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Sample records for transition radiation diagnostic

  1. Longitudinal Electron Bunch Diagnostics Using Coherent Transition Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Mihalcea, Daniel; Happek, Uwe; Regis-Guy Piot, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    The longitudinal charge distribution of electron bunches in the Fermilab A0 photo-injector was determined by using the coherent transition radiation produced by electrons passing through a thin metallic foil. The auto-correlation of the transition radiation signal was measured with a Michelson type interferometer. The response function of the interferometer was determined from measured and simulated power spectra for low electron bunch charge and maximum longitudinal compression. Kramers-Kroning technique was used to determine longitudinal charge distribution. Measurements were performed for electron bunch lengths in the range from 0.3 to 2 ps (rms).

  2. Progress on the Flash X-Ray Optical Transition Radiation Diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, V; Houck, T; Brown, C

    2008-03-30

    This document summarizes the Flash X-Ray accelerator (FXR) optical transition radiation (OTR) spot-size diagnostics efforts in FY07. During this year, new analysis, simulation, and experimental approaches were utilized to interpret OTR spot data from both dielectric foils such as Kapton (VN type) and metal coated foils. Significant new findings of the intricacies involved in the diagnostic and of FXR operational issues were achieved. Geometry and temperature based effects were found to affect the beam image profiles from the OTR foils. These effects must be taken into account in order to deduce accurately the beam current density profile.

  3. Linac-beam characterizations at 600 MeV using optical transition radiation diagnostics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A. H.

    1998-05-27

    Selected optical diagnostics stations were upgraded in anticipation of low-emittance, bright electron beams from a thermionic rf gun or a photoelectric rf gun on the Advanced Photon Source (APS) injector linac. These upgrades include installation of optical transition radiation (OTR) screens, transport lines, and cameras for use in transverse beam size measurements and longitudinal profile measurements. Using beam from the standard thermionic gun, tests were done at 50 MeV and 400 to 650 MeV. Data were obtained on the limiting spatial ({sigma} {approximately} 200 {micro}m) and temporal resolution (300 ms) of the Chromox (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} : Cr) screen (250-{micro}n thick) in comparison to the OTR screens. Both charge-coupled device (CCD) and charge-injection device (CID) video cameras were used as well as the Hamamatsu C5680 synchroscan streak camera operating at a vertical deflection rate of 119.0 MHz (the 24th subharmonic of the S-band 2856-MHz frequency). Beam transverse sizes as small as {sigma}{sub x} = 60 {micro}m for a 600-MeV beam and micropulse bunch lengths of {sigma}{sub {tau}}<3 ps have been recorded for macropulse-averaged behavior with charges of about 2 to 3 nC per macropulse. These techniques are applicable to linac-driven, fourth-generation light source R and D experiments including the APS's SASE FEL experiment.

  4. Coherent transition radiation from a laser wakefield accelerator as an electron bunch diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilborg, J. van; Geddes, C.G.R.; Toth, C.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Martin, M.C.; Hao, Z.; Leemans, W.P.

    2004-01-01

    The observation and modeling of coherent transition radiation from femtosecond laser accelerated electron bunches is discussed. The coherent transition radiation, scaling quadratically with bunch charge, is generated as the electrons transit the plasma-vacuum boundary. Due to the limited transverse radius of the plasma boundary, diffraction effects will strongly modify the angular distribution and the total energy radiated is reduced compared to an infinite transverse boundary. The multi-nC electron bunches, concentrated in a length of a few plasma periods (several tens of microns), experience partial charge neutralization while propagating inside the plasma towards the boundary. This reduces the space-charge blowout of the beam, allowing for coherent radiation at relatively high frequencies (several THz). The charge distribution of the electron bunch at the plasma-vacuum boundary can be derived from Fourier analysis of the coherent part of the transition radiation spectrum. A Michelson interferometer was used to measure the coherent spectrum, and electron bunches with duration on the order of 50 fs (rms) were observed

  5. Feasibility of Optical Transition Radiation Imaging for Laser-driven Plasma Accelerator Electron-Beam Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A. H. [Fermilab; Rule, D. W. [Unlisted, US, MD; Downer, M. C. [Texas U.

    2017-10-09

    We report the initial considerations of using linearly polarized optical transition radiation (OTR) to characterize the electron beams of laser plasma accelerators (LPAs) such as at the Univ. of Texas at Austin. The two LPAs operate at 100 MeV and 2-GeV, and they currently have estimated normalized emittances at ~ 1-mm mrad regime with beam divergences less than 1/γ and beam sizes to be determined at the micron level. Analytical modeling results indicate the feasibility of using these OTR techniques for the LPA applications.

  6. Feasibility of transition radiation diagnostic for hot electrons generated in indirect-drive experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaoyuan; Zheng, Jian; Hu, Guangyue; Yang, Dong; Liu, Yonggang; Li, Sanwei; Jiang, Xianhua; Wang, Zhebin; Zhang, Huan; Peng, Xianshi; Wang, Feng; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2017-10-01

    In the experiment of indirect-drive laser fusion, parameter instabilities like stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) can generate abundant hot electrons, which can preheat fuel and degrade target gain. Hot electrons are usually investigated through their bremsstrahlung measured with filter-fluoresce (FF) X-ray spectrometer. In this presentation, we propose the feasibility of studying hot electrons by detecting the transition radiation (TR) emitted when energetic electrons pass through the outer surface of a hohlraum. With aid of Monte Carlo simulations, we find that the intensity of optical TR is equivalent to that of 0.2 eV black-body radiation (BR) in the typical experiments of the SG-III prototype facility with the energy of 10 kJ during 1 ns. Therefore, optical transition could be a candidate for the measurement of hot electrons without preheating. However, our simulations shows that the outer surface can be heated to 0.55 eV due to the hot electrons, leading to much brighter BR than the TR. In fact, our streaked optical pyrometer indicates that the preheating temperature reaches 0.7-1.0 eV. Hence it would be impossible to diagnose the hot electrons through optical TR. Our calculations show that it is plausibly feasible to detect the TR in the region of far infrared or THz.

  7. Interference of diffraction and transition radiation and its application as a beam divergence diagnostic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Fiorito

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available We have observed the interference of optical diffraction radiation (ODR and optical transition radiation (OTR produced by the interaction of a relativistic electron beam with a micromesh foil and a mirror. The production of forward directed ODR from electrons passing through the holes and wires of the mesh and their separate interactions with backward OTR from the mirror are analyzed with the help of a simulation code. By careful choice of the micromesh properties, mesh-mirror spacing, observation wavelength, and filter band pass, the interference of the ODR produced from the unperturbed electrons passing through the open spaces of the mesh and OTR from the mirror are observable above a broad incoherent background from interaction of the heavily scattered electrons passing through the mesh wires. These interferences (ODTRI are sensitive to the beam divergence and can be used to directly diagnose this parameter. We compare experimental divergence values obtained using ODTRI, conventional OTRI, for the case when front foil scattering is negligible, and computed values obtained from transport code calculations and multiple screen beam size measurements. We obtain good agreement in all cases.

  8. Transition radiation and transition scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, V.L.

    1982-01-01

    Transition radiation is a process of a rather general character. It occurs when some source, which does not have a proper frequency (for example, a charge) moves at a constant velocity in an inhomogeneous and (or) nonstationary medium or near such a medium. The simplest type of transition radiation takes place when a charge crosses a boundary between two media (the role of one of the media may be played by vacuum). In the case of periodic variation of the medium, transition radiation possesses some specific features (resonance transition radiation or transition scattering). Transition scattering occurs, in particular, when a permittivity wave falls onto an nonmoving (fixed) charge. Transition scattering is closely connected with transition bremsstrahlung radiation. All these transition processes are essential for plasma physics. Transition radiation and transition scattering have analogues outside the framework of electrodynamics (like in the case of Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation). In the present report the corresponding range of phenomena is elucidated, as far as possible, in a generally physical aspect. (Auth.)

  9. Transition in occupational radiation exposure monitoring methods in diagnostic and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loennroth, N.; Hirvonen-Kari, M.; Timonen, M.; Savolainen, S.; Kortesniemi, M.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation exposure monitoring is a traditional keystone of occupational radiation safety measures in medical imaging. The aim of this study was to review the data on occupational exposures in a large central university hospital radiology organisation and propose changes in the radiation worker categories and methods of exposure monitoring. An additional objective was to evaluate the development of electronic personal dosimeters and their potential in the digitised radiology environment. The personal equivalent dose of 267 radiation workers (116 radiologists and 151 radiographers) was monitored using personal dosimeters during the years 2006-2010. Accumulated exposure monitoring results exceeding the registration threshold were observed in the personal dosimeters of 73 workers (59 radiologists' doses ranged from 0.1 to 45.1 mSv; 14 radiographers' doses ranged from 0.1 to 1.3 mSv). The accumulated personal equivalent doses are generally very small, only a few angiography radiologists have doses >10 mSv per 5 y. The typical effective doses are -1 and the highest value was 0.3 mSv (single interventional radiologist). A revised categorisation of radiation workers based on the working profile of the radiologist and observed accumulated doses is justified. Occupational monitoring can be implemented mostly with group dosimeters. An active real-time dosimetry system is warranted to support radiation protection strategy where optimisation aspects, including improving working methods, are essential. (authors)

  10. Radiation hardening of diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemon, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    The world fusion program has advanced to the stage where it is appropriate to construct a number of devices for the purpose of burning DT fuel. In these next-generation experiments, the expected flux and fluence of 14 MeV neutrons and associated gamma rays will pose a significant challenge to the operation and diagnostics of the fusion device. Radiation effects include structural damage to materials such as vacuum windows and seals, modifications to electrical properties such as electrical conductivity and dielectric strength and impaired optical properties such as reduced transparency and luminescence of windows and fiber optics during irradiation. In preparation for construction and operation of these new facilities, the fusion diagnostics community needs to work with materials scientists to develop a better understanding of radiation effects, and to undertake a testing program aimed at developing workable solutions for this multi-faceted problem. A unique facility to help in this regard is the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility, a neutron source located at the beam stop of the world's most powerful accelerator, the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). The LAMPF proton beam generates 10 16 neutrons per second because of ''spallation'' reactions when the protons collide with the copper nuclei in the beam stop

  11. Radiation hardening of diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemon, R. E.

    The world fusion program has advanced to the stage where it is appropriate to construct a number of devices for the purpose of burning DT fuel. In these next-generation experiments, the expected flux and fluence of 14 MeV neutrons and associated gamma rays will pose a significant challenge to the operation and diagnostics of the fusion device. Radiation effects include structural damage to materials such as vacuum windows and seals, modifications to electrical properties such as electrical conductivity and dielectric strength and impaired optical properties such as reduced transparency and luminescence of windows and fiber optics during irradiation. In preparation for construction and operation of these new facilities, the fusion diagnostics community needs to work with materials scientists to develop a better understanding of radiation effects, and to undertake a testing program aimed at developing workable solutions for this multi-faceted problem. A unique facility to help in this regard is the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility, a neutron source located at the beam stop of the world's most powerful accelerator, the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). The LAMPF proton beam generates 10(exp 16) neutrons per second because of spallation'reactions when the protons collide with the copper nuclei in the beam stop.

  12. Stimulated coherent transition radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung-chi Lihn.

    1996-03-01

    Coherent radiation emitted from a relativistic electron bunch consists of wavelengths longer than or comparable to the bunch length. The intensity of this radiation out-numbers that of its incoherent counterpart, which extends to wavelengths shorter than the bunch length, by a factor equal to the number of electrons in the bunch. In typical accelerators, this factor is about 8 to 11 orders of magnitude. The spectrum of the coherent radiation is determined by the Fourier transform of the electron bunch distribution and, therefore, contains information of the bunch distribution. Coherent transition radiation emitted from subpicosecond electron bunches at the Stanford SUNSHINE facility is observed in the far-infrared regime through a room-temperature pyroelectric bolometer and characterized through the electron bunch-length study. To measure the bunch length, a new frequency-resolved subpicosecond bunch-length measuring system is developed. This system uses a far-infrared Michelson interferometer to measure the spectrum of coherent transition radiation through optical autocorrelation with resolution far better than existing time-resolved methods. Hence, the radiation spectrum and the bunch length are deduced from the autocorrelation measurement. To study the stimulation of coherent transition radiation, a special cavity named BRAICER is invented. Far-infrared light pulses of coherent transition radiation emitted from electron bunches are delayed and circulated in the cavity to coincide with subsequent incoming electron bunches. This coincidence of light pulses with electron bunches enables the light to do work on electrons, and thus stimulates more radiated energy. The possibilities of extending the bunch-length measuring system to measure the three-dimensional bunch distribution and making the BRAICER cavity a broadband, high-intensity, coherent, far-infrared light source are also discussed

  13. Transition Radiation Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Andronic, A

    2012-01-01

    We review the basic features of transition radiation and how they are used for the design of modern Transition Radiation Detectors (TRD). The discussion will include the various realizations of radiators as well as a discussion of the detection media and aspects of detector construction. With regard to particle identification we assess the different methods for efficient discrimination of different particles and outline the methods for the quantification of this property. Since a number of comprehensive reviews already exist, we predominantly focus on the detectors currently operated at the LHC. To a lesser extent we also cover some other TRDs, which are planned or are currently being operated in balloon or space-borne astro-particle physics experiments.

  14. Staff radiation exposure in radiation diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khakimova, N.U.; Malisheva, E.Yu.; Shosafarova, Sh.G.

    2010-01-01

    Present article is devoted to staff radiation exposure in radiation diagnostics. Data on staff radiation exposure obtained during 2005-2008 years was analyzed. It was found that average individual doses of staff of various occupations in Dushanbe city for 2008 year are at 0.29-2.16 mSv range. They are higher than the average health indicators but lower than maximum permissible dose. It was defined that paramedical personnel receives the highest doses among the various categories of staff.

  15. ALICE Transition Radiation Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Pachmayer, Y

    2013-01-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) is the main electron detector in ALICE. In conduction with the TPC and the ITS, it provides the necessary electron identification capability to study: - Production of light and heavy vector mesons as well as the continuum in the di-electron channel, - Semi leptonic decays of hadrons with open charm and open beauty via the single-electron channel using the displaced vertex information provided by the ITS, - Correlated DD and BB pairs via coincidences of electrons in the central barrel and muons in the forward muon arm, - Jets with high Pτ tracks in one single TRD stack.

  16. arXiv Novel diagnostic for precise measurement of the modulation frequency of Seeded Self-Modulation via Coherent Transition Radiation in AWAKE

    CERN Document Server

    Braunmueller, F.; Alberti, S.; Muggli, P.

    We present the set-up and test-measurements of a waveguide-integrated heterodyne diagnostic for coherent transition radiation (CTR) in the AWAKE experiment. The goal of the proof-of-principle experiment AWAKE is to accelerate a witness electron bunch in the plasma wakefield of a long proton bunch that is transformed by Seeded Self-Modulation (SSM) into a train of proton micro-bunches. The CTR pulse of the self-modulated proton bunch is expected to have a frequency in the range of 90-300 GHz and a duration of 300-700 ps. The diagnostic set-up, which is designed to precisely measure the frequency and shape of this CTR-pulse, consists of two waveguide-integrated receivers that are able to measure simultaneously. They cover a significant fraction of the available plasma frequencies: the bandwidth 90-140 GHz as well as the bandwidth 255-270 GHz or 170-260 GHz in an earlier or a latter version of the set-up, respectively. The two mixers convert the CTR into a signal in the range of 5-20 GHz that is measured on a fa...

  17. Inverse transition radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.; Romea, R.D.; Kimura, W.D.

    1997-01-01

    A new method for laser acceleration is proposed based upon the inverse process of transition radiation. The laser beam intersects an electron-beam traveling between two thin foils. The principle of this acceleration method is explored in terms of its classical and quantum bases and its inverse process. A closely related concept based on the inverse of diffraction radiation is also presented: this concept has the significant advantage that apertures are used to allow free passage of the electron beam. These concepts can produce net acceleration because they do not satisfy the conditions in which the Lawson-Woodward theorem applies (no net acceleration in an unbounded vacuum). Finally, practical aspects such as damage limits at optics are employed to find an optimized set of parameters. For reasonable assumptions an acceleration gradient of 200 MeV/m requiring a laser power of less than 1 GW is projected. An interesting approach to multi-staging the acceleration sections is also presented. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  18. Radiation exposure in diagnostic medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haehnel, S.; Michalczak, H.; Reinoehl-Kompa, S.

    1995-01-01

    This volume includes the manuscripts of the papers read at the conference as well as a summary and assessment of its results. The scientific discussions were centred upon the following issues: - International surveys and comparisons of rdiation exposures in diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine, frequency of the individual diagnostic procedures and age distribution of patients examined; - policies and regulations for the radiation protection of patients, charcteristic dosimetric values and practical usefulness of the effective dose concept during medical examinations; - assessments of the relative benefits and risks and measures to reduce the radiation exposure in the light of quality assurance aspects. The main objective of this conference not only was to evaluate the risks from diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine but also to encourgage a critical analysis and adjustment of examination routines followed in everyday practice. Among the measures recommended were quality assurance, maintenace of international standards, development of guidelines, introduction of standard doses, improved training and professional education of personnel as well as surveys and analyses of certain examination procedures associated with substantial radiation exposure. (orig./MG) [de

  19. Diagnostic radiation and chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, S.R.; Hecht, F.; Lubs, H.A.; Kimberling, W.; Brown, J.; Gerald, P.S.; Summitt, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    Some evidence is presented suggesting that diagnostic X-rays may be important in the origin of a new chromosomal abnormality other than Down syndrome. Chromosome analyses have been carried out on 4342 children, seven or eight years old. Maternal diagnostic irradiation in the year before conception and up to third lunar month of the index pregnancy was recorded, before the chromosome study began, together with a large amount of family and clinical data. Information on X-ray exposure was supplied by the mothers, s o radiation dosage could not be estimated. 21 children (including a pair of twins and a pair of siblings) born to 19 mothers had chromosomal aberrations. The mothers of six children with inherited translocations, rearrangements and XYY karyotypes were excluded, and 3 (23%) of the remaining 13 mothers had received abdominal and pelvic X-ray exposures. In the whole sample, however, only 6% of the mothers had diagnostic irradiation. Two of these mothers, aged sixteen and twenty, gave birth to a child each with de-novo autosomal translocations, and the third mother, aged thirty-two, had a child with a complex mosaicism involving one X chromosome. Although the sample size of the mothers with chromosomally abnormal children is small, the results are significant. (U.K.)

  20. Smith-Purcell Radiation in View of Particle Beam Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Kube, G

    2003-01-01

    The development of the next generation high quality electron beams which are necessary for future high luminosity linear colliders and short wavelengths free electron lasers requires sensitive and non-destructive beam diagnostic techniques. In this context Smith-Purcell radiation which is generated when a charged particle beam passes close to the surface of a periodic structure (diffraction grating) is under discussion as a compact and inexpensive beam profile monitor. In order to study the basic emission process of Smith-Purcell radiation also in view of possible applications for particle beam diagnostics, experimental studies were performed at the Mainz Microtron MAMI in the visible spectral region with a microfocused 855 MeV electron beam. The radiation was separated from background components, as diffracted synchrotron radiation and transition radiation generated by electrons scratching the grating surface, by exploiting their specific emission characteristics. These are the narrow emission cone in the ...

  1. Diagnostic Transitions from Childhood to Adolescence to Early Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, William E.; Adair, Carol E.; Smetanin, Paul; Stiff, David; Briante, Carla; Colman, Ian; Fergusson, David; Horwood, John; Poulton, Richie; Costello, E. Jane; Angold, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Background: Quantifying diagnostic transitions across development is needed to estimate the long-term burden of mental illness. This study estimated patterns of diagnostic transitions from childhood to adolescence and from adolescence to early adulthood. Methods: Patterns of diagnostic transitions were estimated using data from three prospective,…

  2. Cyclotron radiation as Tokamak diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedler-Ferrari, N.

    1985-01-01

    A brief introduction to the use of Electron Cyclotron Emission as diagnostics in tokamaks is made. The utilization feasibility of this dignostics in the TBR-1 and TTF2A tokamaks is discussed. (L.C.) [pt

  3. ALICE Transition Radiation Detector (TRD), test beam.

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Electrons and positrons can be discriminated from other charged particles using the emission of transition radiation - X-rays emitted when the particles cross many layers of thin materials. To develop such a Transition Radiation Detector(TRD) for ALICE many detector prototypes were tested in mixed beams of pions and electrons, as in the example shown here.

  4. The transition radiation. 2. experimental study of the optical transition radiation; Le rayonnement de transition: 2. etude experimentale du rayonnement de transition optique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couillaud, Ch.; Haouat, G.; Seguin, S.; Striby, S

    1999-07-01

    Optical-transition-radiation-based diagnostics have been widely used for many years on electron accelerators in order to measure beam energy and transverse and longitudinal emittances. These diagnostics are very attractive for high brightness electron beams used as drivers for radiation sources. Such diagnostics have been performed on the ELSA facility (18 MeV electron energy, 100 A peak current) using both a single interface and an OTR-Wartski interferometer. We present the accelerator, the experimental set-up and the method for analyzing the OTR angular distribution. Then, the experimental results are described and compared with those from the three gradient method. In addition, we present a beam energy measurement using OTR interferogram analysis. (author)

  5. Review on radiation protection in diagnostic radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Karami

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Discovery of x-ray and using of it for medical imaging have produced tremendous outcomes for diagnosis and treatment of diseases. More than 10 million diagnostic radiological procedures and 100,000 nuclear medicine exams are being performed daily around the world. According to the national commission on radiological protection and measurements (NCRP-report 160, medical x-ray is contribute to approximately 95% of all radiological examinations that is responsible for 74% of the collective dose to the US population. Despite of unique benefits of ionizing radiations, in the field of radiation protection, they are associated with potential risks such as cancer and genetically abnormalities. The cancer risk attributable to diagnostic radiology is estimated about 0.6% to 3%. It is estimated that the radiation dose from diagnostic x-ray procedures are annually responsible for 7,587 and 5,695 cases of radiation induced cancer in the population of Japan and US, respectively. Although the radiation dose associated with most radiological procedures are very low, but rapid increasing use of radiography procedures during two past decades have been concerned due to the cancer risk associated with ionizing radiations. On the base of linear no-threshold (LNT model of dose-response curve, any level of exposure is dangerous. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA is the main target of ionizing radiation. For radiological exposure with low dose, the stochastic effects such as genetic damages and leukemia are concerned. According to the recommendations of the radiation protection regulatory organizations, radiological procedure must be done with respect to social and economic factors in which exposure of patient and population kept as low as reasonable and achievable. Hence, prescription of a radiological test is acceptable only when its advantages are higher than its damages. Optimizing the different parameters such as: collimating the primary beam field to the area of

  6. Bunch length diagnostics with coherent relativistic electron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Ayzatsky, M I; Kushnir, V A; Mitrochenko, V V

    2001-01-01

    One of the most important problems when designing resonance electron linacs with a high beam brightness is creation of an equipment for electron bunch length diagnostics. One of ways to solve this problem is based on analysis of radiation from relativistic electrons (transition,synchrotron etc.). The paper presents results of calculations and experiments on studying the millimeter-band radiation that is a beam exited on the surface of the grating periodic structure and in a linac beam pipe. Experiments were carried out on the linac LIC with 13 MeV particle energy and 0.8 A pulse beam current. The possibility of observed radiation application for estimation of the bunch length value, monitoring its variation and for optimization of the accelerator operating mode was shown experimentally.

  7. Reducing Radiation Dose in Pediatric Diagnostic Fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodadra, Anish; Bartoletti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    To assess radiation dose in common pediatric diagnostic fluoroscopy procedures and determine the efficacy of dose tracking and dose reduction training to reduce radiation use. Fluoroscopy time and radiation dose area product (DAP) were recorded for upper GIs (UGI), voiding cystourethrograms (VCUGs), and barium enemas (BEs) during a six-month period. The results were presented to radiologists followed by a 1-hour training session on radiation dose reduction methods. Data were recorded for an additional six months. DAP was normalized to fluoroscopy time, and Wilcoxon testing was used to assess for differences between groups. Data from 1,479 cases (945 pretraining and 530 post-training) from 9 radiologists were collected. No statistically significant difference was found in patient age, proportion of examination types, or fluoroscopy time between the pre- and post-training groups (P ≥ .1), with the exception of a small decrease in median fluoroscopy time for VCUGs (1.0 vs 0.9 minutes, P = .04). For all examination types, a statistically significant decrease was found in the median normalized DAP (P < .05) between pre- and post-training groups. The median (quartiles) for pretraining and post-training normalized DAPs (μGy·m(2) per minute) were 14.36 (5.00, 38.95) and 6.67 (2.67, 17.09) for UGIs; 13.00 (5.34, 32.71) and 7.16 (2.73, 19.85) for VCUGs; and 33.14 (9.80, 85.26) and 17.55 (7.96, 46.31) for BEs. Radiation dose tracking with feedback, paired with dose reduction training, can reduce radiation dose during diagnostic pediatric fluoroscopic procedures by nearly 50%. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Theory of coherent transition radiation generated by ellipsoidal electron bunches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. P. E. M. Op ’t Root

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the theory of coherent transition radiation (CTR generated by ellipsoidal electron bunches. We calculate analytical expressions for the electric field spectrum, the power spectrum, and the temporal electric field of CTR, generated by cylindrically symmetric ellipsoidal electron bunches with hard and soft edges. This theory is relevant for diagnostics of ellipsoidal electron bunches. Realization of such bunches would solve the problem of space-charge induced emittance degradation.

  9. Advanced Simulations of Optical Transition and Diffraction Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2078350; Bobb, Lorraine Marie; Bolzon, B; Bravin, Enrico; Karataev, Pavel; Kruchinin, Konstantin; Lefevre, Thibaut; Mazzoni, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Charged particle beam diagnostics is a key task in modern and future accelerator installations. The diagnostic tools are practically the “eyes” of the operators. The precision and resolution of the diagnostic equipment are crucial to define the performance of the accelerator. Transition and diffraction radiation (TR and DR) are widely used for electron beam parameter monitoring. However, the precision and resolution of those devices are determined by how well the production, transport and detection of these radiation types are understood. This paper reports on simulations of TR and DR spatial-spectral characteristics using the physical optics propagation (POP) mode of the Zemax advanced optics simulation software. A good consistency with theory is demonstrated. Also, realistic optical system alignment issues are discussed.

  10. A new non intercepting beam size diagnostics using diffraction radiation from a Slit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellano, M.

    1996-09-01

    A new non interpreting beam size diagnostic for high charge electron beams is presented. This diagnostics is based on the analysis of the angular distribution of the 'diffracted' transition radiation emitted by the beam when crossing a slit cut in metallic foil. It allows a resolution better then the radiation transverse formation zone. Numerical results based on the parameters of the TTF FEL beam are given as example

  11. A new non intercepting beam size diagnostics using diffraction radiation from a Slit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellano, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati (Italy). Lab. Nazionale di Frascati

    1996-09-01

    A new non interpreting beam size diagnostic for high charge electron beams is presented. This diagnostics is based on the analysis of the angular distribution of the `diffracted` transition radiation emitted by the beam when crossing a slit cut in metallic foil. It allows a resolution better then the radiation transverse formation zone. Numerical results based on the parameters of the TTF FEL beam are given as example.

  12. Radiation diagnostics in extremely harsh environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dona, H.; Lee, P.H.Y.; Williams, A.H.; McGurn, J.L.; Veeser, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    Some recent Trailmaster experiments have required to use of rather delicate radiation diagnostics in hostile environments. We have developed instrumentation for use high-explosive magnetic flux compression generators and near the noisy environment of high energy capacitor banks. These include some rather unique ''fly-away'' designs for x-ray imaging and spectroscopy, and other optical techniques for plasma temperature and field measurements. We will show some representative data and will also discuss an on-going program for the determination of magnetic field via atomic spectral line splitting and/or broadening

  13. Estimating Relative Uncertainty of Radiative Transition Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel E. Kelleher

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We consider a method to estimate relative uncertainties of radiative transition rates in an atomic spectrum. Few of these many transitions have had their rates determined by more than two reference-quality sources. One could estimate uncertainties for each transition, but analyses with only one degree of freedom are generally fraught with difficulties. We pursue a way to empirically combine the limited uncertainty information in each of the many transitions. We “pool” a dimensionless measure of relative dispersion, the “Coefficient of Variation of the mean,” \\(C_{V}^{n} \\equiv s/(\\bar{x}\\sqrt{n}\\. Here, for each transition rate, “s” is the standard deviation, and “\\(\\bar{x}\\” is the mean of “n” independent data sources. \\(C_{V}^{n}\\ is bounded by zero and one whenever the determined quantity is intrinsically positive. We scatter-plot the \\(C_{V}^{n} \\as a function of the “line strength” (here a more useful radiative transition rate than transition probability. We find a curve through comparable \\(C_{V}^{n} \\as that envelops a specified percentage of the \\(C_{V}^{n} \\s (e.g. 95%. We take this curve to represent the expanded relative uncertainty of the mean. The method is most advantageous when the number of determined transition rates is large while the number of independent determinations per transition is small. The transition rate data of Na III serves as an example.

  14. Effects of radiation exposure from radiopharmaceuticals used in diagnostic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witcofski, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    In the United States about 90 percent of man-made radiation exposure to the general population is from the use of radiation in diagnostic medicine. Although the doses of radiation from these procedures to individuals are generally quite small, large numbers of people are exposed. Estimates of the radiation doses associated with such use in the healing arts are approximately 15 million person-rem to the general population from diagnostic x ray and 3.3 million person-rem from the diagnostic use of radiopharmaceuticals. The purpose of this paper is to present what is known about the possible effects of radiation from diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals

  15. Diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    This is the third edition of CSA Standard C22.2 No. 114 (now CAN/CSA-C22.2 No. 114), which is one of a series of standards issued by the Canadian Standards Association under Part II of the Canadian Electrical Code. This edition marks an important shift towards harmonization of Canadian requirements with those of the European community and the United States. Also important to this edition is the expansion of its scope to include the complete range of diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy equipment, rather than solely radiation-emitting equipment. In so doing, equipment previously addressed by CSA Standard C22.2 No. 125, Electromedical Equipment, specifically lasers for medical applications and diagnostic ultrasound units, is now dealt with in the new edition. By virtue of this expanded scope, many of the technical requirements in the electromedical equipment standard have been introduced to the new edition, thereby bringing CSA Standard C22.2 No. 114 up to date. 14 tabs., 16 figs

  16. Transition radiation from relativistic electrons in periodic radiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, M. L.; Mueller, D.; Prince, T. A.; Hartmann, G.

    1974-01-01

    The generation and detection of transition radiation have been studied in a series of experiments with electrons from 1 to 15 GeV at SLAC and at the Cornell Synchrotron. Periodic radiators, consisting of thin plastic foils stretched in air at constant spacings, were used, and proportional chambers filled with krypton or xenon served as detectors. A detailed discussion of the theoretical predictions is given, and the measurements are systematically compared with the predictions by varying the most critical parameters, such as configuration of radiators and detectors, and energy of the electrons. In general, good agreement between theory and experiment has been found. On the basis of these results, the criteria are summarized under which transition radiation can readily be observed.

  17. Ultrabroadband terahertz source and beamline based on coherent transition radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Casalbuoni

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Coherent transition radiation (CTR in the THz regime is an important diagnostic tool for analyzing the temporal structure of the ultrashort electron bunches needed in ultraviolet and x-ray free-electron lasers. It is also a powerful source of such radiation, covering an exceptionally broad frequency range from about 200 GHz to 100 THz. At the soft x-ray free-electron laser FLASH we have installed a beam transport channel for transition radiation (TR with the intention to guide a large fraction of the radiation to a laboratory outside the accelerator tunnel. The radiation is produced on a screen inside the ultrahigh vacuum beam pipe of the linac, coupled out through a diamond window and transported to the laboratory through an evacuated tube equipped with five focusing and four plane mirrors. The design of the beamline has been based on a thorough analysis of the generation of TR on metallic screens of limited size. The optical propagation of the radiation has been computed taking into account the effects of near-field (Fresnel diffraction. The theoretical description of the TR source is presented in the first part of the paper, while the design principles and the technical layout of the beamline are described in the second part. First experimental results demonstrate that the CTR beamline covers the specified frequency range and preserves the narrow time structure of CTR pulses emitted by short electron bunches.

  18. Charmonium meson and hybrid radiative transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Peng [Indiana U., JLAB; Yépez-Martínez, Tochtli [Indiana U.; Szczepaniak, Adam P. [Indiana U., JLAB

    2014-06-01

    We consider the non-relativistic limit of the QCD Hamiltonian in the Coulomb gauge, to describe radiative transitions between conventional charmonium states and from the lowest multiplet of cc¯ hybrids to charmonium mesons. The results are compared to potential quark models and lattices calculations.

  19. Radiation effects in IFMIF Li target diagnostic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molla, J.; Vila, R.; Shikama, T.; Horiike, H.; Simakov, S.; Ciotti, M.; Ibarra, A.

    2009-01-01

    Diagnostics for the lithium target will be crucial for the operation of IFMIF. Several parameters as the lithium temperature, target thickness or wave pattern must be monitored during operation. Radiation effects may produce malfunctioning in any of these diagnostics due to the exposure to high radiation fields. The main diagnostic systems proposed for the operation of IFMIF are reviewed in this paper from the point of view of radiation damage. The main tools for the assessment of the performance of these diagnostics are the neutronics calculations by using specialised codes and the information accumulated during the last decades on the radiation effects in functional materials, components and diagnostics for ITER. This analysis allows to conclude that the design of some of the diagnostic systems must be revised to assure the high availability required for the target system.

  20. ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker - small piece

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The ATLAS transition radiation tracker is made of 300'000 straw tubes, up to 144cm long. Filled with a gas mixture and threaded with a wire, each straw is a complete mini-detector in its own right. An electric field is applied between the wire and the outside wall of the straw. As particles pass through, they collide with atoms in the gas, knocking out electrons. The avalanche of electrons is detected as an electrical signal on the wire in the centre. The tracker plays two important roles. Firstly, it makes more position measurements, giving more dots for the computers to join up to recreate the particle tracks. Also, together with the ATLAS calorimeters, it distinguishes between different types of particles depending on whether they emit radiation as they make the transition from the surrounding foil into the straws.

  1. ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker - large piece

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The ATLAS transition radiation tracker is made of 300'000 straw tubes, up to 144cm long. Filled with a gas mixture and threaded with a wire, each straw is a complete mini-detector in its own right. An electric field is applied between the wire and the outside wall of the straw. As particles pass through, they collide with atoms in the gas, knocking out electrons. The avalanche of electrons is detected as an electrical signal on the wire in the centre. The tracker plays two important roles. Firstly, it makes more position measurements, giving more dots for the computers to join up to recreate the particle tracks. Also, together with the ATLAS calorimeters, it distinguishes between different types of particles depending on whether they emit radiation as they make the transition from the surrounding foil into the straws.

  2. Last ATLAS transition radiation tracker module installed

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS transition radiation tracker consists of 96 modules and will join the pixel detector and silicon tracker at the heart of the experiment to map the trajectories of particles and identify electrons produced when proton beams collide. In the last image the team responsible for assembly are shown from left to right: Kirill Egorov (Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute), Pauline Gagnon (Indiana University), Ben Legeyt (University of Pennsylvania), Chuck Long (Hampton University), John Callahan (Indiana University) and Alex High (University of Pennsylvania).

  3. Characterization of radiation qualities used in diagnostic X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bero, M.; Zahili, M.; Al Ahmad, M.

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to adjust the radiation beams emitted from X-ray tubes installed at the National Radiation Metrology Laboratory in the field of diagnostic radiology (radiology and mammography) according to the IAEA protocol code number TRS 457, the second goal of this study is to establish various radiation qualities used fordiagnostic radiology applications: RQR, RQA and RQT and the radiation qualities related to mammography applications: RQA-M and RQR-M (author).

  4. Developing diagnostic guidelines for the acute radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Densow, D.; Fliedner, T.M.; Kindler, H.

    1996-01-01

    Diagnostic guidelines seem to be promising for improving medical care. One aspect of a diagnostic guideline for the acute radiation syndrome has been tested against an extensive case history database. Subsequently, the guideline has been optimized for a small set of case histories. The improved performance has been proven by a test against the rest of the case history database

  5. PAMELA Space Mission: The Transition Radiation Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambriola, M.; Bellotti, R.; Cafagna, F.; Circella, M.; De Marzo, C.; Giglietto, N.; Marangelli, B.; Mirizzi, N.; Romita, M.; Spinelli, P.

    2003-07-01

    PAMELA telescope is a satellite-b orne magnetic spectrometer built to fulfill the primary scientific objectives of detecting antiparticles (antiprotons and positrons) in the cosmic rays, and to measure spectra of particles in cosmic rays. The PAMELA telescope is currently under integration and is composed of: a silicon tracker housed in a permanent magnet, a time of flight and an anticoincidence system both made of plastic scintillators, a silicon imaging calorimeter, a neutron detector and a Transition Radiation Detector (TRD). The TRD detector is composed of 9 sensitive layers of straw tubes working in proportional mode for a total of 1024 channels. Each layer is interleaved with a radiator plane made of carbon fibers. The TRD detector characteristics will be described along with its performance studied exposing the detector to particle beams of electrons, pions, muons and protons of different momenta at both CERN-PS and CERN-SPS facilities.

  6. Beamline transition radiation detector for MW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggerty, H.

    1983-01-01

    Recent developments of transition radiation detectors (TRD's) indicate that an efficient and practical system can be deployed for beam line particle tagging for momenta greater than 200 GeV/c. This note describes the design of a prototype system to be tested at Fermilab in Fall, 1983. Pre-prototype testing was done at BNL in March, 1983 and has been followed up by bench testing of gasses and electronics at Fermilab. The design goal is a modular system which puts few contraints on beam line configuration and hence can be adapted to any high energy secondary beam

  7. Evaluation of radiation protection in nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, Ezzeldien Mohammed Nour

    2013-05-01

    This study conducted to evaluate the radiation protection in nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures in four nuclear medicine departments in Sudan. The evaluated procedures followed in these departments were in accordance with the standards, International Recommendations and code of practice for radiation protection in nuclear medicine. The evolution included the optimum design for diagnostic nuclear medicine departments, dealing with radioactive sources, quality assurance and quality control, training and responsibilities for radiation worker taking into account economic factors in Sudan. Evaluation of radiation protection procedures in diagnostic investigations was carried out by taken direct measurements of dose rate and the contamination level in some areas where radiation sources, radiation workers and public are involved. Designated questionnaires covered thirteen areas of radiation protection based on inspection check list for nuclear medicine prepared by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and American Association of Physicist in Medicine (AAPM) were used in the evaluation. This questionnaire has been Filled by Radiation Protection Officer (RPO), nuclear medicine technologist, nuclear medicine specialist in the nuclear medicine departments. Four hospitals, two governmental hospital and two private hospitals, have been assisted, the assessment shows that although the diagnostic nuclear medicine department in Sudan are not applying a fully safety and radiation protection procedures, but the level of radiation dose and the contamination level were found within acceptable limits. The private hospital D scored the higher level of protection (85.25%) while the governmental hospital C scored the lower level of protection (59.02%). Finally, this study stated some recommendations that if implemented could improve the level of radiation protection in nuclear medicine department. One of the most important recommendations is that a proper radiation protection

  8. Radiation safety requirements for training of users of diagnostic X ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Globally, the aim of requirements regarding the use and ownership of diagnostic medical X-ray equipment is to limit radiation by abiding by the 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA) principle. The ignorance of radiographers with regard to radiation safety requirements, however, is currently a cause of ...

  9. Radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging among patients with gastrointestinal disorders.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Desmond, Alan N

    2012-03-01

    There are concerns about levels of radiation exposure among patients who undergo diagnostic imaging for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), compared with other gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. We quantified imaging studies and estimated the cumulative effective dose (CED) of radiation received by patients with organic and functional GI disorders. We also identified factors and diagnoses associated with high CEDs.

  10. Measurement of Sub-Picosecond Electron Bunches via Electro-Optic Sampling of Coherent Transition Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, Timothy John [Northern Illinois U.

    2012-01-01

    Future collider applications as well as present high-gradient laser plasma wakefield accelerators and free-electron lasers operating with picosecond bunch durations place a higher demand on the time resolution of bunch distribution diagnostics. This demand has led to significant advancements in the field of electro-optic sampling over the past ten years. These methods allow the probing of diagnostic light such as coherent transition radiation or the bunch wakefields with sub-picosecond time resolution. We present results on the single-shot electro-optic spectral decoding of coherent transition radiation from bunches generated at the Fermilab A0 photoinjector laboratory. A longitudinal double-pulse modulation of the electron beam is also realized by transverse beam masking followed by a transverse-to-longitudinal phase-space exchange beamline. Live profile tuning is demonstrated by upstream beam focusing in conjunction with downstream monitoring of single-shot electro-optic spectral decoding of the coherent transition radiation.

  11. Diagnostic radiation of potentially reproductive females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El-Bagi, M.E.; Al-Mutairi, M.S.; Al-Thagafi, M.A.; Al-Masri, N.M.; Al-Sasi, O.

    2001-01-01

    Objectives: To find out how consistent or variable is the understanding and practice of radiation protection procedures for women of childbearing age at a multispecialty tertiary hospital. Setting: Riyadh Military Hospital Study. Design: Non-clustered population survey. Methods: A questionnaire was distributed during grand rounds, mid-day clinics and a radiology conference. Questions included which radiation protection rule does the respondent use for females, whether he or she is familiar with those rules and what is his or her source of reference. Further questions were about the radiation dangers to the fetus. Results: Response was 95 (100%). Fifty-seven (60%) were males and 38 (40%) were females. The majority 50 (53%) were Saudis, 16 (17%) Western and 29 (30%) were other nationals. Sixty-two (65%) followed the old rule '10-day rule'; 17 (18%) followed the new '28-day rule' and 16 (17%) didn't know which rule to follow. None of those who followed the '28-day rule' indicated hospital policy as their reference. Conclusions: The understanding and practice of radiation protection guidelines for females is inconsistent. There is significant unfamiliarity with the radiation protection rules among our hospital practitioners. (author)

  12. Explanation of diagnostic criteria for radiation thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Libo; Luo Yunxiao; Wang Jianfeng; Chen Dawei; Cheng Guanghui; Jin Yuke

    2012-01-01

    National occupational health standard-Diagnostic Criteria for Radiation Thyroid Diseases has been approved and issued by the Ministry of Health. Based on the extensive research of literature, this standard was enacted according to the relevant laws and regulations. It is mainly used for diagnosis of thyroid diseases caused by occupational radiation, and it also can serve as a guide to diagnose thyroid disease induced by medical radiation. To implement this standard, and to diagnose and treat the radiation thyroid diseases patient correctly and timely, the contents of this standard were interpreted in this article. (authors)

  13. Gamma-ray Cherenkov-transition radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aginian, M. A.; Ispirian, K. A.; Ispiryan, M.

    2013-10-01

    The spectral and angular distributions as well as the total number of photons of gamma-ray Cherenkov-transition radiation (GCTR) produced by charged particles in the photon energy region {}\\sim(0.8\\text{-}2)\\ \\text{MeV} are calculated. For this purpose we used the experimental results of the recent discovery according to which in the above-mentioned region the measured refractive index of silicon as well as the theoretically calculated refractive index of gold are greater than 1. Using the results of the carried out numerical calculations an experimental arrangement is discussed for the observation and experimental study of the GCTR. As our results show the GCTR photon yield is about one order of magnitude higher than the background bremsstrahlung yield. Some applications of GCTR, in particular, for comparatively easy search of new materials with refractive index n(\\omega )>1 , are proposed.

  14. Observation of Frequency Locked Coherent Transition Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, Roark A; Temkin, Richard J

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of frequency locked, coherent transition radiation (CTR) were performed at the 17 GHz high-gradient accelerator facility built by Haimson Research Corporation at MIT PSFC. CTR produced from a metallic foil placed in the beam path was extracted through a window, and measured with a variety of detectors, including: diode, Helium cooled Si Bolometer, and double heterodyne receiver system. The angular energy distribution measured by the diode and bolometer are in agreement and consistent with calculations for a 15 MeV 200 mA 110 ns beam of 1 ps bunches. Heterodyne receiver measurements were able to show frequency locking, namely inter-bunch coherence at integer multiples of the accelerator RF frequency of 17.14 GHz. At the locked frequencies the power levels are enhanced by the number of bunches in a single beam pulse. The CTR was measured as a comb of locked frequencies up to 240 GHz, with a bandwidth of 50 MHz.

  15. Cancer risks following diagnostic and therapeutic radiation exposure in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinerman, Ruth A. [National Institutes of Health, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, EPS 7044, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2006-09-15

    The growing use of interventional and fluoroscopic imaging in children represents a tremendous benefit for the diagnosis and treatment of benign conditions. Along with the increasing use and complexity of these procedures comes concern about the cancer risk associated with ionizing radiation exposure to children. Children are considerably more sensitive to the carcinogenic effects of ionizing radiation than adults, and children have a longer life expectancy in which to express risk. Numerous epidemiologic cohort studies of childhood exposure to radiation for treatment of benign diseases have demonstrated radiation-related risks of cancer of the thyroid, breast, brain and skin, as well as leukemia. Many fewer studies have evaluated cancer risk following diagnostic radiation exposure in children. Although radiation dose for a single procedure might be low, pediatric patients often receive repeated examinations over time to evaluate their conditions, which could result in relatively high cumulative doses. Several cohort studies of girls and young women subjected to multiple diagnostic radiation exposures have been informative about increased mortality from breast cancer with increasing radiation dose, and case-control studies of childhood leukemia and postnatal diagnostic radiation exposure have suggested increased risks with an increasing number of examinations. Only two long-term follow-up studies of cancer following cardiac catheterization in childhood have been conducted, and neither reported an overall increased risk of cancer. Most cancers can be induced by radiation, and a linear dose-response has been noted for most solid cancers. Risks of radiation-related cancer are greatest for those exposed early in life, and these risks appear to persist throughout life. (orig.)

  16. Coherent Smith-Purcell radiation as a pulse length diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampel, M.C.

    1997-01-01

    Recently, Smith-Purcell radiation has been studied as a candidate for laser-type radiation production in the submillimeter regime. With appropriate choices of beam energy, impact parameter, and grating spacing, there is good coupling to strongly polarized, forward directed radiation. Another regime of possible interest is to use Smith-Purcell radiation as a pulse length diagnostic for medium to high energy electron beams of extremely short pulse duration, on the order of tens of femtoseconds to 1000 fs. Strongly in favor of development of such a diagnostic is its relatively non-destructive nature. With the electron beam passing near, but not through, a metal grating, reaction of the beam distribution itself to the production of the radiation is reduced relative to the much stronger scattering induced by passage through a foil. By careful choice of parameters usable diagnostic radiation ought to be produced with acceptably small emittance growth for an on-line beam monitor, even for the extremely bright electron beams proposed for X-ray FELs, Compton backscatter X-ray sources, or laser/plasma accelerator schemes. In this paper coherent and incoherent Smith-Purcell radiation is examined for reasonable operating parameters of the SATURNUS system at UCLA, with comparisons with results reported from the accelerator test facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. (orig.)

  17. Electron Bunch Length Diagnostic With Coherent Smith-Purcell Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    The authors have designed a new technique for measuring subpicosecond electron bunch lengths using coherent Smith-Purcell radiation. This new diagnostic technique involves passing the electron beam in close proximity of a grating with a period comparable to the electron bunch length. The emitted Smith-Purcell radiation will have a coherent component whose angular position and distribution are directly related to the electron bunch length and longitudinal profile, respectively. This new diagnostic technique is inherently simple, inexpensive and non-intercepting. The authors show that the new technique is also scaleable to femtosecond regime

  18. Protection of W7-X diagnostics from radiation heat loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carls, André, E-mail: andre.carls@ipp.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Köppen, Matthias; Fellinger, Joris; Schauer, Felix [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X), a modular advanced stellarator, is presently under construction at the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics in Greifswald. Part of the inner plasma vessel (PV) surface is covered by graphite tiles which are bolted onto water-cooled CuCrZr heat sink plates. This so-called heat shield is an in-vessel component and shall protect the PV wall and diagnostic components from plasma-edge-radiation and convective heat loads. Numerous diagnostics (e.g. diamagnetic loops, Rogowski coils, etc.) are located in between the heat shield and plasma vessel wall. They are loaded by thermal radiation from the hot heat shield backside, stray radiation from the electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH), and plasma radiation through remaining gaps between the tiles. In order to keep the temperatures of the diagnostics within their specified limits, additional shielding is required. The paper presents the design of such a shielding for the diamagnetic loops. Several options of copper shields and loosely attached Sigraflex{sup ®}-layers, and combinations thereof, are compared with respect to their abilities to reduce the temperatures of the sensitive parts of the diagnostics. To increase the confidence in the results, a sensitivity study with widely varying radiative material properties has been carried out. The advantages and disadvantages of the potential solutions are discussed. As a result two copper shield variants which also reduce the load onto the plasma vessel are presented.

  19. Two dimensional radiated power diagnostics on Alcator C-Moda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, M. L.; Hutchinson, I. H.

    2008-10-01

    The radiated power diagnostics for the Alcator C-Mod tokamak have been upgraded to measure two dimensional structure of the photon emissivity profile in order to investigate poloidal asymmetries in the core radiation. Commonly utilized unbiased absolute extreme ultraviolet (AXUV) diode arrays view the plasma along five different horizontal planes. The layout of the diagnostic set is shown and the results from calibrations and recent experiments are discussed. Data showing a significant, 30%-40%, inboard/outboard emissivity asymmetry during ELM-free H-mode are presented. The ability to use AXUV diode arrays to measure absolute radiated power is explored by comparing diode and resistive bolometer-based emissivity profiles for highly radiative L-mode plasmas seeded with argon. Emissivity profiles match in the core but disagree radially outward resulting in an underprediction of Prad of nearly 50% by the diodes compared to Prad determined using resistive bolometers.

  20. Synchrotron radiation from magnetic undulators as a prospective diagnostic tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbini, R.; Ciocci, F.; Dattoli, G.; Torre, A.; Ginnessi, L.

    1989-01-01

    The brightness of the radiation emitted by an ultrarelativistic e-beam passing through a magnetic undulator is sensitive to the beam quality (namely, energy spread and emittances) and to the undulator characteristics (i.e., possible random errors both in intensity and direction of magnetization, etc.) The spectrum distortion induced by the above effects and the possibility of using the undulator radiation as a diagnostic tool is discussed. Finally the importance of near-field effects when the radiation is detectedunfocussed off-axis and how they can combine with the effects induced by the beam emittances to produced a larger on-axis inhomogeneous broadening

  1. The design of diagnostic medical facilities using ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    This Code, setting out the general principles of radiological protection as applied to diagnostic radiation facilities in hospitals and clinics, is intended as a guide to architects and to works departments concerned with their design and construction, and with the modification of existing units

  2. Transition radiators for electron identification at the CERN ISR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, J.; Iwata, S.; Palmer, R.; Fabjan, C.W.; Nappi, A.; Struczinski, W.; Willis, W.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Lankford, A.J.; Rehak, P.; Moneti, G.-C.

    1977-01-01

    Transition radiators constructed from thin foils of lithium used to separate electrons from heavier charged particles at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) are described. The optimization of the system of the radiator and detector is discussed, leading to the choice of parameters for this design. The special features of the construction of a structure of lithium is described. Results of a number of different measurements of the transition radiation are given. (Auth.)

  3. Transition radiators for electron identification at the CERN ISR

    CERN Document Server

    Cobb, J; Iwata, S; Kourkoumelis, C; Lankford, A J; Moneti, G C; Nappi, A; Palmer, R B; Rehak, P; Struczinski, W; Willis, W J

    1977-01-01

    The authors describe transition radiators constructed from thin foils of lithium, used to separate electrons from heavier charged particles at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR). The optimisation of the system of the radiator and detector is discussed, leading to the choice of parameters for this design. The special features of the construction of a structure of lithium is described. Results of a number of different measurements of the transition radiation are given. (11 refs).

  4. Some aspects of transition radiation and scattering theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, V.L.; Tsytovich, V.N.

    1978-01-01

    Some aspects of transition radiation and transition scattering theory are considered. The transition radiation in vacuum is analysed in the presence of a strong magnetic field. It is shown, that the constant electro-magnetic field makes vacuum similar to the uniaxial ferrodielectric. The appearance of the transition radiation in the nonstationary medium is discussed when its properties in the medium change abruptly in time. It is obtained, that both types of the transition radiation for nonrelativistic particles (on an abrupt boundary of the two media interface and under an abrupt change in time of the medium properties) differ quantitatively (on the order of the value). The role of the radiation transition and scattering in plasma physics has been elucidated from different points. Four most important features of these processes are pointed out. Particularly, essential is shown to be the type of the transition scattering when one plasma wave, being the dielectric constant wave transforms into another one also a plasma wave. In the processes of the transition scattering an essential part is played by the effects of the space dispersion, particularly when the scattering takes place on the small velocity particles. Finally besides transition scattering there exists in plasma or in some cases prevails a Thomson scattering. In this case an important role in plasma is played by the interference between the Thomson and the transition scattering

  5. Identification of high-energetic particles by transition radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struczinski, W.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis gives a comprehensive survey on the application of the transition radiation for the particle identification. After a short historical review on the prediction and the detection of the transition radiation its theoretical foundations are more precisely explained. They form the foundations for the construction of an optimal transition radiation detector the principal construction of which is described. The next chapter shows some experiments by which the main predictions of the transition-radiation theory are confirmed. Then the construction and operation of two transition-radiation detectors are described which were applied at the ISR respectively SPS in the CERN in Geneva in complex experiments. The detector applied at the ISR served for the e ± identification. With two lithium radiators which were followed by xenon-filled proportional chambers an e/π separation of ≅ 10 -2 could be reached. The transition-radiation detector applied in the SPS was integrated into the European Hybrid Spectrometer. It served for the identification of high-energetic pions (> or approx. 90 GeV) against kaons and protons. With twenty units of carbon-fiber radiators which were followed by xenon-filled proportional chambers a π/K, p separation of better than 1:20 for momenta above 100 GeV could be reached. The cluster-counting method is then presented. Finally, a survey on the contemporary status in the development of transition-radiation detectors for the e/π separation is given. It is shown that by an about half a meter long detector the radiators of which consist of carbon fibers an e/π separation in the order of magnitude of ≅ 10 -2 can be reached. (orig./HSI) [de

  6. The IHS diagnostic X-ray equipment radiation protection program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, A.; Byrns, G.; Suleiman, O.

    1994-01-01

    The Indian Health Service (IHS) operates or contracts with Tribal groups to operate 50 hospitals and approximately 165 primary ambulatory care centers. These facilities contain approximately 275 medical and 800 dental diagnostic x-ray machines. IHS environmental health personnel in collaboration with the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) developed a diagnostic x-ray protection program including standard survey procedures and menu-driven calculations software. Important features of the program include the evaluation of equipment performance collection of average patient entrance skin exposure (ESE) measurements for selected procedures, and quality assurance. The ESE data, collected using the National Evaluation of X-ray Trends (NEXT) protocol, will be presented. The IHS Diagnostic X-ray Radiation Protection Program is dynamic and is adapting to changes in technology and workload

  7. Gravitational radiation from first-order phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Child, Hillary L.; Giblin, John T. Jr.

    2012-01-01

    It is believed that first-order phase transitions at or around the GUT scale will produce high-frequency gravitational radiation. This radiation is a consequence of the collisions and coalescence of multiple bubbles during the transition. We employ high-resolution lattice simulations to numerically evolve a system of bubbles using only scalar fields, track the anisotropic stress during the process and evolve the metric perturbations associated with gravitational radiation. Although the radiation produced during the bubble collisions has previously been estimated, we find that the coalescence phase enhances this radiation even in the absence of a coupled fluid or turbulence. We comment on how these simulations scale and propose that the same enhancement should be found at the Electroweak scale; this modification should make direct detection of a first-order electroweak phase transition easier

  8. Gravitational radiation from first-order phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Child, Hillary L.; Giblin, John T. Jr., E-mail: childh@kenyon.edu, E-mail: giblinj@kenyon.edu [Department of Physics, Kenyon College, 201 North College Road, Gambier, OH 43022 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    It is believed that first-order phase transitions at or around the GUT scale will produce high-frequency gravitational radiation. This radiation is a consequence of the collisions and coalescence of multiple bubbles during the transition. We employ high-resolution lattice simulations to numerically evolve a system of bubbles using only scalar fields, track the anisotropic stress during the process and evolve the metric perturbations associated with gravitational radiation. Although the radiation produced during the bubble collisions has previously been estimated, we find that the coalescence phase enhances this radiation even in the absence of a coupled fluid or turbulence. We comment on how these simulations scale and propose that the same enhancement should be found at the Electroweak scale; this modification should make direct detection of a first-order electroweak phase transition easier.

  9. Several problems of the theory of transition radiation and transition scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, V.L.; Tsytovich, V.N.

    1979-01-01

    The process of transition radiation is a very general one. It appears if some source, which does not have a proper frequency (for example a point charge, multipole etc), is moving with a constant velocity in an inhomogeneous and/or nonstationary medium. In the case of a periodic medium the transition radiation has some special peculiarities and is called the resonance transition radiation or transition scattering. Transition scattering occurs particularly in the case when some wave of dielectric permittivity acts on a nonmoving (fixed) charge. The processes of transition radiation and transition scattering have analogies outside electrodynamics similarly to the Vavilov-Cherenkov emission. The latter occurs also for a source moving with a constant velocity but in a homogeneous medium (and only if the velocity of the source exceeds the wave phase velocity in the medium). The present review is dealing with several problems of the theory of transition radiation and transition scattering. Attention is paid mainly to the formulation of the problems and to revealing characterisic features and peculiarities of the phenomena described. (Auth.)

  10. Recent progress in the development of transition radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, M. L.; Hartmann, G.; Prince, T.; Mueller, D.

    1978-01-01

    Transition-radiation detectors have been used in several recent cosmic-ray experiments for particle identification at energies E/mc-squared of at least about 1000. In order to optimize the design of such detectors and to use them for energy measurements over a broad energy range, it is necessary to study the details of the transition-radiation process. Experimental results are presented which test the theoretical predictions more precisely and at higher energies than in previous experiments. The dependence of the interference pattern in the frequency spectrum on the radiator dimensions is studied, and the total transition-radiation yield generated by electrons in various radiators is measured over a very wide energy range, from 5 to 300 GeV. The significance of the individual experimental parameters in the design of transition radiation detectors is reviewed, and the characteristics of transition-radiation detectors capable of measuring particle energies over the range E/mc-squared from about 300 to 100,000 are discussed.

  11. ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker test-beam results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akesson, T.; Arik, E.; Baker, K.; Baron, S.; Benjamin, D.; Bertelsen, H.; Bondarenko, V.; Bytchkov, V.; Callahan, J.; Capeans, M.; Cardiel-Sas, L.; Catinaccio, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Cwetanski, P.; Dam, M.; Danielsson, H.; Dittus, F.; Dolgoshein, B.; Dressnandt, N.; Driouichi, C.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Eerola, P.; Farthouat, P.; Fedin, O.; Froidevaux, D.; Gagnon, P.; Grichkevitch, Y.; Grigalashvili, N.; Hajduk, Z.; Hansen, P.; Kayumov, F.; Keener, P. T.; Kekelidze, G.; Khristatchev, A.; Konovalov, S.; Koudine, L.; Kovalenko, S.; Kowalski, T.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kruger, K.; Laritchev, A.; Lichard, P.; Luehring, F.; Lundberg, B.; Maleev, V.; Markina, I.; McFarlane, K.; Mialkovski, V.; Mitsou, V. A.; Mindur, B.; Morozov, S.; Munar, A.; Muraviev, S.; Nadtochy, A.; Newcomer, F. M.; Ogren, H.; Oh, S. H.; Oleshko, S.; Olszowska, J.; Passmore, S.; Patritchev, S.; Peshekhonov, V.; Petti, R.; Price, M.; Rembser, C.; Rohne, O.; Romaniouk, A.; Rust, D. R.; Ryabov, Yu.; Schegelsky, V.; Seliverstov, D.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Smirnov, S.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Soutchkov, V.; Spiridenkov, E.; Tikhomirov, V.; Van Berg, R.; Vassilakopoulos, V.; Vassilieva, L.; Wang, C.; Williams, H. H.; Zalite, A.

    2004-04-01

    Several prototypes of the Transition Radiation Tracker for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC have been built and tested at the CERN SPS accelerator. Results from detailed studies of the straw-tube hit registration efficiency and drift-time measurements and of the pion and electron spectra without and with radiators are presented.

  12. Measurements of the frequency spectrum of transition radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, M. L.; Mueller, D.

    1977-01-01

    We report a measurement of the frequency spectrum of X-ray transition radiation. X rays were generated by electrons of 5 and 9 GeV in radiators of multiple polypropylene foils, and detected in the range 4 to 30 keV with a calibrated single-crystal Bragg spectrometer. The experimental results closely reproduce the features of the theoretically predicted spectrum. In particular, the pronounced interference pattern of multifoil radiators and the expected hardening of the radiation with increasing foil thickness are clearly observed. The overall intensity of the radiation is somewhat lower than predicted by calculations.

  13. The generation of transition radiation by relativistic particles in plastic foam radiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, T. A.; Mueller, D.; Cherry, M. L.; Hartmann, G.

    1975-01-01

    The design of large area transition radiation detectors for highly relativistic particles can be greatly simplified if plastic foam radiators are employed. Using electron beams with energies 1-9 GeV at the Cornell synchrotron, we have studied the properties of a large variety of transition radiators consisting of commercially available foam materials. In most cases, a measurable transition radiation signal has been observed, but only a few materials have been found to be suitable for practical purposes. The observed radiation yield is in these cases very similar to that of equivalent multifoil radiators. A detailed discussion is given of the particle detection efficiency that can be obtained with high yield foam radiators.

  14. Critical issues in radiation hardening of fusion diagnostic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, J.F.; Barker, R.A.; Engholm, B.A.; Miller, P.H.

    1983-01-01

    In the most recent phase of the DOE funded program in Radiation Hardening of Fusion Reactor Diagnostics, a study and listing have been completed of the critical issues. With this information a long range program plan-including system studies, data surveys and a sponsored experimental program-is being developed for integration into the DOE Fusion Engineering Development Plan. More than twenty critical issues were identified, ranked in terms of three parameters (priority, urgency and impact) and described in terms of the remaining research needed. In addition to the critical issues list, three studies that were completed to assess the impact of some of the critical issues are described here briefly. A Survey was conducted of detectors and transducers expected to be impaired by doserate effects in the fusion environment. A set of Monte Carlo computer calculations of the streaming of neutrons through small, diagnostic-sized penetrations in a blanket-shield structure showed that simple analytic expressions for such streaming are inadequate for even preliminary designs of radiationsensitive diagnostic systems. Tests on radiation-darkened window blanks of quartz and sapphire showed that transmission in the ultraviolet region was improved by annealing at 300 0 C, indicating that it may be feasible to include windows in a well-designed viewing system in a reactor

  15. Observation of coherently enhanced tunable narrow-band terahertz transition radiation from a relativistic sub-picosecond electron bunch train

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piot, P.; Maxwell, T. J.; Sun, Y.-E; Ruan, J.; Lumpkin, A. H.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Rihaoui, M. M.

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the production of narrow-band (δf/f≅20% at f≅0.5THz) transition radiation with tunable frequency over [0.37, 0.86] THz. The radiation is produced as a train of sub-picosecond relativistic electron bunches transits at the vacuum-aluminum interface of an aluminum converter screen. The bunch train is generated via a transverse-to-longitudinal phase space exchange technique. We also show a possible application of modulated beams to extend the dynamical range of a popular bunch length diagnostic technique based on the spectral analysis of coherent radiation.

  16. Meeting the Needs for Radiation Protection: Diagnostic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frush, Donald P

    2017-02-01

    Radiation and potential risk during medical imaging is one of the foremost issues for the imaging community. Because of this, there are growing demands for accountability, including appropriate use of ionizing radiation in diagnostic and image-guided procedures. Factors contributing to this include increasing use of medical imaging; increased scrutiny (from awareness to alarm) by patients/caregivers and the public over radiation risk; and mounting calls for accountability from regulatory, accrediting, healthcare coverage (e.g., Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services), and advisory agencies and organizations as well as industry (e.g., NEMA XR-29, Standard Attributes on CT Equipment Related to Dose Optimization and Management). Current challenges include debates over uncertainty with risks with low-level radiation; lack of fully developed and targeted products for diagnostic imaging and radiation dose monitoring; lack of resources for and clarity surrounding dose monitoring programs; inconsistencies across and between practices for design, implementation and audit of dose monitoring programs; lack of interdisciplinary programs for radiation protection of patients; potential shortages in personnel for these and other consensus efforts; and training concerns as well as inconsistencies for competencies throughout medical providers' careers for radiation protection of patients. Medical care providers are currently in a purgatory between quality- and value-based imaging paradigms, a state that has yet to mature to reward this move to quality-based performance. There are also deficits in radiation expertise personnel in medicine. For example, health physics academic programs and graduates have recently declined, and medical physics residency openings are currently at a third of the number of graduates. However, leveraging solutions to the medical needs will require money and resources, beyond personnel alone. Energy and capital will need to be directed to

  17. Calculation of radiation exposure in diagnostic radiology. Method and surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvauferrier, R.; Ramee, A.; Ezzeldin, K.; Guibert, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    A computerized method for evaluating the radiation exposure of the main target organs during various diagnostic radiologic procedures is described. This technique was used for educational purposes: study of exposure variations according to the technical modalities of a given procedure, and study of exposure variations according to various technical protocols (IVU, EGD barium study, etc.). This method was also used for studying exposure of patients during hospitalization in the Rennes Regional Hospital Center (France) in 1982, according to departments (urology, neurology, etc.). This method and results of these three studies are discussed [fr

  18. Radiation damage in diagnostic window materials for the TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primak, W.

    1981-07-01

    The general problem of evaluating diagnostic window materials for the TFTR at the tank wall location is described. Specific evaluations are presented for several materials: vitreous silica, crystal quartz, sapphire, zinc selenide, and several fluorides: lithium fluoride, magnesium fluoride, and calcium fluoride; and seal glasses are discussed. The effects of the neutrons will be minimal. The major problems arise from the high flux of ionizing radiation, mainly the soft x rays which are absorbed near the surface of the materials. Additionally, this large energy deposition causes a significant thermal pulse with attendant thermal stresses. It is thus desirable to protect the windows with cover slips where this is feasible or to reduce the incident radiation by mounting the windows on long pipes. A more detailed summary is given at the end of this report.

  19. Radiation-free CMR diagnostic heart catheterization in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnayaka, Kanishka; Kanter, Joshua P; Faranesh, Anthony Z; Grant, Elena K; Olivieri, Laura J; Cross, Russell R; Cronin, Ileen F; Hamann, Karin S; Campbell-Washburn, Adrienne E; O'Brien, Kendall J; Rogers, Toby; Hansen, Michael S; Lederman, Robert J

    2017-09-06

    Children with heart disease may require repeated X-Ray cardiac catheterization procedures, are more radiosensitive, and more likely to survive to experience oncologic risks of medical radiation. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is radiation-free and offers information about structure, function, and perfusion but not hemodynamics. We intend to perform complete radiation-free diagnostic right heart catheterization entirely using CMR fluoroscopy guidance in an unselected cohort of pediatric patients; we report the feasibility and safety. We performed 50 CMR fluoroscopy guided comprehensive transfemoral right heart catheterizations in 39 pediatric (12.7 ± 4.7 years) subjects referred for clinically indicated cardiac catheterization. CMR guided catheterizations were assessed by completion (success/failure), procedure time, and safety events (catheterization, anesthesia). Pre and post CMR body temperature was recorded. Concurrent invasive hemodynamic and diagnostic CMR data were collected. During a twenty-two month period (3/2015 - 12/2016), enrolled subjects had the following clinical indications: post-heart transplant 33%, shunt 28%, pulmonary hypertension 18%, cardiomyopathy 15%, valvular heart disease 3%, and other 3%. Radiation-free CMR guided right heart catheterization attempts were all successful using passive catheters. In two subjects with septal defects, right and left heart catheterization were performed. There were no complications. One subject had six such procedures. Most subjects (51%) had undergone multiple (5.5 ± 5) previous X-Ray cardiac catheterizations. Retained thoracic surgical or transcatheter implants (36%) did not preclude successful CMR fluoroscopy heart catheterization. During the procedure, two subjects were receiving vasopressor infusions at baseline because of poor cardiac function, and in ten procedures, multiple hemodynamic conditions were tested. Comprehensive CMR fluoroscopy guided right heart catheterization was feasible and

  20. Diagnostic hepatic haemodynamic techniques: safety and radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari, Andrej; Nair, Hari Kumar; De Gottardi, Andrea; Baumgartner, Iris; Dufour, Jean-François; Berzigotti, Annalisa

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) and transjugular liver biopsy (TJLB) are increasingly used in the management of patients with liver disease. We aimed to describe the safety profile of these procedures, providing data on the intra- and periprocedure complications, radiation exposure and amount of iodinated contrast material used. In 106 consecutive patients undergoing HVPG and TJLB data on fluoroscopy time (FT), absorbed radiation dose, equivalent effective dose (mSv) and volume of iodinated contrast material (ICM) were prospectively collected and reviewed, together with clinical and laboratory data. Incidence and severity of procedure-related complications were assessed. In 28 hospitalised patients, creatinine values after 72 hours of the procedure were reviewed to identify contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN). Median effective radiation dose was 5.4 mSv (IQR 10 mSv). A total 28.3% of patients exceeded an effective exposure of 10 mSv and 9.4% exceeded 20 mSv. Only age and BMI correlated with radiation dose (R = .327, P=.001 and R = .410, Pexposure over 20 mSv. Procedure-related complications occurred in eight patients (7.5%), and were minor in six cases. Median ICM volume was 12.5 mL. 6/28 patients met the diagnostic criteria for CIN. Hepatic venous pressure gradient and Transjugular liver biopsy show a good safety profile and radiation exposure associated with these procedures is in most of the cases low. In hepatic haemodynamic procedures, efforts should be made to reduce the radiation dose in patients with overweight/obesity and to use the minimal possible ICM volume in patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Radiation doses from medical diagnostic procedures in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldrich, J.E.; Lentle, B.C.; Vo, C.

    1997-03-01

    This document sets out to record and analyze the doses incurred in Canada from medical procedures involving the use of ionizing radiation in a typical year. Excluded are those doses incurred during therapeutic irradiation, since they differ in scale to such a large degree and because they are used almost exclusively in treating cancer. In this we are following a precedent set by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Ionizing Radiation. Although the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) notes that dose limits should not be applied to medical exposures, it also observes that doses in different settings for the same procedure may vary by as much as two orders of magnitude, and that there are considerable opportunities for dose reductions in diagnostic radiology. Because these data do not stand in isolation the report also encompasses a review of the relevant literature and some background comment on the evolving technology of the radiological sciences. Because there is a somewhat incomplete perception of the changes taking place in diagnostic methods we have also provided some introductory explanations of the relevant technologies. In addition, there is an analysis of at least some of the limitations on the completeness of the data which are reported here. (author)

  2. Principles of longitudinal beam diagnostics with coherent radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimm, O.; Schmueser, P.

    2006-04-24

    The FLASH facility requires novel techniques to characterize the longitudinal charge distribution of the electron bunches that drive the free-electron laser. Bunch features well below 30 {mu}m need to be resolved. One technique is based on the measurement of the far-infrared radiation spectrum and reconstruction of the bunch shape through Fourier analysis. Currently, experiments using synchrotron, transition and diffraction radiation are operating at FLASH, studying the emission spectra with various instruments. This report describes the basic physics, the measurement principles, and gives explicit mathematical derivations. References to more comprehensive discussions of practical problems and experiments are listed. After a brief introduction in Sect. 1, the radiation spectrum emitted by an electron bunch is calculated in Sect. 2 in far-field approximation. The technique to reconstruct the bunch shape from the spectrum and its basic limitations are then explained in Sect. 3. Practical examples are given. The typical radiation pulse duration ranges from less than 100 femtoseconds to several picoseconds. (orig.)

  3. Phase Transition in the Process of Formation of Electromagnetic Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubov, V. P.; Vaiman, E. V.; Prasath, A.

    2017-04-01

    A new look at the description of the phenomenon of electromagnetic wave radiation as a phase transition of a quasi-static field state (near zone) in the field of running wave (far zone) is suggested. It is demonstrated that the boundary of this transition, called the causal surface, is sufficiently localized. The position of the causal surface depends on the chosen radiation frequency. The skin layer in media with strong absorption is formed at the boundary of the causal surface, and this can be used for depth sensing of such media.

  4. Blackbody radiation shift of the Ga+ clock transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Yongjun; Mitroy, J

    2013-01-01

    The blackbody radiation shift of the Ga + clock transition is computed to be −0.0140 ± 0.0062 Hz at 300 K. The small shift is consistent with the blackbody radiation shifts of the clock transitions of other group III ions which are of a similar size. The polarizabilities of the Ga + states were computed using the configuration interaction method with an underlying semi-empirical core potential. Quadrupole and non-adiabatic dipole polarizabilities were also computed. A byproduct of the analysis involved calculations of the low-lying spectrum and oscillator strengths, including polarizabilities, of the Ga 2+ ion. (paper)

  5. Transition radiation and peculiar nebulas. [Emission lines, color indices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurzadyan, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    The transition radiation resulting from the electrodynamic interaction of fast electrons with dust particles may explain certain observations for peculiar galactic nebulas--Herbig--Haro objects, cometary nebulas, nebulas of the Barnard 10 type, T Tauri stars, FU Ori stars, etc. Equations are derived for the energetic and physical properties of peculiar objects. The probable energy of the fast electrons turns out to be on the order of 1.5 MeV. The excitation of emission lines, the color indices in the case of transition radiation, etc., are also discussed. A possible application of this theory to FUOR's is pointed out.

  6. Theory of K-MM radiative-Auger transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baptista, G.B.

    1975-01-01

    Presently available calculations of transition probabilities for radiative-Auger and double-Auger processes are based on shake-off theory. In this theory, such processes are thought of as being due to electron core rearrangement associated with de-excitation of an inner shell vacancy. It is suggested that radiative-Auger processes result from the interaction of two electrons with one another and the radiation field in the presence of an inner shell vacancy, while double-Auger processes result from the interaction of an electron with two electrons in the presence of a similar vacancy. Expressions for the transition probabilities of these processes are derived in second order time dependent perturbation theory. The interaction is taken as the sum of the Coulomb interaction and electron-field interaction of the electrons involved. This approach allows calculation of the detailed photon or electron energy distribution resulting from such processes, as well as the relative and absolute transition rates involved. As a specific example of this approach the transition probability for the K-MM radiative-Auger effect in argon is calculated and compared with available experimental data. Scaled Thomas-Fermi wavefunctions are used to calculate the total transition probability which is found to be 2.68 x 10 -4 eV/h-bar In addition, the spectral distribution of emitted photons is obtained, and agreement both in magnitude and with the general features of the experimental data is excellent

  7. Case-control study of leukemia and diagnostic radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuasa, Hidemichi; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Ueda, Ryuzo

    1997-01-01

    A case-control study of leukemia and diagnostic X-ray exposure was conducted by a multi-institution co-operative study group. The subjects were 134 patients with acute myelogenous leukemia, 57 with chronic myelogenous leukemia, 56 with acute lymphocytic leukemia and 50 with myelodysplasia syndrome, who were between 15 and 79 years old, and diagnosed at one of 27 hospitals between September 1993 and August 1995. The controls were 479 first-visit patients seen at eight of these 27 hospitals. History of diagnostic X-ray tests between 1982 and 1991 was determined by an anonymous self-administered questionnaire. The total relative dose of radiation exposure was calculated by summing the products of given weights and frequencies of each test. The relative risk was 0.83 (95% confidence interval (C.I.), 0.58-1.19) for relative dose of 10-30 (equivalent to 4-11 times of UGI series), 0.76 (0.48-1.20) for relative dose of 30 or more (more than 12 times of UGI series), when compared with relative dose of 0-10 (0-3 times of UGI series). Analysis according to type of leukemia revealed that only acute myelogenous leukemia had an estimated relative risk above unity (1.08, 95%, C.I. 0.69-1.69, for relative dose 10-30). This study did not support the hypothesis that diagnostic X-ray tests increases leukemia risk. (author)

  8. A large area transition radiation detector for the NOMAD experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassompierre, G.; Bermond, M.; Berthet, M.; Bertozzi, T.; Détraz, C.; Dubois, J.-M.; Dumps, L.; Engster, C.; Fazio, T.; Gaillard, G.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Gouanère, M.; Manola-Poggioli, E.; Mossuz, L.; Mendiburu, J.-P.; Nédélec, P.; Palazzini, E.; Pessard, H.; Petit, P.; Petitpas, P.; Placci, A.; Sillou, D.; Sottile, R.; Valuev, V.; Verkindt, D.; Vey, H.; Wachnik, M.

    1998-02-01

    A transition radiation detector to identify electrons at 90% efficiency with a rejection factor against pions of 10 3 on an area of 2.85 × 2.85 m 2 has been constructed for the NOMAD experiment. Each of its 9 modules includes a 315 plastic foil radiator and a detector plane of 176 vertical straw tubes filled with a xenon-methane gas mixture. Details of the design, construction and operation of the detector are given.

  9. A large area transition radiation detector for the NOMAD experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bassompierre, Gabriel; Berthet, M; Bertozzi, T; Détraz, C; Dubois, J M; Dumps, Ludwig; Engster, Claude; Fazio, T; Gaillard, G; Gaillard, Jean-Marc; Gouanère, M; Manola-Poggioli, E; Mossuz, L; Mendiburu, J P; Nédélec, P; Palazzini, E; Pessard, H; Petit, P; Petitpas, P; Placci, Alfredo; Sillou, D; Sottile, R; Valuev, V Yu; Verkindt, D; Vey, H; Wachnik, M

    1997-01-01

    A transition radiation detector to identify electrons at 90% efficiency with a rejection factor against pions of 10 3 on an area of 2.85 × 2.85 m 2 has been constructed for the NOMAD experiment. Each of its 9 modules includes a 315 plastic foil radiator and a detector plane of 176 vertical straw tubes filled with a xenon-methane gas mixture. Details of the design, construction and operation of the detector are given.

  10. The transition radiation. I: numerical study of the angular and spectral distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couillaud, Ch.; Haouat, G.

    1999-01-01

    The optical transition radiation (OTR) is extensively used since many years as a beam visualisation tool on electron accelerators and serves to monitor the beam during its transport adjustment. Its spatial and temporal characteristics make it very attractive as a diagnostic tool and allow measurements of the beam energy and transverse and longitudinal emittances. We present a numerical study of the transition radiation process in the optical region of the radiated spectrum (OTR) and in the higher part (XTR). Spatial and spectral properties are described. They are used to describe experimental observations performed on the ELSA electron-beam facility. An analytical description of the angular distributions of visible radiation emitted by birefringent targets, used as OTR sources, is also proposed. We also analyze interference phenomena between two OTR sources and show the advantage of using this interferometer as a diagnostic tool for tenth MeV electron accelerators. At last, we present an analytical model allowing to design a soft X-ray source to be installed on the ELSA facility and using either a multi-foil stack or a multilayer of two materials of different permittivities. (authors)

  11. RADIATION THERAPY OF A PRESUMPTIVE URETHRAL TRANSITIONAL CELL CARCINOMA IN AN EASTERN GRAY SQUIRREL (SCIURUS CAROLINENSIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs-Sanford, Sara E; St-Vincent, Rachel; Hiss, Anne

    2015-12-01

    An adult female Eastern gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis), with a previous history of primary renal transitional cell carcinoma treated by nephrectomy, was diagnosed with a metastatic urethral transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) utilizing the veterinary bladder tumor antigen test in combination with other noninvasive diagnostic tests. The squirrel was treated with piroxicam and external beam radiation therapy given in 18 treatments over 30 days to achieve a total of 54 gray. Mild to moderate side effects from the pelvic irradiation were self-limiting and easily managed. Resolution of clinical signs was achieved for approximately 6 mo until recurrence of metastasis. This report represents the first published account of both TCC and external beam radiation therapy in an Eastern gray squirrel.

  12. Branching ratios of radiative transitions in O VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sur, Chiranjib; Chaudhuri, Rajat K

    2007-01-01

    We study the branching ratios of the allowed and forbidden radiative transitions among the first few (9) fine structure levels of O VI using relativistic coupled-cluster theory. We find irregular patterns for a number of transitions within n-complexes with n ≤ 4. We have used the existing values of the allowed electric dipole (E1) transition as a benchmark of our theory. Good agreement with the existing values establish accuracies of not only the theoretical method but the basis function as well. In general, the electric quadrupole (E2) transition probabilities are greater in magnitude than magnetic dipole (M1) transition probabilities, whereas for medium atomic transition frequencies they are of the same order of magnitude. On the other hand, if the transitions involved are in between two fine-structure components of the same term, then the M1 transition probability is more probable than that of E2. The results presented here in tabular and graphical form are compared with the available theoretical and observed data. Graphical analysis helps to understand the trends of electric and magnetic transitions for the decay channels presented here. Our calculated values of the lifetimes of the excited states are in very good agreement with the available results

  13. Emittance measurements of FEL accelerators using optical transition radiation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorito, R.B.; Rule, D.W.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Tokar, R.L.; Dowell, D.H.; Sellyey, W.C.; Lowrey, A.R.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of the emittance of the Boeing FEL accelerator operating at 107 Mev, were performed using optical transition radiation (OTR). The results of the three measurement methods: measurement of beam spot size as a function of magnetic quadrupole focusing strength, two screen beam spot measurements, and beam spot-divergence measurements using a OTR interferometer are compared and shown to be in excellent agreement

  14. Demonstration of artificial intelligence technology for transit railcar diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This report will be of interest to railcar maintenance professionals concerned with improving railcar maintenance fault-diagnostic capabilities through the use of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies. It documents the results of a demonstration ...

  15. Measurements of Compton Scattered Transition Radiation at High Lorentz Factors

    CERN Document Server

    Case, Gary L.; Cherry, Michael L.; Isbert, Joachim; Mitchell, John W.; Patterson, Donald; Case, Gary L.; Cherry, Michael L.; Isbert, Joachim; Mitchell, John W.; Patterson, Donald

    2004-01-01

    X-ray transition radiation can be used to measure the Lorentz factor of relativistic particles. Standard transition radiation detectors (TRDs) typically incorporate thin plastic foil radiators and gas-filled x-ray detectors, and are sensitive up to \\gamma ~ 10^4. To reach higher Lorentz factors (up to \\gamma ~ 10^5), thicker, denser radiators can be used, which consequently produce x-rays of harder energies (>100 keV). At these energies, scintillator detectors are more efficient in detecting the hard x-rays, and Compton scattering of the x-rays out of the path of the particle becomes an important effect. The Compton scattering can be utilized to separate the transition radiation from the ionization background spatially. The use of conducting metal foils is predicted to yield enhanced signals compared to standard nonconducting plastic foils of the same dimensions. We have designed and built a Compton Scatter TRD optimized for high Lorentz factors and exposed it to high energy electrons at the CERN SPS. We pres...

  16. High repetition rate laser systems: targets, diagnostics and radiation protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizzi, Leonida A.; Clark, Eugene; Neely, David; Roso, Luis; Tolley, Martin

    2010-02-01

    Accessing the high repetition regime of ultra intense laser-target interactions at small or moderate laser energies is now possible at a large number of facilities worldwide. New projects such as HiPER and ELI promise to extend this regime to the high energy realm at the multi-kJ level. This opportunity raises several issues on how best to approach this new regime of operation in a safe and efficient way. At the same time, a new class of experiments or a new generation of secondary sources of particles and radiation may become accessible, provided that target fabrication and diagnostics are capable of handling this rep-rated regime. In this paper, we explore this scenario and analyse existing and perspective techniques that promise to address some of the above issues.

  17. Radiation protection of patients in diagnostic radiology in Estonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippova, I.

    2001-01-01

    The medical use of ionizing radiation started at the beginning of the century. It has always been considered necessary, as well as for diagnostic applications where exposure to the patient is the price to pay in order to obtain useful images, as for therapy where the patient is exposed on purpose, in order to kill malignant cells. It is nowadays the major man-made contribution to the population dose. Even with the developments of substitutive imaging or treatment techniques, there is still an increasing demand and many organizations are joining their efforts to try to keep the dose to the patient 'as low as reasonably achievable'. This is particularly the case for the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) which recommended in publication 26 to follow three main principles: justification, optimisation and limitation. Limitation, however, does not apply to patients since the individuals exposed are expected to benefit from this exposure, but justification and optimization are relevant. (author)

  18. The efficient identification of relativistic particles by transition radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, M. L.; Mueller, D.; Prince, T. A.

    1974-01-01

    A system of transition radiation detectors has been constructed and exposed to beams of electrons and pions in the energy range of 3 to 15 GeV at SLAC. Transition radiation was generated in a variety of stacks of mylar foils (radiators), and its intensity was detected with 7 multiwire proportional chambers. The raw data demonstrate a good separation between electron and pion induced signals. A more detailed analysis shows that a very efficient identification of individual particles is possible. Typically, a detection efficiency for electrons above 90%, combined with a pion-electron discrimination ratio of .001, has been achieved. Some conclusions with respect to the design of a practical detector for relativistic particles are drawn.

  19. Recent progress with the Transition Radiation Tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Froidevaux, D

    Start-up of end-cap assembly in Russia On July 2nd at PNPI (first photo) and on August 1st at JINR Dubna (second photo), the first straws were inserted into the first 4-plane end-cap wheels, each containing 3072 straws. The straws were glued, the radiator stacks were installed and the PNPI wheel was tested for gas leaks. An initial large leak rate was observed and fixed by increasing somewhat the amount of glue around each straw end-piece and improving the leak-tightness of the testing equipment itself. PNPI will assemble a total of 48 4-plane wheels of type A using two assembly lines. JINR Dubna will assemble a total of 32 4-plane wheels of type B using a single assembly line. The next steps are the gluing of the so-called active webs (printed circuit boards connecting high voltage and signal lines from straw/wire to HV supply and front-end boards), followed by wiring, and will take place in November. PNPI and JINR Dubna should start mass production in February-March next year. Barrel module produc...

  20. Radiation Protection Education in Diagnostic Radiology in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotelo, E.; Paolini, G.

    2003-01-01

    In Uruguay the lack of Radiation Protection (RP) laws makes education in medical use of ionizing radiations at University, a decisive factor of changes. The six years experience in teaching technicians, radiologists, interventional cardiologists and anesthetists in curricular lectures, continuing education courses and workshops, show the importance of a close link between educators and occupationally exposed professionals. Regarding training and education in the optimization of the procedures, it is essential that both teacher and student comprehend the exact meaning of ALARA concept. This implies that although the educator is the one who manages the physical basis of RP, the student is who teaches the educator about the procedures. This turns RP education into a dynamic process in which at the same time, both educator and student learn and teach. After the theoretical lectures, it is essential that students show their ability in applying the acquired knowledge in their everyday practice. Last nut not least, in order to fulfill the first RP principle,all medicine students need to be educated in RP and quality image criteria before the get their medical doctor degree. Our experience shows that RP education in diagnostic radiology requires an expert with both medical physics and Image technology knowledge that allow an approach to students work, language and everyday problems. Despite the fact that the main result of the Education Program is the way professionals improve their practice, another consequence was that the Regulatory Authority of the country called the teacher team to coordinate the first RP national course. (Author) 14 refs

  1. New perspective for radiation protection in diagnostic procedure in Paraguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sosky, R.A.; Gamarra, M.

    2001-01-01

    The Government in Paraguay approved by Decree Law 10754, dated October 6, 2000, its National Regulation on Basic Safety Standards for Radiation Protection and the Safety of Radiation Sources, based on the IAEA Safety Standards 115. The primary goal of Patient Protection is to ensure that both Regulatory Authorities and all Responsible parties in Medical Practices observe procedural process in conducting their responsibilities on regulatory and administrative affairs. On one side the Government, 'Department de Proteccion Radiologica', under the Health Ministry and Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, and on the other side, the medical practitioner who prescribes or conducts diagnostic or therapeutic treatment, both ensure that the exposure of patients be the minimum. This document describes how the Regulatory Authorities intend to implement this recent act and on the other hand take the advantage of this Conference to understand better this subject, especially on the following subjects: essential requirement for licensing, inspection and enforcement programme in the country's capital and in the interior, where there are more difficulties; workers and medical training and lessons learned applying to developing countries. (author)

  2. Pediatric radiation exposure from diagnostic nuclear medicine examinations in Tehran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neshandar Asli, I.; Tabeie, F.

    2005-01-01

    As a part of a nationwide survey to estimate population exposure to radiation from diagnostic nuclear medicine in Iran, this paper presents the pediatric population radiation exposure due to nuclear medicine examinations in Tehran. Patients and methods: the effective dose equivalent, H E , was used to calculate the collective effective dose in pediatric patients undergoing nuclear medicine procedures, and the corresponding data were obtained from thirty out of thirty seven active nuclear medicine departments in Tehran. Results: annually about 5.26% of nuclear medicine examinations were performed on patients under 15 years of age in Tehran. The most frequent was renal examinations (38.2%), followed y thyroid (27.4%) and bone (26.7%). The annual collective H E for patients under 15 was 19.03 human-Sv, which contributed 3.96% to the collective H E for all patients. The contribution of renal, bone and thyroid examinations to the pediatric collective H E were 24.6% 48.8% and 13.5% respectively. The mean effective dose equivalent per pediatric patient was 3.75 mSv.Conclusion: Among the three most frequent examinations, the bone with a relative frequency of 27.4% constituted 48.8% of the collective H E , which was the highest absorbed dose per examination. The mean effective dose per examination for patients younger than 15 years was 67.9% of the adults

  3. Performance of the AMS-02 Transition Radiation Detector

    CERN Document Server

    von Doetinchem, P.; Karpinski, W.; Kirn, T.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Orboeck, J.; Schael, S.; Schultz von Dratzig, A.; Schwering, G.; Siedenburg, T.; Siedling, R.; Wallraff, W.; Becker, U.; Burger, J.; Henning, R.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Wyatt, J.

    2006-01-01

    For cosmic particle spectroscopy on the International Space Station the AMS experiment will be equipped with a Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) to improve particle identification. The TRD has 20 layers of fleece radiator with Xe/CO2 proportional mode straw tube chambers. They are supported in a conically shaped octagon structure made of CFC-Al-honeycomb. For low power consumption VA analog multiplexers are used as front-end readout. A 20 layer prototype built from final design components has achieved proton rejections from 100 to 2000 at 90% electron efficiency for proton beam energies up to 250 GeV with cluster counting, likelihood and neural net selection algorithms.

  4. The ALICE Transition Radiation Detector: Construction, operation, and performance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Acharya, S.; Adamová, Dagmar; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, Jana; Brož, M.; Contreras, J. G.; Ferencei, Jozef; Hladký, Jan; Horák, D.; Křížek, Filip; Kučera, Vít; Kushpil, Svetlana; Lavička, R.; Mareš, Jiří A.; Petráček, V.; Šumbera, Michal; Vaňát, Tomáš; Závada, Petr

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 881, č. 2 (2018), s. 88-127 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG15052 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : fibre/foam sendwich radiator * transition radiation detector * multi-wire proportional drift chamber * Xenon-based gas micture * tracking * lonisation energy loss Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders; BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics (FZU-D) OBOR OECD: Nuclear physics; Particles and field physics (FZU-D) Impact factor: 1.362, year: 2016

  5. Design And Measurement Of Radiation Exposure Rates At An X-Ray Diagnostic Radiological Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tito-Sutjipto

    2003-01-01

    Every radiation employees suffers radiation exposure risk while doing his job. It is important therefore to investigate the occupational health and safety of radiation employees on its relationship with the design and measurement of radiation exposure rates at an X-ray diagnostic radiological unit in this work, a case study was held on the radiological unit at BP-4 Yogyakarta for patient diagnostics, This research armed to investigate the relationship between the design of radiological unit for X-ray diagnostics and the location of the X-ray machine, based on the distance variable and radiation exposure rate during patient diagnostics. This was performed using radiological unit design data for X-ray diagnostics and the measurement of radiation exposure rates throughout patient diagnostics. The design data can then be used for determining the requirement of primary and secondary shielding materials for radiological unit as well as a calculation basis of radiation exposure rates during patient diagnostics. From the result of the research, it can be concluded that from the occupational health and safety point of view, radiation exposure around the X-ray machines are fairly good, both for the shielding materials in each X-ray room and the radiation exposures received by the workers, because they are far beyond the maximum permittable average limit (16.67 m R/days). (author)

  6. Melting and glass transition of radiation-induced graft polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toi, K.; Kikuchi, M.; Tokuda, T.

    1977-01-01

    Melting and glass transition data are reported employing DSC for styrene-grafted high-density polyethylene obtained by γ radiation. Judging from the data of the melting point and the heat of fusion, the grafted polystyrene had no effect on the polyethylene crystallites, but the half-width of the thermogram was observed to increase slightly, showing an effect on the crystallite size distribution. As no effect was observed on the glass transition temperature by grafting, the amorphous region of the polyethylene apparently was not affected. It is suggested, therefore, that the free volume or segmental mobility will not be decreased by radiation-induced grafting. Very few but long grafted chains had negligible effect on the average polyethylene chain length available for segmental motion, and grafted polystyrene should be expected to differ from the styrene homopolymer in thermal motions

  7. Practical X-ray diagnostics orthopedics and trauma surgery. Indication, adjustment technique and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flechtenmacher, Johannes; Sabo, Desiderius

    2014-01-01

    The book on X-ray diagnostics in orthopedics and trauma surgery includes the following chapters: 1. Introduction: radiation protection, equipment technology radiological diagnostics of skeleton carcinomas, specific aspects of trauma surgery, special aspects of skeleton radiology for children. 2. X-ray diagnostics of different anatomical regions: ankle joint, knee, hips and pelvis, hand and wrist joint, elbow, shoulder, spinal cord. 3. Appendix: radiation protection according to the X-ray regulations.

  8. The ALICE Transition Radiation Detector: construction, operation, and performance

    OpenAIRE

    Acharya, Shreyasi; Adam, Jaroslav; Ahmad, Nazeer; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Umaka, Ejiro Naomi; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vala, Martin; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Bhom, Jihyun

    2018-01-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) was designed and built to enhance the capabilities of the ALICE detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). While aimed at providing electron identification and triggering, the TRD also contributes significantly to the track reconstruction and calibration in the central barrel of ALICE. In this paper the design, construction, operation, and performance of this detector are discussed. A pion rejection factor of up to 410 is achieved at a momentum of 1 G...

  9. Successful beam tests for ALICE Transition Radiation Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Another round of beam tests of prototypes for the Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) for ALICE has been completed and there are already some good results. Mass production of the components of the detector will start early next year.   Top view of the setup for the Transition Radiation Detector prototype tests at CERN.On the left, can be seen the full-scale TRD prototype together with four smaller versions. These are busy days for the TRD (Transition Radiation Detector) team of ALICE. Twenty people - mainly from Germany, but also from Russia and Japan - were working hard during the beam tests this autumn at CERN to assess the performance of their detector prototypes. Analysis of the data shows that the TRD can achieve the desired physics goal even for the highest conceivable multiplicities in lead-lead collisions at the LHC. In its final configuration in the ALICE experiment, the TRD will greatly help in identifying high-momentum electrons, which are 'needles in a haystack' that consists mostly of...

  10. Medical radiation exposure and usage for diagnostic radiology in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Kwan-Hoong; Rassiah, Premavathy; Abdullah, B.J.J.; Wang, Hwee-Beng; Shariff Hambali, Ahmad; Muthuvelu, Pirunthavany; Sivalingam, S.

    2001-01-01

    A national dose survey of routine X-ray examinations in Malaysia (a Level II country) from 1993 to 1995 had established baseline data for seven common types of x-ray examinations. A total of 12 randomly selected public hospitals and 867 patients were included in this survey. Survey results are generally comparable with those reported in the UK, USA and IAEA. The findings support the importance of the ongoing national quality assurance programme to ensure doses are kept to a level consistent with optimum image quality. The data was useful in the formulation of national guidance levels as recommended by the IAEA. The medical radiation exposure and usage for diagnostic radiology (1990-1994) enabled a comparison to be made for the first time with the UNSCEAR 2000 Report. In 1994, the number of physicians, radiologists, x-ray units and x-ray examinations per 1000 population was 0.45, 0.005, 0.065 and 183, respectively; 3.6 million x-ray examinations were performed; the annual effective dose per capita was 0.05 mSv and collective dose was 1000 person-Sv. Chest examinations contributed 63% of the total. Almost all examinations experienced increasing frequency except for barium studies, cholecystography, and intravenous urography (-23%, -36%, -51%). Notable increases were observed in computed tomography (161%), cardiac procedures (190%), and mammography (240%). (author)

  11. Kepler Data Validation I: Architecture, Diagnostic Tests, and Data Products for Vetting Transiting Planet Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twicken, Joseph D.; Catanzarite, Joseph H.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Giroud, Forrest; Jenkins, Jon M.; Klaus, Todd C.; Li, Jie; McCauliff, Sean D.; Seader, Shawn E.; Tennenbaum, Peter; hide

    2018-01-01

    The Kepler Mission was designed to identify and characterize transiting planets in the Kepler Field of View and to determine their occurrence rates. Emphasis was placed on identification of Earth-size planets orbiting in the Habitable Zone of their host stars. Science data were acquired for a period of four years. Long-cadence data with 29.4 min sampling were obtained for approx. 200,000 individual stellar targets in at least one observing quarter in the primary Kepler Mission. Light curves for target stars are extracted in the Kepler Science Data Processing Pipeline, and are searched for transiting planet signatures. A Threshold Crossing Event is generated in the transit search for targets where the transit detection threshold is exceeded and transit consistency checks are satisfied. These targets are subjected to further scrutiny in the Data Validation (DV) component of the Pipeline. Transiting planet candidates are characterized in DV, and light curves are searched for additional planets after transit signatures are modeled and removed. A suite of diagnostic tests is performed on all candidates to aid in discrimination between genuine transiting planets and instrumental or astrophysical false positives. Data products are generated per target and planet candidate to document and display transiting planet model fit and diagnostic test results. These products are exported to the Exoplanet Archive at the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, and are available to the community. We describe the DV architecture and diagnostic tests, and provide a brief overview of the data products. Transiting planet modeling and the search for multiple planets on individual targets are described in a companion paper. The final revision of the Kepler Pipeline code base is available to the general public through GitHub. The Kepler Pipeline has also been modified to support the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) Mission which is expected to commence in 2018.

  12. Report on the Radiation Effects Testing of the Infrared and Optical Transition Radiation Camera Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holloway, Michael Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-20

    Presented in this report are the results tests performed at Argonne National Lab in collaboration with Los Alamos National Lab to assess the reliability of the critical 99Mo production facility beam monitoring diagnostics. The main components of the beam monitoring systems are two cameras that will be exposed to radiation during accelerator operation. The purpose of this test is to assess the reliability of the cameras and related optical components when exposed to operational radiation levels. Both X-ray and neutron radiation could potentially damage camera electronics as well as the optical components such as lenses and windows. This report covers results of the testing of component reliability when exposed to X-ray radiation. With the information from this study we provide recommendations for implementing protective measures for the camera systems in order to minimize the occurrence of radiation-induced failure within a ten month production run cycle.

  13. The Swedish radiation protection institute's regulations on x-ray diagnostics; issued on April 28, 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-04-01

    These regulations are applicable to practices with ionising radiation with respect to medical and dental diagnostics by means of external radiation sources like x-rays or radioactive substances. The regulations are also applicable to medical or dental use of such radiation sources for planning and guidance, for research and for legal and insurance related examinations

  14. Web-based tools for quality assurance and radiation protection in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moores, B. M.; Charnock, P.; Ward, M.

    2010-01-01

    Practical and philosophical aspects of radiation protection in diagnostic radiology have changed very little over the past 50 y even though patient doses have continued to rise significantly in this period. This rise has been driven by technological developments, such as multi-slice computed tomography, that have been able to improve diagnostic accuracy but not necessarily provide the same level of risk-benefit to all patients or groups of patients given the dose levels involved. Can practical radiation protection strategies hope to keep abreast of these ongoing developments? A project was started in 1992 in Liverpool that aimed to develop IT driven quality assurance (QA)/radiation protection software tools based upon a modular quality assurance dose data system. One of the modules involved the assessment of the patient entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) for an X-ray examination that was based upon the use of calibrated X-ray tube exposure factors to calculate ESAK as well as collecting appropriate patient details (age, sex, weight, thickness etc). The package also contained modules for logging all necessary equipment performance QA data. This paper will outline the experience gained with this system through its transition from a local application on a stand alone PC within the department to the current web-based approach. Advantages of a web-based approach to delivering such an application as well as centrally storing data originating on many hospital sites will be discussed together with the scientific support processes that can be developed with such a system. This will include local, national and international considerations. The advantages of importing radiographic examination details directly from other electronic storage systems such as a hospital's radiology information system will be presented together with practical outcomes already achieved. This will include the application of statistical techniques to the very large data sets generated. The development

  15. Oscillator strengths and radiative rates for transitions in neutral sulfur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deb, N.C.; Hibbert, A.

    2008-01-01

    We present accurate oscillator strengths and radiative rates for 2173 E1 transitions among the 120 levels belonging to 3s 2 3p 4 , 3s3p 5 , and 3s 2 3p 3 ( 4 S o , 2 D o , 2 P o )nl configurations where nl=4s,5s,6s,4p,5p,6p,3d,4d,4f,5f. A configuration interaction approach is employed through the standard CIV3 program. The 114 LS states included in the present calculation generate 250 fine-structure levels belonging to the above configurations below 100,000 cm -1 . However, results of only 120 fine-structure levels are presented due to the absence of experimental energy values for the remaining levels. Tabulations of oscillator strengths and radiative rates, and their comparison with other calculations, are presented in the first two tables. In a separate table the oscillator strengths and transition probabilities, in length and velocity gauges, are presented for 2173 E1 transitions, and are arranged in ascending order of wavelength

  16. Radiation exposure and image quality in x-Ray diagnostic radiology physical principles and clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Aichinger, Horst; Joite-Barfuß, Sigrid; Säbel, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    The largest contribution to radiation exposure to the population as a whole arises from diagnostic X-rays. Protecting the patient from radiation is a major aim of modern health policy, and an understanding of the relationship between radiation dose and image quality is of pivotal importance in optimising medical diagnostic radiology. In this volume the data provided for exploring these concerns are partly based on X-ray spectra, measured on diagnostic X-ray tube assemblies, and are supplemented by the results of measurements on phantoms and simulation calculations.

  17. Radiation doses by radiation diagnostics at the border of a hospital. Calculation model for Nuclear Energy Law regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, B.; Thijssen, T.; De Jong, R.

    2000-01-01

    According to the Nuclear Energy Law in the Netherlands radiation doses at the border of a specific institute (e.g. hospitals) must be determined which can not simply be done by measurements. In this article a model calculation for radiation diagnostics is described

  18. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The chapter one presents the composition of matter and atomic theory; matter structure; transitions; origin of radiation; radioactivity; nuclear radiation; interactions in decay processes; radiation produced by the interaction of radiation with matter

  19. The transition radiation. I: numerical study of the angular and spectral distributions; Le rayonnement de transition optique. I: etude numerique des distributions angulaires et spectrales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couillaud, Ch.; Haouat, G

    1999-07-01

    The optical transition radiation (OTR) is extensively used since many years as a beam visualisation tool on electron accelerators and serves to monitor the beam during its transport adjustment. Its spatial and temporal characteristics make it very attractive as a diagnostic tool and allow measurements of the beam energy and transverse and longitudinal emittances. We present a numerical study of the transition radiation process in the optical region of the radiated spectrum (OTR) and in the higher part (XTR). Spatial and spectral properties are described. They are used to describe experimental observations performed on the ELSA electron-beam facility. An analytical description of the angular distributions of visible radiation emitted by birefringent targets, used as OTR sources, is also proposed. We also analyze interference phenomena between two OTR sources and show the advantage of using this interferometer as a diagnostic tool for tenth MeV electron accelerators. At last, we present an analytical model allowing to design a soft X-ray source to be installed on the ELSA facility and using either a multi-foil stack or a multilayer of two materials of different permittivities. (authors)

  20. The transition radiation detector of the PAMELA space mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambriola, M.; Bellotti, R.; Cafagna, F.; Circella, M.; de Marzo, C.; Giglietto, N.; Marangelli, B.; Mirizzi, N.; Romita, M.; Spinelli, P.

    2004-04-01

    PAMELA space mission objective is to flight a satellite-borne magnetic spectrometer built to fulfill the primary scientific goals of detecting antiparticles (antiprotons and positrons) and to measure spectra of particles in cosmic rays. The PAMELA telescope is composed of: a silicon tracker housed in a permanent magnet, a time-of-flight and an anticoincidence system both made of plastic scintillators, a silicon imaging calorimeter, a neutron detector and a Transition Radiation Detector (TRD). The TRD is composed of nine sensitive layers of straw tubes working in proportional mode for a total of 1024 channels. Each layer is interleaved with a radiator plane made of carbon fibers. The TRD characteristics will be described along with its performances studied at both CERN-PS and CERN-SPS facilities, using electrons, pions, muons and protons of different momenta.

  1. The transition radiation detector of the PAMELA space mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambriola, M.; Bellotti, R.; Cafagna, F.; Circella, M.; De Marzo, C.; Giglietto, N.; Marangelli, B.; Mirizzi, N.; Romita, M.; Spinelli, P.

    2004-01-01

    PAMELA space mission objective is to flight a satellite-borne magnetic spectrometer built to fulfill the primary scientific goals of detecting antiparticles (antiprotons and positrons) and to measure spectra of particles in cosmic rays. The PAMELA telescope is composed of: a silicon tracker housed in a permanent magnet, a time-of-flight and an anticoincidence system both made of plastic scintillators, a silicon imaging calorimeter, a neutron detector and a Transition Radiation Detector (TRD). The TRD is composed of nine sensitive layers of straw tubes working in proportional mode for a total of 1024 channels. Each layer is interleaved with a radiator plane made of carbon fibers. The TRD characteristics will be described along with its performances studied at both CERN-PS and CERN-SPS facilities, using electrons, pions, muons and protons of different momenta

  2. Glass transition near the free surface studied by synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikorski, M.

    2008-06-01

    A comprehensive picture of the glass transition near the liquid/vapor interface of the model organic glass former dibutyl phthalate is presented in this work. Several surface-sensitive techniques using x-ray synchrotron radiation were applied to investigate the static and dynamic aspects of the formation of the glassy state from the supercooled liquid. The amorphous nature of dibutyl phthalate close to the free surface was confirmed by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction studies. Results from X-ray reflectivity measurements indicate a uniform electron density distribution close to the interface excluding the possibility of surface freezing down to 175 K. Dynamics on sub-μm length-scales at the surface was studied with coherent synchrotron radiation via x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. From the analysis of the dispersion relation of the surface modes, viscoelastic properties of the dibutyl phthalate are deduced. The Kelvin-Voigt model of viscoelastic media was found to describe well the properties of the liquid/vapor interface below room temperature. The data show that the viscosity at the interface matches the values reported for bulk dibutyl phthalate. The scaled relaxation rate at the surface agrees with the bulk data above 210 K. Upon approaching the glass transition temperature the free surface was observed to relax considerably faster close to the liquid/vapor interface than in bulk. The concept of higher relaxation rate at the free surface is also supported by the results of the quasielastic nuclear forward scattering experiment, during which dynamics on molecular length scales around the calorimetric glass transition temperature is studied. The data were analyzed using mode-coupling theory of the glass transition and the model of the liquid(glass)/vapor interface, predicting inhomogeneous dynamics near the surface. The quasielastic nuclear forward scattering data can be explained when the molecular mobility is assumed to decrease with the increasing

  3. Glass transition near the free surface studied by synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikorski, M.

    2008-06-15

    A comprehensive picture of the glass transition near the liquid/vapor interface of the model organic glass former dibutyl phthalate is presented in this work. Several surface-sensitive techniques using x-ray synchrotron radiation were applied to investigate the static and dynamic aspects of the formation of the glassy state from the supercooled liquid. The amorphous nature of dibutyl phthalate close to the free surface was confirmed by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction studies. Results from X-ray reflectivity measurements indicate a uniform electron density distribution close to the interface excluding the possibility of surface freezing down to 175 K. Dynamics on sub-{mu}m length-scales at the surface was studied with coherent synchrotron radiation via x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. From the analysis of the dispersion relation of the surface modes, viscoelastic properties of the dibutyl phthalate are deduced. The Kelvin-Voigt model of viscoelastic media was found to describe well the properties of the liquid/vapor interface below room temperature. The data show that the viscosity at the interface matches the values reported for bulk dibutyl phthalate. The scaled relaxation rate at the surface agrees with the bulk data above 210 K. Upon approaching the glass transition temperature the free surface was observed to relax considerably faster close to the liquid/vapor interface than in bulk. The concept of higher relaxation rate at the free surface is also supported by the results of the quasielastic nuclear forward scattering experiment, during which dynamics on molecular length scales around the calorimetric glass transition temperature is studied. The data were analyzed using mode-coupling theory of the glass transition and the model of the liquid(glass)/vapor interface, predicting inhomogeneous dynamics near the surface. The quasielastic nuclear forward scattering data can be explained when the molecular mobility is assumed to decrease with the increasing

  4. The impact of education on occupational radiation exposure reduction in a diagnostic radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetter, R.J.; Gray, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Patient load, number of radiographic exams, complexity of some exams, and associated potential occupational radiation exposure of medical personnel have increased significantly in the past decade. Efforts to reduce exposure through employee education and awareness have resulted in significant reduction in occupational exposure for most diagnostic radiographic areas at Mayo Clinic. This paper reviews trends in occupational radiation exposure from diagnostic x- rays at Mayo Clinic over the past ten years. Changes in employee radiation dose equivalents are correlated with patient workload, complexity of exams, increased interventional radiology and cardiology, and efforts to reduce employee radiation exposure

  5. [X-ray endoscopic semiotics and diagnostic algorithm of radiation studies of preneoplastic gastric mucosa changes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akberov, R F; Gorshkov, A N

    1997-01-01

    The X-ray endoscopic semiotics of precancerous gastric mucosal changes (epithelial dysplasia, intestinal epithelial rearrangement) was examined by the results of 1574 gastric examination. A diagnostic algorithm was developed for radiation studies in the diagnosis of the above pathology.

  6. General Principles of Radiation Protection in Fields of Diagnostic Medical Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Kyung-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    After the rapid development of medical equipment including CT or PET-CT, radiation doses from medical exposure are now the largest source of man-made radiation exposure. General principles of radiation protection from the hazard of ionizing radiation are summarized as three key words; justification, optimization, and dose limit. Because medical exposure of radiation has unique considerations, diagnostic reference level is generally used as a reference value, instead of dose limits. In Korea, medical radiation exposure has increased rapidly. For medical radiation exposure control, Korea has two separate control systems. Regulation is essential to control medical radiation exposure. Physicians and radiologists must be aware of the radiation risks and benefits associated with medical exposure, and understand and implement the principles of radiation protection for patients. The education of the referring physicians and radiologists is also important.

  7. Energy levels and radiative rates for transitions in Ti VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, K. M.; Keenan, F. P.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2013-08-01

    We report on calculations of energy levels, radiative rates, oscillator strengths and line strengths for transitions among the lowest 253 levels of the (1s22s22p6) 3s23p5, 3s3p6, 3s23p43d, 3s3p53d, 3s23p33d2, 3s23p44s, 3s23p44p and 3s23p44d configurations of Ti VI. The general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package and flexible atomic code are adopted for the calculations. Radiative rates, oscillator strengths and line strengths are reported for all electric dipole (E1), magnetic dipole (M1), electric quadrupole (E2) and magnetic quadrupole (M2) transitions among the 253 levels, although calculations have been performed for a much larger number of levels. Comparisons are made with existing available results and the accuracy of the data is assessed. Additionally, lifetimes for all 253 levels are listed, although comparisons with other theoretical results are limited to only 88 levels. Our energy levels are estimated to be accurate to better than 1% (within 0.03 Ryd), whereas results for other parameters are probably accurate to better than 20%. A reassessment of the energy level data on the National Institute of Standards and Technology website for Ti VI is suggested.

  8. Energy levels and radiative rates for transitions in Ti VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, K M; Keenan, F P; Msezane, A Z

    2013-01-01

    We report on calculations of energy levels, radiative rates, oscillator strengths and line strengths for transitions among the lowest 253 levels of the (1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 ) 3s 2 3p 5 , 3s3p 6 , 3s 2 3p 4 3d, 3s3p 5 3d, 3s 2 3p 3 3d 2 , 3s 2 3p 4 4s, 3s 2 3p 4 4p and 3s 2 3p 4 4d configurations of Ti VI. The general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package and flexible atomic code are adopted for the calculations. Radiative rates, oscillator strengths and line strengths are reported for all electric dipole (E1), magnetic dipole (M1), electric quadrupole (E2) and magnetic quadrupole (M2) transitions among the 253 levels, although calculations have been performed for a much larger number of levels. Comparisons are made with existing available results and the accuracy of the data is assessed. Additionally, lifetimes for all 253 levels are listed, although comparisons with other theoretical results are limited to only 88 levels. Our energy levels are estimated to be accurate to better than 1% (within 0.03 Ryd), whereas results for other parameters are probably accurate to better than 20%. A reassessment of the energy level data on the National Institute of Standards and Technology website for Ti VI is suggested. (paper)

  9. Diagnostic criterions of the postradiation encephalopathy in remote period of the acute radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyagu, A.I.; Loganovskij, K.N.; Vashchenko, E.A.

    1998-01-01

    Development of post-radiation encephalopathy diagnostic criteria on the base of neuro psychic, neuro- and psychofisiological research in patients who suffered with acute radiation disease after Chernobyl catastrophe was the aim of this work. 110 persons of 20-75 years age were investigated. 55 refs., 6 tab., 6 figs

  10. Overview of radiation protection programme in nuclear medicine facility for diagnostic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Ezzeldein Mohammed Nour Mohammed

    2015-02-01

    This project was conducted to review Radiation Protection Program in Nuclear Medicine facility for diagnostic procedures which will provide guide for meeting the standard and regulatory requirements in diagnostic nuclear medicine. The main objective of this project is to keep dose to staff, patient and public as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). The specific objectives were to review the Radiation Protection Program (RPP) in diagnostic nuclear medicine and to make some recommendation for improving the level of radiation protection in diagnostic nuclear medicine that will help to control normal exposure and prevent or mitigate potential exposure. The methodology used is review of various documents. The review showed that if the Radiation Protection Program is inadequate it leads to unjustified exposure to radiation. Finally, this study stated some recommendations that if implemented could improve the level of radiation protection in nuclear medicine department. One of the most important recommendations is that a qualified Radiation Protection Officer (RPO) should be appointed to lay down and oversee a radiation protection in the nuclear medicine department. The RPO must be given the full authority and the adequate time to enable him to perform his duties effectively. (au)

  11. Radiation syndrome - pathogenesis, course, diagnostic and therapeutic measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trott, K.R.

    1981-01-01

    Owing to lack of practical experience, schemes for medical aid in cases of reactor accidents are based on theoretical models and the results of radiation biology and tumor research. The chances for medical assistance are deduced from the course of the radiation syndrome in affected persons. (DG) [de

  12. Oncology Patient Perceptions of the Use of Ionizing Radiation in Diagnostic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Joseph R; Jones, Aaron K; Clarke, Ryan K; Giordano, Sharon H; Shoemaker, Stowe

    2016-07-01

    To measure the knowledge of oncology patients regarding use and potential risks of ionizing radiation in diagnostic imaging. A 30-question survey was developed and e-mailed to 48,736 randomly selected patients who had undergone a diagnostic imaging study at a comprehensive cancer center between November 1, 2013 and January 31, 2014. The survey was designed to measure patients' knowledge about use of ionizing radiation in diagnostic imaging and attitudes about radiation. Nonresponse bias was quantified by sending an abbreviated survey to patients who did not respond to the original survey. Of the 48,736 individuals who were sent the initial survey, 9,098 (18.7%) opened it, and 5,462 (11.2%) completed it. A total of 21.7% of respondents reported knowing the definition of ionizing radiation; 35.1% stated correctly that CT used ionizing radiation; and 29.4% stated incorrectly that MRI used ionizing radiation. Many respondents did not understand risks from exposure to diagnostic doses of ionizing radiation: Of 3,139 respondents who believed that an abdominopelvic CT scan carried risk, 1,283 (40.9%) believed sterility was a risk; 669 (21.3%) believed heritable mutations were a risk; 657 (20.9%) believed acute radiation sickness was a risk; and 135 (4.3%) believed cataracts were a risk. Most patients and caregivers do not possess basic knowledge regarding the use of ionizing radiation in oncologic diagnostic imaging. To ensure health literacy and high-quality patient decision making, efforts to educate patients and caregivers should be increased. Such education might begin with information about effects that are not risks of diagnostic imaging. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Radiation dose reduction: comparative assessment of publication volume between interventional and diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansmann, Jan; Henzler, Thomas; Gaba, Ron C; Morelli, John N

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to quantify and compare awareness regarding radiation dose reduction within the interventional radiology and diagnostic radiology communities. Abstracts accepted to the annual meetings of the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR), the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE), the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), and the European Congress of Radiology (ECR) between 2005 and 2015 were analyzed using the search terms "interventional/computed tomography" and "radiation dose/radiation dose reduction." A PubMed query using the above-mentioned search terms for the years of 2005-2015 was performed. Between 2005 and 2015, a total of 14 520 abstracts (mean, 660±297 abstracts) and 80 614 abstracts (mean, 3664±1025 abstracts) were presented at interventional and diagnostic radiology meetings, respectively. Significantly fewer abstracts related to radiation dose were presented at the interventional radiology meetings compared with the diagnostic radiology meetings (162 abstracts [1% of total] vs. 2706 [3% of total]; P radiology abstracts (range, 6-27) and 246±105 diagnostic radiology abstracts (range, 112-389) pertaining to radiation dose were presented at each meeting. The PubMed query revealed an average of 124±39 publications (range, 79-187) and 1205±307 publications (range, 829-1672) related to interventional and diagnostic radiology dose reduction per year, respectively (P radiology community over the past 10 years has not mirrored the increased volume seen within diagnostic radiology, suggesting that increased education and discussion about this topic may be warranted.

  14. Transition radiation in metal-metal multilayer nanostructures as a medical source of hard x-ray radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokrovsky, A. L.; Kaplan, A. E.; Shkolnikov, P. L.

    2006-01-01

    We show that a periodic metal-metal multilayer nanostructure can serve as an efficient source of hard x-ray transition radiation. Our research effort is aimed at developing an x-ray source for medical applications, which is based on using low-energy relativistic electrons. The approach toward choosing radiator-spacer couples for the generation of hard x-ray resonant transition radiation by few-MeV electrons traversing solid multilayer structures for the energies of interest to medicine (30-50 keV) changes dramatically compared with that for soft x-ray radiation. We show that one of the main factors in achieving the required resonant line is the absence of the contrast of the refractive indices between the spacer and the radiator at the far wings of the radiation line; for that purpose, the optimal spacer, as a rule, should have a higher atomic number than the radiator. Having experimental goals in mind, we have considered also the unwanted effects due to bremsstrahlung radiation, absorption and scattering of radiated photons, detector-related issues, and inhibited coherence of transition radiation due to random deviation of spacing between the layers. Choosing as a model example a Mo-Ag radiator-spacer pair of materials, we demonstrate that the x-ray transition radiation line can be well resolved with the use of spatial and frequency filtering

  15. The X-ray transition radiation; Le rayonnement de transition X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couillaud, Ch

    2000-07-01

    The interest of producing high-energy radiation using a small-size electron accelerator is growing since many years. It appeared that such accelerators should drive x-ray sources to produce a high flux of radiation. The range of photon-energy available when using electron linacs, for example, is between a few tens of eV and the maximum electron kinetic energy. The transition radiation, which is produced when a charged particle crosses the interface between two media of different permittivities, is a very promising way due to its high production rate. We present here a study of this physical process involving moderate-energy relativistic electrons (20 MeV). We recall the main characteristics of the radiation when the interface is crossed at normal incidence and derive the analytical production yields when the interaction takes place at grazing incidence. The results for both geometries are compared. Finally, the scale laws allowing the optimization of the spectral source brilliance are presented. (author)

  16. Method of middle-intensive electron beams diagnostics by means of transient radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorobyov G. S.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The general method of diagnostics of transient radiation of ribbon-shaped and axially-symmetric electron beams of small section and high power density is described. A comparative analysis of different types of receivers of a transient radiation is carried out for the first time. Advantages and disadvantages of each of receivers of radiation, which must be taken into account at the analysis of concrete object of researches, are indicated.

  17. Inactivation of rabies diagnostic reagents by gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, W.C.; Chappell, W.A.; George, E.H.

    1980-11-01

    Treatment of CVS-11 rabies adsorbing suspensions and street rabies infected mouse brains with gamma radiation resulted in inactivated reagents that are safer to distribute and use. These irradiated reagents were as sensitive and reactive as the nonirradiated control reagents.

  18. Inactivation of rabies diagnostic reagents by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamble, W.C.; Chappell, W.A.; George, E.H.

    1980-01-01

    Treatment of CVS-11 rabies adsorbing suspensions and street rabies infected mouse brains with gamma radiation resulted in inactivated reagents that are safer to distribute and use. These irradiated reagents were as sensitive and reactive as the nonirradiated control reagents

  19. The ALICE Transition Radiation Detector: Construction, operation, and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alice Collaboration

    2018-02-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) was designed and built to enhance the capabilities of the ALICE detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). While aimed at providing electron identification and triggering, the TRD also contributes significantly to the track reconstruction and calibration in the central barrel of ALICE. In this paper the design, construction, operation, and performance of this detector are discussed. A pion rejection factor of up to 410 is achieved at a momentum of 1 GeV/ c in p-Pb collisions and the resolution at high transverse momentum improves by about 40% when including the TRD information in track reconstruction. The triggering capability is demonstrated both for jet, light nuclei, and electron selection.

  20. Process guiding for the ZEUS transition-radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalksy, L.

    1993-03-01

    The Transition-Radiation-Detector (TRD) has been built to separate electrons from pions. It needs a complex gassystem which has to be controlled and monitored by a computer. To enable a test of the gassystem and the TRD's highvoltagesystem a stand-alone-version of the HWC/HWM (hardware-control and hardware-monitoring) had been developed. This stand-alone-version consists of an elementary computer- and software-system. VIP and MVME-147 computers have been selected for the computer-hardware. The computers for realtimeprocessing base on this processors, the VMEbus and digital to analog converters and analog to digital converters. The software-system based on OS/9 device-drivers. With this components monitoring and controlling software has been written. (orig.) [de

  1. Aging studies for the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT)

    CERN Document Server

    Åkesson, T; Bondarenko, V; Capéans-Garrido, M; Catinaccio, A; Cwetanski, Peter; Danielsson, H; Dittus, F; Dolgoshein, B A; Dressnandt, N; Ebenstein, W L; Eerola, Paule Anna Mari; Farthouat, Philippe; Fedin, O; Froidevaux, D; Gavrilenko, I; Grichkevitch, Y; Gagnon, P; Hajduk, Z; Keener, P T; Kekelidze, G D; Konovalov, S; Kowalski, T; Kramarenko, V A; Laritchev, A; Lichard, P; Lundberg, B; Luehring, F C; Markina, I; Manara, A; McFarlane, K; Mitsou, V; Muraviev, S; Newcomer, F M; Ogren, H; Oh, S H; Olszowska, J; Peshekhonov, V D; Rembser, C; Romaniouk, A; Rhone, O; Rust, D R; Shchegelskii, V; Shmeleva, A; Smirnov, S; Smirnova, L N; Sosnovtsev, V V; Sutchkov, S; Tartarelli, F; Tikhomirov, V; Van Berg, R; Vassilieva, L; Wang, C; Williams, H H

    2003-01-01

    A summary of the aging and material validation studies carried out for the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is presented. Particular emphasis is put on the different phenomena observed in straw tubes operating with the chosen Xe/CF//4/CO//2 mixture. The most serious effects observed are silicon deposition on the anode wire and damage of the anode wire gold plating. Etching phenomena and active radical effects are also discussed. With a careful choice of all materials and components, and with good control of the water contamination in the active gas, the ATLAS TRT will operate reliably for 10 years at the LHC design luminosity. To demonstrate this fully, more work is still needed on the gas system purification elements, in particular to understand their interplay with the active species containing fluorine created in the avalanche process under irradiation.

  2. Pragmatic ethical basis for radiation protection in diagnostic radiology

    OpenAIRE

    Malone, Jim; Z?lzer, Friedo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Medical ethics has a tried and tested literature and a global active research community. Even among health professionals, literate and fluent in medical ethics, there is low recognition of radiation protection principles such as justification and optimization. On the other hand, many in healthcare environments misunderstand dose limitation obligations and incorrectly believe patients are protected by norms including a dose limit. Implementation problems for radiation protection in ...

  3. Sparsely Ionizing Diagnostic and Natural Background Radiations are Likely Preventing Cancer and Other Genomic-Instability-Associated Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Bobby R.; Di Palma, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Routine diagnostic X-rays (e.g., chest X-rays, mammograms, computed tomography scans) and routine diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures using sparsely ionizing radiation forms (e.g., beta and gamma radiations) stimulate the removal of precancerous neo-plastically transformed and other genomically unstable cells from the body (medical radiation hormesis). The indicated radiation hormesis arises because radiation doses above an individual-specific stochastic threshold activate a system of coop...

  4. Recent aging studies for the ATLAS transition radiation tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Capéans-Garrido, M; Anghinolfi, F; Arik, E; Baker, O K; Baron, S; Benjamin, D; Bertelsen, H; Bondarenko, V; Bychkov, V; Callahan, J; Cardiel-Sas, L; Catinaccio, A; Cetin, S A; Cwetanski, Peter; Dam, M; Danielsson, H; Dittus, F; Dologshein, B; Dressnandt, N; Driouichi, C; Ebenstein, W L; Eerola, Paule Anna Mari; Farthouat, Philippe; Fedin, O; Froidevaux, D; Gagnon, P; Grichkevitch, Y; Grigalashvili, N S; Hajduk, Z; Hansen, P; Kayumov, F; Keener, P T; Kekelidze, G D; Khristatchev, A; Konovalov, S; Koudine, L; Kovalenko, S; Kowalski, T; Kramarenko, V A; Krüger, K; Laritchev, A; Lichard, P; Luehring, F C; Lundberg, B; Maleev, V; Markina, I; McFarlane, K W; Mialkovski, V; Mindur, B; Mitsou, V A; Morozov, S; Munar, A; Muraviev, S; Nadtochy, A; Newcorner, F M; Ogren, H; Oh, S H; Olszowska, J; Passmore, S; Patritchev, S; Peshekhonov, V D; Petti, R; Price, M; Rembser, C; Rohne, O; Romaniouk, A; Rust, D R; Ryabov, Yu; Ryzhov, V; Shchegelskii, V; Seliverstov, D M; Shin, T; Shmeleva, A; Smirnov, S; Sosnovtsev, V V; Soutchkov, V; Spiridenkov, E; Szczygiel, R; Tikhomirov, V; Van Berg, R; Vassilakopoulos, V I; Vassilieva, L; Wang, C; Williams, H H; Zalite, A

    2004-01-01

    The transition radiation tracker (TRT) is one of the three subsystems of the inner detector of the ATLAS experiment. It is designed to operate for 10 yr at the LHC, with integrated charges of similar to 10 C/cm of wire and radiation doses of about 10 Mrad and 2 multiplied by 10**1**4 neutrons/cm**2. These doses translate into unprecedented ionization currents and integrated charges for a large-scale gaseous detector. This paper describes studies leading to the adoption of a new ionization gas regime for the ATLAS TRT. In this new regime, the primary gas mixture is 70%Xe-27%CO**2-3%O**2. It is planned to occasionally flush and operate the TRT detector with an Ar-based ternary mixture, containing a small percentage of CF**4, to remove, if needed, silicon pollution from the anode wires. This procedure has been validated in realistic conditions and would require a few days of dedicated operation. This paper covers both performance and aging studies with the new TRT gas mixture. 12 Refs.

  5. Calibration of diagnostic x-ray machines using radiation exposure and radiographic parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agba, E.H.; Uloko, P. I.; Tyovenda, A. A.

    2011-01-01

    Calibration of diagnostic x-ray machines using radiation exposure and radiographic parameters of the x-ray machines has been carried out. Three phase diagnostic x-ray machines situated at Federal Medical Centre, Makurdi, General Hospital, Otukpo and Christian Hospital, Mkar were used for the calibration work. The radiation meter was used to measure x-ray radiation exposure. The result of this work demonstrates mR/mAs=C(KV p ) that there exist a power law relation of the form between the radiation exposure and the radiographic parameters of diagnostic x-ray machines, which can be used to estimate patient exposure during routine x-ray diagnostic examinations for wide range of operating parameters. The values of the power exponent n, constant c and total filtrations of the diagnostic x-ray machines have been estimated. These values for the diagnostic x-ray machines at the Federal Medical Centre, Makurdi are: 2.14, 0.88 and 2.77 respectively, for the one at the General Hospital, Otukpo are: 2.07, 0.76 and 2.68 respectively and that of the Christian Hospital, Mkar are: 2.01,0.69 and 2.61 respectively.

  6. Assessment of patient radiation doses during routine diagnostic radiography examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, Asim Karam Aldden Adam

    2015-11-01

    Medical applications of radiation represent the largest source of exposure to general population. Accounting for 3.0 mSv against an estimated 2.4 mSv from a natural back ground in United States. The association of ionizing radiation an cancer risk is assumed to be continuos and graded over the entire range of exposure, The objective of this study is to evaluate the patient radiation doses in radiology departments in Khartoum state. A total of 840 patients ? during two in the following hospitals Khartoum Teaching Hospital (260 patients), Fedail specialized hospital ( 261 patients). National Ribat University hospital ( 189 patients) and Engaz hospital (130 patients). Patient doses were measured for 9 procedures. The Entrance surface Air Kerma (ESAK) was quantified using x-ray unit output by Unifiers xi dose rate meter( Un fore inc. Billdal. Sweden) and patient exposure parameters. The mean patient age. Weight and Body Mass index (BMI) were 42.6 year 58/4 kg and 212 kg/m respectively. The mean patient doses, kv and MAS and E.q was 0.35 mGy per procedures 59.9 volt 19.8 Ampere per second 0.32 Sv . Patient doses were comparable with previous studies. Patient radiation doses showed considerable difference between hospitals due to x- ray systems exposure settings and patient weight. Patient are exposed to unnecessary radiation.(Author)

  7. Far-infrared transition and diffraction radiation. Pt. 2. The THz beamline at the VUV-FEL linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casalbuoni, S.; Schmidt, B.; Schmueser, P.; Steffen, B.; Hamburg Univ.

    2006-01-01

    In order to facilitate longitudinal bunch diagnostics with high-resolution interferometric or spectroscopic devices outside the VUV-FEL tunnel we have designed a Tera-Hertz beamline at the 140 m position of the VUV-FEL linac. The vacuum chamber housing the transition and diffraction radiation screens is located between the last acceleration module and the collimator section in front of the undulator. In Part I of this report we have presented a general scheme for computing the generation, diffraction and optical propagation of transition and diffraction radiation. In the present Part II we describe the design, technical layout and optical performance of the THz beamline at the VUV-FEL and show first measurements. (orig.)

  8. Prophylactic radiation protection in X-ray diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.; Loehr, H.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray diagnosis can lead to stochastic ratidation damage such as uncreased incidence of malignant growths resp. leucemia and malformations in the child and grandchild generations as a consequence of radiation-induced mutations. Non-stocharadiation damage such as burns and lense opacification, which are in each instance clearly attributable to radiation, occur today only on account of incorrect handling of the examination method and technical defects. Normally, the risk to both patient and diagnostician is low and acceptable. Yed if adequate awareness of radiation hazards is missing - which includes full control over the X-ray appliance and knowledge of possible technical defects, the legal maximum doses may be surpassed and avoidable damage caused. (orig.) [de

  9. Radiation safety in X-ray diagnostic installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, K.R.; Ambiger, T.Y.; Viswanathan, P.S.

    1977-01-01

    Safety measures to be strictly adhered to in handling X-ray equipment and exposing patients to X-radiation are described in detail. Hazards resulting from ignorance and careless handling are mentioned. Methods of shielding are indicated. (A.K.)

  10. Compact endocavity diagnostic probes for nuclear radiation detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yonggang; James, Ralph; Bolotnikov, Aleksey

    2014-08-26

    This invention relates to the field of radiation imaging. In particular, the invention relates to an apparatus and a method for imaging tissue or an inanimate object using a novel probe that has an integrated solid-state semiconductor detector and complete readout electronics circuitry.

  11. Explanation of diagnostic criteria for radiation-induced nervous system disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Zhiwei; Jiang Enhai

    2012-01-01

    National occupational health standard-Diagnostic Criteria for Radiation-Induced Nervous System Disease has been issued and implemented by the Ministry of health. This standard contained three independent criteria of the brain, spinal cord and peripheral nerve injury. These three kinds of disease often go together in clinic,therefore,the three diagnostic criteria were merged into radioactive nervous system disease diagnostic criteria for entirety and maneuverability of the standard. This standard was formulated based on collection of the clinical practice experience, extensive research of relevant literature and foreign relevant publications. It is mainly applied to diagnosis and treatment of occupational radiation-induced nervous system diseases, and to nervous system diseases caused by medical radiation exposure as well. In order to properly implement this standard, also to correctly deal with radioactive nervous system injury, the main contents of this standard including dose threshold, clinical manifestation, indexing standard and treatment principle were interpreted in this article. (authors)

  12. Terahertz Pulse Generation in Underdense Relativistic Plasmas: From Photoionization-Induced Radiation to Coherent Transition Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Déchard, J.; Debayle, A.; Davoine, X.; Gremillet, L.; Bergé, L.

    2018-04-01

    Terahertz to far-infrared emission by two-color, ultrashort optical pulses interacting with underdense helium gases at ultrahigh intensities (>1019 W /cm2 ) is investigated by means of 3D particle-in-cell simulations. The terahertz field is shown to be produced by two mechanisms occurring sequentially, namely, photoionization-induced radiation (PIR) by the two-color pulse, and coherent transition radiation (CTR) by the wakefield-accelerated electrons escaping the plasma. We exhibit laser-plasma parameters for which CTR proves to be the dominant process, providing terahertz bursts with field strength as high as 100 GV /m and energy in excess of 10 mJ. Analytical models are developed for both the PIR and CTR processes, which correctly reproduce the simulation data.

  13. A Diagnostic Procedure for Transformative Change Based on Transitions, Resilience, and Institutional Thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briony C. Ferguson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Urban water governance regimes around the world have traditionally planned large-scale, centralized infrastructure systems that aim to control variables and reduce uncertainties. There is growing sectoral awareness that a transition toward sustainable alternatives is necessary if systems are to meet society's future water needs in the context of drivers such as climate change and variability, demographic changes, environmental degradation, and resource scarcity. However, there is minimal understanding of how the urban water sector should operationalize its strategic planning for such change to facilitate the transition to a sustainable water future. We have integrated concepts from transitions, resilience, and institutional theory to develop a diagnostic procedure for revealing insights into which types of strategic action are most likely to influence the direction and pace of change in the overall system toward a desired trajectory. The procedure used the multipattern approach, from transition theory, to identify the system conditions and type of changes necessary for enabling system transformation. It incorporated the adaptive cycle, from resilience theory, to identify the current phase of change for different parts of the system. Finally, it drew on the concepts of institutional pillars and institutional work to identify mechanisms that are likely to be most effective in influencing the transformative dynamics of the system toward a desired trajectory. We have demonstrated application of the proposed diagnostic procedure on a case study of recent transformative change in the urban water system of Melbourne, Australia. We have proposed that an operational diagnostic procedure provides a useful platform from which planners, policy analysts, and decision makers could follow a process of deduction that identifies which types of strategic action best fit the current system conditions.

  14. Swiss nation-wide survey on radiation doses in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aroua, A.; Valley, J.F.; Vader, J.-P.; Burnand, B.

    2001-01-01

    A nation-wide survey on radiation doses in diagnostic radiology was conducted in Switzerland in 1998-1999. More than 250 types of examinations were considered, covering conventional and interventional radiology, angiography, CT, mammography, osteodensitometry, conventional tomography and dental radiology. This survey aimed at establishing the collective radiological impact of radiodiagnostics on the Swiss population. The methodology of the survey is described. The examination frequencies and integral dosimetric results associated with diagnostic radiology in Switzerland are presented. (author)

  15. Absorbed dose to active red bone marrow from diagnostic and therapeutic uses of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, S.B.

    1980-06-01

    The bone-marrow dose arising from radiological procedures as carried out in Australia have been determined as part of a survey of population doses. This paper describes the method of calculation of the radiation doses to the active bone marrow from diagnostic radiography, fluoroscopy and radiotherapy. The results of the calculations are compared with the results of other models of bone-marrow dose for a number of diagnostic X-ray procedures

  16. Production of X-ray transition radiation with relativistic electrons propagating at grazing incidence

    CERN Document Server

    Couillaud, C

    2002-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the production of X-ray transition radiation when a relativistic electron crosses the interface between two media of different permittivities at the grazing incidence. The production yields are derived analytically when a thick interface is considered and are compared with those obtained when the electron crosses the interface at normal incidence. The production of X-ray photons having an energy between two photoabsorption edges or close to a photoabsorption edge is also investigated. The main features of the transition radiation produced are then exhibited and it is shown that the intensity can be increased by many orders of magnitude. We also show that, at grazing incidence, the backward transition radiation has an intensity close to the forward emission one, contrary to the normal incidence case. The production of quasi-monochromatic radiation is also presented. Finally, the production of X-ray transition radiation using a multilayer radiator is considered and compared in both ...

  17. Challenges associated with transition to caregiver role following diagnostic disclosure of Alzheimer disease: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducharme, Francine; Lévesque, Louise; Lachance, Lise; Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne; Coulombe, Renée

    2011-09-01

    The prevalence of Alzheimer's disease is rising. The large number of new cases identified each year means that many new families will set upon a long trajectory of caring for a relative with dementia. Diagnostic disclosure of Alzheimer's disease marks the official transition to the caregiver role, yet this early period of the caregiver career have rarely been studied. Based on Meleis's theoretical framework for role transition, the objectives of this study were to document the characteristics of the caregiving context during the transition to the caregiver role following diagnostic disclosure of Alzheimer's disease and to compare these characteristics by caregiver gender and kinship tie to the relative. A descriptive design was used. Data were collected using standardized measures selected in accordance with the role transition theoretical framework. The sample recruited in Quebec (Canada) cognition clinics comprised 122 caregivers of an elderly relative diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in the past nine months. Findings reveal the context of care to be marked by several challenges for caregivers. The majority of caregivers receives little informal support, has poor knowledge of available formal services, and has difficulty planning ahead for the relative's future care needs. Caregivers themselves report a lack of preparedness to provide care. Compared with men caregivers, women seem to have more problems controlling disturbing thoughts about their new caregiver role and to experience more family conflicts and psychological distress. Compared with offspring caregivers, spouse caregivers are less able to respond to the relative's disruptive behaviors, make less use of problem-solving strategies, and report fewer family conflicts. The challenges faced by caregivers during the transition to the caregiver role are sensitive to nursing interventions. Pro-active interventions from the outset of the caregiving career, such as early assessment of caregiver needs for

  18. Radiation safety concerns and diagnostic reference levels for computed tomography scanners in Tamil Nadu

    OpenAIRE

    Livingstone Roshan; Dinakaran Paul

    2011-01-01

    Radiation safety in computed tomography (CT) scanners is of concern due its widespread use in the field of radiological imaging. This study intends to evaluate radiation doses imparted to patients undergoing thorax, abdomen and pelvic CT examinations and formulate regional diagnostic reference levels (DRL) in Tamil Nadu, South India. In-site CT dose measurement was performed in 127 CT scanners in Tamil Nadu for a period of 2 years as a part of the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB)-funded ...

  19. Personalized estimates of radiation dose from dedicated breast CT in a diagnostic population and comparison with diagnostic mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Karellas, Andrew; O’Connell, Avice M.; Conover, David L.

    2013-01-01

    lower than diagnostic mammography, the median MGD from dedicated breast CT was approximately 13.5% higher than that from diagnostic mammography. The MGD for breast CT is based on a 1.45 mm skin layer and that for diagnostic mammography is based on a 4 mm skin layer; thus, favoring a lower estimate for MGD from diagnostic mammography. The median MGD from dedicated breast CT corresponds to the median MGD from 4 to 5 diagnostic mammography views. In comparison, for the same 133 breasts, the mean and the median number of views per breast during diagnostic mammography were 4.53 and 4, respectively. Paired analysis showed that there was approximately equal likelihood of receiving lower MGD from either breast CT or diagnostic mammography. Future work will investigate methods to reduce and optimize radiation dose from dedicated breast CT. PMID:24165162

  20. Personalized estimates of radiation dose from dedicated breast CT in a diagnostic population and comparison with diagnostic mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Karellas, Andrew; O'Connell, Avice M; Conover, David L

    2013-01-01

    diagnostic mammography, the median MGD from dedicated breast CT was approximately 13.5% higher than that from diagnostic mammography. The MGD for breast CT is based on a 1.45 mm skin layer and that for diagnostic mammography is based on a 4 mm skin layer; thus, favoring a lower estimate for MGD from diagnostic mammography. The median MGD from dedicated breast CT corresponds to the median MGD from four to five diagnostic mammography views. In comparison, for the same 133 breasts, the mean and the median number of views per breast during diagnostic mammography were 4.53 and 4, respectively. Paired analysis showed that there was approximately equal likelihood of receiving lower MGD from either breast CT or diagnostic mammography. Future work will investigate methods to reduce and optimize radiation dose from dedicated breast CT. (paper)

  1. Optical remote diagnostics of atmospheric propagating beams of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl JR., Robert R.

    1990-03-06

    Data is obtained for use in diagnosing the characteristics of a beam of ionizing radiation, such as charged particle beams, neutral particle beams, and gamma ray beams. In one embodiment the beam is emitted through the atmosphere and produces nitrogen fluorescence during passage through air. The nitrogen fluorescence is detected along the beam path to provide an intensity from which various beam characteristics can be calculated from known tabulations. Optical detecting equipment is preferably located orthogonal to the beam path at a distance effective to include the entire beam path in the equipment field of view.

  2. Senior medical students' awareness of radiation risks from common diagnostic imaging examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scali, Elena; Mayo, John; Nicolaou, Savvas; Kozoriz, Michael; Chang, Silvia

    2017-12-01

    Senior medical students represent future physicians who commonly refer patients for diagnostic imaging studies that may involve ionizing radiation. The radiology curriculum at the University of British Columbia provides students with broad-based knowledge about common imaging examinations. The purpose of this study was to investigate students' awareness of radiation exposures and risks. An anonymous multiple-choice cross-sectional questionnaire was distributed to final year medical students to assess knowledge of radiation from common diagnostic examinations and radiation-related risks following completion of the longitudinal radiology curriculum, carried out over the four years of medical training. Sixty-three of 192 eligible students participated (33% response rate). The majority felt that knowledge of radiation doses of common imaging examinations is somewhat or very important; however, only 12% (N = 8) routinely discuss radiation-related risks with patients. While all respondents recognized children as most sensitive to the effects of radiation, only 24% (N = 15) correctly identified gonads as the most radiation-sensitive tissue. Almost all respondents recognized ultrasound and MRI as radiation free modalities. Respondents who correctly identified the relative dose of common imaging examinations in chest x-ray equivalents varied from 3-77% (N = 2 - 49); the remaining responses were largely underestimates. Finally, 44% (N = 28) correctly identified the excess risk of a fatal cancer from an abdominal CT in an adult, while the remainder underestimated this risk. Medical students acknowledge the importance of radiation-related issues to patient care. While almost all students are familiar with radiation-free modalities, many are not familiar with, and commonly underestimate, the relative doses and risks of common imaging studies. This may expose patients to increasing imaging investigations and exposure to radiation hazards.

  3. Constancy of radiation output during diagnostic X-ray exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardran, G.M.; Crooks, H.E.; Birch, R.

    1978-01-01

    Variation in X-ray output and quality during a diagnostic exposure can be undesirable and may result in unnecessary dose to the patient. When significant build-up or decay periods are present errors will arise if factors obtained under steady-state conditions are employed to estimate the exposure. These parameters must be taken into account when calibrating X-ray generators. A variable speed spinning film device and a spectrometry system have been used to measure the variations under fluoroscopic and radiographic conditions for a number of generators. Variations in output due to filament heating, voltage supply and rectification, cable capacity and target pitting have been demonstrated. At low fluoroscopic currents, large surges and long decays have been observed; the significance of these effects is considered. (author)

  4. Evaluation of TLD dose response compared to MCNP-5 simulation of diagnostic X ray equipment - radiation diagnostic image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez G, R.; Cavalieri, T. A.; De Paiva, F.; Dalledone S, P. de T.; Yoriyaz, H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Centro de Engenharia Nuclear / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rodrigues F, M. A. [Universidade Estadual Paulista, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Departamento de Dermatologia e Radioterapia, Av. Prof. Montenegro s/n, Rubiao Junior, 18601-970 Botucatu (Brazil); Vivolo, V., E-mail: chancez@hotmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Gerencia de Metrologia das Radiacoes / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    The thermo luminescent dosimeter (TLD) is used as a radiation dosimeter and can be used as environmental and staff personnel monitoring. The TLD measures ionizing radiation exposure by a process in which the amount of radiation collected by the dosimeter is converted in visible light when the crystal is heated. The amount of emitted light is proportional to the radiation exposure, and then the response of the TLD must be the related to the real dose. In this work it was used twenty four TLD 700 in order to obtain eight values of doses from a diagnostic X-ray equipment. The TLD-700 is a LiF TLD enriched with {sup 7}Li isotope. One way to compare and study the response of TLD is by Monte Carlo method, which has been used as a computational tool to solve problems stochastically. This method can be applied to any geometry, even those where the boundary conditions are unknown, making the method particularly useful to solve problems a priori. In this work it was modeled the X-ray tube exactly as the one used to irradiate the TLD, after the simulation and the TLD irradiation the results of dose value from both were compared. (Author)

  5. Evaluation of TLD dose response compared to MCNP-5 simulation of diagnostic X ray equipment - radiation diagnostic image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez G, R.; Cavalieri, T. A.; De Paiva, F.; Dalledone S, P. de T.; Yoriyaz, H.; Rodrigues F, M. A.; Vivolo, V.

    2014-08-01

    The thermo luminescent dosimeter (TLD) is used as a radiation dosimeter and can be used as environmental and staff personnel monitoring. The TLD measures ionizing radiation exposure by a process in which the amount of radiation collected by the dosimeter is converted in visible light when the crystal is heated. The amount of emitted light is proportional to the radiation exposure, and then the response of the TLD must be the related to the real dose. In this work it was used twenty four TLD 700 in order to obtain eight values of doses from a diagnostic X-ray equipment. The TLD-700 is a LiF TLD enriched with 7 Li isotope. One way to compare and study the response of TLD is by Monte Carlo method, which has been used as a computational tool to solve problems stochastically. This method can be applied to any geometry, even those where the boundary conditions are unknown, making the method particularly useful to solve problems a priori. In this work it was modeled the X-ray tube exactly as the one used to irradiate the TLD, after the simulation and the TLD irradiation the results of dose value from both were compared. (Author)

  6. A practical approach to radiation protection information in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cederblad, Aa.; Bjurklint, E.; Maansson, L.G.; Sund, P.; Kheddache, S.

    1999-01-01

    In a benchmarking process, parameters related to patient doses and image quality were compared in x-ray examinations from 10 radiology departments in western Sweden. One main object of the project was to form a pedagogical process focussing on radiation protection and quality matters by engaging radiographers and radiologists from the departments in practical project work and optimisation discussions. Anatomical phantoms with simulated pathology were used for standardised entrance dose measurements and exposure of phantom images. Radiographer performance, such as centering and collimation, was evaluated by radiographers. Radiologists evaluated clinical images using revised CEC quality criteria. The results of the measurements showed significant differences between the departments both for image quality, entrance dose and the performance of examinations. Explanations to these differences were in many cases found in the choice of equipment, working methods etc. (au)

  7. Children's exposure to diagnostic medical radiation and cancer risk: epidemiologic and dosimetric considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linet, Martha S.; Rajaraman, Preetha [National Cancer Institute, Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kim, Kwang pyo [National Cancer Institute, Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kyung Hee University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi (Korea)

    2009-02-15

    While the etiology of most childhood cancers is largely unknown, epidemiologic studies have consistently found an association between exposure to medical radiation during pregnancy and risk of childhood cancer in offspring. The relation between early life diagnostic radiation exposure and occurrence of pediatric cancer risks is less clear. This review summarizes current and historical estimated doses for common diagnostic radiologic procedures as well as the epidemiologic literature on the role of maternal prenatal, children's postnatal and parental preconception diagnostic radiologic procedures on subsequent risk of childhood malignancies. Risk estimates are presented according to factors such as the year of birth of the child, trimester and medical indication for the procedure, and the number of films taken. The paper also discusses limitations of the methods employed in epidemiologic studies to assess pediatric cancer risks, the effects on clinical practice of the results reported from the epidemiologic studies, and clinical and public health policy implications of the findings. Gaps in understanding and additional research needs are identified. Important research priorities include nationwide surveys to estimate fetal and childhood radiation doses from common diagnostic procedures, and epidemiologic studies to quantify pediatric and lifetime cancer risks from prenatal and early childhood exposures to diagnostic radiography, CT, and fluoroscopically guided procedures. (orig.)

  8. Children's exposure to diagnostic medical radiation and cancer risk: epidemiologic and dosimetric considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linet, Martha S.; Rajaraman, Preetha; Kim, Kwang pyo

    2009-01-01

    While the etiology of most childhood cancers is largely unknown, epidemiologic studies have consistently found an association between exposure to medical radiation during pregnancy and risk of childhood cancer in offspring. The relation between early life diagnostic radiation exposure and occurrence of pediatric cancer risks is less clear. This review summarizes current and historical estimated doses for common diagnostic radiologic procedures as well as the epidemiologic literature on the role of maternal prenatal, children's postnatal and parental preconception diagnostic radiologic procedures on subsequent risk of childhood malignancies. Risk estimates are presented according to factors such as the year of birth of the child, trimester and medical indication for the procedure, and the number of films taken. The paper also discusses limitations of the methods employed in epidemiologic studies to assess pediatric cancer risks, the effects on clinical practice of the results reported from the epidemiologic studies, and clinical and public health policy implications of the findings. Gaps in understanding and additional research needs are identified. Important research priorities include nationwide surveys to estimate fetal and childhood radiation doses from common diagnostic procedures, and epidemiologic studies to quantify pediatric and lifetime cancer risks from prenatal and early childhood exposures to diagnostic radiography, CT, and fluoroscopically guided procedures. (orig.)

  9. Collective radiation dose from diagnostic x-ray examination in nine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjorn

    to estimate the annual incidence of cancer which would be reduced by the use of rare earth intensifying screen. Methods: Data on ... Conclusion: Although the use of ionizing radiation for diagnostic medical procedures is an acceptable part of modern medicine ... coated in a smooth layer on a plastic support or card board.

  10. Diagnostic Accuracy and Radiation Dose of CT Coronary Angiography in Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorre, Mette Medom; Abdulla, Jawdat

    2013-01-01

    Purpose:To determine by means of a systematic review and meta-analysis the diagnostic accuracy, associated radiation dose, and technical challenges of computed tomographic (CT) coronary angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation.Materials and Methods:A systematic literature search...

  11. A Complex of Imaging Diagnostic Devices of Vacuum UV Radiation for the GOL-3 Multimirror Trap

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burdakov, A. V.; Weinzettl, Vladimír; Piffl, Vojtěch; Polosatkin, S. V.; Postupaev, V. V.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 2 (2004), s. 234-239 ISSN 0020-4412 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : plasma diagnostics, spectroscopy, UV radiation Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.312, year: 2004

  12. Radiation doses and correlated late effects in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafsson, M.

    1980-04-01

    Patient irradiation in diagnostic radiology was estimated from measurements of absorbed doses in different organs, assessment of the energy imparted and retrospective calculations based on literature data. Possible late biological effects, with special aspects on children, were surveyed. The dose to the lens of the eye and the possibility of shielding in carotid angiography was studied as was the absorbed dose to the thyroid gland at cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography in children. Calculations of the mean bone marrow dose and gonad doses were performed in children with chronic skeletal disease revealing large contributions from examinations of organs other than the skeleton. The dose distribution in the breast in mammography was investigated. Comparison of the energy imparted in common roentgen examinations in 1960 and 1975 showed an unexpected low decrease in spite of technical improvements. Reasons for the failing decrease are discussed. The energy imparted to children in urological examinations was reduced significantly due to introduction of high sensitivity screens and omission of dose demanding projections. Contributions to the possible late effects were estimated on the basis of the organ doses assessed. (author)

  13. New diagnostic techniques in the service of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goitein, M.

    1979-01-01

    A new technique is a solution to a problem. In this review, the treatment of malignant diseases is discussed according to the following schema; tumor evaluation, with pathology, staging and treatment techniques; the technical assistance in therapy planning, with planning radiation technique, dosimetry, monitoring therapy execution and charged particle therapy; the monitoring of tumor response during therapy; follow-up after therapy; and the impact of technology on outcome. The most significant advance in the last decade is the introduction of X-ray transmission computed tomography (CT). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is applied to the medical field as another physical means. Ultrasound, radioactively labeled compounds, alpha particle microradiography, etc. are promissing techniques for the purpose. Positron emission can be imaged from a variety of isotopes, particularly short-lived positron emitters such as 11 C. Special purpose cameras are used to monitor the positron activity induced within patients by high energy (45 MeV) therapy beam itself. By carefully measuring washout curves, the blood perfusion rate in tumors can be deduced. To the extent that this is an indication of the oxygen tension of the tumors, it may have a value in assessing the likely responsiveness of the tumors to therapy and in guiding the choice of dose and fractionation. (Yamashita, S.)

  14. Off-Axis Undulator Radiation for CLIC Drive Beam Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Jeff, A; Welsch, CP

    2013-01-01

    The Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) will use a novel acceleration scheme in which energy extracted from a very intense beam of relatively low-energy electrons (the Drive Beam) is used to accelerate a lower intensity Main Beam to very high energy. The high intensity of the Drive Beam, with pulses of more than 1015 electrons, poses a challenge for conventional profile measurements such as wire scanners. Thus, new non-invasive profile measurements are being investigated. In this paper we propose the use of relatively inexpensive permanent-magnet undulators to generate off-axis visible Synchrotron Radiation from the CLIC Drive Beam. The field strength and period length of the undulator should be designed such that the on-axis undulator wavelength is in the ultra-violet. A smaller but still useable amount of visible light is then generated in a hollow cone. This light can be reflected out of the beam pipe by a ring-shaped mirror placed downstream and imaged on a camera. In this contribution, results of SRW and ZEMA...

  15. Construction and performance of the ALICE Transition Radiation Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emschermann, David

    2010-01-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) has been designed to identify electrons in the pion dominated background of heavy-ions collisions. As electrons do not interact strongly, they allow to probe the early phase of the interaction. As trigger on high-p t e + e - pairs within 6.5 μs after collision, the TRD can initiate the readout of the Time Projection Chamber (TPC). The TRD is composed of 18 super modules arranged in a barrel geometry in the central part of the ALICE detector. It offers almost 1.2 million readout channels on a total area of close to 700 m 2 . The particle detection properties of the TRD depend crucially on details in the design of the cathode pad readout plane. The design parameters of the TRD readout pad plane are introduced and analysed regarding their physical properties. The noise patterns observed in the detector can be directly linked to the static pad capacitance distribution and corrected for it. A summary is then given of the TRD services infrastructure at CERN: a 70 kW low voltage system, a 1080 channel 2.5 kV high voltage setup and the Ethernet network serving more than 600 nodes. Two beam tests were conducted at the CERN PS accelerator in 2004 and 2007 using full sized TRD chambers from series production. Details on the setups are presented with particular emphasis on the custom tailored data acquisition systems. Finally the performance of the TRD is studied, focusing on the pion rejection capability and the excellent position resolution. (orig.)

  16. Construction and performance of the ALICE Transition Radiation Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emschermann, David

    2010-01-20

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) has been designed to identify electrons in the pion dominated background of heavy-ions collisions. As electrons do not interact strongly, they allow to probe the early phase of the interaction. As trigger on high-p{sub t} e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs within 6.5 {mu}s after collision, the TRD can initiate the readout of the Time Projection Chamber (TPC). The TRD is composed of 18 super modules arranged in a barrel geometry in the central part of the ALICE detector. It offers almost 1.2 million readout channels on a total area of close to 700 m{sup 2}. The particle detection properties of the TRD depend crucially on details in the design of the cathode pad readout plane. The design parameters of the TRD readout pad plane are introduced and analysed regarding their physical properties. The noise patterns observed in the detector can be directly linked to the static pad capacitance distribution and corrected for it. A summary is then given of the TRD services infrastructure at CERN: a 70 kW low voltage system, a 1080 channel 2.5 kV high voltage setup and the Ethernet network serving more than 600 nodes. Two beam tests were conducted at the CERN PS accelerator in 2004 and 2007 using full sized TRD chambers from series production. Details on the setups are presented with particular emphasis on the custom tailored data acquisition systems. Finally the performance of the TRD is studied, focusing on the pion rejection capability and the excellent position resolution. (orig.)

  17. An autocorrelation technique for measuring sub-picosecond bunch length using coherent transition radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, W.

    1991-01-01

    A new technique for determining sub-picosecond bunch length using infrared transition radiation and interferometry is proposed. The technique makes use of an infrared Michelson interferometer for measuring the autocorrelation of transition radiation emitted from a thin conducting foil placed in the beam path. The theory of coherent radiation from a charged particle beam passing through a thin conducting foil is presented. Subsequently, the analysis of this radiation through Michelson interferometry is shown to provide the autocorrelation of the longitudinal bunch profile. An example relevant to the CEBAF front end test is discussed. (author)

  18. Measuring scatter radiation in diagnostic x rays for radiation protection purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panayiotakis, George; Vlachos, Ioannis; Delis, Harry; Tsantilas, Xenophon; Kalyvas, Nektarios; Kandarakis, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    During the last decades, radiation protection and dosimetry in medical X-ray imaging practice has been extensively studied. The purpose of this study was to measure secondary radiation in a conventional radiographic room, in terms of ambient dose rate equivalent H*(10) and its dependence on the radiographic exposure parameters such as X-ray tube voltage, tube current and distance. With some exceptions, the results indicated that the scattered radiation was uniform in the space around the water cylindrical phantom. The results also showed that the tube voltage and filtration affect the dose rate due to the scatter radiation. Finally, the scattered X-ray energy distribution was experimentally calculated. (authors)

  19. Diagnostic value of acoustic radiation force impulse imaging for assessing superficial lymph nodes: A diagnostic accuracy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengjuan; Zhao, Xinming; Ji, Xiaohui; Han, Ruoling; Li, Ping; Du, Min

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging for differentiating superficial lymph nodes.Virtual touch tissue imaging (VTI) grade and shear wave velocity (SWV) were analyzed and compared in 97 patients (65 women, 32 men; mean age, 49 y; range, 23-72 y) with 97 lymph nodes [23 chronic nonspecific reactive lymph nodes (CLNs), 38 metastatic lymph nodes (MLNs), and 36 blood and lymphatic system diseases lymph nodes (BLLNs)]. The elastography characteristics in patients with CLNs, MLNs, and BLLNs were compared using the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test for continuous variables and categorical variables. The diagnostic performance of VTI grade and SWV were evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC).The median of SWV of MLNs was significantly higher (2.90 m/s) than those of CLNs (2.15 m/s) and BLLNs (2.52 m/s). The VTI grade of MLNs was significantly higher than those of CLNs (P accuracy, and AUC were 81.58%, 95.65%, 86.89%, and 0.904, respectively, at a cutoff level of grade IV for VTI grade in differentiating MLNs from CLNs, whereas those of SWV were 57.89%, 86.96%, 68.85%, and 0.752, respectively, at a cutoff level of 2.76 m/s.The diagnostic performance of VTI grade was significantly higher than that of SWV in differentiating MLNs from CLNs. The diagnostic performance of VTI grade and SWV were lower intermediate in differentiating MLNs from BLLNs and in differentiating BLLNs from CLNs, and there was no significant difference between VTI grade and SWV. ARFI imaging may be a feasible method for differentiating MLNs from CLNs.

  20. ICNIRP Statement on Diagnostic Devices Using Non-ionizing Radiation: Existing Regulations and Potential Health Risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Use of non-ionizing radiation (NIR) for diagnostic purposes allows non-invasive assessment of the structure and function of the human body and is widely employed in medical care. ICNIRP has published previous statements about the protection of patients during medical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but diagnostic methods using other forms of NIR have not been considered. This statement reviews the range of diagnostic NIR devices currently used in clinical settings; documents the relevant regulations and policies covering patients and health care workers; reviews the evidence around potential health risks to patients and health care workers exposed to diagnostic NIR; and identifies situations of high NIR exposure from diagnostic devices in which patients or health care workers might not be adequately protected by current regulations. Diagnostic technologies were classified by the types of NIR that they employ. The aim was to describe the techniques in terms of general device categories which may encompass more specific devices or techniques with similar scientific principles. Relevant legally-binding regulations for protection of patients and workers and organizations responsible for those regulations were summarized. Review of the epidemiological evidence concerning health risks associated with exposure to diagnostic NIR highlighted a lack of data on potential risks to the fetus exposed to MRI during the first trimester, and on long-term health risks in workers exposed to MRI. Most of the relevant epidemiological evidence that is currently available relates to MRI or ultrasound. Exposure limits are needed for exposures from diagnostic technologies using optical radiation within the body. There is a lack of data regarding risk of congenital malformations following exposure to ultrasound in utero in the first trimester and also about the possible health effects of interactions between ultrasound and contrast media.

  1. Diagnostic Dental Radiation Risk during Pregnancy: Awareness among General Dentists in Tabriz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahmineh Razi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Pregnant women often do not receive proper dental care in emergency visits due to a lack of awareness of the effect of radiation doses and the involved risks for the fetus. The aim of the present study was to assess the awareness of general dentists practicing in Tabriz, Iran, of the risks involved during exposure to diagnostic dental radiation in pregnant women. Materials and methods. In this descriptive/cross-sectional study, 250 general dentists, who had attended continuing education courses under the supervision of the Faculty of Dentistry, filled out questionnaires on their awareness of radiation risks. Data was analyzed by Spearman's correlation coefficient test. Results. The mean of correct answers was 6.47±1.66, with the least and highest correct answers of 2 and 10, respectively. The highest and the lowest levels of awareness were related to the use of a lead apron (92% and a long rectangular collimator (3.2%, respectively. There was a statistically significant correlation between the age of practitioners and awareness of radiation risks (P=0.02. However, no statistically significant correlation was observed between job experience (P=0.25 and the number of continuing education courses attended (P=0.16 and awareness of radiation risks. Conclusion. The studied population of dentists does not seem to have the sufficient knowledge regarding the diagnostic dental radiation risk during pregnancy. Further educational courses and pamphlets are recommended for increasing their awareness of this subject.

  2. Re-Establishment of Standard Radiation Qualities for Calibration of Dosemeter in Diagnostic Radiology - RQR Series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asmaliza Hashim; Norhayati Abdullah; Mohd Firdaus Abd Rahman

    2016-01-01

    After repairing the high voltage (HV) generator for Philips MG165 X-Ray Machine, the reestablishment of the standard radiation qualities has been done at Medical Physics Calibration Laboratory to meet the IEC and IAEA standard. Standard radiation qualities are the important criteria for calibration of dosemeter in diagnostic radiology. Standard radiation qualities are defined as the added filtration needed to produce and the half value layer (HVL) of the beam for specifies x-ray tube kilo voltage (kV). For calibration of dosemeter in diagnostic radiology, standard radiation qualities RQR represent the beam incident on the patient in general radiography, fluoroscopy and dental application. The HVL were measured using PTW ion chamber of volume 1 cm 3 with PTW electrometer and aluminium filter with 99.9 % purity was used as additional filter for RQR and filter for HVL. The first establishment of standard radiation qualities was made in 2009 for the radiation qualities of RQR. The results of additional filter and 1st HVL from 2009 to 2016 will be discussed further in paper. The ratios of the measured HVL to the standard IEC HVL value for the RQR series also described in this paper. The details of the measurement and the results are described in this paper. (author)

  3. Isotope effect on band gap and radiative transitions properties of boron nitride nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei-Qiang; Yu, Hua-Gen; Zhi, Chunyi; Wang, Jianbin; Liu, Zhenxian; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Bando, Yoshio

    2008-02-01

    We have carried out an isotope study on the band gap and radiative transition spectra of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) using both experimental and theoretical approaches. The direct band gap of BNNTs was determined at 5.38 eV, independent of the nanotube size and isotope substitution, by cathodoluminescences (CL) spectra. At lower energies, several radiative transitions were observed, and an isotope effect was revealed. In particular, we confirmed that the rich CL spectra between 3.0 and 4.2 eV reflect a phonon-electron coupling mechanism, which is characterized by a radiative transition at 4.09 eV. The frequency red shift and peak broadening due to isotopic effect have been observed. Our Fourier transform infrared spectra and density functional theory calculations suggest that those radiative transitions in BNNTs could be generated by a replacement of some nitrogen atoms with oxygen.

  4. A study on enforcement effects of radiation safety control regulations for diagnostic X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Mo IL; Park, Myeong Hwan; Kwon, Duk Moon; Lee, Joon IL

    1999-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to analyze the realities after enforcements of safety control regulations for diagnostic X-ray equipment and to suggest means for an improvement of low radiation safety control. A questionnaire survey for medical radiologic technologists was carried out to determine enforcement effects of the safety control regulations. The results of analysis from the survey are as follows. That is, most of he respondents realized the importance of the radiation safety control system, but about a half of them revealed that regulations were not well observed in accordance with their purposes. Only 43.9 percent of the respondents took an active part in quality control of radiation. And responsibility, sex, age, and knowledge for safety control were important indicators for observations of the regulations. Training for the safety control regulations are needed to ensure safety control and proper usage of diagnostic X-ray equipment. And management of organizations using diagnostic X-ray equipment have to understand and stress the importance of radiation safety control system. (author)

  5. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation as a Diagnostic Tool for the LCLS Longitudinal Feedback System

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Juhao; Huang, Zhirong

    2005-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) will be the world's first x-ray free-electron laser (FEL). To ensure the vitality of FEL lasing, a longitudinal feedback system is required together with other diagnostics. In this paper, we study the possibility of using Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) from the chicane as the diagnostic tool for bunch length feedback. Calculations show that CSR is a good candidate, even for the non-Gaussian, double-horn longitudinal charge distribution. We further check the feasibility for low and high charge options, and also the possibility for detecting the microbunching.

  6. A Case of Radiation-Induced Multifocal Laryngeal Angiosarcoma Presenting as a Diagnostic Dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayme R. Dowdall

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck sarcomas are relatively rare tumors, with angiosarcomas representing a small subset. Angiosarcoma is a malignant endothelial neoplasm characterized by atypical, multilayered, or solid endothelial proliferation with vasoformative architecture. The global incidence of irradiation-associated sarcoma is estimated as between 0.03% and 0.08%. Here we reported the case of an elderly woman previously treated with radiation more than 20 years ago for an unknown primary of head and neck. This interesting case presented as a diagnostic challenge, and multiple biopsies were required to eventually establish the diagnosis of laryngeal angiosarcoma. We additionally have confirmation from our prior radiation records that the patient did, in fact, receive a substantial dose of radiation to the site previously. To our knowledge, this case represents the first report of a documented radiation-induced multifocal laryngeal angiosarcoma.

  7. Effective doses and standardised risk factors from paediatric diagnostic medical radiation exposures: Information for radiation risk communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibbo, Giovanni

    2018-01-01

    In the paediatric medical radiation setting, there is no consistency on the radiation risk information conveyed to the consumer (patient/carer). Each communicator may convey different information about the level of risk for the same radiation procedure, leaving the consumer confused and frustrated. There is a need to standardise risks resulting from medical radiation exposures. In this study, paediatric radiographic, fluoroscopic, CT and nuclear medicine examination data have been analysed to provide (i) effective doses and radiation induced cancer risk factors from common radiological and nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures in standardised formats, (II) awareness of the difficulties that may be encountered in communicating risks to the layperson, and (iii) an overview of the deleterious effects of ionising radiation so that the risk communicator can convey with confidence the risks resulting from medical radiation exposures. Paediatric patient dose data from general radiographic, computed tomography, fluoroscopic and nuclear medicine databases have been analysed in age groups 0 to <5 years, 5 to <10 years, 10 to <15 years and 15 to <18 years to determine standardised risk factors. Mean, minimum and maximum effective doses and the corresponding mean lifetime risks for general radiographic, fluoroscopic, CT and nuclear medicine examinations for different age groups have been calculated. For all examinations, the mean lifetime cancer induction risk is provided in three formats: statistical, fraction and category. Standardised risk factors for different radiological and nuclear medicine examinations and an overview of the deleterious effects of ionising radiation and the difficulties encountered in communicating the risks should facilitate risk communication to the patient/carer.

  8. The Swedish radiation protection institute's regulations on x-ray diagnostics; issued on April 28, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-04-01

    These regulations are applicable to practices with ionising radiation with respect to medical and dental diagnostics by means of external radiation sources like x-rays or radioactive substances. The regulations are also applicable to medical or dental use of such radiation sources for planning and guidance, for research and for legal and insurance related examinations.

  9. Radiative transitions of new particles and the puzzle of cc-bar pseudoscalar mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arafune, J.; Fukugita, M.; Oyanagi, Y.

    1977-01-01

    Radiative transitions between psi's and chi's are investigated in terms of a nonrelativistic quark model. When the level mixing is taken into account, no difficulties are met in M1 transitions, if the newly discovered chi (3454) is assigned to the ground state of the pseudoscalar meson

  10. A conceptual framework for managing radiation dose to patients in diagnostic radiology using reference dose levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almen, Anja; Baath, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    The overall aim of the present work was to develop a conceptual framework for managing radiation dose in diagnostic radiology with the intention to support optimisation. An optimisation process was first derived. The framework for managing radiation dose, based on the derived optimisation process, was then outlined. The outset of the optimisation process is four stages: providing equipment, establishing methodology, performing examinations and ensuring quality. The optimisation process comprises a series of activities and actions at these stages. The current system of diagnostic reference levels is an activity in the last stage, ensuring quality. The system becomes a reactive activity only to a certain extent engaging the core activity in the radiology department, performing examinations. Three reference dose levels-possible, expected and established-were assigned to the three stages in the optimisation process, excluding ensuring quality. A reasonably achievable dose range is also derived, indicating an acceptable deviation from the established dose level. A reasonable radiation dose for a single patient is within this range. The suggested framework for managing radiation dose should be regarded as one part of the optimisation process. The optimisation process constitutes a variety of complementary activities, where managing radiation dose is only one part. This emphasises the need to take a holistic approach integrating the optimisation process in different clinical activities. (authors)

  11. A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR MANAGING RADIATION DOSE TO PATIENTS IN DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY USING REFERENCE DOSE LEVELS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almén, Anja; Båth, Magnus

    2016-06-01

    The overall aim of the present work was to develop a conceptual framework for managing radiation dose in diagnostic radiology with the intention to support optimisation. An optimisation process was first derived. The framework for managing radiation dose, based on the derived optimisation process, was then outlined. The outset of the optimisation process is four stages: providing equipment, establishing methodology, performing examinations and ensuring quality. The optimisation process comprises a series of activities and actions at these stages. The current system of diagnostic reference levels is an activity in the last stage, ensuring quality. The system becomes a reactive activity only to a certain extent engaging the core activity in the radiology department, performing examinations. Three reference dose levels-possible, expected and established-were assigned to the three stages in the optimisation process, excluding ensuring quality. A reasonably achievable dose range is also derived, indicating an acceptable deviation from the established dose level. A reasonable radiation dose for a single patient is within this range. The suggested framework for managing radiation dose should be regarded as one part of the optimisation process. The optimisation process constitutes a variety of complementary activities, where managing radiation dose is only one part. This emphasises the need to take a holistic approach integrating the optimisation process in different clinical activities. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Gamma radiation grafted polymers for immobilization of Brucella antigen in diagnostic test studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docters, E. H.; Smolko, E. E.; Suarez, C. E.

    The radiation grafting process has a wide field of industrial applications, and in the recent years the immobilization of biocomponents in grafted polymeric materials obtained by means of ionizing radiations is a new and important contribution to biotechnology. In the present work, gamma preirradiation grafting method was employed to produce acrylics hydrogels onto polyethylene (PE), polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polystyrene (PS). Two monomers were used to graft the previously mentioned polymers: methacrylic acid (MAAc) and acrylamide (AAm), and several working conditions were considered as influencing the degree of grafting. All this grafted polymers were used to study the possibility of a subsequent immobilization of Brucella antigen (BAg) in diagnostic test studies (ELISA).

  13. The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) proportional drift tube: design and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATLAS TRT Collaboration; Abat, E.; Addy, T. N.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Alison, J.; Anghinolfi, F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Atoian, G.; Auerbach, B.; Baker, O. K.; Banas, E.; Baron, S.; Bault, C.; Becerici, N.; Beddall, A.; Beddall, A. J.; Bendotti, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bertelsen, H.; Bingul, A.; Blampey, H.; Bocci, A.; Bochenek, M.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bychkov, V.; Callahan, J.; Capeáns Garrido, M.; Cardiel Sas, L.; Catinaccio, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chandler, T.; Chritin, R.; Cwetanski, P.; Dam, M.; Danielsson, H.; Danilevich, E.; David, E.; Degenhardt, J.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dittus, F.; Dixon, N.; Dogan, O. B.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dressnandt, N.; Driouchi, C.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Eerola, P.; Egede, U.; Egorov, K.; Evans, H.; Farthouat, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fowler, A. J.; Fratina, S.; Froidevaux, D.; Fry, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Ghodbane, N.; Godlewski, J.; Goulette, M.; Gousakov, I.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grishkevich, Y.; Grognuz, J.; Hajduk, Z.; Hance, M.; Hansen, F.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, P. H.; Hare, G. A.; Harvey, A., Jr.; Hauviller, C.; High, A.; Hulsbergen, W.; Huta, W.; Issakov, V.; Istin, S.; Jain, V.; Jarlskog, G.; Jeanty, L.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kaplan, B.; Kapliy, A. S.; Katounine, S.; Kayumov, F.; Keener, P. T.; Kekelidze, G. D.; Khabarova, E.; Khristachev, A.; Kisielewski, B.; Kittelmann, T. H.; Kline, C.; Klinkby, E. B.; Klopov, N. V.; Ko, B. R.; Koffas, T.; Kondratieva, N. V.; Konovalov, S. P.; Koperny, S.; Korsmo, H.; Kovalenko, S.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Krüger, K.; Kramarenko, V.; Kudin, L. G.; LeBihan, A.-C.; LeGeyt, B. C.; Levterov, K.; Lichard, P.; Lindahl, A.; Lisan, V.; Lobastov, S.; Loginov, A.; Loh, C. W.; Lokwitz, S.; Long, M. C.; Lucas, S.; Lucotte, A.; Luehring, F.; Lundberg, B.; Mackeprang, R.; Maleev, V. P.; Manara, A.; Mandl, M.; Martin, A. J.; Martin, F. F.; Mashinistov, R.; Mayers, G. M.; McFarlane, K. W.; Mialkovski, V.; Mills, B. M.; Mindur, B.; Mitsou, V. A.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Morozov, S. V.; Morris, E.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Muir, A. M.; Munar, A.; Nadtochi, A. V.; Nesterov, S. Y.; Newcomer, F. M.; Nikitin, N.; Novgorodova, O.; Novodvorski, E. G.; Ogren, H.; Oh, S. H.; Oleshko, S. B.; Olivito, D.; Olszowska, J.; Ostrowicz, W.; Passmore, M. S.; Patrichev, S.; Penwell, J.; Perez-Gomez, F.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Petersen, T. C.; Petti, R.; Placci, A.; Poblaguev, A.; Pons, X.; Price, M. J.; hne, O. Rø; Reece, R. D.; Reilly, M. B.; Rembser, C.; Romaniouk, A.; Rousseau, D.; Rust, D.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Ryjov, V.; Söderberg, M.; Savenkov, A.; Saxon, J.; Scandurra, M.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, C.; Sedykh, E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Sivoklokov, S.; Smirnov, S. Yu; Smirnova, L.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, P.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Sprachmann, G.; Subramania, S.; Suchkov, S. I.; Sulin, V. V.; Szczygiel, R. R.; Tartarelli, G.; Thomson, E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tipton, P.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Berg, R.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vassilieva, L.; Wagner, P.; Wall, R.; Wang, C.; Whittington, D.; Williams, H. H.; Zhelezko, A.; Zhukov, K.

    2008-02-01

    A straw proportional counter is the basic element of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT). Its detailed properties as well as the main properties of a few TRT operating gas mixtures are described. Particular attention is paid to straw tube performance in high radiation conditions and to its operational stability.

  14. Measurements of the spectrum and energy dependence of X-ray transition radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, M. L.

    1978-01-01

    The results of experiments designed to test the theory of X-ray transition radiation and to verify the predicted dependence of the characteristic features of the radiation on the radiator dimensions are presented. The X-ray frequency spectrum produced by 5- to 9-GeV electrons over the range 4 to 30 keV was measured with a calibrated single-crystal Bragg spectrometer, and at frequencies up to 100 keV with an NaI scintillator. The interference pattern in the spectrum and the hardening of the radiation with increasing foil thickness are clearly observed. The energy dependence of the total transition-radiation intensity was studied using a radiator with large dimensions designed to yield energy-dependent signals at very high particle energies, up to E/mc-squared approximately equal to 100,000. The results are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  15. Diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography using lower doses of radiation for patients with Crohn's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Craig, Orla

    2012-08-01

    Magnetic resonance and ultrasonography have increasing roles in the initial diagnosis of Crohn\\'s disease, but computed tomography (CT) with positive oral contrast agents is most frequently used to identify those with acute extramural complications. However, CT involves exposure of patients to radiation. We prospectively compared the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT (at a dose comparable to that used to obtain an abdominal radiograph) with conventional-dose CT in patients with active Crohn\\'s disease.

  16. Transverse phase space mapping of relativistic electron beams using optical transition radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Le Sage

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Optical transition radiation (OTR has proven to be a versatile and effective diagnostic for measuring the profile, divergence, and emittance of relativistic electron beams with a wide range of parameters. Diagnosis of the divergence of modern high brightness beams is especially well suited to OTR interference (OTRI techniques, where multiple dielectric or metal foils are used to generate a spatially coherent interference pattern. Theoretical analysis of measured OTR and OTRI patterns allows precise measurement of electron beam emittance characteristics. Here we describe an extension of this technique to allow mapping of divergence characteristics as a function of transverse coordinates within a measured beam. We present the first experimental analysis of the transverse phase space of an electron beam using all optical techniques. Comparing an optically masked portion of the beam to the entire beam, we measure different angular spread and average direction of the particles. Direct measurement of the phase-space ellipse tilt angle has been demonstrated using this optical masking technique.

  17. The Design of Diagnostic Medical Facilities where Ionising Radiation is used

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, J.; O'Reilly, G.; O'Connor, U.; Gallagher, A.; Sheahan, N.; Fennell, S.

    2009-06-01

    The original Code of Practice on The Design of Diagnostic Medical Facilities Using Ionising Radiation was first published by the Nuclear Energy Board in 1988. In the intervening years the 'Blue Book' as it became known has served the medical community well as the sector has expanded and modernised and the late Dr Noel Nowlan, then Chief Executive of the Nuclear Energy Board, deserves much credit for initiating this pioneering contribution to radiation safety in Ireland. There have been significant developments since its publication in terms of the underlying radiation protection legislation, regulatory practice as well as developments in new technologies that have given rise to the need for a revision of the Code. This revised Code is based on a comprehensive draft document produced by the Haughton Institute under contract to the RPII and was finalised following extensive consultations with the relevant stakeholders. The revised Code includes a brief review of the current legislative framework and its specific impact on the management of building projects (Chapters 1 and 2), a presentation of the main types of radiological (Chapter 3) and nuclear medicine (Chapter 4) facilities, a treatment of the technical aspects of shielding calculations (Chapter 5) and a discussion of the practical aspects of implementing shielding solutions in a building context (Chapter 6). The primary purpose of the Code is to assist in the design of diagnostic facilities to the highest radiation protection standards in order to ensure the safety of workers and members of the public and the delivery of a safe service to patients. Diagnostic radiology is a dynamic environment and the Code is intended to be used in consultation with the current literature, an experienced Radiation Protection Advisor and a multidisciplinary project team

  18. Measurement and Simulation of Coaxial to Microstrip Transitions' Radiation Properties and Substrate Influence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Moravek

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A radiation and electro-magnetic (EM field analysis of coaxial-to-microstrip transitions is presented. Radiation is quantified by simulation and measurement of a crosstalk between two Omni-Spectra's transitions using microstrip 'open' calibration standards at different positions. Simulation results are compared to the measured data and good agreement is reported on two different substrates. The evaluation method which is used to analyze quality of the transition and its radiation properties was already developed and verified on a grounded coplanar waveguide (CPWG transmission line. Results can be used to estimate uncertainty budget of the calibrated measurement with respect to the measured radiation. Results on different substrates show interesting behaviour and can prove useful when choosing suitable substrate for specific test-fixture.

  19. The diagnostic importance of phase transitions in liquor at a craniocereberal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanova N.E.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of the work is an investigation of biophysical properties of liquors of patients with a craniocereberal trauma. This investigation has been directed on definition of a degree of a brain defeat, the forecast of the further current of disease and development of methods treatment. Materials and methods. Liquor was undertaken from 62 patients with the diagnosis of an craniocereberal trauma. Research of thermo-impedancemetry of liquors was made with the help of equipment for measurement of temperature dependence of an electric impedance of ditches with a researched liquid. On the -shaped site?function of dependence of a full impedance from temperature the was observed. This site is due to globule-ball phase transition in liquor albumens. Result. It is shown, that numerical values of parameters of phase transition correlate with albumen concentration in liquor. Values of correlation factors are directly proportional to concentration of albumen. Conclusion. It is established, that numerical values of thermo-impedancemetry parameters of curves are directly connected to a degree of a brain defeat and can be used as diagnostic and prognostic criteria.

  20. Radiation exposure of population due to medical diagnostic procedures in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'ev, E.I.; Stavitskij, R.V.; Knizhnikov, V.A.; Barkhudarov, R.M.; Korsunskij, V.N.; Popov, V.I.; Tarasenko, Yu.I.; Postnikov, V.A.; Frolov, N.V.; Sidorin, V.P.

    1984-01-01

    The evaluation of radiation doses to population in the ussr on the basis of the data on frequency of 12 main forms of X-ray examinations and the results of measuring absorbed doses on tissue-kquivalent main's phantom are given. The evaluation of radiation exposure due to radiopharmaceutical preparations is based on consumption of 26 types of compounds in 320 national laboratories and i is performed by the methods developed in the framework of the mird committee (usa). In thhe active bone marrow, lungs mammary, glands thyroid and other organs (stomach, liver, spleen, etc.) the equivalent doses are determined and on their base the effective equivalent doses (eed). The average eed from x ray diagnostic examinations is 1.4 mSv per year (140 mrem per year) of which 55.4% falls on X-ray examination, 26.9% on radiography, 17.7% on mass miniature radiography (fluorography). Radionuclide diagnostics contribution is 3.2x10 -2 mSv per year (3.8 mrem per year). Medicinal radiation exposure approximately doubles the natural background, it is comparable with exposure in premises and essentially exceeds the radiation doses to population from other sources

  1. Diagnostic options for radiative divertor feedback control on NSTX-U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Kaita, R.; McLean, A. G.; Raman, R.

    2012-10-01

    A radiative divertor technique is used in present tokamak experiments and planned for ITER to mitigate high heat loads on divertor plasma-facing components (PFCs) to prevent excessive material erosion and thermal damage. In NSTX, a large spherical tokamak with lithium-coated graphite PFCs and high divertor heat flux (qpeak ≤ 15 MW/m2), radiative divertor experiments have demonstrated a significant reduction of divertor peak heat flux simultaneously with good core H-mode confinement using pre-programmed D2 or CD4 gas injections. In this work diagnostic options for a new real-time feedback control system for active radiative divertor detachment control in NSTX-U, where steady-state peak divertor heat fluxes are projected to reach 20–30 MW/m2, are discussed. Based on the NSTX divertor detachment measurements and analysis, the control diagnostic signals available for NSTX-U include divertor radiated power, neutral pressure, spectroscopic deuterium recombination signatures, infrared thermography of PFC surfaces, and thermoelectric scrape-off layer current. In addition, spectroscopic “security” monitoring of possible confinement or pedestal degradation is recommended. These signals would be implemented in a digital plasma control system to manage the divertor detachment process via an actuator (impurity gas seeding rate).

  2. Radiation doses to the unborn child at diagnostic examinations in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmrot, E. [County Hospital Ryhov, Radiology Department, Joenkoeping (Sweden); Pettersson, H.; Sandborg, M.; Olsson, S.; Nilsson, J. [Linkoeping University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Radiation Physics (Sweden); Cederlund, T. [Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-06-01

    The use of ionising radiation in a medical examination of a woman caring a child is not always possible to avoid. The following situations can occur: (1) The pregnancy of the patient is known and the examination has to be performed due to medical reason, (2) The pregnancy of the patient is unknown at the time of examination. Methods to identify pregnant women at radiological departments in Sweden are already in use, but national rules and methods to calculate the individual dose to the unborn child for different examinations are less evaluated. There is a need of standards for the calculations, estimations and documentation of the radiation dose to the unborn child. According to directives from the European Commission, every X-ray examination has to be justified and optimised. The aim of this study is to determine the absorbed dose to the unborn child for common radiation diagnostic examinations used in Sweden and to find a standardised method for dose calculations. (orig.)

  3. Radiation doses to the unborn child at diagnostic examinations in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmrot, E.; Pettersson, H.; Sandborg, M.; Olsson, S.; Nilsson, J.; Cederlund, T.

    2003-01-01

    The use of ionising radiation in a medical examination of a woman caring a child is not always possible to avoid. The following situations can occur: (1) The pregnancy of the patient is known and the examination has to be performed due to medical reason, (2) The pregnancy of the patient is unknown at the time of examination. Methods to identify pregnant women at radiological departments in Sweden are already in use, but national rules and methods to calculate the individual dose to the unborn child for different examinations are less evaluated. There is a need of standards for the calculations, estimations and documentation of the radiation dose to the unborn child. According to directives from the European Commission, every X-ray examination has to be justified and optimised. The aim of this study is to determine the absorbed dose to the unborn child for common radiation diagnostic examinations used in Sweden and to find a standardised method for dose calculations. (orig.)

  4. Evaluation of radiation protection in x rays room design in diagnostic radiography department in Omdurman locality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, Ahmed yusif Abdelrahman

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study is conducted in order to evaluate the application of radiation protection in x-ray rooms design in diagnosis radiology department, evaluate personal monitoring devices, to assess primary scatter and leakage radiation dose, to assess monitoring devices if available, in period from March 2013 to August 2013. The design data included room size, control room size, manufacture of equipment, room surrounding areas, workload of all equipment rooms, type of x-ray equipment, radiation worker's in all hospital, number of patient in each shift, structural material and shielding, K vp and m As used in x-ray room department during examination testing. The results of this study show that there is x-ray room design, the design of x-ray equipment is accepted according to the radiation safety institute team of quality control. Also the study shows that the radiation protection devices are available and in a good condition and enough in number. The study shows that there are not personal monitoring devices and services. the radiological technologist are well trained. Also the study investigation the radiation protection in x-ray room in diagnostic department in Omdurman locality. Finally the study shows that there is compact able to ICRP recommended and National quality control in Sudan Atomic Energy Council exception, Alwedad, Abusied and Blue Nile there are have not control room concludes that there is only in relationship hospital have a window without shield.(Author)

  5. Analysis of radiation doses to patients from diagnostic department of nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepej, L.; Messingerova, M.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper the values of mean effective dose equivalents per unit activity (H E/1Bq ) were used for the calculation of mean effective dose equivalents for one examination (H E ). The collective effective dose equivalents for each radiopharmaceutical and type of examination (S ER ) and global collective effective dose equivalent for department for all radiopharmaceuticals (S E ) during evaluated period were defined. The data for years from 1992 to 1994 were evaluated and compared with results in literature. The evaluation of radiation doses in nuclear medicine department is useful parameter for internal quality control. Using this method, the radiation dose in this laboratory was changed to minimum (under mean value of Slovak Republic). Unfortunately, the real data of patients radiation doses are different from the calculated one. Due to different kinetic of radiopharmaceuticals in individual patients (influenced by pathology, age, etc.) the evaluation of radiation burden to nuclear medicine patients is problematic. But this approach enable the relative comparison of the changes in values of H E and S E during the observed period. The evaluation of individual (minimal) effective dose equivalent - (H min ) which represents dose calculated under physiologic conditions can be useful for indication of diagnostic examination by physicians. Therefore the systematic registration of H min from all examinations - patient's radiation history. This is specially important in the case of children and young people. The importance of the proposed method, is in regulation of radiation dose from nuclear medicine diagnostic examinations, not only be the control of number and type of examinations, but also by selection of used radiopharmaceuticals and by the way how to use them. (J.K.) 1 fig., 2 refs

  6. Use of an Online Education Platform to Enhance Patients' Knowledge About Radiation in Diagnostic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Joseph R; Jones, A Kyle; Clarke, Ryan K; Shiao, Sue J; Wei, Wei; Shoemaker, Stowe; Parmar, Simrit

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the impact of a digital interactive education platform and standard paper-based education on patients' knowledge regarding ionizing radiation. Beginning in January 2015, patients at a tertiary cancer center scheduled for diagnostic imaging procedures were randomized to receive information about ionizing radiation delivered through a web-based interactive education platform (interactive education group), the same information in document format (document education group), or no specialized education (control group). Patients who completed at least some education and control group patients were invited to complete a knowledge assessment; interactive education patients were invited to provide feedback about satisfaction with their experience. A total of 2,226 patients participated. Surveys were completed by 302 of 745 patients (40.5%) participating in interactive education, 488 of 993 (49.1%) participating in document education, and 363 of 488 (74.4%) in the control group. Patients in the interactive education group were significantly more likely to say that they knew the definition of ionizing radiation, outperformed the other groups in identifying which imaging examinations used ionizing radiation, were significantly more likely to identify from a list which imaging modality had the highest radiation dose, and tended to perform better when asked about the tissue effects of radiation in diagnostic imaging, although this difference was not significant. In the interactive education group, 84% of patients were satisfied with the experience, and 79% said that they would recommend the program. Complex information on a highly technical subject with personal implications for patients may be conveyed more effectively using electronic platforms, and this approach is well accepted. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Diagnostic medical exposures. Advice on exposure to ionising radiation during pregnancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, C.; Shrimpton, J.; Bury, R

    1998-07-01

    The main objective of NRPB advice concerning in utero exposures to ionising radiations is 'to prevent unnecessary exposure of the fetus when medical diagnostic procedures involving ionising radiations are indicated during pregnancy'. In addition, advice is meant to help to avoid unnecessary concern or action if an exposure does occur. NRPB issued ASP8 (Exposure to ionising radiation of pregnant women: advice on the diagnostic exposure of women who are, or who may be, pregnant) in 1985. This advice suggested that there would be no risks to the concepts following irradiation during the first 10 days of the menstrual cycle and that subsequent risks in the remainder of the first 4 week period would be likely to be so small that no special limitation on exposure was required - sometimes known as 'the 28-day rule'. In 1993, NRPB published further advice to replace ASP8 in the Documents of the NRPB series, in Volume 4, No 4 - henceforth referred to as Doc NRPB 4(4){sup 2} - which drew upon data published since 1985. The more recent data suggest that risks in the interval between 10 days and the date at which the next menstrual period is due, although still small for most diagnostic procedures, may be significant for higher dose procedures. Consequently, it is considered there is a need to operate a modified policy for such higher dose procedures. This pocket publication has been produced to present in a concise and user-friendly format the basis of the most recent NRPB advice and to provide a guide for the implementation of that advice in the everyday practice of diagnostic radiology. The opportunity has also been taken to provide the most up to date data on doses in the UK. This publication is split into three parts: an introduction to the terms used in the document, a practical guide to implementation of the advice, and the scientific background to the advice.

  8. Prenatal radiation exposures at diagnostic procedures: methods to identify exposed pregnant patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, H.; Sandborg, M.; Nilsson, J.; Olsson, S.

    2002-01-01

    Knowledge about frequency and doses to embryo/foetus from diagnostic radiology is of great importance both in the sense of estimating the radiation risks but also for optimizing the diagnostic procedures and making decisions regarding alternative procedures. In addition, the pregnant patient has the right to know the magnitude and type of radiation risks expected as a result of foetus exposure. From a risk perspective epidemiological data have shown that the embryo/foetus together with children experience higher radiation sensitivity in terms of induced leukemia and cancer compared to an adult population. Recent estimates give cancer excess lifetime mortality risks for whole body exposures of children and foetus (0-15 y age) of 0.06% (ICRP84, 2000) up to 0.14% per 10 mSv (BEIR-V 1990). In addition to the risk of cancer induction effects of cell killing, e.g. CNS abnormalities, cataracts, malformations, growth retardation, may occur. However, these effects are believed to have a threshold, about 100-200 mGy (ICRP84, 2000), and such foetus doses are rarely reached in diagnostic radiology procedures. There are 2 principal situations where foetus exposures may occur in diagnostic radiology; 1. The pregnancy of the patient is known at the time of examination, but due to the medical indications the examination can not be postponed or put forward in time, and there are no suitable alternative non-radiological procedures. 2. The pregnancy of the patient is not known at the time of examination, either due to the fact that the patient is unaware of her pregnancy or the medical personnel failed to obtain this information. The former situation may occur during the first few weeks from conception, whereas the latter situation may cover a greater gestation period

  9. Diagnostic medical exposures. Advice on exposure to ionising radiation during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, C.; Shrimpton, J.; Bury, R.

    1998-01-01

    The main objective of NRPB advice concerning in utero exposures to ionising radiations is 'to prevent unnecessary exposure of the fetus when medical diagnostic procedures involving ionising radiations are indicated during pregnancy'. In addition, advice is meant to help to avoid unnecessary concern or action if an exposure does occur. NRPB issued ASP8 (Exposure to ionising radiation of pregnant women: advice on the diagnostic exposure of women who are, or who may be, pregnant) in 1985. This advice suggested that there would be no risks to the concepts following irradiation during the first 10 days of the menstrual cycle and that subsequent risks in the remainder of the first 4 week period would be likely to be so small that no special limitation on exposure was required - sometimes known as 'the 28-day rule'. In 1993, NRPB published further advice to replace ASP8 in the Documents of the NRPB series, in Volume 4, No 4 - henceforth referred to as Doc NRPB 4(4) 2 - which drew upon data published since 1985. The more recent data suggest that risks in the interval between 10 days and the date at which the next menstrual period is due, although still small for most diagnostic procedures, may be significant for higher dose procedures. Consequently, it is considered there is a need to operate a modified policy for such higher dose procedures. This pocket publication has been produced to present in a concise and user-friendly format the basis of the most recent NRPB advice and to provide a guide for the implementation of that advice in the everyday practice of diagnostic radiology. The opportunity has also been taken to provide the most up to date data on doses in the UK. This publication is split into three parts: an introduction to the terms used in the document, a practical guide to implementation of the advice, and the scientific background to the advice

  10. Diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donné, A.J.H.; Costley, A.E.; Barnsley, R.

    2007-01-01

    In order to support the operation of ITER and the planned experimental programme an extensive set of plasma and first wall measurements will be required. The number and type of required measurements will be similar to those made on the present-day large tokamaks while the specification...... of the measurements—time and spatial resolutions, etc—will in some cases be more stringent. Many of the measurements will be used in the real time control of the plasma driving a requirement for very high reliability in the systems (diagnostics) that provide the measurements. The implementation of diagnostic systems......&D is needed to prepare the systems. In some cases the environmental difficulties are so severe that new diagnostic techniques are required. The starting point in the development of diagnostics for ITER is to define the measurement requirements and develop their justification. It is necessary to include all...

  11. Transition radiation on semi-infinite plate and Smith-Purcell effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shul'ga, N F; Syshchenko, V V

    2010-01-01

    The Smith-Purcell radiation is usually measured when an electron passes over the grating of metallic stripes. However, for high frequencies (exceeding the plasma frequency of the grating material) none material could be treated as a conductor, but ought to be considered as a dielectric with plasma-like permittivity. So for describing Smith-Purcell radiation in the range of high frequencies new theoretical approaches are needed. In the present paper we apply the simple variant of eikonal approximation developed earlier to the case of radiation on the set of parallel semi-infinite dielectric plates. The formulae obtained describe the radiation generated by the particles both passing through the plates (traditionally referred as 'transition radiation') and moving in vacuum over the grating formed by the edges of the plates (traditionally referred as 'diffraction radiation', and, taking into account the periodicity of the plates arrangement, as Smith-Purcell radiation).

  12. Energy levels and radiative rates for transitions in Mo XV

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, F.; Attia, S. M.

    2017-07-01

    Energy levels, wavelengths, transition probabilities, oscillator strengths, line strengths, and lifetimes have been calculated for transitions among the fine-structure levels belonging to the (1s22s22p6)3s23p63d10, 3s23p63d94l, 3s23p53d104l, and 3s3p63d104l (l = s, p, d, f) configurations of the Ni-like Molybdenum, Mo XV. The results for electric dipole (E1), electric quadrupole (E2), magnetic dipole (M1), and magnetic quadrupole (M2) transitions among the lowest levels of Mo XV have been reported and compared with available NIST results.

  13. Diagnostic Accuracy of Ultrasonic Histogram Features to Evaluate Radiation Toxicity of the Parotid Glands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Tridandapani, Srini; Beitler, Jonathan J.; Yu, David S.; Chen, Zhengjia; Kim, Sungjin; Bruner, Deborah W.; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound histogram features in the quantitative assessment of radiation-induced parotid gland injury and to identify potential imaging biomarkers for radiation-induced xerostomia (dry mouth)—the most common and debilitating side effect after head-and-neck radiotherapy (RT). Materials and Methods Thirty-four patients, who have developed xerostomia after RT for head-and-neck cancer, were enrolled. Radiation-induced xerostomia was defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer morbidity scale. Ultrasound scans were performed on each patient’s parotids bilaterally. The 34 patients were stratified into the acute-toxicity groups (16 patients, ≤3 months after treatment) and the late-toxicity group (18 patients, >3 months after treatment). A separate control group of 13 healthy volunteers underwent similar ultrasound scans of their parotid glands. Six sonographic features were derived from the echo-intensity histograms to assess acute and late toxicity of the parotid glands. The quantitative assessments were compared to a radiologist’s clinical evaluations. The diagnostic accuracy of these ultrasonic histogram features was evaluated with the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Results With an area under the ROC curve greater than 0.90, several histogram features demonstrated excellent diagnostic accuracy for evaluation of acute and late toxicity of parotid glands. Significant differences (P parotid glands. Conclusions We demonstrated that ultrasound histogram features could be used to measure acute and late toxicity of the parotid glands after head-and-neck cancer RT, which may be developed into a low-cost imaging method for xerostomia monitoring and assessment. PMID:25088832

  14. Comparison of radiation exposure during transradial diagnostic coronary angiography with single- or multi-catheters approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plourde, Guillaume; Abdelaal, Eltigani; MacHaalany, Jimmy; Rimac, Goran; Poirier, Yann; Arsenault, Jean; Costerousse, Olivier; Bertrand, Olivier F

    2017-08-01

    To compare radiation exposure during transradial diagnostic coronary angiography (DCA) using standard single- or multi-catheters with different shapes. Transradial DCA can be performed using single- or multi-catheters to canulate left and right coronary ostia. To date, it remains unknown whether there are differences in radiation exposure between the two strategies. From November 2012 to June 2014, 3,410 consecutive patients who underwent transradial DCA were recruited. Groups were based on the initial diagnostic catheter used and were dichotomized between single- and multi-catheters approach. All crossovers were excluded. The multi-catheters approach (Multi) group consisted of Judkins left and right catheters, whereas the single-catheter (Single) group included Amplatz, Barbeau, or Multipurpose catheters. Fluoroscopy time (FT) as a surrogate end-point for total radiation exposure and kerma-area product (KAP; patient radiation exposure) were collected as radiation exposure parameters. A single-catheter strategy was used in 439 patients, while 2,971 patients had a multi-catheters approach. There was no significant difference in FT between groups (2.86 ± 1.48 min for Multi vs. 2.87 ± 1.72 min for Single, P = 0.13). The multi-catheters approach was associated with a significant 15% reduction in KAP (3,599 ± 2,214 cGy · cm 2 vs. 3,073 ± 1,785 cGy · cm 2 , P approach. When pooling all patients, mean FT was 2.86 ± 1.51 min. Mean KAP was 3,141 ± 1,854 cGy · cm 2 . Reference levels in our institution in both groups were below international diagnostic reference levels. Overall both FT and KAP decreased by 15% and 19%, respectively, over the 2-year study period. Compared to a single-catheter approach, a multi-catheters approach with standard Judkins catheters for DCA significantly reduced patient radiation exposure. Whether single catheter designed for DCA by radial approach can further reduce radiation exposure compared to

  15. Diagnostics of Track Quality of Ballastless Track and Transition Areas in Vicinity of Portals of Tunnel Turecky vrch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šmalo Michal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the partial results of diagnostics of experimental sections of ballastless track Rheda 2000® and transition areas between ballastless and ballasted track structure around portals of tunnel Turecky vrch after six measurement cycles. The paper presents differences between each operational measurement and the measurement before putting sections into operation, which indicates a development of track geometry quality.

  16. Development and optimization of the LHC and the SPS beam diagnostics based on synchrotron radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trad, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Measuring the beam transverse emittance is fundamental in every accelerator, in particular for colliders, where its precise determination is essential to maximize the luminosity and thus the performance of the colliding beams. Synchrotron Radiation (SR) is a versatile tool for non-destructive beam diagnostics, since its characteristics are closely related to those of the source beam. At CERN, being the only available diagnostics at high beam intensity and energy, SR monitors are exploited as the proton beam size monitor of the two higher energy machines, the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The thesis work documented in this report focused on the design, development, characterization and optimization of these beam size monitors. Such studies were based on a comprehensive set of theoretical calculations, numerical simulations and experiments. A powerful simulation tool has been developed combining conventional softwares for SR simulation and optics design, thus allowing the description of an SR monitor from its source up to the detector. The simulations were confirmed by direct observations, and a detailed performance studies of the operational SR imaging monitor in the LHC, where different techniques for experimentally validating the system were applied, such as cross-calibrations with the wire scanners at low intensity (that are considered as a reference) and direct comparison with beam sizes de-convoluted from the LHC luminosity measurements. In 2015, the beam sizes to be measured with the further increase of the LHC beam energy to 7 TeV will decrease down to ∼190 μm. In these conditions, the SR imaging technique was found at its limits of applicability since the error on the beam size determination is proportional to the ratio of the system resolution and the measured beam size. Therefore, various solutions were probed to improve the system's performance such as the choice of one light polarization, the reduction of

  17. Feasibility of optical diffraction radiation for a non-invasive low-emittance beam diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Urakawa, J; Kubo, K; Kuroda, S; Terunuma, N; Kuriki, M; Okugi, T; Naito, T; Araki, S; Potylitsin, A P; Naumenko, G A; Karataev, P; Potylitsyna, N A; Vnukov, I; Hirose, T; Hamatsu, R; Muto, T; Ikezawa, M; Shibata, Y

    2001-01-01

    A 'proof-of-principle' experiment on the optical diffraction radiation (ODR) as a single-pulse beam profile monitor is planned using an electron beam extracted from the KEK-ATF damping ring. The main goals of this experiment are the following: (i) To measure the yield and the angular distributions of the optical diffraction radiation from a large-size target at different wavelengths, impact parameters and beam characteristics for a comparison with analogous characteristics of optical transition radiation from a foil with identical optical parameters and for a verification of the model assumption (perfectly conducting semi-infinite target). (ii) To investigate the ODR angular distributions from a tilted target with a slit for observing the interference effects. (iii) To compare the results obtained by simulations based on classical approaches, taking into account the optical characteristics of the equipment and the beam parameters. (iv) To estimate the prospects of using ODR as a new non-invasive tool for ultr...

  18. Description of radiative transitions in the relativistic string model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdnikov, E.B.; Nanobashvili, G.G.; Pron'ko, G.P.

    1991-01-01

    The transition operator for a straight-line string in the electromagnetic field has been built. It's matrix elements between the states of arbitrary spin are calculated in lowest order of perturbation theory. The consistensy conditions for the operator of interaction arising due to quantum constraints are also discussed. 12 refs

  19. Reliability of self-reported diagnostic radiation history in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pijpe, Anouk; Manders, Peggy; Mulder, Renee L.; Leeuwen, Flora E. van; Rookus, Matti A.

    2010-01-01

    We assessed reliability of self-reported diagnostic radiation history in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers with and without breast cancer. Within the frame-work of the HEBON study, 401 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers completed a baseline (1999-2004) and a follow-up questionnaire (2006-2007). Test-retest reliability of self-reported exposure to chest X-rays, fluoroscopies and mammograms was assessed for the entire study population and by case status. Overall proportion agreement on reporting ever/never exposure was good (> 75%), while the corresponding kappa coefficients were between 0.40 and 0.75, indicating at least moderate reliability beyond chance. Reliability of number of exposures was also good (> 75%). Proportion agreement on reporting age at first mammogram was low (40%) for exact consistency and moderate (60%) for consistency ± 1 year. Reliability of age at first mammogram was higher for cases than for unaffected carriers (P < 0.001) but this difference disappeared when excluding diagnostic mammograms (P = 0.60). In unaffected carriers proportion agreement on age at last mammogram was 50%. In general, the direction of disagreement on all items was equally distributed. More consistent reporting was mainly determined by a younger age at questionnaire completion. In conclusion, inconsistent self-report of diagnostic radiation by BRCA1/2 mutation carriers was mainly non-differential by disease status.

  20. Radiation injury of the skin following diagnostic and interventional fluoroscopic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, T.R.; Wagner, L.K.; Mettler, F.A.

    2001-01-01

    Many radiation injuries to the skin, resulting from diagnostic and interventional fluoroscopic procedures, have been reported in recent years. In some cases skin damage was severe and debilitating. We analyzed 72 reports of skin injuries for progression and location of injury, type and number of procedures, and contributing patient and operator factors. Most cases (46) were related to coronary angiography and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). A smaller number was documented after cardiac radiofrequency catheter ablation (12), transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) placement (7), neuroradiological interventions (3) and other procedures (4). Important factors leading to skin injuries were long exposure times over the same skin area, use of high dose rates, irradiation through thick tissue masses, hypersensitivity to radiation, and positioning of arms or breasts into the radiation entrance beam. Physicians were frequently unaware of the high radiation doses involved and did not recognize the injuries as radiation induced. Based on these findings, recommendations to reduce dose and improve patient care are provided. (author)

  1. Exposure of the French paediatric population to ionising radiation from diagnostic medical procedures in 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etard, Cecile; Aubert, Bernard [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Medical Expertise Unit, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Mezzarobba, Myriam [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Laboratory of Epidemiology, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Bernier, Marie-Odile [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Laboratory of Epidemiology, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN/PRP-HOM/SRBE/LEPID, Laboratoire d' Epidemiologie, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2014-12-15

    Medical examination is the main source of artificial radiation exposure. Because children present an increased sensitivity to ionising radiation, radiology practices at a national level in paediatrics should be monitored. This study describes the ionising radiation exposure from diagnostic medical examinations of the French paediatric population in 2010. Data on frequency of examinations were provided by the French National Health Insurance through a representative sample including 107,627 children ages 0-15 years. Effective doses for each type of procedure were obtained from the published French literature. Median and mean effective doses were calculated for the studied population. About a third of the children were exposed to at least one examination using ionising radiation in 2010. Conventional radiology, dental exams, CT scans and nuclear medicine and interventional radiology represent respectively 55.3%, 42.3%, 2.1% and 0.3% of the procedures. Children 10-15 years old and babies from birth to 1 year are the most exposed populations, with respectively 1,098 and 734 examinations per 1,000 children per year. Before 1 year of age, chest and pelvis radiographs are the most common imaging tests, 54% and 32%, respectively. Only 1% of the studied population is exposed to CT scan, with 62% of these children exposed to a head-and-neck procedure. The annual median and mean effective doses were respectively 0.03 mSv and 0.7 mSv for the exposed children. This study gives updated reference data on French paediatric exposure to medical ionising radiation that can be used for public health or epidemiological purposes. Paediatric diagnostic use appears much lower than that of the whole French population as estimated in a previous study. (orig.)

  2. Exposure of the French paediatric population to ionising radiation from diagnostic medical procedures in 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etard, Cecile; Aubert, Bernard; Mezzarobba, Myriam; Bernier, Marie-Odile

    2014-01-01

    Medical examination is the main source of artificial radiation exposure. Because children present an increased sensitivity to ionising radiation, radiology practices at a national level in paediatrics should be monitored. This study describes the ionising radiation exposure from diagnostic medical examinations of the French paediatric population in 2010. Data on frequency of examinations were provided by the French National Health Insurance through a representative sample including 107,627 children ages 0-15 years. Effective doses for each type of procedure were obtained from the published French literature. Median and mean effective doses were calculated for the studied population. About a third of the children were exposed to at least one examination using ionising radiation in 2010. Conventional radiology, dental exams, CT scans and nuclear medicine and interventional radiology represent respectively 55.3%, 42.3%, 2.1% and 0.3% of the procedures. Children 10-15 years old and babies from birth to 1 year are the most exposed populations, with respectively 1,098 and 734 examinations per 1,000 children per year. Before 1 year of age, chest and pelvis radiographs are the most common imaging tests, 54% and 32%, respectively. Only 1% of the studied population is exposed to CT scan, with 62% of these children exposed to a head-and-neck procedure. The annual median and mean effective doses were respectively 0.03 mSv and 0.7 mSv for the exposed children. This study gives updated reference data on French paediatric exposure to medical ionising radiation that can be used for public health or epidemiological purposes. Paediatric diagnostic use appears much lower than that of the whole French population as estimated in a previous study. (orig.)

  3. A transition radiation detector for RHIC featuring accurate tracking and dE/dx particle identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, E.; Lissauer, D.; McCorkle, S.; Polychronakos, V.; Takai, H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Chi, C.Y.; Nagamiya, S.; Sippach, W.; Toy, M.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.F.; Wiggins, C.; Willis, W. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Cherniatin, V.; Dolgoshein, B. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Engineering, (Russian Federation); Bennett, M.; Chikanian, A.; Kumar, S.; Mitchell, J.T.; Pope, K. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1991-12-31

    We describe the results of a test ran involving a Transition Radiation Detector that can both distinguish electrons from pions which momenta greater titan 0.7 GeV/c and simultaneously track particles passing through the detector. The particle identification is accomplished through a combination of the detection of Transition Radiation from the electron and the differences in electron and pion energy loss (dE/dx) in the detector. The dE/dx particle separation is most, efficient below 2 GeV/c while particle ID utilizing Transition Radiation effective above 1.5 GeV/c. Combined, the electron-pion separation is-better than 5 {times} 10{sup 2}. The single-wire, track-position resolution for the TRD is {approximately}230 {mu}m.

  4. A transition radiation detector which features accurate tracking and dE/dx particle identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, E.; Lissauer, D.; McCorkle, S.; Polychronakos, V.; Takai, H.; Chi, C.Y.; Nagamiya, S.; Sippach, W.; Toy, M.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.F.; Wiggins, C.; Willis, W.; Cherniatin, V.; Dolgoshein, B.; Bennett, M.; Chikanian, A.; Kumar, S.; Mitchell, J.T.; Pope, K.

    1991-01-01

    We describe the results of a test run involving a Transition Radiation Detector that can both distinguish electrons from pions with momenta greater than 0.7 GeV/c and simultaneously track particles passing through the detector. The particle identification is accomplished through a combination of the detection of Transition Radiation from the electron and the differences in electron and pion energy loss (dE/dx) in the detector. The dE/dx particle separation is most efficient below 2 GeV/c while particle ID utilizing Transition Radiation is effective above 1.5 GeV/c. Combined, the electron-pion separation is better than 5 x l0 2 . The single-wire, track-position resolution for the TRD is ∼230μm

  5. Identifying Institutional Diagnostic Reference Levels for CT with Radiation Dose Index Monitoring Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, Kate; Li, Iris; Dowdell, Timothy; Gray, Bruce G

    2015-08-01

    To retrospectively evaluate radiation optimization efforts over 4 years for three computed tomography (CT) protocols and to determine institutional (local) diagnostic reference levels for prospective tracking by using automated radiation dose index monitoring software. Approval for this retrospective observational study was obtained from the hospital research ethics board, and the need to obtain informed consent was waived. The study followed a 48-month radiation dose optimization effort in a large academic inner-city trauma and quaternary referral center. Exposure according to equipment, protocol, and year (2010-2013) for adult patients was determined for routine unenhanced head CT examinations, CT pulmonary angiography examinations, and CT examinations for renal colic. Mean exposure (as volume CT dose index [CTDIvol] and dose-length product [DLP]) was averaged to establish local diagnostic reference levels. Means and 75th percentiles for 2013 were compared with findings from surveys in Canada and diagnostic reference levels for similar protocol types internationally. Student t tests were performed to assess significance between annual means, and χ(2) tests were performed for changes in categoric variables. There were 36 996 examinations in 25 234 patients. There was an average exposure reduction of 22% for CTDIvol and 13% for DLP from 2010 to 2013. In 2013, mean CTDIvol for routine head examinations was 50.8 mGy ± 3.7 (standard deviation), 11.8 mGy ± 5.6 for CT pulmonary angiography examinations, and 10.2 mGy ± 4.2 for renal colic CT examinations, while mean DLP was 805.7 mGy · cm ± 124.3, 432.8 mGy-cm ± 219.9, and 469.4 mGy · cm ± 209.2, respectively. The mean CTDIvol and DLP in 2013 were at or close to identified reference values; however, additional optimization is required to reach "as low as reasonably achievable" values for all examinations. Automated methods of radiation dose data collection permit a detailed analysis of radiation dose according

  6. Transition rates and radiative lifetimes of Ca I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yanmei; Derevianko, Andrei

    2018-01-01

    We tabulate spontaneous emission rates for all possible 811 electric-dipole-allowed transitions between the 75 lowest-energy states of Ca I. These involve the 4s ns (n = 4-8), 4s np (n =4-7), 4s nd (n = 3-6), 4s nf (n = 4-6), 3d2, 4p2, 3d4p, and 4s5g electronic configurations. We compile the transition rates by carrying out ab initio relativistic calculations using the combined method of configuration interaction and many-body perturbation theory. The results are compared to the available literature values. The tabulated rates can be useful in various applications, such as optimizing laser cooling in magneto-optical traps, estimating various systematic effects in optical clocks and evaluating static or dynamic polarizabilities and long-range atom-atom interaction coefficients and related atomic properties.

  7. A relativized quark model for radiative baryon transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warns, M.; Schroeder, H.; Pfeil, W.; Rollnik, H.

    1989-03-01

    In this paper we investigate the electromagnetic form factors of baryons and their resonances using the framework of a relativized constituent quark model. Beyond the usual single-quark transition ansatz, we incorporate relativistic corrections which are well-determined by the intrinsic strong interaction and confinement forces between the quarks. Furthermore we separate off for the compound three-quark system the relativistic center-of-mass motion by an approximately Lorentz-invariant approach. In this way for the first time recoil effects could be explicitly studied. Using the harmonic oscillator wavefunctions with the configuration mixing as derived in the Isgur-Karl model, after restoring gauge invariance our relativized interaction hamiltonian can be used to calculate the transversely and longitudinally polarized photon transition form factors of the baryons. (orig.)

  8. Low dose diagnostic radiation does not increase cancer risk in cancer prone mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreham, D., E-mail: dboreham@nosm.ca [Northern Ontario School of Medicine, ON (Canada); Phan, N., E-mail: nghiphan13@yahoo.com [Univ. of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Lemon, J., E-mail: lemonja@mcmaster.ca [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The increased exposure of patients to low dose diagnostic ionizing radiation has created concern that these procedures will result in greater risk of carcinogenesis. However, there is substantial evidence that shows in many cases that low dose exposure has the opposite effect. We have investigated whether CT scans can modify mechanisms associated with carcinogenesis in cancer-prone mice. Cancer was induced in Trp53+/- mice with an acute high dose whole-body 4 Gy γ-radiation exposure. Four weeks following the cancer-inducing dose, weekly whole-body CT scans (10 mGy/scan, 75 kVp X-rays) were given for ten consecutive weeks adding an additional radiation burden of 0.1 Gy. Short-term biological responses and subsequent lifetime cancer risk were investigated. Five days following the last CT scan, there were no detectable differences in the spontaneous levels of DNA damage in blood cells (reticulocytes). In fact, CT scanned mice had significantly lower constitutive levels of oxidative DNA damage and cell death (apoptosis), compared to non-CT scanned mice. This shows that multiple low dose radiation exposures modified the radio response and indicates protective processes were induced in mice. In mice treated with the multiple CT scans following the high cancer-inducing 4 Gy dose, tumour latency was increased, significantly prolonging lifespan. We conclude that repeated CT scans can reduce the cancer risk of a prior high-dose radiation exposure, and delay the progression of specific types of radiation-induced cancers in Trp53+/-mice. This research shows for the first time that low dose exposure long after cancer initiation events alter risk and reduce cancer morbidity. Cancer induction following low doses does not follow a linear non-threshold model of risk and this model should not be used to extrapolate risk to humans following low dose exposure to ionizing radiation. (author)

  9. Retrospective study of cumulative diagnostic radiation exposure during childhood in patients with spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smookler, Gregory; Deavenport-Saman, Alexis

    2015-10-01

    The Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation Committee of the National Academy of Sciences in 2005 and other expert panels have warned that risk of cancer increases with higher doses of radiation. Children with spina bifida and hydrocephalus have far greater exposure to radiation than the average person, starting almost directly after birth and continuing throughout their lifetimes. The purpose of this study was to estimate the amount of ionizing radiation that patients with spina bifida and hydrocephalus are exposed to during childhood from diagnostic imaging. Thirty patients, ages 18 years or older, with spina bifida and hydrocephalus were randomly selected from a spina bifida clinic and their radiology records were reviewed. Descriptive analyses were conducted. The total radiation exposure was then calculated for the study group, and the mean effective dose per patient was determined. In the study group, during their first 18 years, each patient had a mean of 55.1 studies and a median of 45 radiologic studies, a mean of 9.6 brain CT scans, and a mean cumulative effective dose of 81.9 mSv (2.6 mSv/patient/year over 18 years) and a median cumulative effective dose of 77.2 mSV of accumulated radiation exposure (4.5 mSv/patient/year over 18 years). Clinicians should recognize that increased radiation exposure puts patients with spina bifida and hydrocephalus at higher risk for cancer. The population of children and adults with spina bifida and hydrocephalus should be surveyed for incidence of cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Indonesia's experience with IAEA-CRP on radiation protection in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasukha

    2001-01-01

    IAEA-CRP on Radiation Doses in Diagnostic Radiology and Methods for Dose Reduction has as participants some Asian and East European countries. Indonesia is one of participants that followed the IAEA program. This paper is not a discussion of CRP-results since it will be published as a TECDOC soon. But the work on evaluation of examination frequencies, film reject rate analysis, patient dose measurements, image quality before and after Quality Control (QC) and QC itself, gave some experiences to investigators to be explored and presented. Experiences could be in the form of problems, how to solve problems and some suggestions, starting from no QC up to complicated QC to be faced in conventional radiography to CT-scan and fluoroscopy units. These valuable experiences of Indonesia are proven exercise of IAEA-CRP as a good start for next CRP or national projects in diagnostic radiology. (author)

  11. Development and Optimisation of the SPS and LHC beam diagnostics based on Synchrotron Radiation monitors

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081364; Roncarolo, Federico

    Measuring the beam transverse emittance is fundamental in every accelerator, in particular for colliders, where its precise determination is essential to maximize the luminosity and thus the performance of the colliding beams.
 Synchrotron Radiation (SR) is a versatile tool for non-destructive beam diagnostics, since its characteristics are closely related to those of the source beam. At CERN, being the only available diagnostics at high beam intensity and energy, SR monitors are exploited as the proton beam size monitor of the two higher energy machines, the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The thesis work documented in this report focused on the design, development, characterization and optimization of these beam size monitors. Such studies were based on a comprehensive set of theoretical calculations, numerical simulations and experiments. A powerful simulation tool has been developed combining conventional softwares for SR simulation and optics design, thus allowing t...

  12. Radiation protection in medical diagnostic radiology in the city of Sobral, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menezes, F.L.; Paschoal, C.M.M.; Ferreira, F.C.L.; Alcantara, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the suitability to radiation protection of four diagnostic radiology medical services in the city of Sobral-CE, Northeast of Brazil, and to analyze results of the literature for the cities of Rio Branco-AC, North of Brazil, and Rio de Janeiro-RJ, South-east of Brazil. In Sobral-CE, it was performed interviews and direct observations with reference to Brazilian law, the National Ordinance No.453/1998 of the Ministry of Health that regulates the operation of medical and odontological diagnostic radiology services. The results show the occurrence of many items in disagreement with the standard. The technical and operational infractions have basically due to unfamiliarity with the legislation, the lack of investment in training and/or professional development courses. (authors)

  13. Pulse shape and spectrum of coherent diffraction-limited transition radiation from electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Tilborg, J.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2003-12-20

    The electric field in the temporal and spectral domain of coherent diffraction-limited transition radiation is studied. An electron bunch, with arbitrary longitudinal momentum distribution, propagating at normal incidence to a sharp metal-vacuum boundary with finite transverse dimension is considered. A general expression for the spatiotemporal electric field of the transition radiation is derived, and closed-form solutions for several special cases are given. The influence of parameters such as radial boundary size, electron momentum distribution, and angle of observation on the waveform (e.g., radiation pulse length and amplitude) are discussed. For a Gaussian electron bunch, the coherent radiation waveform is shown to have a single-cycle profile. Application to a novel THz source based on a laser-driven accelerator is discussed.

  14. A DETERMINATION OF RADIATIVE TRANSITIONS WIDTHS OF EXCITED STATES IN C(12),

    Science.gov (United States)

    the -2 power to 3.14 F to the -2 power. A new method of analysis has been employed to obtain the radiative widths for the first three excited states...in C(12) from the measured inelastic cross sections. This method of analysis does not depend on a model for the transition charge distribution and is useful in determining the multipolarity of the transition. (Author)

  15. Diagnostic accuracy at several reduced radiation dose levels for CT imaging in the diagnosis of appendicitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Khatonabadi, Maryam; Kim, Hyun; Jude, Matilda; Zaragoza, Edward; Lee, Margaret; Patel, Maitraya; Poon, Cheryce; Douek, Michael; Andrews-Tang, Denise; Doepke, Laura; McNitt-Gray, Shawn; Cagnon, Chris; DeMarco, John; McNitt-Gray, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: While several studies have investigated the tradeoffs between radiation dose and image quality (noise) in CT imaging, the purpose of this study was to take this analysis a step further by investigating the tradeoffs between patient radiation dose (including organ dose) and diagnostic accuracy in diagnosis of appendicitis using CT. Methods: This study was IRB approved and utilized data from 20 patients who underwent clinical CT exams for indications of appendicitis. Medical record review established true diagnosis of appendicitis, with 10 positives and 10 negatives. A validated software tool used raw projection data from each scan to create simulated images at lower dose levels (70%, 50%, 30%, 20% of original). An observer study was performed with 6 radiologists reviewing each case at each dose level in random order over several sessions. Readers assessed image quality and provided confidence in their diagnosis of appendicitis, each on a 5 point scale. Liver doses at each case and each dose level were estimated using Monte Carlo simulation based methods. Results: Overall diagnostic accuracy varies across dose levels: 92%, 93%, 91%, 90% and 90% across the 100%, 70%, 50%, 30% and 20% dose levels respectively. And it is 93%, 95%, 88%, 90% and 90% across the 13.5-22mGy, 9.6-13.5mGy, 6.4-9.6mGy, 4-6.4mGy, and 2-4mGy liver dose ranges respectively. Only 4 out of 600 observations were rated "unacceptable" for image quality. Conclusion: The results from this pilot study indicate that the diagnostic accuracy does not change dramatically even at significantly reduced radiation dose.

  16. Electron beam diagnostics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garganne, P.

    1989-08-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a study on beam diagnostics, using carbon wire scanners and optical transition radiation (DTR) monitors. The main consideration consists in the material selection, taking their thermal properties and their effect on the beam into account [fr

  17. AUTOMATIC ACQUISITION OF CT RADIATION DOSE DATA: USING THE DIAGNOSTIC REFERENCE LEVEL FOR RADIATION DOSE OPTIMIZATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Yoshihiro; Okuda, Yasuo; Tsuge, Tatsuya; Suzuki, Jyunichi; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Konishi, Yasuhiko; Tsujimoto, Takeshi; Nishiki, Shigeo; Satoh, Toshimitsu; Aoyama, Nobukazu; Morimoto, Kyohei; Aita, Masamichi; Yamashita, Yusuke; Yoshitake, Takayasu; Mukai, Masami; Yokooka, Yuki; Yokohama, Noriya; Akahane, Keiichi

    2018-02-07

    The present work describes that we try to construct a system that collects dose information that performed CT examination from multiple facilities and unified management. The results of analysis are compared with other National diagnostic reference level (DRL), and the results are fed back to each facility and the cause of the abnormal value is investigated for dose optimization. Medical information collected 139 144 tests from 33 CT devices in 13 facilities. Although the DRL of this study is lower than that of Japan DRL, it was higher than the DRL of each country. When collecting all the examination, it is thought that the variation of the dose due to the error other than the intended imaging site is large. In future, we should continue to collect information in order to DRL renewal and we also think that it is desirable to collect information on physique and detailed scan region as well. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. A review of current radiation protection in radiological diagnostics in Montenegro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mijovic, Slavoljub; Kovacevic, Zarko; Vuceljic, Mira; Scepanovic, Mara; Picuric, Ivana; Mardjokic, Aleksandar

    2008-01-01

    After getting independence 2006 year and became 192nd member of UN, Montenegro state is conducting measures for radiation protection autonomously. Because of complexity of such issues, Montenegro faced a lot of problems: lack of a national legal system in this field, expertise, appropriate equipments etc. Some estimates have shown that the major exposures of populations in Montenegro to ionizing radiation are due to the medical care. The purpose of this work is to analyze current protection in radiological diagnostics in Montenegro and compare it with international standards. It could be clearly stated where they are in agreement or disagreement. The method of analyzing is a holistic one, starting from the law, regulations and decisions through the protocols of quality controls and finishing with the reports and database of important parameters and data. The main findings are stated as follows: although the current radiation protection in radiological diagnostics is conducting according the law of former Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (FRY) and its regulations and decisions, the overall legal system is still satisfactory; Identification and location of radiation sources through a system of notification and maintaining a national inventory is not satisfactory; There are a lack of expertise and equipments for the technical services, although the procedures and protocols of the quality control are at a satisfactory level; There is a lack of knowledge of professional staff working in this field. The practice is sometimes operated carelessly; The patients protection is satisfactory but there is not care to decrease a level of exposure according the ALARA principle. (author)

  19. Nonlinear narrow Doppler-free resonances for optical transitions and annihilation radiation of a positronium atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letokhov, V.S.; Minogin, V.G.

    1976-01-01

    The possibilities of obtaining narrow resonances without the Doppler broadening for transition between the fine structure levels of the ground and first excited states of a positronium atom are considered. An analysis is carried out of the conditions required for observation of the narrow resonances of saturation of single quantum absorption in the 1S-2P transitions and observation of narrow two-photon absorption resonances in the 1S-2S transitions. It is shown that narrow 2γ annihilation radiation lines of a positronium atom may be obtained with a width much smaller than the Doppler one

  20. Exposure to rays and radiation hazards in connection with diagnostic X-ray procedures in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protzer, K.

    1988-01-01

    In this study, figures and data about radiation exposures for diagnostic purposes are surveyed that were collected in connection with X-ray procedures in children. The data were sorted according to body regions and techniques required for their examination so as to permit separate analyses of procedures in the urogenital tract (intravenous urogramme, micturition cystourethrography), thorax (angiocardiogramme, thoractic aortogramme, examinations using cardiac catheters), gastrointestinal system (fluoroscopy and contrast-enhanced irrigoscopy), pelvis (survey radiography), skull (computed tomography) as well as in miscellaneous group of further origins. The second part of the report discusses the uncertainties surrounding the assessment of radiation hazards and indicated radiation doses. A formula is represented for the calculation of life-time reductions that can be applied to any type of cancer and embraces a number of factors like life expectancy at age X, the patient's age at the time of radiotherapy, the five-year-survival rate for the condition under investigation and the diseased organ. At the end of the study, some methods are pointed out that may be helpful in limiting radiation exposure. (KST) [de

  1. Calibration methodology for instruments utilized in X radiation beams, diagnostic level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penha, M. da; Potiens, A.; Caldas, L.V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. E-mail: mppalbu@ipen.br

    2004-07-01

    Methodologies for the calibration of diagnostic radiology instruments were established at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN. The methods may be used in the calibration procedures of survey meters used in radiation protection measurements (scattered radiation), instruments used in direct beams (attenuated and non attenuated beams) and quality control instruments. The established qualities are recommended by the international standards IEC 1267 and ISO 4037-3. Two ionization chambers were used as reference systems, one with a volume of 30 cm{sup 3} for radiation protection measurements, and the other with a volume of 1 cm{sup 3} for direct beam measurements. Both are traceable to the German Primary Laboratory of Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). In the case of calibration of quality control instruments, a non-invasive method using the measurement of the spectrum endpoint was established with a portable gamma and X-ray Intertechnique spectrometer system. The methods were applied to survey meters (radiation protection measurements), ionization chambers (direct beam measurements) and k Vp meters (invasive and non-invasive instruments). (Author)

  2. MO-C-BRB-01: Introduction [Diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boone, J. [University of California Davis School of Medicine (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology are arguably two of the most technologically advanced specialties in medicine. The imaging and radiation medicine technologies in clinical use today have been continuously improved through new advances made in the commercial and academic research arenas. This symposium explores the translational path from research through clinical implementation. Dr. Pettigrew will start this discussion by sharing his perspectives as director of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB). The NIBIB has focused on promoting research that is technological in nature and has high clinical impact. We are in the age of precision medicine, and the technological innovations and quantitative tools developed by engineers and physicists working with physicians are providing innovative tools that increase precision and improve outcomes in health care. NIBIB funded grants lead to a very high patenting rate (per grant dollar), and these patents have higher citation rates by other patents, suggesting greater clinical impact, as well. Two examples of clinical translation resulting from NIH-funded research will be presented, in radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging. Dr. Yu will describe a stereotactic radiotherapy device developed in his laboratory that is designed for treating breast cancer with the patient in the prone position. It uses 36 rotating Cobalt-60 sources positioned in an annular geometry to focus the radiation beam at the system’s isocenter. The radiation dose is delivered throughout the target volume in the breast by constantly moving the patient in a planned trajectory relative to the fixed isocenter. With this technique, the focal spot dynamically paints the dose distribution throughout the target volume in three dimensions. Dr. Jackson will conclude this symposium by describing the RSNA Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA), which is funded in part by NIBIB and is a synergistic collaboration

  3. MO-C-BRB-02: ASTRO President [Diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minsky, B. [ASTRO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology are arguably two of the most technologically advanced specialties in medicine. The imaging and radiation medicine technologies in clinical use today have been continuously improved through new advances made in the commercial and academic research arenas. This symposium explores the translational path from research through clinical implementation. Dr. Pettigrew will start this discussion by sharing his perspectives as director of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB). The NIBIB has focused on promoting research that is technological in nature and has high clinical impact. We are in the age of precision medicine, and the technological innovations and quantitative tools developed by engineers and physicists working with physicians are providing innovative tools that increase precision and improve outcomes in health care. NIBIB funded grants lead to a very high patenting rate (per grant dollar), and these patents have higher citation rates by other patents, suggesting greater clinical impact, as well. Two examples of clinical translation resulting from NIH-funded research will be presented, in radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging. Dr. Yu will describe a stereotactic radiotherapy device developed in his laboratory that is designed for treating breast cancer with the patient in the prone position. It uses 36 rotating Cobalt-60 sources positioned in an annular geometry to focus the radiation beam at the system’s isocenter. The radiation dose is delivered throughout the target volume in the breast by constantly moving the patient in a planned trajectory relative to the fixed isocenter. With this technique, the focal spot dynamically paints the dose distribution throughout the target volume in three dimensions. Dr. Jackson will conclude this symposium by describing the RSNA Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA), which is funded in part by NIBIB and is a synergistic collaboration

  4. MO-C-BRB-03: RSNA President [Diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenson, R. [RSNA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology are arguably two of the most technologically advanced specialties in medicine. The imaging and radiation medicine technologies in clinical use today have been continuously improved through new advances made in the commercial and academic research arenas. This symposium explores the translational path from research through clinical implementation. Dr. Pettigrew will start this discussion by sharing his perspectives as director of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB). The NIBIB has focused on promoting research that is technological in nature and has high clinical impact. We are in the age of precision medicine, and the technological innovations and quantitative tools developed by engineers and physicists working with physicians are providing innovative tools that increase precision and improve outcomes in health care. NIBIB funded grants lead to a very high patenting rate (per grant dollar), and these patents have higher citation rates by other patents, suggesting greater clinical impact, as well. Two examples of clinical translation resulting from NIH-funded research will be presented, in radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging. Dr. Yu will describe a stereotactic radiotherapy device developed in his laboratory that is designed for treating breast cancer with the patient in the prone position. It uses 36 rotating Cobalt-60 sources positioned in an annular geometry to focus the radiation beam at the system’s isocenter. The radiation dose is delivered throughout the target volume in the breast by constantly moving the patient in a planned trajectory relative to the fixed isocenter. With this technique, the focal spot dynamically paints the dose distribution throughout the target volume in three dimensions. Dr. Jackson will conclude this symposium by describing the RSNA Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA), which is funded in part by NIBIB and is a synergistic collaboration

  5. Prenatal Radiation exposures at diagnostic procedures: methods to identify exposed pregnant patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, H.; Sandborg, M.; Nilsson, J.; Olsson, S.; Hellman, S. [Dept of Radiation Physics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping University, Linkoeping(Sweden); Helmrot, E. [Radiology Dept, County Hospital Ryhov, Joenkoeping (Sweden); Persliden, J. [Dept of Medical Physics, Oerebro Univ Hospital, Oerebro (Sweden); Cederlund, T. [Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-06-01

    Knowledge about frequency and doses to embryo/foetus from diagnostic radiology is of great importance both in the sense of estimating the radiation risks but also for optimizing the diagnostic procedures and making decisions regarding alternative procedures. In addition, the pregnant patient has a right to know the magnitude and type of radiation risks expected as a result of foetus exposure. From a risk perspective epidemiological data has shown that the embryo/foetus together with children experience higher radiation sensitivity in terms of induced leukemia and cancer compared to an adult population. Recent estimates give cancer excess lifetime mortality risks for whole body exposures of children and foetus (0-15 y age) of 0.06% up to 0.14% per 10 mSv. In addition to the risk of cancer induction effects of cell killing, e.g. CNS abnormalities, cataracts, malformations, growth retardation, may occur. However, these effects are believed to have a threshold, about 100-200 mGy, and such foetus doses are rarely reached in diagnostic radiology procedures. There are 2 principal situations where foetus exposures may occur in diagnostic radiology; The pregnancy of the patient is known at the time of examination, but due to the medical indications the examination can not be postponed or put forward in time, and there are no suitable alternative non-radiological procedures. The pregnancy of the patient is not known at the time of examination, either due to the fact that the patient is unaware of her pregnancy or the medical personnel failed to obtain this information. The former situation may occur during the first few weeks from conception, whereas the latter situation may cover a greater gestation period. The frequency of foetus exposure is not well documented. In Sweden, there are well-established routines to track down pregnant patients before examinations are being performed. However, there are no general obligations or routines to document the cases either (i) when

  6. Radiation dose differences between thoracic radiotherapy planning CT and thoracic diagnostic CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanderud, A.; England, A.; Hogg, P.; Fosså, K.; Svensson, S.F.; Johansen, S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the absorbed dose from computed tomography (CT) in radiotherapy planning (RP-CT) against those from diagnostic CT (DG-CT) examinations and to explore the possible reasons for any dose differences. Method: Two groups of patients underwent CT-scans of the thorax with either DG-CT (n = 55) or RP-CT (n = 55). Patients from each group had similar weight and body mass index (BMI) and were divided into low (<25) and high BMI (>25). Parameters including CTDIvol, DLP and scan-length were compared. Results: The mean CTDIvol and DLP values from RP-CT (38.1 mGy, 1472 mGy cm) are approximately four times higher than for DG-CT (9.63 mGy, 376.5 mGy cm). For low BMI group, the CTDIvol in the RP-CT scans (36.4 mGy) is 6.3 times higher than the one in the DG-CT scans (5.8 mGy). For the high BMI group, the CTDIvol in the RP-CT (39.6 mGy) is 2.5 times higher than the one in the DG-CT scans (15.8 mGy). In the DG-CT scans a strong negative linear correlation between noise index (NI) and mean CTDIvol was observed (r = −0.954, p = 0.004); the higher NI, the lower CTDIvol. This was not the case in the RP-CT scans. Conclusion: The absorbed radiation dose is significantly higher and less BMI dependent for RP-CT scans compared to DG-CT. Image quality requirements of the examinations should be researched to ensure that radiation doses are not unnecessarily high. - Highlights: • The radiation dose differences in diagnostic vs. radiotherapy planning thorax CT. • The average effective dose given to radiotherapy planning patients are 30.0 mSv. • The average effective dose given to diagnostic patients are 7.7 mSv. • The CTDIvol is less BMI dependent for radiotherapy planning thorax CT scans compared to diagnostic scans.

  7. Performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker in Run 1 of the LHC: tracker properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Chudoba, Jiří; Hejbal, Jiří; Hladík, Ondřej; Jakoubek, Tomáš; Kepka, Oldřich; Kupčo, Alexander; Kůs, Vlastimil; Lokajíček, Miloš; Lysák, Roman; Marčišovský, Michal; Mikeštíková, Marcela; Němeček, Stanislav; Penc, Ondřej; Šícho, Petr; Staroba, Pavel; Svatoš, Michal; Taševský, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, May (2017), s. 1-42, č. článku P05002. ISSN 1748-0221 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : particle tracking detectors (Gaseous detectors) * transition radiation detectors Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics OBOR OECD: Particles and field physics Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016

  8. Detecting part of the transition radiation detector for the GINES installation at UNK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikhliarov, K.K.; Gavalian, V.G.; Aginian, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    The detecting part of an X-ray transition radiation detector based on thin-walled mylar straws is considered in this paper. The performance of xenon-filled straws in the self-quenching mode is studied in detail. The measurements have been carried out both with radioactive sources and under the electron beam of the Yerevan synchrotron. (orig.)

  9. Synchrotron radiation linear dichroism (SRLD) investigation of the electronic transitions of quinizarin, chrysazin, and anthrarufin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Duy Duc; Jones, Nykola Clare; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning

    2010-01-01

    The electronic transitions of the three α,α'-dihydroxy derivatives of anthraquinone, 1,4‑dihydroxy‑, 1,8-dihydroxy-, and 1,5-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (quinizarin, chrysazin, and anthrarufin), were investigated by synchrotron radiation linear dichroism (SRLD) spectroscopy on samples aligned...

  10. Additional radiation dose to population due to X-ray diagnostic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chougule, A.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Discovery of X rays has revolutionised the medical diagnosis but the fact that the diagnostic radiological procedures contribute about 80 to 90 % of the radiation dose to population as compared to other man made radiation sources cannot be ignored especially when X ray diagnostic facilities are being made available to larger section of the society. The estimated frequency of radiological procedures in India is 12,000 procedures/ year/100,000 population, though it is quite less as compared to developed countries, its increasing day by day. As part of the project, a radiation protection survey of X ray installations and patient radiation dose measurement during various radiological procedures was undertaken. 193 X ray installations were surveyed and the radiation doses received by the patient during various radiological procedure was measured. For measurement of radiation doses, CaSO 4 : Dy thermoluminescence (T.L.) discs of size 13.3 mm diameter and 0.8 mm thickness were used. Pre annealed T.L. discs were fixed by adhesive tape on the patient skin at the center of entrance beam before the exposure. After exposure the T.L. discs were estimated f or entrance skin dose during that particular projection/ examination. 10,000 measurements at different centers during various radiological procedures were done. It was found that chest radiography accounts for 37 % of all radiological procedures and further it was observed that 70 % of the chest X rays were normal with out any pathology indicating scope for curtailing the unwarranted radiological procedures. The special investigations like barium swallow, barium meal and fallow through accounts for about 1.5 % of the total radiological procedures. The entrance skin dose [E.S.D.] during chest radiography was 0.3 + 0.1 mGy where as during K.U.B. and cervical spine radiography it was 6.2 + 1.1 mGy and 5.1 + 0.9 mGy respectively. The details of frequency of various radiological procedures and the

  11. Radiation safety and quality control assurance in X-ray diagnostics 1998; Saeteilyturvallisuus ja laadunvarmistus roentgendiagnostiikassa 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servomaa, A. [ed.

    1998-03-01

    The report is based on a seminar course of lectures `Radiation safety and quality assurance in X-ray diagnostics 1998` organized by the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) in Finland. The lectures included actual information on X-ray examinations: methods of quality assurance, methods of measuring and calculating patient doses, examination frequencies, patient doses, occupational doses, and radiation risks. Paediatric X-ray examinations and interventional procedures were the most specific topics. The new Council Directive 97/43/Euratom on medical exposure, and the European Guidelines on quality criteria for diagnostic radiographic images, were discussed in several lectures. Lectures on general radiation threats and preparedness, examples of radiation accidents, and emergency preparedness in hospitals were also included. (editor)

  12. Radiation-Induced Fluidity and Glass-Liquid Transition in Irradiated Amorphous Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojovan, M.I.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the fluidity behaviour of continuously irradiated glasses using the Congruent Bond Lattice model in which broken bonds 'configurons' facilitate the flow. Irradiation breaks the bonds creating configurons which at high concentrations provide the transition of material from the glassy to liquid state. An explicit equation of viscosity has been derived which gives results in agreement with experimental data. This equation provides correct viscosity data for non-irradiated materials and shows a significant increase of fluidity in radiation fields. It demonstrates a decrease of activation energy of flow for irradiated glasses. A simple equation for glass-transition temperature was also obtained which shows that irradiated glasses have lower glass transition temperatures and are readily transformed from glassy to liquid state e.g. fluidized in strong radiation fields. (authors)

  13. Determining and managing fetal radiation dose from diagnostic radiology procedures in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozbayrak, Mustafa; Cavdar, Iffet; Seven, Mehmet; Uslu, Lebriz; Yeyin, Nami; Tanyildizi, Handan; Abuqbeitah, Mohammad; Acikgoz, A. Serdar; Tuten, Abdullah; Demir, Mustafa [Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkmenistan)

    2015-12-15

    We intended to calculate approximate fetal doses in pregnant women who underwent diagnostic radiology procedures and to evaluate the safety of their pregnancies. We contacted hospitals in different cities in Turkey where requests for fetal dose calculation are usually sent. Fetal radiation exposure was calculated for 304 cases in 218 pregnant women with gestational ages ranging from 5 days to 19 weeks, 2 days. FetDose software (ver. 4.0) was used in fetal dose calculations for radiographic and computed tomography (CT) procedures. The body was divided into three zones according to distance from the fetus. The first zone consisted of the head area, the lower extremities below the knee, and the upper extremities; the second consisted of the cervicothoracic region and upper thighs; and the third consisted of the abdominopelvic area. Fetal doses from radiologic procedures between zones were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test and a Bonferroni-corrected Mann-Whitney U-test. The average fetal doses from radiography and CT in the first zone were 0.05 ± 0.01 mGy and 0.81 ± 0.04 mGy, respectively; 0.21 ± 0.05 mGy and 1.77 ± 0.22 mGy, respectively, in the second zone; and 6.42 ± 0.82 mGy and 22.94 ± 1.28 mGy, respectively, in the third zone (p < 0.001). Our results showed that fetal radiation exposures in our group of pregnant women did not reach the level (50 mGy) that is known to increase risk for congenital anomalies. Fetal radiation exposure in the diagnostic radiology procedures in our study did not reach risk levels that might have indicated abortion.

  14. Ionizing radiation used in medical diagnostics as a source of radiation exposure of the patient with occupational diseases. Analysis and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostolova, D.B.; Paskalev, Z.D.

    2001-01-01

    X-rays in medical diagnostic are the major source of Bulgarian population exposure to ionizing radiations. Diagnostic X-ray is the most diagnostic application and is used in a wide variety of examinations. The modern concept for radiation protection of patients in diagnostic radiology is based on two main principles: justification of the examinations and radiation protection optimization. It is pointed out that the collective effective dose of radiation may be considerably reduced by decreasing the number of clinically unwarranted X-ray examination of storage and delivery of diagnostic information and adopting a system for physical and technical quality control of the X-ray equipment. The aim of this investigation is assessment of the collective effective doses for the patients with occupational diseases exposed to ionizing radiation by radiological diagnostics. The study covers the period of 1990 through 1999. A total of 3293 patients, treated in the Department of Occupational Toxicology, Clinic of Occupational Diseases, Medical University - Sofia, were examined with X-ray and KT (cervical and lumbar spine, chest, skull, stomach, extremities, pelvis, brain). Most of the observed patients were with predominantlyheavy metals poisonings and a few with other chemical agents poisonings. Number of patients with radiological examinations was 1938, number of examination per capita was 0,59 and the total number of radiological examinations was 2536. The average number of radiological examination for one patient was 1,36, the most number of radiological examinations for one patient was 4. The collective effective dose for an examined patient was 1803 man.mSv. Our results shown the essential of the raising ensure that the medical exposure of patients be the minimum necessary to achieve the required diagnostic objective. (author)

  15. A study of radiological protection for women of reproductive age in diagnostic radiology. Questionnaire for medical radiation technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsubone, Chie; Ban, Nobuhiko; Kai, Michiaki

    2005-01-01

    There has been great concern regarding the radiation protection for women of reproductive age when exposed to diagnostic radiation. The 10-day-rule proposed by the ICRP has not been recommended since 1983 because the risk to embryo and fetus within four weeks after menstruation may be small. However, some expects see that incomplete abandon of the 10-day-rule might cause confusion among the medical doctors and patients, and consequently unwarranted abortion happens. This paper surveyed the views of radiation technologies in hospitals and discussed how radiation exposure of women of reproductive age in medicine should be controlled. We found that the views to be 10-day-rule were spilt 50:50 and that radiation technologists do not necessarily think the 10-day-rule should be abandoned. Even the radiation technologists who are supposed to be able to explain to the patients the health risk following diagnostic exposure do not fully understand the risk involved. In conclusion, although a low-dose risk of diagnostic exposure should be sufficiently educated in order to obtain an exact understanding, the 10-day-rule may be useful in order to actually avoid any trouble in diagnostic radiology. (author)

  16. Optimization of radiation protection in diagnostic and interventional radiology: Which is the future?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapaki, V.

    2012-01-01

    As quoted in the latest UNSCEAR 2008 report: 'it appears that the world is entering another period of major technological changes, where the impact of these changes on the population dose worldwide in the future will be difficult to predict'. It is more than true that in this fast changing world and immense technological advances, especially in the medical sector, scientists run a marathon to be able to follow the new techniques that are continuously introduced for the benefit of the patient. Almost half of the radiation to the population in diagnostic radiology arises due to CT and interventional techniques. More and more medical specialties as well as other professions (nurses, technicians, managers, etc.) are currently being introduced into the term 'radiation safety culture' and 'optimization'. Some of these stakeholders were not aware of these expressions and were never trained or educated on these subjects. Each of these specialties should therefore be approached in a different way, indicating and underlining the specific roles of the experts, in order to persuade them to include radiation safety in their every day clinical routine. Below, some of these issues are identified and possible ways to move forward in the future are suggested. (author)

  17. Radiation Exposure from Diagnostic Imaging in a Cohort of Pediatric Transplant Recipients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Seal

    Full Text Available Recipients of solid organ transplants (SOT have extensive diagnostic imaging (DI. The purpose of this study was to quantify this exposure. Children from northern Alberta with SOTs at Stollery Children's Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta January 1, 2006, to July 31, 2012, were included. Effective doses of radiation were estimated using published norms for DI performed post-transplant up to October 16, 2014. The 54 eligible children had 6215 DI studies (5628 plain films, 293 computerized tomography (CT scans, 149 positron emission topography (PET -CT scans, 47 nuclear medicine scans and 98 cardiac catheterizations. Children less than 5 years of age underwent more DI studies than did older children (median (IQR 140 (66-210 vs 49 (19-105, p = 0.010. Children with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (N = 8 had more CT scans (median (IQR 13 (5.5-36 vs 1 (0-5, p100 mSv. In conclusion, a significant proportion of pediatric transplant recipients have sufficient radiation exposure post-transplant for DI to be at potential risk for radiation-induced malignancies.

  18. Irradiation tests of radiation resistance optical fibers for fusion diagnostic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuta, Tsunemi; Shikama, Tatsuo; Nishitani, Takeo; Yamamoto, Shin; Nagata, Shinji; Tsuchiya, Bun; Toh, Kentaro; Hori, Junichi

    2002-11-01

    To promote development of radiation-resistant core optical fibers, the ITER-EDA (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-Engineering Design Activity) recommended carrying out international round-robin irradiation tests of optical fibers to establish a reliable database for their applications in the ITER plasma diagnostics. Ten developed optical fibers were irradiation-tested in a Co-60 gamma cell, a Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). Also, some of them were irradiation tested in a fast neutron irradiation facility of FNS (Fast Neutron Source), especially to study temperature dependence of neutron-associated irradiation effects. Included were several Japanese fluorine doped fibers and one Japanese standard fiber (purified and undoped silica core), as well as seven Russian fibers. Some of Russian fibers were drawn by Japanese manufactures from Russian made pre-form rods to study effects of manufacturing processes to radiation resistant properties. The present paper will describe behaviors of growth of radiation-induced optical transmission loss in the wavelength range of 350-1750nm. Results indicate that role of displacement damages by fast neutrons are very important in introducing permanent optical transmission loss. Spectra of optical transmission loss in visible range will depend on irradiation temperatures and material parameters of optical fibers.

  19. Radiation doses to the unborn child at diagnostic examination in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmrot, E.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes methods to estimate fetal radiation doses from radiation diagnostic examinations, based on survey data from 3 hospitals in southern Sweden. The fetal dose has been calculated with available computer programs and verified by dose measurements inside a female human phantom for conventional X-ray and computed tomography (CT) examinations. Measured fetal doses have been correlated to the DAP (Dose Area Product) value or the CTDI (Computer Tomography Dose Index) and DLP (Dose Length Product) values and conversion factors have been evaluated. For nuclear medicine examinations tables for the calculations of fetal doses by administered activity are presented together with information of administered activity for normal and pregnant women in Sweden. For X-ray examinations where the uterus is outside the primary radiation fields the fetal dose is generally below 1-2 mSv. In order to calculate fetal doses documentation of fluoroscopy time and number of X-ray images, scanning parameters for the CT and administered activity for nuclear medicine examinations are necessary

  20. Radiation exposure and image quality in X-ray diagnostic radiology. Physical principles and clinical applications. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saebel, Manfred; Aichinger, Horst; Dierker, Joachim; Joite-Barfuss, Sigrid

    2012-01-01

    Diagnostic X-rays are the largest contributor to radiation exposure to the general population, and protecting the patient from radiation damage is a major aim of modern health policy. Once the decision has been taken to use ionising radiation for imaging in a particular patient, it is necessary to optimize the image acquisition process taking into account the diagnostic quality of the images and the radiation dose to the patient. Both image quality and radiation dose are affected by a number of parameters, knowledge of which permits scientifically based decision making. The authors of this second edition of Radiation Exposure and Image Quality in X-ray Diagnostic Radiology have spent many years studying the optimization of radiological imaging. In this book they present in detail the basic physical principles of diagnostic radiology and their application to clinical problems. Particular attention is devoted to evaluation of the dose to the patient, the influence of scattered radiation on image quality, the use of antiscatter grids, and optimization of image quality and dose. The final section is a supplement containing tables of data and graphical depictions of X-ray spectra, interaction coefficients, characteristics of X-ray beams, and other aspects relevant to patient dose calculations. In addition, a complementary CD-ROM contains a user-friendly Excel file database covering these aspects that can be used in the reader's own programs. Since the first edition, the text, figures, tables, and references have all been thoroughly updated, and more detailed attention is now paid to image quality and radiation exposure when using digital imaging and computed tomography. This book will be an invaluable aid to medical physicists when performing calculations relating to patient dose and image quality, and will also prove useful for diagnostic radiologists and engineers. (orig.)

  1. Unintentional exposure to radiation during pregnancy from nuclear medical diagnostic procedures; Unabsichtliche Strahlenexposition in der Schwangerschaft durch nuklearmedizinische Diagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moka, D. [Gemeinschaftspraxis fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Essen (Germany)

    2005-12-01

    The administration of radiopharmaceuticals during pregnancy is contraindicated due to a lack of vital indications. However, if prenatal exposure to radiation should occur in the framework of a nuclear medical diagnostic procedure then fortunately no longterm side-effects would normally be expected. Radiation damage in the preimplantation phase leads to early abortion. However, if the further course of pregnancy remains uncomplicated then no subsequent side-effects need be expected. On a conservative estimate, it would require doses exceeding 50 mGy to cause radiation damage within the uterus after the preimplantation phase. However, the standard radioactivities applied for diagnostic purposes in nuclear medicine, can be obtained with doses of less than 20 mGy. On the basis of current knowledge, therefore, there is no reason to terminate pregnancy on medical grounds after diagnostic exposure to radiopharmaceuticals. (orig.)

  2. Thyroid Radiation Dose to Patients from Diagnostic Radiology Procedures over Eight Decades: 1930-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lienard A; Miller, Donald L; Lee, Choonsik; Melo, Dunstana R; Villoing, Daphnée; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Thierry-Chef, Isabelle; Winters, Sarah J; Labrake, Michael; Myers, Charles F; Lim, Hyeyeun; Kitahara, Cari M; Linet, Martha S; Simon, Steven L

    2017-12-01

    This study summarizes and compares estimates of radiation absorbed dose to the thyroid gland for typical patients who underwent diagnostic radiology examinations in the years from 1930 to 2010. The authors estimated the thyroid dose for common examinations, including radiography, mammography, dental radiography, fluoroscopy, nuclear medicine, and computed tomography (CT). For the most part, a clear downward trend in thyroid dose over time for each procedure was observed. Historically, the highest thyroid doses came from the nuclear medicine thyroid scans in the 1960s (630 mGy), full-mouth series dental radiography (390 mGy) in the early years of the use of x rays in dentistry (1930s), and the barium swallow (esophagram) fluoroscopic exam also in the 1930s (140 mGy). Thyroid uptake nuclear medicine examinations and pancreatic scans also gave relatively high doses to the thyroid (64 mGy and 21 mGy, respectively, in the 1960s). In the 21st century, the highest thyroid doses still result from nuclear medicine thyroid scans (130 mGy), but high thyroid doses are also associated with chest/abdomen/pelvis CT scans (18 and 19 mGy for males and females, respectively). Thyroid doses from CT scans did not exhibit the same downward trend as observed for other examinations. The largest thyroid doses from conventional radiography came from cervical spine and skull examinations. Thyroid doses from mammography (which began in the 1960s) were generally a fraction of 1 mGy. The highest average doses to the thyroid from mammography were about 0.42 mGy, with modestly larger doses associated with imaging of breasts with large compressed thicknesses. Thyroid doses from dental radiographic procedures have decreased markedly throughout the decades, from an average of 390 mGy for a full-mouth series in the 1930s to an average of 0.31 mGy today. Upper GI series fluoroscopy examinations resulted in up to two orders of magnitude lower thyroid doses than the barium swallow. There are

  3. Low-dose radiation employed in diagnostic imaging causes genetic effects in cultured cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponzinibbio, Maria V.; Peral-Garcia, Pilar; Seoane, Analia (Inst. de Genetica Veterinaria, Univ. Nacional de La Plata CONICET, La Plata (Argentina)), e-mail: aseoane@fcv.unlp.edu.ar; Crudeli, Cintia (Agencia Nacional de Promocion Cientifica y Tecnologica, La Plata (Argentina))

    2010-11-15

    Background: Exposure to environmental, diagnostic, and occupational sources of radiation frequently involves low doses. Although these doses have no immediately noticeable impact on human health there is great interest in their long-term biological effects. Purpose: To assess immediate and time-delayed DNA damage in two cell lines exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation by using the comet assay and micronucleus test, and to compare these two techniques in the analysis of low-dose induced genotoxicity. Material and Methods: CHO and MRC-5 cells were exposed to 50 milliSievert (mSv) of ionizing radiation and assayed immediately after irradiation and at 16 or 12 passages post-irradiation, respectively. Comet assay and micronucleus test were employed. Results: The comet assay values observed in 50 mSv-treated cells were significantly higher than in the control group for both sample times and cell lines (P < 0.001). Micronuclei frequencies were higher in treated cells than in the control group (P < 0.01, CHO cells passage 16; P < 0.05, MRC-5 cells immediately after exposure; P < 0.01 MRC-5 cells passage 12). Correlation analysis between the two techniques was statistically significant (correlation coefficient 0.82, P < 0.05 and correlation coefficient 0.86, P < 0.05 for CHO and MRC-5 cells, respectively). Cells scored at passages 12 or 16 showed more damage than those scored immediately after exposure in both cell lines (no statistically significant differences). Conclusion: Cytomolecular and cytogenetic damage was observed in cells exposed to very low doses of X-rays and their progeny. A single low dose of ionizing radiation was sufficient to induce such response, indicating that mammalian cells are exquisitely sensitive to it. Comet and micronucleus assays are sensitive enough to assess this damage, although the former seems to be more efficient

  4. Monte Carlo radiation shielding and activation analyses for the Diagnostic Equatorial Port Plug in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serikov, A.; Fischer, U.; Leichtle, D.; Pitcher, C.S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Systematic neutronics analyses were conducted to assess the ITER Equatorial Port Plug radiation shielding performance. ► Shielding optimization was achieved by parametric analyses of several design variants using the MCNP5, FISPACT-2007, and R2Smesh codes. ► Dominant effect of radiation streaming along the port plug gaps was recognized. ► Combination of the gap labyrinths and streaming stoppers or rails reduces shutdown doses by 2 orders of magnitude. ► Using the proposed shielding, the shutdown dose in the ITER port interspace is less than the personnel access limit of 100 μSv/h. - Abstract: This paper addresses neutronics aspects of the design development of the Diagnostic Generic Equatorial Port Plug (EPP) in ITER. To secure the personnel access at the EPP back-end interspace, parametric neutronics analyses of the EPP radiation environment have been performed and practical shielding solutions have been found. Radiation transport was performed with the Monte Carlo MCNP5 code. Activation calculations were conducted with the FISPACT-2007 inventory code. The R2Smesh approach was applied to couple transport and activation calculations. Newly created EPP local MCNP5 model was devised by extracting the EPP and adjacent blanket modules from the ITER Alite-4.1 model with proper modification of the EPP geometry in accordance with recent 3D CAD CATIA model. The EPP local model reproduces the EPP neutronically important features and allows investigation of the EPP neutronics effects in isolation from all other ITER components. Thorough EPP parametric analyses revealed dominant effect of gaps around EPP and several EPP design improvements were implemented as the outcomes of the analyses. Gap labyrinths and streaming stoppers inserted into the gaps were shown are capable to reduce the shutdown dose rate which is below the 100 μSv/h limit of personnel access and by 2 orders of magnitude less than the value in the model with straight gaps.

  5. Low-dose radiation employed in diagnostic imaging causes genetic effects in cultured cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponzinibbio, Maria V.; Peral-Garcia, Pilar; Seoane, Analia; Crudeli, Cintia

    2010-01-01

    Background: Exposure to environmental, diagnostic, and occupational sources of radiation frequently involves low doses. Although these doses have no immediately noticeable impact on human health there is great interest in their long-term biological effects. Purpose: To assess immediate and time-delayed DNA damage in two cell lines exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation by using the comet assay and micronucleus test, and to compare these two techniques in the analysis of low-dose induced genotoxicity. Material and Methods: CHO and MRC-5 cells were exposed to 50 milliSievert (mSv) of ionizing radiation and assayed immediately after irradiation and at 16 or 12 passages post-irradiation, respectively. Comet assay and micronucleus test were employed. Results: The comet assay values observed in 50 mSv-treated cells were significantly higher than in the control group for both sample times and cell lines (P < 0.001). Micronuclei frequencies were higher in treated cells than in the control group (P < 0.01, CHO cells passage 16; P < 0.05, MRC-5 cells immediately after exposure; P < 0.01 MRC-5 cells passage 12). Correlation analysis between the two techniques was statistically significant (correlation coefficient 0.82, P < 0.05 and correlation coefficient 0.86, P < 0.05 for CHO and MRC-5 cells, respectively). Cells scored at passages 12 or 16 showed more damage than those scored immediately after exposure in both cell lines (no statistically significant differences). Conclusion: Cytomolecular and cytogenetic damage was observed in cells exposed to very low doses of X-rays and their progeny. A single low dose of ionizing radiation was sufficient to induce such response, indicating that mammalian cells are exquisitely sensitive to it. Comet and micronucleus assays are sensitive enough to assess this damage, although the former seems to be more efficient

  6. Triggering radiation alarm at security checks. Patients should be informed even after diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Barbara; Neumann, Irmgard; Havlik, Ernst; Palumbo, Renato; Sinzinger, Helmut

    2009-01-01

    During the last few years an increasing number of nuclear medicine patients in various countries evoked a radiation alarm after therapeutic or diagnostic procedures, and even after passive exposure. A prospective calculation of activity retention in the patient's body is difficult due to extremely high variation of uptake and kinetics. Furthermore, different sensitivities and distances of the detectors make a prospective calculation even more difficult. In this article a number of cases are being reported, related problems are discussed and the surprisingly very limited literature reviewed. In order to minimize problems after eventually triggering alarms, we strongly recommend that each patient receives a certificate providing personal data, tracer, dose, half-life of the radionuclide, type and date of procedure applied as well as the nuclear medicine unit to contact for further information. Furthermore, a closer cooperation and exchange of information between the authorities and local nuclear medicine societies, would be welcome.

  7. Theoretical Study of Radiation from a Broad Range of Impurity Ions for Magnetic Fusion Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, Alla [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    2014-03-14

    describing the ionization balance of plasmas, which in turn determines the lines contributing to the spectral emission and the radiative power loss. In particular, we have calculated relativistic atomic data and corresponding dielectronic satellite spectra of highly ionized W ions, such as, for example, Li-like W (with the shortest wavelength of x-ray radiation of about 0.2 Å) that might exist in ITER core plasmas at very high temperatures of 30-40 keV. In addition, we have completed relativistic calculations of low ionized W ions from Lu-like (W3+) to Er-like (W6+) and for Sm-like(W12+) and Pm-like (W13+) that cover a spectral range from few hundred to thousand Å and are more relevant to the edge plasma diagnostics in tokamak.

  8. Large enhancement of radiative strength for soft transitions in the quasicontinuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voinov, A; Algin, E; Agvaanluvsan, U; Belgya, T; Chankova, R; Guttormsen, M; Mitchell, G E; Rekstad, J; Schiller, A; Siem, S

    2004-10-01

    Radiative strength functions (RSFs) for the (56,57)Fe nuclei below the separation energy are obtained from the 57Fe(3He,alphagamma)56Fe and 57Fe(3He,3He'gamma)57Fe reactions, respectively. An enhancement of more than a factor of 10 over common theoretical models of the soft (E(gamma) less than or approximately equal 2 MeV) RSF for transitions in the quasicontinuum (several MeV above the yrast line) is observed. Two-step cascade intensities with soft primary transitions from the 56Fe(n,2gamma)57Fe reaction confirm the enhancement.

  9. Study of a transition radiation detector for the DO experiment at FNAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinstein, F.

    1988-06-01

    The DZero experiment will study proton-antiproton collisions at 1.8 TeV in the center of mass produced at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (USA). The main features of the detector are an excellent hermetical calorimeter and a very good identification of muons and electrons. The Transition Radiation Detector contributes to electron/jet discrimination. Transition radiation is emitted when a charge particle crosses the interface between two media of different refraction indices. A N foils radiator produces about N/137 soft X rays when the Lorentz factor gamma of the particle is greater than a threshold of the order of 1000. The radiated energy saturates when gamma goes to infinity. These properties allow to separate electrons from pions until 140 GeV. This study presents the results of a test on a 5 GeV electron and pion beam of a prototype of chamber and of three radiators made of lithium foils, polypropylene foils, and polyethylene fibers. The detector response to pions and electrons is compared to theoretical predictions. Different statistical methods of electron/pion separation are compared on the experimental data. A method has been performed using likelihood functions which obtains a pion rejection greater than 50 for an electron efficiency of 90%. The performances are compared to those of other TRDs [fr

  10. Radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging in young patients with testicular cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, C.J.; Twomey, M.; O' Regan, K.N. [Cork and Mercy University Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Cork (Ireland); Murphy, K.P.; Maher, M.M.; O' Connor, O.J. [Cork and Mercy University Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Cork (Ireland); University College Cork, Department of Radiology, Cork (Ireland); McLaughlin, P.D. [Cork and Mercy University Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Cork (Ireland); Vancouver General Hospital, Department of Emergency and Trauma Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Power, D.G. [Cork and Mercy University Hospitals, Department of Medical Oncology, Cork (Ireland)

    2015-04-01

    Risks associated with high cumulative effective dose (CED) from radiation are greater when imaging is performed on younger patients. Testicular cancer affects young patients and has a good prognosis. Regular imaging is standard for follow-up. This study quantifies CED from diagnostic imaging in these patients. Radiological imaging of patients aged 18-39 years, diagnosed with testicular cancer between 2001 and 2011 in two tertiary care centres was examined. Age at diagnosis, cancer type, dose-length product (DLP), imaging type, and frequency were recorded. CED was calculated from DLP using conversion factors. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS. In total, 120 patients with a mean age of 30.7 ± 5.2 years at diagnosis had 1,410 radiological investigations. Median (IQR) surveillance was 4.37 years (2.0-5.5). Median (IQR) CED was 125.1 mSv (81.3-177.5). Computed tomography accounted for 65.3 % of imaging studies and 98.3 % of CED. We found that 77.5 % (93/120) of patients received high CED (>75 mSv). Surveillance time was associated with high CED (OR 2.1, CI 1.5-2.8). Survivors of testicular cancer frequently receive high CED from diagnostic imaging, mainly CT. Dose management software for accurate real-time monitoring of CED and low-dose CT protocols with maintained image quality should be used by specialist centres for surveillance imaging. (orig.)

  11. Childhood leukaemia following medical diagnostic exposure to ionizing radiation in utero or after birth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakeford, R.

    2008-01-01

    A statistical association between childhood leukaemia and an abdominal X-ray examination of the pregnant mother was first reported in 1956 from a case-control study of childhood cancer mortality conducted in Great Britain. This study, later called the Oxford Survey of Childhood Cancers (OSCC), was continued and eventually showed a highly statistically significant ∼50% proportional increase in the risk of childhood leukaemia associated with antenatal diagnostic radiography. The association has been confirmed by many case-control studies carried out around the world, the appropriately combined results of which show a highly statistically significant increase in risk that is compatible with the OSCC finding. There is no doubt about the reality of the statistical association, but a causal interpretation has been questioned. On balance, however, the evidence points to low-level irradiation of the fetus increasing the risk of leukaemia in childhood, with an excess relative risk coefficient of around 50 Gy -1 (equivalent to an excess absolute risk coefficient of about 3% Gy -1 ), although the uncertainty associated with these coefficients is considerable and they are likely to be overestimates. In contrast to exposure in utero, the evidence from case-control studies for an association between childhood leukaemia and postnatal exposure to medical diagnostic irradiation is equivocal and sometimes conflicting. Since standard radiation risk models predict that low-level exposure in the early years of life should produce an increased risk of childhood leukaemia that is roughly similar to that arising from fetal exposure, this absence of persuasive evidence is likely to be due to various problems with the studies. This is unfortunate given the rise in relatively high dose diagnostic procedures (e.g. paediatric CT scans) that would be predicted to materially increase the relative risk of childhood leukaemia. (authors)

  12. Multilevel radiative thermal memory realized by the hysteretic metal-insulator transition of vanadium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Kota; Nishikawa, Kazutaka; Iizuka, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Thermal information processing is attracting much interest as an analog of electronic computing. We experimentally demonstrated a radiative thermal memory utilizing a phase change material. The hysteretic metal-insulator transition of vanadium dioxide (VO 2 ) allows us to obtain a multilevel memory. We developed a Preisach model to explain the hysteretic radiative heat transfer between a VO 2 film and a fused quartz substrate. The transient response of our memory predicted by the Preisach model agrees well with the measured response. Our multilevel thermal memory paves the way for thermal information processing as well as contactless thermal management

  13. Radiation-resistance assessment of IR fibres for ITER thermography diagnostic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brichard, B.; Ierschot, S. van; Ooms, H.; Berghmans, F.; Reichle, R.; Pocheau, C.; Decreton, M.

    2006-01-01

    The actively cooled target plates in the divertor of ITER will be subjected to high thermal fluxes (∼ 10 MW/m 2 ). These target plates are compound structures of an armour material at the surface - either carbon fibre reinforced carbon (CFC) or tungsten - and a water cooled CuCrZr structure inside or below. The thermal limit of the interface between the two materials must not exceed 550 o C. Therefore, the temperature must be carefully monitored to prevent structural damages of the divertor plates. Non contact measurements of the temperature offer the advantage to avoid weakening of the cooling plate structure which is already quite complex to manufacture. Infrared thermography of the target surface is therefore considered as a possible solution. Recently a diagnostic concept for spectrally resolved ITER divertor thermography using optical fibres has been proposed by CEA-Cadarache. However, the divertor region will have to face high-radiation flux and the radiation-resistance of InfraRed (IR)-fibres must be evaluated. In collaboration with CEA-Cadarache, an irradiation program has been started at SCK-CEN (Mol, Belgium) with the aim to measure the radiation-induced absorption of different IR fibre candidates operating in the 1-5 μm range. We selected various commercially available IR technologies: ZrF 4 , Hollow-Waveguide, Sapphire and Chalcogenide. For wavelengths below 2 μm we also tested low-OH silica fibres. We carried out a gamma irradiation at a maximum dose-rate of 0.42 Gy/s up to a total dose of about 5000 Gy. We showed that the optical transmission of ZrF 4 fibres strongly decreased under gamma radiation, primarily for wavelengths below 2 μm. In this type of fibre typical optical losses can reach 50 % at 5000 Gy around 3 μm. Nevertheless, the optical transmission can be significantly recovered by performing a thermal annealing treatment at a temperature of 100 o C. We also irradiated a Silver-coated hollow waveguide fibre at the same dose-rate but up

  14. The use of roentgen diagnostics in chiropractor activities. Project based survey according to new regulations regarding radiation protection and use of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raaum, Aud; Widmark, Anders

    2005-12-01

    An audit has been performed in 17 chiropractic enterprises according to new radiation protection legislation. Before the audits a survey of the use of diagnostic imaging in Norwegian chiropractic enterprises was carried out. This report summarizes the results of the survey and the findings at the audits. (Author)

  15. Evaluation method of reference levels of radiation diagnostic in computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, Walter; Borges, Jose C.; Mota, Helvecio C.

    2000-01-01

    The computerized tomography (CT) is a complex technique, with many parameters to be selected and protocols of quality control not standardized, connected with high doses in the patients. In this work a simple methodology is developed, to evaluate levels of reference of diagnosis in computerized tomography using the concept of Multiple Scan Average Dose (MSAD), recently adopted by the Ministry of Health of Brazil. This methodology, can be used in the routine of inspection of evaluation of radiological safety in medical radiation diagnostics, executed by the Department of Medical Physics of the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry and by the sanitary authorities in Brazil. In order to evaluate this dosimeter magnitude the distribution of dose it was studied the dose distribution obtained trough a profile of dose measured in the axial axis of a simulator(phantom) of water with thermoluminescent dosimeters, TLD-100, for three techniques of examination by CT. The magnitude MSAD was evaluated by means of two different methods. In first, it was evaluated for an only cut, and in the second for multiple cuts. This last method presents/displays to be more practical and adapted to be applied in the routine of evaluation of reference levels, with TLDs

  16. Survey of Compliance with Radiation Protection Standards in Diagnostic Imaging Centers of Khuzestan Province in 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    farshid mahmoudi

    2017-03-01

    rooms in 32 diagnostic imaging centers in Khuzestan Province, Iran, 2015. The centers were chosen through random cluster sampling method. The data were obtained using open-ended interview and a checklist designed based on the recommendations of the International Commission for Radiation Protection and Atomic Energy Organization of Iran. Results: The compliance rates with regard to radiology room, radiology equipment, darkroom, and radiographer’s protection were 80.76%, 80.47%, 69.28%, and 93.12%, respectively. Maximum and minimum rates of compliance with the standards were related to performance of the cassette tray (100% and hopper status (25%, respectively. Comparison of public and private imaging centers in terms of safety standards showed no significant differences (P>0.05.Conclusion: The observance of the radiation protection standards in Khuzestan Province was in a relativly desirable condition. However, there are some shortcomings in compliance with the principles of protection in the darkroom. In this regard, with recommend adopting protection measures such as timelyreplacement of processing solution, appropriate ventilation of darkroom, provisionof protection equipment and appliances, and protection training required for entering the darkroom.

  17. Radiation safety concerns and diagnostic reference levels for computed tomography scanners in Tamil Nadu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, Roshan S; Dinakaran, Paul M

    2011-01-01

    Radiation safety in computed tomography (CT) scanners is of concern due its widespread use in the field of radiological imaging. This study intends to evaluate radiation doses imparted to patients undergoing thorax, abdomen and pelvic CT examinations and formulate regional diagnostic reference levels (DRL) in Tamil Nadu, South India. In-site CT dose measurement was performed in 127 CT scanners in Tamil Nadu for a period of 2 years as a part of the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB)-funded project. Out of the 127 CT scanners,13 were conventional; 53 single-slice helical scanners (SSHS); 44 multislice CT (MSCT) scanners; and 17 refurbished scanners. CT dose index (CTDI) was measured using a 32-cm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-body phantom in each CT scanner. Dose length product (DLP) for different anatomical regions was generated using CTDI values. The regional DRLs for thorax, abdomen and pelvis examinations were 557, 521 and 294 mGy cm, respectively. The mean effective dose was estimated using the DLP values and was found to be 8.04, 6.69 and 4.79 mSv for thorax, abdomen and pelvic CT examinations, respectively. The establishment of DRLs in this study is the first step towards optimization of CT doses in the Indian context.

  18. Radiation safety concerns and diagnostic reference levels for computed tomography scanners in Tamil Nadu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livingstone Roshan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation safety in computed tomography (CT scanners is of concern due its widespread use in the field of radiological imaging. This study intends to evaluate radiation doses imparted to patients undergoing thorax, abdomen and pelvic CT examinations and formulate regional diagnostic reference levels (DRL in Tamil Nadu, South India. In-site CT dose measurement was performed in 127 CT scanners in Tamil Nadu for a period of 2 years as a part of the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB-funded project. Out of the 127 CT scanners,13 were conventional; 53 single-slice helical scanners (SSHS; 44 multislice CT (MSCT scanners; and 17 refurbished scanners. CT dose index (CTDI was measured using a 32-cm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA-body phantom in each CT scanner. Dose length product (DLP for different anatomical regions was generated using CTDI values. The regional DRLs for thorax, abdomen and pelvis examinations were 557, 521 and 294 mGy cm, respectively. The mean effective dose was estimated using the DLP values and was found to be 8.04, 6.69 and 4.79 mSv for thorax, abdomen and pelvic CT examinations, respectively. The establishment of DRLs in this study is the first step towards optimization of CT doses in the Indian context.

  19. Enhanced quantum cutting luminescence by Au nanorods through improving radiative transition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Biao; Lin, Lin; Feng, Zhuohong; Huang, Lili; Zhuang, Luoqing; Wang, Zhezhe; Zheng, Zhiqiang

    2017-11-01

    Quantum cutting (QC) phosphor β-NaYF4:Tb3+, Yb3+ nanoparticles (NPs) are decorated with Au nanorods (NRs). By tailoring Au NRs longitudinal plasmon resonance to match the emission wavelength of Yb3+ ion, plasmon-enhanced near-infrared (NIR) QC luminescence is achieved through improving Yb3+ ion's radiative transition rate. The decay curves of Yb3+ ion in β-NaYF4:Tb3+, Yb3+ NPs decorated with Au NRs further confirm the improvement of radiative transition rate. The influence of Au NRs concentration on QC luminescence is also investigated, and the results show that the optimal concentration of Au NRs is 0.12% with the maximum enhancement factor about 3. Our study may not only path the way to achieve simultaneous excitation and emission enhancement of QC luminescence, but also provide a potential application as QC layer to silicon-based solar cells.

  20. Commissioning and Performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker with high energy collisions at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three sub-systems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It consists of close to 300,000 thin-wall drift-tubes (straws) providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points for charged particle tracks. The straws have 0.13 mm resolution and measure tracks with $ ert eta ert < 2 $ and $ pT> 0.5 GeV$. Along with continuous tracking, it provides particle identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons generated by high Lorenz gamma particles in the many polymer fibers or films that fill the spaces between the straws. In this talk, a review of the commissioning and first operational experience of the TRT detector will be presented. Emphasis will be given to performance studies based on the reconstruction and analysis of LHC proton-proton collisions.

  1. Recombination of charge carriers on radiation-induced defects in silicon doped by transition metals impurities

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakevich, L A

    2003-01-01

    It has been studied the peculiarities of recombination of nonequilibrium charge carriers on radiation-induced defects in received according to Czochralski method p-silicon (p approx 3 - 20 Ohm centre dot cm), doped by one of the impurities of transition metals of the IV-th group of periodic table (titanium, zirconium, hafnium). Experimental results are obtained out of the analysis of temperature and injection dependence of the life time of charge carriers. The results are explained taking into consideration the influences of elastic stress fields created by the aggregates of transition metals atoms on space distribution over the crystal of oxygen and carbon background impurities as well as on the migration of movable radiation-induced defects during irradiation. (authors).

  2. Radiative d–d transitions at tungsten centers in II–VI semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushakov, V. V., E-mail: ushakov@lebedev.ru; Krivobok, V. S.; Pruchkina, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    The luminescence spectra of W impurity centers in II–VI semiconductors, specifically, ZnSe, CdS, and CdSe, are studied. It is found that, if the electron system of 5d (W) centers is considered instead of the electron system of 3d (Cr) centers, the spectral characteristics of the impurity radiation are substantially changed. The electron transitions are identified in accordance with Tanabe–Sugano diagrams of crystal field theory. With consideration for the specific features of the spectra, it is established that, in the crystals under study, radiative transitions at 5d W centers occur between levels with different spins in the region of a weak crystal field.

  3. Particle identification using the time-over-threshold method in the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akesson, T.; Arik, E.; Assamagan, K.; Baker, K.; Barberio, E.; Barberis, D.; Bertelsen, H.; Bytchkov, V.; Callahan, J.; Catinaccio, A.; Danielsson, H.; Dittus, F.; Dolgoshein, B.; Dressnandt, N.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Eerola, P.; Farthouat, P.; Froidevaux, D.; Grichkevitch, Y.; Hajduk, Z.; Hansen, J. R.; Keener, P. T.; Kekelidze, G.; Konovalov, S.; Kowalski, T.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Krivchitch, A.; Laritchev, A.; Lichard, P.; Lucotte, A.; Lundberg, B.; Luehring, F.; Mailov, A.; Manara, A.; McFarlane, K.; Mitsou, V. A.; Morozov, S.; Muraviev, S.; Nadtochy, A.; Newcomer, F. M.; Olszowska, J.; Ogren, H.; Oh, S. H.; Peshekhonov, V.; Rembser, C.; Romaniouk, A.; Rousseau, D.; Rust, D. R.; Schegelsky, V.; Sapinski, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Smirnov, S.; Smirnova, L. N.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Soutchkov, S.; Spiridenkov, E.; Tikhomirov, V.; Van Berg, R.; Vassilakopoulos, V.; Wang, C.; Williams, H. H.

    2001-12-01

    Test-beam studies of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) straw tube performance in terms of electron-pion separation using a time-over-threshold method are described. The test-beam data are compared with Monte Carlo simulations of charged particles passing through the straw tubes of the TRT. For energies below 10 GeV, the time-over-threshold method combined with the standard transition-radiation cluster-counting technique significantly improves the electron-pion separation in the TRT. The use of the time-over-threshold information also provides some kaon-pion separation, thereby significantly enhancing the B-physics capabilities of the ATLAS detector.

  4. The estimation of radiation effective dose from diagnostic medical procedures in general population of northern Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabestani Monfared, A.; Abdi, R.

    2006-01-01

    The risks of low-dose Ionizing radiation from radiology and nuclear medicine are not clearly determined. Effective dose to population is a very important factor in risk estimation. The study aimed to determine the effective dose from diagnostic radiation medicine in a northern province of Iran. Materials and Methods: Data about various radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures were collected from all radiology and nuclear medicine departments In Mazandaran Province (population = 2,898,031); and using the standard dosimetry tables, the total dose, dose per examination, and annual effective dose per capita as well as the annual gonadal dose per capita were estimated. Results: 655,730 radiologic examinations in a year's period, lead to 1.45 mSv, 0.33 mSv and 0.31 mGy as average effective dose per examination, annual average effective dose to member of the public, and annual average gonadal dose per capita, respectively. The frequency of medical radiologic examinations was 2,262 examinations annually per 10,000 members of population. However, the total number of nuclear medicine examinations in the same period was 7074, with 4.37 mSv, 9.6 μSv and 9.8 μGy, as average effective dose per examination, annual average effective dose to member of the public and annual average gonadal dose per caput, respectively. The frequency of nuclear medicine examination was 24 examinations annually per 10,000 members of population. Conclusion: The average effective dose per examination was nearly similar to other studies. However, the average annual effective dose and annual average gonadal dose per capita were less than the similar values in other reports, which could be due to lesser number of radiation medicine examinations in the present study

  5. CT imaging of congenital lung lesions: effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance and radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggerty, Jay E.; Smith, Ethan A.; Dillman, Jonathan R. [University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kunisaki, Shaun M. [University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Surgery, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Different iterative reconstruction techniques are available for use in pediatric computed tomography (CT), but these techniques have not been systematically evaluated in infants. To determine the effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance, image quality and radiation dose in infants undergoing CT evaluation for congenital lung lesions. A retrospective review of contrast-enhanced chest CT in infants (<1 year) with congenital lung lesions was performed. CT examinations were reviewed to document the type of lung lesion, vascular anatomy, image noise measurements and image reconstruction method. CTDI{sub vol} was used to calculate size-specific dose estimates (SSDE). CT findings were correlated with intraoperative and histopathological findings. Analysis of variance and the Student's t-test were used to compare image noise measurements and radiation dose estimates between groups. Fifteen CT examinations used filtered back projection (FBP; mean age: 84 days), 15 used adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR; mean age: 93 days), and 11 used model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR; mean age: 98 days). Compared to operative findings, 13/15 (87%), 14/15 (93%) and 11/11 (100%) lesions were correctly characterized using FBP, ASiR and MBIR, respectively. Arterial anatomy was correctly identified in 12/15 (80%) using FBP, 13/15 (87%) using ASiR and 11/11 (100%) using MBIR. Image noise was less for MBIR vs. ASiR (P < 0.0001). Mean SSDE was different among groups (P = 0.003; FBP = 7.35 mGy, ASiR = 1.89 mGy, MBIR = 1.49 mGy). Congenital lung lesions can be adequately characterized in infants using iterative CT reconstruction techniques while maintaining image quality and lowering radiation dose. (orig.)

  6. CT imaging of congenital lung lesions: effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggerty, Jay E.; Smith, Ethan A.; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Kunisaki, Shaun M.

    2015-01-01

    Different iterative reconstruction techniques are available for use in pediatric computed tomography (CT), but these techniques have not been systematically evaluated in infants. To determine the effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance, image quality and radiation dose in infants undergoing CT evaluation for congenital lung lesions. A retrospective review of contrast-enhanced chest CT in infants (<1 year) with congenital lung lesions was performed. CT examinations were reviewed to document the type of lung lesion, vascular anatomy, image noise measurements and image reconstruction method. CTDI vol was used to calculate size-specific dose estimates (SSDE). CT findings were correlated with intraoperative and histopathological findings. Analysis of variance and the Student's t-test were used to compare image noise measurements and radiation dose estimates between groups. Fifteen CT examinations used filtered back projection (FBP; mean age: 84 days), 15 used adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR; mean age: 93 days), and 11 used model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR; mean age: 98 days). Compared to operative findings, 13/15 (87%), 14/15 (93%) and 11/11 (100%) lesions were correctly characterized using FBP, ASiR and MBIR, respectively. Arterial anatomy was correctly identified in 12/15 (80%) using FBP, 13/15 (87%) using ASiR and 11/11 (100%) using MBIR. Image noise was less for MBIR vs. ASiR (P < 0.0001). Mean SSDE was different among groups (P = 0.003; FBP = 7.35 mGy, ASiR = 1.89 mGy, MBIR = 1.49 mGy). Congenital lung lesions can be adequately characterized in infants using iterative CT reconstruction techniques while maintaining image quality and lowering radiation dose. (orig.)

  7. Combined performance tests before installation of the ATLAS Semiconductor and Transition Radiation Tracking Detectors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abat, E.; Abdesselam, A.; Andy, T.N.; Böhm, Jan; Šťastný, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 3, - (2008), P08003/1-P08003/67 ISSN 1748-0221 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08032; GA MŠk 1P04LA212 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : solid state detectors * particle tracking detectors * large detector systems for particle and astroparticle physics * transition radiation detectors Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 0.333, year: 2008

  8. Analysis of Laser Acceleration in a Semi-infinite Space as Inverse Transition Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plettner, T; /SLAC

    2005-10-26

    This article calculates the energy gain of a single relativistic electron interacting with a single gaussian beam that is terminated by a metallic reflector at normal incidence by two different methods: the electric field integral along the path of the electron, and the overlap integral of the transition radiation pattern from the conductive foil with the laser beam. It is shown that for this instance the two calculation methods yield the same expression for the expected energy change of the electron.

  9. Operation of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker under very high irradiation at the CERN LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akesson, T.; Arik, E.; Baker, K.; Baron, S.; Benjamin, D.; Bertelsen, H.; Bondarenko, V.; Bytchkov, V.; Callahan, J.; Capeans, M.; Cardiel-Sas, L.; Catinaccio, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Cwetanski, P.; Dam, M.; Danielsson, H.; Dittus, F.; Dolgoshein, B.; Dressnandt, N.; Driouichi, C.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Eerola, P.; Farthouat, P.; Fedin, O.; Froidevaux, D.; Gagnon, P.; Grichkevitch, Y.; Grigalashvili, N.; Hajduk, Z.; Hansen, P.; Kayumov, F.; Keener, P. T.; Kekelidze, G.; Khristatchev, A.; Konovalov, S.; Koudine, L.; Kovalenko, S.; Kowalski, T.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kruger, K.; Laritchev, A.; Lichard, P.; Luehring, F.; Lundberg, B.; Maleev, V.; McFarlane, K.; Mialkovski, V.; Mindur, B.; Mitsou, V. A.; Morozov, S.; Munar, A.; Muraviev, S.; Nadtochy, A.; Newcomer, F. M.; Ogren, H.; Oh, S. H.; Oleshko, S.; Olszowska, J.; Passmore, S.; Patritchev, S.; Peshekhonov, V.; Petti, R.; Price, M.; Rembser, C.; Rohne, O.; Romaniouk, A.; Rust, D. R.; Ryabov, Yu.; Schegelsky, V.; Seliverstov, D.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Smirnov, S.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Soutchkov, V.; Spiridenkov, E.; Tikhomirov, V.; Van Berg, R.; Vassilakopoulos, V.; Vassilieva, L.; Wang, C.; Williams, H. H.; Zalite, A.

    2004-04-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) performance depends critically on the choice of the active gas and on its properties. The most important operational aspects, which have led to the final choice of the active gas for the operation of the TRT at the LHC design luminosity, are presented. The TRT performance expected at these conditions is reviewed, including pile-up effects at high luminosity.

  10. The numerical evaluation on non-radiative multiphonon transition rate from different electronic bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Bangfen.

    1985-10-01

    A numerical calculation on the non-radiative multiphonon transition probability based on the adiabatic approximation (AA) and the static approximation (SA) has been accomplished in a model of two electronic levels coupled to one phonon mode. The numerical results indicate that the spectra based on different approximations are generally different apart from those vibrational levels which are far below the classical crossing point. For large electron-phonon coupling constant, the calculated transition rates based on AA are more reliable; on the other hand, for small transition coupling the transition rates near or beyond the cross region are quite different for two approximations. In addition to the diagonal non-adiabatic potential, the mixing and splitting of the original static potential sheets are responsible for the deviation of the transition rates based on different approximations. The relationship between the transition matrix element and the vibrational level shift, the Huang-Rhys factor, the separation of the electronic levels and the electron-phonon coupling is analysed and discussed. (author)

  11. Commissioning of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker with Cosmic Rays and single LHC beams

    CERN Document Server

    Cwetanski, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three subsystems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It consists of close to 300000 thin-wall drift tubes (straws) providing on average 35 two-dimensional space points with 0.17 mm resolution for charged particle tracks with pT > 0.5 GeV within |η| < 2. Transition radiation X-rays, generated by particles with γ > 1000 in the special material between the straws, are absorbed in the Xenon based gas mixture and give rise to large signal amplitudes. The front-end electronics implements two thresholds to discriminate the signals: a low threshold (< 300 eV) for registering the passage of minimum ionizing particles, and a high threshold (> 6 keV) to flag the absorption of transition radiation X-rays. The talk will report on the commissioning and first operational experience of the TRT detector and its sophisticated off-detector systems for cooling, active gas, lo...

  12. Determination of electron bunch shape using transition radiation and phase-energy measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosson, E.R.; Berryman, K.W.; Richman, B.A.

    1995-01-01

    We present data comparing microbunch temporal information obtained from electron beam phase-energy measurements with that obtained from transition radiation auto-correlation measurements. The data was taken to resolve some of the ambiguities in previous transition radiation results. By measuring the energy spectrum of the electron beam as a function of its phase relative to the accelerating field, phase-energy information was extracted. This data was analyzed using tomographic techniques to reconstruct the phase-space distribution assuming an electron energy dependence of E(var-phi) = E o + E acc cos(var-phi), where E o is the energy of an electron entering the field, E acc is the peak energy gain, and var-phi is the phase between the crest of the RF wave and an electron. Temporal information about the beam was obtained from the phase space distribution by taking the one dimensional projection along the time axis. We discuss the use of this technique to verify other transition radiation analysis methods

  13. Determination of electron bunch shape using transition radiation and phase-energy measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosson, E.R.; Berryman, K.W.; Richman, B.A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    We present data comparing microbunch temporal information obtained from electron beam phase-energy measurements with that obtained from transition radiation auto-correlation measurements. The data was taken to resolve some of the ambiguities in previous transition radiation results. By measuring the energy spectrum of the electron beam as a function of its phase relative to the accelerating field, phase-energy information was extracted. This data was analyzed using tomographic techniques to reconstruct the phase-space distribution assuming an electron energy dependence of E({var_phi}) = E{sub o} + E{sub acc}cos({var_phi}), where E{sub o} is the energy of an electron entering the field, E{sub acc} is the peak energy gain, and {var_phi} is the phase between the crest of the RF wave and an electron. Temporal information about the beam was obtained from the phase space distribution by taking the one dimensional projection along the time axis. We discuss the use of this technique to verify other transition radiation analysis methods.

  14. Terahertz radiation as a bunch diagnostic for laser-wakefield-accelerated electron bunches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Tilborg, Jeroen; Schroeder, Carl; Filip, Catalin; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Fubiani, Gwenael; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2011-06-17

    Experimental results are reported from two measurement techniques (semiconductor switching and electro-optic sampling) that allow temporal characterization of electron bunches produced by a laser-driven plasma-based accelerator. As femtosecond electron bunches exit the plasma-vacuum interface, coherent transition radiation (at THz frequencies) is emitted. Measuring the properties of this radiation allows characterization of the electron bunches. Theoretical work on the emission mechanism is presented, including a model that calculates the THz wave form from a given bunch profile. It is found that the spectrum of the THz pulse is coherent up to the 200 {micro}m thick crystal (ZnTe) detection limit of 4 THz, which corresponds to the production of sub-50 fs (rms) electron bunch structure. The measurements demonstrate both the shot-to-shot stability of bunch parameters that are critical to THz emission (such as total charge and bunch length), as well as femtosecond synchronization among bunch, THz pulse, and laser beam.

  15. Estimated net radiation in an Amazon-Cerrado transition forest by Landsat 5 TM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Heloisa Oliveira; Biudes, Marcelo Sacardi; Pavão, Vagner Marques; Machado, Nadja Gomes; Querino, Carlos Alexandre Santos; Danelichen, Victor Hugo de Morais

    2017-10-01

    The Amazon-Cerrado transition forest is an extensive region with unique characteristics of radiation exchanges. The measurements of the net radiation (Rn) in this ecosystem are limited to the local scale, and their spatial distribution can be carried out by remote sensing techniques, of which accuracy needs to be evaluated. Thus, the objective of this study was to analyze the accuracy of the model of surface Rn derived from measured solar radiation and estimates of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), surface albedo (α), and land surface temperature (LST) estimated by images of Landsat 5 TM in an Amazon-Cerrado transition forest. The Rn, NDVI, α, and LST were estimated by Landsat 5 TM images and related to micrometeorological measurements in a tower of the study area. There was seasonality of micrometeorological variables with higher values of incident solar radiation, air temperature, and vapor pressure deficit during the dry season. However, there was no seasonality of Rn. NDVI decreased and α increased during the dry season, while LST was nearly constant. The Rn had negative correlation with α and positive with NDVI. Both instantaneous and daily Rn estimated with Landsat 5 TM images showed high correlation and low error values when compared with Rn measured in the study area.

  16. Cherenkov-transition radiation in a waveguide partly filled with a resonance dispersion medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Yu. Alekhina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the electromagnetic field of a charged particle that uniformly moves in a circular waveguide and crosses a boundary between a dielectric medium, which possesses frequency dispersion of a resonant type, and a vacuum area. The investigation of the waveguide mode components is analytically and numerically performed. It is shown that Cherenkov radiation (CR can penetrate through the boundary, and Cherenkov-transition radiation (CTR can be excited in the vacuum region. The conditions for this effect are obtained. It is shown that the CTR can be composed of a single mode (compared with the CTR in a nondispersive dielectric, which is multimode. The amplitude of the CTR is comparable to the amplitude of CR in an extensive range of parameters. The considered effect can be used to generate intense quasimonochromatic radiation.

  17. A non-destructive electron beam diagnostic for a SASE FEL using coherent off-axis undulator radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuman, C.P.; Ponds, M.L.; Barnett, G.A.; Madey, J.M.J.; O'Shea, P.G.

    1999-01-01

    We show that by observing coherent off-axis undulator radiation (COUR) from a short diagnostic wiggler, it may be possible to determine the length and structure of a short electron bunch. Typically the on-axis undulator radiation is incoherent, but at angles of a few degrees, the wavelength of the emitted radiation may be comparable to the length of a short electron bunch, and thus coherence effects emerge. Due to such coherence effects, the intensity of the emitted radiation may change by up to a factor of 10 9 as the angle of observation is increased. The radiation becomes coherent in a way which depends on the length and structure of the electron bunch. Observing COUR disturbs the electron bunch negligibly. Thus, COUR can be used as a non-destructive diagnostic which would allow for optimization of FEL performance while an FEL is operating. Such a diagnostic could be used for proposed SASE FELs, which use short electron bunches. We present two methods to describe the theory for COUR, and we use these methods to calculate the expected outcome of a COUR experiment. We propose an experiment to demonstrate COUR effects and their applications to SASE FELs

  18. Diagnostic reference level: an important tool for reducing radiation doses in adult and pediatric nuclear medicine procedures in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willegaignon, José; Braga, Luis F E F; Sapienza, Marcelo T; Coura-Filho, George B; Cardona, Marissa A R; Alves, Carlos E R; Gutterres, Ricardo F; Buchpiguel, Carlos A

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to establish a concise method for determining a diagnostic reference level (DRL) for adult and pediatric nuclear medicine patients on the basis of diagnostic procedures and administered radioisotope as a means of controlling medical exposure. A screening was carried out in all Brazilian Nuclear Medicine Service (NMS) establishments to support this study by collecting the average activities administered during adult diagnostic procedures and the rules applied to adjust these according to the patient's age and body mass. Percentile 75 was used in all the activities administered as a means of establishing DRL for adult patients, with additional correction factors for pediatric patients. Radiation doses from nuclear medicine procedures on the basis of average administered activity were calculated for all diagnostic exams. A total of 107 NMSs in Brazil agreed to participate in the project. From the 64 nuclear medicine procedures studied, bone, kidney, and parathyroid scans were found to be used in more than 85% of all the NMSs analyzed. There was a large disparity among the activities administered, when applying the same procedures, this reaching, in some cases, more than 20 times between the lowest and the highest. Diagnostic exams based on Ga, Tl, and I radioisotopes proved to be the major exams administering radiation doses to patients. On introducing the DRL concept into clinical routine, the minimum reduction in radiation doses received by patients was about 15%, the maximum was 95%, and the average was 50% compared with the previously reported administered activities. Variability in the available diagnostic procedures as well as in the amount of activities administered within the same procedure was appreciable not only in Brazil, but worldwide. Global efforts are needed to establish a concise DRL that can be applied in adult and pediatric nuclear medicine procedures as the application of DRL in clinical routine has been proven to be an important

  19. Betatron radiation based diagnostics for plasma wakefield accelerated electron beams at the SPARC-LAB test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpakov, V.; Anania, M.P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Cianchi, A. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); “Tor Vergata” University, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Curcio, A. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Dabagov, S. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, Leninskiy Prospekt 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); NRNU “MEPhI”, Kashirskoe highway 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Marocchino, A. [Dipartimento SBAI Universitá di Roma ‘La Sapienza’, via Antonio Scarpa 14/16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Paroli, B. [INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Pompili, R. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Rossi, A.R. [INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Zigler, A. [Racah Institute of Physics Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2016-09-01

    Recent progress with wake-field acceleration has shown a great potential in providing high gradient acceleration fields, while the quality of the beams remains relatively poor. Precise knowledge of the beam size at the exit from the plasma and matching conditions for the externally injected beams are the key for improvement of beam quality. Betatron radiation emitted by the beam during acceleration in the plasma is a powerful tool for the transverse beam size measurement, being also non-intercepting. In this work we report on the technical solutions chosen at SPARC-LAB for such diagnostics tool, along with expected parameters of betatron radiation. - Highlights: • The betatron radiation parameters in SPARC-LAB wakefiled experiments were studied. • The differences with betatron radiation in other wake-field experiments were highlighted. • The solution for betatron radiation detection was investigated.

  20. Radiation protection to the eye and thyroid during diagnostic cerebral angiography : a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shortt, C. P.; Malone, L.; Thornton, J.; Brennan, P.; Lee, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: We measured radiation doses to the eye and thyroid during diagnostic cerebral angiography to assess the effectiveness of bismuth and lead shields at dose reduction. Phantom head angiographic studies were performed with bismuth (study 1) and lead shields (study 2). In study 1 (12 phantoms), thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) were placed over the eyes and thyroid in three groups: (i) no shields (four phantoms); (ii) anterior bismuth shields (four phantoms) and (iii) anterior and posterior bismuth shields (four phantoms). In a second study (eight phantoms), lead shields were placed over the thyroid only and TLD dose measurements obtained in two groups: (i) no shielding (four phantoms) and (ii) thyroid lead shielding (four phantoms). A standard 4-vessel cerebral angiogram was performed on each phantom. Study 1 (bismuth shields) showed higher doses to the eyes compared with thyroid (mean 13.03 vs 5.98 mSv, P < 0.001) and a higher eye dose on the X-ray tube side. Overall, the use of bismuth shielding did not significantly reduce dose to either eyes or thyroid in the measured TLD positions. In study 2, a significant thyroid dose reduction was found with the use of lead shields (47%, mean 2.46 vs 4.62 mSv, P < 0.001). Considerable doses to the eyes and thyroid highlight the need for increased awareness of patient protection. Eye shielding is impractical and interferes with diagnostic capability. Thyroid lead shielding yields significant protection to the thyroid, is not in the field of view and should be used routinely.

  1. Radiation protection to the eye and thyroid during diagnostic cerebral angiography: a phantom study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shortt, C P

    2008-08-01

    We measured radiation doses to the eye and thyroid during diagnostic cerebral angiography to assess the effectiveness of bismuth and lead shields at dose reduction. Phantom head angiographic studies were performed with bismuth (study 1) and lead shields (study 2). In study 1 (12 phantoms), thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) were placed over the eyes and thyroid in three groups: (i) no shields (four phantoms); (ii) anterior bismuth shields (four phantoms) and (iii) anterior and posterior bismuth shields (four phantoms). In a second study (eight phantoms), lead shields were placed over the thyroid only and TLD dose measurements obtained in two groups: (i) no shielding (four phantoms) and (ii) thyroid lead shielding (four phantoms). A standard 4-vessel cerebral angiogram was performed on each phantom. Study 1 (bismuth shields) showed higher doses to the eyes compared with thyroid (mean 13.03 vs 5.98 mSv, P < 0.001) and a higher eye dose on the X-ray tube side. Overall, the use of bismuth shielding did not significantly reduce dose to either eyes or thyroid in the measured TLD positions. In study 2, a significant thyroid dose reduction was found with the use of lead shields (47%, mean 2.46 vs 4.62 mSv, P < 0.001). Considerable doses to the eyes and thyroid highlight the need for increased awareness of patient protection. Eye shielding is impractical and interferes with diagnostic capability. Thyroid lead shielding yields significant protection to the thyroid, is not in the field of view and should be used routinely.

  2. Practical X-ray diagnostics orthopedics and trauma surgery. Indication, adjustment technique and radiation protection; Praktische Roentgendiagnostik Orthopaedie und Unfallchirurgie. Indikation, Einstelltechnik, Strahlenschutz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flechtenmacher, Johannes [Ortho-Zentrum am Ludwigsplatz, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sabo, Desiderius [Klinik St. Elisabeth, Heidelberg (Germany). Sportopaedic Heidelberg

    2014-07-01

    The book on X-ray diagnostics in orthopedics and trauma surgery includes the following chapters: 1. Introduction: radiation protection, equipment technology radiological diagnostics of skeleton carcinomas, specific aspects of trauma surgery, special aspects of skeleton radiology for children. 2. X-ray diagnostics of different anatomical regions: ankle joint, knee, hips and pelvis, hand and wrist joint, elbow, shoulder, spinal cord. 3. Appendix: radiation protection according to the X-ray regulations.

  3. Assessment of medical radiation exposure to patients and ambient doses in several diagnostic radiology departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulieman, A.; Elhadi, T.; Babikir, E.; Alkhorayef, M.; Alnaaimi, M.; Alduaij, M.; Bradley, D. A.

    2017-11-01

    In many countries diagnostic medical exposures typically account for a very large fraction of the collective effective dose that can be assigned to anthropological sources and activities. This in part flags up the question of whether sufficient steps are being taken in regard to potential dose saving from such medical services. As a first step, one needs to survey doses to compare against those of best practice. The present study has sought evaluation of the radiation protection status and patient doses for certain key radiological procedures in four film-based radiology departments within Sudan. The radiation exposure survey, carried out using a survey meter and quality control test tools, involved a total of 299 patients their examinations being carried out at one or other of these four departments. The entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) was determined from exposure settings using DosCal software and an Unfors -Xi-meter. The mean ESAK for x-ray examination of the chest was 0.30±0.1 mGy, for the skull it was 0.96±0.7 mGy, for the abdomen 0.85±0.01 mGy, for spinal procedures 1.30±0.6 mGy and for procedures involving the limbs it was 0.43±0.3 mGy. Ambient dose-rates in the reception area, at the closed door of the x-ray room, recorded instantaneous values of up to 100 μSv/h. In regard to protection, the associated levels were found to be acceptable in three of the four departments, corrective action being required for one department, regular quality control also being recommended.

  4. A comprehensive set of UV and x-ray radiative transition rates for Fe XVI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahar, S N; Sur, C; Pradhan, A K; Eissner, W

    2009-01-01

    Sodium-like Fe XVI is observed in collisionally ionized plasmas such as stellar coronae and coronal line regions of active galactic nuclei including black hole-accretion disc environments. Given its recombination edge from neon-like Fe XVII at ∼/!25 A, the Fe XVI bound-bound transitions lie in the soft x-ray and EUV (extreme ultraviolet) range. We present a comprehensive set of theoretical transition rates for radiative dipole allowed E1 transitions including fine structure for levels with nl(SLJ)≤10, l≤9 using the relativistic Breit-Pauli R-matrix (BPRM) method. In addition, forbidden transitions of electric quadrupole (E2), electric octupole (E3), magnetic dipole (M1) and magnetic quadrupole (M2) type are presented for levels up to 5g(SLJ) from relativistic atomic structure calculations in the Breit-Pauli approximation using code SUPERSTRUCTURE. Some of the computed levels are autoionizing, and oscillator strengths among those are also provided. BPRM results have been benchmarked with the relativistic coupled cluster method and the atomic structure Dirac-Fock code GRASP. Levels computed with the electron collision BPRM codes in bound state mode were identified with a procedure based on the analysis of quantum defects and asymptotic wavefunctions. The total number of Fe XVI levels considered is 96, with 822 E1 transitions. Tabulated values are presented for the oscillator strengths f, line strengths S and Einstein radiative decay rates A. This extensive dataset should enable spectral modelings up to highly excited levels, including recombination-cascade matrices.

  5. Soluble Dietary Fiber Ameliorates Radiation-Induced Intestinal Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition and Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianbo; Ding, Chao; Dai, Xujie; Lv, Tengfei; Xie, Tingbing; Zhang, Tenghui; Gao, Wen; Gong, Jianfeng; Zhu, Weiming; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2017-11-01

    Intestinal fibrosis is a late complication of pelvic radiotherapy. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays an important role in tissue fibrosis. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of soluble dietary fiber on radiation-induced intestinal EMT and fibrosis in a mouse model. Apple pectin (4% wt/wt in drinking water) was administered to wild-type and pVillin-Cre-EGFP transgenic mice with intestinal fibrosis induced by a single dose of abdominal irradiation of 10 Gy. The effects of pectin on intestinal EMT and fibrosis, gut microbiota, and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentration were evaluated. Intestinal fibrosis in late radiation enteropathy showed increased submucosal thickness and subepithelial collagen deposition. Enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) + /vimentin + and EGFP + /α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) + coexpressing cells were most clearly observed at 2 weeks after irradiation and gradually decreased at 4 and 12 weeks. Pectin significantly attenuated the thickness of submucosa and collagen deposition at 12 weeks (24.3 vs 27.6 µm in the pectin + radiation-treated group compared with radiation-alone group, respectively, P soluble dietary fiber pectin protected the terminal ileum against radiation-induced fibrosis. This effect might be mediated by altered SCFA concentration in the intestinal lumen and reduced EMT in the ileal epithelium.

  6. A multi-channel THz and infrared spectrometer for femtosecond electron bunch diagnostics by single-shot spectroscopy of coherent radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesch, Stephan; Schmidt, Bernhard; Behrens, Christopher; Delsim-Hashemi, Hossein; Schmueser, Peter

    2011-08-01

    The high peak current required in free-electron lasers (FELs) is realized by longitudinal compression of the electron bunches to sub-picosecond length. In this paper, a frequency-domain diagnostic method is described that is capable of resolving structures in the femtosecond regime. A novel in-vacuum spectrometer has been developed for spectroscopy of coherent radiation in the THz and infrared range. The spectrometer is equipped with five consecutive dispersion gratings and 120 parallel readout channels; it can be operated either in short wavelength mode (5-44 μm) or in long wavelength mode (45-430 μm). Fast parallel readout permits the spectroscopy of coherent radiation from single electron bunches. Test measurements at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH, using coherent transition radiation, demonstrate excellent performance of the spectrometer. The high sensitivity down to a few micrometers allows study of short bunch features caused for example by microbunching e ects in magnetic chicanes. The device is planned for use as an online bunch profile monitor during regular FEL operation. (orig.)

  7. A multi-channel THz and infrared spectrometer for femtosecond electron bunch diagnostics by single-shot spectroscopy of coherent radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesch, Stephan; Schmidt, Bernhard; Behrens, Christopher; Delsim-Hashemi, Hossein; Schmueser, Peter

    2011-08-15

    The high peak current required in free-electron lasers (FELs) is realized by longitudinal compression of the electron bunches to sub-picosecond length. In this paper, a frequency-domain diagnostic method is described that is capable of resolving structures in the femtosecond regime. A novel in-vacuum spectrometer has been developed for spectroscopy of coherent radiation in the THz and infrared range. The spectrometer is equipped with five consecutive dispersion gratings and 120 parallel readout channels; it can be operated either in short wavelength mode (5-44 {mu}m) or in long wavelength mode (45-430 {mu}m). Fast parallel readout permits the spectroscopy of coherent radiation from single electron bunches. Test measurements at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH, using coherent transition radiation, demonstrate excellent performance of the spectrometer. The high sensitivity down to a few micrometers allows study of short bunch features caused for example by microbunching e ects in magnetic chicanes. The device is planned for use as an online bunch profile monitor during regular FEL operation. (orig.)

  8. Energy levels, radiative rates, and lifetimes for transitions in W XL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Kanti M.; Keenan, Francis P.

    2014-01-01

    Energy levels and radiative rates are reported for transitions in Br-like tungsten, W XL, calculated with the general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package (GRASP). Configuration interaction (CI) has been included among 46 configurations (generating 4215 levels) over a wide energy range up to 213 Ryd. However, for conciseness results are only listed for the lowest 360 levels (with energies up to ∼43 Ryd), which mainly belong to the 4s 2 4p 5 ,4s 2 4p 4 4d,4s 2 4p 4 4f,4s4p 6 ,4p 6 4d,4s4p 5 4d,4s 2 4p 3 4d 2 , and 4s 2 4p 3 4d4f configurations, and provided for four types of transitions, E1, E2, M1, and M2. Comparisons are made with existing (but limited) results. However, to fully assess the accuracy of our data, analogous calculations have been performed with the flexible atomic code, including an even larger CI than in GRASP. Our energy levels are estimated to be accurate to better than 0.02 Ryd, whereas results for radiative rates (and lifetimes) should be accurate to better than 20% for a majority of the strong transitions

  9. A national survey of occupational radiation exposure among diagnostic radiologic technologists in South Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeeyoung; Cha, Eun Shil; Jeong, Meeseon; Lee, Won Jin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate representative occupational characteristics and radiation exposure for South Korean radiologic technologists. The authors conducted a national survey by stratified sampling of South Korean administrative districts and types of medical facilities. A total of 585 technologists were surveyed, and survey data were linked with dosimetry data from the National Dose Registry. A total of 73 % of radiologic technologists sampled were male, 62 % were younger than age 40 and 86.5 % began employment after 1990. The most frequent practices among radiologic technologists were diagnostic routine X-ray followed by computed tomography (CT) and portable X-ray. Male workers were more frequently involved in CT, portable X-ray and interventional radiology whereas female workers carried out most mammography procedures. The average annual effective dose was 2.3 mSv for male and 1.3 mSv for female workers. The dose was significantly higher for workers in the provinces and those who had recently started work. (authors)

  10. Research on radiation exposure from CT part of hybrid camera and diagnostic CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solný, Pavel; Zimák, Jaroslav

    2014-11-01

    Research on radiation exposure from CT part of hybrid camera in seven different Departments of Nuclear Medicine (DNM) was conducted. Processed data and effective dose (E) estimations led to the idea of phantom verification and comparison of absorbed doses and software estimation. Anonymous data from about 100 examinations from each DNM was gathered. Acquired data was processed and utilized by dose estimation programs (ExPACT, ImPACT, ImpactDose) with respect to the type of examination and examination procedures. Individual effective doses were calculated using enlisted programs. Preserving the same procedure in dose estimation process allows us to compare the resulting E. Some differences and disproportions during dose estimation led to the idea of estimated E verification. Consequently, two different sets of about 100 of TLD 100H detectors were calibrated for measurement inside the Aldersnon RANDO Anthropomorphic Phantom. Standard examination protocols were examined using a 2 Slice CT- part of hybrid SPECT/CT. Moreover, phantom exposure from body examining protocol for 32 Slice and 64 Slice diagnostic CT scanner was also verified. Absorbed dose (DT,R) measured using TLD detectors was compared with software estimation of equivalent dose HT values, computed by E estimation software. Though, only limited number of cavities for detectors enabled measurement within the regions of lung, liver, thyroid and spleen-pancreas region, some basic comparison is possible.

  11. Nonintercepting Electron Beam Diagnostics Based on Optical Diffraction Radiation for X-Ray FELs

    CERN Document Server

    Lumpkin, Alex H; Sereno, N S; Yang, B X; Yao, C

    2005-01-01

    The challenge of providing nonintercepting beam diagnostics that address transverse parameters such as beam size and divergence in a linear transport line has been met. We have successfully used near-field imaging of optical diffraction radiation (ODR) from a 7-GeV electron beam passing near a single edge of a conducting screen to obtain beam size for the first time [1]. In this case appreciable visible wavelength ODR is emitted for impact parameters of 1 to 2 mm, values that are close to gamma times the reduced observation wavelength. We have now upgraded our imaging system to include an intensified camera; selectable bandpass filters, neutral density filters, and polarizers; a steering mirror; and an optical lens setup that provides either near-field or far-field imaging. The ODR has been obtained in both the single-edge mode and aperture mode with a single pulse of 3.3 nC. Beam-size resolution in the 20-50 micron regime is projected while beam position resolution to 10 microns with a smaller beam and highe...

  12. Coordinated research programme on radiation protection in diagnostic radiology in Asia and the Far East

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Heron, J.

    1997-01-01

    Ten Asian countries (China, Vietnam, Thailand, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Iran, Philipppines, Malaysia, and Indonesia) are currently participating in a three year programme, as part of a Coordinated Research Programme of the International Atomic Energy Agency, aimed at reducing patient doses in diagnostic radiology through the implementation of optimisation of radiation protection. At the first meeting, held in Manila in September 1995, the project protocol was formulated for the first eighteen months of the programme, where the focus was on plain film radiography. The purpose of the second meeting was to briefly review the first half of the project, and to then come up with protocols for the second phase, where the attention was on dose reduction in fluoroscopic procedures and CT procedures. The second Research Coordination Meeting, held in Manila 3-7 March, was attended by participants from all the countries, with the exception of Iran, plus a consultant from each of Italy and New Zealand, and the scientific secretary from IAEA, Vienna. If the obvious enthusiasm of the participants is able to b maintained on return to their respective countries, then the signs are very healthy for a successful second phase of the programme. (author)

  13. Establishment of national diagnostic reference levels for breast cancer CT protocols in radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Sean O'; Mc Ardle, Orla; Mullaney, Laura

    2016-10-01

    To establish whether CT dose variation occurs in breast cancer localization procedures between radiation therapy (RT) centres in Ireland and to propose diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for this procedure. All RT centres in Ireland were invited to participate in a dose audit survey, providing data on the CT dose index volume (CTDIvol), dose-length product (DLP), current-time product (mAs), tube potential, scan length, slice thickness, scanning margins, use of automated exposure control (AEC) and scanner technology for 10 patients with breast cancer who were average sized. DRLs were derived for each dose descriptor by calculation of the rounded 75th percentile of the distribution of mean doses. Data were returned for 60 patients from 6 RT centres (50% response rate). Significant variation in mean CTDIvol and mean DLP was observed between centres (p CT dose variation occurs between centres, establishing a need for optimization. DRLs for breast cancer localization have been proposed with the potential for reduction in CT dose. This article provides the first reported DRL for breast cancer CT localization procedure in RT and can be used as a benchmark for comparison for other RT centres.

  14. Effects of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction on radiation dose reduction and diagnostic accuracy of pediatric abdominal CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sohi; Kim, Myung-Joon; Lee, Mi-Jung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Children' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Choon-Sik [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Wook; Hong, Jung Hwa [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Since children are more radio-sensitive than adults, there is a need to minimize radiation exposure during CT exams. To evaluate the effects of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) on radiation dose reduction, image quality and diagnostic accuracy in pediatric abdominal CT. We retrospectively reviewed the abdominal CT examinations of 41 children (24 boys and 17 girls; mean age: 10 years) with a low-dose radiation protocol and reconstructed with ASIR (the ASIR group). We also reviewed routine-dose abdominal CT examinations of 41 age- and sex-matched controls reconstructed with filtered-back projection (control group). Image quality was assessed objectively as noise measured in the liver, spleen and aorta, as well as subjectively by three pediatric radiologists for diagnostic acceptability using a four-point scale. Radiation dose and objective image qualities of each group were compared with the paired t-test. Diagnostic accuracy was evaluated by reviewing follow-up imaging studies and medical records in 2012 and 2013. There was 46.3% dose reduction of size-specific dose estimates in ASIR group (from 13.4 to 7.2 mGy) compared with the control group. Objective noise was higher in the liver, spleen and aorta of the ASIR group (P < 0.001). However, the subjective image quality was average or superior in 84-100% of studies. Only one image was subjectively rated as unacceptable by one reviewer. There was only one case with interpretational error in the control group and none in the ASIR group. Use of the ASIR technique resulted in greater than a 45% reduction in radiation dose without impairing subjective image quality or diagnostic accuracy in pediatric abdominal CT, despite increased objective image noise. (orig.)

  15. Labor Markets and School-to-Work Transition in Egypt : Diagnostics, Constraints, and Policy Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Angel-Urdinola, Diego F.

    2010-01-01

    Despite substantial improvements in labor market outcomes in recent years (in raising employment and participation and in lowering unemployment), unemployment rates in Egypt remain exceedingly high among youth2 entering the labor market for the first time. A slow school-to-work transition remains the main reason behind high unemployment rates. The youth unemployment rate in Egypt, at 24 pe...

  16. Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation as a cause of transition radiation anomalous intensity in case of electron grazing incidence on the silver surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zrelov, V.P.; Ruzicka, J.

    1979-01-01

    On the basis of the Vavilov-Cherenkov effect the anomaly in the transition radiation (TR) spectrum is explained which has been first observed by Boersch for grazing particle incidence on the silver surface. The contribution of the Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation to the angle distribution of photons of the TR is estimated. Special attention is drawn to a possibility of the nonthreshold character of Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation in such a medium as silver, and to a necessity of creating a complete theory of Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation for absorbing media

  17. A transition radiation detector for positron identification in a balloon-borne particle astrophysics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbarito, E.; Bellotti, R.; Cafagna, F.; Castellano, M.; Circella, M.; De Cataldo, G.; De Marzo, C.; Fusco, P.; Giglietto, N.; Mongelli, M.; Marangelli, B.; Perchiazzi, M.; Raino, A.; Sacchetti, A.; Spinelli, P.

    1995-01-01

    We have built and tested a transition radiation detector of about 76x80 cm 2 active surface to discriminate positrons from protons in an experiment performed on a balloon flight to search for primordial antimatter. The TRD is made of ten modules each consisting of a carbon fiber radiator followed by a multiwire proportional chamber. In order to achieve a proton-electron rejection factor of the order of 10 -3 with a strict limitation on power consumption to about 40 mW per chamber channel, as required by experimental constraints, we have developed a low power consumption ''cluster counting'' electronics. Different analysis procedures of calibration data are shown. In addition, comparisons of the performances of this detector are also made with a previous similar prototype equipped with standard fast electronics and similar detectors from other authors. ((orig.))

  18. Reversed Cherenkov-transition radiation in a waveguide partly filled with a left-handed medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekhina, Tatiana Yu.; Tyukhtin, Andrey V.

    2018-04-01

    We analyze the electromagnetic field of a charged particle that moves uniformly in a circular waveguide and crosses a boundary between a vacuum area and an area filled with a left-handed medium exhibiting resonant frequency dispersion. The investigation of the waveguide mode components is performed analytically and numerically. The reversed Cherenkov radiation in the filled area of the waveguide and the reversed Cherenkov-transition radiation (RCTR) in the vacuum area are analyzed. The conditions for the excitation of RCTR are obtained. It is shown that the number of modes of RCTR is always finite; in particular, under certain conditions, the RCTR is composed of the first waveguide mode only. Plots of the typical fields of the excited waveguide mode are presented.

  19. C-arm flat-panel CT arthrography of the shoulder: Radiation dose considerations and preliminary data on diagnostic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guggenberger, Roman; Ulbrich, Erika J.; Kaelin, Pascal; Pfammatter, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem; Andreisek, Gustav [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Dietrich, Tobias J. [Balgrist University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Scholz, Rosemarie; Koehler, Christoph; Elsaesser, Thilo [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Business Area Advanced Therapies, Forchheim (Germany); Le Corroller, Thomas [Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS, ISM UMR 7287, Marseille (France); Radiology Department, APHM, Marseille (France)

    2017-02-15

    To investigate radiation dose and diagnostic performance of C-arm flat-panel CT (FPCT) versus standard multi-detector CT (MDCT) shoulder arthrography using MRI-arthrography as reference standard. Radiation dose of two different FPCT acquisitions (5 and 20 s) and standard MDCT of the shoulder were assessed using phantoms and thermoluminescence dosimetry. FPCT arthrographies were performed in 34 patients (mean age 44 ± 15 years). Different joint structures were quantitatively and qualitatively assessed by two independent radiologists. Inter-reader agreement and diagnostic performance were calculated. Effective radiation dose was markedly lower in FPCT 5 s (0.6 mSv) compared to MDCT (1.7 mSv) and FPCT 20 s (3.4 mSv). Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in FPCT 20-s versus 5-s protocols. Inter-reader agreements of qualitative ratings ranged between κ = 0.47-1.0. Sensitivities for cartilage and rotator cuff pathologies were low for FPCT 5-s (40 % and 20 %) and moderate for FPCT 20-s protocols (75 % and 73 %). FPCT showed high sensitivity (81-86 % and 89-99 %) for bone and acromioclavicular-joint pathologies. Using a 5-s protocol FPCT shoulder arthrography provides lower radiation dose compared to MDCT but poor sensitivity for cartilage and rotator cuff pathologies. FPCT 20-s protocol is moderately sensitive for cartilage and rotator cuff tendon pathology with markedly higher radiation dose compared to MDCT. (orig.)

  20. Transverse beam shape measurements of intense proton beams using optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarpine, Victor E.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    A number of particle physics experiments are being proposed as part of the Department of Energy HEP Intensity Frontier. Many of these experiments will utilize megawatt level proton beams onto targets to form secondary beams of muons, kaons and neutrinos. These experiments require transverse size measurements of the incident proton beam onto target for each beam spill. Because of the high power levels, most beam intercepting profiling techniques will not work at full beam intensity. The possibility of utilizing optical transition radiation (OTR) for high intensity proton beam profiling is discussed. In addition, previous measurements of OTR beam profiles from the NuMI beamline are presented.

  1. Geranylgeranylacetone alleviates radiation-induced lung injury by inhibiting epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joong-Sun; Son, Yeonghoon; Jung, Myung-Gu; Jeong, Ye Ji; Kim, Sung-Ho; Lee, Su-Jae; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Lee, Hae-June

    2016-06-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) involves pneumonitis and fibrosis, and results in pulmonary dysfunction. Moreover, RILI can be a fatal complication of thoracic radiotherapy. The present study investigated the protective effect of geranylgeranlyacetone (GGA), an inducer of heat shock protein (HSP)70, on RILI using a C57BL/6 mouse model of RILI developing 6 months subsequent to exposure to 12.5 Gy thoracic radiation. GGA was administered 5 times orally prior and subsequent to radiation exposure, and the results were assessed by histological analysis and western blotting. The results show that late RILI was alleviated by GGA treatment, possibly through the suppression of epithelial‑to‑mesenchymal transition (EMT) marker expression. Based on histological examination, orally administered GGA during the acute phase of radiation injury not only significantly inhibited pro‑surfactant protein C (pro‑SPC) and vimentin expression, but also preserved E‑cadherin expression 6 months after irradiation‑induced injury of the lungs. GGA induced HSP70 and inhibited EMT marker expression in L132 human lung epithelial cells following IR. These data suggest that the prevention of EMT signaling is a key cytoprotective effect in the context of RILI. Thus, HSP70‑inducing drugs, such as GGA, could be beneficial for protection against RILI.

  2. Estimated cumulative radiation dose received by diagnostic imaging during staging and treatment of operable Ewing sarcoma 2005-2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsen, Boel [Haukeland University Hospital, Centre for Nuclear Medicine and PET, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 1400, Bergen (Norway); Fasmer, Kristine Eldevik [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Section, Bergen (Norway); Boye, Kjetil [Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Department of Oncology, Oslo (Norway); Rosendahl, Karen; Aukland, Stein Magnus [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Paediatric Section, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Department of Clinical Medicine, Bergen (Norway); Trovik, Clement [University of Bergen, Department of Clinical Medicine, Bergen (Norway); Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Orthopaedic Section, Bergen (Norway); Biermann, Martin [Haukeland University Hospital, Centre for Nuclear Medicine and PET, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 1400, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Department of Clinical Medicine, Bergen (Norway)

    2017-01-15

    Patients with Ewing sarcoma are subject to various diagnostic procedures that incur exposure to ionising radiation. To estimate the radiation doses received from all radiologic and nuclear imaging episodes during diagnosis and treatment, and to determine whether {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography - computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT) is a major contributor of radiation. Twenty Ewing sarcoma patients diagnosed in Norway in 2005-2012 met the inclusion criteria (age <30 years, operable disease, uncomplicated chemotherapy and surgery, no metastasis or residual disease within a year of diagnosis). Radiation doses from all imaging during the first year were calculated for each patient. The mean estimated cumulative radiation dose for all patients was 34 mSv (range: 6-70), radiography accounting for 3 mSv (range: 0.2-12), CT for 13 mSv (range: 2-28) and nuclear medicine for 18 mSv (range: 2-47). For the patients examined with PET-CT, the mean estimated cumulative effective dose was 38 mSv, of which PET-CT accounted for 14 mSv (37%). There was large variation in number and type of examinations performed and also in estimated cumulative radiation dose. The mean radiation dose for patients examined with PET-CT was 23% higher than for patients not examined with PET-CT. (orig.)

  3. Estimated cumulative radiation dose received by diagnostic imaging during staging and treatment of operable Ewing sarcoma 2005-2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsen, Boel; Fasmer, Kristine Eldevik; Boye, Kjetil; Rosendahl, Karen; Aukland, Stein Magnus; Trovik, Clement; Biermann, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Patients with Ewing sarcoma are subject to various diagnostic procedures that incur exposure to ionising radiation. To estimate the radiation doses received from all radiologic and nuclear imaging episodes during diagnosis and treatment, and to determine whether 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography - computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET-CT) is a major contributor of radiation. Twenty Ewing sarcoma patients diagnosed in Norway in 2005-2012 met the inclusion criteria (age <30 years, operable disease, uncomplicated chemotherapy and surgery, no metastasis or residual disease within a year of diagnosis). Radiation doses from all imaging during the first year were calculated for each patient. The mean estimated cumulative radiation dose for all patients was 34 mSv (range: 6-70), radiography accounting for 3 mSv (range: 0.2-12), CT for 13 mSv (range: 2-28) and nuclear medicine for 18 mSv (range: 2-47). For the patients examined with PET-CT, the mean estimated cumulative effective dose was 38 mSv, of which PET-CT accounted for 14 mSv (37%). There was large variation in number and type of examinations performed and also in estimated cumulative radiation dose. The mean radiation dose for patients examined with PET-CT was 23% higher than for patients not examined with PET-CT. (orig.)

  4. Biological effects of radiation and dosimetry in X-ray diagnostics of children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milkovic, Durdica; Beck, Natko; Kovac, Kornelija; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera; Gajski, Goran

    2008-01-01

    The chest radiograms represent the basic radiological examinations of thorax. The basis for radiation protection especially in pediatrics is the exact determination of doses. The risk estimation of genome damages can be received in human peripheral blood lymphocytes using alkaline version of Comet Assay. The aim of this work was assessment and quantification of the level of DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes of children during airways X-ray examinations of chest and to compare data to the dose of exposure. Doses were determined using thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetry and radiophotoluminescent (RPL) glass dosimetry system. Twenty children with pulmonary diseases, ages between 5 and 14 years were assessed. Dose measurements were conducted for poster-anterior (PA) projection on the forehead, thyroid gland, gonads, chest and back. We used a 150 kV Shimadzu CH-200 M X-ray unit. Peripheral blood samples were taken from children after and prior to X-ray exposure and were examined with the alkaline Comet Assay. Comet Assay is one of the standard techniques for assessing genome damage with variety applications in genotoxicity testing as well as fundamental research in DNA damage and repair. As a measure of DNA damage tail length was used, calculated from the centre of the head and presented in micrometers (μm). Mean value of group after irradiation was 14.04 ± 1.74 as opposed to mean value of group before irradiation that was 13.15 ± 1.33. Differences between mean tail lengths were statistically significant (P<0.05, ANOVA). In addition, correlation was found between doses in primary beam (measured on the back) and the ratio of tail length (DNA damage) before and after irradiation. Doses measured with TL and RPL dosimeters showed satisfactory agreement and both dosimetry methods are suitable for dosimetric measurements in X-ray diagnostics. (author)

  5. Children's exposure to ionizing radiations linked with diagnostic procedures in 2010 in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the medical exposure of the French pediatric population to ionizing radiations (IR) in 2010. It only includes diagnostic procedures. Data are mainly provided by the French Health Insurance (CNAM-TS), through a representative sample of about 1% of the French population (the so-called 'EGB' sample). In 2010, more than 100,000 children from 0 to 15 years old were included in this sample. About 600 examinations per 1000 children were performed: 55% are radiological examinations and 42% dental. CT examinations are rather rare (about 2%). Nuclear medicine and interventional radiology represent less than 1% of the examinations. Children from 10 to 15 years old and babies from new born to 1 year old are the most examined. Exposure of girls and boys are rather similar. From 10 to 15 years old, dental and limbs examinations are the most frequent. Chest and pelvic examinations are the most frequent examinations performed on babies. CT pediatric examinations concern mainly the head and the neck. In 2010, a third of the French children has been exposed to at least one examination using IR. The mean and median effective doses were respectively equal to 0.65 mSv and 0.025 mSv. These values were respectively 5.7 mSv and 1.7 mSv for the children exposed to at least one CT examination (about 1% of the studied population). This study brings reference data on pediatric exposure to IR, and makes them available for public health and epidemiological purposes. This analysis should be periodically carried out to assess the evolution of the pediatric exposure. (authors)

  6. Micro-bunching diagnostics for the IFEL by coherent transition radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.; Cline, D.B.

    1996-10-01

    Here, we propose an effective method for detecting micro-bunching effects (10 fs bunch length) produced by the IFEL interaction, by measuring the CTR spectrum. The pre-bunching of an initially energy- modulated c- beam passing through a wiggler (IFEL interaction) is studied. Simulation shows that more than 40% of electrons are pre- bunched in the micro-bunches. The longitudinal distribution of an optically pre-bunched beam is Fourier analyzed to find the dominant harmonics contributing to the CTR. The CTR spectrum is calculated analytically for the IFEL situation. A detection system has been built to demonstrate this technique

  7. ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT): Straw Tube Gaseous Detectors at High Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three tracking subsystems of the ATLAS Inner Detector. The ATLAS detector is located at LHC/CERN. We report on how these gaseous detectors (“straw tubes”) are performing during the ATLAS 2011 and 2012 runs where the TRT experiences higher rates than previously encountered. The TRT contains ~300000 thin-walled proportional-mode drift tubes providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points with ~130 µm resolution for charged particle tracks with |η| 0.5 GeV. Along with continuous tracking, the TRT provides electron identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons. During the ATLAS 2012 proton-proton data runs, the TRT is operating successfully while being subjected to the highest rates of incident particles ever experienced by a large scale gaseous tracking system. In the second half of 2012, the TRT has collected data in an environment with instantaneous proton-proton luminosity of ~0.8 × 10³�...

  8. ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT): Straw Tube Gaseous Detectors at High Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three tracking subsystems of the ATLAS Inner Detector. The ATLAS detector is located at LHC/CERN. We report on how these gaseous detectors (“straw tubes”) are performing during the ATLAS 2011 and 2012 runs where the TRT experiences higher rates than previously encountered. The TRT contains ~300000 thin-walled proportional-mode drift tubes providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points with ~130 µm resolution for charged particle tracks with |η|  0.5 GeV. Along with continuous tracking, the TRT provides electron identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons. During the ATLAS 2012 proton-proton data runs, the TRT is operating successfully while being subjected to the highest rates of incident particles ever experienced by a large scale gaseous tracking system. As of the submission date of this abstract, the TRT has collected data in an environment with instantaneous proton-proton luminosi...

  9. Characterization and mitigation of coherent-optical-transition-radiation signals from a compressed electron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Lumpkin

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The Advanced Photon Source (APS injector complex includes an option for rf photocathode (PC gun beam injection into the 450-MeV S-band linac. At the 150-MeV point, a four-dipole chicane was used to compress the micropulse bunch length from a few ps to sub-0.5 ps (FWHM. Noticeable enhancements of the optical transition radiation (OTR signal sampled after the APS chicane were then observed as has been reported in the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS injector commissioning. A far-infrared (FIR coherent transition radiation detector and interferometer were used to monitor the bunch compression process and correlate the appearance of localized spikes of OTR signal (5 to 10 times brighter than adjacent areas within the beam-image footprint. We have performed spectral-dependency measurements at 375 MeV with a series of bandpass filters centered in 50-nm increments from 400 to 700 nm and with an imaging spectrometer and observed a broadband enhancement in these spikes. Mitigation concepts of the observed coherent OTR, which exhibits an intensity enhancement in the red part of the visible spectrum as compared to incoherent OTR, are described.

  10. Windowless transition between atmospheric pressure and high vacuum via differential pumping for synchrotron radiation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gog, T.; Casa, D. M.; Kuzmenko, I.; Krakora, R. J.; Bolin, T. B.; X-Ray Science Division

    2007-01-01

    A differential pump assembly is introduced which can provide a windowless transition between the full atmospheric pressure of an in-air sample environment and the high-vacuum region of a synchrotron radiation beamline, while providing a clear aperture of approximately 1 mm to pass through the X-ray beam from a modern third-generation synchrotron radiation source. This novel pump assembly is meant to be used as a substitute for an exit vacuum window on synchrotron beamlines, where the existence of such a window would negatively impact the coherent nature of the X-ray beam or would introduce parasitic scattering, distorting weak scattering signals from samples under study. It is found that the length of beam pipe necessary to reduce atmospheric pressure to below 10 mbar is only about 130 mm, making the expected photon transmission for hard X-rays through this pipe competitive with that of a regular Be beamline window. This result is due to turbulent flow dominating the first pumping stage, providing a mechanism of strong gas conductance limitation, which is further enhanced by introducing artificial surface roughness in the pipe. Successive reduction of pressure through the transitional flow regime into the high-vacuum region is accomplished over a length of several meters, using beam pipes of increasing diameter. While the pump assembly has not been tested with X-rays, possible applications are discussed in the context of coherent and small-angle scattering

  11. Straw Performance Studies and Quality Assurance for the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Cwetanski, Peter; Orava, Risto

    2006-01-01

    The Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC is part of the Inner Detector. It is designed as a robust and powerful gaseous detector that provides tracking through individual drift-tubes (straws) as well as particle identification via transition radiation (TR) detection. The straw tubes are operated with Xe-CO2-O2 70/27/3, a gas that combines the advantages of efficient TR absorption, a short electron drift time and minimum ageing effects. The modules of the barrel part of the TRT were built in the United States while the end-cap wheels are assembled at two Russian institutes. Acceptance tests of barrel modules and end-cap wheels are performed at CERN before assembly and integration with the Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) and the Pixel Detector. This thesis first describes simulations the TRT straw tube. The argon-based acceptance gas mixture as well as two xenon-based operating gases are examined for its properties. Drift velocities and Townsend coefficients are computed with the he...

  12. Radiative parameters for some transitions in Cu(II) and Ag(II) spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biemont, E.; Blagoev, K.; Campos, J.; Mayo, R.; Malcheva, G.; Ortiz, M.; Quinet, P.

    2005-01-01

    Radiative parameters for transitions depopulating the levels belonging to the 3d 8 4s 2 configuration of Cu(II) and 4d 9 6s and 4d 9 5d configurations of Ag(II) have been obtained both theoretically and experimentally. On the experimental side, a laser-produced plasma was used as a source of Cu(II) and Ag(II) spectra. The light emitted by the plasma was focused on the input slit of a grating monochromator coupled with a time-resolved optical multichannel analyzer system. Spectral response calibration of the experimental system was made using a deuterium lamp in the wavelength range extending from 200 to 400-bar nm, and a standard tungsten lamp in the range from 350 to 600-bar nm. The transition probabilities were obtained using measured branching fractions and available radiative lifetimes of the corresponding states. On the theoretical side, a relativistic Hartree-Fock (HFR) approach, including core-polarization effects, has been used for the calculations. A reasonable agreement theory-experiment has been observed

  13. From 'Image Gently' to image intelligently: a personalized perspective on diagnostic radiation risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillerman, R.P. [Department of Pediatric Radiology, Texas Children' s Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-10-15

    The risk of ionizing radiation from diagnostic imaging has been a popular topic in the radiology literature and lay press. Communicating the magnitude of risk to patients and caregivers is problematic because of the uncertainty in estimates derived principally from epidemiological studies of large populations, and alternative approaches are needed to provide a scientific basis for personalized risk estimates. The underlying patient disease and life expectancy greatly influence risk projections. Research into the biological mechanisms of radiation-induced DNA damage and repair challenges the linear no-threshold dose-response assumption and reveals that individuals vary in sensitivity to radiation. Studies of decision-making psychology show that individuals are highly susceptible to irrational biases when judging risks. Truly informed medical decision-making that respects patient autonomy requires appropriate framing of radiation risks in perspective with other risks and with the benefits of imaging. To follow the principles of personalized medicine and treat patients according to their specific phenotypic and personality profiles, diagnostic imaging should optimally be tailored not only to patient size, body region and clinical indication, but also to underlying disease conditions, radio-sensitivity and risk perception and preferences that vary among individuals. (orig.)

  14. Effects of anatomical position on esophageal transit time: A biomagnetic diagnostic technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova-Fraga, Teodoro; Sosa, Modesto; Wiechers, Carlos; la Roca-Chiapas, Jose Maria De; Moreles, Alejandro Maldonado; Bernal-Alvarado, Jesus; Huerta-Franco, Raquel

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the esophageal transit time (ETT) and compare its mean value among three anatomical inclinations of the body; and to analyze the correlation of ETT to body mass index (BMI). METHODS: A biomagnetic technique was implemented to perform this study: (1) The transit time of a magnetic marker (MM) through the esophagus was measured using two fluxgate sensors placed over the chest of 14 healthy subjects; (2) the ETT was assessed in three anatomical positions (at upright, fowler, and supine positions; 90º, 45º and 0º, respectively). RESULTS: ANOVA and Tuckey post-hoc tests demonstrated significant differences between ETT mean of the different positions. The ETT means were 5.2 ± 1.1 s, 6.1 ± 1.5 s, and 23.6 ± 9.2 s for 90º, 45º and 0º, respectively. Pearson correlation results were r = -0.716 and P 0.05 according the subject’s BMI. CONCLUSION: We demonstrated that using this biomagnetic technique, it is possible to measure the ETT and the effects of the anatomical position on the ETT. PMID:18837088

  15. The influence of gamma radiation on the molecular weight and glass transition of PLLA and HAp/PLLA nanocomposite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milicevic, D.; Trifunovic, S.; Dojcilovic, J.; Ignjatovic, N.; Suljovrujic, E.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of gamma radiation on the molecular weight and glass transition behaviour of poly-L-lactide (PLLA) and hydroxyapatite/poly-L-lactide (HAp/PLLA) nanocomposite has been studied. Since PLLA exposed to high-energy radiation in the presence of air is prone to chain scission reactions and large degradation, changes in molecular weight were obtained by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Alterations in the glass transition behaviour were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The apparent activation energy (ΔH*) for glass transition was determined on the basis of the heating rate dependence of the glass transition temperature (T g ). Our findings support the fact that chain scission is the main reason for the decrease of T g and ΔH* with the absorbed dose. Furthermore, more intensive chain scission degradation of PLLA was observed in HAp/PLLA and can only be ascribed to the presence of HAp nanoparticles. Consequently, initial differences in the glass transition temperature and/or apparent activation energy of PLLA and HAp/PLLA became more pronounced with absorbed dose. This study reveals that radiation-induced changes in molecular weight and glass transition temperature occur in a predictable and fairly accurate manner. Therefore, gamma radiation can be used not only for sterilization but also for tailoring desirable end-use properties of these biomaterials.

  16. Theoretical oscillator strengths, transition probabilities, and radiative lifetimes of levels in Pb V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colón, C., E-mail: cristobal.colon@upm.es [Dpto. Física Aplicada. E.U.I.T. Industrial, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ronda de Valencia 3, 28012 Madrid (Spain); Alonso-Medina, A. [Dpto. Física Aplicada. E.U.I.T. Industrial, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ronda de Valencia 3, 28012 Madrid (Spain); Porcher, P. [Laboratoire de Chimie Appliquée de l’Etat Solide, CNRS-UMR 7574, Paris (France)

    2014-01-15

    Theoretical values of oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for 306 spectral lines arising from the 5d{sup 9}ns(n=7,8,9),5d{sup 9}np(n=6,7),5d{sup 9}6d, and 5d{sup 9} 5f configurations, and radiative lifetimes of 9 levels, of Pb V have been obtained. These values were obtained in intermediate coupling (IC) and using ab initio relativistic Hartree–Fock calculations including core-polarization effects. We use for the IC calculations the standard method of least squares fitting of experimental energy levels by means of computer codes from Cowan. We included in these calculations the 5d{sup 8}6s6p and 5d{sup 8}6s{sup 2} configurations. These calculations have facilitated the identification of the 214.25, 216.79, and 227.66 nm spectral lines of Pb V. In the absence of experimental results of oscillator strengths and transition probabilities, we could not make a direct comparison with our results. However, the Stark broadening parameters calculated from these values are in excellent agreement with experimental widening found in the literature. -- Highlights: •Theoretical values of transition probabilities of Pb V have been obtained. •We use for the IC calculations the standard method of least square. •The parameters calculated from these values are in agreement with the experimental values.

  17. Excited meson radiative transitions from lattice QCD using variationally optimized operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shultz, Christian J. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Dudek, Jozef J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Edwards, Robert G. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-06-02

    We explore the use of 'optimized' operators, designed to interpolate only a single meson eigenstate, in three-point correlation functions with a vector-current insertion. These operators are constructed as linear combinations in a large basis of meson interpolating fields using a variational analysis of matrices of two-point correlation functions. After performing such a determination at both zero and non-zero momentum, we compute three-point functions and are able to study radiative transition matrix elements featuring excited state mesons. The required two- and three-point correlation functions are efficiently computed using the distillation framework in which there is a factorization between quark propagation and operator construction, allowing for a large number of meson operators of definite momentum to be considered. We illustrate the method with a calculation using anisotopic lattices having three flavors of dynamical quark all tuned to the physical strange quark mass, considering form-factors and transitions of pseudoscalar and vector meson excitations. In conclusion, the dependence on photon virtuality for a number of form-factors and transitions is extracted and some discussion of excited-state phenomenology is presented.

  18. Monochromatic coherent transition and diffraction radiation from a relativistic electron bunch train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumenko, G.; Potylitsyn, A.; Shevelev, M.; Karataev, P.; Shipulya, M.; Bleko, V.

    2018-04-01

    Electron beams of most accelerators have a bunched structure and are synchronized with the accelerating RF field. Due to modulation of the electron beam with frequency ν RF one can expect to observe resonances with frequencies ν k=kṡ ν RF in radiation spectrum generated via any spontaneous emission mechanism (k is an integer and the resonance order). In this paper we present the results of spectral measurements of coherent transition radiation (CTR) generated by an electron bunch train from the Tomsk microtron with ν RF=2.63GHz in the spectral frequency range from 8 to 35 GHz. We also measured the spectrum of coherent diffraction radiation and demonstrated that the observed spectra in both cases consist of monochromatic lines. For spectral measurements the Martin-Puplett interferometer with spectral resolution of 800 MHz (FWMH) was employed. Using a waveguide frequency cut-off we were able to exclude several spectral lines to observe higher resonance orders of up to k =7.

  19. Backscatter radiation at tissue-titanium interfaces; Biological effects from diagnostic 65 kVp X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosengren, B. (Department of Radiation Sciences, Uppsala University (Sweden) Dept. of Oncology, University Hospital, Bergen (Norway)); Wulff, L. (Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Central Hospital, Boden (Sweden)); Carlsson, E. (Department of Radiation Sciences, Uppsala University (Sweden)); Carlsson, J. (Department of Radiation Sciences, Uppsala University (Sweden)); Strid, K.G. (Dept. of Handicap Research, Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden)); Montelius, A. (Dept. of Hospital Physics, University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden))

    1993-01-01

    The induced secondary electrons from a metal surface by diagnostic X-rays are thought to contribute to cell damage near the tissue-metal boundaries of metal implants. Titanium implants are becoming increasingly more popular for tissue reconstructions and it is rather often desirable to take radiographs of the operated area. In this study we compared the biological effects of radiation on cultured mammalian test cells grown on titanium plates with the radiation effects on cells that were grown on plastic control plates. In order to study the acute radiation effects on cell growth it was necessary to work with rather high radiation doses (0.7-5 Gy). Photon energies, suitable for diagnostic radiography in odontology, 65 kV, were applied. We found that the cells grown on titanium plates were, in terms of the applied dose in the surrounding culture medium, more sensitive to the irradiations than the cells growing on plastic plates. The survival curve for the cells on titanium had a steeper slope, showed no shoulder in the low-dose region and looked like curves normally obtained for high LET radiation. It was not possible to resolve to what degree the titanium-dependent changes were due to an increased dose near the titanium surface or to a change in the radiobiological effectiveness. Although there was a significant decrease in cellular survival near the metal, postoperative intraoral radiography after titanium implantations need not be excluded. The maximal doses given in odontological X-ray examinations are less than 1 mGy and, if the results in this study are applied, the biological effects near the titanium implant will correspond to biological effects in soft tissue of doses less than 20 mGy which is lower than the doses that give acute effects. The risk of acute healing disturbances are significant only at much higher radiation doses. (orig.).

  20. MERRA 3D IAU Diagnostic, Radiation, Time average 3-hourly (1.25x1.25L42) V5.2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MAT3CPRAD or tavg3_3d_rad_Cp data product is the MERRA Data Assimilation System 3-Dimensional radiation diagnostic that is time averaged on pressure levels at a...

  1. MERRA 3D IAU Diagnostic, Radiation, Diurnal (1.25x1.25L42) V5.2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MATUCPRAD or tavgU_3d_rad_Cp data product is the MERRA Data Assimilation System 3-Dimensional radiation diagnostic that is time averaged on pressure levels at a...

  2. MERRA 3D IAU Diagnostic, Radiation, Monthly Mean (1.25x1.25L42) V5.2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MATMCPRAD or tavgM_3d_rad_Cp data product is the MERRA Data Assimilation System 3-Dimensional radiation diagnostic that is time averaged on pressure levels at a...

  3. Ages and transit times as important diagnostics of model performance for predicting carbon dynamics in terrestrial vegetation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos-Núñez, Verónika; Richardson, Andrew D.; Sierra, Carlos A.

    2018-03-01

    The global carbon cycle is strongly controlled by the source/sink strength of vegetation as well as the capacity of terrestrial ecosystems to retain this carbon. These dynamics, as well as processes such as the mixing of old and newly fixed carbon, have been studied using ecosystem models, but different assumptions regarding the carbon allocation strategies and other model structures may result in highly divergent model predictions. We assessed the influence of three different carbon allocation schemes on the C cycling in vegetation. First, we described each model with a set of ordinary differential equations. Second, we used published measurements of ecosystem C compartments from the Harvard Forest Environmental Measurement Site to find suitable parameters for the different model structures. And third, we calculated C stocks, release fluxes, radiocarbon values (based on the bomb spike), ages, and transit times. We obtained model simulations in accordance with the available data, but the time series of C in foliage and wood need to be complemented with other ecosystem compartments in order to reduce the high parameter collinearity that we observed, and reduce model equifinality. Although the simulated C stocks in ecosystem compartments were similar, the different model structures resulted in very different predictions of age and transit time distributions. In particular, the inclusion of two storage compartments resulted in the prediction of a system mean age that was 12-20 years older than in the models with one or no storage compartments. The age of carbon in the wood compartment of this model was also distributed towards older ages, whereas fast cycling compartments had an age distribution that did not exceed 5 years. As expected, models with C distributed towards older ages also had longer transit times. These results suggest that ages and transit times, which can be indirectly measured using isotope tracers, serve as important diagnostics of model structure

  4. Ages and transit times as important diagnostics of model performance for predicting carbon dynamics in terrestrial vegetation models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ceballos-Núñez

    2018-03-01

    diagnostics of model structure and could largely help to reduce uncertainties in model predictions. Furthermore, by considering age and transit times of C in vegetation compartments as distributions, not only their mean values, we obtain additional insights into the temporal dynamics of carbon use, storage, and allocation to plant parts, which not only depends on the rate at which this C is transferred in and out of the compartments but also on the stochastic nature of the process itself.

  5. Results of a Direct Search Using Synchrotron Radiation for the Low-Energy (229)Th Nuclear Isomeric Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeet, Justin; Schneider, Christian; Sullivan, Scott T; Rellergert, Wade G; Mirzadeh, Saed; Cassanho, A; Jenssen, H P; Tkalya, Eugene V; Hudson, Eric R

    2015-06-26

    We report the results of a direct search for the (229)Th (I(π)=3/2(+)←5/2(+)) nuclear isomeric transition, performed by exposing (229)Th-doped LiSrAlF(6) crystals to tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation and observing any resulting fluorescence. We also use existing nuclear physics data to establish a range of possible transition strengths for the isomeric transition. We find no evidence for the thorium nuclear transition between 7.3 eV and 8.8 eV with transition lifetime (1-2) s≲τ≲(2000-5600)  s. This measurement excludes roughly half of the favored transition search area and can be used to direct future searches.

  6. Radiation safety and quality assurance in diagnostic x-ray imaging 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servonmaa, A.

    1999-04-01

    In the European Union, the Directive 97/43/Euratom concerning the medical use of radiation brings many new tasks to radiation users. Quality assurance, patient dose measurement, staff training and clinical audit are among the most essential of these tasks. The Finnish radiation legislation has been modified to comply with the Directive. Much work is still required for practical implementation of these rules. This report deals with applications of the medical radiation Directive. Most applications are still at the planning stage, and clear guidance is lacking. However, the users have to know in time about these plans and future duties concerning them. Experience on quality assurance and clinical audit in hospitals are especially valuable in providing practical information on benefits and problems of these practices. Other radiation related topics, such as radiation risks, radioactivity in foods, and use of radiation in other European countries, are also included in the report. (orig.)

  7. Patients with IBD are exposed to high levels of ionizing radiation through CT scan diagnostic imaging: a five-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeker, Karen I; Lam, Simon; Birchall, Iain; Fedorak, Richard N

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the total effective dose of ionizing radiation from abdominal diagnostic imaging in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) over a 5-year period. Radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging is becoming increasingly common in IBD patients, in part due the availability of computed tomography (CT). Increased risk of malignancy has been associated with radiation exposure. This is a retrospective chart review. A university-based gastroenterology database was searched for patients with a diagnosis of Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC) seen between 2003 and 2008. The cumulative ionizing radiation exposure, expressed in milli-Sieverts (mSv), was then calculated from standard tables and by counting the number of abdominal imaging studies. Patients with CD had higher cumulative radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging than patients with UC (14.3 ± 1.45 mSv/5-y period vs. 5.9 ± 0.81 mSv/5-y period, P=0.00003). Three-quarters of the radiation exposure in both CD and UC was from CT scans. Thirty-four percent (127 of 373) of CD patients had CT scans, compared with just 20% (37 of 182) of UC patients. Importantly, 7% of CD patients were exposed to high levels of radiation (>50 mSv/5 y), in contrast to none of the UC patients. Patients with IBD, and especially CD patients, undergo frequent diagnostic imaging and thus significant exposure to ionizing radiation. This radiation exposure reaches high levels in 7% of CD patients, mainly from CT scanning. Efforts should be made to minimize the radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging by reducing either the number of studies or radiation dose in modalities with ionizing radiation.

  8. Quality guarantee of images as a way for obtained lower levels of radiation doses in diagnostic x-ray rooms: criteria for licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellanos, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    This work constitutes a criticism to the present system for licensing in diagnostic x-ray installations in Guatemala. A series of recommendations are made with the aim of obtaining the best diagnostic imaging. This procedure leads to obtain lower doses of radiation for patients and workers

  9. Observation of multiphase magnetic state of hematite crystal during Morin transition by the method of section topography of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shchetinkin, S.A.; Kvardakov, V.V.; Viler, Eh.; Barushel', Zh.; Shlenker, M.

    2005-01-01

    The boundaries between weak ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases in hematite crystals during Morin transition are detected by the section topography method by synchrotron radiation. It is shown that these boundaries are parallel to (111) surface hence magnetic phases during Morin transition separate the crystal by layers. Change of layer depth in dependence on temperature and magnetic field, and interaction interphase boundaries with crystal defects are observed [ru

  10. On Application of Inverse Radon Transform for Diagnostics of Asymetric Plasmatic Radiation Sources

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlína, Jan; Chvála, František

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 4 (2006), s. 317-325 ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/04/1341; GA ČR(CZ) GA202/05/0728 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20570509 Keywords : radiating plasma * radiation intensity * side-on radiation profiles Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  11. Further time-resolved electron-beam characterizations with optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source Accelerator Systems Div.; Wilke, M.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1992-12-31

    Time-resolved characterizations of electron beams using optical transition radiation (OTR) as a prompt conversion mechanism have recently been extended on the Los Alamos Free-electron Laser (FEL) facility 40-MeV linac. Two key timescales for rf-linac driven FELs are the micropulse (10 ps) and the macropulse (5 {mu}s to 1 ms). In the past we have used gated, intensified cameras to select a single or few micropulses (25 to 400 ns gate width) out of the pulse train to evaluate submacropulse effects. Recently, we have obtained some of the first measurements of micropulse bunch length (7 to 10 ps) and submacropulse spatialposition and profile using OTR and a Hamamatsu streak camera. Additionally, micropulse elongation effects and head-to-tail transverse kick effects are reported as a function of charge.

  12. Further time-resolved electron-beam characterizations with optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source Accelerator Systems Div.); Wilke, M.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Time-resolved characterizations of electron beams using optical transition radiation (OTR) as a prompt conversion mechanism have recently been extended on the Los Alamos Free-electron Laser (FEL) facility 40-MeV linac. Two key timescales for rf-linac driven FELs are the micropulse (10 ps) and the macropulse (5 [mu]s to 1 ms). In the past we have used gated, intensified cameras to select a single or few micropulses (25 to 400 ns gate width) out of the pulse train to evaluate submacropulse effects. Recently, we have obtained some of the first measurements of micropulse bunch length (7 to 10 ps) and submacropulse spatialposition and profile using OTR and a Hamamatsu streak camera. Additionally, micropulse elongation effects and head-to-tail transverse kick effects are reported as a function of charge.

  13. Optical transition radiation measurements for the Los Alamos and Boeing Free-Electron Laser experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Feldman, R.B.; Feldman, D.W.; Apgar, S.A.; Calsten, B.E.; Fiorito, R.B.; Rule, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    Optical transition radiation (OTR) measurements of the electron-beam emittance have been performed at a location just before the wiggler in the Los Alamos Free-Electron Laser (FEL) experiment. Beam profiles and beam divergence patterns from a single macropulse were recorded simultaneously using two intensified charge-injection device (CID) television cameras and an optical beamsplitter. Both single-foil OTR and two-foil OTR interference experiments were performed. Preliminary results are compared to a reference variable quadrupole, single screen technique. New aspects of using OTR properties for pointing the e-beam on the FEL oscillator axis, as well as measuring e-beam emittance are addressed. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  14. Time-resolved electron-beam characterizations with optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Wilke, M.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Time-resolved characterizations of electron beams using optical transition radiation (OTR) as a prompt conversion mechanism have recently been extended on the Los Alamos Free-electron Laser (FEL) facility 40-MeV linac. Two key timescales for rf-linac driven FELs are the micropulse (10 ps) and the macropulse (5 {mu}s to 1 ms). In the past we have used gated, intensified cameras to select a single or few micropulses (25 to 400 ns gate width) out of the pulse train to evaluate submacropulse effects. Recently, we have obtained some of the first measurements of micropulse bunch length (7 to 10 ps) and submacropulse spatial position and profile using OTR and a Hamamatsu streak camera. Additionally, micropulse elongation effects and head-to-tail transverse kicks are reported as a function of charge.

  15. Time-resolved electron-beam characterizations with optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wilke, M.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1992-09-01

    Time-resolved characterizations of electron beams using optical transition radiation (OTR) as a prompt conversion mechanism have recently been extended on the Los Alamos Free-electron Laser (FEL) facility 40-MeV linac. Two key timescales for rf-linac driven FELs are the micropulse (10 ps) and the macropulse (5 {mu}s to 1 ms). In the past we have used gated, intensified cameras to select a single or few micropulses (25 to 400 ns gate width) out of the pulse train to evaluate submacropulse effects. Recently, we have obtained some of the first measurements of micropulse bunch length (7 to 10 ps) and submacropulse spatial position and profile using OTR and a Hamamatsu streak camera. Additionally, micropulse elongation effects and head-to-tail transverse kicks are reported as a function of charge.

  16. High resolution beam monitoring with optical transition radiation at 3 MeV electron energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specka, A.; Bernard, D.; Guirlet, R.; Jacquet, F.; Mine, P.; Montes, B.; Morano, R.; Poilleux, P.; Amiranoff, F.; Morillo, J.

    1993-01-01

    In the framework of the plasma beat wave accelerator experiment at Ecole Polytechnique, high precision position and focussing monitoring of a 3 MeV electron beam is needed. A device is proposed that uses backward optical transition radiation (OTR) from a tilted metal foil held into the beam. For an electron energy of 3 MeV, OTR is emitted within a large solid angle (typical apex angle about 40 degrees) around the direction of specular reflection. The design requirements are a high resolution of the imaging optics (∼ 10 μm), a high sensitivity (∼ 10 μA beam current, not focussed), robustness, and low cost. A prototype has been constructed and successfully tested. A similar device will be used for adjusting a laser focal spot on an electron focal spot, and for monitoring the beam on entry and exit of a gas vessel

  17. Influence of semiclassical plasma on the energy levels and radiative transitions in highly charged ions★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hong-Wei; Chen, Zhan-Bin; Chen, Wen-Cong; Liu, Xiao-Bin; Fu, Nian; Wang, Kai

    2017-11-01

    Considering the quantum effects of diffraction and the collective screening effects, the potential of test charge in semiclassical plasmas is derived. It is generalized exponential screened Coulomb potential. Using the Ritz variational method incorporating this potential, the effects of semiclassical plasma on the energy levels and radiative transitions are investigated systematically, taking highly charged H-like ion as an example. The Debye plasma model is also employed for comparison purposes. Comparisons and analysis are made between these two sets of results and the differences are discussed. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic and Molecular Data and their Applications", edited by Gordon W.F. Drake, Jung-Sik Yoon, Daiji Kato, Grzegorz Karwasz.

  18. Integrated High-Rate Transition Radiation Detector and Tracking Chamber for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD-6 \\\\ \\\\Over the past five years, RD-6 has developed a transition radiation detector and charged particle tracker for high rate operation at LHC. The detector elements are based on C-fibre reinforced kapton straw tubes of 4~mm diameter filled with a Xenon gas mixture. Detailed measurements with and without magnetic field have been performed in test beams, and in particular have demonstrated the possibility of operating straw tubes at very high rate (up to 20~MHz) with accurate drift-time measurement accuracy. A full-scale engineering prototype containing 10~000 straws is presently under assembly and will be accurately measured with a powerful X-ray tube. Integrated front-end electronics with fast readout have been designed and successfully operated in test beam. \\\\ \\\\Finally extensive simulations performed for ATLAS have shown that such a detector will provide powerful pattern recognition, accurate momentum measurements, efficient level-2 triggering and excellent electron identification, even at the highe...

  19. Resonance effects of transition radiation emitted from thin foil stacks using electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awata, Takaaki; Yajima, Kazuaki; Tanaka, Takashi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering] [and others

    1997-03-01

    Transition Radiation(TR) X rays are expected to be a high brilliant X-ray source because the interference among TR X rays emitted from many thin foils placed periodically in vacuum can increase their intensity and make them quasi-monochromatic. In order to study the interference (resonance) effects of TR, we measured the energy spectra of TR for several sets of thin-foil stacks at various emission angles. It was found that the resonance effects of TR are classified into intrafoil and interfoil resonances and the intensity of TR X rays increases nonlinearly with increasing foil number, attributing to the interfoil resonance. It became evident that the brilliance of TR is as high as that of SR. (author)

  20. A high rate transition radiation detector for particle identification in a hadron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Errede, D.; Sheaff, M.; Fenker, H.; Mantsch, P.

    1989-08-01

    A Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) was built for the purpose of tagging beam particles in a high rate (∼2 MHz) 250 GeV/c hadron beam during data taking for Experiment 769 at Fermilab. The availability of a good ''tool kit'', including a Monte Carlo program which could reliably predict the detector performance, made it possible to design and build the TRD in approximately one year. Pion or proton samples, each with a small contamination due to the other, could be selected with high efficiency by making cuts on the number of planes of the TRD registering hits for each incident beam particle. The detector is expected to work well to separate kaons from pions in the 500 GeV/c negative beam for E791. 15 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  1. Disability transitions after 30 months in three community-dwelling diagnostic groups in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pedro-Cuesta, Jesús; García-Sagredo, Pilar; Alcalde-Cabero, Enrique; Alberquilla, Angel; Damián, Javier; Bosca, Graciela; López-Rodríguez, Fernando; Carmona, Montserrat; Carmona, Monserrat; de Tena-Dávila, María J; García-Olmos, Luis; Salvador, Carlos H

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about changes in disability over time among community-dwelling patients. Accordingly, this study sought to assess medium-term disability transitions. 300 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic heart failure and stroke patients living at home in Madrid were selected from general practitioner lists. In 2009, disability was assessed after a mean of 30 months using the World Health Organisation (WHO) Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0). Follow-up was completed using death registries. Losses to follow-up were due to: death, 56; institutionalisation, 9; non-location, 18; and non-participation, 17. Changes in WHODAS 2.0 scores and life status were described and analysed using Cox and multinomial regression. Disability at end of follow-up was imputed for 56 deceased and 44 surviving patients. Mean disability scores for 200 surviving patients at end of follow-up were similar to baseline scores for the whole group, higher than their own baseline scores, and rose by 16.3% when imputed values were added. The strongest Cox predictors of death were: age over 84 years, adjusted hazard ratios with 95%CI 8.18 (3.06-21.85); severe/complete vs. no/mild disability, 5.18 (0.68-39.48); and stroke compared to COPD, 1.40 (0.67-2.91). Non-participants and institutionalised patients had higher proportions with severe/complete baseline disability. A one-point change in baseline WHODAS 2.0 score predicted independent increases in risk of 12% (8%-15%) for severe/complete disability or death. A considerably high proportion of community-dwelling patients diagnosed with COPD, CHF and stroke undergo medium-term changes in disability or vital status. The main features of the emerging pattern for this group appear to be as follows: approximately two-thirds of patients continue living at home with moderately reduced functional status; 1/3 die or worsen to severe/complete disability; and 1/10 improve. Baseline disability scores, age and diagnosis are

  2. Disability transitions after 30 months in three community-dwelling diagnostic groups in Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús de Pedro-Cuesta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about changes in disability over time among community-dwelling patients. Accordingly, this study sought to assess medium-term disability transitions. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 300 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, chronic heart failure and stroke patients living at home in Madrid were selected from general practitioner lists. In 2009, disability was assessed after a mean of 30 months using the World Health Organisation (WHO Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0. Follow-up was completed using death registries. Losses to follow-up were due to: death, 56; institutionalisation, 9; non-location, 18; and non-participation, 17. Changes in WHODAS 2.0 scores and life status were described and analysed using Cox and multinomial regression. Disability at end of follow-up was imputed for 56 deceased and 44 surviving patients. RESULTS: Mean disability scores for 200 surviving patients at end of follow-up were similar to baseline scores for the whole group, higher than their own baseline scores, and rose by 16.3% when imputed values were added. The strongest Cox predictors of death were: age over 84 years, adjusted hazard ratios with 95%CI 8.18 (3.06-21.85; severe/complete vs. no/mild disability, 5.18 (0.68-39.48; and stroke compared to COPD, 1.40 (0.67-2.91. Non-participants and institutionalised patients had higher proportions with severe/complete baseline disability. A one-point change in baseline WHODAS 2.0 score predicted independent increases in risk of 12% (8%-15% for severe/complete disability or death. CONCLUSIONS: A considerably high proportion of community-dwelling patients diagnosed with COPD, CHF and stroke undergo medium-term changes in disability or vital status. The main features of the emerging pattern for this group appear to be as follows: approximately two-thirds of patients continue living at home with moderately reduced functional status; 1/3 die or worsen to severe/complete disability; and 1

  3. Experience of combined cisplatin and radiation therapy for advanced urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Toshiaki; Utsunomiya, Masato; Itoh, Hiroshi; Itatani, Hiroaki; Namiki, Mikio.

    1987-01-01

    Since March, 1981, 13 patients with locally advanced transitional cell carcinoma were treated by combined cisdiamminedichloroplatinum (cisplatin) and full dose radiotherapy. They were 10 men and 3 women. The patient ages ranged from 42 to 79 years, with a median of 59.5 years. The primary sites of transitional cell carcinoma were bladder in 5, ureter in 6, renal pelvis in 1 and prostate in 1. Radiotherapy consisted of a mean tumor dose of 48.7 gray, with a range of 40 to 66.4 gray, was administered with cobalt 60. Cisplatin was infused 5 days a week with a daily dose of 20 to 30 mg. 4 patients recieved 2 courses of cisplatin infusion and others 1 or less. Of the 4 evaluable patients 3 (75 %) achieved a complete response. Toxicity was evaluated for the 13 patients. Mainly gastrointestinal toxicity was noted: appetite loss in 9 (69.2 %), nausea and/or vomiting in 5 (38.5 %) and diarrhea in 5 (38.5 %). Leukocytopenia was noted in 7 patients (53.9 %), but in no one leukocyte count was less than 2000/mm 3 . Mild thrombocytopenia was noted only in 3 patients (23.1 %). All of these toxicities were mild, and the patients recovered soon after the therapy. Herein it is discussed about future problems such as solution of interaction mechanism, detection of practical dose and administering method of cisplatin and radiation. (author)

  4. Dose and diagnostic performance comparison between phase-contrast mammography with synchrotron radiation and digital mammography: a clinical study report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedon, Christian; Rigon, Luigi; Arfelli, Fulvia; Dreossi, Diego; Quai, Elisa; Tonutti, Maura; Tromba, Giuliana; Cova, Maria Assunta; Longo, Renata

    2018-01-01

    Two dosimetric quantities [mean glandular dose (MGD) and entrance surface air kerma (ESAK)] and the diagnostic performance of phase-contrast mammography with synchrotron radiation (MSR) are compared to conventional digital mammography (DM). Seventy-one patients (age range, 41 to 82 years) underwent MSR after a DM examination if questionable or suspicious breast abnormalities were not clarified by ultrasonography. The MGD and the ESAK delivered in both examinations were evaluated and compared. Two on-site radiologists rated the images in consensus according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System assessment categories, which were then correlated with the final diagnoses by means of statistical generalized linear models (GLMs). Receiver operating characteristic curves were also used to assess the diagnostic performance by comparing the area under the curve (AUC). An important MGD and ESAK reduction was observed in MSR due to the monoenergetic beam. In particular, an average 43% reduction was observed for the MGD and a reduction of more than 50% for the ESAK. GLM showed higher diagnostic accuracy, especially in terms of specificity, for MSR, confirmed by AUC analysis ([Formula: see text]). The study design implied that the population was characterized by a high prevalence of disease and that the radiologists, who read the DM images before referring the patient to MSR, could have been influenced in their assessments. Within these limitations, the use of synchrotron radiation with the phase-contrast technique applied to mammography showed an important dose reduction and a higher diagnostic accuracy compared with DM. These results could further encourage research on the translation of x-ray phase-contrast imaging into the clinics.

  5. Absolute scale power measurements of frequency-locked coherent transition radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roark A. Marsh

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available We report the absolute power measurement of frequency-locked terahertz coherent transition radiation (CTR from a train of electron bunches produced by a 17.14 GHz accelerator. Frequency measurements were obtained by two independent techniques: a wave meter with a video diode detector, and a double heterodyne system. Good agreement was seen between these two techniques. The emitted radiation was observed to be a comb of frequencies that are harmonics of the 17.14 GHz accelerator frequency. The heterodyne receiver system showed that each of the emitted harmonics has a very narrow bandwidth, about 25 MHz, which corresponds to the transform-limited bandwidth for the bunch train length of 40 ns. The highest observed frequency was 377.08 GHz, the 22nd harmonic of the 17.14 GHz accelerator frequency. The emitted CTR power was measured on an absolute scale to test the theory of CTR. The power was compared with calculations made using an electric field integral equation (EFIE formulation and excellent agreement was obtained. This agreement serves as a valuable benchmark of the EFIE code, proof of both its validity and usefulness.

  6. Construction of an end-cap module prototype for the ATLAS transition radiation tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Danielsson, H

    2000-01-01

    We have designed, built and tested an 8-plane module prototype for the end-cap of the ATLAS TRT (Transition Radiation Tracker). The overall mechanics as well as the detailed design of individual components are presented. The prototype contains over 6000 straw tubes with a diameter of 4 mm, filled with an active gas mixture of 70% Xe, 20% CF4 and 10% CO//2. Very tight requirements on radiation hardness (10 Mrad and 2 multiplied by l0**1**4 neutrons per cm**2) straw straightness (sagitta less than 300 m), wire positions and leak tightness put great demands upon design and assembly. In order to verify the design, the stability of the wire tension, straw straightness, high-voltage performance and total leak rate have been measured and the results are presented. Some examples of dedicated assembly tooling and testing procedures are also given. Finally, the results of the calculations and measurements of both mechanical behaviour and wire offset are presented. 6 Refs.

  7. Aging and Gas Filtration Studies in the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Sprachmann, Gerald; Störi, Herbert

    2006-01-01

    The Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is one of three particle tracking detectors of the ATLAS Inner Detector whose goal is to exploit the highly exciting new physics potential at CERN's next accelerator, the so-called Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The TRT consists of 370000 straw proportional tubes of 4 mm diameter with a 30 micron anode wire, which will be operated with a Xe/CO2/O2 gas mixture at a high voltage of approximately 1.5 kV. This detector enters a new area that requires it to operate at unprecedented high rates and integrated particle fluxes. Full functionality of the detector over the lifetime (10 years) of the experiment is demanded. Aging of gaseous detectors is a term for the degradation of detector performance during exposure to ionizing radiation. This phenomenon involves very complex physical and chemical processes that are induced by pollution originating from very small amounts of silicon-based substances in some components of the gas system. This work presents a review of previous aging...

  8. Radiation safety and quality in diagnostic x-ray imaging 2001; Saeteilyturvallisuus ja laatu roentgendiagnostiikassa 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servomaa, A.; Parviainen, T. (eds.)

    2001-05-01

    The obligations of the medical exposure directive (97/43/Euratom) for hospitals dominate the current activities in radiation protection in medical radiology. The directive gives special emphasis to radiation exposure of children, to examinations with high radiation doses and to radiation exposure in health screening programmes. The most important examinations with high doses are radiological interventions, where even acute skin effects are possible, and the computed tomography where the number of CT examinations makes only about 5% from the total number of x-ray examinations but the collective effective dose about 40% from the combined collective effective dose of all x-ray examinations. In the research projects financed by the European Commission, radiation exposures to paediatric patients have been measured in radiography, fluoroscopy and CT, and various dose assessment methods have been compared to develop a method for national follow-up of patients' radiation dose. The newest research project is focused on dosimetry and quality assurance in interventional radiology and digital imaging. Other actual topics are the development of radiation protection regulations and quality systems, education and training programmes, and clinical audits. This report deals with new radiation protection guides and recommendations and the education and training of radiological staff in radiation protection. One important topic is the development of national follow-up method of radiation exposure to patients and comparison of various dose assessment methods. Quality assurance in health care and in paediatric radiology, and the acceptance test and quality assurance measurements of radiological equipment are also described. (orig.)

  9. Optimization of a transition radiation detector for the compressed baryonic matter experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arend, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) of the compressed baryonic matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR has to provide electron-pion separation as well as charged-particle tracking. Within this work, thin and symmetric Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers (MWPCs) without additional drift region were proposed. the proposed prototypes feature a foil-based entrance window to minimize the material budget and to reduce the absorption probability of the generated TR photon. Based on the conceptual design of thin and symmetric MWPCs without drift region, multiple prototypes were constructed and their performance presented within this thesis. With the constructed prototypes of generations II and III the geometries of the wire and cathode planes were determined to be 4+4 mm and 5+5 mm. Based on the results of a performed test beam campaign in 2011 with this prototypes new prototypes of generation IV were manufactured and tested in a subsequent test beam campaign in 2012. Prototypes of different radiators were developed together with the MWPC prototypes. Along with regular foil radiators, foam-based radiator types made of polyethylene foam were utilized. Also radiators constructed in a sandwich design, which used different fiber materials confined with solid foam sheets, were used. For the prototypes without drift region, simulations of the electrostatic and mechanical properties were performed. The GARFIELD software package was used to simulate the electric field and to determine the resulting drift lines of the generated electrons. The mean gas amplification depending on the utilized gas and the applied anode voltage was simulated and the gas-gain homogeneity was verified. Since the thin foil-based entrance window experiences a deformation due to pressure differences inside and outside the MWPC, the variation on the gas gain depending on the deformation was simulated. The mechanical properties focusing on the stability of the entrance window was determined with a finiteelement

  10. Optimization of a transition radiation detector for the compressed baryonic matter experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arend, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) of the compressed baryonic matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR has to provide electron-pion separation as well as charged-particle tracking. Within this work, thin and symmetric Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers (MWPCs) without additional drift region were proposed. the proposed prototypes feature a foil-based entrance window to minimize the material budget and to reduce the absorption probability of the generated TR photon. Based on the conceptual design of thin and symmetric MWPCs without drift region, multiple prototypes were constructed and their performance presented within this thesis. With the constructed prototypes of generations II and III the geometries of the wire and cathode planes were determined to be 4+4 mm and 5+5 mm. Based on the results of a performed test beam campaign in 2011 with this prototypes new prototypes of generation IV were manufactured and tested in a subsequent test beam campaign in 2012. Prototypes of different radiators were developed together with the MWPC prototypes. Along with regular foil radiators, foam-based radiator types made of polyethylene foam were utilized. Also radiators constructed in a sandwich design, which used different fiber materials confined with solid foam sheets, were used. For the prototypes without drift region, simulations of the electrostatic and mechanical properties were performed. The GARFIELD software package was used to simulate the electric field and to determine the resulting drift lines of the generated electrons. The mean gas amplification depending on the utilized gas and the applied anode voltage was simulated and the gas-gain homogeneity was verified. Since the thin foil-based entrance window experiences a deformation due to pressure differences inside and outside the MWPC, the variation on the gas gain depending on the deformation was simulated. The mechanical properties focusing on the stability of the entrance window was determined with a finiteelement

  11. TRANSIT

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. TRANSIT. SYSTEM: DETERMINE 2D-POSITION GLOBALLY BUT INTERMITTENT (POST-FACTO). IMPROVED ACCURACY. PRINCIPLE: POLAR SATELLITES WITH INNOVATIONS OF: GRAVITY-GRADIENT ATTITUDE CONTROL; DRAG COMPENSATION. WORKS ...

  12. A strategy to optimize radiation exposure for non-contrast head CT: comparison with the Japanese diagnostic reference levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumamaru, Kanako K; Kogure, Yosuke; Suzuki, Michimasa; Hori, Masaaki; Nakanishi, Atsushi; Kamagata, Koji; Hagiwara, Akifumi; Andica, Christina; Ri, Keiken; Houshido, Naoyoshi; Aoki, Shigeki

    2016-06-01

    To describe how we performed a protocol review, analyzed data, identified opportunities to reduce radiation exposure, and then implemented a new imaging protocol for non-contrast adult head CT at our institution with reduced radiation exposure, using the Japanese diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) as the reference. After analyzing the CT dose index (CTDIvol) and dose length product (DLP) in all non-contrast adult head CT examinations performed during a 3-month period (September to November 2015) in order to identify a specific protocol that contributed to the above-DRL-level radiation exposure observed for non-contrast adult head CT at our institution, phantom studies with objective and subjective image quality analyses were performed to develop a new imaging protocol. After implementing the new protocol, its feasibility was evaluated in terms of radiation exposure, prevalence of significant disease detection, and subjective image quality. The review of 2040 examinations revealed that a helical protocol (CTDIvol = 93.4 mGy) with one of four CT scanners mainly contributed to the above-DRL-level radiation exposure (mean DLP at this scanner = 1401.2 mGy cm) in non-contrast adult head CT at our institution. To replace this protocol, the phantom study identified a wide-volume scan using 120 kVp, 350 mAs, a 4-cm detector, a slice thickness of 5 mm, and a CTDIvol of 69.8 mGy as a new protocol that yielded comparable image quality to the existing protocol. After the implementation of the new protocol, the overall mean DLP reduced to 1365 mGy cm without any apparent degradation of image quality. No significant decrease in the prevalence of significant findings after protocol revision was noted. We report the successful implementation of a new protocol with reduced radiation exposure for non-contrast head CT examinations.

  13. The ICRP principles applied to radiation protection of the patient in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, S.; Mattsson, S.

    1994-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) has published new recommendations in Publication 60. These take account of the new biological information and trends in the setting of radiation protection standards since 1977. The main principle for radiation protection of the patient is that the exposure should be justified not only at a broad level but also with respect to the individual patient. Protection arrangements should be optimised using reference dose levels as an upper bound of the optimisation process. The reference levels should be applied with flexibility and based on sound clinical judgement. (authors)

  14. Interview - a method for diagnostic and attitude formation to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsarova, N.; Katsarov, V.; Belcheva, Yu.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the experimental methodological model used for analyses of attitude changes. The analysis has been performed using two inquiries about ionizing radiation applications between 48 high level school students in Plovdiv, Bulgaria

  15. Quality initiatives: CT radiation dose reduction: how to implement change without sacrificing diagnostic quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, Eric P; Rong, X John; Cody, Dianna D; Ernst, Randy D; Fitzgerald, Nancy E; Kundra, Vikas

    2011-01-01

    The risks and benefits of using computed tomography (CT) as opposed to another imaging modality to accomplish a particular clinical goal should be weighed carefully. To accurately assess radiation risks and keep radiation doses as low as reasonably achievable, radiologists must be knowledgeable about the doses delivered during various types of CT studies performed at their institutions. The authors of this article propose a process improvement approach that includes the estimation of effective radiation dose levels, formulation of dose reduction goals, modification of acquisition protocols, assessment of effects on image quality, and implementation of changes necessary to ensure quality. A first step toward developing informed radiation dose reduction goals is to become familiar with the radiation dose values and radiation-associated health risks reported in the literature. Next, to determine the baseline dose values for a CT study at a particular institution, dose data can be collected from the CT scanners, interpreted, tabulated, and graphed. CT protocols can be modified to reduce overall effective dose by using techniques such as automated exposure control and iterative reconstruction, as well as by decreasing the number of scanning phases, increasing the section thickness, and adjusting the peak voltage (kVp setting), tube current-time product (milliampere-seconds), and pitch. Last, PDSA (plan, do, study, act) cycles can be established to detect and minimize negative effects of dose reduction methods on image quality.

  16. Radiation protection and quality assurance in diagnostic radiology - an IAEA coordinated research project in Asia and Eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oresegun, Modupe; LeHeron, J.; Maccia, C.; Padovani, R.; Vano, E.

    1999-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency currently has two parallel Coordinated Research Projects (CRP) running in Asia and Eastern Europe. The main objective of the CRPs is to raise the level of awareness in participating countries about the need for radiation protection for patients undergoing diagnostic radiology procedures. This is to be achieved by first assessing the status quo in a sample of hospitals and X-ray rooms in each participating country. A program of optimization of radiation protection for patients is then introduced by means of a comprehensive quality assurance program and the implementation of appropriate dose reduction methods, taking into account clinical requirements for diagnostically acceptable images. Patient dose assessment and image quality assessment are to be performed both before and after the introduction of the quality assurance program. The CRP is divided into two phases - the first is concerned with conventional radiography, while the second involves fluoroscopy and computed tomography. The CRP is still running, restricting the scope of this paper to a discussion of the approach being taken with the project. The project will be completed in 1998, with analysis to follow

  17. Radiation exposure of the Italian population due to medical diagnostic examinations in 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benassai, S.; Curatolo, M.; Dobici, F.; Indovina, P.L.; Pugliani, L.; Salvadori, P.

    1977-01-01

    The genetically significant dose received by the Italian population in 1975 due to the diagnostic X-ray examinations and radiopharmaceuticals was investigated and the results are presented. Concerning the diagnostic X-ray examinations the data were obtained by a representative sample and extrapolated over the whole population with reference to the over-all X-ray film consumption. From the reported data it can be concluded that about 50% of population was subjected to X-ray examinations and the genetically significant dose amounts to about 30 mrem. With reference to diagnostic use of radiopharmaceuticals the number of collected data was so large to be considered as representative of the situation. From the collected data it can be concluded that about 10% of population was subjected to these examinations and that the genetically significant dose is less than 2 mrem. Both for diagnostic X-ray examinations and use of radiopharmaceuticals results are here presented for the distribution of different uses and examinations. The genetically significant dose to which the Italian population was exposed in 1975 can be said to be of the order of 30 mrem. In view of lowering this dose some indications are presented with reference both to the legislative and technical measures

  18. Radiation protection in medicine (542) comparison of different dosimetry systems for dose measurements in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milkovic, D.; Ranogajec-Komor, M.; Miljanic, S.; Knezevic, Z.; Krpan, K.

    2006-01-01

    The dose measurement on patients in X-ray diagnostic is not simple, because low doses with low and various energies have to be measured. The aim of this preliminary study was to compare high sensitivity thermoluminescent dosimeter (T.L.D.) (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) and radio-photoluminescent (R.P.L.) glass dosimeters for dose measurements in routine X-ray diagnostic of chest of children. The energy dependence of the dosimeters was investigated in Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL). The energy range was 33- 65 keV mean energy, the dosimeters were placed free in air and on the water phantom. The results were compared to calculated values of Hp(10). The next step was the irradiation in a routine X-ray diagnostic unit. Irradiations were performed by the Shimadzu X-ray unit. The selected irradiation conditions were the same as that most commonly used for baby examinations. Doses were measured with dosimeters placed free-in-air and also with the dosimeters placed on the water phantom and baby phantom. The results show that the R.P.L. glass dosimeters and LiF:Mg,Cu,P based T.L.D. are suitable for low dose measurements in X-ray diagnostic. The uncertainty of dose determination is mainly caused by the energy dependence of dosimeters. (authors)

  19. Radiation protection in medicine (542) comparison of different dosimetry systems for dose measurements in diagnostic radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milkovic, D. [Srebrnjak, Specialized Hospital for Respiratory System Diseases in Children and Youth, Zagreb (Croatia); Ranogajec-Komor, M.; Miljanic, S.; Knezevic, Z.; Krpan, K. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2006-07-01

    The dose measurement on patients in X-ray diagnostic is not simple, because low doses with low and various energies have to be measured. The aim of this preliminary study was to compare high sensitivity thermoluminescent dosimeter (T.L.D.) (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) and radio-photoluminescent (R.P.L.) glass dosimeters for dose measurements in routine X-ray diagnostic of chest of children. The energy dependence of the dosimeters was investigated in Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL). The energy range was 33- 65 keV mean energy, the dosimeters were placed free in air and on the water phantom. The results were compared to calculated values of Hp(10). The next step was the irradiation in a routine X-ray diagnostic unit. Irradiations were performed by the Shimadzu X-ray unit. The selected irradiation conditions were the same as that most commonly used for baby examinations. Doses were measured with dosimeters placed free-in-air and also with the dosimeters placed on the water phantom and baby phantom. The results show that the R.P.L. glass dosimeters and LiF:Mg,Cu,P based T.L.D. are suitable for low dose measurements in X-ray diagnostic. The uncertainty of dose determination is mainly caused by the energy dependence of dosimeters. (authors)

  20. ESTIMATION OF CARDIAC CT ANGIOGRAPHY RADIATION DOSE TOWARD THE ESTABLISHMENT OF NATIONAL DIAGNOSTIC REFERENCE LEVEL FOR CCTA IN IRAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini Nasab, Seyed Mohammad Bagher; Shabestani-Monfared, Ali; Deevband, Mohammad Reza; Paydar, Reza; Nabahati, Mehrdad

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, with the introduction of 64-slice CT and dual-source CT technology, coronary CT angiography (CCTA) has emerged as a useful diagnostic imaging modality as a non-invasive assessment of coronary heart disease. CT produces a larger radiation dose than other imaging tests and cardiac CT involves higher radiation dose with the advances in the spatial and temporal resolution. The aims of this study are patient dose assessment and establishment of national diagnostic reference level for CCTA in Iran. A questionnaire was sent to CCTA centers. Data for patient and CT protocols were obtained. The volumetric CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose length product (DLP) and total DLP were considered in the 32 cm standard body phantom. Calculation of estimated effective dose (ED) was obtained by multiplying the DLP by a conversion factor [k = 0.014 mSv (mGy·cm)-1]. Mean value of CTDIvol and DLP for CCTA was 50 mGy and 825 mGy·cm. The third quartile (75th) of the distribution of mean CTDIvol (66.54 mGy) and DLP (1073 mGy·cm) values was expressed as the diagnostic reference level (DRL) for CCTA in Iran. The median of ED was 10.26 mSv and interquartile range of ED was 7.08-15.03 mSv. A large variety in CTDIvol and DLP among CT scanner and different sites due to variability in CT parameter is noted. It seems that training could help to reduce patient's dose. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Low doses ionizing radiation enhances the invasiveness of breast cancer cells by inducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xin; Li, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Ning; Yang, Qifeng; Moran, Meena S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Low doses ionizing irradiation would enhance the invasiveness of breast cancer cells by inducing EMT. → Low doses ionizing radiation induced morphologic changes in breast cancer cells. → Low doses ionizing radiation led to upregulation of mesenchymal markers and down-regulation of epithelial markers. → Low doses ionizing radiation increased migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process cellular morphologic and molecular alterations facilitate cell invasion. We hypothesized that low dose ionizing irradiation (LDIR) enhances the invasiveness of breast cancer cells by inducing EMT. The effects of LDIR on cellular morphology and the EMT markers of MCF-7 breast cancer cells were analyzed by western blot/RT-PCR and migration/invasion was examined using the transwell assay. We found that LDIR led to the phenotypic changes of EMT in MCF-7 cells and down-regulation of epithelial differentiation markers and transcriptional induction of mesenchymal markers. Furthermore, the radiated cells demonstrated enhanced migration/invasion MCF-7 cells compared with non-radiated cells. In summary, LDIR promotes the invasiveness of breast cancer cells through epithelial to mesenchymal transition. These findings may ultimately provide a new targeted approach for improving the therapeutic effectiveness of radiation in breast cancer.

  2. Diagnostic value of 18F-FDG uptake by spleen in acute radiation disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-jie WU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate whether 18F-FDG uptake can be applied in dosimetry to facilitate a rapid and accurate evaluation of individual radiation dosage after a nuclear accident. Methods Forty-eight Tibetan minipigs were randomly assigned into 6 groups, i.e., 0, 1, 2, 5, 8 and 11Gy groups. Animals in all except 0Gy group received total body irradiation (TBI with a 8MV X centrifugal linear accelerator, and 18F-FDG combined positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT were carried out before TBI, and also at 6, 24 and 72h after receiving TBI in different doses ranging from 1 to 11Gy. Spleen tissues and blood samples were collected for histological examination, apoptosis, and routine blood analysis. Results Mean standardized uptake values (SUVs of the spleen showed significant differences between experimental groups and control group. The spleen SUVs at 6h post-irradiation showed significant correlation with radiation dose; Spearman's correlation coefficient was 0.95(P<0.01. Histopathological observations showed that the degree of splenic damage was proportional to the radiation dose. Moreover, flow cytometry revealed that apoptosis was one of the major forms of splenic lymphocyte death. Conclusion In the Tibetan minipig model, it was shown that radiation doses bear a close relationship with the 18F-FDG uptake of spleen. This finding suggests that 18F-FDG PET/CT may be useful for the rapid detection of individual radiation dosage after acute radiation disease (ARD. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.07.08

  3. Dose assessment and radioprotective medical evaluation of prenatal radiation exposures to diagnostic X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruening, L.; Haehnel, S.; Arndt, D.

    1989-01-01

    The 2nd to 15th weeks after conception are assessed to be the critical time period for the induction of teratogenic radiation damage. In the GDR, women having incurred fetal doses in excess of 100 mGy are recommended to interrupt pregnancy. Of 275 patients advised in the National Board for Atomic Safety and Radiation Protection between 1978 and 1988, approximately 90% were found to have received fetal doses below 20 mGy. Only 4 women had been exposed to doses above 100 mGy. Exposure data were given in the form of tables, and discussed. (author)

  4. Barytes board: a cost effective radiation barrier material for use in diagnostic x-ray suites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of barium based products in protective barrier materials proved successful for many years until their cost of manufacture and increases in labour costs for fixing and stopping saw the introduction of lead ply as the material of choice in diagnostic X-ray suites. Whilst the advantage of sheet lead as a barrier for diagnostic X-rays, where the photoelectric effect predominates is recognised, this precedence is somewhat negated by the high cost of manufacture and delays in supply. Lead lined ply also requires external cladding after erection for an acceptable finish to be obtained. Such cost increases have prompted us to re-evaluate the use of precast barium plaster sheets (Barytes Board) as an alternative barrier material

  5. Diagnostic radiation: a possible factor in malignancy in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel diseases and other essays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, A.G.

    1980-01-01

    This short book is a compilation of five papers that attempt to explore the potential radiation risk of bowel cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease who receive excessive diagnostic radiological examinations. The editor is a co-author for each paper and he wrote the preface. Each paper represents a short series of case histories: in three patients with inflammatory bowel disease, one ultimately developed colon cancer, one esophageal cancer, and one renal cancer; one patients with Crohn disease developed acute myelocytic leukemia; of four patients with renal calculi there were no cancers; one patient is discussed twice. In general, the authors use the same approach: in a small number of patients, the number of radiologic examinations and the number of x-ray films are recorded; the dosage for each patient is calculated with considerable precision from this information; the cancer risk in the absence of additional radiation is cited from the literature; and the probability of the radiation causation of the cancer is discussed, but not proven. (JMT)

  6. Performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker with Cosmic Rays and First High Energy Collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Degenhardt, J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three sub-systems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It consists of close to $300,000$ thin-walled drift tubes (straws) providing on average $30$ two-dimensional space points with $130$~$mu$m resolution for charged particle tracks with $|eta| < 2$ and $p_T > 0.5$~GeV. Along with continuous tracking, it provides particle identification capability through the detection of transition radiation x-ray photons generated by high velocity particles in the many polymer fibers or films that fill the spaces between the straws. The custom-made radiation-hard front-end electronics implements two thresholds to discriminate the signals: a low threshold ($< 300$~eV) for registering the passage of minimum ionizing particles, and a high threshold ($> 6$~keV) to flag the absorption of transition radiation x-rays. The TRT was successfully commissioned with data collected from several million cosmi...

  7. Performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker with Comic Rays and First High Energy Collisions at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Degenhardt, J D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three sub-systems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It consists of close to 300000 thin-wall drift tubes (straws) providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points with 130 μm resolution for charged particle tracks with |η| < 2 and pT > 0.5 GeV. Along with continuous tracking, it provides particle identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons generated by high velocity particles in the many polymer fibers or films that fill the spaces between the straws. The custom-made radiation-hard front-end electronics implements two thresholds to discriminate the signals: a low threshold (< 300 eV) for registering the passage of minimum ionizing particles, and a high threshold (> 6 keV) to flag the absorption of transition radiation X-rays. The TRT was successfully commissioned with data collected from several million cosmic ray muons. A specia...

  8. Exposure of the U.S. population from diagnostic medical radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    This publication includes a short introduction and overview, followed by a brief section on concepts, units, and quantities. Data sources, equipment availability and film usage, number and trends of examinations, demographics, differential trends, exposure and absorbed dose, quality assurance and dose reduction, gonadal and genetically significant doses, mean active bone marrow dose, somatic doses and effective dose equivalents, and future trends in diagnostic radiology are discussed. A summary is then presented

  9. A new diagnostic prospects: the application of synchroton radiation in the cardiac angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, A.R. de.

    1984-01-01

    The application of synchroton radiation by digital subtraction in cardiac angiography is studied. Preliminary researches with phantons, excised hearts of animals and in vivo tests with dogs are reported. The arteriography by synchroton X-ray beam is compared with arteriography by conventional way. (M.A.C.) [pt

  10. Array diagnostics, spatial resolution, and filtering of undesired radiation with the 3D reconstruction algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappellin, C.; Pivnenko, Sergey; Jørgensen, E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on three important features of the 3D reconstruction algorithm of DIATOOL: the identification of array elements improper functioning and failure, the obtainable spatial resolution of the reconstructed fields and currents, and the filtering of undesired radiation and scattering...

  11. Collective radiation dose from diagnostic x-ray examination in nine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Medical x-ray exposures have the largest man made source of population exposure to ionizing radiation in different countries. Recent developments in medical imaging have led to rapid increases in a number of high dose xray examinations performed with significant consequences for individual patient doses ...

  12. A Design Report for the Optical Transition Radiation Imager for the LCLS Undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Bingxin

    2010-12-13

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a free-electron x-ray laser, is under design and construction. Its high-intensity electron beam, 3400 A in peak current and 46 TW in peak power, is concentrated in a small area (37 micrometer in rms radius) inside its undulator. Ten optical transition radiation (OTR) imagers are planned between the undulator segments for characterizing the transverse profiles of the electron beam. In this note, we report on the optical and mechanical design of the OTR imager. Through a unique optical arrangement, using a near-normal-incidence screen and a multi-layer coated mirror, this imager will achieve a fine resolution (12 micrometer or better) over the entire field of view (8 mm x 5 mm), with a high efficiency for single-shot imaging. A digital camera will be used to read out the beam images in a programmable region (5 mm x 0.5 mm) at the full beam repetition rate (120 Hz), or over the entire field at a lower rate (10 Hz). Its built-in programmable amplifier will be used as an electronic intensity control.

  13. B-physics Potential Of The Atlas Experiment, And, Performance Of The Atlas Transition Radiation Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Driouichi, C

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is one of the four experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which is supposed to be operational in early 2007. Proton-proton collisions at an unprecedented centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV will probe new frontiers of the universe, hopefully providing a better understanding of the laws governing our universe. Although the ATLAS detector has been optimized to search for the Higgs boson within the full mass range expected and other new particles, it is well adapted to cover a wide range of B-physics topics. The determination of the angles of the Unitarity Triangle, and measurements of the CP violation are also a key point for a full and coherent understanding of the fundamental forces governing the universe. Intriguing particles, such as the Bc meson, provide a very interesting case to study the interplay of strong and weak interactions, a key problem in the theoretical analysis of the weak decays of hadrons. The Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is a combined straw drift tube and tra...

  14. Combined performance tests before installation of the ATLAS Semiconductor and Transition Radiation Tracking Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Abat, E

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS) Inner Detector provides charged particle tracking in the centre of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The Inner Detector consists of three subdetectors: the Pixel Detector, the Semiconductor Tracker (SCT), and the Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT). This paper summarizes the tests that were carried out at the final stage of SCT+TRT integration prior to their installation in ATLAS. The combined operation and performance of the SCT and TRT barrel and endcap detectors was investigated through a series of noise tests, and by recording the tracks of cosmic rays. This was a crucial test of hardware and software of the combined tracker detector systems. The results of noise and cross-talk tests on the SCT and TRT in their final assembled configuration, using final readout and supply hardware and software, are reported. The reconstruction and analysis of the recorded cosmic tracks allowed testing of the offline analysis chain and verification of basic tracker...

  15. Performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker in Run 1 of the LHC: tracker properties

    CERN Document Server

    Aaboud, Morad; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abeloos, Baptiste; Abidi, Syed Haider; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abraham, Nicola; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adachi, Shunsuke; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adersberger, Michael; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agheorghiesei, Catalin; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akatsuka, Shunichi; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Ali, Babar; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allen, Benjamin William; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Alshehri, Azzah Aziz; Alstaty, Mahmoud; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antel, Claire; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antrim, Daniel Joseph; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Araujo Ferraz, Victor; Arce, Ayana; Ardell, Rose Elisabeth; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Armitage, Lewis James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Artz, Sebastian; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Baines, John; Bajic, Milena; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska-Blenessy, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barranco Navarro, Laura; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans~Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bedognetti, Matteo; Bee, Christopher; Beermann, Thomas; Begalli, Marcia; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Bell, Andrew Stuart; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Belyaev, Nikita; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez, Jose; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Beringer, Jürg; Berlendis, Simon; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernardi, Gregorio; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertram, Iain Alexander; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethani, Agni; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bielski, Rafal; Biesuz, Nicolo Vladi; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Billoud, Thomas Remy Victor; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Bisanz, Tobias; Bittrich, Carsten; Bjergaard, David Martin; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blue, Andrew; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Blunier, Sylvain; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Boerner, Daniela; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bokan, Petar; Bold, Tomasz; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortoletto, Daniela; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Bossio Sola, Jonathan David; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Boutle, Sarah Kate; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Briglin, Daniel Lawrence; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Broughton, James; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruni, Lucrezia Stella; Brunt, Benjamin; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryant, Patrick; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burger, Angela Maria; Burghgrave, Blake; Burka, Klaudia; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Burr, Jonathan Thomas Peter; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Callea, Giuseppe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvente Lopez, Sergio; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Calvet, Thomas Philippe; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Camincher, Clement; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Camplani, Alessandra; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Carbone, Ryne Michael; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Ina; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carlson, Benjamin Taylor; Carminati, Leonardo; Carney, Rebecca; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Casper, David William; Castelijn, Remco; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavallaro, Emanuele; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Celebi, Emre; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerda Alberich, Leonor; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Stephen Kam-wah; Chan, Wing Sheung; Chan, Yat Long; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Che, Siinn; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Shion; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Huajie; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chitan, Adrian; Chiu, Yu Him Justin; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chomont, Arthur Rene; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming Chung; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Michael; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cormier, Felix; Cormier, Kyle James Read; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crawley, Samuel Joseph; Creager, Rachael; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cueto, Ana; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cúth, Jakub; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'amen, Gabriele; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dado, Tomas; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dann, Nicholas Stuart; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Daubney, Thomas; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Maria, Antonio; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vasconcelos Corga, Kevin; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Dehghanian, Nooshin; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Gaudio, Michela; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Denysiuk, Denys; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Dette, Karola; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Clemente, William Kennedy; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Petrillo, Karri Folan; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Díez Cornell, Sergio; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Du, Yanyan; Duarte-Campderros, Jorge; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudder, Andreas Christian; Duffield, Emily Marie; Duflot, Laurent; Dührssen, Michael; Dumancic, Mirta; Dumitriu, Ana Elena; Duncan, Anna Kathryn; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dutta, Baishali; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellajosyula, Venugopal; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Ennis, Joseph Stanford; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Federica; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farina, Christian; Farina, Edoardo Maria; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fawcett, William James; Fayard, Louis; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Flierl, Bernhard Matthias; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Forcolin, Giulio Tiziano; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Foster, Andrew Geoffrey; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; Fressard-Batraneanu, Silvia; Freund, Benjamin; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Louis Guillaume; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Ganguly, Sanmay; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gascon Bravo, Alberto; Gasnikova, Ksenia; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Gee, Norman; Geisen, Marc; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Geng, Cong; Gentile, Simonetta; Gentsos, Christos; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghneimat, Mazuza; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giannetti, Paola; Gibson, Stephen; Gignac, Matthew; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuli, Francesco; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Gama, Rafael; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Giulia; Gonella, Laura; Gongadze, Alexi; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goudet, Christophe Raymond; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gravila, Paul Mircea; Gray, Heather; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Grevtsov, Kirill; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Sabrina; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guan, Wen; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Gui, Bin; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Wen; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Ruchi; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Guzik, Marcin Pawel; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadef, Asma; Hageböck, Stephan; Hagihara, Mutsuto; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Han, Shuo; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Haney, Bijan; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hartmann, Nikolai Marcel; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, Ahmed; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havener, Laura Brittany; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hayakawa, Daiki; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Jochen Jens; Heinrich, Lukas; Heinz, Christian; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Held, Alexander; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Herde, Hannah; Herget, Verena; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Herwig, Theodor Christian; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Higashino, Satoshi; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hiti, Bojan; Hladik, Ondrej; Hoad, Xanthe; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Honda, Shunsuke; Honda, Takuya; Hong, Tae Min; Hooberman, Benjamin Henry; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Hoya, Joaquin; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Shuyang; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Huo, Peng; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuriy; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Ishijima, Naoki; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ito, Fumiaki; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Paul; Jain, Vivek; Jakobi, Katharina Bianca; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Janus, Piotr Andrzej; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Javurkova, Martina; Jeanneau, Fabien; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jelinskas, Adomas; Jenni, Peter; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Hai; Jiang, Yi; Jiang, Zihao; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Jivan, Harshna; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Johnson, Christian; Johnson, William Joseph; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Roger; Jones, Sarah; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Köhler, Markus Konrad; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kaji, Toshiaki; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kaluza, Adam; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneti, Steven; Kanjir, Luka; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kasahara, Kota; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawade, Kentaro; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kay, Ellis; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khader, Mazin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Kharlamova, Tatyana; Khodinov, Alexander; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kilby, Callum; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; Kirchmeier, David; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klapdor-kleingrothaus, Thorwald; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knapik, Joanna; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Köhler, Nicolas Maximilian; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolb, Mathis; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Koulouris, Aimilianos; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Kowalewska, Anna Bozena; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozakai, Chihiro; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Krauss, Dominik; Kravchenko, Anton; Kremer, Jakub Andrzej; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuechler, Jan Thomas; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kulinich, Yakov Petrovich; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kuprash, Oleg; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurchaninov, Leonid; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurth, Matthew Glenn; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lammers, Sabine; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lanfermann, Marie Christine; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Lapertosa, Alessandro; Laplace, Sandrine; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Lazzaroni, Massimo; Le, Brian; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Quilleuc, Eloi; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Benoit; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Lerner, Giuseppe; Leroy, Claude; Lesage, Arthur; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Dave; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Changqiao; Li, Haifeng; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Qi; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Lionti, Anthony Eric; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Hao; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanlin; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo, Cheuk Yee; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina Maria; Loch, Peter; Loebinger, Fred; Loew, Kevin Michael; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Longo, Luigi; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopez, Jorge; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lopez Solis, Alvaro; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Haonan; Lu, Nan; Lu, Yun-ju; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luedtke, Christian; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Luzi, Pierre Marc; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Lyubushkin, Vladimir; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Ma, Yanhui; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Claire; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Maneira, José; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manousos, Athanasios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mansour, Jason Dhia; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Manzoni, Stefano; Mapelli, Livio; Marceca, Gino; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Martensson, Mikael; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Christopher Blake; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Lorenzo; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Maznas, Ioannis; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mc Fadden, Neil Christopher; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McClymont, Laurie; McDonald, Emily; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McNamara, Peter Charles; McPherson, Robert; Meehan, Samuel; Megy, Theo Jean; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meideck, Thomas; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melini, Davide; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Melo, Matej; Meloni, Federico; Menary, Stephen Burns; Meng, Lingxin; Meng, Xiangting; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Miano, Fabrizio; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Minegishi, Yuji; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mistry, Khilesh; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mizukami, Atsushi; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Mlynarikova, Michaela; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mogg, Philipp; Mohapatra, Soumya; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monden, Ryutaro; Mondragon, Matthew Craig; Mönig, Klaus; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montalbano, Alyssa; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Stefanie; Mori, Daniel; Mori, Tatsuya; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moschovakos, Paris; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Harry James; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Muškinja, Miha; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naryshkin, Iouri; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Michael Edward; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Ng, Tsz Yu; Nguyen Manh, Tuan; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nielsen, Jason; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishu, Nishu; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Noguchi, Yohei; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nomura, Marcelo Ayumu; Nooney, Tamsin; Nordberg, Markus; Norjoharuddeen, Nurfikri; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Rourke, Abigail Alexandra; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Pacheco Rodriguez, Laura; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganini, Michela; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Palacino, Gabriel; Palazzo, Serena; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panagoulias, Ilias; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Adam Jackson; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pascuzzi, Vincent; Pasner, Jacob Martin; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Francesca; Pataraia, Sophio; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penwell, John; Peralva, Bernardo; Perego, Marta Maria; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrov, Mariyan; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Peyaud, Alan; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pin, Arnaud Willy J; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Pluth, Daniel; Podberezko, Pavel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozo Astigarraga, Mikel Eukeni; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Puddu, Daniele; Puri, Akshat; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Raine, John Andrew; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Ratti, Maria Giulia; Rauch, Daniel; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Ravinovich, Ilia; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Reale, Marilea; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reed, Robert; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reichert, Joseph; Reiss, Andreas; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resseguie, Elodie Deborah; Rettie, Sebastien; Reynolds, Elliot; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rifki, Othmane; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rimoldi, Marco; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Rizzi, Chiara; Roberts, Rhys Thomas; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodina, Yulia; Rodriguez Perez, Andrea; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Daniel; Roe, Shaun; Rogan, Christopher Sean; Røhne, Ole; Roloff, Jennifer; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosien, Nils-Arne; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Jonatan; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryu, Soo; Ryzhov, Andrey; Rzehorz, Gerhard Ferdinand; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Saha, Puja; Sahinsoy, Merve; Saimpert, Matthias; Saito, Masahiko; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salazar Loyola, Javier Esteban; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sammel, Dirk; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sanchez Pineda, Arturo Rodolfo; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Christian Oliver; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sato, Koji; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Savic, Natascha; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schachtner, Balthasar Maria; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Leigh; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schier, Sheena; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, Korbinian Ralf; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schmitz, Simon; Schneider, Basil; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schott, Matthias; Schouwenberg, Jeroen; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schuh, Natascha; Schulte, Alexandra; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shaikh, Nabila Wahab; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Shen, Yu-Ting; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shirabe, Shohei; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shlomi, Jonathan; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyed Ruhollah; Shope, David Richard; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sickles, Anne Marie; Sidebo, Per Edvin; Sideras Haddad, Elias; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Manuel; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sioli, Maximiliano; Siragusa, Giovanni; Siral, Ismet; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Slovak, Radim; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smiesko, Juraj; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Joshua Wyatt; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snyder, Ian Michael; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Sokhrannyi, Grygorii; Solans Sanchez, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Son, Hyungsuk; Song, Hong Ye; Sopczak, Andre; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spangenberg, Martin; Spanò, Francesco; Sperlich, Dennis; Spettel, Fabian; Spieker, Thomas Malte; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stabile, Alberto; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Giordon; Stark, Jan; Stark, Simon Holm; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Stärz, Steffen; Staszewski, Rafal; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Suchek, Stanislav; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Suruliz, Kerim; Suster, Carl; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Svatos, Michal; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Swift, Stewart Patrick; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Masahiro; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanioka, Ryo; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tapia Araya, Sebastian; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Aaron; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Pierre Thor Elliot; Taylor, Wendy; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Temple, Darren; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todome, Kazuki; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Baojia(Tony); Tornambe, Peter; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Treado, Colleen Jennifer; Trefzger, Thomas; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Trofymov, Artur; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsang, Ka Wa; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsui, Ka Ming; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tu, Yanjun; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tulbure, Traian Tiberiu; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turgeman, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Ucchielli, Giulia; Ueda, Ikuo; Ughetto, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usui, Junya; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valdes Santurio, Eduardo; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Vallier, Alexis; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; van der Graaf, Harry; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varni, Carlo; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vasquez, Jared Gregory; Vasquez, Gerardo; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vetterli, Michel; Viaux Maira, Nicolas; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigani, Luigi; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vishwakarma, Akanksha; Vittori, Camilla; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wallangen, Veronica; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chao; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Qing; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Wei; Wang, Wenxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Washbrook, Andrew; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Aaron Foley; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Weber, Stephen; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Michael David; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Whalen, Kathleen; Whallon, Nikola Lazar; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; Whiteson, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilk, Fabian; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winston, Oliver James; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wobisch, Markus; Wolf, Tim Michael Heinz; Wolff, Robert; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Worm, Steven; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xi, Zhaoxu; Xia, Ligang; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamaguchi, Daiki; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zongchang; Yao, Weiming; Yap, Yee Chinn; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yuen, Stephanie P; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zacharis, Georgios; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zakharchuk, Nataliia; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zeng, Jian Cong; Zeng, Qi; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Guangyi; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Liqing; Zhang, Matt; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Maosen; Zhou, Mingliang; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; Zou, Rui; zur Nedden, Martin; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2017-05-03

    The tracking performance parameters of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) as part of the ATLAS inner detector are described in this paper for different data-taking conditions in proton--proton, proton--lead and lead--lead collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The performance is studied using data collected for different data-taking conditions in proton--proton, proton--lead and lead--lead collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The performance is studied using data collected during the first period of LHC operation (Run 1) and is compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The performance of the TRT, operating with two different gas mixtures (xenon-based and argon-based) and its dependence on the TRT occupancy is presented. These studies show that the tracking performance of the TRT is similar for the two gas mixtures and that a significant contribution to the particle momentum resolution is made by the TRT up to high particle densities.

  16. A new transition radiation detector to detect heavy nuclei around the knee

    CERN Document Server

    Boyle, P J; Wakely, S P

    2002-01-01

    The overall cosmic ray intensity spectrum falls as a constant power law over at least 11 decades of particle energy. One of the only features in this spectrum is the slight change in power law index near 10**1**5eV, often called the 'knee' of the spectrum. Accurate measurements of cosmic ray elemental abundances into this energy region are expected to reveal the origin of this feature, and possibly the nature of cosmic ray sources. The extremely low intensity of particles at these energies (a few per m**2 per year) makes the detection challenging. Since only direct measurements have so far proved reliable for the accurate determination of elemental composition, a large-area, light weight, device is needed to achieve long exposures above the atmosphere - either on high-altitude balloons or spacecraft. Here we report on a detector which uses the x-ray transition radiation yield from plastic foams to provide a response into the knee region for heavy elements. We use individual xenon-filled gas proportional tubes...

  17. Academic training of radiation protection human resources in the X-ray medical diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaona, E.

    2008-12-01

    The current regulation, established by NOM-229-SSA1-2002 standard, T echnical requirements for facilities, health responsibilities, technical specifications for equipment and facilities for radiation protection in medical diagnosis with X-rays, t hat should be credited refresher courses, and training in radiation safety in accordance with current regulations, however, has been observed that the assistance and accreditation of courses is basically to cover administrative and regulatory requirements and therefore does not necessarily cover needs of the patient to radiation protection in the use of old and new technologies. David Brenner and Eric Hall claim that between 1.5 and 2% of all cancers in the USA may be attributable to exposure to X-ray computerized tomography techniques, given the intensive use of these techniques and the patient dose ranges in which incurred. While this is not debatable, if it is, the alternative does not seem to be abandoning the use of computerized tomography, because it gives them undoubted benefits with respect to invasive procedures. Deserves mention concerns the use of computerized tomography in children using scanning protocols designed for adults, in which case it incurs in 5 times higher dose. An additional warning about unwarranted use of computerized tomography is a procedure of this technique in abdomen resulting in an equivalent dose to 298 times that of a mammogram. Additional aspects such as biological effects (including deterministic) of both medical staff and patients of interventional procedures further reinforces the idea that there are education programs in radiation protection. Attention must put in the new generations, including in the curricula of medical residencies in radiology, endoscopy, cardiology and orthopedic, the education (no emerging courses) in radiation protection, radiobiology, radiology physics, and other topics, but previously must have medical physicists in radiology available to train new

  18. Radiation dose reduction through combining positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and diagnostic CT in children and young adults with lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhihua; Gates, Erica L; O'Brien, Maureen M; Trout, Andrew T

    2018-02-01

    Both [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET/CT) and diagnostic CT are at times required for lymphoma staging. This means some body segments are exposed twice to X-rays for generation of CT data (diagnostic CT + localization CT). To describe a combined PET/diagnostic CT approach that modulates CT tube current along the z-axis, providing diagnostic CT of some body segments and localization CT of the remaining body segments, thereby reducing patient radiation dose. We retrospectively compared total patient radiation dose between combined PET/diagnostic CT and separately acquired PET/CT and diagnostic CT exams. When available, we calculated effective doses for both approaches in the same patient; otherwise, we used data from patients of similar size. To confirm image quality, we compared image noise (Hounsfield unit [HU] standard deviation) as measured in the liver on both combined and separately acquired diagnostic CT images. We used t-tests for dose comparisons and two one-sided tests for image-quality equivalence testing. Mean total effective dose for the CT component of the combined and separately acquired diagnostic CT exams were 6.20±2.69 and 8.17±2.61 mSv, respectively (Pdose savings with the combined approach was 24.8±17.8% (2.60±2.51 mSv [range: 0.32-4.72 mSv]) of total CT effective dose. Image noise was not statistically significantly different between approaches (12.2±1.8 HU vs. 11.7±1.5 HU for the combined and separately acquired diagnostic CT images, respectively). A combined PET/diagnostic CT approach as described offers dose savings at similar image quality for children and young adults with lymphoma who have indications for both PET and diagnostic CT examinations.

  19. Single-cycle terahertz pulses with >0.2 V/A field amplitudes via coherent transition radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daranciang, Dan; Goodfellow, John; Fuchs, Matthias; Ghimire, Shambhu; Wen, Haidan; Reis, David A.; Loos, Henrik; Fisher, Alan S.; Lindenberg, Aaron M.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate terahertz pulses with field amplitudes exceeding 0.2 V/A generated by coherent transition radiation. Femtosecond, relativistic electron bunches generated at the Linac Coherent Light Source are passed through a beryllium foil, and the emitted radiation is characterized as a function of the bunch duration and charge. Broadband pulses centered at a frequency of 10 THz with energies of 140 μJ are measured. These far-below-bandgap pulses drive a nonlinear optical response in a silicon photodiode, with which we perform nonlinear autocorrelations that yield information regarding the terahertz temporal profile. Simulations of the spatiotemporal profile agree well with experimental results.

  20. Feasibility of diffraction radiation for noninvasive beam diagnostics as characterized in a storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobb, L.; Kieffer, R.; Lefevre, T.; Mazzoni, S.; Aumeyr, T.; Karataev, P.; Billing, M.; Conway, J.; Shanks, J.

    2018-03-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing demand for noninvasive beam size monitoring on particle accelerators. Ideally, these monitors should be cost effective and require little or no maintenance. These monitors should also be suitable for both linear and circular machines. Here, the experimental setup is described in detail, and the results from a diffraction radiation beam size monitor are presented. This monitor has been tested on the Cornell Electron Storage Ring using a 1 mA (1.6 ×1010 particles per bunch) single bunch electron beam at 2.1 GeV energy. Images of the target surface and the angular distribution of the emitted diffraction radiation were acquired at wavelengths of 400 and 600 nm. These measurements are compared to two analytical models.

  1. The use of diagnostic computerized tomography and radiation therapy in canine and feline hyperadenocorticism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauldin, G.N.; Burk, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Therapy for canine pituitary-dependent Cushing's syndrome (PDC) has primarily been medical management with o,p'-DDD. This drug therapy does not directly affect the underlying pituitary pathology, and may have undesirable side effects. Pituitary-dependent Cushing's syndrome may be caused by pituitary microadenomas or macroadenomas. Advances in diagnostic imagery have allowed the antemortem diagnosis of pituitary macrotumors. Treatment of pituitary tumors may be attempted with radiotherapy, especially if a diagnosis of macrotumor can be made before the onset of profound neurologic signs

  2. Study of TJ-1 Tokamak plasmas with Thomson scattering and radiation diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, C.; Zurro, B.

    1987-06-01

    The Thomson scattering system of TJ-1 is described in detail. The radial profiles of T e and n e obtained in TJ-1 discharges are presented. This data makes possible to deduce characteristic parameters of the plasma confinement in this machine, as energy confinement times, Z eff B. Using also radiation measurements (global and in the visible range) we obtained the particle confinement time and Z eff without non experimental assumptions. (author) 56 figs., 52 refs

  3. Diagnostic medical exposures: advice on exposure to ionising radiation during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The NRPB offers advice on exposure to ionizing radiation during pregnancy, based on data published since 1985. In providing this advice the Board has considered risks to the developing embryo and fetus of death, malformation, mental impairment, cancer (solid tumours and leukaemias) and genetic damage from irradiation after the first missed menstrual period. The possible risks from irradiation of the early (up to 3-4 weeks) conceptus and from gonodal irradiation of patients is also covered in the present advice. (Author)

  4. Steps towards an individual treatment planning with the internal dosimetry of 18F-FDG as example for nuclear diagnostics and perspectives for internal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaickner, M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Moving towards a more individual treatment planning, the studies below describe the perspectives and methods both in nuclear diagnostics and in internal radiation therapy. With 18 F-FDG as example in nuclear diagnostics, a more precise estimation of the effective dose to the patient is achieved by the calculation of physiognomy-dependent S-values. This project is a work in progress and the results are expected soon. Additionally the future possibilities of individual treatment planning in internal radiation therapy, such as the use of β-nuclide pairs and the potentials of combining CT and PET, are outlined. (author)

  5. Software for the estimation of foetal radiation dose to patients and staff in diagnostic radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osei, E K [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Avenue, Toronto ON M5G 2M9 (Canada); Darko, J B [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Avenue, Toronto ON M5G 2M9 (Canada); Faulkner, K [Quality Assurance Centre, Newcastle General Hospital, Westgate Road, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE4 6BE (United Kingdom); Kotre, C J [Regional Medical Physics Department, Newcastle General Hospital, Westgate Road, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE4 6BE (United Kingdom)

    2003-06-01

    Occasionally, it is clinically necessary to perform a radiological examination(s) on a woman who is known to be pregnant or an examination is performed on a woman who subsequently discovers that she was pregnant at the time. In radiological examinations, especially of the lower abdomen and pelvis area, the foetus is directly irradiated. It is therefore important to be able to determine the absorbed dose to the foetus in diagnostic radiology for pregnant patients as well as the foetal dose from occupational exposure of the pregnant worker. The determination of the absorbed dose to the unborn child in diagnostic radiology is of interest as a basis for risk estimates from medical exposure of the pregnant patient and occupational exposure of the pregnant worker. In this paper we describe a simple computer program, FetDose, which calculates the dose to the foetus from both medical and occupational exposures of the pregnant woman. It also calculates the risks of in utero exposure, compares calculated doses with published data in the literature and provides information on the natural spontaneous risks. The program will be a useful tool for the medical and paramedical personnel who are involved with foetal dose (and hence risks) calculations and counselling of pregnant women who may be concerned about in utero exposure of their foetuses.

  6. Software for the estimation of foetal radiation dose to patients and staff in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osei, E K; Darko, J B; Faulkner, K; Kotre, C J

    2003-01-01

    Occasionally, it is clinically necessary to perform a radiological examination(s) on a woman who is known to be pregnant or an examination is performed on a woman who subsequently discovers that she was pregnant at the time. In radiological examinations, especially of the lower abdomen and pelvis area, the foetus is directly irradiated. It is therefore important to be able to determine the absorbed dose to the foetus in diagnostic radiology for pregnant patients as well as the foetal dose from occupational exposure of the pregnant worker. The determination of the absorbed dose to the unborn child in diagnostic radiology is of interest as a basis for risk estimates from medical exposure of the pregnant patient and occupational exposure of the pregnant worker. In this paper we describe a simple computer program, FetDose, which calculates the dose to the foetus from both medical and occupational exposures of the pregnant woman. It also calculates the risks of in utero exposure, compares calculated doses with published data in the literature and provides information on the natural spontaneous risks. The program will be a useful tool for the medical and paramedical personnel who are involved with foetal dose (and hence risks) calculations and counselling of pregnant women who may be concerned about in utero exposure of their foetuses

  7. Detection of parathyroid adenomas using a monophasic dual-energy computed tomography acquisition: diagnostic performance and potential radiation dose reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva-Salinas, Carlos; Flors, Lucia; Durst, Christopher R; Hou, Qinghua; Patrie, James T; Wintermark, Max; Mukherjee, Sugoto

    2016-11-01

    The aims of the study were to compare the diagnostic performance of a combination of virtual non-contrast (VNC) images and arterial images obtained from a single-phase dual-energy CT (DECT) acquisition and standard non-contrast and arterial images from a biphasic protocol and to study the potential radiation dose reduction of the former approach. All DECT examinations performed for evaluation of parathyroid adenomas during a 13-month period were retrospectively reviewed. An initial single-energy unenhanced acquisition was followed by a dual-energy arterial phase acquisition. "Virtual non-contrast images" were generated from the dual-energy acquisition. Two independent and blinded radiologists evaluated three different sets of images during three reading sessions: single arterial phase, single-phase DECT (virtual non-contrast and arterial phase), and standard biphasic protocol (true non-contrast and arterial phase). The accuracy of interpretation in lateralizing an adenoma to the side of the neck and localizing it to a quadrant in the neck was evaluated. Sixty patients (mean age, 65.5 years; age range, 38-87 years) were included in the study. The lateralization and localization accuracy, sensitivity, and positive predicted value (PPV) and negative predicted value (NPV) of the different image datasets were comparable. The combination of VNC and arterial images was more specific than arterial images alone to lateralize a parathyroid lesion (OR = 1.93, p = 0.043). The use of the single-phase protocol resulted in a calculated radiation exposure reduction of 52.8 %. Virtual non-contrast and arterial images from a single DECT acquisition showed similar diagnostic accuracy than a biphasic protocol, providing a significant dose reduction.

  8. Detection of parathyroid adenomas using a monophasic dual-energy computed tomography acquisition: diagnostic performance and potential radiation dose reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiva-Salinas, Carlos; Flors, Lucia; Durst, Christopher R.; Hou, Qinghua; Mukherjee, Sugoto [University of Virginia, Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Patrie, James T. [University of Virginia, Department of Public Health Sciences, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Wintermark, Max [Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The aims of the study were to compare the diagnostic performance of a combination of virtual non-contrast (VNC) images and arterial images obtained from a single-phase dual-energy CT (DECT) acquisition and standard non-contrast and arterial images from a biphasic protocol and to study the potential radiation dose reduction of the former approach. All DECT examinations performed for evaluation of parathyroid adenomas during a 13-month period were retrospectively reviewed. An initial single-energy unenhanced acquisition was followed by a dual-energy arterial phase acquisition. ''Virtual non-contrast images'' were generated from the dual-energy acquisition. Two independent and blinded radiologists evaluated three different sets of images during three reading sessions: single arterial phase, single-phase DECT (virtual non-contrast and arterial phase), and standard biphasic protocol (true non-contrast and arterial phase). The accuracy of interpretation in lateralizing an adenoma to the side of the neck and localizing it to a quadrant in the neck was evaluated. Sixty patients (mean age, 65.5 years; age range, 38-87 years) were included in the study. The lateralization and localization accuracy, sensitivity, and positive predicted value (PPV) and negative predicted value (NPV) of the different image datasets were comparable. The combination of VNC and arterial images was more specific than arterial images alone to lateralize a parathyroid lesion (OR = 1.93, p = 0.043). The use of the single-phase protocol resulted in a calculated radiation exposure reduction of 52.8 %. Virtual non-contrast and arterial images from a single DECT acquisition showed similar diagnostic accuracy than a biphasic protocol, providing a significant dose reduction. (orig.)

  9. Single window for issuing licenses for export and import of ionizing radiation sources and transit of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandev, T.; Stamenov, R.; Misevska, A.; Georgievska-Dimitrevski, B.; Angelovski, G.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present the electronic system for application and issuing licenses for export, import and transit of goods (EXIM), particularly for ionizing radiation sources, in the Republic of Macedonia. This system is a modern and helpful tool for simple issuing licenses, for establishing a unique database and it represents a harmonized system for exchanging information between the governmental, public and private legal persons in the Republic of Macedonia. (author)

  10. Trends of radiation dose to the Slovak population from diagnostic nuclear medicine examinations during the period from 1985 to 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ftacnikova, S.; Ragan, P.

    1998-01-01

    A mathematical formalism was used to evaluate the radiation dose to population from radiodiagnostic procedures. Data for the calculation were obtained from questionnaires sent to the 12 Slovak hospitals which involve nuclear medicine departments. The mean effective dose for a procedure was determined by multiplying the administered radioactivity by the effective dose per unit of applied radiopharmaceutical activity; the latter value was taken from the literature. The values of the collective effective dose, total number of examinations, mean effective dose per examination and per capita and the number of examinations in 1000 inhabitants are tabulated for the 1985-1995 period. A favorable decreasing trend in the mean effective dose per examination after 1991 was observed. This was mainly due to the replacement of 131 I labelled compounds by 99m Tc radiopharmaceuticals. An overview of nuclear medicine diagnostic practice for pediatric and adult patients is also presented. The number of diagnostic procedures per 1000 inhabitants is significantly lower than in the most developed countries, and this unfavorable trend is continuing so far. (P.A.)

  11. Upgrading the Medical Physics Calibration Laboratory Towards ISO/IEC 17025: Radiation Standards and Calibration in Diagnostic Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asmaliza Hashim; Muhammad Jamal Md Isa; Abd Aziz Mhd Ramli; Wan Hazlinda Ismail; Norhayati Abdullah; Shahrul Azlan Azizan; Siti Sara Deraman; Nor Azlin Azraai; Md Khairusalih Md Zin

    2010-01-01

    Calibration of quality control (QC) test tools used in diagnostic radiology is legally required under the Ministry of Health (MOH) requirement. The Medical Physics Calibration Laboratory of the Malaysian Nuclear Agency is the national focal point for the calibration of quality control test tools used in diagnostic radiology. The Medical Physics Calibration Laboratory has measurement traceability to primary standard dosimetry laboratory (Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB)), thus providing an interface between the primary standard dosimetry laboratory and Malaysian hospitals, clinics and license class H holder. The Medical Physics Calibration Laboratory facility is comprised of a constant potential x-ray system with a capability of 160 kV tube and a series of reference and working standard ion chambers. The stability of reference and working standard ion chambers was measured using strontium-90. Dosimetric instruments used in diagnostic radiology is calibrated in terms of air kerma to comply with an International Code of Practices of dosimetry for example IAEA's Technical Report Series number 457. The new series of standard radiation qualities was established based on ISO/IEC 61267. The measurement of beam homogeneity was measured using film and ion chamber to define the field size at certain distance and kV output was measured using the spectrometer and non-invasive kVp meter. The uncertainties measurement was determined with expended uncertainties to a level of confidence of approximately 95% (coverage factor k=2). This paper describes the available facility and the effort of the Medical Physics Calibration Laboratory to upgrade the laboratory towards ISO/IEC 17025. (author)

  12. Performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker with Cosmic Rays and First High Energy Collisions at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Mashinistov, R; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three subsystems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It consists of close to 300000 thin-wall drift tubes (straws) providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points with 130 μm resolution for charged particle tracks with |η| &lt; 2 and pT &gt; 0.5 GeV. The TRT is immersed in a 2 T magnetic field generated by the central solenoid, significantly contributing together with the other two Inner Detector sub-systems to the particle momentum reconstruction. Along with continuous tracking, it provides particle identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons generated by high velocity particles in the many polymer fibers or films that fill the spaces between the straws. As expected from the production of transition radiation (TR), the first collision results show the increase in the number of detected TR-photons for particles with a gamma-factor abo...

  13. Commissioning and performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker with Cosmic Rays and first high energy collision at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three sub-systems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It consists of 298,304 thin- wall drift tubes (straws) providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points with 0.13 mm resolution for charged particle tracks with |η| 0.5 GeV. Along with continuous tracking, it provides particle identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons generated by high velocity particles in the many polymer fibers or films that fill the spaces between the straws. The front-end electronics implements two thresholds to discriminate the signals: a low threshold (6 keV) to flag the absorption of transition radiation X-rays. In this talk, a review of the commissioning and first operational experience of the TRT detector will be presented. Emphasis will be given to initial performance studies based on the reconstruction and analysis of several million cosmic ray tracks collected in the ATLAS cavern....

  14. Performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker with Cosmic Rays and First High Energy Collisions at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, S Yu; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three sub-systems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It consists of close to 300000 thin-wall drift tubes (straws) providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points with 130 μm resolution for charged particle tracks with |η| < 2 and pT > 0.5 GeV. The TRT is immersed in a 2 T magnetic field generated by the central solenoid, significantly contributing together with the other two Inner Detector sub-systems to the particle momentum reconstruction. Along with continuous tracking, it provides particle identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons generated by high velocity particles in the many polymer fibers or films that fill the spaces between the straws. As expected from the production of transition radiation (TR), the first collision results show the increase in the number of detected TR-photons for particles with a gamma-factor above 1000, thus e...

  15. Review of diagnostic methods for TFTR D{endash}T radiation shielding and neutronics studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugel, H.W.; Ascione, G.; Gilbert, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Azziz, N.; Goldhagen, P.; Reginatto, M.; Shebell, P. [U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Measurements Laboratory, New York, New York 10014-4811 (United States); Kumar, A. [School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The methods and instrument systems used for TFTR D{endash}T radiation shielding and neutronics studies involving signal strengths ranging over 10 orders of magnitude are reviewed. Neutron and gamma dose-equivalent, fluence, spectral, and materials activation measurements have been performed at various locations from the TFTR vessel to the nearest property lines. The detection systems include {sup 3}He, BF{sub 3}, and {sup 235}U proportional counters in moderated spheres, Bonner sphere arrays, advanced thermoluminescent detectors, argon ionization chambers, intrinsic Ge gamma detectors, and activation foil spectrometry methods. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Review of diagnostic methods for TFTR D-T radiation shielding and neutronics studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugel, H.W.; Ascione, G.; Gilbert, J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (US). Princeton Plasma Physics Lab.; Azziz, N.; Goldhagen, P.; Reginatto, M.; Shebell, P. [Dept. of Energy, New York, NY (US). Environmental Measurements Lab.; Kumar, A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (US). School of Engineering and Applied Science

    1996-10-01

    The methods and instrument systems used for TFTR D-T radiation shielding and neutronics studies involving signal strengths ranging over 10 orders of magnitude are reviewed. Neutron and gamma dose-equivalent, fluence, spectral, and materials activation measurements have been performed at various locations from the TFTR vessel to the nearest property lines. The detection systems include {sup 3}He, BF{sub 3}, and {sup 235}U proportional counters in moderated spheres, Bonner sphere arrays, advanced thermoluminescent detectors, argon ionization chambers, intrinsic Ge gamma detectors, and activation foil spectrometry methods.

  17. Diagnostics of ionization in air produced by infrared radiation from A pulse CO2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, E. S.

    This thesis begins with a brief account of the historical development of the modern concept of the atom and, building on this foundation, the physical principles responsible for the operation of a LASER are presented. A more detailed description is then given of the pulsed CO2 LASER used in this research, including principles of operation and safety procedures. Next, the research itself is described: an analysis of the ionization in air produced by focusing the LASER's infrared radiation. The data are summarized in graphs which map the region of ionization. Following conclusions on the research performed, specific suggestions are made for future work with the LASER.

  18. Radiation Measurement And Risk Estimation For Pediatric Patients During Routine Diagnostic Examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushra, E.; Sulieman, A.; Osman, H.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate Entrance Surface Dose (ESD) to the patient using Thermo luminescence dosimeters (TLD) during some common routine pediatrics X-ray examinations in main pediatrics hospitals in Sudan. ESD and Effective Dose (E) for pediatrics have been carried out for 250 patients undergoing five different examinations. The mean ESD ranged for neonates ranged between 0.17 mGy-0.30 mGy per radiograph with scattered thyroid dose 0.01 to 0.19 mGy. The risk of radiation induced cancer of was 0.13 x 10-6.

  19. A MONOLITHIC PREAMPLIFIER-SHAPER FOR MEASUREMENT LOSS AND TRANSITION RADIATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KANDASAMY,A.

    1999-11-08

    A custom monolithic circuit has been developed for the Time Expansion Chamber (TEC) of the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). This detector identifies particles by sampling their ionization energy loss (dE/dx) over a 3 cm drift space and by detecting associated transition radiation (TR) photons. The requirement of being simultaneously sensitive to dE/dx and TR events requires a dual-gain system. We have developed a compact solution featuring an octal preamplifier/shaper (P/S) IC with a split gain stage. The circuit, fabricated in 1.2 {micro}m CMOS process, incorporates a trans-impedance preamplifier and a 70 ns unipolar CR-RC{sup 4} shaper with ion tail compensation and active DC offset cancellation. Digitally selectable gain, peaking time, and tail cancellation as well as channel-by-channel charge injection and disable can be configured in the system via a 3-wire interface. The 3.5 x 5 mm{sup 2} die is packaged in a fine-pitch 64-pin PQFP. Equivalent input noise is less than 1500 rms electrons at a power dissipation of 30 mW per channel. On a sample of 2400 chips, the DC offset was 2.3 {+-} 3 mV rms without trimming. A chamber-mounted TEC-PS Printed Circuit Board (PCB) houses four PIS chips, on-board calibration circuit, and 64 analog differential line drivers which transmit the shaped pulses to crate-mounted flash ADC's. 7 m apart An RS-422 link provides digital configuration downloading and read back, and supplies the calibration strobe. The 24.6 cm x 9.5 cm board dissipates 8.5 W.

  20. A MONOLITHIC PREAMPLIFIER-SHAPER FOR MEASUREMENT LOSS AND TRANSITION RADIATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KANDASAMY, A.

    1999-01-01

    A custom monolithic circuit has been developed for the Time Expansion Chamber (TEC) of the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). This detector identifies particles by sampling their ionization energy loss (dE/dx) over a 3 cm drift space and by detecting associated transition radiation (TR) photons. The requirement of being simultaneously sensitive to dE/dx and TR events requires a dual-gain system. We have developed a compact solution featuring an octal preamplifier/shaper (P/S) IC with a split gain stage. The circuit, fabricated in 1.2 microm CMOS process, incorporates a trans-impedance preamplifier and a 70 ns unipolar CR-RC 4 shaper with ion tail compensation and active DC offset cancellation. Digitally selectable gain, peaking time, and tail cancellation as well as channel-by-channel charge injection and disable can be configured in the system via a 3-wire interface. The 3.5 x 5 mm 2 die is packaged in a fine-pitch 64-pin PQFP. Equivalent input noise is less than 1500 rms electrons at a power dissipation of 30 mW per channel. On a sample of 2400 chips, the DC offset was 2.3 ± 3 mV rms without trimming. A chamber-mounted TEC-PS Printed Circuit Board (PCB) houses four PIS chips, on-board calibration circuit, and 64 analog differential line drivers which transmit the shaped pulses to crate-mounted flash ADC's. 7 m apart An RS-422 link provides digital configuration downloading and read back, and supplies the calibration strobe. The 24.6 cm x 9.5 cm board dissipates 8.5 W

  1. Safer radiation therapy treatment resulting from an equipment transition: A mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Pascale A M; Bergs, Jochen; Pijls-Johannesma, Madelon; Backes, Huub; Marneffe, Wim; Vandijck, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    To realize individualized safe radiation therapy, reliable treatment equipment is essential in combination with a system-level improvement approach. We hypothesized that implementation of a system that integrated all required treatment equipment would result in improved safety and stability of the irradiation treatment process. Seven accelerators, portal imaging, and the treatment planning software were replaced by an integrated system that included 6 accelerators. The number of reported safety incidents and root causes were recorded between 2010 and 2014. Time series analysis was performed, and quantitative results were explored by structured interviews. Additionally, downtime was recorded. From January 2010 to July 2014, 5085 incidents were reported. Reports related to the accelerators decreased from 33% (2010) to 20% (2013-2014) of total reports, whereas the number of delivered fractions per accelerator increased by 20% (2010: 643 per month; 2013: 795 per month). Reports related to portal imaging decreased from 16.5 reports per month (2010) to 3.1 (2013-2014). Of these portal imaging reports, 316 had at least 1 technical cause in 2010, which decreased to 13 in 2013-2014. Interviewees attributed the decreased reporting to the equipment transition, not to decreased safety awareness. Downtime decreased by 46%, from 5.4% in 2010 to 2.9% in 2013. The number of reported accelerator- and portal imaging-related incidents decreased significantly, whereas safety awareness remained stable. In addition, accelerator downtime decreased, possibly resulting in less rescheduling of patients and fewer disruptions of work processes. Therefore, we conclude that the risk for serious safety incidents and patient harm decreased after implementation of the new integrated system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. SU-F-T-427: Utilization and Evaluation of Diagnostic CT Imaging with MAR Technique for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, M; Foster, R; Parks, H; Pankuch, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The objective was to utilize and evaluate diagnostic CT-MAR technique for radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods: A Toshiba-diagnostic-CT acquisition with SEMAR(Single-energy-MAR)-algorism was performed to make the metal-artifact-reduction (MAR) for patient treatment planning. CT-imaging datasets with and without SEMAR were taken on a Catphan-phantom. Two sets of CT-numbers were calibrated with the relative electron densities (RED). A tissue characterization phantom with Gammex various simulating material rods was used to establish the relationship between known REDs and corresponding CT-numbers. A GE-CT-sim acquisition was taken on the Catphan for comparison. A patient with bilateral hip arthroplasty was scanned in the radiotherapy CT-sim and the diagnostic SEMAR-CT on a flat panel. The derived SEMAR images were used as a primary CT dataset to create contours for the target, critical-structures, and for planning. A deformable registration was performed with VelocityAI to track voxel changes between SEMAR and CT-sim images. The SEMAR-CT images with minimal artifacts and high quality of geometrical and spatial integrity were employed for a treatment plan. Treatment-plans were evaluated based on deformable registration of SEMAR-CT and CT-sim dataset with assigned CT-numbers in the metal artifact regions in Eclipse v11 TPS. Results: The RED and CT-number relationships were consistent for the datasets in CT-sim and CT’s with and without SEMAR. SEMAR datasets with high image quality were used for PTV and organ delineation in the treatment planning process. For dose distribution to the PTV through the DVH analysis, the plan using CT-sim with the assigned CT-number showed a good agreement to those on deformable CT-SEMAR. Conclusion: A diagnostic-CT with MAR-algorithm can be utilized for radiotherapy treatment planning with CT-number calibrated to the RED. Treatment planning comparison and DVH shows a good agreement in the PTV and critical organs between

  3. Comparison of radiation delivered by current diagnostic procedures for herniated disc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasquet, C.; Drouineau, J.; Goubault, F.; Hurmic, A.; Lavigne, B.; Vandermarcq, P.

    1983-01-01

    Three methods are currently employed for the diagnosis of sciatica due to disc lesions: radiculography, spinal phlebography, and computed tomography. Though their indications vary according to the author, it seemed worthwhile to compare radiation delivered by each of them, because of the often young age of the patients. Dosimetric studies using a Rando Phantom enabled calculation of doses to the skin, spinal cord, and gonads. Results indicated that low doses were delivered by the scanner, relatively high doses by spinal phlebography, and intermediate doses by radiculography. These findings suggest that the initial examination preoperatively in cases of simple sciatica due to herniated disc should be a CT scan whenever possible. Phlebography, on the contrary, and particularly in young women, should be used only exceptionally, as a result of the high doses delivered to the ovaries even during technically simple explorations [fr

  4. Is there an increase in radiation exposure to the population due to diagnostic dental radiography. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spens, E.

    1983-01-01

    Orthodontic cases were examined to assess the superficial and genetically significant gonadal doses accumulated by the patients. During the period of examination, the radiodiagnostic services showed a retrograde tendency. At an average number of 6 radiographs per patient and terminated case the mean superficial dosis in the maxillofacial region amounted to 0.039 Sv, and the mean genetically significant gonadal dosis to 0.0063 mSv. Consequently, the stochastic-somatic radiation risk was greater than the genetic one. From the relatively low frequency of teleradiographs (2.3%) and on the basis of statistical data indications for the need for teleradiological working places in the ambulatory orthodontic care in the GDR are deduced. According to a trend analysis of the yearly frequency distribution of radiographic techniques used for the visualization of the tooth system an increased utilization of orthopantomography in orthodontics, is necessary

  5. Coherent Smith-Purcell radiation as a diagnostic for sub-picosecond electron bunch length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    We suggest a novel technique of measuring sub-picosecond electron bunch length base on coherent Smith-Purcell radiation (SPR) emitted when electrons pass close to the surface of a metal grating. With electron bunch lengths comparable to the grating period, we predict that coherent SPR will be emitted at large angles with respect to direction of beam propagation. As the bunch length shortens, the coherent SPR will be enhanced over the incoherent component that is normally observed at small angles. Furthermore, the angular distribution of the coherent SPR will be shifted toward smaller angles as the bunch length becomes much smaller than the grating period. By measuring the angular distribution of the coherent SPR, one can determine the bunch length of sub-picosecond electron pulses. This new technique is easy to implement and appears capable of measuring femtosecond electron bunch lengths

  6. Exposure to diagnostic radiation and risk of breast cancer among carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations: retrospective cohort study (GENE-RAD-RISK)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijpe, Anouk; Andrieu, Nadine; Easton, Douglas F.; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Cardis, Elisabeth; Noguès, Catherine; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Lasset, Christine; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Paterson, Joan; Manders, Peggy; van Asperen, Christi J.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Thierry-Chef, Isabelle; Hauptmann, Michael; Goldgar, David; Rookus, Matti A.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Fourme, Emmanuelle; Lidereau, Rosette; Stevens, Denise; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Chompret, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Luporsi, Elisabeth; Bonadona, Valérie; Gauducheau, René; de Sienne, Catherine; Lortholary, Alain; Frénay, Marc; Faivre, Laurence; Sobol, Hagay; Huiart, Laetitia; Longy, Michel; Nguyen, Tan Dat; Gladieff, Laurence; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gesta, Paul; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Chevrier, Annie; Rossi, Annick; Perrin, Jean; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Limacher, Jean-Marc; Dugast, Catherine; Courlancy, Polyclinique; Demange, Liliane; Zattara-Cannoni, Hélène; Dreyfus, Hélène; Noruzinia, Mehrdad; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Gregory, Helen; Cole, Trevor; Burgess, Lucy; Rogers, Mark; Hughes, Lisa; Brewer, Carole; Davidson, Rosemarie; Bradshaw, Nicola; Izatt, Louise; Pichert, Gabriella; Langman, Caroline; Chu, Carol; Miller, Julie; Evans, Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Shenton, Andrew; Side, Lucy; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Page, Elizabeth; Castro, Elena; Houlston, Richard; Rahman, Nazneen; Shanley, Susan; Cook, Jackie; Baxter, Lauren; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Eccles, Diana; Verhoef, Senno; Brohet, Richard; Hogervorst, Frans; van 't Veer, Laura; van Leeuwen, Flora; Rookus, Matti; Collée, Margriet; van den Ouweland, Ans; Kriege, Mieke; Schutte, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, Rob; van Asperen, Christi; Wijnen, Juul; Devilee, Peter; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn; Ausems, Margreet; van der Luijt, Rob; Aalfs, Cora; van Os, Theo; Gille, Hans; Gomez-Garcia, Encarna; Blok, Rien; Oosterwijk, Jan; van der Hout, Annemiek; Vasen, Hans; van Leeuwen, Inge

    2012-01-01

    To estimate the risk of breast cancer associated with diagnostic radiation in carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations. Retrospective cohort study (GENE-RAD-RISK). Three nationwide studies (GENEPSO, EMBRACE, HEBON) in France, United Kingdom, and the Netherlands, 1993 female carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations

  7. Image quality, radiation dose and diagnostic accuracy of 70 kVp whole brain volumetric CT perfusion imaging: a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Xiao Kun; Ni, Qian Qian; Zhou, Chang Sheng; Chen, Guo Zhong; Luo, Song; Zhang, Long Jiang; Lu, Guang Ming; Schoepf, U.J.; Fuller, Stephen R.; De Cecco, Carlo N.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate image quality and diagnostic accuracy for acute infarct detection and radiation dose of 70 kVp whole brain CT perfusion (CTP) and CT angiography (CTA) reconstructed from CTP source data. Patients were divided into three groups (n = 50 each): group A, 80 kVp, 21 scanning time points; groups B, 70 kVp, 21 scanning time points; group C, 70 kVp, 17 scanning time points. Objective and subjective image quality of CTP and CTA were compared. Diagnostic accuracy for detecting acute infarct and cerebral artery stenosis ≥ 50 % was calculated for CTP and CTA with diffusion weighted imaging and digital subtraction angiography as reference standards. Effective radiation dose was compared. There were no differences in any perfusion parameter value between three groups (P > 0.05). No difference was found in subjective image quality between three groups (P > 0.05). Diagnostic accuracy for detecting acute infarct and vascular stenosis showed no difference between three groups (P > 0.05). Compared with group A, radiation doses of groups B and C were decreased by 28 % and 37 % (both P < 0.001), respectively. Compared with 80 kVp protocol, 70 kVp brain CTP allows comparable vascular and perfusion assessment and lower radiation dose while maintaining high diagnostic accuracy in detecting acute infarct. (orig.)

  8. Image quality, radiation dose and diagnostic accuracy of 70 kVp whole brain volumetric CT perfusion imaging: a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Xiao Kun; Ni, Qian Qian; Zhou, Chang Sheng; Chen, Guo Zhong; Luo, Song; Zhang, Long Jiang; Lu, Guang Ming [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Medical University of South Carolina, Ashley River Tower, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Charleston, SC (United States); Fuller, Stephen R.; De Cecco, Carlo N. [Medical University of South Carolina, Ashley River Tower, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2016-11-15

    To evaluate image quality and diagnostic accuracy for acute infarct detection and radiation dose of 70 kVp whole brain CT perfusion (CTP) and CT angiography (CTA) reconstructed from CTP source data. Patients were divided into three groups (n = 50 each): group A, 80 kVp, 21 scanning time points; groups B, 70 kVp, 21 scanning time points; group C, 70 kVp, 17 scanning time points. Objective and subjective image quality of CTP and CTA were compared. Diagnostic accuracy for detecting acute infarct and cerebral artery stenosis ≥ 50 % was calculated for CTP and CTA with diffusion weighted imaging and digital subtraction angiography as reference standards. Effective radiation dose was compared. There were no differences in any perfusion parameter value between three groups (P > 0.05). No difference was found in subjective image quality between three groups (P > 0.05). Diagnostic accuracy for detecting acute infarct and vascular stenosis showed no difference between three groups (P > 0.05). Compared with group A, radiation doses of groups B and C were decreased by 28 % and 37 % (both P < 0.001), respectively. Compared with 80 kVp protocol, 70 kVp brain CTP allows comparable vascular and perfusion assessment and lower radiation dose while maintaining high diagnostic accuracy in detecting acute infarct. (orig.)

  9. Quantum dots. From multimodal imaging diagnostics to radiation-induced photodynamic therapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakalova, R.; Aoki, Ichio; Zhelev, Z.; Kanno, Iwao

    2008-01-01

    Nanotechnology-based tools and techniques are rapidly emerging in the field of molecular imaging, biosensing and targeted drug delivery. Employing constructs such as quantum dots (QDs), fullerenes, dendrimers, liposomes, nanotubes and emulsion, these advances lead toward the concept of personalized medicine and the potential for very early, even pre-symptomatic, diagnoses coupled with highly effective targeted therapy. The new term nanomedicine has been used recently. Why nanoparticles are so attractive for molecular imaging diagnostics? Nanoparticles allow a concentration of a large amount of contrast molecules in a very small area/volume (∼20-100 nm in diameter). Thus, after conjugation with target-specific ligands, even single cells or molecules could be detected in the blood stream or tissues, using different techniques. The nanoparticles have also a potential for therapeutic purposes (e.g., drug and gene delivery), which is expected to generate innovations and play a crucial role in medicine. For example, the diagnosis and treatment of cancer at the cellular level could be greatly improved with the development of techniques that enable a highly selective interaction and delivery of analyte probes into the cancer cells and subcellular compartments. Target-specific drug/gene delivery and early diagnosis of cancer is one of the priority research areas in which nanomedicine will play a vital role. Nanomedicine attracts also other clinical fields as surgery, cardiology, respiratory diseases, etc. (author)

  10. The simultaneous measurements of core and outer core density fluctuations in L-H transition using CO2 laser collective scattering diagnostic in the EAST superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, G.M.; Li, Y.D.; Zhang, X.D.; Sun, P.J.; Hu, L.Q.; Li, J.G.; Wu, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    The H-mode is the projected basic operation scenario for the ITER tokamak. The turbulence de-correlation by the synergistic effect of zonal flow and equilibrium ExB flow shear is believed to be the reason for L-H transition, however, the detailed physical mechanism has not been identified so far. Tangential multi-channel CO 2 laser collective scattering diagnostic system (mainly k r measurement) was first installed to investigate electron density fluctuations on EAST tokamak. The measurements in a spontaneous dithering L-H transition show that in core plasma (0 < r/a < 0.5) the low-frequency fluctuations strengthen greatly before L-H transition; meanwhile in outer core plasma (0.2 < r/a < 1) the low-frequency fluctuations strengthen slightly. Bispectral analysis reveals that the coupling strength between low- and high-frequency fluctuations in both core and outer core plasma strengthens greatly before the transition, but the latter is greater than the former. The results indicate that the low-frequency fluctuations of the core and outer core plasma play active, but different, roles in the spontaneous L-H transition. (author)

  11. Diagnostic accuracy of the Barr and Blethyn radiological scoring systems for childhood constipation assessed using colonic transit time as the gold standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Claire R.; Wylie, Anna B.Z.; Adams, Charlotte [Royal Victoria Infirmary, Department of Paediatric Surgery, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Lee, Richard E. [Royal Victoria Infirmary, Department of Radiology, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Jaffray, Bruce [University of Newcastle upon Tyne, School of Clinical Medical Sciences (Child Health), Sir James Spence Institute, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-15

    Constipation is a common childhood symptom and abdominal radiography is advocated in diagnosis and management. To assess the reproducibility and diagnostic accuracy of the Barr and Blethyn systems for quantifying constipation on abdominal radiographs in children. Radiographs were scored by three observers of increasing radiological experience (student, junior doctor, consultant). Abdominal radiographs produced during measurement of colonic transit time (CTT) were classified as constipated or normal based on the value of the transit time, and were scored using both systems by observers blinded to the CTT. Abdominal radiographs obtained in children for reasons other than constipation were classed as normal and similarly scored. Reproducibility was measured using the kappa statistic. Diagnostic accuracy was measured using the area under the curve (AUC) for the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve. Using either system, scores were higher for constipated children (P<0.01). The consultant produced higher scores than the other observers (P<0.01). Interobserver reproducibility was moderate with the best kappa value only 0.48. The best correlation between score and CTT was 0.51 (junior doctor scores). Diagnostic accuracy of the scores was only moderate, with the largest AUC for a ROC curve of 0.84 for the consultant using the Barr score. Scoring of abdominal radiographs in the assessment of childhood constipation should be abandoned because it is dependent on the experience of the observer, is poorly reproducible, and does not accurately discriminate between constipated children and children without constipation. (orig.)

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of the Barr and Blethyn radiological scoring systems for childhood constipation assessed using colonic transit time as the gold standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, Claire R.; Wylie, Anna B.Z.; Adams, Charlotte; Lee, Richard E.; Jaffray, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Constipation is a common childhood symptom and abdominal radiography is advocated in diagnosis and management. To assess the reproducibility and diagnostic accuracy of the Barr and Blethyn systems for quantifying constipation on abdominal radiographs in children. Radiographs were scored by three observers of increasing radiological experience (student, junior doctor, consultant). Abdominal radiographs produced during measurement of colonic transit time (CTT) were classified as constipated or normal based on the value of the transit time, and were scored using both systems by observers blinded to the CTT. Abdominal radiographs obtained in children for reasons other than constipation were classed as normal and similarly scored. Reproducibility was measured using the kappa statistic. Diagnostic accuracy was measured using the area under the curve (AUC) for the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve. Using either system, scores were higher for constipated children (P<0.01). The consultant produced higher scores than the other observers (P<0.01). Interobserver reproducibility was moderate with the best kappa value only 0.48. The best correlation between score and CTT was 0.51 (junior doctor scores). Diagnostic accuracy of the scores was only moderate, with the largest AUC for a ROC curve of 0.84 for the consultant using the Barr score. Scoring of abdominal radiographs in the assessment of childhood constipation should be abandoned because it is dependent on the experience of the observer, is poorly reproducible, and does not accurately discriminate between constipated children and children without constipation. (orig.)

  13. WE-A-BRF-01: Dual-Energy CT Imaging in Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molloi, S [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Li, B [Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Yin, F [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Chen, H [New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    classification based on calcium scores shows excellent agreement with classification on the basis of conventional coronary artery calcium scoring. These studies demonstrate dual-energy cardiovascular CT can potentially be a noninvasive and sensitive modality in high risk patients. On-board KV/MV Imaging. To enhance soft tissue contrast and reduce metal artifacts, we have developed a dual-energy CBCT technique and a novel on-board kV/MV imaging technique based on hardware available on modern linear accelerators. We have also evaluated the feasibility of these two techniques in various phantom studies. Optimal techniques (energy, beam filtration, # of overlapping projections, etc) have been investigated with unique calibration procedures, which leads to successful decomposition of imaged material into acrylic-aluminum basis material pair. This enables the synthesis of virtual monochromatic (VM) CBCT images that demonstrate much less beam hardening, significantly reduced metal artifacts, and/or higher soft tissue CNR compared to single-energy CBCT. Adaptive Radiation Therapy. DECT could actually contribute to the area of Dose-Guided Radiation Therapy (or Adaptive Therapy). The application of DECT imaging using 80kV and 140 kV combinations could potentially increase the image quality by reducing the bone or high density material artifacts and also increase the soft tissue contrast by a light contrast agent. The result of this higher contrast / quality images is beneficial for deformable image registration / segmentation algorithm to improve its accuracy hence to make adaptive therapy less time consuming in its recontouring process. The real time re-planning prior to per treatment fraction could become more realistic with this improvement especially in hypofractional SBRT cases. Learning Objectives: Learn recent developments of dual-energy imaging in diagnosis and radiation therapy; Understand the unique clinical problem and required quantification accuracy in each application

  14. Radiation doses in diagnostic radiology and methods for dose reduction. Report of a co-ordinated research programme (1991-1993)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    It is well recognized that diagnostic radiology is the largest contributor to the collective dose from all man-made sources of radiation. Large differences in radiation doses from the same procedures among different X ray rooms have led to the conclusion that there is a potential for dose reduction. A Co-ordinated Research Programme on Radiation Doses in Diagnostic Radiology and Methods for Dose Reduction, involving Member States with different degrees of development, was launched by the IAEA in co-operation with the CEC. This report summarizes the results of the second and final Research Co-ordination Meeting held in Vienna from 4 to 8 October 1993. 22 refs, 6 figs and tabs

  15. Effect of prenatal exposure to diagnostic radiation on childhood physical and intellectual development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Yumei; Yao Jiaxiang

    1992-01-01

    An epidemiological investigation has been conducted on 1026 prenatally X-ray irradiated children aged from four to seven years in Beijing, Shanghai and Changchun, and 1191 controls of the same age, sex, and birth hospitals. The absorbed doses to fetus range from 11.75 to 42.70 mGy. The results show that there is no significant difference between the two groups in body height, weight and head circumference, and the parameters in the exposed group are all above the normal mean values except for three subgroups who have their height within half a standard deviation below the normal. On intelligence test, the exposed group achieves a slightly lower mean score than that of the control (t = 2.21, P<0.05). But the difference of the distributions of test scores in both groups is not significant, and logistic analysis of confounding factors rules out a consequential role of prenatal radiation in inducing mental retardation. The possible causes of lower I.Q. in the exposed group and the relationship of gestational age to I.Q. are discussed

  16. Comparison of diagnostic performance between single- and multiphasic contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic computed tomography in patients admitted to the emergency department with abdominal pain: potential radiation dose reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Shin Hye; You, Je Sung; Song, Mi Kyong; Choi, Jin-Young; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Chung, Yong Eun

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate feasibility of radiation dose reduction by optimal phase selection of computed tomography (CT) in patients who visited the emergency department (ED) for abdominal pain. We included 253 patients who visited the ED for abdominal pain. They underwent multiphasic CT including precontrast, late arterial phase (LAP), and hepatic venous phase (HVP). Three image sets (HVP, precontrast + HVP, and precontrast + LAP + HVP) were reviewed. Two reviewers determined the most appropriate diagnosis with five-point confidence scale. Diagnostic performances were compared among image sets by weighted-least-squares method or DeLong's method. Linear mixed model was used to assess changes of diagnostic confidence and radiation dose. There was no difference in diagnostic performance among three image sets, although diagnostic confidence level was significantly improved after review of triphasic images compared with both HVP images only or HVP with precontrast images (confidence scale, 4.64 ± 0.05, 4.66 ± 0.05, and 4.76 ± 0.04 in the order of the sets; overall P = 0.0008). Similar trends were observed in the subgroup analysis for diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease and cholecystitis. There is no difference between HVP-CT alone and multiphasic CT for the diagnosis of causes of abdominal pain in patients admitted to the ED without prior chronic disease or neoplasia. • There was no difference in diagnostic performance of HVP CT and multiphasic CT. • The diagnostic confidence level was improved after review of the LAP images. • HVP CT can achieve diagnostic performance similar to that of multiphasic CT, while minimizing radiation.

  17. Radiation environmental impact assessment of radioactive substances of an airport transit storage construction projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Baozeng; Xia Zitong; Zou Zhaozhuang

    2014-01-01

    Radioactive substances belong to dangerous goods transport aviation. Radioactive substances impoundments construction purpose is to ensure that the radioactive material during transport to transport and the public to achieve full or isolation, the effects of radiation on the human body, property and the environment caused by the control to an acceptable level. According to the relevant national standards and norms, for radiation protection evaluation of project construction of an airport radioactive impoundments, feasibility of the construction project radiation environment. (authors)

  18. Measurements of energetic particle radiation in transit to Mars on the Mars Science Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlin, C; Hassler, D M; Cucinotta, F A; Ehresmann, B; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R F; Brinza, D E; Kang, S; Weigle, G; Böttcher, S; Böhm, E; Burmeister, S; Guo, J; Köhler, J; Martin, C; Posner, A; Rafkin, S; Reitz, G

    2013-05-31

    The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft, containing the Curiosity rover, was launched to Mars on 26 November 2011, and for most of the 253-day, 560-million-kilometer cruise to Mars, the Radiation Assessment Detector made detailed measurements of the energetic particle radiation environment inside the spacecraft. These data provide insights into the radiation hazards that would be associated with a human mission to Mars. We report measurements of the radiation dose, dose equivalent, and linear energy transfer spectra. The dose equivalent for even the shortest round-trip with current propulsion systems and comparable shielding is found to be 0.66 ± 0.12 sievert.

  19. Regulatory T Cells Promote β-Catenin–Mediated Epithelium-to-Mesenchyme Transition During Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Shanshan; Pan, Xiujie; Xu, Long; Yang, Zhihua [Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China); Guo, Renfeng [Department of Pathology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Gu, Yongqing; Li, Ruoxi; Wang, Qianjun; Xiao, Fengjun; Du, Li; Zhou, Pingkun [Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China); Zhu, Maoxiang, E-mail: zhumx@nic.bmi.ac.cn [Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis results from thoracic radiation therapy and severely limits radiation therapy approaches. CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}FoxP3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs) as well as epithelium-to-mesenchyme transition (EMT) cells are involved in pulmonary fibrosis induced by multiple factors. However, the mechanisms of Tregs and EMT cells in irradiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the influence of Tregs on EMT in radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Methods and Materials: Mice thoraxes were irradiated (20 Gy), and Tregs were depleted by intraperitoneal injection of a monoclonal anti-CD25 antibody 2 hours after irradiation and every 7 days thereafter. Mice were treated on days 3, 7, and 14 and 1, 3, and 6 months post irradiation. The effectiveness of Treg depletion was assayed via flow cytometry. EMT and β-catenin in lung tissues were detected by immunohistochemistry. Tregs isolated from murine spleens were cultured with mouse lung epithelial (MLE) 12 cells, and short interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of β-catenin in MLE 12 cells was used to explore the effects of Tregs on EMT and β-catenin via flow cytometry and Western blotting. Results: Anti-CD25 antibody treatment depleted Tregs efficiently, attenuated the process of radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis, hindered EMT, and reduced β-catenin accumulation in lung epithelial cells in vivo. The coculture of Tregs with irradiated MLE 12 cells showed that Tregs could promote EMT in MLE 12 cells and that the effect of Tregs on EMT was partially abrogated by β-catenin knockdown in vitro. Conclusions: Tregs can promote EMT in accelerating radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. This process is partially mediated through β-catenin. Our study suggests a new mechanism for EMT, promoted by Tregs, that accelerates radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

  20. Regulatory T Cells Promote β-Catenin–Mediated Epithelium-to-Mesenchyme Transition During Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Shanshan; Pan, Xiujie; Xu, Long; Yang, Zhihua; Guo, Renfeng; Gu, Yongqing; Li, Ruoxi; Wang, Qianjun; Xiao, Fengjun; Du, Li; Zhou, Pingkun; Zhu, Maoxiang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis results from thoracic radiation therapy and severely limits radiation therapy approaches. CD4 + CD25 + FoxP3 + regulatory T cells (Tregs) as well as epithelium-to-mesenchyme transition (EMT) cells are involved in pulmonary fibrosis induced by multiple factors. However, the mechanisms of Tregs and EMT cells in irradiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the influence of Tregs on EMT in radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Methods and Materials: Mice thoraxes were irradiated (20 Gy), and Tregs were depleted by intraperitoneal injection of a monoclonal anti-CD25 antibody 2 hours after irradiation and every 7 days thereafter. Mice were treated on days 3, 7, and 14 and 1, 3, and 6 months post irradiation. The effectiveness of Treg depletion was assayed via flow cytometry. EMT and β-catenin in lung tissues were detected by immunohistochemistry. Tregs isolated from murine spleens were cultured with mouse lung epithelial (MLE) 12 cells, and short interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of β-catenin in MLE 12 cells was used to explore the effects of Tregs on EMT and β-catenin via flow cytometry and Western blotting. Results: Anti-CD25 antibody treatment depleted Tregs efficiently, attenuated the process of radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis, hindered EMT, and reduced β-catenin accumulation in lung epithelial cells in vivo. The coculture of Tregs with irradiated MLE 12 cells showed that Tregs could promote EMT in MLE 12 cells and that the effect of Tregs on EMT was partially abrogated by β-catenin knockdown in vitro. Conclusions: Tregs can promote EMT in accelerating radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. This process is partially mediated through β-catenin. Our study suggests a new mechanism for EMT, promoted by Tregs, that accelerates radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis

  1. Assessment of fetal radiation dose to patients and staff in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osei, E.K.

    2000-07-01

    A major source of uncertainty in the estimation of fetal absorbed radiation dose is the influence of fetal size and position as these change with gestational age. Consequently, dose to the fetus is related to gestational age. Most studies of fetal dose estimation during pregnancy assume that the uterus dose is equal to fetal dose. These dose estimates do not take account of gestational age and individual fetal depth, factors which are significant when calculating dose. To establish both positional and size data for estimation of fetal absorbed dose from radiological examinations, the depths from the mother's anterior surface to the mid-line of the fetal head and abdomen were measured from ultrasound scans in 215 pregnant women. Depths were measured along a ray path projected in the anterior-posterior direction from the mother's abdomen. The fetal size was estimated from measurements of the fetal abdominal and head circumference, femur length and the biparietal diameter. The effects of fetal presentation, maternal bladder volume, placenta location, gestational age and maternal AP thickness on fetal depth and size were analysed. A Monte Carlo (MC) model was developed, and used to derive factors for converting dose-area product and free-in-air entrance surface dose from medical exposure of a pregnant patient to absorbed dose to the uterus/embryo, and for converting uterus dose to fetal dose in the later stages of pregnancy. Also presented are factors for converting thermoluminescence dosimeter reading from occupational exposure of a pregnant worker to equivalent dose to the fetus. The MC model was verified experimentally by direct measurement of uterus depth dose in a female Rando phantom, and also by comparison with other experimental work and MC results in the literature. The application of the various conversion factors is demonstrated by a review of the dose estimation process in 50 cases of fetal irradiation from medical exposures. (author)

  2. Radiation dose to children in diagnostic radiology. Measurements and methods for clinical optimisation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almen, A.J.

    1995-09-01

    A method for estimating mean absorbed dose to different organs and tissues was developed for paediatric patients undergoing X-ray investigations. The absorbed dose distribution in water was measured for the specific X-ray beam used. Clinical images were studied to determine X-ray beam positions and field sizes. Size and position of organs in the patient were estimated using ORNL phantoms and complementary clinical information. Conversion factors between the mean absorbed dose to various organs and entrance surface dose for five different body sizes were calculated. Direct measurements on patients estimating entrance surface dose and energy imparted for common X-ray investigations were performed. The examination technique for a number of paediatric X-ray investigations used in 19 Swedish hospitals was studied. For a simulated pelvis investigation of a 1-year old child the entrance surface dose was measured and image quality was estimated using a contrast-detail phantom. Mean absorbed doses to organs and tissues in urography, lung, pelvis, thoracic spine, lumbar spine and scoliosis investigations was calculated. Calculations of effective dose were supplemented with risk calculations for special organs e g the female breast. The work shows that the examination technique in paediatric radiology is not yet optimised, and that the non-optimised procedures contribute to a considerable variation in radiation dose. In order to optimise paediatric radiology there is a need for more standardised methods in patient dosimetry. It is especially important to relate measured quantities to the size of the patient, using e g the patient weight and length. 91 refs, 17 figs, 8 tabs.

  3. Radiation dose to children in diagnostic radiology. Measurements and methods for clinical optimisation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almen, A.J.

    1995-09-01

    A method for estimating mean absorbed dose to different organs and tissues was developed for paediatric patients undergoing X-ray investigations. The absorbed dose distribution in water was measured for the specific X-ray beam used. Clinical images were studied to determine X-ray beam positions and field sizes. Size and position of organs in the patient were estimated using ORNL phantoms and complementary clinical information. Conversion factors between the mean absorbed dose to various organs and entrance surface dose for five different body sizes were calculated. Direct measurements on patients estimating entrance surface dose and energy imparted for common X-ray investigations were performed. The examination technique for a number of paediatric X-ray investigations used in 19 Swedish hospitals was studied. For a simulated pelvis investigation of a 1-year old child the entrance surface dose was measured and image quality was estimated using a contrast-detail phantom. Mean absorbed doses to organs and tissues in urography, lung, pelvis, thoracic spine, lumbar spine and scoliosis investigations was calculated. Calculations of effective dose were supplemented with risk calculations for special organs e g the female breast. The work shows that the examination technique in paediatric radiology is not yet optimised, and that the non-optimised procedures contribute to a considerable variation in radiation dose. In order to optimise paediatric radiology there is a need for more standardised methods in patient dosimetry. It is especially important to relate measured quantities to the size of the patient, using e g the patient weight and length. 91 refs, 17 figs, 8 tabs

  4. Assessment of fetal radiation dose to patients and staff in diagnostic radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osei, E.K

    2000-07-01

    A major source of uncertainty in the estimation of fetal absorbed radiation dose is the influence of fetal size and position as these change with gestational age. Consequently, dose to the fetus is related to gestational age. Most studies of fetal dose estimation during pregnancy assume that the uterus dose is equal to fetal dose. These dose estimates do not take account of gestational age and individual fetal depth, factors which are significant when calculating dose. To establish both positional and size data for estimation of fetal absorbed dose from radiological examinations, the depths from the mother's anterior surface to the mid-line of the fetal head and abdomen were measured from ultrasound scans in 215 pregnant women. Depths were measured along a ray path projected in the anterior-posterior direction from the mother's abdomen. The fetal size was estimated from measurements of the fetal abdominal and head circumference, femur length and the biparietal diameter. The effects of fetal presentation, maternal bladder volume, placenta location, gestational age and maternal AP thickness on fetal depth and size were analysed. A Monte Carlo (MC) model was developed, and used to derive factors for converting dose-area product and free-in-air entrance surface dose from medical exposure of a pregnant patient to absorbed dose to the uterus/embryo, and for converting uterus dose to fetal dose in the later stages of pregnancy. Also presented are factors for converting thermoluminescence dosimeter reading from occupational exposure of a pregnant worker to equivalent dose to the fetus. The MC model was verified experimentally by direct measurement of uterus depth dose in a female Rando phantom, and also by comparison with other experimental work and MC results in the literature. The application of the various conversion factors is demonstrated by a review of the dose estimation process in 50 cases of fetal irradiation from medical exposures. (author)

  5. Dust Emission at 8 and 24 μ m as Diagnostics of H ii Region Radiative Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oey, M. S.; López-Hernández, J.; Kellar, J. A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 311 West Hall, 1085 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-1107 (United States); Pellegrini, E. W. [Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Überle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Gordon, K. D.; Meixner, M.; Roman-Duval, J. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Jameson, K. E. [Astronomy Department and Laboratory for Millimeter-wave Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Li, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Madden, S. C. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA, Université Paris VII, IRFU/Service d’Astrophysique, Bat. 709, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bot, C. [Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 Rue de l’Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Rubio, M. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Tielens, A. G. G. M. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2017-07-20

    We use the Spitzer Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE) survey of the Magellanic Clouds to evaluate the relationship between the 8 μ m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission, 24 μ m hot dust emission, and H ii region radiative transfer. We confirm that in the higher-metallicity Large Magellanic Cloud, PAH destruction is sensitive to optically thin conditions in the nebular Lyman continuum: objects identified as optically thin candidates based on nebular ionization structure show six times lower median 8 μ m surface brightness (0.18 mJy arcsec{sup −2}) than their optically thick counterparts (1.2 mJy arcsec{sup −2}). The 24 μ m surface brightness also shows a factor of three offset between the two classes of objects (0.13 versus 0.44 mJy arcsec{sup −2}, respectively), which is driven by the association between the very small dust grains and higher density gas found at higher nebular optical depths. In contrast, PAH and dust formation in the low-metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud is strongly inhibited such that we find no variation in either 8 μ m or 24 μ m emission between our optically thick and thin samples. This is attributable to extremely low PAH and dust production together with high, corrosive UV photon fluxes in this low-metallicity environment. The dust mass surface densities and gas-to-dust ratios determined from dust maps using Herschel HERITAGE survey data support this interpretation.

  6. ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT): Straw Tubes for Tracking and Particle Identification at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mindur, Bartosz; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three inner detector tracking subsystems and consists of 300000 thin-walled drift tubes (“straw tubes”) that are 4 mm in diameter. The TRT system provides 30 space points with 130 micron resolution for charged tracks with |η| 0.5 GeV/c. The TRT also provides electron identification capability by detecting transition radiation (TR) X-ray photons in a Xe-based working gas mixture. Compared to Run 1, the LHC beams now provide a higher center of mass energy (13 TeV), more bunches with a reduced spacing (25 ns), and more particles in each bunch leading to very challenging, higher occupancies in the TRT. We will present TRT modifications made for Run 2 for in areas: to improve response to the expected much higher rate of hits and to mitigate leaks of the Xe-based active gas mixture. The higher rates required changes to the data acquisition system and introduction of validity gate to reject out-of-time hits. Radiation-induced gain changes in ...

  7. The use of roentgen diagnostics in chiropractor activities. Project based survey according to new regulations regarding radiation protection and use of radiation; Bruk av roentgendiagnostikk i norske kiropraktorvirksomheter. Prosjektrettet tilsyn etter ny forskrift om straalevern og bruk av straaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raaum, Aud; Widmark, Anders

    2005-12-15

    An audit has been performed in 17 chiropractic enterprises according to new radiation protection legislation. Before the audits a survey of the use of diagnostic imaging in Norwegian chiropractic enterprises was carried out. This report summarizes the results of the survey and the findings at the audits. (Author)

  8. Ionizing diagnostic radiation exposure in patients with Crohn's disease: A retrospective study in a medium hospital and its predictive factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino Rodríguez, Esther; Carrera Alonso, Elisa; Torralba González de Suso, Miguel; Sánchez da Silva, Marta; Martínez López, María; Sánchez-Tembleque Zarandona, María Dolores

    2018-02-01

    It is estimated that diagnostic medical radiation exposure may be responsable for 0.5-2% of cancers worldwide. Because of the relapsing course of Crohn's disease (CD), these patients usually requiere multiple ionizing radiation test. Stimating the total cumulative effective dose received by our CD patients and identifying the risk factors associated with the exposure to a cumulative effective dose due to the disease (CEED) > 50mSv. Retrospective cohort study (2001-2014). patients with CD. Risk dose >50mSv. For calculating de cumulative effective dose and the CEED, all the ionizing test done were taken. For identifying predictive factors for receiving a CEDD >50mSv, an univariate and a multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed using a >50mSv dose as dependent variable. Of the 267 patients analyzed the 24.6% of them received a cumulative effective dose > 50mSv and the 15.2% a CEED>50mSv. In the multivariate analysis, the following variables were identified as independent predictors associated with a CEDD >50mSv: major surgery (OR= 2.1; IC 95% [1.1-3.8]; p=.019) and severity (OR= 20.6; IC 95% [4.5-94.8]; p<.01). Patients with CD are more at risk of receiving risk CEED, so it would be advisable to monitor the cumulative effective dose received to anticipate our intervention in order to avoid reaching that dose. The ultrasounds and abdominal resonance enterography are alternatives in these cases, although their accessibility is limited in some centers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Radiation effects in a CMOS/SOS/Al-Gate D/A converter and on-chip diagnostic transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brucker, G.J.; Heagerty, W.

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained from total dose and transient radiation tests on a CMOS/SOS/Al-Gate D/A converter and on-chip diagnostic transistors. Samples were irradiated by cobalt-60 gamma rays under worst-case conditions, and by 10-MeV electron pulses of 50-ns and 4.4-μs duration. Devices were fabricated with three different insulators; the two discussed here are standard wet oxide and a pyrogenic oxide. Test transistors on the D/A chips made it possible to diagnose the failure modes of the converter and to evaluate some special designs. These consisted of standard edge p- and n-channel transistors, edgeless units, edgeless tetrode transistors, and an edgeless type transmission gate with a diode clamp from substrate to gate. The total dose results indicate that the pyrogenic oxide increased the failure dose of the operational amplifier portion of the converter from 10 3 rads (Si) to 2 x 10 6 rads (Si); however, the sample and hold failed after exposure to a low level of 10 3 rads (Si). Test devices indicated this to be due to the radiation-induced leakage current of the transmission gate which discharges the sample and hold capacitor. The diode clamp decreased the threshold voltage shifts and the leakage currents. The edgeless devices improved the device performance because of a more abrupt turn-on. Narrow-pulse test data indicated that the edgeless units produced less photocurrent than the edge units by about a factor of three to four. Converter upset levels are less than or equal to 10 9 rads/s due to precision requirements which make a few millivolt transients untenable

  10. Exploring Rotations Due to Radiation Pressure: 2-D to 3-D Transition Is Interesting!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxman, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation pressure is an important topic within a standard physics course (see, in particular, Refs. 1 and 2). The physics of radiation pressure is described, the magnitude of it is derived, both for the case of a perfectly absorbing surface and of a perfect reflector, and various applications of this interesting effect are discussed, such as…

  11. The radiative decays of excited states of transition elements located inside and near core-shell nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukhov, Konstantin K.

    2017-12-01

    Here we discuss the radiative decays of excited states of transition elements located inside and outside of the subwavelength core-shell nanoparticles embedded in dielectric medium. Based on the quantum mechanics and quantum electrodynamics, the general analytical expressions are derived for the probability of the spontaneous transitions in the luminescent centers (emitter) inside and outside the subwavelength core-shell nanoparticle. Obtained expressions holds for arbitrary orientation of the dipole moment and the principal axes of the quadrupole moment of the emitter with respect to the radius-vector r connecting the center of the emitter with the center of the nanoparticle. They have simple form and show how the spontaneous emission in core-shell NPs can be controlled and engineered due to the dependence of the emission rates on core-shell sizes, radius-vector r and permittivities of the surrounding medium, shell, and core.

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonic histogram features to evaluate radiation toxicity of the parotid glands: a clinical study of xerostomia following head-and-neck cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Tridandapani, Srini; Beitler, Jonathan J; Yu, David S; Chen, Zhengjia; Kim, Sungjin; Bruner, Deborah W; Curran, Walter J; Liu, Tian

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound histogram features in the quantitative assessment of radiation-induced parotid gland injury and to identify potential imaging biomarkers for radiation-induced xerostomia (dry mouth)-the most common and debilitating side effect after head-and-neck radiotherapy (RT). Thirty-four patients, who have developed xerostomia after RT for head-and-neck cancer, were enrolled. Radiation-induced xerostomia was defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer morbidity scale. Ultrasound scans were performed on each patient's parotids bilaterally. The 34 patients were stratified into the acute-toxicity groups (16 patients, ≤ 3 months after treatment) and the late-toxicity group (18 patients, > 3 months after treatment). A separate control group of 13 healthy volunteers underwent similar ultrasound scans of their parotid glands. Six sonographic features were derived from the echo-intensity histograms to assess acute and late toxicity of the parotid glands. The quantitative assessments were compared to a radiologist's clinical evaluations. The diagnostic accuracy of these ultrasonic histogram features was evaluated with the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. With an area under the ROC curve greater than 0.90, several histogram features demonstrated excellent diagnostic accuracy for evaluation of acute and late toxicity of parotid glands. Significant differences (P xerostomia monitoring and assessment. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Rings and Spirals Forming by Themselves: the Photoelectric Instability in Debris Disks and Transitional disks, Now with Radiation Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchner, Marc J.; Richert, Alex J. W.; Lyra, Wladimir

    2018-01-01

    Previous models of the photoelectric instability (PeI) in optically-thin disks suggested that it could form narrow rings of dust with no need for planets to shepherd them. We used the Pencil Code to perform the new numerical models of this instability that include a spectrum of grain sizes and stellar radiation pressure. The new models show that the instability persists in the presence of radiation pressure, and at low gas levels it tends to create dust rings. At higher gas levels where at least some of the bound grains are well coupled to the gas, clumpy spiral structures form instead. Can these simulations explain the patterns you see in your favorite transitional disk or debris disk (e.g., HD 141569A)? Drop by to compare notes and disk images--just leave the planets at home.

  14. A large area transition radiation detector to measure the energy of muons in the Gran Sasso underground laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbarito, E.; Bellotti, R.; Cafagna, F.; Castellano, M.; De Cataldo, G.; De Marzo, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fusco, P.; Giglietto, N.; Guarnaccia, P.; Mazziotta, M.N.; Mongelli, M.; Montaruli, T.; Perchiazzi, M.; Raino, A.; Sacchetti, A.; Spinelli, P.

    1995-01-01

    We have designed and built a transition radiation detector of 36 m 2 area in order to measure the residual energy of muons penetrating in the Gran Sasso cosmic ray underground laboratory up to the TeV region. It consists of three adjacent modules, each of 2x6 m 2 area. Polystyrene square tubes, filled with a argon-carbon dioxide gas mixture, and polyethylene foam layers are used as proportional detectors and radiators respectively. We cover such a large surface with only 960 channels that provide adequate energy resolution and particle tracking for the astroparticle physics items to investigate. The detector has been calibrated using a reduced size prototype in a test beam. Results from one module exposed to cosmic rays at sea level are shown. (orig.)

  15. Radiative ΩQ∗→ΩQγ and ΞQ∗→ΞQ′γ transitions in light cone QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, T. M.; Azizi, K.; Sundu, H.

    2015-01-01

    We calculate the magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments associated with the radiative Ω Q ∗ →Ω Q γ and Ξ Q ∗ →Ξ Q ′ γ transitions with Q=b or c in the framework of light cone QCD sum rules. It is found that the corresponding quadrupole moments are negligibly small, while the magnetic dipole moments are considerably large. A comparison of the results of the considered multipole moments as well as corresponding decay widths with the predictions of the vector dominance model is performed

  16. Performance of the transition radiation detector flown on the NMSU/WIZARD TS93 balloon-borne instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aversa, F.; Barbiellini, G.; Boezio, M. [Trieste Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Fisica]|[INFN, Trieste (Italy); Basini, G.; Brancaccio, F.M. [INFN, Laboratori nazionali di Frascati, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Bellotti, R. [Bari Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Fisica]|[INFN, Bari (Italy); Bidoli, V. [Rome Univ. `Tor Vergata` (Italy). Dip. di Fisica]|[INFN, Sezione Univ. `Tor Vergata` Rome (Italy); Bocciolini, M. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Fisica]|[INFN, Florence (Italy); Bronzini, F. [Rome Univ. `La Sapienza` (Italy). Dip. di Fisica]|[INFN, Sezione Univ. `La Sapienza` Rome (Italy)

    1995-09-01

    It is built and tested a transition radiation detector (TRD) to discriminate positrons from protons in the balloon flight TS 93 experiment. It is presented the TRD performance using flight data obtaining a proton-positron rejection factor of the order of 10{sup -3}. During the 24 hour flight, the data in the momentum range 4-50 GeV/c are collected. Using the TRD together with the Silicon calorimeter, it is achieved an overall rejection factor of about 10{sup -5} of positron against the proton background over the entire momentum range.

  17. Radiation interception and its efficiency for dry matter production in three crop species in the transitional humid zone of Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idinoba, M.E.; Idinoba, P.A.; Gbadegesin, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    This study was conducted in two years at the experimental fields of the International Institute of Tropical agriculture, Ibadan (7°30 ' N, 3°54 ' E) situated in the humid zone of Nigeria. The objective was to determine the biological productivity of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.), groundnut (Aranchis hypogea L.) and maize (Zea mays L.) in a transitional humid forest zone of Nigeria. Crop productivity was determined by calculating the Radiation Use Efficiency (RUE) from the slope of the relationship between cumulative dry matter and Intercepted Photosynthetic Active Radiation (IPAR). Linear relationships were observed between cumulative total dry weight and cumulative Photosynthetic Active Radiation (PAR) in all the crops. The mean radiation use efficiencies (RUE) obtained were 3.83 g MJ -1 for maize, 2.37 g MJ -1 for groundnut and 2.95 g MJ -1 for cowpea. The maize crop was a better converter of intercepted PAR to dry matter than groundnut and cowpea. (author) [fr

  18. Radiation protection of patients in diagnostic radiology: implementation of a management system optimization; Proteccion radiologica de pacientes en radiodiagnostico: implantacion de un sistema de gestion de la optimizacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corpas Rivera, L.; Devesa Pardo, F. J.; Gamez Jimenez, J. L.; Vallejo Carrascal, C.; Garcia de Diego, A. A.; Amador Vela-Hidalgo, J. J.

    2011-07-01

    The enforcement of quality in diagnostic radiology (Royal Decree 1976/1999 laying down the criteria for quality in diagnostic radiology and Royal Decree 815/2001 to justify the use of ionizing radiations for medical exposure, etc.) and recommendations and European regulations on the matter, is done by carrying out the optimization of the doses received, based on image quality in a continuous process of monitoring of such dose from the dose reference Values ??(VRD ) that the system has allowed to establish for each technique.

  19. Lack of Radiation Dose or Quality Dependence of Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) Mediated by Transforming Growth Factor β

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andarawewa, Kumari L.; Costes, Sylvain V.; Fernandez-Garcia, Ignacio; Chou, William S.; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Park, Howard; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a phenotype that alters cell morphology, disrupts morphogenesis, and increases motility. Our prior studies have shown that the progeny of human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) irradiated with 2 Gy undergoes transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)-mediated EMT. In this study we determined whether radiation dose or quality affected TGF-β-mediated EMT. Methods and Materials: HMECs were cultured on tissue culture plastic or in Matrigel (BD Biosciences, San Jose, CA) and exposed to low or high linear energy transfer (LET) and TGF-β (400 pg/mL). Image analysis was used to measure membrane-associated E-cadherin, a marker of functional epithelia, or fibronectin, a product of mesenchymal cells, as a function of radiation dose and quality. Results: E-cadherin was reduced in TGF-β-treated cells irradiated with low-LET radiation doses between 0.03 and 2 Gy compared with untreated, unirradiated cells or TGF-β treatment alone. The radiation quality dependence of TGF-β-mediated EMT was determined by use of 1 GeV/amu (gigaelectron volt / atomic mass unit) 56 Fe ion particles at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Radiation Laboratory. On the basis of the relative biological effectiveness of 2 for 56 Fe ion particles' clonogenic survival, TGF-β-treated HMECs were irradiated with equitoxic 1-Gy 56 Fe ion or 2-Gy 137 Cs radiation in monolayer. Furthermore, TGF-β-treated HMECs irradiated with either high- or low-LET radiation exhibited similar loss of E-cadherin and gain of fibronectin and resulted in similar large, poorly organized colonies when embedded in Matrigel. Moreover, the progeny of HMECs exposed to different fluences of 56 Fe ion underwent TGF-β-mediated EMT even when only one-third of the cells were directly traversed by the particle. Conclusions: Thus TGF-β-mediated EMT, like other non-targeted radiation effects, is neither radiation dose nor quality dependent at the doses examined.

  20. Cherenkov-transition radiation in a waveguide with a dielectric-vacuum boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Yu. Alekhina

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the electromagnetic field of a charged particle moving uniformly in a circular waveguide and crossing the boundary between a dielectric and a vacuum. Our study focuses on the case when Cherenkov radiation is generated in the dielectric. Analytical and numerical investigation of the waveguide modes is performed. We show that a large radiation can be excited in the vacuum area. The mode amplitudes in the vacuum can be greater than those in the dielectric. The field from a Gaussian bunch is also studied. We note that the effect under consideration can be used to generate a large quasimonochromatic or multimode radiation.

  1. First Central and Eastern European Workshop on Quality control, patient dosimetry and radiation protection in diagnostic and interventional radiology and nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National Frederic Joliot-Curie Research Institute for Radiobiology and Radiohygiene

    2007-01-01

    First Central and Eastern European Workshop on Quality Control, Patient Dosimetry and Radiation Protection in Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, scientifically supported and accredited as a CPD event for medical physicists by EFOMP, National 'Frederic Joliot-Curie' Research Institute for Radiobiology and Radiohygiene (NRIRR), Budapest, Hungary, April 25-28, 2007. Topics of the meeting included all areas of medical radiation physics except radiation therapy. A unique possibility was realized by inviting four European manufacturers of quality control instrumentation, not only for exhibiting but they also had 45 minutes individual presentations about each manufacturer's product scale and conception. Further sessions dealt with dosimetry, optimization, quality control and testing, radiation protection and standardization, computed tomography and nuclear medicine, in 29 oral presentations and 1 poster of the participants. (S.I.)

  2. Dosimetric methodology and reference system for diagnostic level X radiation; Metodologia dosimetrica e sistema de referencia para radiacao X nivel diagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potiens, Maria da Penha Albuquerque

    1999-07-01

    Several methodologies for the calibration of diagnostic radiology instruments were developed and established at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN. These established radiation qualities are recommended by international standards. The methods may be used in the calibration procedures of survey meters used in radiation protection measurements (scattered radiation), instruments used in direct beams (attenuated and non attenuated beams) and quality control instruments. A reference system was proposed using two identical ionization chambers developed at IPEN. They differ only by the collecting electrode material, one of aluminium and the other of graphite. The different energetic dependence of the chamber's response provided a ratio related to the tube potential. The variation of only 0.28%, from 14.3 to 111 keV, on the energetic dependence of the graphite electrode chamber, provided the possibility of air kerma rate determination in the studied radiation beams. (author)

  3. Cherenkov-transition radiation in a waveguide with a dielectric-vacuum boundary

    OpenAIRE

    Tatiana Yu. Alekhina; Andrey V. Tyukhtin

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the electromagnetic field of a charged particle moving uniformly in a circular waveguide and crossing the boundary between a dielectric and a vacuum. Our study focuses on the case when Cherenkov radiation is generated in the dielectric. Analytical and numerical investigation of the waveguide modes is performed. We show that a large radiation can be excited in the vacuum area. The mode amplitudes in the vacuum can be greater than those in the dielectric. The field from a Gaussian bu...

  4. Synchrotron radiation topography studies of the phase transition in LaGaO3 crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, G.D.; Dudley, M.; Wang, Y.; Liu, X.; Liebermann, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation of the orthorhombic to rhombohedral phase transformation occurring at 145degC in lanthanum gallate has been conducted using white beam synchrotron X-ray topography (WBSXRT). The existence of the first order transition was confirmed by differential thermal analysis and X-ray diffractometer powder analysis. Subsequent to this, synchrotron white beam Laue patterns were recorded in situ as a function of temperature, during the transition. Before the transition point was reached, (112) orth type reflection twinning was found to be dominant although a small amount of (110) orth type twinning was also observed in the same crystal. Beyond the transition point, not only did the structural change become evident but also reflection twinning on the (110) rhom planes was observed. The scale of this twinning became finer as the temperature was increased beyond the transition temperature. The twinning observed in both the low and high temperature phases gives rise to deformation of the (011) rhom surface plane which creates problems for the potential use of this material as a substrate for growing high Tc superconducting epitaxial layers. (orig.)

  5. Synchrotron radiation topography studies of the phase transition in LaGaO 3 crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, G.-D.; Dudley, M.; Wang, Y.; Liu, X.; Liebermann, R. C.

    1991-05-01

    An investigation of the orthorhombic to rhombohedral phase transformation occurring at 145°C in lanthanum gallate has been conducted using white beam synchrotron X-ray topography (WBSXRT). The existence of the first order transition was confirmed by differential thermal analysis and X-ray diffractometer powder analysis. Subsequent to this, synchrotron white beam Laue patterns were recorded in situ as a function of temperature, during the transition. Before the transition point was reached, (112) orth type reflection twinning was found to be dominant although a small amount of (110) orth type twinning was also observed in the same crystal. Beyond the transition point, not only did the structural change become evident but also reflection twinning on the (110) rhom planes was observed. The scale of this twinning became finer as the temperature was increased beyond the transition temperature. The twinning observed in both the low and high temperature phases gives rise to deformation of the (011) rhom surface plane which creates problems for the potential use of this material as a substrate for growing high Tc superconducting epitaxial layers.

  6. Performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker With First High Energy pp and Pb-Pb Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three sub-systems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It consists of close to 300000 thin-wall drift tubes (straws) providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points with 0.12-0.15 mm resolution for charged particle tracks with |η| < 2 and pT > 0.5 GeV. Along with continuous tracking, it provides particle identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons generated by high velocity particles in the many polymer fibers or films that fill the spaces between the straws. Custom-built analog and digital electronics is optimized to operate as luminosity increases to the LHC design. In this talk, a review of the commissioning and first operational experience of the TRT detector will be presented. Emphasis will be given to performance studies based on the reconstruction and analysis of LHC collisions. The first studies of the TRT detector response to the extremely hig...

  7. Performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker With First High Energy pp and Pb-Pb Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three sub-systems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It consists of close to 300000 thin-wall drift tubes (straws) providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points with 0.12-0.15 mm resolution for charged particle tracks with |η| 0.5 GeV. Along with continuous tracking, it provides particle identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons generated by high velocity particles in the many polymer fibers or films that fill the spaces between the straws. Custom-built analog and digital electronics is optimized to operate as luminosity increases to the LHC design. In this talk, a review of the commissioning and first operational experience of the TRT detector will be presented. Emphasis will be given to performance studies based on the reconstruction and analysis of LHC collisions. The first studies of the TRT detector response to the extremely high track density conditions...

  8. Performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker with Cosmic Rays and First High Energy Collisions at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Mashinistov, R; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three sub-systems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It consists of close to 300000 thin-wall drift tubes (straws) providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points with 130 μm resolution for charged particle tracks with |η| < 2 and pT > 0.5 GeV/c. The TRT is immersed in a 2 T magnetic field generated by the central solenoid, significantly contributing together with the other two Inner Detector sub-systems to the particle momentum reconstruction. Along with continuous tracking, it provides particle identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons. This talk will describe the operational experience gained with the ATLAS TRT detector during the commissioning with cosmic rays and operation with the first proton-proton collision data at 900 GeV and 7 TeV center-of-mass energy.

  9. ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT): Straw tubes for tracking and particle identification at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00220535; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three inner detector tracking subsystems and consists of ∼300,000 thin-walled drift tubes (“straw tubes”) that are 4 mm in diameter. The TRT system provides ∼30 space points with ∼130 micron resolution for charged tracks with |η| 0.5 GeV/c . The TRT also provides electron identification capability by detecting transition radiation (TR) X-ray photons in an Xe-based working gas mixture. Compared to Run 1, the LHC beams now provide a higher centre of mass energy (13 TeV), more bunches with a reduced spacing (25 ns), and more particles in each bunch leading to very challenging, higher occupancies in the TRT. Significant modifications of the TRT detector have been made for LHC Run 2 mainly to improve response to the expected much higher rate of hits and to mitigate leaks of the Xe-based active gas mixture. The higher rates required changes to the data acquisition system and introduction of validity gate to reject out-of-time hits. Man...

  10. Electron beam bunch length characterizations using incoherent and coherent transition radiation on the APS SASE FEL project

    CERN Document Server

    Lumpkin, Alex H; Berg, W J; Lewellen, J W; Sereno, N S; Happek, U

    2000-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) injector linac has been reconfigured with a low-emittance RF thermionic gun and a photocathode (PC) RF gun to support self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron laser (FEL) experiments. One of the most critical parameters for optimizing SASE performance (gain length) is the electron beam peak current, which requires a charge measurement and a bunch length measurement capability. We report here initial measurements of the latter using both incoherent optical transition radiation (OTR) and coherent transition radiation (CTR). A visible light Hamamatsu C5680 synchroscan streak camera was used to measure the thermionic RF gun beam's bunch length (sigma approx 2-3 ps) via OTR generated by the beam at 220 MeV and 200 mA macropulse average current. In addition, a CTR monitor (Michelson Interferometer) based on a Golay cell as the far-infrared (FIR) detector has been installed at the 40-MeV station in the beamline. Initial observations of CTR signal strength variation wi...

  11. Guidelines on the implementation of radiation protection measures during diagnostic medical exposures of female patients of reproductive capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-08-01

    These guidelines were produced in response to a perceived need for clear guidance concerning the implementation of the 10-day and 28-day rules regarding radiological radiation protection practices. At the outset it is important to emphasise that, in all cases, the seriousness of the clinical situation must be taken into account as being of paramount importance and an overriding consideration to the guidelines. Radiographs of the chest, skull and extremities may be done at any time, provided that best practices are adhered to. All requests for radiological examinations of female patients, which place the uterus in or near the primary X-ray beam, i.e. irradiation between the diaphragm and pubis, or nuclear medicine examinations which are likely to result in a dose to the unborn child up to 10 mGy, should include the date of the last menstrual period. The prescriber and practitioner or radiographer should ask a patient beyond day 10 of the menstrual cycle whether she might be pregnant. This enquiry and the patient's answer should be recorded in writing. If the answer is no, the examination may proceed. If the answer is yes or uncertain, the examination should not proceed. In cases of medical emergency, the practitioner or the prescriber, if necessary following discussion with the practitioner or radiographer and taking justification into account, may decide to proceed with the examination. The practitioner or prescriber must record this decision in writing and sign it. The 10-day rule is recommended for certain high dose examinations where the dose to the uterus is likely to exceed 10 mGy. These include a small number of diagnostic X-ray and nuclear medicine procedures. (author)

  12. Guidelines on the implementation of radiation protection measures during diagnostic medical exposures of female patients of reproductive capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-08-01

    These guidelines were produced in response to a perceived need for clear guidance concerning the implementation of the 10-day and 28-day rules regarding radiological radiation protection practices. At the outset it is important to emphasise that, in all cases, the seriousness of the clinical situation must be taken into account as being of paramount importance and an overriding consideration to the guidelines. Radiographs of the chest, skull and extremities may be done at any time, provided that best practices are adhered to. All requests for radiological examinations of female patients, which place the uterus in or near the primary X-ray beam, i.e. irradiation between the diaphragm and pubis, or nuclear medicine examinations which are likely to result in a dose to the unborn child up to 10 mGy, should include the date of the last menstrual period. The prescriber and practitioner or radiographer should ask a patient beyond day 10 of the menstrual cycle whether she might be pregnant. This enquiry and the patient's answer should be recorded in writing. If the answer is no, the examination may proceed. If the answer is yes or uncertain, the examination should not proceed. In cases of medical emergency, the practitioner or the prescriber, if necessary following discussion with the practitioner or radiographer and taking justification into account, may decide to proceed with the examination. The practitioner or prescriber must record this decision in writing and sign it. The 10-day rule is recommended for certain high dose examinations where the dose to the uterus is likely to exceed 10 mGy. These include a small number of diagnostic X-ray and nuclear medicine procedures. (author)

  13. Ultra-low dose dual-source high-pitch computed tomography of the paranasal sinus: diagnostic sensitivity and radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, Boris; Zangos, Stefan; Friedrichs, Ingke; Bauer, Ralf W.; Kerl, Matthias; Vogl, Thomas J.; Martin M Mack, Martin M. (Clinic of the Goethe Univ., Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany)), email: boris.schell@googlemail.com; Potente, Stefan (Clinic of the Goethe Univ., Dept. of Forensic Medicine, Frankfurt (Germany))

    2012-05-15

    Background: Today's gold standard for diagnostic imaging of inflammatory diseases of the paranasal sinus is computed tomography (CT). Purpose: To evaluate diagnostic sensitivity and radiation dose of an ultra-low dose dual-source CT technique. Material and Methods: Paranasal sinuses of 14 cadaveric heads were independently evaluated by two readers using a modern dual-source CT with lowest reasonable dosage in high-pitch mode (100 kV, 10 mAs, collimation 0.6 mm, pitch value 3.0). Additionally the head part of an anthropomorphic Alderson-Rando phantom was equipped with thermoluminescent detectors to measure radiation exposure to the eye lenses and thyroid gland. Results: Diagnostic accuracy regarding sinusoidal fluid, nasal septum deviation, and mucosal swelling was 100%. Mastoid fluid was detected in 76% and 92%, respectively. In the phantom study, average measured eye lens dosage was 0.64 mGy; radiation exposure of the thyroid gland was 0.085 mGy. Conclusion: Regarding evaluation of inflammatory diseases of the paranasal sinus this study indicates sufficient accuracy of the proposed CT protocol at a very low dosage level

  14. role of some transition metals and metalloproteins on oxidative stress formation among ionizing radiation exposed workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael, M.I.

    2004-01-01

    this study was established to evaluate the role of working in radiation field for different prolonged periods on some oxidant/antioxidant parameters and to estimate the role of other additional factors such as age, smoking and inflammation on the progress of oxidative stress on the chosen volunteers. one hundred and twenty six male volunteers working in the nuclear research center and hot laboratories center were assessed in the present study, they were arranged as 70 radiation exposed workers and 56 control individuals. the radiation exposed workers were rearranged into 50 non-smokers, non-hypertensive and non-diabetics; 10 individuals were smokers, non-hypertensive, non-diabetic and other 10 volunteers with increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (esr), non-smokers, non-hypertensive and non-diabetics

  15. Comparison of diagnostic performance between single- and multiphasic contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic computed tomography in patients admitted to the emergency department with abdominal pain: potential radiation dose reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Shin Hye; You, Je Sung; Choi, Jin-Young; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Chung, Yong Eun [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Mi Kyong [Yonsei University, Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate feasibility of radiation dose reduction by optimal phase selection of computed tomography (CT) in patients who visited the emergency department (ED) for abdominal pain. We included 253 patients who visited the ED for abdominal pain. They underwent multiphasic CT including precontrast, late arterial phase (LAP), and hepatic venous phase (HVP). Three image sets (HVP, precontrast + HVP, and precontrast + LAP + HVP) were reviewed. Two reviewers determined the most appropriate diagnosis with five-point confidence scale. Diagnostic performances were compared among image sets by weighted-least-squares method or DeLong's method. Linear mixed model was used to assess changes of diagnostic confidence and radiation dose. There was no difference in diagnostic performance among three image sets, although diagnostic confidence level was significantly improved after review of triphasic images compared with both HVP images only or HVP with precontrast images (confidence scale, 4.64 ± 0.05, 4.66 ± 0.05, and 4.76 ± 0.04 in the order of the sets; overall P = 0.0008). Similar trends were observed in the subgroup analysis for diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease and cholecystitis. There is no difference between HVP-CT alone and multiphasic CT for the diagnosis of causes of abdominal pain in patients admitted to the ED without prior chronic disease or neoplasia. (orig.)

  16. Irradiation aging of the electronics of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    ATLAS TRT Collaboration; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Talk for a workshop on April 23, 2018 about Radiation effects at the LHC experiments and impact on operation and performance. Plots show the threshold drift over 2 years as is seen in the TRT and ATLAS, showing saturation of threshold drift after run 1. Other slides are studies done in 2013/2014 showing the effects of a Co-60 source on the thresholds, showing threshold drift effects at 30 kRad (effective dose in ATLAS after Run 1) and beyond. The take away from these slides is that the radiation effects saturate and stabilize after around 30 kRads

  17. Radiosensitivity and capacity for radiation-induced sublethal damage repair of canine transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfitt, S L; Milner, R J; Salute, M E; Hintenlang, D E; Farese, J P; Bacon, N J; Bova, F J; Rajon, D A; Lurie, D M

    2011-09-01

    Understanding the inherent radiosensitivity and repair capacity of canine transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) can aid in optimizing radiation protocols to treat this disease. The objective of this study was to evaluate the parameters surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF(2) ), α/β ratio and capacity for sublethal damage repair (SLDR) in response to radiation. Dose-response and split-dose studies were performed using the clonogenic assay. The mean SF(2) for three established TCC cell lines was high at 0.61. All the three cell lines exhibited a low to moderate α/β ratio, with the mean being 3.27. Two cell lines exhibited statistically increased survival at 4 and 24 h in the dose-response assay. Overall, our results indicate that the cell lines are moderately radioresistant, have a high repair capacity and behave similarly to a late-responding normal tissue. These findings indicate that the radiation protocols utilizing higher doses with less fractionation may be more effective for treating TCC. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Radiation-induced tetramer-to-dimer transition of Esterichia coli lactose repressor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Goffinont, S.; Davídková, Marie; Spotheim-Maurizot, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 386, č. 2 (2009), s. 300-304 ISSN 0006-291X R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC09012 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : protein * DNA * radiation * oxidation * tetramer * dimer * lactose repressor Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.548, year: 2009

  19. Transition of radiation protection standards in ICRP recommendations and Japan's response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirabe, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Radiation protection standards are the standards set for the purpose of preventing radiation hazard and other damage. This paper confirm what the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommended against the standard value on public exposure in Japan's laws and regulations, and how the Japanese government responded in introducing it into Japan's laws and regulations. There were delays of 6 to 12 years for the introduction of ICRP recommendations into the laws and regulations. Compared with response to the copyright treaty, which was extremely quick with the delays of only 1 to 2 years, these delays were very large. In Japan's laws and regulations, there are no regulations on the standard value for public exposure, and introduction of the recommended standard value of 1 mSv/year from ICRP has been avoided by the government. It is supposed that the reason for not introducing radiation dose limit and dose constraint value of public exposure was due to the lobbying of electric companies. After the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, the former Nuclear Safety Commission set the reference level for emergency exposure situation at 20 mSv/year. Although there is the long-term target of 1 mSv/year for existing exposure, no reference level has been set yet. Due to these delays or avoidances, the rights of people suffering from radiation exposure are restricted, while perhaps the benefits of electric companies are being protected. (A.O.)

  20. Interventional Radiation Oncology (IRO): Transition of a magnetic resonance simulator to a brachytherapy suite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Roberta; Armour, Elwood; Beeckler, Courtney; Briner, Valerie; Choflet, Amanda; Cox, Andrea; Fader, Amanda N; Hannah, Marie N; Hobbs, Robert; Huang, Ellen; Kiely, Marilyn; Lee, Junghoon; Morcos, Marc; McMillan, Paige E; Miller, Dave; Ng, Sook Kien; Prasad, Rashmi; Souranis, Annette; Thomsen, Robert; DeWeese, Theodore L; Viswanathan, Akila N

    2018-03-13

    As a core component of a new gynecologic cancer radiation program, we envisioned, structured, and implemented a novel Interventional Radiation Oncology (IRO) unit and magnetic resonance (MR)-brachytherapy environment in an existing MR simulator. We describe the external and internal processes required over a 6-8 month time frame to develop a clinical and research program for gynecologic brachytherapy and to successfully convert an MR simulator into an IRO unit. Support of the institution and department resulted in conversion of an MR simulator to a procedural suite. Development of the MR gynecologic brachytherapy program required novel equipment, staffing, infrastructural development, and cooperative team development with anesthetists, nurses, therapists, physicists, and physicians to ensure a safe and functional environment. Creation of a separate IRO unit permitted a novel billing structure. The creation of an MR-brachytherapy environment in an MR simulator is feasible. Developing infrastructure includes several collaborative elements. Unique to the field of radiation oncology, formalizing the space as an Interventional Radiation Oncology unit permits a sustainable financial structure. Copyright © 2018 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.