladders. In both cases, primary end point was measured by the O'Leary-Sant questionnaire score. El-Bahnasy et al., 2009 compared BTX-A with BCG administration, through Global Response Assessment. Kuo et al., 2015 compared hydrodistention plus suburothelial injections of BTX-A with hydrodistension plus normal saline injections. Reduction in pain was estimated by VAS bladder pain score. A similar efficacy to their controls had been found in Kasyan and Manning studies. El-Bahnasy had found improvement in BTX-A in all parameters. Kuo el al. 2015, found a significantly reduction in pain in the BTX-A group. Regarding the risk of bias, three studies did not have adequate descriptions of selection, performance and detection bias. The study of Manning had low risk of selection, attrition and reporting bias. There is not enough evidence to conclude the efficacy of BTX-A for the treatment of interstitial cystitis to improve quality of life. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxins are substances created by plants and animals that are poisonous to humans. Toxins also include some medicines that are helpful in small doses, but poisonous in large amounts. Most toxins that cause problems ...

  7. On botulinum neurotoxin variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montecucco, Cesare; Rasotto, Maria Berica

    2015-01-06

    The rapidly growing number of botulinum neurotoxin sequences poses the problem of the possible evolutionary significance of the variability of these superpotent neurotoxins for toxin-producing Clostridium species. To progress in the understanding of this remarkable phenomenon, we suggest that researchers should (i) abandon an anthropocentric view of these neurotoxins as human botulism-causing agents or as human therapeutics, (ii) begin to investigate in depth the role of botulinum neurotoxins in animal botulism in the wilderness, and (iii) devote large efforts to next-generation sequencing of soil samples to identify novel botulinum neurotoxins. In order to compare the fitness of the different toxins, we suggest that assays of all the steps from toxin production to animal death should be performed. Copyright © 2015 Montecucco and Rasotto.

  8. Do flexible inter-injection intervals improve the effects of botulinum toxin A treatment in reducing impairment and disability in patients with spasticity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trompetto, Carlo; Marinelli, Lucio; Mori, Laura; Puce, Luca; Pelosin, Elisa; Serrati, Carlo; Fattapposta, Francesco; Rinalduzzi, Steno; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Currà, Antonio

    2017-05-01

    In patients treated with botulinum toxin-A (BoNT-A), toxin-directed antibody formation was related to the dosage and frequency of injections, leading to the empirical adoption of minimum time intervals between injections of 3months or longer. However, recent data suggest that low immunogenicity of current BoNT-A preparations could allow more frequent injections. Our hypothesis is that a short time interval between injections may be safe and effective in reducing upper limb spasticity and related disability. IncobotulinumtoxinA was injected under ultrasound guidance in spastic muscles of 11 subjects, who were evaluated just before BoNT-A injection (T0), and 1month (T1), 2months (T2) and 4months (T3) after injecting. At T1, in the case of persistent disability related to spasticity interfering with normal activities, patients received an additional toxin dose. Seven subjects received the additional dose at T1 because of persistent disability; 4 of them had a decrease of disability 1month later (T2). Rethinking the injection scheme for BoNT-A treatment may have a major impact in the management of spasticity and related disability. Future studies with larger sample sizes are warranted to confirm that injection schedules with short time intervals should no longer be discouraged in clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Medical Countermeasure Models. Volume 8. Botulinum Neurotoxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    neurotoxin is produced primarily by the bacterial species Clostridium botulinum , although Clostridium baratii and Clostridium butyricum are also capable of...varied from study to study and ranged from 0.02 IU/ml to 0.2 IU/ml. 54 Fiock MA et al., “Studies of Immunity to Toxins of Clostridium Botulinum . IX... Clostridium Botulinum . IX. Immunologic Response of Man to Purified Pentavalent ABCDE Botulinum Toxoid.” The Journal of Immunology. 90(5). 1962. 66 Siegel

  10. [Functional results of type A botulinum toxin versus oral anti-inflammatory agents in the rehabilitation of painful shoulder syndrome caused by rotator cuff lesion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, Bautista P; Negrete-Corona, J; Chávez-Hinojosa, E

    2014-01-01

    Rotator cuff conditions are characterized by unspecific signs, as well as anatomic alterations and symptoms. They have a multifactorial etiology and may include everything from tendinitis to massive, full thickness tears of the rotator cuff tendon that compromise the normal biomechanics of the involved shoulder. They usually occur in people over 40 years of age but lesions resulting from trauma may vary according to the mechanism of injury and are not directly related with the age at onset of symptoms. Vascular factors have been described as related with rotator cuff tendon damage in conditions affecting the microcirculation. However, recent studies have not proven that the tendon under direct observation shows hypovascularity. Type A botulinum toxin acts by blocking the release of acetylcholine in the neuromuscular plate; in the joints it releases capsular tension and reduces proinflammatory factors such as interleukin-1 (IL-1). There are only a few papers on its intraarticular benefit; in muscle and tendon groups it not only has a muscle relaxant effect, but several publications support its utility for pain management. It has been widely used in the rehabilitation of this group of patients at low doses. Material and methods: Prospective, investigational and longitudinal study involving the follow-up of 24 patients with a diagnosis of painful shoulder syndrome proven clinically and with imaging tests, and caused by rotator cuff lesions. The patients either did not meet the criteria for immediate surgical repair or had already undergone such a repair. Type A botulinum toxin was applied to 12 patients in the subacromial space around the rotator cuff conjoint tendon, as well as in the painful spots and in the muscle contracture in the shoulder. The total dose of Type A