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Sample records for treat light water

  1. Study on light water reactor fuel behavior under reactivity initiated accident condition in TREAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Nobuaki; Ishijima, Kiyomi; Ochiai, Masaaki; Tanzawa, Sadamitsu; Uemura, Mutsumi

    1981-05-01

    This report reviews the results of the fuel failure experiments performed in TREAT in the U.S.A. simulating Reactivity Initiated Accidents. One of the main purposes of the TREAT experiments is the study of the fuel failure behavior, and the other is the study of the molten fuel-water coolant interaction and the consequent hydrogen behavior. This report mainly shows the results of the TREAT experiments studying the fuel failure behavior in Light Water Reactor, and then it describes the fuel failure threshold and the fuel failure mechanism, considering the results of the photographic experiments of the fuel failure behavior with transparent capsules. (author)

  2. Treating mine water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlak, E S; Kochegarova, L V; Zaslavskaya, I Yu

    1980-10-01

    Taking into account the negative influence of mine waters with suspended matter on the natural environment on the surface, the maximum treatment of mine water underground, is proposed. It is noted that full treatment of mine water, using conventional filtration methods, would be rather expensive, but a limited treatment of mine water is possible. Such treated mine water can be used in dust suppression and fire fighting systems. Mine water treated underground should be free of any odor, with pH level ranging from 6 to 9.5, with suspended matter content not exceeding 50 mg/l and coli-titre not less than 300 cm$SUP$3. It is suggested that water treatment to produce water characterized by these parameters is possible and economical. Recommendations on construction of underground sedimentation tanks and channels, and a hydraulic system of cleaning sedimentation tanks are proposed. The settling would be stored underground in abandoned workings. (2 refs.) (In Russian)

  3. A light therapy for treating Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue; Han, Mengmeng; Wang, Qiyan; Zeng, Yuhui; Meng, Qingqiang; Zhang, Jun; Wei, Xunbin

    2017-02-01

    It is generally believed that there are some connections between Alzheimer's disease and amyloid protein plaques in the brain. The typical symptoms of Alzheimer's disease are memory loss, language disorders, mood swings, loss of motivation and behavioral issues. Currently, the main therapeutic method is pharmacotherapy, which may temporarily reduce symptoms, but has many side effects. Infrared light therapy has been studied in a range of single and multiple irradiation protocols in previous studies and was found beneficial for neuropathology. In our research we have studied the effect of infrared light on Alzheimer's disease through transgenic mouse model. We designed an experimental apparatus for treating mice, which primarily included a therapeutic box and a LED array, which emitted infrared light. After the treatment, we assessed the effects of infrared light by performing two tests: cognitive performance of mice in Morris water maze, and plaque load by immunofluorescence analysis. Immunofluorescence analysis was based on measuring the quantity of plaques in mouse brain slices. Our results show that infrared therapy is able to improve cognitive performance in the mouse model. It might provide a novel and safe way to treat Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Light water reactor safety

    CERN Document Server

    Pershagen, B

    2013-01-01

    This book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of light water reactors, combining a historical approach with an up-to-date account of the safety, technology and operating experience of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The introductory chapters set out the basic facts upon which the safety of light water reactors depend. The central section is devoted to the methods and results of safety analysis. The accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl are reviewed and their implications for light wate

  5. Treating PCB contaminated light ballasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, B.

    1995-01-01

    Development and salient features of CON TECH PCB, a light ballast reduction process to allow PCB waste owners to best utilize storage space for the long-term regulated storage of PCBs, or to prepare them for final destruction and to reduce destruction costs, was reviewed. The essence of the process is ballast splitting, i.e. the breaking of the ballast and removing the capacitor containing the toxic PCBs. The work is done in a specially fitted mobile processing unit, thus reducing the storage requirements by better than 50 per cent. Details of the process and some cost and storage facility estimates were provided

  6. Light water lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1962-01-01

    The panel was attended by prominent physicists from most of the well-known laboratories in the field of light-water lattices, who exchanged the latest information on the status of work in their countries and discussed both the theoretical and the experimental aspects of the subjects. The supporting papers covered most problems, including criticality, resonance absorption, thermal utilization, spectrum calculations and the physics of plutonium bearing systems. Refs, figs and tabs

  7. Light water detritiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorchenko, O.A.; Aleksee, I.A.; Bondarenko, S.D.; Vasyanina, T.V. [B.P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute of National Research Centre ' Kurchatov Institute' , Gatchina (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    Hundreds of thousands of tons of tritiated light water have been accumulating from the enterprises of nuclear fuel cycles around the world. The Dual-Temperature Water-Hydrogen (DTWH) process looks like the only practical alternative to Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange (CECE). In DTWH power-consuming lower reflux device (electrolytic cell) is replaced by a so-called 'hot tower' (LPCE column operating at conditions which ensure relatively small value of elementary separation factor α(hot)). In the upper, cold tower, the tritium transfers from hydrogen to water while in the lower, hot tower - in the opposite direction - from water to hydrogen. The DTWH process is much more complicated compared to CECE; it must be thoroughly computed and strictly controlled by an automatic control system. The use of a simulation code for DTWH is absolutely important. The simulation code EVIO-5 deals with 3 flows inside a column (hydrogen gas, water vapour and liquid water) and 2 simultaneous isotope exchange sub-processes (counter-current phase exchange and co-current catalytic exchange). EVIO-5 takes into account the strong dependence of process performance on given conditions (temperature and pressure). It calculates steady-state isotope concentration profiles considering a full set of reversible exchange reactions between different isotope modifications of water and hydrogen (12 molecular species). So the code can be used for simulation of LPCE column operation for detritiation of hydrogen and water feed, which contains H and D not only at low concentrations but above 10 at.% also. EVIO-5 code is used to model a Tritium Removal Facility with a throughput capacity of about 400 m{sup 3}/day. Simulation results show that a huge amount of wet-proofed catalyst is required (about 6000 m{sup 3}), mainly (90%) in the first stage. One reason for these large expenses (apart from a big scale of the problem itself) is the relatively high tritium separation factor in the

  8. Light water detritiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorchenko, O.A.; Aleksee, I.A.; Bondarenko, S.D.; Vasyanina, T.V.

    2015-01-01

    Hundreds of thousands of tons of tritiated light water have been accumulating from the enterprises of nuclear fuel cycles around the world. The Dual-Temperature Water-Hydrogen (DTWH) process looks like the only practical alternative to Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange (CECE). In DTWH power-consuming lower reflux device (electrolytic cell) is replaced by a so-called 'hot tower' (LPCE column operating at conditions which ensure relatively small value of elementary separation factor α(hot)). In the upper, cold tower, the tritium transfers from hydrogen to water while in the lower, hot tower - in the opposite direction - from water to hydrogen. The DTWH process is much more complicated compared to CECE; it must be thoroughly computed and strictly controlled by an automatic control system. The use of a simulation code for DTWH is absolutely important. The simulation code EVIO-5 deals with 3 flows inside a column (hydrogen gas, water vapour and liquid water) and 2 simultaneous isotope exchange sub-processes (counter-current phase exchange and co-current catalytic exchange). EVIO-5 takes into account the strong dependence of process performance on given conditions (temperature and pressure). It calculates steady-state isotope concentration profiles considering a full set of reversible exchange reactions between different isotope modifications of water and hydrogen (12 molecular species). So the code can be used for simulation of LPCE column operation for detritiation of hydrogen and water feed, which contains H and D not only at low concentrations but above 10 at.% also. EVIO-5 code is used to model a Tritium Removal Facility with a throughput capacity of about 400 m 3 /day. Simulation results show that a huge amount of wet-proofed catalyst is required (about 6000 m 3 ), mainly (90%) in the first stage. One reason for these large expenses (apart from a big scale of the problem itself) is the relatively high tritium separation factor in the hot tower

  9. Method of treating waste water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deininger, J. Paul; Chatfield, Linda K.

    1991-01-01

    A process of treating water to remove transuranic elements contained therein by adjusting the pH of a transuranic element-containing water source to within the range of about 6.5 to about 14.0, admixing the water source with an alkali or alkaline earth ferrate in an amount sufficient to form a precipitate within the water source, the amount of ferrate effective to reduce the transuranic element concentration in the water source, permitting the precipitate in the admixture to separate and thereby yield a supernatant liquid having a reduced transuranic element concentration, and separating the supernatant liquid having the reduced transuranic element concentration from the admixture is provided. Additionally, a water soluble salt, e.g., a zirconium salt, can be added with the alkali or alkaline earth ferrate in the process to provide greater removal efficiencies. A composition of matter including an alkali or alkaline earth ferrate and a water soluble salt, e.g., a zirconium salt, is also provided.

  10. Treating water-reactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lussiez, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Some compounds and elements, such as lithium hydride, magnesium, sodium, and calcium react violently with water to generate much heat and produce hydrogen. The hydrogen can ignite or even form an explosive mixture with air. Other metals may react rapidly only if they are finely divided. Some of the waste produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory includes these metals that are contaminated with radioactivity. By far the greatest volume of water-reactive waste is lithium hydride contaminated with depleted uranium. Reactivity of the water-reactive wastes is neutralized with an atmosphere of humid nitrogen, which prevents the formation of an explosive mixture of hydrogen and air. When we adjust the temperature of the nitrogen and the humidifier, the nitrogen can be more or less humid, and the rate of reaction can be adjusted and controlled. Los Alamos has investigated the rates of reaction of lithium hydride as a function of the temperature and humidity, and, as anticipated, they in with in temperature and humidity. Los Alamos will investigate other variables. For example, the nitrogen flow will be optimized to conserve nitrogen and yet keep the reaction rates high. Reaction rates will be determined for various forms of lithium waste, from small chips to powder. Bench work will lead to the design of a skid-mounted process for treating wastes. Other water-reactive wastes will also be investigated

  11. Next generation light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omoto, Akira

    1992-01-01

    In the countries where the new order of nuclear reactors has ceased, the development of the light water reactors of new type has been discussed, aiming at the revival of nuclear power. Also in Japan, since it is expected that light water reactors continue to be the main power reactor for long period, the technology of light water reactors of next generation has been discussed. For the development of nuclear power, extremely long lead time is required. The light water reactors of next generation now in consideration will continue to be operated till the middle of the next century, therefore, they must take in advance sufficiently the needs of the age. The improvement of the way men and the facilities should be, the simple design, the flexibility to the trend of fuel cycle and so on are required for the light water reactors of next generation. The trend of the development of next generation light water reactors is discussed. The construction of an ABWR was started in September, 1991, as No. 6 plant in Kashiwazaki Kariwa Power Station. (K.I.)

  12. Advanced light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golay, M.W.; Todreas, N.E.

    1990-01-01

    Environmental concerns, economics and the earth's finite store of fossil fuels argue for a resuscitation of nuclear power. The authors think improved light-water reactors incorporating passive safety features can be both safe and profitable, but only if attention is paid to economics, effective management and rigorous training methods. The experience of nearly four decades has winnowed out designs for four basic types of reactor: the heavy-water reactor (HWR), the gas-cooled rector (GCR), the liquid-metal-cooled reactor (LMR) and the light-water reactor (LWR). Each design is briefly described before the paper discusses the passive safety features of the AP-600 rector, so-called because it employs an advanced pressurized water design and generates 600 MW of power

  13. Light-water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drevon, G.

    1983-01-01

    This work gives basic information on light-water reactors which is advanced enough for the reader to become familiar with the essential objectives and aspects of their design, their operation and their insertion in the industrial, economic and human environment. In view of the capital role of electric energy in the modern economy a significant place is given to electron-nuclear power stations, particularly those of the type adopted for the French programme. The work includes sixteen chapters. The first chapter relates the history and presents the various applications of light water reactors. The second refers to the general elementary knowledge of reactor physics. The third chapter deals with the high power light-water nuclear power station and thereby introduces the ensuing chapters which, up to and including chapter 13, are devoted to the components and the various aspects of the operation of power stations, in particular safety and the relationship with the environment. Chapter 14 provides information on the reactors adapted to applications other than the generation of electricity on an industrial scale. Chapter 15 shows the extent of the industrial effort devoted to light-water reactors and chapter 16 indicates the paths along which the present work is preparing the future of these reactors. The various chapters have been written to allow for separate consultation. An index of the main technical terms and a bibliography complete the work [fr

  14. Effect of water treated and urea treated neem ( Azadirachta indica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In a study to evaluate the carcass haematological and biochemical characteristics of broiler birds fed graded levels of water and urea-treated neem kernel cake (NKC), 300 day-old broilers (Cobb, 500) were randomly assigned to five dietary treatments for 56 days. Water and feed were fed adlibitum. The diets were ...

  15. Neutron thermalization in light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbate, M.J.; Lolich, J.V.

    1975-05-01

    Investigations related to neutron thermalization in light water have been made. Neutron spectra under quasi-infinite-medium conditions have been measured by the time-of-flight technique and calculations were performed with different codes. Through the use of improved experimental techniques and the best known calculational techniques available, the known discrepancies between experimentals and theoretical values were below from 40% to 16%. The present disagreement is believed to be due the scattering model used (ENDF-GASKET, based on the modified Haywood II frequency spectra), that shows to be very satisfactory for poisoned light water cases. Moreover, previous experiments were completed and differential, integral and pulse-source experimental techniques were improved. Also a second step of a neutron and reactor calculation system was completed. (author)

  16. LIGHT WATER MODERATED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, R.F.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1957-09-17

    A uranium fuel reactor designed to utilize light water as a moderator is described. The reactor core is in a tank at the bottom of a substantially cylindrical cross-section pit, the core being supported by an apertured grid member and comprised of hexagonal tubes each containing a pluralily of fuel rods held in a geometrical arrangement between end caps of the tubes. The end caps are apertured to permit passage of the coolant water through the tubes and the fuel elements are aluminum clad to prevent corrosion. The tubes are hexagonally arranged in the center of the tank providing an amulus between the core and tank wall which is filled with water to serve as a reflector. In use, the entire pit and tank are filled with water in which is circulated during operation by coming in at the bottom of the tank, passing upwardly through the grid member and fuel tubes and carried off near the top of the pit, thereby picking up the heat generated by the fuel elements during the fission thereof. With this particular design the light water coolant can also be used as the moderator when the uranium is enriched by fissionable isotope to an abundance of U/sup 235/ between 0.78% and 2%.

  17. Advanced light water reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giedraityte, Zivile

    2008-01-01

    For nuclear power to be competitive with the other methods of electrical power generation the economic performance should be significantly improved by increasing the time spent on line generating electricity relative to time spent off-line conducting maintenance and refueling. Maintenance includes planned actions (surveillances) and unplanned actions (corrective maintenance) to respond to component degradation or failure. A methodology is described which is used to resolve maintenance related operating cycle length barriers. Advanced light water nuclear power plant is designed with the purpose to maximize online generating time by increasing operating cycle length. (author)

  18. Determination of heavy water in heavy water - light water mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanhueza M, A.

    1986-01-01

    A description about experimental methodology to determine isotopic composition of heavy water - light water mixtures is presented. The employed methods are Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, for measuring heavy water concentrations from 0 to 100% with intervals of 10% approx., and mass Spectrometry, for measuring heavy water concentrations from 0.1 to 1% with intervals of 0.15% approx., by means of an indirect method of Dilution. (Author)

  19. Standards for heavy water concentration determinations in light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varlam, M.; Steflea, D.; Pavelescu, M.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents a method to prepare heavy water -light water standards within the range 144 ppm - 1%. A formula for computing standards concentration based on initial concentration of D 2 O and distilled water is given

  20. Light-water reactor research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-05-01

    This report on the national program of research and development on light water reactors is the second of two reports requested in 1982 by W. Kenneth Davis, Deputy Secretary of the Department of Energy. A first report, published in September 1983, treated the needs for safety-related R and D. In this second report, the Energy Research Advisory Board finds that, although many light water reactors are providing reliable and economic electricity, it appears unlikely that U.S. utilities will order additional reactors until the currently unacceptable economic risk, created by the regulatory climate and uncertain demand, is reduced. Thus it is unlikely that the private sector alone will fund major LWR design improvements. However, nuclear power will continue on its current course of expansion overseas. DOE participation is vitally needed to support the national interest in LWR technology. The report outlines R and D needs for a program to improve the safety, reliability, and economics of the present generation of plants; to develop evolutionary improved designs to be ready when needed; and to explore innovative longer-term concepts for deployment after the year 2000. The respective roles of government and the private sector are discussed

  1. High performance light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squarer, D.; Schulenberg, T.; Struwe, D.; Oka, Y.; Bittermann, D.; Aksan, N.; Maraczy, C.; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, R.; Souyri, A.; Dumaz, P.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the high performance light water reactor (HPLWR) project is to assess the merit and economic feasibility of a high efficiency LWR operating at thermodynamically supercritical regime. An efficiency of approximately 44% is expected. To accomplish this objective, a highly qualified team of European research institutes and industrial partners together with the University of Tokyo is assessing the major issues pertaining to a new reactor concept, under the co-sponsorship of the European Commission. The assessment has emphasized the recent advancement achieved in this area by Japan. Additionally, it accounts for advanced European reactor design requirements, recent improvements, practical design aspects, availability of plant components and the availability of high temperature materials. The final objective of this project is to reach a conclusion on the potential of the HPLWR to help sustain the nuclear option, by supplying competitively priced electricity, as well as to continue the nuclear competence in LWR technology. The following is a brief summary of the main project achievements:-A state-of-the-art review of supercritical water-cooled reactors has been performed for the HPLWR project.-Extensive studies have been performed in the last 10 years by the University of Tokyo. Therefore, a 'reference design', developed by the University of Tokyo, was selected in order to assess the available technological tools (i.e. computer codes, analyses, advanced materials, water chemistry, etc.). Design data and results of the analysis were supplied by the University of Tokyo. A benchmark problem, based on the 'reference design' was defined for neutronics calculations and several partners of the HPLWR project carried out independent analyses. The results of these analyses, which in addition help to 'calibrate' the codes, have guided the assessment of the core and the design of an improved HPLWR fuel assembly. Preliminary selection was made for the HPLWR scale

  2. Process and system for treating waste water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Douglas E.; Shuckrow, Alan J.

    1978-01-01

    A process of treating raw or primary waste water using a powdered, activated carbon/aerated biological treatment system is disclosed. Effluent turbidities less than 2 JTU (Jackson turbidity units), zero TOC (total organic carbon) and in the range of 10 mg/l COD (chemical oxygen demand) can be obtained. An influent stream of raw or primary waste water is contacted with an acidified, powdered, activated carbon/alum mixture. Lime is then added to the slurry to raise the pH to about 7.0. A polyelectrolyte flocculant is added to the slurry followed by a flocculation period -- then sedimentation and filtration. The separated solids (sludge) are aerated in a stabilization sludge basin and a portion thereof recycled to an aerated contact basin for mixing with the influent waste water stream prior to or after contact of the influent stream with the powdered, activated carbon/alum mixture.

  3. Treat mine water using passive methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinmann, R.L.P.; Hedin, R.S.

    1993-01-01

    Passive treatment represents an alternative to conventional chemical treatment of coal mine drainage. When successful, passive systems require less investment, less maintenance and usually are less expensive than conventional chemical treatment systems. As a result, during the last seven years, more than 500 passive systems have been constructed in the United States to treat coal mine drainage. Some exist as an alternative to conventional treatment; others serve as an inexpensive pretreatment step than can decrease subsequent chemical requirements. Sulfide minerals present in rock disturbed during mining can oxidize to form an acidic metal-laden solution, commonly known as acid mine drainage (AMD). Alkalinity present in the rock may partially or completely neutralize AMD, but if either acidity or excessive metal contaminants remain, the water must be treated before it can be discharged legally. The principal regulated contaminant metals of coal mine drainage are iron and manganese. Metal mine drainage often contains more toxic metals, such as cadmium, nickel, copper and zinc. Chemical treatment of AMD is estimated to cost America's mining industry more than $1 million a day. Three principal passive technologies are used in the treatment of coal mine drainage: Aerobic wetlands, wetlands constructed with an organic substrate and anoxic limestone drains (ALDS). The selection of the technology or combination of technologies to be used depends on the quality of the water being treated

  4. The Effects of Different Light Qualities on Gamma Ray-Treated Scenedesmus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adoracion Arañez

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available Unialgal culture of Scenedesmus quadricauda (Turp. Breb. suspended in distilled water was treated with 0 Gy (control, 40 Gy, 80 Gy, and 120 Gy gamma rays from a to 60Co source at Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, placed in one-liter flasks, enough Bold basal medium added to give a transmittance of 97% determined by using a spectrophotometer, kept in the dark for 24 hrs., then placed in vials and distributed equally in three growth chambers with white light, red light, and blue light. The lighting was continuous with algae subjected to the same light intensity, and the temperature maintained at 30±1° C. A sterile regimen was followed.For the first two weeks, the growth rates of algae under white light were highest, followed by those under red light, while those grown under blue light had the lowest growth rate. After the second week, differences in growth rates were not significant anymore. During the first week, generally low doses of gamma radiation had stimulating effects on growth rates while high doses had inhibitory effects on growth. The abnormal Scenedesmus observed were enlarged cells of normal shape in coenobia of two cells and four cells, enlarged cells that were not forming coenobia, coenobia composed of enlarged cells of abnormal shape, coenobia composed of enlarged cells of different sizes, cells with kidney-shape chloroplast, coenobia with cells that were not in alignment as in the normal ones, and cells that were colorless. Percentage of coenobia with enlarged cells determined one week after the treatment showed that higher doses generally produced more enlarged cells than lower doses. Treated algae grown in red light and blue light which showed lesser growth rates than those under white light had higher percentage of enlarged cells. Enlarged cells of normal shape were successfully propagated for more than ten generations.

  5. Supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Oka, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on the latest reactor concepts, single pass core and experimental findings in thermal hydraulics, materials, corrosion, and water chemistry. It highlights research on supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors (SCWRs), one of the Generation IV reactors that are studied around the world. This book includes cladding material development and experimental findings on heat transfer, corrosion and water chemistry. The work presented here will help readers to understand the fundamental elements of reactor design and analysis methods, thermal hydraulics, materials and water

  6. Advances in light water reactor technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Takehiko; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    ""Advances in Light Water Reactor Technologies"" focuses on the design and analysis of advanced nuclear power reactors. This volume provides readers with thorough descriptions of the general characteristics of various advanced light water reactors currently being developed worldwide. Safety, design, development and maintenance of these reactors is the main focus, with key technologies like full MOX core design, next-generation digital I&C systems and seismic design and evaluation described at length. This book is ideal for researchers and engineers working in nuclear power that are interested

  7. Process for treating waste water containing hydrazine from power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, W.

    1982-01-01

    A process for treating waste water containing hydrazine from nuclear power stations is proposed, characterized by the fact that the water is taken continuously through a water decomposition cell. If the water does not have sufficient conductivity itself, a substance raising the electrical conductivity is added to the water to be treated. The electrolysis is situated in the waste water tank. (orig./RB) [de

  8. Light energy dissipation under water stress conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuhlfauth, T.; Scheuermann, R.; Fock, H.P.

    1990-01-01

    Using 14 CO 2 gas exchange and metabolite analyses, stomatal as well as total internal CO 2 uptake and evolution were estimated. Pulse modulated fluorescence was measured during induction and steady state of photosynthesis. Leaf water potential of Digitalis lanata EHRH. plants decreased to -2.5 megapascals after withholding irrigation. By osmotic adjustment, leaves remained turgid and fully exposed to irradiance even at severe water stress. Due to the stress-induced reduction of stomatal conductance, the stomatal CO 2 exchange was drastically reduced, whereas the total CO 2 uptake and evolution were less affected. Stomatal closure induced an increase in the reassimilation of internally evolved CO 2 . This CO 2 -recycling consumes a significant amount of light energy in the form of ATP and reducing equivalents. As a consequence, the metabolic demand for light energy is only reduced by about 40%, whereas net photosynthesis is diminished by about 70% under severe stress conditions. By CO 2 recycling, carbon flux, enzymatic substrate turnover and consumption of light energy were maintained at high levels, which enabled the plant to recover rapidly after rewatering. In stressed D. lanata plants a variable fluorescence quenching mechanism, termed coefficient of actinic light quenching, was observed. Besides water conservation, light energy dissipation is essential and involves regulated metabolic variations

  9. Light energy dissipation under water stress conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuhlfauth, T.; Scheuermann, R.; Fock, H.P. (Universitaet Kaiserslautern (West Germany))

    1990-04-01

    Using {sup 14}CO{sub 2} gas exchange and metabolite analyses, stomatal as well as total internal CO{sub 2} uptake and evolution were estimated. Pulse modulated fluorescence was measured during induction and steady state of photosynthesis. Leaf water potential of Digitalis lanata EHRH. plants decreased to {minus}2.5 megapascals after withholding irrigation. By osmotic adjustment, leaves remained turgid and fully exposed to irradiance even at severe water stress. Due to the stress-induced reduction of stomatal conductance, the stomatal CO{sub 2} exchange was drastically reduced, whereas the total CO{sub 2} uptake and evolution were less affected. Stomatal closure induced an increase in the reassimilation of internally evolved CO{sub 2}. This CO{sub 2}-recycling consumes a significant amount of light energy in the form of ATP and reducing equivalents. As a consequence, the metabolic demand for light energy is only reduced by about 40%, whereas net photosynthesis is diminished by about 70% under severe stress conditions. By CO{sub 2} recycling, carbon flux, enzymatic substrate turnover and consumption of light energy were maintained at high levels, which enabled the plant to recover rapidly after rewatering. In stressed D. lanata plants a variable fluorescence quenching mechanism, termed coefficient of actinic light quenching, was observed. Besides water conservation, light energy dissipation is essential and involves regulated metabolic variations.

  10. Developmental Light-Water Reactor Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1989-12-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Developmental Light-Water Reactor (DLWR) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in FY 1989. It also includes (1) a brief description of the program, (2) definition of goals, (3) earlier achievements, and (4) proposed future activities

  11. Equations of state for light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, G.A.; Granziera, M.R.

    1983-01-01

    The equations of state for light water were developed, based on the tables of Keenan and Keyes. Equations are presented, describing the specific volume, internal energy, enthalpy and entropy of saturated steam, superheated vapor and subcooled liquid as a function of pressure and temperature. For each property, several equations are shown, with different precisions and different degress of complexity. (Author) [pt

  12. Light-water reactor accident classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washburn, B.W.

    1980-02-01

    The evolution of existing classifications and definitions of light-water reactor accidents is considered. Licensing practice and licensing trends are examined with respect to terms of art such as Class 8 and Class 9 accidents. Interim definitions, consistent with current licensing practice and the regulations, are proposed for these terms of art

  13. Facilitation of decommissioning light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, E.B. Jr.

    1979-12-01

    Information on design features, special equipment, and construction methods useful in the facilitation of decommissioning light water reactors is presented. A wide range of facilitation methods - from improved documentation to special decommissioning tools and techniques - is discussed. In addition, estimates of capital costs, cost savings, and radiation dose reduction associated with these facilitation methods are given

  14. Light water reactor safeguards system evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varnado, G.B.; Ericson, D.M. Jr.; Bennett, H.A.; Hulme, B.L.; Daniel, S.L.

    1978-01-01

    A methodology for assessing the effectiveness of safeguards systems was developed in this study and was applied to a typical light water reactor plant. The relative importance of detection systems, barriers, response forces and other safeguards system components was examined in extensive parameter variation studies. (author)

  15. Utility requirements for advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machiels, A.; Gray, S.; Mulford, T.; Rodwell, E.

    1996-01-01

    The nuclear energy industry is actively engaged in developing advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs for the next century. The new designs take advantage of the thousands of reactor-years of experience that have been accumulated by operating over 400 plants worldwide. The EPRI effort began in the early 1980's, when a survey of utility executives was conducted to determine their prerequisites for ordering nuclear power plants. The results were clear: new plants had to be simpler and safer, and have greater design margins, i.e., be more forgiving. The utility executives also supported making improvements to the established light water reactor technology, rather than trying to develop new reactor concepts. Finally, they wanted the option to build mid-size plants (∼600 MWe) in addition to full-size plants of more than 1200 MWe. 4 refs

  16. Materials technologies of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begley, R.

    1984-01-01

    Satisfactory materials performance is a key element in achieving reliable operation of light water reactors. Outstanding performance under rigorous operational conditions has been exhibited by pressure boundary components, core internals, fuel cladding, and other critical components of these systems. Corrosion and stress corrosion phenomena have, however, had an impact on plant availability, most notably relating to pipe cracking in BWR systems and steam generator corrosion in PWR systems. These experiences have stimulated extensive development activities by the nuclear industry in improved NDE techniques, investigation of corrosion phenomena, as well as improved materials and repair processes. This paper reviews key materials performance aspects of light water reactors with particular emphasis on the progress which has been made in modeling of corrosion phenomena, control of the plant operating environment, advanced material development, and application of sophisticated repair procedures. Implementation of this technology provides the basis for improved plant availability

  17. Advanced light water reactors for the nineties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, F.A.; Sugnet, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    The EPRI/Industry advanced light water reactor (ALWR) program and the US Department of Energy ALWR program are closely coordinated to meet the common objective which is the availability of improved and simplified light water reactor plants that may be ordered in the next decade to meet new or replacement capacity requirements. The EPRI/Industry objectives, program participants, and foreign participants, utility requirements document, its organization and content, small plant conceptual design program, the DOE ALWR program, design verification program, General Electric ABWR design features, Combustion Engineering system design, mid-size plant development, General Electric SBWR objectives, Westinghouse/Burns and Roe design objectives, construction improvement, and improved instrumentation and control are discussed in the paper

  18. Ionic behavior of treated water at a water purification plant

    OpenAIRE

    Yanagida, Kazumi; Kawahigashi, Tatsuo

    2012-01-01

    [Abstract] Water at each processing stage in a water purification plant was extracted and analyzed to investigate changes of water quality. Investigations of water at each processing stage at the water purification plant are discussed herein.

  19. Steam explosions in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The report deals with a postulated accident caused by molten fuel falling into the lower plenum of the containment of a reactor. The analysis which is presented in the report shows that the thermal energy released in the resulting steam explosion is not enough to destroy the pressure vessel or the containment. The report was prepared for the Swedish Governmental Committee on steam explosion in light water reactors. It includes statements issued by internationally well-known specialists. (G.B.)

  20. Light water reactor safety research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markoczy, G.; Aksan, S.N.; Behringer, K.; Prodan, M.; Stierli, F.; Ullrich, G.

    1980-07-01

    The research and development activities for the safety of Light Water Power Reactors carried out 1979 at the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research are described. Considerations concerning the necessity, objectives and size of the Safety Research Project are presented, followed by a detailed discussion of the activities in the five tasks of the program, covering fracture mechanics and nondestructive testing, thermal-hydraulics, reactor noise analysis and pressure vessel steel surveillance. (Auth.)

  1. The light water natural uranium reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radkowsky, A.

    A new type of light water seed blanket with the seed having 20% enrichment and the blanket a special combination of elements of natural uranium and thorium, relatively close packed, but sufficient spacing for heat transfer purpose is described. The blanket would deliver approximately half the total energy for about 10,000 MWDIT, so this type of core would be just as economical or better in uranium ore consumation as present cores. (author)

  2. Light-water reactor safety analysis codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.F.; Ransom, V.H.; Ybarrondo, L.J.; Liles, D.R.

    1980-01-01

    A brief review of the evolution of light-water reactor safety analysis codes is presented. Included is a summary comparison of the technical capabilities of major system codes. Three recent codes are described in more detail to serve as examples of currently used techniques. Example comparisons between calculated results using these codes and experimental data are given. Finally, a brief evaluation of current code capability and future development trends is presented

  3. Neutron disadvantage factors in heavy water and light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop-Jordanov, J.

    1966-01-01

    A number od heavy water and light water reactor cells are analyzed in this paper by applying analytical methods of neutron thermalization. Calculations done according to the one-group Amouyal-Benoist method are included in addition. Computer codes for ZUSE Z-23 computer were written by applying both methods. The obtained results of disadvantage factors are then compared to results obtained by one-group P 3 approximation and by multigroup K7-THERMOS code [sr

  4. New lineup of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, Kiyoshi; Oshima, Koichiro; Kitsukawa, Keisuke

    2007-01-01

    Toshiba is promoting technical studies for upcoming nuclear power plants based on its large accumulation of experience in boiling water reactor (BWR) design, manufacturing, construction, and maintenance. Our goal is to achieve higher reliability, lower life-cycle costs, and better competitiveness for nuclear power plants compared with other energy sources. In addition, we are developing a new light water reactor (LWR) lineup featuring the safest and most economical LWRs in the world as next-generation reactors almost at new construction and replacement in the Japanese and international markets expected to start from the 2020s. We are committed not only to developing BWRs with the world's highest performance but also to participating in the pressurized water reactor (PWR) market, taking advantage of the synergistic effect of both Toshiba's and Westinghouse's experience. (author)

  5. Penn State advanced light water reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borkowski, J.A.; Smith, K.A.; Edwards, R.M.; Robinson, G.E.; Schultz, M.A.; Klevans, E.H.

    1987-01-01

    The accident at Three Mile Island heightened concerns over the safety of nuclear power. In response to these concerns, a research group at the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) undertook the conceptual design of an advanced light water reactor (ALWR) under sponsorship of the US Dept. of Energy (DOE). The design builds on the literally hundreds of years worth of experience with light water reactor technology. The concept is a reconfigured pressurized water reactor (PWR) with the capability of being shut down to a safe condition simply by removing all ac power, both off-site and on-site. Using additional passively activated heat sinks and replacing the pressurizer with a pressurizing pump system, the concept essentially eliminates the concerns of core damage associated with a total station blackout. Evaluation of the Penn State ALWR concept has been conducted using the EPRI Modular Modeling System (MMS). Results show that a superior response to normal operating transients can be achieved in comparison to the response with a conventional PWR pressurizer. The DOE-sponsored Penn State ALWR concept has evolved into a significant reconfiguration of a PWR leading to enhanced safety characteristics. The reconfiguration has touched a number of areas in overall plant design including a shutdown turbine in the secondary system, additional passively activated heat sinks, a unique primary side pressurizing concept, a low pressure cleanup system, reactor building layout, and a low power density core design

  6. Is light water reactor technology sustainable?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothwell, G.; Van der Zwaan, B.

    2001-01-01

    This paper proposes criteria for determining ''intermediate sustainability'' over a 500-year horizon. We apply these criteria to Light Water Reactor (LWR) technology and the LWR industry. We conclude that LWR technology does not violate intermediate sustainability criteria for (1) environmental externalities, (2) worker and public health and safety, or (3) accidental radioactive release. However, it does not meet criteria to (1) efficiently use depleted uranium and (2) avoid uranium enrichment technologies that can lead to nuclear weapons proliferation. Finally, current and future global demand for LWR technology might be below the minimum needed to sustain the current global LWR industry. (author)

  7. Trends in light water reactor dosimetry programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahn, F.J.; Serpan, C.Z.; Fabry, A.; McElroy, W.N.; Grundl, J.A.; Debrue, J.

    1977-01-01

    Dosimetry programs and techniques play an essential role in the continued assurance of the safety and reliability of components of light water reactors. Primary concern focuses on the neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels and methods by which the integrity of a pressure vessel can be predicted and monitored throughout its service life. Research in these areas requires a closely coordinated program which integrates the elements of the calculational and material sciences, the development of advanced dosimetric techniques and the use of benchmarks and validation of these methods. The paper reviews the status of the various international efforts in the dosimetry area

  8. Light-water-reactor hydrogen manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camp, A.L.; Cummings, J.C.; Sherman, M.P.; Kupiec, C.F.; Healy, R.J.; Caplan, J.S.; Sandhop, J.R.; Saunders, J.H.

    1983-06-01

    A manual concerning the behavior of hydrogen in light water reactors has been prepared. Both normal operations and accident situations are addressed. Topics considered include hydrogen generation, transport and mixing, detection, and combustion, and mitigation. Basic physical and chemical phenomena are described, and plant-specific examples are provided where appropriate. A wide variety of readers, including operators, designers, and NRC staff, will find parts of this manual useful. Different sections are written at different levels, according to the most likely audience. The manual is not intended to provide specific plant procedures, but rather, to provide general guidance that may assist in the development of such procedures

  9. Development trends in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogelstroem, L.; Simon, M.

    1988-01-01

    The present market for new nuclear power plants is weak, but is expected to pick up again, which is why great efforts are being made to further develop the light water reactor line for future applications. There is both a potential and a need for further improvement, for instance with respect to even higher cost efficiency, a simplified operating permit procedure, shorter construction periods, and increased operational flexibility to meet rising demands in load following behavior and in better cycle data of fuel elements. However, also public acceptance must not be forgotten when deciding about the line to be followed in the development of LWR technology. (orig.) [de

  10. Is light water reactor technology sustainable?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothwell, G. [Stanford Univ., Dept. of Economics, CA (United States); Van der Zwaan, B. [Vrije Univ., Amsterdam, Inst. for Environmental Studies (Netherlands)

    2001-07-01

    This paper proposes criteria for determining ''intermediate sustainability'' over a 500-year horizon. We apply these criteria to Light Water Reactor (LWR) technology and the LWR industry. We conclude that LWR technology does not violate intermediate sustainability criteria for (1) environmental externalities, (2) worker and public health and safety, or (3) accidental radioactive release. However, it does not meet criteria to (1) efficiently use depleted uranium and (2) avoid uranium enrichment technologies that can lead to nuclear weapons proliferation. Finally, current and future global demand for LWR technology might be below the minimum needed to sustain the current global LWR industry. (author)

  11. Pre-treating water with non-thermal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young I.; Fridman, Alexander; Rabinovich, Alexander; Cho, Daniel J.

    2017-07-04

    The present invention consists of a method of pre-treatment of adulterated water for distillation, including adulterated water produced during hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") of shale rock during natural gas drilling. In particular, the invention is directed to a method of treating adulterated water, said adulterated water having an initial level of bicarbonate ion in a range of about 250 ppm to about 5000 ppm and an initial level of calcium ion in a range of about 500 ppm to about 50,000 ppm, said method comprising contacting the adulterated water with a non-thermal arc discharge plasma to produce plasma treated water having a level of bicarbonate ion of less than about 100 ppm. Optionally, the plasma treated water may be further distilled.

  12. Towards intrinsically safe light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannerz, K.

    1983-02-01

    The reactor-safety issue is one of the principal problems threatening the future of the nuclear option, at least in participatory democracies. It has contributed to widespread public distrust and is the direct cause of the escalation in design complexity and quality assurance requirements that are rapidly eroding the competitive advantage of nuclear power. Redesign of the light-water reactor can eliminate those features that leave it open to public distrust and obstructive intervention. This redesign appears feasible within the realm of proven technology in those fields (fuels, materials, water chemistry, waste technology, etc.) in which extended operating experience is essential for confidence in system performance. A pressurized water reactor outline design developed to achieve the above goal is presented. The key feature is the design of the primary system extracting heat from the core so that the latter is protected from damage caused by any credible system failure or any destructive intervention from the outside by either violent means (up to and including nonnuclear warfare) or by mistaken or malicious use of the plant control systems. Such a design objective can be achieved by placing the entire primary circulation system in a large pressurized pool of cold water with a high boric acid content. Enough water is provided in the pool to allow core-decay-heat removal by evaporation for at least one week following any incident with no cooling systems operating. Subsequently it is assumed that a supply of further water (a few cubic meters per hour) from the outside can be arranged, even without the presence of the plant operating personnel

  13. Environmentally assisted cracking in Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Chopra, O.K.; Ruther, W.E.; Kassner, T.F.; Michaud, W.F.; Park, J.Y.; Sanecki, J.E.; Shack, W.J.

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) during the six months from October 1992 to March 1993. Fatigue and EAC of piping, pressure vessels, and core components in LWRs are important concerns as extended reactor lifetimes are envisaged. Topics that have been investigated include (1) fatigue of low-alloy steel used in piping, steam generators, and reactor pressure vessels. (2) EAC of cast stainless steels (SSs), (3) radiation-induced segregation and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 SS after accumulation of relatively high fluence, and (4) EAC of low-alloy steels. Fatigue tests were conducted on medium-sulfur-content A106-Gr B piping and A533-Gr B pressure vessel steels in simulated PWR water and in air. Additional crack growth data were obtained on fracture-mechanics specimens of cast austenitic SSs in the as-received and thermally aged conditions and chromium-nickel-plated A533-Gr B steel in simulated boiling-water reactor (BWR) water at 289 degrees C. The data were compared with predictions based on crack growth correlations for ferritic steels in oxygenated water and correlations for wrought austenitic SS in oxygenated water developed at ANL and rates in air from Section XI of the ASME Code. Microchemical and microstructural changes in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes and a control-blade sheath from operating BWRs were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

  14. Lasers or light sources for treating port-wine stains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Annesofie; Olesen, Anne Braae; Leonardi-Bee, Jo

    2011-01-01

    Port-wine stains are birthmarks caused by malformations of blood vessels in the skin. Port-wine stains manifest themselves in infancy as a flat, red mark and do not regress spontaneously but may, if untreated, become darker and thicker in adult life. The profusion of various lasers and light...

  15. effects of magnetically treated water on germination and growth

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of magnetically treated water on the survival ... density used was 719 gauss (G) measured inside the pipe. ... of the meristem cells and chlorophyll were ..... Table 4 Tomato stem girth irrigated with magnetically and non–magnetically treated .... Electrical Separation, 7: 77-107.

  16. Radiation Protection at Light Water Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Prince, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This book is aimed at Health Physicists wishing to gain a better understanding of the principles and practices associated with a light water reactor (LWR) radiation protection program. The role of key program elements is presented in sufficient detail to assist practicing radiation protection professionals in improving and strengthening their current program. Details related to daily operation and discipline areas vital to maintaining an effective LWR radiation protection program are presented. Programmatic areas and functions important in preventing, responding to, and minimizing radiological incidents and the importance of performing effective incident evaluations and investigations are described. Elements that are integral in ensuring continuous program improvements are emphasized throughout the text.

  17. Light water reactor lower head failure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.; Thinnes, G.L.

    1993-10-01

    This document presents the results from a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored research program to investigate the mode and timing of vessel lower head failure. Major objectives of the analysis were to identify plausible failure mechanisms and to develop a method for determining which failure mode would occur first in different light water reactor designs and accident conditions. Failure mechanisms, such as tube ejection, tube rupture, global vessel failure, and localized vessel creep rupture, were studied. Newly developed models and existing models were applied to predict which failure mechanism would occur first in various severe accident scenarios. So that a broader range of conditions could be considered simultaneously, calculations relied heavily on models with closed-form or simplified numerical solution techniques. Finite element techniques-were employed for analytical model verification and examining more detailed phenomena. High-temperature creep and tensile data were obtained for predicting vessel and penetration structural response

  18. Controlling hydrogen behavior in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullingford, H.S.; Edeskuty, F.J.

    1981-01-01

    In the aftermath of the incident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2), a new and different treatment of the Light Water Reactor (LWR) risks is needed for public safety because of the specific events involving hydrogen generation, transport, and behavior following the core damage. Hydrogen behavior in closed environments such as the TMI-2 containment building is a complex phenomenon that is not fully understood. Hence, an engineering approach is presented for prevention of loss of life, equipment, and environment in case of a large hydrogen generation in an LWR. A six-level defense strategy is described that minimizes the possibility of ignition of released hydrogen gas and otherwise mitigates the consequences of hydrogen release. Guidance is given to reactor manufacturers, utility companies, regulatory agencies, and research organizations committed to reducing risk factors and insuring safety of life, equipment, and environment

  19. Light water reactor lower head failure analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.; Thinnes, G.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1993-10-01

    This document presents the results from a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored research program to investigate the mode and timing of vessel lower head failure. Major objectives of the analysis were to identify plausible failure mechanisms and to develop a method for determining which failure mode would occur first in different light water reactor designs and accident conditions. Failure mechanisms, such as tube ejection, tube rupture, global vessel failure, and localized vessel creep rupture, were studied. Newly developed models and existing models were applied to predict which failure mechanism would occur first in various severe accident scenarios. So that a broader range of conditions could be considered simultaneously, calculations relied heavily on models with closed-form or simplified numerical solution techniques. Finite element techniques-were employed for analytical model verification and examining more detailed phenomena. High-temperature creep and tensile data were obtained for predicting vessel and penetration structural response.

  20. High resolution conductometry for isotopic assay of deuterium in mixtures of heavy water and light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananthanarayanan, R.; Sahoo, P.; Murali, N.

    2014-01-01

    A PC based high resolution conductivity monitoring technique has been deployed for determination of isotopic purity of heavy water in samples containing heavy water and light water mixtures using pulsating sensor based conductivity monitoring instrument. The technique involves accurate determination of conductivities of a series of specially treated heavy water and light water mixtures of various compositions at a constant solution temperature. The shift in conductivity (Δκ), which is the difference between conductivities of composite mixture after and before the formation of a typical complex compound (boric acid–mannitol complex in this case), shows a smooth and reproducible decreasing trend with increase in percentage composition of heavy water. This relation, which is obtained by appropriate calibration, is used in the software program for direct display of isotopic purity of heavy water. The technique is examined for determination of percentage composition of heavy water in the entire range of concentration (0-100 %) with reasonable precision (relative standard deviation, RSD ≤1.5 %). About 1 mL of sample is required for each analysis and analysis is completed within a couple of minutes after pretreatment of sample. The accuracy in measurement is ≤1.75 %. (author)

  1. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gruber, E.E.

    1996-07-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from April 1995 to December 1995. Topics that have been investigated include fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steel used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, EAC of Alloy 600 and 690, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of Type 304 SS. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic steels in water that contained various concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during different portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Crack-growth-rate tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens from several heats of Alloys 600 and 690 in simulated LWR environments. Effects of fluoride-ion contamination on susceptibility to intergranular cracking of high- and commercial- purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-tensile tests at 288 degrees Centigrade. Microchemical changes in the specimens were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to determine whether trace impurity elements may contribute to IASCC of these materials

  2. Light water ultra-safe plant concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klevans, E.

    1989-01-01

    Since the accident at Three Mile Island (TMI), Penn State Nuclear Engineering Department Faculty and Staff have considered various methods to improve already safe reactor designs and public perception of the safety of Nuclear Power. During 1987 and 1988, the Department of Energy provided funds to the Nuclear Engineering Department at Penn State to investigate a plant reconfiguration originated by M.A. Schultz called ''The Light Water Ultra-Safe Plant Concept''. This report presents a final summary of the project with references to several masters' theses and addendum reports for further detail. The two year research effort included design verification with detailed computer simulation of: (a) normal operation characteristics of the unique pressurizing concept, (b) severe transients without loss of coolant, (c) combined primary and secondary system modeling, and (d) small break and large break loss of coolant accidents. Other studies included safety analysis, low power density core design, and control system design to greatly simplify the control room and required operator responses to plant upset conditions. The overall conclusion is that a reconfigured pressurized water reactor can achieve real and perceived safety improvements. Additionally, control system research to produce greatly simplified control rooms and operator requirements should be continued in future projects

  3. Fast reactor cooled by supercritical light water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiwatari, Yuki; Mukouhara, Tami; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Oka, Yoshiaki [Tokyo Univ., Nuclear Engineering Research Lab., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    This report introduces the result of a feasibility study of a fast reactor cooled by supercritical light water (SCFR) with once-through cooling system. It is characterized by (1) no need of steam separator, recirculation system, or steam generator, (2) 1/7 of core flow rate compared with BWR or PWR, (3) high temperature and high pressure permits small turbine and high efficiency exceeding 44%, (4) structure and operation of major components are already experienced by LWRs or thermal power plants. Modification such as reducing blanket fuels and increasing seed fuels are made to achieve highly economic utilization of Pu and high power (2 GWe). The following restrictions were satisfied. (1) Maximum linear heat rate 39 kW/m, (2) Maximum surface temperature of Inconel cladding 620degC, (3) Negative void reactivity coefficient, (4) Fast neutron irradiation rate at the inner surface of pressure vessel less than 2.0x10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}. Thus the high power density of 167 MW/m{sup 3} including blanket is thought to contributes economy. The high conversion is attained to be 0.99 Pu fission residual rate by the outer radius of fuel rod of 0.88 mm. The breeding of 1.034 by Pu fission residual rate can be achieved by using briquette (tube-in-shell) type fuel structure. (K. Tsuchihashi)

  4. Nuclear fuel for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etemad, A.

    1976-01-01

    The goal of the present speech is to point out some of the now-a-day existing problems related to the fuel cycle of light water reactors and to foresee their present and future solutions. Economical aspects of nuclear power generation have been considerably improving, partly through technological advancements and partly due to the enlargement of unit capacity. The fuel cycle, defined in the course of this talk, discusses the exploration, mining, ore concentration, purification, conversion, enrichment, manufacturing of fuel elements, their utilization in a reactor, their discharge and subsequent storage, reprocessing, and their re-use or disposal. Uranium market in the world and the general policy of several uranium owning countries are described. The western world requirement for uranium until the year 2000, uranium resources and the nuclear power programs in the United States, Australia, Canada, South Africa, France, India, Spain, and Argentina are discussed. The participation of Iran in a large uranium enrichment plant based on French diffusion technology is mentioned

  5. Hydrogen behavior in light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, M.; Cummings, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    The Three Mile Island accident resulted in the generation of an estimated 150 to 600 kg of hydrogen, some of which burned inside the containment building, causing a transient pressure rise of roughly 200 kPa (2 atm). With this accident as the immediate impetus and the improved safety of reactors as the long-term goal, the nuclear industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission initiated research programs to study hydrogen behavior and control during accidents at nuclear plants. Several fundamental questions and issues arise when the hydrogen problem for light-water-reactor plants is examined. These relate to four aspects of the problem: hydrogen production; hydrogen transport, release, and mixing; hydrogen combustion; and prevention or mitigation of hydrogen combustion. Although much has been accomplished, some unknowns and uncertainties still remain, for example, the rate of hydrogen production during a degraded-core or molten-core accident, the rate of hydrogen mixing, the effect of geometrical structures and scale on combustion, flame speeds, combustion completeness, and mitigation-scheme effectiveness. This article discusses the nature and extent of the hydrogen problem, the progress that has been made, and the important unresolved questions

  6. An alternative process to treat boiler feed water for reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirgis, Adel; Ghosh, Jyoti P; Achari, Gopal; Langford, Cooper H; Banerjee, Daliya

    2012-09-01

    A bench-scale process to treat boiler feed water for reuse in steam generation was developed. Industrial water samples from a steam-assisted gravity drainage plant in northern Alberta, Canada, were obtained and samples characterized. The technology, which consists of coagulation-settling to remove oil/grease and particulates followed by an advanced oxidative treatment, led to clean water samples with negligible organic carbon. Coagulation followed by settling removed most particulates and some insoluble organics. The advanced oxidative treatment removed any remaining color in the samples, decreased the organic content to near-zero, and provided water ready for reuse.

  7. Photoelectrochemical water splitting: optimizing interfaces and light absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, Sun-Young

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis several photoelectrochemical water splitting devices based on semiconductor materials were investigated. The aim was the design, characterization, and fabrication of solar-to-fuel devices which can absorb solar light and split water to produce hydrogen.

  8. Engineering Characteristics of Chemically Treated Water-Repellent Kaolin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngmin Choi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Water-repellent soils have a potential as alternative construction materials that will improve conventional geotechnical structures. In this study, the potential of chemically treated water-repellent kaolin clay as a landfill cover material is explored by examining its characteristics including hydraulic and mechanical properties. In order to provide water repellency to the kaolin clay, the surface of clay particle is modified with organosilanes in concentrations (CO ranging from 0.5% to 10% by weight. As the CO increases, the specific gravity of treated clay tends to decrease, whereas the total organic carbon content of the treated clay tends to increase. The soil-water contact angle increases with an increase in CO until CO = 2.5%, and then maintains an almost constant value (≈134.0°. Resistance to water infiltration is improved by organosilane treatment under low hydrostatic pressure. However, water infiltration resistance under high hydrostatic pressure is reduced or exacerbated to the level of untreated clay. The maximum compacted dry weight density decreases with increasing CO. As the CO increases, the small strain shear modulus increases, whereas the effect of organosilane treatment on the constrained modulus is minimal. The results indicate that water-repellent kaolin clay possesses excellent engineering characteristics for a landfill cover material.

  9. Engineering Characteristics of Chemically Treated Water-Repellent Kaolin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Youngmin; Choo, Hyunwook; Yun, Tae Sup; Lee, Changho; Lee, Woojin

    2016-01-01

    Water-repellent soils have a potential as alternative construction materials that will improve conventional geotechnical structures. In this study, the potential of chemically treated water-repellent kaolin clay as a landfill cover material is explored by examining its characteristics including hydraulic and mechanical properties. In order to provide water repellency to the kaolin clay, the surface of clay particle is modified with organosilanes in concentrations (CO) ranging from 0.5% to 10% by weight. As the CO increases, the specific gravity of treated clay tends to decrease, whereas the total organic carbon content of the treated clay tends to increase. The soil-water contact angle increases with an increase in CO until CO = 2.5%, and then maintains an almost constant value (≈134.0°). Resistance to water infiltration is improved by organosilane treatment under low hydrostatic pressure. However, water infiltration resistance under high hydrostatic pressure is reduced or exacerbated to the level of untreated clay. The maximum compacted dry weight density decreases with increasing CO. As the CO increases, the small strain shear modulus increases, whereas the effect of organosilane treatment on the constrained modulus is minimal. The results indicate that water-repellent kaolin clay possesses excellent engineering characteristics for a landfill cover material. PMID:28774098

  10. A strategy for improving pump and treat ground water remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, F.

    1992-07-01

    Established pump and treat ground water remediation has a reputation for being too expensive and time consuming, especially when cleanup standards are set at very low levels, e.g., 50 ft below ground surface) widespread ground water contamination. The perceived shortcomings of pump and treat result from the (1) tendency of most contaminants to sorb to formation materials, thus retarding contaminant removal; (2) geologic complexity, which requires detailed characterization for the design of optimal extraction systems within available resources; and (3) failure to apply dynamic well field management techniques. An alternative strategy for improving pump and treat ground water remediation consists of (1) detailed characterization of the geology, hydrology, and chemistry; (2) use of computer-aided data interpretation, data display, and decision support systems; (3) removal of sources, if possible; (4) initial design for plume containment and source remediation; (5) phased installation of the well field; (6) detailed monitoring of the remediation; (7) active ongoing re-evaluation of the operating well field, including redesign as appropriate (dynamic management); (8) re-injection of treated ground water to speed the flushing of contaminants; and (9) setting of appropriate cleanup levels or goals. Use of some or all of these techniques can dramatically reduce the time required to achieve cleanup goals and thus the cost of ground water remediation

  11. Development of light water reactors and subjects for hereafter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murao, Yoshio

    1995-01-01

    As for light water reactors, the structure is relatively simple, and the power plants of large capacity can be realized easily, therefore, they have been used for long period as main nuclear reactors. During that period, the accumulation of experiences on the design, manufacture, operation, maintenance and regulation of light water has become enormous, and in Japan, the social base for maintaining and developing light water reactor technologies has been prepared sufficiently. If the nuclear power generation using seawater uranium is considered, the utilization of uranium for light water reactor technologies can become the method of producing the own energy for Japan. As the factors that threaten the social base of light water reactor technologies, there are a the lowering of the desire to promote light water reactors, the effect of secular deterioration, the price rise of uranium resources, the effect of plutonium accumulation, the effect of the circumstances in developing countries and the sure recruiting of engineers. The construction and the principle of working of light water reactors and the development of light water reactors hereafter, for example, the improvement on small scale and the addition of new technology resulting in cost reduction and the lowering of the quality requirement for engineers, the improvement of core design, the countermeasures by design to serious accidents and others are described. (K.I.)

  12. Light scattering by particles in water theoretical and experimental foundations

    CERN Document Server

    Jonasz, Miroslaw

    2007-01-01

    Light scattering-based methods are used to characterize small particles suspended in water in a wide range of disciplines ranging from oceanography, through medicine, to industry. The scope and accuracy of these methods steadily increases with the progress in light scattering research. This book focuses on the theoretical and experimental foundations of the study and modeling of light scattering by particles in water and critically evaluates the key constraints of light scattering models. It begins with a brief review of the relevant theoretical fundamentals of the interaction of light with condensed matter, followed by an extended discussion of the basic optical properties of pure water and seawater and the physical principles that explain them. The book continues with a discussion of key optical features of the pure water/seawater and the most common components of natural waters. In order to clarify and put in focus some of the basic physical principles and most important features of the experimental data o...

  13. Near real-time analysis of tritium in treated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skibo, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-27

    The Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) is managing large quantities of treated water at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. Moving forward, TEPCO will be discharging from the site clean water that meets agreed criteria. As part of agreements with stakeholders, TEPCO is planning to carefully monitor the water prior to discharge to assure compliance. The objective of this proposal is to support implementation of an on-line “real-time” (continuous or semi-continuous) tritium monitor that will reliably measure levels down to the agreed target 1500 Becquerels per liter (Bq/L).

  14. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Accomplishments Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, Kathryn A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Welcome to the 2014 Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program Accomplishments Report, covering research and development highlights from 2014. The LWRS Program is a U.S. Department of Energy research and development program to inform and support the long-term operation of our nation’s commercial nuclear power plants. The research uses the unique facilities and capabilities at the Department of Energy national laboratories in collaboration with industry, academia, and international partners. Extending the operating lifetimes of current plants is essential to supporting our nation’s base load energy infrastructure, as well as reaching the Administration’s goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions to 80% below 1990 levels by the year 2050. The purpose of the LWRS Program is to provide technical results for plant owners to make informed decisions on long-term operation and subsequent license renewal, reducing the uncertainty, and therefore the risk, associated with those decisions. In January 2013, 104 nuclear power plants operated in 31 states. However, since then, five plants have been shut down (several due to economic reasons), with additional shutdowns under consideration. The LWRS Program aims to minimize the number of plants that are shut down, with R&D that supports long-term operation both directly (via data that is needed for subsequent license renewal), as well indirectly (with models and technology that provide economic benefits). The LWRS Program continues to work closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to ensure that the body of information needed to support SLR decisions and actions is available in a timely manner. This report covers selected highlights from the three research pathways in the LWRS Program: Materials Aging and Degradation, Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization, and Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies, as well as a look-ahead at planned activities for 2015. If you

  15. Polarization Patterns of Transmitted Celestial Light under Wavy Water Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanhua Zhou

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model to describe the polarization patterns of celestial light, which includes sunlight and skylight, when refracted by wavy water surfaces. The polarization patterns and intensity distribution of refracted light through the wave water surface were calculated. The model was validated by underwater experimental measurements. The experimental and theoretical values agree well qualitatively. This work provides a quantitative description of the repolarization and transmittance of celestial light transmitted through wave water surfaces. The effects of wind speed and incident sources on the underwater refraction polarization patterns are discussed. Scattering skylight dominates the polarization patterns while direct solar light is the dominant source of the intensity of the underwater light field. Wind speed has an influence on disturbing the patterns under water.

  16. Mechanical properties of wood from Pinus sylvestris L. treated with Light Organic Solvent Preservative and with waterborne Copper Azole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villasante, A.; Laina, R.; Rojas, J. A. M.; Rojas, I. M.; Vignote, S.

    2013-07-01

    Aim of study: To determine the effect on wood from Pinus sylvestris of treatment with preservatives on mechanical properties and to establish the relation between the penetration and compression strenght. Area of study: Spain. Material and methods: 40 samples of defect-free wood from Pinus sylvestris L. were treated with Light Organic Solvent Preservative (Vacsol Azure WR 2601) and 50 with waterborne Copper Azole (Tanalith E 3492). 40 control samples were not treated (water or preservative). Mechanical resistance to static bending, modulus of elasticity and compression strength parallel to the grain were compared with untreated wood. Regression analysis between the penetration and compression strength parallel was done with the samples treated with waterborne preservative. Main results: The results indicate that the treated wood (with either product) presents a statistically significant increase in mechanical resistance in all three mechanical characteristics. The results obtained differ from earlier studies carried out by other authors. There was no correlation between parallel compression strength and the degree of impregnation of the wood with waterborne Copper Azole. The most probable explanation for these results concerns changes in pressure during treatment. The use of untreated control samples instead of samples treated only with water is more likely to produce significant results in the mechanical resistance studies. Research highlights: Treated wood presents a statistically significant increase in MOE, modulus of rupture to static bending and parallel compression strength. There was no correlation between parallel compression strength and the degree of impregnation with waterborne preservative. (Author)

  17. Assessment of the Quality of Water Treated and Distributed By the Akwa Ibom State Water Company

    OpenAIRE

    N. O. Eddy; A. S. Ekop

    2007-01-01

    The quality of water treated and distributed by the Akwa Ibom Water Company has been assessed by analyzing samples of water collected from different distribution points for their physiochemical parameters, major ions, nutrients and bacteriological quality. The observed values were compared with standard values given by the World Health Organization for portable water. The quality of the analysed water is found fit for human consumption.

  18. Modeling Water Clarity and Light Quality in Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytoplankton is a primary producer of organic compounds, and it forms the base of the food chain in ocean waters. The concentration of phytoplankton in the water column controls water clarity and the amount and quality of light that penetrates through it. The availability of ade...

  19. Microbial pathogens in source and treated waters from drinking water treatment plants in the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    An occurrence survey was conducted on selected pathogens in source and treated drinking water collected from 25 drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs) in the United States. Water samples were analyzed for the protozoa Giardia and Cryptosporidium (EPA Method 1623); the fungi Asp...

  20. An integrated engineering solution in treating tailings pond water (TPW)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Z. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This presentation described the progress that has been made in the treatment of tailings pond water (TPW). Several treatment technologies were examined for their potential use. Any valid treatment methods must be technically practicable and economically feasible in treating TPW. An integrated TPW treatment process was proposed in this paper after reviewing recent published literature related to TPW treatment. The process was proposed based on knowledge and experience gained from municipal and other industrial water and wastewater treatment operations. This engineered treatment process consists of bioadsorption, bioflocculation, suspended sludge blanket filtration, clarification, ozonation, and coke assisted hybrid biodegradation. The proposed treatment process was aiming at environmental release and/or further reuse of the treated TPW. This proposed treatment process features the reuse of 2 waste materials in order to enhance the treatment efficiency, to increase financial feasibility, and to maximize environmental benefits of the treatment. tabs., figs.

  1. Comparison of Novel Carboneous Structures to Treat Nitroaromatic Impacted Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Perfluorinated Compounds from Groundwater using Granular Activated Carbon. University of Colorado. Li, L., Quinlivan, P. A, and Knappe, D. R. U. (2002...and Owens, G. (2009). "Kinetics and thermodynamics of sorption of nitroaromatic compounds to as-grown and oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes...used as adsorbents to treat water contaminated by a model nitroaromatic compound , 2,4- dinitrotoluene (DNT). The DNT adsorption capacity of pristine

  2. Process for treating waste water having low concentrations of metallic contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looney, Brian B; Millings, Margaret R; Nichols, Ralph L; Payne, William L

    2014-12-16

    A process for treating waste water having a low level of metallic contaminants by reducing the toxicity level of metallic contaminants to an acceptable level and subsequently discharging the treated waste water into the environment without removing the treated contaminants.

  3. Mechanical properties of wood from Pinus sylvestris L. treated with Light Organic Solvent Preservative and with waterborne Copper Azole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Villasante

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: To determine the effect on wood from Pinus sylvestris of treatment with preservatives on mechanical properties and to establish the relation between the penetration and compression strength.Area of study: SpainMaterial and Methods: 40 samples of defect-free wood from Pinus sylvestris L. were treated with Light Organic Solvent Preservative (Vacsol Azure WR 2601 and 50 with waterborne Copper Azole (Tanalith E 3492. 40 control samples were not treated (water or preservative. Mechanical resistance to static bending, modulus of elasticity and compression strength parallel to the grain were compared with untreated wood. Regression analysis between the penetration and compression strength parallel was done with the samples treated with waterborne preservative.Main results: The results indicate that the treated wood (with either product presents a statistically significant increase in mechanical resistance in all three mechanical characteristics. The results obtained differ from earlier studies carried out by other authors.There was no correlation between parallel compression strength and the degree of impregnation of the wood with waterborne Copper Azole . The most probable explanation for these results concerns changes in pressure during treatment.The use of untreated control samples instead of samples treated only with water is more likely to produce significant results in the mechanical resistance studies.Research highlights: Treated wood presents a statistically significant increase in MOE, modulus of rupture to static bending  and parallel compression strength.There was no correlation between parallel compression strength and the degree of impregnation with waterborne preservative.Keywords: Light Organic Solvent Preservative; MOE; parallel compression; static bending; waterborne Copper Azole; wood technology.

  4. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassner, T.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Chung, H.M.; Hicks, P.D.; Hins, A.G.; Park, J.Y.; Soppet, W.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1992-03-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking in high water reactors during the six months from April 1991 through September 1991. Topics that have been investigated during this period include (1) fatigue and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of low-alloy steel used in piping and in steam generator and reactor pressure vessels; (2) role of chromate and sulfate in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water on SCC of sensitized Type 304 SS; and (3) radiation-induced segregation (RIS) and irradiation-assisted SCC of Type 304 SS after accumulation of relatively high fluence. Fatigue data were obtained on medium-S-content A533-Gr B and A106-Gr B steels in high-purity (HP) deoxygenated water, in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) water, and in air. Crack-growth-rates (CGRs) of composite specimens of A533-Gr B/Inconel-182/Inconel-600 (plated with nickel) and homogeneous specimens of A533-Gr B were determined under small- amplitude cyclic loading in HP water with ∼ 300 ppb dissolved oxygen. CGR tests on sensitized Type 304 SS indicate that low chromate concentrations in BWR water (25--35 ppb) may actually have a beneficial effect on SCC if the sulfate concentration is below a critical level. Microchemical and microstructural changes in HP and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes used in two operating BWRs were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, and slow-strain,rate- tensile tests were conducts on tubular specimens in air and in simulated BWR water at 289 degrees C

  5. Disinfection of drinking water by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    It is no longer mandatory that a given residue of chlorine is present in drinking water and this has led to interest in the use of ultraviolet radiation for disinfection of water in large public waterworks. After a brief discussion of the effect of ultraviolet radiation related to wavelength, the most usual type of irradiation equipment is briefly described. Practioal considerations regarding the installation, such as attenuation of the radiation due to water quality and deposits are presented. The requirements as to dose and residence time are also discussed and finally it is pointed out that hydraulic imperfections can reduce the effectiveness drastically. (JIW)Ψ

  6. Modeling Water Clarity and Light Quality in Oceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Abdelrhman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton is a primary producer of organic compounds, and it forms the base of the food chain in ocean waters. The concentration of phytoplankton in the water column controls water clarity and the amount and quality of light that penetrates through it. The availability of adequate light intensity is a major factor in the health of algae and phytoplankton. There is a strong negative coupling between light intensity and phytoplankton concentration (e.g., through self-shading by the cells, which reduces available light and in return affects the growth rate of the cells. Proper modeling of this coupling is essential to understand primary productivity in the oceans. This paper provides the methodology to model light intensity in the water column, which can be included in relevant water quality models. The methodology implements relationships from bio-optical models, which use phytoplankton chlorophyll a (chl-a concentration as a surrogate for light attenuation, including absorption and scattering by other attenuators. The presented mathematical methodology estimates the reduction in light intensity due to absorption by pure seawater, chl-a pigment, non-algae particles (NAPs and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM, as well as backscattering by pure seawater, phytoplankton particles and NAPs. The methods presented facilitate the prediction of the effects of various environmental and management scenarios (e.g., global warming, altered precipitation patterns, greenhouse gases on the wellbeing of phytoplankton communities in the oceans as temperature-driven chl-a changes take place.

  7. The safety of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershagen, B.

    1986-04-01

    The book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The central part of the book is devoted to methods and results of safety analysis. Some significant events are described, notably the Three Mile Island accident. The book concludes with a chapter on the PIUS principle of inherent reactor safety as applied to the SECURE type of reactor developed in Sweden. (G.B.)

  8. Pustular Palmoplantar Psoriasis Successfully Treated with Nb-UVB Monochromatic Excimer Light: A Case-Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Gianfaldoni

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Barber’s palmoplantar pustulosis (PPP is a form of localised pustular psoriasis, affecting the palmar and plantar surfaces. It is a chronic disease, with a deep impact on the patients’ quality of life. The Authors discuss a case of Baber Psoriasis successfully treated with monochromatic excimer light.

  9. Amount of leachant and water absorption levels of wood treated with borates and water repellents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baysal, Ergun; Sonmez, Abdullah; Colak, Mehmet; Toker, Hilmi

    2006-12-01

    Wood protection efficacy of borates against biological agents, flame retardancy, and suitability to the environment is well known. Since borates can be applied to timber as water based solutions, they are preferred economically as well. Even though they are highly mobile in wood, boron compounds are widely used in timber preservation. Borates migrate in liquid and increase the hygroscopicity of wood in damp conditions. This study deals with the physical restriction of water access in wood by impregnating water repellent agents into wood to limit amount of leachant and water absorption levels of wood after boron treatment. Borates were incorporated with polyethylene glycol-400 (PEG-400) their bulking effect in wood was considered. Results indicated that the amount of leachates from wood treated with borates in PEG-400 was remarkably higher compared to those of wood treated with the aqueous solutions of borates. Water absorption (WA) levels of wood treated with aqueous solutions of borates were higher than those of their treated samples with the solutions in PEG-400. Secondary treatments of wood with the water repellent (WR) chemicals following borate impregnation reduced the leaching of chemicals from wood in water and also WA of the specimens were less than those of the wood treated with only borates from aqueous and PEG solutions. Styrene (St) was the most effective monomer among the other agents used in terms of immobility effect on borates and WA.

  10. Contaminants in light water reactor coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael, I.; Bechtold, G.

    1975-01-01

    At a lower oxygen content of the pressurized water a reduced metal loss by about 10% was detected. The state of oxidation for incoloy resulting from surface examination was 2,3 +- 0,3 which corresponds to Fe 3 O 4 and a smaller fraction of iron hydroxide. (orig.) [de

  11. Preliminary study of radioactive concentration in treated sewage water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elassaly, F M; Beal, A D.R. [Ministry of Health P.O. Box 1853 Dubai, (United Arab Emirates)

    1995-10-01

    Water from sewage treatment plant is used after processing for irrigation. Two water samples and one consolidated sludge (waste treatment products) were taken each day for period of months. Medical applications and research are the main sources of radioactivity such as Cr-51, Co-57, Ga-67, Se-75, Tc-99 m, In-111, Au-198 and Tl-201. Measurements were carried out using Hp Ge spectrometer with one liter Marinelli breaker. The maximum detected activity was 5.7 Bq.liter with a daily average of 2.4 Bq/liter for water. In the second period maximum activity was found to be 5 Bq/liter with an average daily activity 1.8 Bq/liter. The maximum activity recorded in the sludge during this period was 352 Bq/liter of which 343 Bq/liter was from I-131. The average daily activity was 162 Bq/liter. From these studies the levels of radioactivity concentration were 5 Bq/liter with an average 2 Bq/1 compared level 10 Bq/1 set for drinking water for Gcc countries. Although the sludge show higher activity of 353 Bq/liter it is kept for about year before being disposed. The maximum level for animal fodder is 300 Bq/kg for Gcc countries. These results indicate that radioactive concentration (2 Bq/liter) in the treated waste water present hazard to the public and environment. 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Light induced degradation of testosterone in waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vulliet, Emmanuelle, E-mail: e.vulliet@sca.cnrs.fr [Service Central d' Analyse du CNRS - USR59, Chemin du Canal, F-69360 Solaize (France); Falletta, Marine; Marote, Pedro [Laboratoire des Sciences Analytiques - UMR 5180, Universite Claude Bernard, 43 bd du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Lomberget, Thierry [Laboratoire de Chimie Therapeutique, Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Faculte de Pharmacie-ISPB, EA 4443 Biomolecules, Cancer et Chimioresistances, INSERM U863 Hormones steroides et proteines de liaison, IFR 62, 8 avenue Rockefeller, F-69373, Lyon Cedex 08 (France); Paisse, Jean-Olivier; Grenier-Loustalot, Marie-Florence [Service Central d' Analyse du CNRS - USR59, Chemin du Canal, F-69360 Solaize (France)

    2010-08-01

    The degradation of testosterone under simulated irradiations was studied in phosphate buffers and in natural waters at various excitation wavelengths. The quantum yield of photolysis was significantly lower at 313 nm (2.4 x 10{sup -3}) than at 254 nm (0.225). The formation of several photoproducts was observed, some of them being rapidly transformed in turn while others show higher stability towards subsequent irradiations. The nature of the main products was tentatively identified, both deduced from their spectral and spectrometric data and by comparison with synthesised standard compounds. Among the obtained photoproducts, the main one is possibly a spiro-compound, hydroxylated derivative of testosterone originating from the photohydratation of the enone group. The photodegradation pathway includes also photorearrangements. One of them leads to (1,5,10)-cyclopropyl-17{beta}-hydroxyandrostane-2-one. The pH of the water does not seem to affect the rate of phototransformation and the nature of the by-products.

  13. Passive systems for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adinolfi, R.; Noviello, L.

    1990-01-01

    The paper reviews the most original concepts that have been considered in Italy for the back-fitting of the nuclear power plants in order to reduce the probability and the importance of the release to the environment in case of a core melt. With reference either to BWR or PWR, passive concepts have been considered for back-fitting in the following areas: pump seals damage prevention and ECCS passive operation; reactor passive depressurization; molten reactor core passive cooling; metal containment passive water cooling through a water tank located at high level; containment isolation improvement through a sealing system; containment leaks control and limitation of environmental release. In addition some considerations will be made on the protection against external events introduced from the beginning on the PUN design either on building and equipment lay-out either on structure design. (author). 5 figs

  14. Why Do People Stop Treating Contaminated Drinking Water with Solar Water Disinfection (SODIS)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamas, Andrea; Mosler, Hans-Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Solar Water Disinfection (SODIS) is a simple method designed to treat microbiologically contaminated drinking water at household level. This article characterizes relapse behavior in comparison with continued SODIS use after a 7-month nonpromotion period. In addition, different subtypes among relapsers and continuers were assumed to diverge mainly…

  15. Biologically Pre-Treated Habitation Waste Water as a Sustainable Green Urine Pre-Treat Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, W. Andrew; Thompson, Bret; Sevanthi, Ritesh; Morse, Audra; Meyer, Caitlin; Callahan, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The ability to recover water from urine and flush water is a critical process to allow long term sustainable human habitation in space or bases on the moon or mars. Organic N present as urea or similar compounds can hydrolyze producing free ammonia. This reaction results in an increase in the pH converting ammonium to ammonia which is volatile and not removed by distillation. The increase in pH will also cause precipitation reactions to occur. In order to prevent this, urine on ISS is combined with a pretreat solution. While use of a pretreatment solution has been successful, there are numerous draw backs including: storage and use of highly hazardous solutions, limitations on water recovery (less than 85%), and production of brine with pore dewatering characteristics. We evaluated the use of biologically treated habitation wastewaters (ISS and early planetary base) to replace the current pretreat solution. We evaluated both amended and un-amended bioreactor effluent. For the amended effluent, we evaluated "green" pretreat chemicals including citric acid and citric acid amended with benzoic acid. We used a mock urine/air separator modeled after the urine collection assembly on ISS. The urine/air separator was challenged continually for >6 months. Depending on the test point, the separator was challenged daily with donated urine and flushed with amended or un-amended reactor effluent. We monitored the pH of the urine, flush solution and residual pH in the urine/air separator after each urine event. We also evaluated solids production and biological growth. Our results support the use of both un-amended and amended bioreactor effluent to maintain the operability of the urine /air separator. The ability to use bioreactor effluent could decrease consumable cost, reduce hazards associated with current pre-treat chemicals, allow other membrane based desalination processes to be utilized, and improve brine characteristics.

  16. A light-water detritiation project at Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boniface, H.A.; Castillo, I.; Everatt, A.E.; Ryland, D.K.

    2010-01-01

    The NRU reactor rod bays is a large, open pool of water that receives hundreds of fuel rods annually, each carrying a small amount of residual tritiated heavy water. The tritium concentration of the rod bays water has risen over the years, to a level that is of concern to the operations staff and to the environment. The proposed long-term solution is to reduce the rod bays tritium concentration by direct detritiation of the water. The Combined Electrolytic-Catalytic Exchange (CECE) process is well suited to the light-water detritiation problem. With a tritium-protium separation factor greater than five, a CECE detritiation process can easily achieve the eight orders of magnitude separation required to split a tritiated light-water feed into an essentially tritium-free effluent stream and a tritiated heavy water product suitable for recycling through a heavy water upgrader. This paper describes a CECE light-water detritiation process specifically designed to reduce the tritium concentration in the NRU rod bays to an acceptable level. The conceptual design of a 600 Mg/a detritiation process has been developed and is now at the stage of project review and the beginning of detailed design. (author)

  17. Towards intrinsically safe light-water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannerz, K

    1983-07-01

    Most of the present impediments to the rational use of the nuclear option have their roots in the reactor safety issue. The approach taken to satisfy the escalating safety concerns has resulted in excessively complex and expensive plant designs but has failed to create public confidence. This paper describes a new approach based on the principle of Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS). With the PIUS principle, ultimate safety is obtained by guaranteeing core integrity under all credible conditions. This is accomplished on the basis of the laws of gravity and thermohydraulics alone, interacting with the heat extraction process in an intact or damaged primary circuit, without recourse to engineered safety systems that may fail or dependence on error-prone human intervention. Application of the PIUS principle to the pressurized water reactor involves a substantial redesign of the reactor and primary system but builds on established PWR technology where long-term operation is needed for verification.

  18. Towards intrinsically safe light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannerz, K.

    1983-07-01

    Most of the present impediments to the rational use of the nuclear option have their roots in the reactor safety issue. The approach taken to satisfy the escalating safety concerns has resulted in excessively complex and expensive plant designs but has failed to create public confidence. This paper describes a new approach based on the principle of Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS). With the PIUS principle, ultimate safety is obtained by guaranteeing core integrity under all credible conditions. This is accomplished on the basis of the laws of gravity and thermohydraulics alone, interacting with the heat extraction process in an intact or damaged primary circuit, without recourse to engineered safety systems that may fail or dependence on error-prone human intervention. Application of the PIUS principle to the pressurized water reactor involves a substantial redesign of the reactor and primary system but builds on established PWR technology where long-term operation is needed for verification

  19. Corrosion problems in light water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    The corrosion problems encountered during the author's career are reviewed. Attention is given to the development of Zircaloys and attendant factors that affect corrosion; the caustic and chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic stainless steel steam generator tubing; the qualification of Inconel Alloy 600 for steam generator tubing and the subsequent corrosion problem of secondary side wastage, caustic SCC, pitting, intergranular attack, denting, and primary side SCC; and SCC in weld and furnace sensitized stainless steel piping and internals in boiling water reactor primary coolants. Also mentioned are corrosion of metallic uranium alloy fuels; corrosion of aluminum and niobium candidate fuel element claddings; crevice corrosion and seizing of stainless steel journal-sleeve combinations; SCC of precipitation hardened and martensitic stainless steels; low temperature SCC of welded austenitic stainless steels by chloride, fluoride, and sulfur oxy-anions; and corrosion problems experienced by condensers

  20. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.Y.; Ruther, W.E.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.

    1990-12-01

    Topics that have been investigated during this year include (1) SCC of A533-Gr B steel used in steam generator and reactor pressure vessels, (2) fatigue of Type 316NG SS, and (3) SCC of Type 347 and CF-3 cast duplex stainless steels in simulated BWR water. Crack-growth-rate (CGR) tests were performed on a composite A533-Gr B/Inconel-182 specimen in which the stress corrosion crack in the Inconel-182 weld metal penetrated and grew into the A533-Gr B steel. CGR tests were also conducted on conventional (unplated) and nickel- or gold-plated A533-Gr B specimens to provide insight into whether the nature of the surface layer on the low-alloy steel, either oxide corrosion products or a noble metal, influences the overall SCC process. CGR data on the A533-Gr B specimens were compared with the fatigue crack reference curves in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI, Appendix A. Fatigue tests were conducted on Type 316NG SS in air and simulated BWR water at low strain ranges and frequencies to better establish margins in the ASME Code Section III Fatigue Design Curves. CGR tests were also conducted on specimens of Type 347 SS with different heat-treatment conditions, and a specimen of CF-3 cast stainless steel with a ferrite content of 15.6%. The results were compared with previous data on another heat of Type 347 SS, which was very resistant to SCC, and a CF-3M steel with a ferrite content of 5%. 37 refs., 15 figs., 8 tabs

  1. [The possibility for using the phenomenon of polarized light interference in treating amblyopia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, V G; Vakurina, A E; Kashchenko, T P; Pargina, N M

    1996-01-01

    A new method for treating amblyopia is proposed, making use of the phenomenon of polarized light interference. It helps act simultaneously on the brightness, contrast frequency, and color sensitivity in response to patterns. The method was used in the treatment of 36 children. In group 1 (n = 20) it was combined with the traditional methods. Such treatment was more effective than in controls treated routinely. Group 2 consisted of 16 children in whom previous therapy was of no avail. Visual function was improved in 7 of them.

  2. Safety aspects of water chemistry in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    The goals of the water chemistry control programmes are to maximize operational safety and the availability and operating life of primary system components, to maximize fuel integrity, and to control radiation buildup. To achieve these goals an effective corporate policy should be developed and implemented. Essential management responsibilities are: Recognizing of the long-term benefits of avoiding or minimizing: a) system corrosion; b) fuel failure; and c) radiation buildup. The following control or diagnostic parameters are suitable performance indicators: for PWR primary coolant circuits: pH of reactor water (by operating temperature); Concentration of chlorides in reactor water; Hydrogen (or oxygen) in reactor water. For PWR secondary coolant circuits: pH in feedwater; Cation productivity in steam generator blowdown; Iron concentration in feedwater; Oxygen concentration in condensate. And BWR coolant circuits: Conductivity of reactor water; Concentration of chlorides in reactor water; Iron concentration in feedwater; Copper concentration in feedwater. The present document represents a review of the developments in some Member States on how to implement a reasonable water chemistry programme and how to assess its effectiveness through numerical indicators. 12 figs, 20 tabs

  3. Light and heavy water replacing system in reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Keiji.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to determine the strength of a reactor container while neglecting the outer atmospheric pressure upon evacuation, by evacuating the gap between the reactor container and a biological thermal shield, as well as the container simultaneously upon light water - heavy water replacement. Method: Upon replacing light water with heavy water by vacuum evaporation system in a nuclear reactor having a biological thermal shield surrounding the reactor container incorporating therein a reactor core by way of a heat expansion absorbing gap, the reactor container and the havy water recycling system, as well as the inside of heat expansion absorbing gap are evacuated simultaneously. This enables to neglect the outer atmospheric outer pressure upon evacuation in the determination of the container strength, and the thickness of the container can be decreased by so much as the external pressure neglected. (Moriyama, K.)

  4. Review of advanced methods for treating radioactive contaminated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubourg, M.

    2002-01-01

    The accidental release of large quantities of radionuclide after a nuclear accident tends to contaminate the groundwater system of rivers and lakes by the transfer of the main radionuclides such as Cesium 137, Strontium 90 or Cobalt 60, Ruthenium 106 and others (including transuranic radionuclides, such as: Pu 239, Pu 240, Am 241..). The aim of this paper is to review the possible solutions for the removal of these contaminants from large quantities of water. the use of crown ethers for the selective removal of strontium 90 such as the di-cyclohexyl 18 crown 6 which is able to remove with 90% of efficiency the strontium. the use of zeolites for the removal of Cesium 137. On larger scale the use of electromagnetic filtration technology is able to process in a relatively short time large quantities of water by using a seeding system of resin coated metallic magnetic particles to enhance the filtering efficiency under cold conditions. Examples of efficiencies and results obtained on loops at a fairly large will be given in this paper, theses examples show rather high efficiency of removal even at low concentration of contaminants (a few ppb: part per billion). Examples of water treatment concepts will be also given for treatment of contaminated surface water and to treat large groundwater applications. Major applications could be implemented on various sites namely in Russia (Karatchai lake) or in Belarus and Ukraine. The magnetic filtration is not a new concept but with the use of various selective adsorbing treatment particles, this concept has been proven so effective that dissolved metals in process water have been reduced to level in the very low ppb range. (authors)

  5. Neutron fluence determination for light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.

    1994-01-01

    A general description of limitations that exist in pressure vessel neutron fluence determinations for commercial light water reactors is presented. Complexity factors that arise in light water reactor pressure vessel neutron fluence calculations are identified and used to analyze calculational limitations. Two broad categories of calculational limitations are introduced, namely benchmark field limitations and deep penetration limitations. Explicit examples of limitations that can arise in each of these two broad categories are presented. These limitations are used to show that the recent draft regulatory guide for the determination of pressure vessel neutron fluence, developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is based upon procedures and assumptions that are not valid. To eliminate the complexity and limitations of calculational methods, it is recommended that the determination of light water reactor pressure vessel neutron fluence be based upon experiment. Recommendations for improved methods of pressure vessel surveillance neutron dosimetry are advanced

  6. Studying Intense Pulsed Light Method Along With Corticosteroid Injection in Treating Keloid Scars

    OpenAIRE

    Shamsi Meymandi, Simin; Rezazadeh, Azadeh; Ekhlasi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Results of various studies suggest that the hypertrophic and keloid scars are highly prevalent in the general population and are irritating both physically and mentally. Objective: Considering the variety of existing therapies, intense pulsed light (IPL) method along with corticosteroid injection was evaluated in treating these scars. Materials and Methods: 86 subjects were included in this clinical trial. Eight sessions of therapeutic intervention were done with IPL along with co...

  7. Ultraviolet light: sterile water without chlorine smell and taste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The use of chlorine and hypochlorite is necessary in larger waterworks, but it is a disadvantage in smaller plants, where overtreatment easily leads to smell and taste of chlorine in the water. Ultraviolet light with a wavelength of 2535 Angstrom gives 100% disinfection with a dose of 10 mWs/cm 2 for all known bacteria. In practice a dose of 40 mWs/cm 2 and an irradiation time of 15 minutes is desireable. A standard unit utilising six UV light tubes arranged concentrically around a quartz tube, through which the water flows, is described briefly. (JIW)

  8. Ultraviolet light: sterile water without chlorine smell and taste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-02-14

    The use of chlorine and hypochlorite is necessary in larger waterworks, but it is a disadvantage in smaller plants, where overtreatment easily leads to smell and taste of chlorine in the water. Ultraviolet light with a wavelength of 2535 Angstrom gives 100% disinfection with a dose of 10 mWs/cm/sup 2/ for all known bacteria. In practice a dose of 40 mWs/cm/sup 2/ and an irradiation time of 15 minutes is desireable. A standard unit utilising six UV light tubes arranged concentrically around a quartz tube, through which the water flows, is described briefly.

  9. Removal and recovery of tritium from light and heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.P.; Hammerli, M.

    1979-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing tritium from light water are described, comprising contacting tritiated feed water in a catalyst column in countercurrent flow with hydrogen gas originating from an electrolysis cell so as to enrich this feed water with tritium from the electrolytic hydrogen gas and passing the tritium enriched water to an electrolysis cell wherein the electrolytic hydrogen gas is generated and then fed upwards through the catalyst column or recovered as product. The tritium content of the hydrogen gas leaving the top of the enricher catalyst column is further reduced in a stripper column containing catalyst which transfers the tritium to a countercurrent flow of liquid water. Anodic oxygen and water vapour from the anode compartment may be fed to a drier and condensed electrolyte recycled with a slip stream or recovered as a further tritium product stream. A similar method involving heavy water is also described. (author)

  10. utilization of some agricultural wastes in treating water pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gad, H.M.H.H.

    2003-01-01

    Rice husks, a locally available agricultural by-product, were investigated with aim of producing good adsorbing materials suitable for remediating water pollution . Raw lignocellulose was treated through various procedures: simple carbonization to high temperature, pyrolysis under flowing steam at moderate temperatures and chemical activation with H 3 PO 4 followed by pyrolysis at moderate temperature . A partially deashed precursor was obtained by boiling in alkali solution, thereafter botanical residue was steam activated at a single temperature, and leachate acidified whereby silica was precipitated, many types of adsorbents were thus derived: chars, activated carbon and silica. the obtained various categories of sorbents were characterized by different techniques to asses their physico-chemical and adsorptive properties . this involved: ash content, thermogravimetry, FTIR, electron microscopy, N 2 gas adsorption at 77 k and adsorption capacity from solution using probe molecules

  11. Design features of the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) which improve fuel utilization in light water reactors (LWBR development program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecker, H.C.; Freeman, L.B.

    1981-08-01

    This report surveys reactor core design features of the Light Water Breeder Reactor which make possible improved fuel utilization in light water reactor systems and breeding with the uranium-thorium fuel cycle. The impact of developing the uranium-thorium fuel cycle on utilization of nuclear fuel resources is discussed. The specific core design features related to improved fuel utilization and breeding which have been implemented in the Shippingport LWBR core are presented. These design features include a seed-blanket module with movable fuel for reactivity control, radial and axial reflcetor regions, low hafnium Zircaloy for fuel element cladding and structurals, and a closely spaced fuel rod lattice. Also included is a discussion of several design modifications which could further improve fuel utilization in future light water reactor systems. These include further development of movable fuel control, use of Zircaloy fuel rod support grids, and fuel element design modifications

  12. Blood flow in transplantable bladder tumors treated with hematoporphyrin derivative and light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selman, S.H.; Kreimer-Birnbaum, M.; Klaunig, J.E.; Goldblatt, P.J.; Keck, R.W.; Britton, S.L.

    1984-01-01

    Following hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) photochemotherapy, blood flow to transplantable N-[4-(5-nitro-2-furyl)-2-thia-zolyl] formamide-induced urothelial tumors was determined by a radioactive microsphere technique using either 103 Ru or 141 Ce. Two tumors were implanted s.c. on the abdominal wall of Fischer 344 weanling rats. HPD (10 mg/kg body weight) was administered 24 hr prior to phototherapy (red light, greater than 590 nm; 360 J/sq cm). One of the two tumors was shielded from light exposure and served as an internal control. Blood flows were determined in control animals that received no treatment (Group 1), HPD only (Group 2), or light only (Group 3). In Groups 4 and 5, animals received the combination of HPD and light but differed in the time interval between treatment and blood flow determinations (10 min and 24 hr, respectively). Only blood flow to tumors treated with HPD and light showed a significant decrease (p less than 0.05) when compared with their internal controls both at 10 min (Group 4) and 24 hr (Group 5) after completion of phototherapy. These studies suggest that disruption of tumor blood flow may be an important mechanism of action of this method of cancer therapy

  13. Rheological Behaviour of Water-in-Light Crude Oil Emulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husin, H.; Taju Ariffin, T. S.; Yahya, E.

    2018-05-01

    Basically, emulsions consist of two immiscible liquids which have different density. In petroleum industry, emulsions are undesirable due to their various costly problems in term of transportation difficulties and production loss. A study of the rheological behaviour of light crude oil and its mixture from Terengganu were carried out using Antoon Paar MCR 301 rheometer operated at pressure of 2.5 bar at temperature C. Water in oil emulsions were prepared by mixing light crude oil with different water volume fractions (20%, 30% and 40%). The objectives of present paper are to study the rheological behaviour of emulsion as a fuction of shear rate and model analysis that fitted with the experimental data. The rheological models of Ostwald-De-Waele and Herschel-Bulkley were fitted to the experimental results. All models represented well the rheological data, with high values for the correlation coefficients. The result indicated that variation of water content influenced shear rate-shear stress rheogram of the prepared emulsions. In the case of 100% light crude oil, the study demonstrated non-Newtonian shear thickening behavior. However, for emulsion with different volume water ratios, the rheological behaviour could be well described by Herschel-Bulkley models due to the present of yield stress parameter (R2 = 0.99807). As a conclusion, rheological studies showed that volume water ratio have a great impact on the shear stress and viscosity of water in oil emulsion and it is important to understand these factors to avoid various costly problems.

  14. Burnable poison management in light water reactor lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buenemann, D; Mueller, A

    1970-07-01

    For a better reactivity control and power flattening as well as for an increase in dynamic stability the use of burnable poisons in light water reactors has been considered. The main goals for a burnable poison management and its technological realisation are discussed. The poison is assumed to be in the form of separate poison rods or homogeneous or inhomogeneous poisoning in the fuel rods. A new concept with a central poison rod within the fuel rod is discussed. The balance-equation for the needed concentration of burnable poisons for reactivity central as well as the problems of optimization of lumped poisons are treated in connection with the fuel lattice burnup. A first approximation for the design is found. For the calculation of the microburnup of lumped poison and fuel the special code NEUTRA has been developed. The burnup-equation can be chosen either in a simplified burnup-version with 2 pseudo fission products for each fissionable isotope or with an extended system of burnup equations to be used at sophisticated calculations. These burnup equations are coupled to S{sub N}-routines optionally for cylindrical or x-y-geometry for the proper calculation of the microscopic isotope density-, flux-, and power distributions. The theoretical predictions have been checked by means of special experiments so as to determine the accuracy of the computations. Even for a relatively long burnup of the fuel the predicted values are found to be within the experimental error in the case of lumped rods containing a cadmium-alloy or boron carbide. (auth)

  15. European community light water reactor safety research projects. Experimental issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Research programs on light water reactor safety currently carried out in the European Community are presented. They cover: accident conditions (LOCA, ECCS, core meltdown, external influences, etc...), fault and accident prevention and means of mitigation, normal operation conditions, on and off site implications and equipment under severe accident conditions, and miscellaneous subjects

  16. NEPTUNE: a modular system for light-water reactor calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, J.; Kanevoky, A.; Reuss, P.

    1975-01-01

    A complete modular system of light water reactor calculations has been designed. It includes basic nuclear data processing, the APOLLO phase: transport calculations for cells, multicells, fuel assemblies or reactors, the NEPTUNE phase: reactor calculations. A fuel management module, devoted to the automatic determination of the best shuffling strategy is included in NEPTUNE [fr

  17. Loose parts monitoring in light water reactor cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, A.; Alma, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    The work related to loose monitoring system for light water reactor, developed at GRS - Munique, are described. The basic problems due to the exact localization and detection of the loose part as well the research activities and development necessary aiming to obtain the best techniques in this field. (E.G.) [pt

  18. The manufacture of plutonium fuels for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebastard, G.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the agreement concluded between COGEMA and BELGONUCLEAIRE, reflected in the creation of the COMMOX group which has been made reponsible for promoting and marketing plutonium fuel rods for light water reactors. One then analyses the main aspects of manufacturing this type of fuel and the resources deployed. Finally one indicates the sales prospects scheduled to meet requirements (MELOX plant) [fr

  19. Safety of light water reactors. Risks of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veser, Anke; Schlueter, Franz-Hermann; Raskob, Wolfgang; Landman, Claudia; Paesler-Sauer, Juergen; Kessler, Guenter

    2012-01-01

    The book on the safety of light-water reactors includes the following chapters: Part I: Physical and technical safety concept of actual German and future European light-water reactors: (1) Worldwide operated nuclear power plants in 2011, (2) Some reactor physical fundamentals. (3) Nuclear power plants in Germany. (4) Radioactive exposure due to nuclear power plants. (5) Safety concept of light-water reactors. (6) Probabilistic analyses and risk studies. (7) Design of light-water reactors against external incidents. (8) Risk comparison of nuclear power plants and other energy systems. (9) Evaluation of risk studies using the improved (new) safety concept for LWR. (19) The severe reactor accidents of Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima. Part II: Safety of German LWR in case of a postulated aircraft impact. (11) Literature. (12) Review of requirements and actual design. (13) Incident scenarios. (14) Load approach for aircraft impact. (15) Demonstration of the structural behavior in case of aircraft impact. (16) Special considerations. (17) Evaluation of the safety state of German and foreign nuclear power plants. Part III: ROSOS as example for a computer-based decision making support system for the severe accident management. (19) Literature. (20) Radiological fundamentals, accident management, modeling of the radiological situation. (21) The decision making support system RODOS. (22) RODOS and the Fukushima accident. (23) Recent developments in the radiological emergency management in the European frame.

  20. Overview of environmental materials degradation in light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaaban, H.I.; Wu, P.

    1986-08-01

    This report provides a brief overview of analyses and conclusions reported in published literature regarding environmentally induced degradation of materials in operating light-water reactors. It is intended to provide a synopsis of subjects of concern rather than to address a licensing basis for any newly discovered problems related to reactor materials

  1. Tritium formation and elimination in light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolle, L.; Briec, M.; Miquel, P.

    1976-01-01

    Light-water reactors have a tritium balance which should be considered from both the working constraint and environmental pollution aspects. The formation of tritium in the primary circuit and in the fuel, the elimination and enrichment processes are considered [fr

  2. Design features to facilitate IAEA safeguards at light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasternak, T.; Glancy, J.; Goldman, L.; Swartz, J.

    1981-01-01

    Several studies have been performed recently to identify and analyze light water reactor (LWR) features that, if incorporated into the facility design, would facilitate the implementation of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards. This paper presents results and conclusions of these studies. 2 refs

  3. RETRAN sensitivity studies of light water reactor transients. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrell, N.S.; Gose, G.C.; Harrison, J.F.; Sawtelle, G.R.

    1977-06-01

    This report presents the results of sensitivity studies performed using the RETRAN/RELAP4 transient analysis code to identify critical parameters and models which influence light water reactor transient predictions. Various plant transients for both boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors are examined. These studies represent the first detailed evaluation of the RETRAN/RELAP4 transient code capability in predicting a variety of plant transient responses. The wide range of transients analyzed in conjunction with the parameter and modeling studies performed identify several sensitive areas as well as areas requiring future study and model development

  4. Hydrogen evolution from water using solid carbon and light energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, T; Sakata, T

    1979-11-15

    Hydrogen is produced from water vapour and solid carbon when mixed powders of TiO2, RuO2 and active carbon exposed to water vapor at room temperature, or up to 80 C, are illuminated. At 80 C, the rate of CO and COat2 formation increased. Therefore solar energy would be useful here as a combination of light energy and heat energy. Oxygen produced on the surface of the photocatalyst has a strong oxidising effect on the carbon. It is suggested that this process could be used for coal gasification and hydrogen production from water, accompanied by storage of solar energy.

  5. Microbial water quality of treated water and raw water sources in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microbial water quality is an essential aspect in the provision of potable water for domestic use. The provision of adequate amounts of safe water for domestic purposes has become difficult for most municipalities mandated to do so in Zimbabwe. Morton-Jaffray Treatment Plant supplies potable water to Harare City and ...

  6. Preparation of Heat Treated Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) Nanoparticles for Water Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araoyinbo, A. O.; Abdullah, M. M. A. B.; Rahmat, A.; Azmi, A. I.; Vizureanu, P.; Rahim, W. M. F. Wan Abd

    2018-06-01

    Photocatalysis using the semiconductor titanium dioxide (TiO2) has proven to be a successful technology for waste water purification. The photocatalytic treatment is an alternative method for the removal of soluble organic compounds in waste water. In this research, titanium dioxide nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method using titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) as a precursor. The sol was dried in the oven at 120°C after aging for 24 hours. The dried powder was then calcined at 400°C and 700°C with a heating rate of 10°C/min. The phase transformation of the heat treated titanium dioxide nanoparticles were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD, and the surface morphology by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The photocatalytic activity of the heat treated titanium dioxide nanoparticles in the degradation of methyl orange (MO) dye under ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation has been studied. At calcination temperature of 400°C, only anatase phase was observed, as the calcination temperature increases to 700°C, the rutile phase was present. The SEM images show the irregular shape of titanium dioxide particles and the agglomeration which tends to be more significant at calcined temperature of 700°C. Degradation of methyl orange by 5 mg heat treated titanium dioxide nanoparticles gives the highest percentage of degradation after irradiation by UV lamp for 4 hours.

  7. Nuclear calculation methods for light water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, D.

    1961-02-01

    This report is intended as an introductory review. After a brief discussion of problems encountered in the nuclear design of water moderated reactors a comprehensive scheme of calculations is described. This scheme is based largely on theoretical methods and computer codes developed in the U.S.A. but some previously unreported developments made in this country are also described. It is shown that the effective reproduction factor of simple water moderated lattices may be estimated to an accuracy of approximately 1%. Methods for treating water gap flux peaking and control absorbers are presented in some detail, together with a brief discussion of temperature coefficients, void coefficients and burn-up problems. (author)

  8. A process for treating radioactive water-reactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dziewinski, J.; Lussiez, G.; Munger, D.

    1995-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory and other locations in the complex of experimental and production facilities operated by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) have generated an appreciable quantity of hazardous and radioactive wastes. The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) enacted by the United States Congress in 1976 and subsequently amended in 1984, 1986, and 1988 requires that every hazardous waste must be rendered nonhazardous before disposal. Many of the wastes generated by the DOE complex are both hazardous and radioactive. These wastes, called mixed wastes, require applying appropriate regulations for radioactive waste disposal and the regulations under RCRA. Mixed wastes must be treated to remove the hazardous waste component before they are disposed as radioactive waste. This paper discusses the development of a treatment process for mixed wastes that exhibit the reactive hazardous characteristic. Specifically, these wastes react readily and violently with water. Wastes such as lithium hydride (LiH), sodium metal, and potassium metal are the primary wastes in this category

  9. Self-propagating solar light reduction of graphite oxide in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todorova, N.; Giannakopoulou, T.; Boukos, N.; Vermisoglou, E. [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, NCSR “Demokritos”, 153 41 Attikis (Greece); Lekakou, C. [Division of Mechanical, Medical, and Aerospace Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Trapalis, C., E-mail: c.trapalis@inn.demokritos.gr [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, NCSR “Demokritos”, 153 41 Attikis (Greece)

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Graphite oxide was partially reduced by solar light irradiation in water media. • No addition of catalysts nor reductive agent were used for the reduction. • Specific capacitance increased stepwise with increase of irradiation time. • Self-propagating reduction of graphene oxide by solar light is suggested. - Abstract: Graphite Oxide (GtO) is commonly used as an intermediate material for preparation of graphene in the form of reduced graphene oxide (rGO). Being a semiconductor with tunable band gap rGO is often coupled with various photocatalysts to enhance their visible light activity. The behavior of such rGO-based composites could be affected after prolonged exposure to solar light. In the present work, the alteration of the GtO properties under solar light irradiation is investigated. Water dispersions of GtO manufactured by oxidation of natural graphite via Hummers method were irradiated into solar light simulator for different periods of time without addition of catalysts or reductive agent. The FT-IR analysis of the treated dispersions revealed gradual reduction of the GtO with the increase of the irradiation time. The XRD, FT-IR and XPS analyses of the obtained solid materials confirmed the transition of GtO to rGO under solar light irradiation. The reduction of the GtO was also manifested by the CV measurements that revealed stepwise increase of the specific capacitance connected with the restoration of the sp{sup 2} domains. Photothermal self-propagating reduction of graphene oxide in aqueous media under solar light irradiation is suggested as a possible mechanism. The self-photoreduction of GtO utilizing solar light provides a green, sustainable route towards preparation of reduced graphene oxide. However, the instability of the GtO and partially reduced GO under irradiation should be considered when choosing the field of its application.

  10. In situ measurement of inelastic light scattering in natural waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chuanmin

    Variation in the shape of solar absorption (Fraunhofer) lines are used to study the inelastic scattering in natural waters. In addition, oxygen absorption lines near 689nm are used to study the solar stimulated chlorophyll fluorescence. The prototype Oceanic Fraunhofer Line Discriminator (OFLD) has been further developed and improved by using a well protected fiber optic - wire conductor cable and underwater electronic housing. A Monte-Carlo code and a simple code have been modified to simulate the Raman scattering, DOM fluorescence and chlorophyll fluorescence. A series of in situ measurements have been conducted in clear ocean waters in the Florida Straits, in the turbid waters of Florida Bay, and in the vicinity of a coral reef in the Dry Tortugas. By comparing the reduced data with the model simulation results, the Raman scattering coefficient, b r with an excitation wavelength at 488nm, has been verified to be 2.6 × 10-4m-1 (Marshall and Smith, 1990), as opposed to 14.4 × 10- 4m-1 (Slusher and Derr, 1975). The wavelength dependence of b r cannot be accurately determined from the data set as the reported values (λ m-4 to λ m- 5) have an insignificant effect in the natural underwater light field. Generally, in clear water, the percentage of inelastic scattered light in the total light field at /lambda 510nm. At low concentrations (a y(/lambda = 380nm) less than 0.1m-1), DOM fluorescence plays a small role in the inelastic light field. However, chlorophyll fluorescence is much stronger than Raman scattering at 685nm. In shallow waters where a sea bottom affects the ambient light field, inelastic light is negligible for the whole visible band. Since Raman scattering is now well characterized, the new OFLD can be used to measure the solar stimulated in situ fluorescence. As a result, the fluorescence signals of various bottom surfaces, from coral to macrophytes, have been measured and have been found to vary with time possibly due to nonphotochemical quenching

  11. Light water breeder reactor using a uranium-plutonium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radkowsky, A.; Chen, R.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a light water receptor (LWR) for breeding fissile material using a uranium-plutonium cycle. It comprises: a prebreeder section having plutonium fuel containing a Pu-241 component, the prebreeder section being operable to produce enriched plutonium having an increased Pu-241 component; and a breeder section for receiving the enriched plutonium from the prebreeder section, the breeder section being operable for breeding fissile material from the enriched plutonium fuel. This patent describes a method of operating a light water nuclear reactor (LWR) for breeding fissile material using a uranium-plutonium cycle. It comprises: operating the prebreeder to produce enriched plutonium fuel having an increased Pu-241 component; fueling a breeder section with the enriched plutonium fuel to breed the fissile material

  12. US Advanced Light Water Reactor Program; overall objective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klug, N.

    1989-01-01

    The overall objective of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) program is to perform coordinated programs of the nuclear industry and DOE to insure the availability of licensed, improved, and simplified light water reactor standard plant designs that may be ordered in the 1990's to help meet the US electrical power demand. The discussion includes plans to meet program objectives and the design certification program. DOE is currently supporting the development of conceptual designs, configurations, arrangements, construction methods/plans, and proof test key design features for the General Electric ASBWR and the Westinghouse AP600. Key features of each are summarized. Principal milestones related to licensing of large standard plants, simplified mid-size plant development, and plant lifetime improvement are noted

  13. Analysis of an accelerator-driven subcritical light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruijf, W.J.M. de; Wakker, P.H.; Wetering, T.F.H. van de; Verkooijen, A.H.M.

    1997-01-01

    An analysis of the basic characteristics of an accelerator-driven light water reactor has been made. The waste in the nuclear fuel cycle is considerably less than in the light water reactor open fuel cycle. This is mainly caused by the use of equilibrium nuclear fuel in the reactor. The accelerator enables the use of a fuel composition with infinite multiplication factor k ∞ < 1. The main problem of the use of this type of fuel is the strongly peaked flux distribution in the reactor core. A simple analytical model shows that a large core is needed with a high peak power factor in order to generate net electric energy. The fuel in the outer regions of the reactor core is used very poorly. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  14. Effects of temperature and salinity on light scattering by water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Hu, Lianbo

    2010-04-01

    A theoretical model on light scattering by water was developed from the thermodynamic principles and was used to evaluate the effects of temperature and salinity. The results agreed with the measurements by Morel within 1%. The scattering increases with salinity in a non-linear manner and the empirical linear model underestimate the scattering by seawater for S < 40 psu. Seawater also exhibits an 'anomalous' scattering behavior with a minimum occurring at 24.64 °C for pure water and this minimum increases with the salinity, reaching 27.49 °C at 40 psu.

  15. Uranium utilization of light water cooled reactors and fast breeders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stojadinovic, Timm

    1991-08-01

    The better uranium utilization of fast breeder reactors as compared with water cooled reactors is one argument in favour of the breeder introduction. This report tries to quantify this difference. It gives a generally valid formalism for the uranium utilization as a function of the fuel burnup, the conversion rate, fuel cycle losses and the fuel enrichment. On the basis of realistic assumptions, the ratio between the utilizations of breeder reactors to that of light water cooled reactors (LWR) amounts to 180 for the open LWR cycle and 100 in case of plutonium recycling in LWRs

  16. Coatings used in light-water nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The guide is intended to provide a common basis in the selection of test methods which may be required to evaluate and qualify protective coatings (paints) to be used in a light-water nuclear power plant. Standard test methods for the determination of fire resistance, chemical resistance, physical properties, effects of radiation, decontaminability, thermal conductivity, repairability, and for evaluation under accident conditions are included

  17. Natural uranium fueled light water moderated breeding hybrid power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.; Schneider, A.; Misolovin, A.; Gilai, D.; Levin, P.

    The feasibility of fission-fusion hybrid reactors based on breeding light water thermal fission systems is investigated. The emphasis is on fuel-self-sufficient (FSS) hybrid power reactors that are fueled with natural uranium. Other LWHRs considered include FSS-LWHRs that are fueled with spent fuel from LWRs, and LWHRs which are to supplement LWRs to provide a tandem LWR-LWHR power economy that is fuel-self-sufficient

  18. Controllability studies for an advanced CANDU boiling light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepp, R.M.; Hinds, H.W.

    1976-12-01

    Bulk controllability studies carried out as part of a conceptual design study of a 1200 MWe CANDU boiling-light-water reactor fuelled with U 235 - or Pu-enriched uranium oxide are outlined. The concept, the various models developed for its simulation on a hybrid computer and the perturbations used to test system controllability, are described. The results show that this concept will have better bulk controllability than similar CANDU-BLW reactors fuelled with natural uranium. (author)

  19. Nuclear Data Libraries for Hydrogen in Light Water Ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, L; Gillette, V.H

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear data libraries were produced for hydrogen (H) in light water ice at different temperatures, 20, 30, 50, 77, 112, 180, 230 K.These libraries were produced using the NJOY nuclear data processing system.With this code we produce pointwise cross sections and related quantities, in the ENDF format, and in the ACE format for MCNP.Experimental neutron spectra at such temperatures were compared with MCNP4B simulations, based on the locally produced libraries, leading to satisfactory results

  20. Core design concepts for high performance light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulenberg, T.; Starflinger, J.

    2007-01-01

    Light water reactors operated under supercritical pressure conditions have been selected as one of the promising future reactor concepts to be studied by the Generation IV International Forum. Whereas the steam cycle of such reactors can be derived from modern fossil fired power plants, the reactor itself, and in particular the reactor core, still need to be developed. Different core design concepts shall be described here to outline the strategy. A first option for near future applications is a pressurized water reactor with 380 .deg. C core exit temperature, having a closed primary loop and achieving 2% pts. higher net efficiency and 24% higher specific turbine power than latest pressurized water reactors. More efficiency and turbine power can be gained from core exit temperatures around 500 .deg. C, which require a multi step heat up process in the core with intermediate coolant mixing, achieving up to 44% net efficiency. The paper summarizes different core and assembly design approaches which have been studied recently for such High Performance Light Water Reactors

  1. Color Developing Capacity of Plasma-treated Water as a Source of Nitrite for Meat Curing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Samooel; Kim, Hyun Joo; Park, Sanghoo; Yong, Hae In; Choe, Jun Ho; Jeon, Hee-Joon; Choe, Wonho; Jo, Cheorun

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of plasma with liquid generates nitrogen species including nitrite (NO(-) 2). Therefore, the color developing capacity of plasma-treated water (PTW) as a nitrite source for meat curing was investigated in this study. PTW, which is generated by surface dielectric barrier discharge in air, and the increase of plasma treatment time resulted in increase of nitrite concentration in PTW. The PTW used in this study contains 46 ppm nitrite after plasma treatment for 30 min. To evaluate the effect of PTW on the cured meat color, meat batters were prepared under three different conditions (control, non-cured meat batter; PTW, meat batter cured with PTW; Sodium nitrite, meat batter cured with sodium nitrite). The meat batters were vacuum-packaged and cooked in a water-bath at 80℃ for 30 min. The typical color of cured meat developed in cooked meat batter treated with sodium nitrite or PTW. The lightness (L*) and yellowness (b*) values were similar in all conditions, whereas, the redness (a*) values of cooked meat batter with PTW and sodium nitrite (pnitrite source in the curing process of meat without addition of other nitrite sources.

  2. Dual-purpose light water reactor supplying heat for desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waplington, G.; Fichtner, H.

    1978-01-01

    The technical as well as the economic aspects of using a large commercial light water reactor for the production of both electricity and potable water have been examined. For the basis of the study, the multistage flash distillation process was selected, in conjunction with a reactor rated at not less than 2100 MW (thermal). Combined use of a condensing and a back-pressure turbine (the latter matched to distillation plant steam requirements) represents a convenient method for supplying process heat. Overall costs can be fairly allocated to the two products using the ''power credit'' method. A sample economic evaluation indicates highly favorable water costs as compared with more conventional distillation schemes based on fossil fuel

  3. Analysis of thermal fatigue events in light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuda, Yasunori [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Seika, Kyoto (Japan)

    2000-09-01

    Thermal fatigue events, which may cause shutdown of nuclear power stations by wall-through-crack of pipes of RCRB (Reactor Coolant Pressure Boundary), are reported by licensees in foreign countries as well as in Japan. In this paper, thermal fatigue events reported in anomalies reports of light water reactors inside and outside of Japan are investigated. As a result, it is clarified that the thermal fatigue events can be classified in seven patterns by their characteristics, and the trend of the occurrence of the events in PWRs (Pressurized Water Reactors) has stronger co-relation to operation hours than that in BWRs (Boiling Water Reactors). Also, it is concluded that precise identification of locations where thermal fatigue occurs and its monitoring are important to prevent the thermal fatigue events by aging or miss modification. (author)

  4. Critical heat flux experiments in a circular tube with heavy water and light water. (AWBA Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, C.L.; Beus, S.G.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments were performed to establish the critical heat flux (CHF) characteristics of heavy water and light water. Testing was performed with the up-flow of heavy and of light water within a 0.3744 inch inside diameter circular tube with 72.3 inches of heated length. Comparisons were made between heavy water and light water critical heat flux levels for the same local equilibrium quality at CHF, operating pressure, and nominal mass velocity. Results showed that heavy water CHF values were, on the average, 8 percent below the light water CHF values

  5. Determination of oestrogen hormones in raw and treated water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hormones in water samples have been classified as 'emerging pollutants' and may pose a potential risk for humans. Hormones can be found in both surface and ground water at low concentrations. These compounds enter water streams through wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) and may elicit endocrine disruption to ...

  6. Bacteriological and Physcio – Chemical Evaluation of Water Treated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacteriological and physico-chemical evaluation of water coagulated with Moringa oleifera seed powder preparations on Challawa river water intake station was conducted for a period of ... The implications of the results are discussed in relation to water sanitation and human health and some recommendations presented.

  7. chemical evaluation of water treated with seed powder of moringa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMIN

    2011-12-02

    Dec 2, 2011 ... The implications of the results are discussed in relation to water sanitation and human health and some recommendations presented. Keywords: Bacteriology, Challawa, Physico-chemistry, Seed, Water treatment. INTRODUCTION. About 1.3 billion people still lack safe drinking water and more than 6 ...

  8. Aging management of major light water reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Sinha, U.P.; Ware, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    Review of technical literature and field experience has identified stress corrosion cracking as one of the major degradation mechanisms for the major light water reactor components. Three of the stress corrosion cracking mechanisms of current concern are (a) primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in pressurized water reactors, and (b) intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and (c) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in boiling water reactors. Effective aging management of stress corrosion cracking mechanisms includes evaluation of interactions between design, materials, stressors, and environment; identification and ranking of susceptible sites; reliable inspection of any damage; assessment of damage rate; mitigation of damage; and repair and replacement using corrosion-resistant materials. Management of PWSCC includes use of lower operating temperatures, reduction in residual tensile stresses, development of reliable inspection techniques, and use of Alloy 690 as replacement material. Management of IGSCC of nozzle and attachment welds includes use of Alloy 82 as weld material, and potential use of hydrogen water chemistry. Management of IASCC also includes potential use of hydrogen water chemistry

  9. Treating bulimia with hypnosis and low-level light therapy: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laser, Eleanor; Sassack, Michael

    2012-03-01

    This case report describes an effort to control bulimia nervosa by combining low-level laser therapy (LLLT)-the application of red and near-infrared light to specific body points-and hypnosis. A 29-year old female with a 14-year history of bulimia received one session of LLLT combined with hypnosis. Two weeks later, following a measurable decrease in bulimic episodes (purging), a session of psychotherapy and hypnosis was administered. Six months post-treatment, the patient has experienced a complete cessation of purging activities without recurrence. LLLT, when used in conjunction with hypnosis and psychotherapy, was effective in managing bulimia and may prove useful in treating other eating disorders.

  10. Bacterial composition of natural water sources and consumer treated water in Guambía, Cauca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Mar Meza

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the world, 80% of the infectious and gastrointestinal parasi­te diseases are caused by the use and consume of non-drinka­ble water. The lack of hygiene and the miss functional sanitary techniques are some of the reasons why the diarrheic disease is still an important health problem in developing countries. The water and the contaminated food are considered as the principal vehicles involved in the transmission of bacterium, viruses and parasites; thus, the importance of knowing the mi­crobiological quality of the water of Guambia, indian territory of Cauca, Colombia, and sustain the risk of this insalubrious behavior. Methods: we collected samples of water from Caci­que River (one of the rivers of Guambian territory in different leves of its route; samples from Mamá Dominga Hospital and Las Delicias school treated water and they were analyzed in Angel laboratory S.A in Cali. Results: we found an elevated amount of aerobic mesofilous in all the samples, with >10.000 CFU (colony formed units/ 100ml, (reference parameter

  11. The case of inorganic hypersomnia treated with light therapy in the course of schizoaffective disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masiak Jolanta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available According to ICD 10, nonorganic hypersomnia is defined as “a condition of either excessive daytime sleepiness and sleep attacks (not accounted for by an inadequate amount of sleep or prolonged transition to the fully aroused state upon awakening. When no definite evidence of organic etiology can be found, this condition is usually associated with mental disorders”. The severe hypersomnia in the course of schizoaffective disorder is rather a rare phenomenon. The paper presents the case of 41-year-old female patient with severe hypersomnia during the course of the schizoaffective disorder. The course of hypersomnia was severe. The patient slept constantly day and night and was awoken by her family for about three-hour period of time. The duration of hypersomnia was about one year until the onset of treatment. The patient was successfully treated with light therapy that caused gradual resolution of the symptoms of hypersomnia. The patient is also treated as prior to the onset of hypersomnia with antipsychotics and the mood stabilizers for schizoaffective disorder. Since that time there were six-year-period of follow up when the patient was free of any symptoms of hypersomnia.

  12. ANALISIS PENGOLAHAN AIR TERPRODUKSI DI WATER TREATING PLANT PERUSAHAAN EKSPLOITASI MINYAK BUMI (STUDI KASUS: PT XYZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pertiwi Andaran

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The exploration and production process of oil and its supporting operations always generates waste as by-product. If they are uncontrolled, it might decrease the environmental quality. Thus, it is necessary to manage and treat the waste in order to meet the regulation standard of quality and quantity. PT XYZ is an energy company, particularly oil and gas production, which its production activity generate a large amount of waste as well as produced water. Thus, PT XYZ must have facilities or produced water handling plant which could minimize pollution caused by produced water. PT XYZ already has a system of produced water handling with recycling principle. After oil and water separation including water treating at Water Treating Plant (WTP, produced water will be used for steam injection. This is the part of enhanced oil recovery by steam flooding in Duri Field. Besides, produced water could be used as backwash water at WTP, that is Oil Removal Filter (ORF and Water Softener, which is called brine water. If the produced water and brine water is over load the capacity of oil enhanced recovery injection, it might be disposed through injection to Disposal Well and there are certain condition that produced water should be discharged into canal. The objective f this study is to analyze the performance of a water treating plant in PT XYZ. Water Treating Plant is a facility for treating produced water. Basically, WTP is on good condition and each unit has high efficiency for separating oil and water (60-99%. Horizontal velocity at pit #A of API Separator was larger than the design criteria. In addition, Water Softeners have efficiency until 99% for the hardness.

  13. Histological changes in kidneys of adult rats treated with Monosodium glutamate: A light microscopic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh BR, Ujwal Gajbe, Anil Kumar Reddy, Vandana Kumbhare

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Monosodium Glutamate (MSG, which is chemically known as AJI-NO-MOTO also familiar as MSG in routine life. MSG is always considered to be a controversial food additive used in the world. It is a natural excitatory neurotransmitter, helps in transmitting the fast synaptic signals in one third of CNS. Liver and kidney play a crucial role in metabolism as well as elimination of MSG from the body. Present study is to detect structural changes in adult rat kidney tissue treated with MSG; observations are done with a light microscope. Materials & Methods: The study was conducted in the department of Anatomy, J.N.M.C, Sawangi (M Wardha. Thirty (30 adult Wistar rats (2-3 months old weighing about (200 ± 20g were used in the current study, animals were divided into three groups (Group – A, B, C. Group A: Control, Group B: 3 mg /gm body weight, Group C: 6 mg /gm body weight, MSG were administered orally daily for 45 days along with the regular diet. Observations & Results: The Mean values of animals weight at the end of experiment (46th day respectively were 251.2 ± 13, 244.4 ± 19.9 and 320 ± 31.1. Early degenerative changes like, Glomerular shrinkage (GSr, loss of brush border in proximal convoluted tubules and Cloudy degeneration was observed in sections of kidney treated with 3 mg/gm body weight of MSG. Animals treated with 6 mg/gm body weight of MSG showed rare changes like interstitial chronic inflammatory infiltrate with vacuolation in some of the glomeruli, and much glomerular shrinkage invaginated by fatty lobules. Conclusion: The effects of MSG on kidney tissues of adult rats revealed that the revelatory changes are directly proportional to the doses of MSG.

  14. Possible Use of Treated Wastewater as Irrigation Water at Urban Green Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Bozdoğan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ever increasing demands for fresh water resources have brought the reuse of treated wastewater into agendas. Wastewater has year-long potential to be used as an irrigation water source. Therefore, treated wastewater is used as irrigation water over agricultural lands and urban landscapes, as process water in industrial applications, as back-up water in environmental applications in water resources and wetlands of dry regions. The present study was conducted to investigate the possible use of domestic wastewater treated through pilot-scale constructed wetland of Adana-Karaisalı with dominant Mediterranean climate in irrigation of marigold (Tagetes erecta, commonly used over urban landscapes. Experiments were carried out between the dates May-November 2008 for 7 months with fresh water and treated wastewater. Plant growth parameters (plant height, plant diameter, number of branches and flowering parameters (number of flowers, flower diameter, flower pedicle thickness were monitored in monthly basis. Results revealed positive impacts of treated wastewater irrigations on plant growth during the initial 5 months between May-September but negative impacts in October and November. Similarly, treated wastewater irrigations had positive impacts on flowering parameters during the initial 3 months but had negative impacts during the subsequent 4 months. Such a case indicated shortened visual efficiencies of marigold. Therefore, treated wastewater can be used as an alternative water resource in irrigation of annual flowers, but better results can be attained by mixing treated wastewater with fresh water at certain ratios.

  15. Hydrogen considerations in light-water power reactons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keilholtz, G.W.

    1976-02-01

    A critical review of the literature now available on hydrogen considerations in light-water power reactors (LWRs) and a bibliography of that literature are presented. The subject matter includes mechanisms for the generation of hydrogen-oxygen mixtures, a description of the fundamental properties of such mixtures, and their spontaneous ignition in both static and dynamic systems. The limits for hydrogen flammability and flame propagation are examined in terms of the effects of pressure, temperature, and additives; the emphasis is on the effects of steam and water vapor. The containment systems for pressurized-water reactors (PWRs) and boiling-water reactors (BWRs) are compared, and methods to control hydrogen and oxygen under the conditions of both normal operation and postulated accidents are reviewed. It is concluded that hydrogen can be controlled so that serious complications from the production of hydrogen will not occur. The bibliography contains abstracts from the computerized files of the Nuclear Safety Information Center. Key-word, author, and permuted-title indexes are provided. The bibliography includes responses to questions asked by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) which relate to hydrogen, as well as information on normal operations and postulated accidents including generation of hydrogen from core sprays. Other topics included in the ten sections of the bibliography are metal-water reactions, containment atmosphere, radiolytic gas, and recombiners

  16. Navigation by light polarization in clear and turbid waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Amit; Sabbah, Shai; Erlick, Carynelisa; Shashar, Nadav

    2011-01-01

    Certain terrestrial animals use sky polarization for navigation. Certain aquatic species have also been shown to orient according to a polarization stimulus, but the correlation between underwater polarization and Sun position and hence the ability to use underwater polarization as a compass for navigation is still under debate. To examine this issue, we use theoretical equations for per cent polarization and electric vector (e-vector) orientation that account for the position of the Sun, refraction at the air–water interface and Rayleigh single scattering. The polarization patterns predicted by these theoretical equations are compared with measurements conducted in clear and semi-turbid coastal sea waters at 2 m and 5 m depth over sea floors of 6 m and 28 m depth. We find that the per cent polarization is correlated with the Sun's elevation only in clear waters. We furthermore find that the maximum value of the e-vector orientation angle equals the angle of refraction only in clear waters, in the horizontal viewing direction, over the deeper sea floor. We conclude that navigation by use of underwater polarization is possible under restricted conditions, i.e. in clear waters, primarily near the horizontal viewing direction, and in locations where the sea floor has limited effects on the light's polarization. PMID:21282170

  17. Transmutation of waste actinides in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorrell, T.C.

    1979-04-01

    Actinide recycle and transmutation calculations were made for three irradiation options of a light water reactor (LWR). The cases considered were: all actinides recycled in regular uranium fuel assemblies; transuranic actinides recycled in separate MOX assemblies with 235 U enrichment of uranium; and transuranic actinides recycled in separate MOX assemblies with plutonium enrichment of natural uranium. When all actinides were recycled in a uniform lattice, the transuranic inventory after ten recycles was 38% of the inventory accumulated without recycle. When the transuranics from two regular uranium assemblies were combined with those recycled from a MOX assembly, the transuranic inventory was reduced 50% after five recycles

  18. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of light water reactor flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzanos, C.P.; Weber, D.P.

    1999-01-01

    Advances in computational fluid dynamics (CFD), turbulence simulation, and parallel computing have made feasible the development of three-dimensional (3-D) single-phase and two-phase flow CFD codes that can simulate fluid flow and heat transfer in realistic reactor geometries with significantly reduced reliance, especially in single phase, on empirical correlations. The objective of this work was to assess the predictive power and computational efficiency of a CFD code in the analysis of a challenging single-phase light water reactor problem, as well as to identify areas where further improvements are needed

  19. The industry/EPRI advanced light water reactor program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahlkopf, K.E.; Noble, D.M.; Sugnet, W.R.; Bilan, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    For the United States nuclear power industry to remain viable, it must be prepared to meet the expected need for new generating capacity in the late 1990s with an improved reactor system. The best hope of meeting this requirement is with evolutionary changes in current LWR systems through system simplification and reevaluation of safety and operational design margins. The grid characteristics and the difficulty in raising capital for large projects indicate that smaller light water reactors (400 to 600 MWe) may play an important role the next generation

  20. Major outage trends in light water reactors. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, E.T.

    1978-04-01

    The report is a summary of the major outages which occurred in light water reactor plants during the period January 1971 through June 1977. Only those outages greater than 100 hours duration (exclusive of refueling outages) are included in the report. The trends in outages related to various reactor systems and components are presented as a function of plant age, and alternatively, calendar year. The principal contributors to major outages are ranked by their effect on the overall outage time for PWRs and BWRs. In addition, the outage history of each operating nuclear plant greater than 150 MWe is presented, along with a brief summary of those outages greater than two months duration

  1. Spent fuel data base: commercial light water reactors. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauf, M.J.; Kniazewycz, B.G.

    1979-12-01

    As a consequence of this country's non-proliferation policy, the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel has been delayed indefinitely. This has resulted in spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel being considered as a potential waste form for disposal. Since the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is currently developing methodologies for use in the regulation of the management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes, a comprehensive data base describing LWR fuel technology must be compiled. This document provides that technology baseline and, as such, will support the development of those evaluation standards and criteria applicable to spent nuclear fuel.

  2. Light-water reactor pressure vessel surveillance standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The master matrix standard describes a series of standard practices, guides, and methods for the prediction of neutron-induced changes in light-water reactor (LWR) pressure vessel steels throughout a pressure vessel's service life. Some of these are existing American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards, some are ASTM standards that have been modified, and some are newly proposed ASTM standards. The current (1) scope, (2) areas of application, (3) interrelationships, and (4) status and time table of development, improvement, validation, and calibration for a series of 16 ASTM standards are defined. The standard also includes a discussion of LWR pressure vessel surveillance - justification, requirements, and status of work

  3. Nuclear safety in light water reactors severe accident phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Sehgal, Bal Raj

    2011-01-01

    This vital reference is the only one-stop resource on how to assess, prevent, and manage severe nuclear accidents in the light water reactors (LWRs) that pose the most risk to the public. LWRs are the predominant nuclear reactor in use around the world today, and they will continue to be the most frequently utilized in the near future. Therefore, accurate determination of the safety issues associated with such reactors is central to a consideration of the risks and benefits of nuclear power. This book emphasizes the prevention and management of severe accidents to teach nuclear professionals

  4. Enhancing proliferation resistance in advanced light water reactor fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazimi, M.S.; Pilat, E.E.; Driscoll, M.J.; Xu, Z.; Wang, D.; Zhao, X.

    2001-01-01

    Alternative once-through, light water reactor fuel designs are evaluated for capability to reduce the amount and quality of plutonium produced. Doubling the discharge burnup is quite effective, producing modest reductions in total plutonium and significant increases in 238 Pu whose heat generation and spontaneous neutrons complicate weapon usability. Reductions in the hydrogen to heavy metal ratio are counterproductive. Increases are helpful, but only small changes can be accommodated. Use of ThO 2 in a homogeneous mixture with UO 2 can reduce plutonium production to about 50% of that in a typical present day PWR, and in heterogeneous seed-blanket designs can reduce it to 30 to 45%. (author)

  5. Automated ultrasonic examination of light water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, J.H.

    1975-01-01

    An automated ultrasonic examination system has been developed to meet the pre- and inservice inspection requirements of light water reactors. This system features remotely-controlled travelling instrument carriers, computerized collection and storage or inspection data in a manner providing real time comparison against code standards, and computer control over the positioning of the instrument carriers to provide precise location data. The system is currently being utilized in the field for a variety of reactor inspections. The principal features of the system and the recent inspection experience are discussed. (author)

  6. The economics of the fuel cycle (light water reactors)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepine, J.

    1979-01-01

    The economical characteristics of the fuel cycle (of light water reactors) as well as the definition and calculation method for the average updated cost of the kWh are recalled. The evolution followed by the unit prices of the different operations of the cycle, their total cost and the part taken by this cost in the overall cost of nuclear kWh are described. The effects on the cost of fuel of certain hypotheses, operating requirements and additional cost factors are considered [fr

  7. Light water reactors fuel assembly mechanical design and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This standard establishes a procedure for performing an evaluation of the mechanical design of fuel assemblies for light water-cooled commercial power reactors. It does not address the various aspects of neutronic or thermalhydraulic performance except where these factors impose loads or constraints on the mechanical design of the fuel assemblies. This standard also includes a set of specific requirements for design, various potential performance problems and criteria aimed specifically at averting them. This standard replaces ANSI/ANS-57.5-1978

  8. Environment sensitive cracking in light water reactor pressure boundary materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haenninen, H.; Aho-Mantila, I.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to review the available methods and the most promising future possibilities of preventive maintenance to counteract the various forms of environment sensitive cracking of pressure boundary materials in light water reactors. Environment sensitive cracking is considered from the metallurgical, mechanical and environmental point of view. The main emphasis is on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels and high strenght Ni-base alloys, as well as on corrosion fatigue of low alloy and stainless steels. Finally, some general ideas how to predict, reduce or eliminate environment sensitive cracking in service are presented

  9. Spent fuel data base: commercial light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauf, M.J.; Kniazewycz, B.G.

    1979-12-01

    As a consequence of this country's non-proliferation policy, the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel has been delayed indefinitely. This has resulted in spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel being considered as a potential waste form for disposal. Since the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is currently developing methodologies for use in the regulation of the management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes, a comprehensive data base describing LWR fuel technology must be compiled. This document provides that technology baseline and, as such, will support the development of those evaluation standards and criteria applicable to spent nuclear fuel

  10. Stainless steel clad for light water reactor fuels. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, J.E.; Meyer, J.E.

    1980-07-01

    Proper reactor operation and design guidelines are necessary to assure fuel integrity. The occurrence of fuel rod failures for operation in compliance with existing guidelines suggests the need for more adequate or applicable operation/design criteria. The intent of this study is to develop such criteria for light water reactor fuel rods with stainless steel clad and to indicate the nature of uncertainties in its development. The performance areas investigated herein are: long term creepdown and fuel swelling effects on clad dimensional changes and on proximity to clad failure; and short term clad failure possibilities during up-power ramps

  11. Nuclear powerplant standardization: light water reactors. Volume 2. Appendixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-06-01

    This volume contains working papers written for OTA to assist in preparation of the report, NUCLEAR POWERPLANT STANDARDIZATION: LIGHT WATER REACTORS. Included in the appendixes are the following: the current state of standardization, an application of the principles of the Naval Reactors Program to commercial reactors; the NRC and standardization, impacts of nuclear powerplant standardization on public health and safety, descriptions of current control room designs and Duke Power's letter, Admiral Rickover's testimony, a history of standardization in the NRC, and details on the impact of standardization on public health and safety

  12. Properties of light water reactor spent fuel cladding. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farwick, D.G.; Moen, R.A.

    1979-08-01

    The Commercial Waste and Spent Fuel Packaging Program will provide containment packages for the safe storage or disposal of spent Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel. Maintaining containment of radionuclides during transportation, handling, processing and storage is essential, so the best understanding of the properties of the materials to be stored is necessary. This report provides data collection, assessment and recommendations for spent LWR fuel cladding materials properties. Major emphasis is placed on mechanical properties of the zircaloys and austenitic stainless steels. Limited information on elastic constants, physical properties, and anticipated corrosion behavior is also provided. Work is in progress to revise these evaluations as the program proceeds

  13. Preliminary concepts: safeguards for spent light-water reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, D.D.; Dayem, H.A.; Dietz, R.J.

    1979-06-01

    The technology available for safeguarding spent nuclear fuels from light-water power reactors is reviewed, and preliminary concepts for a spent-fuel safeguards system are presented. Essential elements of a spent-fuel safeguards system are infrequent on-site inspections, containment and surveillance systems to assure the integrity of stored fuel between inspections, and nondestructive measurements of the fuel assemblies. Key safeguards research and development activities necessary to implement such a system are identified. These activities include the development of tamper-indicating fuel-assembly identification systems and the design and development of nondestructive spent-fuel measurement systems

  14. Study of reverse osmosis applicability to light water reactor radwaste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markind, J.; Van Tran, T.

    1978-12-01

    Objectives were to collect and evaluate documented performance data of existing reverse-osmosis/ultrafiltration processes utilized for treating low-level liquid radioactive wastes, originating from light-water-reactor (LWR) nuclear power plants. Relevant information was collected by communication both written and verbal with membrane experts known to be active in the nuclear industry, and by conducting manual and computer searches. The generated information was evaluated on the basis of membrane performance characteristics relevant to nuclear engineering system analysis. 39 figures, 34 tables

  15. Multiregion, multigroup collision probability method with white boundary condition for light water reactor thermalization calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozgener, B.; Ozgener, H.A.

    2005-01-01

    A multiregion, multigroup collision probability method with white boundary condition is developed for thermalization calculations of light water moderated reactors. Hydrogen scatterings are treated by Nelkin's kernel while scatterings from other nuclei are assumed to obey the free-gas scattering kernel. The isotropic return (white) boundary condition is applied directly by using the appropriate collision probabilities. Comparisons with alternate numerical methods show the validity of the present formulation. Comparisons with some experimental results indicate that the present formulation is capable of calculating disadvantage factors which are closer to the experimental results than alternative methods

  16. One-year Surveillance of Human Enteric Viruses in Raw and Treated Wastewaters, Downstream River Waters, and Drinking Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaconelli, M; Muscillo, M; Della Libera, S; Fratini, M; Meucci, L; De Ceglia, M; Giacosa, D; La Rosa, G

    2017-03-01

    Human enteric viruses are a major cause of waterborne diseases, and can be transmitted by contaminated water of all kinds, including drinking and recreational water. The objectives of the present study were to assess the occurrence of enteric viruses (enterovirus, norovirus, adenovirus, hepatitis A and E virus) in raw and treated wastewaters, in rivers receiving wastewater discharges, and in drinking waters. Wastewater treatment plants' (WWTP) pathogen removal efficiencies by adenovirus quantitative real-time PCR and the presence of infectious enterovirus, by cell culture assays, in treated wastewaters and in surface waters were also evaluated. A total of 90 water samples were collected: raw and treated wastewaters (treated effluents and ultrafiltered water reused for industrial purposes), water from two rivers receiving treated discharges, and drinking water. Nested PCR assays were used for the identification of viral DNA/RNA, followed by direct amplicon sequencing. All raw sewage samples (21/21), 61.9 % of treated wastewater samples (13/21), and 25 % of ultrafiltered water samples (3/12) were contaminated with at least one viral family. Multiple virus families and genera were frequently detected. Mean positive PCRs per sample decreased significantly from raw to treated sewage and to ultrafiltered waters. Moreover, quantitative adenovirus data showed a reduction in excess of 99 % in viral genome copies following wastewater treatment. In surface waters, 78.6 % (22/28) of samples tested positive for one or more viruses by molecular methods, but enterovirus-specific infectivity assays did not reveal infectious particles in these samples. All drinking water samples tested negative for all viruses, demonstrating the effectiveness of treatment in removing viral pathogens from drinking water. Integrated strategies to manage water from all sources are crucial to ensure water quality.

  17. Low-head air stripper treats oil tanker ballast water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, M.

    1992-01-01

    Prototype tests conducted during the winter of 1989/90 have successfully demonstrated an economical design for air stripping volatile hydrocarbons from oily tanker ballast water. The prototype air stripper, developed for Alyeska's Ballast Water Treatment (BWT) facility in Valdez, Alaska, ran continuously for three months with an average removal of 88% of the incoming volatile organics. Initially designed to remove oil and grease compounds from tanker ballast water, the BWT system has been upgraded to a three-step process to comply with new, stringent regulations. The BWT biological oxidation process enhances the growth of bacteria present in the incoming ballast water through nutrient addition, aeration, and recirculation within a complete-mixed bioreactor. The average removal of BETX is over 95%, however, occassional upsets required the placement of a polishing air stripper downstream of the aeration tanks. Packed-tower air stripping was investigated but deemed economically unfeasible for a facility that would only occasionally be used. Twelve feet of excess gravity head in the existing BWT hydraulic gradeline were employed to drive the air stripper feed. This limited the stripper packing depth to 8 feet and imposed constraints on the design of the inlet water and air distributors. Water distribution, air flow, temperature effects, and fouling from constituents in the ballast water were investigated. The prototype was operated under water and air flow conditions similar to those specified for the full-scale unit, and at a range of test conditions above and below the normal design conditions

  18. Assessment of microbiological quality of drinking water treated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... quality of drinking water at the point of delivery to the consumer is crucial in safeguarding consumer's health. The current study was undertaken to assess the changes in residual chlorine content with distance in water distribution system in Gwalior city of Madhya Pradesh and assess its relation with the occurrence of total ...

  19. WET-tests on UV-treated ballast water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaag, N.H.B.M.

    2015-01-01

    Damen Shipyards has developed a barge-based ballast water management system (BWMS) that enables direct treatment of ballast water during discharge in a receiving harbour. The treatment is based upon filtration and a once-through UV-treatment. As part of the Type Approval process, the Dutch

  20. Comparative evaluation of recent water hammer events in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    House, R.K.; Sursock, J.P.; Kim, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Water hammer events that occurred in commercial U.S. light water reactors in the five-year period from 1981 to 1985 were surveyed, and a preliminary evaluation of the events was conducted. The information developed supplements a previous study which evaluated water hammer events in the twelve-year period from 1969 to 1981. The current study of water hammer events in the 1980's confirms that the rate of events remains relatively constant (less than 0.25 events per plant year) in both PWRs and BWRs. Although water hammer events are not normally considered a safety issue, the economic impact of the events on plant operations can be significant. One particular severe water hammer event is estimated to have cost the plant owner $10 million for repair and evaluation alone. A variety of key characteristics of the recent water hammer events are summarized to establish a basis for further study of preventative methods

  1. Method of treating radioactive waste waters from uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priban, V.; Novak, L.; Zubcek, L.; Hinterholzinger, O.

    1987-01-01

    radioactive mine waters with suspended solid particles and acid salinated solutions from the process of underground leaching of radioactive ores with sulfuric acid, are discharged in a specified ratio to a common sump. The acid salinated solutions are used as a coagulation agent for the treatment of radioactive mine waters. Both solutions are mixed at simultaneous addition of lime milk suspension. In a sedimentation tank, the precipitate thus produced is sedimented and the clarified water is carried from the tank to a public water flow. The advantages of the method include the treatment of an over-balance 3 m 3 /min of acid salinated solutions from the process of underground leaching of radioactive ores with sulfuric acid, and reduction in the cost of radioactive mine water treatment. (E.S.)

  2. Development of next-generation light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Fumihiko; Yasuoka, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    The Next-Generation Light Water Reactor Development Program, a national project in Japan, was inaugurated in April 2008. The primary objective of this program is to meet the need for the replacement of existing nuclear power plants in Japan after 2030. With the aim of setting a global standard design, the reactor to be developed offers greatly improved safety, reliability, and economic efficiency through several innovative technologies, including a reactor core system with uranium enrichment of 5 to 10%, a seismic isolation system, long-life materials, advanced water chemistry, innovative construction techniques, optimized passive and active safety systems, innovative digital technologies, and so on. In the first three years, a plant design concept with these innovative features is to be established and the effectiveness of the program will be reevaluated. The major part of the program will be completed in 2015. Toshiba is actively engaged in both design studies and technology development as a founding member of this program. (author)

  3. Toward visible light response: Overall water splitting using heterogeneous photocatalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Extensive energy conversion of solar energy can only be achieved by large-scale collection of solar flux. The technology that satisfies this requirement must be as simple as possible to reduce capital cost. Overall water splitting by powder-form photocatalysts directly produces a mixture of H 2 and O2 (chemical energy) in a single reactor, which does not require any complicated parabolic mirrors and electronic devices. Because of its simplicity and low capital cost, it has tremendous potential to become the major technology of solar energy conversion. Development of highly efficient photocatalysts is desired. This review addresses why visible light responsive photocatalysts are essential to be developed. The state of the art for the photocatalysts for overall water splitting is briefly described. Moreover, various fundamental aspects for developing efficient photocatalysts, such as particle size of photocatalysts, cocatalysts, and reaction kinetics are discussed. Copyright © 2011 De Gruyter.

  4. Aerosol behavior and light water reactor source terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbey, F.; Schikarski, W.O.

    1988-01-01

    The major developments in nuclear aerosol modeling following the accident to pressurized water reactor Unit 2 at Three Mile Island are briefly reviewed and the state of the art summarized. The importance and implications of these developments for severe accident source terms for light water reactors are then discussed in general terms. The treatment is not aimed at identifying specific source term values but is intended rather to illustrate trends, to assess the adequacy of the understanding of major aspects of aerosol behavior for source term prediction, and demonstrate in qualitative terms the effect of various aspects of reactor design. Areas where improved understanding of aerosol behavior might lead to further reductions in current source terms predictions are also considered

  5. Tritium formation and elimination in light-water electronuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolle, L.; Bazin, J.

    1977-01-01

    In light-water reactors, the tritium balance should be considered from both the working constraint and environmental pollution aspects. In light-water electronuclear stations with pressurized reactors using boric acid in solution for reactivity control, the amounts of tritium formed in the primary circuit are worthy of note. The estimations concerning the tritium production in a hypothetical 1000 MWe reactor are discussed. In the tritium build-up, the part which takes the tritium formed by fission in the fuel, owing to diffusion through cladding, is still difficult to estimate. The tritium balance in different working nuclear power stations are consequently of interest. But the tritium produced by ternary fission in the fuel is always much more abundant, and remains almost entirely confined in the uranium oxide if the fuel is clad with zircaloy. The annual quantity stored in the fuel elements is more than 20 times larger than that of the built up free tritium in the primary circuit water of a reactor. It reaches about 12,400 Ci in the hypothetical reactor. In the presently operated reprocessing plants, tritium is all going over in the effluents, and is almost entirely released in the environment. Taking into account the increasing quantities of high irradiated fuel to be reprocessed, it seems necessary to develop separation processes. Development work and tests have been achieved jointly by CEA and SAINT-GOBAIN TECHNIQUES NOUVELLES in order to: contain the tritium in the high activity part of the plant; and keep small the tritiated effluent volume, about 300 liters per ton of reprocessed uranium. It is then possible to envisage a storage for decay of isotopic separation processes. Such separation processes have been estimated by CEA assuming a daily output of 1500 liters of water containing 2,3 Ci.1 -1 of tritium, the desired decontamination factor being 100 [fr

  6. Influence of untreated and bacterial-treated Yamuna water on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In present study an attempt has been made to study the pollution level of river Yamuna at Agra, by analyzing the physico-chemical parameters of untreated and bacterial-treated water and its effect on the growth of maize plant. Among different concentrations (25, 50, 75 and 100%) of treated water, the 100% concentration of ...

  7. Creosote movement from treated wood immersed in fresh water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung-Mo Kang; Jeffrey J. Morrell; John Simonsen; Stan Lebow

    2005-01-01

    Creosote has a long history of successful use as a wood preservative, but polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in this preservative have raised environmental concerns, particularly when creosote-treated wood is used in aquatic environments. A number of models have been developed to predict the risk of creosote use in aquatic environments, but one limitation of these models...

  8. Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassner, T.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Chung, H.M.; Hicks, P.D.; Hins, A.G.; Park, J.Y.; Shack, W.J.

    1991-12-01

    Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking of piping, pressure vessels, and core components in light water reactors (LWRs) are important concerns as extended reactor lifetimes are envisaged. The degradation processes include intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of austenitic stainless steel (SS) piping in boiling water reactors (BWRs), and propagation of fatigue or SCC cracks (which initiate in sensitized SS cladding) into low-alloy ferritic steels in BWR pressure vessels. Similar cracking has also occurred in upper shell-to-transition cone girth welds in pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator vessels. Another concern is failure of reactor-core internal components after accumulation of relatively high fluence, which has occurred in both BWRs and PWRs. Research during the past year focused on (1) fatigue and SCC of ferritic steels used in piping and in steam generator and reactor pressure vessels, (2) role of chromate and sulfate in simulated BWR water in SCC of sensitized Type 304 SS, and (3) irradiation-assisted SCC in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes used in two operating BWRs. Failure after accumulation of relatively high fluence has been attributed to radiation-induced segregation (RIS) of elements such as Si, P, Ni, and Cr. This document provides a summary of research progress in these areas

  9. Long term review of research on light water reactor types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumiya, Yutaka

    1982-01-01

    In Japan, 24 nuclear power plants of 17.18 million kWe capacity are in operation, and their rate of operation has shown the good result of more than 60% since 1980. One of the research on the development of light water reactors is the electric power common research, which was started in 1976, and 272 researches were carried out till 1982. It contributed to the counter-measures to stress corrosion cracking, thermal fatigue and the thinning of steam generator tubes, to the reduction of crud generation and the remote control and automation of inspection and maintenance, and to the verification of safety. The important items for the future are the cost down of nuclear power plant construction, the development of robots for nuclear power plants, the improvement of the ability to follow load variation, and the development of light water reactors of new types. It is necessary to diversify the types of reactors to avoid the effect of a serious trouble which may occur in one type of reactors. Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc., thinks that the Japanese type PWRs having the technical features of KWU type PWRs are desirable for the future development. The compatibility with the condition of installation permission in Japan, the required design change and the economy of the standard design PWRs of KWU (1.3 million kW) have been studied since October, 1981, by KWU and three Japanese manufacturers. (Kako, I.)

  10. Qualification issues for advanced light-water reactor protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsah, K.; Clark, R.L.; Antonescu, C.

    1993-01-01

    The instrumentation and control (I ampersand C) systems in advanced reactors will make extensive use of digital controls, microprocessors, multiplexing, and fiber optic transmission. Elements of these advances in I ampersand C have been implemented on some current operating plants. However, the widespread use of the above technologies, as well as the use of artificial intelligence with minimum reliance on human operator control of reactors, highlights the need to develop standards for qualifying the I ampersand C used in the next generation of nuclear power plants. As a first step in this direction, the protection system I ampersand C for present-day plants was compared to that proposed for advanced light-water reactors (ALWRs). An evaluation template was developed by assembling a configuration of a safety channel instrument string for a generic ALWR, then comparing the impact of environmental stressors on that string to their effect on an equivalent instrument string from an existing light-water reactor. The template was then used to suggest a methodology for the qualification of microprocessor-based protection systems. The methodology identifies standards/regulatory guides (or lack thereof) for the qualification of microprocessor-based safety I ampersand C systems. This approach addresses in part issues raised in NRC policy document SECY-91-292, which recognizes that advanced I ampersand C systems for the nuclear industry are ''being developed without consensus standards. as the technology available for design is ahead of the technology that is well understood through experience and supported by application standards.''

  11. Mechanical design of a light water breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauth, W.L. Jr.; Jones, D.S.; Kolsun, G.J.; Erbes, J.G.; Brennan, J.J.; Weissburg, J.A.; Sharbaugh, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    In a light water reactor system using the thorium-232--uranium-233 fuel system in a seed-blanket modular core configuration having the modules arranged in a symmetrical array surrounded by a reflector blanket region, the seed regions are disposed for a longitudinal movement between the fixed or stationary blanket region which surrounds each seed region. Control of the reactor is obtained by moving the inner seed region thus changing the geometry of the reactor, and thereby changing the leakage of neutrons from the relatively small seed region into the blanket region. The mechanical design of the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core includes means for axially positioning of movable fuel assemblies to achieve the neutron economy required of a breeder reactor, a structure necessary to adequately support the fuel modules without imposing penalties on the breeding capability, a structure necessary to support fuel rods in a closely packed array and a structure necessary to direct and control the flow of coolant to regions in the core in accordance with the heat transfer requirements. 4 claims, 24 drawing figures

  12. Issues affecting advanced passive light-water reactor safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beelman, R.J.; Fletcher, C.D.; Modro, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    Next generation commercial reactor designs emphasize enhanced safety through improved safety system reliability and performance by means of system simplification and reliance on immutable natural forces for system operation. Simulating the performance of these safety systems will be central to analytical safety evaluation of advanced passive reactor designs. Yet the characteristically small driving forces of these safety systems pose challenging computational problems to current thermal-hydraulic systems analysis codes. Additionally, the safety systems generally interact closely with one another, requiring accurate, integrated simulation of the nuclear steam supply system, engineered safeguards and containment. Furthermore, numerical safety analysis of these advanced passive reactor designs wig necessitate simulation of long-duration, slowly-developing transients compared with current reactor designs. The composite effects of small computational inaccuracies on induced system interactions and perturbations over long periods may well lead to predicted results which are significantly different than would otherwise be expected or might actually occur. Comparisons between the engineered safety features of competing US advanced light water reactor designs and analogous present day reactor designs are examined relative to the adequacy of existing thermal-hydraulic safety codes in predicting the mechanisms of passive safety. Areas where existing codes might require modification, extension or assessment relative to passive safety designs are identified. Conclusions concerning the applicability of these codes to advanced passive light water reactor safety analysis are presented

  13. Ultraviolet light in the use of water disinfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabbagh, R.

    1999-01-01

    Ultraviolet light is an effective method in the use of water disinfection for swimming pools, potable water and industry required water. For many reasons Ultraviolet light and Ultraviolet compounded with chlorine (Ultraviolet/chlorine) has been brought to attention ed in resent years. In this research, a swimming pool water disinfection was carried out by means of a system with the use of a reactor which was made of stainless steel (SS-304) and with many another standards required. Operation of system was carried out at first in the pilot plant and then installation in essential water treatment integrated. Inactivation of pollution index, E. Coli or Total coliform and Pseudomonas aeroginosa studies with 6000,16000 and 30000 μW.s/cm 2 Ultraviolet dose and then in presence of 0.3,0.6,0.9 and 1.2 mg/1 free chlorine (Ultraviolet/chlorine). In swimming pools minimum free chlorine residual usually is 1.5 mg/1. Optimum Ultraviolet dose was 16000 μW.s/cm 2 attention to 50 percent Ultraviolet absorption ca sued to TSS,TDS and turbidity. In the Ultraviolet/chlorine system suitable rate was 16000μW.s/cm 2 Ultraviolet dose/0.6 mg/1 chlorine in the 2.4 * 10 5 CFU/100 ml for Total coliform and 3600 CFU/100 ml for Pseudomonas aeroginosa. Most probable number (MPN) estimated multiple tube fermentation technique. In this way the flow rate for system indicated about 240 cm 3 /s or 0.9 m 3 /h. The samples polluted for secondary pollution with 54000 CFU/100 ml for E. Coli and 1800 CFU/100ml Pseudomonas aeroginosa. The number of microbes decreased to zero duration after 45 minutes contact time in presence of free chlorine residual in samples. In practical conditions which that disinfectant system was installed in essential water treatment circuit under 1.4 atm hydraulic pressure no growth was seen for pollution index in disinfected water with Ultraviolet in microbial density about 840 CFU/100 ml for Total coliform and 12 CFU/100 ml for pseudomonas aeroginosa. Attention to lower

  14. Ultraviolet light in the use of water disinfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabbagh, R.

    1999-01-01

    Ultraviolet light is an effective method in the use of water disinfection for swimming pools, potable water and industry required water. For many reasons UV light and UV compounded with chlorine (UV/chlorine) has been brought to attention in resent years. In this research, a swimming pool water disinfection was carried out by means of a system with the use of a reactor which was made of stainless steel (SS-304) and with many another standards required. Operation of system was carried out at first in the pilot plant and then installation in essential water treatment integrated. Inactivation of pollution index, E. Coli or Total coliform and Pseudomonas aeroginosa studied with 6000,16000 and 30000 μW.s/cm 2 UV dose and then in presence of 0.3,0.6,0.9 and 1.2 mg/1 free chlorine (UV/chlorine). In swimming pools minimum free chlorine residual usually is 1.5 mg/1. Optimum UV dose was 16000 μW.s/cm 2 attention to 50 percent UV absorption caused to TSS,TDS and turbidity. In the UV/chlorine system suitable rate was 16000μW.s/cm 2 UV dose /0.6 mg/1 chlorine in the 2.4 * 10 5 CFU/100 ml for Total coliform and 3600CFU/100 ml for Pseudomonas aeroginosa. Most probable number(MPN) estimated multiple tube fermentation technique. In this way the flow rate for system indicated about 240 cm 3 /s or 0.9 m 3 /h. The samples polluted for secondary pollution with 54000 CFU/100 ml for E.Coli and 1800 CFU/100ml Pseudomonas aeroginosa. The number of microbes decreased to zero duration after 45 minutes contact time in presence of free chlorine residual in samples. In practical conditions which that disinfectant system was installed in essential water treatment circuit under 1.4 atm hydraulic pressure no growth was seen for pollution index in disinfected water with UV in microbial density about 840 CFU/100 ml for Total coliform and 12CFU/100 ml for Pseudomonas aeroginosa. Attention to lower turbidity, TSS and TDS in tap water, higher flow rate about 560 cm 3 /s or 2 m 3 /h acessesed

  15. Review of pre-treated peat applied in treating domestic wastewaters and oily waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, X.; Coles, C.A.; Asapo, E.S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discussed recent research related to the use of peat in removing contaminants from domestic wastewater, oil-contaminated water, and soil. The review also discussed methods of pretreating peat before its application to polluted area. Pretreatment processes are needed to remove components in peat that interfere with treatment mechanisms. Polymers are added to peat in order to encourage the aggregation of the peat particles into larger colloidal particles that are easy to dewater. Phosphoric acid treatments are also applied to increase the swelling capacity of peat. Hydrogen peroxide is used to break down oil-contaminated peat in order to facilitate its subsequent decomposition. Experiments have demonstrated that peat is an effective adsorbent for many different types of oil. Studies have demonstrated that the removal rate for standard mineral and crude oils from wastewater using peat was 83 and 70 per cent. Applications of commercial peat to the surface of oily contaminated waters resulted in oil removal efficiencies of 99.998 per cent. It was concluded that peat is an effective, low-cost material for removing contaminants from domestic waste water and oil-contaminated water. The peat can also be used as a secondary energy source after the sorption process. While peat is an abundant resource in Canada, the resource is found mainly in wetlands. Effective harvesting strategies should be used to ensure the environmental sustainability of peat filtration systems. 38 refs., 1 tab

  16. Status of advanced technology and design for water cooled reactors: Light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    Water reactors represent a high level of performance and safety. They are mature technology and they will undoubtedly continue to be the main stream of nuclear power. There are substantial technological development programmes in Member States for further improving the technology and for the development of new concepts in water reactors. Therefore the establishment of an international forum for the exchange of information and stimulation of international co-operation in this field has emerged. In 1987 the IAEA established the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water-Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR). Within the framework of IWGATWR the IAEA Technical Report on Status of Advanced Technology and Design for Water Cooled Reactors, Part I: Light Water Reactors and Part II: Heavy Water Reactors has been undertaken to document the major current activities and different trends of technological improvements and developments for future water reactors. Part I of the report dealing with LWRs has now been prepared and is based mainly on submissions from Member States. It is hoped that this part of the report, containing the status of advanced light water reactor design and technology of the year 1987 and early 1988 will be useful for disseminating information to Agency Member States and for stimulating international cooperation in this subject area. 93 refs, figs and tabs

  17. Prevalence, quantification and typing of adenoviruses detected in river and treated drinking water in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heerden, J; Ehlers, M M; Heim, A; Grabow, W O K

    2005-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAds), of which there are 51 serotypes, are associated with gastrointestinal, respiratory, urinary tract and eye infections. The importance of water in the transmission of HAds and the potential health risks constituted by HAds in these environments are widely recognized. Adenoviruses have not previously been quantified in river and treated drinking water samples. In this study, HAds in river water and treated drinking water sources in South Africa were detected, quantified and typed. Adenoviruses were recovered from the water samples using a glass wool adsorption-elution method followed by polyethylene glycol/NaCl precipitation for secondary concentration. The sensitivity and specificity of two nested PCR methods were compared for detection of HAds in the water samples. Over a 1-year period (June 2002 to July 2003), HAds were detected in 5.32% (10/188) of the treated drinking water and 22.22% (10/45) of river water samples using the conventional nested PCR method. The HAds detected in the water samples were quantified using a real-time PCR method. The original treated drinking water and river water samples had an estimate of less than one copy per litre of HAd DNA present. The hexon-PCR products used for typing HAds were directly sequenced or cloned into plasmids before sequencing. In treated drinking water samples, species D HAds predominated. In addition, adenovirus serotypes 2, 40 and 41 were each detected in three different treated drinking water samples. Most (70%) of the HAds detected in river water samples analysed were enteric HAds (serotypes 40 and 41). One HAd serotype 2 and two species D HAds were detected in the river water. Adenoviruses detected in river and treated drinking water samples were successfully quantified and typed. The detection of HAds in drinking water supplies treated and disinfected by internationally recommended methods, and which conform to quality limits for indicator bacteria, warrants an investigation of the

  18. Fuel Summary Report: Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Illum, D.B.; Olson, G.L.; McCardell, R.K.

    1999-01-01

    The Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was a small water cooled, U-233/Th-232 cycle breeder reactor developed by the Pittsburgh Naval Reactors to improve utilization of the nation's nuclear fuel resources in light water reactors. The LWBR was operated at Shippingport Atomic Power Station (APS), which was a Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly Atomic Energy Commission)-owned reactor plant. Shippingport APS was the first large-scale, central-station nuclear power plant in the United States and the first plant of such size in the world operated solely to produce electric power. The Shippingport LWBR was operated successfully from 1977 to 1982 at the APS. During the five years of operation, the LWBR generated more than 29,000 effective full power hours (EFPH) of energy. After final shutdown, the 39 core modules of the LWBR were shipped to the Expended Core Facility (ECF) at Naval Reactors Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). At ECF, 12 of the 39 modules were dismantled and about 1000 of more than 17,000 rods were removed from the modules of proof-of-breeding and fuel performance testing. Some of the removed rods were kept at ECF, some were sent to Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) in Idaho and some to ANL-East in Chicago for a variety of physical, chemical and radiological examinations. All rods and rod sections remaining after the experiments were shipped back to ECF, where modules and loose rods were repackaged in liners for dry storage. In a series of shipments, the liners were transported from ECF to Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC), formerly the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The 47 liners containing the fully-rodded and partially-derodded core modules, the loose rods, and the rod scraps, are now stored in underground dry wells at CPP-749

  19. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilard, Ronaldo; Zhang, Hongbin; Kothe, Douglas; Turinsky, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub for modeling and simulation of nuclear reactors. It brings together an exceptionally capable team from national labs, industry and academia that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated as the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA), will incorporate science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, modern computational science and engineering practices, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) and validation against data from operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It will couple state-of-the-art fuel performance, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics (T-H), and structural models with existing tools for systems and safety analysis and will be designed for implementation on both today's leadership-class computers and the advanced architecture platforms now under development by the DOE. CASL focuses on a set of challenge problems such as CRUD induced power shift and localized corrosion, grid-to-rod fretting fuel failures, pellet clad interaction, fuel assembly distortion, etc. that encompass the key phenomena limiting the performance of PWRs. It is expected that much of the capability developed will be applicable to other types of reactors. CASL's mission is to develop and apply modeling and simulation capabilities to address three critical areas of performance for nuclear power plants: (1) reduce capital and operating costs per unit energy by enabling power uprates and plant lifetime extension, (2) reduce nuclear waste volume generated by enabling higher fuel burnup, and (3) enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability for component performance.

  20. Light requirements of water lobelia (Lobelia dortmanna L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borowiak Dariusz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Maximum depth of colonization (zC and total area covered by a population of Lobelia dortmanna, as well as underwater light regime were studied in 25 soft water lobelia lakes in north-western Poland. Variations in underwater light conditions among the lakes were described by Secchi disc depths (zSD, and by attenuation coefficients of irradiance within photosynthetically active radiation range (Kd,PAR, and euphotic zone depths (zEU derived from photometric measurements conducted twice a year (in midspring and midsummer during the period 2014–2015. Maximum depth of colonization of water lobelia ranged from 0.1 to 2.2 m (median zC = 0.8 m; mean zC = 1.0 m. Nine lakes showed the relative coverage of the littoral zone (RCLZ by L. dortmanna to be greater than the mean value, which was 4.8%. Studies showed that light requirements of water lobelia increase when the maximum depth of colonization also increases. This pattern could be partially related to the greater energy needs of deeper growing individuals due to enlarged seed production and their incubation, and for the creation of much heavier inflorescences. Assessment of the light requirements of L. dortmanna along the depth gradient indicates that relative irradiance (percentage of subsurface irradiance of PAR should be at the level of: (i 47–50% (annual total of quantum irradiance 3083–3280 mol m−2 yr−2 for plants growing within a depth range of 2.0–2.5 m; (ii 44–47% (2886–3083 mol m−2yr−1 for plants growing within a depth range of 1.5–2.0 m; (iii 41–44% (2690–2886 mol m−2yr−2 for plants growing within a depth range of 1.0–1.5 m; and (iv 34–41% (2230–2690 mol m−1 yr−1 for those growing in the littoral zone at a depth of between 0.5 and 1.0 m. In average conditions in the Pomeranian lakes, the maximum depth of colonization by L. dortmanna accounts for approximately a third of the Secchi disc depth and a fifth of the depth of the euphotic zone with irradiance

  1. Hole injection enhancement in organic light emitting devices using plasma treated graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesuraj, P. Justin; Parameshwari, R. [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, School of Physics, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli, 620 024, Tamil Nadu (India); Kanthasamy, K.; Koch, J. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, ATMOS, Appelstr. 2, D-30167, Hannover (Germany); Pfnür, H. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, ATMOS, Appelstr. 2, D-30167, Hannover (Germany); Laboratorium für Nano- und Quantene$ngineering, Schneiderberg 30, D-30167, Hannover (Germany); Jeganathan, K., E-mail: kjeganathan@yahoo.com [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, School of Physics, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli, 620 024, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2017-03-01

    Graphical abstract: Plasma treated Graphene oxide for hole injection enhancement in OLEDs. - Highlights: • Oxygen (O{sub 2}) and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) plasma exposed graphene oxide (GO) sheets have been demonstrated as hole buffer layers in OLEDs. • O{sub 2} plasma exposure induces assimilation of oxygen contents in GO lattice resulting in improved work function that reduced the hole injection barrier further. Whereas, H{sub 2} plasma contrastingly reduced the GO by excluding oxygen which ensuing lower work function. • X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy investigations reveal the capricious amount of oxygen in GO lattice and its corresponding work function variations. • GO and O{sub 2} plasma treated GO significantly improves the current efficiency of OLEDs more than one order with notable reduction in turn on voltage. - Abstract: The hole injection layer (HIL) with high work function (WF) is desirable to reduce the injection barrier between anode and hole transport layer in organic light emitting devices (OLED). Here, we report a novel approach to tune the WF of graphene oxide (GO) using oxygen and hydrogen plasma treatment and its hole injection properties in OLEDs. The mild exposure of oxygen plasma on GO (O{sub 2}-GO) significantly reduces the injection barrier by increasing the WF of anode (4.98 eV) through expansion of C−O bonds. In contrast, the hole injection barrier was drastically increased for hydrogen plasma treated GO (H{sub 2}-GO) layers as the WF is lowered by the contraction of C−O bond. By employing active O{sub 2}-GO as HIL in OLEDs found to exhibit superior current efficiency of 4.2 cd/A as compared to 3.3 cd/A for pristine GO. Further, the high injection efficiency of O{sub 2}-GO infused hole only device can be attributed to the improved energy level matching. Ultraviolet and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to correlate the WF of HIL infused anode towards the enhanced performance of

  2. Studying intense pulsed light method along with corticosteroid injection in treating keloid scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsi Meymandi, Simin; Rezazadeh, Azadeh; Ekhlasi, Ali

    2014-02-01

    Results of various studies suggest that the hypertrophic and keloid scars are highly prevalent in the general population and are irritating both physically and mentally. Considering the variety of existing therapies, intense pulsed light (IPL) method along with corticosteroid injection was evaluated in treating these scars. 86 subjects were included in this clinical trial. Eight sessions of therapeutic intervention were done with IPL along with corticosteroid intralesional injection using 450 to 1200 NM filter, Fluence 30-40 J/cm2, pulse duration of 2.1-10 ms and palsed delay 10-40 ms with an interval of three weeks. To specify the recovery consequences and complication rate and to determine features of the lesion, the criteria specified in the study of Eroll and Vancouver scar scale were used. The level of clinical improvement, color improvement and scar height was 89.1%, 88.8% and 89.1% respectively. The incidence of complications (1 telangiectasia case, 7 hyperpigmentation cases and 2 atrophy cases) following treatment with IPL was 11.6%. Moreover, the participants' satisfaction with IPL method was 88.8%. This study revealed that a combined therapy (intralesional corticosteroid injection + IPL) increases the recovery level of hypertrophic and keloid scars. It was also demonstrated that this method had no significant side effect and patients were highly satisfied with this method.

  3. Effects of magnetically treated water on germination and growth of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lycopersicon Esculentum: variety UC82B) plant. The water was allowed to pass through magnetic treatment pipe for duration of 113 s. The mean magnetic flux density used was 719 gauss (G) measured inside the pipe. The treatments (T1 to T5) were ...

  4. Determination of oestrogen hormones in raw and treated water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use, via sewage treatment plants. If these compounds are not eliminated by wastewater treatment plants, they can then be discharged to rivers and lakes which are used as sources for drinking water production. Therefore, the presence of such organic contaminants may have a negative impact on the quality of drinking ...

  5. Multiangular hyperspectral investigation of polarized light in case 2 waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonizzo, A.; Zhou, J.; Gilerson, A.; Chowdhary, J.; Gross, B.; Moshary, F.; Ahmed, S.

    2009-09-01

    The focus of this work is on the dependence of in situ hyperspectral and multiangular polarized data on the size distribution and refractive index of the suspended particles. Underwater polarization measurements were obtained using a polarimeter developed at the Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory of the City College of New York, NY. The degree of polarization (DOP) of the underwater light field in coastal environments was measured and the water-leaving polarized radiance was derived. In-water optical properties were also measured with an ac-9 (WET Labs). Absorption and attenuation spectra are then used to derive information on the dissolved and suspend components in the water medium which are used in a vector radiative transfer code which provides the upwelling radiance. The model was run for various values of the refractive index of mineral particles until the modeled DOP matched the measured one. The relationship between the intensity of the maximum of the DOP and both the refractive index of the mineral particles and the shapes of their size distributions is analyzed in detail.

  6. Status of advanced light water reactor designs 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-05-01

    The report is intended to be a source of reference information for interested organizations and individuals. Among them are decision makers of countries considering implementation of nuclear power programmes. Further, the report is addressed to government officials with an appropriate technical background and to research institutes of countries with existing nuclear programmes that wish to be informed on the global status in order to plan their nuclear power programmes including both research and development efforts and means for meeting future. The future utilization of nuclear power worldwide depends primarily on the ability of the nuclear community to further improve the economic competitiveness of nuclear power plants while meeting stringent safety requirements. The IAEA's activities in nuclear power technology development include the preparation of status reports on advanced reactor designs to provide all interested IAEA Member States with balanced and objective information on advances in nuclear plant technology. In the field of light water reactors, the last status report published by the IAEA was 'Status of Advanced Light Water Cooled Reactor Designs: 1996' (IAEA-TECDOC-968). Since its publication, quite a lot has happened: some designs have been taken into commercial operation, others have achieved significant steps toward becoming commercial products, including certification from regulatory authorities, some are in a design optimization phase to reduce capital costs, development for other designs began after 1996, and a few designs are no longer pursued by their promoters. With this general progress in mind, on the advice and with the support of the IAEA Department of Nuclear Energy's Technical Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (LWRs), the IAEA has prepared this new status report on advanced LWR designs that updates IAEA-TECDOC-968, presenting the various advanced LWR designs in a balanced way according to a common outline

  7. Modelling inorganic biocide emission from treated wood in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiruta-Barna, Ligia, E-mail: Ligia.barna@insa-toulouse.fr [Universite de Toulouse, INSA, UPS, INP, LISBP, 135 Avenue de Rangueil, F-31077 Toulouse (France); INRA, UMR792, Laboratoire d' Ingenierie des Systemes Biologiques et des Procedes, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR5504, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Schiopu, Nicoleta [Universite Paris-Est, CSTB- Scientific and Technical Centre for the Building Industry, ESE/Environment, 24, rue Joseph Fourier, 38400 Saint Martin d' Heres (France)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {center_dot} We developed a mechanistic model for biocide metals fixation/mobilisation in wood. {center_dot} This is the first chemical model explaining the biocide leaching from treated wood. {center_dot} The main fixation mechanism is the surface complexation with wood polymers. {center_dot} The biocide mobilization is due to metal-DOC complexation and pH effect. - Abstract: The objective of this work is to develop a chemical model for explaining the leaching behaviour of inorganic biocides from treated wood. The standard leaching test XP CEN/TS14429 was applied to a commercial construction material made of treated Pinus sylvestris (Copper Boron Azole preservative). The experimental results were used for developing a chemical model under PHREEQC (a geochemical software, with LLNL, MINTEQ data bases) by considering the released species detected in the eluates: main biocides Cu and B, other trace biocides (Cr and Zn), other elements like Ca, K, Cl, SO{sub 4}{sup -2}, dissolved organic matter (DOC). The model is based on chemical phenomena at liquid/solid interfaces (complexation, ion exchange and hydrolysis) and is satisfactory for the leaching behaviour representation. The simulation results confronted with the experiments confirmed the hypotheses of: (1) biocide fixation by surface complexation reactions with wood specific sites (carboxyl and phenol for Cu, Zn, Cr(III), aliphatic hydroxyl for B, ion exchange to a lesser extent) and (2) biocide mobilisation by extractives (DOC) coming from the wood. The maximum of Cu, Cr(III) and Zn fixation occurred at neutral pH (including the natural pH of wood), while B fixation was favoured at alkaline pH.

  8. Plasma Treated Active Carbon for Capacitive Deionization of Saline Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiping Zeng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The plasma treatment on commercial active carbon (AC was carried out in a capacitively coupled plasma system using Ar + 10% O2 at pressure of 4.0 Torr. The RF plasma power ranged from 50 W to 100 W and the processing time was 10 min. The carbon film electrode was fabricated by electrophoretic deposition. Micro-Raman spectroscopy revealed the highly increased disorder of sp2 C lattice for the AC treated at 75 W. An electrosorption capacity of 6.15 mg/g was recorded for the carbon treated at 75 W in a 0.1 mM NaCl solution when 1.5 V was applied for 5 hours, while the capacity of the untreated AC was 1.01 mg/g. The plasma treatment led to 5.09 times increase in the absorption capacity. The jump of electrosorption capacity by plasma treatment was consistent with the Raman spectra and electrochemical double layer capacitance. This work demonstrated that plasma treatment was a potentially efficient approach to activating biochar to serve as electrode material for capacitive deionization (CDI.

  9. Heavy water standards. Qualitative analyses, sample treating, stocking and manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavelescu, M.; Steflea, D.; Mihancea, I.; Varlam, M.; Irimescu, R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents methods and procedures for measuring heavy water concentration, and also sampling, stocking and handling of samples to be analysed. The main concentration analysis methods are: mass spectrometry, for concentrations less then 1%, densitometry, for concentrations within the range 1% - 99% and infrared spectrometry for concentrations above 99%. Procedures of sampling, processing and purification appropriate to these measuring methods were established. 1 Tab

  10. Safety considerations concerning light water reactors in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, T.

    1977-01-01

    In 1975 the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate was commissioned by the Government to perform a Reactor Safety Study concerning commercial light water reactors. The study will contain an account of: - rules and regulations for reactor designs; - operation experience of the Swedish nuclear power plants with international comparisons; - the development of reactor designs during the last 10 years; - demands and conditions for inspection and inspection methods; - nuclear power plant operation organization; - training of operators; and - the results of research into nuclear safety. The study is scheduled for completion by July 1st, 1977, however, this paper gives a summary of the results of the Reactor Safety Study already available. The paper contains detailed statistics concerning safety related occurrences and reactor scrams in Sweden from July 1st, 1974 until the beginning of 1977

  11. The United States advanced light water reactor (USALWR) development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahlkopf, K.E.; Noble, D.M.; Devine, J.C. Jr.; Sugnet, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    For the United States Nuclear Power industry to remain viable, it must be prepared to meet the expected need for a new generation capacity in the late 90s with an improved reactor system. The best hope of meeting this requirement is with revolutionary changes to current LWR systems through simplification and re-evaluation of safety and operational design margins. In addition, the grid characteristics and the difficulty in raising capital for large projects indicate the smaller light water reactors (600 MWe) may play an important role in the next generation. A cooperative and coordinated program between EPRI, U.S. DOE, the major architect engineers, nuclear steam supply vendors, and the NRC in the U.S. has been undertaken with four major goals in mind

  12. Historical perspective of thermal reactor safety in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, S.

    1986-01-01

    A brief history of thermal reactor safety in U.S. light water reactors is provided in this paper. Important shortcomings in safety philosophy evolution versus time are identified and potential corrective actions are suggested. It should be recognized, that this analysis represents only one person's opinion and that most historical accountings reflect the author's biases and specific areas of knowledge. In that sense, many of the examples used in this paper are related to heat transfer and fluid flow safety issues, which explains why it has been included in a Thermal Hydraulics session. One additional note of caution: the value of hindsight and the selective nature of human memory when looking at the past cannot be overemphasized in any historical perspective

  13. German Light-Water-Reactor Safety-Research Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seipel, H.G.; Lummerzheim, D.; Rittig, D.

    1977-01-01

    The Light-Water-Reactor Safety-Research Program, which is part of the energy program of the Federal Republic of Germany, is presented in this article. The program, for which the Federal Minister of Research and Technology of the Federal Republic of Germany is responsible, is subdivided into the following four main problem areas, which in turn are subdivided into projects: (1) improvement of the operational safety and reliability of systems and components (projects: quality assurance, component safety); (2) analysis of the consequences of accidents (projects: emergency core cooling, containment, external impacts, pressure-vessel failure, core meltdown); (3) analysis of radiation exposure during operation, accident, and decommissioning (project: fission-product transport and radiation exposure); and (4) analysis of the risk created by the operation of nuclear power plants (project: risk and reliability). Various problems, which are included in the above-mentioned projects, are concurrently studied within the Heiss-Dampf Reaktor experiments

  14. Aging management of light water reactor concrete containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Hookhman, C.J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper evaluates aging of light water reactor concrete containments and identifies three degradation mechanisms that have potential to cause widespread aging damage after years of satisfactory experience: alkali-silica reaction, corrosion of reinforcing steel, and sulfate attack. The evaluation is based on a comprehensive review of the relevant technical literature. Low-alkali cement and slow-reacting aggregates selected according to ASTM requirements cause deleterious alkali-silica reactions. Low concentrations of chloride ions can initiate corrosion of the reinforcing steel if the hydroxyl ions are sufficiently reduced by carbonation, leaching, or magnesium sulfate attack. Magnesium sulfate attack on concrete can cause loss of strength and cementitious properties after long exposure. Techniques to detect and mitigate these long-term aging effects are discussed

  15. The United States Advanced Light Water reactor (USALWR) development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahlkopf, K.E.; Noble, D.M.; Devine, Jr.J.C.; Sugnet, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    For the United States Nuclear power industry to remain viable, it must be prepared to meet the expected need for a new generation capacity in the late 90s with an improved reactor system. The best hope of meeting this requirement is with revolutionary changes to current LWR systems through simplification and re-evaluation of safety and operational design margins. In addition, the grid characteristics and the difficulty in raising capital for large projects indicate the smaller light water reactors (600 MWe) may play an important role in the next generation. A cooperative and coordinated program between EPRI, U.S. DOE, the major architect engineers, nuclear steam supply vendors, and the NRC in the U.S. has been undertaken with four major goals in mind. (author)

  16. Assembly homogenization techniques for light water reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    Recent progress in development and application of advanced assembly homogenization methods for light water reactor analysis is reviewed. Practical difficulties arising from conventional flux-weighting approximations are discussed and numerical examples given. The mathematical foundations for homogenization methods are outlined. Two methods, Equivalence Theory and Generalized Equivalence Theory which are theoretically capable of eliminating homogenization error are reviewed. Practical means of obtaining approximate homogenized parameters are presented and numerical examples are used to contrast the two methods. Applications of these techniques to PWR baffle/reflector homogenization and BWR bundle homogenization are discussed. Nodal solutions to realistic reactor problems are compared to fine-mesh PDQ calculations, and the accuracy of the advanced homogenization methods is established. Remaining problem areas are investigated, and directions for future research are suggested. (author)

  17. Commercial Light Water Reactor Tritium Extraction Facility Geotechnical Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    A geotechnical investigation program has been completed for the Circulating Light Water Reactor - Tritium Extraction Facility (CLWR-TEF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The program consisted of reviewing previous geotechnical and geologic data and reports, performing subsurface field exploration, field and laboratory testing and geologic and engineering analyses. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the subsurface conditions for the CLWR-TEF in terms of subsurface stratigraphy and engineering properties for design and to perform selected engineering analyses. The objectives of the evaluation were to establish site-specific geologic conditions, obtain representative engineering properties of the subsurface and potential fill materials, evaluate the lateral and vertical extent of any soft zones encountered, and perform engineering analyses for slope stability, bearing capacity and settlement, and liquefaction potential. In addition, provide general recommendations for construction and earthwork

  18. Power generation versus fuel production in light water hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.

    1977-06-01

    The economic potentials of fissile-fuel-producing light-water hybrid reactors (FFP-LWHR) and of fuel-self-sufficient (FSS) LWHR's are compared. A simple economic model is constructed that gives the capital investment allowed for the hybrid reactor so that the cost of electricity generated in the hybrid based energy system equals the cost of electricity generated in LWR's. The power systems considered are LWR, FSS-LWHR, and FFP-LWHR plus LWR, both with and without plutonium recycling. The economic potential of FFP-LWHR's is found superior to that of FSS-LWHR's. Moreover, LWHR's may compete, economically, with LWR's. Criteria for determining the more economical approach to hybrid fuel or power production are derived for blankets having a linear dependence between F and M. The examples considered favor the power generation rather than fuel production

  19. Anticipated transients without scram for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    In the first two volumes of this report, Anticipated Transients without Scram for Light Water Reactors NUREG-0460, dated April 1978, the NRC staff reviewed the information on this subject that had been developed in the past and evaluated the susceptibility of current nuclear plants to ATWS events using fault tree/event tree analysis techniques. Based on that evaluation, the staff concluded that some corrective measures were required to reduce the risk of severe consequences arising from possible ATWS events. Since the issuance of NUREG-0460, new safety and cost information has become available on ATWS. Also, new insights have been developed on the general subject of quantitative risk assessment. The purpose of this supplement to NUREG-0460 is to summarize the important additions to the information base and to propose a course of action from among a variety of alternatives for resolving the ATWS concern

  20. Conceptual design study of high conversion light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Keisuke; Akie, Hiroshi; Mori, Takamasa; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Ishiguro, Yukio

    1990-06-01

    Since 1984, R and D work has been made for high conversion light water reactors (HCLWRs), at JAERI, to improve the natural uranium saving and effective plutonium utilization by the use of conventional or extended LWR technology. This report summarizes the results of the feasibility study made mainly from the viewpoint of nuclear design in the Phase-I Program (1985∼1989). Until now, the following various types of HCLWR core concepts have been investigated; 1) homogeneous core with tight pitch lattice of fuel rods, 2) homogeneous core with semi-tight pitch lattice, 3) spectral shift core using fertile rod with semi-tight pitch lattice, 4) flat-core, 5) axial heterogeneous core. The core burnup and thermohydraulic analyses during normal operations have been performed to clear up the burnup performances and feasibility for each core. Based on the analysis results, the axial heterogeneous HCLWR core was selected as the JAERI reference core. (author)

  1. Comparative economics of the breeder and light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, B.G.

    1980-01-01

    The issue of breeder timing is studied in this article via a breakeven analysis in which the key driving variables are conveniently segregated into two groups, with uranium price providing the linkage. In one group, the technical and cost characteristics of reactors and fuel cycles determine the uranium breakeven price. In the other group, nuclear demand projections and the uranium supply schedule determine the time paths of uranium price for a given composition of reactor types. The author finds that, even if proliferation risk is ignored, the breeder is not economically competitive with a 30%-improved once-through light water reactor before the year 2030 in the USA and in the world outside communist areas as a whole in 90% of the cases examined. In the exceptional cases, the penalty of delaying commercial breeder introduction to 2030 is small and well within the noise level of long-term energy planning. (author)

  2. Nuclide inventories of spent fuels from light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Keisuke; Okamoto, Tsutomu

    2012-02-01

    Accurate information on nuclide inventories of spent fuels from Light Water Reactors (LWRs) is important for evaluations of criticality, decay heat, radioactivity, toxicity, and so on, in the safety assessments of storage, transportation, reprocessing and waste disposal of the spent fuels. So, a lot of lattice burn-up calculations were carried out for the possible fuel specifications and irradiation conditions in Japanese commercial LWRs by using the latest nuclear data library JENDL-4.0 and a sophisticated lattice burn-up calculation code MOSRA-SRAC. As a result, burn-up changes of nuclide inventories and their possible ranges were clarified for 21 heavy nuclides and 118 fission products, which are important from the viewpoint of impacts to nuclear characteristics and nuclear fuel cycle and environment. (author)

  3. Non-linear analysis in Light Water Reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashid, Y.R.; Sharabi, M.N.; Nickell, R.E.; Esztergar, E.P.; Jones, J.W.

    1980-03-01

    The results obtained from a scoping study sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Light Water Reactor (LWR) Safety Technology Program at Sandia National Laboratories are presented. Basically, this project calls for the examination of the hypothesis that the use of nonlinear analysis methods in the design of LWR systems and components of interest include such items as: the reactor vessel, vessel internals, nozzles and penetrations, component support structures, and containment structures. Piping systems are excluded because they are being addressed by a separate study. Essentially, the findings were that nonlinear analysis methods are beneficial to LWR design from a technical point of view. However, the costs needed to implement these methods are the roadblock to readily adopting them. In this sense, a cost-benefit type of analysis must be made on the various topics identified by these studies and priorities must be established. This document is the complete report by ANATECH International Corporation

  4. Cost analysis of light water reactor power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mooz, W.E.

    1978-06-01

    A statistical analysis is presented of the capital costs of light water reactor (LWR) electrical power plants. The objective is twofold: to determine what factors are statistically related to capital costs and to produce a methodology for estimating these costs. The analysis in the study is based on the time and cost data that are available on U.S. nuclear power plants. Out of a total of about 60 operating plants, useful capital-cost data were available on only 39 plants. In addition, construction-time data were available on about 65 plants, and data on completed construction permit applications were available for about 132 plants. The cost data were first systematically adjusted to constant dollars. Then multivariate regression analyses were performed by using independent variables consisting of various physical and locational characteristics of the plants. The dependent variables analyzed were the time required to obtain a construction permit, the construction time, and the capital cost

  5. Standard Guide for Benchmark Testing of Light Water Reactor Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers general approaches for benchmarking neutron transport calculations in light water reactor systems. A companion guide (Guide E2005) covers use of benchmark fields for testing neutron transport calculations and cross sections in well controlled environments. This guide covers experimental benchmarking of neutron fluence calculations (or calculations of other exposure parameters such as dpa) in more complex geometries relevant to reactor surveillance. Particular sections of the guide discuss: the use of well-characterized benchmark neutron fields to provide an indication of the accuracy of the calculational methods and nuclear data when applied to typical cases; and the use of plant specific measurements to indicate bias in individual plant calculations. Use of these two benchmark techniques will serve to limit plant-specific calculational uncertainty, and, when combined with analytical uncertainty estimates for the calculations, will provide uncertainty estimates for reactor fluences with ...

  6. Waste disposal from the light water reactor fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costello, J.M.; Hardy, C.J.

    1981-05-01

    Alternative nuclear fuel cycles for support of light water reactors are described and wastes containing naturally occurring or artificially produced radioactivity reviewed. General principles and objectives in radioactive waste management are outlined, and methods for their practical application to fuel cycle wastes discussed. The paper concentrates upon management of wastes from upgrading processes of uranium hexafluoride manufacture and uranium enrichment, and, to a lesser extent, nuclear power reactor wastes. Some estimates of radiological dose commitments and health effects from nuclear power and fuel cycle wastes have been made for US conditions. These indicate that the major part of the radiological dose arises from uranium mining and milling, operation of nuclear reactors, and spent fuel reprocessing. However, the total dose from the fuel cycle is estimated to be only a small fraction of that from natural background radiation

  7. Ultraviolet light-emitting diodes in water disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhunen, Sari; Särkkä, Heikki; Sillanpää, Mika

    2009-06-01

    The novel system of ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV LEDs) was studied in water disinfection. Conventional UV lamps, like mercury vapor lamp, consume much energy and are considered to be problem waste after use. UV LEDs are energy efficient and free of toxicants. This study showed the suitability of LEDs in disinfection and provided information of the effect of two emitted wavelengths and different test mediums to Escherichia coli destruction. Common laboratory strain of E. coli (K12) was used and the effects of two emitted wavelengths (269 and 276 nm) were investigated with two photolytic batch reactors both including ten LEDs. The effects of test medium were examined with ultrapure water, nutrient and water, and nutrient and water with humic acids. Efficiency of reactors was almost the same even though the one emitting higher wavelength had doubled optical power compared to the other. Therefore, the effect of wavelength was evident and the radiation emitted at 269 nm was more powerful. Also, the impact of background was studied and noticed to have only slight deteriorating effect. In the 5-min experiment, the bacterial reduction of three to four log colony-forming units (CFU) per cubic centimeter was achieved, in all cases. When turbidity of the test medium was greater, part of the UV radiation was spent on the absorption and reactions with extra substances on liquid. Humic acids can also coat the bacteria reducing the sensitivity of the cells to UV light. The lower wavelength was distinctly more efficient when the optical power is considered, even though the difference of wavelengths was small. The reason presumably is the greater absorption of DNA causing more efficient bacterial breakage. UV LEDs were efficient in E. coli destruction, even if LEDs were considered to have rather low optical power. The effect of wavelengths was noticeable but the test medium did not have much impact. This study found UV LEDs to be an optimal method for bacterial

  8. Study for improvement of light water reactor technology, (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hideaki; Morita, Terumichi; Igarashi, Hiroshi; Tabata, Hiroaki

    1991-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Power Company has performed some studies, which are referred to as 'some feasibility studies of LWR technology', in order to help improve and up-grade the light water reactor technology. We would like to show the key results of the above studies in an orderly fashion in this document. As the third issue, this paper describes the study of the feasibility of applying a suppression pool system in a 4-loop PWR plant in order to reduce containment volume and evaluates the merits of such a system. The results confirmed the feasibility of such a plant consisting of a 4-loop plant with a suppression pool system. The expected merits of a suppression pool type PWR are as follows: (1) The volume within the containment boundary is half of that for the conventional plant. This reduces the material quantity substantially. (2) A wider layout space is obtained since the operating floor is located outside the containment are. And this improves the maneuverability of plant outage. (3) Low center of gravity of the plant contributes to improving the ability to withstand seismic activity. Although there are some open items left that should be confirmed, we consider that PWR with small CV is an appealing plant in the light of further sales points such as relaxing siting conditions, extending the use of robotics and so on. (author)

  9. Utility Leadership in Defining Requirements for Advanced Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugnet, William R.; Layman, William H.

    1990-01-01

    It is appropriate, based on twenty five years of operating experience, that utilities take a position of leadership in developing the technical design and performance requirements for the next generations of nuclear electric generating plants. The U. S. utilities, through the Electric Power Research Institute, began an initiative in 1985 to develop such Utility requirements. Many international Utility organizations, including Korea Electric Power Corporation, have joined as full participants in this important Utility industry initiative. In light of the closer linkage among countries of the world due to rapid travel and telecommunications, it is also appropriate that there be international dialogue and agreement on the principal standards for nuclear power plant acceptability and performance. The Utility/EPRI Advanced Light Water Reactor Program guided by the ALRR Utility Steering Committee has been very successful in developing these Utility requirements. This paper will summarize the state of development of the ALRR Utility Requirements for Evolutionary Plants, recent developments in their review by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, resolution of open issues, and the extension of this effort to develop a companion set of ALRR Utility Requirements for plants employing passive safety features

  10. Transmutation of Americium in Light and Heavy Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyland, B.; Dyck, G.R.; Edwards, G.W.R. [Chalk River Laboratories, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (Canada); Ellis, R.J.; Gehin, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Maldonado, G.I. [University of Tennessee (Knoxville)/ORNL, Tennessee (United States)

    2009-06-15

    There is interest worldwide in reducing the burden on geological nuclear fuel disposal sites. In most disposal scenarios the decay heat loading of the surrounding rock limits the capacity of these sites. On the long term, this decay heat is generated primarily by actinides, and a major contributor 100 to 1000 years after discharge from the reactor is {sup 241}Am. One possible approach to reducing the decay-heat burden is to reprocess spent reactor fuel and use thermal spectrum reactors to 'burn' the Am nuclides. The viability of this approach is dependent upon the detailed changes in chemical and isotopic composition of actinide-bearing fuels after irradiation in thermal reactor spectra. The currently available thermal spectrum reactor options include light water-reactors (LWRs) and heavy-water reactors (HWRs) such as the CANDU{sup R} designs. In addition, as a result of the recycle of spent LWR fuel, there would be a considerable amount of potential recycled uranium (RU). One proposed solution for the recycled uranium is to use it as fuel in Candu reactors. This paper investigates the possibilities of transmuting americium in 'spiked' bundles in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and in boiling water reactors (BWRs). Transmutation of Am in Candu reactors is also examined. One scenario studies a full core fuelled with homogeneous bundles of Am mixed with recycled uranium, while a second scenario places Am in an inert matrix in target channels in a Candu reactor, with the rest of the reactor fuelled with RU. A comparison of the transmutation in LWRs and HWRs is made, in terms of the fraction of Am that is transmuted and the impact on the decay heat of the spent nuclear fuel. CANDU{sup R} is a registered trademark of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). (authors)

  11. Potential of light water reactors for future nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueldner, R.

    2003-01-01

    Energy consumption worldwide is going to increase further in the next few decades. Reliable supplies of electricity can be achieved only by centralized power plant structures. In this scenario, nuclear power plants are going to play a leading role as reliable and competitive plants, also under deregulated market conditions. Today, light water reactors have achieved a leading position, both technically and economically, contributing 85% to worldwide electricity generation in nuclear plants. They will continue to be a proven technology in power generation. In many countries, activities therefore are concentrated on extending the service life of plants beyond a period of forty years. New nuclear generating capacities are expected to be created and added from the end of this decade onward. Most of this capacity will be in light water reactors. The concepts of third-generation reactors will meet all economic and technical safety requirements of the 21st century and will offer considerable potential for further development. Probably some thirty years from now, fourth-generation nuclear power plants will be ready for commercial application. These plants will penetrate especially new sectors of the energy markets. Public acceptance of new nuclear power plants is not a matter of reactor lines, provided that safety requirements are met. The important issue is the management of radioactive waste. The construction of new nuclear power plants in Western Europe and North America mainly hinges on the ability to explain to the public that there is a need for new plants and that nuclear power is fundamental to assuring sustainable development. (orig.)

  12. Materials Inventory Database for the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazi Ahmed; Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton

    2013-08-01

    Scientific research involves the purchasing, processing, characterization, and fabrication of many sample materials. The history of such materials can become complicated over their lifetime – materials might be cut into pieces or moved to various storage locations, for example. A database with built-in functions to track these kinds of processes facilitates well-organized research. The Material Inventory Database Accounting System (MIDAS) is an easy-to-use tracking and reference system for such items. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRS), which seeks to advance the long-term reliability and productivity of existing nuclear reactors in the United States through multiple research pathways, proposed MIDAS as an efficient way to organize and track all items used in its research. The database software ensures traceability of all items used in research using built-in functions which can emulate actions on tracked items – fabrication, processing, splitting, and more – by performing operations on the data. MIDAS can recover and display the complete history of any item as a simple report. To ensure the database functions suitably for the organization of research, it was developed alongside a specific experiment to test accident tolerant nuclear fuel cladding under the LWRS Advanced Light Water Reactor Nuclear Fuels Pathway. MIDAS kept track of materials used in this experiment from receipt at the laboratory through all processes, test conduct and, ultimately, post-test analysis. By the end of this process, the database proved to be right tool for this program. The database software will help LWRS more efficiently conduct research experiments, from simple characterization tests to in-reactor experiments. Furthermore, MIDAS is a universal tool that any other research team could use to organize their material inventory.

  13. Effects of treated waste water irrigation on some qualitative charcterstics of forage sorghum, corn and millet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    alireza emami

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the effects of irrigation with different levels of urban treated waste water on feeding value of forage sorghum (Var. Speed feed and Sugar graze, maize (Var. SC 704 and millet (Var. Nutrifeed an experiment was conducted at Experimental Station No.1, Astan Qods Razavi Mashhad, and Animal Nutrition Laboratory, College of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad. Four varieties of forage plants with five levels of treated waste water: %0, %25, %50, %75 and %100 were compared in a split-plot experiment based on Randomized Complete Block Design with four replications per treatment. Feeding values of forage plants such as Crude Protein content (CP, Neutral Detergent Fiber content (NDF, in vitro Dry Matter Digestibility (DMD, Organic Matter Digestibility (OMD and D-Value were measured. Results showed that treated waste water irrigation had a significant effect on crude protein content. The highest crude protein content was shown at % 100 treated waste water ( %13.76 and the lowest was shown at % treated waste water (%9.54. There were no significant differences between %0 and %25, and also %75 and %100 treated waste water in terms of crude protein content, but there were significant differences between %50 and other treated waste water treatments (except 75% treatments. There were no significant difference between irrigation with different levels of treated waste water in terms of NDF, in vitro DMD, OMD, and D-Value. There were significant differences between forage plants in all studied characteristics, but there were no significant differences on interactions between forage plants and different levels of treated waste water treatments. Forage maize had the highest in vitro DMD at %75 treated waste water and forage sorghum (var. Speed feed had the lowest in vitro DMD at %0 treated waste water treatments with averages of %77.57 and %61.6, respectively. The results indicated that treated waste water increased the percentage of crude

  14. Finding Balance Between Biological Groundwater Treatment and Treated Injection Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Mark A.; Nielsen, Kellin R.; Byrnes, Mark E.; Simmons, Sally A.; Morse, John J.; Geiger, James B.; Watkins, Louis E.; McFee, Phillip M.; Martins, K.

    2015-01-14

    At the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company operates the 200 West Pump and Treat which was engineered to treat radiological and chemical contaminants in groundwater as a result of the site’s former plutonium production years. Fluidized bed bioreactors (FBRs) are used to remove nitrate, metals, and volatile organic compounds. Increasing nitrate concentrations in the treatment plant effluent and the presence of a slimy biomass (a typical microorganism response to stress) in the FBRs triggered an investigation of nutrient levels in the system. Little, if any, micronutrient feed was coming into the bioreactors. Additionally, carbon substrate (used to promote biological growth) was passing through to the injection wells, causing biological fouling of the wells and reduced specific injectivity. Adjustments to the micronutrient feed improved microorganism health, but the micronutrients were being overfed (particularly manganese) plugging the injection wells further. Injection well rehabilitation to restore specific injectivity required repeated treatments to remove the biological fouling and precipitated metal oxides. A combination of sulfamic and citric acids worked well to dissolve metal oxides and sodium hypochlorite effectively removed the biological growth. Intensive surging and development techniques successfully removed clogging material from the injection wells. Ultimately, the investigation and nutrient adjustments took months to restore proper balance to the microbial system and over a year to stabilize injection well capacities. Carefully tracking and managing the FBRs and well performance monitoring are critical to balancing the needs of the treatment system while reducing fouling mechanisms in the injection wells.

  15. Apparatus comprising trace element dosage and method for treating raw water in biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    the inlet (2) to the outlet (3) or in the reverse direction, - the trace element dosage device (13) is positioned upstream of the porous filter material and microbial biomass and is configured to dose trace element(s) to the water flowing through the filter. A method for treating raw water by microbial......Apparatus for treating raw water in a biofilter The present invention relates to an apparatus in which raw water is treated through microbial activity where microbial activity is controlled by nutrients and other parameters. Some of the nutrients controlling the microbial activity are trace...... elements such as certain metals (Cu, Co, Cr, Mo, Ni, W, Zn or a mixture thereof). The apparatus comprising - a volume provided with an inlet (2) for raw water and an outlet (3) for water having been subjected to microbial activity, a filter and a trace element dosage device (13) are placed in this volume...

  16. Using Electrolyte Free Water Balance to Rationalize and Treat Dysnatremias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sanjeev R; Bhave, Gautam

    2018-01-01

    Dysnatremias or abnormalities in plasma [Na + ] are often termed disorders of water balance, an unclear physiologic concept often confused with changes in total fluid balance. However, most clinicians clearly recognize that hypertonic or hypotonic gains or losses alter plasma [Na + ], while isotonic changes do not modify plasma [Na + ]. This concept can be conceptualized as the electrolyte free water balance (EFWB), which defines the non-isotonic components of inputs and outputs to determine their effect on plasma [Na + ]. EFWB is mathematically proportional to the rate of change in plasma [Na + ] (dP Na /dt) and, therefore, is actively regulated to zero so that plasma [Na + ] remains stable at its homeostatic set point. Dysnatremias are, therefore, disorders of EFWB and the relationship between EFWB and dP Na /dt provides a rationale for therapeutic strategies incorporating mass and volume balance. Herein, we leverage dP Na /dt as a desired rate of correction of plasma [Na + ] to define a stepwise approach for the treatment of dysnatremias.

  17. Monitoring the Microbial Purity of the Treated Water and Dialysate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canaud Bernard

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Dialysate purity has become a major concern in recent years since it has been proven that contamination of dialysate is able to induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines, putatively implicated in the development of dialysis related pathology. In order to reduce this risk, it is advised to use ultrapure dialysate as a new standard of dialysate purity. Ultrapure dialysate preparation may be easily achieved with modern water treatment technologies. The reliable production of ultrapure dialysate requires several prerequisites: use of ultrapure water, use of clean electrolytic concentrates, implementation of ultrafilters in the dialysate pathway to ensure cold sterilization of the fresh dialysate. The regular supply with such high-grade purity dialysate relies on predefined microbiological monitoring of the chain using adequate and sensitive methods, and hygienic handling including frequent disinfection to reduce the level of contamination and to prevent biofilm formation. Reliability of this process requires compliance with a very strict quality assurance process. In this paper, we summarized the principles of the dialysate purity monitoring and the criteria used for surveillance in order to establish good antimicrobial practices in dialysis.

  18. Using Electrolyte Free Water Balance to Rationalize and Treat Dysnatremias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sanjeev R.; Bhave, Gautam

    2018-01-01

    Dysnatremias or abnormalities in plasma [Na+] are often termed disorders of water balance, an unclear physiologic concept often confused with changes in total fluid balance. However, most clinicians clearly recognize that hypertonic or hypotonic gains or losses alter plasma [Na+], while isotonic changes do not modify plasma [Na+]. This concept can be conceptualized as the electrolyte free water balance (EFWB), which defines the non-isotonic components of inputs and outputs to determine their effect on plasma [Na+]. EFWB is mathematically proportional to the rate of change in plasma [Na+] (dPNa/dt) and, therefore, is actively regulated to zero so that plasma [Na+] remains stable at its homeostatic set point. Dysnatremias are, therefore, disorders of EFWB and the relationship between EFWB and dPNa/dt provides a rationale for therapeutic strategies incorporating mass and volume balance. Herein, we leverage dPNa/dt as a desired rate of correction of plasma [Na+] to define a stepwise approach for the treatment of dysnatremias. PMID:29740578

  19. Using Electrolyte Free Water Balance to Rationalize and Treat Dysnatremias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev R. Shah

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Dysnatremias or abnormalities in plasma [Na+] are often termed disorders of water balance, an unclear physiologic concept often confused with changes in total fluid balance. However, most clinicians clearly recognize that hypertonic or hypotonic gains or losses alter plasma [Na+], while isotonic changes do not modify plasma [Na+]. This concept can be conceptualized as the electrolyte free water balance (EFWB, which defines the non-isotonic components of inputs and outputs to determine their effect on plasma [Na+]. EFWB is mathematically proportional to the rate of change in plasma [Na+] (dPNa/dt and, therefore, is actively regulated to zero so that plasma [Na+] remains stable at its homeostatic set point. Dysnatremias are, therefore, disorders of EFWB and the relationship between EFWB and dPNa/dt provides a rationale for therapeutic strategies incorporating mass and volume balance. Herein, we leverage dPNa/dt as a desired rate of correction of plasma [Na+] to define a stepwise approach for the treatment of dysnatremias.

  20. Is it possible to treat produced water for recycle and beneficial reuse?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hum, F.; Tsang, P.; Kantzas, A.; Harding, T. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Tomographic Imaging and Porous Media Laboratory

    2005-11-01

    In 2003, the oil and gas industry in Alberta injected 0.3 billion cubic metres of produced water into disposal wells. This paper addressed the issue of using the large volume of produced water for recycling and make water reuse a sustainable activity in Alberta to reduce fresh water demand. Although produced water represents a potential resource for recycling and beneficial reuse, it must first be treated to meet water quality criteria and regulatory guidelines for specific applications. A comprehensive technical and economic review of water treatment technologies was presented. Commonly used and new water desalination technologies were reviewed and key challenges associated with the recycling of produced water were identified. It was shown that water treatment processes are commercially available and that they are not prohibitively expensive. However, the cost of implementing treating processes to meet drinking water quality guidelines is about 3 times the current cost of municipal water supply in Alberta. For that reason, it is more feasible to recycle waste water for agricultural or petroleum applications, such as waterflooding. The water quality guidelines for these other purposes are less stringent than for drinking water and there is also growing public resistance for industry to use fresh water for commercial use. 42 refs., 3 tabs., 14 figs.

  1. Shining new light on treating dementia: integrating EEG neurofeedback training and near infrared photobiomodulation (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Marvin H.

    2017-02-01

    Evidence from animal and human studies regarding the biological impact of near infrared light stimulation has significantly increased of late noting the disease modifying properties of photobiomodulation for improving physical and cognitive performance in subjects with a variety of neurodegenerative conditions. Concurrently we see a growing body of literature regarding the efficacy of operant conditioning of EEG amplitude and connectivity in remediating both cognitive and behavioral symptoms of both neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders including traumatic brain injury, ADHD, PTSD, and dementia. This presentation seeks to outline a treatment model combining these two treatment methods to stop the progression of neurodegeneration using pulsed (10hz), brief (5-20minutes) repeated (1-2x/daily) transcranial and intranasal photobiomodulation with 810nm and 1068nm near infrared phototherapy and operant conditioning of EEG amplitude and coherence. Our initial study on treating dementia with EEG biofeedback (N=37) showed neuroplasticity's potential for modifying cognitive and behavioral symptoms using the evidence from decades of neurological research that never felt the warm touch of a translational researcher's hand. The near infrared interventional studies clarified the order of treatment, i.e., tissue health and renewal were achieved, followed by neural connectivity enhancement. Significant improvements in both immediate and delayed recall and praxis memory as well as executive functioning and behavioral regulation were obtained with each intervention. The inferred synergistic impact of properly combining these approaches is what informs our current clinical applications and future research efforts examining the value of combined treatments for all dementias, parkinson's disease and age-related dry macular degeneration.

  2. Tritium separation from light and heavy water by bipolar electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramey, D.W.; Petek, M.; Taylor, R.D.; Kobisk, E.H.; Ramey, J.; Sampson, C.A.

    1979-10-01

    Use of bipolar electrolysis with countercurrent electrolyte flow to separate hydrogen isotopes was investigated for the removal of tritium from light water effluents or from heavy water moderator. Deuterium-tritium and protium-tritium separation factors occurring on a Pd-25% Ag bipolar electrode were measured to be 2.05 to 2.16 and 11.6 to 12.4 respectively, at current densities between 0.21 and 0.50 A cm -2 , and at 35 to 90 0 C. Current densities up to 0.3 A cm -2 have been achieved in continuous operation, at 80 to 90 0 C, without significant gas formation on the bipolar electrodes. From the measured overvoltage at the bipolar electrodes and the electrolyte conductivity the power consumption per stage was calculated to be 3.0 kwh/kg H 2 O at 0.2 A cm -2 and 5.0 kwh/kg H 2 O at 0.5 A cm -2 current density, compared to 6.4 and 8.0 kwh/kg H 2 O for normal electrolysis. A mathematical model derived for hydrogen isotope separation by bipolar electrolysis, i.e., for a square cascade, accurately describes the results for protium-tritium separation in two laboratory scale, multistage experiments with countercurrent electrolyte flow; the measured tiritum concentration gradient through the cascade agreed with the calculated values

  3. Development of pre-startup equipment for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ram, Rajit; Borkar, S.P.; Dixit, M.Y.; Das, Debashis; Patil, R.K.

    2010-01-01

    Light water reactor (LWR) core typically has high excess reactivity as compared to Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR). Unlike PHWR, where online refueling is done, LWR is operated for a long period to achieve maximum fuel burn-up before refueling. Since the reactivity is always reducing with burn-up of the core, the positions of control rods at criticality are always changing in a single direction, i.e. away from the core. Therefore it is possible to start the LWR even if the nuclear instrumentation is not online, provided the criticality position of control rods is known for previous operation. However, for the very first startup, the criticality position of control rods is required to be determined. A special nuclear instrumentation system, called Pre-startup equipment (PSE) is developed using two numbers of in-core detectors along with the processing electronics. The PSE enables operators to determine the criticality position of control rods for the first startup at zero power. The same equipment can also be used during loading of fuel assemblies. This paper discusses the features and architecture of PSE, its individual circuit blocks and specifications. (author)

  4. Water cooled metal optics for the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, W.R.; Irick, S.C.; Lunt, D.L.J.

    1991-01-01

    The program for providing water cooled metal optics for the Advanced Light Source at Berkeley is reviewed with respect to fabrication and metrology of the surfaces. Materials choices, surface figure and smoothness specifications, and metrology systems for measuring the plated metal surfaces are discussed. Results from prototype mirrors and grating blanks will be presented, which show exceptionally low microroughness and mid-period error. We will briefly describe out improved version of the Long Trace Profiler, and its importance to out metrology program. We have completely redesigned the mechanical, optical and computational parts of the profiler system with the cooperation of Peter Takacs of Brookhaven, Continental Optical, and Baker Manufacturing. Most important is that one of our profilers is in use at the vendor to allow testing during fabrication. Metrology from the first water cooled mirror for an ALS beamline is presented as an example. The preplating processing and grinding and polishing were done by Tucson Optical. We will show significantly better surface microroughness on electroless nickel, over large areas, than has been reported previously

  5. Clarification of dissolved irradiated light-water-reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, G.C.

    1983-02-01

    Bench-scale studies with actual dissolved irradiated light water reactor (LWR) fuels showed that continuous centrifugation is a practical clarification method for reprocessing. Dissolved irradiated LWR fuel was satisfactorily clarified in a bench-scale, continuous-flow bowl centrifuge. The solids separated were successfully reslurried in water. When the reslurried solids were mixed with clarified centrate, the resulting suspension behaved similar to the original dissolver solution during centrifugation. Settling rates for solids in actual irradiated fuel solutions were measured in a bottle centrifuge. The results indicate that dissolver solutions may be clarified under conditions achievable by available plant-scale centrifuge technology. The effective particle diameter of residual solids was calculated to be 0.064 microns for Oconee-1 fuel and 0.138 microns for Dresden-1 fuel. Filtration was shown unsuitable for clarification of LWR fuel solutions. Conventional filtration with filter aid would unacceptably complicate remote canyon operation and maintenance, might introduce dissolved silica from filter aids, and might irreversibly plug the filter with dissolver solids. Inertial filtration exhibited irreversible pluggage with nonradioactive stand-in suspensions under all conditions tested

  6. Light water ultra-safe plant concept: First annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klevans, E.

    1987-01-01

    Since the accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) Penn State Nuclear Engineering Department Faculty and Staff have considered various methods to improve already safe reactor designs and public perception of the safety of Nuclear Power. During the last year, the Department of Energy funded the study of a plant reconfiguration originally proposed by M.A. Shultz. This report presents the status of the project at the end of the first year. A broad set of specifications to improve safety and public perception were set forth and the realization of these goals is achieved in a plant design named, ''The Light Water Ultra-Safe Plant Concept.'' The most significant goals of the concept address the station black-out problem and simplification of required operator actions during abnormal situations. These goals are achieved in the Ultra-Safe Concept by addition of an in-containment atmospheric tank containing a large quantity of cool water, replacement of the conventional PWR pressurizer system with a pressurizing pump, internal emergency power generation, and arrangement of components to utilize natural circulation at shut-down. The first year effort included an evaluation of the normal operation characteristics of the primary system pressurizing concept, evaluating parameters and modeling for analysis of the shutdown scenario, design of a low power density core, design of a low-pressure waste handling system, arrangement of a drainage system for pipe break considerations, and failure modes and effects analysis

  7. A new book : 'light-water reactor materials'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olander, Donald R.; Motta, Arthur T.

    2005-01-01

    The contents of a new book currently in preparation are described. The dearth of books in the field of nuclear materials has left both students in nuclear materials classes and professionals in the same field without a resource for the broad fundamentals of this important sub-discipline of nuclear engineering. The new book is devoted entirely to materials problems in the core of light-water reactors, from the pressure vessel into the fuel. Key topics deal with the UO 2 fuel, zircaloy cladding, stainless steel, and of course, water. The restriction to LWR materials does not mean a short monograph; the enormous quantity of experimental and theoretical work over the past 50 years on these materials presents a challenge of culling the most important features and explaining them in the simplest quantitative fashion. Moreover, LWRs will probably be the sole instrument of the return of nuclear energy in electric power production for the next decade or so. By that time, a new book will be needed

  8. PARs for combustible gas control in advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosler, J.; Sliter, G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the progress being made in the United States to introduce passive autocatalytic recombiner (PAR) technology as a cost-effective alternative to electric recombiners for controlling combustible gas produced in postulated accidents in both future Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs) and certain U. S. operating nuclear plants. PARs catalytically recombine hydrogen and oxygen, gradually producing heat and water vapor. They have no moving parts and are self-starting and self-feeding, even under relatively cold and wet containment conditions. Buoyancy of the hot gases they create sets up natural convective flow that promotes mixing of combustible gases in a containment. In a non-inerted ALWR containment, two approaches each employing a combination of PARs and igniters are being considered to control hydrogen in design basis and severe accidents. In pre-inerted ALWRs, PARs alone control radiolytic oxygen produced in either accident type. The paper also discusses regulatory feedback regarding these combustible gas control approaches and describes a test program being conducted by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Electricite de France (EdF) to supplement the existing PAR test database with performance data under conditions of interest to U.S. plants. Preliminary findings from the EPRI/EdF PAR model test program are included. Successful completion of this test program and confirmatory tests being sponsored by the U. S. NRC are expected to pave the way for use of PARs in ALWRs and operating plants. (author)

  9. Water chemistry control to meet the advanced design and operation of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Hiroshi; Uchida, Shunsuke; Naitoh, Masanori; Okada, Hidetoshi; Sato, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    Water chemistry control is one of the key technologies to establish safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants. The road maps on R and D plans for water chemistry of nuclear power systems in Japan have been proposed along with promotion of R and D related water chemistry improvement for the advanced application of light water reactors (LWRs). The technical trends were divided into four categories, dose rate reduction, structural integrity, fuel integrity and radioactive waste reduction, and latest technical break through for each category was shown for the advanced application of LWRs. At the same time, the technical break through and the latest movements for regulation of water chemistry were introduced for each of major organizations related to nuclear engineering in the world. The conclusions were summarized as follows; 1. Water chemistry improvements might contribute to achieve the advanced application of LWRs, while water chemistry should be often changed to achieve the advanced application of LWRs. 2. Only one solution for water chemistry control was not obtained for achieving the advanced application of LWRs, but miscellaneous solutions were possible for achieving one. Optimal water chemistry control was desired for having the good practices for satisfying multi-targets at the same time and it was much affected by the plant unique systems and operational history. 3. That meant it was difficult to determine water chemistry regulation targets for achieving application of LWRs but it was necessary to prepare suitable guideline for good achievement of application of LWRs. That meant the guideline should be recommendation for good practice in the plant. 4. The water chemistry guide line should be modified along with progress of plant operation and water chemistry and related technologies. (author)

  10. A collection of publications and articles for a light water ultra-safe plant concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klevans, E.H.

    1988-01-01

    This collection contains reports titled: ''The Penn State Ultra-Safe Reactor Concept; '' ''Ultra Safe Nuclear Power; '' ''Use of the Modular Modeling System, in the Design of the Penn State Advanced Light Water Reactor; '' ''Use of the Modular Modeling System in Severe Transient Analysis of Penn State Advanced Light Water Reactor; '' ''PSU Engineers' Reactor Design May Stop a Future TMI; '' and ''The Penn State Advanced Light Water reactor Concept.''

  11. Microbial biosafety of pilot-scale bioreactor treating MTBE and TBA-contaminated drinking water supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Radomir; Klemme, David A; Scow, Kate; Hristova, Krassimira

    2012-03-30

    A pilot-scale sand-based fluidized bed bioreactor (FBBR) was utilized to treat both methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) from a contaminated aquifer. To evaluate the potential for re-use of the treated water, we tested for a panel of water quality indicator microorganisms and potential waterborne pathogens including total coliforms, Escherichia coli, Salmonella and Shigella spp., Campylobacter jejuni, Aeromonas hydrophila, Legionella pneumophila, Vibrio cholerae, Yersinia enterocolytica and Mycobacterium avium in both influent and treated waters from the bioreactor. Total bacteria decreased during FBBR treatment. E. coli, Salmonella and Shigella spp., C. jejuni, V. cholerae, Y. enterocolytica and M. avium were not detected in aquifer water or bioreactor treated water samples. For those pathogens detected, including total coliforms, L. pneumophila and A. hydrophila, numbers were usually lower in treated water than influent samples, suggesting removal during treatment. The detection of particular bacterial species reflected their presence or absence in the influent waters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Irrigating with Treated Oil and Gas Product Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry Brown; Jeffrey Morris; Patrick Richards; Joel Mason

    2010-09-30

    Demonstrating effective treatment technologies and beneficial uses for oil and gas produced water is essential for producers who must meet environmental standards and deal with high costs associated with produced water management. Proven, effective produced-water treatment technologies coupled with comprehensive data regarding blending ratios for productive long-term irrigation will improve the state-of-knowledge surrounding produced-water management. Effective produced-water management scenarios such as cost-effective treatment and irrigation will discourage discharge practices that result in legal battles between stakeholder entities. The goal of this work is to determine the optimal blending ratio required for irrigating crops with CBNG and conventional oil and gas produced water treated by ion exchange (IX), reverse osmosis (RO), or electro-dialysis reversal (EDR) in order to maintain the long term physical integrity of soils and to achieve normal crop production. The soils treated with CBNG produced water were characterized with significantly lower SAR values compared to those impacted with conventional oil and gas produced water. The CBNG produced water treated with RO at the 100% treatment level was significantly different from the untreated produced water, while the 25%, 50% and 75% water treatment levels were not significantly different from the untreated water. Conventional oil and gas produced water treated with EDR and RO showed comparable SAR results for the water treatment technologies. There was no significant difference between the 100% treated produced water and the control (river water). The EDR water treatment resulted with differences at each level of treatment, which were similar to RO treated conventional oil and gas water. The 100% treated water had SAR values significantly lower than the 75% and 50% treatments, which were similar (not significantly different). The results of the greenhouse irrigation study found the differences in biomass

  13. Temperature effects studies in light water reactor lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erradi, Lahoussine.

    1982-02-01

    The CREOLE experiments performed in the EOLE critical facility located in the Nuclear Center of CADARACHE - CEA (UO 2 and UO 2 -PuO 2 lattice reactivity temperature coefficient continuous measurements between 20 0 C and 300 0 C; integral measurements by boron equivalent effect in the moderator; water density effects measurements with the use of over cladding aluminium tubes to remove moderator) allow to get an interesting and complete information on the temperature effects in the light water reactor lattices. A very elaborated calcurated scheme using the transport theory and the APOLLO cross sections library, has been developed. The analysed results of the whole lot of experiments show that the discrepancy between theory and experiment strongly depends on the temperature range and on the type of lattices considered. The error is mainly linked with the thermal spectrum effects. A study on the temperature coefficient sensitivity to the different cell neutron parameters has shown that only the shapes of the 235 U and 238 U thermal cross sections have enough weight and uncertainty margins to explain the observed experimental/calculation bias. Instead of arbitrarily fitting the identified wrong data on the calculation of the reactivity temperature coefficient we have defined a procedure of modification of the cross sections based on the consideration of the basic nuclear data: resonance parameters and associated statistic laws. The implementation of this procedure has led to propose new thermal cross sections sets for 235 U and 238 U consistent with the uncertainty margins associated with the previously accepted values and with some experimental data [fr

  14. Summary of Research on Light Water Reactor Improvement Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mowery, Alfred L.

    2002-01-01

    The Arms Control and Disarmament Agency of the U.S. Department of State instituted a study aimed at improving the light water reactor (LWR) fuel consumption efficiency as an alternative to fuel recycle in the late 1970s. Comparison of the neutron balance tables of an LWR (1982 design) and an 'advanced' Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor explained that the relatively low fuel efficiency of the LWR was not primarily a consequence of water moderator absorptions. Rather, the comparatively low LWR fuel efficiency resulted from its use of poison to hold down startup reactivity together with other neutron losses. The research showed that each neutron saved could reduce fuel consumption by about 5%. In a typical LWR some 5 neutrons (out of 100) were absorbed in control poisons over a cycle. There are even more parasitic and leakage neutron absorptions. The objective of the research was to find ways to minimize control, parasitic, and other neutron losses aimed at improved LWR fuel consumption. Further research developed the concept of 'putting neutrons in the bank' in 238 U early in life and 'drawing them out of the bank' late in life by burning the 239 Pu produced. Conceptual designs were explored that could both control the reactor and substantially improve fuel efficiency and minimize separative work requirements.The U.S. Department of Energy augmented its high burnup fuel program based on the research in the late 1970s. As a result of the success of this program, fuel burnup in U.S. LWRs has almost doubled in the intervening two decades

  15. Application of fully ceramic microencapsulated fuels in light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentry, C.; George, N.; Maldonado, I. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Univ. of Tennessee-Knoxville, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States); Godfrey, A.; Terrani, K.; Gehin, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This study performs a preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of incorporation of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated (FCM) fuels in light water reactors (LWRs). In particular, pin cell, lattice, and full core analyses are carried out on FCM fuel in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Using uranium-based fuel and Pu/Np-based fuel in TRistructural isotropic (TRISO) particle form, each fuel design was examined using the SCALE 6.1 analytical suite. In regards to the uranium-based fuel, pin cell calculations were used to determine which fuel material performed best when implemented in the fuel kernel as well as the size of the kernel and surrounding particle layers. The higher fissile material density of uranium mononitride (UN) proved to be favorable, while the parametric studies showed that the FCM particle fuel design with 19.75% enrichment would need roughly 12% additional fissile material in comparison to that of a standard UO{sub 2} rod in order to match the lifetime of an 18-month PWR cycle. As part of the fuel assembly design evaluations, fresh feed lattices were modeled to analyze the within-assembly pin power peaking. Also, a 'color-set' array of assemblies was constructed to evaluate power peaking and power sharing between a once-burned and a fresh feed assembly. In regards to the Pu/Np-based fuel, lattice calculations were performed to determine an optimal lattice design based on reactivity behavior, pin power peaking, and isotopic content. After obtaining a satisfactory lattice design, the feasibility of core designs fully loaded with Pu/Np FCM lattices was demonstrated using the NESTLE three-dimensional core simulator. (authors)

  16. Application of fully ceramic microencapsulated fuels in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentry, C.; George, N.; Maldonado, I.; Godfrey, A.; Terrani, K.; Gehin, J.

    2012-01-01

    This study performs a preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of incorporation of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated (FCM) fuels in light water reactors (LWRs). In particular, pin cell, lattice, and full core analyses are carried out on FCM fuel in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Using uranium-based fuel and Pu/Np-based fuel in TRistructural isotropic (TRISO) particle form, each fuel design was examined using the SCALE 6.1 analytical suite. In regards to the uranium-based fuel, pin cell calculations were used to determine which fuel material performed best when implemented in the fuel kernel as well as the size of the kernel and surrounding particle layers. The higher fissile material density of uranium mononitride (UN) proved to be favorable, while the parametric studies showed that the FCM particle fuel design with 19.75% enrichment would need roughly 12% additional fissile material in comparison to that of a standard UO 2 rod in order to match the lifetime of an 18-month PWR cycle. As part of the fuel assembly design evaluations, fresh feed lattices were modeled to analyze the within-assembly pin power peaking. Also, a 'color-set' array of assemblies was constructed to evaluate power peaking and power sharing between a once-burned and a fresh feed assembly. In regards to the Pu/Np-based fuel, lattice calculations were performed to determine an optimal lattice design based on reactivity behavior, pin power peaking, and isotopic content. After obtaining a satisfactory lattice design, the feasibility of core designs fully loaded with Pu/Np FCM lattices was demonstrated using the NESTLE three-dimensional core simulator. (authors)

  17. Application of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuels in Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentry, Cole A [ORNL; George, Nathan M [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Godfrey, Andrew T [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to perform a preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of incorporation of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated (FCM) fuels in Light Water Reactors (LWRs). In particular pin cell, lattice, and full core analyses are carried out on FCM fuel in a pressurized water reactor. Using uranium-based fuel and transuranic (TRU) based fuel in TRistructural ISOtropic (TRISO) particle form, each fuel design was examined using the SCALE 6.1 analytical suite. In regards to the uranium-based fuel, pin cell calculations were used to determine which fuel material performed best when implemented in the fuel kernel as well as the size of the kernel and surrounding particle layers. The higher physical density of uranium mononitride (UN) proved to be favorable, while the parametric studies showed that the FCM particle fuel design would need roughly 12% additional fissile material in comparison to that of a standard UO2 rod in order to match the lifetime of an 18-month PWR cycle. As part of the fuel assembly design evaluations, fresh feed lattices were modeled to analyze the within-assembly pin power peaking. Also, a color-set array of assemblies was constructed to evaluate power peaking and power sharing between a once-burned and a fresh feed assembly. In regards to the TRU based fuel, lattice calculations were performed to determine an optimal lattice design based on reactivity behavior, pin power peaking, and isotopic content. After obtaining a satisfactory lattice design, feasibility of core designs fully loaded with TRU FCM lattices was demonstrated using the NESTLE three-dimensional core simulator.

  18. Removal of micropollutants from aerobically treated grey water via ozone and activated carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernandez Leal, L.; Temmink, B.G.; Zeeman, G.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2011-01-01

    Ozonation and adsorption onto activated carbon were tested for the removal micropollutants of personal care products from aerobically treated grey water. MilliQ water spiked with micropollutants (100–1600 µgL-1) was ozonated at a dosing rate of 1.22. In 45 min, this effectively removed (>99%):

  19. Impact of partially treated sewage effluent on the water quality of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Impact of partially treated sewage effluent on the water quality of recipient. Epie Creek in the Niger Delta area of Nigeria was investigated experimentally by analysing the physico-chemical and biological characteristics of the surface water samples collected at four (4) sampling stations: at the effluent discharge point (fall ...

  20. Job-related doses in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnuer, K.

    1993-01-01

    The Treaty of 1957 establishing the European Atomic Energy Community, (EURATOM) was an essential prerequisite for the development of a strong nuclear industry in Europe. Among other things the Treaty provides that the Community shall lay down Basic Safety Standards for the protection of the health of workers and the general public against the dangers arising from ionizing radiation and ensure that they are applied. Following adoption of the Council Directive of 1980, the European Commission defined the basic principles of Justification, Optimization and Limitation to be applied in order to ensure the greatest possible protection of workers and the general public. Subsequently the Commission took initiatives in order to find ways of implementing these three basic principles in practical radiation protection. In 1980 the Commission in close collaboration with the leading nuclear power station operators, set up its own system of 'occupational radiation dose statistics from light water reactors operating in Western Europe'. This was designed for PWRs and BWRs, and the Commission benefited from the experience of neighbouring non-EC countries such as Sweden, Finland, Switzerland and Spain (not yet a member) operating nuclear power stations made by different manufacturers. The paper provides some general information on developments and trends in collective and individual doses to workers in nuclear power stations, based on a unique European databank of approximately 1000 operating reactor years. 9 figs

  1. Investigation of activity release during light water reactor core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, H.; Matschoss, V.; Wild, H.

    1978-01-01

    A test facility was developed for the determination of activity release and of aerosol characteristics under realistic light water reactor core melting conditions. It is composed of a high-frequency induction furnace, a ThO 2 crucible system, and a collection apparatus consisting of membrane and particulate filters. Thirty-gram samples of a representative core material mixture (corium) were melted under air, argon, or steam at 0.8 to 2.2 bar. In air at 2700 0 C, for example, the relative release was 0.4 to 0.7% for iron, chromium, and cobalt and 4 to 11% for tin, antimony, and manganese. Higher release values of 20 to 40% at lower temperatures (2150 0 C, air) were found for selenium, cadmium, tellurium, and cesium. The size distribution of the aerosol particles was trimodal with maxima at diameters of 0.17, 0.30, and 0.73 μm. The result of a qualitative x-ray microanalysis was that the main elements of the melt were contained in each aerosol particle. Further investigations will include larger melt masses and the additional influence of concrete on the release and aerosol behavior

  2. Reactor core of light water-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miwa, Jun-ichi; Aoyama, Motoo; Mochida, Takaaki.

    1996-01-01

    In a reactor core of a light water cooled reactor, the center of the fuel rods or moderating rods situated at the outermost circumference among control rods or moderating rods are connected to divide a lattice region into an inner fuel region and an outer moderator region. In this case, the area ratio of the moderating region to the fuel region is determined to greater than 0.81 for every cross section of the fuel region. The moderating region at the outer side is increased relative to the fuel rod region at the inner side while keeping the lattice pitch of the fuel assembly constant, thereby suppressing the increase of an absolute value of a void reactivity coefficient which tends to be caused when using MOX fuels as a fuel material, by utilizing neutron moderation due to a large quantity of coolants at the outer side of the fuel region. The void reactivity coefficient can be made substantially equal with that of uranium fuel assembly without greatly reducing a plutonium loading amount or without greatly increasing linear power density. (N.H.)

  3. Study on unstable fracture characteristics of light water reactor piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Ryoichi

    1998-08-01

    Many testing studies have been conducted to validate the applicability of the leak before break (LBB) concept for the light water reactor piping in the world. It is especially important among them to clarify the condition that an inside surface crack of the piping wall does not cause an unstable fracture but ends in a stable fracture propagating only in the pipe thickness direction, even if the excessive loading works to the pipe. Pipe unstable fracture tests performed in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute had been planned under such background, and clarified the condition for the cracked pipe to cause the unstable fracture under monotonous increase loading or cyclic loading by using test pipes with the inside circumferential surface crack. This paper examines the pipe unstable fracture by dividing it into two parts. One is the static unstable fracture that breaks the pipe with the inside circumferential surface crack by increasing load monotonously. Another is the dynamic unstable fracture that breaks the pipe by the cyclic loading. (author). 79 refs

  4. Light water reactor pressure isolation valve performance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neely, H.H.; Jeanmougin, N.M.; Corugedo, J.J.

    1990-07-01

    The Light Water Reactor Valve Performance Testing Program was initiated by the NRC to evaluate leakage as an indication of valve condition, provide input to Section XI of the ASME Code, evaluate emission monitoring for condition and degradation and in-service inspection techniques. Six typical check and gate valves were purchased for testing at typical plant conditions (550F at 2250 psig) for an assumed number of cycles for a 40-year plant lifetime. Tests revealed that there were variances between the test results and the present statement of the Code; however, the testing was not conclusive. The life cycle tests showed that high tech acoustic emission can be utilized to trend small leaks, that specific motor signature measurement on gate valves can trend and indicate potential failure, and that in-service inspection techniques for check valves was shown to be both feasible and an excellent preventive maintenance indicator. Life cycle testing performed here did not cause large valve leakage typical of some plant operation. Other testing is required to fully understand the implication of these results and the required program to fully implement them. (author)

  5. Physics methods for calculating light water reactor increased performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenberg, C.; Charlier, A.

    1988-01-01

    The intensive use of light water reactors (LWRs) has induced modification of their characteristics and performances in order to improve fissile material utilization and to increase their availability and flexibility under operation. From the conceptual point of view, adequate methods must be used to calculate core characteristics, taking into account present design requirements, e.g., use of burnable poison, plutonium recycling, etc. From the operational point of view, nuclear plants that have been producing a large percentage of electricity in some countries must adapt their planning to the need of the electrical network and operate on a load-follow basis. Consequently, plant behavior must be predicted and accurately followed in order to improve the plant's capability within safety limits. The Belgonucleaire code system has been developed and extensively validated. It is an accurate, flexible, easily usable, fast-running tool for solving the problems related to LWR technology development. The methods and validation of the two computer codes LWR-WIMS and MICROLUX, which are the main components of the physics calculation system, are explained

  6. Studies of severe accidents in light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    From 10 to 12 November 1986 some 80 delegates met under the auspices of the CEC working group on the safety of light-water reactors. The participants from EC Member States were joined by colleagues from Sweden, Finland and the USA and met to discuss the subject of severe accidents in LWRs. Although this seminar had been planned well before Chernobyl, the ''severe-accident-that-really-happened'' made its mark on the seminar. The four main seminar topics were: (i) high source-term accident sequences identified in PSAs, (ii) containment performance, (iii) mitigation of core melt consequences, (iv) severe accident management in LWRs. In addition to the final panel discussion there was also a separate panel discussion on lessons learned from the Chernobyl accident. These proceedings include the papers presented during the seminar and they are arranged following the seminar programme outline. The presentations and discussions of the two panels are not included in the proceedings. The general conclusions and directions following from these two panels were, however, considered in a seminar review paper which was published in the March 1987 issue of Nuclear Engineering International

  7. Radionuclide distribution in LWR [light-water reactor] spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Thomas, L.E.; Baldwin, D.L.; Mendel, J.E.

    1990-09-01

    The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) provides well-characterized spent fuel from light-water reactors (LWRs) for use in laboratory tests relevant to nuclear waste disposal in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. Interpretation of results from tests on spent fuel oxidation, dissolution, and cladding degradation requires information on the inventory and distribution of radionuclides in the initial test materials. The MCC is obtaining this information from examinations of Approved Testing Materials (ATMs), which include spent fuel with burnups from 17 to 50 MWd/kgM and fission gas releases (FGR) from 0.2 to 18%. The concentration and distribution of activation products and the release of volatile fission products to the pellet-cladding gap and rod plenum are of particular interest because these characteristics are not well understood. This paper summarizes results that help define the 14 C inventory and distribution in cladding, the ''gap and grain boundary'' inventory of radionuclides in fuels with different FGRs, and the structure and radionuclide inventory of the fuel rim region within a few hundred micrometers from the fuel edge. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  8. Neutron radiographic findings in light water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanus, J.C.

    1979-06-01

    The assessment of neutron radiographs of nuclear fuel elements can be much easier, faster and simpler if reference can be made to typical defects, which can be revealed by neutron radiography. In other fields of industrial radiography collections of reference radiographs, showing typical defects in welding, or casting have been completed and published long ago. Since 1974 neutron radiography is routinely used at Risoe National Laboratory, Denmark, for the quality and performance control of nuclear fuel. About 2000 neutron radiographs were taken, mainly during the post irradiation examination of light water reactor fuel. During assessment of neutron radiographs some typical defects of the fuel were found and it was felt that a classification of such defects will help to speed up the assessment procedure. Therefore an attempt was made to establish such a classification, which is currently used at Risoe now. This classification is presented in this atlas, which contains 36 neutron radiographs reproduced on film (in original size) and on paper (twice enlarged). (author)

  9. Controlling radiation fields in siemans designed light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riess, R.; Marchl, T. [Siemens Power Generation Group, Erlangen (Germany)

    1995-03-01

    An essential item for the control of radiation fields is the minimization of the use of satellites in the reactor systems of Light Water Reactors (LWRs). A short description of the qualification of Co-replacement materials will be followed by an illustration of the locations where these materials were implemented in Siemens designed LWRs. Especially experiences in PWRs show the immense influence of reduction of cobalt sources on dose rate buildup. The corrosion and the fatique and wear behavior of the replacement materials has not created concern up to now. A second tool to keep occupational radiation doses at a low level in PWRs is the use of the modified B/Li-chemistry. This is practized in Siemens designed plants by keeping the Li level at a max. value of 2 ppm until it reaches a pH (at 300{degrees}C) of {approximately}7.4. This pH is kept constant until the end of the cycle. The substitution of cobalt base alloys and thus the removal of the Co-59 sources from the system had the largest impact on the radiation levels. Nonetheless, the effectiveness of the coolant chemistry should not be neglected either. Several years of successful operation of PWRs with the replacement materials resulted in an occupational radiation exposure which is below 0.5 man-Sievert/plant and year.

  10. On the path to ordering standardized advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sliter, G.E.

    1997-01-01

    The international Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) program is specifying, designing, and certifying the next generation of nuclear power plants. Begun in the mid-1980's, the program is on track to permit ordering and construction of families of standardized plants at the start of the twenty-first century. ALWRs will be constructed only if they are economically competitive with alternative forms of electricity generation and are recognized as acceptable and favorable by the public, prospective owners, and investors. This paper first gives an overview of the major building blocks ensuring safe, reliable, and economic designs and the status of those designs. Next it lays out the path the industry has charted toward adopting the ALWR option and indicates the status of three key steps -- design certification, utility requirements, and first-of-a-kind engineering. Lastly, the paper focuses on one of the most important building blocks for ensuring economic viability -- life-cycle standardization. Among the topics are the definition and scope of standardization; its advantages and disadvantages; design team standardization plans that describe the desired or optimum degree of standardization and the processes used to achieve it; and the need for an agreement among all plant owners and operators for implementing and sustaining standardization in families of ALWRs. 10 refs., 5 figs

  11. Capital costs of light water reactors: the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKerron, G.

    1979-10-01

    The cost of building a modern nuclear power plant is greater than that of almost any other single civilian project - costs of individual plants are reckoned in hundreds of millions of pounds in the UK, and up to a billion dollars or more in the USA. Hence, depending on the size of nuclear programmes and their funding, escalation of nuclear capital costs may have important economic and social consequences through its effects on overall resource allocation. It is therefore important to analyse the extent and, as far as possible, the sources of cost increases and escalation, in order to see if the experience yields implications for technology policy. The USA has much the greatest experience in nuclear construction: it also has by far the largest amount of published information on the subject of capital costs. As all other countries lack either sufficient experience and/or adequate published cost information, it is impossible to conduct a genuine international comparison, and this paper is confined to an examination of US experience. This paper therefore assembles and evaluates currently available data on light water reactor (PWR and BWR) capital costs in the USA. (author)

  12. Removal of nitrate from water by adsorption onto zinc chloride treated activated carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatnagar, A.; Ji, M.; Choi, Y.H.

    2008-01-01

    Adsorption study with untreated and zinc chloride (ZnCl2) treated coconut granular activated carbon (GAC) for nitrate removal from water has been carried out. Untreated coconut GAC was treated with ZnCl2 and carbonized. The optimal conditions were selected by studying the influence of process...... variables such as chemical ratio and activation temperature. Experimental results reveal that chemical weight ratio of 200% and temperature of 500 degrees C was found to be optimum for the maximum removal of nitrate from water. Both untreated and ZnCl2 treated coconut GACs were characterized by scanning...... capacity of untreated and ZnCl2 treated coconut GACs were found 1.7 and 10.2 mg/g, respectively. The adsorption of nitrate on ZnCl2 treated coconut GAC was studied as a function of contact time, initial concentration of nitrate anion, temperature, and pH by batch mode adsorption experiments. The kinetic...

  13. Whole blood treated with riboflavin and ultraviolet light: quality assessment of all blood components produced by the buffy coat method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Peter; Culibrk, Brankica; Karwal, Simrath; Serrano, Katherine; Levin, Elena; Bu, Daniel; Bhakta, Varsha; Sheffield, William P; Goodrich, Raymond P; Devine, Dana V

    2015-04-01

    Pathogen inactivation (PI) technologies are currently licensed for use with platelet (PLT) and plasma components. Treatment of whole blood (WB) would be of benefit to the blood banking community by saving time and costs compared to individual component treatment. However, no paired, pool-and-split study directly assessing the impact of WB PI on the subsequently produced components has yet been reported. In a "pool-and-split" study, WB either was treated with riboflavin and ultraviolet (UV) light or was kept untreated as control. The buffy coat (BC) method produced plasma, PLT, and red blood cell (RBC) components. PLT units arising from the untreated WB study arm were treated with riboflavin and UV light on day of production and compared to PLT concentrates (PCs) produced from the treated WB units. A panel of common in vitro variables for the three types of components was used to monitor quality throughout their respective storage periods. PCs derived from the WB PI treatment were of significantly better quality than treated PLT components for most variables. RBCs produced from the WB treatment deteriorated earlier during storage than untreated units. Plasma components showed a 3% to 44% loss in activity for several clotting factors. Treatment of WB with riboflavin and UV before production of components by the BC method shows a negative impact on all three blood components. PLT units produced from PI-treated WB exhibited less damage compared to PLT component treatment. © 2014 AABB.

  14. Review of light--water reactor safety studies. Volume 3 of health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nero, A.V.; Farnaam, M.R.K.

    1977-01-01

    This report summarizes and compares important studies of light-water nuclear reactor safety, emphasizing the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Safety Study, work on risk assessment funded by the Electric Power Research Institute, and the Report of the American Physical Society study group on light-water reactor safety. These reports treat risk assessment for nuclear power plants and provide an introduction to the basic issues in reactor safety and the needs of the reactor safety research program. Earlier studies are treated more briefly. The report includes comments on the Reactor Safety Study. The manner in which these studies may be used and alterations which would increase their utility are discussed

  15. Restoration of Wadi Aquifers by Artificial Recharge with Treated Waste Water

    KAUST Repository

    Missimer, Thomas M.

    2012-04-26

    Fresh water resources within the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia are a rare and precious commodity that must be managed within a context of integrated water management. Wadi aquifers contain a high percentage of the naturally occurring fresh groundwater in the Kingdom. This resource is currently overused and has become depleted or contaminated at many locations. One resource that could be used to restore or enhance the fresh water resources within wadi aquifers is treated municipal waste water (reclaimed water). Each year about 80 percent of the country\\'s treated municipal waste water is discharged to waste without any beneficial use. These discharges not only represent a lost water resource, but also create a number of adverse environmental impacts, such as damage to sensitive nearshore marine environments and creation of high-salinity interior surface water areas. An investigation of the hydrogeology of wadi aquifers in Saudi Arabia revealed that these aquifers can be used to develop aquifer recharge and recovery (ARR) systems that will be able to treat the impaired-quality water, store it until needed, and allow recovery of the water for transmittal to areas in demand. Full-engineered ARR systems can be designed at high capacities within wadi aquifer systems that can operate in concert with the natural role of wadis, while providing the required functions of additional treatment, storage and recovery of reclaimed water, while reducing the need to develop additional, energy-intensive desalination to meet new water supply demands. © 2012, The Author(s). Ground Water © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  16. Restoration of wadi aquifers by artificial recharge with treated waste water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missimer, Thomas M; Drewes, Jörg E; Amy, Gary; Maliva, Robert G; Keller, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Fresh water resources within the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia are a rare and precious commodity that must be managed within a context of integrated water management. Wadi aquifers contain a high percentage of the naturally occurring fresh groundwater in the Kingdom. This resource is currently overused and has become depleted or contaminated at many locations. One resource that could be used to restore or enhance the fresh water resources within wadi aquifers is treated municipal waste water (reclaimed water). Each year about 80 percent of the country's treated municipal waste water is discharged to waste without any beneficial use. These discharges not only represent a lost water resource, but also create a number of adverse environmental impacts, such as damage to sensitive nearshore marine environments and creation of high-salinity interior surface water areas. An investigation of the hydrogeology of wadi aquifers in Saudi Arabia revealed that these aquifers can be used to develop aquifer recharge and recovery (ARR) systems that will be able to treat the impaired-quality water, store it until needed, and allow recovery of the water for transmittal to areas in demand. Full-engineered ARR systems can be designed at high capacities within wadi aquifer systems that can operate in concert with the natural role of wadis, while providing the required functions of additional treatment, storage and recovery of reclaimed water, while reducing the need to develop additional, energy-intensive desalination to meet new water supply demands. © 2012, The Author(s). Ground Water © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  17. Light Water Reactor Generic Safety Issues Database (LWRGSIDB). User's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    resolved in other plants and which can be used in reassessing the safety of individual operating plants. The IAEA-TECDOC-1044, Generic Safety Issues for Nuclear Power Plants with Light Water Reactors and Measures Taken for Their Resolution (September 1998), is a compilation of such safety issues which is based on broad international experience. This compilation is one element within the framework of IAEA activities to assist Member States in reassessing the safety of operating nuclear power plants. It is a compilation not only of the generic safety issues identified in nuclear power plants but also, in almost all cases, the measures taken to resolve these issues. The safety issues, which are generic in nature with regard to light water reactors (LWRs), and the measures taken for their resolution, are intended for use as a reference in the reassessment of the safety of operating plants.The information contained in the main body of the TECDOC has been used to establish a database. This database has search, query and report functions. This information is thus available in an electronic form which can be selectively queried and with which reports can be produced according to the requirements of the user. The database also enables the IAEA to update the data periodically on the basis of information made available by Member States

  18. Light water reactor safety. Past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, Bal Raj

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the past, present and possible future developments in light water reactor (LWR) safety. The paper divides the past into two periods: the distant past i.e., before the TMI-2 accident when the main concern was with the design basis, the general design criteria, the concept of the defense in depth, the thermal hydraulics of the large loss of coolant accident (LOCA) and the success of the emergency core cooling system (ECCS), and the near past, i.e., after the TMI-2 accident when the main concern was with the physics of the postulated severe accidents: their prevention and mitigation. The present period is chosen as the translation of the research on the design basis and severe accidents into practical designs of Gen III+ with their core catchers and severe accident management (SAM) strategies, which could, in fact, provide ample assurances of public safety even for very severe accidents. The paper attempts to describe the remaining safety issues for both the Gen II and Gen III+ nuclear plants. The more important safety challenges are being posed by the recent moves of (1) extension of the life of the presently installed Gen II LWRs to 60 years (and perhaps to 80 years) and (2) the large uprates in power that are being sought for the Gen II LWRs. Clearly, the safety margins will be tested by these moves of long extended operations with greater power ratings of the Gen II plants. A prognosis of the emerging development trends in the LWR safety has been attempted with some suggestions. (author)

  19. Radiological characterization for small type light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Ken-ichi; Ichige, Hideaki; Tanabe, Hidenori

    2011-01-01

    In order to plan a decommissioning, amount investigation of waste materials and residual radioactivity inventory evaluation must be performed at the first stage of preparatory tasks. These tasks are called radiological characterization. Reliable information from radiological characterization is crucial for specification of decommissioning plan. With the information, we can perform radiological safety analysis and optimize decommissioning scenario. Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) has already started preparatory tasks for Tsuruga Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 (TS-1) that is the first commercial Small Type Light Water Reactor in Japan. To obtain reliable information about residual radioactivity inventory, we improved radioactivity inventory evaluation procedure. The procedure consists of neutron flux distribution calculation and radioactivity distribution calculation. We need a better understanding about characteristics of neutron transport phenomena in order to obtain reliable neutron flux distribution. Neutron flux was measured in Primary Containment Vessel (PCV) at 30 locations using activation foils. We chose locations where characteristic phenomena can be observed. Three dimensional (3D) neutron flux calculation was also performed to simulate continuous changes of neutron flux distribution. By assessing both the measured values and 3D calculation results, we could perform the calculation that simulates the phenomena well. We got knowledge about how to perform an appropriate neutron flux distribution calculation and also became able to calculate a reliable neutron flux distribution. Using the neutron flux distribution, we can estimate a reliable radioactivity distribution. We applied network-parallel-computing method to the estimation. And further we developed 'flux level approximation method' which use linear or parabola fitting method to estimation. Using these new methods, radioactivity by neutron irradiation, which is radioisotope formation, was calculated at

  20. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, George; Youngblood, Robert; Busby, Jeremy; Hallbert, Bruce; Barnard, Cathy; McCarthy, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline - even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration's energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program's plans.

  1. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Griffith; Robert Youngblood; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Cathy Barnard; Kathryn McCarthy

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline - even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration's energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program's plans.

  2. Reliability assurance programme guidebook for advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-12-01

    To facilitate the implementation of reliability assurance programmes (RAP) within future advanced reactor programmes and to ensure that the next generation of commercial nuclear reactors achieves the very high levels of safety, reliability and economy which are expected of them, in 1996, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) established a task to develop a guidebook for reliability assurance programmes. The draft RAP guidebook was prepared by an expert consultant and was reviewed/modified at an Advisory Group meeting (7-10 April 1997) and at a consults meeting (7-10 October 1997). The programme for the RAP guidebook was reported to and guided by the Technical Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (TWG-LWR). This guidebook will demonstrate how the designers and operators of future commercial nuclear plants can exploit the risk, reliability and availability engineering methods and techniques developed over the past two decades to augment existing design and operational nuclear plant decision-making capabilities. This guidebook is intended to provide the necessary understanding, insights and examples of RAP management systems and processes from which a future user can derive his own plant specific reliability assurance programmes. The RAP guidebook is intended to augment, not replace, specific reliability assurance requirements defined by the utility requirements documents and by individual nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) designers. This guidebook draws from utility experience gained during implementation of reliability and availability improvement and risk based management programmes to provide both written and diagrammatic 'how to' guidance which can be followed to assure conformance with the specific requirements outlined by utility requirements documents and in the development of a practical and effective plant specific RAP in any IAEA Member State

  3. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, Kathryn A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Busby, Jeremy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hallbert, Bruce [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bragg-Sitton, Shannon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Curtis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Barnard, Cathy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans.

  4. Factors in the economic viability of advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzie, R.A.; Bagnal, C.W.; Rohde, K.R.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear power currently produces over 20% of the electricity generated in the United States, and a similar number for the entire world. Electricity generated from these nuclear power plants is typically some of the most economical of all sources, and is becoming even more economical with time as utilities focus on reducing production costs. Nevertheless, with the exception of the Asia Pacific region, no new nuclear orders have been placed in many years, and none are planned for the forseeable future. Two reasons for this demise for nuclear power in the western world are usually put forward: the current price of alternative means of electric power generation and the political climate, which tends to be anti-nuclear. The first of these reasons is founded in the low price of natural gas, which has been the preferred fuel for recent power generation additions. These additions have principally been used as peaking units, which are required only at the highest demand periods and not as base load units. The second reason stems from some bad experiences in the post-TMI era, when projects experienced a rapidly changing regulatory environment, long schedule stretchouts, and huge cost overruns. In spite of this relatively poor environment for new nuclear power plants, major programs to develop advanced light water reactors are continuing to keep the nuclear option alive, both in the United States and Europe. These programs are aimed at capturing the lessons learned from past experience, to ensure the success of future nuclear projects. 6 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  5. Revised accident source terms for light-water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soffer, L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-02-01

    This paper presents revised accident source terms for light-water reactors incorporating the severe accident research insights gained in this area over the last 15 years. Current LWR reactor accident source terms used for licensing date from 1962 and are contained in Regulatory Guides 1.3 and 1.4. These specify that 100% of the core inventory of noble gases and 25% of the iodine fission products are assumed to be instantaneously available for release from the containment. The chemical form of the iodine fission products is also assumed to be predominantly elemental iodine. These assumptions have strongly affected present nuclear air cleaning requirements by emphasizing rapid actuation of spray systems and filtration systems optimized to retain elemental iodine. A proposed revision of reactor accident source terms and some im implications for nuclear air cleaning requirements was presented at the 22nd DOE/NRC Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference. A draft report was issued by the NRC for comment in July 1992. Extensive comments were received, with the most significant comments involving (a) release fractions for both volatile and non-volatile species in the early in-vessel release phase, (b) gap release fractions of the noble gases, iodine and cesium, and (c) the timing and duration for the release phases. The final source term report is expected to be issued in late 1994. Although the revised source terms are intended primarily for future plants, current nuclear power plants may request use of revised accident source term insights as well in licensing. This paper emphasizes additional information obtained since the 22nd Conference, including studies on fission product removal mechanisms, results obtained from improved severe accident code calculations and resolution of major comments, and their impact upon the revised accident source terms. Revised accident source terms for both BWRS and PWRS are presented.

  6. Feasibility study of plutonium recycling in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabuchi, Hideoto

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of plutonium recycling in light water reactors has been studied by the Agency of Natural Resources and Energy, MITI. As the first step of the feasibility study, it was planned to charge two fuel assemblies, containing uranium-plutonium mixed oxide (MO 2 ), in the core of the Tsuruga nuclear power plant (BWR) for testing. The design of fuel the safety of these fuel and the operating characteristics of these special fuel assemblies were evaluated. The specifications of MO 2 fuel pin and fuel assembly are compared to those of present uranium oxide (UO 2 ) fuel. The weight of fissile plutonium in one MO 2 fuel assembly is 2.22 kg. The characteristics of MO 2 fuel assemblies, such as reactivity, control rod worth and power distribution can be kept similar to UO 2 fuel. The plutonium isotope ratio of the MO 2 fuel is assumed as that obtained in the fuel taken out of the Tokai No. 1 gas cooled reactor. The temperature distribution in the fuel pellets is shown, compared to that of UO 2 fuel. The linear power density is 440 w/cm at the beginning of the fuel life and 360 w/cm after the burn-up of 44,000 Mwd/t. The stress in the cladding tubes of MO 2 fuel is not different from that of UO 2 fuel. The pellet-cladding interaction (PCM1) was analyzed, utilizing the FEM code, FEAST. Concerning the calculation of resonance absorption, the space dependence of thermal neutron spectra and the nuclear behavior of hollow pellets the methods of design calculation were checked up. It was recognized that regarding the nuclear characteristics of MO 2 fuel, no special technical question remains. (Nakai, Y.)

  7. Consideration of important technical issues for advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thadani, A.C.; Perch, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    Early in the design and review process of the Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWR), the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in recognition of the importance of defense-in-depth focused its attention on lessons learned from the operating experience, research and other studies as well as addressing the challenges from severe accidents. The Commission issued the Policy Statement on Safety Goals for the Operations of Nuclear Power Plants on August 4, 1986. This policy statement focused on the risks to the public from nuclear power plant operations with the objective of establishing goals that broadly define an acceptable level of radiological risk that might be imposed on the public as a result of nuclear power plant operation. The Commission recognizes the importance of mitigating the consequences of a core-melt accident and continues to emphasize features such as containment and siting in less populated areas as integral parts of the defense-in-depth concept associated with its accident prevention and mitigation philosophy. In its Severe Accident Policy statement, the Commission expressed its expectation that vendors engage in designing new standard plants should address severe accidents during the design stage to take full advantage of insights gained by providing design features to further reduce the likelihood of severe accidents from occurring and, in the unlikely occurrence of a severe accident, mitigating their consequences. Incorporating insights and design features during the design phase can be cost effective when compared to modifications to existing plants. The staff has used this guidance to apply defense-in-depth philosophy in focusing attention on severe accident considerations. This paper discusses some of the key prevention and mitigation issues the NRC has focused its efforts, including emerging technologies being applied to new reactor designs

  8. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kathryn McCarthy; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Shannon Bragg-Sitton; Curtis Smith; Cathy Barnard

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans.

  9. 77 FR 15812 - Initial Test Program of Condensate and Feedwater Systems for Light-Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... Systems for Light-Water Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft regulatory guide... Feedwater Systems for Light- Water Reactors.'' DG-1265 is proposed revision 2 of Regulatory Guide 1.68.1... Plants,'' dated January 1977. This regulatory guide is being revised to: (1) expand the scope of the...

  10. Technology Implementation Plan. Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Commercial Light Water Reactor Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, Lance Lewis; Terrani, Kurt A.; Powers, Jeffrey J.; Worrall, Andrew; Robb, Kevin R.; Snead, Mary A.

    2015-01-01

    This report is an overview of the implementation plan for ORNL's fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) light water reactor fuel. The fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel consists of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) particles embedded inside a fully dense SiC matrix and is intended for utilization in commercial light water reactor application.

  11. Technology Implementation Plan. Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Commercial Light Water Reactor Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, Lance Lewis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Snead, Mary A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This report is an overview of the implementation plan for ORNL's fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) light water reactor fuel. The fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel consists of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) particles embedded inside a fully dense SiC matrix and is intended for utilization in commercial light water reactor application.

  12. Estimation of diffuse attenuation of ultraviolet light in optically shallow Florida Keys waters from MODIS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffuse attenuation of solar light (Kd, m−1) determines the percentage of light penetrating the water column and available for benthic organisms. Therefore, Kd can be used as an index of water quality for coastal ecosystems that are dependent on photosynthesis, such as the coral ...

  13. Hospital hydrotherapy pools treated with ultra violet light: bad bacteriological quality and presence of thermophilic Naegleria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jonckheere, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    The microbiological quality of eight halogenated and two u.v.-treated hydrotherapy pools in hospitals was investigated. The microbiological quality of halogenated hydrotherapy pools was comparable to halogenated public swimming pools, although in some Pseudomonas aeruginosa and faecal pollution indicators were more frequent due to bad management. On the other hand u.v.-treated hydrotherapy pools had very bad microbiological quality. Apart from faecal pollution indicators, P. aeruginosa was present in very high numbers. Halogenated hydrotherapy pools were not highly contaminated with amoebae, and Naegleria spp. were never detected. On the other hand u.v.-treated pools contained very high numbers of thermophilic Naegleria. The Naegleria isolated were identified as N. lovaniensis, a species commonly found in association with N. fowleri. Isoenzyme analysis showed a different type of N. lovaniensis was present in each of two u.v.-treated pools. Images Plate 1 PMID:7061835

  14. Effects of light and microbial activity on the degradation of two fluoroquinolone antibiotics in pond water and sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Juo-Shan; Pan, Hung-Yu; Liu, Shiu-Mei; Lai, Hong-Thih

    2010-07-01

    Enrofloxacin (ENR) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) are two fluoroquinolone (FQ) antibiotics widely used to treat diseases of human beings and cultured animals. These two FQs are usually detected in the effluent of municipal sewage plants and related aquatic environments. The purpose of this study was to understand the fates of ENR and CIP in aquaculture pond water and a sediment slurry in a laboratory-scale experiment. Effects of light and microbial activity on the degradation of these two FQs were investigated. Results indicated that natural irradiation plays a major role in the degradation of ENR and CIP in pond water and the sediment slurry. The 50 % dissipation times (DT(50)) with non-sterile treatment were 0.01 and 18.4 d for ENR, and 0.04 and 17.3 d for CIP in the water and sediment slurry, respectively. On the other hand, the degradation of ENR and CIP under dark conditions was slow or even hindered, and all of their DT(50) values exceeded 100 d. These two FQs degraded faster in the sediment slurry than in pond water under dark conditions. Artificial ultraviolet (UV) and fluorescence light had similar effects on the degradation of ENR in the pond water and sediment slurry. Degradation of CIP was faster with UV than with fluorescence light treatment, while no such difference was found for ENR degradation. CIP was a degradation product of ENR under both light and dark conditions, and DT(50) values for both compounds were shorter in the presence of light. The phenomenon of biodegradation was observed during degradation of CIP in the sediment slurry under natural light.

  15. Process for treating waters and sludges and device for developing this process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levaillant, Claude.

    1977-01-01

    The description is given of a process for treating waters and sludge by means of a ionizing radiation beam, featuring the following stages: settlement of primary waters and sludge, centrifugation of the settled waters and sludge in order to separate the waste waters, the sludge formed of organic compounds charged with heavy metals and the sludge formed of mineral compounds, irradiation, by ionizing radiation beam, of the sludge formed of organic compounds, containing heavy metals, and which are transformed into less toxic and denser recoverable mineral compounds, centrifugation of the irradiated sludge making it possible to obtain clarified waters treated by irradiation, sludge composed of organic compounds freed of their heavy metals and sludge formed of mineral compounds containing heavy metals and which will be easily separated owing to their high density [fr

  16. Treating cooling pond water for Wabamun Lake level mitigation project in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2004-01-01

    Dealing with the challenge of recharging Wabamun Lake by treating nearby cooling pond water, fed by the North Saskatchewan River, and returning it to the lake, is discussed. To deal with the problem, TransAlta Utilities constructed a treatment plant in 1997 next to the 2,029 MW Sundance power plant to mitigate the effect the power plant's ongoing and historical effect on the lake's water level. The objective of the treatment plant is to treat cooling pond water and return it to the lake to raise water levels there, which have been significantly reduced over the last 25 years mostly by power plant intake, but also by lack of rainfall, surface runoff, and natural evaporation. At the Treatment Facility the water to be treated is first chlorinated to kill zooplankton, algae and bacteria, followed by adjusting the pH using sulfuric acid. Alum coagulant is used to destabilize colour, particles and colloids. The next step is feeding the water to the Actiflo clarifiers which use microsand to provide increased surface area for floc attachment, and to act as ballast. Clarified water from the Actiflo system is then fed to to the Dusenflo filters to remove the largest particles of suspended solids, and through a finer sand media to remove the remaining turbidity, colour and bacteria. Thiosulfate is used in the ozonation system to inactivate any remaining bacteria and zooplankton in the filtered water, before discharging it to the lake. The cooling towers, which are part of the system, ensure that the treated water returned to the lake is kept at a constant temperature, varying no more than three degrees C from the lake water temperature. 3 figs

  17. Lighting.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-09-01

    Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

  18. Reducing and verifying haloacetic acids in treated drinking water using a biological filter system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jie C; Chan, Hung Y; Yang, Chih Y; Tseng, Wei B; Han, Jia Y

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on reducing the haloacetic acid (HAA) concentrations in treated drinking water. HAA has been thought to be one possible nutrient supporting heterotrophic bacteria regrowth in drinking water. In this study, experiments were conducted using a pilot-scale system to evaluate the efficiency of biological filters (BF) for reducing excess HAA concentrations in water. The BF system reduced the total HAA concentration and the concentrations of five HAA species in the water. Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), monobromoacetic acid (MBAA) and dibromoacetic acid (DBAA) were the three main HAA5 species that were present in the treated drinking water in this investigation. Combined, these three species represent approximately 77% of the HAA5 in the finished water after BF. The verification of the empirical HAA equation for the outlet in the BF system indicated linear relationships with high correlation coefficients. The empirical equation for the HAA5 concentrations in the finished water was established by examining other nutrients (e.g., dissolved organic carbon (DOC), ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm wavelength (UV254), and ammonia nitrogen) that can reduce pathogenic contamination. These findings may be useful for designing advanced processes for conventional water treatment plants or for managing water treatment and distribution systems for providing high-quality drinking water.

  19. Legionella pneumophila: From potable water to treated greywater; quantification and removal during treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanky, Marina; Rodríguez-Martínez, Sara; Halpern, Malka; Friedler, Eran

    2015-11-15

    Greywater is an alternative water source that can help alleviate stress on depleted water resources. The main options for greywater reuse are toilet flushing and garden irrigation, both producing aerosols. For that reason transmission of inhalable pathogens like Legionella present a potential risk. To improve the understanding about Legionella in greywater, we traced the pathogen seasonally from the potable water system to the final steps of the greywater treatment in four houses in northern Israel. Physicochemical and microbiological parameters were analyzed in order to assess background greywater quality and to establish possible associations with Legionella. The mean concentrations of Legionella pneumophila isolated from the potable water system were 6.4×10(2) and 5.9×10(3) cfu/l in cold and hot water respectively. By amending the ISO protocol for Legionella isolation from drinking water, we succeeded in quantifying Legionella in greywater. The mean Legionella concentrations that were found in raw, treated and treated chlorinated greywater were 1.2×10(5), 2.4×10(4) and 5.7×10(3) cfu/l respectively. While Legionella counts in potable water presented a seasonal pattern with high concentrations in summer, its counts in greywater presented an almost inversed pattern. Greywater treatment resulted in 95% decrease in Legionella counts. No significant difference was found between Legionella concentrations in potable water and the treated chlorinated greywater. These findings indicate that regarding Legionella, reusing treated chlorinated greywater would exhibit a risk that is very similar to the risk associated with using potable water for the same non-potable uses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modro, S.M.; Fisher, J.E.; Weaver, K.D.; Reyes, J.N.; Groome, J.T.; Babka, P.; Carlson, T.M.

    2003-01-01

    The Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) project was conducted under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The primary project objectives were to develop the conceptual design for a safe and economic small, natural circulation light water reactor, to address the economic and safety attributes of the concept, and to demonstrate the technical feasibility by testing in an integral test facility. This report presents the results of the project. After an initial exploratory and evolutionary process, as documented in the October 2000 report, the project focused on developing a modular reactor design that consists of a self-contained assembly with a reactor vessel, steam generators, and containment. These modular units would be manufactured at a single centralized facility, transported by rail, road, and/or ship, and installed as a series of self-contained units. This approach also allows for staged construction of an NPP and ''pull and replace'' refueling and maintenance during each five-year refueling cycle. Development of the baseline design concept has been sufficiently completed to determine that it complies with the safety requirements and criteria, and satisfies the major goals already noted. The more significant features of the baseline single-unit design concept include: (1) Thermal Power--150 MWt; (2) Net Electrical Output--35 MWe; (3) Steam Generator Type--Vertical, helical tubes; (4) Fuel UO 2 , 8% enriched; (5) Refueling Intervals--5 years; (6) Life-Cycle--60 years. The economic performance was assessed by designing a power plant with an electric generation capacity in the range of current and advanced evolutionary systems. This approach allows for direct comparison of economic performance and forms a basis for further evaluation, economic and technical, of the proposed design and for the design evolution towards a more cost competitive concept. Applications such as cogeneration

  1. How to treat Alzheimer’s with new LED light technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Ngoc Mai; Petersen, Paul Michael; Broeng, Jes

    We have developed a new therapeutic LED lamp that modulates with 40 Hz the neuron responses in different parts of the brain without affecting the human vision. The lamp may in the future be used to treat patients with Alzheimer’s disease.......We have developed a new therapeutic LED lamp that modulates with 40 Hz the neuron responses in different parts of the brain without affecting the human vision. The lamp may in the future be used to treat patients with Alzheimer’s disease....

  2. Managed aquifer recharge of treated wastewater: water quality changes resulting from infiltration through the vadose zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekele, Elise; Toze, Simon; Patterson, Bradley; Higginson, Simon

    2011-11-01

    Secondary treated wastewater was infiltrated through a 9 m-thick calcareous vadose zone during a 39 month managed aquifer recharge (MAR) field trial to determine potential improvements in the recycled water quality. The water quality improvements of the recycled water were based on changes in the chemistry and microbiology of (i) the recycled water prior to infiltration relative to (ii) groundwater immediately down-gradient from the infiltration gallery. Changes in the average concentrations of several constituents in the recycled water were identified with reductions of 30% for phosphorous, 66% for fluoride, 62% for iron and 51% for total organic carbon when the secondary treated wastewater was infiltrated at an applied rate of 17.5 L per minute with a residence time of approximately four days in the vadose zone and less than two days in the aquifer. Reductions were also noted for oxazepam and temazepam among the pharmaceuticals tested and for a range of microbial pathogens, but reductions were harder to quantify as their magnitudes varied over time. Total nitrogen and carbamazepine persisted in groundwater down-gradient from the infiltration galleries. Infiltration does potentially offer a range of water quality improvements over direct injection to the water table without passage through the unsaturated zone; however, additional treatment options for the non-potable water may still need to be considered, depending on the receiving environment or the end use of the recovered water. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Gill histopathological alterations in Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus exposed to treated sewage Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António Fontaínhas-Fernandes

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Adult Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, of both sexes were exposed in wastewater from a sewage treatment plant for a period of 4 days. Gill samples were collected after 24, 48, 72 and 96 h and histopathological changes were analyzed by light and scanning electronic microscopy. Gill epithelium of control O. niloticus (freshwater group was similar to that of other teleosts, while histopathological lesions were observed in exposed fishes. The main histopathological changes were edema, lifting of lamellar and filamentar epithelia and lamellar fusion. Cell proliferation with consequent thickening of the filament epithelium was also found in fishes exposed to the treated sewage water. The severity of the lesions increased with the time of exposure, namely the hyperplasia of the epithelial cells with proliferation of filamentar epithelium and fusion of lamellae observed at 96 h. Additionally, several histopathological results obtained by light microscopy were confirmed through scanning microscopy.Tilápias adultas, Oreochromis niloticus, de ambos os sexos foram expostas em águas residuais de uma estação de tratamento de esgoto durante 4 dias. Amostras de brânquia foram recolhidas após 24, 48, 72 e 96 h e as alterações histopatológicas foram analisadas por microscopia óptica e eletrônica de varredura. O epitélio da brânquia do grupo controle apresentou uma morfologia similar à de outros peixes teleosteos, enquanto foram observadas lesões nos peixes expostos. As principais alterações histopatológicas foram edema, destacamento dos epitélios lamelar e filamentar e fusão lamelar. Os peixes expostos às águas residuais mostraram também proliferação celular com consequente aumento da espessura do filamento branquial. A severidade das lesões aumentou com o tempo de exposição, nomeadamente a hiperplasia das células epiteliais com proliferação do epitélio filamentar e fusão das lamelas observadas preferencialmente às 96 h

  4. Calculation methods for advanced concept light water reactor lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmona, S.

    1986-01-01

    In the last few years s several advanced concepts for fuel rod lattices have been studied. Improved fuel utilization is one of the major aims in the development of new fuel rod designs and lattice modifications. By these changes s better performance in fuel economics s fuel burnup and material endurance can be achieved in the frame of the well-known basic Light Water Reactor technology. Among the new concepts involved in these studies that have attracted serious attention are lattices consisting of arrays of annular rods duplex pellet rods or tight multicells. These new designs of fuel rods and lattices present several computational problems. The treatment of resonance shielded cross sections is a crucial point in the analyses of these advanced concepts . The purpose of this study was to assess adequate approximation methods for calculating as accurately as possible, resonance shielding for these new lattices. Although detailed and exact computational methods for the evaluation of the resonance shielding in these lattices are possible, they are quite inefficient when used in lattice codes. The computer time and memory required for this kind of computations are too large to be used in an acceptable routine manner. In order to over- come these limitations and to make the analyses possible with reasonable use of computer resources s approximation methods are necessary. Usual approximation methods, for the resonance energy regions used in routine lattice computer codes, can not adequately handle the evaluation of these new fuel rod lattices. The main contribution of the present work to advanced lattice concepts is the development of an equivalence principle for the calculation of resonance shielding in the annular fuel pellet zone of duplex pellets; the duplex pellet in this treatment consists of two fuel zones with the same absorber isotope in both regions. In the transition from a single duplex rod to an infinite array of this kind of fuel rods, the similarity of the

  5. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. Digital Architecture Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Kenneth [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Oxstrand, Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The Digital Architecture effort is a part of the Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The LWRS program is performed in close collaboration with industry research and development (R&D) programs that provides the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants (NPPs). One of the primary missions of the LWRS program is to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. Therefore, a major objective of the LWRS program is the development of a seamless digital environment for plant operations and support by integrating information from plant systems with plant processes for nuclear workers through an array of interconnected technologies. In order to get the most benefits of the advanced technology suggested by the different research activities in the LWRS program, the nuclear utilities need a digital architecture in place to support the technology. A digital architecture can be defined as a collection of information technology (IT) capabilities needed to support and integrate a wide-spectrum of real-time digital capabilities for nuclear power plant performance improvements. It is not hard to imagine that many processes within the plant can be largely improved from both a system and human performance perspective by utilizing a plant wide (or near plant wide) wireless network. For example, a plant wide wireless network allows for real time plant status information to easily be accessed in the control room, field workers’ computer-based procedures can be updated based on the real time plant status, and status on ongoing procedures can be incorporated into smart schedules in the outage command center to allow for more accurate planning of critical tasks. The goal

  6. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Integrated Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-02-01

    and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program's plans. For the LWRS Program, sustainability is defined as the ability to maintain safe and economic operation of the existing fleet of nuclear power plants for a longer-than-initially-licensed lifetime. It has two facets with respect to long-term operations: (1) manage the aging of plant systems, structures, and components so that nuclear power plant lifetimes can be extended and the plants can continue to operate safely, efficiently, and economically; and (2) provide science-based solutions to the industry to implement technology to exceed the performance of the current labor-intensive business model.

  7. Sustained Recycle in Light Water and Sodium-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piet, Steven J.; Bays, Samuel E.; Pope, Michael A.; Youinou, Gilles J.

    2010-01-01

    From a physics standpoint, it is feasible to sustain recycle of used fuel in either thermal or fast reactors. This paper examines multi-recycle potential performance by considering three recycling approaches and calculating several fuel cycle parameters, including heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; radiotoxicity of waste; and uranium utilization. The first recycle approach is homogeneous mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies in a light water reactor (LWR). The transuranic portion of the MOX was varied among Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. (All-TRU means all isotopes through Cf-252.) The Pu case was allowed to go to 10% Pu in fresh fuel, but when the minor actinides were included, the transuranic enrichment was kept below 8% to satisfy the expected void reactivity constraint. The uranium portion of the MOX was enriched uranium. That enrichment was increased (to as much as 6.5%) to keep the fuel critical for a typical LWR irradiation. The second approach uses heterogeneous inert matrix fuel (IMF) assemblies in an LWR - a mix of IMF and traditional UOX pins. The uranium-free IMF fuel pins were Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. The UOX pins were limited to 4.95% U-235 enrichment. The number of IMF pins was set so that the amount of TRU in discharged fuel from recycle N (from both IMF and UOX pins) was made into the new IMF pins for recycle N+1. Up to 60 of the 264 pins in a fuel assembly were IMF. The assembly-average TRU content was 1-6%. The third approach uses fast reactor oxide fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor with transuranic conversion ratio of 0.50 and 1.00. The transuranic conversion ratio is the production of transuranics divided by destruction of transuranics. The FR at CR=0.50 is similar to the CR for the MOX case. The fast reactor cases had a transuranic content of 33-38%, higher than IMF or MOX.

  8. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Integrated Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-05-01

    proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans. For the LWRS Program, sustainability is defined as the ability to maintain safe and economic operation of the existing fleet of nuclear power plants for a longer-than-initially-licensed lifetime. It has two facets with respect to long-term operations: (1) manage the aging of plant systems, structures, and components so that nuclear power plant lifetimes can be extended and the plants can continue to operate safely, efficiently, and economically; and (2) provide science-based solutions to the industry to implement technology to exceed the performance of the current labor-intensive business model.

  9. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Integrated Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-02-15

    proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program's plans. For the LWRS Program, sustainability is defined as the ability to maintain safe and economic operation of the existing fleet of nuclear power plants for a longer-than-initially-licensed lifetime. It has two facets with respect to long-term operations: (1) manage the aging of plant systems, structures, and components so that nuclear power plant lifetimes can be extended and the plants can continue to operate safely, efficiently, and economically; and (2) provide science-based solutions to the industry to implement technology to exceed the performance of the current labor-intensive business model.

  10. Fuel cycle options for light water reactors in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broecking, D.; Mester, W.

    1999-01-01

    In Germany 19 nuclear power plants with an electrical output of 22 GWe are in operation. Annually about 450 t of spent fuel are unloaded from the reactors. Currently most of the spent fuel elements are shipped to France and the United Kingdom for reprocessing according to contracts which have been signed since the late 70es. By the amendment of the Atomic Energy Act in 1994 the previous priority for reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel was substituted by a legal equivalency of the reprocessing and direct disposal option. As a consequence some utilities take into consideration the direct disposal of their spent fuel for economical reasons. The separated plutonium will be recycled as MOX fuel in light water reactors. About 30 tons of fissile plutonium will be available to German utilities for recycling by the year 2000. Twelve German reactors are already licensed for the use of MOX fuel, five others have applied for MOX use. Eight reactors are currently using MOX fuel or used it in the past. The spent fuel elements which shall be disposed of without reprocessing will be stored in two interim dry storage facilities at Gorleben and Ahaus. The storage capacities are 3800 and 4200 tHM, respectively. The Gorleben salt dome is currently investigated to prove its suitability as a repository for high level radioactive waste, either in a vitrified form or as conditioned spent fuel. The future development of the nuclear fuel cycle and radioactive waste management depends on the future role of nuclear energy in Germany. According to estimations of the German utilities no additional nuclear power plants are needed in the near future. Around the middle of the next decade it will have to be decided whether existing plants should be substituted by new ones. For the foreseeable time German utilities are interested in a highly flexible approach to the nuclear fuel cycle and waste management keeping open both spent fuel management options: the closed fuel cycle and direct disposal of

  11. Alkaline hydrogen peroxide treatment for TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles with superior water-dispersibility and visible-light photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chung-Yi; Tu, Kuan-Ju; Lo, Yu-Shiu [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, College of Nuclear Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Pang, Yean Ling [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lee Kong Chian Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Wu, Chien-Hou, E-mail: chwu@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, College of Nuclear Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2016-09-15

    Alkaline hydrogen peroxide treatment was proposed as a simple and green way to improve the performance of commercial TiO{sub 2} powder for water-dispersibility and visible-light photocatalytic activity on the degradation of dye pollutants. The performance of treated TiO{sub 2} was evaluated as a function of NaOH concentration, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, and treatment time. The optimal conditions were determined to be 24 h in 100 mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and 8 M NaOH. The treated samples were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometry. The analysis revealed that the crystal structure, morphology, and absorption band gap were retained, but the surface of the treated TiO{sub 2} was dramatically changed. The treated TiO{sub 2} was highly dispersible with a uniform hydrodynamic size of 41 ± 12 nm and stable over months in water at pH 3 without any stabilizing ligand and could significantly enhance the visible-light photodegradation of dye pollutants. The superior performance might be attributed to the formation of abundant surface hydroxyl groups. This treatment paves the way for developing water-dispersible TiO{sub 2} with superior visible-light induced photocatalytic degradation of dye pollutants without any complicated and expensive surface modification. - Highlights: • Alkaline hydrogen peroxide is proposed to treat commercial TiO{sub 2} powder. • The treated TiO{sub 2} powder exhibits superior water-dispersibility with a uniform size distribution. • The treated TiO{sub 2} powder can significantly enhance the visible-light photodegradation of dyes.

  12. Alkaline hydrogen peroxide treatment for TiO_2 nanoparticles with superior water-dispersibility and visible-light photocatalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Chung-Yi; Tu, Kuan-Ju; Lo, Yu-Shiu; Pang, Yean Ling; Wu, Chien-Hou

    2016-01-01

    Alkaline hydrogen peroxide treatment was proposed as a simple and green way to improve the performance of commercial TiO_2 powder for water-dispersibility and visible-light photocatalytic activity on the degradation of dye pollutants. The performance of treated TiO_2 was evaluated as a function of NaOH concentration, H_2O_2 concentration, and treatment time. The optimal conditions were determined to be 24 h in 100 mM H_2O_2 and 8 M NaOH. The treated samples were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometry. The analysis revealed that the crystal structure, morphology, and absorption band gap were retained, but the surface of the treated TiO_2 was dramatically changed. The treated TiO_2 was highly dispersible with a uniform hydrodynamic size of 41 ± 12 nm and stable over months in water at pH 3 without any stabilizing ligand and could significantly enhance the visible-light photodegradation of dye pollutants. The superior performance might be attributed to the formation of abundant surface hydroxyl groups. This treatment paves the way for developing water-dispersible TiO_2 with superior visible-light induced photocatalytic degradation of dye pollutants without any complicated and expensive surface modification. - Highlights: • Alkaline hydrogen peroxide is proposed to treat commercial TiO_2 powder. • The treated TiO_2 powder exhibits superior water-dispersibility with a uniform size distribution. • The treated TiO_2 powder can significantly enhance the visible-light photodegradation of dyes.

  13. Water tubing-related injuries treated in US emergency departments, 1991-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinsimer, Kevin R; Nelson, Nicolas G; Roberts, Kristin J; McKenzie, Lara B

    2013-02-01

    The objective was to describe the patterns and mechanisms of water tubing-related injuries treated in U.S. emergency departments. The National Electronic Injury Surveillance System was used to examine cases of water tubing-related injuries. Sample weights were used to calculate national estimates of water tubing-related injuries. Analyses were conducted in 2010. From 1991-2009 an estimated 69,471 injuries were treated in US emergency departments for water tubing-related injuries. The annual number of cases increased 250% over the 19-year study period (P tubing-related injuries differ for children and adults. Research is needed to determine how best to reduce these injuries.

  14. Visible Light Responsive Catalyst for Air Water Purification Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    Investigate and develop viable approaches to render the normally UV-activated TIO2 catalyst visible light responsive (VLR) and achieve high and sustaining catalytic activity under the visible region of the solar spectrum.

  15. Visible Light Responsive Catalyst for Air & Water Purification

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective for this project was to investigate and develop viable approaches to render the normally UV-activated titanium dioxide (TiO2) catalyst visible light...

  16. Cyanobacteria and microcystin contamination in untreated and treated drinking water in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Naa Dzama Addico

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Although cyanobacterial blooms and cyanotoxins represent a worldwide-occurring phenomenon, there are large differences among different countries in cyanotoxin-related human health risk assessment, management practices and policies. While national standards, guideline values and detailed regulatory frameworks for effective management of cyanotoxin risks have been implemented in many industrialized countries, the extent of cyanobacteria occurrence and cyanotoxin contamination in certain geographical regions is under-reported and not very well understood. Such regions include major parts of tropical West and Central Africa, a region constisting of more than 25 countries occupying an area of 12 million km2, with a total population of 500 milion people. Only few studies focusing on cyanotoxin occurrence in this region have been published so far, and reports dealing specifically with cyanotoxin contamination in drinking water are extremely scarce. In this study, we report seasonal data on cyanobacteria and microcystin (MC contamination in drinking water reservoirs and adjacent treatment plants located in Ghana, West Africa. During January-June 2005, concentrations of MCs were monitored in four treatment plants supplying drinking water to major metropolitan areas in Ghana: the treatment plants Barekese and Owabi, which serve Kumasi Metropolitan Area, and the plants Kpong and Weija, providing water for Accra-Tema Metropolitan Area. HPLC analyses showed that 65% samples of raw water at the intake of the treatment plants contained intracellular MCs (maximal detected concentration was 8.73 µg L-1, whereas dissolved toxins were detected in 33% of the samples. Significant reduction of cyanobacterial cell counts and MC concentrations was achieved during the entire monitoring period by the applied conventional water treatment methods (alum flocculation, sedimentation, rapid sand filtration and chlorination, and MC concentration in the final treated water

  17. Lighting

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Lighting Systems Test Facilities aid research that improves the energy efficiency of lighting systems. • Gonio-Photometer: Measures illuminance from each portion of...

  18. An environmentalist's perspective on alternatives to pump and treat for ground water remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, D.L.

    1993-01-01

    Pump and treat is far-and-away the most prevalent technique to remediate contaminated ground water. There is, however, a growing awareness of the limitations of this remediation method to achieve either background or health-based water quality standards, particularly for petroleum hydrocarbon constituents. Given these limitations, this paper explores advantages and disadvantages of some remediation alternatives from an environmentalist's perspective. They are: Do it anyway; Quit; Use supplementary remediation technology; Set alternative concentration standards; and Transfer resources to pollution prevention

  19. Occurrence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia genotypes and subtypes in raw and treated water in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, M L; Xiao, L; Antunes, F; Matos, O

    2009-06-01

    Waterborne outbreaks of diarrhoeal illness reported worldwide are mostly associated with Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. Their presence in aquatic systems makes it essential to develop preventive strategies for water and food safety. This study was undertaken to monitor the presence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in a total of 175 water samples, including raw and treated water from both surface and ground sources in Portugal. The samples were processed according to USEPA Method 1623 for immunomagnetic separation (IMS) of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts, followed by detection of oocysts/cysts by immunofluorecence (IFA) microscopy, PCR-based techniques were done on all water samples collected. Out of 175 samples, 81 (46.3%) were positive for Cryptosporidium and 67 (38.3%) for Giardia by IFA. Cryptosporidium spp. and G. duodenalis genotypes were identified by PCR in 37 (21.7%) and 9 (5.1%) water samples, respectively. C. parvum was the most common species (78.9%), followed by C. hominis (13.2%), C. andersoni (5.3%), and C. muris (2.6%). Subtype IdA15 was identified in all C. hominis-positive water samples. Subtyping revealed the presence of C. parvum subtypes IIaA15G2R1, IIaA16G2R1 and IIdA17G1. Giardia duodenalis subtype A1 was identified. The results of the present study suggest that Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. were widely distributed in source water and treated water in Portugal. Moreover, the results obtained indicate a high occurrence of human-pathogenic Cryptosporidium genotypes and subtypes in raw and treated water samples. Thus, water can be a potential vehicle in the transmission of cryptosporidiosis, and giardiasis of humans and animals in Portugal.

  20. Quality of Drinking Water Treated at Point of Use in Residential Healthcare Facilities for the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Sacchetti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Municipal tap water is increasingly treated at the point of use (POU to improve the acceptability and palatability of its taste. The aim of this study was to assess the bacteriologic and nutritional characteristics of tap water treated at the point of use in residential healthcare facilities for the elderly. Two types of POU devices were used: microfiltered water dispensers (MWDs and reverse-osmosis water dispensers (ROWDs. All samples of water entering the devices and leaving them were tested for the bacteriological parameters set by Italian regulations for drinking water and for opportunistic pathogens associated with various infections in healthcare settings; in addition, the degree of mineralization of the water was assessed. The results revealed widespread bacterial contamination in the POU treatment devices, particularly from potentially pathogenic species. As expected, the use of ROWDs led to a decrease in the saline content of the water. In conclusion, the use of POU treatment in healthcare facilities for the elderly can be considered advisable only if the devices are constantly and carefully maintained.

  1. Quality of Drinking Water Treated at Point of Use in Residential Healthcare Facilities for the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchetti, Rossella; De Luca, Giovanna; Guberti, Emilia; Zanetti, Franca

    2015-09-09

    Municipal tap water is increasingly treated at the point of use (POU) to improve the acceptability and palatability of its taste. The aim of this study was to assess the bacteriologic and nutritional characteristics of tap water treated at the point of use in residential healthcare facilities for the elderly. Two types of POU devices were used: microfiltered water dispensers (MWDs) and reverse-osmosis water dispensers (ROWDs). All samples of water entering the devices and leaving them were tested for the bacteriological parameters set by Italian regulations for drinking water and for opportunistic pathogens associated with various infections in healthcare settings; in addition, the degree of mineralization of the water was assessed. The results revealed widespread bacterial contamination in the POU treatment devices, particularly from potentially pathogenic species. As expected, the use of ROWDs led to a decrease in the saline content of the water. In conclusion, the use of POU treatment in healthcare facilities for the elderly can be considered advisable only if the devices are constantly and carefully maintained.

  2. Electrodialysis reversal: Process and cost approximations for treating coal-bed methane waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajtar, E.T.; Bagley, D.M. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)

    2009-02-15

    Brackish waters with total dissolved solids (TDS) concentrations less than 10,000 mg/L are extracted from coal-beds in the Wyoming Powder River basin to facilitate the production of coal-bed methane. These waters frequently require treatment before disposal or use. Electrodialysis reversal (EDR) has not yet been used to treat these waters but this technology should be suitable. The question is whether EDR would be cost-effective. The purpose of this work, then, was to develop models for predicting the cost of EDR for brackish waters. These models, developed from data available in the literature, were found to predict actual EDR costs as a function of TDS removal, influent flow rate, chemical rejection efficiency, water recovery, electricity use, and labor cost within 10% of reported values. The total amortized cost for removing 1,000 mg/L of TDS from 10,000 m{sup 3}/day of influent assuming no concentrate disposal costs was predicted to range from $0.23/m{sup 3} to $0.85/m{sup 3} and was highly dependent on capital cost and facility life. Concentrate disposal costs significantly affected total treatment cost, providing a total treatment cost range from $0.38/m{sup 3} to $6.38/m{sup 3}, depending on concentrate disposal cost and water recovery. Pilot demonstrations of EDR in the Powder River basin should be conducted to determine the achievable water recovery when treating these waters.

  3. The Physical, Chemical and Microbial Quality of Treated Water in Qom s Desalination Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Yari

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectivesWater is the basis of life and health. The health of food and water supply plays an important role in human health. One of the methods of water desalination is membrane filter reverse osmosis method. This method is used for desalination of drinking water supply in Qom.MethodsThis is a descriptive, cross-sectional study designed to determine the quality of treated water in Qom desalination plant in year 2002. Inlet and outlet water samples of this plant were examined by the standard examination methods and the collected data were compared with national and international standards. Excel software was used for statistical analysis.ResultsThe results showed that the residual chlorine concentration, total hardness and fluoride concentration were lower than the minimum standard limit set for drinking water. The pH was also lower than the minimum standard limit. Microbial contamination was detected in 6% of samples.ConclusionThe results show that the acidity of water was lower than standard in whole plant. This gives corrosive properties to the water and increases the dissolution of materials, which are in contact with this water. In order to eliminate the secondary contamination, the concentration of residual chlorine should be 1 mg/l. But, none of the measurements showed a concentration as high as this value. As fluoride is an important element for health and growth of bone and teeth, especially in growing children, fluoride should be added to the drinking water. As the relationship between hardness of water and cardiovascular diseases has been established, it can be concluded that this drinking water supply can increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases in long time. Dilution of this water is recommended to adjust various factors to the standard limits and keep the total dissolved solids low.Keywords: Qom ;Water; Reverse Osmosis; Desalination Plant; Water Quality

  4. Apparatus and method for treating pollutants in a gas using hydrogen peroxide and UV light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Charles David (Inventor); Clausen, Christian Anthony (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An apparatus for treating pollutants in a gas may include a source of hydrogen peroxide, and a treatment injector for creating and injecting dissociated hydrogen peroxide into the flow of gas. The treatment injector may further include an injector housing having an inlet, an outlet, and a hollow interior extending therebetween. The inlet may be connected in fluid communication with the source of hydrogen peroxide so that hydrogen peroxide flows through the hollow interior and toward the outlet. At least one ultraviolet (UV) lamp may be positioned within the hollow interior of the injector housing. The at least one UV lamp may dissociate the hydrogen peroxide flowing through the tube. The dissociated hydrogen peroxide may be injected into the flow of gas from the outlet for treating pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides.

  5. Effects of blending of desalinated water with treated surface drinking water on copper and lead release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haizhou; Schonberger, Kenneth D; Korshin, Gregory V; Ferguson, John F; Meyerhofer, Paul; Desormeaux, Erik; Luckenbach, Heidi

    2010-07-01

    This study examined effects of desalinated water on the corrosion of and metal release from copper and lead-containing materials. A jar test protocol was employed to examine metal release from copper and lead-tin coupons exposed to water chemistries with varying blending ratios of desalinated water, alkalinities, pHs and orthophosphate levels. Increasing fractions of desalinated water in the blends resulted in non-monotonic changes of copper and lead release, with generally lower metal concentrations in the presence of desalinated water, especially when its contribution increased from 80% to 100%. SEM examination showed that the increased fractions of desalinated water were associated with pronounced changes of the morphology of the corrosion scales, likely due to the influence of natural organic matter. This hypothesis was corroborated by the existence of correlations between changes of the zeta-potential of representative minerals (malachite and hydrocerussite) and metal release. For practical applications, maintaining pH at 7.8 and adding 1 mg/L orthophosphate as PO(4) were concluded to be adequate to decrease copper and lead release. Lower alkalinity of desalinated water was beneficial for blends containing 50% or more desalinated water. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Water quality changes in a post-herbicide treated water hyacinth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment in all cases significantly (P < 0.05) increased the mean alkalinity, pH, conductivity, organic matter, ionic and the solids contents of the water 28 days after treatment. Irrespective of herbicidal treatment, mortality of water hyacinth and subsequent decay in situ significantly lowered (P < 0.05) the amount of dissolved ...

  7. Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, N.B.; Kristensen, Helle Halkjær; Wathes, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality......This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality...

  8. Treated bottom ash medium and method of arsenic removal from drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadgil, Ashok

    2009-06-09

    A method for low-cost arsenic removal from drinking water using chemically prepared bottom ash pre-treated with ferrous sulfate and then sodium hydroxide. Deposits on the surface of particles of bottom ash form of activated iron adsorbent with a high affinity for arsenic. In laboratory tests, a miniscule 5 grams of pre-treated bottom ash was sufficient to remove the arsenic from 2 liters of 2400 ppb (parts per billion) arsenic-laden water to a level below 50 ppb (the present United States Environmental Protection Agency limit). By increasing the amount of pre-treated bottom ash, even lower levels of post-treatment arsenic are expected. It is further expected that this invention supplies a very low-cost solution to arsenic poisoning for large population segments.

  9. In vivo viability of stored red blood cells derived from riboflavin plus ultraviolet light-treated whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancelas, Jose A; Rugg, Neeta; Fletcher, Dana; Pratt, P Gayle; Worsham, D Nicole; Dunn, Susan K; Marschner, Susanne; Reddy, Heather L; Goodrich, Raymond P

    2011-07-01

    A novel system using ultraviolet (UV) light and riboflavin (Mirasol System, CaridianBCT Biotechnologies) to fragment nucleic acids has been developed to treat whole blood (WB), aiming at the reduction of potential pathogen load and white blood cell inactivation. We evaluated stored red blood cell (RBC) metabolic status and viability, in vitro and in vivo, of riboflavin/UV light-treated WB (IMPROVE study). The study compared recovery and survival of RBCs obtained from nonleukoreduced WB treated using three different UV light energies (22, 33, or 44 J/mL(RBC)). After treatment, WB from 12 subjects was separated into components and tested at the beginning and end of component storage. After 42 days of storage, an aliquot of RBCs was radiolabeled and autologously reinfused into subjects for analysis of 24-hour recovery and survival of RBCs. Eleven subjects completed the in vivo study. No device-related adverse events were observed. By Day 42 of storage, a significant change in the concentrations of sodium and potassium was observed. Five subjects had a 24-hour RBC recovery of 75% or more with no significant differences among the energy groups. RBC t(1/2) was 24 ± 9 days for the combined three groups. Significant correlations between 24-hour RBC recovery and survival, hemolysis, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and CO(2) levels were observed. This study shows that key RBC quality variables, hemolysis, and ATP concentration may be predictive of their 24-hour recovery and t(1/2) survival. These variables will now be used to assess modifications to the system including storage duration, storage temperature, and appropriate energy dose for treatment. © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks.

  10. Characterization samples of Tigris river water treated with nano colloidal silver (physically, chemically, microbiologically)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumboos, H. I.; Beden, S. J.; Zouari, K.; Chkir, N.; Ahmed, H. A.

    2012-12-01

    Many researches of using nano silver in purification of drinking water from bacteria and its effect on stan dared properties as drinking water were established. Two stages accomplished in these projects. First stage include preparation of colloidal silver with characterization process and prepare water samples through sedimentation, filtration process, PH and turbidity measure then treated with colloidal silver in volume ratio (0.1-Λ) ml/100ml. The second stage represent select the better results from stage one and take samples to determine the standard characterization values with chemical, physical and microbiological taste. Results will be compared with Iraq standard certification. (Author)

  11. Seawater desalination using small and medium light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamura, Kazuo

    2000-01-01

    Water is an essential substance for sustaining human life. As Japan is an island country, surrounded by the sea and having abundant rainfall, there is no scarcity of water in daily life except during abnormally dry summers or after disasters such as earthquakes. Consequently, there is hardly any demand for seawater desalination plants except on remote islands, Okinawa and a part of Kyushu. However, the IAEA has forecast a scarcity of drinking water in developing countries at the beginning of the 21st century. Further, much more irrigation water will be required every year to prevent cultivated areas from being lost by desertification. If developing countries were to produce such water by seawater desalination using current fossil fuel energy technology, it would cause increased air pollution and global warming. This paper explains the concept of seawater desalination plants using small and medium water reactors (hereinafter called 'nuclear desalination'), as well as important matters regarding the export nuclear desalination plants to developing countries. (author)

  12. A novel water-assisted pulsed light processing for decontamination of blueberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yaoxin; Chen, Haiqiang

    2014-06-01

    Sample heating and shadowing effect have limited the application of pulsed light (PL) technology for decontamination of fresh produce. In this study, a novel setup using water-assisted PL processing was developed to overcome these limitations. Blueberries inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 or Salmonella were either treated with PL directly (dry PL treatment) or immersed in agitated water during the PL treatment (wet PL treatment) for 5-60 s. Although both pathogens were effectively inactivated by the dry PL treatments, the appearance of the blueberries was adversely affected and a maximum temperature of 64.8 °C on the blueberry surface was recorded. On the other hand, the visual appearance of blueberries remained unchanged after wet PL treatments and sample heating was significantly reduced. The wet PL treatments were more effective than chlorine washing on inactivating both pathogens. After a 60-s wet PL treatment, the populations of E. coli O157:H7 inoculated on calyx and skin of blueberries were reduced by 3.0 and >5.8 log CFU/g, respectively. Salmonella on blueberry calyx and skin was reduced by 3.6 and >5.9 log CFU/g, respectively. No viable bacterial cells were recovered from the water used in the wet PL treatments, demonstrating that this setup could prevent the risk of cross-contamination during fresh produce washing. Our results suggest that this new water-assisted PL treatment could be a potential non-chemical alternative (residue free) to chlorine washing since it is both more effective and environmentally friendly than chlorine washing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The management plan of liquid effluent in Korean advanced light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. H.; Lim, H. S.; Jeong, D. W.; Jeong, D. Y.

    2001-01-01

    Non-radioactive liquid effluent in Korean Advanced Light Water Reactor is transferred and treated in centralized waste treatment facility after the radioactivity in effluent is checked within power block. The liquid effluent from centralized waste treatment facility will be discharged by way of discharge canal in order to be in the sufficient condition. As a result of investigating the radiation monitoring design in accordance with 20 provisions by Korean Regulatory Authority, each effluent radiation monitoring with 20 provisions by Korean Regulatory Authority, each effluent radiation monitoring design satisfies the regulatory guideline. In relation to sampling and analyses, most systems satisfy the regulatory guideline except for some effluents from turbine building. And, though sampling and analyses are performed after radioactivity is monitored at each system in turbine building, these exceptions in turbine building effluents are expected to cause no significant problems because radioactivity is monitored by direct or indirect methods prior to release from turbine building. Integrated monitoring on liquid effluent from the centralized waste water treatment facility is not necessary because radiation monitoring, sampling and analyses on each system within power block are performed, and operational effectiveness compared with cost according to adding the radiation monitoring equipment is too low. So, whether the radiation monitoring in this effluent is reflected on design or not is planned to be determined through discussion with regulatory authority

  14. Using algae and submerged calcifying water flora for treating neutral to alkaline uranium-contaminated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dienemann, C.; Dienemann, H.; Stolz, L.; Dudel, E.G.

    2005-01-01

    Elimination of uranium from neutral to alkaline water is a complex technical process involving decarbonation, usually with HCl, followed by uranium removal by adding alkaline substances. In passive water treatment systems, uranium species - which often consist of a combination of oxidation and reduction stages - are not sufficiently considered. Algae and submerged water plants provide a natural alternative. They remove carbon dioxides or hydrogen carbonate, depending on the species, thus reducting the concentrations of the carbonate species. As the uranium species in alkaline water are coupled on the one hand to the carbonate species and on the other hand on the earth alkali metals, algae and submerged calcifying water plants are an excellent preliminary stage as a supplement to conventional passive water treatment systems. For a quantification of this effect, laboratory experiments were made with Cladophara spec. and with uranium concentrations of 100, 250 and 1000 μg U.L -1 at pH 8.3. The pH was adjusted with NaOH resp. Na2CO3 resulting in different uranium species. After 20 minutes, there was a difference in self-absorption between the different species (higher uranium concentration for NaOH than for Na2CO3), which was no longer observeable after 24 h. On the basis of data on the biomass development of macrophytic algae (Cladophora and Microspora) in a flowing river section near Neuensalz/Vogtland district, the final dimensions of a purification stage of this type are assessed. (orig.)

  15. REUSE OF TREATED WASTEWATER IN AGRICULTURE: SOLVING WATER DEFICIT PROBLEMS IN ARID AREAS (REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faissal AZIZ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the arid and semiarid areas, the availability and the management of irrigation water have become priorities of great importance. The successive years of drought, induced by climate change and population growth, increasingly reduced the amount of water reserved for agriculture. Consequently, many countries have included wastewater reuse as an important dimension of water resources planning. In the more arid areas wastewater is used in agriculture, releasing high resource of water supplies. In this context, the present work is a review focusing the reuse of treated wastewater in agriculture as an important strategy for solving water deficit problems in arid areas. Much information concerning the wastewater reuse in different regions of the world and in Morocco, the different wastewater treatment technologies existing in Morocco were discussed. The review focused also the fertilizing potential of wastewater in agriculture, the role of nutrients and their concentrations in wastewater and their advantages effects on plant growth and yield.

  16. The Physical, Chemical and Microbial Quality of Treated Water in Qom s Desalination Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R Yari

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and objectives

    Water is the basis of life and health. The health of food and water supply plays an important role in human health. One of the methods of water desalination is membrane filter reverse osmosis method. This method is used for desalination of drinking water supply in Qom.

    Methods

    This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study designed to determine the quality of treated water in Qom desalination plant in year 2002. Inlet and outlet water samples of this plant were examined by the standard examination methods and the collected data were compared with national and international standards. Excel software was used for statistical analysis.

    Results

    The results showed that the residual chlorine concentration, total hardness and fluoride concentration were lower than the minimum standard limit set for drinking water. The pH was also lower than the minimum standard limit. Microbial contamination was detected in 6% of samples.

    Conclusion

    The results show that the acidity of water was lower than standard in whole plant. This gives corrosive properties to the water and increases the dissolution of materials, which are in contact with this water. In order to eliminate the secondary contamination, the concentration of residual chlorine should be 1 mg/l. But, none of the measurements showed a concentration as high as this value. As fluoride is an important element for health and growth of bone and teeth, especially in growing children, fluoride should be added to the drinking water. As the relationship between hardness of water and cardiovascular diseases has been established, it can be concluded that this drinking water supply can increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases in long time. Dilution of this water is recommended to adjust various factors to the standard limits and keep the total dissolved solids low.

  17. A waveshifter light collector for a water Cherenkov detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claus, R.; Sulak, L.; Ciocio, A.; Stone, J.L.; Seidel, S.; Casper, D.; Bionta, R.M.; Park, H.S.; Wuest, C.; Blewitt, G.; Bratton, C.B.; Dye, S.T.; Learned, J.G.; Errede, S.; Foster, G.W.; Gajewski, W.; Matthews, J.; Sinclair, D.; Thornton, G.; Van Der Velde, J.C.; Ganezer, K.S.; Haines, T.J.; Kropp, W.R.; Price, L.; Reines, F.; Schultz, J.; Sobel, H.W.; Svoboda, R.; Goldhaber, M.; Jones, T.W.; Kielczewska, D.; Losecco, J.M.; Shumard, E.

    1987-01-01

    A device has been developed which is capable of doubling the light collection capability of a 5 inch hemispherical photomultiplier tube. Known as a 'waveshifter plate', its geometry is adaptable to various applications. Its marginal cost is small with respect to that of a phototube, it is readily removable, and it has minimum effect upon dark noise and timing resolution. (orig.)

  18. Report of analyses for light hydrocarbons in ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dromgoole, E.L.

    1982-04-01

    This report contains on microfiche the results of analyses for methane, ethane, propane, and butane in 11,659 ground water samples collected in 47 western and three eastern 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangles of the National Topographic Map Series (Figures 1 and 2), along with a brief description of the analytical technique used and some simple, descriptive statistics. The ground water samples were collected as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance. Further information on the ground water samples can be obtained by consulting the NURE data reports for the individual quadrangles. This information includes (1) measurements characterizing water samples (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), (2) physical measurements, where applicable (water temperature, well description, and other measurements), and (3) elemental analyses

  19. Potential Application of Nanomaterials to treat and detect the contaminated water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R. P.

    2011-12-01

    disinfectants to control water contamination and biofouling. To be developed items are as follows. Nanocatalysis (Au, Ag, Pd) approach to treat contaminated water, using desired form of nanocatalysts immobilized on a solid support. Nanostructured nanomaterials used, via filtration, adsorption to treat contaminated water. and To developed nanobiosensors to detect desired analytes of interest, and then bioremediation (use of microorganisms) and phytoremediation (use of plants) to treat contaminated water.

  20. Comparison of in vitro estrogenic activity and estrogen concentrations in source and treated waters from 25 U.S. drinking water treatment plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    In vitro bioassays have been successfully used to screen for estrogenic activity in wastewater and surface water, however, few have been applied to treated drinking water. Here, extracts of source and treated drinking water samples were assayed for estrogenic activity using T47D...

  1. Potential of domestic sewage effluent treated as a source of water and nutrients in hydroponic lettuce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata da Silva Cuba

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The search for alternative sources of water for agriculture makes the use of treated sewage sludge an important strategy for achieving sustainability. This study evaluated the feasibility of reusing treated sewage effluent as alternative source of water and nutrients for the hydroponic cultivation of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. The experiment was conducted in the greenhouse of the Center for Agricultural Sciences - UFSCar, in Araras, SP. The cultivation took place from February to March 2014. The hydroponic system used was the Nutrient Film Technique, and included three treatments: 1 water supply and mineral fertilizers (TA; 2 use of effluent treated and complemented with mineral fertilizers based on results of previous chemical analysis (TRA; and 3 use of treated effluent (TR. The applied experimental design was four randomly distributed blocks. We evaluated the fresh weight, nutritional status, the microbiological quality of the culture, and the amount of mineral fertilizers used in the treatments. The fresh weights were subjected to analysis of variance and means were compared by the Tukey test at 5% probability. Only the TR treatment showed a significant difference in the evaluated variables, as symptoms of nutritional deficiencies in plants and significant reduction in fresh weights (p <0.01 were found. There was no detectable presence of Escherichia coli in any treatment, and it was possible to use less of some fertilizers in the TRA treatment compared to TA.

  2. Impact assessment of treated wastewater on water quality of the receiver using the Wilcoxon test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofman Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wastewater treatment is a process which aims to reduce the concentration of pollutants in wastewater to the level allowed by current regulations. This is to protect the receivers which typically are rivers, streams, lakes. Examination of the quality of treated wastewater allows for quick elimination of possible negative effects, and the study of water receiver prevents from excessive contamination. The paper presents the results of selected physical and chemical parameters of treated wastewater from the largest on the region in north-eastern Poland city of Bialystok municipal wastewater treatment and Biała River, the receiver. The samples for research were taken 3–4 a month in 2015 from two points: before and after discharge. The impact of the wastewater treatment plant on the quality of the receiver waters was studied by using non-parametric Wilcoxon test. This test determined whether the analyzed indicators varied significantly depending on different sampling points of the river, above and below place of discharge of treated wastewater. These results prove that the treated wastewater does not affect the water quality in the Biała River.

  3. Electrolytic separation factors for oxygen isotopes in light and heavy water solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulens, J.; Olmstead, W.J.; Longhurst, T.H.; Gale, K.L.; Rolston, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    The electrolytic separation factor, α, has been measured for /sup 17/O and /sup 18/O at Pt and Ni anodes in both light and heavy water solutions of 6M KOH as a function of current density. For oxygen-17, isotopic separation effects were not observed, within the experimental uncertainty of +-2%, under all conditions studied. For oxygen-18, there is a small difference of 2% in α values between Pt and Ni in both light and heavy water solutions, but there is no significant difference in α values between light and heavy water solutions. In light waters solutions, the separation factor at Pt is small, α(/sup 18/O) ≤ 1.02 for i ≥ 0.1 A/cm/sub 2/. This value agrees reasonably well with theoretical estimates

  4. Current status of light water reactor and Hitachi's technical improvements for BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miki, Minoru; Ohki, Arahiko.

    1984-01-01

    Gradual technical improvements in Japan over the years has improved the reliability of light water reactors, and has achieved the highest capacity factor level in the world. Commercial operation of Fukushima 2-2 (1,100 MW) of the Tokyo Electric Power Co. was started in February, 1984, as the first standardized BWR base plant, ushering in a new age of domestic light water reactor technology. The ABWR (1,300 MW class) has been developed as Japan's next generation light water reactor, with construction aimed at the latter half of the 1980's. Hitachi's extensive efforts range from key nuclear equipment to various related robots, directed at improving safety, reliability, and the capacity factor, while reducing radiation exposure. This paper presents an outline of Hitachi's participation in the light water reactor's improvement and standardization, and the current status of our role in the international cooperation plan for the ABWR. (author)

  5. More recent developments for the ultrasonic testing of light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiger, H.; Engl, G.

    1976-01-01

    The development of an ultrasonic testing method for the inspection from the outside of the areas close to the cladding of the spherical fields of holes of light water reactor pressure vessels is described

  6. Catalogue and classification of technical safety rules for light-water reactors and reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloser, M.; Fichtner, N.; Neider, R.

    1975-08-01

    This report on the cataloguing and classification of technical rules for land-based light-water reactors and reprocessing plants contains a list of classified rules. The reasons for the classification system used are given and discussed

  7. Survival of Poliovirus in Flowing Turbid Seawater Treated with Ultraviolet Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, W. F.; Hamblet, F. E.; Akin, E. W.

    1967-01-01

    The effectiveness of a model ultraviolet (UV) radiation unit for treating flowing turbid seawater contaminated with poliovirus was determined. At a turbidity of 70 ppm, the observed survival ratios ranged from 1.9 × 10-3 (99.81% reduction) to 1.5 × 10-4 (99.98% reduction) at flow rates ranging from 25 to 15 liters/min; no virus was recovered at flow rates of 10 and 5 liters/min. At a turbidity of 240 ppm, the observed survival ratios ranged from 3.2 × 10-2 (96.80% reduction) to 2.1 × 10-4 (99.98% reduction) at flow rates ranging from 25 to 5 liters/min. As expected, turbidity had an adverse influence on the effectiveness of UV radiation; however, by adjusting the flow rate of the seawater through the treatment unit, adequate disinfection was shown to be predictable. Images Fig. 1 PMID:4291955

  8. Corrosion control when using passively treated abandoned mine drainage as alternative makeup water for cooling systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Chien, Shih-Hsiang; Li, Heng; Monnell, Jason D; Dzombak, David A; Vidic, Radisav D

    2011-09-01

    Passively treated abandoned mine drainage (AMD) is a promising alternative to fresh water as power plant cooling water system makeup water in mining regions where such water is abundant. Passive treatment and reuse of AMD can avoid the contamination of surface water caused by discharge of abandoned mine water, which typically is acidic and contains high concentrations of metals, especially iron. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of reusing passively treated AMD in cooling systems with respect to corrosion control through laboratory experiments and pilot-scale field testing. The results showed that, with the addition of the inhibitor mixture orthophosphate and tolyltriazole, mild steel and copper corrosion rates were reduced to acceptable levels (< 0.127 mm/y and < 0.0076 mm/y, respectively). Aluminum had pitting corrosion problems in every condition tested, while cupronickel showed that, even in the absence of any inhibitor and in the presence of the biocide monochloramine, its corrosion rate was still very low (0.018 mm/y).

  9. Field investigation of arsenic in ceramic pot filter-treated drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, A R; Elmore, A C; Bell, E; Rozycki, C

    2011-01-01

    Ceramic pot filters (CPFs) is one of several household water treatment technologies that is used to treat drinking water in developing areas. The filters have the advantage of being able to be manufactured using primarily locally available materials and local labor. However, naturally-occurring arsenic present in the clay used to make the filters has the potential to contaminate the water in excess of the World Health Organization drinking water standard of 0.01 mg/L. A manufacturing facility in Guatemala routinely rinses filters to reduce arsenic concentrations prior to distribution to consumers. A systemic study was performed to evaluate the change in arsenic concentrations with increasing volumes of rinse water. Arsenic field kit results were compared to standard method laboratory results, and dissolved versus suspended arsenic concentrations in CPF-treated water were evaluated. The results of the study suggest that rinsing is an effective means of mitigating arsenic leached from the filters, and that even in the absence of a formal rinsing program, routine consumer use may result in the rapid decline of arsenic concentrations. More importantly, the results indicate that filter manufacturers should give strong consideration to implementing an arsenic testing program.

  10. Light Refraction by Water as a Rationale for the Poggendorff Illusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2017-01-01

    The Poggendorff illusion in its classical form of parallel lines interrupting a transversal is viewed from the perspective of being related to the everyday experience of observing the light refraction in water. It is argued that if one considers a transversal to be a light ray in air and the para...

  11. Toward visible light response: Overall water splitting using heterogeneous photocatalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Domen, Kazunari

    2011-01-01

    Extensive energy conversion of solar energy can only be achieved by large-scale collection of solar flux. The technology that satisfies this requirement must be as simple as possible to reduce capital cost. Overall water splitting by powder

  12. Bacterial composition of natural water sources and consumer treated water in Guambía, Cauca

    OpenAIRE

    María del Mar Meza; Iván Fernando Ruiz; Giovanny Velásquez

    2012-01-01

    In the world, 80% of the infectious and gastrointestinal parasi­te diseases are caused by the use and consume of non-drinka­ble water. The lack of hygiene and the miss functional sanitary techniques are some of the reasons why the diarrheic disease is still an important health problem in developing countries. The water and the contaminated food are considered as the principal vehicles involved in the transmission of bacterium, viruses and parasites; thus, the importance of knowing the mi­crob...

  13. 10-fold enhancement in light-driven water splitting using niobium oxynitride microcone array films

    KAUST Repository

    Shaheen, Basamat

    2016-03-26

    We demonstrate, for the first time, the synthesis of highly ordered niobium oxynitride microcones as an attractive class of materials for visible-light-driven water splitting. As revealed by the ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), photoelectrochemical and transient photocurrent measurements, the microcones showed enhanced performance (~1000% compared to mesoporous niobium oxide) as photoanodes for water splitting with remarkable stability and visible light activity. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Overview of light water/hydrogen-based low energy nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, George H.; Shrestha, Prajakti J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews light water and hydrogen-based low-energy nuclear reactions (LENRs) including the different methodologies used to study these reactions and the results obtained. Reports of excess heat production, transmutation reactions, and nuclear radiation emission are cited. An aim of this review is to present a summary of the present status of light water LENR research and provide some insight into where this research is heading. (author)

  15. Emission of biocides from treated materials: test procedures for water and air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoknecht, Ute; Wegner, Robby; Horn, Wolfgang; Jann, Oliver

    2003-01-01

    Methods for the determination of biocide emissions from treated materials into water and air were developed and tested in order to support a comparative ecological assessment of biocidal products. Leaching tests, experiments with simulated rain, extraction cleaning of carpets and emission chamber tests were performed with a series of treated materials. The experiments focused on the effect of changes in the procedure as well as characteristics of the specimens and demonstrate the suitability of the proposed methods for biocides of different product types. It was demonstrated that emissions of biocides into water can be compared on the basis of leaching tests in which the emission kinetics of the active ingredients are recorded. However, the water volume per surface area and the timetable for water changes have to be defined in such tests. Functions of flux rates related to time can be well described for inorganic compounds, whereas modelling of the data is more complicated for organic substances. Emission chamber tests using 20-litre and 23-litre glass exsiccators, originally developed to study volatile organic compounds, were successfully adapted for the investigation of the emission of biocides from treated materials which are usually semi volatile organic compounds. However test parameters and the method of analysis have to be adapted to the substances to be determined. Generally, it was found that the emission curves for the semi volatile organic compounds investigated differ from those of volatile organic compounds.

  16. Light and ultrastructural studies on liver of Oreochromis niloticus fry grown in tritiated water during embryonic development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carino, V S; Alvendia-Casauay, A [Institute of Biology, College of Science, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines)

    1991-01-01

    Oreochromis niloticus embryos of different developmental stages were reared in tritiated water at 3.7, 0.37, 0.037, and 0 GBq/1 and harvested at day 21 stage. In general, gross morphology of liver was altered in fry reared in higher tritium concentrations and in fry reared in tritiated water at earlier stages of development. Under light microscopy, fatty infiltration of liver parenchyma, presence of unresorped yolk sac, occasional vacuolation in cytoplasm of hepatocytes, widening of sinusoids, and increased size of space of Disse were observed in liver of fry reared in tritiated water at higher concentrations. At the electron microscope level, swollen mitochondria, fragmented rough endoplasmic reticulum, and insconspicuous glycogen granules compared to control were noted in liver of treated fish. This study give basic information on how cells may be affected by irradiation at the histological, cellular, and subcellular level. (auth.). 8 figs.; 1 tab.

  17. Application of water-assisted ultraviolet light in combination of chlorine and hydrogen peroxide to inactivate Salmonella on fresh produce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shuanghuan; Huang, Runze; Chen, Haiqiang

    2017-09-18

    With the demand for fresh produce increases in recent decades, concerns for microbiological safety of fresh produce are also raised. To identify effective ultraviolet (UV) light treatment for fresh produce decontamination, we first determined the effect of three forms of UV treatment, dry UV (samples were treated by UV directly), wet UV (samples were dipped in water briefly and then exposed to UV), and water-assisted UV (samples were treated by UV while being immersed in agitated water) on inactivation of Salmonella inoculated on tomatoes and fresh-cut lettuce. In general, the water-assisted UV treatment was found to be the most effective for both produce items. Chlorine and hydrogen peroxide were then tested to determine whether they could be used to enhance the decontamination efficacy of water-assisted UV treatment and prevent transfer of Salmonella via wash water by completely eliminating it. Neither of them significantly enhanced water-assisted UV inactivation of Salmonella on tomatoes. Chlorine significantly improved the decontamination effectiveness of the water-assisted UV treatment for baby-cut carrots and lettuce, but not for spinach. In general, the single water-assisted UV treatment and the combined treatment of water-assisted UV and chlorine were similar or more effective than the chlorine washing treatment. In most of the cases, no Salmonella was detected in the wash water when the single water-assisted UV treatment was used to decontaminate tomatoes. In a few cases when Salmonella was detected in the wash water, the populations were very low,≤2CFU/mL, and the wash water contained an extremely high level of organic load and soil level. Therefore, the single water-assisted UV treatment could potentially be used as an environmentally friendly and non-chemical alternative to chlorine washing for tomatoes after validation in industrial scale. For lettuce, spinach and baby-cut carrots, the combined treatment of water-assisted UV treatment and chlorine

  18. EPA and USGS scientists conduct study to determine prevalence of newly-emerging contaminants in treated and untreated drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists from the EPA and USGS are collaborating on a research study to determine the presence of contaminants of emerging concern in treated and untreated drinking water collected from drinking water treatment plants.

  19. Compressive strength measurements of hybrid dental composites treated with dry heat and light emitting diodes (LED post cure treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Krisnawaty

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid composites are mostly used on large cavities as restorative dental materials, whether it is used directly or indirectly. The mechanical properties of composite resin shall increase if it is treated with post cure treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate compressive strength differences between dry heat and Light Emitting Diodes (LED treatment on the hybrid dental composite. A quasi-experimental was applied on this research with a total of 30 samples that were divided into two groups. Each sample was tested using LLOYD Universal Testing Machine with 1 mm/min speed to evaluate the compressive strength. The compressive strength results were marked when the sample was broken. The results of two groups were then analyzed using t-test statistical calculation. The results of this study show that post cure treatment on hybrid composite using LED light box (194.138 MPa was lower than dry heat treatment (227.339 MPa, which was also significantly different from statistical analysis. It can be concluded that compressive strength of LED light box was lower than dry heat post-cure treatment on the hybrid composite resin.

  20. Electrophoretic mobility of PM2 DNA treated with ultimate chemical carcinogens or with ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thielmann, H.W.; Hecht, R.

    1980-01-01

    Superhelical DNA of the Pseudomonas phage PM2 was irradiated with UV-light or reacted with covalently binding carcinogens, such as 7-bromomethyl-benz[a]anthracene, (Ac) 2 ONFln, K-region epoxides, and alkylating agents. Migration velocity of the DNA products was determined using agarose gel electrophoresis. In gels of more than 1.3%-1.9% agarose, modified PM2 DNA exhibited a dose-(concentration-)dependent decrease of migration velocity. This phenomenon is probably due to a decrease in superhelix density which caused the compact DNA coil to assume eventually an open-circular conformation. Comparison of the extent of DNA modification with the decrease of migration velocity revealed that the superhelical structure sensitively reflected the chemical DNA alterations. DNA species exhibiting in 1.6% agarose gels, a migration velocity of up to 30% of that of control DNA showed an increase of velocity in 0.4% agarose. Therefore, in 1.3%-1.9% agarose gels, the decrease of superhelix density is accompanied by an increase of the frictional coefficient, whereas in 0.4%-0.9% agarose gels the same decrease of superhelix density apparently led to a higher degree of flexibility of the macromolecule and/or exposure of additional electric charges. (orig.) [de

  1. Light and electron microscopic analysis of tattoos treated by Q-switched ruby laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, C.R.; Anderson, R.R.; Gange, R.W.; Michaud, N.A.; Flotte, T.J. (Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (USA))

    1991-07-01

    Short-pulse laser exposures can be used to alter pigmented structures in tissue by selective photothermolysis. Potential mechanisms of human tattoo pigment lightening with Q-switched ruby laser were explored by light and electron microscopy. Significant variation existed between and within tattoos. Electron microscopy of untreated tattoos revealed membrane-bound pigment granules, predominantly within fibroblasts and macrophages, and occasionally in mast cells. These granules contained pigment particles ranging from 2-in diameter. Immediately after exposure, dose-related injury was observed in cells containing pigment. Some pigment particles were smaller and lamellated. At fluences greater than or equal to 3 J/cm2, dermal vacuoles and homogenization of collagen bundles immediately adjacent to extracellular pigment were occasionally observed. A brisk neutrophilic infiltrate was apparent by 24 h. Eleven days later, the pigment was again intracellular. Half of the biopsies at 150 d revealed a mild persistent lymphocytic infiltrate. There was no fibrosis except for one case of clinical scarring. These findings confirm that short-pulse radiation can be used to selectively disrupt cells containing tattoo pigments. The physial alteration of pigment granules, redistribution, and elimination appear to account for clinical lightening of the tattoos.

  2. Consistency of Use and Effectiveness of Household Water Treatment among Indian Households Claiming to Treat Their Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Ghislaine; Clasen, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    Household water treatment (HWT) can improve drinking water quality and prevent disease if used correctly and consistently by populations at risk. Current international monitoring estimates by the Joint Monitoring Programme for water and sanitation suggest that at least 1.1 billion people practice HWT. These estimates, however, are based on surveys that may overstate the level of consistent use and do not address microbial effectiveness. We sought to assess how HWT is practiced among households identified as HWT users according to these monitoring standards. After a baseline survey (urban: 189 households, rural: 210 households) to identify HWT users, 83 urban and 90 rural households were followed up for 6 weeks. Consistency of reported HWT practices was high in both urban (100%) and rural (93.3%) settings, as was availability of treated water (based on self-report) in all three sampling points (urban: 98.8%, rural: 76.0%). Nevertheless, only 13.7% of urban and 25.8% of rural households identified at baseline as users of adequate HWT had water free of thermotolerant coliforms at all three water sampling points. Our findings raise questions about the value of the data gathered through the international monitoring of HWT as predictors of water quality in the home, as well as questioning the ability of HWT, as actually practiced by vulnerable populations, to reduce exposure to waterborne diseases.

  3. Suitability of Using Duckweed as Feed and Treated Sewage as Water Source in Tilapia Aquaculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EI-Shafail, S A; Nasrl, F A; EI-Gohary, F.A. A. [Water Pollution Control Department, National Research Centre, Dokki, Giza (Egypt); Cijzen, H J; Steen, N P [Environmental Resources Department, UNESCO-IHE Institute, Delft (Netherlands)

    2004-07-01

    Use of treated effluent and duckweed biomass from a pilot-scale UASB-duckweed ponds system treating domestic sewage was evaluated in rearing Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Nutritional value of duckweed as sole feed was compared with wheat bran. Two sources of water were used for each feed trial, treated-sewage and freshwater. The experiment was conducted in parallel with a conventional settled sewage-fed fishpond. Results of growth performance demonstrated that, in case of freshwater ponds specific growth rate (SGR) of tilapia fed on fresh duckweed was significantly (p < 0.01) higher than the SGR in wheat bran fed pond. No significant difference (p > 0.05) was observed between the two feeding regimes in treated sewage fed ponds. The SGR of tilapia reared in the treated sewage-wheat bran-fed pond (TWP) was significant higher (p <0.01) than the SGR in the freshwater-wheat bran-fed pond (FWP). On the other hand, due to the early spawning in the treated sewage-duckweed fed pond (TOP) SGR of tilapia in the latter was significantly lower (p <0.05) than the SGR in the freshwater-duckweed-fed pond (FDP). The results of net fish yield were 11.8, 8.9, 9.6 and 6.4 ton/ha/y in TDP, TWP, FDP and FWP, respectively. negative net yield (-0.16 ton/ha/y) was observed in the settled sewage- fed pond (SSP) due to high mortality.

  4. Suitability of Using Duckweed as Feed and Treated Sewage as Water Source in Tilapia Aquaculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EI-Shafail, S.A.; Nasrl, F.A.; EI-Gohary, F.A. A.; Cijzen, H.J.; Steen, N.P.

    2004-01-01

    Use of treated effluent and duckweed biomass from a pilot-scale UASB-duckweed ponds system treating domestic sewage was evaluated in rearing Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Nutritional value of duckweed as sole feed was compared with wheat bran. Two sources of water were used for each feed trial, treated-sewage and freshwater. The experiment was conducted in parallel with a conventional settled sewage-fed fishpond. Results of growth performance demonstrated that, in case of freshwater ponds specific growth rate (SGR) of tilapia fed on fresh duckweed was significantly (p 0.05) was observed between the two feeding regimes in treated sewage fed ponds. The SGR of tilapia reared in the treated sewage-wheat bran-fed pond (TWP) was significant higher (p <0.01) than the SGR in the freshwater-wheat bran-fed pond (FWP). On the other hand, due to the early spawning in the treated sewage-duckweed fed pond (TOP) SGR of tilapia in the latter was significantly lower (p <0.05) than the SGR in the freshwater-duckweed-fed pond (FDP). The results of net fish yield were 11.8, 8.9, 9.6 and 6.4 ton/ha/y in TDP, TWP, FDP and FWP, respectively. negative net yield (-0.16 ton/ha/y) was observed in the settled sewage- fed pond (SSP) due to high mortality

  5. Laser-light backscattering response to water content and proteolysis in dry-cured ham

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fulladosa, E.; Rubio-Celorio, M.; Skytte, Jacob Lercke

    2017-01-01

    on the acquisition conditions used. Laser backscattering was influenced by both dryness and proteolysis intensity showing an average light intensity decrease of 0.2 when decreasing water content (1% weight loss) and increasing proteolysis (equivalent to one-hour enzyme action). However, a decrease of scattering area...... was only detected when the water content was decreased (618 mm(2) per 1% weight loss). Changes on scattering of light profiles were only observed when the water content changed. Although there is a good correlation between water content and LBI parameters when analysing commercial samples, proteolysis...... of laser incidence) and to analyse the laser-light backscattering changes caused by additional hot air drying and proteolysis of dry-cured ham slices. The feasibility of the technology to determine water content and proteolysis (which is related to textural characteristics) of commercial sliced dry...

  6. [The organizational aspects of treating light casualties in modern warfare (2)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechaev, E A; Maksimov, G K; Agapov, V K; Golov, Iu S

    1993-07-01

    The experience gathered by Medical Service during the war in Afghanistan and during liquidation of the consequences of various disasters and accidents has shown that the most rational method of treatment of minor wounded near the combat area or zone of disaster was a two-staged (and sometimes a three-staged) management system. At the combat tactical zone it is expedient to render the secondary surgical care and reanimation procedures of vital cases, and also provide treatment of minor wounded who could be returned to their ranks in 10 days. For this purpose it is necessary to integrate the sections of medical triage and minor wounded treatment into organic structure of the Brigade medical company and Divisional hospital. As for Army Medical Brigade it must have in its structure a hospital for minor wounded who could be returned to their ranks in 20 days. All the wounded who have to be treated more than 20 days must be evacuated to the Front hospital for minor wounded.

  7. [Research of aeration with bio-film technology to treat urban landscape water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ying-Wei; Nie, Zhi-Dan; Nian, Yue-Gang; Huang, Min-Sheng; Huang, Jian-Jun; Yan, Hai-Hong; Zhang, Yang

    2008-01-01

    Research of the aeration with bio-film technology was carried out to treat scenic water of a sanatorium in Beijing. The aim of the research was improving the water habitat by increasing the transparency and reducing the concentration of N and P. The equipments were set in a 5,000 m2 water area, which combined the plug flow jet aerator with the elastic biological filler. The research indicated that the transparency increased from 25 cm to 120 cm by the technology. The removal efficiencies of NH4(+)-N, NO3(-)-N and TP were 86.6% , 90% and 73.3%, but there was only 22.4% for TN. The concentration of DO increased from 4.3 mg/L to 7 mg/L. In a word, the aeration with bio-film technology was an effective measure to improve the water habitat by increasing the transparency.

  8. Treating metabolic syndrome's metaflammation with low level light therapy: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Tania M.; Kato, Ilka T.; Deana, Alessandro M.; Ribeiro, Martha S.

    2014-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome comprises a constellation of morbidities such as insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, atherogenic dyslipidemia, dysglycemia and obesity (especially abdominal). Metabolic alterations are observed in major insulin target organs, increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases, type-2 diabetes and therefore mortality. Tissue alterations are characterized by immune cells infiltrates (especially activated macrophages). Released inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α induce chronic inflammation in subjects with metabolic syndrome, since inflammatory pathways are activated in the neighboring cells. The intra-abdominal adipose tissue appears to be of particular importance in the onset of the inflammatory state, and strategies contributing to modulate the inflammatory process within this adipose tissue can mitigate the metabolic syndrome consequences. Considering the low level light therapy (LLLT) recognized benefits in inflammatory conditions, we hypothesized this therapeutic approach could promote positive effects in modulating the inflammatory state of metabolic syndrome. That being the scope of this study, male C57BL/6 mice were submitted to a high-fat/high-fructose diet among 8 weeks to induce metabolic syndrome. Animals were then irradiated on the abdominal region during 21 days using an 850 nm LED (6 sessions, 300 seconds per session, 60 mW output power, ~6 J/cm2 fluence, ~19 mW/cm2 fluence rate). Before and during treatment, blood was sampled either from the retroorbital plexus or from tail puncture for glucose, total cholesterol and triglycerides analysis. So far our results indicate no alterations on these metabolic parameters after LLLT. For further investigations, blood was collected for plasma inflammatory cytokine quantification and fresh ex vivo samples of liver and intra-abdominal adipose tissue were harvested for immunohistochemistry purposes.

  9. DNA repair and induction of plasminogen activator in human fetal cells treated with ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Ishai, R.; Sharon, R.; Rothman, M.; Miskin, R.

    1984-01-01

    We have tested human fetal fibroblasts for development associated changes in DNA repair by utilizing nucleoid sedimentation as an assay for excision repair. Among skin fibroblasts the rate of excision repair was significantly higher in non-fetal cells than in fibroblasts derived from an 8 week fetus; this was evident by a delay in both the relaxation and the restoration of DNA supercoiling in nucleoids after irradiation. Skin fibroblasts derived at 12 week gestation were more repair proficient than those derived at 8 week gestation. However, they exhibited a somewhat lower rate of repair than non-fetal cells. The same fetal and non-fetal cells were also tested for induction of the protease plasminogen activator (PA) after u.v. irradiation. Enhancement of PA was higher in skin fibroblasts derived at 8 week than in those derived at 12 week gestation and was absent in non-fetal skin fibroblasts. These results are consistent with our previous findings that in human cells u.v. light-induced PA synthesis is correlated with reduced DNA repair capacity. Excision repair and PA inducibility were found to depend on tissue of origin in addition to gestational stage, as shown for skin and lung fibroblasts from the same 12 week fetus. Lung compared to skin fibroblasts exhibited lower repair rates and produced higher levels of PA after irradiation. The sedimentation velocity of nucleoids, prepared from unirradiated fibroblasts, in neutral sucrose gradients with or without ethidium bromide, indicated the presence of DNA strand breaks in fetal cells. It is proposed that reduced DNA repair in fetal cells may result from alterations in DNA supercoiling, and that persistent DNA strand breaks enhance transcription of PA gene(s)

  10. Fouling-Resistant Membranes for Treating Concentrated Brines for Water Reuse in Advanced Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendren, Zachary [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Choi, Young Chul [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2014-10-14

    The high total dissolved solids (TDS) levels in the wastewater quality generated from unconventional oil and gas development make the current state-of-the art approach to water treatment/disposal untenable. Our proposed membrane technology approach addresses the two major challenges associated with this water: 1) the membrane distillation process removes the high TDS content, which is often 8 times higher than that of seawater, and 2) our novel membrane coating prevents the formation of scale that would otherwise pose a significant operational hurdle. This is accomplished through next-generation electrically conductive membranes that mitigate fouling beyond what is currently possible, and allow for the flexibility to treat to the water to levels desirable for multiple reuse options, thus reducing fresh water withdrawal, all the way to direct disposal into the environment. The overall project objective was to demonstrate the efficacy of membrane distillation (MD) as a cost-savings technology to treat concentrated brines (such as, but not limited to, produced waters generated from fossil fuel extraction) that have high levels of TDS for beneficial water reuse in power production and other industrial operations as well as agricultural and municipal water uses. In addition, a novel fouling-resistant nanocomposite membrane was developed to reduce the need for chemicals to address membrane scaling due to the precipitation of divalent ions in high-TDS waters and improve overall MD performance via an electrically conductive membrane distillation process (ECMD). This anti-fouling membrane technology platform is based on incorporating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into the surface layer of existing, commercially available MD membranes. The CNTs impart electrical conductivity to the membrane surface to prevent membrane scaling and fouling when an electrical potential is applied.

  11. Radiative transfer modeling of upwelling light field in coastal waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundarabalan, Balasubramanian; Shanmugam, Palanisamy; Manjusha, Sadasivan

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the radiance distribution in coastal waters are a complex problem, but playing a growingly important role in optical oceanography and remote sensing applications. The present study attempts to modify the Inherent Optical Properties (IOPs) to allow the phase function to vary with depth, and the bottom boundary to take into account a sloping/irregular surface and the effective reflectance of the bottom material. It then uses the Hydrolight numerical model to compute Apparent Optical Properties (AOPs) for modified IOPs and bottom boundary conditions compared to the default values available in the standard Hydrolight model. The comparison of the profiles of upwelling radiance simulated with depth-dependent IOPs as well as modified bottom boundary conditions for realistic cases of coastal waters off Point Calimere of southern India shows a good match between the simulated and measured upwelling radiance profile data, whereas there is a significant drift between the upwelling radiances simulated from the standard Hydrolight model (with default values) and measured data. Further comparison for different solar zenith conditions at a coastal station indicates that the upwelling radiances simulated with the depth-dependent IOPs and modified bottom boundary conditions are in good agreement with the measured radiance profile data. This simulation captures significant changes in the upwelling radiance field influenced by the bottom boundary layer as well. These results clearly emphasize the importance of using realistic depth-dependent IOPs as well as bottom boundary conditions as input to Hydrolight in order to obtain more accurate AOPs in coastal waters. -- Highlights: ► RT model with depth-dependent IOPs and modified bottom boundary conditions provides accurate L u profiles in coastal waters. ► The modified phase function model will be useful for coastal waters. ► An inter-comparison with measured upwelling radiance gives merits of the

  12. Deposition of LDH on plasma treated polylactic acid to reduce water permeability

    KAUST Repository

    Bugatti, Valeria

    2013-04-01

    A simple and scalable deposition process was developed to prepare polylactic acid (PLA) coatings with enhanced water barrier properties for food packaging applications. This method based on electrostatic interactions between the positively charged layers of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) modified with ionic liquids (ILs) and the negatively charged plasma treated polylactic acid leads to homogeneous, stable, and highly durable coatings. Deposition of the LDH coatings increases the surface hydrophobicity of the neat PLA, which results to a decrease in water permeability by about 35%. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  13. Water cooling of high power light emitting diode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    The development in light technologies for entertainment is moving towards LED based solutions. This progress is not without problems, when more than a single LED is used. The amount of generated heat is often in the same order as in a conventional discharge lamp, but the allowable operating...... temperature is much lower. In order to handle the higher specific power (W/m3) inside the LED based lamps cold plates were designed and manufactured. 6 different designs were analyzed through laboratory experiments and their performances were compared. 5 designs cover; traditional straight mini channel, S...

  14. Method and equipment for treating waste water resulting from the technological testing processes of NPP equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radulescu, M. C.; Valeca, S.; Iorga, C.

    2016-01-01

    Modern methods and technologies coupled together with advanced equipment for treating residual substances resulted from technological processes are mandatory measures for all industrial facilities. The correct management of the used working agents and of the all wastes resulted from the different technological process (preparation, use, collection, neutralization, discharge) is intended to reduce up to removal of their potential negative impact on the environment. The high pressure and temperature testing stands from INR intended for functional testing of nuclear components (fuel bundles, fuelling machines, etc.) were included in these measures since the use of oils, demineralized water chemically treated, greases, etc. This paper is focused on the method and equipment used at INR Pitesti in the chemical treatment of demineralized waters, as well as the equipment for collecting, neutralizing and discharging them after use. (authors)

  15. Methodology of fuel rod design for pressurized light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira e Silva, A.; Esteves, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    The fuel performance program FRAPCON-1 and the structural finite element program SAP-IV are applied in a pressurized water reactor fuel rod design methodology. The applied calculation procedure allows to dimension the fuel rod components and characterize its internal pressure. (author) [pt

  16. Light penetration in the coastal waters off Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sathyendranath, S.; Varadachari, V.V.R.

    February to April, and by May, just before the onset of the SW monsoon rains, the waters are once again highly turbid, this time apparently due to churning action of wind-waves and strong currents. It has been found that the average irradiance attenuation...

  17. Conclusions drawn of tritium balance in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolle, L.; Bazin, J.

    1978-01-01

    In the tritium balance of pressurized water reactors, using boric acid and lithium in the cooling water, contribution of the tritium produced by fission, diffusing through the zircalloy of the fuel cladding estimated to 0.1%, was not in agreement with quantities measured in reactors. It is still difficult to estimate what percentage is represented by the tritium formed by fission in the fuel, owing to diffusion through cladding. The tritium balance in different working nuclear power stations is consequently of interest. The tritium balance method in the water of the cooling circuit of PWR is fast and experimentally simple. It is less sensitive to errors originating from fission yields than balance of tritium produced by fission in the fuel. A tritium balance in the water of the cooling circuit of Biblis-A, with a specific burn-up of 18000 MWd/t gives a better precision. Diffusion rate of tritium produced by fission was less than 0.2%. So low a contribution is a justification to the use of lithium with an isotopic purity of 99.9% of lithium 7 to limit at a low value the residual lithium 6 [fr

  18. Study of the light emitted in the moderation of a heavy-water pile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breton, D.

    1958-06-01

    During the running of a reactor which uses water as a neutron moderator, a bluish light is seen to appear inside the liquid. A detailed study of this radiation, undertaken on the Fontenay-aux-Roses pile, has shown that the spectrum is identical with that which characterises the light produced by the Cerenkov effect. The light intensity as a function of the pile power grows exponentially as a function of time when the pile diverges, with a lifetime equal to that of the rise in power. An examination of the various particles present in the pile has led to the conclusion that only electrons with an energy greater than 260 keV con produce the Cerenkov light. The light source thus produced is about 2.10 6 photons/cm 2 of water, when the pile power equals 1 watt. (author) [fr

  19. Evaluation of Subsurface Flow and Free-water Surface Wetlands Treating NPR-3 Produced Water - Year No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, J. E.; Jackson, L. M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper is a summary of some of the activities conducted during the first year of a three-year cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between the Department of Energy (DOE) Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) and Texaco relating to the treatment of produced water by constructed wetlands. The first year of the CRADA is for design, construction and acclimation of the wetland pilot units. The second and third years of the CRADA are for tracking performance of pilot wetlands as the plant and microbial communities mature. A treatment wetland is a proven technology for the secondary and tertiary treatment of produced water, storm water and other wastewaters. Treatment wetlands are typically classified as either free-water surface (FWS) or subsurface flow (SSF). Both FWS and SSF wetlands work well when properly designed and operated. This paper presents a collection of kinetic data gathered from pilot units fed a slipstream of Wyoming (NPR-3) produced water. The pilot units are set up outdoors to test climatic influences on treatment. Monitoring parameters include evapotranspiration, plant growth, temperature, and NPDES discharge limits. The pilot wetlands (FWS and SSF) consist of a series of 100-gal plastic tubs filled with local soils, gravel, sharp sand and native wetland plants (cattail (Typha spp.), bulrush (Scirpus spp.), dwarf spikerush (Eleocharis)). Feed pumps control hydraulic retention time (HRT) and simple water control structures control the depth of water. The treated water is returned to the existing produced water treatment system. All NPDES discharge limits are met. Observations are included on training RMOTC summer students to do environmental work

  20. [Effects of light on submerged macrophytes in eutrophic water: research progress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Sha, Zou; Ze-Yu, Nie; Xiao-Yan, Yao; Ji-Yan, Shi

    2013-07-01

    The restoration of submerged macrophytes is the key to remediate eutrophic water and maintain the health of aquatic ecosystem, while light is the main limiting factor. This paper summarized the factors affecting the light extinction in water and the mechanisms of light intensity affecting the physiology of submerged macrophytes, with the focuses on the metabolic mechanisms of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus, the responses of antioxidant enzyme system, and the feedbacks of pigment composition and concentration in the common submerged macrophytes under low light stress. Several engineering techniques applied in the ecological restoration of submerged macrophytes were presented, and the framework of the restoration of submerged macrophytes in eutrophic water was proposed. Some problems in current research and several suggestions on future research were addressed, which could help the related research and engineering practices.

  1. Corrosion control when using secondary treated municipal wastewater as alternative makeup water for cooling tower systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Li, Heng; Chien, Shih-Hsiang; Monnell, Jason D; Chowdhury, Indranil; Dzombak, David A; Vidic, Radisav D

    2010-12-01

    Secondary treated municipal wastewater is a promising alternative to fresh water as power plant cooling water system makeup water, especially in arid regions. Laboratory and field testing was conducted in this study to evaluate the corrosiveness of secondary treated municipal wastewater for various metals and metal alloys in cooling systems. Different corrosion control strategies were evaluated based on varied chemical treatment. Orthophosphate, which is abundant in secondary treated municipal wastewater, contributed to more than 80% precipitative removal of phosphorous-based corrosion inhibitors. Tolyltriazole worked effectively to reduce corrosion of copper (greater than 95% inhibition effectiveness). The corrosion rate of mild steel in the presence of free chlorine 1 mg/L (as Cl2) was approximately 50% higher than in the presence of monochloramine 1 mg/L (as Cl2), indicating that monochloramine is a less corrosive biocide than free chlorine. The scaling layers observed on the metal alloys contributed to corrosion inhibition, which could be seen by comparing the mild steel 21-day average corrosion rate with the last 5-day average corrosion rate, the latter being approximately 50% lower than the former.

  2. Bitter taste masking of enzyme-treated soy protein in water and bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelsen, Anne S; Laursen, Anne; Knudsen, Tine A; Møller, Stine; Kidmose, Ulla

    2018-08-01

    Bioactive protein hydrolysates are often very bitter. To overcome this challenge, xylitol, sucrose, α-cyclodextrin, maltodextrin and combinations of these were tested systematically as bitter-masking agents of an enzyme-treated soy protein in an aqueous model and in a bread model. Sensory descriptive analysis was used to reveal the bitter-masking effect of the taste-masking blends on the enzyme-treated soy protein. In water, xylitol, sucrose and maltodextrin reduced bitterness significantly, whereas α-cyclodextrin did not. No significant difference was observed in bitterness reduction between xylitol and sucrose. Both reduced bitterness significantly more than maltodextrin. No interactions between the taste-masking agents affecting bitterness reduction were found. Clearer bitter-masking effects were seen in the aqueous model compared with the bread model. The bitter-masking effects of α-cyclodextrin and maltodextrin were similar between water and bread. The effect of xylitol and sucrose on bitterness suppression varied between the systems. In water, bitterness was negatively correlated with sweetness. In bread, bitterness was negatively correlated with freshness, and maltodextrin significantly reduced bitterness of the enzyme-treated soy protein and increased freshness. Bitter-masking effects were generally more discernible in the aqueous model compared with the bread model. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Volatile organic compounds in natural biofilm in polyethylene pipes supplied with lake water and treated water from the distribution network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skjevrak, Ingun; Lund, Vidar; Ormerod, Kari; Herikstad, Hallgeir

    2005-10-01

    The objective of this work was investigation of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in natural biofilm inside polyethylene (HDPE) pipelines at continuously flowing water. VOC in biofilm may contribute to off-flavour episodes in drinking water. The pipelines were supplied with raw lake water and treated water from the distribution network. Biofilm was established at test sites located at two different drinking water distribution networks and their raw water sources. A whole range of volatile compounds were identified in the biofilm, including compounds frequently associated with cyanobacteria and algae, such as ectocarpene, dictyopterene A and C', geosmin, beta-ionone and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one. In addition, volatile amines, dimethyldisulphide and 2-nonanone, presumably originating from microorganisms growing in the biofilm, were identified. C8-compounds such as 1-octen-3-one and 3-octanone were believed to be products from microfungi in the biofilm. Degradation products from antioxidants such as Irgafos 168, Irganox 1010 and Irganox 1076 used in HDPE pipes, corresponding to 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol and 2,6-di-tert-butylbenzoquinone, were present in the biofilm.

  4. Separation setup for the light water detritiation process in the water-hydrogen system based on the membrane contact devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenkevich, M. B.; Rastunova, I. L.; Prokunin, S. V.

    2008-01-01

    Detritiation of light water wastes down to a level permissible to discharge into the environment while simultaneously concentrating tritium to decrease amount of waste being buried is a constant problem. The laboratory setup for the light water detritiation process is presented. The separation column consists of 10 horizontally arranged perfluorosulphonic acid Nafion-type membrane contact devises and platinum catalyst (RCTU-3SM). Each contact device has 42.3 cm 2 of the membrane and 10 cm 3 of the catalyst. The column is washed by tritium free light water (L H2O ) and the tritium-containing flow (F HTO ) feeds the electrolyser at λ = G H2 /L H2O = 2. A separation factor of 66 is noted with the device at 336 K and 0.145 MPa. (authors)

  5. Visible-Light-Driven BiOI-Based Janus Micromotor in Pure Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Renfeng; Hu, Yan; Wu, Yefei; Gao, Wei; Ren, Biye; Wang, Qinglong; Cai, Yuepeng

    2017-02-08

    Light-driven synthetic micro-/nanomotors have attracted considerable attention due to their potential applications and unique performances such as remote motion control and adjustable velocity. Utilizing harmless and renewable visible light to supply energy for micro-/nanomotors in water represents a great challenge. In view of the outstanding photocatalytic performance of bismuth oxyiodide (BiOI), visible-light-driven BiOI-based Janus micromotors have been developed, which can be activated by a broad spectrum of light, including blue and green light. Such BiOI-based Janus micromotors can be propelled by photocatalytic reactions in pure water under environmentally friendly visible light without the addition of any other chemical fuels. The remote control of photocatalytic propulsion by modulating the power of visible light is characterized by velocity and mean-square displacement analysis of optical video recordings. In addition, the self-electrophoresis mechanism has been confirmed for such visible-light-driven BiOI-based Janus micromotors by demonstrating the effects of various coated layers (e.g., Al 2 O 3 , Pt, and Au) on the velocity of motors. The successful demonstration of visible-light-driven Janus micromotors holds a great promise for future biomedical and environmental applications.

  6. Outbreaks Associated with Treated Recreational Water - United States, 2000-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavsa, Michele C; Cikesh, Bryanna L; Roberts, Virginia A; Kahler, Amy M; Vigar, Marissa; Hilborn, Elizabeth D; Wade, Timothy J; Roellig, Dawn M; Murphy, Jennifer L; Xiao, Lihua; Yates, Kirsten M; Kunz, Jasen M; Arduino, Matthew J; Reddy, Sujan C; Fullerton, Kathleen E; Cooley, Laura A; Beach, Michael J; Hill, Vincent R; Yoder, Jonathan S

    2018-05-18

    Outbreaks associated with exposure to treated recreational water can be caused by pathogens or chemicals in venues such as pools, hot tubs/spas, and interactive water play venues (i.e., water playgrounds). During 2000-2014, public health officials from 46 states and Puerto Rico reported 493 outbreaks associated with treated recreational water. These outbreaks resulted in at least 27,219 cases and eight deaths. Among the 363 outbreaks with a confirmed infectious etiology, 212 (58%) were caused by Cryptosporidium (which causes predominantly gastrointestinal illness), 57 (16%) by Legionella (which causes Legionnaires' disease, a severe pneumonia, and Pontiac fever, a milder illness with flu-like symptoms), and 47 (13%) by Pseudomonas (which causes folliculitis ["hot tub rash"] and otitis externa ["swimmers' ear"]). Investigations of the 363 outbreaks identified 24,453 cases; 21,766 (89%) were caused by Cryptosporidium, 920 (4%) by Pseudomonas, and 624 (3%) by Legionella. At least six of the eight reported deaths occurred in persons affected by outbreaks caused by Legionella. Hotels were the leading setting, associated with 157 (32%) of the 493 outbreaks. Overall, the outbreaks had a bimodal temporal distribution: 275 (56%) outbreaks started during June-August and 46 (9%) in March. Assessment of trends in the annual counts of outbreaks caused by Cryptosporidium, Legionella, or Pseudomonas indicate mixed progress in preventing transmission. Pathogens able to evade chlorine inactivation have become leading outbreak etiologies. The consequent outbreak and case counts and mortality underscore the utility of CDC's Model Aquatic Health Code (https://www.cdc.gov/mahc) to prevent outbreaks associated with treated recreational water.

  7. Petal abscission in rose flowers: effects of water potential, light intensity and light quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van W.G.; Vojinovic, A.

    1996-01-01

    Petal abscission was studied in roses (Rosa hybrida L.), cvs. Korflapei (trade name Frisco), Sweet Promise (Sonia) and Cara Mia (trade name as officially registered cultivar name). Unlike flowers on plants in greenhouses, cut flowers placed in water in the greenhouse produced visible symptoms of

  8. Investigation of Water Safety in Non-treated Drinking Water with Trace Toxic Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Suw Young; Kim, Dae Hong; Lee, Ga Eun

    2013-09-01

    The trace toxic metal copper was assayed using mercury immobilized on a carbon nanotube electrode (MCW), with a graphite counter and a reference electrode. In this study, a macro-scale convection motor was interfaced with a MCW three-electrode system, in which a handmade MCW was optimized using cyclic- and square-wave stripping voltammetry. An analytical electrolyte for tap water was used instead of an expensive acid or base ionic solution. Under these conditions, optimum parameters were 0.09 V amplitude, 40 Hz frequency, 0.01 V incremental potential, and a 60-s accumulation time. A diagnostic working curve was obtained from 50.0 to 350 μg/L. At a constant Cu(II) concentration of 10.0 μg/L, the statistical relative standard deviation was 1.78% (RSD, n = 15), the analytical accumulation time was only 60 s, and the analytical detection limit approached 4.6 μg/L (signal/noise = 3). The results were applied to nontreated drinking water. The content of the analyzed copper using 9.0 and 4.0 μg/L standards were 8.68 μg/L and 3.96 μg/L; statistical values R(2) = 0.9987 and R(2) = 0.9534, respectively. This method is applicable to biological diagnostics or food surveys.

  9. Dual pressurized light water reactor producing 2000 M We

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-10-15

    The dual unit optimizer 2000 M We (Duo2000) is proposed as a new design concept for large nuclear power plant. Duo is being designed to meet economic and safety challenges facing the 21 century green and sustainable energy industry. Duo2000 has two nuclear steam supply systems (NSSS) of the unit nuclear optimizer (Uno) pressurized water reactor (PWR) in a single containment so as to double the capacity of the plant. Uno is anchored to the optimized power reactor 1000 M We (OPR1000) of the Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. The concept of Duo can be extended to any number of PWRs or pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWR s), or even boiling water reactor (BWRs). Once proven in water reactors, the technology may even be expanded to gas cooled, liquid metal cooled, and molten salt cooled reactors. In particular, since it is required that the small and medium sized reactors (SMRs) be built as units, the concept of Duo2000 will apply to SMRs as well. With its in-vessel retention as severe accident management strategy, Duo can not only put the single most querulous PWR safety issue to end, but also pave ways to most promising large power capacity dispensing with huge redesigning cost for generation III + nuclear systems. The strengths of Duo2000 include reducing the cost of construction by decreasing the number of containment buildings from two to one, minimizing the cost of NSSS and control systems by sharing between the dual units, and lessening the maintenance cost by uniting NSSS. The technology can further be extended to coupling modular reactors as dual, triple, or quadruple units to increase their economics, thus accelerating the commercialization as well as the customization of SMRs. (Author)

  10. Operational limitations of light water reactors relating to fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, H.S.

    1976-07-01

    General aspects of fuel performance for typical Boiling and Pressurized Water Reactors are presented. Emphasis is placed on fuel failures in order to make clear important operational limitations. A discussion of fuel element designs is first given to provide the background information for the subsequent discussion of several fuel failure modes that have been identified. Fuel failure experiences through December 31, 1974, are summarized. The operational limitations that are required to mitigate the effects of fuel failures are discussed

  11. Steam turbine chemistry in light water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svoboda, Robert; Haertel, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Steam turbines in boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plants of various manufacturers have been affected by corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking. Steam chemistry has not been a prime focus for related research because the water in nuclear steam generating systems is considered to be of high purity. Steam turbine chemistry however addresses more the problems encountered in fossil fired power plants on all volatile treatment, where corrosive environments can be formed in zones where wet steam is re-evaporated and dries out, or in the phase transition zone, where superheated steam starts to condense in the low-pressure (LP) turbine. In BWR plants the situation is aggravated by the fact that no alkalizing agents are used in the cycle, thus making any anionic impurity immediately acidic. This is illustrated by case studies of pitting corrosion of a 12 % Cr steel gland seal and of flow-oriented corrosion attack on LP turbine blades in the phase transition zone. In PWR plants, volatile alkalizing agents are used that provide some buffering of acidic impurities, but they also produce anionic decomposition products. (orig.)

  12. Structural, mechanical and light yield characterisation of heat treated LYSO:Ce single crystals for medical imaging applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mengucci, P; Auffray, E; Barucca, G; Cecchi, C; Chipaux, R; Cousson, A; Davì, F; Di Vara, N; Rinaldi, D; Santecchia, E

    2015-01-01

    Five single crystals of cerium-doped lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO:Ce) grown by the Czochralski method were submitted to structural characterisation by X-ray (XRD) and neutron (ND) diffraction, scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy and energy dispersive microanalysis (EDS). The Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS), the Young Modulus (YM) and the Light Yield (LY) of the samples were also measured in order to correlate the mechanical and the optical behaviour of the crystals with the characteristics of their microstructure. Two of the samples analysed were also heat treated at 300 °C for 10 h to evidence possible variations induced by the temperature in the optical and mechanical response of the crystals. Results showed that the mean compositional variations evidenced by the structural analyses do not affect the mechanical and optical behaviour of the samples. On the contrary, the thermal treatment could induce the formation of coherent spherical particles (size 10 to 15 nm), not unifo...

  13. Sequential use of ultraviolet light and chlorine for reclaimed water disinfection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiujuan Wang; Xuexiang Hu; Chun Hu; Dongbin Wei

    2011-01-01

    Several disinfection processes of ultraviolet (UV),chlorine or UV followed by chlorine were investigated in municipal wastewater according to the inactivation of Escherichia coli,Shigella dysenteriae and toxicity formation.The UV inactivation of the tested pathogenic bacteria was not affected by the quality of water.It was found that the inactivated bacteria were obviously reactivated after one day in dark.Fluorescent light irradiation increased the bacteria repair.The increase of UV dosage could cause more damage to bacteria to inhibit bacteria self-repair.No photoreactivation was detected when the UV dose was up to 80 mJ/cm2 for E.coli DH5α,and 23 mJ/cm2 for S.dysenteriae.Nevertheless,sequential use of 8 mJ/cm2 of UV and low concentration of chlorine (1.5mg/L) could effectively inhibit the photoreactivation and inactivate E.coli below the detection limits within seven days.Compared to chlorination alone,the sequential disinfection decreased the genotoxicity of treated wastewater,especially for the sample with high NH3-N concentration.

  14. EPRI-LATTICE: a multigroup neutron transport code for light water reactor lattice physics calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D.B.

    1986-01-01

    EPRI-LATTICE is a multigroup neutron transport computer code for the analysis of light water reactor fuel assemblies. It can solve the two-dimensional neutron transport problem by two distinct methods: (a) the method of collision probabilities and (b) the method of discrete ordinates. The code was developed by S. Levy Inc. as an account of work sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The collision probabilities calculation in EPRI-LATTICE (L-CP) is based on the same methodology that exists in the lattice codes CPM-2 and EPRI-CPM. Certain extensions have been made to the data representations of the CPM programs to improve the overall accuracy of the calculation. The important extensions include unique representations of scattering matrices and fission fractions (chi) for each composition in the problem. A new capability specifically developed for the EPRI-LATTICE code is a discrete ordinates methodology. The discrete ordinates calculation in EPRI-LATTICE (L-SN) is based on the discrete S/sub n/ methodology that exists in the TWODANT program. In contrast to TWODANT, which utilizes synthetic diffusion acceleration and supports multiple geometries, only the transport equations are solved by L-SN and only the data representations for the two-dimensional geometry are treated

  15. Effect of water chemistry improvement on flow accelerated corrosion in light-water nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugino, Wataru; Ohira, Taku; Nagata, Nobuaki; Abe, Ayumi; Takiguchi, Hideki

    2009-01-01

    Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) of Carbon Steel (CS) piping has been one of main issues in Light-Water Nuclear Reactor (LWRs). Wall thinning of CS piping due to FAC increases potential risk of pipe rupture and cost for inspection and replacement of damaged pipes. In particular, corrosion products generated by FAC of CS piping brought steam generator (SG) tube corrosion and degradation of thermal performance, when it intruded and accumulated in secondary side of PWR. To preserve SG integrity by suppressing the corrosion of CS, High-AVT chemistry (Feedwater pH9.8±0.2) has been adopted to Tsuruga-2 (1160 MWe PWR, commercial operation in 1987) in July 2005 instead of conventional Low-AVT chemistry (Feedwater pH 9.3). By the High-AVT adoption, the accumulation rate of iron in SG was reduced to one-quarter of that under conventional Low-AVT. As a result, a tendency to degradation of the SG thermal efficiency was improved. On the other hand, it was clarified that High-AVT is ineffective against Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) at the region where the flow turbulence is much larger. By contrast, wall thinning of CS feed water pipes due to FAC has been successfully controlled by oxygen treatment (OT) for long time in BWRs. Because Magnetite film formed on CS surface under AVT chemistry has higher solubility and porosity in comparison with Hematite film, which is formed under OT. In this paper, behavior of the FAC under various pH and dissolved oxygen concentration are discussed based on the actual wall thinning rate of BWR and PWR plant and experimental results by FAC test-loop. And, it is clarified that the FAC is suppressed even under extremely low DO concentration such as 2ppb under AVT condition in PWR. Based on this result, we propose the oxygenated water chemistry (OWC) for PWR secondary system which can mitigate the FAC of CS piping without any adverse effect for the SG integrity. Furthermore, the applicability and effectiveness of this concept developed for FAC

  16. Renovate produced-water-treating facilities to handle increased water cuts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murti, D.G.K.; Al-Nuaimi, H.R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the modified skimmer tanks that have consistently demonstrated superior oil recovery characteristics compared to conventional design in an oil field tank battery system. The modified tanks have been in continuous service for more than 3 years in one of the oldest oil fields in the Arabian Gulf. The new design has helped recover skimmed oil from a mere 6 bpd (1.0 m 3 ) to more than 55 bpd (8.75 m 3 ) from produced water in a tank battery system alone. The recovery is expected to improve by up to 200 bpd (31.8 m 3 ) once skimmer tanks in all the tank batteries are upgraded to the new design

  17. Bioassay using the water soluble fraction of a Nigerian Light Crude ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary: A 96-hour bioassay was conducted using the water soluble fraction of a Nigerian light crude oil sample on Clarias gariepinus fingerlings. 0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10 mls of water soluble fractions (WSF) of the oil were added to 1000 litres of de-chlorinated tap water to form 0, 25, 50 , 75 and 100 parts per million ...

  18. Characterization of 14C in Swedish light water reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Asa; Aronsson, Per-Olof; Lundgren, Klas; Stenström, Kristina

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents the results of a 4-y investigation of 14C in different waste streams of both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Due to the potential impact of 14C on human health, minimizing waste and releases from the nuclear power industry is of considerable interest. The experimental data and conclusions may be implemented to select appropriate waste management strategies and practices at reactor units and disposal facilities. Organic and inorganic 14C in spent ion exchange resins, process water systems, ejector off-gas and replaced steam generator tubes were analyzed using a recently developed extraction method. Separate analysis of the chemical species is of importance in order to model and predict the fate of 14C within process systems as well as in dose calculations for disposal facilities. By combining the results of this investigation with newly calculated production rates, mass balance assessments were made of the 14C originating from production in the coolant. Of the 14C formed in the coolant of BWRs, 0.6-0.8% was found to be accumulated in the ion exchange resins (core-specific production rate in the coolant of a 2,500 MWth BWR calculated to be 580 GBq GW(e)(-1) y(-1)). The corresponding value for PWRs was 6-10% (production rate in a 2,775 MWth PWR calculated to be 350 GBq GW(e)(-1) y(-1)). The 14C released with liquid discharges was found to be insignificant, constituting less than 0.5% of the production in the coolant. The stack releases, routinely measured at the power plants, were found to correspond to 60-155% of the calculated coolant production, with large variations between the BWR units.

  19. Aging and life extension of major light water reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; MacDonald, P.E.

    1993-01-01

    An understanding of the aging degradation of the major pressurized and boiling water reactor structures and components is given. The design and fabrication of each structure or component is briefly described followed by information on the associated stressors. Interactions between the design, materials and various stressors that cause aging degradation are reviewed. In many cases, aging degradation problems have occurred, and the plant experience to date is analyzed. The discussion summarize the available aging-related information and are supported with extensive references, including references to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) documents, Electric Power Research Institute reports, US and international conference proceedings and other publications

  20. A cost analysis of microalgal biomass and biodiesel production in open raceways treating municipal wastewater and under optimum light wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Zion; Kim, Byung-Hyuk; Ramanan, Rishiram; Choi, Jong-Eun; Yang, Ji-Won; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Hee-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Open raceway ponds are cost-efficient for mass cultivation of microalgae compared with photobioreactors. Although low-cost options like wastewater as nutrient source is studied to overcome the commercialization threshold for biodiesel production from microalgae, a cost analysis on the use of wastewater and other incremental increases in productivity has not been elucidated. We determined the effect of using wastewater and wavelength filters on microalgal productivity. Experimental results were then fitted into a model, and cost analysis was performed in comparison with control raceways. Three different microalgal strains, Chlorella vulgaris AG10032, Chlorella sp. JK2, and Scenedesmus sp. JK10, were tested for nutrient removal under different light wavelengths (blue, green, red, and white) using filters in batch cultivation. Blue wavelength showed an average of 27% higher nutrient removal and at least 42% higher chemical oxygen demand removal compared with white light. Naturally, the specific growth rate of microalgae cultivated under blue wavelength was on average 10.8% higher than white wavelength. Similarly, lipid productivity was highest in blue wavelength, at least 46.8% higher than white wavelength, whereas FAME composition revealed a mild increase in oleic and palmitic acid levels. Cost analysis reveals that raceways treating wastewater and using monochromatic wavelength would decrease costs from 2.71 to 0.73 $/kg biomass. We prove that increasing both biomass and lipid productivity is possible through cost-effective approaches, thereby accelerating the commercialization of low-value products from microalgae, like biodiesel.

  1. Soil-Water Characteristic Curves of Red Clay treated by Ionic Soil Stabilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, D.; Xiang, W.

    2009-12-01

    The relationship of red clay particle with water is an important factor to produce geological disaster and environmental damage. In order to reduce the role of adsorbed water of red clay in WuHan, Ionic Soil Stabilizer (ISS) was used to treat the red clay. Soil Moisture Equipment made in U.S.A was used to measure soil-water characteristic curve of red clay both in natural and stabilized conditions in the suction range of 0-500kPa. The SWCC results were used to interpret the red clay behavior due to stabilizer treatment. In addition, relationship were compared between the basic soil and stabilizer properties such as water content, dry density, liquid limit, plastic limit, moisture absorption rate and stabilizer dosages. The analysis showed that the particle density and specific surface area increase, the dehydration rate slows and the thickness of water film thins after treatment with Ionic Soil Stabilizer. After treatment with the ISS, the geological disasters caused by the adsorbed water of red clay can be effectively inhibited.

  2. Physicochemical and Microbiological Analysis of Drinking Water Treated by Using Ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subedi, D.P.; Khadgi, A.; Tyata, R.B.; Wong, C.S.

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on the application of a Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD ) unit to produce highly oxidizing ozone molecules for the treatment of drinking water. The samples of water were collected from three different sources, namely tap, stone spout and tube-well in the Kathmandu valley. Various physical, chemical and micro-biological analyses were carried out to both the ozone treated and untreated samples of water for comparison. Our results indicated that ozone does not alter the physical characteristics, namely pH, conductivity and turbidity of water but it has significant effect on the chemical properties such as nitrate concentration, total hardness, calcium hardness, Fe(II) and Fe(III) concentration. It was observed that ozone efficiently precipitates ferrous ion into ferric ion and is effective in the removal of fecal coliform, a key element for various water related health problems in most of the developing countries. It is shown that the treatment with ozone leads to a significant reduction in the number of fecal coliform in the samples of drinking water from tap, stone spout and tube well with p values 0.00182, 0.026 and 5.8 x 10 -15 , respectively at 0.05 level of significance. (author)

  3. Experimental studies on catalytic hydrogen recombiners for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drinovac, P.

    2006-01-01

    In the course of core melt accidents in nuclear power plants a large amount of hydrogen can be produced and form an explosive or even detonative gas mixture with aerial oxygen in the reactor building. In the containment atmosphere of pressurized water reactors hydrogen combines a phlogistically with the oxygen present to form water vapor even at room temperature. In the past, experimental work conducted at various facilities has contributed little or nothing to an understanding of the operating principles of catalytic recombiners. Hence, the purpose of the present study was to conduct detailed investigations on a section of a recombiner essentially in order to deepen the understanding of reaction kinetics and heat transport processes. The results of the experiments presented in this dissertation form a large data base of measurements which provides an insight into the processes taking place in recombiners. The reaction-kinetic interpretation of the measured data confirms and deepens the diffusion theory - proposed in an earlier study. Thus it is now possible to validate detailed numeric models representing the processes in recombiners. Consequently the present study serves to broaden and corroborate competence in this significant area of reactor technology. In addition, the empirical knowledge thus gained may be used for a critical reassessment of previous numeric model calculations. (orig.)

  4. High temperature electrochemistry related to light water reactor corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, Gabor; Kerner, Zsolt; Balog, Janos; Schiller, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The present work deals with corrosion problems related to conditions which prevail in a WWER primary circuit. We had a two-fold aim: (A) electrochemical methods were applied to characterise the hydrothermally produced oxides of the cladding material (Zr-1%Nb) of nuclear fuel elements used in Russian made power reactors of WWER type, and (B) a number of possible reference electrodes were investigated with a view to high temperature applications. (A) Test specimens made of the cladding material, Zr-1%Nb, were immersed into an autoclave, filled with an aqueous solution typical to a WWER primary circuit, and were treated for different periods of time up to 28 weeks. The electrode potentials were measured and electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) were taken regularly both as a function of oxidation time and temperature. This rendered information on the overall kinetics of oxide growth. By combining in situ and ex situ impedance measurements, with a particular view of the temperature dependence of EIS, we concluded that the high frequency region of impedance spectra is relevant to the presence of oxide layer on the alloy. This part of the spectra was treated in terms of a parallel CPE||R ox equivalent circuit (CPE denoting constant phase element, R ox ohmic resistor). The CPE element was understood as a dispersive resistance in terms of the continuous time random walk theory by Scher and Lax. This enabled us to tell apart electrical conductance and oxide growth with a model of charge transfer and recombination within the oxide layer as rate determining steps. (B) Three types of reference electrodes were tested within the framework of the LIRES EU5 project: (i) external Ag/AgCl, (ii) Pt/Ir alloy and (iii) Pd(Pt) double polarised active electrode. The most stable of the electrodes was found to be the Pt/Ir one. The Ag/AgCl electrode showed good stability after an initial period of some days, while substantial drifts were found for the Pd(Pt) electrode. EIS spectra of the

  5. Impact of different moderator ratios with light and heavy water cooled reactors in equilibrium states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permana, Sidik; Takaki, Naoyuki; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    As an issue of sustainable development in the world, energy sustainability using nuclear energy may be possible using several different ways such as increasing breeding capability of the reactors and optimizing the fuel utilization using spent fuel after reprocessing as well as exploring additional nuclear resources from sea water. In this present study the characteristics of light and heavy water cooled reactors for different moderator ratios in equilibrium states have been investigated. The moderator to fuel ratio (MFR) is varied from 0.1 to 4.0. Four fuel cycle schemes are evaluated in order to investigate the effect of heavy metal (HM) recycling. A calculation method for determining the required uranium enrichment for criticality of the systems has been developed by coupling the equilibrium fuel cycle burn-up calculation and cell calculation of SRAC 2000 code using nuclear data library from the JENDL 3.2. The results show a thermal spectrum peak appears for light water coolant and no thermal peak for heavy water coolant along the MFR (0.1 ≤ MFR ≤ 4.0). The plutonium quality can be reduced effectively by increasing the MFR and number of recycled HM. Considering the effect of increasing number of recycled HM; it is also effective to reduce the uranium utilization and to increase the conversion ratio. trans-Plutonium production such as americium (Am) and curium (Cm) productions are smaller for heavy water coolant than light water coolant. The light water coolant shows the feasibility of breeding when HM is recycled with reducing the MFR. Wider feasible area of breeding has been obtained when light water coolant is replaced by heavy water coolant

  6. Effect on Compressive Strength of Concrete Using Treated Waste Water for Mixing and Curing of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humaira Kanwal

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Effective utilization of the available resources is imperative approach to achieve the apex of productivity. The modern world is focusing on the conditioning, sustainability and recycling of the assets by imparting innovative techniques and methodologies. Keeping this in view, an experimental study was conducted to evaluate the strength of concrete made with treated waste water for structural use. In this study ninetysix cylinders of four mixes with coarse aggregates in combination with FW (Fresh Water, WW (Wastewater, TWW (Treated Wastewater and TS (Treated Sewagewere prepared. The workability of fresh concrete was checked before pouring of cylinders. The test cylinders were left for 7, 14, 21 and 28 days for curing. After curing, the compressive strength was measured on hardened concrete cylinders accordingly. Test results showed that workability of all the four mixes were between 25-50mm but ultimate compressive strength of concrete with WW was decreased and with TWW, TS at the age of 28 days do not change significantly. This research will open a new wicket in the horizon of recycling of construction materials. The conditioning and cyclic utilization will reduce the cost of the construction and building materials as well as minimize the use of natural resources. This novelty and calculating approach will save our natural assets and resources.

  7. Analysis of alternative light water reactor (LWR) fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heeb, C.M.; Aaberg, R.L.; Boegel, A.J.; Jenquin, U.P.; Kottwitz, D.A.; Lewallen, M.A.; Merrill, E.T.; Nolan, A.M.

    1979-12-01

    Nine alternative LWR fuel cycles are analyzed in terms of the isotopic content of the fuel material, the relative amounts of primary and recycled material, the uranium and thorium requirements, the fuel cycle costs and the fraction of energy which must be generated at secured sites. The fuel materials include low-enriched uranium (LEU), plutonium-uranium (MOX), highly-enriched uranium-thorium (HEU-Th), denatured uranium-thorium (DU-Th) and plutonium-thorium (Pu-Th). The analysis is based on tracing the material requirements of a generic pressurized water reactor (PWR) for a 30-year period at constant annual energy output. During this time period all the created fissile material is recycled unless its reactivity worth is less than 0.2% uranium enrichment plant tails

  8. COMSORS: A light water reactor chemical core catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.

    1997-01-01

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate lightwater reactor (LWR) core-melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass made of lead oxide (PbO) and boron oxide (B 2 O 3 ) is placed under the reactor vessel. If molten core debris is released onto the glass, the following sequence happens: (1) the glass absorbs decay heat as its temperature increases and the glass softens; (2) the core debris dissolves into the molten glass; (3) molten glass convective currents create a homogeneous high-level waste (HLW) glass; (4) the molten glass spreads into a wider pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or transfer to water on top of the molten glass; and (5) the glass solidifies as increased surface cooling area and decreasing radioactive decay heat generation allows heat removal to exceed heat generation

  9. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2003-01-01

    Why is left right and right left in the mirror? Baffled by the basics of reflection and refraction? Wondering just how the eye works? If you have trouble teaching concepts about light that you don t fully grasp yourself, get help from a book that s both scientifically accurate and entertaining with Light. By combining clear explanations, clever drawings, and activities that use easy-to-find materials, this book covers what science teachers and parents need to know to teach about light with confidence. It uses ray, wave, and particle models of light to explain the basics of reflection and refraction, optical instruments, polarization of light, and interference and diffraction. There s also an entire chapter on how the eye works. Each chapter ends with a Summary and Applications section that reinforces concepts with everyday examples. Whether you need a deeper understanding of how light bends or a good explanation of why the sky is blue, you ll find Light more illuminating and accessible than a college textbook...

  10. Advanced steam cycles for light water reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, R.C.

    1975-07-01

    An appraisal of the potential of adding superheat to improve the overall LWR plant cycle performance is presented. The study assesses the economic and technical problems associated with the addition of approximately 500 0 F of superheat to raise the steam temperature to 1000 0 F. The practicality of adding either nuclear or fossil superheat to LWR's is reviewed. The General Electric Company Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) model 238-732 (BWR/6) is chosen as the LWR starting point for this evaluation. The steam conditions of BWR/6 are representative of LWR's. The results of the fossil superheat portion of the evaluation are considered directly applicable to all LWR's. In spite of the potential of a nuclear superheater to provide a substantial boost to the LWR cycle efficiency, nuclear superheat offers little promise of development at this time. There are difficult technical problems to resolve in the areas of superheat fuel design and emergency core cooling. The absence of a developed high integrity, high temperature fuel for operation in the steam/water environment is fundamental to this conclusion. Fossil superheat offers the potential opportunity to utilize fossil fuel supplies more efficiently than in any other mode of central station power generation presently available. Fossil superheat topping cycles evaluated included atmospheric fluidized beds (AFB), pressurized fluidized beds, pressurized furnaces, conventional furnaces, and combined gas/steam turbine cycles. The use of an AFB is proposed as the preferred superheat furnace. Fossil superheat provides a cycle efficiency improvement for the LWR of two percentage points, reduces heat rejection by 15 percent per kWe generated, increases plant electrical output by 54 percent, and burns coal with an incremental net efficiency of approximately 40 percent. This compares with a net efficiency of 36--37 percent which might be achieved with an all-fluidized bed fossil superheat plant design

  11. Environmentally assisted cracking of light-water reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.

    1996-02-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of lightwater reactor (LWR) materials has affected nuclear reactors from the very introduction of the technology. Corrosion problems have afflicted steam generators from the very introduction of pressurized water reactor (PWR) technology. Shippingport, the first commercial PWR operated in the United States, developed leaking cracks in two Type 304 stainless steel (SS) steam generator tubes as early as 1957, after only 150 h of operation. Stress corrosion cracks were observed in the heat-affected zones of welds in austenitic SS piping and associated components in boiling-water reactors (BRWs) as early as 1965. The degradation of steam generator tubing in PWRs and the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic SS piping in BWRs have been the most visible and most expensive examples of EAC in LWRs, and the repair and replacement of steam generators and recirculation piping has cost hundreds of millions of dollars. However, other problems associated with the effects of the environment on reactor structures and components am important concerns in operating plants and for extended reactor lifetimes. Cast duplex austenitic-ferritic SSs are used extensively in the nuclear industry to fabricate pump casings and valve bodies for LWRs and primary coolant piping in many PWRs. Embrittlement of the ferrite phase in cast duplex SS may occur after 10 to 20 years at reactor operating temperatures, which could influence the mechanical response and integrity of pressure boundary components during high strain-rate loading (e.g., seismic events). The problem is of most concern in PWRs where slightly higher temperatures are typical and cast SS piping is widely used

  12. Needs of nuclear data for advanced light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaki, Masao

    2008-01-01

    Hitachi has been developing medium sized ABWRs as a power source that features flexibility to meet various market needs, such as minimizing capital risks, providing a timely return on capital investments, etc. Basic design concepts of the medium sized ABWRs are 1) using the current ABWR design which has accumulated favorable construction and operation histories as a starting point; 2) utilizing standard BWR fuels which have been fabricated by proven technology; 3) achieving a rationalized design by suitably utilizing key components developed for large sized reactors. Development of the medium sized ABWRs has proceeded in a systematic, stepwise manner. The first step was to design an output scale for the 600MWe class reactor (ABWR-600), and the next step was to develop an uprating concept to extend this output scale to the 900MWe class reactor (ABWR-900) based on the rationalized technology of the ABWR-600 for further cost savings. In addition, Hitachi and MHI developed an ultra small reactor, 'Package-Reactor'. About the nuclear data, for the purpose of verification of the nuclear analysis method of BWR for mixed oxide (MOX) cores, UO 2 and MOX fuel critical experiments EPICURE and MISTRAL were analyzed using nuclear design codes HINES and CERES with ENDF/B nuclear data file. The critical keffs of the absorber worth experiments, the water hole worth experiments and the 2D void worth experiments agreed with those of the reference experiments within about 0.1%Δk. The root mean square differences of radial power distributions between calculation and measurement were almost less than 2.0%. The calculated reactivity worth values of the absorbers, the water hole and the 2D void agreed with the measured values within nearly experimental uncertainties. These results indicate that the nuclear analysis method of BWR in the present paper give the same accuracy for the UO 2 cores and the MOX cores. (author)

  13. Disinfection and toxicological assessments of pulsed UV and pulsed-plasma gas-discharge treated-water containing the waterborne protozoan enteroparasite Cryptosporidium parvum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Jennifer; Kirf, Dominik; Garvey, Mary; Rowan, Neil

    2013-09-01

    We report for the first time on the comparative use of pulsed-plasma gas-discharge (PPGD) and pulsed UV light (PUV) for the novel destruction of the waterborne enteroparasite Cryptosporidium parvum. It also describes the first cyto-, geno- and ecotoxicological assays undertaken to assess the safety of water decontaminated using PPGD and PUV. During PPGD treatments, the application of high voltage pulses (16 kV, 10 pps) to gas-injected water (N2 or O2, flow rate 2.5L/min) resulted in the formation of a plasma that generated free radicals, ultraviolet light, acoustic shock waves and electric fields that killed ca. 4 log C. parvum oocysts in 32 min exposure. Findings showed that PPGD-treated water produced significant cytotoxic properties (as determined by MTT and neutral red assays), genotoxic properties (as determined by comet and Ames assays), and ecotoxic properties (as determined by Microtox™, Thamnotox™ and Daphnotox™ assays) that are representative of different trophic levels in aquatic environment (pozone (0.8 mg/L) and/or dissociated nitric and nitrous acid that contributed to the observed disinfection and toxicity. Chemical analysis of PPGD-treated water revealed increasing levels of electrode metals that were present at ≤ 30 times the tolerated respective values for EU drinking water. PUV-treated water did not exhibit any toxicity and was shown to be far superior to that of PPGD for killing C. parvum oocysts taking only 90 s of pulsing [UV dose of 6.29 μJ/cm(2)] to produce a 4-log reduction compared to a similar reduction level achieved after 32min PPGD treatment as determined by combined in vitro CaCo-2 cell culture-qPCR. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Improved biostability assessment of drinking water with a suite of test methods at a water supply treating eutrophic lake water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kooij, Dick; Martijn, Bram; Schaap, Peter G; Hoogenboezem, Wim; Veenendaal, Harm R; van der Wielen, Paul W J J

    2015-12-15

    Assessment of drinking-water biostability is generally based on measuring bacterial growth in short-term batch tests. However, microbial growth in the distribution system is affected by multiple interactions between water, biofilms and sediments. Therefore a diversity of test methods was applied to characterize the biostability of drinking water distributed without disinfectant residual at a surface-water supply. This drinking water complied with the standards for the heterotrophic plate count and coliforms, but aeromonads periodically exceeded the regulatory limit (1000 CFU 100 mL(-1)). Compounds promoting growth of the biopolymer-utilizing Flavobacterium johnsoniae strain A3 accounted for c. 21% of the easily assimilable organic carbon (AOC) concentration (17 ± 2 μg C L(-1)) determined by growth of pure cultures in the water after granular activated-carbon filtration (GACF). Growth of the indigenous bacteria measured as adenosine tri-phosphate in water samples incubated at 25 °C confirmed the low AOC in the GACF but revealed the presence of compounds promoting growth after more than one week of incubation. Furthermore, the concentration of particulate organic carbon in the GACF (83 ± 42 μg C L(-1), including 65% carbohydrates) exceeded the AOC concentration. The increased biomass accumulation rate in the continuous biofouling monitor (CBM) at the distribution system reservoir demonstrated the presence of easily biodegradable by-products related to ClO2 dosage to the GACF and in the CBM at 42 km from the treatment plant an iron-associated biomass accumulation was observed. The various methods applied thus distinguished between easily assimilable compounds, biopolymers, slowly biodegradable compounds and biomass-accumulation potential, providing an improved assessment of the biostability of the water. Regrowth of aeromonads may be related to biomass-turnover processes in the distribution system, but establishment of quantitative relationships is needed for

  15. The lantern shark's light switch: turning shallow water crypsis into midwater camouflage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Julien M.; Mallefet, Jérôme

    2010-01-01

    Bioluminescence is a common feature in the permanent darkness of the deep-sea. In fishes, light is emitted by organs containing either photogenic cells (intrinsic photophores), which are under direct nervous control, or symbiotic luminous bacteria (symbiotic photophores), whose light is controlled by secondary means such as mechanical occlusion or physiological suppression. The intrinsic photophores of the lantern shark Etmopterus spinax were recently shown as an exception to this rule since they appear to be under hormonal control. Here, we show that hormones operate what amounts to a unique light switch, by acting on a chromatophore iris, which regulates light emission by pigment translocation. This result strongly suggests that this shark's luminescence control originates from the mechanism for physiological colour change found in shallow water sharks that also involves hormonally controlled chromatophores: the lantern shark would have turned the initial shallow water crypsis mechanism into a midwater luminous camouflage, more efficient in the deep-sea environment. PMID:20410033

  16. Inactivation of Escherichia Coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Enterica on Blueberries in Water Using Ultraviolet Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuhan; Huang, Yaoxin; Chen, Haiqiang

    2015-07-01

    Ultraviolet light (UV) has antimicrobial effects, but the shadowing effect has limited its application. In this study, a novel setup using UV processing in agitated water was developed to inactivate Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella on blueberries. Blueberries were dip- or spot-inoculated with E. coli or Salmonella. Blueberries inoculated with E. coli were treated for 2 to 10 min with UV directly (dry UV) or immersed in agitated water during UV treatment (wet UV). E. coli was most easily killed on spot-inoculated blueberries with a 5.2-log reduction after 10-min wet UV treatment. Dip-inoculated blueberries were the most difficult to be decontaminated with only 1.6-log reduction after 10-min wet UV treatment. Wet UV treatment generally showed higher efficacies than dry UV treatment, achieving an average of 1.4 log more reduction for spot-inoculated blueberries. For dip-inoculated blueberries, chlorine washing and UV treatments were less effective, achieving blueberries were UV-treated while being immersed in agitated water containing 100 ppm SDS, 0.5% levulinic acid or 10 ppm chlorine. The 3 chemicals did not significantly enhance the wet UV treatment. Findings of this study suggest that UV treatment could be used as an alternative to chlorine washing for blueberries and potentially for other fresh produce. A novel UV light system for decontamination of blueberries in water was developed and evaluated. Results demonstrated that the decontamination efficacy of this system was generally as effective as chlorine washing, indicating that it could potentially be used as an alternative to chlorine washing for blueberries and other fresh produce. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  17. Assessment of Trace Metal Ions on Raw and Treated Water in Dakahlia Drinking water Purification Stations .Behaviour of aluminium in water purification plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Defrawy, M.M.; El-Fadaly, H.; El-Zawawy, F.; Makia, D.

    1999-01-01

    The technology of improvement of water quality at water purification plants can be characterised by a large diversity of method and processes employed and by substantial differences in the design and process structure and equipment. The effect of operational parameters as ph, pre-, post- chlorination, coagulant index and mixing intensities on the level of some metal ions concentration in different sources of drinking water plants were studied. Results of the chemical analysis indicated that the dissolved and total AI 3+ concentration in treated water was much higher than raw water and sometimes with values over the international maximum limit. Much of the overall variation in aqua aluminium ion in treated water could be explained on the basis of ph, solubility, and filtration models efficiency, while ions as Fe 3+ and Mn 2+ were found within the acceptable limits. The data obtained indicated that relation between watershed inputs (CI 2 , H CI, alum dose) and output of soluble aluminium was not necessary simple and straightforward. The investigated water samples were collected from main stations and compact units in Dakahlia Governorate

  18. Mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic biodegradability of water hyacinth pre-treated at 80 degrees C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Ivet; Palatsi, Jordi; Campos, Elena; Flotats, Xavier

    2010-10-01

    Water hyacinth (Eichornia crassipes) is a fast growing aquatic plant which causes environmental problems in continental water bodies. Harvesting and handling this plant becomes an issue, and focus has been put on the research of treatment alternatives. Amongst others, energy production through biomethanation has been proposed. The aim of this study was to assess the anaerobic biodegradability of water hyacinth under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. The effect of a thermal sludge pre-treatment at 80 degrees C was also evaluated. To this end, anaerobic biodegradability tests were carried out at 35 degrees C and 55 degrees C, with raw and pre-treated water hyacinth. According to the results, the thermal pre-treatment enhanced the solubilisation of water hyacinth (i.e. increase in the soluble to total chemical oxygen demand (COD)) from 4% to 12% after 30 min. However, no significant effect was observed on the methane yields (150-190 L CH(4)/kg volatile solids). Initial methane production rates for thermophilic treatments were two fold those of mesophilic ones (6-6.5L vs. 3-3.5 L CH(4)/kg COD x day). Thus, higher methane production rates might be expected from thermophilic reactors working at short retention times. The study of longer low temperature pre-treatments or pre-treatments at elevated temperatures coupled to thermophilic reactors should be considered in the future. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic biodegradability of water hyacinth pre-treated at 80 oC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrer, Ivet; Palatsi, Jordi; Campos, Elena; Flotats, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Water hyacinth (Eichornia crassipes) is a fast growing aquatic plant which causes environmental problems in continental water bodies. Harvesting and handling this plant becomes an issue, and focus has been put on the research of treatment alternatives. Amongst others, energy production through biomethanation has been proposed. The aim of this study was to assess the anaerobic biodegradability of water hyacinth under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. The effect of a thermal sludge pre-treatment at 80 o C was also evaluated. To this end, anaerobic biodegradability tests were carried out at 35 o C and 55 o C, with raw and pre-treated water hyacinth. According to the results, the thermal pre-treatment enhanced the solubilisation of water hyacinth (i.e. increase in the soluble to total chemical oxygen demand (COD)) from 4% to 12% after 30 min. However, no significant effect was observed on the methane yields (150-190 L CH 4 /kg volatile solids). Initial methane production rates for thermophilic treatments were two fold those of mesophilic ones (6-6.5 L vs. 3-3.5 L CH 4 /kg COD.day). Thus, higher methane production rates might be expected from thermophilic reactors working at short retention times. The study of longer low temperature pre-treatments or pre-treatments at elevated temperatures coupled to thermophilic reactors should be considered in the future.

  20. Treating infected diabetic wounds with superoxidized water as anti-septic agent: a preliminary experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadi, S.F.; Khaliq, T.; Zubair, M.; Saaiq, M.; Sikandar, I.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of superoxidized water (MicrocynTM) in diabetic patients with different wounds. One hundred known diabetic patients were enrolled. Half were randomized to the intervention group (those whose wounds were managed with superoxidized water) and half to the control group (whose wounds were treated with normal saline) using a table of random numbers. The two groups were matched for age, gender, duration of diabetes and category of wound. All patients received appropriate surgical treatment for their wounds as required. Local wound treatment was carried out daily using superoxidized water soaked gauzes on twice daily basis in the intervention group and normal saline in the control group. The treatment was continued until wound healing. The main outcome measures were duration of hospital stay, downgrading of the wound category, wound healing time and need for interventions such as amputation. Statistically significant differences were found in favour of the superoxidized water group with respect to duration of hospital stay, downgrading of the wound category and wound healing time. Although the initial results of employing superoxidized water for the management of infected diabetic wounds are encouraging, further multicentre clinical trials are warranted before this antiseptic is recommended for general use. It may offer an economical alternative to other expensive antiseptics with positive impact on the prevailing infection rates, patient outcomes and patient satisfaction. (author)

  1. Investigation into the use of water based brake fluid for light loads ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The actual test of the formulated brake fluid was carried out with a Nissan Sunny vehicle model 1.5 within the speed range of 20km/hr to 80km/hr at the permanent campus· of University of Uyo and the· braking effiqiency obtained at test to its suitability for light loads. Keywords·: Water-based, Brake fluid properties, Light loads ...

  2. Characteristics of ultraviolet light and radicals formed by pulsed discharge in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bing; Kunitomo, Shinta; Igarashi, Chiaki

    2006-09-01

    In this investigation, the ultraviolet light characteristics and OH radical properties produced by a pulsed discharge in water were studied. For the plate-rod reactor, it was found that the ultraviolet light energy has a 3.2% total energy injected into the reactor. The ultraviolet light changed with the peak voltage and electrode distance. UV characteristics in tap water and the distilled water are given. The intensity of the OH radicals was the highest for the 40 mm electrode distance reactor. In addition, the properties of hydrogen peroxide and ozone were also studied under arc discharge conditions. It was found that the OH radicals were in the ground state and the excited state when a pulsed arc discharge was used. The ozone was produced by the arc discharge even if the oxygen gas is not bubbled into the reactor. The ozone concentration produces a maximum value with treatment time.

  3. Characteristics of ultraviolet light and radicals formed by pulsed discharge in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Bing [Dalian Maritime University, College of Environment, 1st Linghai Road, Dalian (China); Kunitomo, Shinta [Ebara Corporation, 1-6-27, Konan, Minato-ku 108-8480 (Japan); Igarashi, Chiaki [Ebara Research Co. Ltd, 2-1, Honfujisawa 4-chome, Fujisawa 251-8502 (Japan)

    2006-09-07

    In this investigation, the ultraviolet light characteristics and OH radical properties produced by a pulsed discharge in water were studied. For the plate-rod reactor, it was found that the ultraviolet light energy has a 3.2% total energy injected into the reactor. The ultraviolet light changed with the peak voltage and electrode distance. UV characteristics in tap water and the distilled water are given. The intensity of the OH radicals was the highest for the 40 mm electrode distance reactor. In addition, the properties of hydrogen peroxide and ozone were also studied under arc discharge conditions. It was found that the OH radicals were in the ground state and the excited state when a pulsed arc discharge was used. The ozone was produced by the arc discharge even if the oxygen gas is not bubbled into the reactor. The ozone concentration produces a maximum value with treatment time.

  4. Programme of research and development on plutonium recycling in light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This is the third annual progress report concerning the programme on plutonium recycling in light-water reactors (indirect action) of the Commission of the European Communities. It covers the year 1978 and follows the annual reports for 1977 (EUR 6002 EN) and 1976 (EUR 5780). The preliminary results obtained under the 1975-79 programme indicate that: (a) assuming that plutonium recycling in light-water reactors is industrially developed by the end of the century, the foreseeable radiological impact on both workers and the general public can be maintained within the limits of current radiation protection standards; (b) on the whole, there is a good knowledge and mastery of the specific aspects involved in the plutonium recycling in light-water reactors and in particular they indicate that plutonium fuels have a similar behaviour to uranium fuels

  5. Study of plutonium recycling physics in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuss, Paul

    1979-10-01

    A stock of plutonium from the reprocessing of thermal neutron reactor fuel is likely to appear in the next few years. The use of this plutonium as fuel replacing 235 U in thermal reactors is probably more interesting than simple stock-piling storage: immobilization of a capital which moreover would deteriorate by radioactive decay of isotope 241 also fissile and present to an appreciable extend in plutonium from reprocessing (half-life 15 years); recycling, on the other hand, will supply energy without complete degradation of the stock for fast neutron reactor loads, the burned matter having been partially renewed by conversion; furthermore the use of plutonium will meet the needs created by a temporary pressure on the naturel and/or enriched uranium market. For these two reasons the recycling of plutonium in thermal neutron reactors is being considered seriously today. The present work is confined to neutronic aspects and centres mainly on pressurized water-moderated reactors, the most highly developed at present in France. Four aspects of the problem are examined: 1. the physics of a plutonium-recycling reactor special features of neutronic phenomena with respect to the 'conventional' scheme of the 235 U burning reactor; 2. calculation of a plutonium-recycling reactor: adaptation of standard methods; 3. qualification of these calculations from the viewpoint of both data and inevitable approximations; 4. the fuel cycle and particularly the equivalence of fissile matters [fr

  6. Safety reviews of next-generation light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudrick, J.A.; Wilson, J.N.

    1997-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is reviewing three applications for design certification under its new licensing process. The U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) and System 80+ designs have received final design approvals. The AP600 design review is continuing. The goals of design certification are to achieve early resolution of safety issues and to provide a more stable and predictable licensing process. NRC also reviewed the Utility Requirements Document (URD) of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and determined that its guidance does not conflict with NRC requirements. This review led to the identification and resolution of many generic safety issues. The NRC determined that next-generation reactor designs should achieve a higher level of safety for selected technical and severe accident issues. Accordingly, NRC developed new review standards for these designs based on (1) operating experience, including the accident at Three Mile Island, Unit 2; (2) the results of probabilistic risk assessments of current and next-generation reactor designs; (3) early efforts on severe accident rulemaking; and (4) research conducted to address previously identified generic safety issues. The additional standards were used during the individual design reviews and the resolutions are documented in the design certification rules. 12 refs

  7. Thermohydraulics of emergency core cooling in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    This report, by a group of experts of the OECD-NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations, reviews the current state-of-knowledge in the field of emergency core cooling (ECC) for design-basis, loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA) and core uncover transients in pressurized- and boiling-water reactors. An overview of the LOCA scenarios and ECC phenomenology is provided for each type of reactor, together with a brief description of their ECC systems. Separate-effects and integral-test facilities, which contribute to understanding and assessing the phenomenology, are reviewed together with similarity and scaling compromises. All relevant LOCA phenomena are then brought together in the form of tables. Each phenomenon is weighted in terms of its importance to the course of a LOCA, and appraised for the adequacy of its data base and analytical modelling. This qualitative procedure focusses attention on the modelling requirements of dominant LOCA phenomena and the current capabilities of the two-fluid models in two-phase flows. This leads into the key issue with ECC: quantitative code assessment and the application of system codes to predict with a well defined uncertainty the behaviour of a nuclear power plant. This issue, the methodologies being developed for code assessment and the question of how good is good enough are discussed in detail. Some general conclusions and recommendations for future research activities are provided

  8. Coastdown in light water reactors as a fuel management strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo, L.G.

    1980-12-01

    Improved uranium utilization by means of extended burnup via routine end-of-cycle coastdown has been analyzed, with a specific focus on pressurided water reactors. Both computer and simple analytic models have been developed to determine the optimal coastdown length. Coastdown has been compared with the use of higher fuel-enrichment to achieve comparable burnup values. Temperature and Power coastdown modes were analyzed and changes in the plant thermodynamic efficiency determined. Effects on fuel integrity due to coastdown were examined using a fuel reliability code (SPEAR). Finally the effects on coastdown duration of major parameters involved in charaterizing reactor operation and the economic enviroment were examined. It was found that natural uranium savings up to 7% could be achieved in a typical application by the use of routine pre-planned coast down up to the economic optimun. If coastdown is carried out all the way up to the economic breakeven point yellowcake savings sum up to 16%. Coastdown is substantially more effective than increasing enrichment to extend cycle length without coastdown. Thermodynamic efficiency does not change appreciably during coastdown, a circumstance which greatly simplifies modeling. Coastdown was found to have no statistically significant effect on predicted fuel failure rates. Finally, simple back-of-the evenlope analytic models were found to give an excellent estimate of coastdown duration to both the optimum and breakeven points, and to correctly track the functional behavior induced by all major variables

  9. Improvement of failed fuel detection system of light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, M.K.; Kang, H.D.; Cho, S.W.; Lee, K.W.

    1981-01-01

    Multi-task DAAS system by utilizing PDP-11/23 computer was assembled and tested for its performances. By connecting four Ge(Li) detectors to this DAAS, test experiments were done to prove system capability for detection and analysis of any fission gases resolved in four independently sampled primary cooling water from a power reactor. Appropriate computer programs were also introduced for this application and satisfactory results were obtained. Further application of this DAAS to the quality test of fuel pins (uniform distribution of enriched uranium in fresh fuel pellets), a prototype fuel scanner system was designed, constructed and tested. Operational principle of this system is based on the determination of 235 U/ 238 U abundance ratio in pellets by precision spectrometry or gamma-rays which are emitted from a portion of fuel pellets. For the uniform scanning, rotational and traverse motions at pre-selected speeds were applied to a fuel pin under tests. A long lens magnetic beta-spectrometer of Argonne National Laboratory was transferred to KAERI and re-installed for future precision beta-gamma spectroscopic research works on short-lived fission products nuclei

  10. Study of Pu consumption in Advanced Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Timely disposal of the weapons plutonium is of paramount importance to permanently safeguarding this material. GE's 1300 MWe Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) has been designed to utilize fill] core loading of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel. Because of its large core size, a single ABWR reactor is capable of disposing 100 metric tons of plutonium within 15 years of project inception in the spiking mode. The same amount of material could be disposed of in 25 years after the start of the project as spent fuel, again using a single reactor, while operating at 75 percent capacity factor. In either case, the design permits reuse of the stored spent fuel assemblies for electrical energy generation for the remaining life of the plant for another 40 years. Up to 40 percent of the initial plutonium can also be completely destroyed using ABWRS, without reprocessing, either by utilizing six ABWRs over 25 years or by expanding the disposition time to 60 years, the design life of the plants and using two ABWRS. More complete destruction would require the development and testing of a plutonium-base fuel with a non-fertile matrix for an ABWR or use of an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR). The ABWR, in addition, is fully capable of meeting the tritium target production goals with already developed target technology

  11. Sediment accretion and carbon storage in constructed wetlands receiving water treated with metal-based coagulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpner, Elizabeth; Kraus, Tamara; Liang, Yan; Bachand, Sandra M.; Horwath, William R.; Bachand, Philip A.M.

    2018-01-01

    In many regions of the world, subsidence of organic rich soils threatens levee stability and freshwater supply, and continued oxidative loss of organic matter contributes to greenhouse gas production. To counter subsidence in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of northern California, we examined the feasibility of using constructed wetlands receiving drainage water treated with metal-based coagulants to accrete mineral material along with wetland biomass, while also sequestering carbon in wetland sediment. Nine field-scale wetlands were constructed which received local drainage water that was either untreated (control), or treated with polyaluminum chloride (PAC) or iron sulfate (FeSO4) coagulants. After 23 months of flooding and coagulant treatment, sediment samples were collected near the inlet, middle, and outlet of each wetland to determine vertical accretion rates, bulk density, sediment composition, and carbon sequestration rates. Wetlands treated with PAC had the highest and most spatially consistent vertical accretion rates (~6 cm year-1), while the FeSO4 wetlands had similarly high accretion rates near the inlet but rates similar to the untreated wetland (~1.5 cm year-1) at the middle and outlet sites. The composition of the newly accreted sediment in the PAC and FeSO4 treatments was high in the added metal (aluminum and iron, respectively), but the percent metal by weight was similar to native soils of California. As has been observed in other constructed wetlands, the newly accreted sediment material had lower bulk densities than the native soil material (0.04-0.10 g cm-3 versus 0.2-0.3 g cm-3), suggesting these materials will consolidate over time. Finally, this technology accelerated carbon burial, with rates in PAC treated wetland (0.63 kg C m-2 yr-1) over 2-fold greater than the untreated control (0.28 kg C m-2 yr-1). This study demonstrates the feasibility of using constructed wetlands treated with coagulants to reverse subsidence by accreting the

  12. Utilization of light water reactors for plutonium incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galperin, A.

    1995-01-01

    In this work a potential of incineration of excess Pu in LWR's is investigated. In order to maintain the economic viability of the Pu incineration option it should be carried out by the existing power plants without additional investment for plant modifications. Design variations are reduced to the fuel cycle optimization, i.e. fuel composition may be varied to achieve optimal Pu destruction. Fuel mixtures considered in this work were based either on uranium or thorium fertile materials and Pu as a fissile component. The slightly enriched U fuel cycle for a typical pressurized water reactor was considered as a reference case. The Pu content of all fuels was adjusted to assure the identical cycle length and discharged burnup values. An equilibrium cycle was simulated by performing cluster burnup calculations. The material composition data for the whole core was estimated based on the core, fuel and cycle parameters. The annual production of Pu of a standard PWR with 1100 MWe output is about 298 kg. The same core completely loaded with the MOX fuel is estimated to consume 474 kg of Pu, mainly fissile isotopes. The MOX-239 fuel type (pure Pu-239) shows a potential toreduce the initial total Pu inventory by 220 kg/year and fissile Pu inventory by 420 kg/year. TMOX and TMOX-239 are based on Th-232 as a fertile component of the fuel, instead of U-238. The amount of Pu destroyed per year for both cases is significantly higher than that of U-based fuels. Especially impressive is the reduction in fissile Pu inventory: more than 900 kg/year. (author)

  13. Ion-Exchange Treating of Cyanide-Contained Waste Water of Some Hydrometallurgy Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheglov, M.Y.

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents results of investigation of possibility to apply strong base anionite for treating waste water of a hydrometallurgical plant from cyanide compounds of heavy metals and to utilize value component (Au, Cu, Zn and so on). As an object of the investigation thickener outlets of a processing plant were chosen. Sorption researches were carried out with model solutions allied to the thickener outlet and with the thickener outlets too in static and dynamic conditions. The main technological parameters were determined, technological schemes of value component sorption and ignite regeneration were developed

  14. Hydrodesulphurization of Light Gas Oil using hydrogen from the Water Gas Shift Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Abdulaziz

    2009-12-01

    The production of clean fuel faces the challenges of high production cost and complying with stricter environmental regulations. In this research, the ability of using a novel technology of upgrading heavy oil to treat Light Gas Oil (LGO) will be investigated. The target of this project is to produce cleaner transportation fuel with much lower cost of production. Recently, a novel process for upgrading of heavy oil has been developed at University of Waterloo. It is combining the two essential processes in bitumen upgrading; emulsion breaking and hydroprocessing into one process. The water in the emulsion is used to generate in situ hydrogen from the Water Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR). This hydrogen can be used for the hydrogenation and hydrotreating reaction which includes sulfur removal instead of the expensive molecular hydrogen. This process can be carried out for the upgrading of the bitumen emulsion which would improve its quality. In this study, the hydrodesulphurization (HDS) of LGO was conducted using in situ hydrogen produced via the Water Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR). The main objective of this experimental study is to evaluate the possibility of producing clean LGO over dispersed molybdenum sulphide catalyst and to evaluate the effect of different promoters and syn-gas on the activity of the dispersed Mo catalyst. Experiments were carried out in a 300 ml Autoclave batch reactor under 600 psi (initially) at 391°C for 1 to 3 hours and different amounts of water. After the hydrotreating reaction, the gas samples were collected and the conversion of carbon monoxide to hydrogen via WGSR was determined using a refinery gas analyzer. The sulphur content in liquid sample was analyzed via X-Ray Fluorescence. Experimental results showed that using more water will enhance WGSR but at the same time inhibits the HDS reaction. It was also shown that the amount of sulfur removed depends on the reaction time. The plan is to investigate the effect of synthesis gas (syngas

  15. Practical considerations in the use of UV light for drinking water disinfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeyanayagam, S.; Cotton, C.

    2002-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light was discovered approximately 150 years ago. The first commercial UV lamp was made in the early 1900s soon followed by the manufacture of the quartz sleeve. These technological advances allowed the first application of UV light for water disinfection in 1907 in France. In the mid 1980s, UV disinfection was named as a Best available technology (BAT) for wastewater disinfection in the United States. Fueled by the recent findings that UV disinfection can inactivate key pathogens at cost effective UV doses, the drinking water industry in North America is closely investigating its application in large installations. (author)

  16. Research and development of super light water reactors and super fast reactors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Y.; Morooka, S.; Yamakawa, M.; Ishiwatari, Y.; Ikejiri, S.; Katsumura, Y.; Muroya, Y.; Terai, T.; Sasaki, K.; Mori, H.; Hamamoto, Y.; Okumura, K.; Kugo, T.; Nakatsuka, T.; Ezato, K.; Akasaka, N.; Hotta, A.

    2011-01-01

    Super Light Water Reactors (Super LWR) and Super Fast Reactors (Super FR) are the supercritical- pressure light water cooled reactors (SCWR) that are developed by the research group of University of Tokyo since 1989 and now jointly under development with the researchers of Waseda University, University of Tokyo and other organizations in Japan. The principle of the reactor concept development, the results of the past Super LWR and Super FR R&D as well as the R&D program of the Super FR second phase project are described. (author)

  17. Flow-induced vibration for light-water reactors. Progress report, April 1978-December 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schardt, J.F.

    1980-03-01

    Flow-Induced vibration for Light Water Reactors (FIV for LWRs) is a four-year program designed to improve the FIV performance of light water reactors through the development of design criteria, analytical models for predicting behavior of components, general scaling laws to improve the accuracy of reduced-scale tests, and the identification of high FIV risk areas. The program commenced December 1, 1976, but was suspended on September 30, 1978, due to a shift in Department of Energy (DOE) priorities away from LWR productivity/availability. It was reinitiated as of August 1, 1979. This progress report summarizes the accomplishments achieved during the period from April 1978 to December 1979

  18. Investigation into the Use of Water Based Brake Fluid for Light Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Akpan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the possibility of using water based fluid as a brake fluid for light loads. Characterization of both standard and water based braked fluids formulated was carried out. The properties of the latter were compared with that of a standard commercial brake fluid. The actual test of the formulated brake fluid was carried out with a Nissan Sunny vehicle model 1.5 within the speed range of 20km/hr to 80km/hr at the permanent campus of University of Uyo and the braking efficiency obtained attest to its suitability for light loads.

  19. Filtered atmospheric venting of light water reactor containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedgran, A.; Ahlstroem, P.E.; Nilsson, L.; Persson, Aa.

    1982-11-01

    The aim of filtered venting is to improve the function of the reactor containment in connection with very severe accidents. By equipping the containment with a safety valve for pressure relief and allowing the released gases to pass through an effective filter, it should be possible to achieve a considerable protective effect. The work has involved detailed studies of the core meltdown sequence, how the molten core material runs out of the reactor vessel, what effect it has on concrete and other structures and how final cooling of the molten core material takes place. On the basis of previous Swedish studies, the project has chosen to study a filter concept that consists of a gravel bed of large volume. This filter plant shall not only retain the radioactive particles that escape from the containment through the vent line, but shall also condense the accompanying steam. After the government decided in 1981 that Barsebaeck was to be equipped with filtered venting and issued specifications regarding its performance, the project aimed at obtaining results that could be used to design and verify a plant for filtered venting at the Barsebaeck nuclear power station. As far as the other Swedish nuclear power plants at Oskarshamn, Ringhals and Forsmark are concerned, the results are only applicable to a limited extent. Additional studies are required for these nuclear power plants before the value of filtered venting can be assessed. Based on the results of experiments and analyses, the project has made a safety analysis with Barsebaeck as a reference plant in order to study how the introduction of filtered venting affects the safety level at a station. In summary, the venting function appears to entail a not insignificant reduction of risks for boiling water reactors of the Barsebaeck type. For a number of types of such very severe core accident cases, the filter design studied ensures a substantial reduction of the releases. However it has not been possible within the

  20. Low-intensity blue-enriched white light (750 lux) and standard bright light (10 000 lux) are equally effective in treating SAD. A randomized controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, Ybe; Dekker, Vera; Schlangen, Luc J. M.; Bos, Elske H.; Ruiter, Martine J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Photoreceptor cells containing melanopsin play a role in the phase-shifting effects of short-wavelength light. In a previous study, we compared the standard light treatment (SLT) of SAD with treatment using short-wavelength blue-enriched white light (BLT). Both treatments used the same

  1. Flooding of a large, passive, pressure-tube light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hejzlar, P.; Todreas, N.E.; Driscoll, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    A reactor concept has been developed which can survive loss of coolant accidents without scram and without replenishing primary coolant inventory, while maintaining safe temperature limits on the fuel and pressure tubes. The proposed concept is a pressure tube type reactor of similar design to CANDU reactors, but differing in three key aspects. First, a solid SiC-coated graphite fuel matrix is used in place of fuel pin bundles to enable the dissipation of decay heat from the fuel in the absence of primary coolant. Second, the heavy water coolant in the pressure tubes is replaced by light water, which also serves as the moderator. Finally, the calandria tank, surrounded by a graphite reflector, contains a low pressure gas instead of heavy water moderator, and this normally-voided calandria is connected to a light water heat sink. The cover gas displaces the light water from the calandria during normal operation, while during loss of coolant or loss of heat sink accidents it allows passive calandria flooding. Calandria flooding also provides redundant and diverse reactor shutdown. This paper describes the thermal hydraulic characteristics of the passively initiated, gravity driven calandria flooding process. Flooding the calandria space with light water is a unique and very important feature of the proposed pressure-tube light water reactor (PTLWR) concept. The flooding of the top row of fuel channels must be accomplished fast enough so that in the total loss of coolant, none of the critical components of the fuel channel, i.e. the pressure tube, the calandria tube, the matrix and the fuel, exceed their design limits. The flooding process has been modeled and shown to be rapid enough to maintain all components within their design limits. (orig.)

  2. Rapid water disinfection using vertically aligned MoS_2 nanofilms and visible light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chong; Kong, Desheng; Hsu, Po-Chun; Yuan, Hongtao; Lee, Hyun-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Here, solar energy is readily available in most climates and can be used for water purification. However, solar disinfection of drinking water (SODIS) mostly relies on ultraviolet light, which represents only 4% of total solar energy, and this leads to slow treatment speed. The development of new materials that can harvest visible light for water disinfection, and speed up solar water purification, is therefore highly desirable. Here, we show that few-layered vertically aligned MoS_2 (FLV-MoS_2) films can be used to harvest the whole spectrum of visible light (~ 50% of solar energy) and achieve highly efficient water disinfection. The bandgap of MoS_2 was increased from 1.3 eV to 1.55 eV by decreasing the domain size, which allowed the FLV-MoS_2 to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) for bacterial inactivation in water. The FLV-MoS_2 showed ~15 times better log inactivation efficiency of indicator bacteria compared to bulk MoS_2, and much faster inactivation of bacteria under both visible light and sunlight illumination compared to widely used TiO_2. Moreover, by using a 5 nm copper film on top of the FLV-MoS_2 as a catalyst to facilitate electron-hole pair separation and promote the generation of ROS, the disinfection rate was further increased 6 fold. With our approach, we achieved water disinfection of >99.999% inactivation of bacteria in 20 minutes with a small amount of material (1.6 mg/L) under simulated visible light.

  3. Rapid water disinfection using vertically aligned MoS2 nanofilms and visible light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chong; Kong, Desheng; Hsu, Po-Chun; Yuan, Hongtao; Lee, Hyun-Wook

    2016-01-01

    In most climates, solar energy is readily available and can be used for water purification. But, solar disinfection of drinking water mostly relies on ultraviolet light, which represents only 4% of the total solar energy, and this leads to a slow treatment speed. Therefore, the development of new materials that can harvest visible light for water disinfection, and so speed up solar water purification, is highly desirable. Here we show that few-layered vertically aligned MoS_2 (FLV-MoS_2) films can be used to harvest the whole spectrum of visible light (~50% of solar energy) and achieve highly efficient water disinfection. The bandgap of MoS_2 was increased from 1.3 to 1.55 eV by decreasing the domain size, which allowed the FLV-MoS_2 to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) for bacterial inactivation in the water. The FLV-MoS_2 showed a ~15 times better log inactivation efficiency of the indicator bacteria compared with that of bulk MoS_2, and a much faster inactivation of bacteria under both visible light and sunlight illumination compared with the widely used TiO_2. Moreover, by using a 5 nm copper film on top of the FLV-MoS_2 as a catalyst to facilitate electron–hole pair separation and promote the generation of ROS, the disinfection rate was increased a further sixfold. Here, we achieved water disinfection of >99.999% inactivation of bacteria in 20 min with a small amount of material (1.6 mg l–1) under simulated visible light.

  4. Boreal Tree Light- and Water-Use: Asynchronous, Diverging, yet Complementary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, C.; Baltzer, J. L.; Barr, A.; Black, T. A.; Bohrer, G.; Detto, M.; Maillet, J.; Matheny, A. M.; Roy, A.; Sonnentag, O.; Stephens, J.

    2017-12-01

    Water stress has been suggested as a key mechanism behind the contemporary increase in tree mortality rates in northwestern North America. However, a detailed analysis of boreal tree light- and water-use strategies as well as their interspecific differences are still lacking. Here, we examine the tree hydraulic behaviour of co-occurring larch (Larix laricina) and black spruce (Picea mariana), two characteristic boreal tree species, near the southern limit of the boreal ecozone in central Canada. Sap flux density (Js) and concurrently recorded stem radius fluctuations and meteorological conditions are used to quantify tree hydraulic functioning and to scrutinize tree light- and water-use strategies. Our analysis reveals an asynchrony in the diel hydrodynamics of the two species with the initial rise in Js occurring two hours earlier in larch than in black spruce. Structural differences in the crown architecture of larch and black spruce lead to interspecific differences in light harvesting that can explain the observed asynchrony in their hydraulic function. Furthermore, the two species exhibit diverging stomatal regulation strategies with larch employing relatively isohydric whereas black spruce anisohydric behaviour. Such asynchronous and diverging tree-level light- and water-use strategies provide new insights into the ecosystem-level complementarity of tree form and function, with implications for understanding boreal forests' water and carbon dynamics and resilience to environmental stress.

  5. Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60,

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busby, Jeremy T; Nanstad, Randy K; Stoller, Roger E; Feng, Zhili; Naus, Dan J

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear reactors present a very harsh environment for components service. Components within a reactor core must tolerate high temperature water, stress, vibration, and an intense neutron field. Degradation of materials in this environment can lead to reduced performance, and in some cases, sudden failure. A recent EPRI-led study interviewed 47 US nuclear utility executives to gauge perspectives on long-term operation of nuclear reactors. Nearly 90% indicated that extensions of reactor lifetimes to beyond 60 years were likely. When polled on the most challenging issues facing further life extension, two-thirds cited plant reliability as the key issue with materials aging and cable/piping as the top concerns for plant reliability. Materials degradation within a nuclear power plant is very complex. There are many different types of materials within the reactor itself: over 25 different metal alloys can be found with can be found within the primary and secondary systems, not to mention the concrete containment vessel, instrumentation and control, and other support facilities. When this diverse set of materials is placed in the complex and harsh environment coupled with load, degradation over an extended life is indeed quite complicated. To address this issue, the USNRC has developed a Progressive Materials Degradation Approach (NUREG/CR-6923). This approach is intended to develop a foundation for appropriate actions to keep materials degradation from adversely impacting component integrity and safety and identify materials and locations where degradation can reasonably be expected in the future. Clearly, materials degradation will impact reactor reliability, availability, and potentially, safe operation. Routine surveillance and component replacement can mitigate these factors, although failures still occur. With reactor life extensions to 60 years or beyond or power uprates, many components must tolerate the reactor environment for even longer times. This may increase

  6. Microbial pathogens in source and treated waters from drinking water treatment plants in the United States and implications for human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    An occurrence survey was conducted on selected pathogens in source and treated drinking water collected from 25 drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs) in the United States. Water samples were analyzed for the protozoa Giardia and Cryptosporidium (EPA Method 1623); the fungi Aspe...

  7. Plasma concentrations of enrofloxacin in African grey parrots treated with medicated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammer, K; Aucoin, D P; Whitt, D A; Prus, S A

    1990-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of enrofloxacin were measured four times during a 7-day treatment period in African grey parrots that were fed with enrofloxacin-medicated drinking water. Water medicated at doubling doses of 0.09, 0.19, 0.38, 0.75, 1.5, and 3.0 mg/ml achieved mean concentrations (+/- SEM) of 0.10 (+/- 0.05), 0.12 (+/- 0.05), 0.12 (+/- 0.03), 0.15 (+/- 0.05), 0.30 (+/- 0.11), and 0.20 (+/- 0.06) micrograms/ml, respectively. A portion of the administered enrofloxacin was metabolized to an equipotent metabolite, ciprofloxacin. Mean ciprofloxacin concentrations paralleled enrofloxacin concentrations but were lower, ranging from 0.04 to 0.27 micrograms/ml. Acceptance of medicated water was adequate at lower doses; however, at doses of 1.5 and 3.0 mg/ml, acceptance was unsatisfactory, and mean weight loss in these groups was significantly higher than the control group. Based on the concentrations achieved in these preliminary trials and the susceptibility patterns of gram-negative bacteria isolated from psittacine birds, drinking water medicated with enrofloxacin at 0.19-0.75 mg/ml might be effective for treating highly susceptible gram-negative bacterial infections in African grey parrots.

  8. Electrochemistry in light water reactors reference electrodes, measurement, corrosion and tribocorrosion issues

    CERN Document Server

    Bosch, R -W; Celis, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    There has long been a need for effective methods of measuring corrosion within light water nuclear reactors. This important volume discusses key issues surrounding the development of high temperature reference electrodes and other electrochemical techniques. The book is divided into three parts with part one reviewing the latest developments in the use of reference electrode technology in both pressurised water and boiling water reactors. Parts two and three cover different types of corrosion and tribocorrosion and ways they can be measured using such techniques as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Topics covered across the book include in-pile testing, modelling techniques and the tribocorrosion behaviour of stainless steel under reactor conditions. Electrochemistry in light water reactors is a valuable reference for all those concerned with corrosion problems in this key technology for the power industry. Discusses key issues surrounding the development of high temperature reference eletrodes A valuab...

  9. An Australian experience with a constructed wetland to treat ash dam water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.W. Jensen; K.W. Riley [Delta Electricity (Australia)

    2003-07-01

    In this paper, the effectiveness of a wetland system to treat water from a power station ash dam is discussed. The wetlands were constructed during 1996 and 1997. The length of the canals within the system is 1700 metres. There was a total planting of 35,000 tube stock of nine different species. In the summer of 1998, Typha orientalis colonised the system and is now the dominant species of emergent plant present. Water is introduced to the wetland from the return channel of the power station. The ash dam water is acidic (pH 4.5 5.5) and contains elevated levels of some trace elements including selenium, boron and fluorine. Of these three trace elements, selenium is regarded as the element of particular environmental concern. Since June 2000, there has been periodic sampling and analysis of both the inlet and outlet waters. The analytes include conductivity, pH, total organic carbon, Al, As, B, Ba, Ca, Cl, K, F, Fe, Mg, Mn, Na, selenite, total selenium, Si, Sr, sulfate and Zn. As well, plant material (stems and roots of the Typha) and sediments have been analysed for selenium. The results indicate boron and fluorine are not removed from the ash dam water by the processes occurring in the wetland. Selenium is partly removed. It appears that selenite is removed in preference to selenate. The development and operation of this experimental wetland is discussed in the context of a sustainable and ecologically sound system of minimising detrimental effects of the discharge of ash water. 26 refs., 4 tabs.

  10. Assessment of solute fluxes beneath an orchard irrigated with treated sewage water: A numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, David; Laufer, Asher; Shapira, Roi H.; Kurtzman, Daniel

    2013-02-01

    Detailed numerical simulations were used to analyze water flow and transport of nitrate, chloride, and a tracer solute in a 3-D, spatially heterogeneous, variably saturated soil, originating from a citrus orchard irrigated with treated sewage water (TSW) considering realistic features of the soil-water-plant-atmosphere system. Results of this study suggest that under long-term irrigation with TSW, because of nitrate uptake by the tree roots and nitrogen transformations, the vadose zone may provide more capacity for the attenuation of the nitrate load in the groundwater than for the chloride load in the groundwater. Results of the 3-D simulations were used to assess their counterparts based on a simplified, deterministic, 1-D vertical simulation and on limited soil monitoring. Results of the analyses suggest that the information that may be gained from a single sampling point (located close to the area active in water uptake by the tree roots) or from the results of the 1-D simulation is insufficient for a quantitative description of the response of the complicated, 3-D flow system. Both might considerably underestimate the movement and spreading of a pulse of a tracer solute and also the groundwater contamination hazard posed by nitrate and particularly by chloride moving through the vadose zone. This stems mainly from the rain that drove water through the flow system away from the rooted area and could not be represented by the 1-D model or by the single sampling point. It was shown, however, that an additional sampling point, located outside the area active in water uptake, may substantially improve the quantitative description of the response of the complicated, 3-D flow system.

  11. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Ditchburn, R W

    1963-01-01

    This classic study, available for the first time in paperback, clearly demonstrates how quantum theory is a natural development of wave theory, and how these two theories, once thought to be irreconcilable, together comprise a single valid theory of light. Aimed at students with an intermediate-level knowledge of physics, the book first offers a historical introduction to the subject, then covers topics such as wave theory, interference, diffraction, Huygens' Principle, Fermat's Principle, and the accuracy of optical measurements. Additional topics include the velocity of light, relativistic o

  12. Water hammer caused by rapid gas production in a severe accident in a light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inasaka, Fujio; Adachi, Masaki; Aya, Izuo; Nariai, Hideki; Shiozaki, Kohki

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the water hammer caused by striking of water mass pushed up by a rapidly growing bubble and its scale effects using two cylindrical model containment vessels of 1.0 and 0.428 m diameters. We also closely observed the movement of water mass and the growing bubble in the vessels. In these experiments, rapid bubble growth was simulated by injecting high-pressure air into a water pool. It was clarified that the water mass was pushed up without any air penetration until the water level reached a certain elevation. On the basis of all data, experimental correlations for estimating the height and striking velocity of the water mass with coherency were proposed, and the water hammer pressure for exerting large forces on the structures was quantitatively evaluated. (author)

  13. Release of natural radionuclides in the Czech Republic - from water treatment plants where water from underground water sources is treated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinaglova, R.

    2014-01-01

    In this abstract author deals with the treatment of drinking water in the Czech Republic with removing of natural radionuclides as well as with treatment of filter cartridges. The advantage of these technologies is that flushing is not required so no wastewater occurs. Used ion exchangers with higher content of uranium are processed in the chemical treatment of uranium ores, managed by DIAMO, state enterprise. (authors)

  14. Growth of Chironomus dilutus larvae exposed to ozone-treated and untreated oil sands process water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.; Wiseman, S.; Franz, E.; Jones, P.; Liber, K.; Giesy, J.; Gamal El-Din, M.; Marin, J.

    2010-01-01

    Oil sand processing operations require large quantities of freshwater and produce large volumes of oil sands process water (OSPW) which must be stored on-site. This presentation reviewed various treatment methods for remediating OSPW in order to eliminate downstream toxicity. Naphthenic acids are the most important target fractions for treatment because they are primarily responsible for the acute toxicity of OSPW. Although ozonation has shown promise for reducing OSPW toxicity, the effects of ozonation on aquatic invertebrates remain unknown. This study investigated the effects of exposure to untreated and ozonated OSPW in Chironomus dilutus larvae. OSPW was treated with either a 50 or 80 mg O 3 /L dose of ozonation. The effects of ozonation levels on C. dilutus survival and growth were examined. The study showed that after a 10-day exposure, there were pronounced effects on survival of larvae exposed to ozone-treated or untreated OSPW. Larvae exposed to OSPW were 64-77 percent smaller than their respective controls, but the mean wet mass of organisms exposed to 50 mg O 3 /L ozonated OSPW was not much different from that of the controls. Larvae exposed to 80 mg O 3 /L ozone-treated OSPW were 40 percent smaller than the freshwater controls, and the mean wet mass was also much larger than the untreated OSPW. It was concluded that the toxicity of OSPW to benthic invertebrates may be reduced by ozone treatment.

  15. A new device for acquiring ground truth on the absorption of light by turbid waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemas, V. (Principal Investigator); Srna, R.; Treasure, W.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A new device, called a Spectral Attenuation Board, has been designed and tested, which enables ERTS-1 sea truth collection teams to monitor the attenuation depths of three colors continuously, as the board is being towed behind a boat. The device consists of a 1.2 x 1.2 meter flat board held below the surface of the water at a fixed angle to the surface of the water. A camera mounted above the water takes photographs of the board. The resulting film image is analyzed by a micro-densitometer trace along the descending portion of the board. This yields information on the rate of attenuation of light penetrating the water column and the Secchi depth. Red and green stripes were painted on the white board to approximate band 4 and band 5 of the ERTS MSS so that information on the rate of light absorption by the water column of light in these regions of the visible spectrum could be concurrently measured. It was found that information from a red, green, and white stripe may serve to fingerprint the composition of the water mass. A number of these devices, when automated, could also be distributed over a large region to provide a cheap method of obtaining valuable satellite ground truth data at present time intervals.

  16. Structural, mechanical and light yield characterisation of heat treated LYSO:Ce single crystals for medical imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mengucci, P., E-mail: p.mengucci@univpm.it [Università Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); André, G. [Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, CEA-CNRS, CE-Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette cedex (France); Auffray, E. [Department PH-CMX CERN, Route de Meyrin, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Barucca, G. [Università Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Cecchi, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Chipaux, R. [CEA DSM/IRFU/SEDI, CE-Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette cedex (France); Cousson, A. [Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, CEA-CNRS, CE-Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette cedex (France); Davì, F. [Università Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Di Vara, N. [Department PH-CMX CERN, Route de Meyrin, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Rinaldi, D.; Santecchia, E. [Università Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy)

    2015-06-11

    Five single crystals of cerium-doped lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO:Ce) grown by the Czochralski method were submitted to structural characterisation by X-ray (XRD) and neutron (ND) diffraction, scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy and energy dispersive microanalysis (EDS). The Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS), the Young Modulus (YM) and the Light Yield (LY) of the samples were also measured in order to correlate the mechanical and the optical behaviour of the crystals with the characteristics of their microstructure. Two of the samples analysed were also heat treated at 300 °C for 10 h to evidence possible variations induced by the temperature in the optical and mechanical response of the crystals. Results showed that the mean compositional variations evidenced by the structural analyses do not affect the mechanical and optical behaviour of the samples. On the contrary, the thermal treatment could induce the formation of coherent spherical particles (size 10 to 15 nm), not uniformly distributed inside the sample, that strongly reduce the UTS and YM values, but it does not affect the optical response of the crystal. This latter result was attributed to the low value of the heating temperature (300 °C) that is not sufficiently high to induce annealing of the oxygen vacancies traps that are responsible of the deterioration of the scintillation properties of the LYSO:Ce crystals. This study was carried out in the framework of the Crystal Clear Collaboration (CCC)

  17. Water hammer caused by rapid steam production in a severe accident in a light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inasaka, Fujio; Adachi, Masaki; Murata, Hiroyuki; Aya, Izuo

    2007-01-01

    We conducted the experimental studies on the water hammer caused by striking of a water mass pushed up by a rapidly growing steam bubble, using a cylindrical model containment vessel of 0.4286 m in diameter. In the experiments, a rapid gas growth was simulated by injecting high-pressure steam into a water pool. It was clarified that coherency of the water mass movement and its water hammer caused by the condensable gas production considerably decreased in comparison with the case of the non-condensable gas production because the rising velocity of the water mass was suppressed due to the steam bubble condensation. On the basis of the data, experimental correlations for estimating the water hammer on the structures in the containment vessel were proposed. (author)

  18. EFFECTIVENESS OF CHITOSAN AS NATURAL COAGULANT AID IN TREATING TURBID WATERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bina ، M. H. Mehdinejad ، M. Nikaeen ، H. Movahedian Attar

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, there has been a concern about the relation between aluminum residuals in treated water and Alzheimer disease, and more interest has been considered on the development of natural coagulants such as chitosan. Chitosan, a natural linear biopolyaminosaccharide, is obtained by alkaline deacetylation of chitin. The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of alum as coagulant in conjunction with chitosan as coagulant aid on the removal of turbidity, hardness and Escherichia coli from water. A conventional jar test apparatus was employed for the tests. The optimum pH was observed between 7 to 7.5 for all turbidities. The optimum doses of alum and chitosan when used in conjunction, were 10mg/L and 1mg/L, 5mg/L and 0.5mg/L, and 5mg/L and 0.5mg/L in low, medium and high turbidities, respectively. Turbidity removal efficiency was resulted between %74.3 to %98.2 by alum in conjunction with chitosan. Residual Al+3 in treated water was less than 0.2 mg/L, meeting the international guidelines. The results showed that turbidity decrease provided also a primary Escherichia coli reduction of 2-4 log units within the first 1 to 2 hr of treatment. Hardness removal efficiency decreased when the total hardness increased from 102 to 476mg/L as CaCO3. At low initial turbidity, chitosan showed marginally better performance on hardness, especially at the ranges of 100 to 210 mg/L as CaCO3. In conclusion, coagulant aid showed a useful method for coagulation process. By using natural coagulants, considerable savings in chemicals and sludge handling cost may be achieved.

  19. Technology programs in support of advanced light water reactor plants: Construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichen, E.P.

    1989-10-01

    Stone ampersand Webster Engineering Corporation (SWEC) is conducting several independent, yet interrelated, studies of light water reactor plants to improve constructibility and quality, to reduce costs and schedule duration, and to simplify design. This document discusses construction approaches. 77 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs

  20. Technology programs in support of advanced light water reactor plants: Construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichen, E.P.

    1987-12-01

    Stone ampersand Webster Engineering Corporation (SWEC) is conducting several independent, yet interrelated, studies of light water reactor plants to improve constructibility and quality, to reduce costs and schedule durations, and to simplify design. This document discusses successes and problems in construction. 49 refs., 16 figs., 8 tabs

  1. Inland Waters Night Lighting Configurations: A Navigation Rules Course for Coast Guard Auxiliarists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Gregory Peter

    A project developed a training program to teach boaters to recognize and interpret properly the lights of other vessels in nighttime or other reduced visibility conditions in the inland waters of the United States. The project followed the Instructional Systems Design model in the development of the course. The target population were members of…

  2. CLUMPED LIGHT WATER MODERATED UO$sub 2$ SUPERHEAT CRITICALS. PART I. EXPERIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warzek, F. G.; Johnston, H. F.

    1963-11-15

    The following critical and subcritical measurements were made in the EVESR core: reactivity with no control rods; full core reactivity with control rods; and power distribution in the full core with control rods. The fuel was UO/ sub 2/, and the elements were of the superheating type. The reactor was light- water-cooled and -moderated. (T.F.H.)

  3. Technology programs in support of advanced light water reactor plants: Construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichen, E.P.

    1989-01-01

    Under Contract No. AC03-86SF16565, Stone ampersand Webster Engineering Corporation (SWEC) is conducting several independent, yet interrelated, studies of light water reactor plants to improve constructibility and quality, to reduce costs and schedule durations, and to simplify design. This document discusses design requirements. 36 refs., 57 figs., 56 tabs

  4. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Constellation Pilot Project FY11 Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, R.

    2011-01-01

    Summary report for Fiscal Year 2011 activities associated with the Constellation Pilot Project. The project is a joint effor between Constellation Nuclear Energy Group (CENG), EPRI, and the DOE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The project utilizes two CENG reactor stations: R.E. Ginna and Nine Point Unit 1. Included in the report are activities associate with reactor internals and concrete containments.

  5. Generic environmental impact statement on handling and storage of spent light water power reactor fuel. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-03-01

    Detailed appendices are included with the following titles: light water reactor fuel cycle, present practice, model 1000MW(e) coal-fired power plant, increasing fuel storage capacity, spent fuel transshipment, spent fuel generation and storage data (1976-2000), characteristics of nuclear fuel, and ''away-from-reactor'' storage concept

  6. The influence of savanna trees on nutrient, water and light availability and the understorey vegetation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludwig, F.; Kroon, de H.; Berendse, F.; Prins, H.H.T.

    2004-01-01

    In an East African savanna herbaceous layer productivity and species composition were studied around Acacia tortilis trees of three different age classes, as well as around dead trees and in open grassland patches. The effects of trees on nutrient, light and water availability were measured to

  7. LWR-WIMS, a computer code for light water reactor lattice calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halsall, M.J.

    1982-06-01

    LMR-WIMS is a comprehensive scheme of computation for studying the reactor physics aspects and burnup behaviour of typical lattices of light water reactors. This report describes the physics methods that have been incorporated in the code, and the modifications that have been made since the code was issued in 1972. (U.K.)

  8. A light water excess heat reaction suggests that cold fusion may be alkali-hydrogen fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, R.T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that Mills and Kneizys presented data in support of a light water excess heat reaction obtained with an electrolytic cell highly reminiscent of the Fleischmann-Pons cold fusion cell. The claim of Mills and Kneizys that their excess heat reaction can be explained on the basis of a novel chemistry, which supposedly also explains cold fusion, is rejected in favor of their reaction being, instead, a light water cold fusion reaction. It is the first known light water cold fusion reaction to exhibit excess heat, it may serve as a prototype to expand our understanding of cold fusion. From this new reactions are deduced, including those common to past cold fusion studies. This broader pattern of nuclear reactions is typically seen to involve a fusion of the nuclides of the alkali atoms with the simplest of the alkali-type nuclides, namely, protons, deuterons, and tritons. Thus, the term alkali-hydrogen fusion seems appropriate for this new type of reaction with three subclasses: alkali-hydrogen fusion, alkali-deuterium fusion, and alkali-tritium fusion. A new three-dimensional transmission resonance model (TRM) is sketched. Finally, preliminary experimental evidence in support of the hypothesis of a light water nuclear reaction and alkali-hydrogen fusion is reported. Evidence is presented that appears to strongly implicate the transmission resonance phenomenon of the new TRM

  9. GENERIC, COMPONENT FAILURE DATA BASE FOR LIGHT WATER AND LIQUID SODIUM REACTOR PRAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. A. Eide; S. V. Chmielewski; T. D. Swantz

    1990-02-01

    A comprehensive generic component failure data base has been developed for light water and liquid sodium reactor probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) . The Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) and the Centralized Reliability Data Organization (CREDO) data bases were used to generate component failure rates . Using this approach, most of the failure rates are based on actual plant data rather than existing estimates .

  10. Assessing the Consistency and Microbiological Effectiveness of Household Water Treatment Practices by Urban and Rural Populations Claiming to Treat Their Water at Home: A Case Study in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Ghislaine; Huaylinos, Maria L.; Gil, Ana; Lanata, Claudio; Clasen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background Household water treatment (HWT) can improve drinking water quality and prevent disease if used correctly and consistently by vulnerable populations. Over 1.1 billion people report treating their water prior to drinking it. These estimates, however, are based on responses to household surveys that may exaggerate the consistency and microbiological performance of the practice—key factors for reducing pathogen exposure and achieving health benefits. The objective of this study was to examine how HWT practices are actually performed by households identified as HWT users, according to international monitoring standards. Methods and Findings We conducted a 6-month case study in urban (n = 117 households) and rural (n = 115 households) Peru, a country in which 82.8% of households report treating their water at home. We used direct observation, in-depth interviews, surveys, spot-checks, and water sampling to assess water treatment practices among households that claimed to treat their drinking water at home. While consistency of reported practices was high in both urban (94.8%) and rural (85.3%) settings, availability of treated water (based on self-report) at time of collection was low, with 67.1% and 23.0% of urban and rural households having treated water at all three sampling visits. Self-reported consumption of untreated water in the home among adults and children water of self-reported users was significantly better than source water in the urban setting and negligible but significantly better in the rural setting. However, only 46.3% and 31.6% of households had drinking water water quality. The lack of consistency and sub-optimal microbiological effectiveness also raises questions about the potential of HWT to prevent waterborne diseases. PMID:25522371

  11. The application of ceramic membranes for treating effluent water from closed-circuit fish farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonisławska Małgorzata

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyze and assess the possibility of using a two-stage filtration system with ceramic membranes: a 3-tube module with 1.0 kDa cut-off (1st stage and a one-tube module with 0.45 kDa cut-off (2nd stage for treating effluent water from a juvenile African catfish aquaculture. The study revealed that during the 1st filtration stage of the effluent water, the highest degrees of retention were obtained with respect to: suspended solids SS (rejection coefficient RI=100%, turbidity (RI=99.40%, total iron (RI=89.20%, BOD5 (RI=76.0%, nitrite nitrogen (RI=62.30%, and CODCr (RI=41.74%. The 2nd filtration stage resulted in a lower reduction degree of the tested indicators in comparison to the 1st filtration stage. At the 2nd stage, the highest values of the rejection coefficient were noted in for the total iron content (RIV=100%, CODCr (RIV=59.52%; RV=64.28%, RVI=63.49% and turbidity (RIV and RV = 45.0%, RVI=50.0%. The obtained results indicate that ceramic membranes (with 1.0 and 0.45 kDa cut-offs may be used in recirculation aquaculture systems as one of the stages of effluent water treatment.

  12. Cleaning oil refining drainage waters out of emulsified oil products with thermic treated cedar nut shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyatanova, P. A.; Adeeva, L. N.

    2017-08-01

    It was elaborated the ability of the sorbent produced by thermic treatment of cedar nut shell to destruct model and real first kind (direct) emulsions in static and dynamic conditions. In static conditions optimal ratio sorbent-emulsion with the original concentration of oil products 800 mg/l was in the range of 2.0 g per 100 ml of emulsion which corresponds to the level of treatment 94.9%. The time of emulsion destruction was 40 minutes. This sorbent is highly active in dynamic processes of oil-contaminated water treatment, the level of treatment 96.0% is being achieved. Full dynamic sorptive capacity of the sorbent is 0.85 g/g. Sorbent based on the thermic treated cedar nut shell can be elaborated as sorptive filter element of local treatment facilities of oil refining and petrochemical processes. After the treatment with this sorbent of drainage waters of oil refinery in dynamic conditions the concentration of oil products became less than mpc on oil products for waste waters coming to biological treatment.

  13. Photodegradation kinetics and transformation products of ketoprofen, diclofenac and atenolol in pure water and treated wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado, R.; Pereira, V.J.; Carvalho, G.; Soeiro, R.; Gaffney, V.; Almeida, C.; Cardoso, V. Vale; Ferreira, E.; Benoliel, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Direct UV photolysis of 3 pharmaceuticals in pure and waste water was investigated. ► Ketoprofen has higher photodegradion kinetics, followed by diclofenac and atenolol. ► MP/UV photodegradation products were identified for the 3 compounds. ► Photodegradation pathways were proposed to explain the obtained products. ► The persistent photoproducts were identified for each compound. -- Abstract: Pharmaceutical compounds such as ketoprofen, diclofenac and atenolol are frequently detected at relatively high concentrations in secondary effluents from wastewater treatment plants. Therefore, it is important to assess their transformation kinetics and intermediates in subsequent disinfection processes, such as direct ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The photodegradation kinetics of these compounds using a medium pressure (MP) lamp was assessed in pure water, as well as in filtered and unfiltered treated wastewater. Ketoprofen had the highest time- and fluence-based rate constants in all experiments, whereas atenolol had the lowest values, which is consistent with the corresponding decadic molar absorption coefficient and quantum yield. The fluence-based rate constants of all compounds were evaluated in filtered and unfiltered wastewater matrices as well as in pure water. Furthermore, transformation products of ketoprofen, diclofenac and atenolol were identified and monitored throughout the irradiation experiments, and photodegradation pathways were proposed for each compound. This enabled the identification of persistent transformation products, which are potentially discharged from WWTP disinfection works employing UV photolysis

  14. Photodegradation kinetics and transformation products of ketoprofen, diclofenac and atenolol in pure water and treated wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, R. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); ESTS-IPS, Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Setúbal do Instituto Politécnico de Setúbal, Rua Vale de Chaves, Campus do IPS, Estefanilha, 2910-761 Setúbal (Portugal); Pereira, V.J. [Instituto de Biologia Experimental e Tecnológica (IBET), Av. da República (EAN), 2784-505 Oeiras (Portugal); Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica (ITQB) – Universidade Nova de Lisboa (UNL), Av. da República, Estação Agronómica Nacional, 2780-157 Oeiras, 5 Portugal (Portugal); Carvalho, G., E-mail: gs.carvalho@fct.unl.pt [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Instituto de Biologia Experimental e Tecnológica (IBET), Av. da República (EAN), 2784-505 Oeiras (Portugal); Soeiro, R. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Gaffney, V.; Almeida, C. [Institute for Medicines and Pharmaceutical Sciences (iMed.UL), Faculdade de Farmácia da Universidade de Lisboa (FFUL), Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, 1600-049 Lisboa (Portugal); Cardoso, V. Vale; Ferreira, E.; Benoliel, M.J. [Empresa Portuguesa das Águas Livres, S.A., Direcção de Controlo de Qualidade da Água, Laboratório Central, Avenida de Berlim, 15, 1800-031 Lisboa (Portugal); and others

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► Direct UV photolysis of 3 pharmaceuticals in pure and waste water was investigated. ► Ketoprofen has higher photodegradion kinetics, followed by diclofenac and atenolol. ► MP/UV photodegradation products were identified for the 3 compounds. ► Photodegradation pathways were proposed to explain the obtained products. ► The persistent photoproducts were identified for each compound. -- Abstract: Pharmaceutical compounds such as ketoprofen, diclofenac and atenolol are frequently detected at relatively high concentrations in secondary effluents from wastewater treatment plants. Therefore, it is important to assess their transformation kinetics and intermediates in subsequent disinfection processes, such as direct ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The photodegradation kinetics of these compounds using a medium pressure (MP) lamp was assessed in pure water, as well as in filtered and unfiltered treated wastewater. Ketoprofen had the highest time- and fluence-based rate constants in all experiments, whereas atenolol had the lowest values, which is consistent with the corresponding decadic molar absorption coefficient and quantum yield. The fluence-based rate constants of all compounds were evaluated in filtered and unfiltered wastewater matrices as well as in pure water. Furthermore, transformation products of ketoprofen, diclofenac and atenolol were identified and monitored throughout the irradiation experiments, and photodegradation pathways were proposed for each compound. This enabled the identification of persistent transformation products, which are potentially discharged from WWTP disinfection works employing UV photolysis.

  15. Sludge accumulation and conversion to methane in a septic tank treating domestic wastewater or black water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmitwalli, Tarek

    2013-01-01

    Although the septic tank is the most applied on-site system for wastewater pre-treatment, limited research has been performed to determine sludge accumulation and biogas production in the tank. Therefore a dynamic mathematical model based on the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) was developed for anaerobic digestion of the accumulated sludge in a septic tank treating domestic wastewater or black water. The results showed that influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of the tank mainly control the filling time with sludge, while operational temperature governs characteristics of the accumulated sludge and conversion to methane. For obtaining stable sludge and high conversion, the tank needs to be operated for a period more than a year without sludge wasting. Maximum conversion to methane in the tank is about 50 and 60% for domestic wastewater and black water, respectively. The required period for sludge wasting depends on the influent COD concentration and the HRT, while characteristics of the wasted sludge are affected by operational temperature followed by the influent COD concentration and the HRT. Sludge production from the tank ranges between 0.19 to 0.22 and 0.13 to 0.15 L/(person.d), for the domestic wastewater and black water, respectively.

  16. Water Absorption Properties of Heat-Treated Bamboo Fiber and High Density Polyethylene Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanxing Du

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To modify water absorption properties of bamboo fiber (BF and high density polyethylene (HDPE composites, heat treatment of BFs was performed prior to compounding them with HDPE to form the composites. The moisture sorption property of the composites was measured and their diffusion coefficients (Dm were evaluated using a one-dimensional diffusion model. Moisture diffusion coefficient values of all composites were in the range of 0.115x10-8 to 1.267x10-8 cm2/s. The values of Dm decreased with increasing BF heat-treatment temperature, and increased with increasing BF loading level. The Dm value of 40 wt% bamboo fiber/HDPE composites with BFs treated with 100 oC was the greatest (i.e., 1.267x10-8cm2/s. Morphology analysis showed increased fiber-matrix interfacial bonding damage due to fiber swelling and shrinking from water uptaking and drying. The mechanism of water absorption of the composite, indicated a general Fickian diffusion process.

  17. INACTIVATION OF PATHOGENIC BACTERIA USING PULSED UV-LIGHT AND ITS APPLICATION IN WATER DISINFECTION AND QUALITY CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Sharifi-Yazdi H. Darghahi

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The lethality of pulsed ultra-violet (UV rich light for the inactivation of pathogenic bacteria has been investigated. A low pressure xenon filled flash lamps that produced UV intensities have been used. The pulsed operation of the system enable the release of electrical energy stored in the capacitor into the flash lamp within a short time and produces the high current and high peak power required for emitting the intense UV flash. The flash frequency was adjusted to one pulse per second. Several types of bacteria were investigated for their susceptibility to pulsed UV illumination. The treated bacterial populations were reduced and determined by direct viable counts. Among the tested bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most susceptible to the pulsed UV- light with a 8 log10 cfu/ml reduction after 11 pulses, while the spores of Bacillus megaterium was the most resistant and only 4 log10 cfu/ml reduction achieved after 50 pulses of illumination. The results of this study demonstrated that pulsed UV- light technology could be used as an effective method for the inactivation, of pathogenic bacteria in different environments such as drinking water.

  18. Fuel utilization potential in light water reactors with once-through fuel irradiation (AWBA Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rampolla, D.S.; Conley, G.H.; Candelore, N.R.; Cowell, G.K.; Estes, G.P.; Flanery, B.K.; Duncombe, E.; Dunyak, J.; Satterwhite, D.G.

    1979-07-01

    Current commercial light water reactor cores operate without recylce of fuel, on a once-through fuel cycle. To help conserve the limited nuclear fuel resources, there is interest in increasing the energy yield and, hence, fuel utilization from once-through fuel irradiation. This report evaluates the potential increase in fuel utilization of light water reactor cores operating on a once-through cycle assuming 0.2% enrichment plant tails assay. This evaluation is based on a large number of survey calculations using techniques which were verified by more detailed calculations of several core concepts. It is concluded that the maximum fuel utilization which could be achieved by practical once-through pressurized light water reactor cores with either uranium or thorium is about 17 MWYth/ST U 3 O 8 (Megawatt Years Thermal per Short Ton of U 3 O 8 ). This is about 50% higher than that of current commercial light water reactor cores. Achievement of this increased fuel utilization would require average fuel burnup beyond 50,000 MWD/MT and incorporation of the following design features to reduce parasitic losses of neutrons: reflector blankets to utilize neutrons that would otherwise leak out of the core; fuel management practices in which a smaller fraction of the core is replaced at each refueling; and neutron economic reactivity control, such as movable fuel control rather than soluble boron control. For a hypothetical situation in which all neutron leakage and parasitic losses are eliminated and fuel depletion is not limited by design considerations, a maximum fuel utilization of about 20 MWYth/ST U 3 O 8 is calculated for either uranium or thorium. It is concluded that fuel utilization for comparable reactor designs is better with uranium fuel than with thorium fuel for average fuel depletions of 30,000 to 35,000 MWD/MT which are characteristic of present light water reactor cores

  19. Microbial pathogens in source and treated waters from drinking water treatment plants in the United States and implications for human health

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Bacteria and fungi in source and treated drinking water. This dataset is associated with the following publication: King , D., S. Pfaller , M. Donohue , S. Vesper ,...

  20. Radiological control aspects of the fabrication of the Light Water Breeder Reactor core (LWBR Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, B.G.

    1979-05-01

    A description is presented of the radiological control aspects of the fabrication of the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core. Included are the radiological control criteria applied for the design and use of fabrication facilities, the controls and limits imposed to minimize radiaion exposure to personnel, and an evaluation of the applied radiological program in meeting the program objectives. The goal of the LWBR program is to develop the technology to breed in light water reactors so that nuclear fuel may be used significantly more efficiently in these reactors. This technology is being developed by designing and fabricating a breeder reactor core, utilizing thoria (ThO 2 ) and binary thoria--urania (ThO 2 - 233 UO 2 ) fuel, to be operated in the existing pressurized water reactor plant owned by the Department of Energy at Shippingport, Pennsylvania

  1. A method and algorithm for correlating scattered light and suspended particles in polluted water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sami Gumaan Daraigan; Mohd Zubir Matjafri; Khiruddin Abdullah; Azlan Abdul Aziz; Abdul Aziz Tajuddin; Mohd Firdaus Othman

    2005-01-01

    An optical model has been developed for measuring total suspended solids TSS concentrations in water. This approach is based on the characteristics of scattered light from the suspended particles in water samples. An optical sensor system (an active spectrometer) has been developed to correlate pollutant (total suspended solids TSS) concentration and the scattered radiation. Scattered light was measured in terms of the output voltage of the phototransistor of the sensor system. The developed algorithm was used to calculate and estimate the concentrations of the polluted water samples. The proposed algorithm was calibrated using the observed readings. The results display a strong correlation between the radiation values and the total suspended solids concentrations. The proposed system yields a high degree of accuracy with the correlation coefficient (R) of 0.99 and the root mean square error (RMS) of 63.57 mg/l. (Author)

  2. Aging assessment and mitigation for major LWR [light water reactor] components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Y.N.; Ware, A.G.; Conley, D.A.; MacDonald, P.E.; Burns, J.J. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    This paper summarizes some of the results of the Aging Assessment and Mitigation Project sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The objective of the project is to develop an understanding of the aging degradation of the major light water reactor (LWR) structures and components and to develop methods for predicting the useful life of these components so that the impact of aging on the safe operation of nuclear power plants can be evaluated and addressed. The research effort consists of integrating, evaluating, and updating the available aging-related information. This paper discusses current accomplishments and summarizes the significant degradation processes active in two major components: pressurized water reactor pressurizer surge and spray lines and nozzles, and light water reactor primary coolant pumps. This paper also evaluates the effectiveness of the current inservice inspection programs and presents conclusions and recommendations related to aging of these two major components. 37 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  3. The Effect of Different Perturbations on the Stability Analysis of Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dykin, Victor

    2010-09-01

    Neutron noise analysis techniques are studied and developed, with primary use of determining the stability of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). In particular, the role of a specific perturbation prevailing in Light Water Reactors, the propagating density perturbation, in the stability of BWRs and on the noise field of LWRs in general, is investigated by considering three topics. In the first topics, we investigate how the neutronic response of the reactor, usually described as a second order system driven by a white noise driving force, is affected by a non-white driving force. This latter arises from the reactivity effect of the propagating density perturbations. The investigation is performed by using spectral and correlation analysis. Propagating perturbations with different velocities are analyzed. We investigate how the accuracy of the determination of the so-called decay ratio (DR) of the system, based on the assumption of white noise driving force, deteriorates with deviations from the white noise character of the driving force. In the second topics, the space dependence of the neutron noise, induced by propagating density perturbations, represented through the perturbation of the absorption, is determined and discussed. A full analytical solution was obtained by the use of the Green's function technique. The solution was analyzed for different frequencies and different system sizes. An interesting new interference effect between the point-kinetic and space-dependent components of the induced noise was discovered and interpreted in physical terms. In the last topics, a non-linear stability analysis of a BWR is performed, using so called Reduced Order Model (ROM) techniques. A ROM is usually constructed by reducing the full set of 3D space-time dependent neutron-kinetics, thermal-hydraulics and heat transfer equations to time-dependent ones, by considering space dependence in a lumped parameter model (one or two discrete channels). The main novelty of our work

  4. Low-intensity blue-enriched white light (750 lux) and standard bright light (10,000 lux) are equally effective in treating SAD. A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesters, Ybe; Dekker, Vera; Schlangen, Luc J M; Bos, Elske H; Ruiter, Martine J

    2011-01-28

    Photoreceptor cells containing melanopsin play a role in the phase-shifting effects of short-wavelength light. In a previous study, we compared the standard light treatment (SLT) of SAD with treatment using short-wavelength blue-enriched white light (BLT). Both treatments used the same illuminance (10,000 lux) and were equally highly effective. It is still possible, however, that neither the newly-discovered photoreceptor cells, nor the biological clock play a major role in the therapeutic effects of light on SAD. Alternatively, these effects may at least be partly mediated by these receptor cells, which may have become saturated as a result of the high illuminances used in the therapy. This randomized controlled study compares the effects of low-intensity BLT to those of high-intensity SLT. In a 22-day design, 22 patients suffering from a major depression with a seasonal pattern (SAD) were given light treatment (10,000 lux) for two weeks on workdays. Subjects were randomly assigned to either of the two conditions, with gender and age evenly distributed over the groups. Light treatment either consisted of 30 minutes SLT (5000 °K) with the EnergyLight® (Philips, Consumer Lifestyle) with a vertical illuminance of 10,000 lux at eye position or BLT (17,000 °K) with a vertical illuminance of 750 lux using a prototype of the EnergyLight® which emitted a higher proportion of short-wavelengths. All participants completed questionnaires concerning mood, activation and sleep quality on a daily basis. Mood and energy levels were also assessed on a weekly basis by means of the SIGH-SAD and other assessment tools. On day 22, SIGH-SAD ratings were significantly lower than on day 1 (SLT 65.2% and BLT 76.4%). On the basis of all assessments no statistically significant differences were found between the two conditions. With sample size being small, conclusions can only be preliminary. Both treatment conditions were found to be highly effective. The therapeutic effects of low

  5. Low-intensity blue-enriched white light (750 lux and standard bright light (10 000 lux are equally effective in treating SAD. A randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bos Elske H

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photoreceptor cells containing melanopsin play a role in the phase-shifting effects of short-wavelength light. In a previous study, we compared the standard light treatment (SLT of SAD with treatment using short-wavelength blue-enriched white light (BLT. Both treatments used the same illuminance (10 000 lux and were equally highly effective. It is still possible, however, that neither the newly-discovered photoreceptor cells, nor the biological clock play a major role in the therapeutic effects of light on SAD. Alternatively, these effects may at least be partly mediated by these receptor cells, which may have become saturated as a result of the high illuminances used in the therapy. This randomized controlled study compares the effects of low-intensity BLT to those of high-intensity SLT. Method In a 22-day design, 22 patients suffering from a major depression with a seasonal pattern (SAD were given light treatment (10 000 lux for two weeks on workdays. Subjects were randomly assigned to either of the two conditions, with gender and age evenly distributed over the groups. Light treatment either consisted of 30 minutes SLT (5000°K with the EnergyLight® (Philips, Consumer Lifestyle with a vertical illuminance of 10 000 lux at eye position or BLT (17 000°K with a vertical illuminance of 750 lux using a prototype of the EnergyLight® which emitted a higher proportion of short-wavelengths. All participants completed questionnaires concerning mood, activation and sleep quality on a daily basis. Mood and energy levels were also assessed on a weekly basis by means of the SIGH-SAD and other assessment tools. Results On day 22, SIGH-SAD ratings were significantly lower than on day 1 (SLT 65.2% and BLT 76.4%. On the basis of all assessments no statistically significant differences were found between the two conditions. Conclusion With sample size being small, conclusions can only be preliminary. Both treatment conditions were found

  6. Disinfection of Spacecraft Potable Water Systems by Photocatalytic Oxidation Using UV-A Light Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmele, Michele N.; O'Neal, Jeremy A.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light has long been used in terrestrial water treatment systems for photodisinfection and the removal of organic compounds by several processes including photoadsorption, photolysis, and photocatalytic oxidation/reduction. Despite its effectiveness for water treatment, UV has not been explored for spacecraft applications because of concerns about the safety and reliability of mercury-containing UV lamps. However, recent advances in ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV LEDs) have enabled the utilization of nanomaterials that possess the appropriate optical properties for the manufacture of LEDs capable of producing monochromatic light at germicidal wavelengths. This report describes the testing of a commercial-off-the-shelf, high power Nichia UV-A LED (250mW A365nnJ for the excitation of titanium dioxide as a point-of-use (POD) disinfection device in a potable water system. The combination of an immobilized, high surface area photocatalyst with a UV-A LED is promising for potable water system disinfection since toxic chemicals and resupply requirements are reduced. No additional consumables like chemical biocides, absorption columns, or filters are required to disinfect and/or remove potentially toxic disinfectants from the potable water prior to use. Experiments were conducted in a static test stand consisting of a polypropylene microtiter plate containing 3mm glass balls coated with titanium dioxide. Wells filled with water were exposed to ultraviolet light from an actively-cooled UV-A LED positioned above each well and inoculated with six individual challenge microorganisms recovered from the International Space Station (ISS): Burkholderia cepacia, Cupriavidus metallidurans, Methylobacterium fujisawaense, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Sphingomonas paucimobilis and Wautersia basilensis. Exposure to the Nichia UV-A LED with photocatalytic oxidation resulted in a complete (>7-log) reduction of each challenge bacteria population in UV-A LEDs and semi

  7. Zinc oxide nanorod mediated visible light photoinactivation of model microbes in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapkota, Ajaya; Anceno, Alfredo J; Dutta, Joydeep [Center of Excellence in Nanotechnology, Asian Institute of Technology, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Baruah, Sunandan; Shipin, Oleg V, E-mail: alfredo.anceno@cemagref.fr, E-mail: joy@ait.ac.th [Environmental Engineering and Management, Asian Institute of Technology, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand)

    2011-05-27

    The inactivation of model microbes in aqueous matrix by visible light photocatalysis as mediated by ZnO nanorods was investigated. ZnO nanorods were grown on glass substrate following a hydrothermal route and employed in the inactivation of gram-negative Escherichia coli and gram-positive Bacillus subtilis in MilliQ water. The concentration of Zn{sup 2+} ions in the aqueous matrix, bacterial cell membrane damage, and DNA degradation at post-exposure were also studied. The inactivation efficiencies for both organisms under light conditions were about two times higher than under dark conditions across the cell concentrations assayed. Anomalies in supernatant Zn{sup 2+} concentration were observed under both conditions as compared to control treatments, while cell membrane damage and DNA degradation were observed only under light conditions. Inactivation under dark conditions was hence attributed to the bactericidal effect of Zn{sup 2+} ions, while inactivation under light conditions was due to the combined effects of Zn{sup 2+} ions and photocatalytically mediated electron injection. The reduction of pathogenic bacterial densities by the photocatalytically active ZnO nanorods in the presence of visible light implies potential ex situ application in water decontamination at ambient conditions under sunlight.

  8. Treating ammonium-rich wastewater with sludge from water treatment plant to produce ammonium alum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Po Cheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study applies a process to treat ammonium-rich wastewater using alum-generated sludge form water purification plant, and gain economic benefit by producing ammonium alum (Al(NH4(SO42·12H2O. The factors affecting production of ammonium alum include molar ratio of ammonium to aluminum concentration, sulfuric acid concentration, mixing speed, mixing time, standing time, and temperature. According to the equation for the ammonium removal reaction, the theoretical quantity of ammonium alum was calculated based on initial and final concentrations of ammonium. Then, the weight of ammonium alum crystal was divided by the theoretical weight to derive the recovery ratio. The optimum sludge and sulfuric acid dosage to treat about 17 g L−1 ammonium wastewater are 300 g L−1 and 100 mL L−1, respectively. The optimal dosage for wastewater is molar ratio of ammonium to aluminum of about 1 due to the aluminum dissolving in acidified wastewater. The ammonium removal efficiency is roughly 70% and the maximum recovery ratio for ammonium alum is 93% when the wastewater is mixed for 10 min at the mixing velocity gradient of 100 s−1. Ammonium alum production or ammonium removal can be enhanced by controlling the reaction at low temperatures.

  9. Light pollution offshore: Zenithal sky glow measurements in the mediterranean coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ges, Xavier; Bará, Salvador; García-Gil, Manuel; Zamorano, Jaime; Ribas, Salvador J.; Masana, Eduard

    2018-05-01

    Light pollution is a worldwide phenomenon whose consequences for the natural environment and the human health are being intensively studied nowadays. Most published studies address issues related to light pollution inland. Coastal waters, however, are spaces of high environmental interest, due to their biodiversity richness and their economical significance. The elevated population density in coastal regions is accompanied by correspondingly large emissions of artificial light at night, whose role as an environmental stressor is increasingly being recognized. Characterizing the light pollution levels in coastal waters is a necessary step for protecting these areas. At the same time, the marine surface environment provides a stage free from obstacles for measuring the dependence of the skyglow on the distance to the light polluting sources, and validating (or rejecting) atmospheric light propagation models. In this work we present a proof-of-concept of a gimbal measurement system that can be used for zenithal skyglow measurements on board both small boats and large vessels under actual navigation conditions. We report the results obtained in the summer of 2016 along two measurement routes in the Mediterranean waters offshore Barcelona, travelling 9 and 31.7 km away from the coast. The atmospheric conditions in both routes were different from the ones assumed for the calculation of recently published models of the anthropogenic sky brightness. They were closer in the first route, whose results approach better the theoretical predictions. The results obtained in the second route, conducted under a clearer atmosphere, showed systematic differences that can be traced back to two expected phenomena, which are a consequence of the smaller aerosol content: the reduction of the anthropogenic sky glow at short distances from the sources, and the slower decay rate of brightness with distance, which gives rise to a relative excess of brightness at large distances from the

  10. Chlorinated and ultraviolet radiation -treated reclaimed irrigation water is the source of Aeromonas found in vegetables used for human consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latif-Eugenín, Fadua; Beaz-Hidalgo, Roxana; Silvera-Simón, Carolina [Unidad de Microbiología, Facultad de Medicina y Ciencias de la Salud, IISPV, Universidad Rovira i Virgili, Reus (Spain); Fernandez-Cassi, Xavi [Departamento de Microbiología, Facultad de Biología, Universidad de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Figueras, María J., E-mail: mariajose.figueras@urv.cat [Unidad de Microbiología, Facultad de Medicina y Ciencias de la Salud, IISPV, Universidad Rovira i Virgili, Reus (Spain)

    2017-04-15

    Wastewater is increasingly being recognized as a key water resource, and reclaimed water (or treated wastewater) is used for irrigating vegetables destined for human consumption. The aim of the present study was to determine the diversity and prevalence of Aeromonas spp. both in reclaimed water used for irrigation and in the three types of vegetables irrigated with that water. Seven of the 11 (63.6%) samples of reclaimed water and all samples of vegetables were positive for the presence of Aeromonas. A total of 216 Aeromonas isolates were genotyped and corresponded to 132 different strains that after identification by sequencing the rpoD gene belonged to 10 different species. The prevalence of the species varied depending on the type of sample. In the secondary treated reclaimed water A. caviae and A. media dominated (91.4%) while A. salmonicida, A. media, A. allosaccharophila and A. popoffii represented 74.0% of the strains in the irrigation water. In vegetables, A. caviae (75.0%) was the most common species, among which a strain isolated from lettuce had the same genotype (ERIC pattern) as a strain recovered from the irrigation water. Furthermore, the same genotype of the species A. sanarellii was recovered from parsley and tomatoes demonstrating that irrigation water was the source of contamination and confirming the risk for public health. - Highlights: • Reclaimed water (= treated wastewater) is used for the irrigation of vegetables. • Aeromonas was found in reclaimed water and irrigated vegetables with this water. • The prevalence of Aeromonas spp. varied between irrigation water and vegetables. • Epidemiological relationships were found between irrigation water and vegetables. • The water was the source of contamination which means a risk for the public health.

  11. Chlorinated and ultraviolet radiation -treated reclaimed irrigation water is the source of Aeromonas found in vegetables used for human consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latif-Eugenín, Fadua; Beaz-Hidalgo, Roxana; Silvera-Simón, Carolina; Fernandez-Cassi, Xavi; Figueras, María J.

    2017-01-01

    Wastewater is increasingly being recognized as a key water resource, and reclaimed water (or treated wastewater) is used for irrigating vegetables destined for human consumption. The aim of the present study was to determine the diversity and prevalence of Aeromonas spp. both in reclaimed water used for irrigation and in the three types of vegetables irrigated with that water. Seven of the 11 (63.6%) samples of reclaimed water and all samples of vegetables were positive for the presence of Aeromonas. A total of 216 Aeromonas isolates were genotyped and corresponded to 132 different strains that after identification by sequencing the rpoD gene belonged to 10 different species. The prevalence of the species varied depending on the type of sample. In the secondary treated reclaimed water A. caviae and A. media dominated (91.4%) while A. salmonicida, A. media, A. allosaccharophila and A. popoffii represented 74.0% of the strains in the irrigation water. In vegetables, A. caviae (75.0%) was the most common species, among which a strain isolated from lettuce had the same genotype (ERIC pattern) as a strain recovered from the irrigation water. Furthermore, the same genotype of the species A. sanarellii was recovered from parsley and tomatoes demonstrating that irrigation water was the source of contamination and confirming the risk for public health. - Highlights: • Reclaimed water (= treated wastewater) is used for the irrigation of vegetables. • Aeromonas was found in reclaimed water and irrigated vegetables with this water. • The prevalence of Aeromonas spp. varied between irrigation water and vegetables. • Epidemiological relationships were found between irrigation water and vegetables. • The water was the source of contamination which means a risk for the public health.

  12. 10 CFR 50.46 - Acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... light-water nuclear power reactors. 50.46 Section 50.46 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... reactors. (a)(1)(i) Each boiling or pressurized light-water nuclear power reactor fueled with uranium oxide... evaluation model. This section does not apply to a nuclear power reactor facility for which the...

  13. Evaluation of treated black liquor used as dispersant of concentrated coal-water slurry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingsong Zhou; Qian Kong; Bing Pan; Xueqing Qiu; Dongjie Yang; Hongming Lou [South China University of Technology, Guangzhou (China). State Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Engineering

    2010-03-15

    The paper making waste liquor is a great water pollution source and much work has been done over the years to overcome this challenge. We present here a solution of black liquor used as dispersant of coal-water slurry (abbreviated as CWS) following chemical treatment. The treated black liquor (abbreviated as TBL) is used to prepare CWS for three bituminous coals, and the factors influencing its dispersing ability and the properties of CWS are investigated. The results show that the increasing sulfonating agent and formaldehyde dosage increase the sulfonic group content while reducing the molecular weight of TBL. The comparison with a naphthalene dispersant shows that TBL has a similar or better dispersing ability, and the large quantity of sulfonic groups engrafted in lignin molecules and the markedly increase of molecular weight are considered the key reason for the excellent performance of TBL. Moreover, the change of the molecular configuration from globular to flocculent in solution observed by TEM is also considered as an important reason for the excellent dispersing effect of TBL for CWS. 25 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Safety analysis of a high temperature supercritical pressure light water cooled and moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwatari, Y.; Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.

    2002-01-01

    A safety analysis code for a high temperature supercritical pressure light water cooled reactor (SCLWR-H) with water rods cooled by descending flow, SPRAT-DOWN, is developed. The hottest channel, a water rod, down comer, upper and lower plenums, feed pumps, etc. are modeled as junction of nodes. Partial of the feed water flows downward from the upper dome of the reactor pressure vessel to the water rods. The accidents analyzed here are total loss of feed water flow, feed water pump seizure, and control rods ejection. All the accidents satisfy the criteria. The accident event at which the maximum cladding temperature is the highest is total loss of feedwater flow. The transients analyzed here are loss of feed water heating, inadvertent start-up of an auxiliary water supply system, partial loss of feed water flow, loss of offsite power, loss of load, and abnormal withdrawal of control rods. All the transients satisfied the criteria. The transient event for which the maximum cladding temperature is the highest is control rod withdrawal at normal operation. The behavior of loss of load transient is different from that of BWR. The power does not increase because loss of flow occurs and the density change is small. The sensitivities of the system behavior to various parameters during transients and accidents are analyzed. The parameters having strong influence are the capacity of the auxiliary water supply system, the coast down time of the main feed water pumps, and the time delay of the main feed water pumps trip. The control rod reactivity also has strong influence. (authors)

  15. Photoreactivation of Pseudomonas cepacia after ultraviolet exposure: a potential source of contamination in ultraviolet-treated waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carson, L.A.; Petersen, N.J.

    1975-01-01

    Cells of a naturally occurring strain of Pseudomonas cepacia grown in distilled water were exposed to ultraviolet radiation. Irradiated samples incubated on membrane filters or in fluid recovery media in the absence of light showed no evidence of dark repair mechanisms. When samples were exposed to fluorescent light ranging from 50 to 950 foot candles (538 to 10,222 lux) of illumination, apparent photo-induced repair of ultraviolet injury resulted in 1- to 4-log increases in viable cells recovered

  16. USEPA/USGS Study of CECs in Source Water and Treated Drinking Water: Assessment of Estrogenic Activity Using an In Vitro Bioassay, T47D-KBluc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are collaborating on a research study to determine the presence of contaminants of emerging concern in treated and untreated drinking water collected from up to 50 drinking water trea...

  17. Fast and "green" method for the analytical monitoring of haloketones in treated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, María; Silva, Manuel; Gallego, Mercedes

    2014-09-05

    Several groups of organic compounds have emerged as being particularly relevant as environmental pollutants, including disinfection by-products (DBPs). Haloketones (HKs), which belong to the unregulated volatile fraction of DBPs, have become a priority because of their occurrence in drinking water at concentrations below 1μg/L. The absence of a comprehensive method for HKs has led to the development of the first method for determining fourteen of these species. In an effort to miniaturise, this study develops a micro liquid-liquid extraction (MLLE) method adapted from EPA Method 551.1. In this method practically, the whole extract (50μL) was injected into a programmed temperature vaporiser-gas chromatography-mass spectrometer in order to improve sensitivity. The method was validated by comparing it to EPA Method 551.1 and showed relevant advantages such as: lower sample pH (1.5), higher aqueous/organic volume ratio (60), lower solvent consumption (200μL) and fast and cost-saving operation. The MLLE method achieved detection limits ranging from 6 to 60ng/L (except for 1,1,3-tribromo-3-chloroacetone, 120ng/L) with satisfactory precision (RSD, ∼6%) and high recoveries (95-99%). An evaluation was carried out of the influence of various dechlorinating agents as well as of the sample pH on the stability of the fourteen HKs in treated water. To ensure the HKs integrity for at least 1 week during storage at 4°C, the samples were acidified at pH ∼1.5, which coincides with the sample pH required for MLLE. The green method was applied to the speciation of fourteen HKs in tap and swimming pool waters, where one and seven chlorinated species, respectively, were found. The concentration of 1.1-dichloroacetone in swimming pool water increased ∼25 times in relation to tap water. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Transmission of light in deep sea water at the site of the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANTARES Collaboration; Aguilar, J. A.; Albert, A.; Amram, P.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardellier-Desages, F. E.; Aslanides, E.; Aubert, J.-J.; Azoulay, R.; Bailey, D.; Basa, S.; Battaglieri, M.; Becherini, Y.; Bellotti, R.; Beltramelli, J.; Bertin, V.; Billault, M.; Blaes, R.; Blanc, F.; Bland, R. W.; de Botton, N.; Boulesteix, J.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brooks, C. B.; Bradbury, S. M.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Bugeon, F.; Burgio, G. F.; Cafagna, F.; Calzas, A.; Caponetto, L.; Carmona, E.; Carr, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Cecchini, S.; Charvis, P.; Circella, M.; Colnard, C.; Compère, C.; Croquette, J.; Cooper, S.; Coyle, P.; Cuneo, S.; Damy, G.; van Dantzig, R.; Deschamps, A.; de Marzo, C.; Destelle, J.-J.; de Vita, R.; Dinkelspiler, B.; Dispau, G.; Drougou, J.-F.; Druillole, F.; Engelen, J.; Favard, S.; Feinstein, F.; Ferry, S.; Festy, D.; Fopma, J.; Fuda, J.-L.; Gallone, J.-M.; Giacomelli, G.; Girard, N.; Goret, P.; Gournay, J.-F.; Hallewell, G.; Hartmann, B.; Heijboer, A.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herrouin, G.; Hößl, J.; Hoffmann, C.; Hubbard, J. R.; Jaquet, M.; de Jong, M.; Jouvenot, F.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karkar, S.; Karolak, M.; Katz, U.; Keller, P.; Kooijman, P.; Korolkova, E. V.; Kouchner, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Lafoux, H.; Lagier, P.; Lamare, P.; Languillat, J.-C.; Laubier, L.; Legou, T.; Le Guen, Y.; Le Provost, H.; Le van Suu, A.; Lo Nigro, L.; Lo Presti, D.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Lyashuk, V.; Magnier, P.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Maron, C.; Massol, A.; Mazéas, F.; Mazeau, B.; Mazure, A.; McMillan, J. E.; Michel, J.-L.; Millot, C.; Milovanovic, A.; Montanet, F.; Montaruli, T.; Morel, J.-P.; Moscoso, L.; Nezri, E.; Niess, V.; Nooren, G. J.; Ogden, P.; Olivetto, C.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Payre, P.; Petta, C.; Pineau, J.-P.; Poinsignon, J.; Popa, V.; Potheau, R.; Pradier, T.; Racca, C.; Randazzo, N.; Real, D.; van Rens, B. A. P.; Réthoré, F.; Ripani, M.; Roca-Blay, V.; Romeyer, A.; Rollin, J.-F.; Romita, M.; Rose, H. J.; Rostovtsev, A.; Ruppi, M.; Russo, G. V.; Sacquin, Y.; Saouter, S.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schuster, W.; Sokalski, I.; Suvorova, O.; Spooner, N. J. C.; Spurio, M.; Stolarczyk, T.; Stubert, D.; Taiuti, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Tilav, S.; Usik, A.; Valdy, P.; Vallage, B.; Vaudaine, G.; Vernin, P.; Virieux, J.; Vladimirsky, E.; de Vries, G.; de Witt Huberts, P.; de Wolf, E.; Zaborov, D.; Zaccone, H.; Zakharov, V.; Zavatarelli, S.; de Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2005-02-01

    The ANTARES neutrino telescope is a large photomultiplier array designed to detect neutrino-induced upward-going muons by their Cherenkov radiation. Understanding the absorption and scattering of light in the deep Mediterranean is fundamental to optimising the design and performance of the detector. This paper presents measurements of blue and UV light transmission at the ANTARES site taken between 1997 and 2000. The derived values for the scattering length and the angular distribution of particulate scattering were found to be highly correlated, and results are therefore presented in terms of an absorption length λabs and an effective scattering length λscteff. The values for blue (UV) light are found to be λabs ≃ 60(26) m, λscteff≃265(122)m, with significant (˜15%) time variability. Finally, the results of ANTARES simulations showing the effect of these water properties on the anticipated performance of the detector are presented.

  19. Modeling the electrochemistry of the primary circuits of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertuch, A.; Macdonald, D.D.; Pang, J.; Kriksunov, L.; Arioka, K.

    1994-01-01

    To model the corrosion behaviors of the heat transport circuits of light water reactors, a mixed potential model (NTM) has been developed and applied to both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Using the data generated by the GE/UKEA-Harwell radiolysis model, electrochemical potentials (ECPs) have been calculated for the heat transport circuits of eight BWRs operating under hydrogen water chemistry (HWC). By modeling the corrosion behaviors of these reactors, the effectiveness of HWC at limiting IGSCC and IASCC can be determined. For simulating PWR primary circuits, a chemical-radiolysis model (developed by the authors) was used to generate input parameters for the MPM. Corrosion potentials of Type 304 and 316 SSs in PWR primary environments were calculated using the NTM and were found to be in good agreement with the corrosion potentials measured in the laboratory for simulated PWR primary environments

  20. Technical specification: Mixed-oxide pellets for the light-water reactor irradiation demonstration test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowell, B.S.

    1997-06-01

    This technical specification is a Level 2 Document as defined in the Fissile Materials Disposition Program Light-Water Reactor Mixed-oxide Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan. It is patterned after the pellet specification that was prepared by Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited, for use by Los Alamos National Laboratory in fabrication of the test fuel for the Parallex Project, adjusted as necessary to reflect the differences between the Canadian uranium-deuterium reactor and light-water reactor fuels. This specification and the associated engineering drawing are to be utilized only for preparation of test fuel as outlined in the accompanying Request for Quotation and for additional testing as directed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory or the Department of Energy