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Sample records for treat diabetic macular

  1. Action on diabetic macular oedema: achieving optimal patient management in treating visual impairment due to diabetic eye disease.

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    Gale, R; Scanlon, P H; Evans, M; Ghanchi, F; Yang, Y; Silvestri, G; Freeman, M; Maisey, A; Napier, J

    2017-05-01

    This paper identifies best practice recommendations for managing diabetes and sight-threatening diabetic eye disease. The authors provide an update for ophthalmologists and allied healthcare professionals on key aspects of diabetes management, supported by a review of the pertinent literature, and recommend practice principles for optimal patient management in treating visual impairment due to diabetic eye disease. In people with diabetes, early optimal glycaemic control reduces the long-term risk of both microvascular and macrovascular complications. The authors propose more can and should be done to maximise metabolic control, promote appropriate behavioural modifications and encourage timely treatment intensification when indicated to ameliorate diabetes-related complications. All people with diabetes should be screened for sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy promptly and regularly. It is shown that attitudes towards treatment adherence in diabetic macular oedema appear to mirror patients' views and health behaviours towards the management of their own diabetes. Awareness of diabetic macular oedema remains low among people with diabetes, who need access to education early in their disease about how to manage their diabetes to delay progression and possibly avoid eye-related complications. Ophthalmologists and allied healthcare professionals play a vital role in multidisciplinary diabetes management and establishment of dedicated diabetic macular oedema clinics is proposed. A broader understanding of the role of the diabetes specialist nurse may strengthen the case for comprehensive integrated care in ophthalmic practice. The recommendations are based on round table presentations and discussions held in London, UK, September 2016.

  2. Factors affecting reading speed in patients with diabetic macular edema treated with laser photocoagulation.

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    Elizabeth Pearce

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To study the factors that may affect reading speed in patients with diabetic macular edema previously treated with laser photocoagulation. METHODS: Consecutive patients with type II diabetes treated with laser photocoagulation for diabetic macular edema (DME at least twelve months previously, with best corrected visual acuity of better than 65 letters (approximately 20/40 measured with Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS charts were included in this study. Patients previously treated with pan-retinal photocoagulation, vitrectomy, intravitreal steroid or anti-VEGF therapy were excluded. Any other ocular co-morbidities that may influence reading ability such as cataract, glaucoma or macular degeneration were also excluded. All patients were refracted by a certified examiner, the following measurements were collected: best corrected visual acuity (BCVA, contrast sensitivity with Pelli-Robson chart, reading speed with MNREAD chart, microperimetry with Nidek MP1, and central subfield thickness with Zeiss spectral domain optical coherent topography. RESULTS: The slow reading group had poorer contrast sensitivity (p = 0.001, reduced retinal sensitivity (p = 0.027 and less stable fixation (p = 0.013. Most interestingly the reduced retinal sensitivity findings were driven by the microperimetry value on the right subfield (p = 0.033, (nasal to the fovea in the right eye and temporal to the fovea in the left eye. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that contrast sensitivity is probably the most important factor that affects reading speed (p = 0.001. CONCLUSION: Reduced retinal sensitivity after laser treatment is associated with reduced reading speed in patients with diabetic macular edema.

  3. [Clinical observation on treating diabetic macular edema with intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide and laser].

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    Wang, Yongbo; Shi, Anna; Shi, Xun; Liu, Weifeng

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of intravitreal injection of triamcinolone acetonide(IVTA) combining with retinal laser treating for diabetic macular edema(DME). Twenty five patients(32 eyes) with DME who has microangioma in macula lutea were randomly divided into group A, B,C and D(8 eyes each group). Eyes in group A were treated with laser photocoagulation. Eyes in group B were treated with multiplier-532 laser photocoagulation and transpupillary thermotherapy. Eyes in group C were treated with multiplier-532 laser photocoagulation and intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide. Eyes in group D were treated with multiplier-532 laser, transpupillary thermotherapy plus triamcinolone acetonide injection. Intravitreal injection of 4 mg triamcinolone acetonide was done 1 week after laser photocoagulation in group C and D. The visual acuity, intraocular pressure, macular thickness (foveal thickness) of the eyes in 4 groups were observed before and 1, 3 and 6 months after treatment. The visual acuity, intraocular pressure and foveal thickness of the 4 groups before treatment showed no significant difference(p> ). The visual acuity, intraocular pressure, macular thickness of eyes in group A, B were better than those of group C, D at 1, 3 and 6 months after treatment, and they had significant difference(p0.05). The effect of laser photocoagulation and intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide, laser photocoagulation combining with transpupillary thermotherapy plus triamcinolone acetonide injectionvisual treating for DME was better than laser photocoagulation alone, laser photocoagulation combining with transpupillary thermotherapy.

  4. Laser-Based Strategies to Treat Diabetic Macular Edema: History and New Promising Therapies

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    Young Gun Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic macular edema (DME is the main cause of visual impairment in diabetic patients. The management of DME is complex and often various treatment approaches are needed. At the present time, despite the enthusiasm for evaluating several new treatments for DME, including the intravitreal pharmacologic therapies (e.g., corticosteroids and anti-VEGF drugs, laser photocoagulation still remains the current standard in DME. The purpose of this review is to update our knowledge on laser photocoagulation for DME and describe the developments in laser systems. And we will also discuss the new laser techniques and review the latest results including benefits of combined therapy. In this paper, we briefly summarize the major laser therapeutics for the treatment of diabetic macular edema and allude to some future promising laser therapies.

  5. Changes in vision- and health-related quality of life in patients with diabetic macular edema treated with pegaptanib sodium or sham

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loftus, Jane V; Sultan, Marla B; Pleil, Andreas M

    2011-01-01

    To compare vision function and self-reported quality of life (QoL) in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME) treated with intravitreous pegaptanib 0.3 mg or sham injection.......To compare vision function and self-reported quality of life (QoL) in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME) treated with intravitreous pegaptanib 0.3 mg or sham injection....

  6. Dexamethasone intravitreal implant in previously treated patients with diabetic macular edema : Subgroup analysis of the MEAD study

    OpenAIRE

    Augustin, A.J.; Kuppermann, B.D.; Lanzetta, P.; Loewenstein, A.; Li, X.; Cui, H.; Hashad, Y.; Whitcup, S.M.; Abujamra, S.; Acton, J.; Ali, F.; Antoszyk, A.; Awh, C.C.; Barak, A.; Bartz-Schmidt, K.U.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dexamethasone intravitreal implant 0.7?mg (DEX 0.7) was approved for treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME) after demonstration of its efficacy and safety in the MEAD registration trials. We performed subgroup analysis of MEAD study results to evaluate the efficacy and safety of DEX 0.7 treatment in patients with previously treated DME. Methods Three-year, randomized, sham-controlled phase 3 study in patients with DME, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 34?68 Early Treatment...

  7. Diabetic Macular Edema.

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    Gundogan, Fatih C; Yolcu, Umit; Akay, Fahrettin; Ilhan, Abdullah; Ozge, Gokhan; Uzun, Salih

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME), one the most prevalent causes of visual loss in industrialized countries, may be diagnosed at any stage of diabetic retinopathy. The diagnosis, treatment, and follow up of DME have become straightforward with recent developments in fundus imaging, such as optical coherence tomography. Laser photocoagulation, intravitreal injections, and pars plana vitrectomy surgery are the current treatment modalities; however, the positive effects of currently available intravitreally injected agents are temporary. At this point, further treatment choices are needed for a permanent effect. The articles published between 1985-2015 years on major databases were searched and most appropriate 40 papers were used to write this review article.

  8. Serological inflammatory factors as biomarkers for anatomic response in diabetic macular edema treated with anti-VEGF.

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    Brito, Pedro; Costa, Jorge; Gomes, Nuno; Costa, Sandra; Correia-Pinto, Jorge; Silva, Rufino

    2018-05-11

    To study the relationship between systemic pro-inflammatory factors and macular structural response to intravitreal bevacizumab for diabetic macular edema (DME). Prospective study including 30 cases with DME, treated with bevacizumab and a minimum follow-up of 6 months. All cases underwent baseline laboratory testing for cardiovascular risk (high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), homocystein), dyslipidemia, renal dysfunction and glucose control. Serum levels of VEGF, soluble ICAM-1, MCP-1 and TNF-α were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Significant associations between systemic factors and quantitative and qualitative spectral-domain optical coherence macular features were analyzed. A mean of 4.82 ± 0.56 intravitreal injections was performed, resulting in significant improvement of central foveal thickness (CFT) (p anatomic response (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.807, p = 0.009 for hsCRP; AUC = 0.788, p = 0.014 for ICAM1). ROC curve analysis revealed hsCRP as a significant biomarker for 6th month CFT decrease anatomic response to anti-VEGF treatment. Cases with higher serum levels of such factors had increased CFT values, despite treatment, suggesting inner blood-retinal barrier breakdown that is not adequately responsive to anti-VEGF monotherapy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Treatment Efficacy and Compliance in Patients with Diabetic Macular Edema Treated with Ranibizumab in a Real-Life Setting

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    Anne-Laurence Best

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess real-life efficacy of ranibizumab and treatment compliance of patients with vision loss secondary to diabetic macular edema (DME. Methods. A retrospective study was conducted in DME patients treated with ranibizumab. Patients were monitored every 4 weeks for visual acuity (VA and central retinal thickness (CRT by SD-OCT. All patients received a loading dose of 3 monthly injections followed by retreatments on an as-needed basis. The primary endpoint was the change in VA at M12. Patient compliance to the follow-up and the correlation between the injection number and VA were also investigated. Compliance was compared to that of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD patients. Results. Seventy-two eyes of 55 consecutive DME patients were included. At baseline, the mean VA was 56.5 letters and CRT was 470 μm. At M12, the mean VA was 63.4 letters (p 70 letters, the mean VA change was +6.9 letters, and the mean CRT was 361.9 μm (p=0.0001 after a mean number of 5.33 intravitreal injections. In patients who received ≥7 injections, the VA gain and final VA were significantly higher than in patients who received <7 injections. At M12, 25.45% of DME patients were lost to follow-up versus 16.8% of nAMD patients (n=55. Discussion/Conclusion. Our study confirms the real-life efficacy of ranibizumab in DME at M12 and the need for a large number of injections to achieve better visual outcomes. We also showed a trend to a lower compliance in diabetic versus nAMD patients.

  10. Uso de triamcinolona intravítrea en edema macular del diabético Intravitreal triamcinolone to treat diabetic macular edema

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    Meysi Ramos López

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Se estima que en el mundo hay 120 millones de diabéticos y que cada 15 años el número de estos se duplica. Algunos datos son descriptivos y reflejan la situación actual: en los países avanzados solo 30 % de los diabéticos tipo I están adecuadamente controlados y 7 % de los tipo 2 con características de alto riesgo no han sido revisados nunca por ningún oftalmólogo. La prevalencia de la retinopatía diabética está determinada por el tipo de diabetes mellitus y por la edad del paciente, disminuye según aumenta la edad. La retinopatía diabética más frecuente es la no proliferativa en un 80 %, contra un 20 %, la proliferativa. La diabetes mellitus en Cuba tiene una prevalencia aproximadamente de 1/10 000. Estudios recientes revelan una prevalencia de la retinopatía diabética de alrededor de 20-25 % entre los pacientes diabéticos. La detección temprana de la retinopatía, el edema macular, y el tratamiento precoz son cruciales en el esfuerzo por reducir la incapacidad visual presentada en los pacientes con diabetes. En este trabajo se evalúa la efectividad de la triamcinolona intravítrea como tratamiento general antiangiogénico y antiinflamatorio del edema macular en un grupo de pacientes diabéticos que fueron atendidos en el Instituto Cubano Oftalmológico "Ramón Pando Ferrer, desde enero hasta julio de 2006. Se realizó un estudio descriptivo-prospectivo de caso control, en el cual, el paciente constituyó su propio control. La muestra estuvo formada por 30 pacientes diabéticos, con diagnóstico de edema macular diabético que fueron candidatos a la aplicación del medicamento. Predominó el sexo femenino con más de 6 años de edad, a pesar que se mejora la agudeza visual, esta no se correspondía con la disminución evidente del edema macular. Los pacientes que no tuvieron tratamiento láser previo, respondieron mejor al medicamento aplicado, como complicaciones postratamiento se presentó hipertensión ocular, involuci

  11. Multifocal electroretinography changes at the 1-year follow-up in a cohort of diabetic macular edema patients treated with ranibizumab.

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    Baget-Bernaldiz, Marc; Romero-Aroca, Pedro; Bautista-Perez, Angel; Mercado, Joaquin

    2017-10-01

    To determine the changes in the multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG) at 1 year in a clinical series of diabetic macular edema (DME) patients treated with ranibizumab (RNBZ) using a pro re nata protocol. We analyzed a clinical series of 35 eyes of 35 patients with DME at baseline and after treating them with RNBZ over 1 year, in order to determine the change in the macular function, which was assessed by means of the response density and the implicit time of the first-order kernel (FOK) P1 wave of the mfERG at the foveola (R1), fovea (R2) and parafovea (R3). These electrophysiological parameters were studied taking into account different independent variables, such as DME type, degree of diabetic retinopathy (DR), level of preservation of both the ellipsoid zone (IS/OS) and the external limiting membrane (ELM) and changes in central retinal thickness (CRT) and total macular volume (TMV). We also studied the relationship between the response density and the best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA). Eyes with cystic and spongiform DME showed better response density with respect to the serous type (p < 0.001) at baseline. Similarly, eyes with high IS/OS and ELM preservation rates showed higher initial response density compared to the others (p < 0.001). Eyes with moderate DR had better response density compared to those with severe and proliferative DR (p = 0.001). At the beginning of the study, those eyes with proliferative and severe DR showed longer implicit times with respect to those with moderate DR (p = 0.04). The response density significantly increased in eyes that anatomically restored the IS/OS and the ELM after being treated with RNBZ (both p < 0.001). Similarly, eyes with spongiform DME further improved the response density with respect to those with cystic and serous DME (p < 0.001). On the contrary, eyes with hard exudates showed less improvement in their response density at the end of the study (p < 0.001). We observed a significant

  12. Corticosteroid Treatment in Diabetic Macular Edema

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    Burcu Nurözler Tabakcı

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic macular edema is the most common cause of visual impairment in patients with diabetes mellitus. The pathogenesis of macular edema is complex and multifactorial. For many years, laser photocoagulation has been considered the standard therapy for the treatment of diabetic macular edema; however, few patients achieve significant improvements in visual acuity. Today the intravitreal administration of anti-inflammatory or anti-angiogenic agents together with the use of laser photocoagulation represents the standard of care for the treatment of this complication. The intravitreal route of administration minimizes the systemic side effects of corticosteroids. Steroid-related ocular side effects are elevated intraocular pressure and cataract, while injection-related complications include endophthalmitis, vitreous hemorrhage, and retinal detachment. In order to reduce the risks and complications, intravitreal implants have been developed recently to provide sustained release of corticosteroids and reduce repeated injections for the management of diabetic macular edema. In this review, the efficacy, safety, and therapeutic potential of intravitreal corticosteroids in diabetic macular edema are discussed with a review of recent literature.

  13. Current status in diabetic macular edema treatments

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    Pedro; Romero-Aroca

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a serious chronic condition,which increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases,kidney failure and nerve damage leading to amputation.Furthermore the ocular complications include diabetic macular edema,is the leading cause of blindness among adults in the industrialized countries.Today,blindness from diabetic macular edema is largely preventable with timely detection and appropriate interventional therapy.The treatment should include an optimized control of glycemia,arterial tension,lipids and renal status.The photocoagulation laser is currently restricted to focal macular edema in some countries,but due the high cost of intravitreal drugs,the use of laser treatment for focal and diffuse diabetic macular edema(DME),can be valid as gold standard in many countries.The intravitreal anti vascular endothelial growth factor drugs(ranibizumab and bevacizumab),are indicated in the treatment of all types of DME,but the correct protocol for administration should be defined for the different Retina Scientific Societies.The corticosteroids for diffuse DME,has a place in pseudophakic patients,but its complications restricted the use of these drugs for some patients.Finally the intravitreal interface plays an important role and its exploration is mandatory in all DME patients.

  14. Intravitreal triamcinolone for diffuse diabetic macular oedema.

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    Gibran, S K

    2012-02-03

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of intravitreal triamcinolone (IVTA) for the treatment of diffuse diabetic macular oedema (DME) refractory to conventional argon macular laser therapy. METHODS: A prospective, consecutive, and noncomparative case series was undertaken involving 38 eyes of 38 patients with refractory DME. Triamcinolone acetonide (4 mg) in 0.1 ml was injected intravitreally. LogMar visual acuity (VA) and macular thickness measured by ocular coherence tomography (OCT) were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively at 1, 3, and 6 months. RESULTS: All patients completed 6 months of follow up. VA (mean+\\/-SD) improved from 0.905+\\/-0.23 to 0.605+\\/-0.28, 0.555+\\/-0.29, and 0.730+\\/-0.30 at 1, 3, and 6 months, respectively. Macular thickness baseline (mean+\\/-SD) on OCT was 418.7+\\/-104.2 microm and this decreased to 276.9+\\/-72.6 microm, 250.6+\\/-53.1 microm, and 308.8+\\/-87.3 microm at 1, 3, and 6 months, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: IVTA may be a potential temporary treatment for refractory DME. It is effective in decreasing macular thickness and improving VA but the effect lasts approximately for 6 months in the majority of patients. Further investigations are required to establish the safety of IVTA for the treatment of DME.

  15. LASER PHOTOCOAGULATION IN DIABETIC MACULAR EDEMA: EFFECTS ON VISUAL ACUITY AND MACULAR EDEMA

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    M.H. Dehghan

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the importance of clinically significant macular edema in diabetic patients, this study is aimed to determine if laser photocoagulation is effective in the treatment of clinically significant diabetic macular edema. In addition, the effects of risk factors arc surveyed* This is an existing data study considering patients with clinically significant diabetic macular edema, treated with argon-green laser photocoagulation in Labbafinejad hospital, department of lasertherapy, from 1995 to 1997. in 60 (42.6% eyes the treatment method was focal, in 22 (15.6% eyes grid, and in 59 (41.84 modified grid laser photocoagulation was performed. The results are based upon deterioration of visual acuity, occurance of moderate visual loss and improvement or persistence of CSME. We studied 114 eyes from 87 patients. Two years after initial treatment, visual acuity improved in 19.1% of eyes, unchanged in 9.5% and worsened in 71.4% of eyes. After this period the rate of moderate visual loss was 28.6% and CSME was improved in 23.8% of eyes. According to our study, baseline visual acuity and retinopathy severity were two important intervening factors in response to lasertherapy. Comparing our results with natural course of diabetic macular edema, indicates that in assessing visual outcome laser photocoagulation is an effective modality in treatment of CSME, but it is not effective in maintaining or improving visual acuity, which is due to patients delay in visiting ophthalmologists and paying not enough attention to follow-up visits.

  16. Primary treatment of diabetic macular edema

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    Ranchod, Tushar; Fine,Stuart

    2009-01-01

    Tushar M Ranchod, Stuart L FineScheie Eye Institute, Department, of Ophthalmology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Diabetic macular edema (DME) is a leading cause of vision loss in older Americans. Thermal laser treatment remains the mainstay of treatment for DME. Recently, alternative primary treatments for DME have been evaluated. These treatments include intravitreal injections of steroids as well as pharmaceuticals containing antibodies against vascular endothel...

  17. Localized changes in Retinal Vessel Caliber after focal/grid laser treatment in Patients with Diabetic Macular Edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundberg, Lars Kristian; Kawasaki, Ryo; Sjølie, Anne K

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE:: To compare retinal vessel caliber changes at the macula region and surrounding the optic disk after focal/grid laser treatment for diabetic macular edema. METHODS:: The study included 69 eyes from 46 patients treated with focal/grid laser for diabetic macular edema. Retinal photographs...

  18. The Frequency of Serous Macular Detachment in Diabetic Macular Edema

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    Onur Yaya

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the epidemiology and frequency of serous macular detachment (SMD in patients diagnosed with diabetic macular edema (DME. Materials and Methods: Hundred and forty-three eyes of 104 patients with DME were examined retrospectively. According to the results of OCT, the patients were separated into two groups; patients diagnosed with SMD and DME (group 1 and patients diagnosed with DME (group 2. They were assessed based on demographic characteristics, average age, duration of diabetes mellitus (DM, hypertension (HT history, best-corrected visual acuity, and diabetic retinopathy stages. Results: The average age of the patients was 61±8.7 years. Forty-three patients (41.3% were female and 61 patients (58.7% were male. Fifty-four of 104 patients (51.9% had DME with SMD. 21 (38.8% patients had bilateral SMD. In group 1, 31 patients were male (57.4% and 23 patients were female (42.6%. In group 2, 30 (60% patients were male and 20 (40% patients were female. In group 1, average age was 60.2±9.6 and the average duration of DM was 12.2±7.0 years, whereas the average age was 61.9±7.6 and the average duration of DM was 14.06±6.8 years in group 2. Forty-two patients in group 1 (77.8% and 30 patients (60% in group 2 had history of HT. Before the treatment, the average best-corrected visual acuity was found to be 0.30±0.24 in group 1 and 0.32±0.25 in group 2. Conclusion: Today, it is thought that diabetic maculopathy is the leading cause of SMD and it is a determining factor of treatment applications. In our study, we aimed at investigating the frequency of SMD in DME and the risk factors for the development of SMD. Although there were some differences between the factors, only the history of HT was found statistically higher in patients with SMD (p=0.04. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2015; 45: 92-96

  19. Treatment progress of diabetic macular edema

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    Dou Kou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy(DR,which can cause blindness, is a serious eye diseases. Diabetic macular edema(DME, often causes irreversible vision loss, can occur in any period of DR. The treatment of DME, including laser photocoagulation, anti-inflammatory therapy, anti-VEGF therapy and surgical treatment have made great progress in recent years as the researches on the pathogenesis deepening. The innovation of minimally invasive technique also proved the surgical treatment more convenience. The joint application of a variety of treatments, also become the main trend of treatment. A review of the present status and progress of the treatment was made in this paper.

  20. Consistency of ocular coherence tomography fast macular thickness mapping in diabetic diffuse macular edema

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    Saraiva, Fabio Petersen; Costa, Patricia Grativol; Inomata, Daniela Lumi; Melo, Carlos Sergio Nascimento; Helal Junior, John; Nakashima, Yoshitaka

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate optical coherence tomography consistency on foveal thickness, foveal volume, and macular volume measurements in patients with and without diffuse diabetic macular edema. Introduction: Optical coherence tomography represents an objective technique that provides cross-sectional tomographs of retinal structure in vivo. However, it is expected that poor fixation ability, as seen in diabetic macular edema, could alter its results. Several authors have discussed the reproducibility of optical coherence tomography, but only a few have addressed the topic with respect to diabetic maculopathy. Methods: The study recruited diabetic patients without clinically evident retinopathy (control group) and with diffuse macular edema (case group). Only one eye of each patient was evaluated. Five consecutive fast macular scans were taken using Ocular Coherence Tomography 3; the 6 mm macular map was chosen. The consistency in measurements of foveal thickness, foveal volume, and total macular volume for both groups was evaluated using the Pearson's coefficient of variation. The T-test for independent samples was used in order to compare measurements of both groups. Results: Each group consisted of 20 patients. All measurements had a coefficient of variation less than 10%. The most consistent parameter for both groups was the total macular volume. Discussion: Consistency in measurement is a mainstay of any test. A test is unreliable if its measurements can not be correctly repeated. We found a good index of consistency, even considering patients with an unstable gaze. Conclusions: Optical coherence tomography is a consistent method for diabetic subjects with diffuse macular edema. (author)

  1. Consistency of ocular coherence tomography fast macular thickness mapping in diabetic diffuse macular edema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saraiva, Fabio Petersen; Costa, Patricia Grativol; Inomata, Daniela Lumi; Melo, Carlos Sergio Nascimento; Helal Junior, John; Nakashima, Yoshitaka [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Oftalmologia]. E-mail: fabiopetersen@yahoo.com.br

    2007-07-01

    Objectives: To investigate optical coherence tomography consistency on foveal thickness, foveal volume, and macular volume measurements in patients with and without diffuse diabetic macular edema. Introduction: Optical coherence tomography represents an objective technique that provides cross-sectional tomographs of retinal structure in vivo. However, it is expected that poor fixation ability, as seen in diabetic macular edema, could alter its results. Several authors have discussed the reproducibility of optical coherence tomography, but only a few have addressed the topic with respect to diabetic maculopathy. Methods: The study recruited diabetic patients without clinically evident retinopathy (control group) and with diffuse macular edema (case group). Only one eye of each patient was evaluated. Five consecutive fast macular scans were taken using Ocular Coherence Tomography 3; the 6 mm macular map was chosen. The consistency in measurements of foveal thickness, foveal volume, and total macular volume for both groups was evaluated using the Pearson's coefficient of variation. The T-test for independent samples was used in order to compare measurements of both groups. Results: Each group consisted of 20 patients. All measurements had a coefficient of variation less than 10%. The most consistent parameter for both groups was the total macular volume. Discussion: Consistency in measurement is a mainstay of any test. A test is unreliable if its measurements can not be correctly repeated. We found a good index of consistency, even considering patients with an unstable gaze. Conclusions: Optical coherence tomography is a consistent method for diabetic subjects with diffuse macular edema. (author)

  2. Quantitative analysis of macular retinal thickness and macular volume in diabetic retinopathy

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    Ying Zhao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate and characterize the macular thickness and macular volume in patients of different stages of diabetic retinopathy with special-domain optical coherence tomography(SD-OCT. METHODS: Totally 40 patients(78 eyeswith diabetic retinopathy were recruited in the study from January 2016 to January 2017 in our hospital. According to the international clinical classification of diabetic retinopathy, 20 cases(40 eyeswere categorized as non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy(NPDRgroup and 20 cases proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDRgroup(38 eyes. All subjects were examined and analyzed with Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study(ETDRSsubfields, which were embedded in HS(Haag-Streitwith diameter of 1, 3 and 6mm.The changes of retinal thickness and volume of the macular center were measured. RESULTS: The thickness of macular foveolar in NPDR group and PDR group were 252.57±31.36μm, 362.47±20.81μm. The retinal thickness of inner superior subfield(ISMand inner nasal subfield(INMwere the thickest; that of inner inferior subfield(IIMwas next to ISM and INM, and that of inner temporal subfield was the thinnest. Of the outer subfields, the retinal thickness of outer superior subfield(OSMwas the thickest; that of outer nasal subfield(ONMwas next to OSM, and that of outer temporal subfield(OTMand outer inferior subfield(OIMwas the thinnest. The value of macular central concave thickness and retinal thickness in each quadrant of the NPDR group were less than those of the PDR group, the difference was statistically significant(P3, 0.28±0.16mm3, the upper and nasal sides of the middle part of the partition were the largest, the inferior and the temporal side were the smallest. The nasal side of the outer loop was the largest, the upper was the second, the temporal side and the inferior were the smallest. The volume of macular central fovea and the retinal volume in each quadrant of the NPDR group were smaller than those of the PDR group, the

  3. Macular micropseudocysts in early stages of diabetic retinopathy.

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    Tremolada, Gemma; Pierro, Luisa; de Benedetto, Umberto; Margari, Sergio; Gagliardi, Marco; Maestranzi, Gisella; Calori, Giliola; Lorenzi, Mara; Lattanzio, Rosangela

    2011-01-01

    To identify by noninvasive means early retinal abnormalities that may predict diabetic macular edema. The authors analyzed retrospectively data from consecutive patients with Type 1 (n = 16) or Type 2 (n = 23) diabetes who presented for routine follow-up of early retinopathy, had no clinical signs or symptoms of diabetic macular edema, and were evaluated with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Age- and gender-matched nondiabetic subjects provided normative data. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography revealed in the macular region of diabetic patients small hyporeflective areas (median diameter, 55 μm) contained within discrete retinal layers that we named micropseudocysts (MPCs). Micropseudocysts are associated with vascular leakage. The patients showing MPCs had more frequently systemic hypertension and increased central foveal thickness than those without MPCs. The association with increased central foveal thickness was only in the patients with Type 2 diabetes. Macular MPCs in patients with mild diabetic retinopathy appear to reflect leakage and can precede macular thickening. The association of MPCs with increased central foveal thickness in patients with Type 2 diabetes, but not in patients with Type 1 diabetes, points to a greater tendency to retinal fluid accumulation in patients with Type 2 diabetes. Studies in larger cohorts will determine the usefulness of MPCs in strategies to abort diabetic macular edema.

  4. ILM peeling in nontractional diabetic macular edema: review and metanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, M; dell'Omo, R; Morescalchi, F; Semeraro, F; Gambicorti, E; Cacciatore, F; Chiosi, F; Costagliola, C

    2017-10-31

    To evaluate the effect of internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling during vitrectomy for nontractional diabetic macular edema. PUBMED, MEDLINE and CENTRAL were reviewed using the following terms (or combination of terms): diabetic macular edema, nontractional diabetic macular edema, internal limiting membrane peeling, vitrectomy, Müller cells. Randomized and nonrandomized studies were included. The eligible studies compared anatomical and functional outcomes of vitrectomy with or without ILM peeling for tractional and nontractional diabetic macular edema. Postoperative best-corrected visual acuity and central macular thickness were considered, respectively, the primary and secondary outcomes. Meta-analysis on mean differences between vitrectomy with and without ILM peeling was performed using inverse variance method in random effects. Four studies with 672 patients were eligible for analysis. No significant difference was found between postoperative best-corrected visual acuity or best-corrected visual acuity change of ILM peeling group compared with nonpeeling group. There was no significant difference in postoperative central macular thickness and central macular thickness reduction between the two groups. The visual acuity outcomes in patients affected by nontractional diabetic macular edema using pars plana vitrectomy with ILM peeling versus no ILM peeling were not significantly different. A larger prospective and randomized study would be necessary.

  5. Subconjunctival sirolimus in the treatment of diabetic macular edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnadev, Nupura; Forooghian, Farzin; Cukras, Catherine; Wong, Wai; Saligan, Leorey; Chew, Emily Y; Nussenblatt, Robert; Ferris, Frederick; Meyerle, Catherine

    2011-11-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) is a leading cause of blindness in the developed world. Sirolimus has been shown to inhibit the production, signaling, and activity of many growth factors relevant to the development of diabetic retinopathy. This phase I/II study assesses the safety of multiple subconjunctival sirolimus injections for the treatment of DME, with some limited efficacy data. In this phase I/II prospective, open-label pilot study, five adult participants with diabetic macular edema involving the center of the fovea and best-corrected ETDRS visual acuity score of ≤74 letters (20/32 or worse) received 20 μl (440 μg) of subconjunctival sirolimus at baseline, month 2 and every 2 months thereafter, unless there was resolution of either retinal thickening on OCT or leakage on fluorescein angiography. Main outcome measures included best-corrected visual acuity and central retinal thickness on OCT at 6 months and 1 year, as well as safety outcomes. Repeated subconjunctival sirolimus injections were well-tolerated, with no significant drug-related adverse events. There was no consistent treatment effect related to sirolimus; one participant experienced a 2-line improvement in visual acuity and 2 log unit decrease in retinal thickness at 6 months and 1 year, two remained essentially stable, one had stable visual acuity but improvement of central retinal thickness of 1 and 3 log units at 6 months and 1 year respectively, and one had a 2-line worsening of visual acuity and a 1 log unit increase in retinal thickness at 6 months and 1 year. Results in the fellow eyes with diabetic macular edema, not treated with sirolimus, were similar. Subconjunctival sirolimus appears safe to use in patients with DME. Assessment of possible treatment benefit will require a randomized trial.

  6. Effect of acute postural variation on diabetic macular oedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinten, Martin; la Cour, Morten; Lund-Andersen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to study the pathophysiology of diabetic macular oedema (DMO) by analysis of concomitant changes in macular volume (MV), mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), intraocular pressure (IOP), and retinal artery and vein diameters in response to acute postural changes in patients with DMO...

  7. Acute effect of pure oxygen breathing on diabetic macular edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinten, Carl Martin; La Cour, Morten; Lund-Andersen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. A small-scale pilot study of the pathophysiology of diabetic macular edema (DME) was made by assessing concomitant changes in macular volume (MV), mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), intraocular pressure (IOP), retinal artery diameter (RAD), and retinal vein diameter (RVD) in response...

  8. Diabetic Macular Edema: Current Understanding, Pharmacologic Treatment Options, and Developing Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kevin; Fortun, Jorge A

    2018-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema comprise a major source of visual disability throughout the developed world. The etiology and pathogenesis of macular edema is intricate and multifactorial, in which the hyperglycemic state in diabetes induces a microangiopathy. Through several inflammatory and vasogenic mediators, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) upregulation and inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, pathologic changes are induced in the vascular endothelium triggering breakdown of the blood retinal barrier, causing extravasation of fluid into the extracellular space and manifesting clinically as macular edema, resulting in visual loss. The advent of medications targeting the VEGF pathway has led to great clinical improvements compared with the previous standard of care of laser therapy alone, as shown in studies such as RISE, RIDE, VIVID, VISTA, and DRCR. However, analyses have shown that many patients have inadequate response or are nonresponders to anti-VEGF therapy, demonstrating the need for additional therapies to more comprehensively treat this disease. Although corticosteroid treatments and implants have demonstrated some efficacy in adjunctive and supplemental treatment, the need to more adequately treat macular edema remains. Our knowledge of diabetic macular edema continues to grow, leading to new currently available and emerging pharmacotherapies to further enhance our treatment and restore vision in those affected by diabetic macular edema. This review will discuss the pathogenesis of diabetic macular edema and the pharmacologic therapies available for its treatment, including anti-VEGF, steroids, and newer therapies still in development, such as angiopoietin antagonists, Tie2 agonists, kallikrein inhibitors, interleukin inhibitors, and others. Copyright 2018 Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology.

  9. Dexamethasone Intravitreal Implant for Diabetic Macular Edema During Pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Concillado, Michael; Lund-Andersen, Henrik; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe the management of diabetic macular edema during pregnancy with the use of a dexamethasone slow-release intravitreal implant. DESIGN: Retrospective, observational, consecutive case series. METHODS: The study included 5 pregnant women who presented with diabetic macular edema...... injection. RESULTS: Diabetic macular edema involving the foveal center was observed between gestational weeks 9 and 23 in 10 eyes of 5 patients. Dexamethasone intravitreal implant injection was given 10 times in 9 eyes with a mean preinjection center field retinal thickness of 535 μm (range, 239-727 μm...... center field thickness and in 6 of 8 eyes by an increase in BCVA of 5 or more approxETDRS letters. A mild transient rise in intraocular pressure occurred in 3 out of 8 eyes. CONCLUSION: Diabetic macular edema involving the foveal center that presented during pregnancy responded promptly to intravitreal...

  10. Diabetic Macular Edema Pathophysiology: Vasogenic versus Inflammatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Romero-Aroca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic macular edema (DME can cause blindness in diabetic patients suffering from diabetic retinopathy (DR. DM parameters controls (glycemia, arterial tension, and lipids are the gold standard for preventing DR and DME. Although the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is known to play a role in the development of DME, the pathological processes leading to the onset of this disease are highly complex and the exact sequence in which they occur is still not completely understood. Angiogenesis and inflammation have been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. However, it still remains to be clarified whether angiogenesis following VEGF overexpression is a cause or a consequence of inflammation. This paper provides a review of the data currently available, focusing on VEGF, angiogenesis, and inflammation. Our analysis suggests that angiogenesis and inflammation act interdependently during the development of DME. Knowledge of DME etiology seems to be important in treatments with anti-VEGF or anti-inflammatory drugs. Current diagnostic techniques do not permit us to differentiate between both etiologies. In the future, diagnosing the physiopathology of each patient with DME will help us to select the most effective drug.

  11. Diabetic macular oedema and visual loss: relationship to location, severity and duration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardner, Thomas W; Larsen, Michael; Girach, Aniz

    2009-01-01

    Abstract. Purpose: To assess the relationship between visual acuity (VA) and diabetic macular oedema (DMO) in relation to the location of retinal thickening and the severity and duration of central macular thickening. Methods: Data from 584 eyes in 340 placebo-treated patients in the 3-years...... (Snellen equivalent = 20/125). Diabetic retinopathy and DMO status were assessed using stereo photographs. Results: Nearly one third of study eyes had foveal centre-involving DMO at the start of the trial. Sustained moderate visual loss was found in 36 eyes, most commonly associated with DMO at the centre...

  12. Macular laser photocoagulation guided by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography versus fluorescein angiography for diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallego-Pinazo R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Roberto Gallego-Pinazo1,2, Ana Marina Suelves-Cogollos1, Rosa Dolz-Marco1, J Fernando Arevalo3, Salvador García-Delpech1, J Luis Mullor4, Manuel Díaz-Llopis1,2,51Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia, Spain; 2Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras, Valencia, Spain; 3Retina and Vitreous Service, Clinical Ophthalmology Center, Caracas, Venezuela; 4Unit of Experimental Ophthalmology, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia, Spain; 5University of Valencia, Faculty of Medicine, Valencia, SpainBackground: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT and fluorescein angiography (FA in the guidance of macular laser photocoagulation for diabetic macular edema.Methods: This was a prospective interventional clinical comparative pilot study. Forty eyes from 24 consecutive patients with diabetic macular edema were allocated to receive laser photocoagulation guided by SD-OCT or FA. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA, central macular thickness, and retinal volume were assessed at baseline and two months after treatment.Results: Subjects treated using FA-guided laser improved BCVA from the logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR 0.52 ± 0.2 to 0.37 ± 0.2 (P < 0.001, and decreased mean central macular thickness from 397.25 ± 139.1 to 333.50 ± 105.7 µm (P < 0.001 and retinal volume from 12.61 ± 1.6 to 10.94 ± 1.4 mm3 (P < 0.001. Subjects treated using SD-OCT guided laser had improved BCVA from 0.48 ± 0.2 to 0.33 ± 0.2 logMAR (P < 0.001, and decreased mean central macular thickness from 425.90 ± 149.6 to 353.4 ± 140 µm (P < 0.001 and retinal volume from 12.38 ± 2.1 to 11.53 ± 1.1 mm3 (P < 0.001. No significant differences between the groups were found in two-month BCVA (P = 0.505, two-month central macular thickness (P = 0.660, or two-month retinal volume (P = 0.582.Conclusion: The short-term results of this pilot study

  13. Association of statin use and hypertriglyceridemia with diabetic macular edema in patients with type 2 diabetes and diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yoo-Ri; Park, Sung Wook; Choi, Shin-Young; Kim, Seung Woo; Moon, Ka Young; Kim, Jeong Hun; Lee, Kihwang

    2017-01-07

    To investigate the effects of dyslipidemia and statin therapy on progression of diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema in patients with type 2 diabetes. The medical records of 110 patients with type 2 diabetes (70 statin users and 40 non-users) were retrospectively reviewed. The two outcome measures were progression of diabetic retinopathy by two or more steps on the early treatment diabetic retinopathy study scale and diabetic macular edema based on optical coherence tomography. Serum lipid profiles were analyzed from 6 months prior to diagnosis of diabetic macular edema. Diabetic retinopathy progressed in 23% of statin users and 18% of non-users (p = 0.506), but diabetic macular edema was present in 23% of statin users and 48% of non-users (p = 0.008). Statins reduced low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in patients with and without diabetic macular edema (p = 0.043 and p = 0.031, respectively). Among statin users, patients with diabetic macular edema had higher levels of triglycerides (p = 0.004) and lower levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p = 0.033) than those without diabetic macular edema. Logistic regression analysis showed that statin use significantly lowered the risk of diabetic macular edema [odds ratio (OR): 0.33, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.12-0.91, p = 0.032]. Hypertriglyceridemia at 6 months prior to development of macular edema was significantly associated with central retinal thickness (OR: 1.52; 95% CI 1.14-2.02, p = 0.005). Lipid lowering therapy with statins protected against the development of diabetic macular edema and progression of diabetic retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes. Hypertriglyceridemia could be used as a surrogate marker for diabetic macular edema.

  14. Analysis of laser photocoagulation with cataract surgery for improvement of visual acuity and macular edema in patients with cataract and diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Yu Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To explore laser photocoagulation with cataract surgery for improvement of visual acuity and macular edema in patients with cataract and diabetic macular edema.METHODS:A total of 60 patients(72 eyesfrom January 2014 to July 2015 in our hospital were selected, which all were diagnosed as cataract with diabetic macular edema. According to a random number table method, the patients were divided into observation group and control group, 30 cases(36 eyesin each group. The observation group was treated with combination therapy of laser photocoagulation before cataract surgeries, while the control group with the combination therapy of laser photocoagulation after cataract surgeries. At 2mo after surgeries, some routine examination, such as visual acuity, fundus examination after mydriasis, slit lamp examination, optical coherence tomography(OCTexamination, fluorescence angiography examination(FFAfor retinal blood vessels were applied in all the patients. RESULTS:The visual acuity of the observation group and the control group before treatments was not significantly different(P>0.05. At 2mo after treatments, the visual inspection showed that compared with the visual acuity before treatment, the visual acuity of the two groups were both significantly improved(PPP>0.05. At 2mo after treatments, compared with those before treatments, the macular thickness of two groups were both significantly improved(PPCONCLUSION:The laser photocoagulation before cataract surgery for patients with cataract and diabetic macular edema can significantly improve their visual acuity and macular thickness.

  15. Updates in the Management of Diabetic Macular Edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Mathew

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease which has multiple effects on different end-organs, including the retina. In this paper, we discuss updates on diabetic macular edema (DME and the management options. The underlying pathology of DME is the leakage of exudates from retinal microaneurysms, which trigger subsequent inflammatory reactions. Both clinical and imaging techniques are useful in diagnosing, classifying, and gauging the severity of DME. We performed a comprehensive literature search using the keywords “diabetes,” “macula edema,” “epidemiology,” “pathogenesis,” “optical coherence tomography,” “intravitreal injections,” “systemic treatment,” “hypertension,” “hyperlipidemia,” “anemia,” and “renal disease” and collated a total of 47 relevant articles published in English language. The main modalities of treatment currently in use comprise laser photocoagulation, intravitreal pharmacological and selected systemic pharmacological options. In addition, we mention some novel therapies that show promise in treating DME. We also review systemic factors associated with exacerbation or improvement in DME.

  16. Clinical efficacy and safety of a light mask for prevention of dark adaptation in treating and preventing progression of early diabetic macular oedema at 24 months (CLEOPATRA): a multicentre, phase 3, randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaprasad, Sobha; Vasconcelos, Joana C; Prevost, A Toby; Holmes, Helen; Hykin, Philip; George, Sheena; Murphy, Caroline; Kelly, Joanna; Arden, Geoffrey B

    2018-05-01

    We aimed to assess 24-month outcomes of wearing an organic light-emitting sleep mask as an intervention to treat and prevent progression of non-central diabetic macular oedema. CLEOPATRA was a phase 3, single-blind, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial undertaken at 15 ophthalmic centres in the UK. Adults with non-centre-involving diabetic macular oedema were randomly assigned (1:1) to wearing either a light mask during sleep (Noctura 400 Sleep Mask, PolyPhotonix Medical, Sedgefield, UK) or a sham (non-light) mask, for 24 months. Randomisation was by minimisation generated by a central web-based computer system. Outcome assessors were masked technicians and optometrists. The primary outcome was the change in maximum retinal thickness on optical coherence tomography (OCT) at 24 months, analysed using a linear mixed-effects model incorporating 4-monthly measurements and baseline adjustment. Analysis was done using the intention-to-treat principle in all randomised patients with OCT data. Safety was assessed in all patients. This trial is registered with Controlled-Trials.com, number ISRCTN85596558. Between April 10, 2014, and June 15, 2015, 308 patients were randomly assigned to wearing the light mask (n=155) or a sham mask (n=153). 277 patients (144 assigned the light mask and 133 the sham mask) contributed to the mixed-effects model over time, including 246 patients with OCT data at 24 months. The change in maximum retinal thickness at 24 months did not differ between treatment groups (mean change -9·2 μm [SE 2·5] for the light mask vs -12·9 μm [SE 2·9] for the sham mask; adjusted mean difference -0·65 μm, 95% CI -6·90 to 5·59; p=0·84). Median compliance with wearing the light mask at 24 months was 19·5% (IQR 1·9-51·6). No serious adverse events were related to either mask. The most frequent adverse events related to the assigned treatment were discomfort on the eyes (14 with the light mask vs seven with the sham mask), painful, sticky, or

  17. Intravitreal gas injection for the treatment of diabetic macular edema

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    McHugh D

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Dominic McHugh, Bhaskar Gupta, Manzar Saeed King's College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London, England, UK Purpose: This study investigates the efficacy of an intravitreal gas injection in inducing a posterior vitreous detachment (PVD in patients with clinically significant diabetic macular edema refractory to laser therapy. Methods: A local ethics committee-approved technique of an intravitreal injection of pure perfluoropropane gas (C3F8 was performed for all participants. After a period of prone positioning, the patients underwent regular and detailed clinical review. Main outcome measures: The induction of a PVD, change in macular thickness, change in visual acuity. Results: A PVD was induced in all five eyes with subsequent signs of reduction in macular thickness and resolution of exudates. Mean visual improvement was 11 ETDRS (Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study letters (range 4–21. Apart from a transient vitreous hemorrhage in one eye, there were no significant treatment-related complications. Conclusion: The induction of a PVD by pneumatic retinopexy appears to have a significant influence on diabetic macular edema in eyes which have not successfully responded to macular laser therapy. A randomized clinical trial is justified on the basis of the initial promising data. Keywords: optical coherence tomography, OCT, posterior vitreous detachment, perfluoropropane

  18. Relation between macular morphology and treatment frequency during twelve months with ranibizumab for diabetic macular edema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Mori

    Full Text Available To investigate whether baseline optical coherence tomography (OCT parameters can predict the treatment frequency of intravitreal ranibizumab (IVR injections during the first year in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME treated with pro re nata (PRN IVR injections.We retrospectively reviewed 68 eyes of 63 patients with center-involved DME who received IVR injections for 12 months or longer according to three monthly IVR injections followed by the PRN dosing. We measured the mean retinal thicknesses in the individual subfields of the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study grid and evaluated the qualitative and quantitative parameters on OCT sectional images. We investigated the relationship between these OCT parameters at baseline and the number of IVR injections during the 12-month follow-up.Three loading doses were administered to 10 eyes; four to seven annualized IVR injections were administered to 34 eyes. The number of eyes that received IVR injections decreased gradually until month 6 and was almost constant from months 7 to 11. No relationships were seen between the treatment frequency and baseline systemic factors and the ophthalmic examination findings. Univariate analyses showed that the number of IVR injections during the first year was associated with the mean retinal thickness in the individual subfields and the transverse length of the disrupted external limiting membrane (ELM and ellipsoid zone of the photoreceptors. Multivariate analysis showed a significant association with the thickness in the inferior subfield alone. The treatment frequency during the 12-month follow-up was not correlated with improved visual acuity but was associated with the decrease in the central subfield thickness and disrupted ELM.The retinal thickness in the inferior subfield predicts the treatment frequency during the first year in eyes with DME treated with PRN IVR injections.

  19. Acute effect of pure oxygen breathing on diabetic macular edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinten, Carl Martin; La Cour, Morten; Lund-Andersen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. A small-scale pilot study of the pathophysiology of diabetic macular edema (DME) was made by assessing concomitant changes in macular volume (MV), mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), intraocular pressure (IOP), retinal artery diameter (RAD), and retinal vein diameter (RVD) in response...... diameters by fundus photography, intraocular pressure by pulse-air tonometry, and arterial blood pressure by sphygmomanometry. Results. After initiation of pure oxygen breathing, reductions of 2.6% in RAD (p=0.04) and 11.5% reduction in RVD (p...

  20. One-year progression of diabetic subclinical macular edema in eyes with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tejerina, Amparo Navea; Vujosevic, Stela; Varano, Monica

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To characterize the 1-year progression of retinal thickness (RT) increase occurring in eyes with subclinical macular edema in type 2 diabetes. METHODS: Forty-eight type 2 diabetic eyes/patients with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR; levels 20 and 35 in the Early Treatment...... Diabetic Retinopathy Study) classified as presenting subclinical macular edema at baseline completed the 1-year follow-up period, from a sample of 194 followed in a 12-month observational and prospective study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01145599). Automated segmentation of the retinal layers...... in these eyes was performed, followed by verification and correction by a human grader. RESULTS: The highest increase in RT over the 1-year follow-up period for the 48 eyes/patients with subclinical macular edema was found in the inner nuclear layer (INL). Progression to clinical macular edema was also...

  1. How to Treat Gestational Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Listen En Español How to Treat Gestational Diabetes Be sure to see the latest Diabetes Forecast ... and a healthy start for your baby. Gestational Diabetes – Looking Ahead Gestational diabetes usually goes away after ...

  2. Frequency of vitreo macular traction in diabetic macular edema on optical coherence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatima, N.; Islam, Q.U.; Shafique, M.

    2017-01-01

    To determine the frequency of vitreo macular traction (VMT) in patients of diabetic macular edema (DME) as detected on spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Armed Forces Institute of Ophthalmology (AFIO) Rawalpindi, from May 2013 to Jan 2014. Patients and Methods: Diabetic patients of less than 18 years of age with DME and central macular thickness of more than 250 micrometers (micro m) were included. The patients with idiopathic VMT, history of vitreoretinal surgery, and history of other retinal vascular diseases were excluded from the study. Dilated fundus was done in each patient using 90 D lens on a slit lamp biomicroscope and patients with diabetic retinopathy changes and DME were subjected to OCT examination using Topcon 3-D OCT 1000 (Topcon Corporation). Record of each patient including demographic data, ocular findings and OCT data were endorsed on a pre-devised proforma. Results: Seventy one eyes of 68 patients were included, 36 (50.7 percent) were males and 35 (49.29 percent) were females. Mean age was 53.17 +- 8.79 years. Mean central macular thickness (CMT) was 361.8 +- 109 mu m. VMT was detected in 17 (23.9 percent) eyes. Amongst these, 2(12.5 percent) eyes had vitreofoveal traction, epiretinal membrane was found in 4 (25 percent) eyes and 11(62.5 percent) eyes had extra foveal VMT. Conclusion: Detection of VMT in about a quarter of cases reflects that OCT is a viable tool for early detection of vitreomacular interface abnormalities. (author)

  3. Diabetic macular oedema: under-represented in the genetic analysis of diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadgate, Suzanne; Kiire, Christine; Halford, Stephanie; Chong, Victor

    2018-04-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, a complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, is a complex disease and is one of the leading causes of blindness in adults worldwide. It can be divided into distinct subclasses, one of which is diabetic macular oedema. Diabetic macular oedema can occur at any time in diabetic retinopathy and is the most common cause of vision loss in patients with type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this review is to summarize the large number of genetic association studies that have been performed in cohorts of patients with type 2 diabetes and published in English-language journals up to February 2017. Many of these studies have produced positive associations with gene polymorphisms and diabetic retinopathy. However, this review highlights that within this large body of work, studies specifically addressing a genetic association with diabetic macular oedema, although present, are vastly under-represented. We also highlight that many of the studies have small patient numbers and that meta-analyses often inappropriately combine patient data sets. We conclude that there will continue to be conflicting results and no meaningful findings will be achieved if the historical approach of combining all diabetic retinopathy disease states within patient cohorts continues in future studies. This review also identifies several genes that would be interesting to analyse in large, well-defined cohorts of patients with diabetic macular oedema in future candidate gene association studies. © 2018 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Efficacy of intravitreal ranibizumab injection combined with macular grid photocoagulation for diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu-Lin Jiang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To evaluate the clinical efficacy of intravitreal injection of ranibizumab combined with macular grid photocoagulation for diabetic macular edema(DME.METHODS:Totally 60 eyes(60 patientswith DME were randomly divided into 2 groups: 30 eyes of simple injection group underwent intravitreal injection of ranibizumab, and 30 eyes of combined treatment group underwent intravitreal injection of ranibizumab and macular grid photocoagulation 1wk later. The best corrected visual acuity(BCVA, central macular thickness(CMTmeasured by optical coherence tomography(OCTand postoperative complications were observed.RESULTS:In simple injection group, the BCVA after operation were separately 0.390±0.075(4wk, 0.367±0.088(8wkand 0.319±0.064(12wk,the CMT after operation were separately 221.63±112.34μm(4wk, 337.73±99.56μm(8wkand 432.92±100.46μm(12wk, which were much better than pre-operation. But during follow-up, the BCVA presented down trend and the CMT was on the rise slowly. In combined treatment group, the BCVA after operation were separately 0.385±0.036(4wk, 0.382±0.079(8wkand 0.377±0.097(12wk,the CMT after operation were separately 249.77±106.55μm(4wk, 270.40±92.88μm(8wkand 275.84±97.34μm(12wk, which were satisfactory and steady during follow-up, better than simple injection group(PCONCLUSION:Intravitreal injection of ranibizumab can effectively improve visual acuity and decrease central foveal thickness for patients with DME, combining with macular grid photocoagulation can ensure therapeutic effects steady and permanent.

  5. Effect of intravitreal bevacizumab on diabetic macular edema with hard exudates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sohee; Lee, Won Ki

    2014-01-01

    Background We evaluated the efficacy of intravitreal bevacizumab on diabetic macular edema with subfoveal and perifoveal hard exudates. Materials and methods Eleven eyes (11 patients) exhibiting diabetic macular edema with subfoveal and perifoveal hard exudates were included in this prospective, nonrandomized interventional pilot study. All patients were treated with monthly scheduled intravitreal bevacizumab injections for 6 months. Changes in the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study best corrected visual acuity, amount of hard exudates on fundus photography, and macular edema detected by central subfield thickness on spectral domain optical coherence tomography after six serial injections, were assessed. The amount of hard exudates at each visit was evaluated as pixels in fundus photography, using an Adobe Photoshop program. Results Ten of 11 patients completed follow-up. The mean Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study best corrected visual acuity was 59.9±5.7 letters (Snellen equivalent, 20/63) at baseline evaluation. The best corrected visual acuity exhibited no significant difference at month 6 compared with at baseline (57.9±6.0 letters or 20/70 at month 6; P=0.085). At month 6, mean central subfield thickness decreased from 370.4±56.5 to 334.6±65.0 μm (P=0.009). The mean amount of hard exudates increased from 4467.1±2736.1 to 6592.4±2498.3 pixels at month 6 (P=0.022). No serious adverse events occurred. Conclusion Continuous intravitreal bevacizumab was found to have no benefit in visual acuity and amount of hard exudates, despite the improvement of macular edema at 6 months. PMID:25143708

  6. Early phacoemulsification in diabetic cataract for early recognition and management of diabetic macular oedema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahab, S.; Rab, K. F. U.; Hargun, L. D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To get optimal visualization of fundus by early phacoemulsification in diabetic cataract for early recognition and management of diabetic macular oedema. Study Design: Interventional study. Place and Duration of Study: Ophthalmology Unit III, Sindh Government Lyari General Hospital and Dow University of Health Sciences and Al-Noor Eye Hospital, Karachi, from July 2008 to June 2009. Methodology: Patients with uncontrolled type-II diabetes mellitus of more than 10 years of duration were selected. Patients with clinical significant macular oedema (CSME), non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) were excluded. Follow-up was done on day 1, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months and 6 months. Results: The male to female ratio was 1:1.44. Out of 218 patients; 129 (59.2%) were males and 89 (40.8%) were females. CSME was found in 82 patients (37.6%) at first postoperative week which declined to 29 cases (13.3%) at first month follow-up. Three subjects developed mild to moderate NPDR. In majority of the subjects, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) gradually improved in each subsequent follow-up visit. Conclusion: Early phacoemulsification in diabetic cataract offers optimal posterior pole visualization and clears the ambiguity of decreased vision either caused by cataract or macular oedema. Uncomplicated phacoemulsification does not accelerate diabetic macular oedema or retinopathy provided glycemic control and co-morbids are well addressed. (author)

  7. Combination of Anti-VEGF and Laser Photocoagulation for Diabetic Macular Edema: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura N. Distefano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic macular edema (DME is the most common cause of vision loss in diabetic patients. Thirty years ago, the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS demonstrated that focal/grid laser photocoagulation reduces moderate vision loss from DME by 50% or more; thus, macular photocoagulation became the gold standard treatment for DME. However, with the development of anti-VEGF drugs (bevacizumab, ranibizumab, and aflibercept, better outcomes were obtained in terms of visual acuity gain and decrease in macular thickness in some studies when antiangiogenic drugs were administered in monotherapy. Macular laser therapy may still play an important role as an adjuvant treatment because it is able to improve macular thickness outcomes and reduce the number of injections needed. Here, we review some of the clinical trials that have assessed the efficacy of macular laser treatment, either as part of the treatment protocol or as rescue therapy.

  8. Treating Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health care team is there for you. Your child's diabetes management plan should be easy to understand, detailed, ... Can Diabetes Be Prevented? Monitoring Blood Sugar Your Child's Diabetes Health Care Team Medicines for Diabetes Type 2 ...

  9. Correlation of visual acuity and central macular morphology in different types of diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-Ju Wu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To observe the correlation of visual acuity and central macular morphology in patients with different types of diabetic macular edema(DME. METHODS: Presented study was single-center, uncontrolled retrospective clinical study. Sixty-two patients(103 eyeswith DME were included. Best corrected visual acuity(BCVAwas evaluated using early treatment diabetic retinopathy study(ETDRSvision test chart. All patients were examined by non-contact tonometer, slit lamp, indirect ophthalmoscope, and fundus fluorescein angiography(FFA. Central subfield mean thickness(CSMTin the macular area of diameter 1mm was measured by optical coherence tomography(OCT.And in the same time the integrity of inner segments/ outer segments(IS/OSand external limiting membrane(ELMreflecting light strip of 350μm center horizontal scanning line was investigated by OCT. BCVA and CSMT in different types of DME patients were analyzed using Kruskal- Wallis test. BCVA and CSMT between the two-two groups in different types of DME patients were analyzed using Nemenyi test, and multiple regression analysis was used to analyze the relative factors of BCVA. RESULTS: In the 103 eyes, 47 eyes(45.6%were focal DME, 35 eyes(34.0%were diffuse DME, 6 eyes(5.8%were ischemic DME and 15 eyes(14.6%were proliferative DME. The difference of mean BCVA(H=69.167, PH=57.113, Pχ2=14.982,Pχ2=14.537,Pχ2=15.596,Pχ2=15.393,Pχ2=16.567,Pχ2=15.687,Pχ2=12.974、P=0.008; CSMT:χ2=13.999,Pr=-0.064,-0.207,-0.082 and -0.160, respectively, Pr=-0.885, -2.522, -1.504, and-0.595, respectively, P>0.05. CONCLUSION: There are statistically significant differences on macular morphology and vision function among different types of DME patients.

  10. Modern diagnostic and treatment aspects of diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Viktorovich Doga

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic macular oedema (DMO is the leading cause of vision loss and disability in working-age people with diabetes mellitus. This literature review describes pathogenetic mechanisms, concepts, diagnostic techniques and capabilities of novel laser technologies in the treatment of DMO. In recent years, the role of cytokines and growth factors in retinal neurodegeneration has been actively investigated. Modern diagnostic techniques for the treatment of diabetic macular oedema, in addition to conventional techniques, include optical coherence tomography, autofluorescence and microperimetry. These techniques allow the visualization of retinal structures and its functional condition, and they can be used to detect DMO at early stages and to provide the most effective treatment. The evolution of laser technology resulted in the formation of new approaches to DMO treatment. Subthreshold micropulse laser (SML treatment, in conjunction with conventional photocoagulation, has pronounced therapeutic effects. SML shows high selectivity towards retinal pigment epithelium while avoiding neurosensory retina injury. Owing to the chronic nature of DMO and pathogenetic mechanisms recently discovered, further elaboration of the SML technique appears to be a very promising treatment.

  11. Risk factors influencing the treatment outcome in diabetic macular oedema

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    Gupta Amod

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A multivariate analysis was done on 96 eyes to evaluate the effect of various risk factors on the final visual outcome after laser photocoagulation for clinically significant macular oedema (CSME in diabetic retinopathy. Advanced age of the patient, large size of CSME and poor baseline visual acuity were found to be significantly associated with poorer outcome (p<0.05. The association of nephropathy and hypertension with poorer visual outcome was of boderline significance (p = 0.054 and 0.07, respectively. Wavelength of the laser (argon or krypton used for treatment did not significantly influence the outcome.

  12. Aspectos atuais na fisiopatologia do edema macular diabético Recent aspects on physiopathology of diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Martins dos Santos Motta

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available O edema macular é a principal causa de baixa visual em pacientes diabéticos. Seu mecanismo de formação é complexo e envolve alterações bioquímicas e estruturais. Os autores fazem uma revisão e atualização dos conceitos fisiopatológicos envolvidos na maculopatia diabética.Macular edema is the leading cause of poor vision in diabetic patients.The mechanism of edema formation is complex and involves biochemical and structural changes. The authors review and update the physiopathologic concepts related to diabetic maculopathy.

  13. Thickness of the retinal photoreceptor outer segment layer in healthy volunteers and in patients with diabetes mellitus without retinopathy, diabetic retinopathy, or diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Ozkaya

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: The PROS layer at the foveal center was thinner in patients who had diabetic retinopathy or diabetic macular edema than both the healthy volunteers and diabetic patients without retinopathy.

  14. Fluocinolone acetonide and its potential in the treatment of chronic diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haritoglou C

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Christos Haritoglou, Aljoscha S Neubauer, Marcus KerntDepartment of Ophthalmology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, GermanyAbstract: Diabetic macular edema (DME is a potentially sight-threatening disease that predominantly affects patients with type 2 diabetes. The pathogenesis is complex, with many contributing factors involved. In addition to overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor in the diabetic eye, there is an inflammatory pathway that contributes to the breakdown of the blood-retina barrier and nonperfusion. In addition to vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors, clinical and experimental investigations underline the great potential of steroids in the treatment of DME. Fluocinolone acetonide is currently the only corticosteroid approved for the treatment of DME in Europe. It is manufactured as an intravitreal insert, releasing fluocinolone acetonide at a rate of 0.2 µg per day. Phase III clinical studies have demonstrated that the beneficial effect of the fluocinolone acetonide insert lasts up to 3 years. Improvement in visual acuity was especially remarkable in patients with a prolonged duration of DME of at least 3 years at the initiation of therapy. Cataract formation occurs in nearly all phakic eyes treated, and needs to be considered when the indication for treatment is made. Given the efficacy versus potential complications of the insert, fluocinolone acetonide represents a promising second-line treatment option in patients with DME. Fluocinolone appears to be especially beneficial for patients whose options for visual recovery have seemed limited up until now.Keywords: diabetic macular edema, fluocinolone acetonide

  15. MACULAR ATROPHY FINDINGS BY OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY ANGIOGRAPHY COMPARED WITH FUNDUS AUTOFLUORESCENCE IN TREATED EXUDATIVE AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasago, Yukari; Shiragami, Chieko; Kobayashi, Mamoru; Osaka, Rie; Ono, Aoi; Yamashita, Ayana; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Hirooka, Kazuyuki

    2017-11-28

    To compare the areas of choriocapillaris (CC) nonperfusion and macular atrophy (MA) in treated exudative age-related macular degeneration. This was a prospective, observational, cross-sectional study. Forty-four eyes exhibiting MA (42 patients with age-related macular degeneration), with a dry macula, underwent fundus autofluorescence and optical coherence tomography angiography. The area of MA detected by fundus autofluorescence and CC nonperfusion detected by optical coherence tomography angiography was measured using image analysis software. The rates of concordance between the MA and CC nonperfusion areas were calculated. We qualitatively and quantitatively compared the areas of MA and CC nonperfusion in age-related macular degeneration eyes. The mean areas of MA and CC nonperfusion were 5.95 ± 4.50 mm and 10.66 ± 7.05 mm, respectively (paired t-test, P autofluorescence matching optical coherence tomography angiography showed that the CC nonperfusion area was almost included in the MA area. The mean concordance rate for the MA area inside the CC nonperfusion area was 87.7 ± 13.9%. The MA and CC nonperfusion areas markedly overlapped. The area of CC nonperfusion correlated with the MA area. Choroidal ischemia might be involved in the pathogenesis of MA in treated age-related macular degeneration.This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CCBY), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  16. Hospitalized cardiovascular events in patients with diabetic macular edema

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    Nguyen-Khoa Bao-Anh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microvascular and macrovascular complications in diabetes stem from chronic hyperglycemia and are thought to have overlapping pathophysiology. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence rate of hospitalized myocardial infarctions (MI and cerebrovascular accidents (CVA in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME compared with diabetic patients without retinal diseases. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of a commercially insured population in an administrative claims database. DME subjects (n = 3519 and diabetes controls without retinal disease (n = 10557 were matched by age and gender. Healthcare claims were analyzed for the study period from 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2005. Incidence and adjusted rate ratios of hospitalized MI and CVA events were then calculated. Results The adjusted rate ratio for MI was 2.50 (95% CI: 1.83-3.41, p  Conclusion Event rates of MI or CVA were higher in patients with DME than in diabetes controls. This study is one of few with sufficient sample size to accurately estimate the relationship between DME and cardiovascular outcomes.

  17. [Fundus autofluorescence. Has it a place in the management of diabetic macular edema?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbiba, W; Baba, A; Bouayed, E; Daldoul, A

    2016-11-01

    Analyze the characteristics of fundus autofluorescence of diabetic macular edema and study the association between these characteristics and visual function. Our study included 18 patients (28 eyes) with clinically significant diabetic macular edema. All patients had a complete eye examination with a fundus autofluorescence imaging and optical coherence tomography. The central macular thickness and central macular volume were measured. The integrity of the inner segment-outer segment junction and the integrity of the external limiting membrane were also evaluated in the same area. Among the 28 eyes studied, 8 had normal autofluorescence. The remaining 20 eyes had abnormal autofluorescence: a hyper-cystoid autofluorescence in 5 eyes (25%), hyper-spot autofluorescence in 8 eyes (40%), and hypo-irregular autofluorescence in 5 eyes (25%). Best corrected visual acuity was significantly better in patients with normal autofluorescence and those with hyper-cystoid autofluorescence. There was no significant difference in central macular thickness (P=0.186) and central macular volume (P=0.191) between the four groups. The autofluorescence is a simple, fast, and non-invasive technique for the study of diabetic macular edema with good correlation to the visual function as well as to the extent of damage to the retina. It is, therefore, a possible alternative to other invasive imaging techniques in particular in the long term monitoring of diabetic macular edema. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Suitability and repeatability of a photostress recovery test device, the macular test device, macular degeneration TEST DEVICE, detector (MDD-2), for diabetes and diabetic retinopathy assessment

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Loughman, James

    2013-10-16

    Diabetic retinopathy can result in impaired photostress recovery time despite normal visual acuity and fundoscopic appearance. The Macular Degeneration Detector (MDD-2) is a novel flash photostress recovery time device. In this study, we examine the repeatability of the MDD-2 in normal and diabetic subjects.

  19. Incidence of diabetic macular edema and associated risk factors in a cohort of patients with type 1 diabetes in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Malin Lundberg

    Incidence of diabetic macular edema and associated risk factors in a cohort of patients with type 1 diabetes in Denmark. Rasmussen M.L.1, Pedersen R.B. 1, Sjølie A.K. 1, Grauslund J1 1University of Southern Denmark, Department of ophthalmology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark Purpose: To eval......Incidence of diabetic macular edema and associated risk factors in a cohort of patients with type 1 diabetes in Denmark. Rasmussen M.L.1, Pedersen R.B. 1, Sjølie A.K. 1, Grauslund J1 1University of Southern Denmark, Department of ophthalmology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark Purpose......: To evaluate the 16-year incidence of diabetic macular edema (DME) in a cohort of type 1 diabetic patients and to investigate possible risk factors of developing DME. Methods: This was a prospective cohort study of Danish type 1 diabetic patients. A total of 131 patients were examined at baseline in 1995...

  20. Triamcinolona subtenoniana en el edema macular diabético Subtenon triamcinolone in the diabetic macular edema

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    Eddy Mesa Hernández

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN: La prevalencia de la retinopatía diabética está determinada por el tipo de diabetes mellitus y por el tiempo de evolución de la enfermedad. El edema macular es la principal causa de la disminución de la agudeza visual en el paciente diabético. Un diagnóstico precoz y certero de esta enfermedad, unido al establecimiento de un tratamiento adecuado es crucial en el esfuerzo por reducir la incapacidad visual. El propósito de este trabajo fue determinar la efectividad de la triamcinolona subtenoniana como tratamiento del edema macular en un grupo de pacientes diabéticos. MÉTODOS: Se realizó un estudio descriptivo-prospectivo de caso control. La muestra estuvo formada por 30 pacientes diabéticos que fueron atendidos en el Hospital Clínicoquirúrgico "Dr. Miguel Enríquez, desde enero a junio de 2007, con diagnóstico de edema macular diabético que cumplieron con los criterios de inclusión. RESULTADOS: Predominó el sexo femenino, el grupo de edades más frecuentes fue de 55 a 65 años. Se relacionó el tiempo de evolución con la presencia de edema macular, se evidenció una involución de esta patología, así como una mejoría en la agudeza visual después de aplicado el tratamiento y no se presentaron complicaciones graves. CONCLUSIONES: El tratamiento con acetato de triamcinolona por vía subtenoniana posterior es una alternativa efectiva en el tratamiento de el edema macular.INTRODUCTION: Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy is determined by type of diabetes mellitus and the length of development of the disease. Macular edema is the main cause of reduction in visual acuity of the diabetic patient. An early exact diagnosis of the disease together with an adequate treatment is essential to decrease visual disability. The objective of this paper was to evaluate the effectiveness of subtenon triamcinolone as therapy for macular edema in a group of diabetics. METHODS: A prospective descriptive case-control study was

  1. Macular thinning in prediabetes or type 2 diabetes without diabetic retinopathy: the Maastricht Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clerck, Eline E B; Schouten, Jan S A G; Berendschot, Tos T J M; Goezinne, Fleur; Dagnelie, Pieter C; Schaper, Nicolaas C; Schram, Miranda T; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Webers, Carroll A B

    2018-03-01

    To assess macular thinning in individuals with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes without diabetic retinopathy (DM2 w/o DR) compared with individuals with normal glucose metabolism (NGM). Using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), we measured macular thickness in six subfields as defined by the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) in 1838 participants from The Maastricht Study, a population-based cohort study (mean age 59 ± 8 years, 49% men, 1087 NGM, 279 prediabetes, 472 DM2 w/o DR). Multivariable linear regression was used to assess the association between macular thickness and glucose metabolism status. After adjustment for age, sex and spherical equivalent, individuals with prediabetes showed a significant decrease in pericentral superior macular thickness [β = -2.14 μm (95% confidence interval (CI): -4.24 to -0.03), p < 0.05] compared with individuals with NGM. In individuals with DM2 w/o DR, the fovea [β = -4.05 μm (95% CI: -6.30 to -1.79), p < 0.001] and the four pericentral quadrants (range: β = -4.64 to -5.29 μm, p < 0.001) were significantly thinner compared with individuals with NGM. There was a significant linear trend of macular thinning with severity of glucose metabolism status in five subfields (p < 0.001). Macular thickness is reduced in prediabetes and a greater reduction occurs in DM2, even before DR is clinically present. About half of the thinning observed in DM2 w/o DR was already found in prediabetes. Generalized thinning of the macula could be related to thinning of the temporal side of the optic nerve head through the connecting papillo-macular bundle. © 2017 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Subthreshold micropulse laser reduces anti-VEGF injection burden in patients with diabetic macular edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisseiev, Elad; Abbassi, Sam; Thinda, Sumeer; Yoon, Joseph; Yiu, Glenn; Morse, Lawrence S

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of micropulse laser in the early treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME) and its associated burden of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injections. This retrospective comparative study compared a group of 19 eyes with DME treated with micropulse laser to a matched control group of 19 eyes with DME treated with ranibizumab injections without micropulse laser. Recorded parameters included previous medical and ocular history, previous and subsequent ranibizumab injections administered for DME, visual acuity (VA), central macular thickness throughout the follow-up period, and the occurrence of any complications. The improvement in VA was comparable in both groups, at 12 months and at the final follow-up. Patients treated with micropulse laser required significantly fewer ranibizumab injections than their controls, both at 12 months (1.7 ± 2.3 vs 5.6 ± 2.1) and by the end of the follow-up (2.6 ± 3.3 vs 9.3 ± 5.1) (plaser were encountered. Micropulse laser is a safe and effective treatment for DME, which may achieve comparable improvement in VA along with a significant reduction in the burden of anti-VEGF injections. We suggest a treatment approach for its inclusion in the early stages of DME.

  3. Blood-retinal barrier glycerol permeability in diabetic macular edema and healthy eyes: estimations from macular volume changes after peroral glycerol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thornit, Dorte Nellemann; Vinten, Carl Martin; Sander, Birgit

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the changes in macular volume (MV) between healthy subjects and patients with diabetic macular edema (DME) after an osmotic load and to determine the glycerol permeability (P(gly)) of the blood-retinal barrier (BRB). METHODS: In this unmasked study, 13 patients with DME and 5...

  4. Clinical relevance of quantified fundus autofluorescence in diabetic macular oedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitake, S; Murakami, T; Uji, A; Unoki, N; Dodo, Y; Horii, T; Yoshimura, N

    2015-05-01

    To quantify the signal intensity of fundus autofluorescence (FAF) and evaluate its association with visual function and optical coherence tomography (OCT) findings in diabetic macular oedema (DMO). We reviewed 103 eyes of 78 patients with DMO and 30 eyes of 22 patients without DMO. FAF images were acquired using Heidelberg Retina Angiograph 2, and the signal levels of FAF in the individual subfields of the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study grid were measured. We evaluated the association between quantified FAF and the logMAR VA and OCT findings. One hundred and three eyes with DMO had lower FAF signal intensity levels in the parafoveal subfields compared with 30 eyes without DMO. The autofluorescence intensity in the parafoveal subfields was associated negatively with logMAR VA and the retinal thickness in the corresponding subfields. The autofluorescence levels in the parafoveal subfield, except the nasal subfield, were lower in eyes with autofluorescent cystoid spaces in the corresponding subfield than in those without autofluorescent cystoid spaces. The autofluorescence level in the central subfield was related to foveal cystoid spaces but not logMAR VA or retinal thickness in the corresponding area. Quantified FAF in the parafovea has diagnostic significance and is clinically relevant in DMO.

  5. Pars Plana Vitrectomy with Internal Limiting Membrane Peeling for Nontractional Diabetic Macular Edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Jan Niklas

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus remains the leading cause of blindness among working age Americans with diabetic macular edema being the most common cause for moderate and severe vision loss. To investigate the anatomical and visual benefits of pars plana vitrectomy with inner limiting membrane peeling in patients with nontractional diabetic macular edema as well as correlation of integrity of outer retinal layers on spectral domain optical coherence tomography to visual outcomes. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 42 diabetic patients that underwent vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling for nontractional diabetic macula edema. The integrity of outer retinal layers was evaluated and preoperative central macular thickness and visual acuity were compared with data at 1 month, 3 months and 6 months postoperatively. The student t-test was used to compare the groups. 31 eyes were included. While no differences were seen at 1 and 3 months, there was significant improvement of both central macular thickness and visual acuity at the 6 months follow up visit compared to preoperatively (357, 427 microns; p=0.03. 20/49, 20/82; p=0.03) . Patients with intact external limiting membrane and ellipsoid zone had better preoperative vision than patients with outer retinal layer irregularities (20/54, 20/100; p=0.03) and greater visual gains postoperatively (20/33, ppeeling can improve retinal anatomy and visual acuity in patients with nontractional diabetic macular edema. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography may help identify patients with potential for visual improvement.

  6. Retinal layer location of increased retinal thickness in eyes with subclinical and clinical macular edema in diabetes type 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandello, Francesco; Tejerina, Amparo Navea; Vujosevic, Stela

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify the retinal layer predominantly affected in eyes with subclinical and clinical macular edema in diabetes type 2. METHODS: A cohort of 194 type 2 diabetic eyes/patients with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (ETDRS levels 20/35) were examined with Cirrus spectral......-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) at the baseline visit (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01145599). Automated segmentation of the retinal layers of the eyes with subclinical and clinical macular edema was compared with a sample of 31 eyes from diabetic patients with normal OCT and an age......-matched control group of 58 healthy eyes. RESULTS: From the 194 eyes in the study, 62 had subclinical macular edema and 12 had clinical macular edema. The highest increases in retinal thickness (RT) were found in the inner nuclear layer (INL; 33.6% in subclinical macular edema and 81.8% in clinical macular edema...

  7. Local retinal sensitivity in relation to specific retinopathy lesions in diabetic macular oedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soliman, Wael; Hasler, Pascal; Sander, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy and recently diagnosed untreated DMO. Investigations included microperimetry, fluorescein angiography, colour fundus photography, and OCT. All measures and gradings were made for each of the nine fields of an early treatment diabetic retinopathy study macula template......Purpose: To study microperimetric macular sensitivity in diabetic macular oedema (DMO) in relation to lesion characteristics obtained by optical coherence tomography (OCT), colour fundus photography, and fluorescein angiography (FA). Methods: The study comprised 20 eyes in 15 patients...... in foveal petaloid (r = -0.50, p = 0.02) and extrafoveal honeycomb patterns (r = -0.8, p detectable effect of focal noncystoid oedema...

  8. [Fluocinolone acetonide (ILUVIEN®) micro-implant for chronic diabetic macular edema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubrane, G; Behar-Cohen, F

    2015-02-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) is a frequent complication of diabetic retinopathy and may cause severe visual loss. In this article, we examine the pathophysiology of DME and review various treatment options, such as laser photocoagulation, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor antibodies, and steroids including ILUVIEN(®), which is a new sustained-release, non biodegradable, injectable, intravitreal micro-implant containing fluocinolone acetonide. The results of the FAME (Fluocinolone Acetonide in Diabetic Macular Edema) studies, conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ILUVIEN(®) in DME, are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. How Is Diabetes Treated in Children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates How Is Diabetes Treated in Children? Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... as diabetes gets worse over time. Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is most often diagnosed in ...

  10. [Association between visual improvement after photocoagulation and the use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors in diabetic macular oedema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somilleda-Ventura, Selma Alin; García-Rubio, Yatzul Zuhaila; Razo Blanco-Hernández, Dulce Milagros; Lima-Gómez, Virgilio

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors are effective in delaying the progression of diabetic retinopathy. It is unknown if their use is associated with a better visual outcome in patients with diabetic macular oedema. A non-experimental, comparative, longitudinal and retrospective study was performed on patients with diabetic macular oedema treated by focal photocoagulation, and with systemic arterial hypertension treated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (Group 1), and without hypertension (Group 2). The dependent variable was the proportion with visual improvement, operatively defined as the gain of one or more lines of vision three weeks after photocoagulation. The independent variable was the use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. The proportion of eyes with visual improvement after treatment was compared between groups using the Chi squared (χ(2)) test. A total of 33 eyes (51.6%) were assigned to group 1, and 31 (48.2%), to group 2. The mean of visual acuity improved after three weeks, compared with baseline (p=0.002). The proportion of eyes with visual improvement did not differ between patients treated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (45.5%) and those that did not use them (51.6%, p=0.4). There was no statistical difference in the proportion of eyes with visual improvement between patients treated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and in those where they were not used. There is no support for the inhibition of angiotensin II in addition to photocoagulation for improving the outcome in patients with diabetic macular oedema. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical application of OCTA in observation of macular blood flow density in patients with diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Xiang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Using optical coherence tomography angiography(OCTAto observe the changes and clinical significance of macular blood flow density in patients with diabetic retinopathy(DR.METHODS: Totally 47 eyes(28 patientswith diabetic retinopathy(DRwere enrolled in the DR group. According to the international clinical grading criteria of diabetic retinopathy, 30 eyes(19 patientswith non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy were classified as the NPDR group, and 17 eyes(11 patientswith proliferative diabetic retinopathy were classified as PDR group. A total of 46(27 subjectshealthy eyes with matched age were enrolled in the control group. All the subjects underwent the 3mm×3mm scanning of macular retina by optical coherence tomography angiography(OCTA, obtaining 4 levels of macular blood flow density map. The macular blood flow density at 3 levels, including superficial retinal layer, deep retinal layer and choroidal capillaries layer, were measured. RESULTS: The macular blood flow density of superfical retinal layer, deep retinal layer and choroidal capillaries layer in DR group were 0.4963±0.0840, 0.4798±0.0801 and 0.5290±0.0528, respectively. Among them, the blood flow density of each layer were 0.5064±0.0843,0.4983±0.0766,0.5345±0.0529, respectively, for the NPDR group, and were 0.4786±0.0830, 0.4473±0.0778,0.5192±0.0526, respectively, for the PDR group. For the control group, the density of each layers were 0.5919±0.0704, 0.6301±0.0527, 0.5691±0.0169, respectively. The macular blood flow density was significantly different in the superficial retinal layer, deep retinal layer and choroidal capillary layer between the control group and the NPDR group, as well as the PDR group and the DR group(total PP=0.029, but not in the superficial retina layer and choroid capillary layer(P=0.236, 0.268. CONCLUSION: Compared with the control group, the macular blood flow density of superficial retinal layer, deep retinal layer and choroidal capillary

  12. Advances in retinal imaging for diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Colin Siang Hui; Chew, Milton Cher Yong; Lim, Louis Wei Yi; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema (DME) are leading causes of blindness throughout the world, and cause significant visual morbidity. Ocular imaging has played a significant role in the management of diabetic eye disease, and the advent of advanced imaging modalities will be of great value as our understanding of diabetic eye diseases increase, and the management options become increasingly varied and complex. Color fundus photography has established roles in screening for diabetic eye disease, early detection of progression, and monitoring of treatment response. Fluorescein angiography (FA) detects areas of capillary nonperfusion, as well as leakage from both microaneurysms and neovascularization. Recent advances in retinal imaging modalities complement traditional fundus photography and provide invaluable new information for clinicians. Ultra-widefield imaging, which can be used to produce both color fundus photographs and FAs, now allows unprecedented views of the posterior pole. The pathologies that are detected in the periphery of the retina have the potential to change the grading of disease severity, and may be of prognostic significance to disease progression. Studies have shown that peripheral ischemia may be related to the presence and severity of DME. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides structural detail of the retina, and the quantitative and qualitative features are useful in the monitoring of diabetic eye disease. A relatively recent innovation, OCT angiography, produces images of the fine blood vessels at the macula and optic disc, without the need for contrast agents. This paper will review the roles of each of these imaging modalities for diabetic eye disease.

  13. Vertical transmission of macular telangiectasia type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaere, Lien; Spielberg, Leigh; Leys, Anita M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report vertical transmission of macular telangiectasia type 2 and type 2 diabetes mellitus in 3 families. In this retrospective interventional case series, the charts of patients with inherited macular telangiectasia type 2 were reviewed. A large spectrum of presentations of macular telangiectasia type 2 was observed and has been studied with different techniques including best-corrected visual acuity, microperimetry, confocal blue reflectance fundus autofluorescence, fluorescein angiography, and time domain and spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Vertical transmission of macular telangiectasia type 2 and associated type 2 diabetes mellitus is described in 3 families. Symptomatic as well as asymptomatic eyes with macular telangiectasia type 2 were identified. In 2 families, a mother and son experienced visual loss and were diagnosed with macular telangiectasia type 2. All 4 patients had type 2 diabetes. Diabetic retinopathy was observed in one mother and her son. In the third family, the index patient was diagnosed macular telangiectasia type 2 after complaints of metamorphopsia. She and her family members had type 2 diabetes mellitus, and further screening of her family revealed familial macular telangiectasia type 2. None of the patients were treated for macular telangiectasia type 2. Macular telangiectasia type 2 may be more common than previously assumed, as vision can remain preserved and patients may go undiagnosed. Screening of family members is indicated, and detection of mild anomalies is possible using fundus autofluorescence and spectral domain optical coherence tomography.

  14. Critical appraisal of ranibizumab in the treatment of diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart MW

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Michael W StewartDepartment of Ophthalmology, Mayo School of Medicine, Jacksonville, FL, USAAbstract: Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness among individuals of working age in industrialized nations, with most of the vision loss resulting from diabetic macular edema (DME. The formation of DME depends on the action of several growth factors and inflammatory mediators, but vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF appears to be critical for breaking down the blood-retinal barrier and promoting the accumulation of macular edema. Laser photocoagulation has been the standard-of-care for three decades, and although it stabilizes vision, significant gains in visual acuity after treatment are unusual. Several VEGF inhibitors (pegaptanib, aflibercept, and ranibizumab have been initially developed and tested for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration and subsequently for DME. In Phase I, II, and III trials for DME, ranibizumab has been shown to be superior to macular laser photocoagulation and intraocular triamcinolone acetonide injections for improving visual acuity and drying the macula. As a result, ranibizumab is the only anti-VEGF drug that has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of DME. Most experts now consider intravitreal anti-VEGF therapy to be standard-of-care for DME involving the fovea.Keywords: aflibercept, bevacizumab, diabetic macular edema, diabetic retinopathy, ranibizumab, vascular endothelial growth factor

  15. Pearl necklace sign in diabetic macular edema: Evaluation and significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kshirasagar Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: (1 The purpose of this study was to describe significance and prevalence of the newly reported pearl necklace spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT sign, in diabetic macular edema (DMO, (2 to track the course of this sign over a period of at least 10 months. Materials and Methods: The pearl necklace SDOCT sign refers to hyperreflective dots in a contiguous ring around the inner wall of cystoid spaces in the retina, recently described for the first time in 21 eyes with chronic exudative maculopathy. A retrospective analysis was performed of SDOCT images of all patients presenting to the DMO referral clinic of a tertiary eye care center, over a period of 24 months. Images of patients displaying this sign were sequentially analyzed for at least 10 months to track the course of the sign. Results: Thirty-five eyes of 267 patients (13.1% were found to display the pearl necklace sign. Twenty-eight eyes responded to intravitreal ranibizumab treatment with resolution of edema. In 21 eyes, the dots coalesced to form a clump, visible in the infrared fundus photograph as hard exudates; in seven eyes, dots disappeared without leaving visible exudates. In three eyes, the sign was seen in subfoveal cystoid spaces, with subsequent development of hard exudates, and drop in visual acuity of 20 letters or more. Conclusion: Pearl necklace SDOCT sign is not infrequent in DMO. This sign is a precursor to hard exudates in the majority of cases. If this sign is seen subfoveally, drop in visual acuity can be expected, despite treatment.

  16. Research status of conbercept treating age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Yan He

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration(AMDis one of the major reasons of blindness among the elderly in the developed countries. As AMD patients are increasing year by year, AMD has become one of the important topics of ophthalmic research to prevent blindness. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood, but many studies have shown that vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGFplays an important role in the pathogenesis. With the development and application of anti-VEGF drugs, there are a variety of drugs applied to the disease. This article introduces conbercept for the treatment of AMD.

  17. Intravitreal injection of Ranibizumab combined with laser for diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Xia Huang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the therapeutic effect of intravitreal injection of Ranibizumab combined with laser for diabetic macular edema(DME. METHODS: Totally 60 cases(60 eyesof DME patients treated in ophthalmology department of our hospital from June 2014 to June 2016 were selected and divided into the observation group and the control group. The control group were treated with laser therapy, and the observation group received intravitreal injection of ranibizumab on the basis of the treatment of the control group. Comparison between two groups on the best corrected visual acuity before operation and at 1wk, 1, 3, 6mo after operation was taken. The non-contact tonometer was used to measure intraocular pressure before and after treatment. The optical coherence tomography(OCTwas conducted to assess preoperative and postoperative central macular thickness(CMT.The postoperative complications of two groups were recorded subsequently. RESULTS: The two groups' postoperative visual acuity was significantly improved, data of the observation group at 1, 3mo after operation was sharply higher than that of the control group, there was statistical significance(PP>0.05. After 1wk of treatment, the two groups' intraocular pressure increased, with statistical significance(PP>0.05. The postoperative CMT of two groups significantly decreased, data of the observation group at 1, 3mo after treatment was evidently lower than that of the control group, there was statistical significance(PP>0.05. In the observation group, 5 cases(5 eyesrecurred within 6mo, the recurrence rate was 17%. In the control group, 10 cases(10 eyesrelapsed, the recurrence rate was 33%, the difference was statistically significant(PCONCLUSION: Compared with laser therapy alone, intravitreal injection of ranibizumab combined with laser therapy has a significant and safe short-term treatment effective for DME patients with a fast visual acuity recovery.

  18. Clinical observation of intravitreal injection of Conbercept treating diabetic macularedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jiang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the clinical efficiency of intravitreal conbercept on diabetic macular edema(DME. METHODS: This was a single arm, open-babel prospective study. Twenty eyes from 20 patients(12 males and 8 femaleswith DME diagnosed by fundus fluorescein angiography(FFAand optical coherence tomography(OCTwere enrolled. Before the injection, best-corrected visual acuity(BCVAof early treatment of diabetic retinopathy study(ETDRS, non-contact tonometer, ophthalmoscope, fundus photography, fundus fluoresein angiograph(FFA, and OCT were examined. All affected eyes were treated with intravitreal conbercept 0.05mL(10mg/mL. Patients were followed up for 6 to 11mo, with a mean duration of 8.55±1.96mo. Post-treatment BCVA, CMT, leakage of macular edema and complications were compared with baseline using repeat analysis. RESULTS: The initial average visual acuity(ETDRS letterswere 43.35±17.45, range from 9 to 70. The initial average central macular thickness(CMTwas 576.30±167.92μm, range from 337 to 987μm. The mean BCVA showed significant improvement during 1, 3, 6mo post-treatment and the latest follow up, with a mean increase of 11.2±5.9, 13.8±7.9, 15.7±6.8 and 14.7±8.6, respectively(PPPPCONCLUSION: Intravitreal conbercept significantly improve visual acuity and macular edema exudation.

  19. Functional VEGF C-634G polymorphism is associated with development of diabetic macular edema and correlated with macular retinal thickness in type 2 diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awata, Takuya; Kurihara, Susumu; Takata, Nobuki; Neda, Tamotsu; Iizuka, Hiroyuki; Ohkubo, Tomoko; Osaki, Masataka; Watanabe, Masaki; Nakashima, Youhei; Inukai, Kouichi; Inoue, Ikuo; Kawasaki, Izumi; Mori, Keisuke; Yoneya, Shin; Katayama, Shigehiro

    2005-01-01

    Since vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has a strong effect on induction of vascular permeability, VEGF is an attractive candidate gene for development of diabetic macular edema (ME). Among the 378 patients with type 2 diabetes studied, 203 patients had no retinopathy, 93 had non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR), and 82 had proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). ME was present in 16 patients with NPDR and 47 patients with PDR. We genotyped three VEGF polymorphisms: C-2,578A, G-1,154A, and C-634G. Genotype and allele distribution of C-634G, but not C-2,578A or G-1,154A, were significantly different between patients with and without diabetic retinopathy. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the C-634G genotype was a risk factor for DR (p = 0.002), and furthermore for ME (p = 0.047), independently from severity of DR, with the -634C allele increasing the risk. Macular thickness measured by optical coherence tomography was correlated with the C-634G genotype, with the trend increasing with the presence of more -634C alleles (p = 0.006). Stepwise regression analysis showed that duration of diabetes and presence of the C-634G genotype were independent predictors of macular thickness. In addition, basic transcriptional activity levels associated with the -634C allele were greater compared to those seen with the -634G allele in human glioma and lymphoblastic T-lymphocyte cells. These results demonstrate that the VEGF C-634G polymorphism is a genetic risk factor for ME as well as DR

  20. Letter to the editor: dexamethasone intravitreal implant in the treatment of diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall J

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available John Hall Alimera Sciences Ltd., Aldershot, Hampshire, UK I read “Dexamethasone intravitreal implant in the treatment of diabetic macular edema” published July 2015 by Dugel et al.1This article is very interesting in terms of providing an outline of the role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of diabetic macular edema and explaining the value of corticosteroids in the treatment of diabetic macular edema. However, I would like to draw your attention to the data presented for ILUVIEN® (fluocinolone acetonide; FAc in Table 2, which has been presented incorrectly and does not reflect the approved product and dose in Europe. ILUVIEN is indicated in Europe for the treatment of vision impairment associated with chronic diabetic macular edema, considered insufficiently responsive to available therapies2 and is approved in Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. ILUVIEN was launched in the United Kingdom in April 2013, Germany in May 2013, and Portugal in January 2015.3View original paper by Dugel et al.

  1. Changes in retinal oxygen saturation after intravitreal aflibercept in patients with diabetic macular edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blindbæk, Søren Leer; Peto, Tunde; Grauslund, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    Design of study: Three months prospective interventional study. Purpose: To evaluate changes in retinal arterial and venous oxygen saturation after intravitreal aflibercept in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME). Methods: We included 17 patients with DME, central retinal thickness (CRT) >300...

  2. Guidelines for the Management of Diabetic Macular Edema by the European Society of Retina Specialists (EURETINA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Garcia-Arumi, Jose; Bandello, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    and socioeconomically efficient manner. Laser treatment has found a less destructive competitor in pharmacological treatments. As a consequence of recent rigorous clinical trials, laser photocoagulation is no longer recommended for the treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME), and anti-vascular endothelial growth...

  3. Advances in retinal imaging for diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Siang Hui Tan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema (DME are leading causes of blindness throughout the world, and cause significant visual morbidity. Ocular imaging has played a significant role in the management of diabetic eye disease, and the advent of advanced imaging modalities will be of great value as our understanding of diabetic eye diseases increase, and the management options become increasingly varied and complex. Color fundus photography has established roles in screening for diabetic eye disease, early detection of progression, and monitoring of treatment response. Fluorescein angiography (FA detects areas of capillary nonperfusion, as well as leakage from both microaneurysms and neovascularization. Recent advances in retinal imaging modalities complement traditional fundus photography and provide invaluable new information for clinicians. Ultra-widefield imaging, which can be used to produce both color fundus photographs and FAs, now allows unprecedented views of the posterior pole. The pathologies that are detected in the periphery of the retina have the potential to change the grading of disease severity, and may be of prognostic significance to disease progression. Studies have shown that peripheral ischemia may be related to the presence and severity of DME. Optical coherence tomography (OCT provides structural detail of the retina, and the quantitative and qualitative features are useful in the monitoring of diabetic eye disease. A relatively recent innovation, OCT angiography, produces images of the fine blood vessels at the macula and optic disc, without the need for contrast agents. This paper will review the roles of each of these imaging modalities for diabetic eye disease.

  4. Phacoemulsification with intravitreal bevacizumab injection in diabetic patients with macular edema and cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinci, Arsen; Batman, Cosar; Ozkilic, Ersel; Altinsoy, Ali

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of phacoemulsification with intravitreal bevacizumab injection in patients with diabetic clinically significant macular edema and cataract. The records of 31 patients with diabetic clinically significant macular edema and cataract, which would interfere with macular laser photocoagulation, who have undergone phacoemulsification with intravitreal injection of 1.25 mg bevacizumab were retrospectively evaluated. All patients had undergone focal or modified grid laser photocoagulation 1 month after the surgery. All patients were evaluated by spectral optical coherence tomography/optical coherence tomography SLO before and 1 and 3 months after the surgery beyond complete ophthalmologic examination. The best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) levels and central macular thickness (CMT) recorded at the first and third months after the surgery were compared with the initial values. Paired samples t test was used for statistical analysis. The mean initial BCVA was 0.10 +/- 0.04 (range, 0.05-0.2). The mean BCVA at the first and third months after the surgery were 0.47 +/- 0.16 (standard deviation) (range, 0.2-0.5) and 0.51 +/- 0.12 (standard deviation) (range, 0.3-0.6), respectively. The BCVA level recorded at the first and third months after the surgery were significantly higher than the initial BCVA (P = 0.004). The mean initial CMT was 387.5 +/- 109.5 microm. The mean CMT at the first and third months after the surgery were 292.7 +/- 57.2 and 275.5 +/- 40.3. The CMT recorded at the first and third months after the surgery were significantly lower than the initial CMT (P < 0.001, P < 0.001). Phacoemulsification with intravitreal injection of bevacizumab provides improvement in clinically significant macular edema with a gain in BCVA in patients with diabetes with clinically significant macular edema and cataract.

  5. Macular edema in underserved diabetic patients: Improving detection by enhancing the optical signature and data analysis techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhamami, Mastour Abdullah

    Diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema are chief causes of vision loss in working adults. Thus, retinal screening of patients with diabetes has become standard practice in some countries to prevent visual impairment and blindness from diabetic retinopathy. One goal is to improve techniques currently used to diagnose diabetic retinopathy. Another goal is to probe pathophysiological changes seen with imaging methods. Analysis was performed on a novel dataset from more than 2000 underserved adult diabetic patients, who were recruited for a screening study for diabetic eye disease. Data were collected from four county clinics at Alameda Health, Alameda County, CA. Over 90% of patients self-identified as a racial/ethnic identity other than non-Hispanic white. We investigated the prevalence and optical properties of macular edema. In the first study, a retrospective cohort study was performed to compare macular thickness in diabetic patients with and without macular edema to determine the presence of damage to the external limiting membrane or and the relation of damage to the ELM to damage to photoreceptors. In the second study, we investigated whether the information in red light better visualizes cysts in diabetic macular edema, as compared to green light. In the third study, we investigated whether the demographic and blood glucose information predict diabetic macular edema. Three logistic regression analyses were compared. In the fourth study, we examined how different outcome measures of retinal thickness vary with demographic and blood glucose measures, using a trichotomous variable for retinal thickness. The findings point strongly to large individual differences in the development of macular edema, which is difficult to diagnose with the most common methods in dark eyes. Further, while blood glucose was found to be important, there are additional differences in the potential for macular edema that are associated with ethnic group and gender.

  6. What Is Macular Edema?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... remains. Macular edema is often a complication of diabetic retinopathy , and is the most common form of ... 2016 Study Compares Eylea, Lucentis and Avastin for Diabetic Macular Edema Jul 17, 2015 Top 5 Risk ...

  7. Darapladib, a lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 inhibitor, in diabetic macular edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staurenghi, Giovanni; Ye, Li; Magee, Mindy H

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the potential of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 inhibition as a novel mechanism to reduce edema and improve vision in center-involved diabetic macular edema (DME). DESIGN: Prospective, multicenter, randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled phase IIa study...... (AEs) and nonocular AEs were similar between treatment groups. CONCLUSIONS: Once-daily oral darapladib administered for 3 months demonstrated modest improvements in vision and macular edema that warrant additional investigation of this novel lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 inhibitory mechanism...

  8. Retinal oxygen saturation in relation to retinal thickness in diabetic macular edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blindbæk, Søren Leer; Peto, Tunde; Grauslund, Jakob

    to retinal thickness in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME). Methods: We included 18 patients with DME that all had central retinal thickness (CRT) >300 µm and were free of active proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Optical coherence tomography (Topcon 3D OCT-2000 spectral domain OCT) was used...... for paracentral edema, the oxygen saturation in the upper and lower temporal arcade branches were compared to the corresponding upper and lower subfield thickness. Spearman’s rank was used to calculate correlation coefficients between CRT and retinal oximetry. Results: Median age and duration of diabetes was 59....... 92.3%, p=0.52). We found no correlation between CRT and retinal oxygen saturation, even when accounting for paracentral edema (p>0.05). Furthermore, there was no difference in retinal oxygen saturation between the macular hemisphere that was more or less affected by DME (p>0.05). Conclusion: Patients...

  9. Dose-ranging evaluation of intravitreal siRNA PF-04523655 for diabetic macular edema (the DEGAS study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Quan Dong; Schachar, Ronald A; Nduaka, Chudy I

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of three doses of PF-04523655, a 19-nucleotide methylated double stranded siRNA targeting the RTP801 gene, for the treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME) compared to focal/grid laser photocoagulation.......To evaluate the safety and efficacy of three doses of PF-04523655, a 19-nucleotide methylated double stranded siRNA targeting the RTP801 gene, for the treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME) compared to focal/grid laser photocoagulation....

  10. A 4-Year Longitudinal Study of 555 Patients Treated with Ranibizumab for Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Annette; Bloch, Sara B; Fuchs, Josefine

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the visual outcome, pattern of discontinuation, ocular complications, and mortality of patients treated with a variable ranibizumab dosing regimen for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) for 4 years.......To investigate the visual outcome, pattern of discontinuation, ocular complications, and mortality of patients treated with a variable ranibizumab dosing regimen for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) for 4 years....

  11. Evaluation of time domain and spectral domain optical coherence tomography in the measurement of diabetic macular edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forooghian, Farzin; Cukras, Catherine; Meyerle, Catherine B; Chew, Emily Y; Wong, Wai T

    2008-10-01

    To evaluate macular thickness and volume measurements and their intrasession repeatability in two optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems: the Stratus OCT, a time domain system, and the Cirrus HD-OCT, a spectral domain system (both by Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc., Dublin, CA), in the context of diabetic macular edema (DME). Thirty-three eyes of 33 diabetic patients with clinically significant macular edema (CSME) were scanned in a single session by a single operator on both OCT systems. Macular thickness measurements of nine standard macular subfields and total macular volume were obtained and analyzed. Bland-Altman plots were constructed to assess agreement in macular measurements. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), coefficients of repeatability (CR(W)), and coefficients of variation (CV(W)) were used to assess intrasession repeatability. Macular thickness in nine retinal subfields and macular volume were significantly higher in the Cirrus HD-OCT system compared with the Stratus OCT system. Subfield thickness and total volume measurements, respectively, were 30 to 55 microm and 3.2 mm(3) greater for the Cirrus HD-OCT system compared with the Stratus OCT system. Both Stratus OCT and Cirrus HD-OCT systems demonstrated high intrasession repeatability, with overlapping ranges for CR(W), CV(W), and ICC. Repeatability measures (CR(W) and CV(W)) differed significantly between systems in only one of nine subfields (outer temporal subfield). Absolute measures of macular thickness and volume in patients with DME differed significantly in magnitude between the Stratus OCT and Cirrus HD-OCT systems. However, both OCT systems demonstrated high intrasessional repeatability. Although the two systems may not be used interchangeably, they appear equally reliable in generating macular measurements for clinical practice and research.

  12. Feasibility of telemedicine in detecting diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaziri, Kamyar; Moshfeghi, Darius M; Moshfeghi, Andrew A

    2015-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy are important causes of visual impairment and blindness in the world. Because of recent advances and newly available treatment modalities along with the devastating consequences associated with late stages of these diseases, much attention has been paid to the importance of early detection and improving patient access to specialist care. Telemedicine or, more specifically, digital retinal imaging utilizing telemedical technology has been proposed as an important alternative screening and management strategy to help meet this demand. In this paper, we perform a literature review and analysis that evaluates the validity and feasibility of telemedicine in detecting diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. Understanding both the progress and barriers to progress that have been demonstrated in these two areas is important for future telemedicine research projects and innovations in telemedicine technology.

  13. [Features associated with retinal thickness extension in diabetic macular oedema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razo Blanco-Hernández, Dulce Milagros; Lima-Gómez, Virgilio; García-Rubio, Yatzul Zuhaila

    2015-01-01

    Clinically significant macular edema has features that are associated with a major risk of visual loss, with thickening that involves the centre of the macula, field 7 or visual deficiency, although it is unknown if these features are related to retinal thickness extension. An observational, analytical, prospective, cross-sectional and open study was conducted. The sample was divided into initial visual acuity ≥0.5, central field thickness, center point thickness, field 7 and macular volume more than the reported 2 standard deviation mean value in eyes without retinopathy. The extension was determined by the number of the central field area equivalent thickening and these features were compared with by Student's t test for independent samples. A total of 199 eyes were included. In eyes with visual acuity of ≥0.5, the mean extension was 2.88±1.68 and 3.2±1.63 in area equivalent in eyes with visual acuity 0.5 (p=0.12). The mean extension in eyes with less than 2 standard deviation of central field thickness, center point thickness, field 7 and macular volume was significantly lower than in eyes with more than 2 standard deviations (1.9±0.93 vs. 4.07±1.49, 2.44±1.47 vs. 3.94±1.52, 1.79±1.07 vs. 3.61±1.57 and 1.6±0.9 vs. 3.9±1.4, respectively, p<0.001). The extension of retinal thickness is related with the anatomical features reported with a greater risk of visual loss, but is not related to initial visual deficiency. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. Edema macular por tratamiento con rosiglitazona en diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Asensio-Sánchez, V.M.; Asensio-Sánchez, M.J.; Gómez-Ramírez, V.

    2010-01-01

    Caso clínico: Mujer de 61 años diabética tipo 2 de 7 años de evolución en tratamiento con insulina. Se añade rosiglitazona (4mg al día) para conseguir un control glucémico adecuado. Un mes después, la paciente presenta edema generalizado y pérdida de visión. El estudio fundoscópico mostró edema macular bilateral. En la exploración sistémica destacaban edemas periféricos. La rosiglitazona fue suspendida y la paciente fue tratada de forma conservadora, con resolución rápida de los edemas perifé...

  15. Automated detection of exudates and macula for grading of diabetic macular edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, M Usman; Tariq, Anam; Khan, Shoab A; Javed, M Younus

    2014-04-01

    Medical systems based on state of the art image processing and pattern recognition techniques are very common now a day. These systems are of prime interest to provide basic health care facilities to patients and support to doctors. Diabetic macular edema is one of the retinal abnormalities in which diabetic patient suffers from severe vision loss due to affected macula. It affects the central vision of the person and causes total blindness in severe cases. In this article, we propose an intelligent system for detection and grading of macular edema to assist the ophthalmologists in early and automated detection of the disease. The proposed system consists of a novel method for accurate detection of macula using a detailed feature set and Gaussian mixtures model based classifier. We also present a new hybrid classifier as an ensemble of Gaussian mixture model and support vector machine for improved exudate detection even in the presence of other bright lesions which eventually leads to reliable classification of input retinal image in different stages of macular edema. The statistical analysis and comparative evaluation of proposed system with existing methods are performed on publicly available standard retinal image databases. The proposed system has achieved average value of 97.3%, 95.9% and 96.8% for sensitivity, specificity and accuracy respectively on both databases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of uncomplicated phacoemulsification on central macular thickness in diabetic patients: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Liu

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of uncomplicated phacoemulsification on central macular thickness (CMT and best corrected visual acuity (BCVA in both diabetic patients without diabetic retinopathy (DR and diabetic patients with mild to moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR.Potential prospective observational studies were searched through PubMed and EMBASE. Standardized mean difference (SMD and 95% confidence interval (CI for changes in CMT and BCVA were evaluated at postoperative 1, 3 and 6 months. The pooled effect estimates were calculated in the use of a random-effects model.A total of 10 studies involving 190 eyes of diabetic patients without diabetic retinopathy and 143 eyes of diabetic patients with NPDR were identified. CMT values demonstrated a statistically significant increase after uncomplicated phacoemulsification at 1 month (SMD, -0.814; 95%CI, -1.230 to -0.399, 3 months (SMD, -0.565; 95%CI, -0.927 to -0.202 and 6 months (SMD, -0.458; 95%CI, -0.739 to -0.177 in diabetic patients with NPDR. There was no statistical difference in CMT values at postoperative 1 month (SMD, -1.206; 95%CI, -2.433 to 0.021and no statistically significant increase in CMT values at postoperative3 months (SMD, -0.535; 95%CI, -1.252 to 0.182 and 6 months (SMD, -1.181; 95%CI, -2.625 to 0.263 in diabetic patients without DR.BCVA was significantly increased at postoperative 1 month (SMD, 1.149; 95%CI, 0.251 to 2.047; and SMD,1.349; 95%CI, 0.264 to 2.434, respectively and 6 months (SMD, 1.295; 95%CI, 0.494 to 2.096; and SMD, 2.146; 95%CI, 0.172 to 4.120, respectively in both diabetic patients without DR and diabetic patients with NPDR. Sensitivity analysis showed that the results were relatively stable and reliable.Uncomplicated phacoemulsification in diabetic patients with mild to moderate NPDR seemed to influence significantly the subclinical thickening of the macular zones at postoperative 1, 3 and 6 months compared with diabetic patients without DR

  17. EVALUATION OF DIABETIC MACULAR OEDEMA WITH SPECTRAL DOMAIN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY AND FUNDUS FLUORESCEIN ANGIOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallika Venkitasubramanian

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Macular oedema is an important cause of visual morbidity in Diabetic Retinopathy. It can be assessed by both Fundus Fluorescein Angiography (FFA and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT. The aims of this study were to evaluate the agreement between morphological features on spectral domain Optical Coherence Tomography and Fluorescein Angiographic leakage patterns in Diabetic Macular Oedema, and to study the correlation between the best corrected visual acuity and central foveal thickness measured by Optical Coherence Tomography. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was an observational study. All patients with Diabetic Macular Oedema underwent complete ophthalmic examination and subjected to FFA and OCT. Presence or absence of macular oedema by FFA and OCT was noted and agreement between two modalities of imaging was assessed. Sensitivity of these modalities were also found out using appropriate statistical methods. Best Corrected Visual Acuity (BCVA measured were converted to LogMAR scale and Central foveal thickness measured by OCT. Linear regression analysis was done with central foveal thickness and LogMAR visual acuity. RESULTS A total of 69 eyes of 39 patients were studied. OCT revealed Diabetic Macular Oedema in 97.5% of eyes. Fundus Fluorescein Angiography performed in these patients identified leakage in 95.6% of eyes. Sensitivity and specificity of FFA and OCT were calculated keeping one as the gold standard for sensitivity and specificity of the other. FFA and OCT had almost equal sensitivity (95.46 for OCT and 96.92 for FFA for detection of DME. Specificity of OCT was found to be slightly higher (33.33% compared to FFA (25%. Our results suggest that there is minimal agreement between these two imaging modalities in evaluating DME. Statistically, Kappa value was 0.248. Linear regression analysis showed that central foveal thickness had a significant correlation with visual acuity, with Pearson correlation coefficient r=0.442, p=0

  18. Comparison of grid laser, intravitreal triamcinolone, and intravitreal bevacizumab in the treatment of diffuse diabetic macular edema.

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    Sobaci, Güngör; Ozge, Gökhan; Erdurman, Cüneyt; Durukan, Hakan A; Bayraktar, Zeki M

    2012-01-01

    To compare the effects of grid laser (GL), intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB), and intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide (IVTA) in diffuse diabetic macular edema (DDME). One hundred and twenty-six patients (126 eyes) treated with GL (modified grid), IVTA (4 mg), and IVB (1.25 mg) injections, matched for best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and OCT-based central macular thickness at presentation, were enrolled. Primary outcome measure was change in best corrected logMAR visual acuity at 1-year follow-up. Rates of visual stabilization (within ±0.2 logMAR of baseline BCVA) (71.4, 83.3, 78.6%, respectively) were not different between the groups (p = 0.41) at 12-month follow-up. Higher rates of anatomical and functional success, however, were evident in IVB and IVTA groups within 6 months of treatment (p < 0.05 for both). No severe adverse effects except higher intraocular pressure (10 mm Hg from baseline) in one third (14 eyes) of the IVTA cases, who required trabeculectomy in 2 (4.8%) eyes, were observed. Intraocular injections may give favorable results within the first 6 months, and after 6 months, GL results seem to be more favorable in the treatment of treatment-naïve, acute, nonischemic, and center-involving DDME. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. SDOCT imaging to identify macular pathology in patients diagnosed with diabetic maculopathy by a digital photographic retinal screening programme.

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    Sarah Mackenzie

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Diabetic macular edema (DME is an important cause of vision loss. England has a national systematic photographic retinal screening programme to identify patients with diabetic eye disease. Grading retinal photographs according to this national protocol identifies surrogate markers for DME. We audited a care pathway using a spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT clinic to identify macular pathology in this subset of patients. METHODS: A prospective audit was performed of patients referred from screening with mild to moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (R1 and surrogate markers for diabetic macular edema (M1 attending an SDOCT clinic. The SDOCT images were graded by an ophthalmologist as SDOCT positive, borderline or negative. SDOCT positive patients were referred to the medical retina clinic. SDOCT negative and borderline patients were further reviewed in the SDOCT clinic in 6 months. RESULTS: From a registered screening population of 17 551 patients with diabetes mellitus, 311 patients met the inclusion criteria between (March 2008 and September 2009. We analyzed images from 311 patients' SDOCT clinic episodes. There were 131 SDOCT negative and 12 borderline patients booked for revisit in the OCT clinic. Twenty-four were referred back to photographic screening for a variety of reasons. A total of 144 were referred to ophthalmology with OCT evidence of definite macular pathology requiring review by an ophthalmologist. DISCUSSION: This analysis shows that patients with diabetes, mild to moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (R1 and evidence of diabetic maculopathy on non-stereoscopic retinal photographs (M1 have a 42.1% chance of having no macular edema on SDOCT imaging as defined by standard OCT definitions of DME when graded by a retinal specialist. SDOCT imaging is a useful adjunct to colour fundus photography in screening for referable diabetic maculopathy in our screening population.

  20. Outcomes of macular hole surgery in patients treated intraoperatively for retinal breaks and/or lattice degeneration.

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    Hwang, John; Escariao, Paulo; Iranmanesh, Reza; Tosi, Gian Marco; Chang, Stanley

    2007-01-01

    To assess the outcome of macular hole surgery in patients treated intraoperatively for retinal breaks and/or lattice degeneration. Retrospective review of patients who underwent macular hole surgery from September 1998 to August 2005. Outcomes in eyes that received intraoperative endolaser photocoagulation for retinal breaks and/or lattice degeneration were compared to outcomes in a case-matched control group without retinal breaks or lattice degeneration. A total of 235 consecutive macular hole surgery cases were reviewed. Twenty-four eyes from 24 patients received intraoperative endolaser photocoagulation for retinal breaks and/or lattice degeneration. Macular hole closure occurred in all case and control eyes without any incidence of postoperative retinal detachment. Best-corrected visual acuity improvement of at least three Snellen lines occurred in 100% of case eyes and 92% of control eyes. Outcomes of macular hole surgery in patients with retinal breaks and/or lattice degeneration are similar to outcomes in the overall population when these conditions are treated with intraoperative endolaser photocoagulation. Postoperative retinal detachment does not appear to be correlated with treated retinal tears and greater attention should focus on detecting and managing intraoperative breaks. In our hands, routine use panoramic viewing has replaced indirect ophthalmoscopy, by saving time, and reducing the risk of contamination.

  1. Relationship between photoreceptor outer segment length and visual acuity in diabetic macular edema.

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    Forooghian, Farzin; Stetson, Paul F; Meyer, Scott A; Chew, Emily Y; Wong, Wai T; Cukras, Catherine; Meyerle, Catherine B; Ferris, Frederick L

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify photoreceptor outer segment (PROS) length in 27 consecutive patients (30 eyes) with diabetic macular edema using spectral domain optical coherence tomography and to describe the correlation between PROS length and visual acuity. Three spectral domain-optical coherence tomography scans were performed on all eyes during each session using Cirrus HD-OCT. A prototype algorithm was developed for quantitative assessment of PROS length. Retinal thicknesses and PROS lengths were calculated for 3 parameters: macular grid (6 x 6 mm), central subfield (1 mm), and center foveal point (0.33 mm). Intrasession repeatability was assessed using coefficient of variation and intraclass correlation coefficient. The association between retinal thickness and PROS length with visual acuity was assessed using linear regression and Pearson correlation analyses. The main outcome measures include intrasession repeatability of macular parameters and correlation of these parameters with visual acuity. Mean retinal thickness and PROS length were 298 mum to 381 microm and 30 microm to 32 mum, respectively, for macular parameters assessed in this study. Coefficient of variation values were 0.75% to 4.13% for retinal thickness and 1.97% to 14.01% for PROS length. Intraclass correlation coefficient values were 0.96 to 0.99 and 0.73 to 0.98 for retinal thickness and PROS length, respectively. Slopes from linear regression analyses assessing the association of retinal thickness and visual acuity were not significantly different from 0 (P > 0.20), whereas the slopes of PROS length and visual acuity were significantly different from 0 (P < 0.0005). Correlation coefficients for macular thickness and visual acuity ranged from 0.13 to 0.22, whereas coefficients for PROS length and visual acuity ranged from -0.61 to -0.81. Photoreceptor outer segment length can be quantitatively assessed using Cirrus HD-OCT. Although the intrasession repeatability of PROS

  2. Uso intravítreo de la triamcinolona en el edema macular diabético Use of intravitreous Triamcinolone in cases of diabetic macular edema

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    Juana Elvira Maciques Rodríguez

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available ANTECEDENTES: el edema macular diabético constituye la causa más frecuente de baja visión en personas con retinopatía diabética. En los diabéticos con edema macular diabético severo o difuso, la fotocoagulación con láser no ha brindado los resultados deseados. OBJETIVOS: revisar el estado actual del uso del acetato de triamcinolona por vía intravítrea en los pacientes con esa enfermedad. DESARROLLO: el acetato de triamcinolona es un corticoide con una potente acción antiinflamatoria y antiangiogénica, que consigue estabilizar la barrera hematorretiniana e inhibir la angiogénesis, de ahí que se ha empleado en el tratamiento del edema macular diabético, donde el daño de la barrera hematorretiniana y la liberación de factores angiogénicos en respuesta a la hipoxia están implicados fuertemente en la patogénesis de este tipo de edema. La administración intravítrea en diversas dosificaciones, y no en pocas ocasiones en forma repetida, han mostrado resultados un tanto controversiales al comparar el efecto beneficioso que produce el acetato de triamcinolona, con la corta duración de su efecto y las preocupaciones relacionadas con las complicaciones (hipertensión ocular, endoftalmitis, hemorragia vítrea, etc. relacionadas con las reinyecciones. Actualmente se ensayan dispositivos que liberan el acetato de triamcinolona de forma lenta y prolongan su efecto, para encontrar una estrategia de tratamiento más razonable y que sus efectos terapéuticos sean siempre superiores a los efectos indeseados. CONCLUSIONES: el tratamiento con acetato de triamcinolona constituye una alternativa en la mejoría del edema macular diabético, aunque estudios prospectivos y con período de seguimiento largo son necesarios para llegar a resultados más consistentes.BACKGROUNDS: diabetic macular edema is the more frequent cause of low grade vision in persons presenting with diabetic retinopathy. In diabetic patients with severe or diffuse diabetic

  3. Microperimetry and fundus autofluorescence in diabetic macular edema: subthreshold micropulse diode laser versus modified early treatment diabetic retinopathy study laser photocoagulation.

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    Vujosevic, Stela; Bottega, Elisa; Casciano, Margherita; Pilotto, Elisabetta; Convento, Enrica; Midena, Edoardo

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare microperimetry and fundus autofluorescence (FAF) after subthreshold micropulse diode laser versus modified Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study photocoagulation for clinically significant diabetic macular edema. A prospective randomized clinical trial including 62 eyes (50 patients) with untreated, center-involving, clinically significant diabetic macular edema was performed. All patients underwent best-corrected visual acuity determination (logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution), slit-lamp biomicroscopy, FAF, optical coherence tomography, microperimetry (macular sensitivity), and fluorescein angiography before and after treatment. Best-corrected visual acuity, optical coherence tomography, microperimetry, and FAF were repeated at 1-, 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month follow-up examinations. Fluorescein angiography was performed at baseline and at 6 and 12 months. Before treatment, demographic and macular parameters were not different between the two treatment groups. At 12 months, best-corrected visual acuity remained stable in both groups (P = 0.41 and P = 0.82), mean central retinal thickness decreased in both groups (P = 0.0002 and P autofluorescence never changed in the micropulse diode laser group even after retreatment. In the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study group, FAF increased up to 9 months and decreased in 6 eyes (20%) at 12 months. Micropulse diode laser seems to be as effective as modified Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study laser photocoagulation in the treatment of clinically significant diabetic macular edema. Micropulse diode laser treatment does not determine any change on FAF showing (at least) nonclinically visible damage of the retinal pigment epithelium. Microperimetry data encourage the use of a new, less aggressive laser therapeutic approach in the treatment of clinically significant diabetic macular edema.

  4. Classification of Diabetic Macular Edema and Its Stages Using Color Fundus Image

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammad Zubair; Shoab A. Khan; Ubaid Ullah Yasin

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) is a retinal thickening involving the center of the macula. It is one of the serious eye diseases which affects the central vision and can lead to partial or even complete visual loss. The only cure is timely diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of the disease. This paper presents an automated system for the diagnosis and classification of DME using color fundus image. In the proposed technique, first the optic disc is removed by applying some preprocessing steps. The preprocessed image is then passed through a classifier for segmentation of the image to detect exudates. The classifier uses dynamic thresholding technique by using some input parameters of the image. The stage classification is done on the basis of anearly treatment diabetic retinopathy study (ETDRS) given criteria to assess the severity of disease. The proposed technique gives a sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 98.27%, 96.58%, and 96.54%, respectively on publically available database.

  5. Six-month postoperative outcomes of intraoperative OCT-guided surgical cystotomy for refractory cystoid macular edema in diabetic eyes

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    Asahina Y

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Yuichi Asahina, Naoko Tachi, Yumi Asahina, Kayoko Yoshimura, Yoshiki Ueta, Yoshihiro Hashimoto Eye Center, Shinseikai Toyama Hospital, Imizu, Toyama, Japan Purpose: This study evaluated the outcomes of surgical cystotomy for recurrent diabetic cystoid macular edema (CME.Patients and methods: We analyzed 20 eyes with a clinical diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy and refractory CME. Release of vitreoretinal adhesion, epiretinal membrane (ERM and internal limiting membrane (ILM peeling and cystotomy guided by intraoperative optical coherence tomography (iOCT were performed in every patient. Pars plana vitrectomy was also performed in 17 patients, 11 of whom also underwent lensectomy and intraocular lens implantation. Central retinal thickness (CRT, central minimum macular thickness (CMMT, macular volume (MV and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA were compared preoperatively and 1 and 6 months post surgery.Results: CRT, CMMT and MV significantly improved 1 and 6 months post surgery in each group (P<0.01. Significant improvements in BCVA were only observed 6 months post surgery (P<0.01. No intra- or postoperative complications were observed in all patients.Conclusion: CRT, CMMT, MV and BCVA significantly improved 6 months following surgical cystectomy. This implies that iOCT-guided cystotomy could be another treatment option for refractory CME in diabetic eyes. Keywords: diabetic retinopathy, cystoid macular edema, intraoperative OCT, cystotomy

  6. Management of diabetic macular edema in Japan: a review and expert opinion.

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    Terasaki, Hiroko; Ogura, Yuichiro; Kitano, Shigehiko; Sakamoto, Taiji; Murata, Toshinori; Hirakata, Akito; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2018-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a frequent cause of visual impairment in working-age adults (≥ 30 years) and in Japan is most commonly observed in those aged 50-69 years. Diabetic macular edema (DME) is one of the main causes of vision disturbance in diabetic retinopathy, which is a clinically significant microvascular complication of diabetes. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy is becoming the mainstay of treatment for DME. However, to achieve sustained long-term improvement in visual acuity, conventional laser photocoagulation, vitrectomy and steroid therapy are also expected to play a role in the treatment of DME. This review summarizes the epidemiology and pathology of diabetic retinopathy and DME, evaluates the findings regarding the diagnosis and treatment of DME, and underscores the importance of systemic management of the disease in the context of the current health care situation in Japan. Finally, the unmet needs of patients with DME and prospects for research are discussed. The weight of evidence suggests that it is important to establish a multipronged treatment strategy centered on anti-VEGF therapy.

  7. Health-related quality of life, visual function and treatment satisfaction following intravitreal dexamethasone implant for diabetic macular edema

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    Ramu J

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Jayashree Ramu,1 Irini Chatziralli,1 Yit Yang,2 Geeta Menon,3 Clare Bailey,4 Michael Eckstein,5 Phil Hykin,1 Sobha Sivaprasad1 On behalf of the OZDRY Study Group 1NIHR Moorfields Biomedical Research Centre, London, 2The Royal Wolverhampton Hospitals NHS Trust, Wolverhampton, 3Frimley Health NHS Foundation Trust, Surrey, 4Bristol Eye Hospital, Bristol, 5Brighton and Sussex University Hospital, Brighton, UK Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore and describe quantitatively patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs, ie, health-related quality of life (QoL, visual function and treatment satisfaction, in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME receiving two different regimens of Ozurdex (intravitreal dexamethasone implant. Methods: In this multicenter, prospective study, 100 patients with center-involving refractory DME were randomized 1:1 to either five monthly fixed dosing or optical coherence tomography (OCT-guided pro re nata (PRN regimen of dexamethasone intravitreal implant therapy. The primary outcome was the difference between arms in change in PROMs and health-related QoL from baseline to 12 months, as measured by the Retinopathy-Dependent Quality of Life (RetDQoL questionnaire, Visual Function Questionnaire-25 (VFQ-25 and Retinopathy Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (RetTSQ. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the RetDQoL score and VFQ-25 score at month 12 compared to those at baseline, whereas the total mean RetTSQ score increased significantly at the exit visit. The two treatment arms did not differ significantly regarding the change in PROMs and health-related QoL questionnaires. Logistic regression analysis showed that visual acuity (VA of ≥55 letters, central foveal thickness <300 µm and macular volume <9.2 mm3 at the exit visit (month 12 predicted a higher change in RetTSQ. Conclusion: This study showed that there is a statistically significant improvement in treatment satisfaction, as

  8. EFFECT OF INTERNAL LIMITING MEMBRANE PEELING DURING VITRECTOMY FOR DIABETIC MACULAR EDEMA: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

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    Nakajima, Takuya; Roggia, Murilo F; Noda, Yasuo; Ueta, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling during vitrectomy for diabetic macular edema. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL were systematically reviewed. Eligible studies included randomized or nonrandomized studies that compared surgical outcomes of vitrectomy with or without ILM peeling for diabetic macular edema. The primary and secondary outcome measures were postoperative best-corrected visual acuity and central macular thickness. Meta-analysis on mean differences between vitrectomy with and without ILM peeling was performed using inverse variance method in random effects. Five studies (7 articles) with 741 patients were eligible for analysis. Superiority (95% confidence interval) in postoperative best-corrected visual acuity in ILM peeling group compared with nonpeeling group was 0.04 (-0.05 to 0.13) logMAR (equivalent to 2.0 ETDRS letters, P = 0.37), and superiority in best-corrected visual acuity change in ILM peeling group was 0.04 (-0.02 to 0.09) logMAR (equivalent to 2.0 ETDRS letters, P = 0.16). There was no significant difference in postoperative central macular thickness and central macular thickness reduction between the two groups. The visual acuity outcomes using pars plana vitrectomy with ILM peeling versus no ILM peeling were not significantly different. A larger randomized prospective study would be necessary to adequately address the effectiveness of ILM peeling on visual acuity outcomes.

  9. Effect of oral tranexamic acid on macular edema associated with retinal vein occlusion or diabetes

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    Takeyama M

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Masayuki Takeyama,1 Fumio Takeuchi,2 Masahiko Gosho,3 Keijiro Sugita,1 Masahiro Zako,4 Masayoshi Iwaki,5 Motohiro Kamei1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Aichi Medical University, Nagakute, 2Department of Biochemistry, Aichi Medical University, Nagakute, 3Department of Clinical Trial and Clinical Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, 4Department of Ophthalmology, Asia Hospital, Seto, 5Department of Ophthalmology, Yokkaichi, Digestive Disease Center, Komono, Japan Purpose: Tranexamic acid (TXA is a widely used antifibrinolytic agent that can also cause a decrease in vascular permeability. We hypothesized that TXA could improve macular edema (ME that is caused by an increase in retinal vascular permeability. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of oral TXA for ME associated with retinal vein occlusion (RVO or diabetic ME (DME.Patients and methods: Oral TXA (1,500 mg daily for 2 weeks was administered to patients with persistent ME secondary to RVO (7 eyes and DME (7 eyes. After 2 weeks (ie, the final day of administration and 6 weeks (ie, 4 weeks after the final administration, best-corrected visual acuity and central macular thickness (CMT were measured and compared with baseline. Analyses were performed for RVO and DME cases. No other treatment was performed during the study period.Results: In RVO cases, significant improvement in CMT was found between baseline (467.7±121.4 µm and 2-week measurements after treatment (428.7±110.5 µm, p=0.024. No significant change was found in CMT between measurements taken at baseline and 6 weeks after treatment. In DME cases, no significant change was found in CMT between measurements taken at baseline and 2 or 6 weeks after treatment. In all analyses of best-corrected visual acuity, no significant change was observed.Conclusion: The results support the hypothesis that plasmin plays a role in the development of ME associated with RVO, and oral TXA administration may be

  10. Effect of serum cytokines and VEGF levels on diabetic retinopathy and macular thickness.

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    Ozturk, Banu Turgut; Bozkurt, Banu; Kerimoglu, Hurkan; Okka, Mehmet; Kamis, Umit; Gunduz, Kemal

    2009-09-19

    To investigate the role of serum inflammatory cytokines and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in diabetic retinopathy (DR) and evaluate their relationship with macular thickness measurements obtained with optical coherence tomography (OCT). The study enrolled 28 healthy subjects (Group 1), 31 patients without DR (Group 2), 49 patients with nonproliferative DR (Group 3), and 46 patients with proliferative DR (Group 4). Macular profile was assessed with Stratus OCT-3 and the serum concentrations of VEGF and interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), interleukin-10 (IL-10), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-1 alpha), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), and epidermal growth factor (EGF) were measured using multiplex bead immunoassay. The median value of the visual acuity was 20/20 (Groups 1 and 2), and 20/100 (Group 3), and 20/125 (Group 4). The median value of central subfield macular thickness was estimated as 165.50 microm in Group 1, 202.5 microm in Group 2, 318 microm in Group 3, and 310 microm in Group 4. The median serum VEGF level, which was 98.20 pg/ml in Group 1, demonstrated a progressive rise to 125.37 pg/ml in Group 2, to 153.07 pg/ml in Group 3, and to 149.12 pg/ml in Group 4. Statistical significance was found between all groups (p0.05). The median serum levels of IL-8, IL-10, MIP-1 alpha, and EGF revealed a wide range within each group, however, no statistically significant relationship was found between the groups (p>0.05). The median values of the serum MCP-1 concentrations presented a statistically significant rise with the progression of DR (p=0.02). No correlation was found between macular thickness and serum cytokine and VEGF levels (p>0.05). Increased serum levels of VEGF and MCP-1 may act as a key regulator of DR and provide a potential tool for risk assessment in diabetic patients. Further studies that evaluate both vitreous and serum levels in various stages of DR are needed to provide a

  11. [Efficacy of topical ketorolac for improving visual function after photocoagulation in diabetic patients with focal macular edema].

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    Razo Blanco-Hernández, Dulce Milagros; Lima-Gómez, Virgilio; Asbun-Bojalil, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Photocoagulation reduces the incidence of visual loss in diabetic patients with focal macular edema, but it can induce it for Efficacy of topical ketorolac for improving visual function after photocoagulation in diabetic patients with focal macular edema 6 weeks after treatment and produces visual improvement in some cases. Topical ketorolac may reduce the inflammation caused by photocoagulation and improve visual outcome. To determine the efficacy of topical ketorolac for improving visual function after photocoagulation in diabetic patients with focal macular edema. An experimental, comparative, prospective, longitudinal study in diabetic patients with focal macular edema was conducted. Eyes were randomized into two groups of topical treatment for 3 weeks after photocoagulation (A: ketorolac, B: placebo). Best corrected visual acuity before and after treatment was compared in each group (paired t test), and the proportion of eyes with visual improvement was compared between groups (χ(2)). The evaluation was repeated after stratifying for initial visual acuity (≥ 0.5, < 0.5). There were 105 eyes included. In group A (n= 46) mean visual acuity changed from 0.50 to 0.58 (p= 0.003), and from 0.55 to 0.55 in group B (n= 59, p= 0.83); mean percent change was 22.3% in group A and 3.5% in group B (p= 0.03). Visual improvement was identified in 25 eyes from group A (54.3%) and 19 from group B (32.2%, p= 0.019, RR 1.65); the difference only persisted when initial visual acuity was ≥ 0.5 (10 [40%], group A, 5 [14.7%], group B, p= 0.02, RR 2.72). Topical ketorolac was more effective than placebo to improve best corrected visual acuity in diabetic patients with focal macular edema.

  12. Diabetic Macular Ischemia Diagnosis: Comparison between Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography and Fluorescein Angiography

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    Jose Mauricio Botto de Barros Garcia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare fluorescein angiography (FA and optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA images of foveal avascular zone (FAZ in patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR with and without diabetic macular ischemia (DMI. Methods. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare area measurements and p values of <0.05 were considered statistically significant. FA and OCTA images were independently graded by 2 observers that reached agreement regarding quantitative DMI according established protocols. The ischemic area was divided into “large” macular ischemia (superior to 0.32 mm2 and “small” (inferior to 0.32 mm2 groups. Quantitative analyses of the FAZ were performed using custom software. Results. Thirty-four eyes from 34 diabetic patients were enrolled. Subjects with DMI presented a mean area on FA and OCTA of 0.68 ± 0.53 mm2 and 0.58 ± 0.35 mm2, respectively (p=0.1374. Patients without DMI presented a mean area on FA and OCTA of 0.19 ± 0.67 mm2 and 0.20 ± 0.79 mm2, respectively (p=0.9594. The ICC for the FAZ measurements between the 2 observers on FA and OCTA was 0.96 and 0.92, respectively. Conclusion. OCTA represents a novel technique for the diagnosis of DMI and it may become an alternative to FA for this purpose.

  13. Effect of posture on the diurnal variation in clinically significant diabetic macular edema.

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    Polito, Antonio; Polini, Giovanni; Chiodini, Raffaella Gortana; Isola, Miriam; Soldano, Franca; Bandello, Francesco

    2007-07-01

    To investigate the role of posture and other systemic factors in the diurnal variation of clinically significant diabetic macular edema (CSDME). Ten eyes of 10 diabetic subjects with CSDME underwent four OCT foveal thickness measurements with StratusOCT at 9 AM and 12, 3, and 6 PM consecutively on two different days, with the subject in an upright position on one and in a recumbent position on the other. For the "recumbent-position" measurements, the patients were admitted the night before and remained in bed during the entire day of testing. Clinical laboratory results at baseline included HbA1c, urinary albumin, and serum creatinine. Refraction and Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) visual acuity were also measured before each OCT measurement was taken. Variations in blood pressure, body temperature, plasma glucose, renin, aldosterone, and cortisol levels were measured and then correlated with macular thickness. Foveal thickening decreased in all cases over the course of the day. The decrease, however, was significantly greater for the upright-position measurements (relative mean +/- SD decrease of 20.6% +/- 6.5% in the upright position and 6.2% +/- 4.6% in the recumbent position). Visual acuity improved by at least 1 ETDRS line in three eyes in the upright position as opposed to only one eye in the recumbent position. There seemed to be no association between any of the systemic factors studied and foveal thickening, with the exception of cortisol. The results support the hypothesis that posture and hydrostatic pressure play a major role in determining time-related shifts in CSDME and suggest that the forces of Starling's law can in part, account for CSDME formation.

  14. Who Gets Diabetic Macular Oedema; When; and Why? Pathogenesis and Risk Factors

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    Banu Turgut Ozturk

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic macular oedema (DMO presents an enormous rise in the last decades with an increasing number of diabetic patients. It has a negative impact on the health-related quality of life beside the related visual loss. Additionally, it incurs more health centre visits, higher health costs, and lower working performance. Therefore, early diagnosis and preventive measures gain more and more importance in the management of DMO. Risk factors for DMO can be divided into systemic and ocular risk factors. The leading systemic risk factors include age, type and duration of diabetes, insulin use, and glucose regulation. Hypertension, nephropathy, hyperlipidaemia, anaemia, cardiovascular disease, smoking, and amputation are other risk factors reported. In addition, susceptibility in cases with endothelial nitric oxide synthase polymorphism and vascular endothelial growth factor C634-G polymorphism has been reported. The severity of diabetic retinopathy, microaneurysm turnover, cataract surgery, incomplete vitreous detachment, and peripheral retinal ischaemia are among ocular risk factors. Though avoiding changes in the metabolic memory related to hyperglycaemia in the early period seems to be the most efficient treatment, nowadays close follow-up of patients with high risk and effort to control the modifiable risk factors seems to be the ideal treatment.

  15. Longitudinal Study of Sustained-Release Dexamethasone Intravitreal Implant in Patients with Diabetic Macular Edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aknin, Isabelle; Melki, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Observational studies are needed to confirm the long-term efficacy and safety of Ozurdex® intravitreal implant in real life. Among 29 patients with persistent diabetic macular edema (DME), of whom 14 (48%) patients did not have any previous treatments and 22 (76%) any previous antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) injections, significant visual acuity (VA) improvement was observed with a mean gain of 13.8 letters at month 6 (p < 0.0001), 12.7 letters at month 12 (p = 0.0032) and 16.5 letters at month 18 (p = 0.0313). During the follow-up, a total of 17 (59%) patients had a VA improvement of ≥15 letters. Significant central macular thickness decrease was observed with a mean reduction of 159.07 μm at month 6 (p < 0.0001), 181.8 μm at month 12 (p < 0.0001) and 236.17 μm at month 18 (p = 0.0313). No serious adverse events were reported. With a good efficacy and safety, manageable adverse events and an injection rate much lower compared to that of anti-VEGF, this study confirms the use of Ozurdex® for the treatment of persistent DME. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Correlation of retinal nerve fibre layer and macular thickness with serum uric acid among type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinuthinee-Naidu, Munisamy-Naidu; Zunaina, Embong; Azreen-Redzal, Anuar; Nyi-Nyi, Naing

    2017-06-14

    Uric acid is a final breakdown product of purine catabolism in humans. It's a potent antioxidant and can also act as a pro-oxidant that induces oxidative stress on the vascular endothelial cells, thus mediating progression of diabetic related diseases. Various epidemiological and experimental evidence suggest that uric acid has a role in the etiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We conducted a cross-sectional study to evaluate the correlation of retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) and macular thickness with serum uric acid in type 2 diabetic patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the Eye Clinic, Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan between the period of August 2013 till July 2015 involving type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with no diabetic retinopathy and with non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR). An evaluation for RNFL and macular thickness was measured using Spectralis Heidelberg optical coherence tomography. Six ml of venous blood was taken for the measurement of serum uric acid and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1 C ). A total of 180 diabetic patients were recruited (90 patients with no diabetic retinopathy and 90 patients with NPDR) into the study. The mean level of serum uric acid for both the groups was within normal range and there was no significance difference between the two groups. Based on gender, both male and female gender showed significantly higher level of mean serum uric acid in no diabetic retinopathy group (p = 0.004 respectively). The mean serum uric acid was significantly higher in patient with HbA1 C  uric acid in both the groups. Serum uric acid showed a poor correlation with RNFL and macular thickness among type 2 diabetic patients.

  17. Macular Atrophy Development and Subretinal Drusenoid Deposits in Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Treated Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarubina, Anna V; Gal-Or, Orly; Huisingh, Carrie E; Owsley, Cynthia; Freund, K Bailey

    2017-12-01

    To explore the association between presence of subretinal drusenoid deposits (SDD) at baseline in eyes with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) with the development of macular atrophy (MA) during anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy. There were 74 eyes without pre-existing MA receiving anti-VEGF therapy for nAMD for 2 years or longer analyzed. At least two image modalities that included spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, near-infrared reflectance, fluorescein angiography, and color fundus photos were used to assess for SDD presence, phenotype (dot and ribbon), and location, neovascularization type, and MA. Logistic regression models using generalized estimating equations assessed the association between SDD and the development of MA adjusting for age, neovascularization type, and choroidal thickness. SDD were present in 46 eyes (63%) at baseline. MA developed in 38 eyes (51%) during the mean of 4.7 ± 1.2 years of follow-up. Compared with eyes without SDD, those with SDD at baseline were 3.0 times (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-8.5, P = 0.0343) more likely to develop MA. Eyes with SDD present in the inferior macula and inferior extramacular fields at baseline were 3.0 times and 6.5 times more likely to develop MA at follow-up than eyes without SDD in these locations (95% CI 1.0-8.9, P = 0.0461 and 95% CI 1.3-32.4, P = 0.0218, respectively). MA development was not associated with a specific SDD phenotype. MA frequently developed in eyes during anti-VEGF treatment. SDD were independently associated with MA development. The extension of SDD into the inferior fundus, particularly in the inferior extramacular field, conferred higher odds of subsequent MA development.

  18. Subfoveal fibrosis in eyes with neovascular age-related macular degeneration treated with intravitreal ranibizumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, Sara Brandi; Lund-Andersen, Henrik; Sander, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    To assess baseline and follow-up characteristics of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) lesions in age-related macular degeneration in relation to the development of subfoveal subretinal fibrosis.......To assess baseline and follow-up characteristics of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) lesions in age-related macular degeneration in relation to the development of subfoveal subretinal fibrosis....

  19. Quantification of fluid resorption from diabetic macular oedema with foveal serous detachment after dexamethasone intravitreal implant (Ozurdex®) in a pregnant diabetic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hodzic-Hadzibegovic, Delila; Ba-Ali, Shakoor; Valerius, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To quantify the fluid resorption from the centre of the fovea in a pregnant woman with diabetic macular oedema by daily optical coherence tomography (OCT) measurements after the administration of intravitreal dexamethasone implant (Ozurdex®). METHODS: A 36-year-old pregnant woman with ty...

  20. Variability of disease activity in patients treated with ranibizumab for neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, P; Scholz, P; Muether, P S; Fauser, S

    2016-08-01

    PurposeTo analyze choroidal neovasularization (CNV) activity and recurrence patterns in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) treated with ranibizumab, and the correlation with individual intraocular vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) suppression time (VST).MethodsPost-hoc analysis of data from a prospective, non-randomized clinical study. Patients with nAMD treated with ranibizumab on a pro re nata regimen. Disease activity was analyzed monthly by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and correlated with VSTs.ResultsOverall, 73 eyes of 73 patients were included in the study with a mean follow-up of 717 days (range: 412-1239 days). Overall, the mean CNV-activity-free interval was 76.5 days (range: 0-829 days). The individual range of the length of dry intervals was high. A total of 42% of patients had a range of more than 90 days. Overall, 16% of patients showed persistent activity. And 12% stayed dry after the initial ranibizumab treatment. No significant correlation was found between the CNV-recurrence pattern and VST (P=0.12).ConclusionsCNV activity in nAMD is irregular, which is reflected in the range of the duration of dry intervals and late recurrences. The biomarker VST solely seems not to be sufficient to explain recurrence pattern of CNV in all AMD patients.

  1. A phase 2/3, multicenter, randomized, double-masked, 2-year trial of pegaptanib sodium for the treatment of diabetic macular edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sultan, Marla B; Zhou, Duo; Loftus, Jane

    2011-01-01

    To confirm the safety and compare the efficacy of intravitreal pegaptanib sodium 0.3 mg versus sham injections in subjects with diabetic macular edema (DME) involving the center of the macula associated with vision loss not due to ischemia.......To confirm the safety and compare the efficacy of intravitreal pegaptanib sodium 0.3 mg versus sham injections in subjects with diabetic macular edema (DME) involving the center of the macula associated with vision loss not due to ischemia....

  2. Safety and efficacy of ranibizumab in diabetic macular edema (RESOLVE Study): a 12-month, randomized, controlled, double-masked, multicenter phase II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Massin, Pascale; Bandello, Francesco; Garweg, Justus G

    2010-01-01

    The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is elevated in diabetic macular edema (DME). Ranibizumab binds to and inhibits multiple VEGF variants. We investigated the safety and efficacy of ranibizumab in DME involving the foveal center.......The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is elevated in diabetic macular edema (DME). Ranibizumab binds to and inhibits multiple VEGF variants. We investigated the safety and efficacy of ranibizumab in DME involving the foveal center....

  3. Cytokine concentration in aqueous humor of eyes with diabetic macular edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Jost B; Jonas, Rahul A; Neumaier, Michael; Findeisen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    To measure cytokine concentrations in aqueous humor of eyes with diffuse diabetic macular edema. The interventional clinical comparative study included a study group of 23 patients with diffuse diabetic macular edema and a control group of 22 patients undergoing cataract surgery. Cytokine concentrations were measured in aqueous humor samples using a Luminex xMAP suspension array technology. In the study group as compared with the control group, significantly higher concentrations were measured for epidermal growth factor (P < 0.001), human growth factor (P < 0.001), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1; P < 0.001), interleukin (IL)-1a2 (P = 0.04), IL-6 (P = 0.001), IL-8 (P < 0.001), interferon gamma-induced protein (P = 0.004), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (P < 0.001), monokine induced by interferon gamma (P < 0.001), matrix metalloproteinase 1 (P = 0.02), matrix metalloproteinase 9 (P < 0.001), plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (P < 0.001), placenta growth factor (P < 0.001), tissue growth factor beta (P = 0.003), vascular cell adhesion molecule (P < 0.001), and vascular endothelial growth factor (P < 0.001). Retinal macula thickness was significantly associated with the concentrations of the epidermal growth factor (P = 0.005; ρ = 0.45), ICAM-1 (P < 0.001; ρ = 0.65), IL-3 (P = 0.002; ρ = 0.48), IL-6 (P = 0.003; ρ = 0.47), IL-8 (P < 0.001; ρ = 0.71), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (P = 0.001; ρ = 0.53), monokine induced by interferon gamma (P < 0.001; ρ = 0.57), matrix metalloproteinase 9 (P < 0.001; ρ = 0.61), tissue growth factor beta (P = 0.01; ρ = 0.42), placenta growth factor (P = 0.004; ρ = 0.46), vascular cell adhesion molecule (P = 0.006; ρ = 0.44), and vascular endothelial growth factor (P = 0.01; ρ = 0.42). In multivariate analysis, macular thickness remained to be significantly associated with the concentration of ICAM-1 (P = 0.03; r = 0.30). Vascular endothelial growth factor concentrations were correlated with concentration

  4. Vitrectomy for Diffuse Refractory Diabetic Macular Edema Associated with a Taut Premacular Posterior Hyaloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooshang Faghihi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the anatomic and visual results and complications of vitrectomy in eyes with diffuse refractory diabetic macular edema associated with a taut posterior hyaloid. METHODS: This prospective interventional case series was conducted on 25 eyes of 22 patients with diffuse refractory clinically significant diabetic macular edema, macular thickness greater than 250 mm on optic coherence tomography (OCT and thickened posterior hyaloid. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA and macular thickness measured by OCT were evaluated preoperatively and repeated 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Macular perfusion was evaluated by fluorescein angiography, pre- and six months postoperatively. RESULTS: Mean BCVA was 1.14±0.51 LogMAR, preoperatively which improved to 0.89±0.53 LogMAR six months postoperatively (P=0.005. Mean preoperative macular thickness was 506±121.9 µm which decreased to 318±90.5 µm, six months postoperatively (P=0.001. CONCLUSION: Vitrectomy and removal of the posterior hyaloid membrane appears beneficial in eyes with diffuse diabetic macular edema unresponsive to laser therapy and a taut premacular posterior hyaloid.

  1. Relationship between Outer Retinal Layers Thickness and Visual Acuity in Diabetic Macular Edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond L. M. Wong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the correlation of outer retinal layers (ORL thickness and visual acuity (VA in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME. Methods. Consecutive DME patients seen at the Retina Clinic of The University of Hong Kong were recruited for OCT assessment. The ORL thickness was defined as the distance between external limiting membrane (ELM and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE at the foveal center. The correlation between total retinal thickness, ORL thickness, and vision was calculated. Results. 78 patients with DME were recruited. The mean age was 58.1 years (±11.5 years and their mean visual acuity measured with Snellen chart was 0.51 (±0.18. The correlation coefficient between total retinal thickness and visual acuity was 0.34 (P < 0.001 whereas the correlation coefficient was 0.65 between ORL thickness and visual acuity (P < 0.001. Conclusion. ORL thickness correlates better with vision than the total retinal thickness. It is a novel OCT parameter in the assessment of DME. Moreover, it could be a potential long term visual prognostic factor for patients with DME.

  2. Clinical Characteristics of Patients with Newly Diagnosed Diabetic Macular Edema in Turkey: A Real-Life Registry Study—TURK-DEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora Eldem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the clinical and diagnostic characteristics of patients with newly diagnosed diabetic macular edema (DME in Turkey in a real-life setting. Methods. A total of 945 consecutive patients (mean (SD age: 61.3 (9.9 years, 55.2% male with newly diagnosed DME were included. Data on patient demographics, comorbidities, ocular history, ophthalmic examination findings including type of DME, central macular thickness (CMT via time domain (TD and spectral domain (SD optical coherence tomography (OCT, and planned treatments were recorded. Results. OCT (98.8% and fundoscopy (92.9% were the two most common diagnostic methods. Diffuse and focal DMEs were detected in 39.2% and 36.9% of cases, respectively. Laser photocoagulation (32.1% and antivascular endothelial growth factors (anti-VEGF; 31.8% were the most commonly planned treatments. The median CMT in the right eye was significantly greater in untreated than in treated patients [376.5 μm (range: 160–840 versus 342 μm (range: 146–999 (p=0.002] and in the left eye [370 μm (range: 201–780 versus 329 μm (range: 148–999 (p<0.001]. Conclusions. This study is the first large-scale real-life registry of DME patients in Turkey. SD-OCT and fundoscopy were the most common diagnostic methods. Laser photocoagulation and anti-VEGF therapy were the most common treatments.

  3. 氪黄激光光凝联合球后注射曲安奈德治疗糖尿病性黄斑水肿%Macular Photocoagulation by Krypton Yellow Laser Combined with Retrobulbar Injection of Triamcinolone Acetonide for Diabetic Macular Edema

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭志华; 陈中山; 金小琴; 吴岚; 宋艳萍

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨氪黄激光黄斑格栅光凝联合球后注射曲安奈德(TA)治疗糖尿病性黄斑水肿的方法及疗效.方法 对123例215只眼糖尿病性黄斑水肿患者进行黄斑部氪黄激光格栅光凝联合球后注射TA治疗,同时选择同期采用其他药物治疗的糖尿病性黄斑水肿患者79例144只眼作为对照组.治疗前后行视力、眼压、眼底,以及眼底荧光造影(FFA)和光学相干层析(OCT)检查.随访1年,观察治疗前后患者视力、黄斑水肿和黄斑区视网膜厚度的变化.结果 光凝联合TA组治疗后患者视力提高者112只眼(52.1%),黄斑水肿完全消退者137只眼(63.7%),部分消退者69只眼(32.1%),黄斑区视网膜厚度正常者122 只眼(56.7%);对照组治疗后视力无提高,黄斑水肿无完全消退者,部分消退者2只眼(1.4%),黄斑区视网膜厚度无达正常者.两组比较,差异具有非常显著意义.结论 氪黄激光光凝联合球后注射TA治疗糖尿病性黄斑水肿疗效显著,无明显并发症发生.%Objective To explore the clinic therapeutic methods and effect of macular grid photocoagulation by krypton yellow laser combined with retrobulbar injection of triamcinolone acetonide(TA) for diabetic macular edema, and to investigate the safety of treatment. Methods Totally 123 patients (215 eyes) diagnosed as diabetic macular edema were performed with macular grid photocoagulation by krypton yellow laser combined with retrobulbar injection of TA ( combined group). The control group of 79 patients ( 144 eyes ) was treated with other drugs. The best-corrected visual acuity ( BCVA), examination of the ocular fundus, FFA and OCT were investigated before and after treatment. Results At the final follow-up, in combined group, BCVA improved in 112 eyes (52. 1% ), complete resolution of macular edema in 137 eyes (63.7%), partial resolution in 69 eyes (32. 1% ), and macular retinal thickness became normal in 122 eyes (56. 7% ). In control group, no

  4. Cystoid macular oedema after phacoemulsification with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus; a hospital-based clinical prospective trial in Karachi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haleem, A.; Rehman, A.U.; Saleem, A.; Memon, S.; Memon, N.; Fahim, M.F.

    2017-01-01

    To know the outcomes of cystoid macular oedema after phacoemulsification in patients with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus using optical coherence tomography. Methods: This non-concurrent, clinical, prospective study was carried out at Al-Ibrahim Eye Hospital, Karachi, from January to August 2015. After phacoemulsification with injectable posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation, eyes of patients were analysed. The patients were divided into diabetic and non-diabetic groups visual acuity, optical coherence tomography and dilated fundus examination were performed preoperatively (baseline) and post-operative 1st week and 6th week. SPSS 20 was used for data analysis. Results: Of the 100 subjects, there were 50(50%) each in diabetic and non-diabetic group. Subsequently, 14(14%) patients were lost to follow-up, and 86 eyes of 86(86%) patients were analysed. Of them, 37(43%) were male and 49(57%) were female. The mean age of participants was 52.21+-7.43 years (range: 38-62 years). The non-diabetic group had 41(47.7%) patients and the diabetic group had 45(52.3%). There was no clinically significant cystoid macular oedema in either group. Central foveal thickness > 43.94 micro m was observed in 1(2.5%) eye in the non-diabetic group and in none in the diabetic group at 1st post-operative week. At the 6th post-operative week, none of eyes in the non-diabetic group and 2(4.44%) eyes of the diabetic group showed macular oedema. There was no statistically significant difference in mean foveal volume between both groups at 1st week (p=0.896) and 6th week (p=0.230). Conclusion: Cystoid macular oedema after phacoemulsification was equally present in both diabetics and non-diabetics without any retinopathy. (author)

  5. Complications of Macular Peeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asencio-Duran, Mónica; Manzano-Muñoz, Beatriz; Vallejo-García, José Luis; García-Martínez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Macular peeling refers to the surgical technique for the removal of preretinal tissue or the internal limiting membrane (ILM) in the macula for several retinal disorders, ranging from epiretinal membranes (primary or secondary to diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment…) to full-thickness macular holes, macular edema, foveal retinoschisis, and others. The technique has evolved in the last two decades, and the different instrumentations and adjuncts have progressively advanced turning into a safer, easier, and more useful tool for the vitreoretinal surgeon. Here, we describe the main milestones of macular peeling, drawing attention to its associated complications. PMID:26425351

  6. What Is Macular Edema?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... side) vision remains. Macular edema is often a complication of diabetic retinopathy , and is the most common form of vision loss for people with diabetes—particularly if it is left untreated. Next What ...

  7. Comparative Study Showing The Application Of Three Dimensional Oct And Ffa Correlation After Combined Bevacizumab/Laser And Triamcinolone/Laser In The Management Of Diabetic Macular Edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helal, N.; Afahmoud, A.F.; Eliwa, T.F.; Omar, O.A.A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: to compare combined therapy by intravitreal triamicinolone acetonide and laser versus intravitreal bevacizumab and laser by three dimensional OCT in the management of diabetic macular edema regarding, the efficacy, duration of action, side effects, and complications of both regimens. Patients and methods: 40 eyes of 32 patients with type II diabetes mellitus, with clinically significant macular edema were enrolled into the study. They were divided equally into two groups, the first group was treated with intravitreal triamicinolone acetonide (4 mg/0.1 ml) followed 6 weeks later by focal Laser and the other group was treated by intravitreal bevacizumab (1.25 mg) followed 4 weeks later by focal Laser. Complete ophthalmological examination including BCVA, OCT and FFA were done preoperative and postoperative at 1, 3, 6, and 9 months. Results: the IVTA/Laser group showed an earlier improvement of BCVA by one line at the 3 month visit (p value 0.025 <0.05), compared to the IVA/Laser group that showed this change to be statistically significant at the 6 month visit (p value 0.048) with a one line improvement in BCVA. Regarding CMT and decrease of CMT than IVA/Laser although in both groups the improvement was transient, and relapses in both parameters occurred. There was a high incidence of cataract and steroid induced glaucoma in susceptible subjects in the IVTA/laser group than the IVA/Laser group. IVA/Laser may have a detrimental effect on FAZ integrity, and progression of the stage of diabetic retinopathy. Regarding mean change in CMT the IVTA/Laser has a stronger effect in reducing CMT, which is statistically significant at three months (p value <0.05). On the other hand IVA/Laser group, statistically significant change in mean CMT was at 1 month. Mean change in CMT between the 2 groups was not statistically significant throughout the study, although IVTA/Laser had a more powerful effect on the metric reduction of CMT, this difference was transient in both

  8. Impact of injection therapy on retinal patients with diabetic macular edema or retinal vein occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaprasad, Sobha; Oyetunde, Sesan

    2016-01-01

    An important factor in the choice of therapy is the impact it has on the patient's quality of life. This survey aimed to understand treatment burden, treatment-related anxiety and worry, and practical issues such as appointment attendance and work absence in patients receiving injection therapy for diabetic macular edema (DME) or retinal vein occlusion (RVO). A European sample of 131 retinal patients completed a detailed questionnaire to elucidate the impact of injection therapy on individuals with DME or RVO. RVO and DME greatly impact a patient's quality of life. An intensive injection regimen and the requirements for multiple hospital visits place a large practical burden on the patient. Each intravitreal injection appointment (including travel time) was reported to take an average of 4.5 hours, with a total appointment burden over 6 months of 13.5 hours and 20 hours for RVO and DME patients, respectively. This creates a significant burden on patient time and may make appointment attendance difficult. Indeed, 53% of working patients needed to take at least 1 day off work per appointment and 71% of patients required a carer's assistance at the time of the injection appointment, ~6.3 hours per injection. In addition to practical issues, three-quarters of patients reported experiencing anxiety about their most recent injection treatment, with 54% of patients reporting that they were anxious for at least 2 days prior to the injection. Patients' most desired improvement to their treatment regimen was to have fewer injections and to require fewer appointments, to achieve the same visual results. Patients' quality of life is clearly very affected by having to manage an intensive intravitreal injection regimen, with a considerable treatment burden having a large negative effect. Reducing the appointment burden to achieve the same visual outcomes and the provision of additional support for patients to attend appointments would greatly benefit those receiving intravitreal

  9. Is Coffee Consumption associated with Age-related Macular Degeneration and Diabetic Retinopathy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Kumari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Coffee is among the most widely consumed beverages in the world. Several epidemiological studies have evaluated the association between coffee consumption and risk of systemic diseases; however, there is paucity of data in relation to coffee consumption and risk of eye diseases.  This study aims to examine the relationship between coffee consumption and risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD and diabetic retinopathy (DR in multiethnic population of Singapore.   Materials and MethodsWe analyzed the data from 4121 study participants from the Singapore Prospective Study Program to examine the relationship of coffee to prevalence of AMD and DR.  A standardized questionnaire that included information about the habitual amount of coffee consumed was completed by all study participants.  Presence and severity of AMD and DR was assessed on fundus photographs using the Mutiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis Grading Protocol. ResultsThe prevalence of AMD and DR in our population was 5.4% and 32.0%, respectively. A positive history of coffee consumption was present in 77.5% of AMD population and 76.1% of DR population with majority of participants consuming 1-2 cups of coffee daily.  No statistically significant association was observed between coffee consumption and odds of AMD or DR after adjusting for confounding factors [AMD: Odds Ratio (OR = 1.27, Confidence Interval (CI = 0.88-1.83, p = 0.20; DR: OR = 1.36, CI = 0.69-2.69, p = 0.37.  ConclusionThis epidemiological study of a large multiethnic population data set do not support the hypothesis that habitual intake of coffee and caffeine is associated with an altered risk of AMD and DR among Asians.

  10. Comparison of Intravitreal Bevacizumab and Intravitreal Diclofenac in the Treatment of Diabetic Macular Edema: a 6-month Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Hooshang; Yahyapour, Hanif; Mahmoudzadeh, Raziyeh; Faghihi, Shahin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of intravitreal diclofenac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), with that of bevacizumab, a well-known anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) drug, in the treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME). Diclofenac was chosen in this study because it has both features of NSAIDs and corticosteroids by inhibiting the cyclooxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase pathways, respectively. In this non-randomized comparative interventional case series, 64 eyes from 32 patients with bilateral naïve DME were selected and every eye was randomly assigned to intravitreal injection of bevacizumab (IVB) or diclofenac (IVD). After exclusion of some patients because of short follow-up duration or less than two intravitreal injections, finally, 52 eyes from 26 patients were analyzed. Of those, 26 eyes received 500 µg/0.1 mL IVD and 26 eyes received 1.25 mg IVB. After 6 months of follow-up, the results indicated that visual acuity was significantly improved from 0.50 ± 0.13 in IVB and 0.52 ± 0.12 LogMAR in IVD at baseline to 0.2 ± 0.1 and 0.29 ± 0.07, respectively. Central macular thickness (CMT) and macular volume were measured based on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) at month 1, 3, and 6. Both groups showed a significant reduction in CMT and macular volume from baseline but there was no significant difference between the IVB and IVD groups. Interestingly, IVD, but not IVB, decreased intraocular pressure (IOP), which is a desirable effect. There was no serious complication due to injections. This study sheds light into the long-term effects of NSAIDs and may support the idea that inflammation suppression by NSAIDs may have the same results as anti-VEGF administration.

  11. [Multicenter Ozurdex® assessment for diabetic macular edema: MOZART study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guigou, S; Hajjar, C; Parrat, E; Merite, P Y; Pommier, S; Matonti, F; Prost-Magnin, O; Meyer, F

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the efficiency and safety of intravitreal implant of 0.7mg dexamathasone in visual impairment due to diabetic macular edema (DME). This was a retrospective, multicenter, study. Seventy-four patients, with a mean age of 65 years, followed for at least 6 months (mean follow-up: 9.8 months) were included in 5 French eye clinics (P 1.5 collective). The mean systolic blood pressure was 138mmHg and the mean HbA1c was 7.2%. We monitored 2 systemic parameters: blood pressure and glycemic balance. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), central retinal thickness (CRT, Spectralis OCT), intraocular pressure (IOP) and cataract progression are studied at baseline and then at 1, 2, 4 and 6 months. The average CRT decrease was: 239μm at month 2 (M2) and 135μm at month 6 (M6). The mean improvement from baseline of BCVA is 8.5 letters at M2 and 7.6 letters at M6. A gain greater than 15 letters is found in 27% of patients at M6. For naive patients the BCVA is 71 letters versus 60 letters (P<0.05). Patients with a baseline CRT <500mmHg have a BCVA of 66 letters versus 57 letters (P<0.05). The mean rate injections was 1.2 at 6 months with an average of 5.4 months for reinjection. Ocular hypertension greater than 25mmHg, managed by topical treatment, is observed in 13.4% of patients. No glaucoma surgery was necessary. Dexamethasone has an anatomical and functional effectiveness in the treatment of DME. Outcomes for naive patients and lower CRT suggest that the duration of diabetes mellitus and previous treatments are negative factors of recovery. Side effects are rare and manageable. Ozurdex(®) seems to be a treatment for visual impairment due to DME with a favorable safety profile. Patient follow-up must be adapted to half-life of the product with a control before M1 (intraocular pressure) and before M5 (DME recurrence, BCVA). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Improved outcome after primary vitrectomy in diabetic patients treated with statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuuminen, Raimo; Sahanne, Sari; Haukka, Jari; Loukovaara, Sirpa

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of preoperative statin treatment on the outcome of primary vitrectomy in type 1 and 2 diabetic patients. In this open, observational institutional study, a total of 192 eyes of 171 type 1 and 2 adult diabetic patients admitted for primary vitrectomy for management of sight-threatening forms of diabetic retinopathy were divided according to the use of lipid-lowering therapy: those with statin treatment (79 eyes of 73 patients) and those taking no statin medication (113 eyes of 98 patients). One-month best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) gain and cumulative 12-month revitrectomy frequency were analyzed. In multivariate linear regression, diabetic patients with statin treatment had a better 1-month BCVA improvement than did those without statin treatment (absolute difference 0.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.02-0.50, p = 0.028). Subgroup analysis revealed that diabetic patients on statin had better postoperative BCVA improvement when preoperative status included partial or panretinal laser photocoagulation (p = 0.042 and p = 0.049) and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy (p = 0.011). Moreover, diabetic patients with preoperative macular edema (p = 0.009), vitreous hemorrhage (p<0.001), proliferative retinopathy (p<0.001), or tractional retinal detachment (p = 0.010) had better BCVA recovery if receiving statin. In Cox proportional hazards regression model, revitrectomies in our 12-month follow-up were less frequent in diabetic patients on statin treatment (hazard ratio 0.28, 95% CI 0.08-0.93, p = 0.037). These data provide novel insight into the potential clinical benefit for patients with sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy undergoing vitrectomy treated with statin.

  13. The results of diagnostic and treatment of patients with diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration at a diabetes type 2.

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    I. V. Vorobyova

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Explore the changing clinical and functional and morphological changes of the retina against application of angiogenesis inhibitor in patients with diabetes type 2 with comorbidity fundus: diabetic retinopathy (DR and agerelated macular degeneration (AMD.Patients and Methods. In the main study group included 22 patients (22 eyes with type 2 diabetes with combined fundus pathology DR and AMD. All patients before and after intravitreal injection of an angiogenesis inhibitor ranibizumab (Lucentis, Novartis was assessed visual acuity, macular thickness and macular morphology based on the results of OCT, the retinal sensitivity according to the data of microperimetry (MAIA. The control group study included 30 people (15 healthy and 15 with type 2 diabetes without DR.Results. When comparing the main group with the control group was revealed that visual acuity in the main group (0,27±0,05 was significantly lower than in the control group (0,8±0,01, p <0.05; retinal thickness was significantly higher in the control group, and the retinal sensitivity was significantly lower. On the background of intravitreal injection of ranibizumab all patients with DR and AMD had significantly increase in visual acuity on average by 37 % (from 0,27±0,05 before treatment to 0,37±0,05 after treatment, a significantly reduction of macular thickness in 9 out of 9 areas, including the fovea centralis, an average of 32.6 % and increase retinal sensitivity by 24 % (from 11,75±1,68 (dB to 14,58±1,68 (dB, (p <0.05. The correlations were found between visual acuity and retinal thickness, as well as between visual acuity and retinal sensitivity of the macula, before treatment r = –0,26, p <0.01 and r = 0,7 p <0.01, respectively, after treatment with r = –0,14, p <0.01 and r = 0,64, p <0.01, respectively. Conclusions. Intravitreal injection of angiogenesis inhibitor ranibizumab to patients with comorbidity fundus DR and AMD on a background of

  14. The results of diagnostic and treatment of patients with diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration at a diabetes type 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Vorobyova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Explore the changing clinical and functional and morphological changes of the retina against application of angiogenesis inhibitor in patients with diabetes type 2 with comorbidity fundus: diabetic retinopathy (DR and agerelated macular degeneration (AMD.Patients and Methods. In the main study group included 22 patients (22 eyes with type 2 diabetes with combined fundus pathology DR and AMD. All patients before and after intravitreal injection of an angiogenesis inhibitor ranibizumab (Lucentis, Novartis was assessed visual acuity, macular thickness and macular morphology based on the results of OCT, the retinal sensitivity according to the data of microperimetry (MAIA. The control group study included 30 people (15 healthy and 15 with type 2 diabetes without DR.Results. When comparing the main group with the control group was revealed that visual acuity in the main group (0,27±0,05 was significantly lower than in the control group (0,8±0,01, p <0.05; retinal thickness was significantly higher in the control group, and the retinal sensitivity was significantly lower. On the background of intravitreal injection of ranibizumab all patients with DR and AMD had significantly increase in visual acuity on average by 37 % (from 0,27±0,05 before treatment to 0,37±0,05 after treatment, a significantly reduction of macular thickness in 9 out of 9 areas, including the fovea centralis, an average of 32.6 % and increase retinal sensitivity by 24 % (from 11,75±1,68 (dB to 14,58±1,68 (dB, (p <0.05. The correlations were found between visual acuity and retinal thickness, as well as between visual acuity and retinal sensitivity of the macula, before treatment r = –0,26, p <0.01 and r = 0,7 p <0.01, respectively, after treatment with r = –0,14, p <0.01 and r = 0,64, p <0.01, respectively. Conclusions. Intravitreal injection of angiogenesis inhibitor ranibizumab to patients with comorbidity fundus DR and AMD on a background of

  15. Prophylaxis of Macular Edema with Intravitreal Ranibizumab in Patients with Diabetic Retinopathy after Cataract Surgery: A Pilot Study

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    Patricia Udaondo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of intravitreal ranibizumab (Lucentis, Genentech, South San Francisco, Calif, USA combined with cataract surgery for the prevention of clinically significant macular edema (CSME in patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR. This prospective interventional case series included fifty-four eyes of 54 patients with a previous diagnosis of nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR without macular edema preoperatively. Subjects were assigned in a 1 : 1 ratio to receive an intraoperative intravitreal ranibizumab injection (n=27 or not (control group, n=27 associated with standardised phacoemulsification surgery. The main outcome measure was the incidence of CSME one and three months after surgery. One month after surgery the incidence of CSME in the control group was 25.92% and 3.70% in the treatment group and at three months was 22.22% and 3.70%, respectively. Short-term results suggest that intravitreal ranibizumab immediately after phacoemulsification prevents CS ME in patients with NPDR.

  16. Cystoid macular edema

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    Tryfon G Rotsos

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Tryfon G Rotsos1, Marilita M Moschos21Medical Retina Service, Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, UK; 2Department of Ophthalmology, University of Athens, GreeceAbstract: We review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and etiology of cystoid macular edema (CME. Inflammatory, diabetic, post-cataract, and macular edema due to age-related macular degeneration is described. The role of chronic inflammation and hypoxia and direct macular traction is evaluated in each case according to different views from the literature. The different diagnostic methods for evaluating the edema are described. Special attention is given to fluoroangiography and the most modern methods of macula examination, such as ocular coherence tomography and multifocal electroretinography. Finally, we discuss the treatment of cystoid macular edema in relation to its etiology. In this chapter we briefly refer to the therapeutic value of laser treatment especially in diabetic maculopathy or vitrectomy in some selected cases. Our paper is focused mainly on recent therapeutic treatment with intravitreal injection of triamcinolone acetonide and anti-VEGF factors like bevacizumab (Avastin, ranibizumab (Lucentis, pegaptamid (Macugen, and others. The goal of this paper is to review the current status of this treatment for macular edema due to diabetic maculopathy, central retinal vein occlusion and post-cataract surgery. For this reason the results of recent multicenter clinical trials are quoted, as also our experience on the use of intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF factors and we discuss its value in clinical practice.Keywords: cystoid macular edema, anti-VEGF, fluoroangiography, OCT, multifocal electroretinography

  17. Efficacy of intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor or steroid injection in diabetic macular edema according to fluid turbidity in optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyungmin; Chung, Heeyoung; Park, Youngsuk; Sohn, Joonhong

    2014-08-01

    To determine if short term effects of intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor or steroid injection are correlated with fluid turbidity, as detected by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in diabetic macular edema (DME) patients. A total of 583 medical records were reviewed and 104 cases were enrolled. Sixty eyes received a single intravitreal bevacizumab injection (IVB) on the first attack of DME and 44 eyes received triamcinolone acetonide treatment (IVTA). Intraretinal fluid turbidity in DME patients was estimated with initial intravitreal SD-OCT and analyzed with color histograms from a Photoshop program. Central macular thickness and visual acuity using a logarithm from the minimum angle of resolution chart, were assessed at the initial period and 2 months after injections. Visual acuity and central macular thickness improved after injections in both groups. In the IVB group, visual acuity and central macular thickness changed less as the intraretinal fluid became more turbid. In the IVTA group, visual acuity underwent less change while central macular thickness had a greater reduction (r = -0.675, p = 0.001) as the intraretinal fluid was more turbid. IVB and IVTA injections were effective in reducing central macular thickness and improving visual acuity in DME patients. Further, fluid turbidity, which was detected by SD-OCT may be one of the indexes that highlight the influence of the steroid-dependent pathogenetic mechanism.

  18. Macular Choroidal Thickness May Be the Earliest Determiner to Detect the Onset of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Prediabetes: A Prospective and Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazgan, Serpil; Arpaci, Dilek; Celik, Haci Ugur; Dogan, Mustafa; Isık, Irem

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the macular and peripapillary choroidal thickness and retinal volume in prediabetes. This prospective comparative study included 53 patients with prediabetes and 53 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects. Only right eyes were selected. Choroidal thicknesses (CT) and retinal volume were measured by optical coherence tomography. Macular CT was measured at the seven points including macular center, 1, 2, and 3 mm distances along the temporal and nasal scans. Peripapillary CT was measured at the eight points of the optic disk area. Systemic and laboratory findings of the subjects were also recorded. There were no significant differences in blood pressures, ocular findings including intraocular pressure, visual acuity, and refractive powers, and macular volumes between the two groups (p > 0.005). Macular and peripapillary CT at all measuring points, body mass index (BMI), fasting blood glucose (FBG), hemoglobinA1C, and lipid profile were significantly higher in prediabetic patients (p Prediabetic factors including impaired FBG, increased hemoglobinA1C, and BMI are independent risk factors for increase in choroidal thickness. Increased macular choroidal thickness may be the earliest determiner to detect the onset of diabetic retinopathy in prediabetes.

  19. Using Patient-Level Data to Develop Meaningful Cross-Trial Comparisons of Visual Impairment in Individuals with Diabetic Macular Edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivaprasad, Sobha; Regnier, Stephane A; Fajnkuchen, Franck

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of baseline characteristics on visual outcome of patients with diabetic macular edema and compare the results of clinical trials with different patient populations. METHODS: A model was created with patient-level data from the RESPOND...

  20. Changes in visual acuity in patients with wet age-related macular degeneration treated with intravitreal ranibizumab in daily clinical practice: the LUMIERE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Salomon Y; Mimoun, Gerard; Oubraham, Hassiba; Zourdani, Alain; Malbrel, Christian; Queré, Stephane; Schneider, Véronique

    2013-03-01

    To survey compliance with recommended intravitreal ranibizumab treatment protocols in daily clinical practice in France, with reference to outcomes. A retrospective, descriptive, observational study in patients with subfoveal wet age-related macular degeneration treated with ranibizumab. All historical data for the study period, including demographic, treatment, and disease details and visual acuity measurements (baseline, Month 3, and Month 12), were recorded retrospectively at least 12 months after the beginning of treatment. In 551 patients followed by 16 ophthalmologists, 12 months of intravitreal ranibizumab treatment induced a mean visual acuity gain of 3.2 ± 14.8 Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study-equivalent letters. Fewer than 40% of patients received the recommended treatment of initial 3 monthly injections. More than 50% had to wait >8 days between diagnosis and treatment. At Month 3, visual acuity gain was greater in patients who had received recommended induction and in whom treatment was initiated quickly. At Month 12, the induction-related effect had largely disappeared but the time-to-treatment effect persisted. Patients had an average of 5.1 injections (2.6 during induction period). No patients were monitored monthly as stipulated in the guidelines. Although poor compliance with recommendations has been reflected in mediocre outcomes, there is evidence that practice is improving.

  1. Impact of injection therapy on retinal patients with diabetic macular edema or retinal vein occlusion

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    Sivaprasad S

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Sobha Sivaprasad,1 Sesan Oyetunde2 1NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, 2Allergan Holdings Ltd., Marlow, UK Purpose: An important factor in the choice of therapy is the impact it has on the patient’s quality of life. This survey aimed to understand treatment burden, treatment-related anxiety and worry, and practical issues such as appointment attendance and work absence in patients receiving injection therapy for diabetic macular edema (DME or retinal vein occlusion (RVO.Patients and methods: A European sample of 131 retinal patients completed a detailed questionnaire to elucidate the impact of injection therapy on individuals with DME or RVO.Results: RVO and DME greatly impact a patient’s quality of life. An intensive injection regimen and the requirements for multiple hospital visits place a large practical burden on the patient. Each intravitreal injection appointment (including travel time was reported to take an average of 4.5 hours, with a total appointment burden over 6 months of 13.5 hours and 20 hours for RVO and DME patients, respectively. This creates a significant burden on patient time and may make appointment attendance difficult. Indeed, 53% of working patients needed to take at least 1 day off work per appointment and 71% of patients required a carer’s assistance at the time of the injection appointment, ~6.3 hours per injection. In addition to practical issues, three-quarters of patients reported experiencing anxiety about their most recent injection treatment, with 54% of patients reporting that they were anxious for at least 2 days prior to the injection. Patients’ most desired improvement to their treatment regimen was to have fewer injections and to require fewer appointments, to achieve the same visual results.Conclusion: Patients’ quality of life is clearly very affected by having to manage an intensive intravitreal injection regimen, with a considerable treatment burden

  2. IFN-alpha antibodies in patients with age-related macular degeneration treated with recombinant human IFN-alpha2a

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Christian; Engler, Claus Bødker; Sander, Birgit

    2002-01-01

    We tested for development of binding and neutralizing antibodies to interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) during IFN-alpha2a therapy of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) of the eyes. Antibodies were investigated retrospectively in sera of 34 patients treated with 3 x 10(6) IU IFN-alpha2...

  3. IFN-alpha antibodies in patients with age-related macular degeneration treated with recombinant human IFN-alpha2a

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Christian; Engler, Claus Bødker; Sander, Birgit

    2002-01-01

    We tested for development of binding and neutralizing antibodies to interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) during IFN-alpha2a therapy of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) of the eyes. Antibodies were investigated retrospectively in sera of 34 patients treated with 3 x 10(6) IU IFN-alpha2a...

  4. [Results of the use of antioxidant and angioprotective agents in type 2 diabetes patients with diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshetova, L K; Vorob'eva, I V; Alekseev, I B; Mikhaleva, L G

    2015-01-01

    to investigate changes in clinical, functional, and morphological parameters of the retina in type 2 diabetes patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR) and those with combined fundus pathology (DR plus age-related macular degeneration (AMD)) before and after a course of antioxidants and angioprotectors in the form of mono- or combination therapy. The study included 180 patients (180 eyes) with type 2 diabetes divided into 6 groups of 30 each. DR was graded according to E. Kohner and M. Porta classification, AMD--AREDS classification. Thus, group 1 consisted of patients with DRO,; group 2--DR1 without DM, group 3--DR1 with DM, group 4--DRO and "dry" AMD (AREDS 1-3), group 5--DR1 with no DM but with AMD (AREDS 1-3), and group 6--DR1 with DM and AMD (AREDS 1-3). A drug containing lutein 6 mg, zeaxanthin 0.5 mg, vitamin C 60 mg, vitamin E 7 mg, vitamin A 1.5 mg, vitamin B2 1.2 mg, rutin 25 mg, zinc 5 mg, selenium 25 mcg, and bilberry extract 60 mg was used for antioxidative therapy. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract 60 mg was chosen as the angioprotector. In all patients visual acuity, macular thickness and morphology (OCT) as well as light sensitivity (microperimetry) were assessed before and after the treatment course. Analysis of baseline measurements demonstrated a significant decrease in best corrected visual acuity (p Macular thickness was increased in all groups, however, the changes were statistically significant only in groups 3 and 6 (pmacular thickness decreased in all groups, however, the changes were statistically significant (p prevention, and early treatment. Conservative treatment with antioxidant and angioprotective agents has been proved effective in type 2 diabetes patients with preclinical (DRO) and early (DR1) diabetic retinopathy and those with DR and "dry" AMD (AREDS 1-3) in terms of functional and morphological parameters of the retina. From all the regimens, a combined antioxidant and double-dose angioprotective (240 mg) therapy appeared to be the most

  5. Effect of Conbercept injection and macular grid pattern photocoagulation in treating macular edema after non-ischemic branch retinal vein occlusion

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    Jiang Zhu

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the effects and safety of intravitreal injection of Conbercept combined with macular grid pattern photocoagulation for macular edema secondary to non-ischemic branch retinal vein occlusion(BRVO. METHODS: A total of 38 patients(38 eyes with macular edema following non-ischemic BRVO were retrospectively analyzed. All patients were given best corrected visual acuity(BCVA, intraocular pressure, slit lamp with preset lens, optic coherent tomography(OCTand fluorescence fundus angiography(FFAexamination. The BCVA and central macular thickness(CMTwere observed before and 1wk, 1, 2, 3, 6, 9 and 12mo after treatment. The change in pre-treatment and post-treatment were compared, and the related complications were recorded. RESULTS:BCVA before treatment and 1wk, 1, 2, 3, 6, 9 and 12mo after treatment were 0.89±0.62, 0.64±0.59, 0.55±0.62, 0.46±0.43, 0.53±0.67, 0.43±0.38, 0.42±0.29, 0.40±0.30, the difference was statistically significant between that before and after treatment(PP>0.05. CMT were 683.25±236.47, 298.65±116.12, 276.89±107.28, 281.55±99.62, 251.41±119.47, 240.58±88.62, 231.74±75.36, 209.51±84.68μm, the difference was statistically significant between that before and after treatment(PP>0.05. There were 11 eyes received one injection, 18 eyes with two injections, 2 eyes with 3, 3 eyes with 4, and 4 eyes more than 4, the average injection was 2.01±1.42. The CMT decreased after every injection. The intraocular hypertension and other complications were not seen after treatment. CONCLUSION: Intravitreal injection of conbercept combined with macular grid pattern photocoagulation for macular edema to non-ischemic BRVO can reduce the macular edema and improve BCVA, which is effective and safety.

  6. Oral minocycline for the treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME): results of a phase I/II clinical study.

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    Cukras, Catherine A; Petrou, Philip; Chew, Emily Y; Meyerle, Catherine B; Wong, Wai T

    2012-06-22

    Inflammation contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of diabetic macular edema (DME). In particular, retinal microglia demonstrate increased activation and aggregation in areas of DME. Study authors investigated the safety and potential efficacy of oral minocycline, a drug capable of inhibiting microglial activation, in the treatment of DME. A single-center, prospective, open-label phase I/II clinical trial enrolled five participants with fovea-involving DME who received oral minocycline 100 mg twice daily for 6 months. Main outcome measurements included best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), central retinal subfield thickness (CST), and central macular volume using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and late leakage on fluorescein angiography (FA). Findings indicated that the study drug was well tolerated and not associated with significant safety issues. In study eyes, mean BCVA improved continuously from baseline at 1, 2, 4, and 6 months by +1.0, +4.0, +4.0, and +5.8 letters, respectively, while mean retinal thickness (CST) on OCT decreased by -2.9%, -5.7%, -13.9, and -8.1% for the same time points. At month 6, mean area of late leakage on FA decreased by -34.4% in study eyes. Mean changes in contralateral fellow eyes also demonstrated similar trends. Improvements in outcome measures were not correlated with concurrent changes in systemic factors. In this pilot proof-of-concept study of DME, minocycline as primary treatment was associated with improved visual function, central macular edema, and vascular leakage, comparing favorably with historical controls from previous studies. Microglial inhibition with oral minocycline may be a promising therapeutic strategy targeting the inflammatory etiology of DME. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01120899.).

  7. Effect of Captopril on Aqueous Levels of Angiotensin II and Its Correlation with Macular Edema in Diabetic Patients

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    Morteza Shahshahan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To determine whether angiotensin II (AT II levels in aqueous humor are related to diabetes mellitus and to evaluate the effect of captopril on this level. We also evaluated the correlation between severity of macular edema and captopril use. METHODS: In a case-control study, aqueous humor samples were obtained at the onset of cataract surgery from 58 eyes of 58 patients, of whom 37 were diabetic. From these latter subjects, 16 had taken captopril (captopril group for at least six months and 21 had not taken any angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (non-captopril group. AT II level was assessed by radioimmunoassay. Severity of macular edema was evaluated by clinical examination after surgery. RESULTS: The aqueous level of AT II was significantly higher in diabetic patients (31.0±7.3 pg/ml compared to non-diabetics (6.28±2.8 pg/ml (Mann Whitney U test, P < 0.0001. In diabetic patients, aqueous concentration of AT II in the captopril group (16.3±6.5 mg/ml was significantly lower than the non-captopril group (75.73±9.36 mg/ml (Mann Whitney U test, P < 0.0003. The severity of macular edema was significantly less in the captopril group compared to the non-captopril group: 68.75% of the captopril group vs 33.3% of the non-captopril group had no macular edema (P < 0.005. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that the

  8. Growth factors for treating diabetic foot ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Gluud, Christian; Nicola, Susana

    2015-01-01

    following treatment for diabetic foot ulcers (RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.14 to 2.94; P value 0.56, low quality of evidence)Although 11 trials reported time to complete healing of the foot ulcers in people with diabetes , meta-analysis was not possible for this outcome due to the unique comparisons within each trial...... (minimum of one toe), complete healing of the foot ulcer, and time to complete healing of the diabetic foot ulcer as the primary outcomes. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Independently, we selected randomised clinical trials, assessed risk of bias, and extracted data in duplicate. We estimated risk ratios......BACKGROUND: Foot ulcers are a major complication of diabetes mellitus, often leading to amputation. Growth factors derived from blood platelets, endothelium, or macrophages could potentially be an important treatment for these wounds but they may also confer risks. OBJECTIVES: To assess...

  9. Liraglutide for treating type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejgaard, Thomas Fremming; Frandsen, Christian Seerup; Holst, Jens Juul

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Many persons with type 1 diabetes do not achieve glycemic targets, why new treatments, complementary to insulin, are of interest. Liraglutide, a long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist could be a potential pharmacological supplement to insulin. This review discusses...... the mechanism of actions, efficacy and safety of liraglutide as add-on to insulin in persons with type 1 diabetes. AREAS COVERED: Physiological and clinical data on liraglutide in type 1 diabetes were reviewed. We searched the Cochrane library, MEDLINE and EMBASE, with the final search performed February 16...... there was no clinically relevant effect on HbA1c. Adverse events were mostly transient gastrointestinal side effects, primarily nausea. Based on the available data, liraglutide cannot be recommended as add-on therapy to insulin in persons with type 1 diabetes with the aim to improve glycemic control. Ongoing trials...

  10. Effect of the perfluorodecalin residue on macular subretinal treated by internal limiting membrane peeling combined with 38G casing needle

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    Xiao-Bo Wang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the effect of the treatment to the perfluorodecalin residue on macular subretinal by internal limiting membrane(ILMpeeling combined with 38G casing needle.METHODS: Twenty-nine cases(29 eyesof retinal reattachment and with perfluorodecalin residual on the macular subretinal, selected in Xiamen Eye Center from January 2008 to October 2013, were divided into group A(14 cases, 14 eyesand group B(15 cases, 15 eyesrandomly. In group A, after removal of silicone oil, perfluorodecalin liquids at the macular subretinal directly were aspirated by 38G casing needle. In group B, after removal of silicone oil, ILM was dyed and peeled completely to the range of 4PD approximately. Then the perfluorodecalin liquids at the macular subretinal were aspirated by 38G casing needle. All cases of both groups were filled with filtered air. After 1wk, the case with macular hole found by OCT was exchanged by air-fluid and filled with 16% C3F8. The best corrected visual acuity(BCVAof two groups of patients was observed after 4, 8, 24wk. OCT was reviewed to observe whether there were perfluorodecalin residue on the macular subretinal, formation of macular hole and macular morphological changes, retinal detachment.RESULTS: BCVA was improved in both groups after 4, 8, 24wk. And the value of BCVA improvedin group B was better than that in group A(PCONCLUSION: ILM peeling combined with 38G casing needle can aspirate completely the perfluorodecalin residual on macular. There were not caused macular hole and retinal detachment. This method is an safe, effective and minimally invasive surgical technique to protect the macular function.

  11. Enhanced Benefit in Diabetic Macular Edema from AKB-9778 Tie2 Activation Combined with Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campochiaro, Peter A; Khanani, Arshad; Singer, Michael; Patel, Sunil; Boyer, David; Dugel, Pravin; Kherani, Saleema; Withers, Barbara; Gambino, Laura; Peters, Kevin; Brigell, Mitchell

    2016-08-01

    To assess the effect of AKB-9778 alone or in combination with ranibizumab in subjects with diabetic macular edema (DME). A phase IIa, randomized, placebo- and sham injection-controlled, double-masked clinical trial. Subjects (n = 144) with decreased vision from DME and central subfield thickness (CST) ≥325 μm measured by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT) enrolled at 36 sites. Subjects were randomized to (1) AKB-9778 monotherapy: subcutaneous AKB-9778 15 mg twice per day (BID) + monthly sham intraocular injections; (2) combination therapy: subcutaneous AKB-9778 15 mg BID + monthly 0.3 mg ranibizumab; or (3) ranibizumab monotherapy: subcutaneous placebo injections BID + monthly 0.3 mg ranibizumab. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and CST were measured at baseline and every 4 weeks. Primary outcome measure was mean change from baseline CST at week 12. Other outcomes included BCVA, safety assessments, and Diabetic Retinopathy Severity Score (DRSS). At week 12, mean change from baseline CST was significantly greater in the combination group (-164.4±24.2 μm) compared with the ranibizumab monotherapy group (-110.4±17.2 μm; P = 0.008) and was 6.2±13.0 μm in the AKB-9778 monotherapy group. Mean CST at week 12 and percentage of eyes with resolved edema was 340.0±11.2 μm and 29.2%, respectively, in the combination group versus 392.1±17.1 μm and 17.0%, respectively, in the ranibizumab monotherapy group. Mean change from baseline BCVA (letters) was 6.3±1.3 in the combination group, 5.7±1.2 in the ranibizumab monotherapy group, and 1.5±1.2 in the AKB-9778 monotherapy group. The percentage of study eyes that gained ≥10 or ≥15 letters was 8.7% and 4.3%, respectively, in the AKB-9778 monotherapy group, 29.8% and 17.0%, respectively, in the ranibizumab monotherapy group, and 35.4% and 20.8%, respectively, in the combination group. Improvements in DRSS in study eyes were similar across groups, and the percentage of qualified fellow eyes

  12. Subthreshold diode-laser micropulse photocoagulation as a primary and secondary line of treatment in management of diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othman IS

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ihab Saad Othman,1 Sherif Ahmed Eissa,1 Mohamed S Kotb,1 Sherin Hassan Sadek21Cairo University, Cairo, 2Fayoum University, Al Fayoum, EgyptBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate subthreshold diode-laser micropulse (SDM photocoagulation as a primary and secondary line of treatment for clinically significant diabetic macular edema (CSDME.Methods: In this prospective nonrandomized case series, 220 cases of nonischemic CSDME were managed primarily and secondarily by SDM photocoagulation on a 15% duty cycle with a mean power of 828 mW and a spot size of 75–125 µm. SDM treatment was repeated at 3–4-month intervals if residual leakage was observed. Additional intravitreal pharmacologic therapy was used according to the response. Follow-up varied from 12 to 19 (mean 14±2.8 months. Novel software designed by the authors was used to record the subvisible threshold laser applications and their parameters on the fundus image of the eye. Evaluation of the results of treatment was done using fluorescein angiography and optical coherence tomography (OCT. Primary outcome measures included changes in visual acuity and foveal thickness at OCT. Secondary outcome measures included visual loss of one or more Snellen lines and laser scars detectable on fundus biomicroscopy or fluorescein angiography.Results: In the primary treatment group, there was significant improvement or stabilization of visual acuity after the first 3–4 months, which was stable thereafter. Visual acuity was stable in the secondary treatment group. A corresponding reduction of macular thickness on OCT was noted during the follow-up period in both groups. Additional therapy included repeat SDM photocoagulation, intravitreal injection of triamcinolone, and pars plana vitrectomy. Laser marks seen as changes in retinal pigment epithelium on fundus biomicroscopy and fluorescein angiography were noted in 3.3% and 5.7% of cases. Our novel software could accurately record the

  13. Emerging vascular endothelial growth factor antagonists to treat neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Rehan M; Ciulla, Thomas A

    2017-09-01

    Evolving anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) treatments for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) include long acting agents, combination strategies involving new pathways, topical agents, sustained-release, and genetic therapy strategies. Areas covered: Brolucizumab and abicipar pegol have smaller molecular size, facilitating higher concentrations and potentially longer duration than current anti-VEGF agents. Agents being combined with anti-VEGFs include OPT-302 (to inhibit VEGF-C and VEGF-D); pegpleranib and rinucumab (to inhibit platelet derived growth factor, PDGF - but both failed to show consistently improved visual outcomes compared to anti-VEGF monotherapy); and RG7716, ARP-1536 and nesvacumab (to activate the Tie-2 tyrosine kinase receptor, which reduces permeability). X-82 is an oral anti-VEGF and anti-PDGF being tested in phase 2 studies. Topical anti-VEGF ± anti-PDGF drugs under study include pazopanib, PAN-90806, squalamine lactate, regorafinib, and LHA510. Sustained-release anti-VEGF delivery treatments, such as the ranibizumab Port Delivery System, GB-102, NT-503, hydrogel depot, Durasert, and ENV1305 aim to reduce the burden of frequent injections. Gene therapies with new viral vectors hold the potential to induce sustained expression of anti-angiogenic proteins via the retina's cellular apparatus, and include AVA-101/201, ADVM-202/302, AAV2-sFLT01, RGX314, and Retinostat. Expert opinion: There are many emerging anti-VEGF treatments that aim to improve visual outcomes and reduce the treatment burden of nAMD.

  14. Contralateral eye-to-eye comparison of intravitreal ranibizumab and a sustained-release dexamethasone intravitreal implant in recalcitrant diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas BJ

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Benjamin J Thomas, Yoshihiro Yonekawa, Jeremy D Wolfe, Tarek S Hassan Department of Vitreoretinal Surgery, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI, USA Objective: To compare the effects of intravitreal ranibizumab (RZB or dexamethasone (DEX intravitreal implant in cases of recalcitrant diabetic macular edema (DME.Methods: Retrospective, interventional study examining patients with symmetric bilateral, center-involved DME recalcitrant to treatment with RZB, who received DEX in one eye while the contralateral eye continued to receive RZB every 4–5 weeks for a study period of 3 months.Results: Eleven patients (22 eyes were included: mean logarithm of the minimal angle of resolution (logMAR visual acuity (VA for the DEX arm improved from 0.415 (standard deviation [SD] ±0.16 to 0.261 (SD ±0.18 at final evaluation, and mean central macular thickness (CMT improved from 461 µm (SD ±156 to 356 µm (SD ±110; net decrease: 105 µm, P=0.01. Mean logMAR VA for the RZB arm improved from 0.394 (SD ±0.31 to 0.269 (SD ±0.19 at final evaluation. Mean CMT improved from 421 µm (SD ±147 to 373 µm (SD ±129; net decrease: 48 µm, P=0.26.Conclusion: A subset of recalcitrant DME patients demonstrated significant CMT reduction and VA improvement after a single DEX injection. Keywords: aflibercept, bevacizumab, central macular thickness, macular edema, dexamethasone implant, diabetic macular edema, diabetic retinopathy, ranibizumab

  15. Albiglutide for treating type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønden, Andreas; Naver, Signe V.; Knop, Filip K.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Albiglutide is a once-weekly, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist approved during 2014 in both the US and Europe for the treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes. The recommended dose is 30 mg with the possibility of uptitration to 50 mg based on individual glycemic response...

  16. Comorbidity and health care visit burden in working-age commercially insured patients with diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiss S

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Szilárd Kiss,1 Hitesh S Chandwani,2 Ashley L Cole,2 Vaishali D Patel,2 Orsolya E Lunacsek,3 Pravin U Dugel4 1Department of Ophthalmology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, 2Global Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA, 3Global Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Xcenda, LLC, Palm Harbor, FL, 4Retinal Consultants of Arizona and USC Eye Institute, Phoenix, AZ, USA Purpose: To examine the comorbidity profile and update estimates of health care resource utilization for commercially insured, working-age adults with diabetic macular edema (DME relative to a matched comparison group of diabetic adults without DME. Additional comparisons were made in the subgroup of pseudophakic patients. Patients and methods: A retrospective matched-cohort study of commercially insured diabetic adults aged 18–63 years was conducted using medical and outpatient pharmacy claims (July 1, 2008–June 30, 2013. Outcomes included diabetes-related and ocular comorbidities and health care resource utilization (any health care visit days, outpatient visit days, inpatient visit days, emergency room visits, eye care-related visit days, unique medications in the 12-month post-index period. Results: All diabetes-related and ocular comorbidities were significantly more prevalent in DME cases versus non-DME controls (P<0.05. A significantly greater proportion of DME cases utilized eye care-related visits compared with non-DME controls (P<0.001. DME cases had almost twice the mean number of total health care visit days compared to non-DME controls (28.6 vs 16.9 days, P<0.001, with a minority of visit days being eye care-related (mean 5.1 vs 1.5 days, P<0.001. Similar trends were observed in pseudophakic cohorts. Conclusion: This working-age DME population experienced a mean of 29 health care visit days per year. Eye care-related visit days were a minority of the overall visit burden (mean 5 days emphasizing the trade-offs DME patients

  17. [Prader-Willi syndrome case with proliferative diabetic retinopathy in both eyes treated by early vitrectomy under local anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Hideyuki; Sato, Yukihiro; Nakashima, Motohiro; Nakajima, Motohiro

    2012-02-01

    Although patients with Prader-Willi syndrome have a high rate of diabetes, to date, there have been only 4 reported cases (6 eyes) undergoing vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Herein, we report a case of Prader-Willi syndrome with proliferative diabetic retinopathy that was treated by early vitrectomy OU under local anesthesia. A 30-year-old man was diagnosed as having Prader-Willi syndrome at the age of 2 years and diabetes at age 17. He was referred to our hospital as diabetic retinopathy had been detected in his first ophthalmological examination at age 29. Visual acuity was 0.6 bilaterally. Proliferative retinopathy, with cataract and macular edema, was identified in both eyes. Panretinal photocoagulation was performed on both eyes. However, proliferative membranes developed bilaterally, and vitreous hemorrhage occurred OS. Visual acuity decreased to 0.3 OU. The patient was hospitalized at our internal medicine department for blood glucose control. Subsequently, with an anesthesiologist on standby, a hypnotic sedative was injected intramuscularly, achieving retro-bulbar anesthesia. Combined cataract and vitreous surgery was performed on the left eye. One week later, a similar operation was performed on the right eye. The patient was discharged four days later. In the two years since these operation, visual acuity has been maintained at 0.8 OU. Patients with Prader-Willi syndrome should be examined for early detection and treatment of diabetic retinopathy.

  18. Fractal-Based Oscillation of Macular Arteriogenesis and Dropout During Progressive Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radharkrishnan, Krishnan; Kaiser, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    By both fractal (D1) and branching (Lv) analysis, macular arterial density oscillated with progression from mild NPDR to PDR. Results are consistent with out study reported recently for the entire arterial and venous branching trees within 50 degree FAs by VESGEN generational branching analysis. Current and previous results are important for advances in early-stage regenerative DR therapies, for which reversal of DR progression to a normal vessel density may be possible. For example, potential use of regenerative angiogenesis stimulators to reverse vascular dropout during mild and severe NPDR is not indicated for treatment of moderate NPDR.

  19. Comparison of dexamethasone intravitreal implant and intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide for the treatment of pseudophakic cystoid macular edema in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dang Y

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Yalong Dang,1,* Yalin Mu,2,* Lin Li,3,* Yahui Mu,2 Shujing Liu,2 Chun Zhang,4 Yu Zhu,1 Yimin Xu4 1Department of Ophthalmology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan Province, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Yellow River Hospital, Henan University of Science and Technology, Sanmenxia, Henan Province, 3Department of Ophthalmology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang, Henan Province, 4Department of Ophthalmology, Peking University Third Hospital, Haidian District, Beijing, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work. Background and objective: Our objective was to investigate the efficacy and safety of dexamethasone (DEX implant for the treatment of pseudophakic cystoid macular edema (PCME in diabetic patients. Study design: This was a prospective, non-randomized, interventional case series of 43 participants. Eighteen patients were enrolled in the DEX implant group and 25 were enrolled in an intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide (IVTA group. Main outcome measures: The primary efficacy measurement was the percentage of patients who gained improvements of more than ten letters in best corrected visual acuity (BCVA during 6 months of follow-up. Other efficacy measurements included change in BCVA, change in central macular thickness (CMT, and number of retreatments. The primary safety evaluation was the percentage of patients with intraocular hypertension and variation in intraocular pressure (IOP during 6 months of follow-up. Other adverse events, such as conjunctival hemorrhage, eye pain, secondary infection, endophthalmitis, noninfectious inflammation, retinal detachment, and implant migration, were also recorded during follow-up. Results: At month 1, we observed that the percentage of patients gaining improvement of more than ten letters was similar in both groups (P=0.625. As patients in the IVTA group were retreated several times, this

  20. Aflibercept, Bevacizumab, or Ranibizumab for Diabetic Macular Edema: Two-Year Results from a Comparative Effectiveness Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, John A; Glassman, Adam R; Ayala, Allison R; Jampol, Lee M; Bressler, Neil M; Bressler, Susan B; Brucker, Alexander J; Ferris, Frederick L; Hampton, G Robert; Jhaveri, Chirag; Melia, Michele; Beck, Roy W

    2016-06-01

    To provide 2-year results comparing anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agents for center-involved diabetic macular edema (DME) using a standardized follow-up and retreatment regimen. Randomized clinical trial. Six hundred sixty participants with visual acuity (VA) impairment from DME. Randomization to 2.0-mg aflibercept, 1.25-mg repackaged (compounded) bevacizumab, or 0.3-mg ranibizumab intravitreous injections performed up to monthly using a protocol-specific follow-up and retreatment regimen. Focal/grid laser photocoagulation was added after 6 months if DME persisted. Visits occurred every 4 weeks during year 1 and were extended up to every 4 months thereafter when VA and macular thickness were stable. Change in VA, adverse events, and retreatment frequency. Median numbers of injections were 5, 6, and 6 in year 2 and 15, 16, and 15 over 2 years in the aflibercept, bevacizumab, and ranibizumab groups, respectively (global P = 0.08). Focal/grid laser photocoagulation was administered in 41%, 64%, and 52%, respectively (aflibercept vs. bevacizumab, P 0.10, for pairwise comparisons). Anti-Platelet Trialists' Collaboration (APTC) events occurred in 5% with aflibercept, 8% with bevacizumab, and 12% with ranibizumab (global P = 0.047; aflibercept vs. bevacizumab, P = 0.34; aflibercept vs. ranibizumab, P = 0.047; ranibizumab vs. bevacizumab, P = 0.20; global P = 0.09 adjusted for potential confounders). All 3 anti-VEGF groups showed VA improvement from baseline to 2 years with a decreased number of injections in year 2. Visual acuity outcomes were similar for eyes with better baseline VA. Among eyes with worse baseline VA, aflibercept had superior 2-year VA outcomes compared with bevacizumab, but superiority of aflibercept over ranibizumab, noted at 1 year, was no longer identified. Higher APTC event rates with ranibizumab over 2 years warrants continued evaluation in future trials. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Ophthalmology. All rights

  1. Therapies for Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain. There is moderate evidence that the drugs oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine, and lacosamide likely do not help treat ... at first, opioids can have less of an effect over time. There is moderate evidence that the ...

  2. Development of Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) in the Fellow Eye of Patients with AMD Treated by Treat-and-Extend Intravitreal Therapy with Aflibercept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimura, Kensuke; Matsumoto, Hidetaka; Morimoto, Masahiro; Akiyama, Hideo

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the development of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) in the fellow eye in patients with unilateral nAMD treated by a treat-and-extend (TAE) regimen with intravitreal aflibercept injections. We retrospectively studied 104 patients with treatment-naïve unilateral nAMD. We assessed best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and exudative changes in the treated eyes and development of nAMD in the fellow eye for 2 years. The subjects included 46 patients with typical AMD (tAMD), 44 with polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV), and 14 with retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP). BCVA was significantly improved after the loading phase in all subtypes. Forty-six patients (44.2%) had no recurrence within 2 years after the loading phase, including 12 (26.1%) with tAMD, 23 (52.2%) with PCV, and 11 (78.6%) with RAP (p < 0.01). Eleven patients (10.6%) developed nAMD in the fellow eye within 2 years, including 4 (8.7%) with tAMD, 0 (0%) with PCV, and 7 (50.0%) with RAP (p < 0.001). Patients with RAP had significantly more frequent development of nAMD in the fellow eye compared to other subtypes, while they showed significantly less recurrence during the TAE regimen with intravitreal aflibercept injections. Development of nAMD in the fellow eye should be monitored in RAP when the injection interval is extended. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Utility of Pars Plana Vitrectomy with Internal Limiting Membrane Dissection, in the Surgical Treatment of Macular Hole and Diabetic Macular Edema. Clinic-Pathological Correlation

    OpenAIRE

    Castro de Sousa, João Paulo

    2006-01-01

    ObjetivosEstudiar el papel de la extracción de la membrana limitante interna (MLI) durante la vitrectomía posterior por vía pars plana (VPP), en el tratamiento quirúrgico de lo agujero macular (AM) y de lo edema macular crónico diabético (EMCD). Hemos estudiado las tasas de éxito clínico de la extracción de la MLI durante la VPP. Además hemos analizado el procedimiento técnico de extracción de la MLI, el aporte de la extracción de la MLI en la resolución clínica del EMCD después de la VPP y e...

  4. What Is Macular Edema?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Diabetic Macular Edema Jul 17, 2015 Top 5 Risk Factors for AMD Jan 29, 2014 Is Your Laser Pointer Dangerous Enough to Cause Eye Injury? Dec 20, 2013 Study Finds Tablets Help People with Low Vision Nov 27, 2013 Follow The ...

  5. What Is Macular Edema?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may be mild to severe, but in many cases, your peripheral (side) vision remains. Macular edema is often a complication of diabetic retinopathy , and is the most common form of vision loss for people with diabetes—particularly if it is left ... Studies Show Zika Virus May Cause More Serious Eye ...

  6. Changes in Macular Retinal Layers and Peripapillary Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness after 577-nm Pattern Scanning Laser in Patients with Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ji Soo; Lee, Young Hoon

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in thickness of each macular retinal layer, the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), and central macular thickness (CMT) after 577-nm pattern scanning laser (PASCAL) photocoagulation in patients with diabetic retinopathy. This retrospective study included 33 eyes with diabetic retinopathy that underwent 577-nm PASCAL photocoagulation. Each retinal layer thickness, peripapillary RNFL thickness, and CMT were measured by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography before 577-nm PASCAL photocoagulation, as well as at 1, 6, and 12 months after 577-nm PASCAL photocoagulation. Computerized intraretinal segmentation of optical coherence tomography was performed to identify the thickness of each retinal layer. The average thickness of the RNFL, ganglion cell layer, inner plexiform layer, inner nuclear layer, inner retinal layer, and CMT at each follow-up increased significantly from baseline (p 0.05). Each macular retinal layer and CMT had a tendency to increase for one year after 577-nm PASCAL photocoagulation, whereas the average thickness of retinal pigment epithelium decreased at one-year follow-up compared to the baseline. Although an increase in peripapillary RNFL thickness was observed one month after 577-nm PASCAL photocoagulation, there were no significant changes at the one-year follow-up compared to the baseline. © 2017 The Korean Ophthalmological Society

  7. Efficacy and safety of sustained-delivery fluocinolone acetonide intravitreal implant in patients with chronic diabetic macular edema insufficiently responsive to available therapies: a real-life study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massin P

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pascale Massin, Ali Erginay, Bénédicte Dupas, Aude Couturier, Ramin Tadayoni Ophthalmology Department, Lariboisière Hospital, Paris, France Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of sustained-delivery fluocinolone acetonide (FAc intravitreal implant for diabetic macular edema (DME. Patients and methods: Prospective study in patients with DME insufficiently responsive to laser and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF. Patients with history of rise of intraocular pressure after intravitreal corticosteroids were excluded. Results: The macular edema rapidly decreased both in group 1 (prior laser only; n=7 eyes and group 2 (prior laser and ≥3 monthly anti-VEGF therapy; n=10 eyes and central subfield thickness was reduced by -299 µm (P=0.008 and -251 µm (P=0.016 at 12 months, respectively. Mean area under the curve from baseline to last value for pseudophakic eyes was +4.2 letters in group 1 and +9.5 letters in group 2. Overall, the FAc implant was well tolerated. Conclusion: This prospective study confirms the efficacy of the FAc implant in DME patients insufficiently responsive to laser and anti-VEGF. Moreover, with a careful patient selection, our safety results would support an earlier use of FAc in the DME treatment pathway. Keywords: diabetic macular edema, intravitreal corticosteroid, corticosteroid intravitreal implant, fluocinolone acetonide

  8. Clinical utilization of anti-vascular endothelial growth-factor agents and patient monitoring in retinal vein occlusion and diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiss S

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Szilárd Kiss,1 Ying Liu,2 Joseph Brown,3 Nancy M Holekamp,4,5 Arghavan Almony,6 Joanna Campbell,2 Jonathan W Kowalski2 1Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY; 2Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA; 3IMS Health, Woodland Hills, CA; 4Pepose Vision Institute, Chesterfield, MO; 5Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO; 6Carolina Eye Associates, Southern Pines, NC, USA Purpose: To examine the utilization of bevacizumab and ranibizumab and disease monitoring in patients with branch or central retinal vein occlusion (BRVO/CRVO or diabetic macular edema (DME in clinical practice.Patients and methods: This retrospective claims analysis included newly diagnosed patients with one or more bevacizumab or ranibizumab injections. Bevacizumab or ranibizumab utilization was assessed by year of first injection: 2008–2010 cohorts (12-month follow-up, January to June 2011 cohort (6-month follow-up. The main outcome measures were mean annual numbers of injections, ophthalmologist visits and optical coherence tomography examinations, and proportion of patients with additional laser or intravitreal triamcinolone (IVTA use.Results: A total of 885 BRVO, 611 CRVO, and 2,733 DME patients treated with bevacizumab were included, with too few ranibizumab-treated patients for meaningful analysis. Across the 2008, 2009, and 2010 cohorts, mean annual numbers of bevacizumab injections increased, but remained low (BRVO 2.5, 3.1, 3.3; CRVO 3.1, 3.1, 3.5; and DME 2.2, 2.5, 3.6, respectively; mean ophthalmologist visits ranged between 4.4 and 6.5, and mean optical coherence tomography examinations ranged between 3.1 and 3.9 across all conditions. A total of 42.0% of BRVO, 16.5% of CRVO, and 57.7% of DME patients received additional laser or IVTA therapy. The number of bevacizumab injections was positively associated with laser use in BRVO (3.3 versus 2.9, P<0.03, and with laser or IVTA use in DME (laser, 3.3 versus 2.7, P<0

  9. Unexpected cutaneous reactions in diabetic and pre diabetic patients treated with salsalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adibi, N.; Faghihimani, E.; Mirbagher, L.; Sohrabi, H.; Toghiani, A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The most commonly reported side effects of salsalate are gastrointestinal events, and few reports are available on its cutaneous side effects. We therefore assessed cutaneous side effects among diabetic/pre-diabetic patients treated with salsalate. Methodology: In a randomized placebo-controlled trial, we evaluated cutaneous side effects in 52 diabetic and 124 pre-diabetic patients, 90 of whom received 3 g/day salsalate and 86 of whom receive a placebo for four weeks. The evaluation was carried out every week using a checklist completed by a single general practitioner. Results: The difference between the salsalate- and placebo-treated groups in overall prevalence of cutaneous reactions was not significant (26.7% versus 17.4%; P < 0.05). Side effects included urticaria (nine (10.1%) salsalate-treated versus six (6.9%) placebo-treated), rashes (five (5.5%) salsalate-treated versus three (3.4%) placebo-treated), pruritus (six (6.7%) salsalate-treated versus three (3.4%) placebo-treated), and edema (two (2.2%) salsalate-treated versus one (1.2%) placebo-treated); in addition, one (1.1%) case of erythema nodosum and one (1.1%) of vasculitis were observed in the salsalate-treated group. In the salsalate group, therapy was discontinued by the physician for three (3.3%) patients because of acute and severe vasculitis, erythema nodosum and urticaria and two (2.2%) patients stopped the treatment themselves because of mild urticaria compared with two patients who stopped using the placebo. Conclusions: Salsalate can cause several and, in some cases, severe cutaneous side effects in patients with diabetes/pre-diabetes. Because these cutaneous eruptions can raise various concerns, including patient non-compliance, greater attention should be paid to dermatological problems in patients under salsalate treatment. (author)

  10. Switching to Aflibercept in Diabetic Macular Edema Not Responding to Ranibizumab and/or Intravitreal Dexamethasone Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Herbaut

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess short-term functional and anatomical outcomes of refractory diabetic macular edema (DME following a switch from ranibizumab or dexamethasone to aflibercept. Methods. We included retrospectively eyes with persistent DME after at least 3 ranibizumab and/or one dexamethasone implant intravitreal injections (IVI. The primary endpoint was the mean change in visual acuity (VA at month 6 (M6 after switching. Results. Twenty-five eyes were included. Before switching to aflibercept, 23 eyes received a median of 9.5 ranibizumab, and among them, 6 eyes received one dexamethasone implant after ranibizumab and 2 eyes received only one dexamethasone implant. Baseline VA, before any IVI, was 52.9 ± 16.5 letters, and preswitch VA was 57.1 ± 19.6 letters. The mean VA gain was +8 letters (p=0.01 between preswitch and M6. The mean central retinal thickness was 470.8 ± 129.9 μm before the switch and 303.3 ± 59.1 μm at M6 (p=0.001. Conclusion. Switching to aflibercept in refractory DME results in significant functional and anatomical improvement. The study was approved by the France Macula Federation ethical committee (FMF 2017-138.

  11. A retrospective, pooled data analysis of the safety of pegaptanib sodium in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration in subjects with or without diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dombi Theresa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the safety of pegaptanib sodium 0.3 mg intravitreal injection in the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration in subjects with or without diabetes mellitus. Methods A pooled, retrospective, analysis was conducted of data from 9 sponsor-administered, randomized, open-label trials. Subjects who received pegaptanib by randomization or change in dose assignment, crossover design, or protocol amendment, were included. Reports of endophthalmitis, increased intraocular pressure, retinal injury, intraocular hemorrhage, traumatic cataract, hypersensitivity reactions, stroke, myocardial infarction, and other arterial thromboembolic events defined by the Antiplatelet Trialists’ Collaboration were identified by Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities preferred terms. Adverse events were summarized from the first injection to 42 days after the last injection. The incidence of adverse events was stratified by the presence/absence of diabetes. Results Of 1,586 subjects enrolled, 165 (10.4% had a history of diabetes mellitus and 1,421 (89.6% did not. The 2 populations were similar at baseline. Based on the comparison of prespecified ocular, hypersensitivity, and Antiplatelet Trialists’ Collaboration event terms, the safety review did not identify any notable differences between the 2 populations. Conclusions This retrospective analysis found no increased safety risk resulting from treatment with pegaptanib 0.3 mg in individuals with neovascular age-related macular degeneration and concomitant diabetes mellitus.

  12. Basis and Design of a Randomized Clinical Trial to Evaluate the Effect of Levosulpiride on Retinal Alterations in Patients With Diabetic Retinopathy and Diabetic Macular Edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Osorio, Ma Ludivina; García-Franco, Renata; Núñez-Amaro, Carlos D; Mira-Lorenzo, Ximena; Ramírez-Neria, Paulina; Hernández, Wendy; López-Star, Ellery; Bertsch, Thomas; Martínez de la Escalera, Gonzalo; Triebel, Jakob; Clapp, Carmen

    2018-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic macular edema (DME) are potentially blinding, microvascular retinal diseases in people with diabetes mellitus. Preclinical studies support a protective role of the hormone prolactin (PRL) due to its ocular incorporation and conversion to vasoinhibins, a family of PRL fragments that inhibit ischemia-induced retinal angiogenesis and diabetes-derived retinal vasopermeability. Here, we describe the protocol of an ongoing clinical trial investigating a new therapy for DR and DME based on elevating the circulating levels of PRL with the prokinetic, dopamine D2 receptor blocker, levosulpiride. It is a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial enrolling male and female patients with type 2 diabetes having DME, non-proliferative DR (NPDR), proliferative DR (PDR) requiring vitrectomy, and DME plus standard intravitreal therapy with the antiangiogenic agent, ranibizumab. Patients are randomized to receive placebo (lactose pill, orally TID) or levosulpiride (75 mg/day orally TID) for 8 weeks (DME and NPDR), 1 week (the period before vitrectomy in PDR), or 12 weeks (DME plus ranibizumab). In all cases the study medication is taken on top of standard therapy for diabetes, blood pressure control, or other medical conditions. Primary endpoints in groups 1 and 2 (DME: placebo and levosulpiride), groups 3 and 4 (NPDR: placebo and levosulpiride), and groups 7 and 8 (DME plus ranibizumab: placebo and levosulpiride) are changes from baseline in visual acuity, retinal thickness assessed by optical coherence tomography, and retinal microvascular abnormalities evaluated by fundus biomicroscopy and fluorescein angiography. Changes in serum PRL levels and of PRL and vasoinhibins levels in the vitreous between groups 5 and 6 (PDR undergoing vitrectomy: placebo and levosulpiride) serve as proof of principle that PRL enters the eye to counteract disease progression. Secondary endpoints are changes during the follow-up of health

  13. Injection related anxiety in insulin-treated diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambanini, A; Newson, R B; Maisey, M; Feher, M D

    1999-12-01

    The presence of injection related anxiety and phobia may influence compliance, glycaemic control and quality of life in patients with insulin-treated diabetes. Unselected consecutive, insulin-treated patients attending a diabetes clinic for follow-up, completed a standardised questionnaire providing an injection anxiety score (IAS) and general anxiety score (GAS). A total of 115 insulin-treated (80 Type 1 and 35 Type 2) diabetic patients completed the questionnaire. Injections had been avoided secondary to anxiety in 14% of cases and 42% expressed concern at having to inject more frequently. An IAS > or = 3 was seen in 28% of patients and of these, 66% injected insulin one to two times/day, 45% had avoided injections, and 70% would be bothered by more frequent injections. A significant correlation between IAS and GAS was seen (Kendall's tau-a 0.30, 95% CI 0.19-0.41, P < 0.001). GAS was significantly associated with both previous injection avoidance and expressed concern at increased injection frequency. No significant correlation was seen with HbA1c and injection or general anxiety scores. Symptoms relating to insulin injection anxiety and phobia have a high prevalence in an unselected group of diabetic patients requiring insulin injections and are associated with higher levels of general anxiety.

  14. Neovascular age-related macular degeneration treated with ranibizumab or aflibercept in the same large clinical setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Annette; Sander, Birgit; Larsen, Michael

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study visual outcome and number of annual injections in treatment-naïve patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) before and after a change in first-line therapy from ranibizumab to aflibercept in a high-volume clinical practice. METHODS: This was a retrospective...

  15. Long-term longitudinal study of patients treated with ranibizumab for neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Annette; Sander, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review the current literature regarding long-term treatment beyond 2 years with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibition for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nv-AMD). RECENT FINDINGS: Only few studies of anti-VEGF treatment for nv-AMD exist beyond...

  16. Management of cataract with macular oedema due to diabetes mellitus Type-II and hypertension with grid laser prior to surgery and intra-vitreal bevacizumab (avastin) peroperatively

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahab, S.; Ahmed, J.

    2010-01-01

    To study the visual outcome in patients subjected to cataract extraction with prior grid laser and intraoperative intravitreal bevacizumab injection. Methods: This prospective case series comprised of 38 patients subjected to phacoemulsification and in the bag intraocular lens implantation at Al-Noor Eye Hospital and Sindh Govt Lyari General Hospital Karachi from January 2007 to December 2008. All the patients had prior macular grid treatment and intra-operative injection of intra-vitreal Avastin. Diabetes mellitus duration, preoperative glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) level and other systemic and local complications of diabetes were recorded. The patients were clinically assessed with bio microscopic examination preoperatively, and postoperatively on day 1, week 1, and in months 1, 2, 3 and 6 respectively. Visual acuity and state of macular oedema was clinically assessed and documented. Results: Out of thirty-eight patients, eighteen were males and 20 were females. Mean duration of diabetes was 9.92 +- 5.5 years (Range 4-16) while that of hypertension was 7.87 +- 3.66 years (Range = 2-15). HbA1c level was 8.36% +- 1.93% (range 6.3 - 12.3). Thirty-one (81.5%) patients had HbA1c level 8.0% or above indicating a poor control. At 6 months of follow up best corrected distant visual acuity of 6/6 to 6/9 was achieved in 23(60.5 %), 6/12 in 11(28.9%) and 6/24 in 4(10.5%) cases while best corrected near acuity of N/6 was achieved in 22(57.8%) N/8 in 12(31.4%) and N/12 in 4(10.5%) cases. At 6 months follow up visual acuity declined in two cases because of uncontrolled diabetes and hypertension. Conclusion: Cataract surgery in diabetic patients with macular oedema and hypertension has a good visual outcome if prior macular grid laser is performed and intra-vitreal anti VEGF is injected during surgery. (author)

  17. Cost-effectiveness of ranibizumab versus aflibercept in the treatment of visual impairment due to diabetic macular edema: a UK healthcare perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Régnier SA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Stephane A Régnier,1 William Malcolm,2 Jennifer Haig,3 Weiguang Xue41Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland; 2Novartis Pharmaceuticals UK Ltd, Frimley Business Park, UK; 3Optum, Burlington, ON, Canada; 4Optum, Uxbridge, UKBackground: Ranibizumab and aflibercept are alternative anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents approved for the treatment of visual impairment (VI due to diabetic macular edema (DME.Objective: To estimate, from a UK healthcare perspective, the cost-effectiveness of ranibizumab 0.5 mg pro re nata (PRN and ranibizumab 0.5 mg treat and extend (T&E compared with aflibercept 2 mg every 8 weeks after five initial monthly doses (2q8 in the treatment of VI due to DME.Methods: A Markov model previously reviewed by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence was used to simulate the long-term outcomes and costs of treating DME. Health states were defined by increments of ten letters in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA, with a 3-month cycle length. Patients could gain (or lose a maximum of two health states between cycles. A 3-year treatment time frame and a lifetime horizon were used. Future costs and health outcomes were discounted at 3.5% per annum. Patient baseline characteristics and the efficacy of ranibizumab PRN were derived using data from the RESTORE study. The relative efficacies of ranibizumab PRN, ranibizumab T&E, and aflibercept were assessed with a network meta-analysis. Different utilities were assigned based on BCVA and whether the treated eye was the better- or the worse-seeing eye. Sensitivity analyses tested the robustness of the model.Results: Lifetime costs per patient of treating DME were £20,019 for ranibizumab PRN, £22,930 for ranibizumab T&E, and £25,859 for aflibercept 2q8. Ranibizumab was dominant over aflibercept, with an incremental gain of 0.05 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs and cost savings of £5,841 (PRN and £2,930 (T&E compared with aflibercept. Ranibizumab PRN and

  18. Observation on Efficacy of Puerarin in Treating Diabetic Retino pathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任平; 胡惠君; 张瑞

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Using the principle of promoting blood circulation to remove s tasis to observe central retinal arterial and venous blood flow indexes, and hemorrheology of diabetic retinopathy patients with puerarin. Methods: Thirty patients with diabetic retinopathy were randomly divided into the treated group (n=15) and the control group (n=15). The treated group was given puerarin 400 mg per day intravenously dripping. The control group was given Mikebao 500 μg intramuscularly, once per day. Both groups were treated for 3 co nsecutive weeks as one treatment course. Two courses later, hemorrheologic parameters, central retinal arterial and venous blood flow indexes were observed . Results: Comparison before and after treatment showed red blood cell aggregation index, the whole bloo d viscosity rate, plasma viscosity rate, fibrinogen and erythrocyte sedimentatio n rate, have all improved obviously (P<0.05, P<0.01). Compared wi th the control gro up, there was significant difference (P<0.05, P<0.01). With the treated group before and after treatment, the peak systolic velocity (P SV) of c entral retinal artery, their end diastolic volume, the acceleration, the central retinal venous reflux velocity have improved respectively. Nak ed eye visions were also improved, compared with the control group, the differe nce was significant (P<0.01). Conclusion: Puerarin could reduc e bl ood viscosity, improve microcirculation, and play a positive therapeutic role i n diabetic retinopathy.

  19. INDUCTION OF MACULAR DETACHMENT FOR THE TREATMENT OF PERSISTENT OR RECURRENT IDIOPATHIC MACULAR HOLES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szigiato, Andrei-Alexandru; Gilani, Fatimah; Walsh, Mark K; Mandelcorn, Efrem D; Muni, Rajeev H

    2016-09-01

    To analyze the efficacy of induced macular detachment for the treatment of persistent or recurrent idiopathic macular holes after treatment with one or more standard pars plana vitrectomies (PPVs) with internal limiting membrane peeling. This study is a retrospective consecutive case series of 10 patients who underwent a PPV with subretinal balanced salt solution injection from 2011 to 2014 to treat persistent or recurrent idiopathic macular holes. All patients had previously undergone PPV with internal limiting membrane peeling. Visual acuity, ocular examination findings, and optical coherence tomographic images were reviewed preoperatively and postoperatively to assess the anatomical and visual outcomes of this procedure. Nine of the 10 patients who underwent the procedure had closure of their macular holes postoperatively (90%) and remained closed 6 months postoperatively. Most patients reported a subjective visual improvement. A mean objective visual improvement of 16 letters (Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study, 0.324 logMAR) was seen between preoperative and 6-month postoperative assessments of all patients (pre = 1.490, post = 1.166; P = 0.022). Subgroup analysis of patients with successful closure revealed 20 letters of improvement (0.398 logMAR) in visual acuity (pre = 1.491, post = 1.093; P = 0.004). There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. In eyes with persistent or recurrent idiopathic macular holes after standard PPV with internal limiting membrane peeling, repeat PPV with subretinal balanced salt solution injection to create a macular detachment may be a viable surgical treatment option. Our results show improved anatomical and visual outcomes postoperatively that compare favorably to other case series describing various surgical treatments for these challenging cases.

  20. Serous Macular Detachments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Özdemir

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Serous macular detachment has only recently been recognized to occur in a significant number of eyes with macular pathology including diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusion, Behçet disease, Irvine-Gass syndrome and pars planitis. These serous retinal detachments associated with retinal vascular leakage are not suspected clinically or angiographically but can be diagnosed with optical coherence tomography (OCT beneath the edematous neurosensory retina. The detection of shallow foveal detachment may be helpful in better understanding the pathogenesis of these disorders. In addition, the detection of serous macular detachment may also help to better guide and assess the results of therapy in the future. (Turk J Oph thal mol 2012; 42: 146-9

  1. Efficacy and safety of sotagliflozin in treating diabetes type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendell, Marc S

    2018-02-01

    Sotagliflozin is the first dual SGLT1/SGLT2 inhibitor developed for use in diabetes. Sotagliflozin blocks SGLT2 in the kidneys and SGLT1 in the intestines resulting in reduced early phase glucose absorption and increased blood levels of GLP-1 and PYY. Urinary glucose excretion is lower than with other agents as a result of decreased glucose absorption. The primary development effort to date has been in Type 1 diabetes. Areas covered: The published information on sotagliflozin is reviewed, along with the recent results of several pivotal Type 1 diabetes trials. Expert opinion: Sotagliflozin treatment lowers HbA1c and reduces glucose variability, with a trend to less hypoglycemic events. In the Type 1 trials, sotagliflozin treated individuals experienced DKA at a higher rate than placebo treated patients. An additional safety issue arises from the as yet unknown potential risks in women of child bearing potential in whom DKA is of utmost concern. The sotagliflozin development program has now been extended to trials in Type 2 diabetes, and long term studies will be needed to assess the benefits and risks of the agent in comparison to other currently marketed SGLT2 inhibitors.

  2. Demographic, medical and visual aspects of Dia- betic Retinopathy (DR and Diabetic Macular Edema (DME in South African diabetic patients*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusha Y. Sukha

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate some of the demographic, medical, and visual aspects of diabetic retinopathy (DR and diabetic macula edema (DME in diabetics attending an urban clinic in Johannesburg, Gauteng. Design: In this cross-sectional study, 202 diabetic patients were recruited. Demographic variables included age, gender, race, age of diagnosis, duration of diabetes mellitus (DM, and social habits. Medical variables included systemic conditions present, blood pressures, body mass indices (BMI, lipid profiles, glycerated haemoglobin (HbA1c, and other biochemical data. Visual variables included distance, pinhole and near visual acuities, contrast visual acuities (CVA, refractive status, colour vision, central visual field evaluation with the Amsler grid, intraocular pressures (IOP, fundus photography and administration of the Impact of Visual Impairment (IVI questionnaire. All variables were compared between diabetic subjects with and with-out DR and DME in both right and left eyes. Results: Overall prevalence of DR was 22.8% and DME 12.5%. In DR subjects, significant results indicated that Whites were more likely to present with DR (p = 0.002. Subjects with DR had a higher mean duration of DM (p = 0.002 and a higher mean diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.035. Autorefraction suggested that more myopia and less astigmatism might be associated with DR. A higher mean CVA at the 2.5% level in DR was significant in both the right eyes (p = 0.042 and left eyes (p = 0.035. These subjects also reported a higher mean IVI score in the consumer and social interaction domain (p = 0.032. Similarly, DME subjects displayed a higher mean duration of DM (p = 0.042 and a higher mean diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.048. A higher mean CVA was associated at both the 10% level: right eyes (p = 0.021; and left eyes (p = 0.046, and at the 2.5% level: right eyes (p = 0.033 and left eyes (p = 0.045. A higher mean IVI score in leisure and work (p = 0.026, consumer and social

  3. Ranibizumab for Visual Impairment due to Diabetic Macular Edema: Real-World Evidence in the Italian Population (PRIDE Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugo Menchini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. An expanded access program (PRIDE study in Italy to provide ranibizumab 0.5 mg to diabetic macular edema (DME patients, prior to reimbursement. Methods. Open-label, prospective, phase IIIb study. Majority of patients were not treatment-naïve before enrollment. Patients received ranibizumab as per the EU label (2011. Safety was assessed by incidences of ocular/systemic adverse events (AEs and serious AEs (SAEs and efficacy in terms of visual acuity (VA change from baseline (decimal score or Snellen (20/value. Results. Overall, 515 patients (83.5% completed the study. In unilateral/bilateral patients, commonly observed AEs were cardiac disorders (1.3%/1.3% and nervous system disorders (1.3%/1.1%; SAEs were reported in 4.5%/4.8% of patients. Acute renal failure, lung carcinoma, and cardiac arrest were the causes of death in one unilateral and two bilateral patients. Ranibizumab improved/maintained VA (Snellen (20/value/decimal scores in both unilateral (up to −16.7/1.5 and bilateral patients (up to −23.6/1.2 at Month 5, with a mean of 4.15 and 4.40 injections, respectively. Overall, no difference was observed in the VA outcomes and treatment exposure between unilateral/bilateral patients. Conclusions. The PRIDE study provided early ranibizumab access to >600 Italian patients. Ranibizumab was well-tolerated and improved/maintained VA in 40.2%–68.8% patients, with no differences in case of unilateral or bilateral pathology. The study is registered with EudraCT.

  4. Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Comparative Effectiveness Trial for Diabetic Macular Edema: Additional Efficacy Post Hoc Analyses of a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jampol, Lee M; Glassman, Adam R; Bressler, Neil M; Wells, John A; Ayala, Allison R

    2016-12-01

    Post hoc analyses from the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network randomized clinical trial comparing aflibercept, bevacizumab, and ranibizumab for diabetic macular edema (DME) might influence interpretation of study results. To provide additional outcomes comparing 3 anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agents for DME. Post hoc analyses performed from May 3, 2016, to June 21, 2016, of a randomized clinical trial performed from August 22, 2012, to September 23, 2015, of 660 participants comparing 3 anti-VEGF treatments in eyes with center-involved DME causing vision impairment. Randomization to intravitreous aflibercept (2.0 mg), bevacizumab (1.25 mg), or ranibizumab (0.3 mg) administered up to monthly based on a structured retreatment regimen. Focal/grid laser treatment was added after 6 months for the treatment of persistent DME. Change in visual acuity (VA) area under the curve and change in central subfield thickness (CST) within subgroups based on whether an eye received laser treatment for DME during the study. Post hoc analyses were performed for 660 participants (mean [SD] age, 61 [10] years; 47% female, 65% white, 16% black or African American, 16% Hispanic, and 3% other). For eyes with an initial VA of 20/50 or worse, VA improvement was greater with aflibercept than the other agents at 1 year but superior only to bevacizumab at 2 years. Mean (SD) letter change in VA over 2 years (area under curve) was greater with aflibercept (+17.1 [9.7]) than with bevacizumab (+12.1 [9.4]; 95% CI, +1.6 to +7.3; P grid laser treatment was performed for DME, the only participants to have a substantial reduction in mean CST between 1 and 2 years were those with a baseline VA of 20/50 or worse receiving bevacizumab and laser treatment (mean [SD], -55 [108] µm; 95% CI, -82 to -28 µm; P grid laser treatment, ceiling and floor effects, or both may account for mean thickness reductions noted only in bevacizumab-treated eyes between 1 and 2 years

  5. Bilateral Macular Edema in a Patient Treated with Tamoxifen: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paraskevas Zafeiropoulos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 41-year-old female patient with progressive bilateral visual loss. On examination, her best corrected visual acuity (BCVA in her right eye was 3/10 and her BCVA in her left eye was 2/10. Fundus and optical coherence tomography examination revealed severe bilateral macular edema. She had been diagnosed with breast cancer 6 years ago and was receiving tamoxifen at a dosage of 20 mg/day ever since. Tamoxifen therapy was discontinued, and the patient received 250 mg of acetazolamide three times a day for a period of 1 month. Both foveae regained their normal contour within 2 months, and her vision was restored to 10/10 BCVA 3 months later. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported where bilateral intraretinal macular edema is the only retinal manifestation in a patient on oral tamoxifen.

  6. Bilateral macular edema in a patient treated with tamoxifen: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafeiropoulos, Paraskevas; Nanos, Panagiotis; Tsigkoulis, Evangelos; Stefaniotou, Maria

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of a 41-year-old female patient with progressive bilateral visual loss. On examination, her best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in her right eye was 3/10 and her BCVA in her left eye was 2/10. Fundus and optical coherence tomography examination revealed severe bilateral macular edema. She had been diagnosed with breast cancer 6 years ago and was receiving tamoxifen at a dosage of 20 mg/day ever since. Tamoxifen therapy was discontinued, and the patient received 250 mg of acetazolamide three times a day for a period of 1 month. Both foveae regained their normal contour within 2 months, and her vision was restored to 10/10 BCVA 3 months later. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported where bilateral intraretinal macular edema is the only retinal manifestation in a patient on oral tamoxifen.

  7. A Crossover Design for Comparative Efficacy: A 36-Week Randomized Trial of Bevacizumab and Ranibizumab for Diabetic Macular Edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Henry E; Thompson, Darby J S; Bailey, Clare; Chew, Emily Y; Cukras, Catherine A; Jaffe, Glenn J; Lee, Richard W J; Loken, Erin K; Meyerle, Catherine B; Wong, Wai; Ferris, Frederick L

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the comparative efficacy of bevacizumab (Avastin) and ranibizumab (Lucentis; both Genentech, Inc, South San Francisco, CA) for diabetic macular edema (DME) using a crossover study design. Randomized, double-masked, 36-week, 3-period crossover clinical trial. Fifty-six subjects with DME involving the center of the macula in one or both eyes. Monthly intravitreous injections of bevacizumab (1.25 mg) or ranibizumab (0.3 mg). Comparison of mean changes in visual acuity and central retinal thickness, tested using a linear mixed-effects model. Based on the linear mixed-effects model, the 3-month estimated mean improvement in visual acuity was 5.3 letters for bevacizumab and 6.6 letters for ranibizumab (difference, 1.3 letters; P = 0.039). Estimated change in optical coherence tomography (OCT) central subfield mean thickness (CSMT) was -89 μm for bevacizumab and -137 μm for ranibizumab (difference, 48 μm; P < 0.001). Incorporating cumulative treatment benefit, the model yielded a predicted 36-week (9-month) average improvement in visual acuity of 7.1 letters (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.0-9.2) for bevacizumab and 8.4 letters (95% CI, 6.3-10.5) for ranibizumab, and a change in OCT CSMT of -128 μm (95% CI, -155 to -100) for bevacizumab and -176 μm (95% CI, -202 to -149) for ranibizumab. There was no significant treatment-by-period interaction (i.e., treatment difference was constant in all 3 periods), nor was there a significant differential carryover effect from one period to the next. This trial demonstrated a statistically significant but small relative clinical benefit of ranibizumab compared with bevacizumab for treatment of DME, using a markedly reduced sample size relative to a full comparative efficacy study. The effects on visual acuity and central retinal thickness for the 2 drugs are consistent with those reported at 1 year for the concurrent parallel-group trial by the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network testing bevacizumab

  8. Pigmentos maculares Macular pigments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Canovas

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A luteína e a zeaxantina são pigmentos amarelos que se localizam na mácula. Devido à sua localização, diminuem e filtram a quantidade de luz principalmente azul que chega aos fotorreceptores, atuam como antioxidantes e podem melhorar a qualidade visual. Esta é uma revisão do seu mecanismo de incorporação, ação, possíveis aplicações e conhecimento científico a respeito.Lutein and Zeaxanthin are yellow pigments located at the macula. Because of your location macular pigments decrease and filter the amount of blue light that reach photoreceptors, protect the outer retina from oxidative stress and may improve the vision quality. This is a review regarding incorporation mechanism, function and knowledge update.

  9. Comparison of phacoemulsification parameters effect on macular thickness changes after uneventful phacoemulsification in diabetic and non-diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Gul Kocak Altintas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the effect of phacoemulsification(phacoparameters in micropulse phaco-tecnology with chamber stabilization environment(CASEand increased control and efficiency(ICEmode on central foveal thickness(CFTchanges after uneventful cataract surgery in normal and diabetic patients without retinopathy.METHODS: In this prospective study a total of 120 patients consist of 60 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus as a diabetic group(DGwithout retinopathy and 60 normal subjects as a control group(CGwho underwent uneventful phaco were evaluated. Intraoperative phacoemulsification parameters including phaco time(PT, and effective phaco time(EPTwere recorded. The CFT measurements were performed preoperatively, at 1 and 3mo postoperatively. The CFT differences were calculated in each exam.RESULTS:The mean PT in DG was 1.40±0.43min and it was 1.44±0.32min in CG, the difference was not significant(P=0.85. The mean EPT was 20.12±8.82s and 19.24±9.02s in DG and CG respectively which was statistically insignificant(P=0.964. The mean preoperative CFT was 218.4±12.0 μm in DG and 222.1±16.6 μm in CG which was not statistically different(P=0.168. The mean increment of CFT in DG was 30.3±37.2 μm at 1mo postoperatively, while it was 13.1±12.5 μm in CG. Even the CFT increments were significant in both groups at 1mo postoperatively, it was statistically higher in DG than that of CG(P=0.001. The average CFT increment at 3mo postoperatively comparing to preoperative level was 12.5±12.4 μm and 4.6±9.7 μm in DG and CG respectively. The increment of CFT was significantly higher in DG than that of CG(P=0.00. But the comparison of the mean CFTs changes from postoperative 1mo and 3mo in both DG and CG, significant decrements were observed in each group(P=0.00 and P=0.03 respectively.CONCLUSION: The significant increment of CFT following uneventful phaco. With the similar phaco parameters were observed in both normal and diabetic subjects. The CFT

  10. A predictive screening tool to detect diabetic retinopathy or macular edema in primary health care: construction, validation and implementation on a mobile application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Azrak

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The most described techniques used to detect diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema have to be interpreted correctly, such that a person not specialized in ophthalmology, as is usually the case of a primary care physician, may experience difficulties with their interpretation; therefore we constructed, validated and implemented as a mobile app a new tool to detect diabetic retinopathy or diabetic macular edema (DRDME using simple objective variables. We undertook a cross-sectional, observational study of a sample of 142 eyes from Spanish diabetic patients suspected of having DRDME in 2012–2013. Our outcome was DRDME and the secondary variables were: type of diabetes, gender, age, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, foveal thickness and visual acuity (best corrected. The sample was divided into two parts: 80% to construct the tool and 20% to validate it. A binary logistic regression model was used to predict DRDME. The resulting model was transformed into a scoring system. The area under the ROC curve (AUC was calculated and risk groups established. The tool was validated by calculating the AUC and comparing expected events with observed events. The construction sample (n = 106 had 35 DRDME (95% CI [24.1–42.0], and the validation sample (n = 36 had 12 DRDME (95% CI [17.9–48.7]. Factors associated with DRDME were: HbA1c (per 1% (OR = 1.36, 95% CI [0.93–1.98], p = 0.113, foveal thickness (per 1 µm (OR = 1.03, 95% CI [1.01–1.04], p < 0.001 and visual acuity (per unit (OR = 0.14, 95% CI [0.00–0.16], p < 0.001. AUC for the validation: 0.90 (95% CI [0.75–1.00], p < 0.001. No significant differences were found between the expected and the observed outcomes (p = 0.422. In conclusion, we constructed and validated a simple rapid tool to determine whether a diabetic patient suspected of having DRDME really has it. This tool has been implemented on a mobile app. Further validation studies are required in the general diabetic population.

  11. Two-Year Outcomes of a Treat-and-Extend Regimen Using Intravitreal Aflibercept Injections for Typical Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Arisa; Matsumoto, Hidetaka; Morimoto, Masahiro; Mimura, Kensuke; Akiyama, Hideo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a treat-and-extend (TAE) regimen using intravitreal injection of aflibercept (IVA) for typical age-related macular degeneration (tAMD). We retrospectively studied 61 treatment-naïve eyes with tAMD. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), central macular thickness (CMT), central choroidal thickness (CCT), number of injections, and complications during 2 years were evaluated. BCVA significantly improved by on average 0.13 logMAR units, and CMT and CCT significantly decreased after 2 years. The number of injections was on average 13.6. In the second year, eyes with classic choroidal neovascularization (CNV) needed significantly fewer treatments than eyes with occult CNV. Fourteen eyes, which developed subfoveal fibrosis, showed significantly poorer BCVA after 2 years. Subfoveal fibrosis was significantly common in classic CNV. A TAE regimen using IVA for tAMD might be effective for improving BCVA and exudative changes. The exudation may be suppressed with fewer treatments in classic CNV compared to occult CNV. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. What Is Macular Edema?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ophthalmology/Strabismus Ocular Pathology/Oncology Oculoplastics/Orbit Refractive Management/Intervention Retina/Vitreous Uveitis ... Macular Edema Sections What Is Macular Edema? What Causes Macular Edema? Macular ...

  13. Micro-implant d'acétonide de fluocinolone (ILUVIEN(®)) pour l'oedème maculaire diabétique chronique [Fluocinolone acetonide (ILUVIEN®) micro-implant for chronic diabetic macular edema].

    OpenAIRE

    Soubrane, G.; Behar-Cohen, F.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) is a frequent complication of diabetic retinopathy and may cause severe visual loss. In this article, we examine the pathophysiology of DME and review various treatment options, such as laser photocoagulation, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor antibodies, and steroids including ILUVIEN(®), which is a new sustained-release, non biodegradable, injectable, intravitreal micro-implant containing fluocinolone acetonide. The results of the FAME (Flu...

  14. The effect of peer support in adults with insulin pump-treated type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, Lene Eide; Meldgaard Andersen, Merete; Jensen, Sabrina

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to explore the effects of a flexible and participatory peer support intervention in a clinical setting for adults with type 1 diabetes treated with an insulin pump, focusing on enhancing diabetes-specific social capital. The key questions were as follows: 1) what...... empowerment, diabetes distress, diabetes-specific social support, and diabetes loneliness. HbA1c levels were compared before and after the intervention. Results: Participants experienced enhanced diabetes-specific social capital, diabetes motivation, awareness of personal diabetes practices, and serenity...

  15. Macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    The macula is the part of the retina that distinguishes fine details at the center of the field of vision. Macular degeneration results from a partial breakdown of the insulating layer between the retina and the choroid layer of ...

  16. What Is Macular Edema?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Macular Edema Sections What Is Macular Edema? What Causes Macular ... Edema Diagnosis Macular Edema Treatment What Is Macular Edema? Leer en Español: ¿Qué es un edema macular? ...

  17. What Is Macular Edema?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Macular Edema Sections What Is Macular Edema? What Causes Macular ... Edema Diagnosis Macular Edema Treatment What Is Macular Edema? Leer en Español: ¿Qué es un edema macular? ...

  18. Diabetes eye exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic retinopathy - eye exams; Diabetes - eye exams; Glaucoma - diabetic eye exam; Macular edema - diabetic eye exam ... if the doctor who takes care of your diabetes checks your eyes, you need an eye exam ...

  19. Efficacy of treat-and-extend regimen with aflibercept for pachychoroid neovasculopathy and Type 1 neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hidetaka; Hiroe, Takashi; Morimoto, Masahiro; Mimura, Kensuke; Ito, Arisa; Akiyama, Hideo

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of intravitreal aflibercept therapy using a treat-and-extend regimen on treatment-naïve pachychoroid neovasculopathy (PNV) and Type 1 neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We retrospectively studied 42 eyes with PNV and 60 eyes with Type 1 neovascular AMD. We assessed best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), central macular thickness (CMT), central choroidal thickness (CCT), and total number of injections over 2 years. The BCVA and CMT improvements during the 2-year treatment period did not differ significantly between PNV and AMD; however, CCT decreased significantly in PNV than in AMD (P<0.05). Management of PNV required significantly fewer injections than AMD during the 2-year period (P<0.05). There were no significant differences in BCVA, CMT and CCT changes between PNV with and without polypoidal lesions (28 vs. 14 eyes) during the 2 year period. Significantly fewer injections were needed for PNV with polypoidal lesions than for PNV without (P<0.01). There were no significant differences in BCVA, CMT and CCT changes, or in the number of injections during the 2-year treatment period, between AMD with and without polypoidal lesions (30 vs. 30 eyes). Treat-and-extend regimen of intravitreal aflibercept injection may be equally effective in terms of improvement of BCVA and exudative changes both in eyes with PNV and those with Type 1 neovascular AMD requiring fewer injections for the former. Among eyes with PNV, those with polypoidal lesions needed fewer injections than those without polypoidal lesions.

  20. Prevalence and incidence of blindness and other degrees of sight impairment in patients treated for neovascular age-related macular degeneration in a well-defined region of the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckle, M; Lee, A; Mohamed, Q; Fletcher, E; Sallam, A; Healy, R; Stratton, I; Tufail, A; Johnston, R L

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the incidence and prevalence of blindness, sight impairment, and other visual acuity (VA) states in patients receiving ranibizumab for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) in Gloucestershire. Serial VA and injection data for all treatment-naive patients receiving their first intravitreal injections of ranibizumab for nAMD in the Gloucestershire National Health Service Ophthalmology department between 2008 and 2010 were extracted from an electronic medical record system. The prevalence of blindness (VA in the better-seeing eye ≤25 Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) letters) at the time of first intravitreal injection was 0.8%, increasing to 3.5% after 3 years. The prevalence of sight impairment (VA in the better-seeing eye 26-39 ETDRS letters) increased from 4.1% at baseline to 5.5% after 3 years. The incidence of initiating ranibizumab treatment for nAMD in people aged ≥50 years in Gloucestershire was 111 people per 100 000 population in 2009, and 97 people in 2010. The incidence of patients meeting the visual criteria for blindness and sight impairment registration from treated nAMD in people aged ≥50 years in Gloucestershire was 3.5 and 9.7 people, respectively per 100 000 population in 2010. This is the first real-world study on the incidence and prevalence of eligibility for blindness and sight impairment registration in treated nAMD in the UK based on VA data. The incidence and prevalence of eligibility for certification of blindness or sight impairment in patients treated with ranibizumab for nAMD is low in Gloucestershire, with only 3.6% of the incident population progressing to blindness in 2010.

  1. Diabetes stigma is associated with negative treatment appraisals among adults with insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmes-Truscott, E.; Browne, J. L.; Ventura, A. D.

    2018-01-01

    and psychosocial issues. Subgroup analyses were conducted on the responses of 456 adults with insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes (38% women; mean ± sd age: 61.2 ± 8.8 years; diabetes duration: 14.5 ± 7.5 years; years using insulin: 6.4 ± 5.5). Participants completed validated measures of perceived and experienced......, BMI, years using insulin, injections per day), self-efficacy, diabetes-specific distress and diabetes stigma (all P diabetes......Aim: To explore factors associated with negative insulin appraisals among adults with Type 2 diabetes, including perceived and experienced diabetes stigma. Methods: The second Diabetes MILES - Australia study (MILES-2) is a national survey of adults with diabetes, focused on behavioural...

  2. A novel intravitreal fluocinolone acetonide implant (Iluvien® in the treatment of patients with chronic diabetic macular edema that is insufficiently responsive to other medical treatment options: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmit-Eilenberger VK

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Vera K Schmit-Eilenberger Augenklinik Städtisches Klinikum, Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg, Germany Background: Iluvien® is a novel, nonbiodegradable, sustained-release drug delivery system (0.2 µg/d fluocinolone acetonide [FAc] indicated in Europe for the treatment of vision impairment associated with chronic diabetic macular edema (DME, considered insufficiently responsive to available therapies.Objective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of 190-µg FAc implant in patients with chronic DME refractory to other medical treatment options in a clinical setting. Methods: Retrospective registry data were collected by using standard case report forms (CRFs. Prior to intravitreal injection of the FAc implant, all patients were treated either with a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF antagonist and/or a steroid (triamcinolone, dexamethasone implant. Patients were excluded from receiving FAc if they had a known history of elevated intraocular pressure (IOP following corticosteroid therapy, glaucoma, ocular hypertension, or any contraindications cited in the summary of product characteristics. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA was the main study parameter. Central fovea thickness (CFT and IOP were measured concurrently. These parameters were recorded prior to and after the injection of the 190-µg FAc implant (between 1 week and 9 months. Injections were performed between May 2013 and March 2014.Results: Fifteen eyes from ten patients were treated. Thirteen eyes (nine patients were pseudophakic, and seven eyes (five patients were vitrectomized prior to receiving therapy. BCVA improved in eleven eyes (73.3%, remained unchanged in two eyes (13.3%, and decreased slightly in two eyes (13.3% at the last follow-up visit versus baseline levels. IOP increased in two patients and was controlled using fixed-combination of IOP-lowering eyedrops or sectorial cyclocryotherapy (n=1.Conclusion: The 190-µg FAc implant was efficacious and showed a favorable

  3. Application of OCT in traumatic macular hole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Li Fu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the application of optical coherence tomography(OCTin the diseases of traumatic macular hole. METHODS: Twenty-five eyes of 23 patients with traumatic macular hole from January 2015 to January 2017 were enrolled in this study, including 9 eyes treated without surgeries, 16 eyes with surgeries. The image features were analyzed using OCT from ZEISS. RESULTS: The OCT characteristics in patients with traumatic macular hole were partial or full-thickness disappearance of the neuro-epithelium. Posterior vitreous detachment was not seen in the traumatic macular hole. OCT examination revealed that 4 eyes had partial detachment of macular hole and 21 eyes had full thickness detachment. Of the twenty-one eyes, 4 eyes had simple macular hole, 10 eyes had macular full-layer division with peripheral nerve epithelium edema, 7 eyes had the macular full-layer hole with the neuro-epithelium localized detachment. In the 25 eyes, 9 eyes did not undergo the surgery, of which 7 eyes were self-healing; 16 eyes were surgically treated. Postoperative OCT showed the macular structure were normal in 12 eyes with the visual acuity improved 3 lines; retinal nerve epithelium were thinning in 4 eyes, visual acuities were not significant improved after surgery. CONCLUSION: OCT examination is necessary for the diagnosis and treatment of traumatic macular hole.

  4. Microarray analysis of thioacetamide-treated type 1 diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devi, Sachin S.; Mehendale, Harihara M.

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that diabetes imparts high sensitivity to numerous hepatotoxicants. Previously, we have shown that a normally non-lethal dose of thioacetamide (TA, 300 mg/kg) causes 90% mortality in type 1 diabetic (DB) rats due to inhibited tissue repair allowing progression of liver injury. On the other hand, DB rats exposed to 30 mg TA/kg exhibit delayed tissue repair and delayed recovery from injury. The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanism of impaired tissue repair and progression of liver injury in TA-treated DB rats by using cDNA microarray. Gene expression pattern was examined at 0, 6, and 12 h after TA challenge, and selected mechanistic leads from microarray experiments were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR and further investigated at protein level over the time course of 0 to 36 h after TA treatment. Diabetic condition itself increased gene expression of proteases and decreased gene expression of protease inhibitors. Administration of 300 mg TA/kg to DB rats further elevated gene expression of proteases and suppressed gene expression of protease inhibitors, explaining progression of liver injury in DB rats after TA treatment. Inhibited expression of genes involved in cell division cycle (cyclin D1, IGFBP-1, ras, E2F) was observed after exposure of DB rats to 300 mg TA/kg, explaining inhibited tissue repair in these rats. On the other hand, DB rats receiving 30 mg TA/kg exhibit delayed expression of genes involved in cell division cycle, explaining delayed tissue repair in these rats. In conclusion, impaired cyclin D1 signaling along with increased proteases and decreased protease inhibitors may explain impaired tissue repair that leads to progression of liver injury initiated by TA in DB rats

  5. Vulvovaginitis and balanitis in patients with diabetes treated with dapagliflozin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsson, Kristina M; Ptaszynska, Agata; Schmitz, Bridget; Sugg, Jennifer; Parikh, Shamik J; List, James F

    2013-01-01

    Vulvovaginitis, balanitis, and related genital infections are common in patients with type 2 diabetes. Glucosuria, which is an outcome of treatment with sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, is among the possible causes. Dapagliflozin, an SGLT2 inhibitor with demonstrated glycemic benefits in patients with diabetes, has been studied across a broad spectrum of patients. Analysis of multi-trial safety data may better define the relationship between glucosuria and genital infection. Safety data were pooled from 12 randomized, placebo-controlled Phase 2b/3 trials to analyze the association of glucosuria with genital infection in patients with suboptimally controlled diabetes (HbA1c >6.5%-12%). Patients were randomized to receive dapagliflozin (2.5mg, 5mg, or 10mg) or placebo once daily, either as monotherapy or add-on to metformin, insulin, sulfonylurea, or thiazolidinedione for 12-24weeks. The incidence of clinical diagnoses and of events suggestive of genital infection was evaluated. The pooled safety data included 4545 patients: 3152 who received once-daily dapagliflozin (2.5mg [n=814], 5mg [n=1145], or 10mg [n=1193]) as monotherapy or add-on treatment, and 1393 placebo-treated patients. For dapagliflozin 2.5mg, 5mg, 10mg, and placebo, diagnosed infections were reported in 4.1%, 5.7%, 4.8%, and 0.9%, respectively. Most infections were mild or moderate and responded to standard antimicrobial treatment. Discontinuation due to these events was rare. No clear dose-response relationship between dapagliflozin and genital infection was demonstrated. Treatment with dapagliflozin 2.5mg, 5mg, or 10mg once daily is accompanied by an increased risk of vulvovaginitis or balanitis, related to the induction of glucosuria. Events were generally mild to moderate, clinically manageable, and rarely led to discontinuation of treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Potential of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs for Treating Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Fields

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The field of stem cell biology has rapidly evolved in the last few decades. In the area of regenerative medicine, clinical applications using stem cells hold the potential to be a powerful tool in the treatment of a wide variety of diseases, in particular, disorders of the eye. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs are promising technologies that can potentially provide an unlimited source of cells for cell replacement therapy in the treatment of retinal degenerative disorders such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD, Stargardt disease, and other disorders. ESCs and iPSCs have been used to generate retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells and their functional behavior has been tested in vitro and in vivo in animal models. Additionally, iPSC-derived RPE cells provide an autologous source of cells for therapeutic use, as well as allow for novel approaches in disease modeling and drug development platforms. Clinical trials are currently testing the safety and efficacy of these cells in patients with AMD. In this review, the current status of iPSC disease modeling of AMD is discussed, as well as the challenges and potential of this technology as a viable option for cell replacement therapy in retinal degeneration.

  7. Potential of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) for Treating Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Mark; Cai, Hui; Gong, Jie; Del Priore, Lucian

    2016-12-08

    The field of stem cell biology has rapidly evolved in the last few decades. In the area of regenerative medicine, clinical applications using stem cells hold the potential to be a powerful tool in the treatment of a wide variety of diseases, in particular, disorders of the eye. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are promising technologies that can potentially provide an unlimited source of cells for cell replacement therapy in the treatment of retinal degenerative disorders such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), Stargardt disease, and other disorders. ESCs and iPSCs have been used to generate retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells and their functional behavior has been tested in vitro and in vivo in animal models. Additionally, iPSC-derived RPE cells provide an autologous source of cells for therapeutic use, as well as allow for novel approaches in disease modeling and drug development platforms. Clinical trials are currently testing the safety and efficacy of these cells in patients with AMD. In this review, the current status of iPSC disease modeling of AMD is discussed, as well as the challenges and potential of this technology as a viable option for cell replacement therapy in retinal degeneration.

  8. Diabetic patients treated with dialysis: complications and quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, V R; Mathiesen, E R; Watt, T

    2007-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of complications, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and the influence of beliefs about control over health in diabetic dialysis patients. METHODS: Of 53 eligible diabetic patients on chronic dialysis during January 2004...... in our clinic, 38 (76%) completed a kidney-specific (Kidney Disease Quality of Life) and a generic (SF-36) questionnaire and were characterised in terms of cardiovascular diseases and diabetic complications. Matched groups of non-diabetic dialysis patients (n = 40) and diabetic patients with a long...... population (47 +/- 19). The diabetic dialysis patients had similar levels of kidney-specific quality of life and mental health compared with the control groups. Reduced physical health was predicted by the presence of end-stage renal disease, diabetes and short time spent in education. Among the diabetic...

  9. Newly diagnosed exudative age-related macular degeneration treated with pegaptanib sodium monotherapy in US community-based practices: medical chart review study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Xiao

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have shown that early detection and treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (NV-AMD can delay vision loss and blindness. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy/safety of intravitreal pegaptanib sodium monotherapy in treatment-naïve subjects with newly diagnosed NV-AMD and to gain insight into characteristics of lesions treated in community-based practices. Methods From seven private US practices, charts were retrospectively reviewed on 73 subjects with previously untreated subfoveal choroidal NV-AMD treated with their first dose of pegaptanib monotherapy on/after 4/1/2005 through 6/5/2006, receiving ≥4 treatments at 6-week intervals over 21 weeks. Primary endpoint: mean visual acuity (VA change from baseline to month 6. Results 75% of lesions were occult, and 82% were subfoveal. From baseline to month 6, mean VA change was -0.68 lines; 58% and 16% gained ≥0 and ≥3 lines of VA, and 70% were responders ( Conclusion Pegaptanib is effective in real-world patients with treatment-naïve NV-AMD in uncontrolled community-based retina practices.

  10. Long-Term Visual Outcomes for a Treat and Extend Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Regimen in Eyes with Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Mrejen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF therapy, clinicians are now focused on various treatment strategies to better control neovascular age-related macular degeneration (NVAMD, a leading cause of irreversible blindness. Herein, we retrospectively reviewed consecutive patients with treatment-naïve NVAMD initially classified based on fluorescein angiography (FA alone or with an anatomic classification utilizing both FA and optical coherence tomography (OCT and correlated long-term visual outcomes of these patients treated with an anti-VEGF Treat-and-Extend Regimen (TER with baseline characteristics including neovascular phenotype. Overall, 185 patients (210 eyes were followed over an average of 3.5 years (range 1–6.6 with a retention rate of 62.9%, and visual acuity significantly improved with a TER that required a mean number of 8.3 (±1.6 (± standard deviation intravitreal anti-VEGF injections/year (range 4–13. The number of injections and the anatomic classification were independent predictors of visual acuity at 6 months, 1, 2, 3 and 4 years. Patients with Type 1 neovascularization had better visual outcomes and received more injections than the other neovascular subtypes. There were no serious adverse events. A TER provided sustained long-term visual gains. Eyes with Type 1 neovascularization had better visual outcomes than those with other neovascular subtypes.

  11. Exercise training improves glycemic control in long-standing insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feyter, de H.M.M.L.; Praet, S.F.E.; Broek, van den N.M.A.; Kuipers, H.; Stehouwer, C.D.; Nicolay, K.; Prompers, J.J.; Loon, van L.J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Regular exercise represents an effective strategy to prevent and/or treat type 2 diabetes ( 1 , 2 ). However, the clinical benefits of exercise intervention in a vastly expanding group of long-standing insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients with comorbidities are less evident. As these patients

  12. BILATERAL SEROUS MACULAR DETACHMENT IN A PATIENT WITH NEPHROTIC SYNDROME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilge, Ayse D; Yaylali, Sevil A; Yavuz, Sara; Simsek, İlke B

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report a case of a woman with nephrotic syndrome who presented with blurred vision because of bilateral serous macular detachment. Case report and literature review. A 55-year-old woman with a history of essential hypertension, diabetes, and nephrotic syndrome was presented with blurred vision in both eyes. Her fluorescein angiography revealed dye leakage in the early and subretinal pooling in the late phases, and optical coherence tomography scans confirmed the presence of subretinal fluid in the subfovel area. In nephrotic syndrome cases especially with accompaniment of high blood pressure, fluid accumulation in the retina layer may occur. Serous macular detachment must be kept in mind when treating these patients.

  13. The evaluation of efficacy of subtenon triamcinolone injection combined with focal laser photocoagulation in diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Öksüz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate efficacyand safety of subtenon triamcinolone (ST in combinationwith focal laser photocoagulation in diabetic macularedema (DME.Materials and methods: Medical records of patients withDME, treated with 40 mg subtenon injection of triamcinoloneacetonid prior to focal laser photocoagulation wereretrospectively analyzed. Seventeen eyes of 17 patientswith DME were enrolled in the study. All patients underwenta comprehensive ophthalmological examinationbefore the treatment. Efficacy of the treatment after STinjection was evaluated by visual acuity and flouresceinangiography (FA. Follow-up visits were performed at 1st,3rd, 6th and 12th months. Repeated measures ANOVA wasused for statistical analysis.Results: The mean age was 61.5 ± 8.7 years and themean visual acuity in the study eyes was 0.22 ± 0.13 beforethe treatment, 0.39 ± 0.15 at 1st month, 0.36 ± 0.18at 3rd month, 0.33 ± 0.15 at 6th month and 0.34 ± 0.16 at12th month. The differences in the visual acuity before thetreatment and follow-up visits were significant (p ˂0.05.Visual acuity was increased in 13 (%76,4 patients, decreasedin 1 (%5,8 and unchanged in 3 (%17,6.Conclusion: Injection of 40 mg of triamsinolon via subtenonroute combined with focal laser photocoagulation isa safe and beneficial treatment in cases of DME

  14. 36-Month Evaluation of Intravitreous Aflibercept Injection for Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Patients Previously Treated With Ranibizumab or Bevacizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Felipe F; Silva, Fabiana Q; Srivastava, Sunil K; Ehlers, Justis P; Schachat, Andrew P; Singh, Rishi P

    2018-03-01

    In the ASSESS study, patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration transitioned from other anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapies to intravitreous aflibercept (Eylea; Regeneron, Tarrytown, NY) injections (IAI). The purpose was to determine the 36-month outcomes following the change from a fixed 24-month IAI dosing regimen to a routine clinical practice regimen. Patients were treated with a fixed bimonthly regimen for the first 2 years. In the third year, patients were managed according to routine clinical practice. A total of 18 patients completed the 36 months and were considered for statistical analyses. At 36 months, a nonsignificant decrease of -37.8 μm in central subfield thickness and a nonsignificant gain of 5.8 letters from baseline were observed. Despite the significant visual and anatomical gains observed in the 2 years of fixed-dosing IAI, there was gradual decline in these improvements when patients were transitioned to a variable regimen. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2018;49:179-185.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Diabetic retinopathy in a remote Indigenous primary healthcare population: a Central Australian diabetic retinopathy screening study in the Telehealth Eye and Associated Medical Services Network project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazionis, L; Jenkins, A; Keech, A; Ryan, C; Brown, A; Boffa, J; Bursell, S

    2018-05-01

    To determine diabetic retinopathy prevalence and severity among remote Indigenous Australians. A cross-sectional diabetic retinopathy screening study of Indigenous adults with Type 2 diabetes was conducted by locally trained non-ophthalmic retinal imagers in a remote Aboriginal community-controlled primary healthcare clinic in Central Australia and certified non-ophthalmic graders in a retinal grading centre in Melbourne, Australia. The main outcome measure was prevalence of any diabetic retinopathy and sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy. Among 301 participants (33% male), gradable image rates were 78.7% (n = 237) for diabetic retinopathy and 83.1% (n = 250) for diabetic macular oedema, and 77.7% (n = 234) were gradable for both diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular oedema. For the gradable subset, the median (range) age was 48 (19-86) years and known diabetes duration 9.0 (0-24) years. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was 47% (n = 110) and for diabetic macular oedema it was 14.4% (n = 36). In the fully gradable imaging studies, sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy prevalence was 16.2% (n = 38): 14.1% (n = 33) for clinically significant macular oedema, 1.3% (n = 3) for proliferative diabetic retinopathy and 0.9% (n = 2) for both. Sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy had been treated in 78% of detected cases. A novel telemedicine diabetic retinopathy screening service detected a higher prevalence of 'any' diabetic retinopathy and sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy in a remote primary care setting than reported in earlier surveys among Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations. Whether the observed high prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was attributable to greater detection, increasing diabetic retinopathy prevalence, local factors, or a combination of these requires further investigation and, potentially, specific primary care guidelines for diabetic retinopathy management in remote Australia. Clinical Trials registration number: Australia and

  16. Treating Mental Illness among Diabetic Black Male Adolescents: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Andrae; Fields, Lashawnda; O'Dwyer, Curtis; Scott, Marquisha Lawrence; Joe, Sean

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To examine randomized controlled trials (RCTs) for treatment evidence for Black male adolescents suffering from comorbid mental illness and diabetes mellitus. Method: A review of the studies published in English-language journals was conducted. Results: We found no RCT focused on Black males with diabetes mellitus Type 2 (DMT2).…

  17. What Is Macular Edema?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Eye Health A-Z Symptoms Glasses & Contacts Tips & Prevention News Ask an Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye ... Macular Edema Symptoms Macular Edema Diagnosis Macular Edema Treatment What Is Macular Edema? Leer en Español: ¿Qué ...

  18. What Is Macular Edema?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Macular Edema Treatment What Is Macular Edema? Leer en Español: ¿Qué es un edema macular? Dec. 01, 2010 Macular edema is swelling or thickening of the eye's macula, the part of your eye responsible for detailed, central vision. The macula is a very small area ...

  19. Explaining psychological insulin resistance in adults with non-insulin-treated type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmes-Truscott, Elizabeth; Skinner, Timothy Chas; Pouwer, F

    2016-01-01

    to the model. CONCLUSIONS: Psychological insulin resistance may reflect broader distress about diabetes and concerns about its treatment but not general beliefs about medicines, depression or anxiety. Reducing diabetes distress and current treatment concerns may improve attitudes towards insulin as a potential......AIMS: To investigate the contribution of general and diabetes-specific emotional wellbeing and beliefs about medicines in the prediction of insulin therapy appraisals in adults with non-insulin-treated type 2 diabetes. METHODS: The sample included Diabetes MILES-Australia cross-sectional survey...... diabetes medications (BMQ Specific); negative insulin therapy appraisals (ITAS); depression (PHQ-9); anxiety (GAD-7), and diabetes distress (DDS-17). Factors associated with ITAS Negative scores were examined using hierarchical multiple regressions. RESULTS: Twenty-two percent of the variance in ITAS...

  20. Increased prevalence of insulin-treated diabetes mellitus in Funen County, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eshøj, O; Green, A; Borch-Johnsen, K

    1994-01-01

    : There was a significant increase in the prevalence of insulin-treated diabetes mellitus in Funen County, Denmark from 1973 to 1987. Analysis of the data shows that an important factor for this increase is a liability to start insulin treatment of type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus at an earlier stage than...

  1. Macular Diplopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shippman, Sara; Cohen, Kenneth R; Heiser, Larissa

    2015-01-01

    Maculopathies affect point-to-point foveal correspondence causing diplopia. The effect that the maculopathies have on the interaction of central sensory fusion and peripheral fusion are different than the usual understanding of treatment for diplopia. This paper reviews the pathophysiology of macular diplopia, describes the binocular pathology causing the diplopia, discusses the clinical evaluation, and reviews the present treatments including some newer treatment techniques. © 2015 Board of regents of the University of Wisconsin System, American Orthoptic Journal, Volume 65, 2015, ISSN 0065-955X, E-ISSN 1553-4448.

  2. Switching from pro re nata to treat-and-extend regimen improves visual acuity in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvannli, Line; Krohn, Jørgen

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the visual outcome after transitioning from a pro re nata (PRN) intravitreal injection regimen to a treat-and-extend (TAE) regimen for patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). A retrospective review of patients who were switched from a PRN regimen with intravitreal injections of bevacizumab, ranibizumab or aflibercept to a TAE regimen. The best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), central retinal thickness (CRT) and type of medication used at baseline, at the time of changing treatment regimen and at the end of the study were analysed. Twenty-one eyes of 21 patients met the inclusion criteria. Prior to the switch, the patients received a mean of 13.8 injections (median, 10; range, 3-39 injections) with the PRN regimen for 44 months (range, 3-100 months), which improved the visual acuity in five patients (24%). After a mean of 6.1 injections (median, 5; range, 3-14 injections) with the TAE regimen over 8 months (range, 2-16 months), the visual acuity improved in 12 patients (57%). The improvement in visual acuity during treatment with the TAE regimen was statistically significant (p = 0.005). The proportion of patients with a visual acuity of 0.2 or better was significantly higher after treatment with the TAE regimen than after treatment with the PRN regimen (p = 0.048). No significant differences in CRT were found between the two treatment regimens. Even after prolonged treatment and a high number of intravitreal injections, switching AMD patients from a PRN regimen to a strict TAE regimen significantly improves visual acuity. © 2017 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Stem Cell Therapies for Treating Diabetes: Progress and Remaining Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneddon, Julie B; Tang, Qizhi; Stock, Peter; Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Roy, Shuvo; Desai, Tejal; Hebrok, Matthias

    2018-06-01

    Restoration of insulin independence and normoglycemia has been the overarching goal in diabetes research and therapy. While whole-organ and islet transplantation have become gold-standard procedures in achieving glucose control in diabetic patients, the profound lack of suitable donor tissues severely hampers the broad application of these therapies. Here, we describe current efforts aimed at generating a sustainable source of functional human stem cell-derived insulin-producing islet cells for cell transplantation and present state-of-the-art efforts to protect such cells via immune modulation and encapsulation strategies. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Lipid Profile Of Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Wistar Rats Treated

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    most common serious metabolic disease in the world, affecting hundreds of millions and ... 1922, the treatment of diabetes mellitus relied mainly on dietary measures ..... In liver, the free fatty acids are catabolized to acetyl CoA, and the excess acetyl. CoA is converted to cholesterol, triglyceride and ketone bodies resulting in.

  5. Androgens and estrogens in postmenopausal insulin-treated diabetic women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyholm, H; Djursing, H; Hagen, C

    1989-01-01

    serum levels of estrone (P less than 0.001), estrone sulfate (P less than 0.05), 17 beta-estradiol (P less than 0.02), and SHBG (P less than 0.001). Levels of testosterone, delta 4-androstenedione, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate tended to be higher (not significantly) in the diabetics. FSH and LH...

  6. Intraretinal hemorrhages in cystoid macular edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovino, J A; Kelly, T J; Marcus, D F

    1984-08-01

    Retinal hemorrhages can be associated with typical cystoid macular edema. We examined the fundus photographs and fluorescein angiograms of 313 eyes of 264 patients with documented cystoid macular edema to establish the incidence and characteristics of associated intraretinal hemorrhages. As we wanted to study only those hemorrhages unique to cystoid macular edema, we excluded 86 eyes because the patients had diseases known to be associated with retinal hemorrhages. These diseases included diabetes mellitus, branch retinal vein occlusion, hypertensive retinopathy, venous stasis retinopathy, and perifoveal telangiectasia. Of the remaining 227 eyes with cystoid macular edema, 56 (24.7%) were identified with retinal hemorrhages not associated with systemic disease. The hemorrhages were characteristically oval, round, or linear and frequently filled or partially filled the intraretinal cystoid space. In many patients, a blood-fluid level was observed.

  7. Diabetes mellitus: new therapeutic approaches to treat an old disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Gabanyi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Diabetes mellitus is a widespread disease whose frequency increases constantly and is expected to reach alarming levels by the year 2025. Introduction of insulin therapy represented a major breakthrough; however, a very strict regimen is required to maintain blood glucose levels within the normal range and to prevent or postpone chronic complications associated with this disease. Frequent hyper- and hypoglycemia seriously affect the quality of life of these patients. Reversion of this situation can only be achieved through whole organ (pancreas transplant or pancreatic islet transplant, the former being a high-risk surgical procedure, while the latter is a much simpler and may be accomplished in only 20-40 min. The advantages and perspectives of islet cell transplantation will be discussed, in the light of tissue engineering and gene therapy. Ongoing research carried out in our laboratory, aimed at developing clinical cell and molecular therapy protocols for diabetes will also be focused. Keywords: Diabetes mellitus, cell and molecular therapy, human pancreatic islets, degenerative diseases, recombinant biopharmaceuticals.

  8. Frequency and risk factors of severe hypoglycaemia in insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akram, K; Pedersen-Bjergaard, U; Carstensen, B

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: The reported risk of severe hypoglycaemia in insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes is highly variable and few studies have evaluated the influence of risk factors. We assessed the incidence and the influence of potential risk factors for severe hypoglycaemia in a questionnaire survey in subjects...... with insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes receiving currently recommended multifactorial intervention. METHODS: Consecutive patients with insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes (n = 401) completed a questionnaire about occurrence of hypoglycaemia in the past, hypoglycaemia awareness and socio-demographic factors. A zero...... treatment and treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin receptor antagonists (ARBs) were associated with reduced risk. C-peptide concentration and HbA1c were not associated with the risk of severe hypoglycaemia. CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort of insulin-treated Type 2...

  9. [Type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity: should we treat the obesity or the diabetes?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Santiago Durán; Sanz, Santiago Durán; Sanz, Alejandro Durán

    2013-09-01

    In this article, we review the results that can be expected after significant weight loss in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We provide consensus-based documentation supported by the American Diabetes Association, the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, and the International Diabetes Federation on the importance of physical exercise, metabolic-bariatric surgery, and drug therapy. Lastly, we report the results of studies published in the last few years on glucagon-like peptide-1 analogs and the new family of oral drugs known as gliflozins, specifically studies published on dapagliflozin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. Good visual outcome in a longstanding macular detachment associated with an optic disc pit treated with vitrectomy, laser, and gas tamponade: case report. doi: 10.20513/2447-6595.2016v56n1p68-70

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Evangelista Marrocos de Aragao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Optic disc pit is a congenital anomaly of the optic nerve frequently associated with macula detachment. It has a poor visual prognosis if left untreated. The treatment of the optic disc remains controversial and includes the use of laser along the edge of the optic nerve, vitrectomy with gas tamponade with or without removal of posterior hyaloid. We report a case of a 19-year-old female with a longstanding macula detachment due to optic disc pit who was treated with vitrectomy with removal of posterior hyaloid, gas tamponade, and laser. Despite longstanding macular detachment the final visual acuity was 20/25.

  11. Fully Automated Segmentation of Fluid/Cyst Regions in Optical Coherence Tomography Images With Diabetic Macular Edema Using Neutrosophic Sets and Graph Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashno, Abdolreza; Koozekanani, Dara D; Drayna, Paul M; Nazari, Behzad; Sadri, Saeed; Rabbani, Hossein; Parhi, Keshab K

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents a fully automated algorithm to segment fluid-associated (fluid-filled) and cyst regions in optical coherence tomography (OCT) retina images of subjects with diabetic macular edema. The OCT image is segmented using a novel neutrosophic transformation and a graph-based shortest path method. In neutrosophic domain, an image is transformed into three sets: (true), (indeterminate) that represents noise, and (false). This paper makes four key contributions. First, a new method is introduced to compute the indeterminacy set , and a new -correction operation is introduced to compute the set in neutrosophic domain. Second, a graph shortest-path method is applied in neutrosophic domain to segment the inner limiting membrane and the retinal pigment epithelium as regions of interest (ROI) and outer plexiform layer and inner segment myeloid as middle layers using a novel definition of the edge weights . Third, a new cost function for cluster-based fluid/cyst segmentation in ROI is presented which also includes a novel approach in estimating the number of clusters in an automated manner. Fourth, the final fluid regions are achieved by ignoring very small regions and the regions between middle layers. The proposed method is evaluated using two publicly available datasets: Duke, Optima, and a third local dataset from the UMN clinic which is available online. The proposed algorithm outperforms the previously proposed Duke algorithm by 8% with respect to the dice coefficient and by 5% with respect to precision on the Duke dataset, while achieving about the same sensitivity. Also, the proposed algorithm outperforms a prior method for Optima dataset by 6%, 22%, and 23% with respect to the dice coefficient, sensitivity, and precision, respectively. Finally, the proposed algorithm also achieves sensitivity of 67.3%, 88.8%, and 76.7%, for the Duke, Optima, and the university of minnesota (UMN) datasets, respectively.

  12. Macular degeneration (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... macula in the back of the eye. The macula is important for clear central vision, allowing an individual to see fine details. There are two types of macular degeneration, dry and wet. Dry macular degeneration is more ...

  13. What Is Macular Edema?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be able to see after vitrectomy surgery for a macular hole? Jan 24, 2016 Can Prolensa drops help a macular hole? Jan 11, 2016 After a person develops ocular histoplasmosis, ...

  14. [Prevalence of Dental Caries in Type 1 Diabetic Patients Treated with Insulin Pump].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Rosana; Coelho, Ana; Paula, Anabela; Marques Ferreira, Manuel; Caramelo, Francisco; Barros, Luísa; Batista, Carla; Melo, Miguel; Silva, Mário Jorge; Carrilho, Eunice

    2016-08-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus and oral health are strictly related on a reciprocal basis, and an increased susceptibility to a wide variety of oral diseases is recognised in these patients. The aim of the present study was to establish a relationship between the prevalence of dental caries in Type 1 diabetic patients treated with insulin pump and that of non-diabetic patients. An observational clinical study of analytical and cross-sectional nature was conducted. The sample consisted of 30 adults with diabetes mellitus treated with insulin pump (selected from the Coimbra Hospital and Universitary Centre) and 30 nondiabetic adults (selected from the ones accompanying the diabetic patients). One dentist evaluated all of the patients between January and May of 2015 in the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Coimbra. During the clinical evaluation a case report form adapted to the objectives of the investigation was completed. Data analysis was performed and the significance level was set at 5%. Diabetic patients showed similar levels on the caries and plaque index to non-diabetic patients. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups as regards oral hygiene habits and frequency of visits to the dentist. Discussão: Although diabetics' diet is less abundant in carbohydrates, which provides a smaller exposure to cariogenic food, the regularity of meals can increase the risk of caries since the critical pH for demineralization is reached frequently throughout the day. However, the existence of a chronic condition may determine a high concern for general preventive care, resulting in an overall improvement of their oral health, which could justify the results. Type 1 diabetic patients treated with insulin pump don't have a higher prevalence of dental caries.

  15. Targeted delivery of curcumin for treating type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maradana, Muralidhara Rao; Thomas, Ranjeny; O'Sullivan, Brendan J

    2013-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition in which cells have reduced insulin signalling, leading to hyperglycemia and long-term complications, including heart, kidney and liver disease. Macrophages activated by dying or stressed cells, induce the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa-B leading to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including TNF and IL-6. These inflammatory macrophages in liver and adipose tissue promote insulin resistance, and medications which reduce inflammation and enhance insulin signalling improve glucose control. Curcumin is an anti-oxidant and nuclear factor kappa-B inhibitor derived from turmeric. A number of studies have shown that dietary curcumin reduces inflammation and delays or prevents obesity-induced insulin resistance and associated complications, including atherosclerosis and immune mediate liver disease. Unfortunately dietary curcumin is poorly absorbed by the digestive system and undergoes glucuronidation and excretion rather than being released into the serum and systemically distributed. This confounds understanding of how dietary curcumin exerts its beneficial effects in type 2 diabetes and associated diseases. New improved methods of delivering curcumin are being developed including nanoparticles and lipid/liposome formulations that increase absorption and bioavailability of curcumin. Development and refinement of these technologies will enable cell-directed targeting of curcumin and improved therapeutic outcome. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Visual Impairment and Blindness Avoided with Ranibizumab in Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Whites with Diabetic Macular Edema in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Rohit; Bressler, Neil M; Doan, Quan V; Danese, Mark; Dolan, Chantal M; Lee, Abraham; Turpcu, Adam

    2015-05-01

    To estimate visual impairment (VI) and blindness avoided with intravitreal ranibizumab 0.3 mg treatment for central-involved diabetic macular edema (DME) among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white individuals in the United States. Population-based model simulating visual acuity (VA) outcomes over 2 years after diagnosis and treatment of DME. Visual acuity changes with and without ranibizumab were based on data from the RISE, RIDE, and DRCR Network trials. For the better-seeing eye, VA outcomes included VI, defined as worse than 20/40 in the better-seeing eye, and blindness, defined as VA of 20/200 or worse in the better-seeing eye. Incidence of 1 or both eyes with central-involved DME in 2010 were estimated based on the 2010 United States population, prevalence of diabetes mellitus, and 1-year central-involved DME incidence rate. Sixty-one percent of incident individuals had bilateral DME and 39% had unilateral DME, but DME could develop in the fellow eye. Cases of VI and blindness avoided with ranibizumab treatment. Among approximately 102 million Hispanic and non-Hispanic white individuals in the United States 45 years of age and older in 2010, an estimated 37 274 had central-involved DME and VI eligible for ranibizumab treatment. Compared with no ranibizumab treatment, the model predicted that ranibizumab 0.3 mg every 4 weeks would reduce the number of individuals with VI from 11 438 (95% simulation interval [SI], 7249-16 077) to 6304 (95% SI, 3921-8981), a 45% (95% SI, 36%-53%) reduction at 2 years. Ranibizumab would reduce the number of incident eyes with VA worse than 20/40 from 16 910 (95% SI, 10 729-23 577) to 9361 (95% SI, 5839-13 245), a 45% (95% SI, 38%-51%) reduction. Ranibizumab was estimated to reduce the number of individuals with legal blindness by 75% (95% SI, 58%-88%) and the number of incident eyes with VA of 20/200 or worse by 76% (95% SI, 63%-87%). This model suggests that ranibizumab 0.3 mg every 4 weeks substantially reduces prevalence of VI and

  17. Efficacy of anti-VEGF and laser photocoagulation in the treatment of visual impairment due to diabetic macular edema: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane Régnier

    Full Text Available Compare the efficacy of ranibizumab, aflibercept, laser, and sham in the first-line treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME to inform technology assessments such as those conducted by the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE.MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Library, congress abstracts, ClinicalTrials.gov registry and Novartis data on file.Studies reporting 6- or 12-month results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs evaluating at least two of ranibizumab 0.5 mg pro re nata, aflibercept 2.0 mg bi-monthly, laser photocoagulation or sham. Study quality was assessed based on likelihood of bias in selection, attrition, detection and performance.Improvement in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA measured as the proportion of patients gaining ≥10 letters on the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study scale. The outcome was chosen following acceptance by NICE of a Markov model with 10-letter health states in the assessment of ranibizumab for DME.Bayesian network meta-analyses with fixed and random effects adjusted for differences in baseline BCVA or central retinal thickness.The analysis included 1,978 patients from eight RCTs. The random effects model adjusting for baseline BCVA was the best model based on total residual. The efficacy of ranibizumab was numerically, but not statistically, superior to aflibercept (odds ratio [OR] 1.59; 95% credible interval [CrI], 0.61-5.37. Ranibizumab and aflibercept were statistically superior to laser monotherapy with ORs of 5.50 (2.73-13.16 and 3.45 (1.62-6.84 respectively. The probability that ranibizumab is the most efficacious treatment was 73% compared with 14% for aflibercept, 12% for ranibizumab plus laser, and 0% for laser.Three of the eight RCTs included are not yet published. The models did not adjust for all potential effect modifiers.Ranibizumab was non-significantly superior to aflibercept and both anti-VEGF therapies had statistically superior efficacy to laser.

  18. What Is Macular Edema?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tips & Prevention News Ask an Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Macular Edema ... Edema Treatment What Is Macular Edema? Leer en Español: ¿Qué es un edema macular? Dec. 01, 2010 ...

  19. A case with relapsed transient neonatal diabetes mellitus treated with sulfonylurea, ending chronic insulin requirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko Ando

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a woman with diabetes mellitus caused by a genetic defect in ABCC8-coding sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1, a subunit of the ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP channel protein. She was diagnosed with diabetes at 7 days after birth. After intravenous insulin drip for 1 month, her hyperglycaemia remitted. At the age of 13 years, her diabetes relapsed, and after that she had been treated by intensive insulin therapy for 25 years with relatively poor glycaemic control. She was switched to oral sulfonylurea therapy and attained euglycaemia. In addition, her insulin secretory capacity was ameliorated gradually.

  20. Retinal thickness measurement and evaluation of natural history of the diabetic macular edema through optical coherence tomography Medida da espessura retiniana e avaliação da história natural do edema macular diabético pela tomografia de coerência óptica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Zacarias Hannouche

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: 1 Diagnose, through optical coherence tomography (OCT exam, the occurrence of diabetic macular edema in patients with diabetic retinopathy and visual acuity of 20/40 or better, by measuring the foveal center point thickness, during one year. 2 Evaluate the edema natural history, during this period, associating the center point thickness with hemoglobin A1c and changes in visual acuity. 3 Correlate the obtained results with the control group. METHODS: A prospective study was done, of a sample of 30 patients with diabetic macular edema and visual acuity of 20/40 or better. Measurements of the best corrected visual acuity, hemoglobin A1c level, biomicroscopy with 78-diopter lens, fluorescein angiogram and optical coherence tomography were made. The retinal thickness was selected as the main variable. Besides descriptive statistics, additional tests were applied to analyze the results and determine the correlation between these variables, such as t-Student, Chi-Square, Tukey and ANOVA. The relation of optical coherence tomography with visual acuity and hemoglobin A1c was studied through linear regression. RESULTS: It was found that there is no significant difference between patients and normal individuals, for the variables age and gender. The values of center point thickness found for men were greater than those for women, showing the influence of gender on that thickness. As many as 83.33% of the diabetic patients with clinically significant macular edema presented moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR, 10% presented mild NPDR and 6.66% severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Patients under combined treatment of insulin and oral hypoglycemiant presented influence on the results of center point thickness (through OCT and visual acuity. The mean duration of diabetes was 9.63 years. Values of center point thickness were always found greater for patients than those for normal eyes. Levels of hemoglobin A1c did not have

  1. An investigation on body weights, blood glucose levels and pituitary-gonadal axis hormones in diabetic and metformin-treated diabetic female rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouya Pournaghi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a metabolic disorder which affects whole body systems including reproductive system. Diabetes is also a contributing factor to infertility. Metformin is one of the most common drugs to control hyperglycemia. In this study, 36 adult Sprague-Dawley female rats (170-210 g were divided into 3 groups (control, diabetic and diabetic-treated by metformin. In second and third groups, diabetes was induced by streptozotocin injection (45 mg kg-1, IP and the third group was treated by metformin hydrochloride (100 mg kg-1 day-1, PO for 8 weeks. Body weights were compared and blood glucose, gonadotropins and sexual hormones were measured. In diabetic group the blood glucose level significantly (P < 0.05 increased in comparison with that of control and metformin-treated diabetic rats. The results also revealed that, in the untreated diabetic rats, the mean body weights and pituitary-gonadal axis hormones were significantly (P < 0.05 reduced in comparison with the control. Although there were significant (P < 0.05 reduction in mean body weights in metformin-treated diabetic rats, reduction in pituitary-gonadal axis hormones was not as sharp as in untreated diabetic rats and only level of progesterone was significantly (P < 0.05 reduced in comparison with the control. The results of this investigation revealed that there was a clear relationship between experimental diabetes with body weight and pituitary-gonadal axis hormones, and treatment with metformin relatively restored diabetic complications.

  2. Macular thickness after glaucoma filtration surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesar, Antonio; Cavar, Ivan; Sesar, Anita Pusić; Geber, Mia Zorić; Sesar, Irena; Laus, Katia Novak; Vatavuk, Zoran; Mandić, Zdravko

    2013-09-01

    The aim of present study was to analyze early postoperative changes in the macular area using optical coherence tomography (OCT) after uncomplicated glaucoma filtration surgery. This prospective study included 32 patients (34 eyes) with open-angle glaucoma, which underwent trabeculectomy with or without use of mitomycin C. Exclusion criteria were macular edema, uveitis, age-related macular degeneration, blurred optical media, secondary glaucoma and angle-closure glaucoma. All standard clinical examinations were made before surgery, at the 2nd day, 1 week and 1 month after surgery. Tomography of the macula was performed during every examination using Cirrus HD OCT for the analysis of central subfield thickness. Results show that thickening of the macula was slightly higher 1 week and 1 month after operation in comparison with baseline end 2nd day postoperativelly. There was no significant difference in the change of macular thickness in patients who have used topical prostaglandins compared with those who have used other topical medications. Also, there was no difference in macular changes between patients treated with or without mitomycin C. In conclusion, we found a slight subclinical increase in macular thickness after uncomplicated trabeculectomy, for which we considered that was the result in reduction of intraocular pressure after glaucoma surgery. Macular thickening after glaucoma filtering surgery could be a physiological reaction to the stress of the retina caused by a sudden reduction of intraocular pressure and it is the consequence of altered relationship between capillary pressure and interstitial fluid pressure.

  3. Efficacy observation on multiple wave length laser for diabetic retinopathy and central retinal vein occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Tian

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To observe the efficacy of the multiple wave length laser in treating diabetic retinopathy combined with central retinal vein occlusion. METHODS:Totally 95 cases(100 eyeswith diabetic retinopathy combined with central retinal vein occlusion were treated by multiple wave length laser. Krypton yellow laser was used for macular edema in focal photocoagulation and diffuse photocoagulation. For peripheral retina, krypton green or krypton red laser were used. Visual acuity, slit-lamp biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy and fundus fluorescein angiography were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. The patients were followed up for 12 to 48wk. In this study, change in visual acuity and macular edema were observed in both groups, and statistical analysis was performed. RESULTS:The effective rate was 61.2% in diffuse macular edema group and 86.3% in focal macular edema group. The general effective rate of later was higher than the former, while the treatment effect had significant statistical difference(PCONCLUSION: Multiple wave length laser is an effective and safe way to treat diabetic macular edema of diabetic retinopathy combined with central retinal vein occlusion,which is worth widely applying in clinical practice.

  4. Metabolic control of type 2 diabetic patients commonly treated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fasting insulin and glucose concentrations were used to assess insulin resistance and sensitivity (%S) using Homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) method. Results: Of the 179 patients studied, 87% of male and 92% of female patients were treated with sulphonylurea drugs whereas 13% and 9% of male and female ...

  5. Clinical analysis of intravitreal injection of triamcinolone acetonide combined macular grid photocoagulation treatment for macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Hua Jing

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the clinical efficacy and safety of intravitreal injection of triamcinolone combined macular grid photocoagulation treatment for macular edema. METHODS: Totally 150 cases(150 eyeswith macular edema in our hospital from July 2009 to November 2013 were selected, which were randomly divided into study group(75 cases, 75 eyesand control group(75 cases, 75 eyes. The cases in control group were treated with macular grid photocoagulation treatment, those in the study group used triamcinolone acetonide combined macular grid photocoagulation treatment. Best corrected visual acuity(BCVA, parallel optical coherence tomography(OCTand fundus fluorescein angiography(FFAwere detected before treatment, after treatment 7d, 1, 3, and 9mo. RESULTS:After the treatment, patients' vision were significantly improved in two groups(PPPP>0.05. Fovea macular neurosensory retinal thickness in the study group was significantly lower than that in control group(PCONCLUSION: Triamcinolone acetonide combined macular grid photocoagulation treatment is accurate, can effectively improve the visual acuity, reduce macular edema, it is safe and reliable, and suitable for clinical application.

  6. Polyamine and amino acid content, and activity of polyamine-synthesizing decarboxylases, in liver of streptozotocin-induced diabetic and insulin-treated diabetic rats

    OpenAIRE

    Brosnan, Margaret E.; Roebothan, Barbara V.; Hall, Douglas E.

    1980-01-01

    1. Concentrations of polyamines, amino acids, glycogen, nucleic acids and protein, and activities of ornithine decarboxylase and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, were measured in livers from control, streptozotocin-diabetic and insulin-treated diabetic rats. 2. Total DNA per liver and protein per mg of DNA were unaffected by diabetes, whereas RNA per mg of DNA and glycogen per g of liver were decreased. Insulin treatment of diabetic rats induced both hypertrophy and hyperplasia, as indicat...

  7. Effect of aluminum chloride on blood glucose level and lipid profile in normal, diabetic and treated diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konda, Venugopala Rao; Eerike, Madhavi; Chary, R Prasanth; Arunachalam, Ruckmani; Yeddula, Venkata Ramana; Meti, Vinayak; Devi, T Sobita

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to assess evaluate the effects of aluminum chloride (AlCl 3 ) on blood glucose and lipid levels in normal, diabetic, and glibenclamide-treated diabetic rats. Forty-two male Wistar rats were divided into seven groups of six each. Group I was normal control, Groups II and III were given AlCl 3 50 and 100 mg/kg, and Group IV to VII were administered with streptozotocin (STZ) (60 mg/kg) intraperitoneally. Group IV was diabetic control, Group V in addition was given AlCl 3 50 mg/kg, Group VI glibenclamide (10 mg/kg), and Group VII glibenclamide and AlCl 3 (50 mg/kg) per-oral daily for 28 days. Blood glucose and lipid levels were estimated at base line, after diabetes was set in and on the last day of study. Histopathological changes in pancreas, liver, and kidney were studied. No significant change was observed in blood glucose and lipid levels in Group I. Group II and III showed a dose-dependent significant increase in blood glucose was observed. Group V had a reduction in blood glucose but not to the nondiabetic level. Group VI had significant reduction in blood sugar. In Group VII, treated with glibenclamide and AlCl 3 , there was no significant change in blood glucose reduction compared to Group VI. Lipid levels were reduced in groups treated with AlCl 3 and glibenclamide and not in other groups. Gross tissue damage was seen in pancreas in STZ group and in liver and kidney in AlCl 3 groups. AlCl 3 administration in Wistar rats caused in significant hyperglycemia in normal rats, hypoglycemia in diabetic rats, and did not influenced hypoglycemic effect of glibenclamide and in addition, resulted in reduction in lipid levels.

  8. Efficiency and safety of laser photocoagulation with or without intravitreal ranibizumab for treatment of diabetic macular edema: a systematic review and Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-Wei Qian

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare the therapeutic effect and safety of laser photocoagulation along with intravitreal ranibizumab (IVR versus laser therapy in treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME. METHODS: Pertinent publications were identified through comprehensive searches of PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov to identify randomized clinical trials (RCTs comparing IVR+laser to laser monotherapy in patients with DME. Therapeutic effect estimates were determined by weighted mean differences (WMD of change from baseline in best corrected visual acuity (BCVA and central retinal thickness (CRT at 6, 12, or 24mo after initial treatment, and the risk ratios (RR for the proportions of patients with at least 10 letters of improvement or reduction at 12mo. Data regarding major ocular and nonocular adverse events (AEs were collected and analyzed. The Review Manager 5.3.5 was used. RESULTS: Six RCTs involving 2069 patients with DME were selected for this Meta-analysis. The results showed that IVR+laser significantly improved BCVA compared with laser at 6mo (WMD: 6.57; 95% CI: 4.37-8.77; P<0.00001, 12mo (WMD: 5.46; 95% CI: 4.35-6.58; P<0.00001, and 24mo (WMD: 3.42; 95% CI: 0.84-5.99; P=0.009 in patients with DME. IVR+laser was superior to laser in reducing CRT at 12mo from baseline with statistical significance (WMD: -63.46; 95% CI: -101.19 to -25.73; P=0.001. The pooled RR results showed that the proportions of patients with at least 10 letters of improvement or reduction were in favor of IVR+laser arms compared with laser (RR: 2.13; 95% CI: 1.77-2.57; P<0.00001 and RR: 0.37; 95% CI: 0.22-0.62; P=0.0002, respectively. As for AEs, the pooled results showed that a significantly higher proportion of patients suffering from conjunctival hemorrhage (study eye and diabetic retinal edema (fellow eye in IVR+laser group compared to laser group (RR: 3.29; 95% CI: 1.53-7.09; P=0.002 and RR: 3.02; 95% CI: 1.24-7.32; P=0.01, respectively. The

  9. Diabetic retinopathy - ocular complications of diabetesmellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martin M Nentwich; Michael W Ulbig

    2015-01-01

    In industrialized nations diabetic retinopathy is the mostfrequent microvascular complication of diabetes mellitusand the most common cause of blindness in the workingagepopulation. In the next 15 years, the number ofpatients suffering from diabetes mellitus is expected toincrease significantly. By the year 2030, about 440 millionpeople in the age-group 20-79 years are estimated to besuffering from diabetes mellitus worldwide (prevalence7.7%), while in 2010 there were 285 million people withdiabetes mellitus (prevalence 6.4%). This accounts foran increase in patients with diabetes in industrialized nations by 20% and in developing countries by 69% until the year 2030. Due to the expected rise in diabetic patients, the need for ophthalmic care of patients (i.e. , exams and treatments) will also increase and represents a challenge for eye-care providers. Development of optimized screening programs, which respect available resources of the ophthalmic infrastructure, will become even more important. Main reasons for loss of vision in patients with diabetes mellitus are diabetic macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Incidence or progression of these potentially blinding complications can be greatly reduced by adequate control of blood glucose and blood pressure levels. Additionally, regular ophthalmic exams are mandatory for detecting ocular complications and initiating treatments such as laser photocoagulation in case of clinical significant diabetic macular edema or early proliferative diabetic retinopathy. In this way, the risk of blindness can considerably be reduced. In advanced stages of diabetic retinopathy, pars-plana vitrectomy is performed to treat vitreous hemorrhage and tractional retinal detachment. In recent years, the advent of intravitreal medication has improved therapeutic options for patients with advanced diabetic macular edema.

  10. Frequency and risk factors of severe hypoglycemia in insulin-treated type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akram, Kamran; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Borch-Johnsen, Knut

    2006-01-01

    Intensive treatment regimens including early initiation of insulin treatment are important to prevent late complications in type 2 diabetes. The assumed risk of severe hypoglycemia (SH) is a major barrier to initiation of insulin treatment. To assess the relevance of this risk we evaluated...... the frequency of SH as reported in the literature. Using Medline and Embase search we identified 11 studies (5 retrospective and 6 prospective) including at least 50 patients with insulin-treated type 2 diabetes followed for at least 6 months in which frequency of SH was reported. The incidence of SH....... Only few studies looked into the impact of risk factors on the rate of SH. Impaired hypoglycemia awareness, high age, long duration of diabetes and insulin therapy increased the risk, while no association was found with HbA1c and insulin dose. The present knowledge of SH in insulin-treated type 2...

  11. Metformin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes have normal mitochondrial complex I respiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Steen; Rabøl, R; Hansen, C N

    2012-01-01

    The glucose-lowering drug metformin has been shown to inhibit complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain in skeletal muscle. To investigate this effect in vivo we studied skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory capacity and content from patients with type 2 diabetes treated...

  12. Use of an automated bolus calculator in MDI-treated type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Signe; Meldgaard, Merete; Serifovski, Nermin

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effect of flexible intensive insulin therapy (FIIT) and an automated bolus calculator (ABC) in a Danish type 1 diabetes population treated with multiple daily injections. Furthermore, to test the feasibility of teaching FIIT in a 3-h structured course....

  13. Only a fraction of patients with ischaemic diseases or diabetes are treated to recommended target values for plasma lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siggaard-Andersen, Niels; Freiberg, Jacob J; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that individuals in the general population with and without ischaemic cardiovascular disease, or with diabetes, are treated to recommended target values for plasma lipids.......We tested the hypothesis that individuals in the general population with and without ischaemic cardiovascular disease, or with diabetes, are treated to recommended target values for plasma lipids....

  14. Sustained glucagon-like peptide 1 expression from encapsulated transduced cells to treat obese diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moralejo, Daniel; Yanay, Ofer; Kernan, Kelly; Bailey, Adam; Lernmark, Ake; Osborne, William

    2011-04-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are two prevalent chronic diseases that have become a major public health concern in industrialized countries. T2D is characterized by hyperglycemia and islet beta cell dysfunction. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) promotes β cell proliferation and neogenesis and has a potent insulinotropic effect. Leptin receptor deficient male rats are obese and diabetic and provide a model of T2D. We hypothesized that their treatment by sustained expression of GLP-1 using encapsulated cells may prevent or delay diabetes onset. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) retrovirally transduced to secrete GLP-1 were seeded into TheraCyte(TM) encapsulation devices, implanted subcutaneously and rats were monitored for diabetes. Rats that received cell implants showed mean plasma GLP-1 level of 119.3 ± 10.2pM that was significantly elevated over control values of 32.4 ± 2.9pM (P<0.001). GLP-1 treated rats had mean insulin levels of 45.9 ± 2.3ng/ml that were significantly increased over control levels of 7.3±1.5ng/ml (P<0.001). In rats treated before diabetes onset elevations in blood glucose were delayed and rats treated after onset became normoglycemic and showed improved glucose tolerance tests. Untreated diabetic rats possess abnormal islet structures characterized by enlarged islets with α-cell infiltration and multifocal vacuolization. GLP-1 treatment induced normalization of islet structures including a mantle of α-cells and increased islet mass. These data suggest that encapsulated transduced cells may offer a potential long term treatment of patients. Copyright © 2010 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. OCTA在DR患者黄斑血流密度观察中的应用%Clinical application of OCTA in observation of macular blood flow density in patients with diabetic retinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向湘; 马红婕; 唐仕波

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) to observe the changes and clinical significance of macular blood flow density in patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR).METHODS: Totally 47 eyes (28 patients) with diabetic retinopathy (DR) were enrolled in the DR group.According to the international clinical grading criteria of diabetic retinopathy, 30 eyes (19 patients) with non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy were classified as the NPDR group, and 17 eyes (11 patients) with proliferative diabetic retinopathy were classified as PDR group.A total of 46 (27 subjects) healthy eyes with matched age were enrolled in the control group.All the subjects underwent the 3mm×3mm scanning of macular retina by optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA), obtaining 4 levels of macular blood flow density map.The macular blood flow density at 3 levels, including superficial retinal layer, deep retinal layer and choroidal capillaries layer, were measured.RESULTS: The macular blood flow density of superfical retinal layer, deep retinal layer and choroidal capillaries layer in DR group were 0.4963±0.0840, 0.4798±0.0801 and 0.5290±0.0528, respectively.Among them, the blood flow density of each layer were 0.5064±0.0843,0.4983±0.0766,0.5345±0.0529, respectively, for the NPDR group, and were 0.4786±0.0830, 0.4473±0.0778,0.5192±0.0526, respectively, for the PDR group.For the control group, the density of each layers were 0.5919±0.0704, 0.6301±0.0527, 0.5691±0.0169, respectively.The macular blood flow density was significantly different in the superficial retinal layer, deep retinal layer and choroidal capillary layer between the control group and the NPDR group, as well as the PDR group and the DR group (total P<0.001).Statistically significant difference was found between the NPDR group and the PDR group in the deep retina layer (P=0.029), but not in the superficial retina layer and choroid capillary layer (P=0.236, 0.268).CONCLUSION: Compared with the

  16. Methoxsalen-induced macular toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Maitray

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoralen compounds such as methoxsalen are photosensitizer agents used in conjunction with ultraviolet A (UVA radiation exposure as photochemotherapy (Psoralens and ultraviolet-A therapy [PUVA therapy] for certain epidermal skin disorders such as psoriasis and vitiligo. Methoxsalen has been shown to be associated with premature cataract formation by forming adducts with lens proteins following oral administration and subsequent UVA exposure. Hence, the use of UV-filtering glasses is recommended during PUVA therapy sessions. Ocular tissues can be exposed to its photosensitizing effect with subsequent UV radiation exposure through sunlight if the patient was to be without protective eye glasses, potentially causing macular toxicity. Till date, there have been no reports in the literature of any posterior segment ocular toxicity arising from methoxsalen use. Here, we describe a case of a bilateral macular toxicity in a middle-aged male treated with methoxsalen for vitiligo.

  17. Prediction of Excessive Weight Gain in Insulin Treated Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cichosz, Simon Lebech; Lundby-Christensen, Louise; Johansen, Mette D

    2017-01-01

    of this study was to identify predictors of weight gain in insulin treated patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS: A total of 412 individuals with Type 2 diabetes mellitus were, in addition to metformin or placebo, randomized into 18-month treatment groups with three different insulin analogue......AIMS: Weight gain is an ongoing challenge when initiating insulin therapy in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, if prediction of insulin associated weight gain was possible on an individualized level, targeted initiatives could be implemented to reduce weight gain. The objective...... treatment regimens. Participants with excessive weight gain were defined as the group with weight gain in the 4(th) quartile. We developed a pattern classification method to predict individuals prone to excessive weight gain. RESULTS: The median weight gain among all patients (n = 412) was 2.4 (95...

  18. Prevalence of pharamcologically-treated diabetes in term pregnancies in Haryana, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharti Kalra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM is common in pregnancy. Epidemiological studies have described the prevalence of GDM in the antenatal period, but do not assess the number of women who require pharmacological therapy at term. This information is important for obstetric care providers and health planners. We reviewed indoor charts of all women admitted for delivery at a maternity center in Karnal, Haryana, India. Of the 569 participants, 0.87% had preexisting diabetes, while 1.93% were being treated with drugs for GDM (0.70% insulin, 1.23% metformin. The overall prevalence of diabetes needing drug therapy at time of delivery in pregnant women was 2.81%.

  19. Overweight and the metabolic syndrome in adult offspring of women with diet-treated gestational diabetes mellitus or type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Tine D; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Hansen, Torben

    2009-01-01

    Overweight and the metabolic syndrome in adult offspring of women with diet-treated gestational diabetes mellitus or type 1 diabetes Context: In animal studies exposure to intrauterine hyperglycemia increases the risk of cardiovascular disease through only partly understood epigenetic mechanisms....... Human long-term follow-up studies on the same topic are few. Objective: To study the risk of overweight and the metabolic syndrome in adult offspring of women with diet-treated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) or type 1 diabetes, and additionally to study associations between estimates of maternal...... hyperglycemia and outcome in the offspring Design: Follow-up study of 1,066 primarily Caucasians aged 18-27 years. Setting: Center for pregnant women with diabetes, Rigshospitalet, Denmark Participants: Offspring of women with diet-treated GDM (n=168) and an un-exposed reference group (n=141). Offspring...

  20. Long-term changes of macular retinal thickness after idiopathic macular hole surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To determine the changes of regional macular retinal thickness(RTwith spectral domain optical coherence tomography(SD-OCTafter successful pars plana vitrectomy(PPVsurgery with inner limiting membrane(ILMpeeling in patients with idiopathic macular hole.METHODS:A non-randomized retrospective case study on 17 patients(17 eyeswho were hospitalized between March 1, 2011 and June 30, 2013. All 17 eyes had been diagnosed with idiopathic macular hole and thereafter underwent 25G-PPV surgeries performed by the same surgeon with ILM peeling and short-term gas tamponade. In the 6mo-plus follow-up after surgery, these eyes were found to have successful closure in the macular hole. The macular RT of the nine areas in the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study was measured by SD-OCT. All patients were applied by SD-OCT with linear scan of the macular. At least four examinations on the operated eye were conducted in contrast to the other normal eye: before the surgery, 3~5wk after the surgery(stage A, 2~3mo after the surgery(stage B, and >6mo after the surgery(stage C.RESULTS:In stage A, the macular RT of operated eyes in the areas of C, IS, II, IN, OS, OI, ON(263.00±39.48, 313.92±18.35, 311.00±18.02, 335.67±19.91, 280.83±33.74, 269.92±23.32, 307.00±28.40were significantly thicker than the corresponding areas of the normal fellow eyes(220.51±23.94, 292.08±21.93, 282.50±20.30, 288.33±20.76, 251.25±17.60, 247.75±21.48, 265.17±24.76μm(PP>0.01. In Stage B, the macular RT in the areas of II, IN, OS(335.67±19.20,319.75±19.20, 273.50±16.89μmwere significantly thicker than the corresponding areas of the normal fellow eyes(286.33±20.46, 293.42±17.64, 252.50±16.32μm(PP> 0.01. In Stage C, the macular RT of operated eyes with the areas of IN(321.17±19.71μmwere significantly thicker than the corresponding areas of the normal fellow eyes(296.25±19.57μm(PP>0.01. Moreover, the macular RT of operated eyes in the areas of ON, IT(307.00±28

  1. Heberprot-P: a novel product for treating advanced diabetic foot ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlanga, Jorge; Fernández, José I; López, Ernesto; López, Pedro A; del Río, Amaurys; Valenzuela, Carmen; Baldomero, Julio; Muzio, Verena; Raíces, Manuel; Silva, Ricardo; Acevedo, Boris E; Herrera, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer is a principal diabetic complication. It has been shown that diabetic patients have decreased growth factor concentrations in their tissues, particularly epidermal growth factor. Growth factor shortage impairs wound healing, which leads to chronic nonhealing wounds and sometimes eventual amputation. Ischemic diabetic foot ulcer is the most difficult to treat and confers the highest amputation risk. Injecting epidermal growth factor deep into the wound bottom and contours encourages a more effective pharmacodynamic response in terms of granulation tissue growth and wound closure. Epidermal growth factor injected into the ulcer matrix may also result in association with extracellular matrix proteins, thus enhancing cell proliferation and migration. Heberprot-P is an innovative Cuban product containing recombinant human epidermal growth factor for peri- and intra-lesional infiltration; evidence reveals it accelerates healing of deep and complex ulcers, both ischemic and neuropathic, and reduces diabetes-related amputations. Clinical trials of Heberprot-P in patients with diabetic foot ulcers have shown that repeated local infiltration of this product can enhance healing of chronic wounds safely and efficaciously. As a result, Heberprot-P was registered in Cuba in 2006, and in 2007 was included in the National Basic Medications List and approved for marketing. It has been registered in 15 other countries, enabling treatment of more than 100,000 patients. Heberprot-P is a unique therapy for the most complicated and recalcitrant chronic wounds usually associated with high amputation risk. Local injection in complex diabetic wounds has demonstrated a favorable risk-benefit ratio by speeding healing, reducing recurrences and attenuating amputation risk. Further testing and deployment worldwide of Heberprot-P would provide an opportunity to assess the product's potential to address an important unmet medical need.

  2. Congenital malformations in offspring of diabetic women treated with oral hypoglycaemic agents during embryogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellmuth, E; Damm, P; Mølsted-Pedersen, L

    1994-01-01

    A markedly increased risk (50%) of congenital malformations in the offspring of women treated with oral hypoglycaemic agents during the first trimester has recently been reported. With this background, the medical records of a consecutive sample of 25 pregnant Type 2 diabetic women treated...... with oral hypoglycaemic agents during embryogenesis between 1966 and 1991 in the diabetic service of a university hospital, were studied retrospectively. None of the infants had major congenital malformations disclosed in the neonatal period (0%, 97.5% confidence interval 0.0-13.7%), but one minor...... congenital malformation was found (4.0%, 95% confidence interval 0.1-20.3%). Although this study, due to the limited number of pregnancies examined, does not exclude an association between treatment with oral hypoglycaemic agents at the time of embryogenesis and major congenital malformations...

  3. What Is Macular Edema?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an Ophthalmologist Answers Would a macular wrinkle cause black streaks in my vision? Oct 05, 2017 When will I be able to see after vitrectomy surgery for a macular hole? Jan 24, 2016 Can Prolensa drops help a ...

  4. The macular xanthophylls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shazia S; Lott, McGregor N; Marcus, Dennis M

    2005-01-01

    The macular pigments are predominantly composed of three carotenoids: lutein, zeaxanthin, and meso-zeaxanthin. These carotenoids are concentrated and distributed in a selective manner. The properties of these pigments are further explored along with their methods of uptake, stabilization, and storage. The dual nature of these pigments as filters and antioxidants are elaborated upon in relation to their protective effects upon the macula, specifically in age-related macular degeneration. Evidence suggests that increased levels of macular pigment are correlated with a decreased risk of age-related macular degeneration. Many have sought to exploit this therapeutic relation. Studies reveal that oral supplementation with lutein and zeaxanthin can increase the levels of macular pigments in the retina and plasma. The effects of such supplementation on actual ocular function have yet to be fully addressed. New and standardized methods of assessing macular pigment density are discussed and future areas of research to further our understanding of macular xanthophylls as they pertain to age-related macular degeneration are highlighted.

  5. Incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus treated with SGLT2 inhibitors and other antihyperglycemic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiting; Desai, Mehul; Ryan, Patrick B; DeFalco, Frank J; Schuemie, Martijn J; Stang, Paul E; Berlin, Jesse A; Yuan, Zhong

    2017-06-01

    To estimate and compare incidence of diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA) among patients with type 2 diabetes who are newly treated with SGLT2 inhibitors (SGLT2i) versus non-SGLT2i antihyperglycemic agents (AHAs) in actual clinical practice. A new-user cohort study design using a large insurance claims database in the US. DKA incidence was compared between new users of SGLT2i and new users of non-SGLT2i AHAs pair-matched on exposure propensity scores (EPS) using Cox regression models. Overall, crude incidence rates (95% CI) per 1000 patient-years for DKA were 1.69 (1.22-2.30) and 1.83 (1.58-2.10) among new users of SGLT2i (n=34,442) and non-SGLT2i AHAs (n=126,703). These rates more than doubled among patients with prior insulin prescriptions but decreased by more than half in analyses that excluded potential autoimmune diabetes (PAD). The hazard ratio (95% CI) for DKA comparing new users of SGLT2i to new users of non-SGLT2i AHAs was 1.91 (0.94-4.11) (p=0.09) among the 30,196 EPS-matched pairs overall, and 1.13 (0.43-3.00) (p=0.81) among the 27,515 EPS-matched pairs that excluded PAD. This was the first observational study that compared DKA risk between new users of SGLT2i and non-SGLT2i AHAs among patients with type 2 diabetes, and overall no statistically significant difference was detected. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The Diabetes Surgery Summit consensus conference: recommendations for the evaluation and use of gastrointestinal surgery to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, Francesco; Kaplan, Lee M; Schauer, Philip R; Cummings, David E

    2010-03-01

    To develop guidelines for the use of gastrointestinal surgery to treat type 2 diabetes and to craft an agenda for further research. Increasing evidence demonstrates that bariatric surgery can dramatically ameliorate type 2 diabetes. Not surprisingly, gastrointestinal operations are now being used throughout the world to treat diabetes in association with obesity, and increasingly, for diabetes alone. However, the role for surgery in diabetes treatment is not clearly defined and there are neither clear guidelines for these practices nor sufficient plans for clinical trials to evaluate the risks and benefits of such "diabetes surgery." A multidisciplinary group of 50 voting delegates from around the world gathered in Rome, Italy for the first International Conference on Gastrointestinal Surgery to Treat Type 2 Diabetes--(the "Diabetes Surgery Summit"). During the meeting, available scientific evidence was examined and critiqued by the entire group to assess the strength of evidence and to draft consensus statements. Through an iterative process, draft statements were then serially discussed, debated, edited, reassessed, and finally presented for formal voting. After the Rome meeting, statements that achieved consensus were summarized and distributed to all voting delegates for further input and final approval. These statements were then formally critiqued by representatives of several sientific societies at the 1st World Congress on Interventional Therapies for T2DM (New York, Sept 2008). Input from this discussion was used to generate the current position statement. A Diabetes Surgery Summit (DSS) Position Statement consists of recommendations for clinical and research issues, as well as general concepts and definitions in diabetes surgery. The DSS recognizes the legitimacy of surgical approaches to treat diabetes in carefully selected patients. For example, gastric bypass was deemed a reasonable treatment option for patients with poorly controlled diabetes and a

  7. Two-year functional and anatomical results after converting treatment resistant eyes with exudative age-related macular degeneration to aflibercept in accordance with a treat and extend protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørstad, Øystein Kalsnes; Faber, Rowan Thomas; Moe, Morten Carstens

    2017-08-01

    To study the effects of converting to aflibercept in accordance with a treat and extend (T&E) strategy in eyes with treatment resistant exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Two-year prospective study of eyes with exudative AMD and persistent macular fluid despite monthly treatment with ranibizumab or bevacizumab. Eyes were converted to 2.0 mg aflibercept in accordance with a T&E protocol. Fifty eyes from 47 patients were included. At baseline, the mean central retinal thickness (CRT) was 273 μm and mean best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) 0.25 logarithm of the minimal angle of resolution (logMAR). The mean number of aflibercept injections the first year was 9.2. After 1 year, there was a reduction in mean CRT to 228 μm (p < 0.001); 22 eyes (44%) had a dry macula; and the mean BCVA was 0.24 logMAR (p = 0.531). The mean number of aflibercept injections the second year was 8.0 (p = 0.013 compared to first year). After 2 years, 24 eyes (48%) received treatment more frequently than every eighth week. The mean CRT was 225 μm (p < 0.001 compared to baseline); 31 eyes (62%) had a dry macula; and mean BCVA was 0.32 logMAR (p = 0.005 compared to baseline). Five eyes did not complete 2 years of aflibercept treatment after failing to improve. A majority of eyes showed improved anatomic outcomes. There was a small decrease in mean BCVA after the second year of treatment. About half of the eyes required treatment more frequently than the recommended aflibercept label of an 8-week interval. © 2017 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Bilateral visual outcomes and service utilization of patients treated for 3 years with ranibizumab for neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chavan R

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Randhir Chavan,1,* Swati Panneerselvam,1,* Parul Adhana,1 Nirodhini Narendran,1 Yit Yang1,2 1Eye Infirmary, New Cross Hospital, Royal Wolverhampton Hospitals NHS Trust Wolverhampton, West Midlands, UK; 2Faculty of Life and Health Sciences, Aston University, Birmingham, UK *These authors contributed equally to this paper Background: The aim of this study was to describe bilateral visual outcomes and the effect of incomplete follow-up after 3 years of ranibizumab therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Secondarily, the demands on service provision over a 3-year period were described. Methods: Data on visual acuity, hospital visits, and injections were collected over 36 months on consecutive patients commencing treatment over a 9-month period. Visual outcome was determined for 1 all patients, using last observation carried forward for missed visits due to early discontinuation and 2 only those patients completing full 36-month follow-up. Results: Over 3 years, 120 patients cumulatively attended hospital for 1,823 noninjection visits and 1,365 injection visits. A visual acuity loss of <15 letters (L was experienced by 78.2% of patients. For all patients (n=120, there was a mean loss of 1.68 L using last observation carried forward for missing values. Excluding five patients who died and 30 who discontinued follow-up, mean gain was 1.47 L. In bilateral cases, final acuity was on average 9 L better in second eyes compared to first eyes. Also, 91% of better-seeing eyes continued to be the better-seeing eye. Conclusion: We have demonstrated our approach to describing the long-term service provision and visual outcomes of ranibizumab therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration in a consecutive cohort of patients. Although there was a heavy burden with very frequent injections and clinic visits, patients can expect a good level of visual stability and a very high chance of maintaining their better

  9. Patient characteristics do not predict poor glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes patients treated in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudswaard, AN; Stolk, RP; Zuithoff, P; Rutten, GEHM

    Many diabetic patients in general practice do not achieve good glycaemic control. The aim of this study was to assess which characteristics of type 2 diabetes patients treated in primary care predict poor glycaemic control (HbA(1c) greater than or equal to7%). Data were collected from the medical

  10. Innovative Thoughts on Treating Diabetes from the Perspective of Traditional Chinese Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Bing; Zhou, Qiang; Zhao, Tian-Yu; He, Li-Sha; Guo, Jing; Chen, Hong-Dong; Zhao, Lin-Hua; Tong, Xiao-Lin

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly increasing incidence of diabetes mellitus (DM) is becoming a major public health issue. As one of the important parts in complementary and alternative therapies, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is promising in treating DM. In this review, we summarize new thoughts on treating DM that aim to improve the clinical efficacy of TCM from the perspectives of principle, methods, formula, herbs, and doses. Our approach is as follows: principle: we use a combination of symptoms, syndromes, and diseases as a new mode for treating diabetes; methods: emphasizing heat-clearing in the early and middle stage of T2DM and invigorating blood circulation throughout the whole process of T2DM are two innovative methods to treat T2DM; formulas and herbs: choosing formulas and herbs based on the combination of TCM theory and current medicine. We will emphasize four strategies to help doctors choose formulas and herbs, including treatment based on syndrome differentiation, choosing herbs of bitter and sour flavors to counteract sweet flavor, choosing formulas and herbs aimed at main symptoms, and using modern pharmacological achievements in clinical practice; dose: reasonable drug dose plays an important role in the treatment of DM and a close relationship exists between dose and clinical efficacy.

  11. Autologous transplantation of the internal limiting membrane for refractory macular holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morizane, Yuki; Shiraga, Fumio; Kimura, Shuhei; Hosokawa, Mio; Shiode, Yusuke; Kawata, Tetsuhiro; Hosogi, Mika; Shirakata, Yukari; Okanouchi, Toshio

    2014-04-01

    To determine the effectiveness of autologous transplantation of the internal limiting membrane (ILM) for refractory macular holes. Prospective, interventional case series. Ten eyes of 10 consecutive patients who underwent autologous transplantation of the ILM for the treatment of refractory macular holes were studied. The primary diseases in these patients were large idiopathic macular holes that had existed for more than 1 year (4 eyes), a traumatic macular hole (1 eye), myopic foveoschisis (2 eyes), foveoschisis resulting from pit-macular syndrome (2 eyes), and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (1 eye). Apart from the 5 eyes with idiopathic or traumatic macular holes, macular holes developed in the other 5 eyes after initial vitrectomies with ILM removal. In all eyes, regular macular hole surgery failed to achieve closure. The main outcome measures used in this study were macular hole closure and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA). Macular holes were closed successfully in 9 eyes (90%) after autologous transplantation of the ILM. The postoperative BCVAs were significantly better than the preoperative BCVAs (P = .007, paired t test). Postoperative BCVAs improved by more than 0.2 logarithm of the minimal angle of resolution units in 8 eyes (80%) and were unchanged in 2 eyes (20%). Although this is a pilot study, the results suggest that autologous transplantation of the ILM may contribute to improved anatomic and visual outcomes in the treatment of refractory macular holes and may warrant further investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Treating infected diabetic wounds with superoxidized water as anti-septic agent: a preliminary experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadi, S.F.; Khaliq, T.; Zubair, M.; Saaiq, M.; Sikandar, I.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of superoxidized water (MicrocynTM) in diabetic patients with different wounds. One hundred known diabetic patients were enrolled. Half were randomized to the intervention group (those whose wounds were managed with superoxidized water) and half to the control group (whose wounds were treated with normal saline) using a table of random numbers. The two groups were matched for age, gender, duration of diabetes and category of wound. All patients received appropriate surgical treatment for their wounds as required. Local wound treatment was carried out daily using superoxidized water soaked gauzes on twice daily basis in the intervention group and normal saline in the control group. The treatment was continued until wound healing. The main outcome measures were duration of hospital stay, downgrading of the wound category, wound healing time and need for interventions such as amputation. Statistically significant differences were found in favour of the superoxidized water group with respect to duration of hospital stay, downgrading of the wound category and wound healing time. Although the initial results of employing superoxidized water for the management of infected diabetic wounds are encouraging, further multicentre clinical trials are warranted before this antiseptic is recommended for general use. It may offer an economical alternative to other expensive antiseptics with positive impact on the prevailing infection rates, patient outcomes and patient satisfaction. (author)

  13. Biotransformation effect of Bombyx Mori L. may play an important role in treating diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, La; Li, Yin; Guo, Xin-Feng; Liu, Xu-Sheng

    2016-11-01

    Compared with herbal drugs, medicine processed from animals (animal medicine) was thought to have more bioactive substances and higher activities. Biotransformation effect often plays an important role in their effect. However, researches about effect of animal medicine on diabetic nephropathy and applying animal medicine as natural bio-transformer were seldom reported. The purpose of this paper was to reveal the use of Bombyx Mori L. on diabetic nephropathy from ancient to modern times. The classical literature indicated that Saosi Decoction (), which contains Bombyx Mori L. or silkworm cocoon, was applied to treat disorders congruent with modern disease diabetic nephropathy from the Ming to Qing Dynasty in ancient China. Modern studies showed that Bombyx Mori L. contains four main active constituents. Among these, 1-deoxynojirimycin (1-DNJ) and quercetin showed promising potential to be new agents in diabetic nephropathy treatment. The concentrations of 1-DNJ and the activities of quercetin in Bombyx Mori L. are higher than in mulberry leaves, because of the biotransformation in the Bombyx Mori L. body. However, these specifific components need further human and mechanistic studies to determine their therapeutic potential for this challenging condition.

  14. Evaluation of Glycemic and Lipid Profile of Offspring of Diabetic Wistar Rats Treated with Malpighia emarginata Juice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra M. Barbalho

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowing that maternal diabetes is related to hyperglycemia and fetal hyperinsulinemia, which affect the lipid metabolism, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Malpighia emarginata (acerola juice on the glycemic and lipid profile of offspring of diabetic and nondiabetic Wistar rats. The adult offspring of non-diabetic dams and of dams with severe streptozotocin-induced diabetes were divided into groups: G1, offspring (of control dams treated with water, G2, offspring (of diabetic dams treated with water, G3, male offspring (of control dams treated with acerola juice, and G4, male offspring (of diabetic dams treated with acerola juice. The offspring of diabetic dams treated with acerola juice showed significantly decreased levels of glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, and increased HDL-c. The use of acerola juice is a potential strategy to aid in the prevention of DM and dyslipidemia and its complications or to act as an auxiliary in the treatment of these diseases.

  15. GCK-MODY in the US National Monogenic Diabetes Registry: frequently misdiagnosed and unnecessarily treated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, David; Naylor, Rochelle N; Bell, Charles D; Berry, Shivani; Montgomery, Jazzmyne T; Tadie, Elizabeth C; Hwang, Jessica L; Greeley, Siri Atma W; Philipson, Louis H

    2016-10-01

    GCK-MODY leads to mildly elevated blood glucose typically not requiring therapy. It has been described in all ethnicities, but mainly in Caucasian Europeans. Here we describe our US cohort of GCK-MODY. We examined the rates of detection of heterozygous mutations in the GCK gene in individuals referred to the US Monogenic Diabetes Registry with a phenotype consistent with GCK-MODY. We also assessed referral patterns, treatment and demography, including ethnicity, of the cohort. Deleterious heterozygous GCK mutations were found in 54.7 % of Registry probands selected for GCK sequencing for this study. Forty-nine percent were previously unnecessarily treated with glucose-lowering agents, causing hypoglycemia and other adverse effects in some of the subjects. The proportion of probands found to have a GCK mutation through research-based testing was similar across each ethnic group. However, together African-American, Latino and Asian subjects represented only 20.5 % of screened probands and 17.2 % of those with GCK-MODY, despite higher overall diabetes prevalence in these groups. Our data show that a high detection rate of GCK-MODY is possible based on clinical phenotype and that prior to genetic diagnosis, a large percentage are inappropriately treated with glucose-lowering therapies. We also find low minority representation in our Registry, which may be due to disparities in diagnostic diabetes genetic testing and is an area needing further investigation.

  16. [Prevalence of Dental Caries in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Treated with Multiple Insulin Injections and that of Individuals without Diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Diogo; Coelho, Ana; Paula, Anabela; Caramelo, Francisco; Carrilho, Francisco; Barros, Luísa; Batista, Carla; Melo, Miguel; Ferreira, Manuel Marques; Carrilho, Eunice

    2017-05-31

    In addition to macro and microvascular complications that are associated with the disease, hyperglycaemia is also a risk factor for several oral complications. The aim of this study is to establish a relationship between dental caries in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus treated with multiple insulin injections and that of individuals without diabetes. It is also an aim to characterize the oral hygiene habits of this population. An observational clinical study of analytical and cross-sectional nature was conducted. Thirty patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and 30 individuals without diabetes were observed and questioned about information regarding their medical history. Oral examination was conducted according to the standards of the World Health Organization and ICDAS was used for caries detection. Statistical analysis was performed and the significance level was set at 5%. Patients with diabetes mellitus showed similar caries levels to that of individuals without diabetes. Patients with diabetes mellitus had a higher dental plaque index. Only 10% of the patients having episodes of nocturnal hypoglycaemia brush their teeth after glucose intake. Although there's some controversy in the literature regarding the prevalence of caries in patients with diabetes mellitus, the results are in agreement with a great number of studies. However, patients with diabetes mellitus have a higher plaque index which can be associated with a higher risk for developing certain oral pathologies. No statistically significant association was found between type 1 diabetes mellitus and dental caries.

  17. Relevance of Retinal Thickness Changes in the OCT Inner and Outer Rings to Predict Progression to Clinical Macular Edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vujosevic, Stela; Varano, Monica; Egan, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To characterize the relevance of macular thickness changes in the inner and outer rings in the progression of macular edema in eyes/patients with diabetes type 2. METHODS: A total of 374 type 2 diabetic patients with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (ETDRS levels 20-35) were...... included in a 12-month prospective observational study to identify retinopathy progression. Retinal thickness analyses were performed in 194 eyes/patients using Cirrus SD- OCT and 166 eyes/patients using Spectralis SD-OCT. The DRCR.net classification of subclinical and clinical macular edema was used....... A composite grading of macular edema is proposed in this study. RESULTS: A total of 317 eyes/patients completed the study. SD-OCT identified clinical macular edema in 24 eyes/patients (6.7%) and subclinical macular edema in 104 eyes/patients (28.9%) at baseline. Increased thickness of the central subfield...

  18. Effect of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy in Patients With Insulin-Treated Diabetes Mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szepietowska, Barbara; Kutyifa, Valentina; Ruwald, Martin H

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) modify outcome in patients with heart failure (HF). We aimed to analyze the risk for death, HF alone, combined end point HF/death, and ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF) in patients with mild HF without DM and in those with DM, further stratified...... branch block in the Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial With Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy trial. Treatment with CRT-D versus implantable cardioverter defibrillator was associated with 76% risk reduction in all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 0.24; 95% confidence interval 0.08 to 0.......74, p = 0.012) in subgroup of diabetic patients treated with insulin only (interaction p = 0.043). Significant risk reduction in HF alone, HF/death, and the VT/VF after CRT-D was observed across investigated groups and similar left ventricular reverse remodeling to CRT-D. In conclusion, patients...

  19. Strategies for glucose control in a study population with diabetes, renal disease and anemia (Treat study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinrauch, Larry A; D'Elia, John A; Finn, Peter; Lewis, Eldrin F; Desai, Akshay S; Claggett, Brian L; Cooper, Mark E; McGill, Janet B

    2016-03-01

    Glucose lowering medication use among patients with type 2 diabetes and advanced renal disease (eGFRrenal disease advances, most of the oral anti-diabetic agents requiring renal clearance must be reduced or discontinued. The potential for prolonged hypoglycemia, fluid/volume overload and congestive heart failure may complicate medication choices. In order to evaluate patterns of glycemia management we describe glucose lowering medication use among patients with advanced renal disease and type 2 diabetes in a large multinational outcome trial designed to focus on patients with eGFRrenal function when compared with standard populations with normal kidney function. The use of multiple oral agents, or oral agents plus insulin was quite common. While gender did not appear to play a role in medication choices, there were significant regional variations. For example, oral agents were used more in North America compared with other regions (Latin America, Australia/Western Europe, Russia/Eastern Europe). Patients enrolled at more advanced ages were less likely to be on a regimen of rapid-acting insulin alone consistent with recommendations that suggest a preference for longer-acting preparations in the geriatric population (1). Higher degrees of obesity were associated more complex treatment regimens. Despite this population being at high risk for cardiovascular events, the use of beta blockers (50%), statins (64%) and aspirin (48%) were relatively low, especially in the group that did not require medications to achieve adequate glycemic control. Current attempts to compare strategies for diabetes therapy must control for baseline demographic group differences influencing treatment choice. Future recommendations for glycemic control in patients with Grade 3 or higher chronic kidney disease require additional studies, with matched populations. We suggest that evaluation of studies similar to TREAT will assist in determining the optimal therapeutic regimens for populations

  20. Abnormal subcellular distribution of GLUT4 protein in obese and insulin-treated diabetic female dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Vargas

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The GLUT4 transporter plays a key role in insulin-induced glucose uptake, which is impaired in insulin resistance. The objective of the present study was to investigate the tissue content and the subcellular distribution of GLUT4 protein in 4- to 12-year-old control, obese and insulin-treated diabetic mongrel female dogs (4 animals per group. The parametrial white adipose tissue was sampled and processed to obtain both plasma membrane and microsome subcellular fractions for GLUT4 analysis by Western blotting. There was no significant difference in glycemia and insulinemia between control and obese animals. Diabetic dogs showed hyperglycemia (369.9 ± 89.9 mg/dl. Compared to control, the plasma membrane GLUT4, reported per g tissue, was reduced by 55% (P < 0.01 in obese dogs, and increased by 30% (P < 0.05 in diabetic dogs, and the microsomal GLUT4 was increased by ~45% (P < 0.001 in both obese and diabetic animals. Considering the sum of GLUT4 measured in plasma membrane and microsome as total cellular GLUT4, percent GLUT4 present in plasma membrane was reduced by ~65% (P < 0.001 in obese compared to control and diabetic animals. Since insulin stimulates GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane, percent GLUT4 in plasma membrane was divided by the insulinemia at the time of tissue removal and was found to be reduced by 75% (P < 0.01 in obese compared to control dogs. We conclude that the insulin-stimulated translocation of GLUT4 to the cell surface is reduced in obese female dogs. This probably contributes to insulin resistance, which plays an important role in glucose homeostasis in dogs.

  1. Diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Tien Y; Cheung, Chui Ming Gemmy; Larsen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus and is a major cause of vision loss in middle-aged and elderly people. One-third of people with diabetes have DR. Severe stages of DR include proliferative DR, caused by the abnormal growth of new retinal blood vessels......, and diabetic macular oedema, in which there is exudation and oedema in the central part of the retina. DR is strongly associated with a prolonged duration of diabetes, hyperglycaemia and hypertension. It is traditionally regarded as a microvascular disease, but retinal neurodegeneration is also involved...... (VEGF). Optimal control of blood glucose and blood pressure in individuals with diabetes remains the cornerstone for preventing the development and arresting the progression of DR. Anti-VEGF therapy is currently indicated for diabetic macular oedema associated with vision loss, whereas laser...

  2. Adult Multisystem Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Presenting with Central Diabetes Insipidus Successfully Treated with Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Eun Choi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the rare case of an adult who was diagnosed with recurrent multisystem Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH involving the pituitary stalk and lung who present with central diabetes insipidus and was successfully treated with systemic steroids and chemotherapy. A 49-year-old man visited our hospital due to symptoms of polydipsia and polyuria that started 1 month prior. Two years prior to presentation, he underwent excision of right 6th and 7th rib lesions for the osteolytic lesion and chest pain, which were later confirmed to be LCH on pathology. After admission, the water deprivation test was done and the result indicated that he had central diabetes insipidus. Sella magnetic resonance imaging showed a mass on the pituitary stalk with loss of normal bright spot at the posterior lobe of the pituitary. Multiple patchy infiltrations were detected in both lung fields by computed tomography (CT. He was diagnosed with recurrent LCH and was subsequently treated with inhaled desmopressin, systemic steroids, vinblastine, and mercaptopurine. The pituitary mass disappeared after two months and both lungs were clear on chest CT after 11 months. Although clinical remission in multisystem LCH in adults is reportedly rare, our case of adult-onset multisystem LCH was treated successfully with systemic chemotherapy using prednisolone, vinblastine, and 6-mercaptopurine, which was well tolerated.

  3. A randomized, controlled clinical trial of honey-impregnated dressing for treating diabetic foot ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imran, M.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of Beri-honey-impregnated dressing on diabetic foot ulcer and compare it with normal saline dressing. Study Design: A randomized, controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Sughra Shafi Medical Complex, Narowal, Pakistan and Bhatti International Trust (BIT) Hospital, Affiliated with Central Park Medical College, Lahore, from February 2006 to February 2010. Methodology: Patients with Wagner's grade 1 and 2 ulcers were enrolled. Those patients were divided in two groups; group A (n=179) treated with honey dressing and group B (n=169) treated with normal saline dressing. Outcome measures were calculated in terms of proportion of wounds completely healed (primary outcome), wound healing time, and deterioration of wounds. Patients were followed-up for a maximum of 120 days. Results: One hundred and thirty six wounds (75.97%) out of 179 were completely healed with honey dressing and 97 (57.39%) out of 169 wtih saline dressing (p=0.001). The median wound healing time was 18.00 (6 - 120) days (Median with IQR) in group A and 29.00 (7 - 120) days (Median with IQR) in group B (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The present results showed that honey is an effective dressing agent instead of conventional dressings, in treating patients of diabetic foot ulcer. (author)

  4. What Is Macular Edema?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a macular hole? Jan 11, 2016 After a person develops ocular histoplasmosis, is it common that years or even decades pass before the person notices the vision changes and the disease is ...

  5. What Is Macular Edema?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the most common form of vision loss for people with diabetes—particularly if it is left untreated. ... a macular hole? Jan 11, 2016 After a person develops ocular histoplasmosis, is it common that years ...

  6. Prevalence of nocturnal hypoglycemia in first trimester of pregnancy in patients with insulin treated diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellmuth, Ellinor Adelheid; Damm, P; Mølsted-Pedersen, L

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Excellent metabolic control before conception and during diabetic pregnancies is the aim in order to avoid malformations and perinatal morbidity. Since an inverse correlation between median blood glucose concentration (BG) and hypoglycemia as well as a high prevalence of nocturnal...... the night, caused by either discomfort or cannula problems. Of the remaining 43 patients, 16 (37%) had at least one blood glucose ... of pregnancy in insulin treated patients. Only one patient registered the hypoglycemia. Nocturnal hypoglycemia could be predicted in the majority of patients by measurements of BG before bedtime....

  7. Longstanding refractory pseudophakic cystoid macular edema resolved using intravitreal 0.7 mg dexamethasone implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brynskov T

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Troels Brynskov,1,2 Caroline Schmidt Laugesen,1 Jakob Halborg,1 Henrik Kemp,1 Torben Lykke Sørensen1,21Department of Ophthalmology, Copenhagen University Hospital Roskilde, Roskilde, Denmark; 2Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, DenmarkBackground: Refractory pseudophakic cystoid macular edema (PCME following cataract surgery has long posed a challenge to clinicians, but intravitreal injections with a sustained delivery 0.7 mg dexamethasone implant has emerged as a promising therapy for this condition.Objective: To present a case of longstanding and refractory PCME with complete remission through 189 days of follow-up after two successive injections with intravitreal dexamethasone implants.Case report: A 59-year-old male had experienced metamorphopsia for approximately 4 years and had been diagnosed with PCME 15 months earlier. Since the time of the diagnosis, the condition had been refractory to both subtenon triamcinolone acetonide and a total of five injections with intravitreal ranibizumab. After the last injection with ranibizumab, central subfield mean thickness was 640 µm, and the best corrected visual acuity was 78 Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study letters. Following an intravitreal injection with a dexamethasone implant, the macular edema resolved at the next follow-up. The macular edema returned 187 days after the first injection and was treated with another intravitreal dexamethasone implant. Again, the macular edema subsided completely, and best corrected visual acuity improved to 84 Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study letters, a condition which was maintained through an additional 189 days of follow-up.Conclusion: Chronic PCME is traditionally a difficult condition to treat, but we are encouraged by the optimal response experienced with intravitreal sustained release dexamethasone implants in our patient whose longstanding PCME had been refractory to previous treatments with both

  8. Effects of self-monitoring of glucose on distress and self-efficacy in people with non-insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malanda, U. L.; Bot, S. D. M.; Kostense, P. J.; Snoek, F. J.; Dekker, J. M.; Nijpels, G.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effects of self-monitoring of glucose in blood or urine, on diabetes-specific distress and self-efficacy, compared with usual care in people with non-insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes mellitus. One hundred and eighty-one participants with non-insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes mellitus

  9. Outpatient costs in pharmaceutically treated diabetes patients with and without a diagnosis of depression in a Dutch primary care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosmans Judith E

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess differences in outpatient costs among pharmaceutically treated diabetes patients with and without a diagnosis of depression in a Dutch primary care setting. Methods A retrospective case control study over 3 years (2002-2004. Data on 7128 depressed patients and 23772 non-depressed matched controls were available from the electronic medical record system of 20 general practices organized in one large primary care organization in the Netherlands. A total of 393 depressed patients with diabetes and 494 non-depressed patients with diabetes were identified in these records. The data that were extracted from the medical record system concerned only outpatient costs, which included GP care, referrals, and medication. Results Mean total outpatient costs per year in depressed diabetes patients were €1039 (SD 743 in the period 2002-2004, which was more than two times as high as in non-depressed diabetes patients (€492, SD 434. After correction for age, sex, type of insurance, diabetes treatment, and comorbidity, the difference in total annual costs between depressed and non-depressed diabetes patients changed from €408 (uncorrected to €463 (corrected in multilevel analyses. Correction for comorbidity had the largest impact on the difference in costs between both groups. Conclusions Outpatient costs in depressed patients with diabetes are substantially higher than in non-depressed patients with diabetes even after adjusting for confounders. Future research should investigate whether effective treatment of depression among diabetes patients can reduce health care costs in the long term.

  10. A Synthetic-Biology-Inspired Therapeutic Strategy for Targeting and Treating Hepatogenous Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Shuai; Yin, Jianli; Shao, Jiawei; Yu, Yuanhuan; Yang, Linfeng; Wang, Yidan; Xie, Mingqi; Fussenegger, Martin; Ye, Haifeng

    2017-02-01

    Hepatogenous diabetes is a complex disease that is typified by the simultaneous presence of type 2 diabetes and many forms of liver disease. The chief pathogenic determinant in this pathophysiological network is insulin resistance (IR), an asymptomatic disease state in which impaired insulin signaling in target tissues initiates a variety of organ dysfunctions. However, pharmacotherapies targeting IR remain limited and are generally inapplicable for liver disease patients. Oleanolic acid (OA) is a plant-derived triterpenoid that is frequently used in Chinese medicine as a safe but slow-acting treatment in many liver disorders. Here, we utilized the congruent pharmacological activities of OA and glucagon-like-peptide 1 (GLP-1) in relieving IR and improving liver and pancreas functions and used a synthetic-biology-inspired design principle to engineer a therapeutic gene circuit that enables a concerted action of both drugs. In particular, OA-triggered short human GLP-1 (shGLP-1) expression in hepatogenous diabetic mice rapidly and simultaneously attenuated many disease-specific metabolic failures, whereas OA or shGLP-1 monotherapy failed to achieve corresponding therapeutic effects. Collectively, this work shows that rationally engineered synthetic gene circuits are capable of treating multifactorial diseases in a synergistic manner by multiplexing the targeting efficacies of single therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Partial recovery of erythrocyte glycogen in diabetic rats treated with phenobarbital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da-Silva C.A.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Erythrocytes may play a role in glucose homeostasis during the postprandial period. Erythrocytes from diabetic patients are defective in glucose transport and metabolism, functions that may affect glycogen storage. Phenobarbital, a hepatic enzyme inducer, has been used in the treatment of patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM, increasing the insulin-mediated glucose disposal. We studied the effects of phenobarbital treatment in vivo on glycemia and erythrocyte glycogen content in control and alloxan-diabetic rats during the postprandial period. In control rats (blood glucose, 73 to 111 mg/dl in femoral and suprahepatic veins the erythrocyte glycogen content was 45.4 ± 1.1 and 39.1 ± 0.8 µg/g Hb (mean ± SEM, N = 4-6 in the femoral artery and vein, respectively, and 37.9 ± 1.1 in the portal vein and 47.5 ± 0.9 in the suprahepatic vein. Diabetic rats (blood glucose, 300-350 mg/dl presented low (P<0.05 erythrocyte glycogen content, i.e., 9.6 ± 0.1 and 7.1 ± 0.7 µg/g Hb in the femoral artery and vein, respectively, and 10.0 ± 0.7 and 10.7 ± 0.5 in the portal and suprahepatic veins, respectively. After 10 days of treatment, phenobarbital (0.5 mg/ml in the drinking water did not change blood glucose or erythrocyte glycogen content in control rats. In diabetic rats, however, it lowered (P<0.05 blood glucose in the femoral artery (from 305 ± 18 to 204 ± 45 mg/dl and femoral vein (from 300 ± 11 to 174 ± 48 mg/dl and suprahepatic vein (from 350 ± 10 to 174 ± 42 mg/dl, but the reduction was not sufficient for complete recovery. Phenobarbital also stimulated the glycogen synthesis, leading to a partial recovery of glycogen stores in erythrocytes. In treated rats, erythrocyte glycogen content increased to 20.7 ± 3.8 µg/g Hb in the femoral artery and 30.9 ± 0.9 µg/g Hb in the suprahepatic vein (P<0.05. These data indicate that phenobarbital activated some of the insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism steps which were

  12. Anti-Diabetic Potential of Ocimum gratissimum Leaf Fractions in Fortified Diet-Fed Streptozotocin Treated Rat Model of Type-2 Diabetes

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    Stanley I. R. Okoduwa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ocimum gratissimum (OG is used in the traditional management of diabetes in Nigeria. This study investigated the anti-diabetic potential of OG leaf fractions (OGLF in a rat model of Type-2 diabetes (T2D. Method: Methanol crude extract of OG leaf was fractionated with solvents of increasing order of polarity (n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl-acetate, n-butanol and water. The anti-diabetic potential of the fractions was evaluated in vivo. T2D was induced in Albino Wistar rats and treated with OGLF. Result: The T2D rats showed significant elevation in serum levels of fasting blood glucose (FBG, liver and kidney function biomarkers. At 4-weeks of intervention with OGLF, the untreated diabetic control group maintained severe hyperglycaemia in the presence of 61.7% serum insulin, 17.3% pancreatic β-cell function (HOMA-β and 51.5% Insulin sensitivity. The glucose tolerance ability was enhanced in the n-butanol-fraction (OGb treated group. With 74.8% available serum insulin and 38.6% improvement in insulin sensitivity, the OGb treated group had a 63.5% reduction in FBG and it was found to be most effective as it ameliorates a majority of the changes caused in the studied parameters in diabetic rats. Conclusions: The data from this study suggest that OGb fraction is a potential candidate for the development of an effective drug for the management of T2D.

  13. Association of obesity and treated hypertension and diabetes with cognitive ability in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depp, Colin A; Strassnig, Martin; Mausbach, Brent T; Bowie, Christopher R; Wolyniec, Paula; Thornquist, Mary H; Luke, James R; McGrath, John A; Pulver, Ann E; Patterson, Thomas L; Harvey, Philip D

    2014-06-01

    People with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia are at greater risk for obesity and other cardio-metabolic risk factors, and several prior studies have linked these risk factors to poorer cognitive ability. In a large ethnically homogenous outpatient sample, we examined associations among variables related to obesity, treated hypertension and/or diabetes and cognitive abilities in these two patient populations. In a study cohort of outpatients with either bipolar disorder (n = 341) or schizophrenia (n = 417), we investigated the association of self-reported body mass index and current use of medications for hypertension or diabetes with performance on a comprehensive neurocognitive battery. We examined sociodemographic and clinical factors as potential covariates. Patients with bipolar disorder were less likely to be overweight or obese than patients with schizophrenia, and also less likely to be prescribed medication for hypertension or diabetes. However, obesity and treated hypertension were associated with worse global cognitive ability in bipolar disorder (as well as with poorer performance on individual tests of processing speed, reasoning/problem-solving, and sustained attention), with no such relationships observed in schizophrenia. Obesity was not associated with symptom severity in either group. Although less prevalent in bipolar disorder compared to schizophrenia, obesity was associated with substantially worse cognitive performance in bipolar disorder. This association was independent of symptom severity and not present in schizophrenia. Better understanding of the mechanisms and management of obesity may aid in efforts to preserve cognitive health in bipolar disorder. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Fanconi's syndrome and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in an adult treated with ifosfamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingemi, Amanda I; Bota, Vasile M; Peguero, Anyeri; Charpentier, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Fanconi's syndrome is a serious condition characterized by type II proximal renal tubular dysfunction, with urinary loss of glucose, amino acids, phosphate, bicarbonate, and potassium. Ifosfamide-induced Fanconi's syndrome is reported in about 1.4-5% of children being treated for solid tumors, yet only a few cases have been reported in adults. We describe a 54-year-old man who came to the hospital with symptoms of neutropenic fever 4 days after his fourth cycle of ifosfamide and doxorubicin treatment for recurrent sarcoma with metastases to the lung. During admission, he was noted to have severe renal tubular dysfunction; ifosfamide-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and Fanconi's syndrome were suspected. He received supportive therapy that resulted in incomplete resolution of signs and symptoms. The patient was discharged after a 5-day hospital stay when his white blood cell count increased from 0.1-2.5 × 10(3) /mm(3) and his fever had resolved. Use of the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicated a probable relationship (score of 7) between the patient's development of diabetes insipidus and Fanconi's syndrome and his use of ifosfamide. This dual diagnosis of diabetes insipidus and Fanconi's syndrome in an adult makes this case unusual, as well as therapeutically challenging. We conducted a review of the existing literature regarding ifosfamide-induced Fanconi's syndrome and describe the proposed mechanisms and therapeutic options. This case suggests that patients treated with ifosfamide should be monitored closely for renal function to identify, and perhaps prevent, these rare adverse events. Preliminary animal models show promise for adding N-acetylcysteine to ifosfamide treatment, but more research is necessary before using this drug as a therapeutic option. © 2012 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  15. Impact of changes in metabolic control on progression to photocoagulation for clinically significant macular oedema:a 20 year study of type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, B.; Larsen, M.; Andersen, Elisabeth Wreford

    2013-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Although increasing hyperglycaemia, arterial hypertension and longer duration of diabetes raise the risk of progression of diabetic retinopathy, short-term benefits in terms of improved metabolic control and lowered blood pressure have not been demonstrated. We therefore examined ...

  16. Microcurrent stimulation in the treatment of dry and wet macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaikin L

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Laurie Chaikin,1 Kellen Kashiwa,2 Michael Bennet,2 George Papastergiou,3 Walter Gregory4 1Private practice, Alameda, CA, USA; 2Retina Institute of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, USA; 3California Retinal Associates, San Diego, CA, USA; 4Clinical Trials Research Unit, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK Purpose: To determine the safety and efficacy of the application of transcutaneous (transpalpebral microcurrent stimulation to slow progression of dry and wet macular degeneration or improve vision in dry and wet macular degeneration. Methods: Seventeen patients aged between 67 and 95 years with an average age of 83 years were selected to participate in the study over a period of 3 months in two eye care centers. There were 25 eyes with dry age-related macular degeneration (DAMD and six eyes with wet age-related macular degeneration (WAMD. Frequency-specific microcurrent stimulation was applied in a transpalpebral manner, using two programmable dual channel microcurrent units delivering pulsed microcurrent at 150 µA for 35 minutes once a week. The frequency pairs selected were based on targeting tissues, which are typically affected by the disease combined with frequencies that target disease processes. Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study or Snellen visual acuity (VA was measured before and after each treatment session. All treatment was administered in a clinical setting. Results: Significant increases were seen in VA in DAMD (P=0.012, Wilcoxon one-sample test, but in WAMD, improvements did not reach statistical significance (P=0.059. In DAMD eyes, twice as many patients showed increase in VA (52% compared to those showing deterioration (26%, with improvements being often sizeable, whereas deteriorations were usually very slight. In WAMD eyes, five of six (83% patients showed an increase and none showed deterioration. Conclusion: The substantial changes observed over this period, combined with continued improvement for

  17. Dramatic course of osteomyelitis in a patient treated with immediately placed dental implants suffering from uncontrolled diabetes: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Christian; Hartwig, Stefan; Nack, Claudia; Nahles, Susanne; Nelson, Katja; Raguse, Jan-Dirk

    2015-01-01

    To report a rare and dramatic complication following immediate dental implant placement in a heavy smoker, who had a delayed diagnosis of uncontrolled diabetes. In this case report we present the dramatic course of a 64-year old female patient treated with five immediate post-extractive dental implants in the mandible, who developed osteomyelitis, which manifested initially as local peri-implant inflammation and progressed into a spontaneous jaw fracture, despite repeated surgical interventions and antibiotic courses over a 3-year period, until diabetes was diagnosed. A symptom-free status could be achieved only after partial mandibulectomy, treatment of diabetes and reconstruction with a microvascular fibula free flap. In the presence of mandibular osteomyelitis refractory to therapy, yet undiagnosed underlying pathologies, such as diabetes, should be investigated and treated urgently.

  18. Chronic saponin treatment attenuates damage to the pancreas in chronic alcohol-treated diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Ran Choi

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: Saponin may not only be helpful in alleviating the rapid progress of diabetes due to chronic alcohol consumption in diabetic patients, but may also show potential as an antidiabetic drug candidate for diabetic patients who chronically consume alcohol.

  19. Retinal micropseudocysts in diabetic retinopathy: prospective functional and anatomic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Raimondo; Cennamo, Gilda; Finelli, Maria Luisa; Bonavolontà, Paola; Greco, Giovanni Maria; de Crecchio, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence, progression and functional predictive value of retinal micropseudocysts (MPCs) in diabetic patients. Prospective controlled observational study. From among all the type 2 diabetic patients evaluated during a period of 5 months between September 2009 and January 2010, we enrolled all patients with retinal MPCs at spectral-domain scanning laser ophthalmoscope/optical coherence tomography (SD-SLO/OCT) not previously treated for diabetic retinopathy. Forty diabetic patients without MPCs served as the control group. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), central retinal thickness (CRT), macular sensitivity and stability of fixation at SD-SLO/OCT microperimetry were measured monthly for 12 months. 22/156 patients with type 2 diabetes (14.1%, 32 eyes) met the inclusion criteria. The 95% confidence interval for the prevalence estimate of MPCs was 12.3-16.6%. Mean BCVA, CRT and central retinal sensitivity at baseline were 77.53 ± 2.2 Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study letters, 242.31 ± 31.0 µm and 15.95 ± 0.61 dB, respectively. Fixation was stable in all cases. Compared to the control group, eyes with MPCs had similar BCVA but greater CRT (p = 0.01) and reduced macular sensitivity (p = 0.001) at baseline and at each follow-up visit. Over time, CRT remained stable in eyes with MPCs, whereas macular sensitivity progressively decreased. MPCs in diabetic retinopathy are associated, temporally or causally, with a progressive reduction of macular sensitivity despite a stable BCVA, CRT and fixation. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Mayombian ethnic, vegetables low intake, insulin treatment, diabetic nephropathy and severe diabetic retinopathy are determinants of blindness in diabetic Africans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moise, Mvitu Muaka; Benjamin, Longo-Mbenza; Enoch, Cibanda Yokobo; Igor, Longo Phemba

    2013-01-01

    AIM To determine the frequency and causes of blindness in diabetic Africans. METHODS The study was a cross-sectional survey carried out among known black diabetics consecutively admitted at the Teaching Hospital, University of Kinshasa, between 2005 and 2007. Examination methods included interviewer-administered structured questionnaire, eye examinations (visual acuity, tonometry, funduscopy), and fasting plasma glycaemia test. RESULTS Of the 227 patients examined, 15.9% had blindness. Univariate analyses showed significant association between female, severity of diabetic retinopathy, Mayombian ethnic group, use of insulin treatment, low intake of vegetables, diabetic nephropathy, open angle glaucoma and blindness in all diabetics. After logistic regression, only diabetic nephropathy, use of insulin treatment, macular oedema, Mayombian ethnic group and vegetables low intake were the independent risk factors of blindness in all diabetics. However, after logistic regression in the sub-group with diabetic retinopathy, only open angle glaucoma and proliferative diabetic retinopathy were the independent determinants of blindness. CONCLUSION The majority of the causes of blindness in these diabetic Africans are avoidable. It is recommended that appropriate diabetes care, nutrition education, periodic eye examination and laser photocoagulation facilities should be provided for treating diabetics in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24195057

  1. Treated Autoimmune Thyroid Disease Is Associated with a Decreased Quality of Life among Young Persons with Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Spirkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D in children and adolescents is relatively often accompanied by other immunopathological diseases, autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD or celiac disease (CD. Our aim was to assess whether these conditions are associated with changes in the health-related quality of life (HRQOL in pediatric patients with T1D. In a cross-sectional study we identified eligible 332 patients with T1D aged 8–18 years, of whom 248 (75% together with their parents responded to the PedsQL Generic and Diabetes Modules. Compared to 143 patients without thyroid autoantibodies, 40 patients with a thyroxine-treated AITD scored lower in the overall generic HRQOL (P=0.014, as well as in the overall diabetes-specific HRQOL (P=0.013. After adjustment for age, gender, duration of diabetes, type of diabetes treatment, and diabetes control, this association remained statistically significant for the generic HRQOL (P=0.023. Celiac disease was not associated with a change in the generic or diabetes-specific HRQOL (P=0.07  and   P=0.63, resp.. Parental scores showed no association with AITD or celiac disease, except a marginally significant decrease in the overall generic HRQOL (P=0.039 in the T1D + AITD compared to T1D group. Our study indicates that, in pediatric patients with T1D, concomitant thyroxine-treated AITD is associated with lower quality of life.

  2. Occult Macular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Işıl Sayman Muslubaş

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Occult macular dystrophy is an inherited macular dystrophy characterized by a progressive decline of bilateral visual acuity with normal fundus appearance, fluorescein angiogram and full-field electroretinogram. This case report presents a 20-year-old female patient with bilateral progressive decline of visual acuity for six years. Her visual acuity was 3-4/10 in both eyes. Anterior segment and fundus examination, fluorescein angiogram and full-field electroretinogram were normal. She could read all Ishihara pseudoisochromatic plates. Fundus autofluorescence imaging was normal. There was a mild central hyporeflectance on fundus infrared reflectance imaging in both eyes. Reduced foveal thickness and alterations of the photoreceptor inner and outer segment junction were observed by optical coherence tomography in both eyes. Central scotoma was also found by microperimetry and reduced central response was revealed by multifocal electroretinogram in both eyes. These findings are consistent with the clinical characteristics of occult macular dystrophy

  3. Treating Diabetes Mellitus: Pharmacophore Based Designing of Potential Drugs from Gymnema sylvestre against Insulin Receptor Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Uzzal Hossain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is one of the most prevalent metabolic disorders which can affect the quality of life severely. Injectable insulin is currently being used to treat DM which is mainly associated with patient inconvenience. Small molecules that can act as insulin receptor (IR agonist would be better alternatives to insulin injection. Herein, ten bioactive small compounds derived from Gymnema sylvestre (G. sylvestre were chosen to determine their IR binding affinity and ADMET properties using a combined approach of molecular docking study and computational pharmacokinetic elucidation. Designing structural analogues were also performed for the compounds associated with toxicity and less IR affinity. Among the ten parent compounds, six were found to have significant pharmacokinetic properties with considerable binding affinity towards IR while four compounds were associated with toxicity and less IR affinity. Among the forty structural analogues, four compounds demonstrated considerably increased binding affinity towards IR and less toxicity compared with parent compounds. Finally, molecular interaction analysis revealed that six parent compounds and four analogues interact with the active site amino acids of IR. So this study would be a way to identify new therapeutics and alternatives to insulin for diabetic patients.

  4. Chelation therapy to treat atherosclerosis, particularly in diabetes: is it time to reconsider?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas, Gervasio A; Ergui, Ian

    2016-08-01

    Case reports and case series have suggested a possible beneficial effect of chelation therapy in patients with atherosclerotic disease. Small randomized trials conducted in patients with angina or peripheral artery disease, however, were not sufficiently powered to provide conclusive evidence on clinical outcomes. The Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT) was the first randomized trial adequately powered to detect the effects of chelation therapy on clinical endpoints. We discuss results and future research. Expert commentary: Chelation reduced adverse cardiovascular events in a post myocardial infarction (MI) population. Patients with diabetes demonstrated even greater benefit, with a number needed to treat of 6.5 patients to prevent a cardiac event over 5 years, with a 41% relative reduction in risk of a cardiac event (p = 0.0002). These results led to the revision of the ACC/AHA guideline recommendations for chelation therapy, changing its classification from class III to class IIb. TACT2, a replicative trial, will assess the effects of chelation therapy on cardiovascular outcomes in diabetic patients with a prior myocardial infarction. We are seeking participating sites for TACT2.

  5. Hypoglycemia in type 2 diabetes patients treated with insulin: the advantages of continuous glucose monitoring

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    Vadim Valer'evich Klimontov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims.  To determine the incidence and risk factors for hypoglycemia in elderly insulin-treated type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients by means of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM. Materials and Methods.  We observed seventy-six hospitalized patients with T2DM, aged 65 to 79 years. Treatment with basal insulin (n=36, premixed insulin (n=12 or basal-bolus insulin regimen (n=28 was followed by metformin (n=44, glimepiride (n=14 and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (n=14. 2-days CGM with retrospective data analysis was performed in all patients. During CGM, three fasting and three 2-h postprandial finger-prick glucose values were obtained daily with portable glucose meter. Results.  Hypoglycemia (identified as blood glucose

  6. Raman spectroscopy enables noninvasive biochemical identification of the collagen regeneration in cutaneous wound healing of diabetic mice treated with MSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenxia; Liu, Hanping; Deng, Xiaoyuan; Jin, Ying; Sun, Huimin; Li, Caiyun; Wang, Ning; Chu, Jing

    2017-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) had been reported as a novel therapeutic strategy for non-healing diabetic cutaneous wound mainly by promoting the formation of extracellular matrix (ECM) and neovasculature. Collagen regeneration is one of the key processes of ECM remodeling in wound healing. Accordingly, rapid assessment of the collagen content in a noninvasive manner can promptly provide objective evaluation for MSC therapy of cutaneous wound healing and strength evidence to adjust therapeutic regimen. In the present study, noninvasive Raman microspectroscopy was used for tracing the regeneration status of collagen during diabetic wound healing with MSCs. Wound tissues of normal mice, diabetic mice, and MSC-treated diabetic mice were subjected to Masson trichrome staining assay and submitted to spectroscopic analysis by Raman microspectroscopy after wounding 7, 14, and 21 days. Masson trichrome staining demonstrated that there was more collagen deposition in diabetic + MSCs group relative to diabetic group. The relative intensity of Raman collagen peak positions at 937, 1004, 1321, 1452, and 1662 cm -1 increased in MSC-treated diabetic group compared to diabetic group, although normal mice group had the highest relative intensity of collagen peak bands. Correlation analysis suggested that the spectral bands had a high positive correlation with the collagen intensity detected by Masson trichrome staining in wound tissues of three groups. Our results demonstrate that Raman microspectroscopy has potential application in rapidly and quantitatively assessing diabetic wound healing with MSCs by monitoring collagen variation, which may provide a novel method for the study of skin regeneration.

  7. Patients' preferences for involvement in the decision-making process for treating diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marahrens, Lydia; Kern, Raimar; Ziemssen, Tjalf; Fritsche, Andreas; Martus, Peter; Ziemssen, Focke; Roeck, Daniel

    2017-08-09

    To assess factors associated with the preferred role of the attending ophthalmologist in the decision-making processes before treating diabetic retinopathy (DR). Cross-sectional study of 810 adults attending secondary diabetes care centers (NCT02311504). Diabetes patients were classified using a validated questionnaire in an ophthalmologist-dominant decision-making (ODM), shared decision-making (SDM) and patient-dominant decision-making (PDM) style. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine factors associated with the decision-making process. A majority of 74.3% patients preferred SDM between ophthalmologist and patient, 17.4% patients wanted ODM, delegating the decision-making process to the ophthalmologist, 8.3% preferred the autonomous style of PDM. Patients wanting ODM were older (OR = 1.2 per decade, p = 0.013), had a lower level of education (OR = 1.4, p = 0.001) and had a higher frequency of consultations per year (OR = 1.3, p = 0.022). Patients with better basic knowledge in DR and memorizing their HbA 1 c level showed a higher propensity for SDM (OR = 1.1, p = 0.037). Patients wanting PDM had a significantly higher education (OR = 1.3, p = 0.036) and a greater desire for receiving information from self-help groups (OR = 1.3, p = 0.015). The first evaluation of the general patient wishes for the treatment of DR confirmed the concept of SDM, which was favored by three quarters. In particular, older patients with low educational attainment wanted to delegate the decision-making process to the ophthalmologist. Amelioration of ophthalmologic education in diabetic programs might take up patients' propensity for SDM. Regardless of the decision-making group, nearly all patients wanted the medical and scientific information to be transferred by and shared with the ophthalmologist. The study was registered on www.clinicaltrials.gov (identifier: NCT02311504) on December 4th 2014.

  8. Radiation treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, Tomoko; Mandai, Michiko; Honjo, Megumi; Matsuda, Naoko; Miyamoto, Hideki; Takahashi, Masayo; Ogura, Yuichiro; Sasai, Keisuke [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1996-11-01

    Fifteen eyes of age-related macular degeneration were treated by low-dose radiation. All the affected eyes had subfoveal neovascular membrane. Seventeen nontreated eyes with similar macular lesion served as control. Radiation was performed using photon beam at 6MV. Each eye received daily dose of 2 Gy for 5 consecutive days. When evaluated 9 to 12 months after treatment, the size of neovascular membrane had decreased in 47% of treated eyes and 7% of control eyes. The visual acuity improved by 2 lines or more in 13% of treated eyes and in none of control eyes. When the initial neovascular membrane was less than 1.5 disc diameter in size, the visual acuity had improved or remained stationary in 90% of treated eyes and in 36% of control eyes. The findings show the potential beneficial effect of radiation for age-related macular degeneration. (author)

  9. Cross-sectional analysis of adult diabetes type 1 and type 2 patients with diabetic microvascular complications from a German retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happich, M; Breitscheidel, L; Meisinger, C; Ulbig, M; Falkenstein, P; Benter, U; Watkins, J

    2007-06-01

    To obtain epidemiological data on the prevalence of predefined stages of diabetic microvascular complications from a representative cross-section of patients with existing microvascular complications of type 1 or type 2 diabetes in Germany. A cross-sectional, retrospective study of medical records of 705 type 1 and 1910 type 2 adult diabetic patients with a diagnosis of retinopathy and/or peripheral neuropathy and/or nephropathy before 2002 and treated in 2002 in Germany. Of 376 patients with type 1 diabetes having retinopathy, 59.3% had mild or moderate non-proliferative retinopathy without macular oedema, 27.1% had macular oedema, and 13.6% had severe retinopathy without macular oedema. In 862 patients with type 2 diabetes, the distribution of retinopathy/maculopathy classes was 56.8%, 35.5%, and 7.7%, respectively. Of 381 type 1 diabetes patients with observed peripheral neuropathy, 81.4% had sensorimotor neuropathy, 8.9% had diabetic foot conditions, and 9.7% had lower extremity amputations because of diabetes. In 1005 patients with type 2 diabetes, the distribution of neuropathy classes was 78.2%, 12.1%, and 9.7%, respectively. The proportions of patients with renal insufficiency in type 1 and type 2 diabetes groups were 15.3% versus 13.5%, respectively. The study suggests that there are considerable proportions of patients with progressive stages of microvascular complications related to type 1 and type 2 diabetes in Germany. This underlines the importance of improvement of optimal quality of care and frequent screening for preventing late diabetic microvascular complications and the necessity of effective intervention strategies to tackle this major public health problem.

  10. What Is Age-Related Macular Degeneration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Age-Related Macular Degeneration Sections What Is Macular Degeneration? How is AMD ... What Does Macular Degeneration Look Like? What Is Macular Degeneration? Leer en Español: ¿Qué es la degeneración macular ...

  11. Autofluorescence Imaging for Diagnosis and Follow-up of Cystoid Macular Edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazanin Ebrahimiadib

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipofuscin results from digestion of photoreceptor outer segments by the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE and is the principal compound that causes RPE fluorescence during autofluorescence imaging. Absorption of the 488-nanometer blue light by macular pigments, especially by the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, causes normal macular hypo-autofluorescence. Fundus autofluorescence imaging is being increasingly employed in ophthalmic practice to diagnose and monitor patients with a variety of retinal disorders. In macular edema for example, areas of hyper-autofluorescence are usually present which are postulated to be due to dispersion of macular pigments by pockets of intraretinal fluid. For this reason, the masking effect of macular pigments is reduced and the natural autofluorescence of lipofuscin can be observed without interference. In cystic types of macular edema, e.g. cystoid macular edema due to retinal vein occlusion, diabetic macular edema and post cataract surgery, hyperautofluorescent regions corresponding to cystic spaces of fluid accumulation can be identified. In addition, the amount of hyper-autofluorescence seems to correspond to the severity of edema. Hence, autofluorescence imaging, as a noninvasive technique, can provide valuable information on cystoid macular edema in terms of diagnosis, followup and efficacy of treatment.

  12. Ultra-wide-field imaging in diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi Falavarjani, Khalil; Tsui, Irena; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2017-10-01

    Since 1991, 7-field images captured with 30-50 degree cameras in the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study were the gold standard for fundus imaging to study diabetic retinopathy. Ultra-wide-field images cover significantly more area (up to 82%) of the fundus and with ocular steering can in many cases image 100% of the fundus ("panretinal"). Recent advances in image analysis of ultra-wide-field imaging allow for precise measurements of the peripheral retinal lesions. There is a growing consensus in the literature that ultra-wide-field imaging improves detection of peripheral lesions in diabetic retinopathy and leads to more accurate classification of the disease. There is discordance among studies, however, on the correlation between peripheral diabetic lesions and diabetic macular edema and optimal management strategies to treat diabetic retinopathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the treatment of radiation-induced macular ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamim A Haji

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Shamim A Haji1,2, Ronald EP Frenkel1,2,31Eye Research Foundation, Stuart, FL, USA; 2East Florida Eye Institute, Stuart, FL, USA; 3Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Miami, FL, USAPurpose: To report a case of radiation-induced macular ischemia where vision and macular perfusion improved after hyperbaric oxygen (HBO therapy.Methods: A 62-year-old male patient developed radiation-induced macular ischemia after he was treated with radiation for brain glioma. The patient presented with best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA acuity of 20/400 in his right eye. Optical coherence tomography (OCT showed central macular thickness of 468 μm. The patient received focal laser, intravitreal triamcinolone, and HBO therapy.Results: The patient’s vision improved from 20/400 to 20/100 after focal laser and intravitreal triamcinolone. His central macular thickness improved from 468 μm to 132 μm. After receiving HBO therapy, his VA improved to 20/50 and fluorescein angiography showed improvement in macular perfusion.Conclusion: HBO therapy improves macular perfusion in patients with radiation-induced macular ischemia.Keywords: macular ischemia, visual acuity, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, macular perfusion

  14. Immunology of age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambati, Jayakrishna; Atkinson, John P.; Gelfand, Bradley D.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness in aged individuals. Recent advances have highlighted the essential role of immune processes in the development, progression and treatment of AMD. In this Review we discuss recent discoveries related to the immunological aspects of AMD pathogenesis. We outline the diverse immune cell types, inflammatory activators and pathways that are involved. Finally, we discuss the future of inflammation-directed therapeutics to treat AMD in the growing aged population. PMID:23702979

  15. Treated of type 1 diabetes mellitus in non-obese diabetic mice by transplantation of allogeneic bone marrow and pancreatic tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumizu, R.; Sugiura, K.; Iwai, H.

    1987-01-01

    Non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice provide a model for type 1 diabetes mellitus. We previously showed that allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) can prevent and treat insulitis and overt diabetes in NOD mice. However, ABMT alone could not be used to treat overt diabetes in NOD mice whose islets had been completely destroyed. To provide insulin-producing cells, pancreatic tissue from newborn mice was grafted under the renal capsules in combination with ABMT. The aims of concomitant ABMT are as follows. (i) It induces immunological tolerance to the donor-type major histocompatibility complex determinants and permits the host to accept subsequent pancreatic allografts from the bone marrow donor. (ii) ABMT replaces abnormal stem cells with normal stem cells. After transplantation of bone marrow plus newborn pancreas, NOD mice showed reduction of the glycosuria and a normal response in the glucose-tolerance test. Immunohistological study revealed the presence of clustered insulin-containing beta cells in the grafted pancreatic transplants. ABMT may become a viable treatment of established type 1 diabetes mellitus in humans

  16. Outcomes for Women with Gestational Diabetes Treated with Metformin: A Retrospective, Case-Control Study

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    Rachel T. McGrath

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Metformin is increasingly being used a therapeutic option for the management of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. The aim of this study was to compare the maternal characteristics and perinatal outcomes of women with GDM treated with metformin (with or without supplemental insulin with those receiving other management approaches. A retrospective, case-control study was carried out and 83 women taking metformin were matched 1:1 with women receiving insulin or diet and lifestyle modification alone. Women managed with diet and lifestyle modification had a significantly lower fasting plasma glucose (p < 0.001 and HbA1c (p < 0.01 at diagnosis of GDM. Furthermore, women managed with metformin had a higher early pregnancy body mass index (BMI compared to those receiving insulin or diet and lifestyle modification (p < 0.001. There was no difference in mode of delivery, birth weight or incidence of large- or small-for-gestational-age neonates between groups. Women receiving glucose lowering therapies had a higher rate of neonatal hypoglycaemia (p < 0.05. The incidence of other adverse perinatal outcomes was similar between groups. Despite their greater BMI, women with metformin-treated GDM did not have an increased risk of adverse perinatal outcomes. Metformin is a useful alternative to insulin in the management of GDM.

  17. What Is Macular Edema?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the retina, where they are transmitted to the brain and interpreted as the images you see. It is the macula that is responsible for your pinpoint vision, allowing you to read, sew or recognize a face. Macular edema develops when blood vessels in the retina are leaking ...

  18. Treating fat grafts with human endothelial progenitor cells promotes their vascularization and improves their survival in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Saher; Ben-Nun, Ohad; Egozi, Dana; Keren, Aviad; Malyarova, Nastya; Kruchevsky, Danny; Gilhar, Amos; Ullmann, Yehuda

    2012-10-01

    Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells are required for vascularization of a fat graft to form a functional microvasculature within the graft and to facilitate its integration into the surrounding tissues. Organ transplantation carries a high risk of graft loss and rejection in patients with diabetes mellitus because endothelial progenitor cell function is impaired. The authors investigated the influence of endothelial progenitor cell treatment on the phenotype and survival of human fat grafts in immunocompromised mice with experimentally induced diabetes mellitus. The authors injected 1 ml of human fat tissue into the scalps of 14 nondiabetic and 28 diabetic immunocompromised mice, and then treated some of the grafts with endothelial progenitor cells that was isolated from the blood of a human donor. The phenotype of the endothelial progenitor cell-treated fat grafts from the 14 diabetic mice was compared with that of the untreated fat grafts from 14 nondiabetic and 14 diabetic mice, 18 days and 15 weeks after fat transplantation. Determination of graft phenotype included measurements of weight and volume, vascular endothelial growth factor levels, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and caspase 3 expression levels, and histologic analysis of the extent of vascularization. The untreated grafts from the diabetic mice were fully resorbed 15 weeks after fat transplantation. The phenotype of endothelial progenitor cell-treated fat grafts from the diabetic mice was similar to that of the untreated fat grafts from the nondiabetic mice. Endothelial progenitor cell treatment of transplanted fat can increase the survival of a fat graft by inducing its vascularization and decreasing the extent of apoptosis.

  19. Intravitreal Bevacizumab and Triamcinolone for Treatment of Cystoid Macular Oedema Associated with Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia and Imatinib Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric K. Newcott

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy of intravitreal bevacizumab and triamcinolone in the treatment of cystoid macular oedema in a case with chronic myeloid leukaemia on imatinib treatment. Methods. We treated a 78-year-old man with bilateral cystoid macular oedema with intravitreal triamcinolone and subsequent bevacizumab in one eye and intravitreal bevacizumab, alone, in the fellow eye. Results. Serial intravitreal bevacizumab with and without triamcinolone treated cystoid macular oedema in both eyes and improved the vision. Conclusion. Intravitreal bevacizumab and triamcinolone could be viable options to treat cystoid macular oedema due to chronic myeloid leukaemia and imatinib therapy.

  20. Macular Hole Progression after Intravitreal Bevacizumab for Hemicentral Retinal Vein Occlusion

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    Manish Nagpal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Macular edema secondary to retinal vein occlusion is commonly being treated with off-label intravitreal bevacizumab with good outcomes. A significant reduction in macular edema and improvement in visual acuity is seen following such a treatment with no serious adverse effects. In the reported case, a full-thickness macular hole was noticed one month after intravitreal bevacizumab for macular edema secondary to hemicentral retinal vein occlusion. On a detailed review of the pre- and postoptical coherence tomography scans, it was realized that there was a preexisting stage 2-3 macular hole which was masked by the hemorrhages and edema at the fovea and the macular hole had progressed following the injection.

  1. The anti-ALS drug riluzole attenuates pericyte loss in the diabetic retinopathy of streptozotocin-treated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jeong A. [Neural Injury Research Center, Asan Institute for Life Sciences, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Yoo-Ri [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Hyae-Ran [Neural Injury Research Center, Asan Institute for Life Sciences, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hwangseo [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Jae-Young, E-mail: jkko@amc.seoul.kr [Neural Injury Research Center, Asan Institute for Life Sciences, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Young Hee, E-mail: yhyoon@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Loss of pericytes, considered an early hallmark of diabetic retinopathy, is thought to involve abnormal activation of protein kinase C (PKC). We previously showed that the anti-amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) drug riluzole functions as a PKC inhibitor. Here, we examined the effects of riluzole on pathological changes in diabetic retinopathy. Pathological endpoints examined in vivo included the number of pericytes and integrity of retinal vessels in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. In addition, PKC activation and the induction of monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP1) were assessed in diabetic mice and in human retinal pericytes exposed to advanced glycation end product (AGE) or modified low-density lipoprotein (mLDL). The diameter of retinal vessels and the number of pericytes were severely reduced, and the levels of MCP1 and PKC were increased in STZ-induced diabetic mice. Administration of riluzole reversed all of these changes. Furthermore, the increased expression of MCP1 in AGE- or mLDL-treated cultured retinal pericytes was inhibited by treatment with riluzole or the PKC inhibitor GF109203X. In silico modeling showed that riluzole fits well within the catalytic pocket of PKC. Taken together, our results demonstrate that riluzole attenuates both MCP1 induction and pericyte loss in diabetic retinopathy, likely through its direct inhibitory effect on PKC. - Highlights: • The effects of riluzole were examined in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. • The diameter of retinal vessels and the number of pericytes were severely reduced. • The levels of MCP1 and PKC were increased, while riluzole reversed all changes. • Riluzole attenuated the level of MCP1 in AGE- or mLDL-treated retinal pericytes. • Riluzole attenuated both MCP1 induction and pericyte loss in diabetic retinopathy.

  2. The anti-ALS drug riluzole attenuates pericyte loss in the diabetic retinopathy of streptozotocin-treated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jeong A.; Chung, Yoo-Ri; Byun, Hyae-Ran; Park, Hwangseo; Koh, Jae-Young; Yoon, Young Hee

    2017-01-01

    Loss of pericytes, considered an early hallmark of diabetic retinopathy, is thought to involve abnormal activation of protein kinase C (PKC). We previously showed that the anti-amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) drug riluzole functions as a PKC inhibitor. Here, we examined the effects of riluzole on pathological changes in diabetic retinopathy. Pathological endpoints examined in vivo included the number of pericytes and integrity of retinal vessels in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. In addition, PKC activation and the induction of monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP1) were assessed in diabetic mice and in human retinal pericytes exposed to advanced glycation end product (AGE) or modified low-density lipoprotein (mLDL). The diameter of retinal vessels and the number of pericytes were severely reduced, and the levels of MCP1 and PKC were increased in STZ-induced diabetic mice. Administration of riluzole reversed all of these changes. Furthermore, the increased expression of MCP1 in AGE- or mLDL-treated cultured retinal pericytes was inhibited by treatment with riluzole or the PKC inhibitor GF109203X. In silico modeling showed that riluzole fits well within the catalytic pocket of PKC. Taken together, our results demonstrate that riluzole attenuates both MCP1 induction and pericyte loss in diabetic retinopathy, likely through its direct inhibitory effect on PKC. - Highlights: • The effects of riluzole were examined in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. • The diameter of retinal vessels and the number of pericytes were severely reduced. • The levels of MCP1 and PKC were increased, while riluzole reversed all changes. • Riluzole attenuated the level of MCP1 in AGE- or mLDL-treated retinal pericytes. • Riluzole attenuated both MCP1 induction and pericyte loss in diabetic retinopathy.

  3. Correlation between choroidal thickness and macular hole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Li Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To explore the correlation between choroidal thickness and macular hole, and to provide a theoretical basis for diagnosis and treatment of macular hole. METHODS: This study included 40 cases of monocular idiopathic macular hole patients who were treated in ophthalmology of our hospital from June 2015 to June 2016 and 40 cases of healthy people. Sicked eyes of idiopathic macular hole patients(40 eyeswere set as the Group A, uninjured side eyes(40 eyeswere set as the Group B, eyes of 40 cases of healthy people(40 normal eyeswere set as the Group C. Choroidal thickness of macular fovea, macular fovea 1mm, 3mm at 9 points, 4 directions in the upper, lower, nasal and temporal regions were measured through coherent optical tomography of enhanced deep imaging(enhanced depth image optical coherence tomography, EDI-OCT. They were recorded as SFCT, SCT1mm, SCT3mm, ICT1mm, ICT3mm, NCT1mm, NCT3mm, TCT1mm, TCT3mm, and correlation analysis between SFCT and age was analyzed. RESULTS: Average SFCT of Group A, B had no significant difference, data of the Group C was significantly higher than those of the Group A, B, there was statistical significance(P1mm, SCT3mm, ICT1mm, ICT3mm, NCT1mm, NCT3mm, TCT1mm, TCT3mm of the Group A, B had no significant difference(P>0.05, and choroidal thickness at each point of the Group C was significantly higher than that of Group A and B, there was statistical significance(Pr=-0.065, P=0.148; r=-0.057, P=0.658, SFCT of the Group C was negatively correlated with age(r=-0.343, P=0.041. CONCLUSION: The pathogenesis of idiopathic macular hole may be related to the sharp decrease of choroidal thickness, choroidal thickness of uninjured side eyes reduces more sharply than normal population and choroidal vascular metabolism reduces may be pathogenic.

  4. Phobia of self-injecting and self-testing in insulin-treated diabetes patients: opportunities for screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mollema, E. D.; Snoek, F. J.; Heine, R. J.; van der Ploeg, H. M.

    2001-01-01

    To define clinically relevant cut-off points for severe fear of self-injecting (FSI) and self-testing (FST) (phobia) in insulin-treated patients with diabetes, and to estimate the magnitude of these phobias in our research population. FSI and FST were assessed in a cross-sectional survey using the

  5. A patient treated with olanzapine developing diabetes de novo : proposal for hyperglycaemia screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duiverman, M. L.; Cohen, D.; van Oven, W.; Nieboer, P.

    2007-01-01

    We report a patient with schizophrenia who developed diabetes mellitus during treatment with olanzapine. The case confirms the pattern of atypical antipsychotic-related diabetic emergencies: rapid onset in relatively young patients, often with severe glucose derangements and serious complications.

  6. Ethnopharmacological field study of the plants used to treat type 2 diabetes among the Cakchiquels in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Elda Carola; Andrade-Cetto, Adolfo

    2015-01-15

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by tissue resistance to the action of insulin, combined with a relative deficiency in insulin secretion. In Guatemala, type 2 diabetes results in significant mortality rates. The low incomes of the indigenous population results in the use of alternative therapies such as medicinal plants to treat the illness. We could not find any previous study related to the use of medicinal plants to treat diabetes in Guatemala. The aim of this work is to determine the most effective plant species used in traditional medicine to treat type 2 diabetes. We performed an ethnopharmacological field study among the Cakchiquels of Chimaltenango to select the most prominent plants used to treat the disease. Type 2 diabetic patients from their community health centers were interviewed using structured questionnaires. Two mathematical tools were used to identify potential plant species: the Disease Consensus Index and the Use Value. International databases, including SCOPUS, PubMed, and Google Scholar, were used to identify whether the plants with the highest scores were known to elicit hypoglycemic effects. After analyzing the data, we can propose the following plants as the most prominent among the Cakchiquels of Chimaltenango to treat type 2 diabetes: Hamelia patens Jacq., Neurolaena lobata (L.) R.Br.ex Cass., Solanum americanum Mill., Croton guatemalensis Lotsy, and Quercus peduncularis Née. The Cakchiquel patients interviewed did not understand type 2 diabetes; however, they associated the onset of their disease with a negative emotion, such as shock, sadness or anger. Despite changes in lifestyle, influences of advertising, the availability of innovative treatments and the use of oral hypoglycemic treatments provided by health facilities serving indigenous communities, the Cakchiquel continue to use medicinal plants as adjunctive treatment. While they are unaware whether the plants can cause additional harm, they consider their consumption

  7. Efficacy of vitamin B12 combined with metformin in treating type 2 diabetes and its effect on homocysteine

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    Na Geng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe and analyze Vitamin B12 combined with metformin treat for the type 2 diabetes, which affect the homocysteine. Methods: 92 cases of type 2 diabetes were selected in our hospital for treatment and study from October 2014 to April 2014. All patients were randomly divided into control group (46 cases and observation group (46 cases. Treatment of patients in the control group: patients were treated by metformin; observation group patients: Take vitamin B12 to patients treated with metformin. Finally, patient outcomes, as well as vitamin B12 and homocysteine in patients before and after treatment were analyzed. Results: Before treatment, all patients vitamin B12 content difference comparisons were no significant differences (P>0.05. Patients were treated in January, June and 1 year after the vitamin B12 content of the observation group were significantly higher in patients with vitamin B12 levels of data compared to each other there was a significant difference (P0.05. Patients were treated in January, June and 1 year after the homocysteine content of the observation group were not significantly reduced, the control group of patients with homocysteine increased significantly (P<0.000 1. Conclusions: Vitamin B12 combined with metformin in type 2 diabetes treatment, can significantly increase a patient's body to control homocysteine, while the treatment effect is obvious, clinical recommendations widely implemented.

  8. Effect of change in body weight on incident diabetes mellitus in patients with stable coronary artery disease treated with atorvastatin (from the treating to new targets study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Kwok-Leung; Waters, David D; Messig, Michael; DeMicco, David A; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Barter, Philip J

    2014-05-15

    Features of the metabolic syndrome are independent risk factors for new-onset diabetes mellitus (NODM) related to statin therapy. Obesity is the predominant underlying risk factor for the metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus. This study investigated whether change in body weight may predict NODM in statin-treated patients. A total of 7,595 patients without prevalent diabetes mellitus at baseline from the Treating to New Targets (TNT) study were included in this analysis. They were randomized to atorvastatin 10 or 80 mg/day and monitored for a median of 4.9 years. NODM developed in 659 patients (8.1% in the 10-mg group and 9.2% in the 80-mg group). There was a significant increase in body weight (0.9 kg, p weight was greater in patients with NODM than those without NODM (1.6 vs 0.9 kg, p weight with NODM risk remained significant after adjusting for confounding factors (hazard ratios 1.33, 1.42, and 1.88 for quartiles 2, 3, and 4 compared with quartile 1, respectively). Similar results were obtained in patients with normal fasting glucose level. In conclusion, 1-year change in body weight is predictive of NODM in patients who underwent statin therapy from the TNT trial. Our study highlights the importance of weight control as a lifestyle measure to prevent statin-related NODM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Skin grafting and tissue replacement for treating foot ulcers in people with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santema, Trientje B; Poyck, Paul P C; Ubbink, Dirk T

    2016-02-11

    Foot ulceration is a major problem in people with diabetes and is the leading cause of hospitalisation and limb amputations. Skin grafts and tissue replacements can be used to reconstruct skin defects for people with diabetic foot ulcers in addition to providing them with standard care. Skin substitutes can consist of bioengineered or artificial skin, autografts (taken from the patient), allografts (taken from another person) or xenografts (taken from animals). To determine the benefits and harms of skin grafting and tissue replacement for treating foot ulcers in people with diabetes. In April 2015 we searched: The Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid EMBASE and EBSCO CINAHL. We also searched clinical trial registries to identify ongoing studies. We did not apply restrictions to language, date of publication or study setting. Randomised clinical trials (RCTs) of skin grafts or tissue replacements for treating foot ulcers in people with diabetes. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the quality of the included studies. We included seventeen studies with a total of 1655 randomised participants in this review. Risk of bias was variable among studies. Blinding of participants, personnel and outcome assessment was not possible in most trials because of obvious differences between the treatments. The lack of a blinded outcome assessor may have caused detection bias when ulcer healing was assessed. However, possible detection bias is hard to prevent due to the nature of the skin replacement products we assessed, and the fact that they are easily recognisable. Strikingly, nearly all studies (15/17) reported industry involvement; at least one of the authors was connected to a commercial organisation or the study was funded by a commercial organisation. In addition, the funnel plot for

  10. Self-treating hypoglycaemia: a longitudinal qualitative investigation of the experiences and views of people with Type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, J; Rankin, D; Cooke, D D; Elliott, J; Amiel, S; Heller, S

    2013-02-01

      Despite improvements in insulin therapy, hypoglycaemia remains an inevitable part of life for many people with Type 1 diabetes. Little attention has been paid to how individuals self-treat hypoglycaemia and their likes and dislikes of clinically recommended treatments. We explored participants' experiences of self-treating hypoglycaemia after attending a structured education programme for people with Type 1 diabetes. Our aims were: to identify treatments that are acceptable to people with Type 1 diabetes; and to provide recommendations for promoting self-treatment in line with clinical guidelines.   Thirty adults with Type 1 diabetes were recruited from the Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating (DAFNE) programme in the UK. Study participants were interviewed post-course and 6 and 12 months later, enabling their experiences to be explored over time.   Study participants described a poor knowledge of how to self-treat hypoglycaemia correctly pre-course. Post-course, individuals often struggled to adhere to clinically recommended guidelines because of: panic, disorientation, hunger sensations and consequent difficulties ingesting fixed quantities of fast-acting carbohydrate; use of sweets to manage hypoglycaemia; reversion to habituated practices when cognitive impairment as a result of hypoglycaemia supervened; difficulties ingesting dextrose tablets; and other people's anxieties about under-treatment.   Historical experiences of hypoglycaemia and habituated practices can influence present self-treatment approaches. Professionals need to be aware of the range of difficulties individuals may experience restricting themselves to fixed quantities of fast-acting carbohydrate to manage hypoglycaemia. There may be merit in developing a more acceptable range of treatments tailored to people's own preferences, circumstances and needs. © 2012 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2012 Diabetes UK.

  11. Photocoagulation treatment for clinically significant radiation macular oedema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinyoun, J.L.; Zamber, R.W.; Lawrence, B.S.; Barlow, W.E.; Arnold, A.M. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Macular oedema is a leading cause of vision loss in patients with radiation retinopathy. In an effort to find an effective treatment for this vision threatening complication, 12 eyes (eight patients) were treated with photocoagulation for clinically significant radiation macular oedema (CSRMO) defined as central macular thickening, exudates threatening the macular centre, or one disc area of thickening in the macula. Median visual acuity improved from 20/100 pre-operatively to 20/90 at the initial post-operative examination (mean follow up 5 months) and to 20/75 at the final post-operative examination (mean follow up 39 months). At the final post-operative examination, visual acuity had improved in eight (67%) eyes and six (50%) eyes had complete resolution of the CSRMO; two (17%) other eyes had improved anatomically in that fewer CSRMO criteria were present. These results suggest that macular photocoagulation is effective in decreasing macular oedema and improving vision in eyes with CSRMO. (author).

  12. Photocoagulation treatment for clinically significant radiation macular oedema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinyoun, J.L.; Zamber, R.W.; Lawrence, B.S.; Barlow, W.E.; Arnold, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    Macular oedema is a leading cause of vision loss in patients with radiation retinopathy. In an effort to find an effective treatment for this vision threatening complication, 12 eyes (eight patients) were treated with photocoagulation for clinically significant radiation macular oedema (CSRMO) defined as central macular thickening, exudates threatening the macular centre, or one disc area of thickening in the macula. Median visual acuity improved from 20/100 pre-operatively to 20/90 at the initial post-operative examination (mean follow up 5 months) and to 20/75 at the final post-operative examination (mean follow up 39 months). At the final post-operative examination, visual acuity had improved in eight (67%) eyes and six (50%) eyes had complete resolution of the CSRMO; two (17%) other eyes had improved anatomically in that fewer CSRMO criteria were present. These results suggest that macular photocoagulation is effective in decreasing macular oedema and improving vision in eyes with CSRMO. (author)

  13. Treating Diet-Induced Diabetes and Obesity with Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Pancreatic Progenitor Cells and Antidiabetic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E. Bruin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cell (hESC-derived pancreatic progenitor cells effectively reverse hyperglycemia in rodent models of type 1 diabetes, but their capacity to treat type 2 diabetes has not been reported. An immunodeficient model of type 2 diabetes was generated by high-fat diet (HFD feeding in SCID-beige mice. Exposure to HFDs did not impact the maturation of macroencapsulated pancreatic progenitor cells into glucose-responsive insulin-secreting cells following transplantation, and the cell therapy improved glucose tolerance in HFD-fed transplant recipients after 24 weeks. However, since diet-induced hyperglycemia and obesity were not fully ameliorated by transplantation alone, a second cohort of HFD-fed mice was treated with pancreatic progenitor cells combined with one of three antidiabetic drugs. All combination therapies rapidly improved body weight and co-treatment with either sitagliptin or metformin improved hyperglycemia after only 12 weeks. Therefore, a stem cell-based therapy may be effective for treating type 2 diabetes, particularly in combination with antidiabetic drugs.

  14. Increased Micronuclei Frequency in Oral and Lingual Epithelium of Treated Diabetes Mellitus Patients

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    Jesús Emilo Quintero Ojeda

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a metabolic disease characterized by persistent high levels of glucose in plasma. Chronic hyperglycemia is thought to increase oxidative stress and the formation of free radicals that in turn damage cells. Thus, we decided to determine the frequency of nuclear abnormalities in epithelial cells from cheek and tongue mucosa of DM patients with type 1 (DM1, treated only with insulin and type 2 (DM2, treated with metformin using the buccal micronucleus cytome (BMCyt assay. Micronuclei frequency in cheek epithelial cells was higher in both DM1 (0.75 ± 0.31, P<0.001 and DM2 (0.52 ± 0.27, P<0.001 patients, as compared to healthy controls (0.07  ±  0.06. Similarly, micronuclei frequency in tongue epithelium was increased in DM1 (0.81  ±  0.22, P<0.001 and DM2 (0.41  ±  0.21, P<0.001 groups, in comparison to controls (0.06  ±  0.05. Besides, we found a positive correlation between micronuclei frequency and the onset time of DM2 in both cheek (ρ = 0.69, P<0.001 and tongue epithelial cells (ρ = 0.71, P<0.001, but not with onset time of DM1 or age of the patients. Considering all this, we pose that BMCyt could serve as a fast and easily accessible test to assess genotoxic damage during dental visits of DM patients, helping to monitor their disease.

  15. Risk factors of age-related macular degeneration in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia Nano

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSES: To assess the risk factors of age-related macular degeneration in Argentina using a case-control study. METHODS: Surveys were used for subjects' antioxidant intake, age/gender, race, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes (and type of treatment, smoking, sunlight exposure, red meat consumption, fish consumption, presence of age-related macular degeneration and family history of age-related macular degeneration. Main effects models for logistic regression and ordinal logistic regression were used to analyze the results. RESULTS: There were 175 cases and 175 controls with a mean age of 75.4 years and 75.5 years, respectively, of whom 236 (67.4% were female. Of the cases with age-related macular degeneration, 159 (45.4% had age-related macular degeneration in their left eyes, 154 (44.0% in their right eyes, and 138 (39.4% in both eyes. Of the cases with age-related macular degeneration in their left eyes, 47.8% had the dry type, 40.3% had the wet type, and the type was unknown for 11.9%. The comparable figures for right eyes were: 51.9%, 34.4%, and 13.7%, respectively. The main effects model was dominated by higher sunlight exposure (OR [odds ratio]: 3.3 and a family history of age-related macular degeneration (OR: 4.3. Other factors included hypertension (OR: 2.1, smoking (OR: 2.2, and being of the Mestizo race, which lowered the risk of age-related macular degeneration (OR: 0.40. Red meat/fish consumption, body mass index, and iris color did not have an effect. Higher age was associated with progression to more severe age-related macular degeneration. CONCLUSION: Sunlight exposure, family history of age-related macular degeneration, and an older age were the significant risk factors. There may be other variables, as the risk was not explained very well by the existing factors. A larger sample may produce different and better results.

  16. Visceral adipose tissue macrophage-targeted TACE silencing to treat obesity-induced type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Seok-Beom; Song, Yoonsung; Kim, Yong-Hee

    2017-12-01

    Obesity is an increasingly prevalent global health problem. Due to its close relations with metabolic diseases and cancer, new therapeutic approaches for treating obesity and obesity-induced metabolic diseases are required. Visceral white adipose tissue (WAT) has been closely associated with obesity-induced inflammation and adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) are responsible for obesity-induced inflammation by releasing inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6. TNF-α converting enzyme (TACE) is a transmembrane enzyme that induces the enzymatic cleavage and release of inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we developed a nonviral gene delivery system consisting of an oligopeptide (ATS-9R) that can selectively target visceral ATMs. In here we shows visceral adipose tissue-dominant inflammatory gene over-expressions in obese mouse and our strategy enabled the preferential delivery of therapeutic genes to visceral ATMs and successfully achieved ATM-targeted gene silencing. Finally, ATS-9R-mediated TACE gene silencing in visceral ATMs alleviated visceral fat inflammation and improved type 2 diabetes by reducing whole body inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A case of lean polycystic ovary syndrome with early stage of type 1 diabetes successfully treated with metformin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigiyama, Fumika; Kumashiro, Naoki; Rikitake, Takayuki; Usui, Shuki; Saegusa, Michiko; Kitamura, Mamoru; Uchino, Hiroshi; Hirose, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is common in obese women with insulin resistant type 2 diabetes for which metformin treatment is getting established in addition to clomiphene. However, lean PCOS patients are sometimes accompanied with type 1 diabetes. It remains unclear whether these patients are insulin resistant and whether metformin is effective for them. A 32-year-old woman, who suffered from acne, hirsutism, and menstrual disorders since age 29, was diagnosed as PCOS by serum high LH levels and polycystic ovary on echography. Interestingly, her body mass index (BMI) had consistently been 21.0 kg/m2 since age 20. She was first treated with clomiphene for one year for infertility but it did not improve her menstrual cycle nor did she get pregnant during that period. She was then assessed with diabetes mellitus and subsequently diagnosed as type 1 diabetes with mild hyperglycemia (HbA1c 6.0%). Since her insulin secretion was still well preserved, to assess insulin sensitivity, hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp test was performed and showed her to be insulin resistant. Low dose insulin and low dose metformin treatment was started without clomiphene. After her ovulation and menstrual cycle were ameliorated only one month later, her treatment was supplemented with clomiphene for the next three months enabling her to at last become pregnant. This report highlights the efficacy of metformin in lean PCOS with type 1 diabetes. Insulin therapy is essential for type 1 diabetes but hyperinsulinemia potentially exacerbates PCOS through hyperandrogenism. Metformin is therefore recommended for treatment of lean PCOS with type 1 diabetes as well as common obese PCOS with type 2 diabetes.

  18. The Histological, Histomorphometrical and Histochemical Changes of Testicular Tissue in the Metformin Treated and Untreated Streptozotocin-Induced Adult Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davoud Kianifard

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, diabetes was induced in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats by single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ at 45 mg kg-1 of body weight. A group comprised of 8 diabetic rats was treated with metformin at 100 mg kg-1 of body weight for reducing the elevated blood glucose level. The results revealed that, in the untreated diabetic rats, the body and testicular weight reduced in comparison with the control rats (P < 0.05 , the metformin treated diabetic rats showed body weight loss in comparison with the control group (P < 0.05. In the untreated diabetic rats, the blood glucose level significantly increased in comparison with control and metformin treated diabetic rats. Histomorphological examinations revealed a reduction in testicular capsule diameter, seminiferous tubules (STs and germinal epithelium height, increase of amorphous material of interstitial tissue, germ cell depletion, decrease in cellular population and activity and disruption of spermatogenesis in the untreated diabetic rats in comparison with control group. In metformin treated diabetic rats, the histomorphological alterations were seen in lesser part in comparison with untreated diabetic group. The results from this study proved that, there was a direct relationship between increased levels of blood glucose as a result of STZ-induced diabetes and the histomorphological changes of testicular tissue.

  19. Amylase, Lipase, and Acute Pancreatitis in People With Type 2 Diabetes Treated With Liraglutide: Results From the LEADER Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, William M; Buse, John B; Ghorbani, Marie Louise Muus; Ørsted, David D; Nauck, Michael A

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate serum amylase and lipase levels and the rate of acute pancreatitis in patients with type 2 diabetes and high cardiovascular risk randomized to liraglutide or placebo and observed for 3.5-5.0 years. A total of 9,340 patients with type 2 diabetes were randomized to either liraglutide or placebo (median observation time 3.84 years). Fasting serum lipase and amylase were monitored. Acute pancreatitis was adjudicated in a blinded manner. Compared with the placebo group, liraglutide-treated patients had increases in serum lipase and amylase of 28.0% and 7.0%, respectively. Levels were increased at 6 months and then remained stable. During the study, 18 (0.4% [1.1 events/1,000 patient-years of observation] [PYO]) liraglutide-treated and 23 (0.5% [1.7 events/1,000 PYO]) placebo patients had acute pancreatitis confirmed by adjudication. Most acute pancreatitis cases occurred ≥12 months after randomization. Liraglutide-treated patients with prior history of pancreatitis ( n = 147) were not more likely to develop acute pancreatitis than similar patients in the placebo group ( n = 120). Elevations of amylase and lipase levels did not predict future risk of acute pancreatitis (positive predictive value pancreatitis among liraglutide-treated patients (regardless of previous history of pancreatitis) compared with the placebo group. Liraglutide was associated with increases in serum lipase and amylase, which were not predictive of an event of subsequent acute pancreatitis. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  20. A diet based on high-heat-treated foods promotes risk factors for diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birlouez-Aragon, Inès; Saavedra, Giselle; Tessier, Frédéric J; Galinier, Anne; Ait-Ameur, Lamia; Lacoste, Florence; Niamba, Claude-Narcisse; Alt, Nadja; Somoza, Veronika; Lecerf, Jean-Michel

    2010-05-01

    The modern Western lifestyle is characterized by the consumption of high-heat-treated foods because of their characteristic taste and flavor. However, it has been shown that treating food at high temperatures can generate potentially harmful compounds that promote inflammation and cardiovascular disease in subjects with diabetes. The aim of this study was to determine whether high-heat-treated foods also pose a risk for healthy subjects. A randomized, crossover, diet-controlled intervention trial with 62 volunteers was designed to compare the potential metabolic effects of 2 diets, one that was based on mild steam cooking and another that was based on high-temperature cooking. These 2 diets differed mainly in their contents of Maillard reaction products (MRPs). MRPs were assessed in the diet and in subjects' feces, blood, and urine samples, with N(epsilon)-carboxymethyllysine as an indicator of MRPs. Biological indicators of glucose and lipid metabolism as well as oxidative stress were analyzed in subjects after 1 mo on each diet. In comparison with the steamed diet, 1 mo of consuming the high-heat-treated diet induced significantly lower insulin sensitivity and plasma concentrations of long-chain n-3 (omega-3) fatty acids and vitamins C and E [-17% (P markers associated with an enhanced risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases in healthy people. Replacing high-heat-treatment techniques by mild cooking techniques may help to positively modulate biomarkers associated with an increased risk of diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases.

  1. Gastric emptying and timing of insulin injection in insulin-treated diabetics Using99m Te-sulfur colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheta, M.; El-Borrolossy, H.; El-Tawil, A.

    1997-01-01

    Gastric emptying of 99m Tc labelled liquid and solid meals were studied in 112 long-standing insulin insulin treated diabetics to evaluate the relationship of gastroparesis to patients age, sex, gastrointestinal symptoms, diabetic neuropathic complication and glycemic control, and to evaluate the influence of gastric emptying and timing of insulin injection as modifying factors for blood glucose control aiming at objective optimization of timing of insulin injection for every individual patient using the proposed equation: time of insulin injection=onset of insulin action -solid lag time. Patients were classified into three group: A) no neuropathy; B) peripheral neuropathy; and C) peripheral and autonomic neuropathy and compared to healthy volunteers as controls. Diabetics showed statistically significant prolonged gastric lag time and T1/2 for both liquid and solid meals compared to those of controls

  2. Research progresses in treating diabetic foot with autologous stem cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Hanlin; Gao Bin

    2010-01-01

    Because the distal arteries of lower extremities become narrowed or even occluded in diabetic foot, the clinical therapeutic results for diabetic foot have been unsatisfactory so far. Autologous stem cell transplantation that has emerged in recent years is a new, safe and effective therapy for diabetic foot, which achieves its excellent clinical success in restoring the blood supply of ischemic limb by way of therapeutic angiogenesis. Now autologous stem cell transplantation has become one of the hot points in medical research both at home and abroad, moreover, it has brought a new hope of cure to the patients with diabetic foot. (authors)

  3. Prevalence of depressive symptoms among non insulin treated Greek type 2 diabetic subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gikas Aristofanis

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression is common among diabetic subjects. We conducted the present study to estimate the prevalence of depression in subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2D in Greece. Methods The study sample consisted of 320 T2D subjects without overt macrovascular disease attending the diabetes outpatient clinic of our hospital, from June 2007 to December 2007. Depressive symptoms were measured using the 21-item Beck Depression Inventory, modified for use in diabetic subjects. Results Of the study subjects 107 (33.4% reported elevated depressive symptoms. More women than men with diabetes reported symptoms of depression (48.4% vs. 12.7%, P 1c (P = 0.04, and duration of diabetes (P = 0.004. In the male study group, univariate linear regression analysis showed no significant relationships between depressive symptoms and the testing variables. Conclusion The prevalence of depression in Greek T2D subjects is high. Diabetic female subjects showed increased levels of depressive symptoms compared with male subjects. Independent risk factors of depressive symptoms in diabetic female subjects were diabetes duration and glycemic control.

  4. Resistant starch but not enzymatic treated waxy maize delays development of diabetes in Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedemann, Mette Skou; Hermansen, Kjeld; Pedersen, Sven

    2017-01-01

    excretion during week 8 in rats fed the GLU and EMS diets than that of rats fed S and RS showed that they were diabetic. Urinary nontargeted metabolomics revealed that the diabetic state of rats fed S, GLU, and EMS diets influenced microbial metabolism, as well as amino acid, lipid, and vitamin metabolism......Background: The incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasing worldwide, and nutritional management of circulating glucose may be a strategic tool in the prevention of T2D. Objective: We studied whether enzymatically modified waxy maize with an increased degree of branching delayed the onset...... glucose concentrations in feed-deprived rats, none of the groups developed diabetes. However, in week 9, plasma glucose after feed deprivation was significantly lower in rats fed the S and RS diets (13.5 mmol/L) than in rats fed the GLU and EMS diets (17.0–18.9 mmol/L), and rats fed RS had lower HbA1c (4...

  5. Changes in the pharmacokinetics of digoxin in polyuria in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice and lithium carbonate-treated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikarashi, Nobutomo; Kagami, Mai; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Ishii, Makoto; Toda, Takahiro; Ochiai, Wataru; Sugiyama, Kiyoshi

    2011-06-01

    In humans, digoxin is mainly eliminated through the kidneys unchanged, and renal clearance represents approximately 70% of the total clearance. In this study, we used the mouse models to examine digoxin pharmacokinetics in polyuria induced by diabetes mellitus and lithium carbonate (Li(2)CO(3)) administration, including mechanistic evaluation of the contribution of glomerular filtration, tubular secretion, and tubular reabsorption. After digoxin administration to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice, digoxin CL/F increased to approximately 2.2 times that in normal mice. After treatment with Li(2)CO(3) (0.2%) for 10 days, the CL/F increased approximately 1.1 times for normal mice and 1.6 times for STZ mice. Creatinine clearance (CLcr) and the renal mRNA expression levels of mdr1a did not differ significantly between the normal, STZ, and Li(2)CO(3)-treated mice. The urine volume of STZ mice was approximately 26 mL/day, 22 times that of normal mice. The urine volume of Li(2)CO(3)-treated mice increased approximately 7.3 times for normal mice and 2.3 times for STZ mice. These results suggest that the therapeutic effect of digoxin may be significantly reduced in the presence of polyuria either induced by diabetes mellitus or manifested as an adverse effect of Li(2)CO(3) in diabetic patients, along with increased urine volume.

  6. Improving self-management in insulin-treated adults participating in diabetes education. The role of overprotection by the partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedoorn, M; Keers, J C; Links, T P; Bouma, J; Ter Maaten, J C; Sanderman, R

    2006-03-01

    To examine the role of overprotection by the partner--i.e. excessive protection, unnecessary help, excessive praise for accomplishments, or attempts to restrict activities as a consequence of underestimating the patient's capabilities--in changes in patient self-management in the context of diabetes education. Sixty-seven insulin-treated patients with a partner completed questionnaires on admission to a Multidisciplinary Intensive Education Programme (MIEP) and 3 months after completing the core module of MIEP. Factors assessed were overprotection by their partner and three aspects of diabetes self-management, namely internal locus of control, diabetes-related distress and HbA1c. Regression analyses were used to test the independent associations of patient sex, baseline overprotection and the interaction between sex and overprotection with diabetes self-management at the follow-up stage, controlling for the baseline value of the dependent variable. The increase in internal locus of control and decrease in HbA1c were both significantly less for female patients who perceived their partner to be rather overprotective than for female patients who did not perceive their partner to be overprotective. The more patients, both male and female, perceived their partner to be overprotective, the less their diabetes-related distress decreased. Overprotection by the partner showed a negative association with improvement in diabetes self-management, especially for female patients. Thus, an intervention programme with the aim of reducing overprotection by the partner, or the perception of this, may enhance self-management in patients participating in diabetes education.

  7. Modelling the Effect of Exercise on Insulin Pharmacokinetics in "Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion" Treated Type 1 Diabetes Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Juhl, Rune; Schmidt, Signe

    Introduction: The artificial pancreas is believed to ease the burden of constant management of type 1 diabetes for the patients substantially. An important aspect of the artificial pancreas development is the mathematical models used for control, prediction or simulation. A major challenge...... infusion (CSII) treated patients by modelling the absorption rate as a function of exercise. Methods: Three models are estimated from 17 data sequences. All of them are based on a linear three-compartment base model. The models are based on stochastic differential equations to allow noise to enter...... of the measurement variance. Conclusion: A model to predict the insulin appearance in plasma during exercise in CSII treated patients is identified. Further clinical studies are needed to confirm the increase in insulin plasma concentration during exercise in type 1 diabetes patients. These studies should include...

  8. Dietary supplementation with myo-inositol in women during pregnancy for treating gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Julie; Crawford, Tineke J; Alsweiler, Jane; Crowther, Caroline A

    2016-09-07

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is any degree of glucose intolerance that first presents and is recognised during pregnancy and usually resolves after the birth of the baby. GDM is associated with increased short- and long-term morbidity for the mother and her baby. Treatment usually includes lifestyle modification and/or pharmacological therapy (oral antidiabetic agents or insulin) with the aim to maintain treatment targets for blood glucose concentrations. Finding novel treatment agents which are effective, acceptable and safe for the mother and her baby are important. One such emerging potential intervention is myo-inositol which is an isomer of inositol and occurs endogenously and is found in natural dietary sources such as fruits, vegetables, nuts and cereals. To assess if dietary supplementation with myo-inositol during pregnancy is safe and effective, for the mother and fetus, in treating gestational diabetes. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 April 2016), ClinicalTrials.gov, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (7 April 2016), and reference lists of retrieved studies. All published and unpublished randomised controlled trials or cluster-randomised controlled trials reporting on the use of myo-inositol compared with placebo, no treatment or another intervention for the treatment of women with gestational diabetes. Quasi-randomised and cross-over studies are not eligible for inclusion. Women with pre-existing diabetes were excluded. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. For key outcomes (where data were available), we assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We included two studies (142 women and infants), both were conducted in women in Italy and compared myo-inositol with a placebo control.None of the maternal primary outcomes pre-specified for this review were reported in

  9. In-hospital costs of diabetic foot disease treated by a multidisciplinary foot team

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinkel, Willem D.; Luiten, Jacky; van Dongen, Jelle; Kuppens, Bram; Van Neck, Johan W.; Polinder, Suzanne; Castro Cabezas, Manuel; Coert, J. Henk

    2017-01-01

    Background The diabetic foot imposes significant burden on healthcare systems. Obtaining knowledge on the extent of the costs of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) is of value to health care researchers investigating cost-effectiveness of interventions that prevent these costly complications. Objectives To

  10. Skin grafting and tissue replacement for treating foot ulcers in people with diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santema, Trientje B.; Poyck, Paul P. C.; Ubbink, Dirk T.

    2016-01-01

    Foot ulceration is a major problem in people with diabetes and is the leading cause of hospitalisation and limb amputations. Skin grafts and tissue replacements can be used to reconstruct skin defects for people with diabetic foot ulcers in addition to providing them with standard care. Skin

  11. Preventing and Treating Type 2 Diabetes through a Physically Active Lifestyle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Raymond W.; Kamla, Jim; Lee, Man-Cheong; Mak, Jennifer Y.

    2007-01-01

    The general decrease in physical activity in the United States population has led to an increase of cases of type 2 diabetes (non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, NIDDM), obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and arteriosclerosis. Remarkable scientific advancements have been made toward understanding the beneficial effects of physical activity…

  12. Beta Cell Mass Restoration in Alloxan-Diabetic Mice Treated with EGF and Gastrin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imane Song

    Full Text Available One week of treatment with EGF and gastrin (EGF/G was shown to restore normoglycemia and to induce islet regeneration in mice treated with the diabetogenic agent alloxan. The mechanisms underlying this regeneration are not fully understood. We performed genetic lineage tracing experiments to evaluate the contribution of beta cell neogenesis in this model. One day after alloxan administration, mice received EGF/G treatment for one week. The treatment could not prevent the initial alloxan-induced beta cell mass destruction, however it did reverse glycemia to control levels within one day, suggesting improved peripheral glucose uptake. In vitro experiments with C2C12 cell line showed that EGF could stimulate glucose uptake with an efficacy comparable to that of insulin. Subsequently, EGF/G treatment stimulated a 3-fold increase in beta cell mass, which was partially driven by neogenesis and beta cell proliferation as assessed by beta cell lineage tracing and BrdU-labeling experiments, respectively. Acinar cell lineage tracing failed to show an important contribution of acinar cells to the newly formed beta cells. No appearance of transitional cells co-expressing insulin and glucagon, a hallmark for alpha-to-beta cell conversion, was found, suggesting that alpha cells did not significantly contribute to the regeneration. An important fraction of the beta cells significantly lost insulin positivity after alloxan administration, which was restored to normal after one week of EGF/G treatment. Alloxan-only mice showed more pronounced beta cell neogenesis and proliferation, even though beta cell mass remained significantly depleted, suggesting ongoing beta cell death in that group. After one week, macrophage infiltration was significantly reduced in EGF/G-treated group compared to the alloxan-only group. Our results suggest that EGF/G-induced beta cell regeneration in alloxan-diabetic mice is driven by beta cell neogenesis, proliferation and recovery of

  13. Weight and Diabetes (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teens Diabetes Center Can Diabetes Be Prevented? Your Child's Diabetes Health Care Team Type 1 Diabetes: What Is ... Mass Index (BMI) Charts Eating Out When Your Child Has Diabetes Meal Plans and Diabetes Treating Type 2 Diabetes ...

  14. Adapting to the therapeutic recommendations of patients treated of type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Alicja Świątoniowska

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction.  Year after year, more and more people are suffering from diabetes, the number  of people with diabetes in 2012 confirms its fourfold increase over the last 35 years. It is estimated that in 2035, diabetes will be diagnosed in every third person. Currently the treatment of type 2 diabetes is based on glycemic control and avoidance  of complications. These goals can be achieved through lifestyle changes, the use  of hypoglycaemic drugs, and insulin injections. Achieving correct glycemic control is only possible if patients follow therapeutic recommendations. Data in the literature indicate that only 50% of patients follow established therapeutic regimens. Aim. The aim of the study is the presentation of previous state of knowledge on the adherence in type 2 diabetes. Brief description of state of knowledge. At present, there are few studies available assessing the level of adherence to the recommendations by patients with diabetes and adherence factors. Available publications indicate conflicting results regarding the influence of age, sex and duration  of the disease on the level of compliance. Conclusions. It is necessary to conduct further analysis of the causes of non-compliance, to select non-adherence-prone patients, and to implement methods to improve adherence to treatment recommendations in case of diabetes.

  15. Cataract surgery in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Theil, Pernille Koefoed; Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the outcome after cataract surgery in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) treated with intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injections in routine clinical practice. Methods We extracted information about patients recorded...

  16. Can diabetes be treated as an indirectly work-related disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Marcinkiewicz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article the authors attempted to analyze the arguments for considering diabetes as a work-related disease. An overview of literature has been done out of articles published in the years 1980–2016, with the use of combination of key words referring to employment, workplace, and diabetes. The PubMed database was the source of data. The authors indicate that the following arguments are in favor of diabetes being recognized as a work-related disease: diabetes is not an occupational disease, it is not directly related to the work environment or the way the work is performed, but there are observed adverse effects of occupational work-related nuisances, such as night shift work, long work hours, job strain or workplace standing time, which influence its development and course. The number of publications on diabetes, including the problem of occupational work is comparable to the number of analogous publications concerning work-related diseases such as hypertension or ischemic heart disease. Moreover, some aspects of professional activity and diabetes were also included in clinical recommendations for the workplace, which is uncommon in the case of other diseases, even those generally recognized as work-related. Data from medical references, indicating the effectiveness of workplace interventions aimed at preventing diabetes development and/or worsening of its course should be considered as an argument for the inclusion of diabetes into the group of work-related diseases. This should also support the need for further research and practical actions aimed at preventing diabetes at the workplace. Med Pr 2017;68(5:667–675

  17. Achondroplasia and Macular Coloboma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahoor, M H; Amizadeh, Y; Sorkhabi, R

    2015-01-01

    Achondroplasia is an autosomal dominant congenital disorder of enchondral ossification. It is clinically characterized by low stature, craniofacial deformity, and vertebral malformation. Associated ophthalmic features include telecanthus, exotropia, angle anomalies, and cone-rod dystrophy. A 24-year-old male presented with decreased vision bilaterally and typical achondroplasia. The best corrected visual acuity was 20/70 in both eyes. Anterior segment examination was normal. Fundus examination revealed a well-demarcated circular paramacular lesion in both eyes. As macular coloboma and achondroplasia are developmental disorders, the funduscopic examination is required in patients with achondroplasia.

  18. Disease severity is associated with the use of complementary medicine to treat or manage type-2 diabetes: data from the 2002 and 2007 National Health Interview Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahin Richard L

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The overall prevalence of complementary medicine (CM use among adults in the United States with diabetes has been examined both in representative national samples and in more restricted populations. However, none of these earlier studies attempted to identify predictors of CM use to treat diabetes among the populations sampled, nor looked for a relationship between CM use and diabetes severity. Methods Combining data from the 2002 and 2007 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS, we constructed a nationally representative sample of 3,978 U.S. adults aged ≥18 years with self-reported diabetes. Both the 2002 and 2007 NHIS contained extensive questions on the use of CM. We used logistic regression to examine the association between diabetes severity and overall CM use, as well as the use of specific categories of CM. Results In adults with type-2 diabetes, 30.9% used CM for any reason, but only 3.4% used CM to treat or manage their type-2 diabetes versus 7.1% of those with type-1 diabetes. Among those using CM to treat/manage their type-2 diabetes, 77% used both CM and conventional prescription medicine for their diabetes. The most prevalent types of CM therapies used were diet-based interventions (35.19%, S.E. 5.11 and non-vitamin/non-mineral dietary supplements (33.74%, S.E. 5.07. After controlling for sociodemographic factors, we found that, based on a count of measures of diabetes severity, persons with the most severe diabetes had nearly twice the odds of using CM as those with less severe disease (OR=1.9, 95%CI 1.2-3.01. Persons who had diabetes 10 years or more (OR=1.66, 95%CI 1.04-3.66 and those that had a functional limitation resulting from their diabetes (OR=1.74, 95%CI 1.09-2.8 had greater odds of using CM than those not reporting these measures. No significant associations were observed between overall CM use and other individual measures of diabetes severity: use of diabetic medications, weak or failing kidneys

  19. FT-Raman spectroscopic study of skin wound healing in diabetic rats treated with Cenostigma macrophyllum Tul

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, Nayana Pinheiro Machado de Freitas; Martins, Marcelino, E-mail: nayanamachado@oi.com.br [Faculdade Diferencial Integral (FACID), Teresina, PI (Brazil); Costa, Charlytton Luis Sena da; Maia Filho, Antonio Luis [Universidade Estadual do Piaui (UESPI), Teresina, PI (Brazil); Raniero, Leandro; Martin, Airton Abrahao; Arisawa, Emilia Angela Loschiavo [Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: patients with diabetes mellitus exhibit a delay in the lesion repair process. The active components of Cenostigma macrophyllum may represent a viable alternative to facilitate the recovery of these lesions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of emulsion oil-water Cenostigma macrophyllum in the repair process of lesions in rats with induced diabetes. Methods: 63 male rats (Wistar, 200-250 g body weight, 30-40 days old) were distributed into the following groups: control (C), diabetic (D) and diabetic treated with Cenostigma macrophyllum (P), subdivided based on the experimental times, days 7, 14 and 28, with 21 animals per main group. Diabetes mellitus (DM) was induced by administration of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg via penile vein and 12-h fasting) and confirmed at day 21 (glycemic index > 240 mg/dL). In the animals of group P, 0.5 ml of the oil-water emulsion obtained from the plant seed was used. The samples were removed and hemisectioned, and one portion was used for the quantitative histological analysis of collagen using Masson's trichrome staining, while another portion was analyzed by FT-Raman spectroscopy. Results: A higher percentage area of the volume of collagen fibers was observed for the experimental time Day 14 in group P compared with group D (p < 0.001). Regarding the ratio of areas of the amides I (1700-1600 cm{sup -1}) and III (1245-1345 cm{sup -1}), the groups D and P show the opposite behavior. Conclusion: Cenostigma macrophyllum accelerated the repair process in skin of diabetic ratsfor14 days. (author)

  20. Engineering a Clinically Translatable Bioartificial Pancreas to Treat Type I Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orive, Gorka; Emerich, Dwaine; Khademhosseini, Ali; Matsumoto, Shinichi; Hernandez, R. M.; Pedraz, J. L.; Desai, Tejal; Calafiore, Riccardo; de Vos, Paul

    Encapsulating, or immunoisolating, insulin-secreting cells within implantable, semipermeable membranes is an emerging treatment for type 1 diabetes. This approach can eliminate the need for immunosuppressive drug treatments to prevent transplant rejection and overcome the shortage of donor tissues

  1. The prevalence and pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus in treated HIV-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Il Joon; Kotler, Donald P

    2011-06-01

    HIV-associated morbidity and mortality have declined significantly since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). These developments have allowed an increased focus on associated adverse metabolic effects, such as dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and insulin resistance, which are risk factors for cardiovascular disease and other adverse outcomes. The pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the metabolic changes are complicated and not yet fully elucidated due to the difficulty of separating the effects of HIV infection from those of HAART, co-morbidities, or individual patient vulnerabilities. This article reviews studies concerning the prevalence and incidence of diabetes mellitus and HIV, HIV-specific effects on diabetes mellitus complications, and HIV-specific diabetes mellitus treatment considerations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Application of Herbal Medicines with Bitter Flavor and Cold Property on Treating Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongdong Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus has been a global pandemic. Traditional Chinese Medicine has been used on diabetes mellitus for thousands of years and the modern Chinese medicine studies have found a curative effect of herbal medicine with bitter flavor and cold property on diabetes. This review will introduce the theory summary of flavor and property in TCM, argument basis, the evidences from clinical trails and animal experiments, the possible antidiabetic mechanisms, and advantages on lowering glucose of herbal medicines with bitter flavor and cold property and take rhizome, Chinese rhubarb, and Momordica charantia, the three herbal medicines with bitter flavor and cold property, as examples to illustrate the exact antidiabetic effect. It is hoped that this review can provide some ideas and inspiration for the treatment of diabetes with herbal medicine.

  3. The incidence of hypoglycaemia in children with type 1 diabetes and treated asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, N.P.; Wales, J.K.H.

    2003-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate whether treatment of coexisting asthma has any effect on the incidence of hypoglycaemia and on glycaemic control in children with type 1 diabetes. \\ud \\ud METHODS: An observational study of children attending the paediatric diabetes clinics of five hospitals in the North Trent Region. Information on the frequency of hypoglycaemia in the preceding three months, treatment for asthma, and the individual’s latest HbA1c, was recorded when they attended for review. \\ud \\ud RESU...

  4. Percutaneous flexor tenotomy for preventing and treating toe ulcers in people with diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Anne; Bjerre-Christensen, Ulla; Almdal, Thomas Peter

    2013-01-01

    The purpose was to examine the effectiveness of flexor tenotomy in a modified technique to prevent and heal neuropathic and neuroischaemic pressure ulcers on the tip of the toe in claw- or hammer-toe deformities in people with diabetes.......The purpose was to examine the effectiveness of flexor tenotomy in a modified technique to prevent and heal neuropathic and neuroischaemic pressure ulcers on the tip of the toe in claw- or hammer-toe deformities in people with diabetes....

  5. Lipid profile of alloxan-induced diabetic wistar rats treated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    weeks; Group 2, diabetes control rats, induced with 150 mg/kg b.w., i.p. administration of alloxan and thereafter given 0.2 ml distilled water throughout the study period; Groups 3, 4 and 5, diabetic (i.p., 150 mg/kg b.w. alloxan) rats were given single oral dose of MAD (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg b.w. respectively) for 4 weeks; ...

  6. The Role of Liuwei Dihuang Pills and Ginkgo Leaf Tablets in Treating Diabetic Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To observe the clinical prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy of Liuwei Dihuang Pills and Ginkgo Leaf Tablets for type 2 diabetic vascular complications. Methods. It was a randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled clinical trial. 140 outpatients with type 2 diabetes were recruited and randomly divided into the treatment group and control group. The two groups were given basic therapy (management of blood sugar, blood pressure, etc.. Additionally, the treatment group was given Liuwei Dihuang Pills and Ginkgo Leaf Tablets, while the control group was given Liuwei Dihuang Pills and Ginkgo Leaf Tablets placebos. All subjects were followed up for consecutive 36 months and observed monthly. The clinical data as urinary microalbumin to urinary creatinine ratio (Umalb/cr, carotid intima-media thickness (IMT, diabetic nephropathy (DN and diabetic retinopathy (DR prevalence, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events, blood glucose, and blood pressure were collected and analyzed statistically. Results. After 36-month treatment, the Umalb/cr level and DN and DR prevalence in treatment group were all significantly lower than control group (P0.05. Conclusions. Liuwei Dihuang Pills and Ginkgo Leaf Tablets are beneficial to diabetic microvascular complications, while the efficacy to diabetic macrovascular complications needs more observations.

  7. The Role of Liuwei Dihuang Pills and Ginkgo Leaf Tablets in Treating Diabetic Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Yu, Jiangyi; Liu, Jingshun; An, Xiaofei

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To observe the clinical prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy of Liuwei Dihuang Pills and Ginkgo Leaf Tablets for type 2 diabetic vascular complications. Methods. It was a randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled clinical trial. 140 outpatients with type 2 diabetes were recruited and randomly divided into the treatment group and control group. The two groups were given basic therapy (management of blood sugar, blood pressure, etc.). Additionally, the treatment group was given Liuwei Dihuang Pills and Ginkgo Leaf Tablets, while the control group was given Liuwei Dihuang Pills and Ginkgo Leaf Tablets placebos. All subjects were followed up for consecutive 36 months and observed monthly. The clinical data as urinary microalbumin to urinary creatinine ratio (Umalb/cr), carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), diabetic nephropathy (DN) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) prevalence, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events, blood glucose, and blood pressure were collected and analyzed statistically. Results. After 36-month treatment, the Umalb/cr level and DN and DR prevalence in treatment group were all significantly lower than control group ( P 0.05). Conclusions. Liuwei Dihuang Pills and Ginkgo Leaf Tablets are beneficial to diabetic microvascular complications, while the efficacy to diabetic macrovascular complications needs more observations.

  8. Intravitreal triamcinolone for the treatment of cystoid macular oedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Kraut

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Longstanding cystoid macular oedema (CME can result in loss of central vision, and there are only limited therapeutic possibilities. The aim of this article is to report clinical outcome of our patients with CME treated with intravitreal application of triamcinolone acetonide.Methods: Prospective clinical interventional non-comparative case study of patients, treated for CME in 2004 in Eye Clinic of Ljubljana. There were 15 patients (16 eyes in the 1–16 months follow-up study. Patients received an intravitreal injection of 4 mg (0,1 ml triamcinolone acetonide transconjunctivally with topical anesthesia. The visual and anatomic responses were observed as well as related potentional complications.Results: Causes of CME were: cataract surgery in 6 patients, branch retinal vein occlusion in 5 patients, uveitis in 2 patients, and diabetes and age related macular degeneration respectively in one patient. Age of patients was between 27 to 85 years, mean 69 years. Visual acuity before the treatment was from 0.017 to 0.6, mean 0.2. After the treatment visual acuity was from 0.017 to 1.0, mean 0.32. In patient series after cataract operation mean visual acuity before therapy was 0.12 and final 0.36, and in uveitis group 0.32 and final 0.42. In other CME forms there was insignificant visual improvement. In 2 patients (13% increased intraocular preasure was found and treatment with topical ocular hypertensive agents was sufficient. In one patient progressive cataract was established, and in one patient retinal fibrosis in the macula and around thrombotic vein was found.Conclusions: Intravitreal triamcinolone application is probably a good and safe therapeutic possibility for CME, the risk of serious adverse events considering good technique of injections is low. In our series of patients best results were found in patients after cataract surgery and uveitis. However, the observed series is too small to bring final conclusions.

  9. Prevalence of undiagnosed and inadequately treated type 2 diabetes mellitus, hyperension, and dyslipidemia in morbidly obese patients who present for bariatric surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Context: Pharmacotherapy is considered the primary treatment modality for metabolic diseases, such as diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension (HTN), and dyslipidemia (DYS). Objective: We hypothesize that these metabolic diseases become exceedingly difficult to treat with pharmacotherapy in morbidly ob...

  10. Insulin-like plant proteins as potential innovative drugs to treat diabetes-The Moringa oleifera case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, P C; Oliveira, J T A; Sousa, D O B; Alves, B G T; Carvalho, A F U; Franco, O L; Vasconcelos, I M

    2017-10-25

    Various plant species have long been used in traditional medicine worldwide to treat diabetes. Among the plant-based compounds with hypoglycemic properties, studies on insulin-like proteins isolated from leaves, fruits and seeds are rarely reported in the relevant literature. Our research group has been investigating the presence of insulin-like proteins in Moringa oleifera, a plant species native to India, and we have obtained a leaf protein isolate and semi-purified derived fractions, as well as a seed coat protein fraction (Mo-SC), with hypoglycemic activity in chemically induced diabetic mice that have increased tolerance to orally administered glucose. Equally importantly, Mo-SC possesses insulin-like antigenic epitopes. In this context, the present review aims to highlight that prospection of insulin-like proteins in plants is of the utmost importance both for finding new drugs for the treatment of diabetes and for shedding light on the mechanisms involved in diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Wonder of Life (kalanchoe pinnata) leaves to treat diabetic foot infections in Trinidad & Tobago: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawich, Shamir O; Harnarayan, Patrick; Budhooram, Steve; Bobb, Nahmorah J; Islam, Shariful; Naraynsingh, Vijay

    2014-10-01

    : Wonder of Life (kalanchoe pinnata) leaves are commonly used to treat diabetic foot infections. These patients are usually non-compliant with conventional medical therapy. We surmised that these patients would have a higher incidence of treatment failures. Patients admitted with diabetic foot infections were separated into two groups: a Study Group comprised patients who used topical kalanchoe pinnata and a Medical Therapy Group contained patients who were compliant with conventional treatment. The patients were observed over the course of their hospitalisation. There were 382 patients in the Medical Therapy Group and 96 in the Study Group, who waited 9.21 ± 5.3 days (Mean ± SD) before seeking medical attention. There were similar rates of all amputations (34.8% vs. 37.5%; P = 0.643) and mortality (0.8% vs. 1.0%; P = 1.000) in the Study and Medical Therapy groups. There may be value in the use of topical kalanchoe pinnata to treat diabetic foot infections. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  12. Uso de la metformina en la diabetes mellitus tipo II Use of metformin to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohana Salazar ÁLvarez

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Metformina es una biguanida eficaz en el control metabólico de la diabetes mellitus tipo II, no insulinodependiente cuando el control dietético falla. Dada su probada eficacia y actual accesibilidad en el mercado de medicamentos en Cuba, para ser utilizada a nivel primario de atención no solo en pacientes sintomáticos sino en la población en riesgo, se presenta este artículo cuyo propósito es actualizar a los especialistas de Medicina General Integral y Medicina Interna acerca de aspectos de interés relacionados con este medicamento, como: interacciones medicamentosas, enfermedades concomitantes, la biotransformación de la droga y los posibles efectos adversos que se pueden asociar a su uso. Se presentan consideraciones finales acerca del uso de esta droga.Metformin is an effective biguanide for the metabolic control of non-insulin dependent type 2 diabetes mellitus when the dietary control fails. Given its proven efficacy and present accessibility in the pharmaceutical market in Cuba -to be used at primary health care not only in symptomatic patients but in the population at risk-this article was presented to update the knowledge of the Family Medicine and Internal Medicine specialists about interesting aspects related to this drug, i.e, drug interactions, concomitant diseases, drug biotransformation and the possible adverse effects associated to its use. Final remarks on the use of this drug were stated.

  13. Age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Morten; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    2002-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common macular disease affecting elderly people in the Western world. It is characterised by the appearance of drusen in the macula, accompanied by choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) or geographic atrophy. The disease is more common in Caucasian....... Smoking is probably also a risk factor. Preventive strategies using macular laser photocoagulation are under investigation, but their efficacy in preventing visual loss is as yet unproven. There is no treatment with proven efficacy for geographic atrophy. Optimal treatment for exudative AMD requires...

  14. Effect of methazolamide in patients with refractory uveitic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Bin Jiang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To evaluate the efficacy and safety of methazolamide in treating refractory uveitic macular edema. METHODS: Retrospective self-controlled study was designed. A total of 15 patients(20 eyeswith refractory uveitic macular edema which used methazolamide as adjuvant therapy were enrolled in Shanghai First People's Hospital from January 2015 to June 2016. The changes of central macular thickness(CMTand best corrected visual acuity(BCVAwere observed at baseline and 2, 4, 8wk after treatment. We also focused on the incidence of complications and relapse. RESULTS: The CMT was 445.95±154.10μm, 338.83±138.34μm, 251.50±40.20μm, 244.90±35.68μm at baseline, 2, 4 and 8wk after treatment, respectively. The differences among them were statistically significant(F=15.467, PF=5.208, PCONCLUSION: Methazolamide is beneficial in improving macular edema and vision in 4wk. When the cumulative dose is more than 1400mg, we need pay attention to the complications. After discontinuing methazolamide for 1wk, macular edema relapsed in some patients, and more than half of patients recurred after 3mo. So the patients should be followed closely in 3mo after withdrawal of methazolamide.

  15. Comparison of film and digital fundus photographs in eyes of individuals with diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gangaputra, Sapna; Almukhtar, Talat; Glassman, Adam R

    2011-01-01

    To compare grading of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic macular edema (DME) from stereoscopic film versus stereoscopic digital photographs obtained from a subset of Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network (DRCR.net) participants.......To compare grading of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic macular edema (DME) from stereoscopic film versus stereoscopic digital photographs obtained from a subset of Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network (DRCR.net) participants....

  16. Counterregulatory hormones in insulin-treated diabetic patients admitted to an accident and emergency department with hypoglycaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, A; Christensen, N J; Hilsted, Jannik

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was (1) to describe hormone responses in insulin-induced hypoglycaemia and (2) to investigate if a combined treatment with intravenous glucose and intramuscular glucagon (group A) would improve glucose recovery as compared to treatment with intravenous glucose alone (group B)...... significantly elevated concentrations of adrenaline and glucagon were found in diabetic patients admitted with severe hypoglycaemia to an Accident and Emergency Department.......). Eighteen adult patients with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus admitted to the Accident and Emergency Department with hypoglycaemia (plasma glucose 1.23 +/- 0.15 mmol l(-1) on admission) were randomized to one of the above treatments and plasma glucose and counterregulatory hormones were measured before...

  17. Use of maggot therapy for treating a diabetic foot ulcer colonized by multidrug resistant bacteria in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia A.R.Q. Pinheiro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the efficacy of maggot therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcer infected with multidrug resistant microorganisms. A 74 year old female patient with diabetes for over 30 years, was treated with maggot therapy using larvae of Chrysomya megacephala. The microbiological samples were collected to evaluate aetiology of the infection. The therapy done for 43 days resulted in a reduction of necrosis and the ulcer′s retraction of 0.7 cm [2] in area. Analysis of the bacteriological swabs revealed the presence of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Further studies need to be done to confirm the role of maggot therapy in wound healing using a large sample and a proper study design.

  18. Clinical effect comparison of different surgical methods for treating diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Wu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare the clinical results of different surgical methods for diabetic antipathy. METHODS: Eighty cases(102 eyeswith diabetic antipathy were selected in our hospital from January 2012 to December 2013. Thirty-eight cases(48 eyesin group A received joint surgical treatment, 42 cases(54 eyesin group B took staging of surgical treatment. The clinical effect was observed in both groups.RESULTS: The vision after surgery was improved than that of before surgery in two groups, there were no significant differences(P>0.05. A postoperative complication rate was 16.7% in group A and 22.2% in group B, showed no significant difference(P>0.05. CONCLUSION: Surgery and staging joint surgery are both feasible for diabetic retinopathy patients, can, improve the visionr. Both of them are worthy of clinical application.

  19. Placental dysfunction in Suramin-treated rats: impact of maternal diabetes and effects of antioxidative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Peppi; Olovsson, Matts; Eriksson, Ulf J

    2005-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate a rat model of placental dysfunction/preeclampsia in pregnancies complicated by maternal diabetes. A second objective was to evaluate the effects of vitamin E treatment in this model. Normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats of two different strains (U and H) were given intraperitoneal (IP) injections of the angiogenesis inhibitor Suramin (Sigma Chemical Co, St Louis, MO) or saline in early pregnancy, and fed standard or vitamin E-enriched food. The outcome of pregnancy was evaluated on gestational day 20. In both rat strains Suramin caused fetal growth retardation, decreased placental blood flow, and increased placental concentration of the isoprostane 8-iso-PGF(2alpha). In the U rats Suramin also caused increased fetal resorption rate, increased maternal blood pressure, decreased renal blood flow, and diminished maternal growth. Diabetes caused severe maternal and fetal growth retardation, increased resorption rate, and increased placental 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) concentration independent of Suramin administration. The maternal and fetal effects of Suramin and diabetes were more pronounced in the U strain than in the H strain. Vitamin E treatment improved the status of Suramin-injected diabetic rats: in U rats the blood pressure increase was normalized; and in both U and H rats the decreased placental blood flow was marginally enhanced, and the increase in placental 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) was partly normalized by vitamin E. Suramin injections to pregnant rats cause a state of placental insufficiency, which in U rats resembles human preeclampsia. The induction of this condition is at least partly mediated by oxidative stress, and antagonized by antioxidative treatment. Maternal diabetes involves increased oxidative stress, and causes both maternal and fetal morbidity, which are only marginally affected by additional Suramin treatment.

  20. The effect of peer support in adults with insulin pump-treated type 1 diabetes: a pilot study of a flexible and participatory intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joensen LE

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Lene Eide Joensen,1 Merete Meldgaard Andersen,2 Sabrina Jensen,1 Kirsten Nørgaard,2 Ingrid Willaing1 1Diabetes Management Research, Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Gentofte, 2Department of Endocrinology, Hvidovre Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark Aim: The aim of this study was to explore the effects of a flexible and participatory peer support intervention in a clinical setting for adults with type 1 diabetes treated with an insulin pump, focusing on enhancing diabetes-specific social capital. The key questions were as follows: 1 what effects are appropriate to expect, according to participants? and 2 to what extent did these effects occur? Methods: Two peer support intervention programs were conducted in a diabetes specialist clinic (N=30. A participatory and adaptable approach allowed flexibility in the content of peer support meetings, which were facilitated by a diabetes nurse. Individual interviews explored participants’ perception of effects of the intervention. Interview data were analyzed qualitatively. Participants (n=27 completed a baseline and postintervention questionnaire that included items assessing diabetes empowerment, diabetes distress, diabetes-specific social support, and diabetes loneliness. HbA1c levels were compared before and after the intervention. Results: Participants experienced enhanced diabetes-specific social capital, diabetes motivation, awareness of personal diabetes practices, and serenity and openness in life with diabetes. They also became more aware of treatment and support possibilities. Negative effects included feeling sad or upset after the meetings or feeling different than and not as well-controlled as other participants. Quantitative analyses showed enhanced social support, decreased eating distress and trends toward enhanced diabetes empowerment, decreased diabetes loneliness, and decreased diabetes distress (powerlessness. We found fewer positive and/or negative outcomes among participants who felt

  1. 1-year clinical outcomes of diabetic patients treated with everolimus-eluting bioresorbable vascular scaffolds: a pooled analysis of the ABSORB and the SPIRIT trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Takashi; Onuma, Yoshinobu; van Geuns, Robert-Jan; Chevalier, Bernard; Patel, Tejas M; Seth, Ashok; Diletti, Roberto; García-García, Hector M; Dorange, Cécile C; Veldhof, Susan; Cheong, Wai-Fung; Ozaki, Yukio; Whitbourn, Robert; Bartorelli, Antonio; Stone, Gregg W; Abizaid, Alexandre; Serruys, Patrick W

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate 1-year clinical outcomes of diabetic patients treated with the Absorb bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS). Clinical outcomes of diabetic patients after BVS implantation have been unreported. This study included 101 patients in the ABSORB Cohort B trial and the first consecutive 450 patients with 1 year of follow-up in the ABSORB EXTEND trial. A total of 136 diabetic patients were compared with 415 nondiabetic patients. In addition, 882 diabetic patients treated with everolimus-eluting metal stents (EES) in pooled data from the SPIRIT trials (SPIRIT FIRST [Clinical Trial of the Abbott Vascular XIENCE V Everolimus Eluting Coronary Stent System], SPIRIT II [A Clinical Evaluation of the XIENCE V Everolimus Eluting Coronary Stent System], SPIRIT III [Clinical Trial of the XIENCE V Everolimus Eluting Coronary Stent System (EECSS)], SPIRIT IV Clinical Trial [Clinical Evaluation of the XIENCE V Everolimus Eluting Coronary Stent System]) were used for the comparison by applying propensity score matching. The primary endpoint was a device-oriented composite endpoint (DoCE), including cardiac death, target vessel myocardial infarction, and target lesion revascularization at 1-year follow-up. The cumulative incidence of DoCE did not differ between diabetic and nondiabetic patients treated with the BVS (3.7% vs. 5.1%, p = 0.64). Diabetic patients treated with the BVS had a similar incidence of the DoCE compared with diabetic patients treated with EES in the matched study group (3.9% for the BVS vs. 6.4% for EES, p = 0.38). There were no differences in the incidence of definite or probable scaffold/stent thrombosis (0.7% for both diabetic and nondiabetic patients with the BVS; 1.0% for diabetic patients with the BVS vs. 1.7% for diabetic patients with EES in the matched study group). In the present analyses, diabetic patients treated with the BVS showed similar rates of DoCEs compared with nondiabetic patients treated with the BVS and

  2. Macular degeneration - age-related

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AMD occurs when the blood vessels under the macula become thin and brittle. Small yellow deposits, called drusen, form. Almost all people with macular degeneration start with the dry form. Wet AMD occurs ...

  3. Sustained glucagon-like peptide 1 expression from encapsulated transduced cells to treat obese diabetic rats

    OpenAIRE

    Moralejo, Daniel; Yanay, Ofer; Kernan, Kelly; Bailey, Adam; Lernmark, Ake; Osborne, William

    2011-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are two prevalent chronic diseases that have become a major public health concern in industrialized countries. T2D is characterized by hyperglycemia and islet beta cell dysfunction. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) promotes β cell proliferation and neogenesis and has a potent insulinotropic effect. Leptin receptor deficient male rats are obese and diabetic and provide a model of T2D. We hypothesized that their treatment by sustained expression of GLP-1 using e...

  4. Adiponectin, Leptin, and Leptin Receptor in Obese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Treated with Insulin Detemir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Olczyk

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to quantitatively assess the expression of selected regulatory molecules, such as leptin, leptin receptor, and adiponectin in the blood of obese patients with type 2 diabetes both before treatment and after six months of pharmacological therapy with the long-lasting insulin analogue, insulin detemir. A significant decrease in the analysed regulatory molecules, i.e., leptin receptor and adiponectin, was found in blood plasma of the patients with untreated type 2 diabetes. These changes were accompanied by an increase in plasma leptin concentrations. Insulin treatment resulted in the normalization of plasma leptin receptor and adiponectin concentrations. The circulating leptin level did not change following anti-diabetic therapy with insulin detemir. Gender was a significant factor modifying the circulating level of all the analysed regulatory active compounds. Bioinformatic analysis was performed using Matlab with the Signal Processing Toolbox. The conducted discriminant analysis revealed that the leptin receptor, Δw(19, and adiponectin, Δw(21, were the parameters undergoing the most significant quantitative changes during the six-month therapy with insulin detemir. The conducted examinations indicated the contribution of adipocytokines—the biologically-active mediators of systemic metabolism, such as leptin and adiponectin in the pathomechanism of disorders being the basis for obesity which leads to development of insulin resistance, which, in turn, results in the occurrence of type 2 diabetes.

  5. Recurrent impetigo herpetiformis with diabetes and hypoalbuminemia successfully treated with cyclosporine, albumin, insulin and metformin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Chembolli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a patient with recurrent impetigo herpetiformis associated with diabetes mellitus, hypoalbuminemia, and hypocalcaemia; who was refractory to corticosteroids. Cyclosporine along with other supportive measures proved to be life-saving with maintenance of pregnancy.

  6. The modified Pirogoff's amputation in treating diabetic foot infections: surgical technique and case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Nather

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: This paper describes the surgical technique of a modified Pirogoff's amputation performed by the senior author and reports the results of this operation in a single surgeon case series for patients with diabetic foot infections. Methods: Six patients with diabetic foot infections were operated on by the National University Hospital (NUH diabetic foot team in Singapore between November 2011 and January 2012. All patients underwent a modified Pirogoff's amputation for diabetic foot infections. Inclusion criteria included the presence of a palpable posterior tibial pulse, ankle brachial index (ABI of more than 0.7, and distal infections not extending proximally beyond the midfoot level. Clinical parameters such as presence of pulses and ABI were recorded. Preoperative blood tests performed included a glycated hemoglobin level, hemoglobin, total white blood cell count, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, albumin, and creatinine levels. All patients were subjected to 14 sessions of hyperbaric oxygen therapy postoperatively and were followed up for a minimum of 10 months. Results: All six patients had good wound healing. Tibio-calcaneal arthrodesis of the stump was achieved in all cases by 6 months postoperatively. All patients were able to walk with the prosthesis. Conclusions: The modified Pirogoff's amputation has been found to show good results in carefully selected patients with diabetic foot infections. The selection criteria included a palpable posterior tibial pulse, distal infections not extending proximally beyond the midfoot level, ABI of more than 0.7, hemoglobin level of more than 10 g/dL, and serum albumin level of more than 30 g/L.

  7. Neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage is not associated with wound healing in diabetic foot ulcer patients treated in a multidisciplinary setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Canner, Joseph K; Mathioudakis, Nestoras; Sherman, Ronald L; Hines, Kathryn; Lippincott, Christopher; Black, James H; Abularrage, Christopher J

    2018-04-01

    Socioeconomic deprivation is associated with poor glycemic control and higher hospital admission rates in patients with diabetes. We sought to quantify the effects of neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation on wound healing among a cohort of patients with diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) treated in a multidisciplinary setting. Socioeconomic disadvantage was calculated for all patients using the area deprivation index (ADI) stratified by quartile (from ADI-0: least through ADI-3: most). Predictors of wound healing were assessed using Cox proportional hazards models accounting for patient demographics, wound characteristics, and ADI category. Six hundred twenty-one wounds were evaluated, including 59% ADI-0, 7% ADI-1, 12% ADI-2, and 22% ADI-3. After accounting for patient demographics and wound characteristics, the likelihood of wound healing was similar between groups (ADI-3 versus ADI-0: hazards ratio [HR] 1.03 [95% confidence interval 0.76-1.41]). Independent predictors of poor wound healing included peripheral arterial disease (HR 0.75), worse wound stage (stage 4: HR 0.48), larger wound area (HR 0.99), and partially dependent functional status (HR 0.45) (all, P healing was largely dependent on wound characteristics and vascular status rather than patient demographics or neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage. Use of a multidisciplinary approach to the management of DFU may overcome the negative effects of socioeconomic disadvantage frequently described in the diabetic population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Persistent lipid abnormalities in statin-treated patients with diabetes mellitus in Europe and Canada: results of the Dyslipidaemia International Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leiter, L. A.; Lundman, P.; da Silva, P. M.; Drexel, H.; Jünger, C.; Gitt, A. K.; Absenger, Guun; Albrich, Ernst; Allinger, Berndt; Allinger, Stephan; Anacher, Gerald; Angermayr, Gertraud; Angermeier, Hermann; Anzengruber, Aneas; Archimanitis, Gabriele; Arnsteiner, Patricia; Auberger, Wolfgang; Azhary, Mawaheb; Barfuss, Michael; Bauer, Christian; Bauer, Birgit Elisabeth; Beclin, Thomas; Binder, Thomas; Binder, Gabriele; Böhler, Dietmar; Brändle, Johann; Breslmair, Jörg; Brettlecker, Marlis; Bürger, Michael; Calvi, Inge; Dorfinger, Werner; Doringer-Schnepf, Elisabeth; Eer, Anton; Eckmayr, Christine; Eder, Franz; Egermann, Margit; Erath, Michael; Etzinger, Michael; Etzinger, Claudia; Fiedler, Lothar; Filip, Wolfgang; Filip, Michaela; Föchterle, Johann; Fodor, Anita; Frieden, Thomas; Gareiss, Mertens; Gföllner, Peter; Ghamarian, Thomas; Goritschan, Michael; Haar, Klaus; Habeler, Gerhard; Hadjiivanov, Valery; Haiböck, Christian; Hammer, Regina; Hartmann, Siegfried; Haschkovitz, Herbert; Hauer, Walter; Hauer, Josef; Haunschmidt, Christian; Heimayr, Christine; Hengl, Wolfgang; Hengl, Gunter; Hermann, Rudolf; Herrmann, Rainer; Hillebrand, Roswitha; Hintersteininger, Otto; Hirsch, Michael; Hitzinger, Martin; Hochegger, Tanja; Hockl, Wolfgang; Hoi, Michael; Hörmann, Jan; Hudler, Brigitte; Imb, Gerhard; Joichl, Anea; Jungbauer, Karl; Kapl, Gerlinde; Kerschbaum, Margit; Kienesberger, Franz; Killinger, Gerhard; Kitzler, Gerhard; Klein, Franz; Kleinbichler, Dietmar; Kohr, Anton; Kopetzky, Michael; Korthals, Christian; Kortschak, Werner; Koschutnik, Martin; Kraus, Werner A.; Kurzemann, Susanne; Lavicka, Claus; Lehner, Guido; Lenz, Jürgen; Lepuschütz, Sabine; Lichtenwallner, Michael; Lober, Reinhard; Loidl, Christine; Lopatka, Eduard; Ludwig, Rudolf; Maca, Thomas; Mair, Anneliese; Mandak, Michael; Margreiter, Maria; Margreiter, Anea; Markovics, Michael; Matejicek, Frieich; Mohilla, Maximillian; Moll, Christian; Mörz, Beate; Mörz, Reinhard; Nagl, Heinz; Neumayr, Günther; Oberroitmair, Helmut; Oberzinner, Michael; Pallamar, Walter; Pangratz, Sibylle; Parandian, Laurenz; Paulus, Alexana; Pfaffenwimmer, Christoph; Plaichinger, Peter; Pokorn, Thomas; Polanec, Helmuth; Pöll-Weiss, Barbara; Pralea, Doralina; Puttinger, Johann; Quinton, Thomas; Ranegger, Matthias; Rass, Sepp; Rauch, Heribert; Riehs, Manfred; Robetin, Erich; Rohringer, Jörg; Rupprechter, Josef; Sadjed, Eduard; Schimbach, Johann Alois; Schmid, Jutta; Schneiderbauer, Rotraud; Schopper, Wolfgang; Schulze-Bauer, Alfred; Schuster, Gottfried; Schwarz, Johann; Schwarz, Maria; Schweighofer, Christoph; Schwelle, Franz; Simma, Hanspeter; Sock, Renate; Sock, Reinhard; Sprenger, Fritz; Stiglmayr, Thomas; Stocker, Ilse; Stütz, Pia; Tama, Mustafa; Teleky, Ursula; Tschauko, Werner; Veits, Martin; Vikydal, Gerhard; Vlaschitz, Karl; Wais, Elisabeth; Wais, Adam; Wegmann, Robert; Wehle, Franz; Weindl, Manfred; Weinhandl, Manuela; Wendt, Ursula; Wendt, Klaus; Werner-Tutschku, Volker; Werner-Tutschku, Christine; Wilscher, Josef; Wind, Norbert; Winter, Aneas; Wolfschütz, Gerald; Wolfsgruber, Markus; Wolfsgruber, Brigitte; Wurm, Renate; Ziebart-Schroth, Arno; Zimmermann, Maximillian; Zinnagl, Aneas; Zirm, Anea; Zirm Canada, Bernhard; Bokenfohr, Grace Mary; Liu, Edmond K. H.; Melling, Gordon W.; Papp, Edward William; Sachdeva, Ashok K.; Snyman, Ernst Retief; Varma, Sonya; Ward, Richard A.; Tiong Wong, Anew Pak; Basson, Paul J.; Brodie, Brian D.; Chahal, Sukhjiwan Jeevyn; Chan, William Y.; Chow, John C.; Cormack, Maura; Eddy, Donald H. J.; Ezekiel, Daniel; Farquhar, Anew; Gu, Shian; Hii, Ting H.; Ho-Asjoe, Marianne P. K.; Hosie, Anew; Jaffer, Shahin; Jakubowski, Anew T.; Karim, Mandy; Kiai, Cristina; Kooy, Jacobus; Lytle, Craig R.; Mcleod, Kevin Lain; Morgan, David C.; Myckatyn, Michael M.; Ng, John P. Y.; Schriemer, Ronnald; Schumacher, Gerhard; Grey Stopforth, James; Hoo Tsui, Winston Wai; Wilson, Robin T.; Wong, Danny; Wong, Wilfred T.; Yeung, Margaret M. W.; Cram, David Harvey; Kumari Dissanayake, Dilani Tamara; Gerber, Johan Daniel W.; Haligowski, David; Hrabarchuk, Blair; Kroczak, Tadeusz J.; Lipson, Alan H.; Mahay, Raj K.; Wessels Mare, Abraham Carel; Mohamdee, Feisal John; Olynyk, Frederick Theodore; Pieterse, Wickus; Ramgoolam, Rajenanath; Rothova, Anna; Saunders, Kevin Kenneth; Szajkowski, Stanley; van Gend, Richard F.; van Rensburg, Nicolaas Marthinus Jansen; Anand, Sanjiv; Baer, Carolyn E. H.; Basque, Eric J. Y.; Benaya, Sebastian; Bessoudo, Ricardo; Bhalla, Jaswinder; Chettiar, Nataraj V.; Craig, Brian N.; Desrosiers, France; Ranjani Imbulgoda, Manel; Morgan, Gareth M.; Nowak, Zbigniew J.; Scott, Daniel G.; Searles, Gregory R.; Slorach, J. Ninian; Stevenson, Robert N.; Browne, Noel John; Bruff, Karl Joseph; Collingwood, John Maurice; Collins, Wayne; Over, Aidan; Gabriel, Anthony M.; Govender, Moonsamy; Hart, David G.; Hatcher, Lydia B.; Janes, John; Kielty, John F.; Krisdaphongs, Michoke; Lush, Richard Boyd; Moulton, William Bertram; Riche, Cyril R.; Rideout, Gary M.; Roberts, Bernard C.; Walsh, Paul E.; Wight, Harold G.; Woodland, K. Heather; Woodland, Robert C.; Atkinson, Bradley Charles; Chow, Carlyle S. H. A.; Collins, James A.; Graham, Robert D.; Hosein, Jalal; Machel, Teresa M.; Mahaney, Gordon Ralston; Mclean, James Robert Bruce; Murray, Michael R.; Myatt, Gregory Alexander; Ozere, Christopher P.; Saha, Amal Krishna; Sanders, David Herbert; Seaman, Donald Maxwell; Seaman, James Gordon; Swinamer, Deanna; Voon Yee, Kenny Yew; Ali, Mohamed Mustapha; Bankay, Clarence D. C.; Beduhn, Eitel Erich Reinhold; Callaghan, Denis J.; Chan, Yun Kai; Chaudhri, Arif R.; Chen, Richard Y. Y.; Conway, James Robin; Cunningham, William L.; Cusimano, Steven Lawrence; Souza, Eleanor De; de Souza, Selwyn X.; Deyoung, John Paul; Epstein, Ralph; Faiers, Alan Arthur; Figurado, Victor John; Forbes, F. Basil Trayer; Gabor, Zsuzsanna; Gallardo, Rodolfo Canonizado; Gaur, Shiva K.; George, Elizabeth; Hartford, Brian J.; Shiu-Chung Ho, Michael; Ho, Chung; Ismail, Shiraz H.; Bhushan Kalra, Bharat; Koprowicz, Kinga; Kumar, Naresh; Lam, Clement; Lau, Ming-Jarm; Law, Hugo Kwok Cheung; Fung, Max Leung Sui; Liutkus, Joanne Frances; Lotfallah, Talaat K.; Luton, Robert G.; Meneses, Gloria S.; Miller, Mark Lee; Nagji, Noorbegum; Ng, Ken H. M.; Ng Thow Hing, Roland E.; Pandey, Amritanshu Shekhar; Petrov, Ivan; Rosenthall, Wendy; Rudner, Howard; Russell, Alan Douglas; Sanchez, Zenia A.; Shaban, Joseph A.; Shariff, Shiraz B. K.; Shih, Chung Ming; Sinclair, Duncan W.; Spink, Donald Richard; Tung, Tommy Hak Tsun; Vizel, Saul; Yanover, David Frederick; Zavodni, Louis S.; Cusack, Paul; Dewar, Charles M.; Hooley, Peter; Kassner, Rachel Anne; Mackinnon, Randy James; Molyneaux, Harold W.; Shetty, Karunakara Naduhithlu; Barrière, Ginette; Berjat, Maria B.; Bernucci, Bruno; Bérubé, Claude; Boueau, Ghyslain; Chehayeb, Raja; Ciricillo, Domenico; Constance, Christian M.; Côté, Gilles; Desroches, Jacques; Gagnon, Robert; Gaueau, Gilles; Godbout, Jean Louis; Harvey, Pierre; Hassan, Youssef; Hoang, Ngoc Vinh; Houde, Danielle; Lalonde, Alain-Paul; Lavoie, Régis; Leclair, Normand; Meagher, Luc; Ouimet, Alain; Plourde, Simon; Rioux, Denis W.; Roberge, Claude; Roy, Bruno; Sasseville, Richard; Serfaty, Samuel; Theriault, Lyne; Timothée, Jean R.; Tjia, Sabine; Tremblay, Bruno; Turcotte, Jean; Bose, Sabyasachi; Aletta Bouwer, Hester; Chernesky, Patricia A.; Johnson, Mervin Louis; Kemp, David R.; Lai, Raymond Pong-Che; Lee, Frank R.; Lipsett, William G. C.; Lombard, Schalk J.; Majid, Falah S.; Malan, Johannes J.; Maree, Narinda; Nayar, Arun; Nel, Mandi; Oduntan, Oluwole O.; Rajakumar, Alphonsus R. J.; Baraka Ramadan, Fauzi; Shamsuzzaman, Mohammed; Vermeulen, Abraham P. M.; Fred, C.; Anthonsen, Birgitte; Ardest, Steen Pennerup; Arnold-Larsen, Susanne Kajsa; Axelsen, Allan; Barfoed, Klaus; Birkler, Niels Erik; Blokkebak, Jens; Boserup, Jørgen; Kettrup Brassøe, Jens Ole; Chovanec, Martin; Lykke Christensen, Bendt; Christensen, Micael; Skjøth Christensen, Randi; Eidner, Per Olav; Eisbo, Jørn; Elsvor, Jan; Engmann, Ida Veng-Christensen; Eriksen, Rene Milling; Frederiksen, Thorkil; Frølund, Hanne Charlotte; Garne, Susanne; Giørtz, Agnete; Gregersen, Bettina; Halkier, Merete Lundbye; Hansen, Jens Georg; Harder, Jan; Jørgen, Hans; Henriksen, O.; Kirkeby Hoffmann, Michael; Holk, Erik; Hollensen, Jan; Jacobsen, Rune; Jakobsen, Lotte; Jensen, Christian; Jensen, Morten; Jensen, Vibeke; Jepsen, Peter; Johannsen, Jens Arne; Verner Johansen, Lars; Johansen, Ole Steen; Juul, Kristian; Jørgensen, Arvid Frank; Jørgensen, Peter; Jørgensen, Ulrik Miilmann; Kensmark, Lars; Kjellerup, Carsten; Kjaer, Ejner; Kjaersgaard, Morten; Klubien, Peter; Kolby, Peter; Korsgaard Thomsen, Kristian; Krebs, Peter; Kristiansen, Tom; Lyng, Flemming; Madsen, Natalia V.; Meyer-Christensen, Jesper; Mogensen, Ole; Mortensen, Finn; Nielsen, Lotta Marie; Nielsen, Per Schiwe; Nielsen, Søren Kjærem; Ommen, Henrik; Juhl Otte, Jens; Østergaard Paridon, Volle; Parm, Michael; Peampour, Kian; Petersen, Kirsten; Pilgaard, Peder Jensen; Poulsen, Svend Erik; Preisler, Thomas; Hast Prins, Søren Ulrik; Randløv, Annette; Rasmussen, Birgit Reindahl; Elmegaard Rasmussen, Peter; Rasmussen, Regnar; Roed, Søren Flemming; Sander, Kirsten Foltmar; Schmidt, Ejnar Ørum; Jørgen Schultz, Paul; Smidemann, Margit; Solgaard, Jørgen; Stripp, Tommy; Søderlund, Michael Rene M.; Søgaard, Henning; Søndergaard, Dorte E.; Sørensen, Birgitte H.; Sørensen, Gerhard Seth; Thøgersen, Niels; Toftdahl, Hans; Uggerhøj, Hanne; Uhrenholt, Bjarne; Veronika Ullisch, Eva; Valentiner-Branth, Christian; Vinberg, Jørgen; Vinter, Svend Aage; Vittrup, Preben; Winther-Pedersen, Niels; Wøldike, Anne Grete; Zederkof, Jørgen M.; Thue Østergaard, Merete; Abiven, Patrick; Abraham, Dominique; de Beaumais, Philippe Adam; Ado, Jean Pierre; Affres, Helene; Agache, Regis; Airault Leman, Anne Marie; Moussarih, Abdallah Al; Albaric, Christian; Allaouchiche, Thierry; Allignol, Christian; Ammor, Mohammed; Ammoun Bourdelas, Corinne; Amsallem, Luc; Anquez, Denis; Antonini, Jean Michel; Assuied, Virginia; Attia, Gerard; Audebert, Olivier; Audibert, Henri; Ayach, Claude; Bagdadlian, Serge; Bagni, Marina; Baillet, Jean; Ballivian Cardozo, Fernando; Baranes, Robert; Barbier, Patricia; Barousse, Francoise; Bas, Sylvie; Battaglia, Jean Marc; Baudonnat, Bruno; Bauple, Jean Louis; Domengetroy, Frederic Baylac; Beard, Thierry; Beaumier, Eric; Beaumont, Jean Francois; Baylac Domengetroy, Frederic; Beck, Christian; Behar, Michel; Behr, Bernard; Benady, Richard; Benghanem, Mohamed Mounir; Benichou, Herve; Bensoussan, Jean Marc; Bensussan, Pierre; Bercegeay, Pascal; Berneau, Jean Baptiste; Bertolotti, Alexane; Bertrand, Sylviane; Besson, Alain; Bezanson, Christophe; Bezier, Christophe; Bezzina, Remy; Bichon, Herve; Bickar, Pierre; Billot, Pierre; Billot Belmere, Marie Claude; Bisson, Francois; Blanc, Dominique; Bloch, Jean Luc; Bloch, Bernard; Blondin, Hyacinthe; Blot, Jacques; Bloud, Raymond; Blouin, Pascal; Boesch, Christophe; Boiteux, Jean Luc; Bonnafous, Pierre; Bonneau, Yanick; Bonnefoy, Laurent; Borg, Bernard; Borys, Jean Michel; Brunehaut Petaut, Myriam; Boschmans, Sabine; Said, Rami Bou; Bouallouche, Abderrahmane; Bouchet, Jacques; Bouchlaghem, Khaled; Boulen, Yvon; Bouline, Benoit; Bounekhla, Mohamed Salah; Bouquin, Vincent; Bourgeois, Marie Brigitte; Bourgois, Didier; Brandily, Christian; Brandt, Pierre; Branquart, Frederic; Breilh, Patrick; Brilleman, Fabrice; Brisson, Thierry; Brocard, Francis; Bruel, Pierre; Brun, Jean Pierre; Buisson, Jean Gabriel; Buisson Virmoux, Isabelle; Bur, Christian; Cabal Malville, Elodie; Cabantous, Serge; Cabrol, Pierre; Cagnoli Gromovoi, Sylviane; Caillaux, Bruno Xavier; Caillot, Didier; Canchon Ottaviani, Isabelle; Canu, Philippe; Caramella, Alexana; Caramella, Alexane; Cardaillac, Christian; Carrivale, Alain; Cartal, Jean Pierre; Cassany, Bernard; Cauon, Bernard; Causeret, Jean Marie; Caye, Philippe; Cayet, Jean Paul; Cazor, Gilles; Cesarini, Joel; Chakra, Georges; Chambeau, Bernadette; Chambon, Valerie; Chanas, Jack; Chapuzot, Patrick; Charon, Ane; Charpin, Eric; Charton, Frederic; Cheikel, Jean; Chemin, Philippe; Chennouf, Kamel; Chequel, Henri; Chevrier, Denis; Ciroux, Patrick; Cissou, Yves; Claeys, Jean Luc; Clariond, Yves; Classen, Olivier; Cloerec, Ane; Clouet, Sophie; Cloup Lefeuvre, Anne Marie; Cochet, Chantal; Cocuau, Didier; Cohen, Henri; Cohen Presberg, Pascale Cohen; Colin, Stephane; Colin, Remy; Colucci, Robert; Come, Philippe; Condouret, Pierre; Conturie, Agnes; Corbin, Ane; Corticelli, Paola; Coste, Daniel; Cotrel, Olivier; Coueau, Sylvie; Coulon, Paul; Courdy, Christian; Courtin, Marc; Courtot, Pierre; Coutrey, Laurent; Couval, Rene; Cravello, Patrick; Cressey, Olivier; Cuisinier, Yves; Cunin, Bernard; Cunnington, Bernard; Cusseau, Herve; Cuvelier, Christian; Arailh, Bruno D.; Dabboura, Adib; Dages, Laurence; Dahmani, Noureddine; Dandignac, Jean Christophe; Daney, Dominique; Dannel, Bernard; Darbois, Dominique; Dareths, Philippe; Daubin, Daniel; David, Jean Claude; de Foiard, Patrick; de Mallmann Guyot, Veronique De; de Wit, Marie Astrid; Debast, Francoise; Deboute, Eric; Debuc, Jean Pierre; Dechoux, Edouard; Decloux, Olivier; Decruyenaere, Yannick; Dejans, Jacques Maurice; Delarue, Michel; Delattre, Xavier; Delmaire, Patrick; Denis, Lucien; Deschamps Ben Ayed, Myriam; Devins, Pascal; Dezou, Sylvie; Dieuzaide, Pierre; Dirheimer, Bertrand; Dominguez, Paul; Donadille, Florence; Dondain, Benoit; Doridan, Pierre; Ouhet, Pascal; Dubois, Arnaud; Dubois, Ane; Ducharme, Pascal; Duchez, Paul; Dulard, Catherine; Dumoulin, Marc; Duprey, Georges; Durand, Jacques; Mohamed, Ibrahim; Chehab, El; Emery, Bernard; Emmanuel, Georges; Ashari, Ghazaleh Esna; Evrard, Eric; Fargeot Lamy, Aleth; Farges, Jean Louis; Faucher, Patrick; Faucie, Alain; Faure, Yves; Favre, Jean Jacques; Felipe, Jean Louis; Feret, Daniel; Ferragu, Alain; Ferrandin, Gerard; Ferriot, Francois; Finelle, Laurent; Flond, Jacques; Foieri, Jean; Fol, Stephane; Fontaine, Brigitte; Forichon, Dominique; Foucry, Michel; Fournier, Jean Francois; Fregeac, Bernard; Fuchs, Martin; Gabriel, Franck; Gaimard, Didier; Gallois, Stephane; Garapon, Georges; Garas, Mamdouh; Garcia, Pierre; Garcia, Jean Michel; Garcia, Marie Pierre; Garman, Waddah; Garzuel, Dominique; Gaspard, Jean Marc; Gauci, Laurent; Gautheron, Patrick; Gauthier, Jacques; Gauthier Lafaye, Pierre Yves; Gay, Michel Charles; Gay Duc, Bernadette; Gayout, Olivier; Gegu, Yann; Gentile, Francois; Germain, Emmanuel; Gharbi, Gerard; Gigandet Tamarelle, Catherine; Gilardie, Alain; Gilles Verliat, Martine; Gillet, Thierry; Gnana, Philippe; Goguey, Alain; Gombert, Alain; Gonin, Bernard; Gonzales, Philippe; Goulesque, Xavier; Graba, Jean Marc; Granier, Alain; Greiner, Olivier; Groboz, Martial; Gromoff, Serge; Grossemy, Xavier; Grossi, Christian; Guenin, Frederic; Gueranger, Pierre; Guerin, Patrick; Guerineau, Jean Pierre; Guessous Zghal, Fathia; Guicheux, Dominique; Guillere, Jacqueline; Guyonnet, Gilles; Haddad, Samir; Hadj, Nordine; Hamani, Djamel; Hamm, Jacky; Hammoudi, Djamal; Harle, Xavier; Harnie Coussau, Pierre; Hazen, Richard; Hembert, Francois; Hemon, Pierre; Hergue, Michel; Hestin, Christian; Heyraud, Luc; Hindennach, Dieter; Hirot, Etienne; Ho Wang Yin, Chan Shing; Hocquelet Denis, Catherine; Hoppe, Patrice; Horovitz, Daniel; Hours, Jean Michel; Houta, Benjamin; Hua, Gerard; Hui Bon Hoa, Nicole; Humez, Philippe; Hurier, Michel; Husson, Gerald; Hyvernat, Guy; Ichard, Jean Francois; Impens, Claude; Iovescu, Decebal; Jacob, Philippe; Jacob, Gildas; Jacquemart, Jean Pierre; Jacquier, Philippe; Jahanshahi Honorat, Shideh; Jalladeau, Jean Francois; Jan, Luc; Jannel, Yves; Jarrige, Vincent; Jeremiasz, Richard; Annick Jestin Depond, Marie; Joseph, Michel; Joseph Henri Fargue, Helene; Joubrel, Alain; Jouet, Alain; Julien, Bruno; Jullien, Francois; Jullien, Jean Louis; Kadoche, David; Kahl, Etienne; Kanawati, Aiman; Khalife, Sami; Khettou, Christophe; Kiers, Jean Paul; Kissel, Christian; Klein, Jean Claude; Klopfenstein, Samuel; Koch, Alexis; Koenig, Georges; Kohler, Philippe; Koriche, Abdelmalek; Labernardiere, Nicole; Labet, Philippe; Lablanche, Fabien; Laborde Laulhe, Vincent; Lagorce, Xavier; Laine, Eric; Lalague, Pascal; Laleu, Jean Noel; Lambert, Michel; Lambert Ledain, Mireille Lambert; Lambertyn, Xavier; Lame, Jean Francois; Langlois, Frederic; Lanoix, Eric; Laprade, Michel; Lasseri, Charaf; Laterrade, Bernard; Laurent, Jean Claude; Laurier, Bernard; Laval, Laurent; Le Borgne, Patrick; Le Franc, Pierre; Le Henaff, Patrick; Le Noir de Carlan, Herve; Le Roy, Jean Pierre; Le Roy Hennion, Florence; Lebon, Louis; Lecler, Olivier; Leclerc, Philippe; Ledieu, Christian; Lefebvre, Bernard; Lefevre, Philippe; Lehujeur, Catherine; Leiber, Christian; Leick, Gerard; Lemberthe, Thierry; Lenevez, Norbert; Lenoble, Patrick; Leriche, Philippe; Leroux, Eric; Leroy, Jean Michel; Leroy, Christian; Lescaillez, Dominique; Leurele, Christian; Lhermann, Sophie; Libermann, Pierre; Licari, Gilbert; Lo Re, Antoine; Long, Philippe; Long, Jean Louis; Lormeau, Boris; Louchart, Jean Christophe; Lucas, Jean Pierre; Luquet, Thierry; Lussato, Philippe; Maarouf, Moustapha; Mabilais, Francois; Magnier Sinclair, Christine; Mahot Moreau, Pascale; Malafosse, Denis; Mandirac, Jean Paul; Manolis, Jerome; Mante, Jean Pierre; Maquaire, Claude; Marchal, Thierry; Marchand, Guillaume; Marillesse, Olivier; Marmier, Gabriel; Herve Maron, Yves; Marrachelli, Nadine; Marsaux, Michel; Martin, Bruno; Martin, Michel; Deiss, Pascale Martin; Masson, Arnaud; Mativa, Bruno; Matton, Jean Francois; Mauffrey, Jean; Mauriere, Serge; Maurois, Georges; Maury, Joceline; Mayer, Frederic; Menu, Pierre; Mercier, Bernard; Messmer, Daniel; Mestiri, Sami; Meyer, Gilles; Michaelides, Michael; Michaud, Gilles; Michenaud, Bernard; Mielot, Stephane; Millory Marco, Jerry Anne; Mingam, Stephane; Mira, Reginald; Mius, Stephane; Monnier Meteau, Marie Paule; Mora, Francis; Morbois Trabut, Louise; Morosi, Laurent; Mougeolle, Jean Luc; Mouget, Jean Louis; Mouroux, Daniel; Mouthon, Jean Marie; Muller, Jacques; Nakache, Ane; Narbonne, Herve; Navarranne Roumec, Anne; Navarro, Pierre; Neubrand, Jean Yves; Nguyen, Quang Thieu; Nguyen Quang, Guy; Nguyen Xuan, Thong; Niot, Patrice; Oudart, Jean Maurice; Outteryck, Alain; Pages, Jean Marie; Paillet, Charles; Pain, Jean Marie; Pangaud de Gouville, Patricia; Paquin, Olivier; Parent, Vincent; Parer Richard, Claire; Parrot, Francine; Parthenay, Pascal; Pascariello, Jean Claude; Passebon, Jean Claude; Pere, Alain; Perelstein, Laurent; Perot, Michel; Petit, Richard; Petit, Philippe; Petit, Francois; Petruzzi, Philippe; Phelipeau, Denis; Philippon, Jean Claude; Philippon, Gilles; Picard, Bruno; Picard, Jean Claude; Picot, Bernard; Piera, Jean Francois; Pieri, Alain; Piffoux, Eric; Pilard, Patrick; Pillet, Alain; Pinot, Philippe; Pinzani, Alain; Pleskof, Alain; Plessier, Jean Claude; Plisson, Alain; Pochon, Claude; Poggi, Valerie; Poirat, Alain; Poiree, Maurice; Polleux, Janick; Noel Pontecaille, Jean; Posocco, Regis; Pospiech, Jean Claude; Pradies, Felix; Prevot, Remi; Pueyo, Jean Bernard; Quaelli, Jacques; Rabbia, Michel; Rabemananjara, Aimery; Rami, Saad; Rapin, Jean Jacques; Rasquin, Corinne; Ratinaud, Didier; Reboud, Bruno; Reboul, Philippe; Reichman, Jean Jacques; Reinhardt, Patrick; Renard Houta, Catherine Renard; Reverdy, Olivier; Revol, Michel; Rey, Pierre Alain; Richardeau, Yves; Rives, Bernard; Robida, Christine; Rochez Fraiberg, Muriel; Rodet, Jean Pierre; Rolland, Jean Francois; Romand, Bruno; Romano, Jean Paul; Rosati Gretere, Chantal; Rosey, Alain; Rosset, Martial; Rossi, Jean Pierre; Rouquette, Georges; Rousseau, Michel; Rousselon, Xavier; Roy, Christophe; Royer, Denis; Ruetsch, Marcel; Saade, Maurice; Saby Kuchler, Nicolas; Samar, Guy; Sanchez, Pierre Yves; Sane, Alain; Sanz, Jean Paul; Sardon, Michel; Sarrazin, Marc Eric; Sasportes, Gilbert; Saudou, Francis; Sauze, Elisabeth; Savary, Pascal; Schenowitz, Alain; Schmartz, Pierre; Schoepfer, Marc Olivier; Seewagen, Jacques; Serramoune, Denis; Serre, Christian; Sicard Guroo, Helene; Sichãc, Jean Philippe; Sifaoui, Sylvain; Simoncello, Marc; Simonin, Marie Jeanne; Simonnet, Jean Francois; Spindler, Didier; Steier, Alain; Sultan, Charles Raphael; Taghipour, Kouroch; Talayrach, Bruno; Talbot, Francois; Talhouarn, Vanessa; Tallec, Yves; Tarasco Schenrey, Elisabeth; Tarrene, Michel; Tater, Dominique; Tessier, Bernard; Teste, Marie; Thierry, Dominique; Thiollier, Patrice; Thoreau, Frederic; Thual, Jean; Traen, Vincent; Trigano, Jacques Alexane; Troussier, Jean Bernard; Truong Ky Minh, Bernard; van Melckebeke, Gerard; Vaque, Philippe; Vaucelle, Celine; Vedel, Eric; Venu, Didier; Verdavoine, Patrick; Vergeron, Jean; Viallon, Philippe; Viault, Dominique; Vieules, Jean Max; Vigier, Jean Paul; Vilain, Jean Marie; Villard, Bruno; Vitoux, Jean Francois; Viviand, Paul; Vivien, Olivier; Walter, Patrice; Waquier, Patrick; Waszkiewicz, Jean Marc; Weidich, Stephane; Westerfeld, Raymond; Weynachter, Gerald; Wilhelm, Pierre; Wolff, Claude; Wursthorn, Marc; Zammattio, Didier; Zylinski, Bernard; Lauer, Peter; Kühn, Uwe; Weltzel, Wolfgang; Mohr, Hella; Weyland, Klaus; Spittel, Bärbel; Böhm, Günter; Ferdowsy, Said; Hanusch, Peter; Spiekermann, Josef; Albert, Edwin; Stuff, Karl; Jungmair, Wolfgang; Koller, Sabine; Schubert, Wilhelm; Schlehahn, Fred; Bormann, Gundula; Graf, Kristof; Stiehler, Gisela; Bock, Manfred; Müller, Angelika; Haufe, Michael; Nielsen, Lorenz; Raum, Doris; Rogler, Karin; Bürstner, Joachim; Völk, Hans-Jörg; Sachse, Michael; Escher, Torsten; Doumit, Adel; O'dey, Hildegard; Holzmann, Ulrike; Sauer, Hermann; Schellenberg, Gottfried; Carius, Jürgen; Dänschel, Wilfried; Kopf, Aneas; Zerr, Elena; Tatalovic, Ratko; Rupp, Heiun; Anders, Elfriede; Mende, Marion; Volk, Ulrich; Hagenow, Aneas; Lang, Thomas; Schmitz, Karl-Heinz; Gössling, Jan-Henik; Mutsch, Günther; Steidel, Joachim; Osten, Klaus; Giokoglu, Kiriakos; Bellisch, Sabine; Füll, Katja; Walther, Wolfgang; Flick, Sabine; Dünnebier, Rosemarie; Dharmawan, Ichsan; Schönmehl, Wolfgang; Hoss, Valentin; Kipping, Stephan; Wolf, Hans-Joachim; Wolf, Hans-Frieich; Willmann, Volker; Bugarski, Bruno; Hoffschröer, Josef; Von Wallfeld, Siegrun; Ruhland, Guun; Bulling, Daniel; Häusler, Maren; Haustein, Gabriele; Kallenbach, Cornelia; Schwemmler, Claudia; Frank, Antje; Lodder-Bender, Ulrike; Rawe, Klaus; Reinert, Hans-Ferdinand; Schönhof, Petra; Fahrenschon, Klaus; Schorcht, Elisabeth; Etzold, Erika; Brehm, Michael; Paust, Wolf-Dieter; Schulte-Kemna, Achim; Pötter, Klaus-Werner; Ott-Voigtländer, Ulrike; Schwenke, Reto; Thinesse-Mallwitz, Manuela; Siml, Steffi; Stern, Hirene; Roelen, Harald; Scherhag, Klaus-Peter; Matulla, Petra; Herrmann, Hans Joachim; Neumann, Gerhard; Barbuia, Marius; Vormann, Reinhold; Hitzler, Karl; Linum, Aneas; Hanke, Klaus; Hohberg, Hans-Joachim; Klingel, Roger; Hohnstädter, Rainer; Klasen, Hartmut; Aschermann, Peter; Grau, Wilfried; Killinger, Paul; Gross, Kathrin; Naus, Rainer; Todoroff, Karin; Zühlke, Wolfgang; Kellner, Hanns-Ulrich; Hager, Eva; Thieme, Jochen; Kornitzky, Michael; Rösch, Volker; Heinze, Elke; Hiederer, Wolfgang; Konz, Karl-Heinz; Köhler, Michael; Diekmann, Martin; Junghans, Edith; Dietermann, Friedgard; Kerp, Ekkehard; Schäfer-Lehnhausen, Silvia; Kruck, Irmtraut; Ettelt, Rolf; Hölscher, Aneas; Kittler, Sybil; Jung, Heiun; Mailänder, Albert; Nowara, Peter; Ritschl, Harald; Mödl, Bernhard; Gallwitz, Torsten; Meyer, Stephan; Peter, Anton; Peters, Otto; Pflaum, Petra; Fröhlich, Karl-Heinz; Mertens, Hans-Jürgen; Merlin-Sprünken, Verena; Erpenbach, Klaus; Fervers, Frank; Kuhl, Ulrike; Halsig, Friedemann; Rein, Wilfried; Hauser, Ernst-Richard; Laubenthal, Florin; Richard, Frank; Langer, Claus; Lange, Rainer; Eska, Jan; Mohanty, George; Lange, Isengard; Eltges, Nicole; Kuntz, Christoph; Mechery, Thomas; Vöckl, Josef; Viergutz, Christoph; Stähle-Klose, Claudia; Sohr, Katja; Böhler, Steffen; Brecke, Georg; Burls, Malcolm; Werner, Karl-Michael; Vorpahl, Ralf; Stahl-Weigert, Beate; Bunge, Gerd; Thomsen, Jutta; Blessing, Erwin; Bengel, Bengel; Buhlmann, Ulla; Tröger, Tröger; Sippel, Sippel; Vossschulte, Vossschulte; Wilms, Wilms; Appelt, Appelt; Dauterstedt, Dauterstedt; Witte, Witte; Böttger, Uta; Wyborski, Waltraud; Strache, Sabine; Böttger, Werner; Zeiner, Luise; Wuttke, Wanda; Stoidner- Amann, Annette; Stoermer, Brigitte; Bock, Stephan; Groos-März, Cornelia; Thamm, Maria-Elisabeth; Meier, Josef; Schneider, Martin; Niessen, Ulrich; Storm, Gernot-Rainer; Streitbürger, Elmar; Münkel, Thomas; Palfi, Mihai; Naumann, Ulrich; Tannhof, Gabriele; Streibhardt, Frank; Gebhardt, Wolfgang; Nieswandt, Gerhard; Gerke, Ulrich; Nöhring, Axel; Bott, Jochen; Goertz, Jutta; Winkler, Dietmar; Lotter, Edith; Kraaz, Katja; Bärwinkel, Petra; Hildebrandt, Diana; Weyers, Georg; Kubin-Siring, Birgit; Baier, Eduard; Weber, Thomas; Holz, Dirk-Egbert; Wolfers, Johannes; Kihm, Wolfgang; Kamali-Ernst, Schirin; Amann, Wolfgang; Kaase, Hans-Jürgen; Banning, Ottmar; Voigt, Thomas; Grünert, Frank; Gürtler, Michael; Pferdmenges, Karin; van Treek, Heiko; Möller, Bernd; Weigel, Sybille; Jun Hassler, Normann; Mauer, Helmuth; Beckers, Erwin; Weber, Clemens-August; Hawash, Hana; Ladke, Dietrich; Labitzky, Gerlinde; Kunkel, Petra; Hartung, Wolfgang; Pomykaj, Thomas; Prokop, Heiun; Schleif, Thomas; Cascino, Luisa; Exner, Petra; Daelman, Eric; Dietrich, Aneas; Prasse, Thomas; Brundisch, Stefanie; Schipper, Ralf; Duderstaedt, Bernd; de Haan, Fokko; Schmidt-Reinwald, Astrid; Seidel, Peter; Schmitz, Joachim; Bülent, Ergec; Ja Pique, Pyoong; Ding, Roland; Eggeling, Thomas; Duderstaedt, Elvira; Ferchland, Hans-Peter; Kruth, Renate; Gralla, Dieter; Köhler, Angelika; Laborge, Joachim Rene; Hammer, Harald; Richter, Ilona; Sauldie, Happy; Valk-Denkema, Inge Van Der; van der Valk, Leo; Feely, John; Dunne, Liam; Cox, John; Doyle, Michael; O'Gorman, Mary; Kennedy, John; Maher, Brian; Forde, Derek; Harrington, Peter; Cronin, Brian; Coady, Anew; Craig, John; O'Dowd, Caroline; O'Doherty, Brian; O'Connor, Patrick; Ling, Roland; Perry, Majella; Crowley, James; Keaveney, Lynda; Townley, Eadaoin; O'Shea, Eamonn; Regan, Michael; Cunningham, Seamus; Bluett, Desmond; Whyte, Oliver; Casey, Michael; Ruane, Fergal; Fitzgerald, Eleanor; O'Beirn, Eugene; Faller, Eamonn; Moffatt, Sean; Coleman, Michael; Day, Brendan; Mcadam, Brendan; O'Neill, Daragh; Mac Mahon, Conor; Wheeler, Mark; Byrne, Sheila; Fulcher, Kieran; CAREY, Owen; O'Connell, Kieran; Keane, Jack; Almarsomi, Laith; Vaughan, Carl; O'Callaghan, Tom; Grufferty, Tadgh; Shanahan, Eamon; Crowley, Brendan; Moran, Joe; Cotter, Jeremy; Healy, Colin; Curtin, Tom; Dillon, Joe; Dennehy, Thomas; Murphy, Elaine; Kennedy, Michael; Coffey, Donal; Carroll, Paul O.; Oliver, Barry; Mccarthy, Shane; Joyce, Peter; O'Shea, Gerard; Apperloo, A. J.; Basart, D. C. G.; Bax, M.; Beysens, P. A. J.; Breed, J. G. S.; Derks, A.; Eijgenraam, J. W.; Hermann, J. P. R.; Janus, C. L.; Kaasjager, H. A. H.; Klomps, H. C.; Koole, M. A. C.; Koster, T.; Kroon, C.; Lieverse, A. G.; Massaar-Hagen, B. E. M.; Moghaddam, F.; Oldenburg-Ligtenberg, P. C.; Potter van Loon, B. J.; Stroes, E. S. G.; Twickler, Th B.; van Asperdt, F. G. M. H.; van Asseldonk, J. P. M.; van der Loos, T. L. J. M.; van der Velde, R. Y.; van der Vring, J. A. F.; van Dorp, W. T.; van Essen, G. G.; van Kalmthout, P. M.; van Liebergen, R. A. M.; van Wissem, S.; Waanders, H.; Withagen, A. J. A. M.; Andersen, Per Vidar Klemet; Andersen, Randi F.; Andersson, Egil; Arnstad, Asle; Belguendouz, Larbi; Birkeland, Inge Arve; Bjørkum, Kari; Bredvold, Thor; Brevig, Leif Harald; Buchman, Erik; Burkeland-Matre, Rune; Burski, Krzysztoft; Byre, Roald; Bø, Per Erik; Dahl, Erik; Duch, Anna; Duong, Khoa; Dvergsdal, Peter; Edvardsen, Magne; Ernø, Asbjørn; Fredwall, Svein Otto; Glasø, Morten; Glasø, Jan; Grini, Asbjørn; Hallaråker, Arne; Normann Hansen, Age Normann; Haugland, Helge Haugland; Henrichsen, Svein Høegh; Hestnes, Atle; Idehen, Norman I. E.; Jacobsen, Kristin Løland; Johansen, Ture; Johnsen, Roald; Jonasmo, Kåre; Kirknes, Svetalana; Kjetså, Arild; Kjaer, Peter; Knoph, Erik; Knutssøn, Carl; Koss, Arne; Kravtchenko, Oleg; Krogsæter, Dagfinn; Langaker, Kåre; Lind, Knut W.; Lund, Kjell Rømyhr; Madsbu, Sverre; Mehlum, Yvonne E. Mazurek; Moon, Philipp; Movafagh, Aram; Myhrer, Kurt; Nørager, Dan Michael; Ore, Stephan; Rafat, Hooshang B.; Rød, Reinert; Schmidt-Melbye, Torgeir; Singh, Navneet; Singsås, Tore; Skjelvan, Gunnar; Smet, Arthur; Staalesen, Staale; Storeheier, Espen; Storhaug, Sidsel; Storm-Larsen, Ane; Sundby, Jon Eivind; Syverstad, Dag Eivind; Sørensen, Anne Sissel; Torjusen, Trygve B.; Torkelsen, Arne; Tunby, Jan Reidar; Vanberg, Pål Johan; Vevatne, Audun; Vikse, Arild; Wahlstrøm, Viktor; Walaas, Kirsten; Walløe, Arne Eyolf; Wear-Hansen, Hans-Gunnar; Ole Ystgaard, Ole Aneas; Zimmermann, Birgit; Øvsthus, Knut; Aião, Julio; Albuquerque, Mario; Alves, Fernando; Esteves, Antonio; Amaral, Maria Fatima; Amaral, Fátima; Amorim, Helena; Anade, Benilde; Anade, Maria Benilde; Antonio, Godinho; Araujo, Francisco; Arriaga, Antonio; Baeta, Sonia; Afonso, Francisca Banha; Beato, Vitor; Beirão, Paula; Martins, Ausenda Belo; Bernardes, Jose; Botas, Luis; Baeta, Antonio; Ramos, Manuel Braga; Brandão, Peo; Brandão, Antonio G.; Brandão, Antonio; Raposo, Antonio Caetano; Carrilho, Francisco; Carvalho, Isabel; Carvalho, Patricia; Castel-Branco, Ana; Castellano, Maria Desamparados; Corredoura, Ana; Corredoura, Ana Sofia; Costa, Vitor; Coutinho, João; Crujo, Francisco; Cunha, Damião; Dias, Manuela; Fernandes, Maria Emilia; Ferreira, Gustavo; Ferreira, Dirce; Ferreira, Jorge; Ferreira, Antonio M.; Fonseca, Antonio; Freitas, Paula; Gago, Amandio; Galego, Rosa; Garrett, Antonio Viriato; Gavina, Cristina; Simões, José Geraldes; Gomes, Maria Fatima; Gomes, Norberto; Gomez, Brigitte; Graça, Peo; Gravato, Antonio; Guedes, Nuno Filipe; Guerra, Fernanda; Issa, Custódio; João, Isabel Fernandes; João, Isabel; Jorge, Vasco; Leite, Maria Salome; Lousada, Nuno; Macedo, Filipe M.; Madeira Lopes, João; Magalhães, Jorge; Marinho, Jose Carlos; Marques, Carlos; Marques, Jose Augusto; Marques Ferreira, Antonio; Martins, Jose Carlos; Martins, J. Belo; Matos, Alice; Melo, Miguel; Miguel, Antonia; Monteiro, Filomena; Monteiro, Francisco; Monteiro, Filomena B.; Sarmento, João Morais; Morato Sá, Maria José; Mota, Joana; Moura, Luis; Moura, Brenda; Neves, Lena; Neves, Celestino; Oliveira, Maria; Oliveira Ramos, Manuel; Osorio, Ramos; Pacheco, Joao; Palma, Isabel; Peixoto, Maria Cristina; Pereira, Helder; Pestana, João; Pignatelli, Duarte; Pinho, Hernani; Puig, Jorge; Raindo, Maria; Ramos, Helena; Rebelo, Marta; Roigues, Antonio; Roigues, Alvaro; Roigues, Elisabete; Rola, José; Rovytchcva, Milena; Sa, João; Santos, Fernando; Santos, João Cesar; Sequeira Duarte, Joao; Serra E Silva, Polybio; Silva, Bernardino; Silva, Paula; Silva, Maria; Silva, Francisco; Silva, Dora; Silva, José; Silvestre, Isabel; Simões, Heleno; Soares, Manuela; Sousa, Nelson; Sousa, Antonio; Souto, Delfina; Teixeira, Esmeralda; Torres, Isabel; Valle, Tahydi; Ventura, Carlos; Vicente, Ana; Vieira, Muriel; Alfaro, Rafael; Alonso, Roigo; Alvarez, Juan Carlos; Allut, Germán; Amado, Jose A.; Ampuero, Javier; Angel, Luis Fernando; Antolín, Eduardo; Anton, Javier; Aranda, Jose Luis; Argimon, Jordi; Arques, Francesc; Arribas, Jose Peo; Arroya, Concepción; Arroyo, Jose Antonio; Auladell, Maria Antonia; Bajo, Julian; BALVIN, Alberto; Ballester, Jose Vicente; Barreda Glez, Maria Jesus; Becerra, Antonio; Bermejo, Juan Carlos; Bernacer, Luis; Besada, Ricardo; Blasco, Jesús; Bravo, Manuel; Bueno, Francisco Manuel; Campo, Ignacio; Carrasco, Jose Luis; Catalán, José Ignacio; Cobo, Jose; Coello, Ignacio; Combarro, Jesús; Contreras, Juan A.; Correa, Julian; Cortilla, Alberto; Cuatrecasas, Guillem; Chicharro, Sana; de Dios, Juan; de Los Arcos, Enrique; de Portugal, Jose; del Cañizo, Francisco; del Molino, Fatima; Díaz, Jose Luis; Domingo, Javier; Escobar, Carlos; Escoda, Jaume; Espinosa, Eugenio; Ester, Francisco; Fernandez, Antonio; Ferreiro, Manuel; Fondas, Jose Maria; Fraile, Angel Luis; Franco, Miguel; Fuentes, Francisco; Garcia, Jose Antonio; Garcia, Domingo; Garcia, Manuel Enrique; García, Luis; Garcia, Jesus; Gilabert, Rosa; Goiria, Begoña; Gomez, Purificación; Gomez-Calcerrada, David; Gonzalez, Manuel; Gonzalez, Jose Manuel; Guijarro, Carlos; Guirao Gujarro, Victor; Herrera, Carlos; Herrera, Maria Carmen; Herrero, Miguel; Ibarguren, Amaya; Irigoyen, Luis; Jimenez, Blas; Lamelas, Jose Antonio; Laplaza, Ismael; Laporta, Felix; Lazo, Victor; Leal, Mariano; Ledesma, Vicente; Lopez, Peo; Lopez, Pablo; Lopez, Alberto; López, Maria Jose; Lopez-Cepero, Eduardo; Lorenzo, Francisco; Lucena, Javier; Luquín, Rafael; Lloveras, Ariadna; Maceda, Teresa; Macia, Ramon; Marti, Cristina; Martin, Jose Maria; Martin, Isodoro; Martín Lesende, Iñaki; Martinez, Mercedes; Martinez, Juan Alberto; Martinez, Peo; Martinez, Angel; Mato, Fernando; Medel, Federico; Mederos, Ana Maria; Mediavilla, Javier; Mediavilla, Gregorio; Mestron, Antonio; Michans, Antonio; Millán, Jesús; Molina, Carlos; Monroy, Carmelo; Monte, Inés; Montes, Jose Maria; Morales, Clotilde; Morales, Francisco J.; Morata, Carmen; Mori, Carlos; Muñoz, Jaime; Muñoz, Maria Jose; Núnez, Julio; Nuñez, Alfonso; Ocaña, Fermin; Olaz, Fernando; Ollero Artigas, Anes; Ortega, Juan; Oteo, Olga; Pascual, Jose Maria; Paya, Jose Antonio; Pechuan, Joaquín; Penedo Suarez, Ramón; Perez, Eugenia; Pesquera, Carlos; Pia, Gonzalo; Piea, Maria; Pinilla, Martin; Pita, Alejano; Pose, Antonio; Prieto Díaz, Miguel Angel; Quesada, Carmen; Ramirez, Francisco; Ramirez, Carmen; Ramirez, Luisa; Reinares, Leonardo; Rey, Salvador; Ribas, Montse; Ridaura, Amparo; Ridocci, Francisco; Rigueiro, Peo; Rivera, Salomón; Robles, Antonio; Rodero, Estrella; Roiguez, Jose Angel; Romero, Fernando; Romero Hernandez, Franklin; Romeu, Regina; Rubio Buisán, Lorenzo; Salas, Fernando; Sánchez, Carlos; Sánchez, Jesus; Saponi, Jose Maria; Serres, Miguel; Suarez, Saturnino; Suarez, Carmen; Tato, Maria; Tebar, Francisco Javier; Toda, Maria Roca; Tofe, Santiago; Urdiain, Raquel; Vaamonde, Leopoldo; Valderrama, Javier; Vazquez, Jose Antonio; Velazquez, Osvaldo; Venell, Federico; Vilariño, Ruben; Villa, Maria Jesus; Villar, Maria Dolores; Zarauza, Jesus; Zuñiga, Manuel; Abab, Jose Luis; Abad, Eduardo; Abad, Rafael; Afonso, Carmen; Aguilar, Gerardo; Alberiche, Maria Del Pino; Alcolea, Rosa; Alegria, Eduardo; Almagro, Fátima; Almenara, Africa; Almenos, Maria Cruz; Alonso, Javier; Alvarez, Manuel; Ampudia, Javier; Andia, Victor Manuel; Anglada, Jordi; Aranda, Miguel Ángel; Arbelo, Lorenzo; Armengol, Francesc; Arnau, Asunción; Arrarte, Vicente; Arribas, Bienvenido; Artiñano, Yolanda; Avilés, Benjamín; Ayensa, Javier; Ballestar, Enric; Ballester, Javier; Barcelo, Bartolome; Barcena, Felix; Barranco, Mercedes; Barrena, Isabel; Barriales, Vicente; Barrot, Joan; Bartolome, Jose A.; Belmonte, Joan; Bellés, Amadeo; Benito, Josefina; Bernad, Antonio; Biendicho, Armando; Blanco, Rubén; Boix, Evangelina; Bonora, Carlos; Boxó, Jose Ramon; Brea, Angel; Caballero, Peo; Cabrera, Peo; Cabrero, Juan Jose; Calduch, Lourdes; Calero, Francisco; Calvo Garcia, Jose Javier; Camacho, Jose; Canales, Juan Jose; Caparros, Jorge; Carbonell, Francisco; Caro, Manuel; Castilla, Miguel Angel; Castillo, Luis; Cepero, Daniel; Cerdan, Miguel; Cimbora, Antonio; Civera, Miguel; Colchero, Justo; Comas Fuentes, Angel; Corpas, Clara; Corrales, Juan Antonio; Cotobal, Eusebio; Cruz, Carmen; Cruz, Inmaculada; de La Flor, Manuel D.; de Luis, Alberto; del Alamo, Alberto; del Rosario, Victor; Diego, Carlos; D'Lacoste, Marta; Doganis Peppas, Constantino; Dominguez, Jose Ramon; Durá, Francisco Javier; Durand, Jose L.; Ena, Javier; Encinas, Ana Rosa; Erdozain, Juan Peo; Escribano, Jose; Escriva, Blanca; Esteve, Eduardo; Facila, Lorenzo; Fenoll, Federico; Fernandez, Eugenio; Fernandez, Celia; Fernandez, Maria Jesus; Fernandez, Antonia; Fernandez, Jacinto; Fernandez, Severo; Fernandez, Jose Manuel; Fernandez, Jose Manuel Fernandez; Ferrer, Juan Carlos; Ferrer, Peo; Ferrer Bascuñana, Peo; Fierro, Maria Jose; Flores, Julio; Fuentes, Fernando; Fuertes, Jorge; Galgo, Alberto; Galvez, Angel; Gallego, Anea; Garcia, Maria Angeles; Garcia, Jose; Garcia, Maria Luisa; Garcia, Peo; Garcia, Javier; García, Francisco; Garrido, Nícolas Garrido; Gil, Manuel Gil; Ginés Gascón, Ramón; Godoy, Diego; Gomez, Carlos Manuel; Gonzalez, Miguel; Gonzalez, Rosa; Gonzalez, Rocío; Gonzalez, Enrique; Gonzalez, Juan Jose; Gonzalez, Joaquin; Gonzalez Huambos, Adan; Guerrero, Jordi; Guillen, Rosario; Guirao, Lorenzo; Gutierrez, Fernando; Gutierrez, Diego; Hernandez, Alberto; Hernandez, Antonio; Hernandis, Vicenta; Herrero, Jose Vicente; Herreros, Benjamin; Hevia Roiguez, Eduardo; Horgue, Antonio; Illan, Fatima; Inigo, Pilar; Ibrahim Jaber, Ali; Jimenez, Manuel; Jornet, Agusti; Juanola, Ester; Laguna, Alfonso; Latorre, Juan; Lebron, Jose Antonio; Lecube, Albert; Ledesma, Claudio; Ligorria, Cristina; Lima, Joan; López, Jose Enrique; Lopez, Manuel; López, José Antonio; López, Jaime; López, Isio; Lozano, Jose Vicente; Mangas, Miguel Angel; Mangas, Alipio; Manzano, Antonio; Maraver, Juan; Marco, Maria Dolores; Marchán, Enrique; Marchante, Francisco; Marin, Fernando; Marreo, Josefa Esther; Martin, Manuel; Martin, Alberto; Martin, Francisco Javier; Martinez, Antonio; Martinez, Guillermo; Martínez, Luis; Martinez Barselo, Antonio Pablo; Mas, Emili; Mascareño, Isabel; Mascarós, Enrique; Massa, Rita; Mazón, Pilar; Mediavilla, Juan Diego; Mena, Candido; Mendez, Jose; Mendez, Jose Maria; Mezquita Raya, Peo; Millan, Jose Maria; Millaruelo, Jose; Minguela, Ester; Miret, Pere; Molina, Mariano; Molina, Carmen; Montagud, Blanca; Montalban, Coral; Montiel, Angel; Montoro, Javier; Monze, Bernardo; Moreno, Francisco Luis; Morillas, Antonio; Moro, Jose Antonio; Moya, Ana; Muñiz, Ovidio; Muñoz, Manuel; Navarro, Vicente Luis; Nerin, Jesus; Nicolas, Ricardo; Nogueiras, Concepción; Ojeda, Benito; Olmerilla, Javier; Oller, Guillermo; Ortega, Antonio; Ortega, Manuel; Ortega, Miguel; Ortiz, Maria Jose; Otegui Alarduya, Luis; Palet, Jordi; Palomo, Jesus; Paytubí, Carlos; Peiro, Rafael; Pelaez, Carmen; Peña, Peo; Peñafiel, Javier; Perez, Antonia; Perez, Elvira; Perez, Tomas; Peso, Miguel; Pilar, Juan Manuel; Piñeiro, Carlos; Plaza, Jose Antonio; Polo, Noelia; Portal, Maria; Prieto, Jesus; Prieto, Luis; Prieto Novo, Manuel; Puñal, Peo; Quesada, Miguel; Quindimil, Jose Antonio; Rabade, Jose Manuel; Ramila Beraza, Luis Antonio; Ramirez, José Manuel; Ramos, Jose Antonio; Ramos, Francisco; Rayo, Manuel; Reixa Vizoso, Sol; Reyes, Antonio; Rico, Miguel Angel; Ripoll, Tomas; Rivera, Antonio; Robres, Mariano; Rodilla, Enrique; Roiguez, Miguel Angel; Roiguez, Zoilo Jesus; Roiguez, Carlos; Roiguez, Pilar; Roiguez, Melchor; Roiguez, Alfonso; Rojas, Domingo; Rosell, Luis; Rossignoli, Carlos; Rueda, Antonio; Rueda, Eloy; Ruix, Anes; Ruiz, Jose Antonio; Ruiz, Luis; Saban, Jose; Saez, Francisco Jose; Salleras, Narcis; Sánchez, Gerardo; Sanchez, Gloria; Sanchez, Angel; Sanfeliu, Josep Maria; Sangros Gonzalez, Javier; Santos, Francisco; Santus, Eufrosina; Sebastian, Alfredo; Seguro, Maria Eugenia; Selles, David; Serrano, Daniel; Serrano, Soledad; Serrano, Adalberto; Sestorain, Francisco; Solbes, Ruben; Soriano, Cristina; Suárez, Héctor; Surroca, Maria Luisa; Tarabini, Ada; Tarraga, Peo; Teixido, Eulalia; Terron, Raquel; Torres, Antonio; Tortosa, Jose Maria; Tortosa, Frederic; Valdés, Carmen; Valdés, Peo; Valiente, Jose Ignacio; Varo, Antonio; Vazquez, Enrique; Vázquez, Luis; Vela Ruiz de Morales, Jose Manuel; Vericat, Antonio; Vicioso, Peo; Vilaplana, Carlos; Villazón, Francisco; Lidia Viñas, Lidia Viñas; Zuagoitia, Jose Felix; Nörgaard, Faris; Dziamski, Ryszard; Haglund, Lars; Holm, Daniela; Sars, Mikael; Jagunic, Ivica; Östgård, Per; Kumlin, Lars; Jacobsson, Michael; Hamad, Yousef; Jäger, Wanje; Särhammar, Lars; Olsson, Anders; Boldt-Christmas, Antonina; Nyborg, Karin; Kjellström, Thomas; Ghazal, Faris; Wikström, Lene; Holby, Torulf; Bhiladvala, Pallonji; Kynde, Sara Maria; Eizyk, Enrique Julio; Tengblad, Anders; Christoffersson, Ole; Sjöström, Astrid; Kynde, Christian; Katzman, Per; Tenhunen, Anita; Lennermo, Klas; Lindholm, Carl-Johan; Löndahl, Magnus; Elfstrand, Aino; Grönlund-Brown, Inger; Ziedén, Bo; Minnhagen, Karin; Lindvall, Peter; Fant, Kristina; Kaczynski, Jacek; Wallmark, Anders; Wallén, Carl-Erik; Wallberg, Håkan; Grönquist, Lennart; Hansen, John Albert; Björkander, Inge; Timberg, Ingar; Rosenqvist, Ulf; Fries, Robert; Carlsson, Jan-Erik; Rautio, Aslak Tauno; Sjöberg, Lennart; Wirdby, Alexander; Höök, Peter; Larsson, Åsa; Bergström, Catharina Lysell; Jwayed, Addnan; Smolowicz, Adam; Lindman, Anne-Christine; Nilsson, Per; Tarrach, Gerrit; Carlsson, Ingolf; Wieloch, Mattias; Rindevall, Peter; Strömblad, Gunnar; Holmberg, Göran; Shahnazarian, Henrik; Melchior, Jan; Younan, Kamal; Hansson, Anders; Bjurklint, Dag; Borgencrantz, Bertil; Sjöström, Malin; Mullaart, Mikael; Munoz, Marjatta; Jakkola, Vallentina; Romot, Jaan; Dash, Rabinarayan; Magnusson, Jan-Olof; Ahmed, Saman; Jonsson, Christina; Pipkorn, Owe; Bray, Edward; Wolff, Aneas; Black, Iain; Head, Christopher; Allan, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of persistent lipid abnormalities in statin-treated patients with diabetes with and without the metabolic syndrome. This was a cross-sectional study of 22,063 statin-treated outpatients consecutively recruited by clinicians in Canada and 11 European countries. Patient

  9. Cognitive–Behavioral Therapy and Hypnotic Relaxation to Treat Sleep Problems in an Adolescent With Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfect, Michelle M.; Elkins, Gary R.

    2014-01-01

    Inadequate sleep among adolescents frequently contributes to obesity and reduced academic performance, along with symptoms of anxiety, depression, fatigue, and attention deficits. The etiological bases of sleep quality has been associated with both stress and sleep habits. These problems tend to be especially important for adolescents with diabetes as the effects of poor sleep complicate health outcomes. This case example concerns a 14-year-old adolescent girl with a history of type I diabetes and stress-related sleep difficulties. Treatment included cognitive–behavioral methods and hypnotic relaxation therapy. Results of this case example and other controlled research suggest that hypnotic relaxation therapy is well accepted, results in good compliance, and serves as a useful adjunctive to cognitive–behavioral intervention for sleep problems. PMID:20865769

  10. Non-insulin drugs to treat hyperglycaemia in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Christian Seerup; Dejgaard, Thomas Fremming; Madsbad, Sten

    2016-01-01

    Insulin treatment of individuals with type 1 diabetes has shortcomings and many patients do not achieve glycaemic and metabolic targets. Consequently, the focus is on novel non-insulin therapeutic approaches that reduce hyperglycaemia and improve metabolic variables without increasing the risk...... with few participants; evidence for the efficacy of concomitant treatments is scarce and largely clinically insignificant. A subgroup of patients with type 1 diabetes for whom non-insulin antidiabetic drugs could significantly benefit glycaemic control cannot yet be defined, but we suggest that obese...... of hypoglycaemia or other adverse events. Several therapies given in conjunction with insulin have been investigated in clinical trials, including pramlintide, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, sodium-glucose co-transporter inhibitors, metformin, sulfonylureas...

  11. Might genetics play a role in understanding and treating diabetic polyneuropathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spallone, Vincenza

    2017-05-01

    Despite the high prevalence and impact on quality of life, costs, and survival, there are still unresolved issues regarding diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN): the lack of definite knowledge of its pathogenesis; the limited preventive action of glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes; and the unavailability of evidence-based effective disease-modifying treatment. How can genetics provide the tools to address these gaps? Ziegler et al for the GDS Group explore the novel hypothesis that genetic variability in transketolase (TKT) might contribute to susceptibility to DPN in patients with newly diagnosed type 1 and type 2 diabetes (well characterised for DPN). Transketolase diverts excess glycolytic metabolites from the hexosamine, protein kinase C, and advanced glycation endproduct pathways to the pentose phosphate pathway, with a protective effect against hyperglycaemia-induced damage. Moreover, thiamine and its derivative benfotiamine are among the few disease-modifying agents still under consideration as DPN treatment. The authors find significant associations of single-nucleotide polymorphisms of the TKT gene with the Total Symptom Score and thermal thresholds, in particular in male participants with type 2 diabetes. Moreover, they measure plasma methylglyoxal (a glycating agent, whose availability is hindered by TKT) without however finding a relation with TKT single-nucleotide polymorphisms. The link found between TKT genetic variability and nerve function measures is considered here in the context of DPN genetic studies and of experimental and clinical findings regarding thiamine and benfotiamine. The conclusion is that available data supports the decision to maintain focus on both the search for DPN genetic biomarkers and the therapeutic attempts to target thiamine, TKT, and methylglyoxal. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Targeting carbonic anhydrase to treat diabetic retinopathy: Emerging evidences and encouraging results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiwei, Zhang [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, HuaShan Hospital, Institute of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, No. 12 Wulumuqi Road, Shanghai 200040 (China); Hu, Renming, E-mail: taylorzww@gmail.com [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, HuaShan Hospital, Institute of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, No. 12 Wulumuqi Road, Shanghai 200040 (China)

    2009-12-18

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of vision loss among working-age populations in developed countries. Current treatment options are limited to tight glycemic, blood pressure control and destructive laser surgery. Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are a group of enzymes involving in the rapid conversion of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons. Emerging evidences reveal CA inhibitors hold the promise for the treatment of DR. This article summarizes encouraging results from clinical and animal studies, and reviews the possible mechanisms.

  13. Targeting carbonic anhydrase to treat diabetic retinopathy: Emerging evidences and encouraging results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiwei, Zhang; Hu, Renming

    2009-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of vision loss among working-age populations in developed countries. Current treatment options are limited to tight glycemic, blood pressure control and destructive laser surgery. Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are a group of enzymes involving in the rapid conversion of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons. Emerging evidences reveal CA inhibitors hold the promise for the treatment of DR. This article summarizes encouraging results from clinical and animal studies, and reviews the possible mechanisms.

  14. Angiotensin-(1-7): A Novel Peptide to Treat Hypertension and Nephropathy in Diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padda, Ranjit Singh; Shi, Yixuan; Lo, Chao-Sheng; Zhang, Shao-Ling; Chan, John S D

    2015-10-14

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a pivotal role in mammalian homeostasis physiology. The RAS can be delineated into a classical RAS (the pressor arm) including angiotensinogen (Agt), renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensin II (Ang II) and angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R), and a counterbalancing novel RAS (the depressor arm) including Agt, renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE-2), angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang 1-7) and Ang 1-7 receptor (or Mas receptor (MasR)). Hyperglycemia (diabetes) induces severe tissue oxidative stress, which stimulates the pressor arm of the renal RAS axis and leads to an increase in ACE/ACE-2 ratio, with excessive formation of Ang II. There is a growing body of evidence for beneficial effects of the depressor arm of RAS (ACE-2/Ang 1-7/MasR) axis in diabetes, hypertension and several other diseased conditions. Evidence from in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies reflects anti-oxidant, anti-fibrotic, and anti-inflammatory properties of Ang 1-7. Most of the currently available therapies only target suppression of the pressor arm of RAS with angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) and ACE inhibitors (ACEi). However, it is time to consider simultaneous activation of the depressor arm for more effective outcomes. This review summarizes the recent updates on the protective role of Ang 1-7 in hypertension and kidney injury in diabetes, as well as the possible underlying mechanism(s) of Ang 1-7 action, suggesting that the ACE-2/Ang 1-7/MasR axis can be developed as a therapeutic target for the treatment of diabetes-induced hypertension and renal damage.

  15. Could We Really Use Aloe vera Food Supplements to Treat Diabetes? Quality Control Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon Habtemariam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes UK has recently listed a number of herbs and spices that have been clinically shown to improve blood glucose control in type-2 diabetes patients and the diabetes high-risk group. With Aloe vera being top in this list, its health benefit along with health and beauty/food retailers supplying it was illustrated in detail. Previous article from this laboratory scrutinised the merit of using A. vera as an alternative therapy to prescription antidiabetic drugs and the risk of using food supplements in the market which do not qualify as drug preparations. In continuation of this discussion, the present study assesses three Aloe Pura brands and one Holland and Barret brand of A. vera juice supplements in the UK market through chromatographic and spectroscopic analysis. While the polysaccharide active ingredient, acemannan, appears to be within the recommended limit, it was found that Aloe Pura (one of the best-selling brands for A. vera supplement products have benzoate additive that does not appear in the supplement levels. Moreover, two of the Aloe Pura brand juices contain methanol, suggesting that the International Aloe Science Council (IASC certification does not guarantee the medicinal quality of these products. The therapeutic fitness of such supplements is discussed.

  16. Treating Chronically Ill Diabetic Patients with Limited Life Expectancy: Implications for Performance Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, LeChauncy D.; Landrum, Cassie R.; Urech, Tracy H.; Profit, Jochen; Virani, Salim S.; Petersen, Laura A.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Objectives To validly assess quality-of-care differences among providers, performance measurement programs must reliably identify and exclude patients for whom the quality indicator may not be desirable, including those with limited life expectancy. We developed an algorithm to identify patients with limited life expectancy and examined the impact of limited life expectancy on glycemic control and treatment intensification among diabetic patients. Design We identified diabetic patients with coexisting congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, dementia, end-stage liver disease, and/or primary/metastatic cancers with limited life expectancy. To validate our algorithm, we assessed 5-year mortality among patients identified as having limited life expectancy. We compared rates of meeting performance measures for glycemic control between patients with and without limited life expectancy. Among uncontrolled patients, we examined the impact of limited life expectancy on treatment intensification within 90 days. Setting 110 Veterans Administration facilities; October 2006 – September 2007 Participants 888,628 diabetic patients Measurements Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) Quality measurement and performance-based reimbursement systems should acknowledge the different needs of this population. PMID:22260627

  17. Could We Really Use Aloe vera Food Supplements to Treat Diabetes? Quality Control Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes UK has recently listed a number of herbs and spices that have been clinically shown to improve blood glucose control in type-2 diabetes patients and the diabetes high-risk group. With Aloe vera being top in this list, its health benefit along with health and beauty/food retailers supplying it was illustrated in detail. Previous article from this laboratory scrutinised the merit of using A. vera as an alternative therapy to prescription antidiabetic drugs and the risk of using food supplements in the market which do not qualify as drug preparations. In continuation of this discussion, the present study assesses three Aloe Pura brands and one Holland and Barret brand of A. vera juice supplements in the UK market through chromatographic and spectroscopic analysis. While the polysaccharide active ingredient, acemannan, appears to be within the recommended limit, it was found that Aloe Pura (one of the best-selling brands for A. vera supplement) products have benzoate additive that does not appear in the supplement levels. Moreover, two of the Aloe Pura brand juices contain methanol, suggesting that the International Aloe Science Council (IASC) certification does not guarantee the medicinal quality of these products. The therapeutic fitness of such supplements is discussed. PMID:29511381

  18. Endogenous Stem Cells Were Recruited by Defocused Low-Energy Shock Wave in Treating Diabetic Bladder Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yang; Xu, Lina; Zhao, Yong; Wang, Muwen; Jin, Xunbo; Zhang, Haiyang

    2017-04-01

    Defocused low-energy shock wave (DLSW) has been shown effects on activating mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in vitro. In this study, recruitment of endogenous stem cells was firstly examined as an important pathway during the healing process of diabetic bladder dysfunction (DBD) treated by DLSW in vivo. Neonatal rats received intraperitoneal injection of 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine (EdU) and then DBD rat model was created by injecting streptozotocin. Four weeks later, DLSW treatment was performed. Afterward, their tissues were examined by histology. Meanwhile, adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) were treated by DLSW in vitro. Results showed DLSW ameliorated voiding function of diabetic rats by recruiting EdU + Stro-1 + CD34 - endogenous stem cells to release abundant nerve growth factor (NGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Some EdU + cells overlapped with staining of smooth muscle actin. After DLSW treatment, ADSCs showed higher migration ability, higher expression level of stromal cell-derived factor-1 and secreted more NGF and VEGF. In conclusion, DLSW could ameliorate DBD by recruiting endogenous stem cells. Beneficial effects were mediated by secreting NGF and VEGF, resulting into improved innervation and vascularization in bladder.

  19. CONTAMINATED PROBLEMATIC SKIN WOUNDS IN DIABETIC PATIENTS TREATED WITH AUTOLOGOUS PLATELET-RICH PLASMA (PRP: A case series study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsvetan Sokolov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of platelet-rich plasma (PRP on contaminated problematic skin ulcers in patients with diabetes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 6 patients had been treated within the period from 2012 to 2014; they had various types of problematic wounds and diabetes type 2. Patients’ distribution by sex was as follows: 1 man and 5 women; mean age- 68 years. Ulcer types: acute (2 patients, hard-to-heal (2 patients and chronic (2 patients ulcers. The mean size of the skin and soft tissue defect was 9,5 cm2. Pathogenic microflora was isolated in 4 patients - S. aureus in three and Е. Coli in one. Based on a scheme developed by us, all cases were treated by administering platelet-rich plasma, derived by PRGF Endoret system. Follow-up period was within 4 – 6 months (4,5 on average. We used platelet rich plasma derived by PRGF Endoret system, applied on the wound bed on a weekly basis. RESULTS: Application of PRP allowed successful closure of all wounds. There were no complications associated with treatment of PRP. Epithelialization of the wound took 15 weeks on average for all patients. One patient presented with hyperkeratosis. Initial score of followed wounds, based on the scales are as follows: Total wound score – 10 p. Total anatomic score – 8 p. Total score – 15 p. at the initial stage. At the end of the treatment period scores were as follows - 0 p., which means excellent results CONCLUSION: We believe that the application of PRP may become optimal therapy in the treatment of contaminated problematic wounds in diabetic patients. PRP not only stimulates wound healing, but also has antimicrobial properties, which may contribute to the prevention of infections.

  20. What Is Macular Edema?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of diabetic retinopathy , and is the most common form of vision loss for people with diabetes—particularly ... about eye health and preserving your vision. Privacy Policy Related Studies Show Zika Virus May Cause More ...

  1. Doctor Octavio Montoro y los primeros casos de diabetes tratados con insulina en Cuba Doctor Octavio Montoro and the first cases of diabetes treated with insulin in Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagoberto Álvarez Aldana

    2003-08-01

    physicians in the application of insulin therapy, a significant event in the history of Cuban endocrinology but practically unknown for the new generations of endocrinologists. This literature review is aimed at underlining the introduction of insulin in modern clinics as an important event in Cuban medical histography, disseminating the clinical evolution and therapeutical scheme applied to the first cases of diabetes mellitus treated with insulin in Cuba and emphasizing the determination and capacity of the health professionals who were the pioneers of the clinical use of insulin in those years, among them Doctor Octavio Montoro. We consulted the medical references, files and other sources of that time to make this paper. As a result, it was learned that the treatment with insulin of diabetic patients was introduced in Cuba on February,1923 by Doctor Montoro, who had been recognized by his medical pieces of knowledge and vast culture. He occupied several posts and received a number of decorations. It was concluded that Cuba was one of the first countries in the world that used insulin as a therapeutical weapon against diabetes. Doctor Octavio Montoro made important contributions to research on diabetes; therefore, according to our opinion, he deserves to be considered as father of diabetology in our country.

  2. Pooled analysis of the CONFIRM registries: safety outcomes in diabetic patients treated with orbital atherectomy for peripheral artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael S; Yang, Tae; Adams, George

    2014-04-01

    To compare the acute outcomes of orbital atherectomy treatment in diabetic vs. non-diabetic patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). The CONFIRM registry series contained 1842 diabetic patients (1111 men; mean age 70.6±10.2 years) with 2819 lesions and 1247 non-diabetic patients (732 men; mean age 72.9±10.7 years) with 1885 lesions. The composite rate of procedure-related complications, including dissection, perforation, slow flow, vessel closure, spasm, embolism, and thrombus formation, was analyzed for the diabetic and non-diabetic groups. Diabetics were younger but had a higher prevalence of coronary artery disease (patherectomy resulted in similar low procedure-related complication rates in both the diabetic and non-diabetic groups, despite diabetics having more unfavorable baseline clinical and lesion characteristics. This study suggests that orbital atherectomy is a safe and effective treatment modality in both the diabetic and the non-diabetic populations.

  3. The nutraceutical benefits of subfractions of Abelmoschus esculentus in treating type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Ning Huang

    Full Text Available Abelmoschus esculentus (AE, a commonly consumed vegetable, is well-known for its anti-hyperglycemic effects. However, few scientific reports have identified its targets because mucilage increases the difficulty of manipulation. We recently reported extraction steps to obtain subfractions of AE, which were found to attenuate the adverse effects of high glucose and fatty acid in vitro. In this study, we used modified extraction steps and type 2 diabetic rats to explore whether AE subfractions can improve the metabolic disturbances caused by insulin resistance in vivo. AE subfractions (F1, F2, and FR were prepared. The type 2 diabetes model was induced by feeding male Sprague-Dawley rats with a high-fat diet and injecting them with 35 mg/kgbw streptozotocin when their body weight reached 475 ± 15 g. After a hyperglycemic status had been confirmed, the rats were tube-fed with or without different doses of AE subfractions. Serum glucose, lipid markers, insulin, HbA1c and HOMA-IR were measured in the following 12 weeks. Serum glucose promptly increased and insulin resistance was noted in the diabetic rats (glucose: 360-500 mg/dl, HOMA-IR 9.8-13.8. F2, rich in polysaccharides and carbohydrates, was most effective in attenuating hyperglycemia and insulin resistance (glucose: 200 mg/dl; HOMA-IR: 5.3 and especially HbA1C (from 8.0% to 6.5%. All of the AE subfractions lowered the level of triglycerides and free fatty acid, but not the level of total cholesterol. FR significantly increased the high-density lipoprotein/low-density lipoprotein ratio, indicating its benefits for lipoprotein profiles. While F2 and FR were associated with weight gain, F1 possessed an anti-obese effect. In conclusion, whether it is consumed as a vegetable or as a nutraceutical, AE has the potential to be an adjuvant therapy for diabetes. AE subfractions could be developed individually and deserve further investigation.

  4. Education and patient preferences for treating type 2 diabetes: a stratified discrete-choice experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janssen EM

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ellen M Janssen,1 Daniel R Longo,2 Joan K Bardsley,3 John FP Bridges1 1Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, 2Department of Family Medicine and Population Health, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, 3MedStar Health Research Institute and MedStar Nursing, Hyattsville, MD, USA Purpose: Diabetes is a chronic condition that is more prevalent among people with lower educational attainment. This study assessed the treatment preferences of patients with type 2 diabetes by educational attainment. Methods: Patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited from a national online panel in the US. Treatment preferences were assessed using a discrete-choice experiment. Participants completed 16 choice tasks in which they compared pairs of treatment profiles composed of six attributes: A1c decrease, stable blood glucose, low blood glucose, nausea, treatment burden, and out-of-pocket cost. Choice models and willingness-to-pay (WTP estimates were estimated using a conditional logit model and were stratified by educational status. Results: A total of 231 participants with a high school diploma or less education, 156 participants with some college education, and 165 participants with a college degree or more completed the survey. Participants with a college degree or more education were willing to pay more for A1c decreases ($58.84, standard error [SE]: 10.6 than participants who had completed some college ($28.47, SE: 5.53 or high school or less ($17.56, SE: 3.55 (p≤0.01. People with a college education were willing to pay more than people with high school or less to avoid nausea, low blood glucose events during the day/night, or two pills per day. Conclusion: WTP for aspects of diabetes medication differed for people with a college education or more and a high school education or less. Advanced statistical methods might overcome limitations of stratification and advance understanding

  5. Evaluation of subconjunctival injection of triamcinolone acetonide in patients with macular edema secondary to uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Chen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To evaluate the clinical effect of subconjunctival injection of triamcinolone acetonide in patients with macular edema secondary to uveitis. METHODS:Sixty-eight patients(82 eyeswith macular edema secondary to uveitis selected in our hospital from October 2014 to October 2015 were assigned into control group and experimental group according to random number table method, with 34 cases(41 eyesin each group. Patients in the control group were treated by intraocular injection of triamcinolone acetonide, and patients in the experimental group were given subconjunctival injection of triamcinolone acetonide. Clinical effect, central macular thickness and adverse reactions in the two groups were compared. RESULTS:There was no significant difference on the central macular thickness and best corrected visual acuity between the two groups before treatment(P>0.05. Central macular thickness in the experimental group after treatment(214.26±65.54 μmwas significantly lower than that in the control group after treatment(256.47±84.52 μm,PPPPCONCLUSION:Subconjunctival injection of triamcinolone acetonide exerts obvious effect in uveitis patients with macular edema, effectively improves visual acuity, alleviates macular edema and reduces the incidence of intraocular pressure increasing, conjunctival hemorrhage and other adverse reactions, which is safe and effective, thus has potential application.

  6. Treatment satisfaction of patients undergoing ranibizumab therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration in a real-life setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gohil R

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rishma Gohil,1,2 Roxanne Crosby-Nwaobi,1,2 Angus Forbes,2 Ben J Burton,3 Philip Hykin,1 Sobha Sivaprasad1,4 1National Institute for Health Research Moorfields Biomedical Research Centre, London, 2Diabetes Nursing, King’s College London, London, 3Ophthalmology Department, James Paget University Hospital, Great Yarmouth, 4Laser and Retinal Research Unit, King’s College Hospital, London, UK Context: Treatment satisfaction with a loading phase of monthly injections for 3 months followed by a pro-re-nata regimen of ranibizumab in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD remains unclear.Aims: The aim was to evaluate the treatment satisfaction of persons with nAMD treated with ranibizumab in a real-life setting.Settings and design: A cross-sectional study was conducted across three eye clinics within the National Health Service in the UK, where treatment is provided free at point of contact.Materials and methods: A total of 250 patients were selected randomly for the study. Treatment satisfaction was assessed using the Macular Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire. Data were collected on satisfaction of the service provided (Client Service Questionnaire-8 and the patients’ demographic and quality of life and treatment history. Factors governing treatment questionnaire were determined.Results: The most important factors that determined the satisfaction were the service provided at the clinic (Client Service Questionnaire-8, health-related quality of life (EQ-5D-3L, and duration of AMD. Visual acuity changes were rated as less important than one would have expected.Conclusion: The study result suggested that treatment satisfaction for nAMD was governed by the perception of being reviewed and injected regularly over a long period of time than the actual change in visual acuity from the treatment. Keyword: macular treatment satisfaction questionnaire, patient related outcome measure, treatment history, quality of life 

  7. The potential of SGLT2 inhibitors in phase II clinical development for treating type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pafili, K; Maltezos, E; Papanas, N

    2016-10-01

    There is now an abundance of anti-diabetic agents. However, only few patients achieve glycemic targets. Moreover, current glucose-lowering agents mainly depend upon insulin secretion or function. Sodium glucose co-transporter type 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors present a novel glucose-lowering therapy, inducing glycosuria in an insulin-independent fashion. In this review, the authors discuss the key efficacy and safety data from phase II clinical trials in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) of the main SGLT2 inhibitors approved or currently in development, and provide a rationale for their use in T2DM. Despite the very promising characteristics of this new therapeutic class, a number of issues await consideration. One important question is what to expect from head-to-head comparison data. We also need to know if dual inhibition of SGLT1/SGLT2 is more efficacious in reducing HbA1c and how this therapy affects metabolic and cardiovascular parameters. Additionally, several SGLT2 agents that have not yet come to market have hitherto been evaluated in Asian populations, whereas approved SGLT2 inhibitors have been frequently studied in other populations, including Caucasian subjects. Thus, we need more information on the potential role of ethnicity on their efficacy and safety.

  8. Myocardial glucose utilisation in type II diabetes mellitus patients treated with sulphonylurea drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Ikuo; Inoue, Yusuke; Moritan, Toshiyuki; Ohtomo, Kuni; Nagai, Ryozo

    2006-01-01

    Chronic sulphonylurea treatment maintains improved glycaemic control through mechanisms other than enhancement of insulin secretion and may act on various organs. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the chronic use of sulphonylurea drugs influences PET measurement of myocardial glucose utilisation (MGU) in type II diabetes mellitus. Forty-two patients with type II diabetes mellitus and 17 control subjects underwent dynamic 18 F-FDG PET to measure MGU during hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamping. Twenty-one patients had been taking sulphonylurea drugs for more than 1 year (SU group), and the other 21 patients were drug naive (non-SU group). The haemoglobin A1c levels in the two patient groups were similar. Glucose disposal rate (GDR) was also determined as a marker of whole-body insulin resistance. GDR in the SU group (9.01±2.53 mg min -1 kg -1 ) was significantly higher than that in the non-SU group (4.10±2.47, p -1 100 g -1 ) was significantly higher than that in the non-SU group (5.53±2.05, p<0.01) and was similar to that in the controls (7.49±2.74). (orig.)

  9. Use of snacks in insulin-treated people with diabetes mellitus and association with HbA1c , weight and quality of life: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, T; Kloos, C; Keßler, D; Müller, N; Thierbach, R; Wolf, G; Müller, U A

    2015-03-01

    Insulin therapies with prandial injections offer the possibility to skip snacks or omit meals. It is unclear how many people with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus eat snacks and whether they snack for their own comfort or only on the recommendation of healthcare professionals. In 2004, 163 consecutive people with insulin-treated diabetes seen in a university outpatient department were interviewed regarding their diet and degree of satisfaction with their meals. Fifty-five had Type 1 diabetes [age 47 years; diabetes duration 18 years; BMI 27 kg/m(2) ; HbA1c 62 mmol/mol (7.8%)], 53 had Type 2 diabetes with biphasic insulin therapy [age 68 years; diabetes duration 17 years; BMI 31 kg/m(2) ; HbA1c 60 mmol/mol (7.6%)] and 55 had Type 2 diabetes with prandial insulin therapy [age 60 years; diabetes duration 16 years; BMI 33 kg/m(2) ; HbA1c 59 mmol/mol (7.6%)]. Eighty per cent of those with Type 1 diabetes ate snacks, together with 77% of the Type 2 diabetes/biphasic group and 62% of the Type 2 diabetes/prandial group. Most participants (91% Type 1 diabetes, 88% Type 2 diabetes/biphasic group, 82% Type 2 diabetes/prandial group) liked to have snacks. The time at which they ate snacks was the same for both diabetes types. There were no differences between participants with Type 1 diabetes who snacked and those who did not in terms of age (P = 0.350), BMI (P = 0.368), HbA1c (P = 0.257) and time since diagnosis (P = 0.846). Participants with Type 2 diabetes who ate snacks were older than those who did not (biphasic: P = 0.006; prandial: P = 0.008). There were no differences in terms of BMI (biphasic: P = 0.731; prandial: P = 0.393), HbA1c (biphasic: P = 0.747; prandial: P = 0.616) and time since diagnosis (biphasic: P = 0.06; prandial: P = 0.620). Most people with insulin-treated diabetes eat snacks voluntarily and not because of physicians' instructions. There were no correlations between the use of snacks and HbA1c , BMI and

  10. Histomorphological and morphometric studies of the pancreatic islet cells of diabetic rats treated with aqueous extracts of Momordica charantia (karela fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Aftab Hossain

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effect of aqueous extract of Momordica charantia (karela (M. charantia fruits on blood glucose level, pancreatic weight changes and histopathology of pancreatic changes in the streptozotocin (STZ induced diabetic rats. Methods: Thirty-six albino rats were used in the experiment; diabetes mellitus was induced in 30 adult albino rats, using intraperitoneal injection of 55 mg/kg STZ. Six non diabetic rats remained as control (T1 . The diabetic rats were randomly assigned into five equal groups: diabetic control (T2 without any treatment, groups T3, T4, T5 and T6 were treated with aqueous extract of karela fruits daily at a doses of 250, 500 and 750 mg/kg and glibenclamide (5 mg/kg up to 90 d, respectively. At Day 90, all rats were sacrificed, the pancreases of the rats were excised and processed. Results: The results of this study indicate that aqueous extract of M. charantia fruits was able to reduce blood glucose level significantly compared with the diabetic control group (P<0.01. Histopathologically, STZ resulted severe necrotic changes in pancreatic islets. Tissues sections of pancreas in the treated groups showed regeneration of β cells and increased size of pancreatic islets. Conclusions: The present study suggests that oral feeding of M. charantia fruit juice has a significant anti-hyperglycemic effect and may have a role in the regeneration of the β cells in STZ diabetic rats.

  11. Management of pseudophakic cystoid macular edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Suqin; Patel, Shriji; Baumrind, Ben; Johnson, Keegan; Levinsohn, Daniel; Marcus, Edward; Tannen, Brad; Roy, Monique; Bhagat, Neelakshi; Zarbin, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Pseudophakic cystoid macular edema (PCME) is a common complication following cataract surgery. Acute PCME may resolve spontaneously, but some patients will develop chronic macular edema that affects vision and is difficult to treat. This disease was described more than 50 years ago, and there are multiple options for clinical management. We discuss mechanisms, clinical efficacy, and adverse effects of these treatment modalities. Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents and corticosteroids are widely used and, when combined, may have a synergistic effect. Intravitreal corticosteroids and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) agents have shown promise when topical medications either fail or have had limited effects. Randomized clinical studies evaluating anti-VEGF agents are needed to fully evaluate benefits and risks. When PCME is either refractory to medical therapy or is associated with significant vitreous involvement, pars plana vitrectomy has been shown to improve outcomes, though it is associated with additional risks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Visual Acuity is Related to Parafoveal Retinal Thickness in Patients with Retinitis Pigmentosa and Macular Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockhurst, Robert J.; Gaudio, Alexander R.; Berson, Eliot L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To quantify the prevalence and effect on visual acuity of macular cysts in a large cohort of patients with retinitis pigmentosa. Methods In 316 patients with typical forms of retinitis pigmentosa, we measured visual acuities with Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) charts, detected macular cysts with optical coherence tomography (OCT), and quantified retinal thicknesses by OCT. We used the FREQ, LOGISTIC, and GENMOD procedures of SAS to evaluate possible risk factors for cyst prevalence and the MIXED procedure to quantify the relationships of visual acuity to retinal thickness measured at different locations within the macula. Results We found macular cysts in 28% of the patients, 40% of whom had cysts in only one eye. Macular cysts were seen most often in patients with dominant disease and not at all in patients with X-linked disease (p = 0.006). In eyes with macular cysts, multiple regression analysis revealed that visual acuity was inversely and independently related to retinal thickness at the foveal center (p = 0.038) and within a ring spanning an eccentricity of 5° to 10° from the foveal center (p = 0.004). Conclusions Macular cysts are a common occurrence in retinitis pigmentosa, especially among patients with dominantly-inherited disease. Visual acuity is influenced by edema in the parafovea, as well as in the fovea. PMID:18552390

  13. [Diabetic retinopathy during pregnancy.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, E.R.; Rasmussen, K.L.; Laugesen, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim was to evaluate the prevalence and progression of diabetic retinopathy during pregnancy in women with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Dilated fundal photography was performed at approximately 10 and 28 gestational weeks in 58 and 18 women with type 1 and type...... 2 diabetes, respectively. Retinopathy was classified as five stages +/- macular oedema. Progression was defined as deterioration corresponding to at least one stage between the two examinations. Clinical parameters were obtained from the medical records. RESULTS: Diabetic retinopathy was found in 36...... (62%) women with type 1 and three (17%) with type 2 diabetes at the first examination. In 26 (34%) retinopathy progressed; four women developed proliferations, three macular oedema and three reduction of visual acuity >/=0.2 on Snellen's chart in at least one eye. HbA1c in early pregnancy was the only...

  14. Increasing incidence of diabetes after gestational diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauenborg, Jeannet; Hansen, Torben; Jensen, Dorte Møller

    2004-01-01

    To study the incidence of diabetes among women with previous diet-treated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in the light of the general increasing incidence of overweight and diabetes and to identify risk factors for the development of diabetes.......To study the incidence of diabetes among women with previous diet-treated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in the light of the general increasing incidence of overweight and diabetes and to identify risk factors for the development of diabetes....

  15. FFA STUDY OF MACULAR LESIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Vinayagamurthy

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Macula is an important portion of retina that occupies the posterior pole of retina. Any disease that affects macula results in significant loss of central vision, form vision and colour vision to an extent. Macular lesions can be hereditary as well as acquired. Macular lesions occur in both younger and older individuals. Anatomically, a macular lesions can vary from a simple lesion like an RPF defect to a vision-threatening lesions like choroidal neovascular membrane. Many screening tests that are sensitive and specific are available to assess the functioning of macula called as ‘macular function test’. But, the greater understanding of the retinal vascular led to the usage of fluorescein angiogram in the detection and screening of macular, retinovascular and optic disc lesions. Through fundus fluorescein angiogram is a thirty-year-old procedure; it is still in vogue in almost all parts of the world. It has its own merits. The aim of the study is to study the role of fluorescein angiography in the evaluation of macular lesions. MATERIALS AND METHODS A hospital-based prospective randomised study was done, which included 50 patients. Detailed patient history was taken and thorough ocular and systemic examination was done. All patients were examined by ophthalmoscopy (direct and indirect and slit-lamp examination with 90D followed by fluorescein angiography. Ophthalmoscopic and fluorescein angiography findings were analysed and categorised. Patients were advised proper ocular and systemic treatment and follow up. RESULTS 50 cases with macular lesions were analysed and categorised into conditions like ARMD, CSR, macular oedema, CME, degenerations and dystrophies and miscellaneous conditions. FFA altered the diagnosis in 8% cases and categorised the cases in all cases. 16% patients developed adverse reactions like allergy, vomiting and nausea. On statistical analysis, FFA proved to be cheap and superior diagnostic tool in confirming

  16. Targeting Insulin-Degrading Enzyme to Treat Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wei-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) selectively degrades peptides, such as insulin, amylin, and amyloid β (Aβ) that form toxic aggregates, to maintain proteostasis. IDE defects are linked to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Structural and biochemical analyses revealed the molecular basis for IDE-mediated destruction of amyloidogenic peptides and this information has been exploited to develop promising inhibitors of IDE to improve glucose homeostasis. However, the inhibition of IDE can also lead to glucose intolerance. In this review, I focus on recent advances regarding our understanding of the structure and function of IDE and the discovery of IDE inhibitors, as well as challenges in developing IDE-based therapy for human diseases, particularly T2DM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Retinal changes in diabetic patients without diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Alina Gabriela; Istrate, Sinziana Luminita; Iancu, Raluca Claudia; Guta, Oana Maria; Ciuluvica, Radu; Voinea, Liliana

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure retinal vessel caliber and to examine early changes in macular thickness using optical coherence tomography (OCT). We evaluated to what extend vascular caliber and macular thickness differed between patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus without diabetic retinopathy compared with healthy individuals. 26 diabetic patients without diabetic retinopathy and 26 normal participants without any retinal and optic nerve diseases underwent ophthalmic examination, fundus photography, and OCT imaging. Temporal inferior retinal vessel diameters were measured using OCT. Also, we measured macular thickness in nine ETDRS subfields using Cirrus OCT. The mean age in the diabetic group was 61.5 years and in the control group, 55.5 years. Wider retinal arterioles and venules were found in patients with diabetes compared with healthy subjects (120 µm versus 96 µm, pdiabetes mellitus, central macular thickness was significantly thinner than that of control eyes (243.5 µm versus 269.9 µm, p value diabetes without diabetic retinopathy.

  18. Predictors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and end‑stage renal disease respectively in adults of both ... Departments of Medicine, and 1Ophthalmology, Era's Lucknow Medical ... The collected data included age, gender, duration of diabetes and ..... also shown to be effective in preventing DR in individuals .... retinopathy and diabetic macular edema disease severity.

  19. Follow up of MRI bone marrow edema in the treated diabetic Charcot foot – a review of patient charts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantelau, Ernst-A.; Zweck, Brigitte; Haage, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Ill-defined areas of water-like signal on bone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), characterized as bone marrow edema or edema-equivalent signal-changes (EESC), is a hallmark of active-stage pedal neuro-osteoarthropathy (Charcot foot) in painless diabetic neuropathy, and is accompanied by local soft-tissue edema and hyperthermia. The longitudinal effects on EESC of treating the foot in a walking cast were elucidated by reviewing consecutive cases of a diabetic foot clinic. Study design: Retrospective observational study, chart review Material and methods: Cases with active-stage Charcot foot were considered, in whom written reports on baseline and follow-up MRI studies were available for assessment. Only cases without concomitant infection or skin ulcer were chosen, in whom both was documented, onset of symptomatic foot swelling and patient compliance with cast treatment. Results: From 1994 to 2017, 45 consecutive cases in 37 patients were retrieved, with 95 MRI follow-up studies (1–6 per case, average interval between studies 13 weeks). Decreasing EESC was documented in 66/95 (69%) follow-up studies. However, 29/95 (31%) studies revealed temporarily increasing, migrating or stagnating EESC. Conclusion: EESC on MRI disappear in response to prolonged offloading and immobilizing treatment; however, physiologic as well as pathologic fluctuations of posttraumatic EESC have to be considered when interpreting the MR images. Conventional MRI is useful for surveillance of active-stage Charcot foot recovery. PMID:29713425

  20. Effects of subcutaneous, low-dose glucagon on insulin-induced mild hypoglycaemia in patients with insulin pump treated type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranjan, Ajenthen; Schmidt, S; Madsbad, Sten

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the dose-response relationship of subcutaneous glucagon administration on plasma glucose and on counterregulatory hormone responses during subcutaneous insulin induced mild hypoglycaemia in patients with type 1 diabetes treated with insulin pumps. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eight...... hypoglycaemia in patients with type 1 diabetes....... insulin pump treated patients completed a blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Hypoglycaemia was induced in the fasting state by a subcutaneous insulin bolus and when plasma glucose reached 3.4 mmol/l (95%CI 3.2-3.5), a subcutaneous bolus of either 100, 200, 300 µg glucagon or saline...

  1. Repeat Intravitreal Dexamethasone Implant for Refractory Cystoid Macular Edema in Syphilitic Uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra C. Lautredou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To report the successful utilization of adjunctive repeat intravitreal corticosteroid therapy for the treatment of cystoid macular edema in syphilis-related uveitis. Methods/Patients. An HIV-positive patient with treated ocular syphilis who developed refractory cystoid macular edema (CME was treated with repeat intravitreal corticosteroid therapy including dexamethasone intravitreal implants. Results. Treatment led to the resolution of CME and improvement in visual acuity. Conclusions. Intravitreal corticosteroid therapy may be a viable adjunctive treatment for refractory CME in patients with treated syphilitic uveitis. Corticosteroid-induced exacerbation of infection is unlikely in patients with an adequate serologic treatment response.

  2. Progressive macular hypomelanosis: an overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Relyveld, Germaine N.; Menke, Henk E.; Westerhof, Wiete

    2007-01-01

    Progressive macular hypomelanosis (PMH) is a common skin disorder that is often misdiagnosed. Various authors have written about similar skin disorders, referring to them by different names, but we believe that all these similar disorders are part of the same entity.PMH is characterized by

  3. Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sonia

    2015-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly. AMD is diagnosed based on characteristic retinal findings in individuals older than 50. Early detection and treatment are critical in increasing the likelihood of retaining good and functional vision. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you, discussing your symptoms, and going over your health history, your doctor may test for diabetes if he or she suspects you are at risk. To check for diabetes, your doctor may request the following tests: Fasting blood sugar test. This test is usually done ...

  5. Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2015-01-01

    For >30 years, insulin has been the drug of choice for the medical treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus. However, the use of oral hypoglycaemic agents has increased during the past 1–2 decades, so a recent comparison of treatment with glibenclamide, metformin or insulin in women...... with gestational diabetes mellitus is highly relevant....

  6. Neonatal outcomes in women with gestational diabetes mellitus treated with metformin in compare with insulin: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safura Ruholamin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of this study was to compare neonatal outcomes in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM treated with either metformin or insulin. Materials and Methods: A randomized clinical trial carried out on year 2011 on 109 women with GDM who did not adequately control by dietary measures. They received metformin 500 mg once or twice daily or insulin 0.2 IU/kg/day initially. The dose was titrated to achieve target blood glucose values. Neonatal outcomes such as hypoglycemia, birth weight, Apgar score, umbilical artery pH, and hyperbilirubinemia in the 50 women who remained exclusively on metformin were compared with 50 women who treated with insulin. Results: Two groups were similar in mean fasting blood sugar (P = 0.7 and postprandial measurements (P = 0.8 throughout GDM treatment. Pregnancy complications or preterm labor were not different significantly between two groups. Considering neonatal outcomes between insulin and metformin groups, such as hypoglycemia (2 [4%] and 0 [0%], respectively, birth weight (3342 ± 506 mg and 3176 ± 438 mg, respectively, 5 th min Apgar score <7 (no one in either group, umbilical artery pH <7.05 (no one in either group and hyperbilirubinemia (1 [2%] and 0 [0%], respectively, no significant statistical differences were seen. Conclusion: Based on these preliminary data, considering neonatal outcomes, metformin appears to be a safe as insulin in the treatment of GDM.

  7. Relationship between metabolic control and self-monitoring of blood glucose in insulin-treated patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto González, Alfonso; Quintela Fernández, Niurka; Pumar López, Alfonso; Darias Garzón, Ricardo; Rivas Fernández, Margarita; Barberá Comes, Gloria

    2015-05-01

    To assess the relationship between metabolic control (MC) and frequency of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) in insulin-treated patients with type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 (T2DM) diabetes mellitus, and to analyze the factors associated to MC. A multicenter, cross-sectional, observational study was conducted in which endocrinologists enrolled diabetic patients treated with insulin who used a glucometer. The cut-off value for MC was HbA1c ≤ 7%. Grade of acceptance of the glucometer was assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS). A total of 341 patients (53.5% males) with a mean age (SD) 52.8 (16.3) years, mean HbA1c of 7.69% (1.25) and 128 (37.5%) with T1DM and 211 (61.9%) with T2DM were evaluable. SMBG was done by 86.1% at least once weekly. No relationship was seen between MC and SMBG (P=.678) in the overall sample or in the T1DM (P=.940) or T2DM (P=.343) subgroups. In the logistic regression model, hyperglycemic episodes (Exp-b [risk] 1.794, P=0.022), falsely elevated HbA1c values (Exp-b 3.182, P=.005), and VAS (Exp-b 1.269, P=.008) were associated to poor MC in the total sample. Hyperglycemic episodes (Exp-b 2.538, P=.004), falsely elevated HbA1c values (Exp-b 3.125, P=.012), and VAS (Exp-b 1.316, P=.026) were associated to poor MC in the T2DM subgroup, while body mass index (Exp-b 1.143, P=.046) was associated to poor MC in the T1DM subgroup. In this retrospective, non-controlled study on patients with DM treated with insulin who used a glucometer, no relationship was seen between the degree of metabolic control and frequency of use of the glucometer. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of Ramadan fasting on platelet reactivity in diabetic patients treated with clopidogrel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouida, W; Baccouche, H; Sassi, M; Dridi, Z; Chakroun, T; Hellara, I; Boukef, R; Hassine, M; Added, F; Razgallah, R; Khochtali, I; Nouira, S

    2017-01-01

    The effects of Ramadan fasting (RF) on clopidogrel antiplatelet inhibition were not previously investigated. The present study evaluated the influence of RF on platelet reactivity in patients with high cardiovascular risk (CVR) in particular those with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). A total of 98 stable patients with ≥2 CVR factors were recruited. All patients observed RF and were taking clopidogrel at a maintenance dose of 75 mg. Clinical findings and serum lipids data were recorded before Ramadan (Pre-R), at the last week of Ramadan (R) and 4 weeks after the end of Ramadan (Post-R). During each patient visit, nutrients intakes were calculated and platelet reactivity assessment using Verify Now P2Y12 assay was performed. In DM patients, the absolute PRU changes from baseline were +27 ( p  = 0.01) and +16 ( p  = 0.02) respectively at R and Post-R. In addition, there was a significant increase of glycemia and triglycerides levels with a significant decrease of high-density lipoprotein. In non DM patients there was no significant change in absolute PRU values and metabolic parameters. Clopidogrel resistance rate using 2 cut-off PRU values (235 and 208) did not change significantly in DM and non DM patients. RF significantly decreased platelet sensitivity to clopidogrel in DM patients during and after Ramadan. This effect is possibly related to an increase of glycemia and serum lipids levels induced by fasting. Clinical Trials.gov NCT02720133. Registered 24 July 2014.Retrospectively registered.

  9. Intensive Treat-to-Target Statin Therapy in High-Risk Japanese Patients With Hypercholesterolemia and Diabetic Retinopathy: Report of a Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Hiroshi; Komuro, Issei; Takeuchi, Masahiro; Akasaka, Takashi; Daida, Hiroyuki; Egashira, Yoshiki; Fujita, Hideo; Higaki, Jitsuo; Hirata, Ken-Ichi; Ishibashi, Shun; Isshiki, Takaaki; Ito, Sadayoshi; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Kato, Satoshi; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Kitakaze, Masafumi; Kitazono, Takanari; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Murakami, Tomoaki; Murohara, Toyoaki; Node, Koichi; Ogawa, Susumu; Saito, Yoshihiko; Seino, Yoshihiko; Shigeeda, Takashi; Shindo, Shunya; Sugawara, Masahiro; Sugiyama, Seigo; Terauchi, Yasuo; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Ueshima, Kenji; Utsunomiya, Kazunori; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Yo, Shoei; Yokote, Koutaro; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Yoshimura, Michihiro; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Nakao, Kazuwa; Nagai, Ryozo

    2018-06-01

    Diabetes is associated with high risk of cardiovascular (CV) events, particularly in patients with dyslipidemia and diabetic complications. We investigated the incidence of CV events with intensive or standard lipid-lowering therapy in patients with hypercholesterolemia, diabetic retinopathy, and no history of coronary artery disease (treat-to-target approach). In this multicenter, prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded end point study, eligible patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to intensive statin therapy targeting LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) targeting LDL-C 100-120 mg/dL ( n = 2,524). Mean follow-up was 37 ± 13 months. LDL-C at 36 months was 76.5 ± 21.6 mg/dL in the intensive group and 104.1 ± 22.1 mg/dL in the standard group ( P target strategy in high-risk patients deserves further investigation. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  10. Glucose-Lowering Effects and Low Risk of Hypoglycemia in Patients With Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young When Treated With a GLP-1 Receptor Agonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostoft, S. H.; Bagger, J. I.; Hansen, Torben

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The most common form of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY), hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 alpha (HNF1A diabetes: MODY3) is often treated with sulfonylureas that confer a high risk of hypoglycemia. We evaluated treatment with GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) in patients with HNF1A...... diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Sixteen patients with HNF1A diabetes (8 women; mean age 39 years [range 23-67 years]; BMI 24.9 +/- 0.5 kg/m(2) [mean +/- SEM]; fasting plasma glucose [FPG] 9.9 +/- 0.9 mmol/L; HbA(1c) 6.4 +/- 0.2% [47 +/- 3 mmol/mol]) received 6 weeks of treatment with a GLP-1RA...

  11. Diabetes Care and Treatment Project: A Diabetes Institute of the Walter Reed Health Care System and Joslin (and University of Hawaii) Telemedicine Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    digital teleophthalmology system as used by three federal healthcare agencies for detecting proliferative diabetic retinopathy . Telemedicine and e...Research Group. Detection of diabetic macular edema: ophthalmoscopy versus photography—Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study report number 5...project are the establishment of a telemedicine system for comprehensive diabetes management and the assessment of diabetic retinopathy that

  12. Quality of life in Danish children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion or multiple daily injections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkebæk, Niels; Kristensen, Lene Juel; Mose, Anne

    2014-01-01

    ), and to investigate whether HRQoL assessments were influenced by treatment duration. METHODS: Participants were recruited through the Danish Registry for Diabetes in Childhood and Adolescence. A total of 700 children and adolescents (360 girls), 8-17 years, were included. Of these, 295 were treated with CSII (160......AIMS: The aims of the study were to compare health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in a National Danish population of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D) treated with either continuous subcutaneous insulin injection (CSII) or multiple daily insulin injections (MDI...... for more than one year) and 405 with MDI (238 for more than one year). Participants and their parents completed the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Diabetes and Generic Module. HbA1c was analyzed centrally. RESULTS: Parents reported children and adolescents on CSII for more than one year to have less...

  13. Clinical applications of the sustained-release dexamethasone implant for treatment of macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío Herrero-Vanrell, Jose Augusto Cardillo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Rocío Herrero-Vanrell1, Jose Augusto Cardillo2, Baruch D Kuppermann31Department of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Technology, School of Pharmacy, Complutense University, Madrid, Spain; 2Hospital de Olhos de Araraquara, Araraquara, São Paulo, Brazil; 3Gavin Herbert Eye Institute, University of California, Irvine, CA, USAAbstract: Macular edema is one of the leading causes of vision loss among patients with retinal vein occlusion, diabetic retinopathy, and posterior chamber inflammatory disease. However, the treatment of macular edema is considerably limited by the difficulty in delivering effective doses of therapeutic agents into the vitreous cavity. In recent years, the development of a sustained-release dexamethasone intravitreal implant (Ozurdex® has enabled more controlled drug release at a stable rate over a long period of time, with a potentially lower rate of adverse events. Clinical studies indicate that this dexamethasone implant is a promising new treatment option for patients with persistent macular edema resulting from retinal vein occlusion, diabetic retinopathy, and uveitis or Irvine-Gass syndrome.Keywords: diabetic retinopathy, macular edema, Ozurdex®, posterior-segment inflammatory disease, retinal vein occlusion, sustained-release dexamethasone implant

  14. Sensitivity and reproducibility of urinary C-peptide as estimate of islet B-cell function in insulin-treated diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjessing, H J; Matzen, L E; Faber, O K

    1989-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to evaluate the ability of urinary C-peptide determination to demonstrate presence of residual insulin secretion, and to evaluate the reproducibility of urinary C-peptide excretion in 125 insulin-treated diabetic patients. C-peptide was determined in two...

  15. Uptake and Effects of the e-Vita Personal Health Record with Self-Management Support and Coaching, for Type 2 Diabetes Patients Treated in Primary Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, M.; de Wit, M.; Sieverink, Floor; Roelofsen, Y.; Hendriks, S.H.; Bilo, H.J.G.; Snoek, F.J.

    2016-01-01

    We studied the use, uptake, and effects of e-Vita, a personal health record, with self-management support and personalized asynchronized coaching, for type 2 diabetes patients treated in primary care. Patients were invited by their practice nurse to join the study aimed at testing use and effects of

  16. Anti-diabetic potential of the essential oil of Pinus koraiensis leaves toward streptozotocin-treated mice and HIT-T15 pancreatic β cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Hye-Eun; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Sohn, Eun Jung; Lee, Min-Ho; Ko, Hyun-Suk; Jeong, Soo-Jin; Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome creates risk factors for coronary heart disease, diabetes, fatty liver, obesity and several cancers. Our group has already reported that the essential oil from leaves of Pinus koraiensis SIEB (EOPK) exerted antihyperlipidemic effects by upregulating the low-density lipoprotein receptor and inhibiting acyl-coenzyme A, cholesterol acyltransferases. We evaluated in the current study the anti-diabetic effects of EOPK on mice with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type I diabetes and on HIT-T15 pancreatic β cells. EOPK significantly protected HIT-T15 cells from STZ-induced cytotoxicity and reduced the blood glucose level in STZ