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Sample records for trapping magnetic fields

  1. Trapped field recovery of bulk superconductor magnets by static field magnetization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Z., E-mail: zigang@kaiyodai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Applied Physics, Department of Marine Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Tokyo 135-8533 (Japan); Tsuzuki, K.; Miki, M.; Felder, B.; Hara, S.; Izumi, M. [Laboratory of Applied Physics, Department of Marine Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Tokyo 135-8533 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    A series of initial trapped fields after ZFC or FC magnetization are used to simulate the attenuated trapped field. It is possible and easy to recover the lost trapped field and regain the best trapped field performance as before. In the re-magnetization process, the initial magnetic flux inside the bulk magnets will help to recover the trapped field. The optimum recovery field is recommended to be 2.5 times the saturation field of the bulk at LN2 temperature. Thanks to the trapped field of bulk high-temperature superconductors, they can be used as field-pole magnets in the high temperature superconducting (HTS) rotating machines. For example, an output power of 10 kW at 720 rpm was realized by an average trapped field of 0.56 T of eight melt-textured GdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} (Gd-123) bulks at liquid nitrogen temperature in TUMSAT in 2004. Similarly to the HTS machines involving 1G or 2G wires, the trapped field of the bulk is possibly sensitive and even can be attenuated by the AC component field during the operation. Hence, it is necessary to recover the trapped field once being decreased to some extent in the practical application. From this point, we have investigated the trapped field recovery of HTS bulk magnets by static field magnetization in the paper. A series of different initial trapped fields after zero-field-cooling or field-cooling magnetization are used to simulate the attenuated trapped field. By comparing the trapped field peak and its distribution, the trapped field was found to be able to recover by the static field magnetization method with a stronger excitation field and the initial trapped flux inside the bulk also has an influence on the recovery process. The optimum recovery field was found to be about 2.5 times the saturated trapped field of the bulk at liquid nitrogen temperature, by which the bulk can regain the former best trapped field performance.

  2. Trapped field recovery of bulk superconductor magnets by static field magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Z.; Tsuzuki, K.; Miki, M.; Felder, B.; Hara, S.; Izumi, M.

    2011-11-01

    Thanks to the trapped field of bulk high-temperature superconductors, they can be used as field-pole magnets in the high temperature superconducting (HTS) rotating machines. For example, an output power of 10 kW at 720 rpm was realized by an average trapped field of 0.56 T of eight melt-textured GdBa2Cu3Oy (Gd-123) bulks at liquid nitrogen temperature in TUMSAT in 2004. Similarly to the HTS machines involving 1G or 2G wires, the trapped field of the bulk is possibly sensitive and even can be attenuated by the AC component field during the operation. Hence, it is necessary to recover the trapped field once being decreased to some extent in the practical application. From this point, we have investigated the trapped field recovery of HTS bulk magnets by static field magnetization in the paper. A series of different initial trapped fields after zero-field-cooling or field-cooling magnetization are used to simulate the attenuated trapped field. By comparing the trapped field peak and its distribution, the trapped field was found to be able to recover by the static field magnetization method with a stronger excitation field and the initial trapped flux inside the bulk also has an influence on the recovery process. The optimum recovery field was found to be about 2.5 times the saturated trapped field of the bulk at liquid nitrogen temperature, by which the bulk can regain the former best trapped field performance.

  3. Anisotropy of magnetoresistance on trapping magnetic fields in granular HTSC

    CERN Document Server

    Sukhanov, A A

    2003-01-01

    The features of magnetoresistance in Bi (Pb)-HTSC ceramics with the magnetic fields trapped are investigated. It is found that on trapping magnetic flux the magnetoresistance in granular HTSC becomes anisotropic. Moreover, for magnetic fields H parallel and currents perpendicular to field H sub i which induces the trapping the magnetoresistance field dependence DELTA R(H) is nonmonotonic and the magnetoresistance is negative for small fields H < Hinv. The effect of trapped field and transport current and their orientations on the dependence DELTA R(H) is investigated. In particular, it is found that the field of magnetoresistance sign inversion Hinv almost linearly grows with increase of the effective trapped magnetic fields. Hinv decreases down to zero as the angle between fields H and H sub i increases up to pi/2 and slightly decreases with increasing transport current. The results are treated in terms of the model of magnetic flux trapping in superconducting grains or 'loops' embedded in a matrix of wea...

  4. Trapped magnetic field measurements on HTS bulk by peak controlled pulsed field magnetization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Tetsuya; Watasaki, Masahiro; Kimura, Yosuke; Miki, Motohiro; Izumi, Mitsuru

    2010-01-01

    For the past several years, we have studied the high-temperature superconducting (HTS) synchronous motor assembled with melt-textured Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk magnets. If the single pulse field magnetizes a bulk effectively, size of electrical motor will become small for the strong magnetic field of the HTS magnets without reducing output power of motor. In the previous study, we showed that the HTS bulk was magnetized to excellent cone-shape magnetic field distribution by using the waveform control pulse magnetization (WCPM) method. The WCPM technique made possible the active control of the waveform on which magnetic flux motion depended. We generated the pulse waveform with controlled risetime for HTS bulk magnetization to suppress the magnetic flux motion which decreases magnetization efficiency. The pulsed maximum magnetic flux density with slow risetime is not beyond the maximum magnetic flux density which is trapped by the static field magnetization. But, as for applying the pulse which has fast risetime, the magnetic flux which exceed greatly the threshold penetrates the bulk and causes the disorder of the trapped magnetic distribution. This fact suggests the possibility that the threshold at pulsed magnetization influences the dynamic magnetic flux motion. In this study, Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk is magnetized by the controlled arbitrary trapezoidal shape pulse, of which the maximum magnetic flux density is controlled not to exceed the threshold. We will present the trapped magnetic characteristics and the technique to generate the controlled pulsed field.

  5. Measurements of flux pumping activation of trapped field magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein, Roy; Parks, Drew; Sawh, Ravi-Persad [Texas Center for Superconductivity, 202 Houston Science Center, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5002 (United States); Davey, Kent [Physics Department, 617 Science and Research Building I, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Large grains of high temperature superconducting (HTS) material can be utilized as trapped field magnets (TFMs). Persistent currents are set up in the HTS when it is cooled in a magnetic field, or exposed to a magnetic field after cooling. TFMs have been improved over the past two decades by the efforts of a large number of worldwide research groups. However, applications using TFMs have lagged, in part due to the problem of high fields needed for activation. We describe herein experiments designed to observe the behaviour of TFM activation using repeated applications of low fields (called 'pumping'). Significant partial activation is obtained using a non-uniform pumping field (e.g., a small permanent magnet) which is higher in the centre of the HTS than at the periphery. Cooling in zero field followed by pumping with such a field results in trapping the full applied field, in comparison to half of the applied field being trapped by cooling in zero field followed by application of a uniform field. We find that for partial activation by cooling in a field and subsequent activation by pumping, the resulting fields are additive. We also conclude that for activation by fluxoid pumping, creep assists the process.

  6. A new concept of a hybrid trapped field magnet lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Keita; Fujishiro, Hiroyuki; Ainslie, Mark D.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a new concept of a hybrid trapped field magnet lens (HTFML) is proposed. The HTMFL exploits the ‘vortex pinning effect’ of an outer superconducting bulk cylinder, which is magnetized as a trapped field magnet (TFM) using field-cooled magnetization (FCM), and the ‘diamagnetic shielding effect’ of an inner bulk magnetic lens to generate a concentrated magnetic field higher than the trapped field from the TFM in the bore of the magnetic lens. This requires that, during the zero-field-cooled magnetization process, the outer cylinder is in the normal state (T> superconducting transition temperature, T c) and the inner lens is in the superconducting state (T magnetizing field is applied, followed by cooling to an appropriate operating temperature, then removing the external field. This is explored for two potential cases: (1) exploiting the difference in T c of two different bulk materials (‘case-1’), e.g. MgB2 (T c = 39 K) and GdBaCuO (T c = 92 K) or (2) using the same material for the whole HTFML, e.g., GdBaCuO, but utilizing individually controlled cryostats, the same cryostat with different cooling loops or coolants, or heaters that keep the outer bulk cylinder at a temperature above T c to achieve the same desired effect. The HTFML is verified using numerical simulations for ‘case-1’ using an MgB2 cylinder and GdBaCuO lens pair and for ‘case-2’ using a GdBaCuO cylinder and GdBaCuO lens pair. As a result, the HTFML could reliably generate a concentrated magnetic field B c = 4.73 T with the external magnetizing field B app = 3 T in the ‘case-1’, and a higher B c = 13.49 T with higher B app = 10 T in the ‘case-2’, respectively. This could, for example, be used to enhance the magnetic field in the bore of a bulk superconducting NMR/MRI system to improve its resolution.

  7. Dual-stage trapped-flux magnet cryostat for measurements at high magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Zahirul; Das, Ritesh K.; Weinstein, Roy

    2015-04-14

    A method and a dual-stage trapped-flux magnet cryostat apparatus are provided for implementing enhanced measurements at high magnetic fields. The dual-stage trapped-flux magnet cryostat system includes a trapped-flux magnet (TFM). A sample, for example, a single crystal, is adjustably positioned proximate to the surface of the TFM, using a translation stage such that the distance between the sample and the surface is selectively adjusted. A cryostat is provided with a first separate thermal stage provided for cooling the TFM and with a second separate thermal stage provided for cooling sample.

  8. Flux Trapping Properties of Bulk HIGH-TC Superconductors in Static Field-Cooling Magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Z.; Tsuzuki, K.; Miki, M.; Felder, B.; Hara, S.; Izumi, M.

    2013-06-01

    The trapping process and saturation effect of trapped magnetic flux of bulk high-temperature superconductors by static field-cooling magnetization (FCM) are reported in the paper. With a cryogenic Bell Hall sensor attached on the center of the bulk surface, the synchronous magnetic signals were recorded during the whole magnetization process. It enables us to know the flux trapping behavior since the removal of the excitation field, as well as the subsequent flux relaxation phenomenon and the flux dissipation in the quench process of the bulk sample. With the help of flux mapping techniques, the relationship between the trapped flux and the applied field was further investigated; the saturation effect of trapped flux was discussed by comparing the peak trapped field and total magnetic flux of the bulk sample. These studies are useful to understand the basic flux trapping properties of bulk superconductors.

  9. Characteristics of single-atom trapping in a magneto-optical trap with a high magnetic-field gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Seokchan; Choi, Youngwoon; Park, Sangbum; Ji, Wangxi; Lee, Jai-Hyung; An, Kyungwon

    2007-01-01

    A quantitative study on characteristics of a magneto-optical trap with a single or a few atoms is presented. A very small number of 85 Rb atoms were trapped in a micron-size magneto-optical trap with a high magnetic-field gradient. In order to find the optimum condition for a single-atom trap, we have investigated how the number of atoms and the size of atomic cloud change as various experimental parameters, such as a magnetic-field gradient and the trapping laser intensity and detuning. The averaged number of atoms was measured very accurately with a calibration procedure based on the single-atom saturation curve of resonance fluorescence. In addition, the number of atoms in a trap could be controlled by suppressing stochastic loading events by means of a real-time active feedback on the magnetic-field gradient

  10. Minimum Contradictions Physics and Propulsion via Superconducting Magnetic Field Trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassikas, A. A.

    2010-01-01

    All theories are based on Axioms which obviously are arbitrary; e.g. SRT, GRT, QM Axioms. Instead of manipulating the experience through a new set of Arbitrary Axioms it would be useful to search, through a basic tool that we have at our disposal i.e. Logic Analysis, for a set of privileged axioms. Physics theories, beyond their particular axioms, can be restated through the basic communication system as consisting of the Classical Logic, the Sufficient Reason Principle and the Anterior-Posterior Axiom. By means of a theorem this system can be proven as contradictory. The persistence in logic is the way for a set of privileged axioms to be found. This can be achieved on the basis of the Claim for Minimum Contradictions. Further axioms beyond the ones of the basic communications imply further contradictions. Thus, minimum contradictions can be achieved when things are described through anterior-posterior terms; due to existing contradictions through stochastic space-time, which is matter itself, described through a Ψ wave function and distributed, in a Hypothetical Measuring Field (HMF), through the density probability function P(r, t). On this basis, a space-time QM is obtained and this QM is a unified theory satisfying the requirements of quantum gravity. There are both mass-gravitational space-time (g) regarded as real and charge-electromagnetic (em) space-time that could be regarded as imaginary. In a closed system energy conversion-conservation and momentum action take place through photons, which can be regarded either as (g) or (em) space-time formation whose rest mass is equal to zero. Universe Evolution is described through the interaction of the gravitational (g) with the electromagnetic (em) space-time-matter field and not through any other entities. This methodology implies that there is no need for dark matter. An experiment is proposed relative to the (g)+(em) interaction based on Superconducting Magnetic Field Trapping to validate this approach.

  11. Electric and magnetic field optimization procedure for Penning trap mass spectrometers

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, D; Bollen, G; Delahaye, P; George, S; Guénaut, C; Herfurth, F; Herlert, A; Lunney, D; Schweikhard, L; Yazidjian, C

    2009-01-01

    Significant systematic errors in high-precision Penning trap mass spectrometry can result from electric and magnetic field imperfections. An experimental procedure to minimize these uncertainties is presented for the on-line Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP, located at ISOLDE/CERN. The deviations from the ideal magnetic and electric fields are probed by measuring the cyclotron frequency and the reduced cyclotron frequency, respectively, of stored ions as a function of the time between the ejection of ions from the preparation trap and their capture in the precision trap, which influences the energy of their axial motion. The correction parameters are adjusted to minimize the frequency shifts.

  12. Trapped-ion quantum logic gates based on oscillating magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospelkaus, Christian; Langer, Christopher E.; Amini, Jason M.; Brown, Kenton R.; Leibfried, Dietrich; Wineland, David J.

    2009-05-01

    Oscillating magnetic fields and field gradients can be used to implement single-qubit rotations and entangling multiqubit quantum gates for trapped-ion quantum information processing. With fields generated by currents in microfabricated surface-electrode traps, it should be possible to achieve gate speeds that are comparable to those of optically induced gates for realistic distances between the ions and the electrode surface. Magnetic-field-mediated gates have the potential to significantly reduce the overhead in laser-beam control and motional-state initialization compared to current QIP experiments with trapped ions and will eliminate spontaneous scattering decoherence, a fundamental source of decoherence in laser-mediated gates. A potentially beneficial environment for the implementation of such schemes is a cryogenic ion trap, because small length scale traps with low motional heating rates can be realized. A cryogenic ion trap experiment is currently under construction at NIST.

  13. An Orbital Trap Mass Analyzer Using a Hybrid Magnetic-Electric Field: A Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chongsheng; Wu, Fangling; Ding, Li; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2018-03-01

    An orbital ion trap mass analyzer employing hybrid magnetic-electric field was designed and simulated. The trap has a rotational symmetrical structure and the hybrid trapping field was created in a toroidal space between 12 pairs of sector detection electrodes. Ion injection and ion orbital motion inside the trap were simulated using SIMION 8.1 with a user Lua program, and the required electric and magnetic field were investigated. The image charge signal can be picked up by the 12 pairs of detection electrodes and the mass resolution was evaluated using FFT. The simulated resolving power for the optimized configuration over 79,000 FWHM was obtained at the magnetic induction intensity of 0.5 Tesla in the simulation. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Modelling and comparison of trapped fields in (RE)BCO bulk superconductors for activation using pulsed field magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainslie, M. D.; Fujishiro, H.; Ujiie, T.; Zou, J.; Dennis, A. R.; Shi, Y.-H.; Cardwell, D. A.

    2014-06-01

    The ability to generate a permanent, stable magnetic field unsupported by an electromotive force is fundamental to a variety of engineering applications. Bulk high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials can trap magnetic fields of magnitude over ten times higher than the maximum field produced by conventional magnets, which is limited practically to rather less than 2 T. In this paper, two large c-axis oriented, single-grain YBCO and GdBCO bulk superconductors are magnetized by the pulsed field magnetization (PFM) technique at temperatures of 40 and 65 K and the characteristics of the resulting trapped field profile are investigated with a view of magnetizing such samples as trapped field magnets (TFMs) in situ inside a trapped flux-type superconducting electric machine. A comparison is made between the temperatures at which the pulsed magnetic field is applied and the results have strong implications for the optimum operating temperature for TFMs in trapped flux-type superconducting electric machines. The effects of inhomogeneities, which occur during the growth process of single-grain bulk superconductors, on the trapped field and maximum temperature rise in the sample are modelled numerically using a 3D finite-element model based on the H-formulation and implemented in Comsol Multiphysics 4.3a. The results agree qualitatively with the observed experimental results, in that inhomogeneities act to distort the trapped field profile and reduce the magnitude of the trapped field due to localized heating within the sample and preferential movement and pinning of flux lines around the growth section regions (GSRs) and growth sector boundaries (GSBs), respectively. The modelling framework will allow further investigation of various inhomogeneities that arise during the processing of (RE)BCO bulk superconductors, including inhomogeneous Jc distributions and the presence of current-limiting grain boundaries and cracks, and it can be used to assist optimization of

  15. High magnetic field trapping in monolithic single-grain YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) bulk materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, L.; Xue, Y. Y.; Ramirez, D.; Huang, Z. J.; Meng, R. L.; Chu, C. W.

    1993-01-01

    Results of our study on high magnetic field trapping in unirradiated, high quality monolithic single-grain YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) disks are reported. A record high 4 T trapped field at the surface of the unirradiated disks is observed. However, below 11 K, large flux avalanches caused by thermal instability severely limit the remnant trapped field. Therefore, flux avalanche, rather than Jc x d, dictates the maximum trapped field at low temperatures. To overcome this problem, a strong high temperature superconductor trapped field magnet is proposed. A novel application of the avalanche effect is also mentioned.

  16. Production of antihydrogen at reduced magnetic field for anti-atom trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G.B.; Boston, A.; Bowe, P.D.; Cesar, C.L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Chartier, M.; Deutsch, A.; Fajans, J.; Fujiwara, M.C.; Funakoshi, R.; Gill, D.R.; Gomberoff, K.; Hangst, J.S.; Hayano, R.S.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M.J.; Jorgensen, L.V.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Page, R.D.; Povilus, A.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D.M.; Storey, J.W.; Thompson, R.I.; van der Werf, D.P.; Wurtele, J.S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2008-01-01

    We have demonstrated production of antihydrogen in a 1$,$T solenoidal magnetic field. This field strength is significantly smaller than that used in the first generation experiments ATHENA (3$,$T) and ATRAP (5$,$T). The motivation for using a smaller magnetic field is to facilitate trapping of antihydrogen atoms in a neutral atom trap surrounding the production region. We report the results of measurements with the ALPHA (Antihydrogen Laser PHysics Apparatus) device, which can capture and cool antiprotons at 3$,$T, and then mix the antiprotons with positrons at 1$,$T. We infer antihydrogen production from the time structure of antiproton annihilations during mixing, using mixing with heated positrons as the null experiment, as demonstrated in ATHENA. Implications for antihydrogen trapping are discussed.

  17. Motion of guiding center drift atoms in the electric and magnetic field of a Penning trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmin, S.G.; O'Neil, T.M.

    2005-01-01

    The ApparaTus for High precision Experiment on Neutral Antimatter and antihydrogen TRAP collaborations have produced antihydrogen atoms by recombination in a cryogenic antiproton-positron plasma. This paper discusses the motion of the weakly bound atoms in the electric and magnetic field of the plasma and trap. The effective electric field in the moving frame of the atom polarizes the atom, and then gradients in the field exert a force on the atom. An approximate equation of motion for the atom center of mass is obtained by averaging over the rapid internal dynamics of the atom. The only remnant of the atom internal dynamics that enters this equation is the polarizability for the atom. This coefficient is evaluated for the weakly bound and strongly magnetized (guiding center drift) atoms understood to be produced in the antihydrogen experiments. Application of the approximate equation of motion shows that the atoms can be trapped radially in the large space charge field near the edge of the positron column. Also, an example is presented for which there is full three-dimensional trapping, not just radial trapping. Even untrapped atoms follow curved trajectories, and such trajectories are discussed for the important class of atoms that reach a field ionization diagnostic. Finally, the critical field for ionization is determined as an upper bound on the range of applicability of the theory

  18. Resonance enhancement of two photon absorption by magnetically trapped atoms in strong rf-fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, A.; Mishra, S. R.

    2018-01-01

    Applying a many mode Floquet formalism for magnetically trapped atoms interacting with a polychromatic rf-field, we predict a large two photon transition probability in the atomic system of cold 87Rb atoms. The physical origin of this enormous increase in the two photon transition probability is due to the formation of avoided crossings between eigen-energy levels originating from different Floquet sub-manifolds and redistribution of population in the resonant intermediate levels to give rise to the resonance enhancement effect. Other exquisite features of the studied atom-field composite system include the splitting of the generated avoided crossings at the strong field strength limit and a periodic variation of the single and two photon transition probabilities with the mode separation frequency of the polychromatic rf-field. This work can find applications to characterize properties of cold atom clouds in the magnetic traps using rf-spectroscopy techniques.

  19. Hidden in the light: Magnetically induced afterglow from trapped chameleon fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gies, Holger; Mota, David F.; Shaw, Douglas J.

    2008-01-01

    We propose an afterglow phenomenon as a unique trace of chameleon fields in optical experiments. The vacuum interaction of a laser pulse with a magnetic field can lead to a production and subsequent trapping of chameleons in the vacuum chamber, owing to their mass dependence on the ambient matter density. Magnetically induced reconversion of the trapped chameleons into photons creates an afterglow over macroscopic timescales that can conveniently be searched for by current optical experiments. We show that the chameleon parameter range accessible to available laboratory technology is comparable to scales familiar from astrophysical stellar energy-loss arguments. We analyze quantitatively the afterglow properties for various experimental scenarios and discuss the role of potential background and systematic effects. We conclude that afterglow searches represent an ideal tool to aim at the production and detection of cosmologically relevant scalar fields in the laboratory

  20. Trapped magnetic field in a (NdFeB)–(MgB{sub 2}) pair-type bulk magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldica, Gheorghe [National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor 105bis, 077125 Magurele, Ilfov (Romania); Burdusel, Mihail [National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor 105bis, 077125 Magurele, Ilfov (Romania); Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, ‘‘Politehnica’’ University of Bucharest, Splaiul Independentei 316, 060042 Bucharest (Romania); Badica, Petre, E-mail: badica2003@yahoo.com [National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor 105bis, 077125 Magurele, Ilfov (Romania)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Dense MgB{sub 2} discs were obtained by ex-situ Spark Plasma Sintering. • A NdFeB–MgB{sub 2} pair-type bulk magnet was tested for different working conditions. • The polarity of the NdFeB permanent magnet influences macro flux jumps of MgB{sub 2}. • Trapped field of the pair was 2.45 T (20 K) and 3.3 T (12 K). - Abstract: Superconducting bulk discs, S, of 20 mm in diameter and 3.5 or 3.3 mm thickness of MgB{sub 2} (pristine or added with cubic BN, respectively) with density above 97% were prepared by Spark Plasma Sintering. Discs were combined in a pair-type sandwich-like arrangement with a permanent NdFeB axially magnetised magnet, PM (∼0.5 T). Measurement of the trapped field, B{sub tr}, with temperature, time, and the reduction rate of the applied magnetic field was performed using a Hall sensor positioned at the centre between the superconductor and the permanent magnet. It is shown that the permanent magnet with certain polarity favors higher trapped field of the superconductor owing to suppression of flux jumps specific for high density MgB{sub 2} samples. The B{sub tr} of the PM–S pair was 2.45 T (20 K) and 3.3 T (12 K)

  1. Trapped magnetic field in a (NdFeB)–(MgB2) pair-type bulk magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldica, Gheorghe; Burdusel, Mihail; Badica, Petre

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Dense MgB 2 discs were obtained by ex-situ Spark Plasma Sintering. • A NdFeB–MgB 2 pair-type bulk magnet was tested for different working conditions. • The polarity of the NdFeB permanent magnet influences macro flux jumps of MgB 2 . • Trapped field of the pair was 2.45 T (20 K) and 3.3 T (12 K). - Abstract: Superconducting bulk discs, S, of 20 mm in diameter and 3.5 or 3.3 mm thickness of MgB 2 (pristine or added with cubic BN, respectively) with density above 97% were prepared by Spark Plasma Sintering. Discs were combined in a pair-type sandwich-like arrangement with a permanent NdFeB axially magnetised magnet, PM (∼0.5 T). Measurement of the trapped field, B tr , with temperature, time, and the reduction rate of the applied magnetic field was performed using a Hall sensor positioned at the centre between the superconductor and the permanent magnet. It is shown that the permanent magnet with certain polarity favors higher trapped field of the superconductor owing to suppression of flux jumps specific for high density MgB 2 samples. The B tr of the PM–S pair was 2.45 T (20 K) and 3.3 T (12 K)

  2. Dependence of the confinement time of an electron plasma on the magnetic field in a quadrupole Penning trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyavappa, B.M.; Datar, Durgesh; Prakash; Ananthamurthy, Sharath [Bangalore University, Department of Physics, Bangalore (India)

    2017-12-15

    A quadrupole Penning trap is used to confine electrons in weak magnetic fields. Perturbations due to space charge and imperfections in the trap geometry, as well as collisions with the background gas molecules, lead to loss of the electrons from the trap. We present in this work the results on measurements of the electron confinement time and its dependence on the magnetic field in a quadrupolar Penning trap. We describe a method to measure the confinement time of an electron cloud under weak magnetic fields (0.01 T - 0.1 T). This time is found to scale as τ ∝ B{sup 1.41} in variance with the theoretically expected confinement time that scales as τ ∝ B{sup 2} for trapped electrons that are lost through collisions with the neutrals present in the trap. A measurement of the expansion rate of the electron plasma in the trap through controlled variation of the trap voltage, yields expansion times that depend on the energy of escaping electrons. This is found to vary in our case in the scaling range B{sup 0.32} to B{sup 0.43}. Distorting the geometry of the trap, results in a marked change in the confinement time's dependence on the magnetic field. The results indicate that the confinement time of the electron cloud in the trap is limited by both, effects of collisions and perturbations that result in the plasma loss through expansion in the trap. (orig.)

  3. Countering the stray magnetic field of the CUSP trap by using additional coils

    CERN Document Server

    Thole, Jelle

    2016-01-01

    The ASACUSA experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN tries to measure the Hyperfine Structure (HFS) of Antihydrogen (H ̄) using a Rabi spectroscopy set-up. In measuring this HFS it will yield a very precise test of CPT-symmetry. For this set-up to work a homogeneous magnetic field is needed in the cavity where the Hyperfine transition of H ̄ occurs. Due to the stray fields from the CUSP trap, where H ̄ is produced, additional coils are needed to counter these fields. It is found, using COMSOL simulations, that two coils are suitable for this. Leading to a relative standard deviation of the magnetic field of σB/B = 1.06%.

  4. Trapped magnetic field of a superconducting bulk magnet in high- T sub c RE-Ba-Cu-O

    CERN Document Server

    Fujimoto, H; Higuchi, T; Nakamura, Y; Kamijo, H; Nagashima, K; Murakami, M

    1999-01-01

    Superconducting magnets made of high-T sub c superconductors are promising for industrial applications. It is well known that REBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 sub - sub x and LRE (light rare-earth) Ba sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 sub - sub x superconductors prepared by melt processes have a high critical current density, J sub c , at 77 K and high magnetic fields. Therefore, the materials are very prospective for high magnetic field application as a superconducting permanent/bulk magnet with liquid-nitrogen refrigeration. LREBaCuO bulks, compared with REBaCuO bulks, exhibit a larger J sub c in high magnetic fields and a much improved irreversibility field, H sub i sub r sub r , at 77 K. In this study, we discuss the possibility and trapped field properties of a superconducting bulk magnet, as well as the melt processing for bulk superconductors and their characteristic superconducting properties. One of the applications is a superconducting magnet for the future magnetically levitated (Maglev) train.

  5. Trapped magnetic field of a superconducting bulk magnet in high- T{sub c} RE-Ba-Cu-O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Yoo, Sang Im; Higuchi, Takamitsu; Nakamura, Yuichi; Kamijo, Hiroki; Nagashima, Ken [Railway Technical Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan); Murakami, Masato [International Superconductivity Technology Center, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    Superconducting magnets made of high-T{sub c} superconductors are promising for industrial applications. It is well known that REBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} and LRE (light rare-earth) Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} superconductors prepared by melt processes have a high critical current density, J{sub c}, at 77 K and high magnetic fields. Therefore, the materials are very prospective for high magnetic field application as a superconducting permanent/bulk magnet with liquid-nitrogen refrigeration. LREBaCuO bulks, compared with REBaCuO bulks, exhibit a larger J{sub c} in high magnetic fields and a much improved irreversibility field, H{sub irr}, at 77 K. In this study, we discuss the possibility and trapped field properties of a superconducting bulk magnet, as well as the melt processing for bulk superconductors and their characteristic superconducting properties. One of the applications is a superconducting magnet for the future magnetically levitated (Maglev) train.

  6. Magnetic field extraction of trap-based electron beams using a high-permeability grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurst, N. C.; Danielson, J. R.; Surko, C. M., E-mail: csurko@physics.ucsd.edu [Physics Department, University of California, 9500 Gilman Drive, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    A method to form high quality electrostatically guided lepton beams is explored. Test electron beams are extracted from tailored plasmas confined in a Penning-Malmberg trap. The particles are then extracted from the confining axial magnetic field by passing them through a high magnetic permeability grid with radial tines (a so-called “magnetic spider”). An Einzel lens is used to focus and analyze the beam properties. Numerical simulations are used to model non-adiabatic effects due to the spider, and the predictions are compared with the experimental results. Improvements in beam quality are discussed relative to the use of a hole in a high permeability shield (i.e., in lieu of the spider), and areas for further improvement are described.

  7. A significant advantage for trapped field magnet applications—A failure of the critical state model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Roy; Parks, Drew; Sawh, Ravi-Persad; Carpenter, Keith; Davey, Kent

    2015-10-01

    Ongoing research has increased achievable field in trapped field magnets (TFMs) to multi-Tesla levels. This has greatly increased the attractiveness of TFMs for applications. However, it also increases the already very difficult problem of in situ activation and reactivation of the TFMs. The pulsed zero-field-cool (ZFC) method of activation is used in most applications because it can be accomplished with much lower power and more modest equipment than field-cool activation. The critical state model (CSM) has been a reliable theoretical tool for experimental analysis and engineering design of TFMs and their applications for over a half-century. The activating field, BA, required to fully magnetize a TFM to its maximum trappable field, BT,max, using pulsed-ZFC is predicted by CSM to be R ≡ BA/BT,max ≥ 2.0. We report here experiments on R as a function of Jc, which find a monotonic decrease of R to 1.0 as Jc increases. The reduction to R = 1.0 reduces the power needed to magnetize TFMs by about an order of magnitude. This is a critical advantage for TFM applications. The results also indicate the limits of applicability of CSM, and shed light on the physics omitted from the model. The experimental results rule out heating effects and pinning center geometry as causes of the decrease in R. A possible physical cause is proposed.

  8. Microstructured segmented Paul trap with tunable magnet field gradient; Mikrostrukturierte segmentierte Paul-Falle mit einstellbarem Magnetfeldgradienten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufmann, Delia

    2012-02-03

    Strings of laser cooled ions stored in microstructured Paul traps (microtraps) have promising potential for quantum information science. They provide a system which can be screened from a decohering environment, accurately prepared, manipulated and state selectively detected with efficiency close to unity. Magnetic field gradients allow for addressing trapped ions in frequency space. Furthermore, coupling of the ions' motional and spin states and long range spin-spin coupling of the ions' internal states are induced by such a gradient. This method is called Magnetic Gradient Induced Coupling, MAGIC. In this thesis, the design, construction and first characterization of a novel microtrap with an integrated solenoid is reported. The solenoid is designed to create a high magnetic field gradient per dissipated heat. The microtrap consists of three layers stacked onto each other. The outer layers provide a trapping potential, while the inner layer creates the switchable magnetic field gradient. Another specialty of this trap is the 33 pairs of DC-electrodes, allowing to move the ions along the trap axis and to adjust the range and the strength of the ions' spin-spin interactions. The microtrap is fixed on top of a ceramic block that provides the necessary electrical connections via thick film printed wires, a technique adopted in the context of microtraps for the first time, and in addition acts as a vacuum interface. The volume of the vacuum chamber is quite small, allowing for pressures in the low 10{sup -11} mbar range. In this microtrap, {sup 172}Yb{sup +}-ions are trapped, cooled and shuttled over a distance of about 2 mm. Trapped ions are used as magnetic field gradient probes, with a relative magnetic field precision of {delta}B/B{sub 0}=7.10{sup -6}. The addressing of two ions with the MAGIC method in the solenoid's magnetic field gradient is demonstrated.

  9. Magnetic traps with a spherical separatrix: Tornado traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peregood, B.P.; Lehnert, B.

    1981-01-01

    A review is given on the features of magnetic traps with a spherical separatrix, with special emphasis on Tornado spiral coil configurations. The confinement and heating of static plasms in Tornado traps is treated, including the topology of the magnetic field structure, the magneto-mechanical properties of the magnetic coil system, as well as the particle orbits and plasma behaviour in these traps. In addition, the mode of rotating plasma operation by crossed electric and magnetic fields is described. The results of experiments on static and rotating plasmas are summarized, and conclusions are drawn about future possibilities of Tornado traps in the creation and containment of hot plasmas. (orig.)

  10. Field evaluation of CDC and Mosquito Magnet X traps baited with dry ice, CO2 sachet, and octenol against mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Rui-De; Doyle, Melissa A; Kline, Daniel L

    2008-06-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) light traps and Mosquito Magnet X (MMX) traps baited with dry ice, octenol, and a new formulation (granular) of carbon dioxide (CO2) were evaluated against adult mosquitoes in the field. The results showed that the MMX traps (68.6%) baited with dry ice collected more mosquitoes compared to the CDC light traps (32.4%) only. The CDC traps baited with dry ice (64%) collected significantly more mosquitoes than traps baited with CO2 sachets (11%) or octenol (23%). The MMX traps baited with dry ice (85.5%) collected significantly more mosquitoes than traps baited with CO2 sachets (6.5%) or octenol (9%). The CDC traps baited with the formulations of normal and slow release CO2 sachets collected more mosquitoes than the formulation of fast release sachets. The CDC traps baited with fresh sachets and 24-h-exposed sachets collected significantly more mosquitoes than the traps baited with 48-h- and 72-h-exposed sachets.

  11. Magnetic field mapping of the UCNTau magneto-gravitational trap: design study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libersky, Matthew Murray [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-04

    The beta decay lifetime of the free neutron is an important input to the Standard Model of particle physics, but values measured using different methods have exhibited substantial disagreement. The UCN r experiment in development at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) plans to explore better methods of measuring the neutron lifetime using ultracold neutrons (UCNs). In this experiment, UCNs are confined in a magneto-gravitational trap formed by a curved, asymmetric Halbach array placed inside a vacuum vessel and surrounded by holding field coils. If any defects present in the Halbach array are sufficient to reduce the local field near the surface below that needed to repel the desired energy level UCNs, loss by material interaction can occur at a rate similar to the loss by beta decay. A map of the magnetic field near the surface of the array is necessary to identify any such defects, but the array's curved geometry and placement in a vacuum vessel make conventional field mapping methods difficult. A system consisting of computer vision-based tracking and a rover holding a Hall probe has been designed to map the field near the surface of the array, and construction of an initial prototype has begun at LANL. The design of the system and initial results will be described here.

  12. A magnetic particle micro-trap for large trapping surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P.

    2012-01-08

    Manipulation of micron-size magnetic particles of the superparamagnetic type contributes significantly in many applications like controlling the antibody/antigen binding process in immunoassays. Specifically, more target biomolecules can be attached/tagged and analyzed since the three dimensional structure of the magnetic particles increases the surface to volume ratio. Additionally, such biomolecular-tagged magnetic particles can be easily manipulated by an external magnetic field due to their superparamagnetic behavior. Therefore, magnetic particle- based immunoassays are extensively applied in micro-flow cytometry. The design of a square-loop micro-trap as a magnetic particle manipulator as well as numerical and experimental analysis is presented. Experimental results showed that the micro-trap could successfully trap and concentrate magnetic particles from a large to a small area with a high spatial range.

  13. Effects of a strong magnetic field on internal gravity waves: trapping, phase mixing, reflection and dynamical chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loi, Shyeh Tjing; Papaloizou, John C. B.

    2018-04-01

    The spectrum of oscillation modes of a star provides information not only about its material properties (e.g. mean density), but also its symmetries. Spherical symmetry can be broken by rotation and/or magnetic fields. It has been postulated that strong magnetic fields in the cores of some red giants are responsible for their anomalously weak dipole mode amplitudes (the "dipole dichotomy" problem), but a detailed understanding of how gravity waves interact with strong fields is thus far lacking. In this work, we attack the problem through a variety of analytical and numerical techniques, applied to a localised region centred on a null line of a confined axisymmetric magnetic field which is approximated as being cylindrically symmetric. We uncover a rich variety of phenomena that manifest when the field strength exceeds a critical value, beyond which the symmetry is drastically broken by the Lorentz force. When this threshold is reached, the spatial structure of the g-modes becomes heavily altered. The dynamics of wave packet propagation transitions from regular to chaotic, which is expected to fundamentally change the organisation of the mode spectrum. In addition, depending on their frequency and the orientation of field lines with respect to the stratification, waves impinging on different parts of the magnetised region are found to undergo either reflection or trapping. Trapping regions provide an avenue for energy loss through Alfvén wave phase mixing. Our results may find application in various astrophysical contexts, including the dipole dichotomy problem, the solar interior, and compact star oscillations.

  14. Highly versatile atomic micro traps generated by multifrequency magnetic field modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courteille, Ph W; Deh, B; Fortagh, J; Guenther, A; Kraft, S; Marzok, C; Slama, S; Zimmermann, C

    2006-01-01

    We propose the realization of custom-designed adiabatic potentials for cold atoms based on multimode radio frequency radiation in combination with static inhomogeneous magnetic fields. For example, the use of radio frequency combs gives rise to periodic potentials acting as gratings for cold atoms. In strong magnetic field gradients, the lattice constant can be well below 1 μm. By changing the frequencies of the comb in time the gratings can easily be propagated in space, which may prove useful for Bragg scattering atomic matter waves. Furthermore, almost arbitrarily shaped potentials are possible such as disordered potentials on a scale of several 100 nm or lattices with a spatially varying lattice constant. The potentials can be made state selective and, in the case of atomic mixtures, also species selective. This opens new perspectives for generating tailored quantum systems based on ultracold single atoms or degenerate atomic and molecular quantum gases

  15. Compact toroid challenge experiment with the increasing in the energy input into plasma and the level of trapped magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romadanov, I.V.; Ryzhkov, S.V., E-mail: ryzhkov@power.bmstu.ru

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Compact torus formation method with high level of magnetic flux is proposed. • A compact torus is produced in a theta-pinch-coil with pulse mode of operation. • Key feature is a pulse of current in an axial direction. • We report a level of linked magnetic flux is higher than theta-pinch results. - Abstract: The present work reports on compact toroid hydrogen plasma creation by means of a specially designed discharge system and results of magnetic fields introduction. Experiments in the compact toroid challenge (CTC) device at P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute (FIAN) have been conducted since 2005. The CTC device differs from the conventional theta-pinch formation in the use of an axial current for enhanced efficiency. We have used a novel technique to maximize the flux linked to the plasma. The purpose of this method is to increase the energy input into the plasma and the level of trapped magnetic flux using an additional toroidal magnetic field. A study of compact torus formation with axial and toroidal currents was done and a new method is proposed and implemented.

  16. Spin-polarized deuterium in magnetic traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelman, J.M.V.A.; Stoof, H.T.C.; Verhaar, B.J.; Walraven, J.T.M.

    1987-01-01

    We have calculated the spin-exchange two-body rate constants associated with the population dynamics of the hyperfine levels of atomic deuterium as a function of magnetic field in the Boltzmann zero-temperature limit. Results indicate that a gas of low-field--seeking deuterium atoms trapped in a static magnetic field minimum decays rapidly into an ultrastable gas of doubly spin-polarized deuterium. We also discuss the temperature dependence of various effects

  17. Magnetic trapping of cold bromine atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennick, C J; Lam, J; Doherty, W G; Softley, T P

    2014-01-17

    Magnetic trapping of bromine atoms at temperatures in the millikelvin regime is demonstrated for the first time. The atoms are produced by photodissociation of Br2 molecules in a molecular beam. The lab-frame velocity of Br atoms is controlled by the wavelength and polarization of the photodissociation laser. Careful selection of the wavelength results in one of the pair of atoms having sufficient velocity to exactly cancel that of the parent molecule, and it remains stationary in the lab frame. A trap is formed at the null point between two opposing neodymium permanent magnets. Dissociation of molecules at the field minimum results in the slowest fraction of photofragments remaining trapped. After the ballistic escape of the fastest atoms, the trapped slow atoms are lost only by elastic collisions with the chamber background gas. The measured loss rate is consistent with estimates of the total cross section for only those collisions transferring sufficient kinetic energy to overcome the trapping potential.

  18. Improvement of charged particles transport across a transverse magnetic filter field by electrostatic trapping of magnetized electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, B. K.; Hazarika, P.; Chakraborty, M.; Bandyopadhyay, M.

    2014-01-01

    A study on the transport of charged particles across a magnetic filter field has been carried out in a double plasma device (DPD) and presented in this manuscript. The DPD is virtually divided into two parts viz. source and target regions by a transverse magnetic field (TMF) which is constructed by inserting strontium ferrite magnets into two stainless steel rectangular tubes. Plasma electrons are magnetized but ions are unmagnetized inside the TMF region. Negative voltages are applied to the TMF tubes in order to reduce the loss of electrons towards them. Plasma is produced in the source region by filament discharge method and allowed to flow towards the target region through this negatively biased TMF. It is observed that in the target region, plasma density can be increased and electron temperature decreased with the help of negatively biased TMF. This observation is beneficial for negative ion source development. Plasma diffusion across the negatively biased TMF follows Bohm or anomalous diffusion process when negative bias voltage is very less. At higher negative bias, diffusion coefficient starts deviating from the Bohm diffusion value, associated with enhanced plasma flow in the target region

  19. Improvement of charged particles transport across a transverse magnetic filter field by electrostatic trapping of magnetized electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, B. K., E-mail: bdyt.ds@rediffmail.com; Hazarika, P.; Chakraborty, M. [Centre of Plasma Physics-Institute for Plasma Research, Tepesia-782402, Kamrup, Assam (India); Bandyopadhyay, M., E-mail: mainak@iter-india.org [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar-382025, Gujarat (India)

    2014-07-15

    A study on the transport of charged particles across a magnetic filter field has been carried out in a double plasma device (DPD) and presented in this manuscript. The DPD is virtually divided into two parts viz. source and target regions by a transverse magnetic field (TMF) which is constructed by inserting strontium ferrite magnets into two stainless steel rectangular tubes. Plasma electrons are magnetized but ions are unmagnetized inside the TMF region. Negative voltages are applied to the TMF tubes in order to reduce the loss of electrons towards them. Plasma is produced in the source region by filament discharge method and allowed to flow towards the target region through this negatively biased TMF. It is observed that in the target region, plasma density can be increased and electron temperature decreased with the help of negatively biased TMF. This observation is beneficial for negative ion source development. Plasma diffusion across the negatively biased TMF follows Bohm or anomalous diffusion process when negative bias voltage is very less. At higher negative bias, diffusion coefficient starts deviating from the Bohm diffusion value, associated with enhanced plasma flow in the target region.

  20. Magnet system of the ''AMBAL'' experimental trap with ambipolar mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimov, G.I.; Lysyanskij, P.B.; Tadber, M.V.; Timoshin, I.Ya.; Shrajner, K.K.

    1982-01-01

    A magnet system of the ''AMBAL'' ambipolar trap under construction is described. The trap magnetic field configuration, geometry of the main coils and diagram of the whole device magnet system are outlined. Drift surface cross sections in the equatorial plane of the ring mirror device, in the median plane and at different distances from the trap median plane are presented. The magnet system design is described in brief

  1. Magnetic Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Schöller, Markus; Hubrig, Swetlana

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we give a brief introduction into the use of the Zeeman effect in astronomy and the general detection of magnetic fields in stars, concentrating on the use of FORS2 for longitudinal magnetic field measurements.

  2. Polar-core spin vortex of quasi-2D ferromagnetic spin-1 condensate in a flat-bottomed optical trap with a weak magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Gong-Ping; Li, Pin; Li, Ting; Xue, Ya-Jie

    2018-02-01

    Motivated by the recent experiments realized in a flat-bottomed optical trap (Navon et al., 2015; Chomaz et al., 2015), we study the ground state of polar-core spin vortex of quasi-2D ferromagnetic spin-1 condensate in a finite-size homogeneous trap with a weak magnetic field. The exact spatial distribution of local spin is obtained with a variational method. Unlike the fully-magnetized planar spin texture with a zero-spin core, which was schematically demonstrated in previous studies for the ideal polar-core spin vortex in a homogeneous trap with infinitely large boundary, some plateaus and two-cores structure emerge in the distribution curves of spin magnitude in the polar-core spin vortex we obtained for the larger effective spin-dependent interaction. More importantly, the spin values of the plateaus are not 1 as expected in the fully-magnetized spin texture, except for the sufficiently large spin-dependent interaction and the weak-magnetic-field limit. We attribute the decrease of spin value to the effect of finite size of the system. The spin values of the plateaus can be controlled by the quadratic Zeeman energy q of the weak magnetic field, which decreases with the increase of q.

  3. Magnetic Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils

    2015-01-01

    of the fluid flow at the top of the core. However, what is measured at or near the surface of the Earth is the superposition of the core field and fields caused by magnetized rocks in the Earth’s crust, by electric currents flowing in the ionosphere, magnetosphere, and oceans, and by currents induced......he Earth has a large and complicated magnetic field, the major part of which is produced by a self-sustaining dynamo operating in the fluid outer core. Magnetic field observations provide one of the few tools for remote sensing the Earth’s deep interior, especially regarding the dynamics...... in the Earth by time-varying external fields. These sources have their specific characteristics in terms of spatial and temporal variations, and their proper separation, based on magnetic measurements, is a major challenge. Such a separation is a prerequisite for remote sensing by means of magnetic field...

  4. Dynamics of plasma−dust structures formed in a trap created in the narrowing of a current channel in a magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzlieva, E. S., E-mail: plasmadust@yandex.ru; Karasev, V. Yu., E-mail: v.karasev@spbu.ru; Pavlov, S. I. [St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    The geometry and dynamics of plasma−dust structures in a longitudinal magnetic field is studied experimentally. The structures are formed in a glow-discharge trap created in the double electric layer produced as a result of discharge narrowing by means of a dielectric insert introduced in the discharge tube. Studies of structures formed in the new type of glow-discharge trap are of interest from the standpoint of future experiments with complex plasmas in superstrong magnetic fields in which the dust component is magnetized. Different types of dielectric inserts were used: conical and plane ones with symmetric and asymmetric apertures. Conditions for the existence of stable dust structures are determined for dust grains of different density and different dispersity. According to the experimental results, the angular velocity of dust rotation is ≥10 s{sup –1}, which is the fastest type of dust motion for all types of discharges in a magnetic field. The rotation is interpreted by analyzing the dynamics of individual dust grains.

  5. Magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestel, L.; Arizona Univ., Tucson)

    1985-01-01

    The role of the Galactic magnetic field in the early stages of star formation is examined. The dynamical and observational consequences of the anisotropic collapse of cool gas clouds permeated by the local Galactic magnetic field are discussed. Magneto-gravitational equilibria of such clouds with subcritical mass-flux ratios, especially in the thin disk approximation, are addressed. Magnetic braking of both subcritical and supercritical masses is considered, and the consequences of flux leakage during the molecular cloud phase are discussed, including the effect on field topology

  6. Tornado type closed magnetic trap for an ECR source

    CERN Document Server

    Abramova, K B; Voronin, A V; Zorin, V G

    1999-01-01

    We propose to use a Tornado type closed magnetic trap for creation of a source of mul-ticharged ions with plasma heating by microwave radiation. Plasma loss in closed traps is deter-mined by diffusion across the magnetic field, which increases substantially plasma confinement time as compared to the classical mirror trap [1]. We propose to extract ions with the aid of additional coils which partially destroy the closed structure of the magnetic lines in the trap, but don not influence the total confinement time. This allows for producing a controlled plasma flux that depends on the magnetic field of the additional coil. The Tornado trap also possesses merits such as an opportunity to produce high magnetic fields up to 3 T, which makes possible heating and confinement of plasma with a high density of electrons; plasma stability to magneto-hydrodynamic perturbations because the magnetic field structure corresponds to the "min B" configuration; and relatively low costs. All estimates and calculations were carrie...

  7. Manipulating Neutral Atoms in Chip-Based Magnetic Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveline, David; Thompson, Robert; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute; Yu, Nan; Kohel, James

    2009-01-01

    Several techniques for manipulating neutral atoms (more precisely, ultracold clouds of neutral atoms) in chip-based magnetic traps and atomic waveguides have been demonstrated. Such traps and waveguides are promising components of future quantum sensors that would offer sensitivities much greater than those of conventional sensors. Potential applications include gyroscopy and basic research in physical phenomena that involve gravitational and/or electromagnetic fields. The developed techniques make it possible to control atoms with greater versatility and dexterity than were previously possible and, hence, can be expected to contribute to the value of chip-based magnetic traps and atomic waveguides. The basic principle of these techniques is to control gradient magnetic fields with suitable timing so as to alter a trap to exert position-, velocity-, and/or time-dependent forces on atoms in the trap to obtain desired effects. The trap magnetic fields are generated by controlled electric currents flowing in both macroscopic off-chip electromagnet coils and microscopic wires on the surface of the chip. The methods are best explained in terms of examples. Rather than simply allowing atoms to expand freely into an atomic waveguide, one can give them a controllable push by switching on an externally generated or a chip-based gradient magnetic field. This push can increase the speed of the atoms, typically from about 5 to about 20 cm/s. Applying a non-linear magnetic-field gradient exerts different forces on atoms in different positions a phenomenon that one can exploit by introducing a delay between releasing atoms into the waveguide and turning on the magnetic field.

  8. Spin-polarized deuterium : stabilization in magnetic traps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelman, J.M.V.A.; Stoof, H.T.C.; Verhaar, B.J.; Walraven, J.T.M.

    1987-01-01

    We report on a calculation of the spin-exchange two-body rate constants associated with the population dynamics of the hyperfine levels of atomic deuterium as a function of magnetic field in the Boltzmann zero temperature limit. We find that a gas of low field seeking deuterium atoms trapped in a

  9. Continuous magnetic trapping of laser cooled atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagnato, V.S.; Lafyatis, G.; Martin, A.G.; Raab, E.L.; Landry, J.; Ahmad-Bitar, R.N.; Pritchard, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present here initial results of the deceleration of a thermal atomic beam from -- 1000 to -- 100 m/s. The experiment was conducted in the 1.4-m long vertical superconducting solenoid which produced the slowing field. The fluorescence of the slowed atomic beam has been studied as a function of laser frequency. Figure 2 is a 12-GHz scan showing the fluorescence at a position 150 cm from the beginning of the solenoid. The wide peak corresponds to unslowed atoms with generally the initial velocity distribution. The second, narrower, peak corresponds to slowed atoms with a velocity of -- 150 m/s. Similar spectra have been obtained for various positions along the magnetic slower and trap. These data should allow better understanding of the cooling process and will be compared to computer models

  10. Sky-distribution of intensity of synchrotron radio emission of relativistic electrons trapped in Earth’s magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimenko V.V.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the calculations of synchrotron radio emission intensity from Van Allen belts with Gaussian space distribution of electron density across L-shells of a dipole magnetic field, and with Maxwell’s relativistic electron energy distribution. The results of these calculations come to a good agreement with measurements of the synchrotron emission intensity of the artificial radiation belt’s electrons during the Starfish nuclear test. We have obtained two-dimensional distributions of radio brightness in azimuth — zenith angle coordinates for an observer on Earth’s surface. The westside and eastside intensity maxima exceed several times the maximum level of emission in the meridian plane. We have also constructed two-dimensional distributions of the radio emission intensity in decibels related to the background galactic radio noise level. Isotropic fluxes of relativistic electrons (Е~1 MeV should be more than 107 cm–2s–1 for the synchrotron emission intensity in the meridian plane to exceed the cosmic noise level by 0.1 dB (riometer sensitivity threshold.

  11. Single-molecule studies using magnetic traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionnet, Timothée; Allemand, Jean-François; Revyakin, Andrey; Strick, Terence R; Saleh, Omar A; Bensimon, David; Croquette, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, techniques have been developed to study and manipulate single molecules of DNA and other biopolymers. In one such technique, the magnetic trap, a single DNA molecule is bound at one end to a glass surface and at the other to a magnetic microbead. Small magnets, whose position and rotation can be controlled, pull on and rotate the microbead. This provides a simple method to stretch and twist the molecule. The system allows one to apply and measure forces ranging from 10(-3) to >100 pN. In contrast to other techniques, the force measurement is absolute and does not require calibration of the sensor. In this article, we describe the principle of the magnetic trap, as well as its use in the measurement of the elastic properties of DNA and the study of DNA-protein interactions.

  12. Measuring the neutron lifetime using magnetically trapped neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Shaughnessy, C.M.; Golub, R.; Schelhammer, K.W.; Swank, C.M.; Seo, P.-N. [North Carolina State University, 2401 Stinson Drive, Raleigh, NC (United States); Huffman, P.R., E-mail: Paul_Huffman@ncsu.ed [North Carolina State University, 2401 Stinson Drive, Raleigh, NC (United States); Dzhosyuk, S.N.; Mattoni, C.E.H.; Yang, L.; Doyle, J.M. [Harvard University, 17 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA (United States); Coakley, K.J.; Thompson, A.K.; Mumm, H.P. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Lamoreaux, S.K.; McKinsey, D.N. [Yale University, 217 Prospect Street, New Haven, CT (United States); Yang, G. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2009-12-11

    The neutron beta-decay lifetime plays an important role both in understanding weak interactions within the framework of the Standard Model and in theoretical predictions of the primordial abundance of {sup 4}He in Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. In previous work, we successfully demonstrated the trapping of ultracold neutrons in a conservative potential magnetic trap. A major upgrade of the apparatus is nearing completion at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research (NCNR). In our approach, a beam of 0.89 nm neutrons is incident on a superfluid {sup 4}He target within the minimum field region of an Ioffe-type magnetic trap. A fraction of the neutrons is downscattered in the helium to energies <200neV, and those in the appropriate spin state become trapped. The inverse process is suppressed by the low phonon density of helium at temperatures less than 200 mK, allowing the neutron to travel undisturbed. When the neutron decays the energetic electron ionizes the helium, producing scintillation light that is detected using photomultiplier tubes. Statistical limitations of the previous apparatus will be alleviated by significant increases in field strength and trap volume resulting in twenty times more trapped neutrons.

  13. Measuring the Neutron Lifetime using Magnetically Trapped Ultracold Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumm, H. P.; Coakley, K. J.; Dewey, M. S.; Huber, M. G.; Hughes, P. P.; Thompson, A. K.; Golub, R.; Huffer, C. R.; Huffman, P. R.; O'Shaughnessy, C. M.; Schelhammer, K. W.

    2010-11-01

    The neutron beta-decay lifetime is important in both theoretical predictions of the primordial abundance of ^4He and providing a strong unitarity test of the CKM mixing matrix. We have previously demonstrated trapping of Ultracold Neutrons (UCN) in a magnetic trap, and, though statistically limited, measured a lifetime consistent with the world average. A major upgrade of the apparatus has now been completed at NIST. In our unique approach, a 0.89 nm neutron beam is incident on a superfluid ^4He target within the minimum field region of an Ioffe-type magnetic trap. Neutrons are downscattered by single phonon scattering in liquid helium to near rest and trapped; at sufficiently low temperatures, the low phonon density in the helium suppresses upscatter. The electron accompanying neutron decay produces scintillation in the superfluid helium and can be detected in real time. Previous statistical limitations as well as systematics related to neutron material bottling will be reduced by significant increases in field strength and trap volume. Details of analyses of the systematics as well as the initial performance benchmarks of the new apparatus will be presented.

  14. Magnetic Field Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Magnetic Field Calculator will calculate the total magnetic field, including components (declination, inclination, horizontal intensity, northerly intensity,...

  15. Magnetic trapping and thermal isolation of nitrogen hydride molecules using the buffer gas techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsikata, Edem

    Thermal isolation of trapped NH molecules is accomplished. We cool NH molecules to 500 mK using helium vapor buffer gas and magnetically trap them in the 4 Tesla field of an anti-Helmholtz superconducting magnet. The helium is introduced using a fast-acting cryogenic valve, allowing us to abruptly switch off the flow. The buffer gas rapidly exits the trapping region through a large diameter orifice. We trap 105 molecules with lifetimes exceeding 20 s. The prospect of extending the loading and trapping techniques to observe atom-molecule collisions is investigated.

  16. Characterization of a magnetic trap by polarization dependent Zeeman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Vandel; Lyngsøe, Jens Kristian; Thorseth, Anders

    2008-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a detailed experimental study of our cloverleaf magnetic trap for sodium atoms. By using polarization dependent Zeeman spectroscopy of our atomic beam, passing the magnetic trap region, we have determined important trap parameters such as gradients, their curvatures...

  17. A magnetic method to concentrate and trap biological targets

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Fuquan

    2012-11-01

    Magnetoresistive sensors in combination with magnetic particles have been used in biological applications due to, e.g., their small size and high sensitivity. A growing interest is to integrate magnetoresistive sensors with microchannels and electronics to fabricate devices that can perform complex analyses. A major task in such systems is to immobilize magnetic particles on top of the sensor surface, which is required to detect the particles\\' stray field. In the presented work, a bead concentrator, consisting of gold microstructures, at the bottom of a microchannel, is used to attract and move magnetic particles into a trap. The trap is made of a chamber with a gold microstructure underneath and is used to attract and immobilize a defined number of magnetic beads. In order to detect targets, two kinds of solutions were prepared; one containing only superparamagnetic particles, the other one containing beads with the protein Bovine serum albumin as the target and fluorescent markers. Due to the size difference between bare beads and beads with target, less magnetic beads were immobilized inside the volume chamber in case of magnetic beads with target as compared to bare magnetic beads. © 1965-2012 IEEE.

  18. Trapping ultracold atoms in a sub-micron-period triangular magnetic lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Tran, T.; Surendran, P.; Herrera, I.; Balcytis, A.; Nissen, D.; Albrecht, M.; Sidorov, A.; Hannaford, P.

    2017-07-01

    We report the trapping of ultracold 87Rb atoms in a 0.7-μ m-period two-dimensional triangular magnetic lattice on an atom chip. The magnetic lattice is created by a lithographically patterned magnetic Co/Pd multilayer film plus bias fields. Rubidium atoms in the |F =1 , mF=-1 > low-field seeking state are trapped at estimated distances down to about 100 nm from the chip surface and with calculated mean trapping frequencies up to about 800 kHz . The measured lifetimes of the atoms trapped in the magnetic lattice are in the range 0.4-1.7 ms , depending on distance from the chip surface. Model calculations suggest the trap lifetimes are currently limited mainly by losses due to one-dimensional thermal evaporation following loading of the atoms from the Z -wire trap into the very tight magnetic lattice traps, rather than by fundamental loss processes such as surface interactions, three-body recombination, or spin flips due to Johnson magnetic noise. The trapping of atoms in a 0.7 -μ m -period magnetic lattice represents a significant step toward using magnetic lattices for quantum tunneling experiments and to simulate condensed matter and many-body phenomena in nontrivial lattice geometries.

  19. Accumulation and thermalization of cold atoms in a finite-depth magnetic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicireanu, R.; Beaufils, Q.; Pouderous, A.; Laburthe-Tolra, B.; Maréchal, E.; Porto, J. V.; Vernac, L.; Keller, J. C.; Gorceix, O.

    2007-08-01

    We study the continuous accumulation of cold atoms from a magneto-optical trap (MOT) into a finite depth trap, consisting in a magnetic quadrupole trap dressed by a radiofrequency (rf) field. Chromium atoms (Cr52) in a MOT are continuously optically pumped by the MOT lasers to metastable dark states. In the presence of a rf field, the temperature of the metastable atoms that remain magnetically trapped can be as low as 25μK , with a density of 1017atomsm-3 , resulting in an increase of the phase-space density, still limited to 7.0×10-6 by inelastic collisions. To investigate the thermalization issues in the truncated trap, we measure the free evaporation rate in the rf-truncated magnetic trap, and deduce the average elastic cross section for atoms in the D45 metastable states, σel=7.0×10-16m2 .

  20. Magnetic Field Grid Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Magnetic Field Properties Calculator will computes the estimated values of Earth's magnetic field(declination, inclination, vertical component, northerly...

  1. Continuous loading of cold atoms into a Ioffe-Pritchard magnetic trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Piet O; Hensler, Sven; Werner, Joerg; Binhammer, Thomas; Goerlitz, Axel; Pfau, Tilman

    2003-01-01

    We present a robust continuous optical loading scheme for a Ioffe-Pritchard (IP) type magnetic trap (MT). Chromium atoms are cooled and trapped in a modified magneto-optical trap (MOT) consisting of a conventional 2D-MOT in the radial direction and an axial molasses. The MOT and IP trap share the same magnetic field configuration. Continuous loading of atoms into the IP trap is provided by radiative leakage from the MOT to a metastable level which is magnetically trapped and decoupled from the MOT light. We are able to accumulate 30 times more atoms in the MT than in the MOT. The absolute number of 2 x 10 8 atoms is limited by inelastic collisions. A model based on rate equations shows good agreement with the data. Our scheme can also be applied to other atoms with similar level structure like alkaline earth metals

  2. Trapped field internal dipole superconducting motor generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. (Downers Grove, IL)

    2001-01-01

    A motor generator including a high temperature superconductor rotor and an internally disposed coil assembly. The motor generator superconductor rotor is constructed of a plurality of superconductor elements magnetized to produce a dipole field. The coil assembly can be either a conventional conductor or a high temperature superconductor. The superconductor rotor elements include a magnetization direction and c-axis for the crystals of the elements and which is oriented along the magnetization direction.

  3. Cosmological magnetic fields - V

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction. Magnetic fields seem to be everywhere that we can look in the universe, from our own sun out to high-redshift Lyman-« systems. The fields we ... is the field tensor, is the four-potential, and В is the four-current. The field tensor is observer-independent, while the electric and magnetic fields depend on the ...

  4. Magnetic flux trapping in superconducting niobium

    CERN Document Server

    Benvenuti, Cristoforo; Campisi, I E; Darriulat, Pierre; Durand, C; Peck, M A; Russo, R; Valente, A M

    1997-01-01

    In a systematic study of the RF response of superconducting niobium cavities operated in their fundamental TM010 mode at 1.5 GHz, magnetic flux trapping has been used as a tool to diagnose the presenc e of pinning centres. In addition to bulk niobium cavities the study covers copper cavities, the inner walls of which are coated with 1.5 µm thick niobium films grown by magnetron sputtering in a nobl e gas atmosphere. The use of different gases (Xe, Kr, Ar and Ne) or gas mixtures has made it possible to vary the concentration of noble gas atoms in the films. Film contamination is characterised by an electron mean free path l calculated from the results of systematic measurements of the penetration depth at T = 0 K, l0, and from RRR measurements made on samples prepared under similar conditions as the cavity films.

  5. Gap-related trapped magnetic flux dependence between single and combined bulk superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Z.; Miki, M.; Felder, B.; Tsuzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.; Uetake, T.; Izumi, M.

    2011-05-01

    Aiming at examining the trapped-flux dependence between single and combined bulk superconductors for field-pole applications, three rectangular Y 1.65Ba 2Cu 3O 7-x (YBCO) bulks with a possibly compact combination were employed to investigate the trapped-flux characteristics of single and combined bulks with a field-cooling magnetization (FCM) method. A gap-related dependence was found between them. At lower gaps of 1 mm and 5 mm, the peak trapped fields and total magnetic flux of combined bulks are both smaller than the additive values of each single bulk, which can be ascribed to the demagnetization influences of the field around the bulk generated by the adjacent ones. While, at larger gaps like 10 mm, the situation becomes reversed. The combined bulks can attain bigger peak trapped fields as well as total magnetic flux, which indicates that the magnetic field by the bulk combination can reach higher gaps, thanks to the bigger magnetic energy compared with the single bulk. The presented results show that, on one hand, it is possible to estimate the total trapped magnetic flux of combined bulks by an approximate additive method of each single bulk while considering a demagnetization factor; on the other hand, it also means that the performance of combined bulks will be superior to the addition of each single bulk at larger gaps, thus preferable for large-scaled magnet applications.

  6. Magnetic field measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Shigemitsu; Takeuchi, Kazuhiro; Hirota, Jun-ichi.

    1996-01-01

    In order to directly measure the magnetic fields in the vicinity of plasmas in a thermonuclear device, electric current is supplied to a conductor intersecting magnetic fields, and the position of the conductor is changed by generated electromagnetic forces, and the positional change of the conductor is measured to determine the magnetic fields. Namely, if electric current is supplied to the conductor crossing the magnetic fields, electromagnetic forces directly in proportion to the magnetic fields exert on the object. If the forces are measured, magnetic fields can be determined directly without using an integrator. If springs are attached to the conductor undergoing electromagnetic forces, as a method of measuring electromagnetic forces, since the distortion is in proportion to the electromagnetic forces, magnetic fields can be determined, for example, by changing the position of a contact of a variable resistor interlocking with the positional change of the spring. Since a semiconductor device which is sensitive to radiation is not necessary and the magnetic fields can be measured directly in this method for the measurement of the magnetic fields, the measurement can be conducted at a constant accuracy even in a long period of time. The device of the present invention can measure magnetic fields with no drift components of the integrator, has excellent radiation-resistance and can improve the plant safety. (N.H.)

  7. Magnetic field measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Shigemitsu; Abe, Mitsushi.

    1996-01-01

    If signal voltages are integrated with lapse of time in a thermonuclear device, erroneous voltages are also integrated with lapse of time thereby resulting in occurrence of measuring errors increased with lapse of time, and continuous measurement for magnetic fields at high accuracy for a long period of time has been difficult. Then, a movable coil is disposed in the magnetic fields to be measured in order to directly measure the magnetic fields at the periphery of the plasmas, and electric current is supplied to the coil and resulted electromagnetic force is measured to obtain a magnetic field. If electric current is supplied to the coil in the magnetic fields, electromagnetic force (rotational torque) directly in proportion to the magnetic fields is generated. If the electromagnetic force is measured, magnetic fields can be determined directly without using an integrator. If a resistor wire is disposed on one end of the coil so that the resistor wire extends/shrinks by the electromagnetic force and changes the resistance value, the electromagnetic force can be determined from the magnetic fields based on the change of the resistance values. Since the measurement using magnetic fields does not require semiconductor devices which are sensitive to radiation, and the magnetic fields can be measured directly, the measurement can be conducted at a constant accuracy even for a long period of time. (N.H.)

  8. The heating of electrons in magnetic traps of low-pressure electron-cyclotron-resonance microwave-frequency reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrin, A.B.

    2005-01-01

    One analyzes procedures to maintain plasma in low-pressure electron-cyclotron-resonance microwave reactors where fast neutrons trapped by permanent magnets serve as ionization source. One studies the role of regions of electron-cyclotron heating of electrons by a wave electric field. On the basis of mathematical simulation of electron motion in magnetic traps one investigates into the effect of magnetic trap sizes on heating efficiency and words the principles to design electron-cyclotron-resonance microwave reactors [ru

  9. The Juno Magnetic Field Investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Benn, Mathias; Bjarnø, Jonas Bækby

    2017-01-01

    The Juno Magnetic Field investigation (MAG) characterizes Jupiter’s planetary magnetic field and magnetosphere, providing the first globally distributed and proximate measurements of the magnetic field of Jupiter. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent magnetometer sensor ...

  10. Gap-related trapped magnetic flux dependence between single and combined bulk superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Z., E-mail: zgdeng@gmail.co [Laboratory of Applied Physics, Department of Marine Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Tokyo 135-8533 (Japan); Miki, M.; Felder, B.; Tsuzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.; Uetake, T.; Izumi, M. [Laboratory of Applied Physics, Department of Marine Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Tokyo 135-8533 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: {yields} Rectangular YBCO bulks to realize a compact combination. {yields} The gap effect was added to consider in the trapped flux density mapping. {yields} The trapped-flux dependence between single and combined bulks is gap related. {yields} It is possible to estimate the total magnetic flux of bulk combinations. - Abstract: Aiming at examining the trapped-flux dependence between single and combined bulk superconductors for field-pole applications, three rectangular Y{sub 1.65}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} (YBCO) bulks with a possibly compact combination were employed to investigate the trapped-flux characteristics of single and combined bulks with a field-cooling magnetization (FCM) method. A gap-related dependence was found between them. At lower gaps of 1 mm and 5 mm, the peak trapped fields and total magnetic flux of combined bulks are both smaller than the additive values of each single bulk, which can be ascribed to the demagnetization influences of the field around the bulk generated by the adjacent ones. While, at larger gaps like 10 mm, the situation becomes reversed. The combined bulks can attain bigger peak trapped fields as well as total magnetic flux, which indicates that the magnetic field by the bulk combination can reach higher gaps, thanks to the bigger magnetic energy compared with the single bulk. The presented results show that, on one hand, it is possible to estimate the total trapped magnetic flux of combined bulks by an approximate additive method of each single bulk while considering a demagnetization factor; on the other hand, it also means that the performance of combined bulks will be superior to the addition of each single bulk at larger gaps, thus preferable for large-scaled magnet applications.

  11. Organic magnetic field sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCamey, Dane; Boehme, Christoph

    2017-01-24

    An organic, spin-dependent magnetic field sensor (10) includes an active stack (12) having an organic material with a spin-dependence. The sensor (10) also includes a back electrical contact (14) electrically coupled to a back of the active stack (12) and a front electrical contact (16) electrically coupled to a front of the active stack (12). A magnetic field generator (18) is oriented so as to provide an oscillating magnetic field which penetrates the active stack (12).

  12. Trapping cold molecules and atoms: Simultaneous magnetic deceleration and trapping of cold molecular Oxygen with Lithium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerman, Nitzan; Karpov, Michael; Segev, Yair; Bibelink, Natan; Narevicius, Julia; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2016-05-01

    Cooling molecules to the ultra-cold regime remains a major challenge in the growing field of cold molecules. The molecular internal degrees of freedom complicate the effort of direct application of laser cooling. An alternative and general path towards ultra-cold molecules relies on sympathetic cooling via collisions with laser-cooled atoms. Here, we demonstrate the first step towards application of sympathetic cooling by co-trapping of molecular Oxygen with Lithium atoms in a magnetic trap at a temperature of 300 mK. Our experiment begins with a pulsed supersonic beam which is a general source for cold high-flux atomic and molecular beams. Although the supersonic expansion efficiently cools the beam to temperatures below 1K, it also accelerates the beam to high mean velocities. We decelerate a beam of O2 in a moving magnetic trap decelerator from 375 m/s to a stop. We entrained the molecular beam with Li atoms by laser ablation prior to deceleration. The deceleration ends with loading the molecules and atoms into a static quadrupole trap, which is generated by two permanent magnets. We estimate 109 trapped molecules with background limited lifetime of 0.6 Sec. Our achievement enables application of laser cooling on the Li atoms in order to sympathetically cool the O2.

  13. Magnetic fields at Neptune

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ness, N.F.; Acuna, M.H.; Burlaga, L.F.; Connerney, J.E.P.; Lepping, R.P.; Neubauer, F.M.

    1989-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center-University of Delaware Bartol Research Institute magnetic field experiment on the Voyager 2 spacecraft discovered a strong and complex intrinsic magnetic field of Neptune and an associated magnetosphere and magnetic tail. A maximum magnetic field of nearly 10,000 nanoteslas (1 nanotesla = 10 -5 gauss) was observed near closest approach, at a distance of 1.18 R N . The planetary magnetic field between 4 and 15 R N can be well represented by an offset tilted magnetic dipole (OTD), displaced from the center of Neptune by the surprisingly large amount of 0.55 R N and inclined by 47 degrees with respect to the rotation axis. Within 4 R N , the magnetic field representation must include localized sources or higher order magnetic multipoles, or both, which are not yet well determined. As the spacecraft exited the magnetosphere, the magnetic tail appeared to be monopolar, and no crossings of an imbedded magnetic field reversal or plasma neutral sheet were observed. The auroral zones are most likely located far from the rotation poles and may have a complicated geometry. The rings and all the known moons of Neptune are imbedded deep inside the magnetosphere, except for Nereid, which is outside when sunward of the planet. The radiation belts will have a complex structure owing to the absorption of energetic particles by the moons and rings of Neptune and losses associated with the significant changes in the diurnally varying magnetosphere configuration. In an astrophysical context, the magnetic field of Neptune, like that of Uranus, may be described as that of an oblique rotator

  14. Progress towards magnetic trapping of ultra-cold neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Huffman, P R; Butterworth, J S; Coakley, K J; Dewey, M S; Dzhosyuk, S N; Gilliam, D M; Golub, R; Greene, G L; Habicht, K; Lamoreaux, S K; Mattoni, C E H; McKinsey, D N; Wietfeldt, F E; Doyle, J M

    2000-01-01

    We report progress towards magnetic trapping of ultra-cold neutrons (UCN) in preparation for a neutron lifetime measurement. UCN will be produced by inelastic scattering of cold (0.89 nm) neutrons in a reservoir of superfluid sup 4 He and confined in a three-dimensional magnetic trap. As the trapped neutrons decay, recoil electrons will generate scintillations in the liquid He, which should be detectable with nearly 100% efficiency. This direct measure of the number of UCN decays vs. time can be used to determine the neutron beta-decay lifetime.

  15. Progress towards magnetic trapping of ultra-cold neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, P.R.; Brome, C.R.; Butterworth, J.S.; Coakley, K.J.; Dewey, M.S.; Dzhosyuk, S.N.; Gilliam, D.M.; Golub, R.; Greene, G.L.; Habicht, K.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Mattoni, C.E.H.; McKinsey, D.N.; Wietfeldt, F.E.; Doyle, J.M

    2000-02-11

    We report progress towards magnetic trapping of ultra-cold neutrons (UCN) in preparation for a neutron lifetime measurement. UCN will be produced by inelastic scattering of cold (0.89 nm) neutrons in a reservoir of superfluid {sup 4}He and confined in a three-dimensional magnetic trap. As the trapped neutrons decay, recoil electrons will generate scintillations in the liquid He, which should be detectable with nearly 100% efficiency. This direct measure of the number of UCN decays vs. time can be used to determine the neutron beta-decay lifetime.

  16. Magnetic fields in cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    The possible role of a large-scale relic magnetic field in the history of the Universe is considered. The perturbation of the cosmic microwave back-ground radiation on large angular scales due to a homogeneous magnetic field is estimated in a simple relativistic model. This allows corresponding limits to be placed on the magnitude of any such large-scale relic magnetic field at the present time. These limits are essentially the strongest which can be set on the largest scales. A corresponding bound is obtained by use of the requirement that the field should not spoil the predictions of primordial nucleosynthesis. It is noted that the existence of large-scale cosmic magnetic fields would circumvent the limits previously set - also on the basis of nucleosynthesis considerations - on the large-scale anisotropy now present in the Universe. (author)

  17. Relevance of sub-surface chip layers for the lifetime of magnetically trapped atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, H. B.; Henkel, C; Haller, E.

    2005-01-01

    on the thickness of that layer, as long as the layers below have a much smaller conductivity; essentially the same magnetic noise would be obtained with a metallic membrane suspended in vacuum. Based on our theory we give general scaling laws of how to reduce the effect of surface magnetic noise on the trapped...... measurements where the center of a side guide trap is laterally shifted with respect to the current carrying wire using additional bias fields. Comparing the experiment to theory, we find a fair agreement and demonstrate that for a chip whose topmost layer is metallic, the magnetic noise depends essentially...

  18. Cosmic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez Almeida, Jorge

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic fields pervade the universe and play an important role in many astrophysical processes. However, they require specialised observational tools, and are challenging to model and understand. This volume provides a unified view of magnetic fields across astrophysical and cosmological contexts, drawing together disparate topics that are rarely covered together. Written by the lecturers of the XXV Canary Islands Winter School, it offers a self-contained introduction to cosmic magnetic fields on a range of scales. The connections between the behaviours of magnetic fields in these varying contexts are particularly emphasised, from the relatively small and close ranges of the Sun, planets and stars, to galaxies and clusters of galaxies, as well as on cosmological scales. Aimed at young researchers and graduate students, this up-to-date review uniquely brings together a subject often tackled by disconnected communities, conveying the latest advances as well as highlighting the limits of our current understandi...

  19. Influence of grain boundary connectivity on the trapped magnetic flux of multi-seeded bulk superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Z., E-mail: zgdeng@gmail.com [Laboratory of Applied Physics, Department of Marine Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Tokyo 135-8533 (Japan); Miki, M.; Felder, B.; Tsuzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.; Hara, S.; Uetake, T.; Izumi, M. [Laboratory of Applied Physics, Department of Marine Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Tokyo 135-8533 (Japan)

    2011-09-15

    Four different performance multi-seeded YBCO bulks as representatives. A coupling ratio to reflect the coupling quality of GBs inside multi-seeded bulks. An averaged trapped magnetic flux density parameter was introduced. The top-seeded melt-growth process with multi-seeding technique provides a promising way to fabricate large-sized bulk superconductors in an economical way. To understand the essential characteristics of the multi-seeded bulks, the paper reports the influence of the grain boundary (GB) coupling or connectivity on the total trapped magnetic flux. The coupling ratio, the lowest trapped flux density in the GB area to the averaged top value of the two neighboring peak trapped fields, is introduced to reflect the coupling quality of GBs inside a multi-seeded bulk. By the trapped flux density measurement of four different performance multi-seeded YBCO bulk samples as representatives, it was found that the GB coupling plays an important role for the improvement of the total trapped magnetic flux; moreover, somewhat more significant than the widely used parameter of the peak trapped fields to evaluate the physical performance of bulk samples. This characteristic is different with the case of the well-grown single-grain bulks.

  20. Transient anisotropic magnetic field calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesenik, Marko; Gorican, Viktor; Trlep, Mladen; Hamler, Anton; Stumberger, Bojan

    2006-01-01

    For anisotropic magnetic material, nonlinear magnetic characteristics of the material are described with magnetization curves for different magnetization directions. The paper presents transient finite element calculation of the magnetic field in the anisotropic magnetic material based on the measured magnetization curves for different magnetization directions. For the verification of the calculation method some results of the calculation are compared with the measurement

  1. Magnetic Fields Versus Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Kerry

    2018-04-01

    Deep within giant molecular clouds, hidden by dense gas and dust, stars form. Unprecedented data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) reveal the intricate magnetic structureswoven throughout one of the most massive star-forming regions in the Milky Way.How Stars Are BornThe Horsehead Nebulasdense column of gas and dust is opaque to visible light, but this infrared image reveals the young stars hidden in the dust. [NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage Team]Simple theory dictates that when a dense clump of molecular gas becomes massive enough that its self-gravity overwhelms the thermal pressure of the cloud, the gas collapses and forms a star. In reality, however, star formation is more complicated than a simple give and take between gravity and pressure. Thedusty molecular gas in stellar nurseries is permeated with magnetic fields, which are thought to impede the inward pull of gravity and slow the rate of star formation.How can we learn about the magnetic fields of distant objects? One way is by measuring dust polarization. An elongated dust grain will tend to align itself with its short axis parallel to the direction of the magnetic field. This systematic alignment of the dust grains along the magnetic field lines polarizes the dust grains emission perpendicular to the local magnetic field. This allows us to infer the direction of the magnetic field from the direction of polarization.Magnetic field orientations for protostars e2 and e8 derived from Submillimeter Array observations (panels a through c) and ALMA observations (panels d and e). Click to enlarge. [Adapted from Koch et al. 2018]Tracing Magnetic FieldsPatrick Koch (Academia Sinica, Taiwan) and collaborators used high-sensitivity ALMA observations of dust polarization to learn more about the magnetic field morphology of Milky Way star-forming region W51. W51 is one of the largest star-forming regions in our galaxy, home to high-mass protostars e2, e8, and North.The ALMA observations reveal

  2. Earth's Magnetic Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    research with the aim to better characterise the state and dynamics of Earth’s magnetic field. Advances in the exploitation of geomagnetic observations hold a huge potential not only for an improved quantitative description of the field source but also for a better understanding of the underlying processes...

  3. Trapped field measurements on MgB{sub 2} bulk samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koblischka, Michael; Karwoth, Thomas; Zeng, XianLin; Hartmann, Uwe [Institute of Experimental Physics, Saarland University, P. O. Box 151150, D-66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Berger, Kevin; Douine, Bruno [University of Lorraine, GREEN, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2016-07-01

    Trapped field measurements were performed on bulk, polycrystalline MgB{sub 2} samples stemming from different sources with the emphasis to develop applications like superconducting permanent magnets ('supermagnets') and electric motors. We describe the setup for the trapped field measurements and the experimental procedure (field cooling, zero-field cooling, field sweep rates). The trapped field measurements were conducted using a cryocooling system to cool the bulk samples to the desired temperatures, and a low-loss cryostat equipped with a room-temperature bore and a maximum field of ±5 T was employed to provide the external magnetic field. The superconducting coil of this cryostat is operated using a bidirectional power supply. Various sweep rates of the external magnetic field ranging between 1 mT/s and 40 mT/s were used to generate the applied field. The measurements were performed with one sample and two samples stacked together. A maximum trapped field of 7 T was recorded. We discuss the results obtained and the problems arising due to flux jumping, which is often seen for the MgB{sub 2} samples cooled to temperatures below 10 K.

  4. ISR Radial Field Magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    There were 37 (normal) + 3 (special) Radial Field magnets in the ISR to adjust vertically the closed orbit. Gap heights and strengths were 200 mm and .12 Tm in the normal magnets, 220 mm and .18 Tm in the special ones. The core length was 430 mm in both types. Due to their small length as compared to the gap heights the end fringe field errors were very important and had to be compensated by suitably shaping the poles. In order to save on cables, as these magnets were located very far from their power supplies, the coils of the normal type magnets were formed by many turns of solid cpper conductor with some interleaved layers of hollow conductor directly cooled by circulating water

  5. A micro-pillar array to trap magnetic beads in microfluidic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka Pasan

    2012-12-01

    A micro-pillar array (MPA) is proposed in this paper to trap and separate magnetic beads (MBs) in microfluidic systems. MBs are used in many biomedical applications due to being compatible in dimension to biomolecules, the large surface area available to attach biomolecules, and the fact that they can be controlled by a magnetic field. Trapping and separating these labeled biomolecules is an important step toward achieving reliable and accurate quantification for disease diagnostics. Nickel Iron (Ni50Fe 50) micro-pillars were fabricated on a Silicon (Si) substrate by standard microfabrication techniques. Experimental results showed that MBs could be trapped on the MPA at the single bead level and separated from other non-target particles. This principle can easily be extended to trap and separate target biomolecules in heterogeneous biological samples. © 2012 IEEE.

  6. Mercury's Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    Mercury is the only inner solar system body other than Earth to possess an active core dynamo-driven magnetic field and the only planet with a small, highly dynamic magnetosphere. Measurements made by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft have provided a wealth of data on Mercury's magnetic field environment. Mercury's weak magnetic field was discovered 40 years ago by the Mariner 10 spacecraft, but its large-scale geometry, strength and origin could not be definitively established. MESSENGER data have shown that the field is dynamo-generated and can be described as an offset axisymmetric dipole field (hereafter OAD): the magnetic equator lies ~0.2 RM (RM = 2440 km) north of the geographic equator and the dipole moment is 2.8 x1019 Am2 (~0.03% that of Earth's). The weak internal field and the high, but variable, solar wind ram pressure drive vigorous magnetospheric dynamics and result in an average distance from the planet center to the sub-solar magnetopause of only 1.42 RM. Magnetospheric models developed with MESSENGER data have allowed re-analysis of the Mariner 10 observations, establishing that there has been no measureable secular variation in the internal field over 40 years. Together with spatial power spectra for the OAD, this provides critical constraints for viable dynamo models. Time-varying magnetopause fields induce secondary core fields, the magnitudes of which confirm the core radius estimated from MESSENGER gravity and Earth-based radar data. After accounting for large-scale magnetospheric fields, residual signatures are dominated by additional external fields that are organized in the local time frame and that vary with magnetospheric activity. Birkeland currents have been identified, which likely close in the planetary interior at depths below the base of the crust. Near-periapsis magnetic field measurements at altitudes greater than 200 km have tantalizing hints of crustal fields, but crustal

  7. Cosmic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kronberg, Philipp P

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields are important in the Universe and their effects contain the key to many astrophysical phenomena that are otherwise impossible to understand. This book presents an up-to-date overview of this fast-growing topic and its interconnections to plasma processes, astroparticle physics, high energy astrophysics, and cosmic evolution. The phenomenology and impact of magnetic fields are described in diverse astrophysical contexts within the Universe, from galaxies to the filaments and voids of the intergalactic medium, and out to the largest redshifts. The presentation of mathematical formulae is accessible and is designed to add insight into the broad range of topics discussed. Written for graduate students and researchers in astrophysics and related disciplines, this volume will inspire readers to devise new ways of thinking about magnetic fields in space on galaxy scales and beyond.

  8. Dependence of the trapping regions with the radial electric field in TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.; Liniers, M.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of the electric field upon the radial and angular distributions of trapped ions of energies between 0.1 and 1 keV in TJ-II is analysed. Near the magnetic axis, with moderate electric fields, the trapped fraction increases for negative potentials and decreases for positive ones. Nevertheless for high potentials this decreasing for positive sign can be reversed. Near the plasma periphery trapping is affected only for high potentials and always increases, independently of the potential sign. The sensibility to negative potentials is always higher than for the positive ones. These trapping changes are almost uniform in poloidal and toroidal angular profiles and affect mainly to marginally trapped or passing particles. Nevertheless for high potentials or energie the resonances modify this behaviour and inhibit the increasing of trapping in the outer side or the torus. For the locally trapped population fraction a steady decrease with the potential appears independently of the sign, except very near the magnetic axis or the plasma periphery. The global result of all these partial effects is the presence of a wide trapping minimum for moderate positive electric potential, potential that increases with the ion energy as well as a strong increase for high electric fields of either sign, more visible for negative potentials and high energies. For the locally trapped population a steady decrease with potential appears independently of the sign. All these effects can be explained by the combined action of the appearance and elimination of radial magnetic barriers and of the electric field resonances. (Author)

  9. Effects of trapped electrons on electromagnetic fields in an oblique shock wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toida, Mieko; Shikii, Kenta

    2009-01-01

    A magnetosonic shock wave propagating obliquely to an external magnetic field can trap electrons and accelerate them to ultrarelativistic energies. The effect of trapped electrons on electromagnetic fields in a shock wave is studied by theory and particle simulations. The expressions for field strengths are analytically obtained, including the number of trapped electrons n t as a factor. It is shown that as n t increases, the magnitude of F increases, where F is the integral of the parallel electric field, E || =(E·B)/B, along B. Theoretical analysis also suggests that the increase in F causes the electrons to be trapped deeper and accelerated to higher kinetic energies. These theoretical predictions are verified with relativistic electromagnetic particle simulations.

  10. Vortex creation during magnetic trap manipulations of spinor Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itin, A. P.; Morishita, T.; Satoh, M.; Watanabe, S.; Tolstikhin, O. I.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate several mechanisms of vortex creation during splitting of a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in a magnetic double-well trap controlled by a pair of current carrying wires and bias magnetic fields. Our study is motivated by a recent MIT experiment on splitting BECs with a similar trap [Y. Shin et al., Phys. Rev. A 72, 021604 (2005)], where an unexpected fork-like structure appeared in the interference fringes indicating the presence of a singly quantized vortex in one of the interfering condensates. It is well known that in a spin-1 BEC in a quadrupole trap, a doubly quantized vortex is topologically produced by a 'slow' reversal of bias magnetic field B z . Since in the experiment a doubly quantized vortex had never been seen, Shin et al. ruled out the topological mechanism and concentrated on the nonadiabatic mechanical mechanism for explanation of the vortex creation. We find, however, that in the magnetic trap considered both mechanisms are possible: singly quantized vortices can be formed in a spin-1 BEC topologically (for example, during the magnetic field switching-off process). We therefore provide a possible alternative explanation for the interference patterns observed in the experiment. We also present a numerical example of creation of singly quantized vortices due to 'fast' splitting; i.e., by a dynamical (nonadiabatic) mechanism

  11. Controlling trapping potentials and stray electric fields in a microfabricated ion trap through design and compensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charles Doret, S; Amini, Jason M; Wright, Kenneth; Volin, Curtis; Killian, Tyler; Ozakin, Arkadas; Denison, Douglas; Hayden, Harley; Pai, C-S; Slusher, Richart E; Harter, Alexa W

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in quantum information processing with trapped ions have demonstrated the need for new ion trap architectures capable of holding and manipulating chains of many (>10) ions. Here we present the design and detailed characterization of a new linear trap, microfabricated with scalable complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) techniques, that is well-suited to this challenge. Forty-four individually controlled dc electrodes provide the many degrees of freedom required to construct anharmonic potential wells, shuttle ions, merge and split ion chains, precisely tune secular mode frequencies, and adjust the orientation of trap axes. Microfabricated capacitors on dc electrodes suppress radio-frequency pickup and excess micromotion, while a top-level ground layer simplifies modeling of electric fields and protects trap structures underneath. A localized aperture in the substrate provides access to the trapping region from an oven below, permitting deterministic loading of particular isotopic/elemental sequences via species-selective photoionization. The shapes of the aperture and radio-frequency electrodes are optimized to minimize perturbation of the trapping pseudopotential. Laboratory experiments verify simulated potentials and characterize trapping lifetimes, stray electric fields, and ion heating rates, while measurement and cancellation of spatially-varying stray electric fields permits the formation of nearly-equally spaced ion chains. (paper)

  12. Magnetic field of Mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D.J.; Beard, D.B.

    1977-01-01

    The geomagnetic field, suitably scaled down and parameterized, is shown to give a very good fit to the magnetic field measurements taken on the first and third passes of the Mariner 10 space probe past Mercury. The excellence of the fit to a reliable planetary magnetospheric model is good evidence that the Mercury magnetosphere is formed by a simple, permanent, intrinsic planetary magnetic field distorted by the effects of the solar wind. The parameters used for a best fit to all the data are (depending slightly on the choice of data) 2.44--2.55 for the ratio of Mercury's magnetic field strength at the subsolar point to that of the earth's subsolar point field (this results in a dipole moment of 170 γR/sub M/ 3 (R/sub M/ is Mercury Radius), i.e., 2.41 x 10 22 G cm 3 in the same direction as the earth's dipole), approx.-113 γR/sub M/ 4 for the planetary quadrupole moment parallel to the dipole moment, 10degree--17degree for the tilt of the planet dipole toward the sun, 4.5degree for the tilt of the dipole toward dawn, and 2.5degree--7.6degree aberration angle for the shift in the tail axis from the planet-sun direction because of the planet's orbital velocity. The rms deviation overall for the entire data set compared with the theoretical fitted model for the magnetic field strength was 17 γ (approx.4% of the maximum field measured). If the data from the first pass that show presumed strong time variations are excluded, the overall rms deviation for the field magnitude is only 10 γ

  13. Magnetic trapping of energetic particles on open dayside boundary layer flux tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, S.W.H.; Lewis, Z.V.

    1990-01-01

    Both simple as well as detailed empirical magnetic models of the Earth's dayside magnetosphere suggest that field lines near the magnetopause boundary in the noon quadrant (∼ 09:00 to ∼ 15:00 M.L.T.) possess an unusual property due to the compressive effect of the impinging solar wind flow, namely that the equatorial region represents a local maximum in the magnetic field strength, and not a minimum as elsewhere in the magnetosphere. In this region the field lines can therefore support two distinct particle populations, those which bounce across the equator between mirror points on either side, and those which are trapped about the off-equatorial field strength minima and are confined to one side of the equator. When these field lines become magnetically open due to the occurrence of magnetic reconnection at the equatorial magnetopause, the former particles will rapidly escape into the magnetosheath by field-aligned flow, while the latter population may be sustained within the boundary layer over many bounce periods, as the flux tubes contract and move tailward. Consequently, trapped distributions of energetic particles may commonly occur on open field lines in the dayside boundary layer in the noon quadrant, particularly at high latitudes. The existence of such particles is thus not an infallible indicator of the presence of closed magnetic field lines in this region. At earlier and later local times, however, the boundary layer field lines revert to possessing a minimum in the field strength at the equator. (author)

  14. Efficient magnetic field measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Setiawan, Iwan; Moonen, Niek; Buesink, Frits; Leferink, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Measuring magnetic fields of equipment under test at low frequencies which is received by loop antennas using an EMI receiver with small bandwidths takes much time and can even reach a week for a standard measurement. This waste in time could be avoided by applying time domain measurements.

  15. Magnetic field compression using pinch-plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, K.; Tanimoto, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Veno, I.

    1987-01-01

    In a previous report, the method for ultra-high magnetic field compression by using the pinchplasma was discussed. It is summarized as follows. The experiment is performed with the Mather-type plasma focus device tau/sub 1/4/ = 2 μs, I=880 kA at V=20 kV). An initial DC magnetic field is fed by an electromagnet embedded in the inner electrode. The axial component of the magnetic field diverges from the maximum field of 1 kG on the surface of the inner electrode. The density profile deduced from a Mach-Zehnder interferogram with a 2-ns N/sub 2/-laser shows a density dip lasting for 30 ns along the axes. Using the measured density of 8 x 10/sup 18/ cm/sup -3/, the temperature of 1.5 keV and the pressure balance relation, the magnitude of the trapped magnetic field is estimated to be 1.0 MG. The magnitude of the compressed magnetic field is also measured by Faraday rotation in a single-mode quartz fiber and a magnetic pickup soil. A protective polyethylene tube (3-mm o.d.) is used along the central axis through the inner electrode and the discharge chamber. The peak value of the compressed field range from 150 to 190 kG. No signal of the magnetic field appears up to the instance of the maximum pinch

  16. Influence of grain boundary connectivity on the trapped magnetic flux of multi-seeded bulk superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Z.; Miki, M.; Felder, B.; Tsuzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.; Hara, S.; Uetake, T.; Izumi, M.

    2011-09-01

    The top-seeded melt-growth process with multi-seeding technique provides a promising way to fabricate large-sized bulk superconductors in an economical way. To understand the essential characteristics of the multi-seeded bulks, the paper reports the influence of the grain boundary (GB) coupling or connectivity on the total trapped magnetic flux. The coupling ratio, the lowest trapped flux density in the GB area to the averaged top value of the two neighboring peak trapped fields, is introduced to reflect the coupling quality of GBs inside a multi-seeded bulk. By the trapped flux density measurement of four different performance multi-seeded YBCO bulk samples as representatives, it was found that the GB coupling plays an important role for the improvement of the total trapped magnetic flux; moreover, somewhat more significant than the widely used parameter of the peak trapped fields to evaluate the physical performance of bulk samples. This characteristic is different with the case of the well-grown single-grain bulks.

  17. Progress In Research On Open - Ended Magnetic Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruglyakov, E. P.; Burdakov, A. V.; Ivanov, A. A.

    2006-01-01

    At present, three modern types of mirror machines for plasma confinement and heating exist in Novosibirsk (Multi-mirror,-GOL-3, Gas Dynamic Trap,-GDT, and Tandem Mirror,- AMBAL-M). From the engineering point of view all these systems are very attractive because of simple axisymmetric geometry of magnetic configurations. In this paper, the status of GOL-3 and GDT machines is presented. The most crucial experiments for the mirror concept are described such as a demonstration of different principles of suppression of longitudinal electron heat conductivity (GDT, GOL-3), finding of MHD stable regimes of confinement of high β (more than 0.4) plasma in axisymmetric geometry of magnetic field, an effective heating of a dense plasma (of order of 10 21 m-3) by high current relativistic electron beam (GOL-3), etc. In the case of multi-mirror geometry (GOL-3) significant increase of confinement time of hot plasma (up to several tens times) was obtained in comparison with single mirror geometry. Besides, electron heating (up to 2 keV) in result of high current electron beam — plasma interaction, the heating of ions (up to 2 keV) was discovered in the multi-mirror geometry (55 mirror cells with total length of the trap equal to 12 meters). There was no any effect of ion heating in the single mirror geometry. The reasons of appearance of the ion heating in multi-mirror geometry are discussed. It should be mentioned that on the basis of the GOL-3 and GDT one can obtain an important information for ITER and for future fusion program. In the case of GOL-3 the longitudinal energy density flux of plasma after heating by REB can be so high as 50 MJ/m2. A lot of experiments can be made on plasma-wall interaction (evaporation, erosion and ionization of wall material, propagation of the impurity ions along magnetic field lines at long distances, etc). Some of these experiments are described in this paper. Using principle of confinement of "warm" collisional plasma placed in gas

  18. Progress In Research On Open - Ended Magnetic Traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruglyakov, E. P.; Burdakov, A. V.; Ivanov, A. A.

    2006-01-01

    At present, three modern types of mirror machines for plasma confinement and heating exist in Novosibirsk (Multi-mirror,-GOL-3, Gas Dynamic Trap,-GDT, and Tandem Mirror,- AMBAL-M). From the engineering point of view all these systems are very attractive because of simple axisymmetric geometry of magnetic configurations. In this paper, the status of GOL-3 and GDT machines is presented. The most crucial experiments for the mirror concept are described such as a demonstration of different principles of suppression of longitudinal electron heat conductivity (GDT, GOL-3), finding of MHD stable regimes of confinement of high β (more than 0.4) plasma in axisymmetric geometry of magnetic field, an effective heating of a dense plasma (of order of 10 21 m-3) by high current relativistic electron beam (GOL-3), etc. In the case of multi-mirror geometry (GOL-3) significant increase of confinement time of hot plasma (up to several tens times) was obtained in comparison with single mirror geometry. Besides, electron heating (up to 2 keV) in result of high current electron beam -- plasma interaction, the heating of ions (up to 2 keV) was discovered in the multi-mirror geometry (55 mirror cells with total length of the trap equal to 12 meters). There was no any effect of ion heating in the single mirror geometry. The reasons of appearance of the ion heating in multi-mirror geometry are discussed. It should be mentioned that on the basis of the GOL-3 and GDT one can obtain an important information for ITER and for future fusion program. In the case of GOL-3 the longitudinal energy density flux of plasma after heating by REB can be so high as 50 MJ/m2. A lot of experiments can be made on plasma-wall interaction (evaporation, erosion and ionization of wall material, propagation of the impurity ions along magnetic field lines at long distances, etc). Some of these experiments are described in this paper. Using principle of confinement of 'warm' collisional plasma placed in gas dynamic

  19. A biodetection method using magnetic particles and micro traps

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Fuquan

    2012-03-09

    The general working principle of magnetoresistive sensors for biological applications is to specifically attach bioanalytesto magnetic particles and then detect the particles that are immobilized on the sensor surface. The immobilization of the particles on the sensor surface commonly uses biomolecular interactions, e.g., antigen-antibody. Thus, the sensor surface needs to be functionalized via biological treatments in order to capture certain bioanalytes. In the presented work, a new method is proposed, which does not rely on functionalization of the sensor surface. Current carrying microstructures in combination with mechanical micro traps are used to immobilize magnetic particles. Analyte detection is based on the difference in size between bare magnetic particles and particles with analyte attached, which causes a different number of particles to be captured in the micro traps.

  20. Magnetic fields in diffuse media

    CERN Document Server

    Pino, Elisabete; Melioli, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents the current knowledge of magnetic fields in diffuse astrophysical media. Starting with an overview of 21st century instrumentation to observe astrophysical magnetic fields, the chapters cover observational techniques, origin of magnetic fields, magnetic turbulence, basic processes in magnetized fluids, the role of magnetic fields for cosmic rays, in the interstellar medium and for star formation. Written by a group of leading experts the book represents an excellent overview of the field. Nonspecialists will find sufficient background to enter the field and be able to appreciate the state of the art.

  1. Antimagnets: controlling magnetic fields with superconductor-metamaterial hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Alvaro; Navau, Carles; Prat-Camps, Jordi; Chen Duxing

    2011-01-01

    Magnetism is very important in various areas of science and technology, ranging from magnetic recording through energy generation to trapping cold atoms. Physicists have managed to master magnetism-to create and manipulate magnetic fields-almost at will. Surprisingly, there is at least one property that has been elusive until now: how to 'switch off' the magnetic interaction of a magnetic material with existing magnetic fields without modifying them. Here we introduce the antimagnet, a design that conceals the magnetic response of a given volume from its exterior, without altering the external magnetic fields, in some respects analogous to recent theoretical proposals for cloaking electromagnetic waves with metamaterials. However, unlike these devices, which require extreme material properties, our device is feasible and needs only two kinds of available materials: superconductors and isotropic magnetic materials. Antimagnets may have applications in magnetic-based medical techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging or in reducing the magnetic signature of vessels or planes.

  2. Measuring the Neutron Lifetime with Magnetically Trapped Ultracold Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumm, H. P.; Huber, M. G.; Yue, A. T.; Thompson, A. K.; Dewey, M. S.; Huffer, C. R.; Huffman, P. R.; Schelhammer, K. W.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Coakley, K. J.

    2014-03-01

    We describe an experiment to measure the neutron lifetime using a technique with a set of systematic uncertainties largely different than those of previous measurements. In this approach, ultracold neutrons (UCN) are produced by inelastic scattering of cold (0.89 nm) neutrons in a reservoir of superfluid 4He. These neutrons are then confined using a three-dimensional magnetic trap. As the trapped neutrons beta decay, the energetic electrons produced in the decay generate scintillations in the liquid He; each decay is detectable with nearly 100 % efficiency. The neutron lifetime can be directly determined by measuring the scintillation rate as a function of time.

  3. High-field penning-malmberg trap: confinement properties and use in positron accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartley, J.H.

    1997-09-01

    This dissertation reports on the development of the 60 kG cryogenic positron trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and compares the trap`s confinement properties with other nonneutral plasma devices. The device is designed for the accumulation of up to 2{times}10{sup 9} positrons from a linear-accelerator source. This positron plasma could then be used in Bhabha scattering experiments. Initial efforts at time-of-flight accumulation of positrons from the accelerator show rapid ({approximately}100 ms) deconfinement, inconsistent with the long electron lifetimes. Several possible deconfinement mechanisms have been explored, including annihilation on residual gas, injection heating, rf noise from the accelerator, magnet field curvature, and stray fields. Detailed studies of electron confinement demonstrate that the empirical scaling law used to design the trap cannot be extrapolated into the parameter regime of this device. Several possible methods for overcoming these limitations are presented.

  4. Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegelmann, Thomas; Petrie, Gordon J. D.; Riley, Pete

    2017-09-01

    Coronal magnetic field models use photospheric field measurements as boundary condition to model the solar corona. We review in this paper the most common model assumptions, starting from MHD-models, magnetohydrostatics, force-free and finally potential field models. Each model in this list is somewhat less complex than the previous one and makes more restrictive assumptions by neglecting physical effects. The magnetohydrostatic approach neglects time-dependent phenomena and plasma flows, the force-free approach neglects additionally the gradient of the plasma pressure and the gravity force. This leads to the assumption of a vanishing Lorentz force and electric currents are parallel (or anti-parallel) to the magnetic field lines. Finally, the potential field approach neglects also these currents. We outline the main assumptions, benefits and limitations of these models both from a theoretical (how realistic are the models?) and a practical viewpoint (which computer resources to we need?). Finally we address the important problem of noisy and inconsistent photospheric boundary conditions and the possibility of using chromospheric and coronal observations to improve the models.

  5. Earth's Magnetic Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    research with the aim to better characterise the state and dynamics of Earth’s magnetic field. Advances in the exploitation of geomagnetic observations hold a huge potential not only for an improved quantitative description of the field source but also for a better understanding of the underlying processes...... and physics. Key is the separation of the field sources in the observations, especially, but not solely, during times of quiet geomagnetic conditions, when the most subtle geomagnetic effects can be identified and become significant. The collected articles are based on the current constellation of ground......This volume provides a comprehensive view on the different sources of the geomagnetic field both in the Earth’s interior and from the field’s interaction with the terrestrial atmosphere and the solar wind. It combines expertise from various relevant areas of geomagnetic and near Earth space...

  6. Progress in research on open-ended magnetic traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruglyakov, E.P.; Burdakov, A.V.; Ivanov, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    At present, three modern types of mirror machines for plasma confinement and heating exist in Novosibirsk (Multi-mirror - GOL-3, Gas Dynamic Trap - GDT, and Tandem Mirror - AMBAL-M). From the engineering point of view all these systems are very attractive because of simple axi-symmetric geometry of magnetic configurations. In this paper, the status of GOL-3 and GDT machines is presented. The most crucial experiments for the mirror concept are described, i.e. the demonstration of different principles for the suppression of electron heat conductivity (in GDT and GOL-3), finding of MHD-stable regimes for the confinement of high b (> 0.4) plasma in axi-symmetric geometry of the magnetic field, an effective heating of a dense (of the order of 10 21 m -3 ) plasma by high-current relativistic electron beam (in GOL-3), etc. In the case of multi-mirror geometry (GOL-3) a significant increase in confinement time of hot plasma (up to several tens times) was observed in a comparison with single-mirror geometry. Besides electron heating (up to 2 keV) the heating of ions (up to 2 keV) was discovered in the multi-mirror geometry (55 mirror cells of the total length of the trap equal to 12 meters), as a result of the interaction of high-current electron beam with plasma. There was no effect of the ion heating in the single-mirror geometry. The reasons of the appearance of the ion heating in the multi-mirror configuration are discussed. It should especially be mentioned that on the basis of the GDT experiment it is possible to make a very important intermediate step. Using 'warm' plasma and oblique injection of fast atoms of deuterium and tritium one can create a powerful 14-MeV neutron source with a moderate irradiation area for material tests (e.g. about 1 square meter), and with a low tritium consumption. It should also be mentioned that there is no other candidate for the construction of a plasma-based neutron source with such low tritium consumption (about 150 grams

  7. Magnetization reversal in ultrashort magnetic field pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, M.; Lopusnik, R.; Fassbender, J.; Hillebrands, B.

    2000-01-01

    We report the switching properties of a thin magnetic film subject to an ultrashort, laterally localized magnetic field pulse, obtained by numerical investigations. The magnetization distribution in the film is calculated on a grid assuming Stoner-like coherent rotation within the grid square size. Perpendicularly and in-plane magnetized films exhibit a magnetization reversal due to a 4 ps magnetic field pulse. Outside the central region the pulse duration is short compared to the precession period. In this area the evolution of the magnetization during the field pulse does not depend strongly on magnetic damping and/or pulse shape. However, the final magnetization distribution is affected by the magnetic damping. Although the pulse duration is short compared to the precession period, the time needed for the relaxation of the magnetization to the equilibrium state is rather large. The influence of the different magnetic anisotropy contributions and the magnetic damping parameter enters into the magnetization reversal process. Comparing the case of perpendicular anisotropy with different kinds of in-plane anisotropies, a principal difference is found due to the symmetry of the shape anisotropy with respect to the anisotropy in question

  8. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  9. Magnetic Field Topology in Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, T. A.; Frank, A.

    2000-01-01

    We present results on the magnetic field topology in a pulsed radiative. jet. For initially helical magnetic fields and periodic velocity variations, we find that the magnetic field alternates along the, length of the jet from toroidally dominated in the knots to possibly poloidally dominated in the intervening regions.

  10. The Capacitive Magnetic Field Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyatkov, D. O.; Yurchenko, A. V.; Balashov, V. B.; Yurchenko, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    The results of a study of sensitive element magnetic field sensor are represented in this paper. The sensor is based on the change of the capacitance with an active dielectric (ferrofluid) due to the magnitude of magnetic field. To prepare the ferrofluid magnetic particles are used, which have a followingdispersion equal to 50 brand 5BDSR. The dependence of the sensitivity of the capacitive element from the ferrofluid with different dispersion of magnetic particles is considered. The threshold of sensitivity and sensitivity of a measuring cell with ferrofluid by a magnetic field was determined. The experimental graphs of capacitance change of the magnitude of magnetic field are presented.

  11. Effect of traps' adjacency on the electric field dependence of mobility in organic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yun; Chen Xiao-Qing; Hou Xiao-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    In some organic materials, varying the finite distance between adjacent carrier traps modifies the Coulomb potential around each trap, resulting in a more complex field-dependence of mobility, differing from (but not incompatible with) the usually considered relationship of ln μ ∝ √E, a relationship which has been successfully explained by the Poole—Frenkel effect. To investigate the influence of the adjacency of traps, a model system is proposed, which consists of two traps separated by distance α. Our numerical calculation shows that with increasing α, the dependence of mobility on the electric field changes from linear to exponential. Moreover, beyond a certain large α, i.e., as the distance to the nearest trap approaches infinity, the proposed model is essentially the same as the Poole—Frenkel effect. The proposed model accounts for the effect of the energy barrier shape, especially the effect of the location of the potential-energy maximum, a phenomenon which is not accommodated in the Poole—Frenkel model. Because the model assumes the Coulomb interaction between the adjacent traps, it applies to those charged traps which may exist in organic materials for various reasons. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  12. Magnetism and pairing of two-dimensional trapped fermions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa, Simone; Varney, Christopher N; Rigol, Marcos; Scalettar, Richard T

    2011-01-21

    The emergence of local phases in a trapped two-component Fermi gas in an optical lattice is studied using quantum Monte Carlo simulations. We treat temperatures that are comparable to or lower than those presently achievable in experiments and large enough systems that both magnetic and paired phases can be detected by inspection of the behavior of suitable short-range correlations. We use the latter to suggest the interaction strength and temperature range at which experimental observation of incipient magnetism and d-wave pairing are more likely and evaluate the relation between entropy and temperature in two-dimensional confined fermionic systems.

  13. Properties and parameters of the electron beam injected into the mirror magnetic trap of a plasma accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, V. V., E-mail: temple18@mail.ru; Novitsky, A. A.; Vinnichenko, L. A.; Umnov, A. M.; Ndong, D. O. [Peoples’ Friendship University of Russia (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-15

    The parameters of the injector of an axial plasma beam injected into a plasma accelerator operating on the basis of gyroresonance acceleration of electrons in the reverse magnetic field are determined. The trapping of the beam electrons into the regime of gyroresonance acceleration is numerically simulated by the particle- in-cell method. The optimal time of axial injection of the beam into a magnetic mirror trap is determined. The beam parameters satisfying the condition of efficient particle trapping into the gyromagnetic autoresonance regime are found.

  14. In situ electromagnetic field diagnostics with an electron plasma in a Penning-Malmberg trap

    CERN Document Server

    Amole, C; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Capra, A.; Cesar, C.L.; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Evetts, N.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M.C.; Gill, D.R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J.S.; Hardy, W.N.; Hayden, M.E.; Isaac, C.A.; Jonsell, S.; Kurchaninov, L.; Little, A.; Madsen, N.; McKenna, J.T.K.; Menary, S.; Napoli, S.C.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D.M.; So, C.; Stracka, S.; Tharp, T.; Thompson, R.I.; van der Werf, D.P.; Wurtele, J.S.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel detection method for the cyclotron resonance frequency of an electron plasma in a Penning-Malmberg trap. With this technique, the electron plasma is used as an in situ diagnostic tool for measurement of the static magnetic field and the microwave electric field in the trap. The cyclotron motion of the electron plasma is excited by microwave radiation and the temperature change of the plasma is measured non-destructively by monitoring the plasma's quadrupole mode frequency. The spatially-resolved microwave electric field strength can be inferred from the plasma temperature change and the magnetic field is found through the cyclotron resonance frequency. These measurements were used extensively in the recently reported demonstration of resonant quantum interactions with antihydrogen.

  15. Positrons trapped in polyethylene: Electric field effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolaccini, M.; Bisi, A.; Gambarini, G.; Zappa, L.

    1978-01-01

    The intensity of the iot 2 -component of positrons annihilated in polyethylene is found to increase with increasing electric field, while the formation probability of the positron state responsible for this component remains independent of the field. (orig.) 891 HPOE [de

  16. Projectile-power-compressed magnetic-field pulse generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlett, R.H.; Takemori, H.T.; Chase, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    Design considerations and experimental results are presented of a compressed magnetic field pulsed energy source. A 100-mm-diameter, gun-fired projectile of approx. 2MJ kinetic energy was the input energy source. An initial magnetic field was trapped and compressed by the projectile. With a shorted load, a magajoule in a nanohenry was the design goal, i.e., 50 percent energy transformation from kinetic to magnetic. Five percent conversion was the highest recorded before gauge failure

  17. Particle simulation in stochastic magnetic fields at tokamak edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C. C.; Nishimura, Y.; Cheng, C. Z.

    2013-10-01

    An orbit following simulation code is developed incorporating magnetic perturbation. While magnetic field lines can exhibit stochastic behavior in the presence of incommensurate magnetic perturbations, the particle motions are also influenced by the mirror force and the perturbed electric fields. Remnants of lowest order magnetic islands can also play an important role in regulating the particle and heat transport. Effective perpendicular transport can be enhanced in the presence of trapped particles; how the mirror force influences the transport in stochastic magnetic fields is examined. This work is supported by National Science Council of Taiwan, NSC 100-2112-M-006-021-MY3 and NCKU Top University Project.

  18. First Ever Storage of Ultracold Neutrons in a Magnetic Trap Made of Permanent Magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezhov, V F; Andreev, A Z; Glushkov, A A; Glushkov, A G; Groshev, M N; Knyazkov, V A; Krygin, G B; Ryabov, V L; Serebrov, A P; Bazarov, B A; Geltenbort, P; Hartman, F J; Paul, S; Picker, R; Zimmer, O; Kovrizhnykh, N A

    2005-01-01

    Further improvement in the accuracy of any neutron lifetime experiment by means of ultracold neutrons (UCN) in material bottles is limited due to unavoidable systematic effects when the UCN are reflected from the walls. However, such effects can be excluded in principle if magnetic trapping of UCN is used. The storage of UCN in a small magnetic trap made of permanent magnets was demonstrated for the first time ever. The measured storage time in this feasibility study was (882 ± 16) s. At this level of accuracy no depolarization was observed.

  19. Magnetic Fields: Visible and Permanent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkeljohn, Dorothy R.; Earl, Robert D.

    1983-01-01

    Children will be able to see the concept of a magnetic field translated into a visible reality using the simple method outlined. Standard shelf paper, magnets, iron filings, and paint in a spray can are used to prepare a permanent and well-detailed picture of the magnetic field. (Author/JN)

  20. Spinning magnetic trap for automated microfluidic assay systems†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbarg, Jasenka; Kamgar-Parsi, Kian; Shields, Adam R.; Howell, Peter B.; Ligler, Frances S.

    2012-01-01

    While sophisticated analyses have been performed using lab-on-chip devices, in most cases the sample preparation is still performed off chip. The global need for easy-to-use, disposable testing devices necessitates that sample processing is automated and that transport complexity between the processing and analytical components is minimal. We describe a complete sample manipulation unit for performing automated target capture, efficient mixing with reagents, and controlled target release in a microfluidic channel, using an array of spinning magnets. The “MagTrap” device consists of 6 pairs of magnets in a rotating wheel, situated immediately beneath the microchannel. Rotation of the wheel in the direction opposite to the continuous flow entraps and concentrates the bead-target complexes and separates them from the original sample matrix. As the wheel rotates and the active pair of magnets moves away from the microchannel, the beads are released and briefly flow downstream before being trapped and pulled upstream by the next pair of magnets. This dynamic and continuous movement of the beads ensures that the full surface area of each bead is exposed to reagents and prevents aggregation. The release of the target-bead complexes for further analysis is facilitated by reversing the rotational direction of the wheel to sweep the beads downstream. Sample processing with the MagTrap was demonstrated for the detection of E. coli in a range of concentrations (1 × 103, 1 × 104 and 1 × 106 cells ml−1). Results show that sample processing with the MagTrap outperformed the standard manual protocols, improving the detection capability while simultaneously reducing the processing time. PMID:22344487

  1. The external magnetic field environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Calculations were made to predict magnetic field intensities surrounding an aircraft following a lightning strike. Aircraft design and aircraft structural geometry were considered in the computations. A wire grid aircraft model was used to aid in magnetic flux estimation.

  2. Simultaneous diamagnetic and magnetic particle trapping in ferrofluid microflows via a single permanent magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yilong; Kumar, Dhileep Thanjavur; Lu, Xinyu; Kale, Akshay; DuBose, John; Song, Yongxin; Wang, Junsheng; Li, Dongqing; Xuan, Xiangchun

    2015-01-01

    Trapping and preconcentrating particles and cells for enhanced detection and analysis are often essential in many chemical and biological applications. Existing methods for diamagnetic particle trapping require the placement of one or multiple pairs of magnets nearby the particle flowing channel. The strong attractive or repulsive force between the magnets makes it difficult to align and place them close enough to the channel, which not only complicates the device fabrication but also restricts the particle trapping performance. This work demonstrates for the first time the use of a single permanent magnet to simultaneously trap diamagnetic and magnetic particles in ferrofluid flows through a T-shaped microchannel. The two types of particles are preconcentrated to distinct locations of the T-junction due to the induced negative and positive magnetophoretic motions, respectively. Moreover, they can be sequentially released from their respective trapping spots by simply increasing the ferrofluid flow rate. In addition, a three-dimensional numerical model is developed, which predicts with a reasonable agreement the trajectories of diamagnetic and magnetic particles as well as the buildup of ferrofluid nanoparticles. PMID:26221197

  3. Progress on the Magnetic Trapping of Ultra-cold Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, John M.

    1998-04-01

    Ultra-cold neutrons (UCN) have been instrumental in making improved measurements of the neutron beta-decay lifetime and in searches for a permanent electric dipole moment.(R. Golub, D. Richardson and S.K. Lamoreaux, Ultra-cold Neutrons), Adam Hilger, 1991 The most accurate experiments have taken place using in-core devices at ILL (Grenoble, France) and PNPI (St. Petersburg, Russia). Superthermal techniques offer the promise of high-density sources of UCN via scattering of cold neutrons. Cold neutron beams are available at many neutron facilities. We are currently working on the development of a superfluid helium UCN source using the Cold Neutron Research Facility at the NIST Research Reactor (Gaithersburg) . Our first experiment plans to use superthermal scattering of neutrons in superfluid helium to produce UCN within a magnetic trapping volume. A magnetic trap 30 cm long and 4 cm diameter will be filled with helium at about 100 mK. Cold neutrons (around 11 K) will be introduced into the trapping region where some of them scatter to low enough energies (around 1 mK) so that they are magnetically trapped. Once trapped the UCN travel undisturbed; they have a very small probability of upscattering. Detection will be accomplished as the UCN beta-decay. The resultant high-energy electron creates excited molecular helium dimers, a portion which decay in less than 10 ns and emit radiation in the XUV (50-100 nm). We have developed techniques to measure these scintillations. Analysis indicates that a high accuracy measurement of the neutron beta decay lifetime should be possible using our techniques. An apparatus has been constructed and initial runs are underway. An overview of the experiment, discussion of systematic errors and recent experimental progress will be presented. This work is done in collaboration with C. Brome, J. Butterworth, S. Dzhosyuk, P. Huffman, C. Mattoni, D. McKinsey, M. Cooper, G. Greene, S. Lamoreaux, R. Golub, K. Habicht, K. Coakley, S. Dewey, D

  4. Mercury's magnetic field and interior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connerney, J.E.P.; Ness, N.F.

    1988-01-01

    The magnetic-field data collected on Mercury by the Mariner-10 spacecraft present substantial evidence for an intrinsic global magnetic field. However, studies of Mercury's thermal evolution show that it is most likely that the inner core region of Mercury solidified or froze early in the planet's history. Thus, the explanation of Mercury's magnetic field in the framework of the traditional planetary dynamo is less than certain

  5. Magnetically modified biocells in constant magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramov, E.G.; Panina, L.K.; Kolikov, V.A.; Bogomolova, E.V.; Snetov, V.N.; Cherepkova, I.A.; Kiselev, A.A.

    2017-01-01

    Paper addresses the inverse problem in determining the area, where the external constant magnetic field captures the biological cells modified by the magnetic nanoparticles. Zero velocity isolines, in area where the modified cells are captured by the magnetic field were determined by numerical method for two locations of the magnet. The problem was solved taking into account the gravitational field, magnetic induction, density of medium, concentration and size of cells, and size and magnetization of nanoparticles attached to the cell. Increase in the number of the nanoparticles attached to the cell and decrease in the cell’ size, enlarges the area, where the modified cells are captured and concentrated by the magnet. Solution is confirmed by the visible pattern formation of the modified cells Saccharomyces cerevisiae. - Highlights: • The inverse problem was solved for finding zero velocity isolines of magnetically modified biological cells. • Solution of the inverse problem depends on the size of cells and the number of nanoparticles attached to the single cell. • The experimental data are in agreement with theoretical solution.

  6. Magnetically modified biocells in constant magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramov, E.G.; Panina, L.K. [Saint Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kolikov, V.A., E-mail: kolikov1@yandex.ru [Institute for Electrophysics and Electric Power of the RAS, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bogomolova, E.V. [Botanical Institute of the RAS after V.L.Komarov, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Snetov, V.N. [Institute for Electrophysics and Electric Power of the RAS, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Cherepkova, I.A. [Saint Petersburg State Institute of Technology, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kiselev, A.A. [Institute for Electrophysics and Electric Power of the RAS, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-01

    Paper addresses the inverse problem in determining the area, where the external constant magnetic field captures the biological cells modified by the magnetic nanoparticles. Zero velocity isolines, in area where the modified cells are captured by the magnetic field were determined by numerical method for two locations of the magnet. The problem was solved taking into account the gravitational field, magnetic induction, density of medium, concentration and size of cells, and size and magnetization of nanoparticles attached to the cell. Increase in the number of the nanoparticles attached to the cell and decrease in the cell’ size, enlarges the area, where the modified cells are captured and concentrated by the magnet. Solution is confirmed by the visible pattern formation of the modified cells Saccharomyces cerevisiae. - Highlights: • The inverse problem was solved for finding zero velocity isolines of magnetically modified biological cells. • Solution of the inverse problem depends on the size of cells and the number of nanoparticles attached to the single cell. • The experimental data are in agreement with theoretical solution.

  7. Development of a flexible microfluidic system integrating magnetic micro-actuators for trapping biological species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulcrand, R; Jugieu, D; Escriba, C; Bancaud, A; Bourrier, D; Boukabache, A; Gué, A M

    2009-01-01

    A flexible microfluidic system embedding microelectromagnets has been designed, modeled and fabricated by using a photosensitive resin as structural material. The fabrication process involves the integration of micro-coils in a multilayer SU-8 microfluidic system by combining standard electroplating and dry films lamination. This technique offers numerous advantages in terms of integration, biocompatibility and chemical resistance. Various designs of micro-coils, including spiral, square or serpentine wires, have been simulated and experimentally tested. It has been established that thermal dissipation in micro-coils depends strongly on the number of turns and current density but remains compatible with biological applications. Real-time experimentations show that these micro-actuators are efficient in trapping magnetic micro-beads without any external field source or a permanent magnet and highlight that the size of microfluidic channels has been adequately designed for optimal trapping. Moreover, we trap magnetic beads in less than 2 s and release them instantaneously into the micro-channel. The actuation solely relies on electric fields, which are easier to control than standard magneto-fluidic modules

  8. Dynamics of magnetically trapped particles foundations of the physics of radiation belts and space plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Roederer, Juan G

    2014-01-01

    This book is a new edition of Roederer’s classic Dynamics of Geomagnetically Trapped Radiation, updated and considerably expanded. The main objective is to describe the dynamic properties of magnetically trapped particles in planetary radiation belts and plasmas and explain the physical processes involved from the theoretical point of view. The approach is to examine in detail the orbital and adiabatic motion of individual particles in typical configurations of magnetic and electric fields in the magnetosphere and, from there, derive basic features of the particles’ collective “macroscopic” behavior in general planetary environments. Emphasis is not on the “what” but on the “why” of particle phenomena in near-earth space, providing a solid and clear understanding of the principal basic physical mechanisms and dynamic processes involved. The book will also serve as an introduction to general space plasma physics, with abundant basic examples to illustrate and explain the physical origin of diff...

  9. Averaging out magnetic forces with fast rf sweeps in an optical trap for metastable chromium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufils, Q.; Chicireanu, R.; Pouderous, A.; de Souza Melo, W.; Laburthe-Tolra, B.; Maréchal, E.; Vernac, L.; Keller, J. C.; Gorceix, O.

    2008-05-01

    We introduce a time-averaged trap in which the internal state of the atoms is rapidly modulated to modify the magnetic trapping potential. In our experiment, fast radio-frequency linear sweeps flip the spins of atoms at a fast rate, which averages out the magnetic forces. We use this procedure to optimize the accumulation of metastable chromium atoms in an optical dipole trap from a magneto-optical trap. The potential experienced by the metastable atoms is identical to the bare optical dipole potential, so that this procedure allows for trapping all magnetic sublevels, hence increasing by up to 80% the final number of accumulated atoms.

  10. Local Magnetic Measurements of Trapped Flux Through a Permanent Current Path in Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiller, Markus; Esquinazi, Pablo D.; Quiquia, José Barzola; Precker, Christian E.

    2018-04-01

    Temperature- and field-dependent measurements of the electrical resistance of different natural graphite samples suggest the existence of superconductivity at room temperature in some regions of the samples. To verify whether dissipationless electrical currents are responsible for the trapped magnetic flux inferred from electrical resistance measurements, we localized them using magnetic force microscopy on a natural graphite sample in remanent state after applying a magnetic field. The obtained evidence indicates that at room temperature a permanent current flows at the border of the trapped flux region. The current path vanishes at the same transition temperature T_c≈ 370 K as the one obtained from electrical resistance measurements on the same sample. This sudden decrease in the phase is different from what is expected for a ferromagnetic material. Time-dependent measurements of the signal show the typical behavior of flux creep of a permanent current flowing in a superconductor. The overall results support the existence of room-temperature superconductivity at certain regions in the graphite structure and indicate that magnetic force microscopy is suitable to localize them. Magnetic coupling is excluded as origin of the observed phase signal.

  11. Local Magnetic Measurements of Trapped Flux Through a Permanent Current Path in Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiller, Markus; Esquinazi, Pablo D.; Quiquia, José Barzola; Precker, Christian E.

    2018-02-01

    Temperature- and field-dependent measurements of the electrical resistance of different natural graphite samples suggest the existence of superconductivity at room temperature in some regions of the samples. To verify whether dissipationless electrical currents are responsible for the trapped magnetic flux inferred from electrical resistance measurements, we localized them using magnetic force microscopy on a natural graphite sample in remanent state after applying a magnetic field. The obtained evidence indicates that at room temperature a permanent current flows at the border of the trapped flux region. The current path vanishes at the same transition temperature T_c≈ 370 K as the one obtained from electrical resistance measurements on the same sample. This sudden decrease in the phase is different from what is expected for a ferromagnetic material. Time-dependent measurements of the signal show the typical behavior of flux creep of a permanent current flowing in a superconductor. The overall results support the existence of room-temperature superconductivity at certain regions in the graphite structure and indicate that magnetic force microscopy is suitable to localize them. Magnetic coupling is excluded as origin of the observed phase signal.

  12. Measurements of magnetic field alignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    The procedure for installing Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipoles in their respective cryostats involves aligning the average direction of their field with the vertical to an accuracy of 0.5 mrad. The equipment developed for carrying on these measurements is described and the measurements performed on the first few prototypes SSC magnets are presented. The field angle as a function of position in these 16.6 m long magnets is a characteristic of the individual magnet with possible feedback information to its manufacturing procedure. A comparison of this vertical alignment characteristic with a magnetic field intensity (by NMR) characteristic for one of the prototypes is also presented. 5 refs., 7 figs

  13. NMR in pulsed magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, Edy

    2011-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments in pulsed magnetic fields up to 30.4 T focused on 1H and 93Nb nuclei are reported. Here we discuss the advantage and limitation of pulsed field NMR and why this technique is able to become a promising research tool. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Magnetic Fields of Neutron Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Neutron stars: population; magnetic fields; X-ray binaries: evolution; millisecond pulsars: inter-connections. Abstract. This article briefly reviews our current understanding of the evolution of magnetic fields in neutron stars, which basically defines the evolutionary pathways between different observational classes ...

  15. The MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D.

    2014-01-01

    The MAVEN magnetic field investigation is part of a comprehensive particles and fields subsystem that will measure the magnetic and electric fields and plasma environment of Mars and its interaction with the solar wind. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer sensors, remotely mounted at the outer extremity of the two solar arrays on small extensions ("boomlets"). The sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics assemblies that are integrated within the particles and fields subsystem and draw their power from redundant power supplies within that system. Each magnetometer measures the ambient vector magnetic field over a wide dynamic range (to 65,536 nT per axis) with a quantization uncertainty of 0.008 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range and an accuracy of better than 0.05%. Both magnetometers sample the ambient magnetic field at an intrinsic sample rate of 32 vector samples per second. Telemetry is transferred from each magnetometer to the particles and fields package once per second and subsequently passed to the spacecraft after some reformatting. The magnetic field data volume may be reduced by averaging and decimation, when necessary to meet telemetry allocations, and application of data compression, utilizing a lossless 8-bit differencing scheme. The MAVEN magnetic field experiment may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. A spacecraft magnetic control program was implemented to provide a magnetically clean environment for the magnetic sensors and the MAVEN mission plan provides for occasional spacecraft maneuvers - multiple rotations about the spacecraft x and z axes - to characterize spacecraft fields and/or instrument offsets in flight.

  16. A half-ring GMR sensor for detection of magnetic beads immobilized on a circular micro-trap

    KAUST Repository

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka Pasan

    2011-11-01

    Utilizing magnetic principles in biological immunoassays is an attractive option given its ability to remotely and non-invasively manipulate and detect cells tagged with micro/nano size superparamagnetic type beads and due to the fact that even the most complex biological immunoassays will have very little magnetic effect. The presence of magnetic beads can be detected by a magnetic sensor which quantifies the amount of target cells present in the immunoassay. In order to increase the detection rate a circular conducting micro-trap is employed to attract, trap and transport the magnetic beads to the sensing area. In this research we propose a half-ring spin valve type giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensor for the measurement of stray fields produced by 2 μm magnetic beads which are around the circular micro-trap. A couple of half-ring GMR sensors can be used to cover the entire circular border width, in order to detect the majority of the immobilized magnetic beads. Analytical and numerical analysis leading towards the fabrication of the half-ring GMR sensor are presented. DC characterization of the fabricated sensor showed a magnetoresistance of 5.9 %. Experimental results showed that the half-ring GMR sensor detected the presence of 2 μm magnetic beads. Hence, half-ring GMR sensors integrated with a circular micro-trap have great potential to be used as an effective disease diagnostic device. © 2011 IEEE.

  17. Cosmological magnetic fields

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Magnetic fields are observed not only in stars, but in galaxies, clusters, and even high redshift Lyman- systems. In principle, these fields could play an important role in structure formation and also affect the anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB). The study of cosmological magnetic fields aims ...

  18. Controlled trapping and detection of magnetic particles by a magnetic microactuator and a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Giouroudi, Ioanna

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents the design and testing of an integrated micro-chip for the controlled trapping and detection of magnetic particles (MPs). A unique magnetic micro-actuator consisting of square-shaped conductors is used to manipulate the MPs towards a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensing element which rapidly detects the majority of MPs trapped around the square-shaped conductors. The ability to precisely transport a small number of MPs in a controlled manner over long distances by magnetic forces enables the rapid concentration of a majority of MPs to the sensing zone for detection. This is especially important in low concentration samples. The conductors are designed in such a manner so as to increase the capture efficiency as well as the precision and speed of transportation. By switching current to different conductors, MPs can be manipulated and immobilized on the innermost conductor where the GMR sensor is located. This technique rapidly guides the MPs towards the sensing zone. Secondly, for optimum measurement capability with high spatial resolution the GMR sensor is fabricated directly underneath and all along the innermost conductor to detect the stray fields originating from the MPs. Finally, a microfluidic channel is fabricated on top of this micro-chip. Experiments inside the microchannel were carried out and the MPs were successfully trapped at the sensing area. © (2014) Trans Tech Publications.

  19. SQUIDs De-fluxing Using a Decaying AC Magnetic Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlashov, Andrei Nikolaevich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Semenov, Vasili Kirilovich [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Plattsburgh, NY (United States); Anderson, Bill [Senior Scientific, LLC, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-06-08

    Flux trapping is the Achilles’ heel of all superconductor electronics. The most direct way to avoid flux trapping is a prevention of superconductor circuits from exposure to magnetic fields. Unfortunately this is not feasible if the circuits must be exposed to a strong DC magnetic field even for a short period of time. For example, such unavoidable exposures take place in superparamagnetic relaxation measurements (SPMR) and ultra-low field magnetic resonance imaging (ULF MRI) using unshielded thin-film SQUID-based gradiometers. Unshielded SQUIDs stop working after being exposed to DC magnetic fields of only a few Gauss in strength. In this paper we present experimental results with de-fluxing of planar thin-film LTS SQUID-based gradiometers using a strong decaying AC magnetic field. We used four commercial G136 gradiometers for SPMR measurements with up to a 10 mT magnetizing field. Strong 12.9 kHz decaying magnetic field pulses reliably return SQUIDs to normal operation 50 ms after zeroing the DC magnetizing field. This new AC de-fluxing method was also successfully tested with seven other different types of LTS SQUID sensors and has been shown to dissipate extremely low energy.

  20. Developing Density of Laser-Cooled Neutral Atoms and Molecules in a Linear Magnetic Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez, Joe, III; Walstrom, Peter; di Rosa, Michael

    2013-05-01

    In this poster we show that neutral particle injection and accumulation using laser-induced spin flips may be used to form dense ensembles of ultracold magnetic particles, i.e., laser-cooled paramagnetic atoms and molecules. Particles are injected in a field-seeking state, are switched by optical pumping to a field-repelled state, and are stored in the minimum-B trap. The analogous process in high-energy charged-particle accumulator rings is charge-exchange injection using stripper foils. The trap is a linear array of sextupoles capped by solenoids. Particle-tracking calculations and design of our linear accumulator along with related experiments involving 7Li will be presented. We test these concepts first with atoms in preparation for later work with selected molecules. Finally, we present our preliminary results with CaH, our candidate molecule for laser cooling. This project is funded by the LDRD program of Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  1. Pulsed field magnetization strategies and the field poles composition in a bulk-type superconducting motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhen; Ruiz, H. S.; Coombs, T. A.

    2017-03-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) bulks offer the potential of trapping and maintaining much higher magnetic loading level compared with the conventional permanent magnets used in rotary machines, although the effective magnetization of multiple HTS bulks with different relative orientations over the surface of cylindrical rotors creates new challenges. In this paper, we present the design and numerical validation of the Pulse Field Magnetization (PFM) strategy considered for the magnetization of the four-pole synchronous fully superconducting motor developed at the University of Cambridge. In a first instance, singular columns of up to five HTS bulks aligned over the height of the rotor were subjected to up to three magnetic pulses of 1.5 T peak, and the experimental results have been simulated by considering the electrical and thermal properties of the system in a 2D approach. The entire active surface of the rotor is covered by HTS bulks of approximately the same dimensions, resulting in an uneven distribution of pole areas with at least one of the poles formed by up to 3 columns of magnetized bulks, with relatively the same peaks of trapped magnetic field. Thus, in order to effectively use the entire area of the superconducting rotor, multiple pulsed fields per column have been applied under the same experimental conditions, what results in about three times larger magnetic pole areas but with an average drop on the peaks of trapped magnetic field of about 50%.

  2. Field testing of different chemical combinations as odour baits for trapping wild mosquitoes in The Gambia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Jawara

    Full Text Available Odour baited traps have potential use in population surveillance of insect vectors of disease, and in some cases for vector population reduction. Established attractants for human host-seeking mosquitoes include a combination of CO(2 with L-lactic acid and ammonia, on top of which additional candidate compounds are being tested. In this field study in rural Gambia, using Latin square experiments with thorough randomization and replication, we tested nine different leading candidate combinations of chemical odorants for attractiveness to wild mosquitoes including anthropophilic malaria vectors, using modified Mosquito Magnet-X (MM-X counterflow traps outside experimental huts containing male human sleepers. Highest catches of female mosquitoes, particularly of An. gambiae s.l. and Mansonia species, were obtained by incorporation of tetradecanoic acid. As additional carboxylic acids did not increase the trap catches further, this 'reference blend' (tetradecanoic acid with L-lactic acid, ammonia and CO(2 was used in subsequent experiments. MM-X traps with this blend caught similar numbers of An. gambiae s.l. and slightly more Mansonia and Culex mosquitoes than a standard CDC light trap, and these numbers were not significantly affected by the presence or absence of human sleepers in the huts. Experiments with CO(2 produced from overnight yeast cultures showed that this organic source was effective in enabling trap attractiveness for all mosquito species, although at a slightly lower efficiency than obtained with use of CO(2 gas cylinders. Although further studies are needed to discover additional chemicals that increase attractiveness, as well as to optimise trap design and CO(2 source for broader practical use, the odour-baited traps described here are safe and effective for sampling host-seeking mosquitoes outdoors and can be incorporated into studies of malaria vector ecology.

  3. Rotating superconductor magnet for producing rotating lobed magnetic field lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, Sadek K.; Sampson, William B.; Leonard, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a rotating superconductor magnet for producing a rotating lobed magnetic field, comprising a cryostat; a superconducting magnet in the cryostat having a collar for producing a lobed magnetic field having oppositely directed adjacent field lines; rotatable support means for selectively rotating the superconductor magnet; and means for energizing the superconductor magnet.

  4. Resonant magnetic fields from inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Byrnes, Christian T; Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Urban, Federico R

    2012-01-01

    We propose a novel scenario to generate primordial magnetic fields during inflation induced by an oscillating coupling of the electromagnetic field to the inflaton. This resonant mechanism has two key advantages over previous proposals. First of all, it generates a narrow band of magnetic fields at any required wavelength, thereby allaying the usual problem of a strongly blue spectrum and its associated backreaction. Secondly, it avoids the need for a strong coupling as the coupling is oscillating rather than growing or decaying exponentially. Despite these major advantages, we find that the backreaction is still far too large during inflation if the generated magnetic fields are required to have a strength of ${\\cal O}(10^{-15}\\, \\Gauss)$ today on observationally interesting scales. We provide a more general no-go argument, proving that this problem will apply to any model in which the magnetic fields are generated on subhorizon scales and freeze after horizon crossing.

  5. Magnetic fields and scintillator performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, D.; Ronzhin, A.; Hagopian, V.

    1995-06-01

    Experimental data have shown that the light output of a scintillator depends on the magnitude of the externally applied magnetic fields, and that this variation can affect the calorimeter calibration and possibly resolution. The goal of the measurements presented here is to study the light yield of scintillators in high magnetic fields in conditions that are similar to those anticipated for the LHC CMS detector. Two independent measurements were performed, the first at Fermilab and the second at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Florida State University

  6. Magnetic field reconnexion in a sheared field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugai, M.

    1981-01-01

    A nonlinear development of the Petschek mode in a sheared magnetic field where there is a field component Bsub(z) along an X line is numerically studied. It is found that finite-amplitude intermediate waves, adjacent to the slow shock, may eventually stand in the quasi-steady configuration; on the other hand, the fundamental characteristics of the Petschek-mode development are scarcely influenced, either qualitatively or quantitatively, by the Bsub(z) field. (author)

  7. Quantum simulations of quantum magnetism with hundreds of trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Kevin; Bohnet, Justin; Jordan, Elena; Gaerttner, Martin; Safavi-Naini, Arghavan; Rey, Ana Maria; Bollinger, John

    2017-04-01

    Quantum simulators, where one well-controlled physical system mimics another complex system, may enable understanding of quantum many-body physics that cannot be fully studied using conventional techniques on classical computers. We describe quantum simulations of a network of interacting magnetic spins performed with 2-dimensional arrays of hundreds Be+ ions crystallized in a Penning trap. We discuss how we engineer a tunable transverse Ising model, and explain how we generate and observe far-from-equilibrium quantum spin dynamics, including signatures of entanglement. We summarize progress exploring optimized adiabatic protocols for preparing low energy states of the transverse Ising Hamiltonian and implementing a sub-Doppler cooling scheme for the drumhead modes of the ion array.

  8. Flux trapping during field reversal in a field reversed theta pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milroy, R.D.; Hoffman, A.L.; Slough, J.T.; Harding, D.G.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper we present new results from both numerical and experimental studies of the formation of the conducting sheath near the tube wall and its effectiveness in trapping bias flux during field reversal

  9. ISR split-field magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1975-01-01

    The experimental apparatus used at intersection 4 around the Split-Field Magnet by the CERN-Bologna Collaboration (experiment R406). The plastic scintillator telescopes are used for precise pulse-height and time-of-flight measurements.

  10. Ultracold plasma dynamics in a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianli

    Plasmas, often called the fourth state of matter and the most common one in the universe, have parameters varying by many orders of magnitude, from temperature of a few hundred kelvin in the Earth's ionosphere to 10 16 K in the magnetosphere of a pulsar. Ultracold plasmas, produced by photoionizing a sample of laser-cooled and trapped atoms near the ionization limit, have extended traditional neutral plasma parameters by many orders of magnitude, to electron temperatures below 1 K and ion temperatures in the tens of muK to a few Kelvin, and densities of 105 cm -3 to 1010 cm-3. These plasmas thus provide a testing ground to study basic plasma theory in a clean and simple system with or without a magnetic field. Previous studies of ultracold plasmas have primarily concentrated on temperature measurements, collective modes and expansion dynamics in the absence of magnetic fields. This thesis presents the first study of ultracold plasma dynamics in a magnetic field. The presence of a magnetic field during the expansion can initiate various phenomena, such as plasma confinement and plasma instabilities. While the electron temperatures are very low in ultracold plasmas, we need only tens of Gauss of magnetic field to observe significant effects on the expansion dynamics. To probe the ultraocold plasma dynamics in a magnetic field, we developed a new diagnostic - projection imaging, which images the ion distribution by extracting the ions with a high voltage pulse onto a position-sensitive detector. Early in the lifetime of the plasma (explosion of the dense ion cloud. For later times, we measure the 2-D Gaussian width of the ion image, obtaining the transverse expansion velocity as a function of magnetic field (up to 70 G), and observe that the transverse expansion velocity scales as B-1/2, explained by a nonlinear ambipolar diffusion model that involes anisotropic diffusion in two different directions. We also present the first observation of a plasma instability in an

  11. The Juno Magnetic Field Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Benn, M.; Bjarno, J. B.; Denver, T.; Espley, J.; Jorgensen, J. L.; Jorgensen, P. S.; Lawton, P.; Malinnikova, A.; Merayo, J. M.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Schnurr, R.; Sheppard, D.; Smith, E. J.

    2017-11-01

    The Juno Magnetic Field investigation (MAG) characterizes Jupiter's planetary magnetic field and magnetosphere, providing the first globally distributed and proximate measurements of the magnetic field of Jupiter. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent magnetometer sensor suites, each consisting of a tri-axial Fluxgate Magnetometer (FGM) sensor and a pair of co-located imaging sensors mounted on an ultra-stable optical bench. The imaging system sensors are part of a subsystem that provides accurate attitude information (to ˜20 arcsec on a spinning spacecraft) near the point of measurement of the magnetic field. The two sensor suites are accommodated at 10 and 12 m from the body of the spacecraft on a 4 m long magnetometer boom affixed to the outer end of one of 's three solar array assemblies. The magnetometer sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics boards within the magnetometer electronics package mounted inside Juno's massive radiation shielded vault. The imaging sensors are controlled by a fully hardware redundant electronics package also mounted within the radiation vault. Each magnetometer sensor measures the vector magnetic field with 100 ppm absolute vector accuracy over a wide dynamic range (to 16 Gauss = 1.6 × 106 nT per axis) with a resolution of ˜0.05 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range (±1600 nT per axis). Both magnetometers sample the magnetic field simultaneously at an intrinsic sample rate of 64 vector samples per second. The magnetic field instrumentation may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. The attitude determination system compares images with an on-board star catalog to provide attitude solutions (quaternions) at a rate of up to 4 solutions per second, and may be configured to acquire images of selected targets for science and engineering analysis. The system tracks and catalogs objects that pass through the imager field of

  12. Dependence of direct losses and trapping properties with the magnetic configuration in TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.; Liniers, M.

    1998-05-01

    The former studies concerning direct losses, disymmetries, trapping and radial electric field effects for intermediate energy ions have been extended to several magnetic configurations in TJ-II. In the absence of electric field there are strong similarities in the behaviour of all configurations: disymmetries, loss distributions at plasma border, radial and angular profiles, etc. Generally the differences are only quantitative and dominated by the magnetic ripple at border, that is clearly related with the configuration radius. This qualitative similarity disappears in the presence of a radial electric field. The field resonance are at the origin of these differences. A simple model reproduces correctly the ordering and degree of influence of these resonances. Except when the 0 resonance predominates the los distributions at plasma border move always in the direction of the induced poloidal rotation. The los radial profiles are strongly affected by the -2 Resonance, that can provoke the appearance of lost passing ions well inside the plasma. Instead the radial and angular profiles for trapping are only slightly affected by the -2 Resonance, while the 0 Resonance has a very strong influence there

  13. Kinetic features and non-stationary electron trapping in paraxial magnetic nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Arriaga, G.; Zhou, J.; Ahedo, E.; Martínez-Sánchez, M.; Ramos, J. J.

    2018-03-01

    The paraxial expansion of a collisionless plasma jet into vacuum, guided by a magnetic nozzle, is studied with an Eulerian and non-stationary Vlasov-Poisson solver. Parametric analyzes varying the magnetic field expansion rate, the size of the simulation box, and the electrostatic potential fall are presented. After choosing the potential fall leading to a zero net current beam, the steady states of the simulations exhibit a quasi-neutral region followed by a downstream sheath. The latter, an unavoidable consequence of the finite size of the computational domain, does not affect the quasi-neutral region if the box size is chosen appropriately. The steady state presents a strong decay of the perpendicular temperature of the electrons, whose profile versus the inverse of the magnetic field does not depend on the expansion rate within the quasi-neutral region. As a consequence, the electron distribution function is highly anisotropic downstream. The simulations revealed that the ions reach a higher velocity during the transient than in the steady state and their distribution functions are not far from mono-energetic. The density percentage of the population of electrons trapped during the transient, which is computed self-consistently by the code, is up to 25% of the total electron density in the quasi-neutral region. It is demonstrated that the exact amount depends on the history of the system and the steady state is not unique. Nevertheless, the amount of trapped electrons is smaller than the one assumed heuristically by kinetic stationary theories.

  14. Recent Progress Towards a Measurement of the Neutron Lifetime Using Magnetically Trapped Ultracold Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelhammer, K. W.; Huffer, C. R.; Huffman, P. R.; Marley, D. E.; Coakley, K. J.; Huber, Michael; Hughes, P. P.; Mumm, H. P.; Thompson, A. K.; Yue, A. T.; Abrams, N. C.

    2012-03-01

    Free neutron beta decay is a fundamental process in the Standard Model that can be used to test the weak interaction as well as provide information about primordial ^4He abundance. Recent precision measurements of the neutron lifetime have led to reduced confidence in the absolute value of this parameter; due presumably to unknown systematic effects. This work seeks to measure the neutron lifetime using a different technique that employs a superconducting magnetic trap to confine ultracold neutrons. Neutrons are loaded into the trap through the superthermal technique where 1 mEv neutrons down scatter from phonons in liquid helium losing the majority of their energy. Neutrons in the appropriate spin state are then confined by the static magnetic field. During the past year, over 400 run cycles of data were collected using the upgraded apparatus. Analysis of previous data sets was limited due to large numbers of background events relative to the neutron decay signal. An increased number of trapped neutrons as well as a analysis using pulse shape discrimination allows one to significantly increase the overall precision of the measurement. Details of this ongoing analysis will be presented with preliminary results.

  15. Coulomb scatter of diamagnetic dust particles in a cusp magnetic trap under microgravity conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myasnikov, M. I., E-mail: miasnikovmi@mail.ru; D’yachkov, L. G.; Petrov, O. F.; Vasiliev, M. M., E-mail: mixxy@mail.ru; Fortov, V. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Savin, S. F.; Serova, E. O. [Korolev Rocket and Space Corporation Energia, ul. Lenina 4A (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    The effect of a dc electric field on strongly nonideal Coulomb systems consisting of a large number (~10{sup 4}) of charged diamagnetic dust particles in a cusp magnetic trap are carried out aboard the Russian segment of the International Space Station (ISS) within the Coulomb Crystal experiment. Graphite particles of 100–400 μm in size are used in the experiments. Coulomb scatter of a dust cluster and the formation of threadlike chains of dust particles are observed experimentally. The processes observed are simulated by the molecular dynamics (MD) method.

  16. Electric & Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Lead Mercury Mold Nanomaterials Ozone Perfluorinated Chemicals Pesticides Radon Soy Infant Formula Styrene Water Pollution Weather ... 102-486, Section 2118) Questions and Answers about Biological Effects and Potential Hazards of Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields - ...

  17. An isoelectrically trapped enzyme reactor operating in an electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righetti, P G; Bossi, A

    1998-06-01

    Membrane enzyme reactors constitute an attempt at integrating catalytic conversion, product separation and/or concentration and catalyst recovery into a single operation. Whereas conventional membrane reactors confine an enzyme, in a free form, to one side of a membrane by size exclusion, electrostatic repulsion, or physical or chemical immobilization onto an intermediate support (gel, liposome), the membrane reactor here described is shown to operate under an entirely new principle: enzyme confinement into an isoelectric trap located in a multicompartment electrolyzer operating in an electric field. Two isoelectric membranes, having pI values encompassing both the enzyme pI and the pH of its optimum of activity, act by continuously titrating the enzyme trapped inside, thus preventing it from escaping the reaction chamber. Charged products generated by the enzyme catalysis are continuously electrophoretically transported away from the reaction chamber and collected into other chambers stacked either towards the cathodic or anodic sides. In a urease reactor, ammonia is continuously harvested towards the cathode, thus allowing >95% substrate consumption with maintenance of enzyme integrity over much longer time periods than in a batch reactor. In a trypsin reactor, casein is digested and biologically active peptides are continuously harvested in a pure form into appropriate isoelectric traps. In a third example, pure D-phenylglycine is produced from a racemate mixture, via an acylation reaction onto a cosubstrate (the ester methyl-4-hydroxyphenyl acetate), brought about by the enzyme penicillin G acylase.

  18. MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENTS FOR FAST-CHANGING MAGNETIC FIELDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Several recent applications for fast ramped magnets have been found that require rapid measurement of the field quality during the ramp. (In one instance, accelerator dipoles will be ramped at 1 T/sec, with measurements needed to the accuracy typically required for accelerators.) We have built and tested a new type of magnetic field measuring system to meet this need. The system consists of 16 stationary pickup windings mounted on a cylinder. The signals induced in the windings in a changing magnetic field are sampled and analyzed to obtain the field harmonics. To minimize costs, printed circuit boards were used for the pickup windings and a combination of amplifiers and ADPs used for the voltage readout system. New software was developed for the analysis. Magnetic field measurements of a model dipole developed for the SIS200 accelerator at GSI are presented. The measurements are needed to insure that eddy currents induced by the fast ramps do not impact the field quality needed for successful accelerator operation

  19. Laser spectroscopy of the 4s4p(3) P-2-4s3d(1) D-2 transition on magnetically trapped calcium atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dammalapati, U.; Norris, I.; Burrows, C.; Riis, E.

    2011-01-01

    Laser excitation of the 4s4p(3) P-2-4s3d(1) D-2 transition in atomic calcium has been observed and the wavelength determined to 1530.5298(6) nm. The metastable 4s4p(3) P-2 atoms were magnetically trapped in the quadrupole magnetic field of a magneto-optical trap. This state represents the only

  20. Magnetic field of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Aleksey

    2013-04-01

    The magnetic field of the Earth has global meaning for a life on the Earth. The world geophysical science explains: - occurrence of a magnetic field of the Earth it is transformation of kinetic energy of movements of the fused iron in the liquid core of Earth - into the magnetic energy; - the warming up of a kernel of the Earth occurs due to radioactive disintegration of elements, with excretion of thermal energy. The world science does not define the reasons: - drift of a magnetic dipole on 0,2 a year to the West; - drift of lithospheric slabs and continents. The author offers: an alternative variant existing in a world science the theories "Geodynamo" - it is the theory « the Magnetic field of the Earth », created on the basis of physical laws. Education of a magnetic field of the Earth occurs at moving the electric charge located in a liquid kernel, at rotation of the Earth. At calculation of a magnetic field is used law the Bio Savara for a ring electric current: dB = . Magnetic induction in a kernel of the Earth: B = 2,58 Gs. According to the law of electromagnetic induction the Faradey, rotation of a iron kernel of the Earth in magnetic field causes occurrence of an electric field Emf which moves electrons from the center of a kernel towards the mantle. So of arise the radial electric currents. The magnetic field amplifies the iron of mantle and a kernel of the Earth. As a result of action of a radial electric field the electrons will flow from the center of a kernel in a layer of an electric charge. The central part of a kernel represents the field with a positive electric charge, which creates inverse magnetic field Binv and Emfinv When ?mfinv = ?mf ; ?inv = B, there will be an inversion a magnetic field of the Earth. It is a fact: drift of a magnetic dipole of the Earth in the western direction approximately 0,2 longitude, into a year. Radial electric currents a actions with the basic magnetic field of a Earth - it turn a kernel. It coincides with laws

  1. Microfluidic biosensing device for controlled trapping and detection of magnetic microparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Giouroudi, Ioanna

    2013-05-01

    A magnetic microfluidic device is proposed to transport and trap magnetic microparticles (MPs) to a sensing area. Once the MPs are concentrated in the vicinity of the sensing area, a spin valve type giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensor is used to detect their presence. The device is used for the detection of biological targets once they are labeled with functionalized MPs. Manipulation of the MPs is achieved by employing a microstructure which consists of planar ringshaped conducting microloops. These microloops are designed to produce high magnetic field gradients which are directly proportional to the force applied to manipulate the MPs. Upon sequential application of current, starting from the outermost loop, MPs are directed to move from the outermost to the innermost loop. The speed with which the MPs move towards the sensing area is controlled by the speed with which current is switched between the loops. On top of the microstructure, a microfluidic channel is fabricated using a standard photolithography technique and a dry film resist layer (Ordyl SY355). Experimental results showed that MPs of different diameters were successfully trapped at the sensing area and detected by the GMR sensor located directly under the innermost square loop. © 2013 IEEE.

  2. Fast Transverse Beam Instability Caused by Electron Cloud Trapped in Combined Function Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antipov, Sergey [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Electron cloud instabilities affect the performance of many circular high-intensity particle accelerators. They usually have a fast growth rate and might lead to an increase of the transverse emittance and beam loss. A peculiar example of such an instability is observed in the Fermilab Recycler proton storage ring. Although this instability might pose a challenge for future intensity upgrades, its nature had not been completely understood. The phenomena has been studied experimentally by comparing the dynamics of stable and unstable beam, numerically by simulating the build-up of the electron cloud and its interaction with the beam, and analytically by constructing a model of an electron cloud driven instability with the electrons trapped in combined function dipoles. Stabilization of the beam by a clearing bunch reveals that the instability is caused by the electron cloud, trapped in beam optics magnets. Measurements of microwave propagation confirm the presence of the cloud in the combined function dipoles. Numerical simulations show that up to 10$^{-2}$ of the particles can be trapped by their magnetic field. Since the process of electron cloud build-up is exponential, once trapped this amount of electrons significantly increases the density of the cloud on the next revolution. In a combined function dipole this multi-turn accumulation allows the electron cloud reaching final intensities orders of magnitude greater than in a pure dipole. The estimated fast instability growth rate of about 30 revolutions and low mode frequency of 0.4 MHz are consistent with experimental observations and agree with the simulations. The created instability model allows investigating the beam stability for the future intensity upgrades.

  3. Photographing magnetic fields in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, R.B.; Wright, L.S.

    Magneto-optic techniques coupled with high-speed photography are being used to study the destruction of superconductivity by a magnetic field. The phenomenon of superconductivity will be introduced with emphasis placed on the properties of type I and type II superconductors in a magnetic field. The Faraday effect and its application to the study of the penetration of magnetic fields into these superconductors will be described; the relative effectiveness of some types of paramagnetic glass will be demonstrated. A number of cinefilms will be shown to illustrate the versatility of the magneto-optic method for observing flux motion and patterns. The analysis of data obtained from a high speed film (10,200 fps) of a flux jump in Nb-Zr will be presented and discussed

  4. Magnetic fields around black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, David A. G.

    Active Galactic Nuclei are the most powerful long-lived objects in the universe. They are thought to harbor supermassive black holes that range from 1 million solar masses to 1000 times that value and possibly greater. Theory and observation are converging on a model for these objects that involves the conversion of gravitational potential energy of accreting gas to radiation as well as Poynting flux produced by the interaction of the rotating spacetime and the electromagnetic fields originating in the ionized accretion flow. The presence of black holes in astrophysics is taking center stage, with the output from AGN in various forms such as winds and jets influencing the formation and evolution of the host galaxy. This dissertation addresses some of the basic unanswered questions that plague our current understanding of how rotating black holes interact with their surrounding magnetized accretion disks to produce the enormous observed energy. Two magnetic configurations are examined. The first involves magnetic fields connecting the black hole with the inner accretion disk and the other involves large scale magnetic fields threading the disk and the hole. We study the effects of the former type by establishing the consequences that magnetic torques between the black hole and the inner accretion disk have on the energy dissipation profile. We attempt a plausible explanation to the observed "Deep Minimum" state in the Seyfert galaxy MCG-6- 30-15. For the latter type of magnetic geometry, we study the effects of the strength of the magnetic field threading the black hole within the context of the cherished Blandford & Znajek mechanism for black hole spin energy extraction. We begin by addressing the problem in the non-relativistic regime where we find that the black hole-threading magnetic field is stronger for greater disk thickness, larger magnetic Prandtl number, and for a larger accretion disk. We then study the problem in full relativity where we show that our

  5. Magnetic Fields of Neutron Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sushan Konar

    2017-09-12

    Sep 12, 2017 ... Over the decades, one of the primary preoccupations of neutron star research has been to look for a unification scheme connecting the widely different observational classes (shown in Fig. 1). The magnetic field, ranging from 108 G in millisecond pulsars to 1015 G in mag- netars, has been central to this ...

  6. Magnetic fields in Neutron Stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viganò, D.; Pons, J.A.; Miralles, J.A.; Rea, N.; Cenarro, A.J.; Figueras, F.; Hernández-Monteagudo, J.; Bueno, T.; Valdivielso, L.

    2015-01-01

    Isolated neutron stars show a diversity in timing and spectral properties, which has historically led to a classification in different sub-classes. The magnetic field plays a key role in many aspects of the neutron star phenomenology: it regulates the braking torque responsible for their timing

  7. Collective excitations of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a magnetic trap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mewes, M.O.; Andrews, M.R.; van Druten, N.J.; Kurn, D.M.; Durfee, D.S.; Townsend, C.G.; Ketterle, W.

    1996-01-01

    Collective excitations of a dilute Bose condensate have been observed. These excitations are analogous to phonons in superfluid helium. Bose condensates were created by evaporatively cooling magnetically trapped sodium atoms. Excitations were induced by a modulation of the trapping potential, and

  8. Field trapping of subsurface vapor phase petroleum hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moyer, E.E.; Ostendorf, D.W.; Kampbell, D.H.; Xie, Y.

    1994-01-01

    Soil gas samples from intact soil cores were collected on adsorbents at a field site, then thermally desorbed and analyzed by laboratory gas chromatography (GC). Vertical concentration profiles of predominant vapor phase petroleum hydrocarbons under ambient conditions were obtained for the zone directly above the capillary fringe. Water and residual phase weathered aviation gasoline were present in this region of the profile. The sampling, trapping, and GC methodology was effective in most respects. Reproducibility, trapping, and desorption efficiency were generally satisfactory, and different sorbent tubes gave similar results. A minor shortcoming of the method occurred with the most volatile compound, 2,3-dimethylbutane, which was poorly retained during several weeks of storage time and was also poorly desorbed. Vapor phase concentrations of predominant hydrocarbon compounds all increased with depth at one sampling location. At a more highly contaminated location, concentrations of highly volatile compounds increased with depth while concentrations of less volatile compounds remained constant or decreased, possibly indicating distillation effects. Scatter in the data was attributed to heterogeneities in water and residual phase distribution

  9. Field evaluation of a new light trap for phlebotomine sand flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaglio, Gabriella; Napoli, Ettore; Falsone, Luigi; Giannetto, Salvatore; Brianti, Emanuele

    2017-10-01

    Light traps are one of the most common attractive method for the collection of nocturnal insects. Although light traps are generally referred to as "CDC light traps", different models, equipped with incandescent or UV lamps, have been developed. A new light trap, named Laika trap 3.0, equipped with LED lamps and featured with a light and handy design, has been recently proposed into the market. In this study we tested and compared the capture performances of this new trap with those of a classical light trap model under field conditions. From May to November 2013, a Laika trap and a classical light trap were placed biweekly in an area endemic for sand flies. A total of 256 sand fly specimens, belonging to 3 species (Sergentomyia minuta, Phlebotomus perniciosus, Phlebotomus neglectus) were collected during the study period. The Laika trap captured 126 phlebotomine sand flies: P. perniciosus (n=38); S. minuta (n=88), a similar number of specimens (130) and the same species were captured by classical light trap which collected also 3 specimens of P. neglectus. No significant differences in the capture efficiency at each day of trapping, neither in the number of species or in the sex of sand flies were observed. According to results of this study, the Laika trap may be a valid alternative to classical light trap models especially when handy design and low power consumption are key factors in field studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Permanent magnet electron beam ion source/trap systems with bakeable magnets for improved operation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M; Zschornack, G; Kentsch, U; Ritter, E

    2014-02-01

    The magnetic system of a Dresden electron beam ion source (EBIS) generating the necessary magnetic field with a new type of permanent magnet made of high energy density NdFeB-type material operable at temperatures above 100 °C has been investigated and tested. The employment of such kind of magnets provides simplified operation without the time-consuming installation and de-installation procedures of the magnets for the necessary baking of the ion source after commissioning and maintenance work. Furthermore, with the use of a new magnetization technique the geometrical filling factor of the magnetic Dresden EBIS design could be increased to a filling factor of 100% leading to an axial magnetic field strength of approximately 0.5 T exceeding the old design by 20%. Simulations using the finite element method software Field Precision and their results compared with measurements are presented as well. It could be shown that several baking cycles at temperatures higher than 100 °C did not change the magnetic properties of the setup.

  11. Effect of silver addition on the mechanical and field trapping properties of Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Nariki, S; Matsui, M; Murakami, M

    2002-01-01

    The effect of Ag addition on the microstructure and the mechanical and field trapping properties of Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk superconductor has been investigated. The single grain Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk superconductors 32 mm in diameter were fabricated with 0-30 mass%Ag/sub 2/O additions by the melt growth method under controlled oxygen partial pressure of 1.0%. From microscopic observations, it was found that the macro- cracks in the a-b plane decreased with Ag addition. The three-point bending test showed that the average strength of Ag-free bulk was 69 MPa at room temperature, while the strength was dramatically improved to 110-115 MPa with 10-30 mass%Ag/sub 2/O additions. The trapped magnetic field of Ag-free bulk sample was 1.3 T at 77 K. The trapped field of bulk Gd-Ba-Cu-O samples with 10-20 mass%Ag/sub 2/O exhibited high values of 1.8-2.0 T at 77 K. However, the trapped field of the sample with 30 mass%Ag/sub 2/O addition was lowered to 1.1 T with decreasing the critical current density. The trapped field of Ag- adde...

  12. Galactic and intergalactic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    This course-tested textbook conveys the fundamentals of magnetic fields and relativistic plasma in diffuse cosmic media, with a primary focus on phenomena that have been observed at different wavelengths. Theoretical concepts are addressed wherever necessary, with derivations presented in sufficient detail to be generally accessible.In the first few chapters the authors present an introduction to various astrophysical phenomena related to cosmic magnetism, with scales ranging from molecular clouds in star-forming regions and supernova remnants in the Milky Way, to clusters of galaxies. Later c

  13. Probing Magnetic Fields with Square Kilometre Array and its ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    /fulltext/joaa/037/04/0042. Keywords. Magnetic fields; telescopes; galaxies: magnetic fields; ISM: magnetic fields; stars: magnetic fields; turbulence. Abstract. Origin of magnetic fields, its structure and effects on dynamical processes in stars to ...

  14. Dissipative dust-acoustic shock waves in a varying charge electronegative magnetized dusty plasma with trapped electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacha, Mustapha [Faculty of Physics, Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Plasma Physics Group, University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB, B.P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria); Tribeche, Mouloud, E-mail: mouloudtribeche@yahoo.fr, E-mail: mtribeche@usthb.dz [Faculty of Physics, Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Plasma Physics Group, University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB, B.P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria); Algerian Academy of Sciences and Technologies, Algiers (Algeria)

    2016-08-15

    The combined effects of an oblique magnetic field and electron trapping on dissipative dust-acoustic waves are examined in varying charge electronegative dusty plasmas with application to the Halley Comet plasma (∼10{sup 4} km from the nucleus). A weakly nonlinear analysis is carried out to derive a modified Korteweg-de Vries-Burger-like equation. Making use of the equilibrium current balance equation, the physically admissible values of the electron trapping parameter are first constrained. We then show that the Burger dissipative term is solely due to the dust charge variation process. It is found that an increase of the magnetic field obliqueness or a decrease of its magnitude renders the shock structure more dispersive.

  15. RESICALC: Magnetic field modeling program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, J.M.

    1992-12-01

    RESICALC, Version 1.0, is a Microsoft Windows application that describes the magnetic field environment produced by user-defined arrays of transmission lines, distribution lines, and custom conductors. These arrays simulate specific situations that may be encountered in real-world community settings. RESICALC allows the user to define an area or ''world'' that contains the transmission and/or distribution lines, user-defined conductors, and locations of residences. The world contains a ''reference grid'' within which RESICALC analyzes the magnetic field environment due to all conductors within the world. Unique physical parameters (e.g., conductor height and spacing) and operating characteristics can be assigned to all electrical conductors. RESICALC's output is available for the x, y, z axis separately, the resultant (the three axes added in quadrature), and the major axis, each in three possible formats: a three-dimensional map of the magnetic field, two dimensional-contours, and as a table with statistical values. All formats may be printed, accompanied by a three-dimensional view of the world the user has drawn. The view of the world and the corresponding three-dimensional field map may be adjusted to the elevation and rotation angle of the user's preference

  16. Establishment of magnetic coordinates for a given magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.

    1981-04-01

    A method is given for expressing the magnetic field strength in magnetic coordinates for a given field. This expression is central to the study of equilibrium, stability, and transport in asymmetric plasmas

  17. A Vorticity-Magnetic Field Dynamo Instability

    OpenAIRE

    Blackman, Eric G.; Chou, Tom

    1997-01-01

    We generalize the mean field magnetic dynamo to include local evolution of the mean vorticity in addition to the mean magnetic field. The coupled equations exhibit a general mean field dynamo instability that enables the transfer of turbulent energy to the magnetic field and vorticity on larger scales. The growth of the vorticity and magnetic field both require helical turbulence which can be supplied by an underlying global rotation. The dynamo coefficients are derived including the backreac...

  18. Evaluation of the characteristics of a field emission cathode for use in a Mercury ion trap frequency standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christman, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    The performance is reported of a field emission array characterized for the purpose of replacing the filament in a trapped ion frequency standard. This dark electron emitter eliminates the need for the interference filter currently used in the trapped ion standard. While reducing the filament's unwanted light, this filter causes a significant reduction in the signal. The magnetic field associated with the filament is also eliminated, thus potentially improving the present stability of the trapped ion standard. The operation of the filament in the present system is described, as well as the associated concerns. The cathode considered for the filament's replacement is then described along with the experimental system. Experimental results, observations, and conclusions are presented.

  19. Evaluation of two counterflow traps for testing behaviour-mediating compounds for the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae s.s. under semi-field conditions in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmied, Wolfgang H; Takken, Willem; Killeen, Gerry F; Knols, Bart G J; Smallegange, Renate C

    2008-11-03

    Evaluation of mosquito responses towards different trap-bait combinations in field trials is a time-consuming process that can be shortened by experiments in contained semi-field systems. Possible use of the BG Sentinel (BGS) trap to sample Anopheles gambiae s.s. was evaluated. The efficiency of this trap was compared with that of the Mosquito Magnet-X (MM-X) trap, when baited with foot odour alone or combinations of foot odour with carbon dioxide (CO2) or lemongrass as behaviour-modifying cues. Female An. gambiae s.s. were released in an experimental flight arena that was placed in a semi-field system and left overnight. Catch rates for the MM-X and BGS traps were recorded. Data were analysed by fitting a generalized linear model to the (n+1) transformed catches. Both types of traps successfully captured mosquitoes with all odour cues used. When the BGS trap was tested against the MM-X trap in a choice assay with foot odour as bait, the BGS trap caught about three times as many mosquitoes as the MM-X trap (P = 0.002). Adding CO2 (500 ml/min) to foot odour increased the number of mosquitoes caught by 268% for the MM-X (P BGS trap, compared to foot odour alone. When lemongrass leaves were added to foot odour, mosquito catches were reduced by 39% (BGS, P BGS trap shows high potential for field trials due to its simple construction and high catch rate when baited with human foot odour only. However, for rapid screening of different baits in a contained semi-field system, the superior discriminatory power of the MM-X trap is advantageous.

  20. Hyperfine Level Interactions of Diamond Nitrogen Vacancy Ensembles Under Transverse Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-06

    transverse mag- netic bias field (B|| or B⊥) lifts this degeneracy, ener- getically separating the spin states and increasing sensi- tivity to magnetic or...light-trapping diamond waveguide geometry [19]. We lift the ms = ±1 degeneracy by ap- plying a static magnetic field and tune the microwave ex- citation...Hyperfine level interactions of diamond nitrogen vacancy ensembles under transverse magnetic fields Hannah Clevenson,1, 2, ∗ Edward H. Chen,1, 2

  1. Using injection molding and reversible bonding for easy fabrication of magnetic cell trapping and sorting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royet, David; Hériveaux, Yoann; Marchalot, Julien; Scorretti, Riccardo; Dias, André; Dempsey, Nora M.; Bonfim, Marlio; Simonet, Pascal; Frénéa-Robin, Marie

    2017-04-01

    Magnetism and microfluidics are two key elements for the development of inexpensive and reliable tools dedicated to high-throughput biological analysis and providing a large panel of applications in domains ranging from fundamental biology to medical diagnostics. In this work, we introduce a simple protocol, relying on injection molding and reversible bonding for fabrication of magnetic cell trapping and sorting devices using only standard soft-lithography equipment. Magnetic strips or grids made of Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) doped with hard (NdFeB) or soft (carbonyl iron) magnetic powders were integrated at the bottom of whole PDMS chips. Preliminary results show the effective deviation/trapping of magnetic beads or magnetically-labeled bacteria as the sample flows through the microchannel, proving the potential of this rapid prototyping approach for easy fabrication of magnetic cell sorters.

  2. On the origin of cosmic magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulsrud, Russell M.; Zweibel, Ellen G.

    2008-04-01

    and most popular mechanism is the α-Ω mean field dynamo theory developed by a number of people in the late sixties. This theory and its application to galactic magnetic fields is discussed in considerable detail in this review. We point out certain difficulties with this theory that make it seem unlikely that this is the whole story. The main difficulty with this as the only such amplification mechanism is rooted in the fact that, on galactic scales, flux is constant and is frozen in the interstellar medium. This implies that flux must be removed from the galactic discs, as is well recognized by the standard theory. For our Galaxy this turns out to be a major problem, since unless the flux and the interstellar mass are somehow separated, some interstellar mass must also be removed from the deep galactic gravitational well. This is very difficult. It is pointed out that unless the field has a substantial field strength, much larger than that of the seed fields, this separation can hardly happen. And of course, it must if the α-Ω dynamo is to start from the ultra weak seed field. (It is our philosophy, expressed in this review, that if an origin theory is unable to create the magnetic field in our Galaxy it is essentially incomplete.) Thus, it is more reasonable for the first and largest amplification to occur before the Galaxy forms, and the matter embedded in the field is gravitationally trapped. Two such mechanisms are discussed for such a pregalactic origin; (1) they are generated in the turbulence of the protogalaxy and (2) the fields come from giant radio jets. Several arguments against a primordial origin are also discussed, as are ways around them. Our conclusion as to the most likely origin of cosmic magnetic fields is that they are first produced at moderate field strengths by primordial mechanisms and then changed and their strength increased to their present value and structure by a galactic disc dynamo. The primordial mechanisms have not yet been

  3. Anisotropic magnetism in field-structured composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, James E.; Venturini, Eugene; Odinek, Judy; Anderson, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic field-structured composites (FSCs) are made by structuring magnetic particle suspensions in uniaxial or biaxial (e.g., rotating) magnetic fields, while polymerizing the suspending resin. A uniaxial field produces chainlike particle structures, and a biaxial field produces sheetlike particle structures. In either case, these anisotropic structures affect the measured magnetic hysteresis loops, with the magnetic remanence and susceptibility increased significantly along the axis of the structuring field, and decreased slightly orthogonal to the structuring field, relative to the unstructured particle composite. The coercivity is essentially unaffected by structuring. We present data for FSCs of magnetically soft particles, and demonstrate that the altered magnetism can be accounted for by considering the large local fields that occur in FSCs. FSCs of magnetically hard particles show unexpectedly large anisotropies in the remanence, and this is due to the local field effects in combination with the large crystalline anisotropy of this material. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  4. Measurements of Solar Vector Magnetic Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagyard, M.J.

    1985-05-01

    Various aspects of the measurement of solar magnetic fields are presented. The four major subdivisions of the study are: (1) theoretical understanding of solar vector magnetic fields; (3) techniques for interpretation of observational data; and (4) techniques for data display

  5. On the origin of cosmic magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulsrud, Russell M; Zweibel, Ellen G

    2008-01-01

    and most popular mechanism is the α-Ω mean field dynamo theory developed by a number of people in the late sixties. This theory and its application to galactic magnetic fields is discussed in considerable detail in this review. We point out certain difficulties with this theory that make it seem unlikely that this is the whole story. The main difficulty with this as the only such amplification mechanism is rooted in the fact that, on galactic scales, flux is constant and is frozen in the interstellar medium. This implies that flux must be removed from the galactic discs, as is well recognized by the standard theory. For our Galaxy this turns out to be a major problem, since unless the flux and the interstellar mass are somehow separated, some interstellar mass must also be removed from the deep galactic gravitational well. This is very difficult. It is pointed out that unless the field has a substantial field strength, much larger than that of the seed fields, this separation can hardly happen. And of course, it must if the α-Ω dynamo is to start from the ultra weak seed field. (It is our philosophy, expressed in this review, that if an origin theory is unable to create the magnetic field in our Galaxy it is essentially incomplete.) Thus, it is more reasonable for the first and largest amplification to occur before the Galaxy forms, and the matter embedded in the field is gravitationally trapped. Two such mechanisms are discussed for such a pregalactic origin; (1) they are generated in the turbulence of the protogalaxy and (2) the fields come from giant radio jets. Several arguments against a primordial origin are also discussed, as are ways around them. Our conclusion as to the most likely origin of cosmic magnetic fields is that they are first produced at moderate field strengths by primordial mechanisms and then changed and their strength increased to their present value and structure by a galactic disc dynamo. The primordial mechanisms have not yet been

  6. Remanent magnetization of instrument materials for low magnetic field applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mester, J.C.; Lockhart, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    We report remanent magnetization and magnetic susceptibility measurements made on materials used in the construction of cryogenic instruments. SQUID based magnetometers were used to make the measurements over a range of background fields from 10 2 to 10 -7 Gauss. Although the materials tested are generally regarded as non-magnetic, some samples have sufficiently high magnetization values, or values which vary with foundry lot and heat, that use in low field or magnetically sensitive applications is contraindicated. (author)

  7. Magnetic Field Measurement of induction Hobs

    OpenAIRE

    森, 秀樹||モリ, ヒデキ||Mori, Hideki; 松井, 景樹||マツイ, ケイジュ||Matsui, Keiju; 山本, 勇||ヤマモト, イサム||Yamamoto, Isamu

    2004-01-01

    Recently domestic induction hobs have rapidly come into wide use in Japan. When cooking a strong high frequency magnetic field is generated in the area of induction hob. However, there are few reports of the measurement of the magnetic field during actual cooking. The magnetic field resulting from various working conditions of several types of induction hobs are reported here. Measurements of the magnetic field due to differences in various types of converter, the size and materials of the co...

  8. Design and performance of a cryogenic apparatus for magnetically trapping ultracold neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, P. R.; Coakley, K. J.; Doyle, J. M.; Huffer, C. R.; Mumm, H. P.; O'Shaughnessy, C. M.; Schelhammer, K. W.; Seo, P.-N.; Yang, L.

    2014-11-01

    The cryogenic design and performance of an apparatus used to magnetically confine ultracold neutrons (UCN) is presented. The apparatus is part of an effort to measure the beta-decay lifetime of the free neutron and is comprised of a high-current superconducting magnetic trap that surrounds ∼21 l of isotopically pure 4He cooled to approximately 250 mK. A 0.89 nm neutron beam can enter the apparatus from one end of the magnetic trap and a light collection system allows visible light generated within the helium by decays to be transported to detectors at room temperature. Two cryocoolers are incorporated to reduce liquid helium consumption.

  9. Pulsed field magnetization strategies and the field poles composition in a bulk-type superconducting motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Zhen; Ruiz, H.S.; Coombs, T.A.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Different compositions of the magnetic poles have been obtained depending on the relative orientation of the magnetizing coil and the surfaces of the columns of bulks that conform a magnetic pole. • Two bidimensional models accounting for the electromagnetic response of the top and lateral cross sections of three columns of HTS bulks subjected to multiple pulsed magnetic fields have been created. • An extended PFM strategy has been proposed by considering the magnetization of at least three successive columns of HTS bulks per pole. In the extended PFM strategy the area of each one of the poles can be seen increased by a factor of 200%-400% - Abstract: High temperature superconducting (HTS) bulks offer the potential of trapping and maintaining much higher magnetic loading level compared with the conventional permanent magnets used in rotary machines, although the effective magnetization of multiple HTS bulks with different relative orientations over the surface of cylindrical rotors creates new challenges. In this paper, we present the design and numerical validation of the Pulse Field Magnetization (PFM) strategy considered for the magnetization of the four-pole synchronous fully superconducting motor developed at the University of Cambridge. In a first instance, singular columns of up to five HTS bulks aligned over the height of the rotor were subjected to up to three magnetic pulses of 1.5 T peak, and the experimental results have been simulated by considering the electrical and thermal properties of the system in a 2D approach. The entire active surface of the rotor is covered by HTS bulks of approximately the same dimensions, resulting in an uneven distribution of pole areas with at least one of the poles formed by up to 3 columns of magnetized bulks, with relatively the same peaks of trapped magnetic field. Thus, in order to effectively use the entire area of the superconducting rotor, multiple pulsed fields per column have been applied

  10. Pulsed field magnetization strategies and the field poles composition in a bulk-type superconducting motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhen, E-mail: zhen.huang@sjtu.edu.cn [Academy of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Ruiz, H.S., E-mail: dr.harold.ruiz@le.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Coombs, T.A., E-mail: tac1000@cam.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, 9 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Different compositions of the magnetic poles have been obtained depending on the relative orientation of the magnetizing coil and the surfaces of the columns of bulks that conform a magnetic pole. • Two bidimensional models accounting for the electromagnetic response of the top and lateral cross sections of three columns of HTS bulks subjected to multiple pulsed magnetic fields have been created. • An extended PFM strategy has been proposed by considering the magnetization of at least three successive columns of HTS bulks per pole. In the extended PFM strategy the area of each one of the poles can be seen increased by a factor of 200%-400% - Abstract: High temperature superconducting (HTS) bulks offer the potential of trapping and maintaining much higher magnetic loading level compared with the conventional permanent magnets used in rotary machines, although the effective magnetization of multiple HTS bulks with different relative orientations over the surface of cylindrical rotors creates new challenges. In this paper, we present the design and numerical validation of the Pulse Field Magnetization (PFM) strategy considered for the magnetization of the four-pole synchronous fully superconducting motor developed at the University of Cambridge. In a first instance, singular columns of up to five HTS bulks aligned over the height of the rotor were subjected to up to three magnetic pulses of 1.5 T peak, and the experimental results have been simulated by considering the electrical and thermal properties of the system in a 2D approach. The entire active surface of the rotor is covered by HTS bulks of approximately the same dimensions, resulting in an uneven distribution of pole areas with at least one of the poles formed by up to 3 columns of magnetized bulks, with relatively the same peaks of trapped magnetic field. Thus, in order to effectively use the entire area of the superconducting rotor, multiple pulsed fields per column have been applied

  11. Evaluation of two counterflow traps for testing behaviour-mediating compounds for the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae s.s. under semi-field conditions in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Killeen Gerry F

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evaluation of mosquito responses towards different trap-bait combinations in field trials is a time-consuming process that can be shortened by experiments in contained semi-field systems. Possible use of the BG Sentinel (BGS trap to sample Anopheles gambiae s.s. was evaluated. The efficiency of this trap was compared with that of the Mosquito Magnet-X (MM-X trap, when baited with foot odour alone or combinations of foot odour with carbon dioxide (CO2 or lemongrass as behaviour-modifying cues. Methods Female An. gambiae s.s. were released in an experimental flight arena that was placed in a semi-field system and left overnight. Catch rates for the MM-X and BGS traps were recorded. Data were analysed by fitting a generalized linear model to the (n+1 transformed catches. Results Both types of traps successfully captured mosquitoes with all odour cues used. When the BGS trap was tested against the MM-X trap in a choice assay with foot odour as bait, the BGS trap caught about three times as many mosquitoes as the MM-X trap (P = 0.002. Adding CO2 (500 ml/min to foot odour increased the number of mosquitoes caught by 268% for the MM-X (P Conclusion The BGS trap shows high potential for field trials due to its simple construction and high catch rate when baited with human foot odour only. However, for rapid screening of different baits in a contained semi-field system, the superior discriminatory power of the MM-X trap is advantageous.

  12. Behavior of magnetic superconductors in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzdin, A.I.

    1984-01-01

    We investigate the behavior in a magnetic field of magnetic superconductors in which the ferromagnetic and superconducting transition temperatures are close together. It is shown that as the temperature is lowered the order of the superconducting transition changes from second to first. The corresponding critical fields and the field and temperature dependences of the magnetization are determined. Attention is focused on a discontinuity in the magnetization in the vortex core in magnetic superconductors. This feature plus the relatively large scattering cross section make magnetic superconductors convenient objects for the study of the superconducting vortex lattice by neutron diffraction

  13. Microwave Measurements of Coronal Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, K.

    2006-08-01

    Magnetic field measurements of the solar corona using microwave observation are reviewed. The solar corona is filled with highly ionised plasma and magnetic field. Moving charged particles interact with magnetic field due to Lorentz force. This results in gyration motion perpendicular to the magnetic field and free motion along the magnetic field. Circularly polarized electro-magnetic waves interact with gyrating electrons efficiently and the interaction depends on the sense of circular polarization (right-handed or left-handed). This is the reason why we can measure magnetic field strength through microwave observations. This process does not require complicated quantum physics but the classical treatment is enough. Hence the inversion of measured values to magnetic field strength is simpler than in the case of optical and infrared measurements. There are several methods to measure magnetic field strength through microwave observations. We can divide them into two categories: one is based on emission mechanisms and the other is based on wave propagation. In the case of emission mechanisms, thermal f-f emission, thermal gyro-resonance emission and non-thermal gyro-synchrotron emission can be used to measure magnetic field strength. In the case of wave propagation, polarization reversal due to propagation through quasi-transverse magnetic field region can be used. Examples of distribution of magnetic field strength in the solar corona measured by Nobeyama Radioheliograph will be presented.

  14. Interaction between two magnetic dipoles in a uniform magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, J. G.; Liu, X. Y.; Chen, H. H.; Deng, R. D.; Yan, Q. X.

    2016-02-01

    A new formula for the interaction force between two magnetic dipoles in a uniform magnetic field is derived taking their mutual magnetic interaction into consideration and used to simulate their relative motion. Results show that when the angle β between the direction of external magnetic field and the centerline of two magnetic dipoles is 0 ° or 90 °, magnetic dipoles approach each other or move away from each other in a straight line, respectively. And the time required for them to contact each other from the initial position is related to the specific susceptibility and the diameter of magnetic particles, medium viscosity and magnetic field strength. When β is between 0 ° and 90 °, magnetic dipole pair performs approximate elliptical motion, and the motion trajectory is affected by the specific susceptibility, diameter and medium viscosity but not magnetic field strength. However, time required for magnetic dipoles to complete the same motion trajectory is shorter when adopting stronger magnetic field. Moreover, the subsequent motion trajectory of magnetic dipoles is ascertained once the initial position is set in a predetermined motion trajectory. Additionally, magnetic potential energy of magnetic dipole pairs is transformed into kinetic energy and friction energy during the motion.

  15. Interaction between two magnetic dipoles in a uniform magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Ku

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A new formula for the interaction force between two magnetic dipoles in a uniform magnetic field is derived taking their mutual magnetic interaction into consideration and used to simulate their relative motion. Results show that when the angle β between the direction of external magnetic field and the centerline of two magnetic dipoles is 0 ° or 90 °, magnetic dipoles approach each other or move away from each other in a straight line, respectively. And the time required for them to contact each other from the initial position is related to the specific susceptibility and the diameter of magnetic particles, medium viscosity and magnetic field strength. When β is between 0 ° and 90 °, magnetic dipole pair performs approximate elliptical motion, and the motion trajectory is affected by the specific susceptibility, diameter and medium viscosity but not magnetic field strength. However, time required for magnetic dipoles to complete the same motion trajectory is shorter when adopting stronger magnetic field. Moreover, the subsequent motion trajectory of magnetic dipoles is ascertained once the initial position is set in a predetermined motion trajectory. Additionally, magnetic potential energy of magnetic dipole pairs is transformed into kinetic energy and friction energy during the motion.

  16. Effective magnetic moment of neutrinos in strong magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez, A; Masood, S S; Gaitan, R; Rodríguez, S

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we compute the effective magnetic moment of neutrinos propagating in dense high magnetized medium. Taking typical values of magnetic field and densities of astrophysical objects (such as the cores of supernovae and neutron stars) we obtain an effective type of dipole magnetic moment in agreement with astrophysical and cosmological bounds. (Author)

  17. Structure of boundary layers of plasmas confined by magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laval, G.; Pellat, R.

    1963-01-01

    The structure of a transition sheath between a magnetically confined plasma and vacuum is investigated. A one-dimensional, static solution of the collisionless Vlasov equation is sought. The two kinds of particles are assumed to have unequal masses, M- and M+, and temperatures, T- and T+; and the parameter λ 2 = (M-/M+) (T-/T+) = (R-/R+) (R-, R+ are Larmor radii) is introduced. For non-relativistic particles, the result is obtained that no physical solution can exist except for λ = 1 without trapped particles. The problem for Maxwellian distribution functions, no charge separation field λ = 1 + α with α small, and with trapped particles, is investigated. For negative α, only trapped ions are needed, and the distribution function of trapped particles that provides the thinnest sheath can be calculated. A complete solution of the problem with unequal masses, charge separation field, and trapped electrons is given. The sheath thickness is about four Larmor radii, a good physical picture if stable. (authors) [fr

  18. Magnetic field measuring system for remapping the ORIC magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosko, S.W.; Hudson, E.D.; Lord, R.S.; Hensley, D.C.; Biggerstaff, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    The Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility will integrate a new 25 MV tandem electrostatic acccelerator into the existing cyclotron laboratory which includes the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC). Computations of ion paths for beam injection from the new tandem into ORIC require field mapping in the regions traversed by the beam. Additional field data is also desired for the higher levels (approx.19 kG) now used for most heavy ion beams. The magnetic field measurement system uses 39 flip coil/current integrator sets with computer controlled data scanning. The coils are spaced radially at 1 inch intervals in an arm which can be rotated azimuthally in 2 degree increments. The entire flip coil assembly can be shifted to larger radii to measure fields beyond the pole boundary. Temperature stabilization of electronic circuitry permits a measurement resolution of +-1 gauss over a dynamic range of +-25,000 gauss. The system will process a scan of 8000 points in about one hour

  19. The magnetic field measurements of the booster synchrotron magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumada, Masayuki; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Takikawa, Koji; Someya, Hirohiko; Kurosawa, Toshitake.

    1978-03-01

    The magnetic field properties of the booster synchrotron magnet are investigated. Method of the field measurement, magnetic field measuring system, its data acquisition system and procedure of data processing are described in detail, with a special emphasis on the accuracy in the measurement. The excitation dependences and distributions of the field strength, field gradient, multipole fields and their effective lengths are given and analyzed. The betatron tune and chromaticity are discussed by taking account of the effect of the fringing field as well as the multipole fields of focussing and defocussing sectors. (auth.)

  20. Using injection molding and reversible bonding for easy fabrication of magnetic cell trapping and sorting devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Royet, David; Hériveaux, Yoann; Marchalot, Julien; Scorretti, Riccardo [Univ Lyon, ECL, UCB Lyon1, CNRS, Ampere, F-69134 Ecully (France); Dias, André; Dempsey, Nora M. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes - CNRS, Inst Neel, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Bonfim, Marlio [Universidade Federal do Paraná, DELT, Curitiba (Brazil); Simonet, Pascal; Frénéa-Robin, Marie [Univ Lyon, ECL, UCB Lyon1, CNRS, Ampere, F-69134 Ecully (France)

    2017-04-01

    Magnetism and microfluidics are two key elements for the development of inexpensive and reliable tools dedicated to high-throughput biological analysis and providing a large panel of applications in domains ranging from fundamental biology to medical diagnostics. In this work, we introduce a simple protocol, relying on injection molding and reversible bonding for fabrication of magnetic cell trapping and sorting devices using only standard soft-lithography equipment. Magnetic strips or grids made of Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) doped with hard (NdFeB) or soft (carbonyl iron) magnetic powders were integrated at the bottom of whole PDMS chips. Preliminary results show the effective deviation/trapping of magnetic beads or magnetically-labeled bacteria as the sample flows through the microchannel, proving the potential of this rapid prototyping approach for easy fabrication of magnetic cell sorters. - Highlights: • Soft and hard magnetic PDMS composites were microstructured by injection molding. • Tunable or autonomous magnetic microdevices can be fabricated using this approach. • Continuous-flow bacterial cell trapping and deviation were demonstrated.

  1. Using injection molding and reversible bonding for easy fabrication of magnetic cell trapping and sorting devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royet, David; Hériveaux, Yoann; Marchalot, Julien; Scorretti, Riccardo; Dias, André; Dempsey, Nora M.; Bonfim, Marlio; Simonet, Pascal; Frénéa-Robin, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Magnetism and microfluidics are two key elements for the development of inexpensive and reliable tools dedicated to high-throughput biological analysis and providing a large panel of applications in domains ranging from fundamental biology to medical diagnostics. In this work, we introduce a simple protocol, relying on injection molding and reversible bonding for fabrication of magnetic cell trapping and sorting devices using only standard soft-lithography equipment. Magnetic strips or grids made of Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) doped with hard (NdFeB) or soft (carbonyl iron) magnetic powders were integrated at the bottom of whole PDMS chips. Preliminary results show the effective deviation/trapping of magnetic beads or magnetically-labeled bacteria as the sample flows through the microchannel, proving the potential of this rapid prototyping approach for easy fabrication of magnetic cell sorters. - Highlights: • Soft and hard magnetic PDMS composites were microstructured by injection molding. • Tunable or autonomous magnetic microdevices can be fabricated using this approach. • Continuous-flow bacterial cell trapping and deviation were demonstrated.

  2. Permanent Magnet Ecr Plasma Source With Magnetic Field Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Frank C.; Spencer, John E.

    2000-12-19

    In a plasma-producing device, an optimized magnet field for electron cyclotron resonance plasma generation is provided by a shaped pole piece. The shaped pole piece adjusts spacing between the magnet and the resonance zone, creates a convex or concave resonance zone, and decreases stray fields between the resonance zone and the workpiece. For a cylindrical permanent magnet, the pole piece includes a disk adjacent the magnet together with an annular cylindrical sidewall structure axially aligned with the magnet and extending from the base around the permanent magnet. The pole piece directs magnetic field lines into the resonance zone, moving the resonance zone further from the face of the magnet. Additional permanent magnets or magnet arrays may be utilized to control field contours on a local scale. Rather than a permeable material, the sidewall structure may be composed of an annular cylindrical magnetic material having a polarity opposite that of the permanent magnet, creating convex regions in the resonance zone. An annular disk-shaped recurve section at the end of the sidewall structure forms magnetic mirrors keeping the plasma off the pole piece. A recurve section composed of magnetic material having a radial polarity forms convex regions and/or magnetic mirrors within the resonance zone.

  3. Measurements of magnetic field sources in schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.B.

    1992-01-01

    The Electrical Systems Division of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has initiated several research projects to investigate magnetic field levels, their characteristics, and their sources. This paper describes measurements of magnetic field sources in schools. Magnetic field measurements were made at four schools in the service areas of two utility companies. Magnetic field measurements included profiles of the magnetic field versus distance near power lines, around the perimeter of the school buildings, and at several locations within each school. Twenty-four hour measurements were also made to record the temporal variation of the magnetic field at several locations at each school. The instrumentation, measurement techniques, and magnetic field sources identified are discussed

  4. Manipulating beams of ultra-cold atoms with a static magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowlands, W.J.; Lau, D.C.; Opat, G.I.; Sidorov, A.I.; McLean, R.J.; Hannaford, P.

    1996-01-01

    The preliminary results on the deflection of a beam of ultra-cold atoms by a static magnetic field are presented. Caesium atoms trapped in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) are cooled using optical molasses, and then fall freely under gravity to form a beam of ultra-cold atoms. The atoms pass through a static inhomogeneous magnetic field produced by a single current-carrying wire, and are deflected by a force dependent on the magnetic substate of the atom. A schematical diagram of the experimental layout for laser trapping and cooling of cesium atom is given. The population of atoms in various magnetic substates can be altered by using resonant laser radiation to optically pump the atoms. The single-wire deflection experiment described can be considered as atomic reflexion from a cylindrical magnetic mirror; the underlying principles and techniques being relevant to the production of atomic mirrors and diffraction gratings. 16 refs., 10 figs

  5. Magnetization reversal of ferromagnetic nanoparticles under inhomogeneous magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Joonyeon; Yi, Hyunjung; Cheol Koo, Hyun; Mironov, V.L.; Gribkov, B.A.; Fraerman, A.A.; Gusev, S.A.; Vdovichev, S.N.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated remagnetization processes in ferromagnetic nanoparticles under inhomogeneous magnetic field induced by the tip of magnetic force microscope (MFM) in both theoretical and empirical ways. Systematic MFM observations were carried out on arrays of submicron-sized elliptical ferromagnetic particles of Co and FeCr with different sizes and periods. It clearly reveals the distribution of remanent magnetization and processes of local remagnetization of individual ferromagnetic particles. Modeling of remagnetization processes in ferromagnetic nanoparticles under magnetic field induced by MFM probe was performed on the base of Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for magnetization. MFM-induced inhomogeneous magnetic field is very effective to control the magnetic state of individual ferromagnetic nanoparticles as well as to create different distribution of magnetic field in array of ferromagnetic nanoparticles

  6. Phase space of positron trajectories exiting a charged particle source through a magnetic field point cusp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiester, A.S.; Pacheco, J.L.; Ordonez, C.A.; Weathers, D.L.

    2014-01-01

    A configuration of magnetic fields using properties of cylindrically symmetric permanent magnets is presented as a candidate to produce a high purity charged particle source or trap. Cylindrically symmetric hollow permanent magnets produce magnetic field point cusps on the axis of symmetry. A magnetic field point cusp reflects all particles that lie outside a narrow region of phase space, a region dependent on particle kinetic energies and on the magnetic field intensity. An analysis of the phase space of positron trajectories entering and exiting a magnetic field point cusp is presented and quantified with respect to magnetic field intensity and particle kinetic energy. Preliminary experimental results support the use of point cusps for ion source applications

  7. Influence of the shear flow on electron cyclotron resonance plasma confinement in an axisymmetric magnetic mirror trap of the electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izotov, I. V.; Razin, S. V.; Sidorov, A. V.; Skalyga, V. A.; Zorin, V. G.; Bagryansky, P. A.; Beklemishev, A. D.; Prikhodko, V. V.

    2012-01-01

    Influence of shear flows of the dense plasma created under conditions of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) gas breakdown on the plasma confinement in the axisymmetric mirror trap (''vortex'' confinement) was studied experimentally and theoretically. A limiter with bias potential was set inside the mirror trap for plasma rotation. The limiter construction and the optimal value of the potential were chosen according to the results of the preliminary theoretical analysis. This method of ''vortex'' confinement realization in an axisymmetric mirror trap for non-equilibrium heavy-ion plasmas seems to be promising for creation of ECR multicharged ion sources with high magnetic fields, more than 1 T.

  8. Fringing field measurement of dipole magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Hongyou; Jiang Weisheng; Mao Naifeng; Mao Xingwang

    1985-01-01

    The fringing field of a dipole magnet with a C-type circuit and homogeneous field in the gap has been measured including the distributions of fringing fields with and without magnetic shield. The measured data was analyzed by using the concept of virtual field boundary

  9. Magnetization of the joint-free high temperature superconductor (RE)Ba2Cu3Ox coil by field cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yali; Wang, Yawei; Li, Jianwei; Jin, Zhijian

    2017-09-01

    Joint-free (RE)Ba2Cu3Ox (REBCO) coil based on `wind-and-flip' technique has been developed to generate a persistent magnetic field without power supply. This paper is to study the magnetization characteristics of the joint-free REBCO coil by field cooling, in order to trap higher field. A joint-free pancake coil is wound by REBCO tapes and the field cooling magnetization test is performed on it. An approximate numerical model based on H-formulation is built for this coil to analyze its magnetization behavior, which is validated by the experimental results Analysis show that a persistent direct current is induced in the coil during the field cooling operation, which generates the trapped field. The induced current of the joint-free coil shows an intrinsic non-uniform distribution among turns. Increasing the magnetization field and critical current of REBCO conductors can considerably increase the trapped field. But the trapping factor (the rate of trapped field to background magnetization field) reaches a maximum value (60 % for the test coil). This maximum value is an intrinsic characteristics for a fabricated coil, which only depends on the coil's geometry structure. With a same usage of REBCO tapes, the trapping factor can be improved significantly by optimizing the coil structure to multiple pancakes, and it can approach 100 %.

  10. Magnetic field effects on microwave absorbing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Ira; Hollingsworth, Charles S.; Mckinney, Ted M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was to gather information to formulate a microwave absorber that can work in the presence of strong constant direct current (DC) magnetic fields. The program was conducted in four steps. The first step was to investigate the electrical and magnetic properties of magnetic and ferrite microwave absorbers in the presence of strong magnetic fields. This included both experimental measurements and a literature survey of properties that may be applicable to finding an appropriate absorbing material. The second step was to identify those material properties that will produce desirable absorptive properties in the presence of intense magnetic fields and determine the range of magnetic field in which the absorbers remain effective. The third step was to establish ferrite absorber designs that will produce low reflection and adequate absorption in the presence of intense inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. The fourth and final step was to prepare and test samples of such magnetic microwave absorbers if such designs seem practical.

  11. Strong and superstrong pulsed magnetic fields generation

    CERN Document Server

    Shneerson, German A; Krivosheev, Sergey I

    2014-01-01

    Strong pulsed magnetic fields are important for several fields in physics and engineering, such as power generation and accelerator facilities. Basic aspects of the generation of strong and superstrong pulsed magnetic fields technique are given, including the physics and hydrodynamics of the conductors interacting with the field as well as an account of the significant progress in generation of strong magnetic fields using the magnetic accumulation technique. Results of computer simulations as well as a survey of available field technology are completing the volume.

  12. Trapping of particles by the leakage of a standing wave ultrasonic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanyan; Hu, Junhui

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents a method of trapping particles by the acoustic leakage from a low frequency standing wave ultrasonic field. The standing wave ultrasonic field is generated in a triangular air gap between two vibrating V-shaped metal strips. Particles are trapped to the lower outlet of the standing wave ultrasonic field. The acoustic radiation force acting on the particles in this method is opposite to the direction of the acoustic leakage. Particles such as medicine pills with a weight up to 256 mg per particle can be trapped. A physical model is developed to analyze the trapping phenomena. The effects of the vibration displacement amplitude at the tip of the V-shaped metal strip, particle's shape and weight, and size of standing wave ultrasonic field on the trapping capability are investigated theoretically and experimentally.

  13. Exploring Magnetic Fields with a Compass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunk, Brandon; Beichner, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A compass is an excellent classroom tool for the exploration of magnetic fields. Any student can tell you that a compass is used to determine which direction is north, but when paired with some basic trigonometry, the compass can be used to actually measure the strength of the magnetic field due to a nearby magnet or current-carrying wire. In this…

  14. Deformation of Water by a Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zijun; Dahlberg, E. Dan

    2011-01-01

    After the discovery that superconducting magnets could levitate diamagnetic objects, researchers became interested in measuring the repulsion of diamagnetic fluids in strong magnetic fields, which was given the name "The Moses Effect." Both for the levitation experiments and the quantitative studies on liquids, the large magnetic fields necessary…

  15. Accurate method of the magnetic field measurement of quadrupole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumada, M.; Sakai, I.; Someya, H.; Sasaki, H.

    1983-01-01

    We present an accurate method of the magnetic field measurement of the quadrupole magnet. The method of obtaining the information of the field gradient and the effective focussing length is given. A new scheme to obtain the information of the skew field components is also proposed. The relative accuracy of the measurement was 1 x 10 -4 or less. (author)

  16. Metal oxide-graphene field-effect transistor: interface trap density extraction model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faraz Najam

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A simple to implement model is presented to extract interface trap density of graphene field effect transistors. The presence of interface trap states detrimentally affects the device drain current–gate voltage relationship Ids–Vgs. At the moment, there is no analytical method available to extract the interface trap distribution of metal-oxide-graphene field effect transistor (MOGFET devices. The model presented here extracts the interface trap distribution of MOGFET devices making use of available experimental capacitance–gate voltage Ctot–Vgs data and a basic set of equations used to define the device physics of MOGFET devices. The model was used to extract the interface trap distribution of 2 experimental devices. Device parameters calculated using the extracted interface trap distribution from the model, including surface potential, interface trap charge and interface trap capacitance compared very well with their respective experimental counterparts. The model enables accurate calculation of the surface potential affected by trap charge. Other models ignore the effect of trap charge and only calculate the ideal surface potential. Such ideal surface potential when used in a surface potential based drain current model will result in an inaccurate prediction of the drain current. Accurate calculation of surface potential that can later be used in drain current model is highlighted as a major advantage of the model.

  17. Electrolytic tiltmeters inside magnetic fields: Some observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J.M.; Calvo, E.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M.I.; Luque, J.M.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J.C.; Yuste, C.; Calderon, A.; Garcia-Moral, L.A.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F.J.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Arbol, P.; Scodellaro, L.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto, A.L.

    2007-01-01

    We present observations of the electrolytic clinometers behaviour inside magnetic field environments introducing phenomenological expressions to account for the measured output voltage variations as functions of field gradients and field strengths

  18. Improving the magnetic field homogeneity by varying magnetic field structure in a geophone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Li; Wang, Wentao; Yao, Zhenjing; Gao, Qiang; Han, Zhiming

    2018-01-01

    The magnetic field structure is a key factor that affects performance of the magneto-electric geophone. In order to enhance the magnetic field homogeneity and magnetic induction intensity of the magnetic field structure, this paper proposes a new magnetic field structure. It consists of two cylindrical permanent magnets: an H-type magnetic boot and an external magnetic yoke. The proposed magnetic field structure can broaden the range of a uniform magnetic field and increase the magnetic field intensity of working air-gap. To confirm the validity of the design, the finite element analysis and real measurement experiments were conducted. The finite element simulations using the ANASYS Electromagnetics Suite 17.2.0 showed that the air-gap magnetic induction intensity is increased and the work space with a uniform magnetic field is broadened. Meanwhile, the output voltage of the coil is increased, and the harmonic distortion rate of output voltage is reduced. According to the real measurement experimental results, compared with the traditional magnetic field structure, the uniform range of the magnetic field is improved 23% in the entire air-gap path, and the magnetic induction intensity enhances 24% over the proposed new magnetic field structure.

  19. Generating the optimal magnetic field for magnetic refrigeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Insinga, Andrea Roberto; Smith, Anders

    2016-01-01

    In a magnetic refrigeration device the magnet is the single most expensive component, and therefore it is crucially important to ensure that an effective magnetic field as possible is generated using the least amount of permanent magnets. Here we present a method for calculating the optimal...... in the optimal segmentation, for any number of segments specified. These two methods are used to determine the optimal magnet design of a 12-piece, two-pole concentric cylindrical magnet for use in a continuously rotating magnetic refrigeration device....

  20. Investigations on magnetic field induced optical transparency in magnetic nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Dillip Kumar; Philip, John

    2018-02-01

    We study the magnetic field induced optical transparency and its origin in magnetic nanoemulsion of droplets of average size ∼200 nm containing superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Beyond a certain volume fraction (Φ > 0.0021) of magnetic nanoemulsion and a critical magnetic field (Hc1), the transmitted light intensity increases drastically and reaches a maximum at another critical magnetic field (Hc2), beyond which the transmitted light intensity decreases and reaches a plateau. Interestingly, the transmitted light intensity at Hc2 is found to increase linearly with Φ and the critical magnetic fields Hc1 and Hc2 follow power law decay with Φ (i.e. Hc ∼ Φ-x), with exponents 0.48 and 0.27, respectively. The light intensity recovers to its initial value when the magnetic field is switched off, indicating the perfect reversibility of the field induced transparency process. The observed straight line scattered patterns above Hc2, on a screen placed perpendicular to the incident beam, confirms the formation of rod like anisotropic nanostructures perpendicular to the direction of light propagation. The magneto-optical measurements in the emulsion confirm that the observed field induced transparency in magnetic emulsions for Φ > 0.0021 is due to the optical birefringence caused by the rod like nanostructures. The reduced birefringence is found to be proportional to the square of the applied magnetic field. This finding offers several possibilities in using magnetic nanofluids in tunable optical devices.

  1. Progress toward magnetic confinement of a positron-electron plasma: nearly 100% positron injection efficiency into a dipole trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneking, Matthew

    2017-10-01

    The hydrogen atom provides the simplest system and in some cases the most precise one for comparing theory and experiment in atomics physics. The field of plasma physics lacks an experimental counterpart, but there are efforts underway to produce a magnetically confined positron-electron plasma that promises to represent the simplest plasma system. The mass symmetry of positron-electron plasma makes it particularly tractable from a theoretical standpoint and many theory papers have been published predicting modified wave and stability properties in these systems. Our approach is to utilize techniques from the non-neutral plasma community to trap and accumulate electrons and positrons prior to mixing in a magnetic trap with good confinement properties. Ultimately we aim to use a levitated superconducting dipole configuration fueled by positrons from a reactor-based positron source and buffer-gas trap. To date we have conducted experiments to characterize and optimize the positron beam and test strategies for injecting positrons into the field of a supported permanent magnet by use of ExB drifts and tailored static and dynamic potentials applied to boundary electrodes and to the magnet itself. Nearly 100% injection efficiency has been achieved under certain conditions and some fraction of the injected positrons are confined for as long as 400 ms. These results are promising for the next step in the project which is to use an inductively energized high Tc superconducting coil to produce the dipole field, initially in a supported configuration, but ultimately levitated using feedback stabilization. Work performed with the support of the German Research Foundation (DFG), JSPS KAKENHI, NIFS Collaboration Research Program, and the UCSD Foundation.

  2. Dynamic shielding of the magnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAU, M.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a comparative study of the methods used to control and compensate the direct and alternative magnetic fields. Two frequently used methods in the electromagnetic compatibility of the complex biomagnetism installations were analyzed. The two methods refer to the use of inductive magnetic field sensors (only for alternative fields and of fluxgate magnetometers as active transducers which measures both the direct and alternative components of the magnetic field. The applications of the dynamic control of the magnetic field are: control of the magnetic field of the military ships, control of parasite magnetic field produced by power transformers and the electrical networks, protection of the mass spectrometers, electronic microscopes, SQUID and optical pumping magnetometers for applications in biomagnetism.

  3. Tripolar electric field Structure in guide field magnetic reconnection

    OpenAIRE

    S. Fu; S. Huang; M. Zhou; B. Ni; X. Deng

    2018-01-01

    It has been shown that the guide field substantially modifies the structure of the reconnection layer. For instance, the Hall magnetic and electric fields are distorted in guide field reconnection compared to reconnection without guide fields (i.e., anti-parallel reconnection). In this paper, we performed 2.5-D electromagnetic full particle simulation to study the electric field structures in magnetic reconnection under different initial guide fields (Bg). Once the amplit...

  4. Magnetic field measurements of the superEBIS superconducting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herschcovitch, A.; Kponou, A.; Clipperton, R.; Hensel, W.; Usack, F.

    1994-01-01

    SuperEBIS was designed to have a solenoidal magnetic field of a 5 Tesla strength with a 120 cm long bore. The field was specified to be straight within 1 part in 10000 within the bore, and uniform to within 1 part in 1000 within the central 90 cm. Magnetic field measurements were performed with a computerized magnetic field measuring setup that was borrowed from W. Sampson's group. A preliminary test was made of a scheme to determine if the magnetic and mechanical axes of the solenoid coincided, and, if not, by how much

  5. Field free line magnetic particle imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Erbe, Marlitt

    2014-01-01

    Marlitt Erbe provides a detailed introduction into the young research field of Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) and field free line (FFL) imaging in particular. She derives a mathematical description of magnetic field generation for FFL imaging in MPI. To substantiate the simulation studies on magnetic FFL generation with a proof-of-concept, the author introduces the FFL field demonstrator, which provides the world's first experimentally generated rotated and translated magnetic FFL field complying with the requirements for FFL reconstruction. Furthermore, she proposes a scanner design of consi

  6. Evolution of coronal and interplanetary magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    Numerous studies have provided the detailed information necessary for a substantive synthesis of the empirical relation between the magnetic field of the sun and the structure of the interplanetary field. The author points out the latest techniques and studies of the global solar magnetic field and its relation to the interplanetary field. The potential to overcome most of the limitations of present methods of analysis exists in techniques of modelling the coronal magnetic field using observed solar data. Such empirical models are, in principle, capable of establishing the connection between a given heliospheric point and its magnetically-connected photospheric point, as well as the physical basis for the connection. (Auth.)

  7. Pulsed-Field Magnetization Properties of Bulk Superconductors by Employment of Vortex-Type Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Z.; Shinohara, N.; Miki, M.; Felder, B.; Tsuzuki, K.; Watasaki, M.; Kawabe, S.; Taguchi, R.; Izumi, M.

    Vortex-type magnetizing coils are gaining more and more attention to activate bulk superconductors in pulsed-field magnetization (PFM) studies, compared with solenoid-type ones. Following existing reports, we present experimental results of the different penetration patterns of magnetic flux between the two kinds of coils. It was found that the magnetic flux will primarily penetrate inside the bulk from the upper and lower surfaces by using vortex coils, rather than from the periphery in the case of solenoid coils. Moreover, the bulk submitted to a small pulsed-field excitation exhibits a similar field profile as the excitation field (convex or concave shape); a phenomenon named field memory effect. The use of vortex- or solenoid-type coils in PFM will pose an influence on the initial flux penetration patterns during the flux trapping processes, but both coils can finally excite the best conical trapped field shape of the bulk.

  8. Cosmic Rays in Intermittent Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukurov, Anvar; Seta, Amit; Bushby, Paul J.; Wood, Toby S. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Snodin, Andrew P., E-mail: a.seta1@ncl.ac.uk, E-mail: amitseta90@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Applied Science, King Mongkut’s University of Technology North Bangkok, Bangkok 10800 (Thailand)

    2017-04-10

    The propagation of cosmic rays in turbulent magnetic fields is a diffusive process driven by the scattering of the charged particles by random magnetic fluctuations. Such fields are usually highly intermittent, consisting of intense magnetic filaments and ribbons surrounded by weaker, unstructured fluctuations. Studies of cosmic-ray propagation have largely overlooked intermittency, instead adopting Gaussian random magnetic fields. Using test particle simulations, we calculate cosmic-ray diffusivity in intermittent, dynamo-generated magnetic fields. The results are compared with those obtained from non-intermittent magnetic fields having identical power spectra. The presence of magnetic intermittency significantly enhances cosmic-ray diffusion over a wide range of particle energies. We demonstrate that the results can be interpreted in terms of a correlated random walk.

  9. Magnetic field mapper based on rotating coils

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2087244; Arpaia, Pasquale

    This thesis presents a magnetic field mapper based on rotating coils. The requirements, the architecture, the conceptual design, and the prototype for straight magnets were shown. The proposed system is made up of a rotating coil transducer and a train-like system for longitudinal motion and positioning inside magnet bore. The mapper allows a localized measurement of magnetic fields and the variation of the harmonic multipole content in the magnet ends. The proof-of-principle demonstration and the experimental characterization of the rotating-coil transducer specifically conceived for mapping validated the main objective of satisfying the magnetic measurement needs of the next generation of compact accelerators.

  10. High magnetic fields science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Miura, Noboru

    2003-01-01

    This three-volume book provides a comprehensive review of experiments in very strong magnetic fields that can only be generated with very special magnets. The first volume is entirely devoted to the technology of laboratory magnets: permanent, superconducting, high-power water-cooled and hybrid; pulsed magnets, both nondestructive and destructive (megagauss fields). Volumes 2 and 3 contain reviews of the different areas of research where strong magnetic fields are an essential research tool. These volumes deal primarily with solid-state physics; other research areas covered are biological syst

  11. Laser-cooling and electromagnetic trapping of neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, W.D.; Migdall, A.L.; Metcalf, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    Until recently it has been impossible to confine and trap neutral atoms using electromagnetic fields. While many proposals for such traps exist, the small potential energy depth of the traps and the high kinetic energy of available atoms prevented trapping. We review various schemes for atom trapping, the advances in laser cooling of atomic beams which have now made trapping possible, and the successful magnetic trapping of cold sodium atoms

  12. DC-based magnetic field controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotter, Dale K.; Rankin, Richard A.; Morgan, John P,.

    1994-01-01

    A magnetic field controller for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage.

  13. Charged particle traps physics and techniques of charged particle field confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Major, Fouad G; Werth, Günther

    2005-01-01

    This book provides an introduction and guide to modern advances in charged particle (and antiparticle) confinement by electromagnetic fields. Confinement in different trap geometries, the influence of trap imperfections, classical and quantum mechanical description of the trapped particle motion, different methods of ion cooling to low temperatures, and non-neutral plasma properties (including Coulomb crystals) are the main subjects. They form the basis of such applications of charged particle traps as high-resolution optical and microwave spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, atomic clocks, and, potentially, quantum computing

  14. Demagnetizing fields in active magnetic regenerators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Bahl, Christian R.H.; Smith, Anders

    2014-01-01

    A magnetic material in an externally applied magnetic field will in general experience a spatially varying internal magnetic field due to demagnetizing effects. When the performance of active magnetic regenerators (AMRs) is evaluated using numerical models the internal field is often assumed...... is in general both a function of the overall shape of the regenerator and its morphology (packed particles, parallel plates etc.) as well as the magnetization of the material. Due to the pronounced temperature dependence of the magnetization near the Curie temperature, the demagnetization field is also...... temperature dependent. We propose a relatively straightforward method to correct sufficiently for the demagnetizing field in AMR models. We discuss how the demagnetizing field behaves in regenerators made of packed spheres under realistic operation conditions....

  15. Magnetic field sensor for isotropically sensing an incident magnetic field in a sensor plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Bharat B. (Inventor); Wan, Hong (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A magnetic field sensor that isotropically senses an incident magnetic field. This is preferably accomplished by providing a magnetic field sensor device that has one or more circular shaped magnetoresistive sensor elements for sensing the incident magnetic field. The magnetoresistive material used is preferably isotropic, and may be a CMR material or some form of a GMR material. Because the sensor elements are circular in shape, shape anisotropy is eliminated. Thus, the resulting magnetic field sensor device provides an output that is relatively independent of the direction of the incident magnetic field in the sensor plane.

  16. Transient Magnetic Field in a Conducting Cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zygmunt Piatek

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper we determine the transient magnetic field in a conducting cylinder placed in external longitudinal sine-shaped magnetic field using the solution of Bessell equation in cylindrical co-ordinates, and also applying integral Laplace transformations, attenuation and diffusion of the magnetic field strength in the cylinder. The resulting equations can be used to describe volume density of the power lost in the cylinder and to determine substitute parameters of the inductor-cylindrical work system.

  17. Novel Electrochemical Phenomena in Magnetic Fields(Research in High Magnetic Fields)

    OpenAIRE

    Mogi, Iwao; Kamiko, Masao

    1996-01-01

    Recent two topics are given of electrochemical studies in steady magnetic fields at the High Field Laboratory of Tohoku University. One is the magnetic-field-induced diffusion-limited-aggregation in the pattern formation of silver electrodeposits . The other is the magnetic field effect on the learning effect in a dopant-exchange process of an organic conducting polymer polypyrrole.

  18. Strongly Interacting Matter in Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Shijun; Wu, Youjia; Zhuang, Pengfei

    Inverse magnetic catalysis effect on the chiral phase transition is investigated in the frame of SU(2) NJL model with Pauli-Villars regularization scheme. We consider two scenarios, the chiral chemical potential μ5 caused by sphalerons and magnetic inhibition of mesons π0. With different chiral chemical potential, we always obtain magnetic catalysis in the mean field calculation, due to the enhancement of Fermi surface of the pairing fermions by μ5. On the other hand, when going beyond the mean field approximation by including the feed-down from mesons to quarks, the competition between the magnetic catalysis effect of quarks and magnetic inhibition effect of mesons leads to the transition from inverse magnetic catalysis to delayed magnetic catalysis with increasing magnetic field.

  19. Minimizing magnetic fields for precision experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altarev, I.; Fierlinger, P.; Lins, T.; Marino, M. G.; Nießen, B.; Petzoldt, G.; Reisner, M.; Stuiber, S.; Sturm, M.; Taggart Singh, J.; Taubenheim, B.; Rohrer, H. K.; Schläpfer, U.

    2015-06-01

    An increasing number of measurements in fundamental and applied physics rely on magnetically shielded environments with sub nano-Tesla residual magnetic fields. State of the art magnetically shielded rooms (MSRs) consist of up to seven layers of high permeability materials in combination with highly conductive shields. Proper magnetic equilibration is crucial to obtain such low magnetic fields with small gradients in any MSR. Here, we report on a scheme to magnetically equilibrate MSRs with a 10 times reduced duration of the magnetic equilibration sequence and a significantly lower magnetic field with improved homogeneity. For the search of the neutron's electric dipole moment, our finding corresponds to a 40% improvement of the statistical reach of the measurement. However, this versatile procedure can improve the performance of any MSR for any application.

  20. Magnetic field measurements and mapping techniques

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    These lectures will present an overview of the most common techniques used for the measurement of magnetic field in accelerator magnets. The formalism for a harmonic description of the magnetic field will be presented, including a discussion of harmonics allowed under various types of symmetries in the magnet. The harmonic coil technique for measurement of field harmonics will be covered in depth. Using examples from recent projects, magnetic measurements will be shown to be a powerful tool for monitoring magnet production. Measurements of magnetic axis using extensions of the harmonic coil technique, as well as other techniques, such as the colloidal cell and stretched wire, will be covered. Topics of interest in superconducting magnets, such as time decay and snapback, requiring relatively fast measurements of the harmonics, will also be described.

  1. Investigation on stresses of superconductors under pulsed magnetic fields based on multiphysics model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaobin, E-mail: yangxb@lzu.edu.cn; Li, Xiuhong; He, Yafeng; Wang, Xiaojun; Xu, Bo

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • The differential equation including temperature and magnetic field was derived for a long cylindrical superconductor. • Thermal stress and electromagnetic stress were studied at the same time under pulse field magnetizing. • The distributions of the magnetic field, the temperature and stresses are studied and compared for two pulse fields of the different duration. • The Role thermal stress and electromagnetic stress play in the process of pulse field magnetizing is discussed. - Abstract: A multiphysics model for the numerical computation of stresses, trapped field and temperature distribution of a infinite long superconducting cylinder is proposed, based on which the stresses, including the thermal stresses and mechanical stresses due to Lorentz force, and trapped fields in the superconductor subjected to pulsed magnetic fields are analyzed. By comparing the results under pulsed magnetic fields with different pulse durations, it is found that the both the mechanical stress due to the electromagnetic force and the thermal stress due to temperature gradient contribute to the total stress level in the superconductor. For pulsed magnetic field with short durations, the thermal stress is the dominant contribution to the total stress, because the heat generated by AC-loss builds up significant temperature gradient in such short durations. However, for a pulsed field with a long duration the gradient of temperature and flux, as well as the maximal tensile stress, are much smaller. And the results of this paper is meaningful for the design and manufacture of superconducting permanent magnets.

  2. Operating a magnetic nozzle helicon thruster with strong magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Kazunori, E-mail: kazunori@ecei.tohoku.ac.jp; Komuro, Atsushi; Ando, Akira [Department of Electrical Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    A pulsed axial magnetic field up to ∼2.8 kG is applied to a 26-mm-inner-diameter helicon plasma thruster immersed in a vacuum chamber, and the thrust is measured using a pendulum target. The pendulum is located 30-cm-downstream of the thruster, and the thruster rf power and argon flow rate are fixed at 1 kW and 70 sccm (which gives a chamber pressure of 0.7 mTorr). The imparted thrust increases as the applied magnetic field is increased and saturates at a maximum value of ∼9.5 mN for magnetic field above ∼2 kG. At the maximum magnetic field, it is demonstrated that the normalized plasma density, and the ion flow energy in the magnetic nozzle, agree within ∼50% and of 10%, respectively, with a one-dimensional model that ignores radial losses from the nozzle. This magnetic nozzle model is combined with a simple global model of the thruster source that incorporates an artificially controlled factor α, to account for radial plasma losses to the walls, where α = 0 and 1 correspond to zero losses and no magnetic field, respectively. Comparison between the experiments and the model implies that the radial losses in the thruster source are experimentally reduced by the applied magnetic field to about 10% of that obtained from the no magnetic field model.

  3. Magnetic field and magnetic isotope effects on photochemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakasa, Masanobu

    1999-01-01

    By at present exact experiments and the theoretical analysis, it was clear that the magnetic field less than 2 T affected a radical pair reaction and biradical reaction. The radical pair life and the dissipative radical yield showed the magnetic field effects on chemical reactions. The radical pair mechanism and the triplet mechanism were known as the mechanism of magnetic field effects. The radical pair mechanism consists of four mechanisms such as the homogeneous hyperfine interaction (HFC), the delta-g mechanism, the relaxation mechanism and the level cross mechanism. In order to observe the magnetic effects of the radical pair mechanism, two conditions need, namely, the recombination rate of singlet radical pair > the dissipation rate and the spin exchange rate > the dissipation rate. A nanosecond laser photo-decomposition equipment can observe the magnetic field effects. The inversion phenomena of magnetic field effect, isolation of the relaxation mechanism and the delta-g mechanism, the magnetic field effect of heavy metal radical reaction, the magnetic field effect in homogeneous solvent, saturation of delta-g mechanism are explained. The succeeded examples of isotope concentration by the magnetic isotope effect are 17 O, 19 Si, 33 S, 73 Ge and 235 U. (S.Y.)

  4. Ferroelectric Cathodes in Transverse Magnetic Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander Dunaevsky; Yevgeny Raitses; Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2002-01-01

    Experimental investigations of a planar ferroelectric cathode in a transverse magnetic field up to 3 kGs are presented. It is shown that the transverse magnetic field affects differently the operation of ferroelectric plasma cathodes in ''bright'' and ''dark'' modes in vacuum. In the ''bright'' mode, when the surface plasma is formed, the application of the transverse magnetic field leads to an increase of the surface plasma density. In the ''dark'' mode, the magnetic field inhibits the development of electron avalanches along the surface, as it does similarly in other kinds of surface discharges in the pre-breakdown mode

  5. Thermodynamical instabilities under strong magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. J.

    2017-03-01

    The thermodynamical instabilities of low densities in the n p matter and n p e matter are studied within several relativistic nuclear models under some values of magnetic fields. The results are compared between each other and the effects of the symmetry energy slope at saturation density on the instability are investigated. The instability regions can exhibit bands due to the presence of Landau levels for very strong magnetic fields of the order of 1017 G, while for weaker magnetic fields, the bands are replaced by many diffused or scattered pieces. It also shows that the proton fraction in the inner crust of neutron stars may be complex under strong magnetic fields.

  6. The strongest magnetic fields in the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, A; Falanga, M; Lyutikov, M; Mereghetti, S; Piran, T; Treumann, RA

    2016-01-01

    This volume extends the ISSI series on magnetic fields in the Universe into the domain of what are by far the strongest fields in the Universe, and stronger than any field that could be produced on Earth. The chapters describe the magnetic fields in non-degenerate strongly magnetized stars, degenerate stars (such as white dwarfs and neutron stars), exotic members called magnetars, and in their environments, as well as magnetic fields in the environments of black holes. These strong fields have a profound effect on the behavior of matter, visible in particular in highly variable processes like radiation in all known wavelengths, including Gamma-Ray bursts. The generation and structure of such strong magnetic fields and effects on the environment are also described.

  7. Response of Magnetic Force Microscopy Probes under AC Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungthong, A.; Ruksasakchai, P.; Saengkaew, K.; Cheowanish, I.; Damrongsak, B.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) probes with different coating materials were characterized under AC magnetic field. A perpendicular magnetic write head similar to those used in hard disk drives was employed as the AC magnetic field generator. In order to measure a response of MFM probes to AC magnetic field, a MFM probe under test was scanned, at a scan height of 10 nm, across the surface of the magnetic write head. During MFM imaging, the write head was biased by a sufficient magnitude of AC current, approximately 30 mA. A spectral analysis for a frequency sweep from 1 kHz to 100 MHz was extracted from post-processing MFM images. As expected, a MFM probe coated with hard magnetic alloys, i.e. FePt, has the lowest response to AC magnetic fields. MFM probes coated with soft magnetic alloys, i.e. NiFe and NiCoCr, have a relatively high and flat response across the frequency range. Ni coated MFM probe has the highest response to AC magnetic fields. In addition, CoCr and NiCo coated MFM probes show lower response than NiFe and NiCoCr probes at low frequencies; however, theirs response to AC magnetic field increase for the AC magnetic field with a frequency above 50 kHz. This can be implied that those MFM probes are a good candidate for being used to study the high-frequency performance of perpendicular magnetic write heads. Noting that response of all MFM probes significantly decreased when driven frequencies above 1 MHz due to the limitation of the hardware, i.e. response of quadrant photodiode and op-amp in a pre-amplifier.

  8. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  9. NMR magnetic field controller for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheler, G.; Anacker, M.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance controller for magnetic fields, which can also be used for pulsed NMR investigations, is described. A longtime stability of 10 -7 is achieved. The control signal is generated by a modified time sharing circuit with resonance at the first side band of the 2 H signal. An exact calibration of the magnetic field is achieved by the variation of the H 1 - or of the time-sharing frequency. (author)

  10. Solar Force-free Magnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wiegelmann

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The structure and dynamics of the solar corona is dominated by the magnetic field. In most areas in the corona magnetic forces are so dominant that all non-magnetic forces like plasma pressure gradient and gravity can be neglected in the lowest order. This model assumption is called the force-free field assumption, as the Lorentz force vanishes. This can be obtained by either vanishing electric currents (leading to potential fields or the currents are co-aligned with the magnetic field lines. First we discuss a mathematically simpler approach that the magnetic field and currents are proportional with one global constant, the so-called linear force-free field approximation. In the generic case, however, the relation between magnetic fields and electric currents is nonlinear and analytic solutions have been only found for special cases, like 1D or 2D configurations. For constructing realistic nonlinear force-free coronal magnetic field models in 3D, sophisticated numerical computations are required and boundary conditions must be obtained from measurements of the magnetic field vector in the solar photosphere. This approach is currently of large interests, as accurate measurements of the photospheric field become available from ground-based (for example SOLIS and space-born (for example Hinode and SDO instruments. If we can obtain accurate force-free coronal magnetic field models we can calculate the free magnetic energy in the corona, a quantity which is important for the prediction of flares and coronal mass ejections. Knowledge of the 3D structure of magnetic field lines also help us to interpret other coronal observations, e.g., EUV images of the radiating coronal plasma.

  11. Induced magnetic-field effects in inductively coupled plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.H.; Rognlien, T.D.

    1995-01-01

    In inductive plasma sources, the rapid spatial decay of the electric field arising from the skin effect produces a large radio frequency (RF) magnetic field via Faraday's law. We previously determined that this magnetic field leads to a reduction of the electron density in the skin region, as well as a reduction in the collisionless heating rate. The electron deficit leads to the formation of an electrostatic potential which pulls electrons in to restore quasineutrality. Here we calculate the electron density including both the induced and electrostatic fields. If the wave frequency is not too low, the ions respond only to the averaged fields, and hence the electrostatic field is oscillatory, predominantly at the second harmonic of the applied field. We calculate the potential required to establish a constant electron density, and compare with numerical orbit-code calculations. For times short compared to ion transit times, the quasineutral density is just the initial ion density. For timescales long enough that the ions can relax, the density profile can be found from the solution of fluid equations with an effective (ponderomotive-like) potential added. Although the time-varying electrostatic potential is an extra source of heating, the net effect of the induced magnetic and electrostatic fields through trapping, early turning, and direct heating is a significant reduction in collisionless heating for parameters of interest

  12. Spectroscopy of Charge Carriers and Traps in Field-Doped Single Crystal Organic Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaoyang [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Frisbie, Daniel [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2017-03-31

    The proposed research aims to achieve quantitative, molecular level understanding of charge carriers and traps in field-doped crystalline organic semiconductors via in situ linear and nonlinear optical spectroscopy, in conjunction with transport measurements and molecular/crystal engineering.

  13. Structure of magnetic field in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, M.V.A.P.; Caldas, I.L.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic surfaces, necessary to plasma confinement, can be extinguished by resonant helical perturbations with small intensities due to plasma oscillations or external helical currents. The mapping of magnetic field is obtained intergrating numerically the differential equation of its lines. Criteria which evaluate the chaotic distribution of lines between resonant magnetic islands are presented. (M.C.K.) [pt

  14. Molecular nanomagnet in periodic magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinitsyn, N.A.

    2002-01-01

    The behavior of molecular nanomagnets in periodic magnetic field transverse to the easy axis direction is investigated. It is shown that at sufficiently strong field the tunneling time can be considerably reduced

  15. Tripolar electric field Structure in guide field magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Song; Huang, Shiyong; Zhou, Meng; Ni, Binbin; Deng, Xiaohua

    2018-03-01

    It has been shown that the guide field substantially modifies the structure of the reconnection layer. For instance, the Hall magnetic and electric fields are distorted in guide field reconnection compared to reconnection without guide fields (i.e., anti-parallel reconnection). In this paper, we performed 2.5-D electromagnetic full particle simulation to study the electric field structures in magnetic reconnection under different initial guide fields (Bg). Once the amplitude of a guide field exceeds 0.3 times the asymptotic magnetic field B0, the traditional bipolar Hall electric field is clearly replaced by a tripolar electric field, which consists of a newly emerged electric field and the bipolar Hall electric field. The newly emerged electric field is a convective electric field about one ion inertial length away from the neutral sheet. It arises from the disappearance of the Hall electric field due to the substantial modification of the magnetic field and electric current by the imposed guide field. The peak magnitude of this new electric field increases linearly with the increment of guide field strength. Possible applications of these results to space observations are also discussed.

  16. Control of magnetism by electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukura, Fumihiro; Tokura, Yoshinori; Ohno, Hideo

    2015-03-01

    The electrical manipulation of magnetism and magnetic properties has been achieved across a number of different material systems. For example, applying an electric field to a ferromagnetic material through an insulator alters its charge-carrier population. In the case of thin films of ferromagnetic semiconductors, this change in carrier density in turn affects the magnetic exchange interaction and magnetic anisotropy; in ferromagnetic metals, it instead changes the Fermi level position at the interface that governs the magnetic anisotropy of the metal. In multiferroics, an applied electric field couples with the magnetization through electrical polarization. This Review summarizes the experimental progress made in the electrical manipulation of magnetization in such materials, discusses our current understanding of the mechanisms, and finally presents the future prospects of the field.

  17. Magnetic isotope and magnetic field effects on the DNA synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchachenko, Anatoly L.; Orlov, Alexei P.; Kuznetsov, Dmitry A.; Breslavskaya, Natalia N.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic isotope and magnetic field effects on the rate of DNA synthesis catalysed by polymerases β with isotopic ions 24Mg2+, 25Mg2+ and 26Mg2+ in the catalytic sites were detected. No difference in enzymatic activity was found between polymerases β carrying 24Mg2+ and 26Mg2+ ions with spinless, non-magnetic nuclei 24Mg and 26Mg. However, 25Mg2+ ions with magnetic nucleus 25Mg were shown to suppress enzymatic activity by two to three times with respect to the enzymatic activity of polymerases β with 24Mg2+ and 26Mg2+ ions. Such an isotopic dependence directly indicates that in the DNA synthesis magnetic mass-independent isotope effect functions. Similar effect is exhibited by polymerases β with Zn2+ ions carrying magnetic 67Zn and non-magnetic 64Zn nuclei, respectively. A new, ion–radical mechanism of the DNA synthesis is suggested to explain these effects. Magnetic field dependence of the magnesium-catalysed DNA synthesis is in a perfect agreement with the proposed ion–radical mechanism. It is pointed out that the magnetic isotope and magnetic field effects may be used for medicinal purposes (trans-cranial magnetic treatment of cognitive deceases, cell proliferation, control of the cancer cells, etc). PMID:23851636

  18. Coulomb blockade induced by magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusmartsev, F.V.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the authors found that a Coulomb blockade can be induced by magnetic field. The authors illustrated this effect on the example of a ring consisting of two and many Josephson junctions. For the ring with two junctions we present an exact solution. The transition into Coulomb blockade state on a ring transforms into a linear array of Josephson junctions, although in latter case the effect of magnetic field disappears. In the state of Coulomb blockade the magnetization may be both diamagnetic and paramagnetic. The Coulomb blockade may also be removed by external magnetic field

  19. An application of random field theory to analysis of electron trapping sites in disordered media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilczer, M.; Bartczak, W.M.

    1993-01-01

    The potential energy surface in a disordered medium is considered a random field and described using the concepts of the mathematical theory of random fields. The preexisting traps for excess electrons are identified with certain regions of excursion (extreme regions) of the potential field. The theory provides an analytical method of statistical analysis of these regions. Parameters of the cavity-averaged potential field, which are provided by computer simulation of a given medium, serve as input data for the analysis. The statistics of preexisting traps are obtained for liquid methanol as a numerical example of the random field method. 26 refs., 6 figs

  20. Rotating artificial gauge magnetic and electric fields

    OpenAIRE

    Lembessis, V. E.; Alqarni, A.; Alshamari, S.; Siddig, A.; Aldossary, O. M.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the creation of artificial gauge magnetic and electric fields created when a two-level atom interacts with an optical Ferris wheel light field.These fields have the spatial structure of the optical Ferris wheel field intensity profile. If this optical field pattern is made to rotate in space then we have the creation of artificial electromagnetic fields which propagate in closed paths. The properties of such fields are presented and discussed

  1. Magnetic Fields at the Center of Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Philippe; Hui, Kaleonui; Goldman, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    In this note we synthesize and extend expressions for the magnetic field at the center of very short and very long current-carrying coils. Elementary physics textbooks present the following equation for the magnetic field inside a very long current-carrying coil (solenoid): B[subscript sol] = µ[subscript 0] (N/L) I, (1) where I is the current, N…

  2. Magnetic Field Strength Evaluation Yu. S. Yefimov

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Blazars—magnetic fields—polarimetry. 1. Introduction. It is known that blazar radiation consists of several components. In optical region synchrotron radiation produced by the moving of relativistic electrons in the mag- netic field of a jet dominates. Magnetic field controls practically all main physical processes in galaxies ...

  3. Hydrogen atom moving across a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozovik, Yu.E.; Volkov, S.Yu.

    2004-01-01

    A hydrogen atom moving across a magnetic field is considered in a wide region of magnitudes of magnetic field and atom momentum. We solve the Schroedinger equation of the system numerically using an imaginary time method and find wave functions of the lowest states of atom. We calculate the energy and the mean electron-nucleus separation as a function of atom momentum and magnetic field. All the results obtained could be summarized as a phase diagram on the 'atom-momentum - magnetic-field' plane. There are transformations of wave-function structure at critical values of atom momentum and magnetic field that result in a specific behavior of dependencies of energy and mean interparticle separation on the atom momentum P. We discuss a transition from the Zeeman regime to the high magnetic field regime. A qualitative analysis of the complicated behavior of wave functions vs P based on the effective potential examination is given. We analyze a sharp transition at the critical momentum from a Coulomb-type state polarized due to atom motion to a strongly decentered (Landau-type) state at low magnetic fields. A crossover occurring at intermediate magnetic fields is also studied

  4. Evolution of Neutron Star Magnetic Fields

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... This paper reviews the current status of the theoretical models of the evolution of the magnetic fields of neutron stars other than magnetars. It appears that the magnetic fields of neutron stars decay significantly only if they are in binary systems. Three major physical models for this, namely spindown-induced ...

  5. Earth magnetism a guided tour through magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, Wallace H

    2001-01-01

    An introductory guide to global magnetic field properties, Earth Magnetism addresses, in non-technical prose, many of the frequently asked questions about Earth''s magnetic field. Magnetism surrounds and penetrates our Earth in ways basic science courses can rarely address. It affects navigation, communication, and even the growth of crystals. As we observe and experience an 11-year solar maximum, we may witness spectacular satellite-destroying solar storms as they interact with our magnetic field. Written by an acknowledged expert in the field, this book will enrich courses in earth science, atmospheric science, geology, meteorology, geomagnetism, and geophysics. Contains nearly 200 original illustrations and eight pages of full-color plates.* Largely mathematics-free and with a wide breadth of material suitable for general readers* Integrates material from geomagnetism, paleomagnetism, and solar-terrestrial space physics.* Features nearly 200 original illustrations and 4 pages of colour plates

  6. Classical theory of electric and magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Good, Roland H

    1971-01-01

    Classical Theory of Electric and Magnetic Fields is a textbook on the principles of electricity and magnetism. This book discusses mathematical techniques, calculations, with examples of physical reasoning, that are generally applied in theoretical physics. This text reviews the classical theory of electric and magnetic fields, Maxwell's Equations, Lorentz Force, and Faraday's Law of Induction. The book also focuses on electrostatics and the general methods for solving electrostatic problems concerning images, inversion, complex variable, or separation of variables. The text also explains ma

  7. Parameterization and measurements of helical magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, W.; Okamura, M.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic fields with helical symmetry can be parameterized using multipole coefficients (a n , b n ). We present a parameterization that gives the familiar multipole coefficients (a n , b n ) for straight magnets when the helical wavelength tends to infinity. To measure helical fields all methods used for straight magnets can be employed. We show how to convert the results of those measurements to obtain the desired helical multipole coefficients (a n , b n )

  8. Mechanics of magnetic fluid column in strong magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polunin, V.M.; Ryapolov, P.A.; Platonov, V.B.

    2017-01-01

    Elastic-and magnetic properties of magnetic fluid confined by ponderomotive force in a tube fixed in horizontal position are considered. The system is placed in a strong magnetic field under the influence of external static and dynamic perturbations. An experimental setup has been developed. A theoretical basis of the processes of magnetic colloid elastic deformation has been proposed. The values of the static ponderomotive elasticity coefficient and the elasticity coefficient under dynamic action are experimentally determined. The calculations of the saturation magnetization for two magnetic fluid samples, carried out according to the equation containing the dynamic elasticity coefficient, are in good agreement with the experimental magnetization curve. The described method is of interest when studying magnetophoresis and aggregation of nanoparticles in magnetic colloids.

  9. Theoretical Interpretation of Cosmic Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhail, F. I.; Wanas, M. I.; Eid, A. M.

    1995-06-01

    The paper discusses the possibilty of interpreting the magnetic fields of astronomical bodies in the framework of a unified field theory. Using one of the solutions of the generalized field theory, a direct relation between the polar magnetic field, the angular velocity and the gravitational potential of the body considered, is obtained. The geometric model used for applications has spherical symmetry and is of the type (FIGI). The predictions of the theoretical formula, obtained from the model, are compared with available observational data, and with the empirical formula of Blackett. The theoretical formula gives a possible interpretation of a seed magnetic field which will develop and produce the large-scale magnetic field observed for celestial objects. The formula shows that the field is generated as a result of rotation of a massive object.

  10. Magnetic Helicity and Large Scale Magnetic Fields: A Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Eric G.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic fields of laboratory, planetary, stellar, and galactic plasmas commonly exhibit significant order on large temporal or spatial scales compared to the otherwise random motions within the hosting system. Such ordered fields can be measured in the case of planets, stars, and galaxies, or inferred indirectly by the action of their dynamical influence, such as jets. Whether large scale fields are amplified in situ or a remnant from previous stages of an object's history is often debated for objects without a definitive magnetic activity cycle. Magnetic helicity, a measure of twist and linkage of magnetic field lines, is a unifying tool for understanding large scale field evolution for both mechanisms of origin. Its importance stems from its two basic properties: (1) magnetic helicity is typically better conserved than magnetic energy; and (2) the magnetic energy associated with a fixed amount of magnetic helicity is minimized when the system relaxes this helical structure to the largest scale available. Here I discuss how magnetic helicity has come to help us understand the saturation of and sustenance of large scale dynamos, the need for either local or global helicity fluxes to avoid dynamo quenching, and the associated observational consequences. I also discuss how magnetic helicity acts as a hindrance to turbulent diffusion of large scale fields, and thus a helper for fossil remnant large scale field origin models in some contexts. I briefly discuss the connection between large scale fields and accretion disk theory as well. The goal here is to provide a conceptual primer to help the reader efficiently penetrate the literature.

  11. Orienting Paramecium with intense static magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valles, James M., Jr.; Guevorkian, Karine; Quindel, Carl

    2004-03-01

    Recent experiments on cell division suggest the application of intense static magnetic fields as a novel tool for the manipulation of biological systems [1]. The magnetic field appears to couple to the intrinsic anisotropies in the diamagnetic components of the cells. Here, we present measurements of the intrinsic average diamagnetic anisotropy of the whole single celled ciliate, Paramecium Caudatum. Magnetic fields, 2.5 T Paramecium Caudatum that were suspended in a density matched medium. The organisms align with their long axis parallel to the applied magnetic field. Their intrinsic diamagnetic anisotropy is 3x10-11 in cgs units. We will discuss the implications of these results for employing magnetic fields to probe the behavior of swimming Paramecium. [1] J. M. Valles, Jr. et al., Expt. Cell Res.274, 112-118 (2002).

  12. Probing Magnetic Fields of Early Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-06-01

    How do magnetic fields form and evolve in early galaxies? A new study has provided some clever observations to help us answer this question.The Puzzle of Growing FieldsDynamo theory is the primary model describing how magnetic fields develop in galaxies. In this picture, magnetic fields start out as weak seed fields that are small and unordered. These fields then become ordered and amplified by large-scale rotation and turbulence in galaxy disks and halos, eventually leading to the magnetic fields we observe in galaxies today.Schematic showinghow to indirectly measure protogalactic magnetic fields. The measured polarization of a background quasar is altered by the fields in a foreground protogalaxy. Click for a closer look! [Farnes et al. 2017/Adolf Schaller/STSCI/NRAO/AUI/NSF]To test this model, we need observations of the magnetic fields in young protogalaxies. Unfortunately, we dont have the sensitivity to be able to measure these fields directly but a team of scientists led by Jamie Farnes (Radboud University in the Netherlands) have come up with a creative alternative.The key is to find early protogalaxies that absorb the light of more distant background objects. If a protogalaxy lies between us and a distant quasar, then magnetic fields of the protogalaxy if present will affect the polarization measurements of the background quasar.Observing Galactic Building BlocksTop: Redshift distribution for the background quasars in the authors sample. Bottom: Redshift distribution for the foreground protogalaxies the authors are exploring. [Farnes et al. 2017]Farnes and collaborators examined two types of foreground protogalaxies: Damped Lyman-Alpha Absorbers (DLAs) and Lyman Limit Systems (LLSs). They obtained polarimetric data for a sample of 114 distant quasars with nothing in the foreground (the control sample), 19 quasars with DLAs in the foreground, and 27 quasars with LLSs in the foreground. They then used statistical analysis techniques to draw conclusions about

  13. Two populations of the solar magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obridko, V. N.; Livshits, I. M.; Sokoloff, D. D.

    2017-12-01

    Dynamo theory suggests that there are two types of solar dynamo, namely the conventional mean-field dynamo, which produces large- and small-scale magnetic fields involved in the activity cycle, and also the small-scale dynamo, which produces a cycle independent small-scale magnetic field. The relative contribution of the two mechanisms to solar magnetism remains a matter of scientific debate, which includes the opinion that the contribution of the small-scale dynamo is negligible. Here, we consider several tracers of magnetic activity that separate cycle-dependent contributions to the background solar magnetic field from those that are independent of the cycle. We call background fields the magnetic fields outside active regions and give further development of this concept. The main message of our paper is that background fields include two relative separate populations. The background fields with a strength up to 100 Mx cm-2 are very poorly correlated with the sunspot numbers and vary little with the phase of the cycle. In contrast, stronger magnetic fields demonstrate pronounced cyclic behaviour. We discuss how this result can be included in the above-mentioned concepts of solar dynamo studies.

  14. Line formation in microturbulent magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domke, H.; Pavlov, G.G.

    1979-01-01

    The formation of Zeeman lines in Gaussian microturbulent magnetic fields is considered assuming LTE. General formulae are derived for the local mean values of the transfer matrix elements. The cases of one-dimensional (longitudinal), isotropic, and two-dimensional (transversal) magnetic microturbulence are studied in some detail. Asymptotic formulae are given for small mean as well as for small microturbulent magnetic fields. Characteristic effects of magnetic microturbulence on the transfer coefficients are: (i) the broadening of the frequency contours, although only for the case of longitudinal Zeeman effect and longitudinal magnetic microturbulence this effect can be described analogous to Doppler broadening, (ii) the appearance of a pseudo-Zeeman structure for nonlongitudinal magnetic microturbulence, (iii) the reduction of maximal values of circular polarization, and (iv) the appearance of characteristic linear polarization effects due to the anisotropy of the magnetic microturbulence. Line contours and polarization of Zeeman triplets are computed for Milne-Eddington atmospheres. It is shown that magnetic intensification due to microturbulent magnetic fields may be much more efficient than that due to regular fields. The gravity center of a Zeeman line observed in circularly polarized light remains a reasonable measure of the line of sight component of the mean magnetic field for a line strength eta 0 < approx. 2. For saturated lines, the gravity center distance depends significantly on the magnetic microturbulence and its anisotropy. The influence of magnetic microturbulence on the ratio of longitudinal field magnetographic signals shows that unique conclusions about the magnetic microstructure can be drawn from the line ratio measurements only in combination with further spectroscopic data or physical reasoning. (orig.)

  15. Magnetic multipole induced zero-rotation frequency bounce-resonant loss in a Penning–Malmberg trap used for antihydrogen trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bray, C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jørgensen, L V; Kerrigan, S J; Keller, J; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2009-01-01

    In many antihydrogen trapping schemes, antiprotons held in a short-well Penning–Malmberg trap are released into a longer well. This process necessarily causes the bounce-averaged rotation frequency $\\overline{\\Omega}_r$ of the antiprotons around the trap axis to pass through zero. In the presence of a transverse magnetic multipole, experiments and simulations show that many antiprotons (over 30% in some cases) can be lost to a hitherto unidentified bounce-resonant process when $\\overline{\\Omega}_r$ is close to zero.

  16. A Penning trap for advanced studies with particles in extreme laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, M.; Quint, W.; Paulus, G.G.; Stöhlker, Th.

    2012-01-01

    We present a Penning trap as a tool for advanced studies of particles in extreme laser fields. Particularly, trap-specific manipulation techniques allow control over the confined particles’ localization and spatial density by use of trap electrodes as ‘electrostatic tweezers’ and by application of a ‘rotating wall’, respectively. It is thereby possible to select and prepare well-defined ion ensembles and to optimize the laser–particle interaction. Non-destructive detection of reaction educts and products with up to single-ion sensitivity supports advanced studies by maintaining the products for further studies at extended confinement times of minutes and above. The trap features endcaps with conical openings for applications with strongly focused lasers. We show that such a modification of a cylindrical trap is possible while harmonicity and tunability are maintained.

  17. A Penning trap for advanced studies with particles in extreme laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, M.; Quint, W.; Paulus, G. G.; Stöhlker, Th.

    2012-08-01

    We present a Penning trap as a tool for advanced studies of particles in extreme laser fields. Particularly, trap-specific manipulation techniques allow control over the confined particles' localization and spatial density by use of trap electrodes as 'electrostatic tweezers' and by application of a 'rotating wall', respectively. It is thereby possible to select and prepare well-defined ion ensembles and to optimize the laser-particle interaction. Non-destructive detection of reaction educts and products with up to single-ion sensitivity supports advanced studies by maintaining the products for further studies at extended confinement times of minutes and above. The trap features endcaps with conical openings for applications with strongly focused lasers. We show that such a modification of a cylindrical trap is possible while harmonicity and tunability are maintained.

  18. Warm inflation in presence of magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piccinelli, Gabriella [Centro Tecnológico, FES Aragón, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Avenida Rancho Seco S/N, Bosques de Aragón, Nezahualcóyotl, Estado de México 57130 (Mexico); Sánchez, Ángel [Department of Physics, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States); Ayala, Alejandro; Mizher, Ana Julia [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-543, México Distrito Federal 04510 (Mexico)

    2013-07-23

    We present preliminary results on the possible effects that primordial magnetic fields can have for a warm inflation scenario, based on global supersymmetry, with a new-inflation-type potential. This work is motivated by two considerations: first, magnetic fields seem to be present in the universe on all scales which rises de possibility that they could also permeate the early universe; second, the recent emergence of inflationary models where the inflaton is not assumed to be isolated but instead it is taken as an interacting field, even during the inflationary expansion. The effects of magnetic fields are included resorting to Schwinger's proper time method.

  19. Lutzomyia spp. (Diptera: Psychodidae) response to olfactory attractant- and light emitting diode-modified Mosquito Magnet X (MM-X) traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Rajinder S; Kaufman, Phillip E; Butler, Jerry F

    2009-09-01

    Mosquito Magnet-X traps were modified for use with blue, green, red, and blue-green-red light-emitting diodes and olfactory attractants to determine the response of Lutzomyia shannoni (Dyar) and Lutzomyia vexator (Coquillett) (Diptera: Psychodidae) field populations to these attractants. Red and blue-green-red-baited traps captured the highest numbers of Lu. shannoni and Lu. vexator, respectively, although, there were no significant differences between the colors. Baiting the traps with CO, attracted significantly higher numbers of Lu. shannoni but showed no effect on Lu. vexator capture. In comparison with CO, alone, Lu. shannoni preferred 1-octen-3-ol and 1-hexen-3-ol (0.05 g per trap) in combination with CO.

  20. MAVEN Observations of the Effects of Crustal Magnetic Fields on Electron Density and Temperature in the Martian Dayside Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Casey L.; Vogt, Marissa F.; Withers, Paul; Andersson, Laila; England, Scott; Liu, Guiping

    2017-11-01

    Mars lacks a global magnetic field but possesses concentrated regions of crustal magnetic field that influence the planet's interaction with the solar wind and the structure of the Martian ionosphere. In this study we survey 17 months of MAVEN Langmuir Probe and Waves dayside electron density and temperature measurements to study how these quantities are affected in regions with strong crustal magnetic fields. Above 200 km altitude, we find that regions of strong crustal magnetic fields feature cooler electron temperatures and enhanced electron densities compared to regions with little or no crustal magnetic field. Neutral densities and temperatures are not significantly affected. Closed field lines on which electrons can be trapped are more prevalent in strong crustal field regions than elsewhere. Trapped on closed field lines, electrons are protected against loss processes involving the solar wind. This would lead to longer plasma lifetimes, higher densities, and lower temperatures.

  1. Magnetic fields in noninvasive brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Dourado, Marcos; Conforto, Adriana Bastos; Caboclo, Luis Otávio Sales Ferreira; Scaff, Milberto; Guilhoto, Laura Maria de Figueiredo Ferreira; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2014-04-01

    The idea that magnetic fields could be used therapeutically arose 2000 years ago. These therapeutic possibilities were expanded after the discovery of electromagnetic induction by the Englishman Michael Faraday and the American Joseph Henry. In 1896, Arsène d'Arsonval reported his experience with noninvasive brain magnetic stimulation to the scientific French community. In the second half of the 20th century, changing magnetic fields emerged as a noninvasive tool to study the nervous system and to modulate neural function. In 1985, Barker, Jalinous, and Freeston presented transcranial magnetic stimulation, a relatively focal and painless technique. Transcranial magnetic stimulation has been proposed as a clinical neurophysiology tool and as a potential adjuvant treatment for psychiatric and neurologic conditions. This article aims to contextualize the progress of use of magnetic fields in the history of neuroscience and medical sciences, until 1985.

  2. Dynamic Magnetic Field Applications for Materials Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazuruk, K.; Grugel, Richard N.; Motakef, S.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic fields, variable in time and space, can be used to control convection in electrically conducting melts. Flow induced by these fields has been found to be beneficial for crystal growth applications. It allows increased crystal growth rates, and improves homogeneity and quality. Particularly beneficial is the natural convection damping capability of alternating magnetic fields. One well-known example is the rotating magnetic field (RMF) configuration. RMF induces liquid motion consisting of a swirling basic flow and a meridional secondary flow. In addition to crystal growth applications, RMF can also be used for mixing non-homogeneous melts in continuous metal castings. These applied aspects have stimulated increasing research on RMF-induced fluid dynamics. A novel type of magnetic field configuration consisting of an axisymmetric magnetostatic wave, designated the traveling magnetic field (TMF), has been recently proposed. It induces a basic flow in the form of a single vortex. TMF may find use in crystal growth techniques such as the vertical Bridgman (VB), float zone (FZ), and the traveling heater method. In this review, both methods, RMF and TMF are presented. Our recent theoretical and experimental results include such topics as localized TMF, natural convection dumping using TMF in a vertical Bridgman configuration, the traveling heater method, and the Lorentz force induced by TMF as a function of frequency. Experimentally, alloy mixing results, with and without applied TMF, will be presented. Finally, advantages of the traveling magnetic field, in comparison to the more mature rotating magnetic field method, will be discussed.

  3. Magnetic Field Measurements In Magnetized Plasmas Using Zeeman Broadening Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Showera; Wallace, Matthew; Presura, Radu; Neill, Paul

    2017-10-01

    The Zeeman effect has been used to measure the magnetic field in high energy density plasmas. This method is limited when plasma conditions are such that the line broadening due to the high plasma density and temperature surpasses the Zeeman splitting. We have measured magnetic fields in magnetized laser plasmas under conditions where the Zeeman splitting was not spectrally resolved. The magnetic field strength was determined from the difference in widths of two doublet components, using an idea proposed by Tessarin et al. (2011). Time-gated spectra with one-dimensional space-resolution were obtained at the Nevada Terawatt Facility for laser plasmas created by 20 J, 1 ns Leopard laser pulses, and expanding in the azimuthal magnetic field produced by the 0.6 MA Zebra pulsed power generator. We explore the response of the Al III 4s 2S1/2 - 4p 2P1 / 2 , 3 / 2 doublet components to the external magnetic field spatially along the plasma. Radial magnetic field and electron density profiles were measured within the plasma plume. This work was supported by the DOE/OFES Grant DE-SC0008829 and DOE/NNSA contract DE-FC52-06NA27616.

  4. Interplanetary magnetic field and geomagnetic Dst variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, V. L.; Desai, U. D.

    1973-01-01

    The interplanetary magnetic field has been shown to influence the ring current field represented by Dst. Explorer 28 hourly magnetic field observations have been used with the hourly Dst values. The moderate geomagnetic storms of 60 gammas and quiet-time fluctuations of 10 to 30 gammas are correlated with the north to south change of the interplanetary field component perpendicular to the ecliptic. This change in the interplanetary field occurs one to three hours earlier than the corresponding change in the Dst field.

  5. Development of a new superfluid helium ultra-cold neutron source and a new magnetic trap for neutron lifetime measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, Kent Kwan Ho

    2013-01-01

    The development of an Ultra-Cold Neutron (UCN) source at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) based on super-thermal down-scattering of a Cold Neutron (CN) beam in superfluid 4 He is described. A continuous flow, self-liquefying 3 He cryostat was constructed. A beryllium coated prototype converter vessel with a vertical, window-less extraction system was tested on the PF1b CN beam at the ILL. Accumulation measurements with a mechanical valve, and continuous measurements with the vessel left open, were made. The development of a new magnetic UCN trap for neutron lifetime (τ β ) measurements is also described. A 1.2 m long octupole made from permanent magnets, with a bore diameter of 94 mm and surface field of 1.3 T, was assembled. This will be combined with a superconducting coil assembly and used with vertical confinement of UCN by gravity. A discussion of the systematic effects, focussing on the cleaning of above-threshold UCNs, is given. The possibility of detecting the charged decay products is also discussed. UCN storage experiments with the magnetic array and a fomblin-coated piston were performed on PF2 at the ILL. These measurements studied depolarization, spectrum cleaning, and loss due to material reflections in the trap experimentally.

  6. A field test of attractant traps for invasive Burmese pythons (Python molurus bivittatus) in southern Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Robert N.; Hart, Kristen M.; Rodda, Gordon H.; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Snow, Ray W.; Cherkiss, Michael; Rozar, Rondald; Goetz, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Context: Invasive Burmese pythons (Python molurus bivittatus) are established over thousands of square kilometres of southern Florida, USA, and consume a wide range of native vertebrates. Few tools are available to control the python population, and none of the available tools have been validated in the field to assess capture success as a proportion of pythons available to be captured. Aims: Our primary aim was to conduct a trap trial for capturing invasive pythons in an area east of Everglades National Park, where many pythons had been captured in previous years, to assess the efficacy of traps for population control. We also aimed to compare results of visual surveys with trap capture rates, to determine capture rates of non-target species, and to assess capture rates as a proportion of resident pythons in the study area. Methods: We conducted a medium-scale (6053 trap nights) experiment using two types of attractant traps baited with live rats in the Frog Pond area east of Everglades National Park. We also conducted standardised and opportunistic visual surveys in the trapping area. Following the trap trial, the area was disc harrowed to expose pythons and allow calculation of an index of the number of resident pythons. Key results: We captured three pythons and 69 individuals of various rodent, amphibian, and reptile species in traps. Eleven pythons were discovered during disc harrowing operations, as were large numbers of rodents.

  7. Write field asymmetry in perpendicular magnetic recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhanjie; Bai, Daniel Z.; Lin, Ed; Mao, Sining

    2012-04-01

    We present a systematic study of write field asymmetry by using micromagnetic modeling for a perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR) writer structure. Parameters investigated include initial magnetization condition, write current amplitude, write current frequency, and initial write current polarity. It is found that the write current amplitude and frequency (data rate) are the dominant factors that impact the field asymmetry. Lower write current amplitude and higher write current frequency will deteriorate the write field asymmetry, causing recording performance (such as bit error rate) degradation.

  8. Discriminating between antihydrogen and mirror-trapped antiprotons in a minimum-B trap

    CERN Document Server

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Kurchaninov, L; Jonsell, S; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-01-01

    Recently, antihydrogen atoms were trapped at CERN in a magnetic minimum (minimum-B) trap formed by superconducting octupole and mirror magnet coils. The trapped antiatoms were detected by rapidly turning off these magnets, thereby eliminating the magnetic minimum and releasing any antiatoms contained in the trap. Once released, these antiatoms quickly hit the trap wall, whereupon the positrons and antiprotons in the antiatoms annihilated. The antiproton annihilations produce easily detected signals; we used these signals to prove that we trapped antihydrogen. However, our technique could be confounded by mirror-trapped antiprotons, which would produce seemingly-identical annihilation signals upon hitting the trap wall. In this paper, we discuss possible sources of mirror-trapped antiprotons and show that antihydrogen and antiprotons can be readily distinguished, often with the aid of applied electric fields, by analyzing the annihilation locations and times. We further discuss the general properties of antipr...

  9. Neutron stars velocities and magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paret, Daryel Manreza; Martinez, A. Perez; Ayala, Alejandro.; Piccinelli, G.; Sanchez, A.

    2018-01-01

    We study a model that explain neutron stars velocities due to the anisotropic emission of neutrinos. Strong magnetic fields present in neutron stars are the source of the anisotropy in the system. To compute the velocity of the neutron star we model its core as composed by strange quark matter and analice the properties of a magnetized quark gas at finite temperature and density. Specifically we have obtained the electron polarization and the specific heat of magnetized fermions as a functions of the temperature, chemical potential and magnetic field which allow us to study the velocity of the neutron star as a function of these parameters.

  10. Planetary nebulae and the interstellar magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiligman, G.M.

    1980-01-01

    Previous workers have found a statistical correlation between the projected directions of the interstellar magnetic field and the major axes of planetary nebulae. This result has been examined theoretically using a numerical hydromagnetic model of a cold plasma nebula expanding into a uniform vacuum magnetic field, with nebular gas accreting on the surface. It is found that magnetic pressure alone is probably not sufficient to shape most planetary nebulae to the observed degree. Phenomena are discussed which could amplify simple magnetic pressure, alter nebular morphology and account for the observed correlation. (author)

  11. Tuning permanent magnets with adjustable field clamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schermer, R.I.

    1987-01-01

    The effective length of a permanent-magnet assembly can be varied by adjusting the geometrical parameters of a field clamp. This paper presents measurements on a representative dipole and quadrupole as the field clamp is withdrawn axially or radially. The detailed behavior depends upon the magnet multipolarity and geometry. As a rule-of-thumb, a 3-mm-thick iron plate placed at one end plane of the magnet will shorten the length by one-third of the magnet bore radius

  12. Tuning bacterial hydrodynamics with magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, C. J.; Mumper, E.; Brown, E. E.; Brangham, J. T.; Lower, B. H.; Lower, S. K.; Yang, F. Y.; Sooryakumar, R.

    2017-06-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are a group of motile prokaryotes that synthesize chains of lipid-bound, magnetic nanoparticles called magnetosomes. This study exploits their innate magnetism to investigate previously unexplored facets of bacterial hydrodynamics at surfaces. Through use of weak, uniform, external magnetic fields and local, micromagnetic surface patterns, the relative strength of hydrodynamic, magnetic, and flagellar force components is tuned through magnetic control of the bacteria's orientation. The resulting swimming behaviors provide a means to experimentally determine hydrodynamic parameters and offer a high degree of control over large numbers of living microscopic entities. The implications of this controlled motion for studies of bacterial motility near surfaces and for micro- and nanotechnology are discussed.

  13. Characterization of pinning stability of HTS Gd123 bulks by using a pulsed-field magnetization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, R; Miki, M; Tsuzuki, K; Izumi, M; Yamaguchi, K; Kimura, Y; Ida, T

    2010-01-01

    High-temperature superconductor (HTS) Gd-bulks are used for field-pole magnets of rotating machines. We have conducted a study of pulsed-field magnetization (PFM) for the bulks to be magnetized alternatively on the rotor. Performances of HTS bulks have been qualified on the basis of the field-cooling magnetization (FCM). HTS bulks are a kind of crystals containing lots of tiny crystals boundaries. It is difficult to find comparable data between PFM and FCM results, mainly because of the different pinning stability through both processes. We need to assess an effective method of characterization for the flux pinning stability under PFM. We compared two HTS bulks: one shows a flux flow and relatively small trapped flux while the other is magnetized with a little flux instability and a large integrated trapped flux. These Gd123 bulks are 100 mm in diameter and 20 mm in thickness. After applying PFM at the liquid nitrogen temperature, we measured the trapped field density distribution and introduced a new parameter representing the trapped flux instability at each position on the surface of the bulk. We propose a way of visualization of the flux pinning instability of the HTS bulks.

  14. Design of integral magnetic field sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Liang; Cheng Yinhui; Wu Wei; Li Baozhong; Zhou Hui; Li Jinxi; Zhu Meng

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic field is one of the important physical parameters in the measuring process of pulsed EMP. We researched on anti-interference and high-sensitivity measurement technique of magnetic field in this report. Semi rigid cables were to bent into ringed antenna so that the antenna was shielded from electric-field interference and had little inductance; In order to have high sensitivity, operational transconductance amplifier was used to produce an active integrator; We designed an optical-electronic transferring module to upgrade anti-interference capability of the magnetic-field measurement system. A measurement system of magnetic field was accomplished. The measurement system was composed of antenna, integrator, and optical-electric transferring module and so on. We calibrated the measurement system in coaxial TEM cell. It indicates that, the measurement system's respondence of rise time is up to 2.5 ns, and output width at 90%-maximum of the pulse is wider than 200 ns. (authors)

  15. Trapping ions from a fast beam in a radio-frequency ion trap: Exploring the energy exchange with the longitudinal radio-frequency field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Annette; Lammich, Lutz; Vad Andersen, John Erik

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of injecting ions from an initially fast moving beam into a multipole radio-frequency (RF) ion trap without the use of buffer gas is described. The chosen trap geometry gives rise to an oscillating electric field along the direction of the incoming ions, and through an analytical...

  16. Bound states in a strong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, C. S.; Navarra, F. S.; Noronha, J.; Oliveira, E. G.; Ferreira Filho, L. G.

    2013-01-01

    We expect a strong magnetic field to be produced in the perpendicular direction to the reaction plane, in a noncentral heavy-ion collision . The strength of the magnetic field is estimated to be eB∼m 2 π ∼ 0.02 GeV 2 at the RHIC and eB∼ 15m 2 π ∼ 0.3 GeV 2 at the LHC. We investigate the effects of the magnetic field on B 0 and D 0 mesons, focusing on the changes of the energy levels and of the mass of the bound states.

  17. Primordial magnetic fields in hybrid inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, A C; Davis, Anne Christine; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos

    1997-01-01

    We show that, during hybrid inflation, a primordial magnetic field can be created, sufficiently strong to seed the galactic dynamo and generate the observed galactic magnetic fields. Considering the inflaton dominated regime, our field is produced by the Higgs--field gradients, resulting from a grand unified phase transition. The evolution of the field is followed from its creation through to the epoch of structure formation, subject to the relevant constraints. We find that it is always possible to create a magnetic field of sufficient magnitude, provided the phase transition occurs during the final 15 e-foldings of the inflationary period. the achieved field can be coherent over large distances and, for some parameter space, it is strong enough to dispense with the galactic dynamo.

  18. Conductance of auroral magnetic field lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weimer, D.R.; Gurnett, D.A.; Goertz, C.K.

    1986-01-01

    DE-1 high-resolution double-probe electric-field data and simultaneous magnetic-field measurements are reported for two 1981 events with large electric fields which reversed over short distances. The data are presented graphically and analyzed in detail. A field-line conductance of about 1 nmho/sq m is determined for both upward and downward currents, and the ionospheric conductivity is shown, in the short-wavelength limit, to have little effect on the relationship between the (N-S) electric and (E-W) magnetic fields above the potential drop parallel to the magnetic-field lines. The results are found to be consistent with a linear relationship between the field-aligned current density and the parallel potential drop. 14 references

  19. Magnetic field decay in black widow pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Camile; de Avellar, Marcio G. B.; Horvath, J. E.; Souza, Rodrigo A. de; Benvenuto, O. G.; De Vito, M. A.

    2018-04-01

    We study in this work the evolution of the magnetic field in `redback-black widow' pulsars. Evolutionary calculations of these `spider' systems suggest that first the accretion operates in the redback stage, and later the companion star ablates matter due to winds from the recycled pulsar. It is generally believed that mass accretion by the pulsar results in a rapid decay of the magnetic field when compared to the rate of an isolated neutron star. We study the evolution of the magnetic field in black widow pulsars by solving numerically the induction equation using the modified Crank-Nicolson method with intermittent episodes of mass accretion on to the neutron star. Our results show that the magnetic field does not fall below a minimum value (`bottom field') in spite of the long evolution time of the black widow systems, extending the previous conclusions for much younger low-mass X-ray binary systems. We find that in this scenario, the magnetic field decay is dominated by the accretion rate, and that the existence of a bottom field is likely related to the fact that the surface temperature of the pulsar does not decay as predicted by the current cooling models. We also observe that the impurity of the pulsar crust is not a dominant factor in the decay of magnetic field for the long evolution time of black widow systems.

  20. Environmental magnetic fields: Influences on early embryogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, I.L.; Hardman, W.E.; Winters, W.D.; Zimmerman, S.; Zimmerman, A.M. (Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio (United States))

    1993-04-01

    A 10-mG, 50 to 60-Hz magnetic field is in the intensity and frequency range that people worldwide are often exposed to in homes and in the workplace. Studies about the effects of 50- to 100-Hz electromagnetic fields on various species of animal embryos (fish, chick, fly, sea urchin, rat, and mouse) indicate that early stages of embryonic development are responsive to fluctuating magnetic fields. Chick, sea urchin, and mouse embryos are responsive to magnetic field intensities of 10-100 mG. Results from studies on sea urchin embryos indicate that exposure to conditions of rotating 60-Hz magnetic fields, e.g., similar to those in our environment, interferes with cell proliferation at the morula stage in a manner dependent on field intensity. The cleavage stages, prior to the 64-cell stage, were not delayed by this rotating 60-Hz magnetic field suggesting that the ionic surges, DNA replication, and translational events essential for early cleavage stages were not significantly altered. Studies of histone synthesis in early sea urchin embryos indicated that the rotating 60-Hz magnetic field decreased zygotic expression of early histone genes at the morula stage and suggests that this decrease in early histone production was limiting to cell proliferation. Whether these comparative observations from animal development studies will be paralleled by results from studies of human embryogenesis, as suggested by some epidemiology studies, has yet to be established. 38 refs.

  1. Working in the magnetic field of ultrahigh field MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitgeb, N.; Gombotz, H.

    2013-01-01

    Development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) device technology continues to increase the static magnetic flux densities applied and consequently leads to considerably increased occupational exposure. This has already made it necessary to review limits of occupational exposure and to postpone European legal regulations for occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields. This raises the question whether and if so which adverse health effects and health risks might be associated with occupational exposure to MRI ultra-high static magnetic fields. Based on a survey on interaction mechanisms recommendations and safety rules are presented to help minimize adverse health effects of emerging ultra-high field MRI. (orig.) [de

  2. Relaxed plasmas in external magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spies, G.O.; Li, J.

    1991-08-01

    The well-known theory of relaxed plasmas (Taylor states) is extended to external magnetic fields whose field lines intersect the conducting toroidal boundary. Application to an axially symmetric, large-aspect-ratio torus with circular cross section shows that the maximum pinch ratio, and hence the phenomenon of current saturation, is independent of the external field. The relaxed state is explicitly given for an external octupole field. In this case, field reversal is inhibited near parts of the boundary if the octupole generates magnetic x-points within the plasma. (orig.)

  3. The CMS Magnetic Field Map Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, V.I.; Andreev, V.; Ball, A.; Cure, B.; Herve, A.; Gaddi, A.; Gerwig, H.; Karimaki, V.; Loveless, R.; Mulders, M.; Popescu, S.; Sarycheva, L.I.; Virdee, T.

    2010-04-05

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general-purpose detector designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive featuresinclude a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6 m diameter by 12.5 m long free bore, enclosed inside a 10000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. Accurate characterization of the magnetic field everywhere in the CMS detector is required. During two major tests of the CMS magnet the magnetic flux density was measured inside the coil in a cylinder of 3.448 m diameter and 7 m length with a specially designed field-mapping pneumatic machine as well as in 140 discrete regions of the CMS yoke with NMR probes, 3-D Hall sensors and flux-loops. A TOSCA 3-D model of the CMS magnet has been developed to describe the magnetic field everywhere outside the tracking volume measured with the field-mapping machine. A volume based representation of the magnetic field is used to provide the CMS simulation and reconstruction software with the magnetic field ...

  4. Spatial configuration of a plasma bunch formed under gyromagnetic resonance in a magnetic mirror trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, V. V.; Novitskii, A. A.; Umnov, A. M.; Chuprov, D. V., E-mail: chu-d@mail.ru [Peoples’ Friendship University of Russia (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-15

    The spatial configuration of a relativistic plasma bunch generated under the gyromagnetic autoresonance and confined in a magnetic mirror trap has been studied experimentally and numerically. The characteristics of bremsstrahlung generated by the plasma bunch from the gas and chamber walls were investigated using X-ray spectroscopy and radiometry, which made it possible to determine the localization of the bunch and analyze the dynamics of its confinement.

  5. Mercury's Crustal Magnetic Field from MESSENGER Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, A.; Johnson, C.

    2017-12-01

    We present a regional spherical-harmonic based crustal magnetic field model for Mercury between latitudes 45° and 70° N, derived from MESSENGER magnetic field data. In addition to contributions from the core dynamo, the bow shock, and the magnetotail, Mercury's magnetic field is also influenced by interactions with the solar wind. The resulting field-aligned currents generate magnetic fields that are typically an order of magnitude stronger at spacecraft altitude than the field from sources within Mercury's crust. These current sources lie within the satellite path and so the resulting magnetic field can not be modeled using potential-field approaches. However, these fields are organized in the local-time frame and their spatial structure differs from that of the smaller-scale crustal field. We account for large-scale magnetic fields in the local-time reference frame by subtracting from the data a low-degree localized vector spherical-harmonic model including curl components fitted at satellite altitude. The residual data exhibit consistent signals across individual satellite tracks in the body fixed reference frame, similar to those obtained via more rudimentary along-track filtering approaches. We fit a regional internal-source spherical-harmonic model to the night-time radial component of the residual data, allowing a maximum spherical-harmonic degree of L = 150. Due to the cross-track spacing of the satellite tracks, spherical-harmonic degrees beyond L = 90 are damped. The strongest signals in the resulting model are in the region around the Caloris Basin and over Suisei Planitia, as observed previously. Regularization imposed in the modeling allows the field to be downward continued to the surface. The strongest surface fields are 30 nT. Furthermore, the regional power spectrum of the model shows a downward dipping slope between spherical-harmonic degrees 40 and 80, hinting that the main component of the crustal field lies deep within the crust.

  6. Magnetic monopoles in field theory and cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajantie, Arttu

    2012-12-28

    The existence of magnetic monopoles is predicted by many theories of particle physics beyond the standard model. However, in spite of extensive searches, there is no experimental or observational sign of them. I review the role of magnetic monopoles in quantum field theory and discuss their implications for particle physics and cosmology. I also highlight their differences and similarities with monopoles found in frustrated magnetic systems.

  7. Calculation of magnetic fields for engineering devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colonias, J.S.

    1976-06-01

    The methodology of magnet technology and its application to various engineering devices are discussed. Magnet technology has experienced a rigid growth in the past few years as a result of the advances made in superconductivity, numerical methods and computational techniques. Included are discussions on: (1) mathematical models for solving magnetic field problems; (2) the applicability, usefulness, and limitations of computer programs that utilize these models; (3) examples of application in various engineering disciplines; and (4) areas where further contributions are needed

  8. Electromagnetic trapping of cold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balykin, V.I.; Minogin, V.G.; Letokhov, V.S.

    2000-01-01

    This review describes the methods of trapping cold atoms in electromagnetic fields and in the combined electromagnetic and gravity fields. We discuss first the basic types of the dipole radiation forces used for cooling and trapping atoms in the laser fields. We outline next the fundamentals of the laser cooling of atoms and classify the temperature limits for basic laser cooling processes. The main body of the review is devoted to discussion of atom traps based on the dipole radiation forces, dipole magnetic forces, combined dipole radiation-magnetic forces, and the forces combined of the dipole radiation-magnetic and gravity forces. Physical fundamentals of atom traps operating as waveguides and cavities for cold atoms are also considered. The review ends with the applications of cold and trapped atoms in atomic, molecular and optical physics. (author)

  9. Constraints on primordial magnetic fields from inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Daniel; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    We present generic bounds on magnetic fields produced from cosmic inflation. By investigating field bounds on the vector potential, we constrain both the quantum mechanical production of magnetic fields and their classical growth in a model independent way. For classical growth, we show that only if the reheating temperature is as low as T reh  ∼< 10 2  MeV can magnetic fields of 10 −15  G be produced on Mpc scales in the present universe. For purely quantum mechanical scenarios, even stronger constraints are derived. Our bounds on classical and quantum mechanical scenarios apply to generic theories of inflationary magnetogenesis with a two-derivative time kinetic term for the vector potential. In both cases, the magnetic field strength is limited by the gravitational back-reaction of the electric fields that are produced simultaneously. As an example of quantum mechanical scenarios, we construct vector field theories whose time diffeomorphisms are spontaneously broken, and explore magnetic field generation in theories with a variable speed of light. Transitions of quantum vector field fluctuations into classical fluctuations are also analyzed in the examples

  10. Diffusion with intrinsic trapping in 2-d incompressible stochastic velocity fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlad, M.; Spineanu, F.; Misguich, J.H.; Vlad, M.; Spineanu, F.; Balescu, R.

    1998-10-01

    A new statistical approach that applies to the high Kubo number regimes for particle diffusion in stochastic velocity fields is presented. This 2-dimensional model describes the partial trapping of the particles in the stochastic field. the results are close to the numerical simulations and also to the estimations based on percolation theory. (authors)

  11. Electron traps in polar liquids. An application of the formalism of the random field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilczer, M.; Bartczak, W.M.

    1992-01-01

    The potential energy surface in a disordered medium is described, using the concepts of the mathematical theory of random fields. The statistics of trapping sites (the regions of an excursion of the random field) is obtained for liquid methanol as a numerical example of the theory. (author). 15 refs, 4 figs

  12. High Field Magnetization of Tb Single Crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roeland, L. W.; Cock, G. J.; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1975-01-01

    The magnetization of Tb single crystals was measured in magnetic fields to 34T along the hard direction at temperature of 1.8, 4.2, 65.5 and 77K, and along with easy direction at 4.2 and 77K. The data are compared with the results of a self-consistent spin wave calculation using a phenomenological...

  13. Measurement of Radio Frequency Magnetic Field

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartušek, Karel; Gescheidtová, E.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 6 (2006), s. 555-558 ISSN 1931-7360 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8110 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : MR tomographic scanner * magnetic susceptibility * body implants * mapping the radiofrequency magnetic field * ANSYS Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  14. Magnetic field modulation spectroscopy of rubidium atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The magnetically modulated saturation absorption profile is studied for a wide range of external DC magnetic field. The salient features of Doppler-free signal generated by laser frequency modulation and atomic energy level modulation are compared. The DC offset of the signal profile is found to be unstable as ...

  15. Deformable nematic droplets in a magnetic field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, R.H.J.; van der Schoot, P. P. A. M.

    2012-01-01

    We present a Frank-Oseen elasticity theory for the shape and structure of deformable nematic droplets with homeotropic surface anchoring in the presence of a magnetic field. Inspired by recent experimental observations, we focus on the case where the magnetic susceptibility is negative, and find

  16. Evolution of Neutron Star Magnetic Fields

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    The magnetic field of a neutron star determines the evolution of its spin, its radia- tive properties and its interaction with the ... resulting in metal-like transport properties (electrical and heat conductivities) in this region (Yakovlev & Urpin ... from the spinning neutron star via magnetic coupling. The shorter the decay time scale.

  17. Magnetic field distribution in the plasma flow generated by a plasma focus discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrofanov, K. N., E-mail: mitrofan@triniti.ru [Troitsk Institute for Innovaiton and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Krauz, V. I., E-mail: krauz_vi@nrcki.ru; Myalton, V. V.; Velikhov, E. P.; Vinogradov, V. P.; Vinogradova, Yu. V. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15

    The magnetic field in the plasma jet propagating from the plasma pinch region along the axis of the chamber in a megajoule PF-3 plasma focus facility is studied. The dynamics of plasma with a trapped magnetic flow is analyzed. The spatial sizes of the plasma jet region in which the magnetic field concentrates are determined in the radial and axial directions. The magnetic field configuration in the plasma jet is investigated: the radial distribution of the azimuthal component of the magnetic field inside the jet is determined. It is shown that the magnetic induction vector at a given point in space can change its direction during the plasma flight. Conclusions regarding the symmetry of the plasma flow propagation relative to the chamber axis are drawn.

  18. Effect of the induced magnetic field on peristaltic flow of a couple stress fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mekheimer, Kh.S.

    2008-01-01

    We have analyzed the MHD flow of a conducting couple stress fluid in a slit channel with rhythmically contracting walls. In this analysis we are taking into account the induced magnetic field. Analytical expressions for the stream function, the magnetic force function, the axial pressure gradient, the axial induced magnetic field and the distribution of the current density across the channel are obtained using long wavelength approximation. The results for the pressure rise, the frictional force per wave length, the axial induced magnetic field and distribution of the current density across the channel have been computed numerically and the results were studied for various values of the physical parameters of interest, such as the couple stress parameter γ, the Hartmann number M, the magnetic Reynolds number R m and the time averaged mean flow rate θ. Contour plots for the stream and magnetic force functions are obtained and the trapping phenomena for the flow field is discussed

  19. External magnetic field configurations for EXTRAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnevier, B.

    1982-08-01

    The strongly inhomogeneous magnetic field for stabilization of a pinch in an Extrap configuration can be created in various ways. Some possibilities both for the linear case and for the toroidal case are discussed. (author)

  20. The Polar BEAR magnetic field experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bythrow, P. F.; Potemra, T. A.; Zanetti, L. J.; Mobley, F. F.; Scheer, L.; Radford, W. E.

    1987-09-01

    The objectives and the instrumentation of the Polar BEAR magnetic field experiment are described along with the preliminary results from simultaneous measurements of Birkeland currents and UV auroral emissions. The experiment consists of an integrated sensor head, analog electronics, and digital electronics. The sensor head is a single unit containing sensor windings for each of the three orthogonal axes, oriented parrallel to the spacecraft coordinates; to minimize interference from spacecraft-generated magnetic fields, the sensor unit is located at the end of the +y solar panel. The digital electronics package is essentially identical to that flown on HILAT. A signal processor digitizes the analog outputs of the three orthogonal axes of the flux-gate magnetometer to a 13-bit resolution, yielding a magnetic field range of + or - 63,000 nT and a resolution of 15.2 nT. The full-resolution magnetic field values are recovered by data processing techniques on the ground.

  1. Hydrogen atoms in a strong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, R.R. dos.

    1975-07-01

    The energies and wave functions of the 14 lowest states of a Hydrogen atom in a strong magnetic field are calculated, using a variational scheme. The equivalence between the atomic problem and the problems related with excitons and impurities in semiconductors in the presence of a strong magnetic field are shown. The calculations of the energies and wave functions have been divided in two regions: the first, for the magnetic field ranging between zero and 10 9 G; in the second the magnetic field ranges between 10 9 and 10 11 G. The results have been compared with those obtained by previous authors. The computation time necessary for the calculations is small. Therefore this is a convenient scheme to obtain the energies and wave functions for the problem. Transition probabilities, wavelengths and oscillator strengths for some allowed transitions are also calculated. (Author) [pt

  2. KEK effort for high field magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamoto, T

    2011-01-01

    KEK has emphasized efforts to develop the RHQNb3Al superconductor and a sub-scale magnet reaching 13 T towards the HL-LHC upgrade in last years. In addition, relevant R&D regarding radiation resistance has been carried out. For higher field magnets beyond 15 T, HTS in combination with A15 superconductors should be one of baseline materials. However, all these superconductors are very sensitive to stress and strain and thorough understanding of behaviour is truly desired for realization of high field magnets. KEK has launched a new research subject on stress/strain sensitivity of HTS and A15 superconductors in collaboration with the neutron diffraction facility at J-PARC and High Field Laboratory in Tohoku University. Present activity for high field magnets at KEK is reported.

  3. THE SNS RING DIPOLE MAGNETIC FIELD QUALITY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WANDERER,P.; JACKSON,J.; JAIN,A.; LEE,Y.Y.; MENG,W.; PAPAPHILIPPOU,I.; SPATARO,C.; TEPIKIAN,S.; TSOUPAS,N.; WEI,J.

    2002-06-03

    The large acceptance and compact size of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ring implies the use of short, large aperture dipole magnets, with significant end field errors. The SNS will contain 32 such dipoles. We report magnetic field measurements of the first 16 magnets. The end field errors have been successfully compensated by the use of iron bumps. For 1.0 GeV protons, the magnets have been shimmed to meet the 0.01% specification for rms variation of the integral field. At 1.3 GeV, the rms variation is 0.036%. The load on the corrector system at 1.3 GeV will be reduced by the use of sorting.

  4. Proton imaging of stochastic magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bott, A. F. A.; Graziani, C.; Tzeferacos, P.; White, T. G.; Lamb, D. Q.; Gregori, G.; Schekochihin, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    Recent laser-plasma experiments (Fox et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., vol. 111, 2013, 225002; Huntington et al., Nat. Phys., vol. 11(2), 2015, 173-176 Tzeferacos et al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 24(4), 2017a, 041404; Tzeferacos et al., 2017b, arXiv:1702.03016 [physics.plasm-ph]) report the existence of dynamically significant magnetic fields, whose statistical characterisation is essential for a complete understanding of the physical processes these experiments are attempting to investigate. In this paper, we show how a proton-imaging diagnostic can be used to determine a range of relevant magnetic-field statistics, including the magnetic-energy spectrum. To achieve this goal, we explore the properties of an analytic relation between a stochastic magnetic field and the image-flux distribution created upon imaging that field. This `Kugland image-flux relation' was previously derived (Kugland et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. vol. 83(10), 2012, 101301) under simplifying assumptions typically valid in actual proton-imaging set-ups. We conclude that, as with regular electromagnetic fields, features of the beam's final image-flux distribution often display a universal character determined by a single, field-scale dependent parameter - the contrast parameter s/{\\mathcal{M}}lB$ - which quantifies the relative size of the correlation length B$ of the stochastic field, proton displacements s$ due to magnetic deflections and the image magnification . For stochastic magnetic fields, we establish the existence of four contrast regimes, under which proton-flux images relate to their parent fields in a qualitatively distinct manner. These are linear, nonlinear injective, caustic and diffusive. The diffusive regime is newly identified and characterised. The nonlinear injective regime is distinguished from the caustic regime in manifesting nonlinear behaviour, but as in the linear regime, the path-integrated magnetic field experienced by the beam can be extracted uniquely. Thus, in the linear and

  5. Split-Field Magnet facility upgraded

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1977-01-01

    The Split Field Magnet (SFM) was the largest spectrometer for particles from beam-beam collisions in the ISR. It could determine particle momenta in a large solid angle, but was designed mainly for the analysis of forward travelling particles.As the magnet was working on the ISR circulating beams, its magnetic field had to be such as to restore the correct proton orbit.The SFM, therefore, produced zero field at the crossing point and fields of opposite signs upstream and downstream of it and was completed by 2 large and 2 small compensator magnets. The gradient effects were corrected by magnetic channels equipped with movable flaps. The useful magnetic field volume was 28 m3, the induction in the median plane 1.14 T, the gap heigth 1.1 m, the length 10.5 m, the weight about 1000 ton. Concerning the detectors, the SFM was the first massive application of multiwire proportional chambers (about 70000 wires) which filled the main and the large compensator magnets. In 1976 an improved programme was started with tw...

  6. High-Field Superconducting Magnets Supporting PTOLEMY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Ann; Luo, Audrey; Osherson, Benjamin; Gentile, Charles; Tully, Chris; Cohen, Adam

    2013-10-01

    The Princeton Tritium Observatory for Light, Early Universe, Massive Neutrino Yield (PTOLEMY) is an experiment planned to collect data on Big Bang relic neutrinos, which are predicted to be amongst the oldest and smallest particles in the universe. Currently, a proof-of-principle prototype is being developed at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory to test key technologies associated with the experiment. A prominent technology in the experiment is the Magnetic Adiabatic Collimation with an Electrostatic Filter (MAC-E filter), which guides tritium betas along magnetic field lines generated by superconducting magnets while deflecting those of lower energies. B field mapping is performed to ensure the magnets produce a minimum field at the midpoint of the configuration of the magnets and to verify accuracy of existing models. Preliminary tests indicate the required rapid decrease in B field strength from the bore of the more powerful 3.35 T magnet, with the field dropping to 0.18 T approximately 0.5 feet from the outermost surface of the magnet.

  7. Magnetic Fields of Neutron Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sushan Konar

    2017-09-12

    Sep 12, 2017 ... The emphasis here is on the evolution in binary systems and the newly emergent classes of millisecond pulsars. Keywords. Neutron stars: population—magnetic fields—X-ray binaries: evolution—millisecond pulsars: ...... Konar, S. 2013, in: Astronomical Society of India Conference. Series, Vol. 8, edited by ...

  8. Wake field in matched kicker magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Y.

    1979-01-01

    Coherent transverse instability observed in KEK booster proton synchrotron has been reported previously. This instability is induced by the interaction of the beam with kicker magnet for the fast beam extraction. To understand the mechanism completely, it is necessary to know the wake field in detail. Here, the wake field or induced current in the kicker magnet which is terminated with matched resistance is considered

  9. Supersymmetry breaking in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akyeampong, D.A.

    1981-10-01

    The one-loop effective potential of an abelian supersymmetric model in an environment provided by a constant external magnetic field is derived. It is shown that magnetic field breaks supersymmetry and that the value of the resulting minimum potential is lower than that of the tree level. This could be relevant to the question of possible restoration of the symmetry at higher loops. (author)

  10. Ehrenfest force in inhomogeneous magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisakyan, A.N.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Samojlov, V.N.

    2000-01-01

    The Ehrenfest force in an inhomogeneous magnetic field is calculated. It is shown that there exist such (very rare) topologically nontrivial physical situations when the Gauss theorem in its classic formulation fails and, as a consequence, apart from the usual Lorentz force an additional, purely imaginary force acts on the charged particle. This force arises only in inhomogeneous magnetic fields of special configurations, has a purely quantum origin, and disappears in the classical limit

  11. Core Processes: Earth's eccentric magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Earth’s magnetic field is characterized by a puzzling hemispheric asymmetry. Calculations of core dynamo processes suggest that lopsided growth of the planet’s inner core may be part of the cause.......Earth’s magnetic field is characterized by a puzzling hemispheric asymmetry. Calculations of core dynamo processes suggest that lopsided growth of the planet’s inner core may be part of the cause....

  12. Magnetic fields and massive star formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qizhou; Keto, Eric; Ho, Paul T. P.; Ching, Tao-Chung; Chen, How-Huan [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Qiu, Keping [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China); Girart, Josep M.; Juárez, Carmen [Institut de Ciències de l' Espai, (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciències, C5p 2, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Liu, Hauyu; Tang, Ya-Wen; Koch, Patrick M.; Rao, Ramprasad; Lai, Shih-Ping [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Li, Zhi-Yun [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Frau, Pau [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, Alfonso XII, 3 E-28014 Madrid (Spain); Li, Hua-Bai [Department of Physics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Padovani, Marco [Laboratoire de Radioastronomie Millimétrique, UMR 8112 du CNRS, École Normale Supérieure et Observatoire de Paris, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Bontemps, Sylvain [OASU/LAB-UMR5804, CNRS, Université Bordeaux 1, F-33270 Floirac (France); Csengeri, Timea, E-mail: qzhang@cfa.harvard.edu [Max Planck Institute for Radioastronomy, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2014-09-10

    Massive stars (M > 8 M {sub ☉}) typically form in parsec-scale molecular clumps that collapse and fragment, leading to the birth of a cluster of stellar objects. We investigate the role of magnetic fields in this process through dust polarization at 870 μm obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The SMA observations reveal polarization at scales of ≲0.1 pc. The polarization pattern in these objects ranges from ordered hour-glass configurations to more chaotic distributions. By comparing the SMA data with the single dish data at parsec scales, we found that magnetic fields at dense core scales are either aligned within 40° of or perpendicular to the parsec-scale magnetic fields. This finding indicates that magnetic fields play an important role during the collapse and fragmentation of massive molecular clumps and the formation of dense cores. We further compare magnetic fields in dense cores with the major axis of molecular outflows. Despite a limited number of outflows, we found that the outflow axis appears to be randomly oriented with respect to the magnetic field in the core. This result suggests that at the scale of accretion disks (≲ 10{sup 3} AU), angular momentum and dynamic interactions possibly due to close binary or multiple systems dominate over magnetic fields. With this unprecedentedly large sample of massive clumps, we argue on a statistical basis that magnetic fields play an important role during the formation of dense cores at spatial scales of 0.01-0.1 pc in the context of massive star and cluster star formation.

  13. Neutron oscillations and the primordial magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, S.

    1988-01-01

    It has been claimed that a primordial magnetic field must exist in order to suppress possible oscillations of neutrons into antineutrons which would otherwise affect the cosmological synthesis of helium. We demonstrate that such oscillations, even if they do occur, have a negligible effect on primordial nucleosynthesis, thus refuting the above claim. Hence the possible existence of a primordial magnetic field, relevant to current speculations concerning superconducting 'cosmic strings', remains an open question. (author)

  14. The Strongest Magnetic Field in Sunspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, J.; Sakurai, T.

    2017-12-01

    Sunspots are concentrations of magnetic fields on the solar surface. Generally, the strongest magnetic field in each sunspot is located in the dark umbra in most cases. A typical field strength in sunspots is around 3,000 G. On the other hand, some exceptions also have been found in complex sunspots with bright regions such as light bridges that separate opposite polarity umbrae, for instance with a strength of 4,300 G. However, the formation mechanism of such strong fields outside umbrae is still puzzling. Here we report an extremely strong magnetic field in a sunspot, which was located in a bright region sandwiched by two opposite-polarity umbrae. The strength is 6,250 G, which is the largest ever observed since the discovery of magnetic field on the Sun in 1908 by Hale. We obtained 31 scanned maps of the active region observed by Hinode/SOT/SP with a cadence of 3 hours over 5 days (February 1-6, 2014). Considering the spatial and temporal evolution of the vector magnetic field and the Doppler velocity in the bright region, we suggested that this strong field region was generated as a result of compression of one umbra pushed by the outward flow from the other umbra (Evershed flow), like the subduction of the Earth's crust in plate tectonics.

  15. Interstellar magnetic fields: An observational perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    The plausibility of magnetic molecular clouds is established. It is shown that the empirically known relations between spectral line width, density, and cloud size can be derived from a virial equilibrium model where gravity is balanced by the sum of magnetic and pressure support. It is shown that substitution of measured density, cloud size, and line width measurements into the model can predict observed field strength to within a factor of two. The Zeeman effect is discussed and new measurements are presented for magnetic field strength based on OH and HI Zeeman observations at the Arecibo and Green Bank telescopes. The Barnard 1 (B1) region, in the Perseus Molecular Cloud Complex, is discussed in detail. OH spectral line intensity maps are presented for the regions where the OH Zeeman effect was observed, which allow, for the first time, comparison of observed field strength values with predicted field strength values, using emission from a single molecular species. Spatial structure of magnetic fields in molecular clouds are investigated. New optical polarization maps are presented for the dark clouds in Perseus, Taurus, and Ophiuchus. The polarization observed is attributed to preferential extinction of background starlight by magnetically aligned dust grains in the clouds, and we analyze the polarization maps as maps of the projection of the magnetic field onto the plane of the sky

  16. Study of marine magnetic field

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhattacharya, G.C.

    to the present although the frequency of reversals has changed considerably through time. During a reversal, the intensity usually decreases by about an order of magnitude for several thousand years, while the field maintains its direction. The field... (IGRF). The IGRF is basically a weighted average of several candidate spherical harmonic models of the main field and its secular variation for a given epoch adopted by International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA). The first IGRF...

  17. Generation of Nonlinear Electric Field Bursts in the Outer Radiation Belt through Electrons Trapping by Oblique Whistler Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapitov, Oleksiy; Drake, James; Mozer, Forrest

    2016-04-01

    Huge numbers of different nonlinear structures (double layers, electron holes, non-linear whistlers, etc. referred to as Time Domain Structures - TDS) have been observed by the electric field experiment on board the Van Allen Probes. A large part of the observed non-linear structures are associated with whistler waves and some of them can be directly driven by whistlers. The parameters favorable for the generation of TDS were studied experimentally as well as making use of 2-D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations for the system with inhomogeneous magnetic field. It is shown that an outward propagating front of whistlers and hot electrons amplifies oblique whistlers which collapse into regions of intense parallel electric field with properties consistent with recent observations of TDS from the Van Allen Probe satellites. Oblique whistlers seed the parallel electric fields that are driven by the beams. The resulting parallel electric fields trap and heat the precipitating electrons. These electrons drive spikes of intense parallel electric field with characteristics similar to the TDSs seen in the VAP data. The decoupling of the whistler wave and the nonlinear electrostatic component is shown in PIC simulation in the inhomogeneous magnetic field system. These effects are observed by the Van Allen Probes in the radiation belts. The precipitating hot electrons propagate away from the source region in intense bunches rather than as a smooth flux.

  18. In-plane magnetic field dependence of electric field-induced magnetization switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, S.; Nakatani, Y.; Yamanouchi, M.; Ikeda, S.; Matsukura, F.; Ohno, H.

    2013-08-01

    Electric field-induced magnetization switching through magnetization precession is investigated as a function of in-plane component of external magnetic field for a CoFeB/MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction with perpendicular easy axis. The switching probability is an oscillatory function of the duration of voltage pulses and its magnitude and period depend on the magnitude of in-plane magnetic field. Experimental results are compared with simulated ones by using Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert-Langevin equation, and possible factors determining the probability are discussed.

  19. Effect of Coulomb scattering from trapped charges on the mobility in an organic field-effect transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharma, A.; Janssen, N.M.A.; Matthijssen, S.J.G.; de Leeuw, D.M.; Kemerink, M.; Bobbert, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the effect of Coulomb scattering from trapped charges on the mobility in the two-dimensional channel of an organic field-effect transistor. The number of trapped charges can be tuned by applying a prolonged gate bias. Surprisingly, after increasing the number of trapped charges to a

  20. Nuclear resonance apparatus including means for rotating a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, H.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus including magnet apparatus for generating a homogeneous static magnetic field between its magnetic poles, shims of a magnetic substance mounted on the magnetic poles to apply a first gradient magnetic field intensity distribution in a direction orthogonal as to the direction of line of magnetic force of the static magnetic field, gradient magnetic field generating electromagnetic apparatus for generating a second gradient magnetic field having a gradient magnetic field intensity distribution in superimposition with the static magnetic field and for changing the magnetic field gradient of the first gradient magnetic field, an oscillator for generating an oscillating output having a frequency corresponding to the nuclear magnetic resonance condition of an atomic nucleus to be measured, a coil wound around a body to be examined for applying the output of said oscillator as electromagnetic waves upon the body, a receiver for detecting the nuclear magnetic resonance signals received by the coil, a gradient magnetic field controller making a magnetic field line equivalent to the combined gradient magnetic fields and for rotating the line along the section of the body to be examined by controlling said gradient magnetic field generating electromagnetic apparatus and devices for recording the nuclear magnetic resonance signals, for reconstructing the concentration distribution of the specific atomic nuclei in the section of the body, and a display unit for depicting the result of reconstruction

  1. Heating of charged particles by electrostatic wave propagating perpendicularly to uniform magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Keishiro; Shimojo, Takashi.

    1978-02-01

    Increase in kinetic energy of a charged particle, affected by an electrostatic wave propagating perpendicularly to a uniform magnetic field, is obtained for both the initial and later stages. Detrapping time of the particle from the potential dent of the electrostatic wave and energy increase during trapping of the particle is analytically derived. Numerical simulations are carried out to support theoretical results. (auth.)

  2. Coherent control of quantum jumps in an optical lattice by a weak axial magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacherjee, Aranyabhuti

    2001-07-01

    As an extension to our earlier work [Opt. Commun. 191, 83 (2001)] we study how a weak axial magnetic field applied along the axis of an optical lattice can coherently control the photon statistics of a trapped cold metastable Helium atom. (author)

  3. Tracing Magnetic Fields with Spectroscopic Channel Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarian, A.; Yuen, Ka Ho

    2018-01-01

    We identify velocity channel map intensities as a new way to trace magnetic fields in turbulent media. This work makes use of both the modern theory of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, which predicts that magnetic eddies are aligned with the local direction of the magnetic field, and also the theory of spectral line position–position–velocity (PPV) statistics, which describes how velocity and density fluctuations are mapped onto PPV space. In particular, we use the fact that the fluctuations of the intensity of thin channel maps are mostly affected by the turbulent velocity, while the thick maps are dominated by density variations. We study how contributions of the fundamental MHD modes affect the Velocity Channel Gradients (VChGs), and demonstrate that the VChGs arising from Alfvén and slow modes are aligned perpendicular to the local direction of the magnetic field, while the VChGs produced by the fast mode are aligned parallel to the magnetic field. The dominance of Alfvén and slow modes in interstellar media will therefore allow reliable magnetic field tracing using the VChGs. We explore ways of identifying self-gravitating regions that do not require polarimetric information. In addition, we also introduce a new measure, termed “Reduced Velocity Centroids” (RVCGs), and compare its abilities with those of VChGs. We employed VChGs in analyzing GALFA 21 cm data and successfully compared the magnetic field directions with the Planck polarization observations. The applications of the suggested techniques include both tracing the magnetic field in diffuse interstellar media and star-forming regions, and removing the galactic foreground in the framework of cosmological polarization studies.

  4. High-magnetic field atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter discusses both the traditional developments of Zeeman techniques at strong fields and the fundamental concepts of diamagnetism. Topics considered include historical aspects, the production of high fields, the atom in a magnetic field (Hamiltonian and symmetries, the various magnetic regimes in atomic spectra), applications of the Zeeman effect at strong B fields, the Landau regime for loosely bound particles, theoretical concepts of atomic diamagnetism, and the ultra-high-field regime and quantum electrodynamics. It is concluded that the wide implications of the problem of the strongly magnetized hydrogen atom in various domains of physics and its conceptual importance concerning theoretical methods of classical and quantum mechanics justify the experimental and theoretical efforts in atomic physics

  5. Fast reconnection of weak magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweibel, E.G.

    1998-01-01

    Fast magnetic reconnection refers to annihilation or topological rearrangement of magnetic fields on a timescale that is independent (or nearly independent) of the plasma resistivity. The resistivity of astrophysical plasmas is so low that reconnection is of little practical interest unless it is fast. Yet, the theory of fast magnetic reconnection is on uncertain ground, as models must avoid the tendency of magnetic fields to pile up at the reconnection layer, slowing down the flow. In this paper it is shown that these problems can be avoided to some extent if the flow is three dimensional. On the other hand, it is shown that in the limited but important case of incompressible stagnation point flows, every flow will amplify most magnetic fields. Although examples of fast magnetic reconnection abound, a weak, disordered magnetic field embedded in stagnation point flow will in general be amplified, and should eventually modify the flow. These results support recent arguments against the operation of turbulent resistivity in highly conducting fluids. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  6. Suppressing drift chamber diffusion without magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martoff, C.J.; Snowden-Ifft, D.P.; Ohnuki, T.; Spooner, N.; Lehner, M.

    2000-01-01

    The spatial resolution in drift chamber detectors for ionizing radiation is limited by diffusion of the primary electrons. A strong magnetic field along the drift direction is often applied (Fancher et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 161 (1979) 383) because it suppresses the transverse diffusion, improving the resolution but at considerable increase in cost and complexity. Here we show that transverse track diffusion can be strongly suppressed without any magnetic field. This is achieved by using a gas additive which reversibly captures primary ionization electrons, forming negative ions. The ions drift with thermal energies even at very high drift fields and low pressures (E/P=28.5 V/cm torr), and the diffusion decreases with increasing drift field. Upon arrival at the avalanche region of the chamber the negative ions are efficiently stripped and ordinary avalanche gain is obtained. Using this technique, r.m.s. transverse diffusion less than 200 μm has been achieved over a 15 cm drift path at 40 torr with zero magnetic field. The method can provide high spatial resolution in detectors with long drift distances and zero magnetic field. Negative ion drift chambers would be particularly useful at low pressures and in situations such as space-based or underground experiments where detector size scaleability is important and cost, space, or power constraints preclude the use of a magnetic field

  7. Maneuvering thermal conductivity of magnetic nanofluids by tunable magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jaykumar; Parekh, Kinnari; Upadhyay, R. V.

    2015-06-01

    We report an experimental investigation of magnetic field dependent thermal conductivity of a transformer oil base magnetic fluid as a function of volume fractions. In the absence of magnetic field, thermal conductivity increases linearly with an increase in volume fraction, and magnitude of thermal conductivity thus obtained is lower than that predicted by Maxwell's theory. This reveals the presence of clusters/oligomers in the system. On application of magnetic field, it exhibits a non-monotonous increase in thermal conductivity. The results are interpreted using the concept of a two-step homogenization method (which is based on differential effective medium theory). The results show a transformation of particle cluster configuration from long chain like prolate shape to the aggregated drop-like structure with increasing concentration as well as a magnetic field. The aggregated drop-like structure for concentrated system is supported by optical microscopic images. This shape change of clusters reduces thermal conductivity enhancement. Moreover, this structure formation is observed as a dynamic phenomenon, and at 226 mT field, the length of the structure extends with time, becomes maximum, and then reduces. This change results in the increase or decrease of thermal conductivity.

  8. Magnetic Field Response Measurement Acquisition System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Stanley E. (Inventor); Taylor, Bryant D. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic field response sensors designed as passive inductor- capacit or circuits produce magnetic field responses whose harmonic frequenci es correspond to states of physical properties for which the sensors measure. Power to the sensing element is acquired using Faraday induc tion. A radio frequency antenna produces the time varying magnetic fi eld used for powering the sensor, as well as receiving the magnetic field response of the sensor. An interrogation architecture for disce rning changes in sensor's response frequency, resistance and amplitud e is integral to the method thus enabling a variety of measurements. Multiple sensors can be interrogated using this method, thus eliminat ing the need to have a data acquisition channel dedicated to each se nsor. The method does not require the sensors to be in proximity to a ny form of acquisition hardware. A vast array of sensors can be used as interchangeable parts in an overall sensing system.

  9. Neutrino oscillations in strong magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likhachev, G.G.; Studenikin, A.I.

    1994-07-01

    Neutrino conversion processes between two neutrino species and the corresponding oscillations induced by strong magnetic fields are considered. The value of the critical strength of magnetic field B cr as a function of characteristics of neutrinos in vacuum (Δm 2 ν , mixing angle θ), effective particle density of matter n eff , neutrino (transition) magnetic moment μ-tilde and energy E is introduced. It is shown that the neutrino conversion and oscillations effects induced by magnetic fields B ≥ B cr are important and may result in the depletion of the initial type of ν's in the bunch. A possible increase of these effects in the case when neutrinos pass through a sudden decrease of density of matter (''cross-boundary effect'') and applications to neutrinos from neutron stars and supernova are discussed. (author). 25 refs

  10. Magnetic Field Aided Indoor Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    at a deep subsurface fracture. . .or when a highly conductive active magma chamber at a volcanic site moves before an eruption” [1]. The second cause...is brought about “as a result of the loading of rock surfaces as a major dam is filled or at a volcano as a result of a change in the magma chamber... temperature fluctuations and the readings might not be stable over long periods of operation. Due to the design requirements of the device, the magnetic

  11. Neutron stars, magnetic fields, and gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, F.K.

    2001-01-01

    The r-modes of rapidly spinning young neutron stars have recently attracted attention as a promising source of detectable gravitational radiation. These neutron stars are expected to have magnetic fields ∼ 10 12 G. The r-mode velocity perturbation causes differential motion of the fluid in the star; this is a kinematic effect. In addition, the radiation-reaction associated with emission of gravitational radiation by r-waves drives additional differential fluid motions; this is a dynamic effect. These differential fluid motions distort the magnetic fields of neutron stars and may therefore play an important role in determining the structure of neutron star magnetic fields. If the stellar field is ∼ 10 16 (Ω/Ω B ) G or stronger, the usual r-modes are no longer normal modes of the star; here Ω and Ω B are the angular velocities of the star and at which mass shedding occurs. Much weaker magnetic fields can prevent gravitational radiation from amplifying the r-modes or damp existing r-mode oscillations on a relatively short timescale by extracting energy from the modes faster than gravitational wave emission can pump energy into them. The onset of proton superconductivity in the cores of newly formed magnetic neutron stars typically increases the effect on the r-modes of the magnetic field in the core by many orders of magnitude. Once the core has become superconducting, magnetic fields of the order of 10 12 G or greater are usually sufficient to damp r-modes that have been excited by emission of gravitational radiation and to suppress any further emission. A rapid drop in the strength of r-mode gravitational radiation from young neutron stars may therefore signal the onset of superconductivity in the core and provide a lower bound on the strength of the magnetic field there. Hence, measurements of r-mode gravitational waves from newly formed neutron stars may provide valuable diagnostic information about magnetic field strengths, cooling processes, and the

  12. Magnetization relaxation of single molecule magnets after field cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Julio F.; Alonso, Juan J.

    2004-03-01

    Magnetic clusters, such as Fe8 and Mn_12, behave at low temperatures as large single spins S. In crystals, anisotropy energies U allow magnetic relaxation only through tunneling at k_BTstackrelspins with dipolar interactions. To mimic tunneling effects, a spin on a lattice site where h is within some tunnel window -h_wmagnetic dipole field drift.

  13. Materials processing, pulsed field magnetization and field-pole application to propulsion motors on Gd123 bulk superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, M; Xu, C; Xu, Y; Morita, E; Kimura, Y; Hu, A; Ichihara, M; Murakami, M; Sakai, N; Hirabayashi, I; Sugimoto, H; Miki, M

    2008-01-01

    Gd123 bulk superconductor is one of the promising magnet materials. We studied the materials processing to grow high performance magnet with a doping of nano-sized metal oxides such as ZrO 2 as a candidature of pinning centre. The enhancement of the critical current density was obtained. Growth of nano-sized particles of Gd211 in addition to BaZrO 3 were observed by TEM. The formation of nano-sized particles appears a key to improve the integrated flux trapped inside the bulks and the TEM reveals an intriguing effect of the addition to the microstructure of bulk materials. Magnetization process is crucial especially for an extended machinery. Pulsed field magnetization was applied to the field-pole bulk on the rotor disk of the tested synchronous motor. The trapped flux density of 1.3 T for Gd123 bulk sample and of 60 mm diameter was reached in the limited dimension of the tested motor by a step cooling method down to 38 K with a closed-cycle condensed neon. The pulsed magnetic field was applied with a new type of split-armature coil. A large bulk of 140 mm diameter has also shown a potential flux trapping superior to other smaller specimens. The bulk magnet provides a strong magnetic field around the bulk body itself with high current density relative to a coil winding. A comparative drawing of a 'torque density' of a variety of motors which is defined as the torque divided by the volume of the motor indicates a potential advantage of bulk motor as a super permanent magnet motor

  14. Magnetic nanoparticles for applications in oscillating magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeraphatdit, Chorthip [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Enzymatic and thermochemical catalysis are both important industrial processes. However, the thermal requirements for each process often render them mutually exclusive: thermochemical catalysis requires high temperature that denatures enzymes. One of the long-term goals of this project is to design a thermocatalytic system that could be used with enzymatic systems in situ to catalyze reaction sequences in one pot; this system would be useful for numerous applications e.g. conversion of biomass to biofuel and other commodity products. The desired thermocatalytic system would need to supply enough thermal energy to catalyze thermochemical reactions, while keeping the enzymes from high temperature denaturation. Magnetic nanoparticles are known to generate heat in an oscillating magnetic field through mechanisms including hysteresis and relaxational losses. We envisioned using these magnetic nanoparticles as the local heat source embedded in sub-micron size mesoporous support to spatially separate the particles from the enzymes. In this study, we set out to find the magnetic materials and instrumental conditions that are sufficient for this purpose. Magnetite was chosen as the first model magnetic material in this study because of its high magnetization values, synthetic control over particle size, shape, functionalization and proven biocompatibility. Our experimental designs were guided by a series of theoretical calculations, which provided clues to the effects of particle size, size distribution, magnetic field, frequency and reaction medium. Materials of theoretically optimal size were synthesized, functionalized, and their effects in the oscillating magnetic field were subsequently investigated. Under our conditions, the materials that clustered e.g. silica-coated and PNIPAM-coated iron oxides exhibited the highest heat generation, while iron oxides embedded in MSNs and mesoporous iron oxides exhibited the least bulk heating. It is worth noting that the specific

  15. UNDERSTANDING THE GEOMETRY OF ASTROPHYSICAL MAGNETIC FIELDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broderick, Avery E.; Blandford, Roger D.

    2010-01-01

    Faraday rotation measurements have provided an invaluable technique for probing the properties of astrophysical magnetized plasmas. Unfortunately, typical observations provide information only about the density-weighted average of the magnetic field component parallel to the line of sight. As a result, the magnetic field geometry along the line of sight, and in many cases even the location of the rotating material, is poorly constrained. Frequently, interpretations of Faraday rotation observations are dependent upon underlying models of the magnetic field being probed (e.g., uniform, turbulent, equipartition). However, we show that at sufficiently low frequencies, specifically below roughly 13(RM/1 rad m -2 ) 1/4 (B/1 G) 1/2 MHz, the character of Faraday rotation changes, entering what we term the 'super-adiabatic regime' in which the rotation measure (RM) is proportional to the integrated absolute value of the line-of-sight component of the field. As a consequence, comparing RMs at high frequencies with those in this new regime provides direct information about the geometry of the magnetic field along the line of sight. Furthermore, the frequency defining the transition to this new regime, ν SA , depends directly upon the local electron density and magnetic field strength where the magnetic field is perpendicular to the line of sight, allowing the unambiguous distinction between Faraday rotation within and in front of the emission region. Typical values of ν SA range from 10 kHz (below the ionospheric cutoff, but above the heliospheric cutoff) to 10 GHz, depending upon the details of the Faraday rotating environment. In particular, for resolved active galactic nuclei, including the black holes at the center of the Milky Way (Sgr A*) and M81, ν SA ranges from roughly 10 MHz to 10 GHz, and thus can be probed via existing and up-coming ground-based radio observatories.

  16. Alaska and Yukon magnetic compilation, residual total magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, W.; Saltus, Richard W.; Hayward, N.; Oneschuk, D.

    2017-01-01

    This map is a compilation of aeromagnetic surveys over Yukon and eastern Alaska. Aeromagnetic surveys measure the total intensity of the earth's magnetic field. The field was measured by a magnetometer aboard an aircraft flown in parallel lines spaced at 200 m to 10000 m across the map area. The magnetic field reflects magnetic properties of bedrock and provides qualitative and quantitative information used in geological mapping. Understanding the geology will help geologists map the area, assist mineral/hydrocarbon exploration activities, and provide useful information necessary for communities, aboriginal associations, and government to make land use decisions. This survey was flown to improve our knowledge of the area. It will support ongoing geological mapping and resource assessment.

  17. Measurement of gradient magnetic field temporal characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartusek, K.; Jflek, B.

    1994-01-01

    We describe a technique of measuring the time dependence and field distortions of magnetic fields due to eddy currents (EC) produced by time-dependent magnetic field gradients. The EC measuring technique makes use of a large volume sample and selective RF excitation pulses and free induction decay (FID) (or a spin or gradient echo) to measure the out-of-phase component of the FID, which is proportional to γδB, i.e. the amount the signal is off resonance. The measuring technique is sensitive, easy to implement and interpret, and used for determining pre-emphasis compensation parameters

  18. IMAGINE: Interstellar MAGnetic field INference Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steininger, Theo

    2018-03-01

    IMAGINE (Interstellar MAGnetic field INference Engine) performs inference on generic parametric models of the Galaxy. The modular open source framework uses highly optimized tools and technology such as the MultiNest sampler (ascl:1109.006) and the information field theory framework NIFTy (ascl:1302.013) to create an instance of the Milky Way based on a set of parameters for physical observables, using Bayesian statistics to judge the mismatch between measured data and model prediction. The flexibility of the IMAGINE framework allows for simple refitting for newly available data sets and makes state-of-the-art Bayesian methods easily accessible particularly for random components of the Galactic magnetic field.

  19. Understanding dielectrophoretic trapping of neuronal cells: modelling electric field, electrode-liquid interface and fluid flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heida, T.; Rutten, W.L.C.; Marani, E.

    2002-01-01

    By application of dielectrophoresis neuronal cells can be trapped successfully. Several trapping experiments have been performed using a quadrupole electrode structure at different amplitudes (1, 3, and 5 V pp ) and frequencies (10-50 MHz). Due to the high conductivity of the suspending medium negative dielectrophoretic forces are created. The dielectrophoretic force is determined by the gradient of the electric field. However, the electrode-liquid interfaces are responsible for decreased electric field strengths, and thus decreased field gradients, inside the medium, especially at lower frequencies. Circuit modelling is used to determine the frequency-dependent electric field inside the medium. The creation of an electric field in high conductivity of the medium results in local heating, which in turn induces fluid flow. This flow also drives the neurons and was found to enhance the trapping effect of the dielectrophoretic force. With the use of finite element modelling, this aspect was investigated. The results show that the dielectrophoretic force is dominating just above the substrate. When the upward dielectrophoretic force is large enough to levitate the cells, they may be dragged along with the fluid flow. The result is that more cells may be trapped than expected on the basis of dielectrophoresis alone. (author)

  20. Acceleration of superparamagnetic particles with magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stange, R., E-mail: Robert.stange@tu-dresden.de; Lenk, F.; Bley, T.; Boschke, E.

    2017-04-01

    High magnetic capture efficiency in the context of Biomagnetic Separation (BMS) using superparamagnetic particles (SMPs) requires efficient mixing and high relative velocities between cellular and other targets and SMPs. For this purpose, batch processes or microfluidic systems are commonly used. Here, we analyze the characteristics of an in-house developed batch process experimental setup, the Electromagnetic Sample Mixer (ESM) described earlier. This device uses three electromagnets to increase the relative velocity between SMPs and targets. We carry out simulations of the magnetic field in the ESM and in a simpler paradigmatic setup, and thus were able to calculate the force field acting on the SMPs and to simulate their relative velocities and fluid dynamics due to SMP movement. In this way we were able to show that alternate charging of the magnets induces a double circular stream of SMPs in the ESM, resulting in high relative velocities of SMPs to the targets. Consequently, due to the conservation of momentum, the fluid experiences an acceleration induced by the SMPs. We validated our simulations by microscopic observation of the SMPs in the magnetic field, using a homemade apparatus designed to accommodate a long working-distance lens. By comparing the results of modeling this paradigmatic setup with the experimental observations, we determined that the velocities of the SMPs corresponded to the results of our simulations. - Highlights: • Investigation of a batch process setup for complex forming at Biomagnetic Separation. • Simulation of fluid flow characteristics in this Electro Magnetic Samplemixer. • Simulation of relative velocities between magnetic particles and fluid in the setup. • Simulation of fluid flow induced by the acceleration of magnet particles. • Validation of magnetic fields and flow characteristics in paradigmatic setups. • Reached relative velocity is higher than the sedimentation velocity of the particles • Alternating

  1. Correlated motion of two atoms trapped in a single-mode cavity field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asboth, Janos K.; Domokos, Peter; Ritsch, Helmut

    2004-01-01

    We study the motion of two atoms trapped at distant positions in the field of a driven standing-wave high-Q optical resonator. Even without any direct atom-atom interaction the atoms are coupled through their position dependent influence on the intracavity field. For sufficiently good trapping and low cavity losses the atomic motion becomes significantly correlated and the two particles oscillate in their wells preferentially with a 90 deg. relative phase shift. The onset of correlations seriously limits cavity cooling efficiency, raising the achievable temperature to the Doppler limit. The physical origin of the correlation can be traced back to a cavity mediated crossfriction, i.e., a friction force on one particle depending on the velocity of the second particle. Choosing appropriate operating conditions allows for engineering these long range correlations. In addition this cross-friction effect can provide a basis for sympathetic cooling of distant trapped clouds

  2. Intermittent character of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, Roberto; Carbone, Vincenzo; Chapman, Sandra; Hnat, Bogdan; Noullez, Alain; Sorriso-Valvo, Luca

    2007-01-01

    Interplanetary magnetic field magnitude fluctuations are notoriously more intermittent than velocity fluctuations in both fast and slow wind. This behavior has been interpreted in terms of the anomalous scaling observed in passive scalars in fully developed hydrodynamic turbulence. In this paper, the strong intermittent nature of the interplanetary magnetic field is briefly discussed comparing results performed during different phases of the solar cycle. The scaling properties of the interplanetary magnetic field magnitude show solar cycle variation that can be distinguished in the scaling exponents revealed by structure functions. The scaling exponents observed around the solar maximum coincide, within the errors, to those measured for passive scalars in hydrodynamic turbulence. However, it is also found that the values are not universal in the sense that the solar cycle variation may be reflected in dependence on the structure of the velocity field

  3. Neutron Scattering and High Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winn, Barry L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Stone, Matthew B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The workshop “Neutron Scattering and High Magnetic Fields” was held September 4-5, 2014 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The workshop was held in response to a recent report by the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences entitled “High Magnetic Field Science and Its Application in the United States: Current Status and Future Directions.”1 This report highlights the fact that neutron scattering measurements carried out in high magnetic fields provide important opportunities for new science. The workshop explored the range of the scientific discoveries that could be enabled with neutron scattering measurements at high fields (25 Tesla or larger), the various technologies that might be utilized to build specialized instruments and sample environment equipment to enable this research at ORNL, and possible routes to funding and constructing these facilities and portable high field sample environments.

  4. The combined field emission-spin trapping method for studying reactions of electrons in organic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Shoji; Ohta, Yasunari; Yoshida, Hiroshi

    1979-01-01

    The reactions of electrons injected by field emission into solutions have been investigated. Free radicals generated by the dissociative electron attachment to chlorinated solutes in benzene solutions were detected by the spin trapping-ESR method, using pentamethylnitrosobenzene as a spin trapping agent. Nondissociative electron attachment to styrene caused by the field emission was also evidenced by detecting the α-methylbenzyl radical generated secondarily from the styrene radical anion. The electrons field-emitted into the solutions are captured almost quantitatively by the electron scavenging solutes. The field emission method has been found to be useful for generating authentically free radicals and for studying the anionic reaction induced by electrons without interference of countercations and of any reaction intermediates from solvent molecules. As an example of the chemical utilization of the field emission technique, the ESR parameters of the spin adducts of several hydrocarbon radicals have been collected by this technique. (author)

  5. The Magnetic Field Structure of Mercury's Magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Z. J.; Ding, Y.; Slavin, J. A.; Zhong, J.; Poh, G.; Sun, W. J.; Wei, Y.; Chai, L. H.; Wan, W. X.; Shen, C.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we use the magnetic field data measured by MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging from 2011 to 2015 to investigate the average magnetic field morphology of Mercury's magnetotail in the down tail 0-3 RM (RM = 2,440 km, Mercury's radius). It is found that Mercury has a terrestrial-like magnetotail; the magnetic field structure beyond 1.5 RM down tail is stretched significantly with typical lobe field 50 nT. A cross-tail current sheet separating the antiparallel field lines of lobes is present in the equatorial plane. The magnetotail width in north-south direction is about 5 RM, while the transverse width is about 4 RM. Thus, the magnetotail shows elongation along the north-south direction. At the cross-tail current sheet center, the normal component of magnetic field (10-20 nT) is much larger than the cross-tail component. The lobe-field-aligned component of magnetic field over current sheet can be well fitted by Harris sheet model. The curvature radius of field lines at sheet center usually reaches a minimum around midnight (100-200 km) with stronger current density (40-50 nA/m2), while the curvature radius increases toward both flanks (400-600 km) with the decreased current density (about 20 nA/m2). The half-thickness of current sheet around midnight is about 0.25 RM or 600 km, and the inner edge of current sheet is located at the down tail about 1.5 RM. Our results about the field structure in the near Mercury's tail show an evident dawn-dusk asymmetry as that found in the Earth's magnetotail, but reasons should be different. Possible reasons are discussed.

  6. New analytical solutions for bosonic field trapping in thick branes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landim, R.R. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Caixa Postal 6030, Campus do Pici, 60455-760 Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Alencar, G., E-mail: geovamaciel@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Caixa Postal 6030, Campus do Pici, 60455-760 Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Tahim, M.O. [Universidade Estadual do Ceará, Faculdade de Educação, Ciências e Letras do Sertão Central, R. Epitácio Pessoa, 2554, 63.900-000 Quixadá, Ceará (Brazil); Costa Filho, R.N. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Caixa Postal 6030, Campus do Pici, 60455-760 Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil)

    2014-04-04

    New analytical solutions for gravity, scalar and vector field localization in Randall–Sundrum (RS) models are found. A smooth version of the warp factor with an associated function f(z)=exp(3A(z)/2) inside the walls (|z|fields. By using the boundary conditions we are able to show that, for any of these solutions, the density probability for finding a massive mode in the membrane has a universal behavior for small values of mass given by |ψ{sub m}(0)|{sup 2}=β{sub 1}m+β{sub 3}m{sup 3}+β{sub L}m{sup 3}log(m)+⋯. As a consequence, the form of the leading order correction, for example, to the Newton's law is general and does not depend on the potential used. At the end we also discuss why complications arise when we use the method to find analytical solutions to the fermion case.

  7. Field Models in Electricity and Magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Barba, Paolo Di; Wiak, S

    2008-01-01

    Covering the development of field computation in the past forty years, Field Models in Electricity and Magnetism intends to be a concise, comprehensive and up-to-date introduction to field models in electricity and magnetism, ranging from basic theory to numerical applications. The approach assumed throughout the whole book is to solve field problems directly from partial differential equations in terms of vector quantities. Theoretical issues are illustrated by practical examples. In particular, a single example is solved by different methods so that, by comparison of results, limitations and advantages of the various methods are made clear. The subjects of the synthesis of fields and of the optimal design of devices, which are growing in research and so far have not been adequately covered in textbooks, are developed in addition to more classical subjects of analysis. Topics covered include: vector fields: electrostatics, magnetostatics, steady conduction; analytical methods for solving boundary-value probl...

  8. Magnetic Fields in the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Susan

    2017-01-01

    The Milky Way is magnetized. Invisible magnetic fields thread the Galaxy on all scales and play a vital but still poorly understood role in regulating flows of gas in the interstellar medium and the formation of stars. I will present highlights from my thesis work on magnetic fields in the diffuse interstellar gas and in accretion disks. At high Galactic latitudes, diffuse neutral hydrogen is organized into an intricate network of slender linear features. I will show that these neutral hydrogen “fibers” are extremely well aligned with the ambient magnetic field as traced by both starlight polarization (Clark et al. 2014) and Planck 353 GHz polarized dust emission (Clark et al. 2015). The structure of the neutral interstellar medium is more tightly coupled to the magnetic field than previously known. Because the orientation of neutral hydrogen is an independent predictor of the local dust polarization angle, our work provides a new tool in the search for inflationary gravitational wave B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background, which is currently limited by dust foreground contamination. Magnetic fields also drive accretion in astrophysical disks via the magnetorotational instability (MRI). I analytically derive the behavior of this instability in the weakly nonlinear regime and show that the saturated state of the instability depends on the geometry of the background magnetic field. The analytical model describes the behavior of the MRI in a Taylor-Couette flow, a set-up used by experimentalists in the ongoing quest to observe MRI in the laboratory (Clark & Oishi 2016a, 2016b).

  9. Electrically induced magnetic fields; a consistent approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batell, Brian; Ferstl, Andrew

    2003-09-01

    Electromagnetic radiation exists because changing magnetic fields induce changing electric fields and vice versa. This fact often appears inconsistent with the way some physics textbooks solve particular problems using Faraday's law. These types of problems often ask students to find the induced electric field given a current that does not vary linearly with time. A typical example involves a long solenoid carrying a sinusoidal current. This problem is usually solved as an example or assigned as a homework exercise. The solution offered by many textbooks uses the approximation that the induced, changing electric field produces a negligible magnetic field, which is only valid at low frequencies. If this approximation is not explicitly acknowledged, then the solution appears inconsistent with the description of electromagnetic radiation. In other cases, when the problem is solved without this approximation, the electric and magnetic fields are derived from the vector potential. We present a detailed calculation of the electric and magnetic fields inside and outside the long solenoid without using the vector potential. We then offer a comparison of our solution and a solution given in an introductory textbook.

  10. Upper critical magnetic field of superconducting films with magnetic impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemberger, T.R.

    1978-01-01

    The upper critical magnetic field, H/sub c2/(T), of In-Mn and Pb-Mn alloy films was measured. H/sub c2/ was determined from the resistance of the films. The results were compared with the theory of Fulde and Maki. This theory assumes that the electron-phonon coupling is weak, and that the interaction between the impurity spins and the conduction electron spins is weak. The theory predicts that the pair-breaking effect of the magnetic impurities is temperature-independent, and that the pair-breaking effects of the magnetic impurities and the applied magnetic field are additive. Furthermore, it predicts explicitly the temperature dependence of H/sub c2/. The temperature dependence of H/sub c2/ for the In-Mn alloy films is well described by the Fulde-Maki theory, despite the moderately strong electron-phonon coupling and the strong interaction between the impurity spins and the conduction electron spins. The temperature dependence of H/sub c2/ for the Pb-Mn alloy films is not well described by the Fulde-Maki theory, probably due to the strong electron-phonon coupling in Pb. However, even without a quantitatively correct theory, one can conclude from the Pb-Mn data that the pair-breaking effect of the magnetic impurities is temperature independent, and that the pair-breaking effects of the magnetic impurities and the applied magnetic field are additive. For some of the Pb-Mn alloy films, there was a region of positive curvature in H/sub c2/(T) near the zero-field transition temperature. This positive curvature is not understood

  11. Design of a calcium oven and permanent magnet Zeeman slower for use in trapping of ultracold calcium atoms and the creation of RbCa molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsagian, Alexandria; Kleinert, Michaela

    2013-05-01

    Ultracold heteronuclear molecules are of great interest for their applications in ultracold chemistry, precision spectroscopy, tests of fundamental symmetries, and quantum computation. Alkaline/Alkali-metal dimers in particular possess both a permanent electric and magnetic dipole moment, making them ideal for the study of strong long-range dipole-dipole interactions in combined electric and magnetic fields. We will discuss our progress toward the creation of ultracold RbCa with special emphasis on the permanent magnet Zeeman slower for calcium. This slower uses neodymium magnet pairs at varying distances from the calcium beam to closely match the ideal slowing field. Future work will involve using the slower to trap calcium and create the novel molecule RbCa. This work has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust, and Willamette University.

  12. Magnetic Field Observations at Purcell, Oklahoma Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, P. J. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Gibson, J. P. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The campaign “Magnetic Field Observations at Purcell, Oklahoma” installed a ground-based magnetometer at Purcell’s U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility boundary installation at the Kessler Atmospheric and Ecological Field Station, University of Oklahoma, to measure local magnetic field variations. It is a part of the nine stations of the Mid-continent MAgnetoseismic Chain (McMAC) placed as close to the 330° magnetic longitude as possible. This is the meridian in the world where land covers the greatest continuous range in magnetic latitude. Figure 1 shows the map of the magnetometer stations along the 330th magnetic meridian, including the Purcell (PCEL) station. The main scientific objective of the campaign is to detect the field line resonance (FLR) frequencies of the magnetic field line connected to the Purcell station. This magnetic field line extends from Purcell to the outer space at distances as far as 2 Earth radii (RE). To accurately identify FLR frequencies, however, simultaneous measurements at slightly different latitudes along the same meridian are necessary to allow the use of the cross-phase technique. This consideration explains the arrangement to operate magnetometers at the Americus (AMER) and Richardson (RICH) stations nearby. The measured resonant frequency can infer the plasma mass density along the field line through the method of normal-mode magnetoseismology. The magnetometer at the Purcell station can detect many other types of magnetic field fluctuations associated with the changes in the electric currents in the ionosphere and the magnetosphere, which by large are affected by the solar activity. In other words, the magnetic field data collected by this campaign are also useful for understanding space weather phenomena. The magnetometer was installed at Purcell’s ARM boundary facility in March 27, 2006. The construction of the triaxial fluxgate magnetometer used by the

  13. Magnetic Thermometer: Thermal effect on the Agglomeration of Magnetic Nanoparticles by Magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Daeseong; Kim, Hackjin

    2018-03-01

    We have investigated the agglomeration of magnetite nanoparticles in the aqueous solution under magnetic field by measuring temporal change of magnetic weight. The magnetic weight corresponds to the force due to the magnetization of magnetic materials. Superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles are synthesized and used in this work. When the aqueous solution of magnetite nanoparticle is placed under magnetic field, the magnetic weight of the sample jumps instantaneously by Neel and Brown mechanisms and thereafter increases steadily following a stretched exponential function as the nanoparticles agglomerate, which results from the distribution of energy barriers involved in the dynamics. Thermal motions of nanoparticles in the agglomerate perturb the ordered structure of the agglomerate to reduce the magnetic weight. Fluctuation of the structural order of the agglomerate by temperature change is much faster than the formation of agglomerate and explained well with the Boltzmann distribution, which suggests that the magnetic weight of the agglomerate works as a magnetic thermometer.

  14. Primordial magnetic fields from metric perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Maroto, A L

    2001-01-01

    We study the amplification of electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations induced by the evolution of scalar metric perturbations at the end of inflation. Such perturbations break the conformal invariance of Maxwell equations in Friedmann-Robertson-Walker backgrounds and allow the growth of magnetic fields on super-Hubble scales. We estimate the strength of the fields generated by this mechanism on galactic scales and compare the results with the present bounds on the galactic dynamo seed fields.

  15. Non-Linear Dynamics of a Porous Medium Saturated With Electrolyte in the Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perepechko, Y.

    2006-12-01

    The correct description of dynamics of saturated porous media in the magnetic field is one of the topical problems for mechanics of electromagnetic multi-phase media. This report studies the non-linear model of the conducting liquid flow through non-conducting deformable porous medium in the external magnetic field. We consider the most interesting case with the magnetic field, transverse to the fluid flow, what allows us to examine interaction between the magnetic field and transverse oscillations. The determining equations of the model, including non-linear two-velocity equations for dynamics of saturated porous deformable medium and Maxwell equation in magnetic-hydrodynamic approximation, are invariant relative to Galileo transformation and coordinated from the point of thermal dynamics. This model includes two longitudinal types of acoustic waves and two transverse types of magnetic-acoustic waves, which are transformed into transverse sound-waves and Alfven waves without magnetic-acoustic interaction. The effect of external magnetic field on the pattern of non- linear filtration of electrolyte through an inelastically-deformable porous medium is studied numerically together with the analysis of coordinated magnetic fields, generated during electrolyte filtration and porous matrix deformation. An increase in the magnetic field by a liquid conducting phase is examined in two cases: for the trapped magnetic field and for diffusion of the magnetic field due to electric conductivity of electrolyte. This model allows investigation of magnetic-seismic and seismic-magnetic effects and their use in applied geophysics, particularly, for earthquake forecast and development of new methods for geophysical research. This research was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research grant 06.05.65110, by the President's grants NSh.1573.2003.5, and by the Russian Ministry Science and Education grant RNP.2.1.1.702.

  16. High magnetic field magnetization of a new triangular lattice antiferromagnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, H. D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). National High Magnetic Field Lab. (MagLab); Stritzinger, Laurel Elaine Winter [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Harrison, Neil [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-23

    In CsV(MoO4)2, the magnetic V3+ ions with octahedral oxygen-coordination form a geometrically frustrated triangular lattice. So fare, there is no magnetic properties reported on it. Recently, we successfully grew single crystals of CsV(MoO4)2 by using flux method. The susceptibility shows a sharp drop around 24 K, representing a long range magnetic ordering. To understand the physical properties of this new triangular lattice antiferromagnet (TLAF), we pursued high field magnetization measurements to answer two questions: (i) what is the saturation field, which will be very useful to calculate the exchange interaction of the system? (ii) Will it exhibit spin state transition, such as the up up down phase with 1/3-saturation moment as other TLAFs? Recently, we performed VSM measurements in Cell 8, Tallahassee, NHMFL, the results show that the magnetization reaches 0.38 MuB at 34 T, which is just 19% of the full moment of 2 MuB for V3+ (3d2) ions. Apparently we need higher field to reach 1/3 value or full moment.

  17. The CMS Magnetic Field Map Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Klyukhin, V. I.; Amapane, N.; Andreev, V.; Ball, A.; Curé, B.; Hervé, A.; Gaddi, A.; Gerwig, H.; Karimaki, V.; Loveless, R.; Mulders, M.; Popescu, S.; Sarycheva, L. I.; Virdee, T.

    2011-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general-purpose detector designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive featuresinclude a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6 m diameter by 12.5 m long free bore, enclosed inside a 10000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. Accurate characterization of the magnetic field everywhere in the CMS detector is required. During two major tests of the CMS magnet the magnetic flux density was measured insid...

  18. Direct probing of electron and hole trapping into nano-floating-gate in organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Ze-Qun; Wang, Shun; Chen, Jian-Mei; Gao, Xu; Dong, Bin, E-mail: wangsd@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: chilf@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: bdong@suda.edu.cn; Chi, Li-Feng, E-mail: wangsd@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: chilf@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: bdong@suda.edu.cn; Wang, Sui-Dong, E-mail: wangsd@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: chilf@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: bdong@suda.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China)

    2015-03-23

    Electron and hole trapping into the nano-floating-gate of a pentacene-based organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memory is directly probed by Kelvin probe force microscopy. The probing is straightforward and non-destructive. The measured surface potential change can quantitatively profile the charge trapping, and the surface characterization results are in good accord with the corresponding device behavior. Both electrons and holes can be trapped into the nano-floating-gate, with a preference of electron trapping than hole trapping. The trapped charge quantity has an approximately linear relation with the programming/erasing gate bias, indicating that the charge trapping in the device is a field-controlled process.

  19. Direct probing of electron and hole trapping into nano-floating-gate in organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Ze-Qun; Wang, Shun; Chen, Jian-Mei; Gao, Xu; Dong, Bin; Chi, Li-Feng; Wang, Sui-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Electron and hole trapping into the nano-floating-gate of a pentacene-based organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memory is directly probed by Kelvin probe force microscopy. The probing is straightforward and non-destructive. The measured surface potential change can quantitatively profile the charge trapping, and the surface characterization results are in good accord with the corresponding device behavior. Both electrons and holes can be trapped into the nano-floating-gate, with a preference of electron trapping than hole trapping. The trapped charge quantity has an approximately linear relation with the programming/erasing gate bias, indicating that the charge trapping in the device is a field-controlled process

  20. Streaming flows produced by oscillating interface of magnetic fluid adsorbed on a permanent magnet in alternating magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, S.; Ito, M.; Ishimoto, Y.; Nix, S.

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes microstreaming flows generated by oscillating interface of magnetic fluid adsorbed on a circular cylindrical permanent magnet in alternating magnetic field. The interface of magnetic fluid adsorbed on the NdFeB magnet responds to the external alternating magnetic flied as harmonic oscillation. The directions of alternating magnetic field are parallel and antiparallel to the magnetic field of permanent magnet. The oscillation of magnetic fluid interface generates streaming flow around the magnet-magnetic fluid element in water. Microstreaming flows are observed with a high-speed video camera analysis system. The flow pattern generated by magnetic fluid motion depends on the Keulegan-Carpenter number and the Reynolds number.

  1. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Fridjonsson, Einar Orn

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth\\'s magnetic field system.

  2. Diffusive processes in a stochastic magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.; Vlad, M.; Vanden Eijnden, E.; Spineanu, F.; Misguich, J.H.; Balescu, R.

    1995-01-01

    The statistical representation of a fluctuating (stochastic) magnetic field configuration is studied in detail. The Eulerian correlation functions of the magnetic field are determined, taking into account all geometrical constraints: these objects form a nondiagonal matrix. The Lagrangian correlations, within the reasonable Corrsin approximation, are reduced to a single scalar function, determined by an integral equation. The mean square perpendicular deviation of a geometrical point moving along a perturbed field line is determined by a nonlinear second-order differential equation. The separation of neighboring field lines in a stochastic magnetic field is studied. We find exponentiation lengths of both signs describing, in particular, a decay (on the average) of any initial anisotropy. The vanishing sum of these exponentiation lengths ensures the existence of an invariant which was overlooked in previous works. Next, the separation of a particle's trajectory from the magnetic field line to which it was initially attached is studied by a similar method. Here too an initial phase of exponential separation appears. Assuming the existence of a final diffusive phase, anomalous diffusion coefficients are found for both weakly and strongly collisional limits. The latter is identical to the well known Rechester-Rosenbluth coefficient, which is obtained here by a more quantitative (though not entirely deductive) treatment than in earlier works

  3. The ARASE (ERG) magnetic field investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Ayako; Teramoto, Mariko; Nomura, Reiko; Nosé, Masahito; Fujimoto, Akiko; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Shinohara, Manabu; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Obana, Yuki; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Mita, Makoto; Takashima, Takeshi; Shinohara, Iku

    2018-03-01

    The fluxgate magnetometer for the Arase (ERG) spacecraft mission was built to investigate particle acceleration processes in the inner magnetosphere. Precise measurements of the field intensity and direction are essential in studying the motion of particles, the properties of waves interacting with the particles, and magnetic field variations induced by electric currents. By observing temporal field variations, we will more deeply understand magnetohydrodynamic and electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves in the ultra-low-frequency range, which can cause production and loss of relativistic electrons and ring-current particles. The hardware and software designs of the Magnetic Field Experiment (MGF) were optimized to meet the requirements for studying these phenomena. The MGF makes measurements at a sampling rate of 256 vectors/s, and the data are averaged onboard to fit the telemetry budget. The magnetometer switches the dynamic range between ± 8000 and ± 60,000 nT, depending on the local magnetic field intensity. The experiment is calibrated by preflight tests and through analysis of in-orbit data. MGF data are edited into files with a common data file format, archived on a data server, and made available to the science community. Magnetic field observation by the MGF will significantly improve our knowledge of the growth and decay of radiation belts and ring currents, as well as the dynamics of geospace storms.

  4. Field flattening in superconducting beam transport magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, G.H.

    1994-01-01

    Dipoles in which the beam traverses the midplane well away from tie magnet axis may benefit from flattening of the vertical field on the midplane. A procedure is described for doing so, making use of Chebyshev polynomials. In the case of the large aperture ''DX'' magnets located immediately on each side of the six intersection regions of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Powder (RHIC), a comparison is made of the field of coils optimized in this way and of coils optimized in the more common way by minimizing the leading coefficients of the Fourier expansion about the magnet axis. The comparison is of the integrated Fourier coefficients of the field expanded locally along the beam trajectory

  5. Chiral battery, scaling laws and magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anand, Sampurn; Bhatt, Jitesh R.; Pandey, Arun Kumar

    2017-01-01

    We study the generation and evolution of magnetic field in the presence of chiral imbalance and gravitational anomaly which gives an additional contribution to the vortical current. The contribution due to gravitational anomaly is proportional to T "2 which can generate seed magnetic field irrespective of plasma being chirally charged or neutral. We estimate the order of magnitude of the magnetic field to be 10"3"0 G at T ∼ 10"9 GeV, with a typical length scale of the order of 10"−"1"8 cm, which is much smaller than the Hubble radius at that temperature (10"−"8 cm). Moreover, such a system possess scaling symmetry. We show that the T "2 term in the vorticity current along with scaling symmetry leads to more power transfer from lower to higher length scale as compared to only chiral anomaly without scaling symmetry.

  6. Generation of intense transient magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, R.F.

    1983-01-01

    In a laser system, the return current of a laser generated plasma is conducted near a target to subject that target to a magnetic field. The target may be either a small non-fusion object for testing under the magnetic field or a laser-fusion pellet. In the laser-fusion embodiment, the laser-fusion pellet is irradiated during the return current flow and the intense transient magnetic field is used to control the hot electrons thereof to hinder them from striking and heating the core of the irradiated laser-fusion pellet. An emitter, e.g. a microballoon of glass, metal or plastics, is subjected to a laser pulse to generate the plasma from which the return current flows into a wire cage or a coil and then to earth. (author)

  7. Consistency relation for cosmic magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Sloth, Martin S.

    2012-12-01

    If cosmic magnetic fields are indeed produced during inflation, they are likely to be correlated with the scalar metric perturbations that are responsible for the cosmic microwave background anisotropies and large scale structure. Within an archetypical model of inflationary magnetogenesis, we show that there exists a new simple consistency relation for the non-Gaussian cross correlation function of the scalar metric perturbation with two powers of the magnetic field in the squeezed limit where the momentum of the metric perturbation vanishes. We emphasize that such a consistency relation turns out to be extremely useful to test some recent calculations in the literature. Apart from primordial non-Gaussianity induced by the curvature perturbations, such a cross correlation might provide a new observational probe of inflation and can in principle reveal the primordial nature of cosmic magnetic fields.

  8. Magnetic fields of HgMn stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubrig, S.; González, J. F.; Ilyin, I.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The frequent presence of weak magnetic fields on the surface of spotted late-B stars with HgMn peculiarity in binary systems has been controversial during the two last decades. Recent studies of magnetic fields in these stars using the least-squares deconvolution (LSD) technique have...... by applying the moment technique on spectral lines of inhomogeneously distributed elements separately. Furthermore, we present new determinations of the mean longitudinal magnetic field for the HgMn star HD 65949 and the hotter analog of HgMn stars, the PGa star HD 19400, using FORS 2 installed at the VLT. We...... also give new measurements of the eclipsing system ARAur with a primary star of HgMn peculiarity, which were obtained with the SOFIN spectropolarimeter installed at the Nordic Optical Telescope. Methods. We downloaded from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) archive the publically available HARPS...

  9. Solar Flare Magnetic Fields and Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, George

    2012-01-01

    This volume is devoted to the dynamics and diagnostics of solar magnetic fields and plasmas in the Sun’s atmosphere. Five broad areas of current research in Solar Physics are presented: (1) New techniques for incorporating radiation transfer effects into three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic models of the solar interior and atmosphere, (2) The connection between observed radiation processes occurring during flares and the underlying flare energy release and transport mechanisms, (3) The global balance of forces and momenta that occur during flares, (4) The data-analysis and theoretical tools needed to understand and assimilate vector magnetogram observations and (5) Connecting flare and CME phenomena to the topological properties of the magnetic field in the Solar Atmosphere. The role of the Sun’s magnetic field is a major emphasis of this book, which was inspired by a workshop honoring Richard C. (Dick) Canfield.  Dick has been making profound contributions to these areas of research over a long and pro...

  10. Magnetic field measurements of the BLAST spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dow, Karen A.; Botto, Tancredi; Goodhue, Abigail; Hasell, Douglas; Loughnan, Dylan; Murphy, Kilian; Smith, Timothy Paul; Ziskin, Vitaliy

    2009-01-01

    The Bates Large Acceptance Spectrometer Toroid has been built to study nuclear physics reactions using a stored, polarized electron beam and a variety of polarized targets internal to the storage ring. The spectrometer consists of eight coils surrounding the target cell. There is a requirement of nominally zero field along the centerline of the spectrometer for proper electron beam storage. In addition, the polarized internal targets require a low field gradient in the target region. Magnetic field measurements were made near the beam centerline to guide the alignment of the coils and satisfy the field magnitude and gradient requirements. After the coils were aligned, the magnetic field was measured in the detector regions to provide information for particle tracking.

  11. Magnetic Field Amplification via Protostellar Disc Dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyda, S.; Lovelace, R. V. E.; Ustyugova, G. V.; Koldoba, A. V.; Wasserman, I.

    2018-03-01

    We numerically investigate the generation of a magnetic field in a protostellar disc via an αΩ-dynamo and the resulting magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) driven outflows. We find that for small values of the dimensionless dynamo parameter αd the poloidal field grows exponentially at a rate σ ∝ Ω _K √{α _d}, before saturating to a value ∝ √{α _d}. The dynamo excites dipole and octupole modes, but quadrupole modes are suppressed, because of the symmetries of the seed field. Initial seed fields too weak to launch MHD outflows are found to grow sufficiently to launch winds with observationally relevant mass fluxes of order 10^{-9} M_{⊙}/{yr} for T Tauri stars. This suggests αΩ-dynamos may be responsible for generating magnetic fields strong enough to launch observed outflows.

  12. A variational study of the self-trapped magnetic polaron formation in double-exchange model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tao; Feng Mang; Wang Kelin

    2005-01-01

    We study the formation of self-trapped magnetic polaron (STMP) in an antiferro/ferromagnetic double-exchange model semi-analytically by variational solutions. It is shown that the Jahn-Teller effect is not essential to the STMP formation and the STMP forms in the antiferromagnetic material within the region of the order of the lattice constant. We also confirm that no ground state STMP exists in the ferromagnetic background, but the ground state bound MP could appear due to the impurity potential

  13. Doped spin ladders under magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, G.

    2007-07-01

    This thesis deals with the physics of doped two-leg ladders which are a quasi one-dimensional and unconventional superconductor. We particularly focus on the properties under magnetic field. Models for strongly correlated electrons on ladders are studied using exact diagonalization and density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG). Results are also enlightened by using the bosonization technique. Taking into account a ring exchange it highlights the relation between the pairing of holes and the spin gap. Its influence on the dynamics of the magnetic fluctuations is also tackled. Afterwards, these excitations are probed by the magnetic field by coupling it to the spin degree of freedom of the electrons through Zeeman effect. We show the existence of doping-dependent magnetization plateaus and also the presence of an inhomogeneous superconducting phase (FFLO phase) associated with an exceeding of the Pauli limit. When a flux passes through the ladder, the magnetic field couples to the charge degree of freedom of the electrons via orbital effect. The diamagnetic response of the doped ladder probes the commensurate phases of the t-J model at low J/t. Algebraic transverse current fluctuations are also found once the field is turned on. Lastly, we report numerical evidences of a molecular superfluid phase in the 3/2-spin attractive Hubbard model: at a density low enough, bound states of four fermions, called quartets, acquire dominant superfluid fluctuations. The observed competition between the superfluid and density fluctuations is connected to the physics of doped ladders. (author)

  14. Permanent Magnet Spiral Motor for Magnetic Gradient Energy Utilization: Axial Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valone, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    The Spiral Magnetic Motor, which can accelerate a magnetized rotor through 90% of its cycle with only permanent magnets, was an energy milestone for the 20th century patents by Kure Tekkosho in the 1970's. However, the Japanese company used old ferrite magnets which are relatively weak and an electrically-powered coil to jump start every cycle, which defeated the primary benefit of the permanent magnet motor design. The principle of applying an inhomogeneous, anisotropic magnetic field gradient force Fz = μ cos φ dB/dz, with permanent magnets is well-known in physics, e.g., Stern-Gerlach experiment, which exploits the interaction of a magnetic moment with the aligned electron spins of magnetic domains. In this case, it is applied to dB/dθ in polar coordinates, where the force Fθ depends equally on the magnetic moment, the cosine of the angle between the magnetic moment and the field gradient. The radial magnetic field increases in strength (in the attractive mode) or decreases in strength (in the repulsive mode) as the rotor turns through one complete cycle. An electromagnetic pulsed switching has been historically used to help the rotor traverse the gap (detent) between the end of the magnetic stator arc and the beginning (Kure Tekko, 1980). However, alternative magnetic pulse and switching designs have been developed, as well as strategic eddy current creation. This work focuses on the switching mechanism, novel magnetic pulse methods and advantageous angular momentum improvements. For example, a collaborative effort has begun with Toshiyuki Ueno (University of Tokyo) who has invented an extremely low power, combination magnetostrictive-piezoelectric (MS-PZT) device for generating low frequency magnetic fields and consumes "zero power" for static magnetic field production (Ueno, 2004 and 2007a). Utilizing a pickup coil such as an ultra-miniature millihenry inductor with a piezoelectric actuator or simply Wiegand wire geometry, it is shown that the necessary

  15. Ultralow field magnetization reversal of two-body magnetic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Field induced magnetization reversal was investigated in a system of two magnetic nanoparticles with uniaxial anisotropies and magnetostatic interaction. By using the micromagnetic simulation, ultralow switching field strength was found when the separation distance between the two particles reaches a critical small value (on nanometer scale in the perpendicular configuration where the anisotropic axes of the two particles are perpendicular to the separation line. The switching field increases sharply when the separation is away from the critical distance. The ultralow field switching phenomenon was missed in the parallel configuration where both the anisotropic axes are aligned along the separation line of the two particles. The micromagnetic results are consistent with the previous theoretical prediction [J. Appl. Phys. 109, 104303 (2011] where dipolar interaction between two single-domain magnetic particles was considered. Our present simulations offered further proofs and possibilities for the low-power applications of information storage as the two-body magnetic nanoparticles might be implemented as a composite information bit.

  16. Magnetic field calculation for Fermilab-style magnet coil end

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, K.; McInturff, A.D.

    1982-09-01

    A simple end field calculation is described, which utilizes a reciprocal theorem of mutual inductance between actual windings and a virtual coil. The calculation method is applied to a Fermilab-style magnet, and the computation results are compared with those obtained by GFUN

  17. High magnetic field ohmically decoupled non-contact technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilgen, John [Oak Ridge, TN; Kisner, Roger [Knoxville, TN; Ludtka, Gerard [Oak Ridge, TN; Ludtka, Gail [Oak Ridge, TN; Jaramillo, Roger [Knoxville, TN

    2009-05-19

    Methods and apparatus are described for high magnetic field ohmically decoupled non-contact treatment of conductive materials in a high magnetic field. A method includes applying a high magnetic field to at least a portion of a conductive material; and applying an inductive magnetic field to at least a fraction of the conductive material to induce a surface current within the fraction of the conductive material, the surface current generating a substantially bi-directional force that defines a vibration. The high magnetic field and the inductive magnetic field are substantially confocal, the fraction of the conductive material is located within the portion of the conductive material and ohmic heating from the surface current is ohmically decoupled from the vibration. An apparatus includes a high magnetic field coil defining an applied high magnetic field; an inductive magnetic field coil coupled to the high magnetic field coil, the inductive magnetic field coil defining an applied inductive magnetic field; and a processing zone located within both the applied high magnetic field and the applied inductive magnetic field. The high magnetic field and the inductive magnetic field are substantially confocal, and ohmic heating of a conductive material located in the processing zone is ohmically decoupled from a vibration of the conductive material.

  18. Magnetic Catalysis in Graphene Effective Field Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeTar, Carleton; Winterowd, Christopher; Zafeiropoulos, Savvas

    2016-12-23

    We report on the first calculation of magnetic catalysis at zero temperature in a fully nonperturbative simulation of the graphene effective field theory. Using lattice gauge theory, a nonperturbative analysis of the theory of strongly interacting, massless, (2+1)-dimensional Dirac fermions in the presence of an external magnetic field is performed. We show that in the zero-temperature limit, a nonzero value for the chiral condensate is obtained which signals the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry. This result implies a nonzero value for the dynamical mass of the Dirac quasiparticle.

  19. The Magnetic Field of Planet Earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulot, G.; Finlay, Chris; Constable, C. G.

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic field of the Earth is by far the best documented magnetic field of all known planets. Considerable progress has been made in our understanding of its characteristics and properties, thanks to the convergence of many different approaches and to the remarkable fact that surface rocks...... yr) to the longest (virtually the age of the Earth) time scales are finally reviewed, underlining the respective roles of the magnetohydodynamics at work in the core, and of the slow dynamic evolution of the planet as a whole....

  20. Reduction of a Ship's Magnetic Field Signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Holmes, John

    2008-01-01

    Decreasing the magnetic field signature of a naval vessel will reduce its susceptibility to detonating naval influence mines and the probability of a submarine being detected by underwater barriers and maritime patrol aircraft. Both passive and active techniques for reducing the magnetic signatures produced by a vessel's ferromagnetism, roll-induced eddy currents, corrosion-related sources, and stray fields are presented. Mathematical models of simple hull shapes are used to predict the levels of signature reduction that might be achieved through the use of alternate construction materials. Al

  1. Consistency relation for cosmic magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, R. K.; Sloth, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    If cosmic magnetic fields are indeed produced during inflation, they are likely to be correlated with the scalar metric perturbations that are responsible for the cosmic microwave background anisotropies and large scale structure. Within an archetypical model of inflationary magnetogenesis, we show...... to be extremely useful to test some recent calculations in the literature. Apart from primordial non-Gaussianity induced by the curvature perturbations, such a cross correlation might provide a new observational probe of inflation and can in principle reveal the primordial nature of cosmic magnetic fields. DOI...

  2. Multiple-trapping in pentacene field-effect transistors with a nanoparticles self-assembled monolayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keanchuan Lee

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A silver nanoparticles self-assembled monolayer (SAM was incorporated in pentacene field-effect transistor and its effects on the carrier injection and transport were investigated using the current-voltage (I − V and impedance spectroscopy (IS measurements. The I − V results showed that there was a significant negative shift of the threshold voltage, indicating the hole trapping inside the devices with about two orders higher in the contact resistance and an order lower in the effective mobility when a SAM was introduced. The IS measurements with the simulation using a Maxwell-Wagner equivalent circuit model revealed the existence of multiple trapping states for the devices with NPs, while the devices without NPs exhibited only a single trap state.

  3. High magnetic fields in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Laurence J.; Parkin, Don E.; Crow, Jack E.; Schneider-Muntau, Hans J.; Sullivan, Neil S.

    During the past thirty years research using high magnetic fields has technically evolved in the manner, but not the magnitude, of the so-called big science areas of particle physics, plasma physics, neutron scattering, synchrotron light scattering, and astronomy. Starting from the laboratories of individual researchers it moved to a few larger universities, then to centralized national facilities with research and maintenance staffs, and, finally, to joint international ventures to build unique facilities, as illustrated by the subject of this conference. To better understand the nature of this type of research and its societal justification it is helpful to compare it, in general terms, with the aforementioned big-science fields. High magnetic field research differs from particle physics, plasma physics, and astronomy in three respects: (1) it is generic research that cuts across a wide range of scientific disciplines in physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, and engineering; (2) it studies materials and processes that are relevant for a variety of technological applications and it gives insight into biological processes; (3) it has produced, at least, comparably significant results with incomparably smaller resources. Unlike neutron and synchrotron light scattering, which probe matter, high magnetic fields change the thermodynamic state of matter. This change of state is fundamental and independent of other state variables, such as pressure and temperature. After the magnetic field is applied, various techniques are then used to study the new state.

  4. Neutron energy focusing with magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwab, D.E.; Summhammer, J.; Rauch, H.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: For the majority of neutron optics instruments and many neutron scattering techniques the use of a monochromatic neutron beam is vitally important. Most monochromators are passive, and often include an interaction with matter. They cut off certain parts of the spectrum, and as a consequence, large losses of neutron density occur, and the spectral density is depleted as well. On the other hand, active energy focusing systems enrich the beam in a very narrow velocity band without considerable losses. Here, we study the active monochromatization of neutrons, generated at a pulsed neutron source by interaction with magnetic fields. The first proposed set-up consists of magnets which surround the beam-line. They produce traveling magnetic waves with desired velocity to escort a neutron pulse between the source and an instrument. During the interaction, the magnetic field forces the neutrons to accelerate or decelerate to this velocity. Simulations show that a comoving magnetic field, shaped like an harmonic oscillator, or of a sinusoidal form, effectuates an increase of neutron intensity up to an order of magnitude in a small but variable velocity band. Consequently, the precision of related neutron scattering experiments is increased or their measurement time is decreased, accordingly. Another concept arises from static and rf spinflip stages. Thereby, an appropriate number of photons of the rf-field can be transmitted to or extracted from the neutrons. Polarized neutrons entering a static magnetic field which is oriented perpendicularly to the neutrons propagation direction, are subject to acceleration or deceleration depending on their spin orientation (Zeeman shift). Flipping the neutrons spin by on rf coil inside the static field, causes a second acceleration or deceleration of the neutrons when they are leaving the static field. They immediately enter the next stage with another static field, which is much smaller than the one they have just left. Its

  5. Single trap dynamics in electrolyte-gated Si-nanowire field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pud, S.; Gasparyan, F.; Petrychuk, M.; Li, J.; Offenhäusser, A.; Vitusevich, S. A.

    2014-06-01

    Liquid-gated silicon nanowire (NW) field effect transistors (FETs) are fabricated and their transport and dynamic properties are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Random telegraph signal (RTS) fluctuations were registered in the nanolength channel FETs and used for the experimental and theoretical analysis of transport properties. The drain current and the carrier interaction processes with a single trap are analyzed using a quantum-mechanical evaluation of carrier distribution in the channel and also a classical evaluation. Both approaches are applied to treat the experimental data and to define an appropriate solution for describing the drain current behavior influenced by single trap resulting in RTS fluctuations in the Si NW FETs. It is shown that quantization and tunneling effects explain the behavior of the electron capture time on the single trap. Based on the experimental data, parameters of the single trap were determined. The trap is located at a distance of about 2 nm from the interface Si/SiO2 and has a repulsive character. The theory of dynamic processes in liquid-gated Si NW FET put forward here is in good agreement with experimental observations of transport in the structures and highlights the importance of quantization in carrier distribution for analyzing dynamic processes in the nanostructures.

  6. Biomaterials and Magnetic fields for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan; Mazuruk, Konstanty

    2003-01-01

    The field of biomaterials has emerged as an important topic in the purview of NASA s new vision of research activities in the Microgravity Research Division. Although this area has an extensive track record in the medical field as borne out by the routine use of polymeric sutures, implant devices, and prosthetics, novel applications such as tissue engineering, artificial heart valves and controlled drug delivery are beginning to be developed. Besides the medical field, biomaterials and bio-inspired technologies are finding use in a host of emerging interdisciplinary fields such as self-healing and self-assembling structures, biosensors, fuel systems etc. The field of magnetic fluid technology has several potential applications in medicine. One of the emerging fields is the area of controlled drug delivery, which has seen its evolution from the basic oral delivery system to pulmonary to transdermal to direct inoculations. In cancer treatment by chemotherapy for example, targeted and controlled drug delivery has received vast scrutiny and substantial research and development effort, due to the high potency of the drugs involved and the resulting requirement to keep the exposure of the drugs to surrounding healthy tissue to a minimum. The use of magnetic particles in conjunction with a static magnetic field allows smart targeting and retention of the particles at a desired site within the body with the material transport provided by blood perfusion. Once so located, the therapeutical aspect (radiation, chemotherapy, hyperthermia, etc.) of the treatment, now highly localized, can be implemented.

  7. Electrostatic potential in a collisionless plasma flow along open magnetic field lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kunihiro; Katayama, Hideaki; Miyawaki, Fujio

    1992-06-01

    Formation of the steady-state potential in a collisionless plasma flow along nonuniform magnetic field lines terminated at a wall is studied theoretically under the condition that a particle source in a plasma can be neglected. It is found that the plasma flow is required to satisfy the generalized Bohm criterion over the whole region for the formation of the steady-state continuous potential in the divergent magnetic field. A monotonically falling potential can build up from the inside of the magnetic throat to the wall only if the Bohm criterion is marginally satisfied at the throat. Numerical solutions to Poisson's equation show that a potential profile outside the throat is strongly dependent upon the particle density of electrons trapped between the throat and the wall. Controllability of the potential by increasing the trapped-electron density is discussed briefly. (author)

  8. Magnetic field measurements on the sun and implications for stellar magnetic field observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, W.H.; Giampapa, M.S.; Worden, S.P.

    1987-01-01

    Results of solar magnetic field measurements in plages, sunspot umbrae, and sunspot penumbrae using high spectral resolution, unpolarized infrared H band spectral data are presented. A Fourier deconvolution analysis scheme similar to that utilized for stellar magnetic field measurements is adopted. As an example, a field strength of 3240 + or - 450 G is determined in a sunspot umbra combined with a value of 2000 + or - 180 G in the associated penumbra. These values are compared with a direct measurement of the spot umbra and penumbra field strengths based on the observed separation of the Zeeman components of the magnetically sensitive lines. Possible origins for the discrepancy between the results inferred by these two different techniques are discussed. The Fourier analysis results confirm the widespread occurrence of kilogauss level fields in the solar photosphere. The implications of the solar results for stellar magnetic field measurements are considered. 45 references.

  9. Field assessment of synthetic attractants and traps for the Old World screw-worm fly, Chrysomya bezziana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urech, R; Green, P E; Brown, G W; Spradbery, J P; Tozer, R S; Mayer, D G; Tack Kan, Y

    2012-07-06

    The performance of newly developed trapping systems for the Old World screw-worm fly, Chrysomya bezziana has been determined in field trials on cattle farms in Malaysia. The efficacy of non-sticky traps and new attractants to trap C. bezziana and non-target flies was compared with the standard sticky trap and Swormlure. The optimal trap was a modified LuciTrap(®) with a new attractant mixture, Bezzilure-2. The LuciTrap/Bezzilure-2 caught on average 3.1 times more C. bezziana than the sticky trap with Swormlure (PChrysomya megacephala and Chrysomya rufifacies with factors of 5.9 and 6.4, respectively. The LuciTrap also discriminates with factors of 90 and 3.6 against Hemipyrellia sp. and sarcophagid flesh flies respectively, compared to the sticky trap. The LuciTrap/Bezzilure-2 system is recommended for screwworm fly surveillance as it is more attractive and selective towards C. bezziana and provides flies of better quality for identification than the sticky trap. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mercury's Internal Magnetic Field: Modeling Core Fields with Smooth Inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, H.; Johnson, C. L.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Purucker, M. E.; Solomon, S. C.

    2008-12-01

    MESSENGER's second flyby (M2) of Mercury on 6 October 2008 will provide significantly improved geographical sampling of the planet's internal magnetic field over previous measurements. Latitudinal coverage and spacecraft altitudes will be similar to those during MESSENGER's first encounter (M1), but the spacecraft trajectory will be displaced by about 180° in longitude, yielding the first magnetic measurements in the western hemisphere. We investigate spatial structure in Mercury's internal magnetic field by applying methods from inverse theory to construct low-degree-and-order spherical harmonic models. External fields predicted by a parameterized magnetospheric model are subtracted from the vector field observations. The approach takes into account noise contributions from long-wavelength uncertainties in the external field models, unexplained short-wavelength features, and spacecraft attitude errors. We investigate the effect of different regularization (smoothness) constraints on our inversions. Analyses of data from M1 and the two Mariner 10 flybys that penetrated the magnetosphere yield a preferred spherical harmonic solution to degree and order eight with the centered, axial dipole term g10 dominating. The model shows structure at low and mid-latitude regions near the flybys. Terms predicted by an analytical model for long- wavelength crustal fields - namely g10, g30 and g32 - are present, but their relative amplitudes are not consistent with such a field. We conclude that structure in our models is dominated by core, rather than by crustal, fields. We also investigate, through simulations, field morphologies that are recoverable while the spacecraft is in orbit about Mercury, under the assumption that the long-wavelength contributions from external sources can be accurately modeled and removed. Although the elliptical orbit of MESSENGER will impede the recovery of southern hemisphere structure, we obtain excellent recovery of the dipole field and of

  11. MAGNETIC FIELD TWISTING BY INTERGRANULAR DOWNDRAFTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taroyan, Youra; Williams, Thomas [Department of Physics, IMPACS, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-01

    The interaction of an intergranular downdraft with an embedded vertical magnetic field is examined. It is demonstrated that the downdraft may couple to small magnetic twists leading to an instability. The descending plasma exponentially amplifies the magnetic twists when it decelerates with depth due to increasing density. Most efficient amplification is found in the vicinity of the level, where the kinetic energy density of the downdraft reaches equipartition with the magnetic energy density. Continual extraction of energy from the decelerating plasma and growth in the total azimuthal energy occurs as a consequence of the wave-flow coupling along the downdraft. The presented mechanism may drive vortices and torsional motions that have been detected between granules and in simulations of magnetoconvection.

  12. Geological techniques utilized in trap Spring Field discovery, Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolly, E.D.

    1980-01-01

    The trap at Eagle Springs Field is a combination stratigraphic truncation-subcrop-fault trap. Production occurs from matrix and fracture porosity in reservoirs in the Sheep Pass Formation (Cretaceous and Eocene) and the Garrett Ranch volcanic group (Oligocene). Probably the most unique feature about the field is that the production occurs from the highest position on the lowermost fault block at the basin margin. On the adjacent higher fault blocks the reservoir beds were removed by erosion during the basin and range orogenic event. The position of the truncated edge of the lower Tertiary reservoir units is controlled by the fault pattern at the margin of the valley-basin Graben. Detailed geomorphic studies indicated that this fault pattern may be identified at the surface. Regional geomorphic mapping of fault patterns was conducted to localize areas with possible subcrop truncation patterns similar to Eagle Springs Field. 20 references.

  13. Magnetic field dependence of vortex activation energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... the resistance as a function of temperature and magnetic field in clean polycrystalline samples of NbSe2, MgB2 and Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10 (BSCCO) superconductors. Thermally activated flux flow behaviour is seen in all the three systems and clearly identified in bulk MgB2. While the activation energy at low fields for MgB2 ...

  14. Magnetic field influence on paramecium motility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, M.F.; Rosen, A.D. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The influence of a moderately intense static magnetic field on movement patterns of free swimming Paramecium was studied. When exposed to fields of 0.126 T, these ciliated protozoa exhibited significant reduction in velocity as well as a disorganization of movement pattern. It is suggested that these findings may be explained on the basis of alteration in function of ion specific channels within the cell membrane.

  15. Magnetic fields and density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salsbury, Freddie Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A major focus of this dissertation is the development of functionals for the magnetic susceptibility and the chemical shielding within the context of magnetic field density functional theory (BDFT). These functionals depend on the electron density in the absence of the field, which is unlike any other treatment of these responses. There have been several advances made within this theory. The first of which is the development of local density functionals for chemical shieldings and magnetic susceptibilities. There are the first such functionals ever proposed. These parameters have been studied by constructing functionals for the current density and then using the Biot-Savart equations to obtain the responses. In order to examine the advantages and disadvantages of the local functionals, they were tested numerically on some small molecules

  16. Super-strong Magnetic Field in Sunspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Takenori J.; Sakurai, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    Sunspots are the most notable structure on the solar surface with strong magnetic fields. The field is generally strongest in a dark area (umbra), but sometimes stronger fields are found in non-dark regions, such as a penumbra and a light bridge. The formation mechanism of such strong fields outside umbrae is still puzzling. Here we report clear evidence of the magnetic field of 6250 G, which is the strongest field among Stokes I profiles with clear Zeeman splitting ever observed on the Sun. The field was almost parallel to the solar surface and located in a bright region sandwiched by two opposite-polarity umbrae. Using a time series of spectral data sets, we discuss the formation process of the super-strong field and suggest that this strong field region was generated as a result of compression of one umbra pushed by the horizontal flow from the other umbra, such as the subduction of the Earth’s crust in plate tectonics.

  17. Compensation-device for a magnetic field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruit, P.; Ferreira, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    The invention relates to compensation device for a magnetic field generated through electric traction in a tram or train transport system that comprises an overhead line and rails, the overhead line and rails during operation being live, wherein a predetermined section of the overhead line and rails

  18. Magnetic Field Strength Evaluation Yu. S. Yefimov

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Magnetic Field Strength Evaluation. 75 fluctuations have natural explanation in the frame of shock-in-jet model (Marscher. & Gear 1985; Hughes et al. 1989; Qian et al. 1991). However, the flare activity (especially periodical) presents some difficulties in this model. To eliminate these problems, Camenzind & Krockenberger ...

  19. Enhanced microactuation with magnetic field curing of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The incorporation of nanoparticles of iron in a natural rubber matrix leads to flexible magnetorheolog- ical (MR) materials. Rod-shaped MR elastomers based on natural rubber and nanosized iron have been moulded both with and without the application of an external magnetic field during curing. These MR elastomer rods ...

  20. Rotational Rectification of an Alternating Magnetic Field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 5. Rotational Rectification of an Alternating Magnetic Field. N Kumar. Classroom Volume 18 Issue 5 May 2013 pp 458-467. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/018/05/0458-0467 ...

  1. ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet reached nominal field

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

     On 9 November the barrel toroid magnet reached its nominal field of 4 teslas, with an electrical current of 21 000 amperes (21 kA) passing through the eight superconducting coils as shown on this graph

  2. Historic Methods for Capturing Magnetic Field Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Alistair

    2016-01-01

    I investigated two late 19th-century methods for capturing magnetic field images from iron filings for historical insight into the pedagogy of hands-on physics education methods, and to flesh out teaching and learning practicalities tacit in the historical record. Both methods offer opportunities for close sensory engagement in data-collection…

  3. Inversion layer thermopower in high magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girvin, S.M.; Jonson, M.

    1982-11-20

    The authors calculate the thermopower of an ideal two-dimensional electron gas (inversion layer) in a quantising magnetic field. They find that the thermopower is a universal function of the reduced temperature which has a novel dependence on the chemical potential.

  4. Strain sensors for high field pulse magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Christian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zheng, Yan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Easton, Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present an investigation into several strain sensing technologies that are being considered to monitor mechanical deformation within the steel reinforcement shells used in high field pulsed magnets. Such systems generally operate at cryogenic temperatures to mitigate heating issues that are inherent in the coils of nondestructive, high field pulsed magnets. The objective of this preliminary study is to characterize the performance of various strain sensing technologies at liquid nitrogen temperatures (-196 C). Four sensor types are considered in this investigation: fiber Bragg gratings (FBG), resistive foil strain gauges (RFSG), piezoelectric polymers (PVDF), and piezoceramics (PZT). Three operational conditions are considered for each sensor: bond integrity, sensitivity as a function of temperature, and thermal cycling effects. Several experiments were conducted as part of this study, investigating adhesion with various substrate materials (stainless steel, aluminum, and carbon fiber), sensitivity to static (FBG and RFSG) and dynamic (RFSG, PVDF and PZT) load conditions, and sensor diagnostics using PZT sensors. This work has been conducted in collaboration with the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), and the results of this study will be used to identify the set of sensing technologies that would be best suited for integration within high field pulsed magnets at the NHMFL facility.

  5. Cylindrical isentropic compression by ultrahigh magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zhuowei; Luo, Hao; Zhang, Hengdi; Zhao, Shichao; Tang, Xiaosong; Tong, Yanjin; Song, Zhenfei; Tan, Fuli; Zhao, Jianheng; Sun, Chengwei

    2014-05-01

    The cylindrical isentropic compression by ultrahigh magnetic field (MC-1) is a kind of unique high energy density technique. It has characters like ultrahigh pressure and low temperature rising, and would have widely used in areas like high pressure physics, new material synthesis and ultrahigh magnetic field physics. The Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (IFP, CAEP) has begun the experiment since 2011 and a primary experimental device had been set-up. In the experiments, a seed magnetic field of 5 Tesla were set-up first and compressed by a stainless steel liner which is driven by high explosive initiated synchronously. The internal diameter of the liner is 97 mm, and its thickness is 1.5 mm. The movement of liner was recorded optically and a typical turnaround phenomenon was observed. From the photography results the liner was compressed smoothly and evenly and its average velocity was about 5-6 km/s. In the experiment a axial magnetic field of over 1400 Tesla has been recorded. The MC-1 process was numerical simulated by 1D MHD code MC11D and the simulations are in accord with the experiments.

  6. Physics of semiconductors in high magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Miura, Noboru

    2008-01-01

    This book summarizes most of the fundamental physical phenomena which semiconductors and their modulated structures exhibit in high magnetic fields. Readers can learn not only the basic theoretical background but also the present state of the art from the most advanced data in this rapidly growing research area.

  7. Manifestations of Magnetic Field Inhomogeneities Lawrence Rudnick

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Both observations and simulations reveal large inhomo- geneities in magnetic field distributions in diffuse plasmas. Incorporating these inhomogeneities into various calculations can significantly change the inferred physical conditions. In extragalactic sources, e.g., these can compromise analyses of spectral ...

  8. Manipulation of molecular structures with magnetic fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boamfa, M.I.

    2003-01-01

    The present thesis deals with the use of magnetic fields as a handle to manipulate matter at a molecular level and as a tool to probe molecular properties or inter molecular interactions. The work consists of in situ optical studies of (polymer) liquid crystals and molecular aggregates in high

  9. Enhanced microactuation with magnetic field curing of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The incorporation of nanoparticles of iron in a natural rubber matrix leads to flexible magnetorheological (MR) materials. Rod-shaped MR elastomers based on natural rubber and nanosized iron have been moulded both with and without the application of an external magnetic field during curing. These MR elastomer rods ...

  10. Magnetic Field Structure in Relativistic Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jermak Helen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Relativistic jets are ubiquitous when considering an accreting black hole. Two of the most extreme examples of these systems are blazars and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs, the jets of which are thought to be threaded with a magnetic field of unknown structure. The systems are made up of a black hole accreting matter and producing, as a result, relativistic jets of plasma from the poles of the black hole. Both systems are viewed as point sources from Earth, making it impossible to spatially resolve the jet. In order to explore the structure of the magnetic field within the jet we take polarisation measurements with the RINGO polarimeters on the world’s largest fully autonomous, robotic optical telescope: The Liverpool Telescope. Using the polarisation degree and angle measured by the RINGO polarimeters it is possible to distinguish between global magnetic fields created in the central engine and random tangled magnetic fields produced locally in shocks. We also monitor blazar sources regularly during quiescence with periods of flaring monitored more intensively. Reported here are the early polarisation results for GRBs 060418 and 090102, along with future prospects for the Liverpool Telescope and the RINGO polarimeters.

  11. Solar Magnetic Fields J. O. Stenflo

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I wish to dedicate this presentation to my dear friend Arvind Bhatnagar, whom I have known for nearly four decades, since we shared office for half a year in 1968 in ..... The pattern of quiet-Sun magnetic fields appears to maintain a high degree of self- similarity as we zoom in on ever smaller scales, as illustrated in Fig. 5.

  12. Electro-mechanical resonant magnetic field sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temnykh, A.B.; Lovelace, R.V.E.

    2002-01-01

    We describe a new type of magnetic field sensor, which is termed as an Electro-Mechanical Resonant Sensor (EMRS). The key part of this sensor is a small conductive elastic element with low damping rate and therefore, a high Q fundamental mode of frequency f 1 . An AC current is driven through the elastic element which, in the presence of a magnetic field, causes an AC force on the element. When the frequency of the AC current matches the resonant frequency of the element, maximum vibration of the element occurs and this can be measured precisely by optical means. We have built and tested a model sensor of this type by using for the elastic element, a length of copper wire of diameter 0.030 mm formed into a loop shape. The wire motion was measured using a light-emitting diode photo-transistor assembly. This sensor demonstrated a sensitivity better than 0.001 G for an applied magnetic field of ∼1 G and a good selectivity for the magnetic field direction. The sensitivity can be easily improved by a factor of ∼10-100 by a more sensitive measurement of the elastic element motion and by having the element in vacuum to reduce the drag force

  13. Magnetic field and gradient analysis around matrix for HGMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, S.K.; Ha, D.W.; Ko, R.K.; Kwon, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    A High Gradient Magnetic Separator (HGMS) uses matrix to make high magnetic field gradient so that ferro- or para-magnetic particles can be attracted to them by high magnetic force. These matrixes are usually composed of stainless wires having high magnetization characteristics. This paper deals with superconducting HGMS which is aimed for purifying wastewater by using stainless steel matrix. Background magnetic field up to 6 T is generated by a superconducting solenoid and the stainless steel matrix are arranged inside of the solenoid. In order to calculate magnetic forces exerting on magnetic particles in wastewater, it is important to calculate magnetic field and magnetic field gradient those are proportional to the magnetic force acting on the particle. So we presents magnetic field distribution analysis result and estimates how many times of magnetic force will act on a particle when the matrix are arranged or not.

  14. Synthetic sex pheromone attracts the leishmaniasis vector Lutzomyia longipalpis (Diptera: Psychodidae) to traps in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, D P; Bandi, K K; Brazil, R P; Oliveira, A G; Hamilton, J G C

    2009-05-01

    Improving vector control remains a key goal in reducing the world's burden of infectious diseases. More cost-effective approaches to vector control are urgently needed, particularly because vaccines are unavailable and treatment is prohibitively expensive. The causative agent of American visceral leishmaniasis (AVL), Leishmania chagasi, Cunha and Chagas (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae), is transmitted between animal and human hosts by blood-feeding female sand flies attracted to mating aggregations formed on or above host animals by male-produced sex pheromones. Our results show the potential of using synthetic pheromones to control populations of Lutzomyia longipalpis Lutz and Neiva (Diptera: Psychodidae), the sand fly vector of one of the world's most important neglected diseases, AVL. We showed that a synthetic pheromone, (+/-)-9-methylgermacrene-B, produced from a low-cost plant intermediate, attracted females in the laboratory. By formulating dispensers that released this pheromone at a rate similar to that released by aggregating males, we were able to attract flies of both sexes to traps in the field. These dispensers worked equally well when deployed with mechanical light traps and inexpensive sticky traps. If deployed effectively, pheromone-based traps could be used to decrease AVL transmission rates through specific targeting and reduction of L. longipalpis populations. This is the first study to show attraction of a human disease-transmitting insect to a synthetic pheromone in the field, showing the general applicability of this novel approach for developing new tools for use in vector control.

  15. Magnetic field dynamos and magnetically triggered flow instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefani, F.; Albrecht, T.; Arlt, R.; Christen, M.; Gailitis, A.; Gellert, M.; Giesecke, A.; Goepfert, O.; Herault, J.; Kirillov, O. N.; Mamatsashvili, G.; Priede, J.; Rüdiger, G.; Seilmayer, M.; Tilgner, A.; Vogt, T.

    2017-07-01

    The project A2 of the LIMTECH Alliance aimed at a better understanding of those magnetohydrodynamic instabilities that are relevant for the generation and the action of cosmic magnetic fields. These comprise the hydromagnetic dynamo effect and various magnetically triggered flow instabilities, such as the magnetorotational instability and the Tayler instability. The project was intended to support the experimental capabilities to become available in the framework of the DREsden Sodium facility for DYNamo and thermohydraulic studies (DRESDYN). An associated starting grant was focused on the dimensioning of a liquid metal experiment on the newly found magnetic destabilization of rotating flows with positive shear. In this survey paper, the main results of these two projects are summarized.

  16. Confinement of ripple-trapped slowing-down ions by a radial electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, W.

    1998-03-01

    Weakly collisional ions trapped in the toroidal field ripples at the outer plasma edge can be prevented to escape the plasma due to grad B-drift by a counteracting radial electric field. This leads to an increase in the density of ripple-trapped ions, which can be monitored by the analysis of charge exchange neutrals. The minimum radial electric field E r necessary to confine ions with energy E and charge q (q=-1: charge of the electron) is E r = -E/(q * R), where R is the major radius at the measuring point. Slowing-down ions from neutral injection are usually in the right energy range to be sufficiently collisionless in the plasma edge and show the confinement by radial electric fields in the range of tens of kV/m. The density of banana ions is almost unaffected by the radial electric field. Neither in L/H- nor in H/L-transitions does the density of ripple-trapped ions and, hence, the neutral particle fluxes, show jumps in times shorter than 1 ms. According to [1,2] the response time of the density and the fluxes to a sudden jump in the radial electric field is less than 200 μs, if the halfwidth of the electric field is larger or about 2 cm. This would exclude rapid jumps in the radial electric field at the transition. Whether the halfwidth of the electric field is that large during transition cannot be decided from the measurement of the fluxes alone. (orig.)

  17. Electrical conductivity of quark matter in magnetic field

    OpenAIRE

    Kerbikov, B.; Andreichikov, M.

    2011-01-01

    Fermion currents in dense quark matter embedded into magnetic field are under intense discussions motivated by Chiral Magnetic Effect. We argue that conductivity of quark matter may be independent of the magnetic field direction and not proportional to the magnetic field strength.

  18. Parahydrogen discriminated PHIP at low magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prina, I.; Buljubasich, L.; Acosta, R. H.

    2015-02-01

    Parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) is a powerful hyperpolarization technique. However, as the signal created has an anti-phase characteristic, it is subject to signal cancellation when the experiment is carried out in inhomogeneous magnetic fields or in low fields that lack the necessary spectral resolution. The use of benchtop spectrometers and time domain (TD) analyzers has continuously grown in the last years and many applications are found in the food industry, for non-invasive compound detection or as a test bench for new contrast agents among others. In this type of NMR devices the combination of low and inhomogeneous magnetic fields renders the application of PHIP quite challenging. We have recently shown that the acquisition of J-spectra in high magnetic fields not only removes the anti-phase peak cancellation but also produces a separation of thermal from hyperpolarized signals, providing Parahydrogen Discriminated (PhD-PHIP) spectra. In this work we extend the use of PhD-PHIP to low and inhomogeneous fields. In this case the strong coupling found for the protons of the sample renders spin-echo spectra that have a great complexity, however, a central region in the spectrum with only hyperpolarized signal is clearly identified. This experimental approach is ideal for monitoring real time chemical reaction of pure PHIP signals.

  19. Theoretical and experimental study of trapped particle echoes in a magnetic mirror machine. Application to diffusion study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatelier, Michel.

    1976-01-01

    A simple mechanical model is used to investigate the various physical mechanisms originating the echoes. The model is applied to nuclear spins and echoes from particles trapped in a magnetostatic well. The theory of echoes from trapped ions in a magnetic machine is developed. The effects that may be observed when two magnetic perturbations are applied to the plasma are described. Diffusion effects in the velocity space are then taken into account when the diffusion is due either to Coulomb collisions or to a microturbulence at the ion cyclotron frequency. The experimental results obtained with the DECA II B machine are described. Emphasis is put upon the effects observed when magnetic perturbations are applied to the plasma and echoes observation independently of the diffusion study, as it is the first time that trapped particle echoes are observed in a hot plasma [fr

  20. Nonadiabatic transitions in electrostatically trapped ammonia molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirste, Moritz; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard; Sartakov, Boris G.

    2009-01-01

    Nonadiabatic transitions are known to be major loss channels for atoms in magnetic traps but have thus far not been experimentally reported upon for trapped molecules. We have observed and quantified losses due to nonadiabatic transitions for three isotopologues of ammonia in electrostatic traps by comparing the trapping times in traps with a zero and a nonzero electric field at the center. Nonadiabatic transitions are seen to dominate the overall loss rate even for the present samples that are at relatively high temperatures of 30 mK. It is anticipated that losses due to nonadiabatic transitions in electric fields are omnipresent in ongoing experiments on cold molecules.

  1. Faraday diamagnetism under slowly oscillating magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Tsunehisa; Kimura, Fumiko; Kimura, Yosuke

    2018-04-01

    Diamagnetism is a universal phenomenon of materials arising from the orbital motion of electrons bound to atoms, which is commonly known as Langevin diamagnetism. The orbital motion also occurs according to the Faraday's law of induction when the applied magnetic field is oscillating. However, the influence of this dynamic effect on the magnetism of materials has seldom been studied. Here, we propose a new type diamagnetism coined Faraday diamagnetism. The magnitude of this diamagnetism evaluated by an atomic electric circuit model was as large as that of Langevin diamagnetism. The predicted scale of Faraday diamagnetism was supported by experiments.

  2. Navigation: Bat orientation using Earth's magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holland, Richard A.; Thorup, Kasper; Vonhof, Maarten J.

    2006-01-01

    Bats famously orientate at night by echolocation 1 , but this works over only a short range, and little is known about how they navigate over longer distances 2 . Here we show that the homing behaviour of Eptesicus fuscus, known as the big brown bat, can be altered by artificially shifting...... the Earth's magnetic field, indicating that these bats rely on a magnetic compass to return to their home roost. This finding adds to the impressive array of sensory abilities possessed by this animal for navigation in the dark....

  3. Primordial magnetic field amplification from turbulent reheating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calzetta, Esteban; Kandus, Alejandra

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the possibility of primordial magnetic field amplification by a stochastic large scale kinematic dynamo during reheating. We consider a charged scalar field minimally coupled to gravity. During inflation this field is assumed to be in its vacuum state. At the transition to reheating the state of the field changes to a many particle/anti-particle state. We characterize that state as a fluid flow of zero mean velocity but with a stochastic velocity field. We compute the scale-dependent Reynolds number Re(k), and the characteristic times for decay of turbulence, t d and pair annihilation t a , finding t a d . We calculate the rms value of the kinetic helicity of the flow over a scale L and show that it does not vanish. We use this result to estimate the amplification factor of a seed field from the stochastic kinematic dynamo equations. Although this effect is weak, it shows that the evolution of the cosmic magnetic field from reheating to galaxy formation may well be more complex than as dictated by simple flux freezing

  4. The magnetic field dependent dynamic properties of magnetorheological elastomers based on hard magnetic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Qianqian; Wang, Yu; Gong, Xinglong

    2017-07-01

    In this study, novel magnetorheological elastomers based on hard magnetic particles (H-MREs) were developed and the magnetic field dependent dynamic properties of the H-MREs were further investigated. The storage modulus of H-MREs could not only be increased by increasing magnetic field but also be decreased by the increasing magnetic field of opposite orientation. For the anisotropic H-MREs with 80 wt% NdFeB particles, the field-induced increasing and decreasing modulus was 426 kPa and 118 kPa respectively. Moreover, the dynamic performances of H-MREs significantly depended on the pre-structure magnetic field, magnetizing field and test magnetic field. The H-MREs were initially magnetized and formed the chain-like microstructure by the pre-structure magnetic field. The field-induced increasing and decreasing modulus of H-MREs both raised with increasing of the magnetizing field. When the magnetizing field increased from 400 to 1200 kA m-1, the field induced decreasing modulus of the 80 wt% isotropic H-MREs raised from 3 to 47 kPa. The magnetic field dependent curves of H-MREs’ storage modulus were asymmetric if the magnetizing field was higher than the test magnetic field. Based on the dipolar model of MREs and magnetic properties of hard magnetic material, a reasonable explanation was proposed to understand the H-MREs’ field dependent mechanical behaviors.

  5. An atlas of photospheric magnetic field observations and computed coronal magnetic fields: 1976-1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeksema, J. T.; Scherrer, P. H.

    1986-01-01

    Daily magnetogram observations of the large-scale photospheric magnetic field have been made at the John M. Wilcox Solar Observatory at Stanford since May of 1976. These measurements provide a homogeneous record of the changing solar field through most of solar cycle 21. Using the photospheric data, the configuration of the coronal and heliospheric fields can be calculated using a Potential Field-Source Surface model. This provides a three-dimensional picture of the heliospheric field evolution during the solar cycle. This paper announces the publication of UAG Report No. 94, an Atlas containing the complete set of synoptic charts of the measured photospheric magnetic field, the computed field at the source surface, and the coefficients of the multipole expansion of the coronal field. The general underlying structures of the solar and heliospheric fields, which determine the environment for solar-terrestrial relations and provide the context within which solar activity related events occur, can be approximated from these data.

  6. Magnetic field effect in organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niedermeier, Ulrich

    2009-12-14

    The discovery of a magnetic field dependent resistance change of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) in the year 2003 has attracted considerable scientific and industrial research interest. However, despite previous progress in the field of organic spin-electronics, the phenomenon of the ''organic magnetoresistance (OMR) effect'' is not yet completely understood. In order to improve the understanding of the microscopic mechanisms which ultimately cause the OMR effect, experimental investigations as well as theoretical considerations concerning the OMR are addressed in this thesis. In polymer-based OLED devices the functional dependencies of the OMR effect on relevant parameters like magnetic field, operating voltage, operating current and temperature are investigated. Based on these results, previously published models for potential OMR mechanisms are critically analyzed and evaluated. Finally, a concept for the OMR effect is favored which suggests magnetic field dependent changes of the spin state of electron-hole pairs as being responsible for changes in current flow and light emission in OLEDs. In the framework of this concept it is possible to explain all results from own measurements as well as results from literature. Another important finding made in this thesis is the fact that the value of the OMR signal in the investigated OLED devices can be enhanced by appropriate electrical and optical conditioning processes. In particular, electrical conditioning causes a significant enhancement of the OMR values, while at the same time it has a negative effect on charge carrier transport and optical device characteristics. These results can be explained by additional results from charge carrier extraction measurements which suggest that electrical conditioning leads to an increase in the number of electronic trap states inside the emission layer of the investigated OLED devices. The positive influence of trap states on the OMR effect is

  7. PSI-ECRIT(S) a hybrid magnetic system with a mirror ratio of 10 for H-like heavy ion production and trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Biri, S; Hitz, D

    1999-01-01

    At the Paul Scherrer Institut ( PSI, Switzerland) an experimental program is started to measure the ground state shift and width of pionic hydrogen. To calibrate the crystal spectrometer X-ray transitions in hydrogen-like heavy ions (e.g. Ar17+) produced by ECR ion sources, are necessary. In PSI a superconducting cyclotron trap magnet originally developed for high energy experiments will be transformed into an ECR Ion Trap (ECRIT). The SC-magnet can deliver more than 4 Tesla magnetic fields with a mirror ratio of 2. A careful calculation showed this mirror ratio can be increased upto 10 and the trap can operate with frequencies between 5 and 20 GHz. To form a closed resonance zone a relatively large open structure (LBL-AECRU-type) NdFeB hexapole will be applied. The first tests will be performed with 6.4 GHz. Later higher frequencies (10 or 14.5 GHz) and the 2-frequency heating (6.4+10, 6.4+14.5 or 10+14.5) are planned to be applied to get enough quantity of H-like heavy ions. Since the main goal of this mach...

  8. Measurement of the CMS Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00096921; Bergsma, F.; Campi, D.; Cure, B.; Gaddi, A.; Gerwig, H.; Herve, A.; Korienek, J.; Linde, F.; Lindenmeyer, C.; Loveless, R.; Mulders, M.; Nebel, T.; Smith, R.P.; Stickland, D.; Teafoe, G.; Veillet, L.; Zimmerman, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of the magnetic field in the tracking volume inside the superconducting coil of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector under construction at CERN is done with a fieldmapper designed and produced at Fermilab. The fieldmapper uses 10 3-D B-sensors (Hall probes) developed at NIKHEF and calibrated at CERN to precision 0.05% for a nominal 4 T field. The precise fieldmapper measurements are done in 33840 points inside a cylinder of 1.724 m radius and 7 m long at central fields of 2, 3, 3.5, 3.8, and 4 T. Three components of the magnetic flux density at the CMS coil maximum excitation and the remanent fields on the steel-air interface after discharge of the coil are measured in check-points with 95 3-D B-sensors located near the magnetic flux return yoke elements. Voltages induced in 22 flux-loops made of 405-turn installed on selected segments of the yoke are sampled online during the entire fast discharge (190 s time-constant) of the CMS coil and integrated offline to provide a measurement of the...

  9. Validation of the CMS Magnetic Field Map

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00096921; Amapane, N.; Ball, A.; Curé, B.; Gaddi, A.; Gerwig, H.; Mulders, M.; Calvelli, V.; Hervé, A.; Loveless, R.

    2014-10-26

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector, designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive features include a 4-T superconducting solenoid with 6-m-diameter by 12.5-m-length free bore, enclosed inside a 10,000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. The return yoke consists of five dodecagonal three-layered barrel wheels and four end-cap disks at each end comprised of steel blocks up to 620 mm thick, which serve as the absorber plates of the muon detection system. To measure the field in and around the steel, a system of 22 flux loops and 82 three-dimensional (3-D) Hall sensors is installed on the return yoke blocks. A TOSCA 3-D model of the CMS magnet is developed to describe the magnetic field everywhere outside the tracking volume measured with the field-mapping machine. The magnetic field description is compared with the measurements and discussed.

  10. Influence of magnetic field configuration on magnetohydrodynamic waves in Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezek, Nicholas; Buffett, Bruce

    2018-04-01

    We develop a numerical model to study magnetohydrodynamic waves in a thin layer of stratified fluid near the surface of Earth's core. Past studies have been limited to using simple background magnetic field configurations. However, the choice of field distribution can dramatically affect the structure and frequency of the waves. To permit a more general treatment of background magnetic field and layer stratification, we combine finite volume and Fourier methods to describe the wave motions. We validate our model by comparisons to previous studies and examine the influence of background magnetic field configuration on two types of magnetohydrodynamic waves. We show that the structure of zonal Magnetic-Archimedes-Coriolis (MAC) waves for a dipole background field is unstable to small perturbations of the field strength in the equatorial region. Modifications to the wave structures are computed for a range of field configurations. In addition, we show that non-zonal MAC waves are trapped near the equator for realistic magnetic field distributions, and that their latitudinal extent depends upon the distribution of magnetic field strength at the CMB.

  11. Photo-excited charge collection spectroscopy probing the traps in field-effect transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Im, Seongil; Kim, Jae Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Solid state field-effect devices such as organic and inorganic-channel thin-film transistors (TFTs) have been expected to promote advances in display and sensor electronics. The operational stabilities of such TFTs are thus important, strongly depending on the nature and density of charge traps present at the channel/dielectric interface or in the thin-film channel itself. This book contains how to characterize these traps, starting from the device physics of field-effect transistor (FET). Unlike conventional analysis techniques which are away from well-resolving spectral results, newly-introduced photo-excited charge-collection spectroscopy (PECCS) utilizes the photo-induced threshold voltage response from any type of working transistor devices with organic-, inorganic-, and even nano-channels, directly probing on the traps. So, our technique PECCS has been discussed through more than ten refereed-journal papers in the fields of device electronics, applied physics, applied chemistry, nano-devices and materia...

  12. Trapping and breaking of in vivo nicked DNA during pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sharik R.; Kuzminov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) offers a high-resolution approach to quantify chromosomal fragmentation in bacteria, measured as percent of chromosomal DNA entering the gel. The degree of separation in PFG depends upon the size of DNA, as well as various conditions of electrophoresis, such as electric field strength (FS), time of electrophoresis, switch time and buffer composition. Here we describe a new parameter, the structural integrity of the sample DNA itself, that influences its migration through PFGs. We show that sub-chromosomal fragments containing both spontaneous and DNA damage-induced nicks are prone to breakage during PFGE. Such breakage at single strand interruptions results in artefactual decrease in molecular weight of linear DNA making accurate determination of the number of double strand breaks difficult. While breakage of nicked sub-chromosomal fragments is FS-independent, some high molecular weight sub-chromosomal fragments are also trapped within wells under the standard PFGE conditions. This trapping can be minimized by lowering the field strength and increasing the time of electrophoresis. We discuss how breakage of nicked DNA may be mechanistically linked to trapping. Our results suggest how to optimize conditions for PFGE when quantifying chromosomal fragmentation induced by DNA damage. PMID:23770235

  13. Magnetic field control of hysteretic switching in Co/Al2O3 multilayers by carrier injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Kalitsov

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We propose a theoretical model of magnetic field dependence of hysteretic switching in magnetic granular system. The model is based on the self-trapped electrons mechanism. Our calculations show that the switching voltage may be significantly decreased with increasing the magnetic field. The underlying mechanism is the influence of the magnetic field on electron occupation of the conduction band, which depends on the materials used in magnetic granular system, concentration of magnetic granules in the insulating matrix, applied voltage, and the charge accumulation on the granules. We support our theoretical calculations by measuring the magnetic field dependence of resistive switching behaviour in Co/Al2O3 granular multilayers. Our experimental results are in qualitative agreement with the proposed theory.

  14. Interplanetary Magnetic Field Guiding Relativistic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, S.; Demoulin, P.; Dasso, S.; Klein, K. L.

    2011-01-01

    The origin and the propagation of relativistic solar particles (0.5 to few Ge V) in the interplanetary medium remains a debated topic. These relativistic particles, detected at the Earth by neutron monitors have been previously accelerated close to the Sun and are guided by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) lines, connecting the acceleration site and the Earth. Usually, the nominal Parker spiral is considered for ensuring the magnetic connection to the Earth. However, in most GLEs the IMF is highly disturbed, and the active regions associated to the GLEs are not always located close to the solar footprint of the nominal Parker spiral. A possible explanation is that relativistic particles are propagating in transient magnetic structures, such as Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs). In order to check this interpretation, we studied in detail the interplanetary medium where the particles propagate for 10 GLEs of the last solar cycle. Using the magnetic field and the plasma parameter measurements (ACE/MAG and ACE/SWEPAM), we found widely different IMF configurations. In an independent approach we develop and apply an improved method of the velocity dispersion analysis to energetic protons measured by SoHO/ERNE. We determined the effective path length and the solar release time of protons from these data and also combined them with the neutron monitor data. We found that in most of the GLEs, protons propagate in transient magnetic structures. Moreover, the comparison between the interplanetary magnetic structure and the interplanetary length suggest that the timing of particle arrival at Earth is dominantly determined by the type of IMF in which high energetic particles are propagating. Finally we find that these energetic protons are not significantly scattered during their transport to Earth.

  15. NMR in rotating magnetic fields: Magic angle field spinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakellariou, D.; Meriles, C.; Martin, R.; Pines, A.

    2004-09-10

    Magic angle sample spinning has been one of the cornerstones in high-resolution solid state NMR. Spinning frequencies nowadays have increased by at least one order of magnitude over the ones used in the first experiments and the technique has gained tremendous popularity. It is currently a routine procedure in solid-state NMR, high-resolution liquid-state NMR and solid-state MRI. The technique enhances the spectral resolution by averaging away rank 2 anisotropic spin interactions thereby producing isotropic-like spectra with resolved chemical shifts and scalar couplings. Andrew proposed that it should be possible to induce similar effects in a static sample if the direction of the magnetic field is varied, e.g., magic-angle rotation of the B0 field (B0-MAS) and this has been recently demonstrated using electromagnetic field rotation. Here we discuss on the possibilities to perform field rotation using alternative hardware, together with spectroscopic methods to recover isotropic resolution even in cases where the field is not rotating at the magic angle. Extension to higher magnetic fields would be beneficial in situations where the physical manipulation of the sample is inconvenient or impossible. Such situations occur often in materials or biomedical samples where ''ex-situ'' NMR spectroscopy and imaging analysis is needed.

  16. Electric and magnetic fields at power frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Anthony B; Green, Lois M

    2010-01-01

    Exposures to electric and magnetic fields are among the most ubiquitous exposures that the Canadian population experiences. Sources of electric and magnetic field exposures may be occupational or residential and include proximity to certain types of electrical equipment, transmission and distribution power lines as well as appliance use. The early studies of children tended toward a consistent association between risks for leukemia and brain cancer and residential proximity to power lines having high wire configuration. More recent studies-and studies which have attempted to improve upon the measurement of exposure by using calculated fields, point-in-time or personal monitoring-have been inconsistent, with some suggesting increased risk and others not. Occupational exposures have suggested an increase in risk for leukemia, and to a lesser extent brain cancer and Non-Hodgkin lymphoma. However, studies of residential exposures and cancer in adults generally have suggested no effect. Laboratory work has been unable to demonstrate a biological mechanism which might explain the epidemiological findings. In spite of extensive efforts over the past 20 years and many expert reviews, it has been difficult to reach consensus regarding the carcinogenic effects of electric and magnetic fields. Exposure assessment has proven to be complex, and agreement on the relevant exposure metric has not yet been obtained. There is justification to question whether point-in-time measures in homes are appropriate indices of the relevant etiological exposure, as they fail to account for changes over time, peak exposures or time-varying fields. Nevertheless, it is probably desirable to err on the side of caution in not placing too much weight on the inconsistencies. The IARC has classified EMF as a "possible carcinogen" which refers to the circumstances where there is limited evidence of carcinogenicity in humans and inadequate evidence in experimental animals. The IARC review indicated

  17. Statistical planning for a neutron lifetime experiment using magnetically trapped neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coakley, K.J. [Nat. Inst. of Stand. and Technol., Boulder, CO (United States). Stat. Eng. Div.

    1998-04-11

    At the NIST cold neutron research facility, a two-stage experiment will be repeated many times. During the first stage of each run cycle, ultracold neutrons will be produced and confined in a magnetic trap filled with superfluid {sup 4}He. Ultracold neutrons will result when cold (8.9 A) neutrons undergo inelastic scattering in the superfluid helium. After filling the trap to a desired level, decay events will be recorded as a function of time. Detection is possible because the charged particles created by neutron decay generate detectable scintillations in the helium. In addition to neutron decay events, background events will be recorded. I model the background as a stationary Poisson process. By Monte Carlo methods, I study the performance of two nonlinear algorithms for estimating the mean lifetime of the neutron. In one method, the event time data are summarized as a histogram where the bin widths vary. I select the time endpoints of the bins so that the expected number of counts per bin contributed by the decay process is approximately constant. In the second method, the lifetime is estimated from the complete sequence of event times. The histogram method yields a less variable estimate than does the complete data estimation method. The allocation of time between the fill and decay stages affects the precision of the estimate. To get the optimal time allocation, I minimize the asymptotic variance of the estimated mean lifetime (estimated from the pooled histogram data from all cycles) given knowledge of the rate at which neutrons enter the trap and parameters which characterize the background. The mean lifetime estimate is biased. I observe bias reduction when estimating the lifetime from data pooled from many cycles (rather than averaging estimates from each of the cycles). (orig.) 14 refs.

  18. Magnetic Field Water Treatment Section - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopec, M.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: In the last year the activity of the team was focused on industrial implementing of methods developed, as well as on designing and implementing devices for magnetohydrodynamic water treatment and water filtration in the magnetic field. - Phase 1 of research for Ostrowiec Steelworks in Ostrowiec Swietokrzyski (IFJ N-3454 Research) on the possibilities of implementation of the methods of magnetohydrodynamic water treatment in water and sewage circuits, as well as of the method of filtration in the magnetic field were completed. In this part of research, phase analyses of deposits from water and sewage circuits were carried out. In the rolling mill circuit of Ostrowiec Steelworks, a magnetic filter with a capacity of 200 m 3 /h, designed in the Institute of Nuclear Physics was installed and tested. Implementation of this filter is predicted for the year 1999. - Research for the Kozienice Power Station in Swierze Gorne (IFJ N-3450 Research) on determination of the phase composition of total suspended solids in water-steam circuits was completed. - A preliminary evaluation was completed on economic effects of implementation of the prototype magnetic filter FM-500 which has been operational since 1993 in the circuit of turbine condensate cleaning in the 225 MW unit in the power station in Polaniec. (author)

  19. New Methods of Magnetic Field Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholtygin, A. F.

    2015-04-01

    The standard methods of magnetic field measurements, based on the relation between the Stokes V parameter and the first derivative of the line profile intensity were modified by applying a linear integral transform to both sides of this relation. We used the wavelet integral transform with the DOG wavelets. The key advantage of the proposed method is the effective suppression of the noise contribution both to the line profile and the Stokes V parameter. To test the proposed method, spectropolarimetric observations of the young O star θ1 Ori C were used. We also demonstrate that the smoothed Time Variation Spectra (smTVS) can be used as a tool for detecting the local stellar magnetic fields.

  20. Modified methods of stellar magnetic field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholtygin, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    The standard methods of the magnetic field measurement, based on an analysis of the relation between the Stokes V-parameter and the first derivative of the total line profile intensity, were modified by applying a linear integral operator \\hat{L} to both sides of this relation. As the operator \\hat{L}, the operator of the wavelet transform with DOG-wavelets is used. The key advantage of the proposed method is an effective suppression of the noise contribution to the line profile and the Stokes parameter V. The efficiency of the method has been studied using model line profiles with various noise contributions. To test the proposed method, the spectropolarimetric observations of the A0 star α2 CVn, the Of?p star HD 148937, and the A0 supergiant HD 92207 were used. The longitudinal magnetic field strengths calculated by our method appeared to be in good agreement with those determined by other methods.

  1. Frictional Coulomb drag in strong magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønsager, Martin Christian; Flensberg, Karsten; Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

    1997-01-01

    A treatment of frictional Coulomb drag between two two-dimensional electron layers in a strong perpendicular magnetic field, within the independent electron picture, is presented. Assuming fully resolved Landau levels, the linear response theory expression for the transresistivity rho(21) is eval......A treatment of frictional Coulomb drag between two two-dimensional electron layers in a strong perpendicular magnetic field, within the independent electron picture, is presented. Assuming fully resolved Landau levels, the linear response theory expression for the transresistivity rho(21......) is evaluated using diagrammatic techniques. The transresistivity is given by an integral over energy and momentum transfer weighted by the product of the screened interlayer interaction and the phase space for scattering events. We demonstrate, by a numerical analysis of the transresistivity, that for well...

  2. Improving Magnet Designs With High and Low Field Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden; Smith, Anders

    2011-01-01

    A general scheme for increasing the difference in magnetic flux density between a high and a low magnetic field region by removing unnecessary magnet material is presented. This is important in, e.g., magnetic refrigeration where magnet arrays have to deliver high field regions in close proximity...... to low field regions. Also, a general way to replace magnet material with a high permeability soft magnetic material where appropriate is discussed. As an example, these schemes are applied to a two dimensional concentric Halbach cylinder design resulting in a reduction of the amount of magnet material...

  3. Dynamics of charge carrier trapping in NO2 sensors based on ZnO field-effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andringa, A.; Vlietstra, N.; Smits, E.C.P.; Spijkman, M.J.; Gomes, H.L.; Klootwijk, J.H.; Blom, P.W.M.; Leeuw, D.M. de

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) detection with ZnO field-effect transistors is based on changes in the threshold voltage caused by charge carriertrapping. Here we investigate the dynamics of charge trapping and recovery as a function of temperature. The threshold voltage shifts for both trapping and recovery

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging at Ultrahigh Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uğurbil, Kamil

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of 4 T human systems in three academic laboratories circa 1990, rapid progress in imaging and spectroscopy studies in humans at 4 T and animal model systems at 9.4 T have led to the introduction of 7 T and higher magnetic fields for human investigation at about the turn of the century. Work conducted on these platforms has demonstrated the existence of significant advantages in SNR and biological information content at these ultrahigh fields, as well as the presence of numerous challenges. Primary difference from lower fields is the deviation from the near field regime; at the frequencies corresponding to hydrogen resonance conditions at ultrahigh fields, the RF is characterized by attenuated traveling waves in the human body, which leads to image nonuniformities for a given sample-coil configuration because of interferences. These nonuniformities were considered detrimental to the progress of imaging at high field strengths. However, they are advantageous for parallel imaging for signal reception and parallel transmission, two critical technologies that account, to a large extend, for the success of ultrahigh fields. With these technologies, and improvements in instrumentation and imaging methods, ultra-high fields have provided unprecedented gains in imaging of brain function and anatomy, and started to make inroads into investigation of the human torso and extremities. As extensive as they are, these gains still constitute a prelude to what is to come given the increasingly larger effort committed to ultrahigh field research and development of ever better instrumentation and techniques. PMID:24686229

  5. Estafette of drift resonances, stochasticity and control of particle motion in a toroidal magnetic trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishkin, Alexander A. [Institute of Plasma Physics, National Science Center, Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2001-02-01

    A new method of particle motion control in toroidal magnetic traps with rotational transform using the estafette of drift resonances and stochasticity of particle trajectories is proposed. The use of the word estafette' here means that the particle passes through a set of resonances in consecutive order from one to another during its motion. The overlapping of adjacent resonances can be moved radially from the center to the edge of the plasma by switching on the corresponding perturbations in accordance with a particular rule in time. In this way particles (e.g. cold alpha-particle) can be removed from the center of the confinement volume to the plasma periphery. For the analytical treatment of the stochastic behaviour of particle motion the stochastic diffusion coefficients D{sub r,}r, D{sub r,{theta}}, D{sub {theta}}{sub ,{theta}} are introduced. The new approach is demonstrated by numerical computations of the test helium particle trajectories in the toroidal trap Large Helical Device. (author)

  6. Neutron lifetime experiments using magnetically trapped neutrons: optimal background correction strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coakley, K.J. E-mail: kevin.coakley@nist.gov

    2001-08-21

    In the first stage of each run of a neutron lifetime experiment, a magnetic trap is filled with neutrons. In the second stage of each run, decay events plus background events are observed. In a separate experiment, background is measured. The mean lifetime is estimated by fitting a two parameter exponential model to the background-corrected data. For two models of the background signal, I determine the optimal ratio of the number of 'background-only' measurements to the number of primary 'neutron decay plus background' measurements. Further, for each run, I determine the optimal allocation of time for filling and for observing decay events. For the case where the background consists of an activated material (aluminum) plus a stationary Poisson process, the asymptotic standard error of the lifetime estimate computed from the background-corrected data is lower than the asymptotic standard error computed from the uncorrected data. For the case where the background is a stationary Poisson process, background correction is desirable provided that the background intensity is sufficiently small compared to the rate at which neutrons enter the trap.

  7. Flatland Electrons in High Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayegan, M.

    This paper provides a review of recent developments in the physics of two-dimensional carrier systems in perpendicular magnetic fields. The emphasis is on many-body phenomena in very clean GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures, probed via magnetotransport measurements. Topics that are discussed include the integer and fractional quantum Hall effects, Wigner crystallization, composite Fermions, Skyrmions, stripe and bubble phases in single layer systems, and electron-hole pairing and Bose-Einstein condensation in interacting bilayer systems.

  8. Ground Vehicle Navigation Using Magnetic Field Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT/DEE/ENG/12-17 Ground Vehicle Navigation Using Magnetic Field Variation DISSERTATION Presented to...or groundwater content due to “deep subsurface fractures” [8]. Volcanoes and even man-made occurrences such as filling a large reservoir after a dam...Gradient Data from Effigy Mounds National Park, Iowa ”, 2005. URL http://www.archaeology-geophysics.com/Publications.html. 168 24. Judd, T. and T. Vu. “Use

  9. Mitigated-force carriage for high magnetic field environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludtka, Gerard M.; Ludtka, Gail M.; Wilgen, John B.; Murphy, Bart L.

    2015-05-19

    A carriage for high magnetic field environments includes a plurality of work-piece separators disposed in an operable relationship with a work-piece processing magnet having a magnetic field strength of at least 1 Tesla for supporting and separating a plurality of work-pieces by a preselected, essentially equal spacing, so that, as a first work-piece is inserted into the magnetic field, a second work-piece is simultaneously withdrawn from the magnetic field, so that an attractive magnetic force imparted on the first work-piece offsets a resistive magnetic force imparted on the second work-piece.

  10. Neutron lifetime experiments using magnetically trapped neutrons optimal background correction strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Coakley, K J

    2001-01-01

    In the first stage of each run of a neutron lifetime experiment, a magnetic trap is filled with neutrons. In the second stage of each run, decay events plus background events are observed. In a separate experiment, background is measured. The mean lifetime is estimated by fitting a two parameter exponential model to the background-corrected data. For two models of the background signal, I determine the optimal ratio of the number of 'background-only' measurements to the number of primary 'neutron decay plus background' measurements. Further, for each run, I determine the optimal allocation of time for filling and for observing decay events. For the case where the background consists of an activated material (aluminum) plus a stationary Poisson process, the asymptotic standard error of the lifetime estimate computed from the background-corrected data is lower than the asymptotic standard error computed from the uncorrected data. For the case where the background is a stationary Poisson process, background corr...

  11. Magnetic hyperfine field at caesium in iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashworth, C.J.; Back, P.; Stone, N.J.; White, J.P.; Ohya, S.

    1990-01-01

    We report temperature dependence of nuclear orientation (NO), and the first observation of NMR/ON on Cs in iron. 132,136 Cs were implanted at room temperature into polycrystalline and single crystal iron. NO values for the (average) magnetic hyperfine field B hf (CsFe) are close to 34 T, intermediate between the value of 40.7 T found in on-line samples made at mK temperatures and the NMR/ON value of 27.8(2) T. The latter studies. The site/field distribution is briefly discussed. (orig.)

  12. Relativistic thermal plasmas - Effects of magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, S.; Lightman, A. P.

    1983-01-01

    Processes and equilibria in finite, relativistic, thermal plasmas are investigated, taking into account electron-positron creation and annihilation, photon production by internal processes, and photon production by a magnetic field. Inclusion of the latter extends previous work on such plasmas. The basic relations for thermal, Comptonized synchrotron emission are analyzed, including emission and absorption without Comptonization, Comptonized thermal synchrotron emission, and the Comptonized synchrotron and bremsstrahlung luminosities. Pair equilibria are calculated, including approximations and dimensionless parameters, the pair balance equation, maximum temperatures and field strengths, and individual models and cooling curves.

  13. Tunneling decay in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharpee, T.; Dykman, M.I.; Platzman, P.M.

    2002-01-01

    We provide a semiclassical theory of tunneling decay in a magnetic field and a three-dimensional potential of a general form. Because of broken time-reversal symmetry, the standard WKB technique has to be modified. The decay rate is found from the analysis of the Hamilton trajectories of the particle in complex phase space and time. In a magnetic field, the tunneling particle comes from beneath the barrier with a nonzero velocity. The exit location in the classically allowed region is obtained by matching the decaying and outgoing branches of the WKB wave function on a caustic of the set of the complex trajectories. The slope of the logarithm of the wave function sharply changes on the anti-Stokes surface where there occurs switching between different WKB branches. For potential wells that are parabolic near the minimum, we also provide a bounce-type formulation. The theory is applied to the models that are relevant to tunneling from correlated two-dimensional electron systems in a magnetic field parallel to the electron layer

  14. Magnetic separation technique for environmental water purification by strong magnetic field generator loading HTS bulk magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, T.; Tanaka, K.; Kimura, T.; Mimura, D.; Fukui, S.; Ogawa, J.; Sato, T.; Ooizumi, M.; Yokoyama, K.; Yamaguchi, M.

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic separation technique in combination with high temperature superconducting bulk magnets has been investigated to purify the ground water which has been used in the coolant system for the incinerator furnace to cool the burning gas. The experiment has been operated by means of the newly-built alternating channel type magnetic separating device. The separation ratios of ferromagnetic flocks including fine magnetite powder have been estimated by means of the high gradient magnetic separation method with small iron balls filled in the water channels. As the magnetic force acting on the magnetic particle is given by the product of a magnetization of the material and a gradient of magnetic field, and as the ferromagnetic stainless steel balls yield the steep gradient of magnetic field around them in a strong magnetic field, the system has exhibited a quite excellent performance with respect to the separation ratios. The separation ratios of the flocks which contain the magnetite powder with the values more than 50 ppm have remained over 80% for under the flow rates less than 5 L/min.

  15. Magnetic separation technique for environmental water purification by strong magnetic field generator loading HTS bulk magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, T.; Tanaka, K.; Kimura, T.; Mimura, D.; Fukui, S.; Ogawa, J.; Sato, T.; Ooizumi, M.; Yokoyama, K.; Yamaguchi, M.

    2010-11-01

    The magnetic separation technique in combination with high temperature superconducting bulk magnets has been investigated to purify the ground water which has been used in the coolant system for the incinerator furnace to cool the burning gas. The experiment has been operated by means of the newly-built alternating channel type magnetic separating device. The separation ratios of ferromagnetic flocks including fine magnetite powder have been estimated by means of the high gradient magnetic separation method with small iron balls filled in the water channels. As the magnetic force acting on the magnetic particle is given by the product of a magnetization of the material and a gradient of magnetic field, and as the ferromagnetic stainless steel balls yield the steep gradient of magnetic field around them in a strong magnetic field, the system has exhibited a quite excellent performance with respect to the separation ratios. The separation ratios of the flocks which contain the magnetite powder with the values more than 50 ppm have remained over 80% for under the flow rates less than 5 L/min.

  16. Waves on the surface of a magnetic fluid layer in a traveling magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, K.; Zeidis, I.; Naletova, V.A.; Turkov, V.A.

    2004-01-01

    The plane flow of a layer of incompressible viscous magnetic fluid with constant magnetic permeability under the action of a traveling magnetic field is analyzed. The strength of the magnetic field producing a sinusoidal traveling small-amplitude wave on the surface of a magnetic fluid is found. This flow can be used in designing mobile robots

  17. Field modeling for transcranial magnetic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thielscher, Axel; Antunes, Andre; Saturnino, Guilherme B

    2015-01-01

    ) improving the usability of the tools for field calculation to the level that they can be easily used by non-experts. We then introduce a new version of our pipeline for field calculations (www.simnibs.org) that substantially simplifies setting up and running TMS and tDCS simulations based on Finite......Electric field calculations based on numerical methods and increasingly realistic head models are more and more used in research on Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS). However, they are still far from being established as standard tools for the planning and analysis in practical applications...... of TMS. Here, we start by delineating three main challenges that need to be addressed to unravel their full potential. This comprises (i) identifying and dealing with the model uncertainties, (ii) establishing a clear link between the induced fields and the physiological stimulation effects, and (iii...

  18. Solar Polarimetry and Magnetic Field Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Toro Iniesta, J. C.

    2001-05-01

    The magnetic nature of most solar (spatially resolved or unresolved) structures is amply recognized. Magnetic fields of the Sun play a paramount rôle in the overall thermodynamic and dynamic state of our star. The main observable manifestation of solar magnetic fields is the polarization of light either through the Zeeman effect on spectral lines or through the Hanle effect (depolarization by very weak magnetic fields of light previously polarized by scattering). Hence, one can easily understand the increasing importance that polarimetry is experimenting continuously in solar physics. Under the title of this contribution a six-hour course was given during the summer school. Clearly, the limited extension allocated for the notes in these proceedings avoids an extensive account of the several topics discussed: 1) a description of light as an electromagnetic wave and the polarization properties of monochromatic, time-harmonic, plane waves; 2) the polarization properties of polychromatic light and, in particular, of quasi-monochromatic light; 3) the transformations of (partially) polarized light by linear optical systems and a description of the ways we measure the Stokes parameters by spatially and/or temporally modulating the polarimetric signal; 4) a discussion on specific problems relevant to solar polarimetry like seeing-induced and instrumental polarization, or modulation and demodulation, along with a brief description of current solar polarimeters; 5) the vector radiative transfer equation for polarized light and its links to the scalar one for unpolarized light, together with a summary of the Zeeman effect and its consequences on line formation in a magnetized stellar atmosphere; 7) an introduction of the paramount astrophysical problem, i.e., that of finding diagnostics that enable the solar physicist to interpret the observables in terms of the solar atmospheric quantities, including a discussion on contribution and response functions; and 8) a brief

  19. Field-ball milling induced anisotropy in magnetic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poudyal, Narayan [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Altuncevahir, Baki [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Chakka, Vamsi [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Chen Kanghua [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Black, Truman D [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Liu, J Ping [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Ding, Yong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Wang Zhonglin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2004-12-21

    Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B and Sm{sub 2}Co{sub 17} particles of submicrometre sizes have been prepared by ball milling in a magnetic field. Structural and magnetic characterization reveal that these submicrometre particles milled in a magnetic field, consisting of nanosize grains, exhibit strong magnetic anisotropy compared with the particles milled without a magnetic field. Based on in situ observations of the field-ball milling in a transparent container, the mechanism of field-induced anisotropy in the nanostructured hard magnetic particles is discussed. (rapid communication)

  20. High-field NMR using resistive and hybrid magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zhehong; Kwak, Hyung-Tae; Bird, Mark; Cross, Timothy; Gor'kov, Peter; Brey, William; Shetty, Kiran

    2008-03-01

    Resistive and resistive-superconducting hybrid magnets can generate dc magnetic fields much higher than conventional superconducting NMR magnets but the field spatial homogeneity and temporal stability are usually not sufficient for high-resolution NMR experiments. Hardware and technique development addressing these issues are presented for high-resolution NMR at magnetic fields up to 40 T. Passive ferromagnetic shimming and magic-angle spinning are used effectively to reduce the broadening from inhomogeneous magnetic field. A phase correction technique based on simultaneous heteronuclear detection is developed to compensate magnetic field fluctuations to achieve high spectral resolution.

  1. Observations of magnetic fields in diffuse clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, P. C.; Goodman, A. A.; Gusten, R.; Heiles, C.

    1995-03-01

    We report 32 statistically significant measurements of the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field strength, Bz, in four diffuse clouds, via the Zeeman effect in the 21 cm line of H I. The region near Magnani, Blitz, and Mundy 1985 (MBM) 27-30 in the Ursa Major complex has Bz greater than 4 micro-G throughout a filamentary region 15 pc long, with significant structure on scales as small as 1.6 pc. The greatest field strength measured in this cloud is 19 +/- 2 micro-G, greater than in most diffuse clouds by a factor approximately 2. Comparison of measurements with different telescopes suggests that the field strength at the map peak may be significantly greater than 19 micro-G on scales smaller than 1.6 pc. The magnetic and kinetic energy densities M and K in this cloud are comparable, within a factor 2 of 2 x 10-11ergs/cu cm, and greater than the gravitational energy density by a factor approximately 500. Among the four clouds surveyed, six positions where CO emission is a local maximim have essentially the same mean line-of-sight field strength, Bz approximately = 8 micro-G, as do four positions where CO emission is too weak to be detected. The similarity of M and K in the diffuse clouds discussed here, as well as in denser, self-gravitating clouds, suggests strong coupling between magnetic fields and gas motions in some interstellar clouds, independent of their self-gravity. This coupling probably arises from ion-neutral collisions, which allow propagation of MHD waves.

  2. Microscopic observation of magnetic bacteria in the magnetic field of a rotating permanent magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smid, Pieter; Shcherbakov, Valeriy; Petersen, Nikolai

    2015-09-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are ubiquitous and can be found in both freshwater and marine environments. Due to intracellular chains of magnetic single domain particles, they behave like swimming compass needles. In external magnetic fields like the Earth's magnetic field, a torque is acting on the chain. This will cause the bacterium to be rotated and aligned with the external field. The swimming direction of magnetotactic bacteria can be controlled with external magnetic fields, which makes it convenient to study them under a light microscope. Usually, a special set of coils arranged around a light microscope is used to control the swimming magnetotactic bacteria. Here, we present a simple mechanical system with a permanent magnet, which produces a rotating magnetic field of nearly constant amplitude in the focal plane of a light microscope. The device is placed beside the light microscope and easily adaptable to almost any microscope and thus convenient for field experiments. To describe the trajectories qualitatively, a theoretical model of the trajectories is presented. This device can be used to control the swimming direction of magnetotactic bacteria and also for studying their magnetic and hydrodynamic properties.

  3. Field-dependent dynamic responses from dilute magnetic nanoparticle dispersions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fock, Jeppe; Balceris, Christoph; Costo, Rocio

    2017-01-01

    The response of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to an oscillating magnetic field outside the linear response region is important for several applications including magnetic hyperthermia, magnetic resonance imaging and biodetection. The size and magnetic moment are two critical parameters for the pe...

  4. Iron-YBCO heterostructures and their application for trapped field superconducting motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granados, X; Bartolome, E; Obradors, X; Tornes, M; Rodrigues, L; Gawalek, W; McCulloch, M; Hughes, D Dew; Campbell, A; Coombs, T; Ausloos, M; Cloots, R

    2006-01-01

    In this work we report on the magnetic behavior of the heterostructures formed by bulk based YBCO rings and ferromagnetic yoke. The magnetization cycle has been performed by an In-Field Hall Mapping technique. A video-like recording of the magnetization process makes it possible to obtain the magnetization of selected areas. The current flowing through the superconducting rings can be deduced from the magnetic field maps. The displacement of the peak of magnetization due to the flux reversal produced by the magnetization of the yoke is also considered. These hybrid heterostructures formed by ferromagnetic and superconducting material have been applied in the construction of the rotor for a brushless AC motor. The design and construction of this machine was carried out within the framework of the TMR Network SUPERMACHINES. The rotor has been designed in a quadrupolar configuration by cutting large YBCO 'window frames' from seeded melt-textured single domain YBCO pellets. This rotor has been coupled to a conventional stator of copper coils wound on an iron armature. The stator can be excited both in bipolar or quadrupolar mode. We report on the behaviour of the motor after a field cooling process when excited in quadrupolar mode

  5. High magnetic field generation for laser-plasma experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, B. B.; Froula, D. H.; Davis, P. F.; Ross, J. S.; Fulkerson, S.; Bower, J.; Satariano, J.; Price, D.; Krushelnick, K.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2006-01-01

    An electromagnetic solenoid was developed to study the effect of magnetic fields on electron thermal transport in laser plasmas. The solenoid, which is driven by a pulsed power system supplying 30 kJ, achieves magnetic fields of 13 T. The field strength was measured on the solenoid axis with a magnetic probe and optical Zeeman splitting. The measurements agree well with analytical estimates. A method for optimizing the solenoid design to achieve magnetic fields exceeding 20 T is presented

  6. Suppressing drift chamber diffusion without magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Martoff, C J; Ohnuki, T; Spooner, N J C; Lehner, M

    2000-01-01

    The spatial resolution in drift chamber detectors for ionizing radiation is limited by diffusion of the primary electrons. A strong magnetic field along the drift direction is often applied (Fancher et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 161 (1979) 383) because it suppresses the transverse diffusion, improving the resolution but at considerable increase in cost and complexity. Here we show that transverse track diffusion can be strongly suppressed without any magnetic field. This is achieved by using a gas additive which reversibly captures primary ionization electrons, forming negative ions. The ions drift with thermal energies even at very high drift fields and low pressures (E/P=28.5 V/cm torr), and the diffusion decreases with increasing drift field. Upon arrival at the avalanche region of the chamber the negative ions are efficiently stripped and ordinary avalanche gain is obtained. Using this technique, r.m.s. transverse diffusion less than 200 mu m has been achieved over a 15 cm drift path at 40 torr with ze...

  7. Hydrogen molecular ion in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    The energy of the ground electronic state of H 2 /sup ts+/ is studied as a function of the internuclear separation R 12 , the angle theta, between the molecular axis and the magnetic field, and the field strength B. For small B the molecular diamagnetism reaches its maximum value when theta = π/2 and R 12 approx. =5 Bohr radii. This maximum value is about 50% greater than the diamagnetism of an isolated H atom. At large B the molecule shrinks due to magnetic compression of the electron wave function, and the molecular vibration frequencies increase substantially. A strong diamagnetic torque appears which tends to align the molecular axis along the field. This gives rise to a zero-point rotational oscillation about theta = 0 whose energy can substantially exceed that of the zero-point vibrational oscillation. The calculations presented indicate that even if the protons had infinite mass, the molecule would become unstable to dissociation at theta = π/2 in fields > or approx. =1.6 x 10 11 G

  8. Hydrogen atom in intense magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, V.; Kelly, D. C.

    1972-01-01

    The structure of a hydrogen atom situated in an intense magnetic field is investigaged. Three approaches are employed. An elementary Bohr picture establishes a crucial magnetic field strength, H sub a approximately equal to 5 x 10 to the 9th G. Fields in excess of H sub a are intense in that they are able to modify the characteristic atomic scales of length and binding energy. A second approach solves the Schrodinger equation by a combination of variational methods and perturbation theory. It yields analytic expressions for the wave functions and energy eigenvalues. A third approach determines the energy eigenvalues by reducing the Schrodinger equation to a one-dimensional wave equation, which is then solved numerically. Energy eigenvalues are tabulated for field strengths of 2 x 10 to the 10th G and 2 x 10 to the 12th G. It is found that at 2 x 10 to the 12th G the lowest energy eigenvalue is changed from -13.6 to about -180 eV in agreement with previous variational computations.

  9. Pressure, Chaotic Magnetic Fields and MHD Equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.R. Hudson & N. Nakajima

    2010-05-12

    Analyzes of plasma behavior often begin with a description of the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium, this being the simplest model capable of approximating macroscopic force balance. Ideal force balance is when the pressure gradient is supported by the Lorentz force, ∇p = j x B. We discuss the implications of allowing for a chaotic magnetic field on the solutions to this equation. We argue that the solutions are pathological and not suitable for numerical calculations. If the pressure and magnetic Field are continuous, the only non-trivial solutions have an uncountable infinity of discontinuities in the pressure gradient and current. The problems arise from the arbitrarily small length scales in the structure of the field, and the consequence of ideal force balance that the pressure is constant along the Field-lines, B • ∇p = 0. A simple method to ameliorate the singularities is to include a small but Finite perpendicular diffusion. A self-consistent set of equilibrium equations is described and some algorithmic approaches aimed at solving these equations are discussed.

  10. Interaction of Mutually Perpendicular Magnetic Fields in HTSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilyev Aleksandr Fedorovich

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article a problem of interaction of the crossed magnetic fields in superconductors is considered. Superconducting materials have nonlinear magnetic properties. It allows using a non-linear magnetic susceptibility for measurement of feeble magnetic fields. We place a wire of superconducting material in a constant parallel uniform magnetic field. Then we let through a wire the alternating current leak. Interaction of mutual and perpendicular variation magnetic fields, with adequate accuracy is described by Ginzburg-Landau's equations. Approximate solution of the written equations is received. The component of a magnetic field parallel to a wire contains a variable component. Frequency of a variable component of the magnetic field is equal to the doubled current frequency. Amplitude of the variable component of the magnetic field is proportional to strength of the constant magnetic field. The experimental installation for research of interaction of mutually perpendicular magnetic fields is created. The cylinder from HTSC of ceramics of the YBa2Cu3O7-x was used as a sensor. Dependence of amplitude of the second harmonica of a variation magnetic field on strength of a constant magnetic field is received.

  11. Radio Frequency Trap for Containment of Plasmas in Antimatter Propulsion Systems Using Rotating Wall Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, William Herbert, III (Inventor); Martin, James Joseph (Inventor); Lewis, Raymond A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A containment apparatus for containing a cloud of charged particles comprises a cylindrical vacuum chamber having a longitudinal axis. Within the vacuum chamber is a containment region. A magnetic field is aligned with the longitudinal axis of the vacuum chamber. The magnetic field is time invariant and uniform in strength over the containment region. An electric field is also aligned with the longitudinal axis of the vacuum chamber and the magnetic field. The electric field is time invariant, and forms a potential well over the containment region. One or more means are disposed around the cloud of particles for inducing a rotating electric field internal to the vacuum chamber. The rotating electric field imparts energy to the charged particles within the containment region and compress the cloud of particles. The means disposed around the outer surface of the vacuum chamber for inducing a rotating electric field are four or more segments forming a segmented ring, the segments conforming to the outer surface of the vacuum chamber. Each of the segments is energized by a separate alternating voltage. The sum of the voltages imposed on each segment establishes the rotating field. When four segments form a ring, the rotating field is obtained by a signal generator applying a sinusoidal signal phase delayed by 90,180 and 270 degrees in sequence to the four segments.

  12. Coronal rain in magnetic bipolar weak fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, C.; Keppens, R.; Fang, X.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: We intend to investigate the underlying physics for the coronal rain phenomenon in a representative bipolar magnetic field, including the formation and the dynamics of coronal rain blobs. Methods: With the MPI-AMRVAC code, we performed three dimensional radiative magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation with strong heating localized on footpoints of magnetic loops after a relaxation to quiet solar atmosphere. Results: Progressive cooling and in-situ condensation starts at the loop top due to radiative thermal instability. The first large-scale condensation on the loop top suffers Rayleigh-Taylor instability and becomes fragmented into smaller blobs. The blobs fall vertically dragging magnetic loops until they reach low-β regions and start to fall along the loops from loop top to loop footpoints. A statistic study of the coronal rain blobs finds that small blobs with masses of less than 1010 g dominate the population. When blobs fall to lower regions along the magnetic loops, they are stretched and develop a non-uniform velocity pattern with an anti-parallel shearing pattern seen to develop along the central axis of the blobs. Synthetic images of simulated coronal rain with Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly well resemble real observations presenting dark falling clumps in hot channels and bright rain blobs in a cool channel. We also find density inhomogeneities during a coronal rain "shower", which reflects the observed multi-stranded nature of coronal rain. Movies associated to Figs. 3 and 7 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  13. Superconducting niobium in high rf magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, G.

    1988-01-01

    The benefit of superconducting cavities for accelerator applications depends on the field and Q/sub 0/ levels which can be achieved reliably in mass producible multicell accelerating structures. The presently observed field and Q/sub 0/ limitations are caused by anomalous loss mechanisms which are not correlated with the intrinsic properties of the pure superconductor but rather due to defects or contaminants on the superconducting surface. The ultimate performance levels of clean superconducting cavities built from pure Nb will be given by the rf critical field and the surface resistance of the superconductor. In the first part of this paper a short survey is given of the maximum surface magnetic fields achieved in single-cell cavities. The results of model calculations for the thermal breakdown induced by very small defects and for the transition to the defect free case is discussed in part 2. In the last chapter, a discussion is given for the rf critical field of Nb on the basis of the Ginzburg-Landau Theory. It is shown that not only purity but also the homogeneity of the material should become important for the performance of superconducting Nb cavities at field levels beyond 100mT. Measurement results of the upper critical field for different grades of commercially available Nb sheet materials are given. 58 references, 20 figures, 1 table

  14. Tracing magnetic fields with aligned grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarian, A.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic fields play a crucial role in various astrophysical processes, including star formation, accretion of matter, transport processes (e.g., transport of heat), and cosmic rays. One of the easiest ways to determine the magnetic field direction is via polarization of radiation resulting from extinction or/and emission by aligned dust grains. Reliability of interpretation of the polarization maps in terms of magnetic fields depends on how well we understand the grain-alignment theory. Explaining what makes grains aligned has been one of the big issues of the modern astronomy. Numerous exciting physical effects have been discovered in the course of research undertaken in this field. As both the theory and observations matured, it became clear that the grain-alignment phenomenon is inherent not only in diffuse interstellar medium or molecular clouds but also is a generic property of the dust in circumstellar regions, interplanetary space and cometary comae. Currently the grain-alignment theory is a predictive one, and its results nicely match observations. Among its predictions is a subtle phenomenon of radiative torques. This phenomenon, after having stayed in oblivion for many years after its discovery, is currently viewed as the most powerful means of alignment. In this article, I shall review the basic physical processes involved in grain alignment, and the currently known mechanisms of alignment. I shall also discuss possible niches for different alignment mechanisms. I shall dwell on the importance of the concept of grain helicity for understanding of many properties of grain alignment, and shall demonstrate that rather arbitrarily shaped grains exhibit helicity when they interact with gaseous and radiative flows

  15. From the Gyration of Electrons to Cosmic Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Employing Bohr's quantum theory, the author deduces three limits, which correspond to the magnetic fields of white dwarfs, neutron stars and the strongest in the universe. The author discusses the possible origins of magnetic fields due to collapse of stars, which produces a magnetic field of 10[superscript 8] T. Although the complete analysis…

  16. Superconducting Sphere in an External Magnetic Field Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonov, Sergey N.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to give the intelligible procedure for undergraduate students to grasp proof of the fact that the magnetic field outside the hollow superconducting sphere (superconducting shell) coincides with the field of a point magnetic dipole both when an uniform external magnetic field is applied as when a ferromagnetic sphere…

  17. PHASE GRADIENT METHOD OF MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENTS IN ELECTRIC VEHICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. G. Ptitsyna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Operation of electric and hybrid vehicles demands real time magnetic field control, for instance, for fire and electromagnetic safety. The article deals with a method of magnetic field measurements onboard electric cars taking into account peculiar features of these fields. The method is based on differential methods of measurements, and minimizes the quantity of magnetic sensors.

  18. Magnetic field stabilization for high-accuracy mass measurements on exotic nuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Marie-Jeanne, M; Blaum, K; Djekic, S; Dworschak, M; Hager, U; Herlert, Alexander; Nagy, S; Savreux, R; Schweikhard, L; Stahl, S; Yazidjian, C; Nagy, Sz.

    2007-01-01

    The magnetic-field stability of a mass spectrometer plays a crucial role in precision mass measurements. In the case of mass determination of short-lived nuclides with a Penning trap, major causes of instabilities are temperature fluctuations in the vicinity of the trap and pressure fluctuations in the liquid helium cryostat of the superconducting magnet. Thus systems for the temperature and pressure stabilization of the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at the ISOLDE facility at CERN have been installed. A reduction of the fluctuations by at least one order of magnitude downto dT=+/-5mK and dp=+/-50mtorr has been achieved, which corresponds to a relative frequency change of 2.7x10^{-9} and 1.5x10^{-10}, respectively. With this stabilization the frequency determination with the Penning trap only shows a linear temporal drift over several hours on the 10 ppb level due to the finite resistance of the superconducting magnet coils.

  19. A demonstration of magnetic field optimization in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, S.

    2002-01-01

    The behaviors of trapped particles in helical ripples are complicated and would enhance the radial transport of energetic particles and thermal plasma (neoclassical transport) in heliotrons. Thus the improvement of energetic particle confinement and the reduction of the neoclassical transport are key issues for a future reactor based on the helical system. On the other hand, recent LHD and CHS experimental results have shown good plasma performances in the 'inward shifted' configurations, in which the ideal MHD stability analysis predicts instability. These facts suggest that the MHD stability problem is not a severe one for plasma confinement in heliotrons and makes it reasonable to consider shifting the magnetic axis further inwards in LHD where further improvement of the neoclassical transport and energetic particle transport can be expected. In this paper, we show an optimized configuration of LHD to a level typical of so-called 'advanced stellarators' and demonstrate experimentally the effect of magnetic field optimization on the energetic particle confinement and the thermal plasma transport (neoclassical transport). (author)

  20. Coherent drift wave structures in sheared magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, P.J.; Horton, W.

    1993-01-01

    For the problem of calculating the coherent drift wave structures in sheared magnetic fields, the authors have found it useful to derive the governing nonlinear pde from a variational principle. The variational principle is based on the free energy functional F[var-phi] = ∫ V F(var-phi, ∇ var-phi, x)dx dy. The method is applied to the vortex with speed u derived in Su et al., given by ∇ 2 var-phi = (1 - v d /u) var-phi - S m 2 /u 2 (x - var-phi/u) (x - var-phi/2u) var-phi where space is measured in units of ρ s , var-phi = (eΦ/T e )(L n /ρ s ) and the magnetic shear parameter is S m . While the linearized problem (var-phi much-lt ux) describes the usual shear induced damping, nonlinear solutions with trapped flow (var-phi > ur 0 ) form nonlinear self-bound states, which are maxima of the free energy F. The authors discuss the analytic properties and the numerical procedures for solving these types of nonlinear pde's