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Sample records for transfer protein nsltp

  1. Characterization of a new antifungal non-specific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP) from sugar beet leaves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, A K; Brunstedt, J; Madsen, M T

    2000-01-01

    A novel protein (IWF5) comprising 92 amino acids has been purified from the intercellular washing fluid of sugar beet leaves using cation exchange chromatography and reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography. Based on amino acid sequence homology, including the presence of eight...... cysteines at conserved positions, the protein can be classified as a member of the plant family of non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs). The protein is 47% identical to IWF1, an antifungal nsLTP previously isolated from leaves of sugar beet. A potential site for N-linked glycosylation present...

  2. Characterization and antifungal properties of wheat nonspecific lipid transfer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jin-Yue; Gaudet, Denis A; Lu, Zhen-Xiang; Frick, Michele; Puchalski, Byron; Laroche, André

    2008-03-01

    This study simultaneously considered the phylogeny, fatty acid binding ability, and fungal toxicity of a large number of monocot nonspecific lipid transfer proteins (ns-LTP). Nine novel full-length wheat ns-LTP1 clones, all possessing coding sequences of 348 bp, isolated from abiotic- and biotic-stressed cDNA libraries from aerial tissues, exhibited highly conserved coding regions with 78 to 99 and 71 to 100% identity at the nucleotide and amino acid levels, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses revealed two major ns-LTP families in wheat. Eight wheat ns-LTP genes from different clades were cloned into the expression vector pPICZalpha and transformed into Pichia pastoris. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Western blotting, and in vitro lipid binding activity assay confirmed that the eight ns-LTP were all successfully expressed and capable of in vitro binding fatty acid molecules. A comparative in vitro study on the toxicity of eight wheat ns-LTP to mycelium growth or spore germination of eight wheat pathogens and three nonwheat pathogens revealed differential toxicities among different ns-LTP. Values indicating 50% inhibition of fungal growth or spore germination of three selected ns-LTP against six fungi ranged from 1 to 7 microM. In vitro lipid-binding activity of ns-LTP was not correlated with their antifungal activity. Using the fluorescent probe SYTOX Green as an indicator of fungal membrane integrity, the in vitro toxicity of wheat ns-LTP was associated with alteration in permeability of fungal membranes.

  3. Pomegranate ( Punica granatum L.) expresses several nsLTP isoforms characterized by different immunoglobulin E-binding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolla, Michela; Zenoni, Sara; Scheurer, Stephan; Vieths, Stefan; San Miguel Moncin, Maria Del Mar; Olivieri, Mario; Antico, Andrea; Ferrer, Marta; Berroa, Felicia; Enrique, Ernesto; Avesani, Linda; Marsano, Francesco; Zoccatelli, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    Pomegranate allergy is associated with sensitization to non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs). Our aim was to identify and characterize the non-specific nsLTPs expressed in pomegranate at the molecular level and to study their allergenic properties in terms of immunoglobulin E (IgE)-binding and cross-reactivity with peach nsLTP (Pru p 3). A non-equilibrium two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoretic approach based on acid-urea PAGE and sodium dodecyl sulfate PAGE was set up to separate pomegranate nsLTPs. Their immunoreactivity was tested by immunoblotting carried out with anti-Pru p 3 polyclonal antibodies and sera from pomegranate-allergic patients. For final identification, pomegranate nsLTPs were purified by chromatography and subjected to trypsin digestion and mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. For this purpose, the sequences obtained by cDNA cloning of three pomegranate nsLTPs were integrated in the database that was subsequently searched for MS data interpretation. Four nsLTPs were identified by 2-D immunoblotting. The detected proteins showed different IgE-binding capacity and partial cross-reactivity with Pru p 3. cDNA cloning and MS analyses led to the identification of three nsLTP isoforms with 66-68% amino acid sequence identity named Pun g 1.0101, Pun g 1.0201 and Pun g 1.0301. By 2-D electrophoresis, we could separate different nsLTP isoforms possessing different IgE-binding properties, which might reflect peculiar allergenic potencies. The contribution of Pru p 3 to prime sensitization is not central as in other plant nsLTPs. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Solvation study of the non-specific lipid transfer protein from wheat by intermolecular NOEs with water and small organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liepinsh, Edvards; Sodano, Patrick; Tassin, Severine; Marion, Didier; Vovelle, Francoise; Otting, Gottfried

    1999-01-01

    Intermolecular nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) were measured between the protons of various small solvent or gas molecules and the non-specific lipid transfer protein (ns-LTP) from wheat. Intermolecular NOEs were observed with the hydrophobic pocket in the interior of wheat ns-LTP, which grew in intensity in the order cyclopropane (saturated solution) < methane (140 bar) < ethane (40 bar) < acetonitrile (5% in water) < cyclohexane (saturated solution) < benzene (saturated solution). No intermolecular NOEs were observed with dioxane (5% in water). The intermolecular NOEs were negative for all of the organic molecules tested. Intermolecular NOEs between wheat ns-LTP and water were weak or could not be distinguished from exchange-relayed NOEs. As illustrated by the NOEs with cyclohexane versus dioxane, the hydrophobic pocket in wheat ns-LTP preferably binds non-polar molecules. Yet, polar molecules like acetonitrile can also be accommodated. The pressure dependence of the NOEs between methane and wheat ns-LTP indicated incomplete occupancy, even at 190 bar methane pressure. In general, NOE intensities increased with the size of the ligand molecule and its vapor pressure. NMR of the vapor phase showed excellent resolution between the signals from the gas phase and those from the liquid phase. The vapor concentration of cyclohexane was fivefold higher than that of the dioxane solution, supporting the binding of cyclohexane versus uptake of dioxane

  5. Molecular characterization of Api g 2, a novel allergenic member of the lipid-transfer protein 1 family from celery stalks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gadermaier, Gabriele; Egger, Matthias; Girbl, Tamara; Erler, Anja; Harrer, Andrea; Vejvar, Eva; Liso, Marina; Richter, Klaus; Zuidmeer, Laurian; Mari, Adriano; Ferreira, Fatima

    2011-01-01

    Celery represents a relevant cross-reactive food allergen source in the adult population. As the currently known allergens are not typical elicitors of severe symptoms, we aimed to identify and characterize a non-specific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP). MS and cDNA cloning were applied to obtain the

  6. Allergenic relevance of nonspecific lipid transfer proteins 2: Identification and characterization of Api g 6 from celery tuber as representative of a novel IgE-binding protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vejvar, Eva; Himly, Martin; Briza, Peter; Eichhorn, Stephanie; Ebner, Christof; Hemmer, Wolfgang; Ferreira, Fatima; Gadermaier, Gabriele

    2013-11-01

    Apium graveolens represents a relevant food allergen source linked with severe systemic reactions. We sought to identify an IgE-binding nonspecific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP) in celery tuber. A low molecular weight protein exclusively present in celery tuber was purified and designated Api g 6. The entire protein sequence was obtained by MS and classified as member of the nsLTP2 family. Api g 6 is monomeric in solution with a molecular mass of 6936 Da. The alpha-helical disulfide bond-stabilized structure confers tremendous thermal stability (Tm > 90°C) and high resistance to gastrointestinal digestion. Endolysosomal degradation demonstrated low susceptibility and the presence of a dominant peptide cluster at the C-terminus. Thirty-eight percent of A. graveolens allergic patients demonstrated IgE reactivity to purified natural Api g 6 in ELISA and heat treatment did only partially reduce its allergenic activity. No correlation in IgE binding and limited cross-reactivity was observed with Api g 2 and Art v 3, nsLTP1 from celery stalks and mugwort pollen. Api g 6, a novel nsLTP2 from celery tuber represents the first well-characterized allergen in this protein family. Despite similar structural and physicochemical features as nsLTP1, immunological properties of Api g 6 are distinct which warrants its inclusion in molecule-based diagnosis of A. graveolens allergy. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Molecular characterization of Api g 2, a novel allergenic member of the lipid-transfer protein 1 family from celery stalks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadermaier, Gabriele; Egger, Matthias; Girbl, Tamara; Erler, Anja; Harrer, Andrea; Vejvar, Eva; Liso, Marina; Richter, Klaus; Zuidmeer, Laurian; Mari, Adriano; Ferreira, Fatima

    2011-04-01

    Celery represents a relevant cross-reactive food allergen source in the adult population. As the currently known allergens are not typical elicitors of severe symptoms, we aimed to identify and characterize a non-specific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP). MS and cDNA cloning were applied to obtain the full-length sequence of a novel allergenic nsLTP from celery stalks. The purified natural molecule consisted of a single isoallergen designated as Api g 2.0101, which was recombinantly produced in Escherichia coli Rosetta-gami. The natural and recombinant molecules displayed equivalent physicochemical and immunological properties. Circular dichroism revealed a typical α-helical fold and high thermal stability. Moreover, Api g 2 was highly resistant to simulated gastrointestinal digestion. As assessed by ELISA, thermal denaturation did not affect the IgE binding of Api g 2. Natural and recombinant Api g 2 showed similar allergenic activity in mediator release assays. Api g 2-specific IgE antibodies cross-reacted with peach and mugwort pollen nsLTPs. Based on our results, it can be anticipated that inclusion of recombinant Api g 2 in the current panel of allergens for molecule-based diagnosis will facilitate the evaluation of the clinical relevance of nsLTP sensitization in celery allergy and help clinicians in the management of food allergic patients. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. BraLTP1, a lipid transfer protein gene involved in epicuticular wax deposition, cell proliferation and flower development in Brassica napus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Liu

    Full Text Available Plant non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs constitute large multigene families that possess complex physiological functions, many of which remain unclear. This study isolated and characterized the function of a lipid transfer protein gene, BraLTP1 from Brassica rapa, in the important oilseed crops Brassica napus. BraLTP1 encodes a predicted secretory protein, in the little known VI Class of nsLTP families. Overexpression of BnaLTP1 in B. napus caused abnormal green coloration and reduced wax deposition on leaves and detailed wax analysis revealed 17-80% reduction in various major wax components, which resulted in significant water-loss relative to wild type. BnaLTP1 overexpressing leaves exhibited morphological disfiguration and abaxially curled leaf edges, and leaf cross-sections revealed cell overproliferation that was correlated to increased cytokinin levels (tZ, tZR, iP, and iPR in leaves and high expression of the cytokinin biosynthsis gene IPT3. BnaLTP1-overexpressing plants also displayed morphological disfiguration of flowers, with early-onset and elongated carpel development and outwardly curled stamen. This was consistent with altered expression of a a number of ABC model genes related to flower development. Together, these results suggest that BraLTP1 is a new nsLTP gene involved in wax production or deposition, with additional direct or indirect effects on cell division and flower development.

  9. A Lipid Transfer Protein Increases the Glutathione Content and Enhances Arabidopsis Resistance to a Trichothecene Mycotoxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E McLaughlin

    Full Text Available Fusarium head blight (FHB or scab is one of the most important plant diseases worldwide, affecting wheat, barley and other small grains. Trichothecene mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON accumulate in the grain, presenting a food safety risk and health hazard to humans and animals. Despite considerable breeding efforts, highly resistant wheat or barley cultivars are not available. We screened an activation tagged Arabidopsis thaliana population for resistance to trichothecin (Tcin, a type B trichothecene in the same class as DON. Here we show that one of the resistant lines identified, trichothecene resistant 1 (trr1 contains a T-DNA insertion upstream of two nonspecific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP genes, AtLTP4.4 and AtLTP4.5. Expression of both nsLTP genes was induced in trr1 over 10-fold relative to wild type. Overexpression of AtLTP4.4 provided greater resistance to Tcin than AtLTP4.5 in Arabidopsis thaliana and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae relative to wild type or vector transformed lines, suggesting a conserved protection mechanism. Tcin treatment increased reactive oxygen species (ROS production in Arabidopsis and ROS stain was associated with the chloroplast, the cell wall and the apoplast. ROS levels were attenuated in Arabidopsis and in yeast overexpressing AtLTP4.4 relative to the controls. Exogenous addition of glutathione and other antioxidants enhanced resistance of Arabidopsis to Tcin while the addition of buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis, increased sensitivity, suggesting that resistance was mediated by glutathione. Total glutathione content was significantly higher in Arabidopsis and in yeast overexpressing AtLTP4.4 relative to the controls, highlighting the importance of AtLTP4.4 in maintaining the redox state. These results demonstrate that trichothecenes cause ROS accumulation and overexpression of AtLTP4.4 protects against trichothecene-induced oxidative stress by increasing the glutathione

  10. Electron transfer in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1991-01-01

    Electron migration between and within proteins is one of the most prevalent forms of biological energy conversion processes. Electron transfer reactions take place between active centers such as transition metal ions or organic cofactors over considerable distances at fast rates and with remarkable...... specificity. The electron transfer is attained through weak electronic interaction between the active sites, so that considerable research efforts are centered on resolving the factors that control the rates of long-distance electron transfer reactions in proteins. These factors include (in addition......-containing proteins. These proteins serve almost exclusively in electron transfer reactions, and as it turns out, their metal coordination sites are endowed with properties uniquely optimized for their function....

  11. Electrophoretic transfer protein zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Daniel; Hill, Adam P; Kashou, Anthony; Wilson, Karl A; Tan-Wilson, Anna

    2011-04-15

    Zymography detects and characterizes proteolytic enzymes by electrophoresis of protease-containing samples into a nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) gel containing a copolymerized protein substrate. The usefulness of zymography for molecular weight determination and proteomic analysis is hampered by the fact that some proteases exhibit slower migration through a gel that contains substrate protein. This article introduces electrophoretic transfer protein zymography as one solution to this problem. In this technique, samples containing proteolytic enzymes are first resolved in nonreducing SDS-PAGE on a gel without protein substrate. The proteins in the resolving gel are then electrophoretically transferred to a receiving gel previously prepared with a copolymerized protein substrate. The receiving gel is then developed as a zymogram to visualize clear or lightly stained bands in a dark background. Band intensities are linearly related to the amount of protease, extending the usefulness of the technique so long as conditions for transfer and development of the zymogram are kept constant. Conditions of transfer, such as the pore sizes of resolving and receiving gels and the transfer time relative to the molecular weight of the protease, are explored. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Crystal structure of peach Pru p 3, the prototypic member of the family of plant non-specific lipid transfer protein pan-allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquato, Nicola; Berni, Rodolfo; Folli, Claudia; Folloni, Silvia; Cianci, Michele; Pantano, Sergio; Helliwell, John R; Zanotti, Giuseppe

    2006-02-24

    This study describes the three-dimensional crystal structure of a non-specific lipid transport protein (ns-LTP) from Rosaceae. Whilst ns-LTPs from species other than Rosaceae, such as nuts, cereals, grape, oranges and vegetables are also responsible for plant food allergies, this is less frequent compared with ns-LTPs from Rosaceae in the Mediterranean area. In this heterologously expressed peach Pru p3, a ligand is present inside the central cavity of the protein, presumably a fatty acid that was present or produced in the culture medium of the expression organism Escherichia coli. Moreover, the two molecules of ns-LTP present in the asymmetric unit bind this ligand in a different way, suggesting a significant degree of plasticity for the peach ns-LTP binding cavity, despite the presence of four disulphide bridges. Two molecules are present in the asymmetric unit: molecule A is a fully liganded protein, while molecule B apparently represents a partially liganded state. Also, molecular dynamics simulation, along with other evidence, suggests that these two molecular conformations represent different states in solution. Comparison of the 3D models of different ns-LTPs justifies the evidence of a high degree of conservation of the putative IgE binding epitopes among proteins of the Rosaceae family and the presence of significant amino acid replacements in correspondence of the same regions in ns-LTPs of botanical species unrelated to Rosaceae.

  13. Detection of proteins on blot transfer membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasse, Joachim; Gallagher, Sean R

    2003-11-01

    In the basic and alternate protocols of this unit, proteins are stained after electroblotting from polyacrylamide gels to blot transfer membranes. If the samples of interest are electrophoresed in duplicate and transferred to a blot transfer membrane, half of the membrane can be stained to determine the efficiency of transfer to the membrane and the other half can be used for immunoblotting (i.e., western blotting). Detection limits of each staining method are given along with a list of compatible blot transfer membranes and gels. A support protocol describes a method for alkali treatment that enhances subsequent staining of bound proteins.

  14. Membranes and mammalian glycolipid transferring proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuuf, Jessica; Mattjus, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Glycolipids are synthesized in and on various organelles throughout the cell. Their trafficking inside the cell is complex and involves both vesicular and protein-mediated machineries. Most important for the bulk lipid transport is the vesicular system, however, lipids moved by transfer proteins are also becoming more characterized. Here we review the latest advances in the glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP) and the phosphoinositol 4-phosphate adaptor protein-2 (FAPP2) field, from a membrane point of view. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Functional studies on the phosphatidychloride transfer protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, A.P.M. de

    2002-01-01

    The phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (PC-TP) has been studied for over 30 years now. Despite extensive research concerning the biochemical, biophysical and structural properties of PC-TP, the function of this protein is still elusive. We have studied in vitro the folding and the mechanism of PC

  16. Dynamics in electron transfer protein complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Bashir, Qamar

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have provided experimental evidence for the existence of an encounter complex, a transient intermediate in the formation of protein complexes. We have used paramagnetic relaxation enhancement NMR spectroscopy in combination with Monte Carlo simulations to characterize and visualize the ensemble of encounter orientations in the short-lived electron transfer complex of yeast Cc and CcP. The complete conformational space sampled by the protein molecules during the dynamic part of ...

  17. Plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein mass and phospholipid transfer protein activity are associated with leptin in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullaart, R. P. F.; de Vries, R.; Dallinga-Thie, G. M.; van Tol, A.; Sluiter, W. J.

    Adipose tissue contributes to plasma levels of lipid transfer proteins and is also the major source of plasma adipokines. We hypothesized that plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mass, phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) activity and cholesteryl ester transfer (CET, a measure of CETP

  18. Determination of phospholipid transfer proteins in rat tissues by immunoassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teerlink, T.

    1983-01-01

    Several quantitative immunoassays have been developed for two phospholipid transfer proteins from rat liver, i.e. the phosphatidylcholine transfer protein and the non-specific lipid transfer protein. The development of a double-antibody radioimmunoassay for the phosphatidylcholine transfer protein is described. The transfer protein was labelled with iodine-125 by the mild glucose oxidase-lactoperoxidase method. Although less than one tyrosine residue per molecule of transfer protein was labelled, only 20% of the labelled transfer protein was immunoprecipitable. This value could be increased to 80% by purifying the labelled protein by affinity chromatography on a column of anti-phosphatidylcholine transfer protein-IgG coupled to Sepharose 4B. The radioimmunoassay was used to determine the levels of phosphatidylcholine transfer protein in homogenates and 105 000 xg supernatants from various rat tissues as well as several Morris hepatomas. An enzyme immunoassay for the non-specific lipid transfer protein is also described. The antiserum that was raised especially by the author was cross-reactive with the non-specific lipid transfer protein present in 105 000 xg supernatants from human, mouse and bovine liver. The non-specific lipid transfer protein lost its immunoreactivity upon labelling with iodine-125 using different labelling techniques. Therefore, a regular radioimmunoassay could not be developed. The results of these different assays were compared. (Auth.)

  19. Problems with multiple use of transfer buffer in protein electrophoretic transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorri, Yaser; Kurien, Biji T; Scofield, R Hal

    2010-04-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) and SDS-PAGE are the two most useful methods in protein separation. Proteins separated by 2DE or SDS-PAGE are usually transferred to membranes using a variety of methods, such as electrophoretic transfer, heat-mediated transfer, or nonelectrophoretic transfer, for specific protein detection and/or analysis. In a recent study, Pettegrew et al. claim to reuse transfer buffer containing methanol for at least five times for transferring proteins from SDS-PAGE to polyvinylidene difluoride. They add 150-200 ml fresh transfer solution each time for extended use as a result of loss of transfer buffer. Finally, they test efficiency of each protein transfer by chemiluminescence detection. Here, we comment on this report, as we believe this method is not accurate and useful for protein analysis, and it can cause background binding as well as inaccurate protein analysis.

  20. Phosphatidylinositol transfer protein alpha and its role in neurodegeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunte, H.

    2007-01-01

    Selective neuronal loss is a prominent feature in neurodegenerative disorders. Recently, a link between neurodegeneration and a deficiency in the protein phosphatidylinositol transfer protein alpha (PI-TPalpha) has been demonstrated. In this context it is of importance that fibroblasts

  1. Folding Membrane Proteins by Deep Transfer Learning

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Sheng

    2017-08-29

    Computational elucidation of membrane protein (MP) structures is challenging partially due to lack of sufficient solved structures for homology modeling. Here, we describe a high-throughput deep transfer learning method that first predicts MP contacts by learning from non-MPs and then predicts 3D structure models using the predicted contacts as distance restraints. Tested on 510 non-redundant MPs, our method has contact prediction accuracy at least 0.18 better than existing methods, predicts correct folds for 218 MPs, and generates 3D models with root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) less than 4 and 5 Å for 57 and 108 MPs, respectively. A rigorous blind test in the continuous automated model evaluation project shows that our method predicted high-resolution 3D models for two recent test MPs of 210 residues with RMSD ∼2 Å. We estimated that our method could predict correct folds for 1,345–1,871 reviewed human multi-pass MPs including a few hundred new folds, which shall facilitate the discovery of drugs targeting at MPs.

  2. Phospholipid transfer protein activity and incident type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbasi, Ali; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The plasma activity of phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), which has multifaceted functions in lipoprotein metabolism and in inflammatory responses, is elevated in insulin resistant conditions. We determined the association of plasma PLTP activity with incident type 2 diabetes mellitus

  3. Dynamics in electron transfer protein complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bashir, Qamar

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have provided experimental evidence for the existence of an encounter complex, a transient intermediate in the formation of protein complexes. We have used paramagnetic relaxation enhancement NMR spectroscopy in combination with Monte Carlo simulations to characterize and visualize

  4. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with differential effects on plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein and phospholipid transfer protein activities and concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullaart, RPF; De Vries, R; Scheek, L; Borggreve, SE; Van Gent, T; Dallinga-Thie, GM; Ito, M; Nagano, M; Sluiter, WJ; Hattori, H; Van Tol, A

    Background: Human plasma contains two lipid transfer proteins, cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), which are crucial in reverse cholesterol transport. Methods: Plasma CETP and PLTP activity levels and concentrations in 16 type 2 diabetic patients and

  5. Phospholipid transfer protein activity and incident type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbasi, Ali; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    2015-01-01

    The plasma activity of phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), which has multifaceted functions in lipoprotein metabolism and in inflammatory responses, is elevated in insulin resistant conditions. We determined the association of plasma PLTP activity with incident type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).

  6. Antimicrobial activity of Brassica nectar lipid transfer protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) provide an ancient, innate immunity conserved in all multicellular organisms. In plants, there are several large families of AMPs defined by sequence similarity. The nonspecific lipid transfer protein (LTP) family is defined by a conserved signature of eight cysteines a...

  7. Lipid transfer proteins from fruit: cloning, expression and quantification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidmeer, Laurian; van Leeuwen, W. Astrid; Budde, Ilona Kleine; Cornelissen, Jessica; Bulder, Ingrid; Rafalska, Ilona; Besolí, Noèlia Telléz; Akkerdaas, Jaap H.; Asero, Riccardo; Fernandez Rivas, Montserrat; Rivas, Montserrat Fernandez; Gonzalez Mancebo, Eloina; Mancebo, Eloina Gonzalez; van Ree, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lipid transfer proteins (LTP) are stable, potentially life-threatening allergens in fruits and many other vegetable foods. The aim of this study was to clone and express recombinant apple LTP (Mal d 3), as has previously been done for peach LTP (Pru p 3) and set up quantitative tests for

  8. Measurement of lipid transfer protein in 88 apple cultivars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sancho, Ana I.; van Ree, Ronald; van Leeuwen, Astrid; Meulenbroek, Bert J.; van de Weg, Eric W.; Gilissen, Luud J. W. J.; Puehringer, Helene; Laimer, Margit; Martinelli, Alessio; Zaccharini, Marzio; Vazquez-Cortes, Sonia; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Karin; Mills, E. N. Clare; Zuidmeer, Laurian

    2008-01-01

    Background: Fruits are a major cause of food allergy in adults. Lipid transfer proteins (LTP) are implicated in severe allergic reactions to fruits, but little is known about LTP content in different cultivars. Objective: Determination of the levels of LTP in a wide range of apple cultivars.

  9. Gene ontology based transfer learning for protein subcellular localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Shuigeng

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediction of protein subcellular localization generally involves many complex factors, and using only one or two aspects of data information may not tell the true story. For this reason, some recent predictive models are deliberately designed to integrate multiple heterogeneous data sources for exploiting multi-aspect protein feature information. Gene ontology, hereinafter referred to as GO, uses a controlled vocabulary to depict biological molecules or gene products in terms of biological process, molecular function and cellular component. With the rapid expansion of annotated protein sequences, gene ontology has become a general protein feature that can be used to construct predictive models in computational biology. Existing models generally either concatenated the GO terms into a flat binary vector or applied majority-vote based ensemble learning for protein subcellular localization, both of which can not estimate the individual discriminative abilities of the three aspects of gene ontology. Results In this paper, we propose a Gene Ontology Based Transfer Learning Model (GO-TLM for large-scale protein subcellular localization. The model transfers the signature-based homologous GO terms to the target proteins, and further constructs a reliable learning system to reduce the adverse affect of the potential false GO terms that are resulted from evolutionary divergence. We derive three GO kernels from the three aspects of gene ontology to measure the GO similarity of two proteins, and derive two other spectrum kernels to measure the similarity of two protein sequences. We use simple non-parametric cross validation to explicitly weigh the discriminative abilities of the five kernels, such that the time & space computational complexities are greatly reduced when compared to the complicated semi-definite programming and semi-indefinite linear programming. The five kernels are then linearly merged into one single kernel for

  10. Concerted actions of cholesteryl ester transfer protein and phospholipid transfer protein in type 2 diabetes : effects of apolipoproteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.; van Tol, Arie

    Purpose of review Type 2 diabetes frequently coincides with dyslipidemia, characterized by elevated plasma triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and the presence of small dense low-density lipoprotein particles. Plasma lipid transfer proteins play an essential role in

  11. Conformational dependence of a protein kinase phosphate transfer reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labute, Montiago; Henkelman, Graeme; Tung, Chang-Shung; Fenimore, Paul; McMahon, Ben

    2007-03-01

    Atomic motions and energetics for a phosphate transfer reaction catalyzed by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase have been calculated using plane-wave density functional theory, starting from structures of proteins crystallized in both the reactant conformation (RC) and the transition-state conformation (TC). In TC, we calculate that the reactants and products are nearly isoenergetic with a 20-kJ/mol barrier, whereas phosphate transfer is unfavorable by 120 kJ/mol in the RC, with an even higher barrier. Our results demonstrate that the phosphate transfer reaction occurs rapidly and reversibly in a particular conformation of the protein, and that the reaction can be gated by changes of a few tenths of an angstrom in the catalytic site [1]. [1] G.H. Henkelman, M.X. LaBute, C.-S. Tung, P.W. Fenimore, B.H. McMahon, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA vol. 102, no. 43:15347-15351 (2005).

  12. Probing hydrogen bonding interactions and proton transfer in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Beining

    Scope and method of study. Hydrogen bonding is a fundamental element in protein structure and function. Breaking a single hydrogen bond may impair the stability of a protein. It is therefore important to probe dynamic changes in hydrogen bonding interactions during protein folding and function. Time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is highly sensitive to hydrogen bonding interactions. However, it lacks quantitative correlation between the vibrational frequencies and the number, type, and strength of hydrogen bonding interactions of ionizable and polar residues. We employ quantum physics theory based ab initio calculations to study the effects of hydrogen bonding interactions on vibrational frequencies of Asp, Glu, and Tyr residues and to develop vibrational spectral markers for probing hydrogen bonding interactions using infrared spectroscopy. In addition, proton transfer process plays a crucial role in a wide range of energy transduction, signal transduction, and enzymatic reactions. We study the structural basis for proton transfer using photoactive yellow protein as an excellent model system. Molecular dynamics simulation is employed to investigate the structures of early intermediate states. Quantum theory based ab initio calculations are used to study the impact of hydrogen bond interactions on proton affinity and proton transfer. Findings and conclusions. Our extensive density function theory based calculations provide rich structural, spectral, and energetic information on hydrogen bonding properties of protonated side chain groups of Asp/Glu and Tyr. We developed vibrational spectral markers and 2D FTIR spectroscopy for structural characterization on the number and the type of hydrogen bonding interactions of the COOH group of Asp/Glu and neutral phenolic group of Tyr. These developments greatly enhance the power of time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy as a major experimental tool for structural characterization of functionally important

  13. Phospholipid transfer from vesicles to high density lipoproteins, catalyzed by human plasma phospholipid transfer protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeny, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    Human plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) catalyzes the mass transfer of phosphatidylcholine (PC). Partial purification of PLTP yielded proteins with apparent M/sub r/ = 59,000 and 40,000 by SDS-PAGE. PLTP activity was measured by transfer of [ 14 C]L-α-dipalmitoyl PC from egg-PC vesicles to HDL. Activity was enhanced at low pH (4.5) upon addition of β-mercaptoethanol while Ca +2 and Na + had no effect. E/sub act/ for facilitated PC transfer was 18.2 +/- 2 kcal/mol. The donor specificity of PLTP was examined using vesicles containing egg-PC plus cholesterol or sphingomyelin. The fluidity of the donor membrane (measured by fluorescence polarization of diphenylhexatriene) correlated strongly with a decrease in PLTP activity. Phosphatidic acid did not affect activity. Increase in vesicle size reduced activity. The acceptor specificity of PLTP was examined using chemically modified HDL. PLTP activity increased up to 1.7-fold with an initial increase in negative charge and then decreased upon extensive modification. A mechanism is proposed where PLTP binds to vesicls and enhances the diffusion of PC into the medium where it is adsorbed by HDL

  14. Regulation of Lipid and Glucose Metabolism by Phosphatidylcholine Transfer Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hye Won; Wei, Jie; Cohen, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (PC-TP, a.k.a. StARD2) binds phosphatidylcholines and catalyzes their intermembrane transfer and exchange in vitro. The structure of PC-TP comprises a hydrophobic pocket and a well-defined head-group binding site, and its gene expression is regulated by peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α. Recent studies have revealed key regulatory roles for PC-TP in lipid and glucose metabolism. Notably, Pctp−/− mice are sensitized to insulin action and exhibit more efficient brown fat-mediated thermogenesis. PC-TP appears to limit access of fatty acids to mitochondria by stimulating the activity of thioesterase superfamily member 2, a newly characterized long-chain fatty acyl-CoA thioesterase. Because PC-TP discriminates among phosphatidylcholines within lipid bilayers, it may function as a sensor that links metabolic regulation to membrane composition. PMID:20338778

  15. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer system for measuring dynamic protein-protein interactions in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Boyu; Wang, Yao; Song, Yunhong; Wang, Tietao; Li, Changfu; Wei, Yahong; Luo, Zhao-Qing; Shen, Xihui

    2014-05-20

    Protein-protein interactions are important for virtually every biological process, and a number of elegant approaches have been designed to detect and evaluate such interactions. However, few of these methods allow the detection of dynamic and real-time protein-protein interactions in bacteria. Here we describe a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) system based on the bacterial luciferase LuxAB. We found that enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP) accepts the emission from LuxAB and emits yellow fluorescence. Importantly, BRET occurred when LuxAB and eYFP were fused, respectively, to the interacting protein pair FlgM and FliA. Furthermore, we observed sirolimus (i.e., rapamycin)-inducible interactions between FRB and FKBP12 and a dose-dependent abolishment of such interactions by FK506, the ligand of FKBP12. Using this system, we showed that osmotic stress or low pH efficiently induced multimerization of the regulatory protein OmpR and that the multimerization induced by low pH can be reversed by a neutralizing agent, further indicating the usefulness of this system in the measurement of dynamic interactions. This method can be adapted to analyze dynamic protein-protein interactions and the importance of such interactions in bacterial processes such as development and pathogenicity. Real-time measurement of protein-protein interactions in prokaryotes is highly desirable for determining the roles of protein complex in the development or virulence of bacteria, but methods that allow such measurement are not available. Here we describe the development of a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) technology that meets this need. The use of endogenous excitation light in this strategy circumvents the requirement for the sophisticated instrument demanded by standard fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Furthermore, because the LuxAB substrate decanal is membrane permeable, the assay can be performed without lysing the bacterial cells

  16. Ligand and membrane-binding behavior of the phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins PITPα and PITPβ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptist, Matilda; Panagabko, Candace; Cockcroft, Shamshad; Atkinson, Jeffrey

    2016-12-01

    Phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITPs) are believed to be lipid transfer proteins because of their ability to transfer either phosphatidylinositol (PI) or phosphatidylcholine (PC) between membrane compartments, in vitro. However, the detailed mechanism of this transfer process is not fully established. To further understand the transfer mechanism of PITPs we examined the interaction of PITPs with membranes using dual polarization interferometry (DPI), which measures protein binding affinity on a flat immobilized lipid surface. In addition, a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based assay was also employed to monitor how quickly PITPs transfer their ligands to lipid vesicles. DPI analysis revealed that PITPβ had a higher affinity to membranes compared with PITPα. Furthermore, the FRET-based transfer assay revealed that PITPβ has a higher ligand transfer rate compared with PITPα. However, both PITPα and PITPβ demonstrated a preference for highly curved membrane surfaces during ligand transfer. In other words, ligand transfer rate was higher when the accepting vesicles were highly curved.

  17. Acute and chronic effects of a 24-hour intravenous triglyceride emulsion challenge on plasma lecithin : cholesterol acyltransferase, phospholipid transfer protein, and cholesteryl ester transfer protein activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemens, SC; Van Tol, A; Sluiter, WJ; Dullaart, RPF

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) are key factors in remodeling of high density lipoproteins (HDL) and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. We examined the effect of a large, 24 h intravenous fat load on plasma

  18. [Better performance of Western blotting: quick vs slow protein transfer, blotting membranes and the visualization methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ling-Quan; Pu, Ying-Hui; Ma, Shi-Kun

    2008-01-01

    To study how the choices of the quick vs slow protein transfer, the blotting membranes and the visualization methods influence the performance of Western blotting. The cellular proteins were abstracted from human breast cell line MDA-MB-231 for analysis with Western blotting using quick (2 h) and slow (overnight) protein transfer, different blotting membranes (nitrocellulose, PVDF and nylon membranes) and different visualization methods (ECL and DAB). In Western blotting with slow and quick protein transfer, the prestained marker presented more distinct bands on nitrocellulose membrane than on the nylon and PVDF membranes, and the latter also showed clear bands on the back of the membrane to very likely cause confusion, which did not occur with nitrocellulose membrane. PVDF membrane allowed slightly clearer visualization of the proteins with DAB method as compared with nitrocellulose and nylon membranes, and on the latter two membranes, quick protein transfer was likely to result in somehow irregular bands in comparison with slow protein transfer. With slow protein transfer and chemiluminescence for visualization, all the 3 membranes showed clear background, while with quick protein transfer, nylon membrane gave rise to obvious background noise but the other two membranes did not. Different membranes should be selected for immunoblotting according to the actual needs of the experiment. Slow transfer of the proteins onto the membranes often has better effect than quick transfer, and enhanced chemiluminescence is superior to DAB for protein visualization and allows highly specific and sensitive analysis of the protein expressions.

  19. Protein electron transfer: is biology (thermo)dynamic?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2015-01-01

    Simple physical mechanisms are behind the flow of energy in all forms of life. Energy comes to living systems through electrons occupying high-energy states, either from food (respiratory chains) or from light (photosynthesis). This energy is transformed into the cross-membrane proton-motive force that eventually drives all biochemistry of the cell. Life’s ability to transfer electrons over large distances with nearly zero loss of free energy is puzzling and has not been accomplished in synthetic systems. The focus of this review is on how this energetic efficiency is realized. General physical mechanisms and interactions that allow proteins to fold into compact water-soluble structures are also responsible for a rugged landscape of energy states and a broad distribution of relaxation times. Specific to a protein as a fluctuating thermal bath is the protein-water interface, which is heterogeneous both dynamically and structurally. The spectrum of interfacial fluctuations is a consequence of protein’s elastic flexibility combined with a high density of surface charges polarizing water dipoles into surface nanodomains. Electrostatics is critical to the protein function and the relevant questions are: (i) What is the spectrum of interfacial electrostatic fluctuations? (ii) Does the interfacial biological water produce electrostatic signatures specific to proteins? (iii) How is protein-mediated chemistry affected by electrostatics? These questions connect the fluctuation spectrum to the dynamical control of chemical reactivity, i.e. the dependence of the activation free energy of the reaction on the dynamics of the bath. Ergodicity is often broken in protein-driven reactions and thermodynamic free energies become irrelevant. Continuous ergodicity breaking in a dense spectrum of relaxation times requires using dynamically restricted ensembles to calculate statistical averages. When applied to the calculation of the rates, this formalism leads to the nonergodic

  20. Human plasma phospholipid transfer protein increases the antiatherogenic potential of high density lipoproteins in transgenic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. van Haperen (Rien); A. van Tol (Arie); P. Vermeulen; M. Jauhiainen; T. van Gent (Teus); P.M. van den Berg (Paul); S. Ehnholm (Sonja); A.W.M. van der Kamp (Arthur); M.P.G. de Crom (Rini); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractPlasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) transfers phospholipids between lipoprotein particles and alters high density lipoprotein (HDL) subfraction patterns in vitro, but its physiological function is poorly understood. Transgenic mice that overexpress

  1. The prion protein has DNA strand transfer properties similar to retroviral nucleocapsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabus, C; Auxilien, S; Péchoux, C; Dormont, D; Swietnicki, W; Morillas, M; Surewicz, W; Nandi, P; Darlix, J L

    2001-04-06

    The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are fatal neurodegenerative diseases that are associated with the accumulation of a protease-resistant form of the cellular prion protein (PrP). Although PrP is highly conserved and widely expressed in vertebrates, its function remains a matter of speculation. Indeed PrP null mice develop normally and are healthy. Recent results show that PrP binds to nucleic acids in vitro and is found associated with retroviral particles. Furthermore, in mice the scrapie infectious process appears to be accelerated by MuLV replication. These observations prompted us to further investigate the interaction between PrP and nucleic acids, and compare it with that of the retroviral nucleocapsid protein (NC). As the major nucleic acid-binding protein of the retroviral particle, NC protein is tightly associated with the genomic RNA in the virion nucleocapsid, where it chaperones proviral DNA synthesis by reverse transcriptase. Our results show that the human prion protein (huPrP) functionally resembles NCp7 of HIV-1. Both proteins form large nucleoprotein complexes upon binding to DNA. They accelerate the hybridization of complementary DNA strands and chaperone viral DNA synthesis during the minus and plus DNA strand transfers necessary to generate the long terminal repeats. The DNA-binding and strand transfer properties of huPrP appear to map to the N-terminal fragment comprising residues 23 to 144, whereas the C-terminal domain is inactive. These findings suggest that PrP could be involved in nucleic acid metabolism in vivo. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  2. Breeding bread wheat cultivars for high protein content by transfer of protein genes from Triticum dicoccoides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grama, A.; Gerechter-Amitai, Z.K.; Blum, A.; Rubenthaler, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    Triticum dicoccoides sel. G-25, a selection of wild emmer with a protein content of 20.5% and a kernel weight of 31.5 mg, was used as the donor of protein genes. Since this selection is highly resistant to stripe rust, the object of the crossing programme was to transfer this resistance, together with the high protein potential, to durum and bread wheat cultivars susceptible to the disease. In the tetraploid lines obtained from the T. dicoccoides/T. durum cross, the protein values ranged from 17 to 22%. These lines had resistance to stripe rust from the wild emmer and to stem rust from the durum. After two further crosses between these tetraploid lines and T. aestivum cultivars, several lines were selected which combined good yield, high protein level and resistance to rust diseases. These lines attained protein levels of 14 to 19% in the whole grain and 14 to 17% in the flour, combined with yields of 4.5 to 6.0 t/ha. They had also inherited resistance to stem rust, and in some instances also to leaf rust, from the cultivated wheat parental lines. (author)

  3. Fast electron transfer through a single molecule natively structured redox protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Della Pia, Eduardo Antonio; Chi, Qijin; Macdonald, J. Emyr

    2012-01-01

    The electron transfer properties of proteins are normally measured as molecularly averaged ensembles. Through these and related measurements, proteins are widely regarded as macroscopically insulating materials. Using scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), we present new measurements of the conduc...

  4. Radical transfer between proteins: role of tyrosine, tryptophan and protein peroxyl radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, J.A.; Ostdal, H.; Davies, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Reaction of the Fe(III) forms of the heme proteins myoglobin (Mb) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with H 2 O 2 gives rise to high-oxidation-state heme-derived species which can be described as a Fe(IV)-oxo porphyrin radical-cation ('Compound 1'). In the case of Mb, the Fe(IV)-oxo porphyrin radical-cation undergoes rapid electron transfer with the surrounding protein to give protein (globin)-derived radicals and an Fe(lV)-oxo species ('Compound 2'). The globin-derived radicals have been shown to be located at two (or more) sites: Tyr-103 or Trp-14, with the latter radical known to react with oxygen to give a Trp-derived peroxyl radical (Mb-Trp-OO*). With HRP, the Fe(lV)-oxo porphyrin radical-cation carries out two successive one-electron oxidation reactions at the exposed heme edge to give firstly 'Compound 2' [the Fe(lV)oxo species] and then the resting Fe(III) state of the enzyme. n this study we have investigated whether the Trp-14 peroxyl radical from Mb and the Compound 1 and 2 species from HRP (in the absence and presence of free Tyr) can oxidise amino acids, peptides and proteins. Such reactions constitute intermolecular protein-to-protein radical transfer reactions and hence protein chain-oxidation. We have also examined whether these oxidants react with antioxidants. Reaction of these heme-protein derived oxidants with amino acids, proteins and antioxidants has been carried out at room temperature for defined periods of time before freeze-quenching to 77K to halt reaction. The radical species present in the reaction system at the time of freezing were subsequently examined by EPR spectroscopy at 77K. Three free amino acids, Tyr, Trp and Cys (with Cys the least efficient) have been shown to react rapidly with Mb-Trp-OO*, as evidenced by the loss of the characteristic EPR features of Mb-Trp-OO* on inclusion of increasing concentrations of the amino acids. All other amino acids are much less reactive. Evidence has also been obtained for (inefficient) hydrogen

  5. Kinetics of proton transfer in a green fluorescent protein: A laser ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    therefore implicates bulk solvent-controlled protein dynamics in the protonation process. ... recently to protein–protein interactions in the bacterial response regulator SpoOF. NMR ..... molecular mechanism for redox-driven proton transfer to a buried iron–sulphur cluster ... Dynamic simulations of proton transfer from bulk.

  6. Transfer buffer containing methanol can be reused multiple times in protein electrotransfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettegrew, Colin J; Jayini, Renuka; Islam, M Rafiq

    2009-04-01

    We investigated the feasibility of repeated use of transfer buffer containing methanol in electrotransfer of proteins from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels to polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane using a prestained protein marker of broad molecular sizes. Transfer of the antitumor protein p53 in HEK293T cell extracts, using fresh and used transfer buffer, followed by detection with anti-p53 antibody was also performed to test detectability in immunoblot. Results from these experiments indicate that the transfer buffer can be reused at least five times and maintain a similar extent of protein transfer to PVDF membrane. Repeated use of the transfer buffer containing methanol will significantly reduce the volume of hazardous waste generated and its disposal cost as well as its adverse effect on environment.

  7. Probing intermolecular protein-protein interactions in the calcium-sensing receptor homodimer using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Hansen, Jakob L; Sheikh, Søren P

    2002-01-01

    -induced intermolecular movements in the CaR homodimer using the new bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique, BRET2, which is based on the transference of energy from Renilla luciferase (Rluc) to the green fluorescent protein mutant GFP2. We tagged CaR with Rluc and GFP2 at different intracellular locations...

  8. Influence of insulin sensitivity and the TaqIB cholesteryl ester transfer protein gene polymorphism on plasma lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase and lipid transfer protein activities and their response to hyperinsulinemia in non-diabetic men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. Riemens; A. van Tol (Arie); B.K. Stulp; R.P.F. Dullaart (Robin)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractLecithin:cholesteryl acyl transferase (LCAT), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), and lipoprotein lipases are involved in high density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism. We evaluated the influence of insulin

  9. Conditions that allow for effective transfer of membrane proteins onto nitrocellulose membrane in Western blots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeyrathne, Priyanka D; Lam, Joseph S

    2007-04-01

    A major hurdle in characterizing bacterial membrane proteins by Western blotting is the ineffectiveness of transferring these proteins from sodium dodecyl sulfate -- polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) gel onto nitrocellulose membrane, using standard Western blot buffers and electrophoretic conditions. In this study, we compared a number of modified Western blotting buffers and arrived at a composition designated as the SDS-PAGE-Urea Lysis buffer. The use of this buffer and specific conditions allowed the reproducible transfer of highly hydrophobic bacterial membrane proteins with 2-12 transmembrane-spanning segments as well as soluble proteins onto nitrocellulose membranes. This method should be broadly applicable for immunochemical studies of other membrane proteins.

  10. Horizontal transfer, not duplication, drives the expansion of protein families in prokaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd J Treangen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene duplication followed by neo- or sub-functionalization deeply impacts the evolution of protein families and is regarded as the main source of adaptive functional novelty in eukaryotes. While there is ample evidence of adaptive gene duplication in prokaryotes, it is not clear whether duplication outweighs the contribution of horizontal gene transfer in the expansion of protein families. We analyzed closely related prokaryote strains or species with small genomes (Helicobacter, Neisseria, Streptococcus, Sulfolobus, average-sized genomes (Bacillus, Enterobacteriaceae, and large genomes (Pseudomonas, Bradyrhizobiaceae to untangle the effects of duplication and horizontal transfer. After removing the effects of transposable elements and phages, we show that the vast majority of expansions of protein families are due to transfer, even among large genomes. Transferred genes--xenologs--persist longer in prokaryotic lineages possibly due to a higher/longer adaptive role. On the other hand, duplicated genes--paralogs--are expressed more, and, when persistent, they evolve slower. This suggests that gene transfer and gene duplication have very different roles in shaping the evolution of biological systems: transfer allows the acquisition of new functions and duplication leads to higher gene dosage. Accordingly, we show that paralogs share most protein-protein interactions and genetic regulators, whereas xenologs share very few of them. Prokaryotes invented most of life's biochemical diversity. Therefore, the study of the evolution of biology systems should explicitly account for the predominant role of horizontal gene transfer in the diversification of protein families.

  11. Monitoring glycolipid transfer protein activity and membrane interaction with the surface plasmon resonance technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohvo-Rekilä, Henna; Mattjus, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP) is a protein capable of binding and transferring glycolipids. GLTP is cytosolic and it can interact through its FFAT-like (two phenylalanines in an acidic tract) motif with proteins localized on the surface of the endoplasmic reticulum. Previous in vitro work with GLTP has focused mainly on the complete transfer reaction of the protein, that is, binding and subsequent removal of the glycolipid from the donor membrane, transfer through the aqueous environment, and the final release of the glycolipid to an acceptor membrane. Using bilayer vesicles and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, we have now, for the first time, analyzed the binding and lipid removal capacity of GLTP with a completely label-free technique. This technique is focused on the initial steps in GLTP-mediated transfer and the parameters affecting these steps can be more precisely determined. We used the new approach for detailed structure-function studies of GLTP by examining the glycolipid transfer capacity of specific GLTP tryptophan mutants. Tryptophan 96 is crucial for the transfer activity of the protein and tryptophan 142 is an important part of the proteins membrane interacting domain. Further, we varied the composition of the used lipid vesicles and gained information on the effect of membrane properties on GLTP activity. GLTP prefers to interact with more tightly packed membranes, although GLTP-mediated transfer is faster from more fluid membranes. This technique is very useful for the study of membrane-protein interactions and lipid-transfer rates and it can easily be adapted to other membrane-interacting proteins. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Modifier Genes for Mouse Phosphatidylinositol Transfer Protein alpha (vibrator) That Bypass Juvenile Lethality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Concepcion, Dorothy; Johannes, Frank; Lo, Yuan Hung; Yao, Jay; Fong, Jerry; Hamilton, Bruce A.

    Phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITPs) mediate lipid signaling and membrane trafficking in eukaryotic cells. Loss-of-function mutations of the gene encoding PITP alpha in mice result in a range of dosage-sensitive phenotypes, including neurological dysfunction, neurodegeneration, and

  13. In vitro thermodynamic dissection of human copper transfer from chaperone to target protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiec, Moritz S; Weise, Christoph F; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2012-01-01

    Transient protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions are fundamental components of biological activity. To understand biological activity, not only the structures of the involved proteins are important but also the energetics of the individual steps of a reaction. Here we use in vitro biophysical methods to deduce thermodynamic parameters of copper (Cu) transfer from the human copper chaperone Atox1 to the fourth metal-binding domain of the Wilson disease protein (WD4). Atox1 and WD4 have the same fold (ferredoxin-like fold) and Cu-binding site (two surface exposed cysteine residues) and thus it is not clear what drives metal transfer from one protein to the other. Cu transfer is a two-step reaction involving a metal-dependent ternary complex in which the metal is coordinated by cysteines from both proteins (i.e., Atox1-Cu-WD4). We employ size exclusion chromatography to estimate individual equilibrium constants for the two steps. This information together with calorimetric titration data are used to reveal enthalpic and entropic contributions of each step in the transfer process. Upon combining the equilibrium constants for both steps, a metal exchange factor (from Atox1 to WD4) of 10 is calculated, governed by a negative net enthalpy change of ∼10 kJ/mol. Thus, small variations in interaction energies, not always obvious upon comparing protein structures alone, may fuel vectorial metal transfer.

  14. Preferential transfer of certain plasma membrane proteins onto T and B cells by trogocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Daubeuf

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available T and B cells capture antigens via membrane fragments of antigen presenting cells (APC in a process termed trogocytosis. Whether (and how a preferential transfer of some APC components occurs during trogocytosis is still largely unknown. We analyzed the transfer onto murine T and B cells of a large panel of fluorescent proteins with different intra-cellular localizations in the APC or various types of anchors in the plasma membrane (PM. Only the latter were transferred by trogocytosis, albeit with different efficiencies. Unexpectedly, proteins anchored to the PM's cytoplasmic face, or recruited to it via interaction with phosphinositides, were more efficiently transferred than those facing the outside of the cell. For proteins spanning the PM's whole width, transfer efficiency was found to vary quite substantially, with tetraspanins, CD4 and FcRgamma found among the most efficiently transferred proteins. We exploited our findings to set immunodiagnostic assays based on the capture of preferentially transferred components onto T or B cells. The preferential transfer documented here should prove useful in deciphering the cellular structures involved in trogocytosis.

  15. Entropy Transfer between Residue Pairs and Allostery in Proteins: Quantifying Allosteric Communication in Ubiquitin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysima Hacisuleyman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It has recently been proposed by Gunasakaran et al. that allostery may be an intrinsic property of all proteins. Here, we develop a computational method that can determine and quantify allosteric activity in any given protein. Based on Schreiber's transfer entropy formulation, our approach leads to an information transfer landscape for the protein that shows the presence of entropy sinks and sources and explains how pairs of residues communicate with each other using entropy transfer. The model can identify the residues that drive the fluctuations of others. We apply the model to Ubiquitin, whose allosteric activity has not been emphasized until recently, and show that there are indeed systematic pathways of entropy and information transfer between residues that correlate well with the activities of the protein. We use 600 nanosecond molecular dynamics trajectories for Ubiquitin and its complex with human polymerase iota and evaluate entropy transfer between all pairs of residues of Ubiquitin and quantify the binding susceptibility changes upon complex formation. We explain the complex formation propensities of Ubiquitin in terms of entropy transfer. Important residues taking part in allosteric communication in Ubiquitin predicted by our approach are in agreement with results of NMR relaxation dispersion experiments. Finally, we show that time delayed correlation of fluctuations of two interacting residues possesses an intrinsic causality that tells which residue controls the interaction and which one is controlled. Our work shows that time delayed correlations, entropy transfer and causality are the required new concepts for explaining allosteric communication in proteins.

  16. Entropy Transfer between Residue Pairs and Allostery in Proteins: Quantifying Allosteric Communication in Ubiquitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacisuleyman, Aysima; Erman, Burak

    2017-01-01

    It has recently been proposed by Gunasakaran et al. that allostery may be an intrinsic property of all proteins. Here, we develop a computational method that can determine and quantify allosteric activity in any given protein. Based on Schreiber's transfer entropy formulation, our approach leads to an information transfer landscape for the protein that shows the presence of entropy sinks and sources and explains how pairs of residues communicate with each other using entropy transfer. The model can identify the residues that drive the fluctuations of others. We apply the model to Ubiquitin, whose allosteric activity has not been emphasized until recently, and show that there are indeed systematic pathways of entropy and information transfer between residues that correlate well with the activities of the protein. We use 600 nanosecond molecular dynamics trajectories for Ubiquitin and its complex with human polymerase iota and evaluate entropy transfer between all pairs of residues of Ubiquitin and quantify the binding susceptibility changes upon complex formation. We explain the complex formation propensities of Ubiquitin in terms of entropy transfer. Important residues taking part in allosteric communication in Ubiquitin predicted by our approach are in agreement with results of NMR relaxation dispersion experiments. Finally, we show that time delayed correlation of fluctuations of two interacting residues possesses an intrinsic causality that tells which residue controls the interaction and which one is controlled. Our work shows that time delayed correlations, entropy transfer and causality are the required new concepts for explaining allosteric communication in proteins.

  17. Electron transfer reactions in structural units of copper proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraggi, M.

    1975-01-01

    In previous pulse radiolysis studies it was suggested that the reduction of the Cu(II) ions in copper proteins by the hydrated electron is a multi-step electron migration process. The technique has been extended to investigate the reduction of some structural units of these proteins. These studies include: the reaction of the hydrated electron with peptides, the reaction of the disulphide bridge with formate radical ion and radicals produced by the reduction of peptides, and the reaction of Cu(II)-peptide complex with esub(aq)sup(-) and CO 2 - . Using these results the reduction mechanism of copper and other proteins will be discussed. (author)

  18. Probing membrane protein structure using water polarization transfer solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jonathan K; Hong, Mei

    2014-10-01

    Water plays an essential role in the structure and function of proteins, lipid membranes and other biological macromolecules. Solid-state NMR heteronuclear-detected (1)H polarization transfer from water to biomolecules is a versatile approach for studying water-protein, water-membrane, and water-carbohydrate interactions in biology. We review radiofrequency pulse sequences for measuring water polarization transfer to biomolecules, the mechanisms of polarization transfer, and the application of this method to various biological systems. Three polarization transfer mechanisms, chemical exchange, spin diffusion and NOE, manifest themselves at different temperatures, magic-angle-spinning frequencies, and pulse irradiations. Chemical exchange is ubiquitous in all systems examined so far, and spin diffusion plays the key role in polarization transfer within the macromolecule. Tightly bound water molecules with long residence times are rare in proteins at ambient temperature. The water polarization-transfer technique has been used to study the hydration of microcrystalline proteins, lipid membranes, and plant cell wall polysaccharides, and to derive atomic-resolution details of the kinetics and mechanism of ion conduction in channels and pumps. Using this approach, we have measured the water polarization transfer to the transmembrane domain of the influenza M2 protein to obtain information on the structure of this tetrameric proton channel. At short mixing times, the polarization transfer rates are site-specific and depend on the pH, labile protons, sidechain conformation, as well as the radial position of the residues in this four-helix bundle. Despite the multiple dependences, the initial transfer rates reflect the periodic nature of the residue positions from the water-filled pore, thus this technique provides a way of gleaning secondary structure information, helix tilt angle, and the oligomeric structure of membrane proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All

  19. Energy transfer at the active sites of heme proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dlott, D.D.; Hill, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    Experiments using a picosecond pump-probe apparatus at the Picosecond Free-electron Laser Center at Stanford University, were performed to investigate the relaxation of carbon monoxide bound to the active sites of heme proteins. The significance of these experiments is two-fold: (1) they provide detailed information about molecular dynamics occurring at the active sites of proteins; and (2) they provide insight into the nature of vibrational relaxation processes in condensed matter. Molecular engineering is used to construct various molecular systems which are studied with the FEL. We have studied native proteins, mainly myoglobin obtained from different species, mutant proteins produced by genetic engineering using recombinant DNA techniques, and a variety of model systems which mimic the structures of the active sites of native proteins, which are produced using molecular synthesis. Use of these different systems permits us to investigate how specific molecular structural changes affect dynamical processes occurring at the active sites. This research provides insight into the problems of how different species needs are fulfilled by heme proteins which have greatly different functionality, which is induced by rather small structural changes

  20. Single-step azide introduction in proteins via an aqueous diazo transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, S.F.M.; Teeuwen, R.L.M.; Nallani, M.; van Berkel, S.S.; Cornelissen, J.J.L.M.; Nolte, R.J.M.; van Hest, J.C.M.

    The controlled introduction of azides in proteins provides targetable handles for selective protein manipulation. We present here an efficient diazo transfer protocol that can be applied in an aqueous solution, leading to the facile introduction of azides in the side chains of lysine residues and at

  1. Single-Step Azide Introduction in Proteins via an Aqueous Diazo Transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, Stijn; Teeuwen, R.L.M.; Nallani, Madhavan; van Berkel, S.S; Cornelissen, Jeroen Johannes Lambertus Maria; Nolte, Roeland; van Hest, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The controlled introduction of azides in proteins provides targetable handles for selective protein manipulation. We present here an efficient diazo transfer protocol that can be applied in an aqueous solution, leading to the facile introduction of azides in the side chains of lysine residues and at

  2. Severe immediate allergic reactions to grapes: part of a lipid transfer protein-associated clinical syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vassilopoulou, Emilia; Zuidmeer, Laurian; Akkerdaas, Jaap; Tassios, Ioannis; Rigby, Neil R.; Mills, E. N. Clare; van Ree, Ronald; Saxoni-Papageorgiou, Photini; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Grape allergy is considered rare; grape lipid transfer protein (LTP; Vit v 1), an endochitinase and a thaumatin-like protein (TLP) have been reported as grape allergens. A considerable number of patients have referred to our department for severe reactions to grapes, and several IgE

  3. The role of profilin and lipid transfer protein in strawberry allergy in the Mediterranean area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidmeer, L.; Salentijn, E.; Rivas, M. F.; Mancebo, E. G.; Asero, R.; Matos, C. I.; Pelgrom, K. T. B.; Gilissen, L. J. W. J.; van Ree, R.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In contrast to other Rosaceae fruit, only few cases of patients with adverse reactions to strawberry are listed in literature. OBJECTIVE To identify allergenic proteins in strawberry and to express and characterize recombinant strawberry lipid transfer protein (LTP; rFra a 3). METHODS:

  4. Phosphatidylcholine Transfer Protein Interacts with Thioesterase Superfamily Member 2 to Attenuate Insulin Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Ersoy, Baran A.; Tarun, Akansha; D’Aquino, Katharine; Hancer, Nancy J.; Ukomadu, Chinweike; White, Morris F.; Michel, Thomas; Manning, Brendan D.; Cohen, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (PC-TP) is a phospholipid-binding protein that is enriched in liver and that interacts with thioesterase superfamily member 2 (THEM2). Mice lacking either protein exhibit improved hepatic glucose homeostasis and are resistant to diet-induced diabetes. Insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) are key effectors of insulin signaling, which is attenuated in diabetes. We found that PC-TP inhibited IRS2, as evidenc...

  5. Free cholesterol is a potent regulator of lipid transfer protein function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of altered lipoprotein free cholesterol (FC) content on the transfer of cholesteryl ester (CE) and triglyceride (TG) from very low- (VLDL), low- (LDL), and high-(HDL) density lipoproteins by the plasma-derived lipid transfer protein (LTP). The FC content of VLDL and HDL was selectively altered by incubating these lipoproteins with FC/phospholipid dispersions of varying composition. FC-modified lipoproteins were then equilibrated with [3H] TG, [14C]CE-labeled lipoproteins of another class to facilitate the subsequent modification of the radiolabeled donor lipoproteins. LTP was added and the extent of radiolabeled TG and CE transfer determined after 1 h. With either LDL or VLDL as lipid donor, an increase in the FC content of these lipoproteins caused a concentration-dependent inhibition (up to 50%) of CE transfer from these particles, without any significant effect on TG transfer. In contrast, with HDL as donor, increasing the HDL FC content had little effect on CE transfer from HDL, but markedly stimulated (up to 2.5-fold) the transfer of TG. This differential effect of FC on the unidirectional transfer of radiolabeled lipids from VLDL and HDL led to marked effects on LTP-facilitated net mass transfer of lipids. During long-term incubation of a constant amount of LTP with FC-modified VLDL and HDL, the extent of net mass transfer was linearly related to lipoprotein FC content; a 4-fold increase in FC content resulted in a 3-fold stimulation of the CE mass transferred to VLDL, which was coupled to an equimolar, reciprocal transfer of TG mass to HDL. Since lipid transfer between lipoproteins is integral to the process of reverse cholesterol transport, we conclude that lipoprotein FC levels are a potent, positive regulator of the pathways involved in sterol clearance. FC may modulate lipid transfer by altering the availability of CE and TG to LTP at the lipoprotein surface

  6. First principles design of a core bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goparaju, Geetha; Fry, Bryan A.; Chobot, Sarah E.; Wiedman, Gregory; Moser, Christopher C.; Leslie Dutton, P.; Discher, Bohdana M.

    2016-05-01

    Here we describe the design, Escherichia coli expression and characterization of a simplified, adaptable and functionally transparent single chain 4-α-helix transmembrane protein frame that binds multiple heme and light activatable porphyrins. Such man-made cofactor-binding oxidoreductases, designed from first principles with minimal reference to natural protein sequences, are known as maquettes. This design is an adaptable frame aiming to uncover core engineering principles governing bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer function and recapitulate protein archetypes proposed to represent the origins of photosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics — the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson.

  7. Extended synaptotagmins are Ca2+-dependent lipid transfer proteins at membrane contact sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haijia; Liu, Yinghui; Gulbranson, Daniel R; Paine, Alex; Rathore, Shailendra S; Shen, Jingshi

    2016-04-19

    Organelles are in constant communication with each other through exchange of proteins (mediated by trafficking vesicles) and lipids [mediated by both trafficking vesicles and lipid transfer proteins (LTPs)]. It has long been known that vesicle trafficking can be tightly regulated by the second messenger Ca(2+), allowing membrane protein transport to be adjusted according to physiological demands. However, it remains unclear whether LTP-mediated lipid transport can also be regulated by Ca(2+) In this work, we show that extended synaptotagmins (E-Syts), poorly understood membrane proteins at endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane contact sites, are Ca(2+)-dependent LTPs. Using both recombinant and endogenous mammalian proteins, we discovered that E-Syts transfer glycerophospholipids between membrane bilayers in the presence of Ca(2+) E-Syts use their lipid-accommodating synaptotagmin-like mitochondrial lipid binding protein (SMP) domains to transfer lipids. However, the SMP domains themselves cannot transport lipids unless the two membranes are tightly tethered by Ca(2+)-bound C2 domains. Strikingly, the Ca(2+)-regulated lipid transfer activity of E-Syts was fully recapitulated when the SMP domain was fused to the cytosolic domain of synaptotagmin-1, the Ca(2+)sensor in synaptic vesicle fusion, indicating that a common mechanism of membrane tethering governs the Ca(2+)regulation of lipid transfer and vesicle fusion. Finally, we showed that microsomal vesicles isolated from mammalian cells contained robust Ca(2+)-dependent lipid transfer activities, which were mediated by E-Syts. These findings established E-Syts as a novel class of LTPs and showed that LTP-mediated lipid trafficking, like vesicular transport, can be subject to tight Ca(2+)regulation.

  8. Direct effects of ionizing radiation on integral membrane proteins. Noncovalent energy transfer requires specific interpeptide interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jhun, E.; Jhun, B.H.; Jones, L.R.; Jung, C.Y.

    1991-01-01

    The 12 transmembrane alpha helices (TMHs) of human erythrocyte glucose transporter were individually cut by pepsin digestion as membrane-bound 2.5-3.5-kDa peptide fragments. Radiation-induced chemical degradation of these fragments showed an average target size of 34 kDa. This is 10-12 x larger than the average size of an individual TMH, demonstrating that a significant energy transfer occurs among these TMHs in the absence of covalent linkage. Heating this TMH preparation at 100 degree C for 15 min reduced the target size to 5 kDa or less, suggesting that the noncovalent energy transfer requires specific helix-helix interactions. Purified phospholamban, a small (6-kDa) integral membrane protein containing a single TMH, formed a pentameric assembly in sodium dodecyl sulfate. The chemical degradation target size of this phospholamban pentamer was 5-6 kDa, illustrating that not all integral membrane protein assemblies permit intersubunit energy transfer. These findings together with other published observations suggest strongly that significant noncovalent energy transfer can occur within the tertiary and quaternary structure of membrane proteins and that as yet undefined proper molecular interactions are required for such covalent energy transfer. Our results with pepsin-digested glucose transporter also illustrate the importance of the interhelical interaction as a predominating force in maintaining the tertiary structure of a transmembrane protein

  9. A conserved endoplasmic reticulum membrane protein complex (EMC facilitates phospholipid transfer from the ER to mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujoy Lahiri

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial membrane biogenesis and lipid metabolism require phospholipid transfer from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER to mitochondria. Transfer is thought to occur at regions of close contact of these organelles and to be nonvesicular, but the mechanism is not known. Here we used a novel genetic screen in S. cerevisiae to identify mutants with defects in lipid exchange between the ER and mitochondria. We show that a strain missing multiple components of the conserved ER membrane protein complex (EMC has decreased phosphatidylserine (PS transfer from the ER to mitochondria. Mitochondria from this strain have significantly reduced levels of PS and its derivative phosphatidylethanolamine (PE. Cells lacking EMC proteins and the ER-mitochondria tethering complex called ERMES (the ER-mitochondria encounter structure are inviable, suggesting that the EMC also functions as a tether. These defects are corrected by expression of an engineered ER-mitochondrial tethering protein that artificially tethers the ER to mitochondria. EMC mutants have a significant reduction in the amount of ER tethered to mitochondria even though ERMES remained intact in these mutants, suggesting that the EMC performs an additional tethering function to ERMES. We find that all Emc proteins interact with the mitochondrial translocase of the outer membrane (TOM complex protein Tom5 and this interaction is important for PS transfer and cell growth, suggesting that the EMC forms a tether by associating with the TOM complex. Together, our findings support that the EMC tethers ER to mitochondria, which is required for phospholipid synthesis and cell growth.

  10. Impact of the lipid bilayer on energy transfer kinetics in the photosynthetic protein LH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogren, John I; Tong, Ashley L; Gordon, Samuel C; Chenu, Aurélia; Lu, Yue; Blankenship, Robert E; Cao, Jianshu; Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S

    2018-03-28

    Photosynthetic purple bacteria convert solar energy to chemical energy with near unity quantum efficiency. The light-harvesting process begins with absorption of solar energy by an antenna protein called Light-Harvesting Complex 2 (LH2). Energy is subsequently transferred within LH2 and then through a network of additional light-harvesting proteins to a central location, termed the reaction center, where charge separation occurs. The energy transfer dynamics of LH2 are highly sensitive to intermolecular distances and relative organizations. As a result, minor structural perturbations can cause significant changes in these dynamics. Previous experiments have primarily been performed in two ways. One uses non-native samples where LH2 is solubilized in detergent, which can alter protein structure. The other uses complex membranes that contain multiple proteins within a large lipid area, which make it difficult to identify and distinguish perturbations caused by protein-protein interactions and lipid-protein interactions. Here, we introduce the use of the biochemical platform of model membrane discs to study the energy transfer dynamics of photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes in a near-native environment. We incorporate a single LH2 from Rhodobacter sphaeroides into membrane discs that provide a spectroscopically amenable sample in an environment more physiological than detergent but less complex than traditional membranes. This provides a simplified system to understand an individual protein and how the lipid-protein interaction affects energy transfer dynamics. We compare the energy transfer rates of detergent-solubilized LH2 with those of LH2 in membrane discs using transient absorption spectroscopy and transient absorption anisotropy. For one key energy transfer step in LH2, we observe a 30% enhancement of the rate for LH2 in membrane discs compared to that in detergent. Based on experimental results and theoretical modeling, we attribute this difference to

  11. Analysis of Native-Like Proteins and Protein Complexes Using Cation to Anion Proton Transfer Reactions (CAPTR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laszlo, Kenneth J.; Bush, Matthew F.

    2015-12-01

    Mass spectra of native-like protein complexes often exhibit narrow charge-state distributions, broad peaks, and contributions from multiple, coexisting species. These factors can make it challenging to interpret those spectra, particularly for mixtures with significant heterogeneity. Here we demonstrate the use of ion/ion proton transfer reactions to reduce the charge states of m/ z-selected, native-like ions of proteins and protein complexes, a technique that we refer to as cation to anion proton transfer reactions (CAPTR). We then demonstrate that CAPTR can increase the accuracy of charge state assignments and the resolution of interfering species in native mass spectrometry. The CAPTR product ion spectra for pyruvate kinase exhibit ~30 peaks and enable unambiguous determination of the charge state of each peak, whereas the corresponding precursor spectra exhibit ~6 peaks and the assigned charge states have an uncertainty of ±3%. 15+ bovine serum albumin and 21+ yeast enolase dimer both appear near m/ z 4450 and are completely unresolved in a mixture. After a single CAPTR event, the resulting product ions are baseline resolved. The separation of the product ions increases dramatically after each subsequent CAPTR event; 12 events resulted in a 3000-fold improvement in separation relative to the precursor ions. Finally, we introduce a framework for interpreting and predicting the figures of merit for CAPTR experiments. More generally, these results suggest that CAPTR strongly complements other mass spectrometry tools for analyzing proteins and protein complexes, particularly those in mixtures.

  12. Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP) genotype and cognitive function in persons aged 35 years or older

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Izaks, Gerbrand J.; van der Knaap, Aafke M.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Navis, Gerjan; Slaets, Joris P. J.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    Common polymorphisms of the Cholestryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP) gene may predict lower risk of cognitive decline. We investigated the association of cognitive function with CETP genotype in a population-based cohort of 4135 persons aged 35-82 years. Cognitive function was measured with the Ruff

  13. Clinical importance of non-specific lipid transfer proteins as food allergens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ree, R.

    2002-01-01

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) have recently been identified as plant food allergens. They are good examples of true food allergens, in the sense that they are capable of sensitizing, i.e. inducing specific IgE, as well as of eliciting severe symptoms. This is in contrast with most

  14. Effect of in vitro gastric and duodenal digestion on the allergenicity of grape lipid transfer protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vassilopoulou, Emilia; Rigby, Neil; Moreno, F. Javier; Zuidmeer, Laurian; Akkerdaas, Jaap; Tassios, Ioannis; Papadopoulos, Nikos G.; Saxoni-Papageorgiou, Photini; van Ree, Ronald; Mills, Clare

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe grape allergy has been linked to lipid transfer protein (LTP) sensitization. LTPs are known to be resistant to pepsin digestion, although the effect of gastroduodenal digestion on its allergenicity has not been reported. OBJECTIVE: We sought to investigate the effect of gastric

  15. A cost-effective device for the rapid transfer of gel-separated proteins onto membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Hann W; Huang, Yu-Chen; Tam, Ming F

    2009-03-01

    We describe here the fabrication of a cost-effective semi-dry blotting apparatus for the transfer of proteins onto membranes. Graphite sheets were used as electrodes. Protein mixtures were separated on NuPAGE 4% to 12% polyacrylamide gradient gels. With a Tris-bicine buffer, we demonstrated that close to 80% of the proteins with apparent molecular mass of 80kDa or less were removed from the gels after 8min of blotting. The process is much faster than the techniques reported previously in the literature.

  16. Immune response in mice to ingested soya protein: antibody production, oral tolerance and maternal transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hanne Risager; Pedersen, Susanne Brix; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2004-01-01

    antibody response in the offspring, bat in this case in the absence of oral tolerance. This indicates that, under certain conditions, factors involved in spontaneous antibody production can be transmitted from mother to offspring. Understanding the immune response to soya protein ingested under healthy...... by ELISA, and to the presence of oral tolerance detected as a suppressed antibody and cell-proliferation response upon immunisation with soya protein. F0 mice generated soya-specific antibodies, while oral tolerance to the same soya proteins was also clearly induced. When F0 dams were transferred to soya...

  17. Preparation of fluorescent tocopherols for use in protein binding and localization with the alpha-tocopherol transfer protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, Phillip; Cecchini, Matt; Chirico, Sara; Gordon, Heather; Morley, Samantha; Manor, Danny; Atkinson, Jeffrey

    2006-06-01

    Sixteen fluorescent analogues of the lipid-soluble antioxidant vitamin alpha-tocopherol were prepared incorporating fluorophores at the terminus of omega-functionalized 2-n-alkyl-substituted chromanols (1a-d and 4a-d) that match the methylation pattern of alpha-tocopherol, the most biologically active form of vitamin E. The fluorophores used include 9-anthroyloxy (AO), 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD), N-methyl anthranilamide (NMA), and dansyl (DAN). The compounds were designed to function as fluorescent reporter ligands for protein-binding and lipid transfer assays. The fluorophores were chosen to maximize the fluorescence changes observed upon moving from an aqueous environment (low fluorescence intensity) to an hydrophobic environment such as a protein's binding site (high fluorescence intensity). Compounds 9d (anthroyloxy) and 10d (nitrobenzoxadiazole), having a C9-carbon chain between the chromanol and the fluorophore, were shown to bind specifically and reversibly to recombinant human tocopherol transfer protein (alpha-TTP) with dissociation constants of approximately 280 and 60 nM, respectively, as compared to 25 nM for the natural ligand 2R,4'R,8'R-alpha-tocopherol. Thus, compounds have been prepared that allow the investigation of the rate of alpha-TTP-mediated inter-membrane transfer of alpha-tocopherol and to investigate the mechanism of alpha-TTP function at membranes of different composition.

  18. Phospholipid transfer protein deficiency decreases the content of S1P in HDL via the loss of its transfer capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Guo, Shoudong; Feng, Yumei; Feng, Lei; Cui, Yingjie; Song, Guohua; Luo, Tian; Zhang, Ke; Wang, Yiwei; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Qin, Shucun

    2014-02-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is an amphiphilic signaling molecule, which is enriched in functional high density lipoprotein (HDL) and shows arterial protection. The distribution of S1P is changed with increased plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) activity and impaired HDL function in patients with coronary heart diseases. Therefore, we hypothesized that PLTP might transfer S1P among cells or lipoproteins. We found that plasma S1P contents were decreased by 60.1 % in PLTP knockout mice (PLTP-/-, N = 5) compared with their wild type littermates (WT, N = 5) (151.70 ± 38.59 vs. 379.32 ± 59.90 nmol/l, PS1P content in HDL fraction (HDL-S1P) from PLTP-/- was decreased by 64.7 % compared with WT (49.36 ± 1.49 vs. 139.76 ± 2.94 nmol/l, PS1P transfer assay indicated that PLTP could facilitate S1P transport from erythrocytes to HDL at 37 °C in D-Hanks buffer. Plasma content of apolipoprotein M, a specific adaptor of S1P, was not changed in PLTP-/- compared with WT. Therefore, we concluded that PLTP was a key factor to maintain plasma HDL-S1P, and PLTP deficiency could decrease the S1P content in plasma lipoproteins, which involves its capability of transferring S1P from erythrocyte to HDL.

  19. Causality, transfer entropy, and allosteric communication landscapes in proteins with harmonic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacisuleyman, Aysima; Erman, Burak

    2017-06-01

    A fast and approximate method of generating allosteric communication landscapes in proteins is presented by using Schreiber's entropy transfer concept in combination with the Gaussian Network Model of proteins. Predictions of the model and the allosteric communication landscapes generated show that information transfer in proteins does not necessarily take place along a single path, but an ensemble of pathways is possible. The model emphasizes that knowledge of entropy only is not sufficient for determining allosteric communication and additional information based on time delayed correlations should be introduced, which leads to the presence of causality in proteins. The model provides a simple tool for mapping entropy sink-source relations into pairs of residues. By this approach, residues that should be manipulated to control protein activity may be determined. This should be of great importance for allosteric drug design and for understanding the effects of mutations on function. The model is applied to determine allosteric communication in three proteins, Ubiquitin, Pyruvate Kinase, and the PDZ domain. Predictions are in agreement with molecular dynamics simulations and experimental evidence. Proteins 2017; 85:1056-1064. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Dynamics and energetics of the mammalian phosphatidylinositol transfer protein phospholipid exchange cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grabon, Aby; Orłowski, Adam; Tripathi, Ashutosh

    2017-01-01

    . However, the details of the PITP-mediated lipid exchange cycle remain entirely obscure. Here, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the mammalian StART-like PtdIns/phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) transfer protein PITPα, both on membrane bilayers and in solvated systems, informed downstream biochemical...... analyses that tested key aspects of the hypotheses generated by the molecular dynamics simulations. These studies provided five key insights into the PITPα lipid exchange cycle: (i) interaction of PITPα with the membrane is spontaneous and mediated by four specific protein substructures; (ii) the ability......Phosphatidylinositol-transfer proteins (PITPs) regulate phosphoinositide signaling in eukaryotic cells. The defining feature of PITPs is their ability to exchange phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) molecules between membranes, and this property is central to PITP-mediated regulation of lipid signaling...

  1. Simulation of fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments: effect of the dyes on protein folding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Lucy R; Paci, Emanuele

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer is a powerful technique which is often used to probe the properties of proteins and complex macromolecules. The technique relies on relatively large fluorescent dyes which are engineered into the molecule of interest. In the case of small proteins, these dyes may affect the stability of the protein, and modify the folding kinetics and the folding mechanisms which are being probed. Here we use atomistic simulation to investigate the effect that commonly used fluorescent dyes have on the folding of a four-helix bundle protein. We show that, depending on where the dyes are attached, their effect on the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the protein may be significant. We find that, while the overall folding mechanism is not affected by the dyes, they can destabilize, or even stabilize, intermediate states.

  2. Lipid transfer proteins do their thing anchored at membrane contact sites… but what is their thing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Louise H; Levine, Tim P

    2016-04-15

    Membrane contact sites are structures where two organelles come close together to regulate flow of material and information between them. One type of inter-organelle communication is lipid exchange, which must occur for membrane maintenance and in response to environmental and cellular stimuli. Soluble lipid transfer proteins have been extensively studied, but additional families of transfer proteins have been identified that are anchored into membranes by transmembrane helices so that they cannot diffuse through the cytosol to deliver lipids. If such proteins target membrane contact sites they may be major players in lipid metabolism. The eukaryotic family of so-called Lipid transfer proteins Anchored at Membrane contact sites (LAMs) all contain both a sterol-specific lipid transfer domain in the StARkin superfamily (related to StART/Bet_v1), and one or more transmembrane helices anchoring them in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), making them interesting subjects for study in relation to sterol metabolism. They target a variety of membrane contact sites, including newly described contacts between organelles that were already known to make contact by other means. Lam1-4p target punctate ER-plasma membrane contacts. Lam5p and Lam6p target multiple contacts including a new category: vacuolar non-NVJ cytoplasmic ER (VancE) contacts. These developments confirm previous observations on tubular lipid-binding proteins (TULIPs) that established the importance of membrane anchored proteins for lipid traffic. However, the question remaining to be solved is the most difficult of all: are LAMs transporters, or alternately are they regulators that affect traffic more indirectly? © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  3. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuttitta, Christina M.; Ericson, Daniel L.; Scalia, Alexander; Roessler, Christian G.; Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Campos, Olven; Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M.; Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S.

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic high-throughput screening method is described for harvesting protein crystals and combining the protein crystals with chemicals such as a fragment library. Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s −1 ) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening

  4. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttitta, Christina M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); The City University of New York, 2800 Victory Boulevard, Staten Island, NY 10314 (United States); Ericson, Daniel L. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); University at Buffalo, SUNY, 12 Capen Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Scalia, Alexander [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Binghamton University, 4400 Vestal Parkway East, Binghamton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Roessler, Christian G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Teplitsky, Ella [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5215 (United States); Joshi, Karan [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); PEC University of Technology, Chandigarh (India); Campos, Olven [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33414 (United States); Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Orville, Allen M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S., E-mail: soares@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic high-throughput screening method is described for harvesting protein crystals and combining the protein crystals with chemicals such as a fragment library. Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s{sup −1}) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  5. Quantifying information transfer by protein domains: Analysis of the Fyn SH2 domain structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenaerts, Tom; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Stricher, Francois

    2008-01-01

    instance of communication over a noisy channel. In particular, we analyze the conformational correlations between protein residues and apply the concept of mutual information to quantify information exchange. Mapping out changes of mutual information on the protein structure then allows visualizing how...... distal communication is achieved. We illustrate the approach by analyzing information transfer by the SH2 domain of Fyn tyrosine kinase, obtained from Monte Carlo dynamics simulations. Our analysis reveals that the Fyn SH2 domain forms a noisy communication channel that couples residues located......Background: Efficient communication between distant sites within a protein is essential for cooperative biological response. Although often associated with large allosteric movements, more subtle changes in protein dynamics can also induce long-range correlations. However, an appropriate formalism...

  6. Purification of nonspecific lipid transfer protein (sterol carrier protein 2) from human liver and its deficiency in livers from patients with cerebro-hepato-renal (Zellweger) syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amerongen, A. van; Helms, J.B.; Krift, T.P. van der; Schutgens, R.B.H.; Wirtz, K.W.A.

    1987-01-01

    The nonspecific lipid transfer protein (i.e., sterol carrier protein 2) from human liver was purified to homogeneity using ammonium sulfate precipitation, CM-cellulose chromatography, molecular sieve chromatography and fast protein liquid chromatography. Its amino acid composition was determined and

  7. In-silico assessment of protein-protein electron transfer. a case study: cytochrome c peroxidase--cytochrome c.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank H Wallrapp

    Full Text Available The fast development of software and hardware is notably helping in closing the gap between macroscopic and microscopic data. Using a novel theoretical strategy combining molecular dynamics simulations, conformational clustering, ab-initio quantum mechanics and electronic coupling calculations, we show how computational methodologies are mature enough to provide accurate atomistic details into the mechanism of electron transfer (ET processes in complex protein systems, known to be a significant challenge. We performed a quantitative study of the ET between Cytochrome c Peroxidase and its redox partner Cytochrome c. Our results confirm the ET mechanism as hole transfer (HT through residues Ala194, Ala193, Gly192 and Trp191 of CcP. Furthermore, our findings indicate the fine evolution of the enzyme to approach an elevated turnover rate of 5.47 × 10(6 s(-1 for the ET between Cytc and CcP through establishment of a localized bridge state in Trp191.

  8. Noninvasive imaging of protein-protein interactions from live cells and living subjects using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Abhijit; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2005-12-01

    This study demonstrates a significant advancement of imaging of a distance-dependent physical process, known as the bioluminescent resonance energy transfer (BRET2) signal in living subjects, by using a cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. A CCD camera-based spectral imaging strategy enables simultaneous visualization and quantitation of BRET signal from live cells and cells implanted in living mice. We used the BRET2 system, which utilizes Renilla luciferase (hRluc) protein and its substrate DeepBlueC (DBC) as an energy donor and a mutant green fluorescent protein (GFP2) as the acceptor. To accomplish this objective in this proof-of-principle study, the donor and acceptor proteins were fused to FKBP12 and FRB, respectively, which are known to interact only in the presence of the small molecule mediator rapamycin. Mammalian cells expressing these fusion constructs were imaged using a cooled-CCD camera either directly from culture dishes or by implanting them into mice. By comparing the emission photon yields in the presence and absence of rapamycin, the specific BRET signal was determined. The CCD imaging approach of BRET signal is particularly appealing due to its capacity to seamlessly bridge the gap between in vitro and in vivo studies. This work validates BRET as a powerful tool for interrogating and observing protein-protein interactions directly at limited depths in living mice.

  9. Probability weighted ensemble transfer learning for predicting interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyu Mei

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of host-pathogen protein interaction networks is of great significance to reveal the underlying microbic pathogenesis. However, the current experimentally-derived networks are generally small and should be augmented by computational methods for less-biased biological inference. From the point of view of computational modelling, data scarcity, data unavailability and negative data sampling are the three major problems for host-pathogen protein interaction networks reconstruction. In this work, we are motivated to address the three concerns and propose a probability weighted ensemble transfer learning model for HIV-human protein interaction prediction (PWEN-TLM, where support vector machine (SVM is adopted as the individual classifier of the ensemble model. In the model, data scarcity and data unavailability are tackled by homolog knowledge transfer. The importance of homolog knowledge is measured by the ROC-AUC metric of the individual classifiers, whose outputs are probability weighted to yield the final decision. In addition, we further validate the assumption that only the homolog knowledge is sufficient to train a satisfactory model for host-pathogen protein interaction prediction. Thus the model is more robust against data unavailability with less demanding data constraint. As regards with negative data construction, experiments show that exclusiveness of subcellular co-localized proteins is unbiased and more reliable than random sampling. Last, we conduct analysis of overlapped predictions between our model and the existing models, and apply the model to novel host-pathogen PPIs recognition for further biological research.

  10. Identification of compounds with binding affinity to proteins via magnetization transfer from bulk water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalvit, Claudio; Pevarello, Paolo; Tato, Marco; Veronesi, Marina; Vulpetti, Anna; Sundstroem, Michael

    2000-01-01

    A powerful screening by NMR methodology (WaterLOGSY), based on transfer of magnetization from bulk water, for the identification of compounds that interact with target biomolecules (proteins, RNA and DNA fragments) is described. The method exploits efficiently the large reservoir of H 2 O magnetization. The high sensitivity of the technique reduces the amount of biomolecule and ligands needed for the screening, which constitutes an important requirement for high throughput screening by NMR of large libraries of compounds. Application of the method to a compound mixture against the cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (cdk2) protein is presented

  11. Quinoline-3-carboxamide Derivatives as Potential Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Kang Shen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel quinoline-3-carboxamide derivatives 1017 and 2327 were designed and synthesized as cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP inhibitors. All of them exhibited activity against CETP. Particularly, compounds 24 and 26 displayed the best activity against CETP with the same inhibitory rate of 80.1%.

  12. Tunneling nanotube (TNT)-mediated neuron-to neuron transfer of pathological Tau protein assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    TARDIVEL , Meryem; Bégard , Séverine; Bousset , Luc; Dujardin , Simon; Coens , Audrey; Melki , Ronald; Buée , Luc; Colin , Morvane

    2016-01-01

    A given cell makes exchanges with its neighbors through a variety of means ranging from diffusible factors to vesicles. Cells use also tunneling nanotubes (TNTs), filamentous-actin-containing membranous structures that bridge and connect cells. First described in immune cells, TNTs facilitate HIV-1 transfer and are found in various cell types, including neurons. We show that the microtubule-associated protein Tau, a key player in Alzheimer?s disease, is a bona fide constituent of TNTs. This i...

  13. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (cetp) inhibition in the treatment of cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Kaur, Mandeep

    2016-09-01

    In one embodiment, the invention provides methods of treatment which use therapeutically effective amounts of Choleste ryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP) inhibitors to treat a variety of cancers. In certain embodiments, the inhibitor is a CETP-inhibiting small molecule, CETP-inhibiting antisense oligonucleotide, CETP-inhibiting siRNA or a CETP- inhibiting antibody. Related pharmaceutical compositions, kits, diagnostics and screens are also provided.

  14. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (cetp) inhibition in the treatment of cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Kaur, Mandeep; Esau, Luke E.; Sagar, Sunii

    2016-01-01

    In one embodiment, the invention provides methods of treatment which use therapeutically effective amounts of Choleste ryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP) inhibitors to treat a variety of cancers. In certain embodiments, the inhibitor is a CETP-inhibiting small molecule, CETP-inhibiting antisense oligonucleotide, CETP-inhibiting siRNA or a CETP- inhibiting antibody. Related pharmaceutical compositions, kits, diagnostics and screens are also provided.

  15. Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne; Aarkrog, Vibe

    Bogen er den første samlede indføring i transfer på dansk. Transfer kan anvendes som praksis-filosofikum. Den giver en systematisk indsigt til den studerende, der spørger: Hvordan kan teoretisk viden bruges til at reflektere over handlinger i situationer, der passer til min fremtidige arbejdsplads?...

  16. DNA-binding proteins regulating pIP501 transfer and replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Grohmann

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available pIP501 is a Gram-positive broad-host-range model plasmid intensively used for studying plasmid replication and conjugative transfer. It is a multiple antibiotic resistance plasmid frequently found in clinical Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolates. Replication of pIP501 proceeds unidirectionally by a theta mechanism. The minimal replicon of pIP501 is composed of the repR gene encoding the essential rate-limiting replication initiator protein RepR and the origin of replication, oriR, located downstream of repR. RepR is similar to RepE of related streptococcal plasmid pAMβ1, which has been shown to possess RNase activity cleaving free RNA molecules in close proximity of the initiation site of DNA synthesis. Replication of pIP501 is controlled by the concerted action of a small protein, CopR, and an antisense RNA, RNAIII. CopR has a dual role: It acts as transcriptional repressor at the repR promoter and prevents convergent transcription of RNAIII and repR mRNA (RNAII, thereby indirectly increasing RNAIII synthesis. CopR binds asymmetrically as a dimer at two consecutive binding sites upstream of and overlapping with the repR promoter. RNAIII induces transcriptional attenuation within the leader region of the repR mRNA (RNAII. Deletion of either control component causes a 10- to 20-fold increase of plasmid copy number, while simultaneous deletions have no additional effect. Conjugative transfer of pIP501 depends on a type IV secretion system (T4SS encoded in a single operon. Its transfer host-range is considerably broad, as it has been transferred to virtually all Gram-positive bacteria including filamentous streptomycetes and even the Gram-negative Escherichia coli. Expression of the 15 genes encoding the T4SS is tightly controlled by binding of the relaxase TraA, the transfer initiator protein, to the operon promoter, which overlaps with the origin of transfer (oriT. The T4SS operon encodes the DNA-binding proteins TraJ (VirD4

  17. Quantifying information transfer by protein domains: Analysis of the Fyn SH2 domain structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serrano Luis

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efficient communication between distant sites within a protein is essential for cooperative biological response. Although often associated with large allosteric movements, more subtle changes in protein dynamics can also induce long-range correlations. However, an appropriate formalism that directly relates protein structural dynamics to information exchange between functional sites is still lacking. Results Here we introduce a method to analyze protein dynamics within the framework of information theory and show that signal transduction within proteins can be considered as a particular instance of communication over a noisy channel. In particular, we analyze the conformational correlations between protein residues and apply the concept of mutual information to quantify information exchange. Mapping out changes of mutual information on the protein structure then allows visualizing how distal communication is achieved. We illustrate the approach by analyzing information transfer by the SH2 domain of Fyn tyrosine kinase, obtained from Monte Carlo dynamics simulations. Our analysis reveals that the Fyn SH2 domain forms a noisy communication channel that couples residues located in the phosphopeptide and specificity binding sites and a number of residues at the other side of the domain near the linkers that connect the SH2 domain to the SH3 and kinase domains. We find that for this particular domain, communication is affected by a series of contiguous residues that connect distal sites by crossing the core of the SH2 domain. Conclusion As a result, our method provides a means to directly map the exchange of biological information on the structure of protein domains, making it clear how binding triggers conformational changes in the protein structure. As such it provides a structural road, next to the existing attempts at sequence level, to predict long-range interactions within protein structures.

  18. Ultrafast Nonradiative Decay and Excitation Energy Transfer by Carotenoids in Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumen

    This dissertation investigates the photophysical and structural dynamics that allow carotenoids to serve as efficient excitation energy transfer donor to chlorophyll acceptors in photosynthetic light harvesting proteins. Femtosecond transient grating spectroscopy with optical heterodyne detection has been employed to follow the nonradiative decay pathways of carotenoids and excitation energy transfer to chlorophylls. It was found that the optically prepared S2 (11Bu+) state of beta-carotene decays in 12 fs fs to populate an intermediate electronic state, Sx, which then decays nonradiatively to the S 1 state. The ultrafast rise of the dispersion component of the heterodyne transient grating signal reports the formation of Sx intermediate since the rise of the dispersion signal is controlled by the loss of stimulated emission from the S2 state. These findings were extended to studies of peridinin, a carbonyl substituted carotenoid that serves as a photosynthetic light-harvesting chromophore in dinoflagellates. Numerical simulations using nonlinear response formalism and the multimode Brownian oscillator model assigned the Sx intermediate to a torsionally distorted structure evolving on the S2 potential surface. The decay of the Sx state is promoted by large amplitude out-of-plane torsional motions and is significantly retarded by solvent friction owing to the development of an intramolecular charge transfer character in peridinin. The slowing of the nonradiative decay allows the Sx state to transfer significant portion of the excitation energy to chlorophyll a acceptors in the peridinin-chlorophyll a protein. The results of heterodyne transient grating study on peridinin-chlorophyll a protein suggests two distinct energy transfer channels from peridinin to chlorophyll a: a 30 fs process involving quantum coherence and delocalized peridinin-Chl states and an incoherent, 2.5 ps process involving the distorted S2 state of peridinin. The torsional evolution on the S2

  19. Effect of growth hormone replacement therapy on plasma lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase and lipid transfer protein activities in growth hormone-deficient adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Beentjes; A. van Tol (Arie); W.J. Sluiter (Wim); R.P.F. Dullaart (Robin)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe effects of growth hormone (GH) replacement on plasma lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), and phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), factors involved in high density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism, are

  20. Plasma phospholipid transfer protein activity is related to insulin resistance : impaired acute lowering by insulin in obese Type II diabetic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemens, SC; van Tol, A; Sluiter, WJ; Dullaart, RPF

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) have important functions in high density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism. We determined the association of plasma CETP and PLTP activities (measured with exogenous' substrate assays) with insulin resistance, plasma

  1. Constraints on lateral gene transfer in promoting fimbrial usher protein diversity and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubenrauch, Christopher J; Dougan, Gordon; Lithgow, Trevor; Heinz, Eva

    2017-11-01

    Fimbriae are long, adhesive structures widespread throughout members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. They are multimeric extrusions, which are moved out of the bacterial cell through an integral outer membrane protein called usher. The complex folding mechanics of the usher protein were recently revealed to be catalysed by the membrane-embedded translocation and assembly module (TAM). Here, we examine the diversity of usher proteins across a wide range of extraintestinal (ExPEC) and enteropathogenic (EPEC) Escherichia coli , and further focus on a so far undescribed chaperone-usher system, with this usher referred to as UshC. The fimbrial system containing UshC is distributed across a discrete set of EPEC types, including model strains like E2348/67, as well as ExPEC ST131, currently the most prominent multi-drug-resistant uropathogenic E. coli strain worldwide. Deletion of the TAM from a naive strain of E. coli results in a drastic time delay in folding of UshC, which can be observed for a protein from EPEC as well as for two introduced proteins from related organisms, Yersinia and Enterobacter We suggest that this models why the TAM machinery is essential for efficient folding of proteins acquired via lateral gene transfer. © 2017 The Authors.

  2. How changing the particle structure can speed up protein mass transfer kinetics in liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritti, Fabrice; Horvath, Krisztian; Guiochon, Georges

    2012-11-09

    The mass transfer kinetics of a few compounds (uracil, 112 Da), insulin (5.5 kDa), lysozyme (13.4 kDa), and bovine serum albumin (BSA, 67 kDa) in columns packed with several types of spherical particles was investigated under non-retained conditions, in order to eliminate the poorly known contribution of surface diffusion to overall sample diffusivity across the porous particles in RPLC. Diffusivity across particles is then minimum. Based on the porosity of the particles accessible to analytes, it was accurately estimated from the elution times, the internal obstruction factor (using Pismen correlation), and the hindrance diffusion factor (using Renkin correlation). The columns used were packed with fully porous particles 2.5 μm Luna-C(18) 100 Å, core-shell particles 2.6 μm Kinetex-C(18) 100 Å, 3.6 μm Aeris Widepore-C(18) 200 Å, and prototype 2.7 μm core-shell particles (made of two concentric porous shells with 100 and 300 Å average pore size, respectively), and with 3.3 μm non-porous silica particles. The results demonstrate that the porous particle structure and the solid-liquid mass transfer resistance have practically no effect on the column efficiency for small molecules. For them, the column performance depends principally on eddy dispersion (packing homogeneity), to a lesser degree on longitudinal diffusion (effective sample diffusivity along the packed bed), and only slightly on the solid-liquid mass transfer resistance (sample diffusivity across the particle). In contrast, for proteins, this third HETP contribution, hence the porous particle structure, together with eddy dispersion govern the kinetic performance of columns. Mass transfer kinetics of proteins was observed to be fastest for columns packed with core-shell particles having either a large core-to-particle ratio or having a second, external, shell made of a thin porous layer with large mesopores (200-300 Å) and a high porosity (~/=0.5-0.7). The structure of this external shell seems

  3. Radioiodinated, photoactivatable phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine: transfer properties and differential photoreactive interaction with human erythrocyte membrane proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroit, A.J.; Madsen, J.; Ruoho, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    An isotopically labeled cross-linking reagent, succinimido 3-(3-[ 125 I]iodo-4-azidophenyl)propionate, has been synthesized and coupled to 1-acyl-2-(aminocaproyl)phosphatidylcholine according to previously described procedures. 125 I- and N 3 -labeled phosphatidylserine ( 125 I-N 3 -PS) was produced from the phosphatidylcholine (PC) analog by phospholipase D catalyzed base exchange in the presence of L-serine. These phospholipid analogues are photoactivatable, are labeled with 125 I at high specific activity, completely incorporate into synthetic vesicles, and spontaneously transfer between membranes. When an excess of acceptor vesicles or red blood cells (RBC) was mixed with a population of donor vesicles containing the 125 I-N 3 -phospholipids, approximately 40% of the analogues transferred to the acceptor population. After transfer in the dark to RBC, all of the 125 I-N 3 -PC incorporated into the cells could be removed by washing with serum, whereas the 125 I-N 3 -PS could not. After photolabeling of intact RBC, ∼50% of the PC and 20% of the PS cross-linked to membrane proteins as determined by their insolubility in CHCl 3 /MeOH. Analysis of probe distribution by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that 125 I-N 3 -PS preferentially labeled a M/sub r/ 30,000 peptide which contained ∼30% of the protein-bound label

  4. Study of protein-probe complexation equilibria and protein-surfactant interaction using charge transfer fluorescence probe methyl ester of N,N-dimethylamino naphthyl acrylic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahanta, Subrata; Balia Singh, Rupashree; Bagchi, Arnab [Department of Chemistry University of Calcutta 92, A.P.C. Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); Nath, Debnarayan [Department of Physical Chemistry, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Guchhait, Nikhil, E-mail: nguchhait@yahoo.co [Department of Chemistry University of Calcutta 92, A.P.C. Road, Kolkata 700009 (India)

    2010-06-15

    In this paper, we demonstrate the interaction between intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) probe-Methyl ester of N,N-dimethylamino naphthyl acrylic acid (MDMANA) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) using absorption and fluorescence emission spectroscopy. The nature of probe protein binding interaction, fluorescence resonance energy transfer from protein to probe and time resolved fluorescence decay measurement predict that the probe molecule binds strongly to the hydrophobic cavity of the protein. Furthermore, the interaction of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) with water soluble protein BSA has been investigated using MDMANA as fluorescenece probe. The changes in the spectral characteristics of charge transfer fluorescence probe MDMANA in BSA-SDS environment reflects well the nature of the protein-surfactant binding interaction such as specific binding, non-cooperative binding, cooperative binding and saturation binding.

  5. High plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein levels may favour reduced incidence of cardiovascular events in men with low triglycerides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borggreve, Susanna E.; Hillege, Hans L.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; de Jong, Paul E.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Grobbee, Diederik E.; van Tol, Arie; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    2007-01-01

    High cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) concentrations are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in subjects with high triglycerides. We determined the relationship of plasma CETP with incident CVD in a population with relatively low triglycerides. A nested

  6. Plasma angiopoietin-like 4 is related to phospholipid transfer protein activity in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruppen, Eke G.; Kersten, Sander; Dullaart, Robin P.F.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4) inhibits lipoprotein lipase, whereas phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) enhances hepatic triglyceride secretion. Both factors may be upregulated by inflammatory pathways. Since the extent to which these circulating factors are interrelated is unknown, we

  7. Separating the mechanism-based and off-target actions of cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors with CETP gene polymorphisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sofat, Reecha; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Smeeth, Liam; Humphries, Steve E.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Cooper, Jackie; Shah, Tina; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Ricketts, Sally L.; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Wareham, Nicholas; Khaw, Kay Tee; Kumari, Meena; Kivimaki, Mika; Marmot, Michael; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; van der Harst, Pim; Dullaart, Robin P. F.; Navis, Gerjan; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Thompson, John F.; McCaskie, Pamela; Palmer, Lyle J.; Arca, Marcello; Quagliarini, Fabiana; Gaudio, Carlo; Cambien, François; Nicaud, Viviane; Poirer, Odette; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Isaacs, Aaron; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Pencina, Michael; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Ordovas, Jose; Li, Tricia Y.; Kakko, Sakari; Kauma, Heikki; Savolainen, Markku J.; Kesäniemi, Y. Antero; Sandhofer, Anton; Paulweber, Bernhard; Sorli, Jose V.; Goto, Akimoto; Yokoyama, Shinji; Okumura, Kenji; Horne, Benjamin D.; Packard, Chris; Freeman, Dilys; Ford, Ian; Sattar, Naveed; McCormack, Valerie; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Ebrahim, Shah; Smith, George Davey; Kastelein, John J. P.; Deanfield, John; Casas, Juan P.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors raise high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, but torcetrapib, the first-in-class inhibitor tested in a large outcome trial, caused an unexpected blood pressure elevation and increased cardiovascular events. Whether the

  8. Epididymosomes: transfer of fertility-modulating proteins to the sperm surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-DeLeon, Patricia A

    2015-01-01

    A variety of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked proteins are acquired on spermatozoa from epididymal luminal fluids (ELF) during sperm maturation. These proteins serve roles in immunoprotection and in key steps of fertilization such as capacitation, acrosomal exocytosis and sperm-egg interactions. Their acquisition on sperm cells is mediated both by membrane vesicles (epididymosomes, EP) which were first reported to dock on the sperm surface, and by lipid carriers which facilitate the transfer of proteins associated with the membrane-free fraction of ELF. While the nonvesicular fraction is more efficient, both pathways are dependent on hydrophobic interactions between the GPI-anchor and the external lipid layer of the sperm surface. More recently proteomic and hypothesis-driven studies have shown that EP from several mammals carry transmembrane (TM) proteins, including plasma membrane Ca 2 + -ATPase 4 (PMCA4). Synthesized in the testis, PMCA4 is an essential protein and the major Ca 2 + efflux pump in murine spermatozoa. Delivery of PMCA4 to spermatozoa from bovine and mouse EP during epididymal maturation and in vitro suggests that the docking of EP on the sperm surface precedes fusion, and experimental evidence supports a fusogenic mechanism for TM proteins. Fusion is facilitated by CD9, which generates fusion-competent sites on membranes. On the basis of knowledge of PMCA4's interacting partners a number of TM and membrane-associated proteins have been identified or are predicted to be present, in the epididymosomal cargo deliverable to spermatozoa. These Ca 2 + -dependent proteins, undetected in proteomic studies, play essential roles in sperm motility and fertility, and their detection highlights the usefulness of the hypothesis-driven approach.

  9. Epididymosomes: transfer of fertility-modulating proteins to the sperm surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia A Martin-DeLeon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A variety of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-linked proteins are acquired on spermatozoa from epididymal luminal fluids (ELF during sperm maturation. These proteins serve roles in immunoprotection and in key steps of fertilization such as capacitation, acrosomal exocytosis and sperm-egg interactions. Their acquisition on sperm cells is mediated both by membrane vesicles (epididymosomes, EP which were first reported to dock on the sperm surface, and by lipid carriers which facilitate the transfer of proteins associated with the membrane-free fraction of ELF. While the nonvesicular fraction is more efficient, both pathways are dependent on hydrophobic interactions between the GPI-anchor and the external lipid layer of the sperm surface. More recently proteomic and hypothesis-driven studies have shown that EP from several mammals carry transmembrane (TM proteins, including plasma membrane Ca 2 + -ATPase 4 (PMCA4. Synthesized in the testis, PMCA4 is an essential protein and the major Ca 2 + efflux pump in murine spermatozoa. Delivery of PMCA4 to spermatozoa from bovine and mouse EP during epididymal maturation and in vitro suggests that the docking of EP on the sperm surface precedes fusion, and experimental evidence supports a fusogenic mechanism for TM proteins. Fusion is facilitated by CD9, which generates fusion-competent sites on membranes. On the basis of knowledge of PMCA4′s interacting partners a number of TM and membrane-associated proteins have been identified or are predicted to be present, in the epididymosomal cargo deliverable to spermatozoa. These Ca 2 + -dependent proteins, undetected in proteomic studies, play essential roles in sperm motility and fertility, and their detection highlights the usefulness of the hypothesis-driven approach.

  10. Lipid-regulated sterol transfer between closely apposed membranes by oxysterol-binding protein homologues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Timothy A; Choi, Mal-Gi; Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Mears, Jason A; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Hinshaw, Jenny E; Prinz, William A

    2009-12-14

    Sterols are transferred between cellular membranes by vesicular and poorly understood nonvesicular pathways. Oxysterol-binding protein-related proteins (ORPs) have been implicated in sterol sensing and nonvesicular transport. In this study, we show that yeast ORPs use a novel mechanism that allows regulated sterol transfer between closely apposed membranes, such as organelle contact sites. We find that the core lipid-binding domain found in all ORPs can simultaneously bind two membranes. Using Osh4p/Kes1p as a representative ORP, we show that ORPs have at least two membrane-binding surfaces; one near the mouth of the sterol-binding pocket and a distal site that can bind a second membrane. The distal site is required for the protein to function in cells and, remarkably, regulates the rate at which Osh4p extracts and delivers sterols in a phosphoinositide-dependent manner. Together, these findings suggest a new model of how ORPs could sense and regulate the lipid composition of adjacent membranes.

  11. Recombinant production and solution structure of lipid transfer protein from lentil Lens culinaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gizatullina, Albina K. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Department of Physicochemical Biology and Biotechnology, Institutskii per., 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Finkina, Ekaterina I.; Mineev, Konstantin S.; Melnikova, Daria N.; Bogdanov, Ivan V. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Telezhinskaya, Irina N.; Balandin, Sergey V. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Department of Physicochemical Biology and Biotechnology, Institutskii per., 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Shenkarev, Zakhar O. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Arseniev, Alexander S. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Department of Physicochemical Biology and Biotechnology, Institutskii per., 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V., E-mail: ovch@ibch.ru [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Department of Physicochemical Biology and Biotechnology, Institutskii per., 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Lipid transfer protein from lentil seeds (Lc-LTP2) was overexpressed in E. coli. •Antimicrobial activity and spatial structure of the recombinant Lc-LTP2 were examined. •Internal tunnel-like lipid-binding cavity occupies ∼7% of the total Lc-LTP2 volume. •Binding of DMPG lipid induces moderate rearrangements in the Lc-LTP2 structure. •Lc-LTP2/DMPG complex has limited lifetime and dissociates within tens of hours. -- Abstract: Lipid transfer protein, designated as Lc-LTP2, was isolated from seeds of the lentil Lens culinaris. The protein has molecular mass 9282.7 Da, consists of 93 amino acid residues including 8 cysteines forming 4 disulfide bonds. Lc-LTP2 and its stable isotope labeled analogues were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Antimicrobial activity of the recombinant protein was examined, and its spatial structure was studied by NMR spectroscopy. The polypeptide chain of Lc-LTP2 forms four α-helices (Cys4-Leu18, Pro26-Ala37, Thr42-Ala56, Thr64-Lys73) and a long C-terminal tail without regular secondary structure. Side chains of the hydrophobic residues form a relatively large internal tunnel-like lipid-binding cavity (van der Waals volume comes up to ∼600 Å{sup 3}). The side-chains of Arg45, Pro79, and Tyr80 are located near an assumed mouth of the cavity. Titration with dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) revealed formation of the Lc-LTP2/lipid non-covalent complex accompanied by rearrangements in the protein spatial structure and expansion of the internal cavity. The resultant Lc-LTP2/DMPG complex demonstrates limited lifetime and dissociates within tens of hours.

  12. Recombinant production and solution structure of lipid transfer protein from lentil Lens culinaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gizatullina, Albina K.; Finkina, Ekaterina I.; Mineev, Konstantin S.; Melnikova, Daria N.; Bogdanov, Ivan V.; Telezhinskaya, Irina N.; Balandin, Sergey V.; Shenkarev, Zakhar O.; Arseniev, Alexander S.; Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Lipid transfer protein from lentil seeds (Lc-LTP2) was overexpressed in E. coli. •Antimicrobial activity and spatial structure of the recombinant Lc-LTP2 were examined. •Internal tunnel-like lipid-binding cavity occupies ∼7% of the total Lc-LTP2 volume. •Binding of DMPG lipid induces moderate rearrangements in the Lc-LTP2 structure. •Lc-LTP2/DMPG complex has limited lifetime and dissociates within tens of hours. -- Abstract: Lipid transfer protein, designated as Lc-LTP2, was isolated from seeds of the lentil Lens culinaris. The protein has molecular mass 9282.7 Da, consists of 93 amino acid residues including 8 cysteines forming 4 disulfide bonds. Lc-LTP2 and its stable isotope labeled analogues were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Antimicrobial activity of the recombinant protein was examined, and its spatial structure was studied by NMR spectroscopy. The polypeptide chain of Lc-LTP2 forms four α-helices (Cys4-Leu18, Pro26-Ala37, Thr42-Ala56, Thr64-Lys73) and a long C-terminal tail without regular secondary structure. Side chains of the hydrophobic residues form a relatively large internal tunnel-like lipid-binding cavity (van der Waals volume comes up to ∼600 Å 3 ). The side-chains of Arg45, Pro79, and Tyr80 are located near an assumed mouth of the cavity. Titration with dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) revealed formation of the Lc-LTP2/lipid non-covalent complex accompanied by rearrangements in the protein spatial structure and expansion of the internal cavity. The resultant Lc-LTP2/DMPG complex demonstrates limited lifetime and dissociates within tens of hours

  13. Tunneling nanotube (TNT)-mediated neuron-to neuron transfer of pathological Tau protein assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardivel, Meryem; Bégard, Séverine; Bousset, Luc; Dujardin, Simon; Coens, Audrey; Melki, Ronald; Buée, Luc; Colin, Morvane

    2016-11-04

    A given cell makes exchanges with its neighbors through a variety of means ranging from diffusible factors to vesicles. Cells use also tunneling nanotubes (TNTs), filamentous-actin-containing membranous structures that bridge and connect cells. First described in immune cells, TNTs facilitate HIV-1 transfer and are found in various cell types, including neurons. We show that the microtubule-associated protein Tau, a key player in Alzheimer's disease, is a bona fide constituent of TNTs. This is important because Tau appears beside filamentous actin and myosin 10 as a specific marker of these fine protrusions of membranes and cytosol that are difficult to visualize. Furthermore, we observed that exogenous Tau species increase the number of TNTs established between primary neurons, thereby facilitating the intercellular transfer of Tau fibrils. In conclusion, Tau may contribute to the formation and function of the highly dynamic TNTs that may be involved in the prion-like propagation of Tau assemblies.

  14. How anacetrapib inhibits the activity of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein? Perspective through atomistic simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aijanen, T.; Koivuniemi, A.; Javanainen, M.

    2014-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the reciprocal transfer of neutral lipids (cholesteryl esters, triglycerides) and phospholipids between different lipoprotein fractions in human blood plasma. A novel molecular agent known as anacetrapib has been shown to inhibit CETP activity...... and thereby raise high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol and decrease low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, thus rendering CETP inhibition an attractive target to prevent and treat the development of various cardiovascular diseases. Our objective in this work is to use atomistic molecular dynamics...... simulations to shed light on the inhibitory mechanism of anacetrapib and unlock the interactions between the drug and CETP. The results show an evident affinity of anacetrapib towards the concave surface of CETP, and especially towards the region of the N-terminal tunnel opening. The primary binding site...

  15. Dynamics and energetics of the mammalian phosphatidylinositol transfer protein phospholipid exchange cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabon, Aby; Orłowski, Adam; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Vuorio, Joni; Javanainen, Matti; Róg, Tomasz; Lönnfors, Max; McDermott, Mark I; Siebert, Garland; Somerharju, Pentti; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Bankaitis, Vytas A

    2017-09-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-transfer proteins (PITPs) regulate phosphoinositide signaling in eukaryotic cells. The defining feature of PITPs is their ability to exchange phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) molecules between membranes, and this property is central to PITP-mediated regulation of lipid signaling. However, the details of the PITP-mediated lipid exchange cycle remain entirely obscure. Here, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the mammalian StART-like PtdIns/phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) transfer protein PITPα, both on membrane bilayers and in solvated systems, informed downstream biochemical analyses that tested key aspects of the hypotheses generated by the molecular dynamics simulations. These studies provided five key insights into the PITPα lipid exchange cycle: (i) interaction of PITPα with the membrane is spontaneous and mediated by four specific protein substructures; (ii) the ability of PITPα to initiate closure around the PtdCho ligand is accompanied by loss of flexibility of two helix/loop regions, as well as of the C-terminal helix; (iii) the energy barrier of phospholipid extraction from the membrane is lowered by a network of hydrogen bonds between the lipid molecule and PITPα; (iv) the trajectory of PtdIns or PtdCho into and through the lipid-binding pocket is chaperoned by sets of PITPα residues conserved throughout the StART-like PITP family; and (v) conformational transitions in the C-terminal helix have specific functional involvements in PtdIns transfer activity. Taken together, these findings provide the first mechanistic description of key aspects of the PITPα PtdIns/PtdCho exchange cycle and offer a rationale for the high conservation of particular sets of residues across evolutionarily distant members of the metazoan StART-like PITP family. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. TRANSFER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports on further studies on long range energy transfer between curcumine as donor and another thiazine dye, thionine, which is closely related to methylene blue as energy harvester (Figure 1). Since thionine is known to have a higher quantum yield of singlet oxygen sensitization than methylene blue [8], it is ...

  17. The Golgi localization of phosphatidylinositol transfer protein beta requires the protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation of serine 262 and is essential for maintaining plasma membrane sphingomyelin levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tiel, Claudia M.; Westerman, Jan; Paasman, Marten A.; Hoebens, Martha M.; Wirtz, Karel W. A.; Snoek, Gerry T.

    2002-01-01

    Recombinant mouse phosphatidylinositol transfer protein (PI-TP)beta is a substrate for protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent phosphorylation in vitro. Based on site-directed mutagenesis and two-dimensional tryptic peptide mapping, Ser(262) was identified as the major site of phosphorylation and Ser(165)

  18. The role of phosphatidylinositol-transfer proteins at membrane contact sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selitrennik, Michael; Lev, Sima

    2016-04-15

    Phosphatidylinositol-transfer proteins (PITPs) have been initially identified as soluble factors that accelerate the monomeric exchange of either phosphatidylinositol (PI) or phosphatidylcholine (PC) between membrane bilayersin vitro They are highly conserved in eukaryotes and have been implicated in different cellular processes, including vesicular trafficking, signal transduction, and lipid metabolism. Recent studies suggest that PITPs function at membrane contact sites (MCSs) to facilitate the transport of PI from its synthesis site at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to various membrane compartments. In this review, we describe the underlying mechanism of PITPs targeting to MCSs, discuss their cellular roles and potential mode of action. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  19. Transfer functions for protein signal transduction: application to a model of striatal neural plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Scheler

    Full Text Available We present a novel formulation for biochemical reaction networks in the context of protein signal transduction. The model consists of input-output transfer functions, which are derived from differential equations, using stable equilibria. We select a set of "source" species, which are interpreted as input signals. Signals are transmitted to all other species in the system (the "target" species with a specific delay and with a specific transmission strength. The delay is computed as the maximal reaction time until a stable equilibrium for the target species is reached, in the context of all other reactions in the system. The transmission strength is the concentration change of the target species. The computed input-output transfer functions can be stored in a matrix, fitted with parameters, and even recalled to build dynamical models on the basis of state changes. By separating the temporal and the magnitudinal domain we can greatly simplify the computational model, circumventing typical problems of complex dynamical systems. The transfer function transformation of biochemical reaction systems can be applied to mass-action kinetic models of signal transduction. The paper shows that this approach yields significant novel insights while remaining a fully testable and executable dynamical model for signal transduction. In particular we can deconstruct the complex system into local transfer functions between individual species. As an example, we examine modularity and signal integration using a published model of striatal neural plasticity. The modularizations that emerge correspond to a known biological distinction between calcium-dependent and cAMP-dependent pathways. Remarkably, we found that overall interconnectedness depends on the magnitude of inputs, with higher connectivity at low input concentrations and significant modularization at moderate to high input concentrations. This general result, which directly follows from the properties of

  20. Studies on a microbially derived, high molecular weight inhibitor of plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marschke, C.K.; McGee, J.E.; Melchior, G.W.; Castle, C.K.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have isolated an organism which accumulates an inhibitor of Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP). Purification of 100,000-fold was achieved by ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by Hydroxyl Apatite, Agarose AO.5, and Mono Q (Pharmacia) chromatographies. The use of 14 C-labelled protein molecular weight standards followed by SDS-PAGE revealed some proteolytic activity. However, inhibition of the proteases did not affect the inhibitor potency. The inhibitor has an estimated molecular weight of 40 Kd and appears to exist as two forms. One form was eluted from a Mono Q column by 100 mM NaCl while the other was not bound. Our evidence indicated that the bound form was progressively denatured, or proteolyzed, during storage of the fermentation beer, to the unbound form. Importantly though this molecular change did not affect either inhibitory activity or the apparent molecular weight

  1. Transfer in SDS of biotinylated proteins from acrylamide gels to an avidin-coated membrane filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Arthur; Wang, Chaojian; Li, Jing; Xu, Qiang

    2004-06-01

    Avidin was covalently linked to aldehyde-derivatized polyethersulfone membrane filters. These filters were used in Western blot analysis of proteins reacted with biotinylation reagents and electrophoresed in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on polyacrylamide gels. Electrophoretic transfer from the gels to these filters was in 0.1% SDS, in which the covalently bound avidin retained its biotin-binding capacity. We compared Western blots on avidin-coated membrane filters of biotinylated and nonbiotinylated forms of mouse immunoglobulin G (IgG), mouse IgG heavy chain, muscle-type acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit, and fused alpha and beta subunits of receptor. Biotinylated proteins were captured with high specificity compared to their nonbiotinylated counterparts and sensitively detected on the avidin-coated membranes.

  2. IR-FEL-induced green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene transfer into plant cell

    CERN Document Server

    Awazu, K; Tamiya, E

    2002-01-01

    A Free Electron Laser (FEL) holds potential for various biotechnological applications due to its characteristics such as flexible wavelength tunability, short pulse and high peak power. We could successfully introduce the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) gene into tobacco BY2 cells by IR-FEL laser irradiation. The irradiated area of the solution containing BY2 cells and plasmid was about 0.1 mm sup 2. FEL irradiation at a wavelength of 5.75 and 6.1 mu m, targeting absorption by the ester bond of the lipid and the amide I bond of the protein, respectively, was shown to cause the introduction of the fluorescent dye into the cell. On the other hand, transient expression of the GFP fluorescence was only observed after irradiation at 5.75 mu m. The maximum transfer efficiency was about 0.5%.

  3. Short-Range Electron Transfer in Reduced Flavodoxin: Ultrafast Nonequilibrium Dynamics Coupled with Protein Fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Mainak; He, Ting-Fang; Lu, Yangyi; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2018-05-03

    Short-range electron transfer (ET) in proteins is an ultrafast process on the similar timescales as local protein-solvent fluctuations thus the two dynamics are coupled. Here, we use semiquinone flavodoxin and systematically characterized the photoinduced redox cycle with eleven mutations of different aromatic electron donors (tryptophan and tyrosine) and local residues to change redox properties. We observed the forward and backward ET dynamics in a few picoseconds, strongly following a stretched behavior resulting from a coupling between local environment relaxations and these ET processes. We further observed the hot vibrational-state formation through charge recombination and the subsequent cooling dynamics also in a few picoseconds. Combined with the ET studies in oxidized flavodoxin, these results coherently reveal the evolution of the ET dynamics from single to stretched exponential behaviors and thus elucidate critical timescales for the coupling. The observed hot vibration-state formation is robust and should be considered in all photoinduced back ET processes in flavoproteins.

  4. Nanoscale charge transfer in redox proteins and DNA: Towards biomolecular electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artés, Juan Manuel; López-Martínez, Montserrat; Díez-Pérez, Ismael; Sanz, Fausto; Gorostiza, Pau

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how charges move through and between biomolecules is a fundamental question that constitutes the basis for many biological processes. On the other hand, it has potential applications in the design of sensors based on biomolecules and single molecule devices. In this review we introduce the study of the electron transfer (ET) process in biomolecules, providing an overview of the fundamental theory behind it and the different experimental approaches. The ET in proteins is introduced by reviewing a complete electronic characterization of a redox protein (azurin) using electrochemical scanning tunnelling microscopy (ECSTM). The ET process in DNA is overviewed and results from different experimental approaches are discussed. Finally, future directions in the study of the ET process in biomolecules are introduced as well as examples of possible technological applications

  5. Ultrafast quenching of tryptophan fluorescence in proteins: Interresidue and intrahelical electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu Weihong; Li Tanping; Zhang Luyuan; Yang Yi; Kao Yating; Wang Lijuan [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biochemistry, Program of Biophysics, Chemical Physics, and Biochemistry, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Zhong Dongping [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biochemistry, Program of Biophysics, Chemical Physics, and Biochemistry, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)], E-mail: dongping@mps.ohio-state.edu

    2008-06-23

    Quenching of tryptophan fluorescence in proteins has been critical to the understanding of protein dynamics and enzyme reactions using tryptophan as a molecular optical probe. We report here our systematic examinations of potential quenching residues with more than 40 proteins. With site-directed mutation, we placed tryptophan to desired positions or altered its neighboring residues to screen quenching groups among 20 amino acid residues and of peptide backbones. With femtosecond resolution, we observed the ultrafast quenching dynamics within 100 ps and identified two ultrafast quenching groups, the carbonyl- and sulfur-containing residues. The former is glutamine and glutamate residues and the later is disulfide bond and cysteine residue. The quenching by the peptide-bond carbonyl group as well as other potential residues mostly occurs in longer than 100 ps. These ultrafast quenching dynamics occur at van der Waals distances through intraprotein electron transfer with high directionality. Following optimal molecular orbital overlap, electron jumps from the benzene ring of the indole moiety in a vertical orientation to the LUMO of acceptor quenching residues. Molecular dynamics simulations were invoked to elucidate various correlations of quenching dynamics with separation distances, relative orientations, local fluctuations and reaction heterogeneity. These unique ultrafast quenching pairs, as recently found to extensively occur in high-resolution protein structures, may have significant biological implications.

  6. Lipid transfer protein: a pan-allergen in plant-derived foods that is highly resistant to pepsin digestion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asero, R.; Mistrello, G.; Roncarolo, D.; de Vries, S. C.; Gautier, M. F.; Ciurana, C. L.; Verbeek, E.; Mohammadi, T.; Knul-Brettlova, V.; Akkerdaas, J. H.; Bulder, I.; Aalberse, R. C.; van Ree, R.

    2001-01-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are stable and highly conserved proteins of around 10 kD. They have recently been identified as allergens in fruits of the Rosaceae family. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the highly conserved structure of LTPs justifies a designation as a true

  7. Lipid transfer protein: A pan-allergen in plant-derived foods that is highly resistant to pepsin digestion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asero, R.; Mistrello, G.; Roncarolo, D.; Vries, de S.C.; Gautier, M.F.; Ciurana, C.L.; Verbeek, E.; Mohammadi, T.; Knul-Brettlova, V.; Akkerdaas, J.H.; Bulder, I.; Aalberse, R.C.; Ree, van R.

    2001-01-01

    Background: Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are stable and highly conserved proteins of around 10 kD. They have recently been identified as allergens in fruits of the Rosaceae family. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the highly conserved structure of LTPs justifies a

  8. In Situ Blotting : A Novel Method for Direct Transfer of Native Proteins from Sectioned Tissue to Blotting Membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okabe, Masashi; Nyakas, Csaba; Buwalda, Bauke; Luiten, Paul G.M.

    1993-01-01

    We describe a novel technique for direct transfer of native proteins from unfixed frozen tissue sections to an immobilizing matrix, e.g., nitrocellulose, polyvinyliden difluoride, or positively charged nylon membranes. Proteins are directly blotted onto the membrane, providing optimal accessibility

  9. Sequential Proton Loss Electron Transfer in Deactivation of Iron(IV) Binding Protein by Tyrosine Based Food Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Ning; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2017-01-01

    The iron(IV) binding protein ferrylmyoglobin, MbFe(IV)=O, was found to be reduced by tyrosine based food components in aqueous solution through a sequential proton loss electron transfer reaction mechanism without binding to the protein as confirmed by isothermal titration calorimetry. Dopamine a...

  10. Mitochondrial cardiolipin/phospholipid trafficking: the role of membrane contact site complexes and lipid transfer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlattner, Uwe; Tokarska-Schlattner, Malgorzata; Rousseau, Denis; Boissan, Mathieu; Mannella, Carmen; Epand, Richard; Lacombe, Marie-Lise

    2014-04-01

    Historically, cellular trafficking of lipids has received much less attention than protein trafficking, mostly because its biological importance was underestimated, involved sorting and translocation mechanisms were not known, and analytical tools were limiting. This has changed during the last decade, and we discuss here some progress made in respect to mitochondria and the trafficking of phospholipids, in particular cardiolipin. Different membrane contact site or junction complexes and putative lipid transfer proteins for intra- and intermembrane lipid translocation have been described, involving mitochondrial inner and outer membrane, and the adjacent membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum. An image emerges how cardiolipin precursors, remodeling intermediates, mature cardiolipin and its oxidation products could migrate between membranes, and how this trafficking is involved in cardiolipin biosynthesis and cell signaling events. Particular emphasis in this review is given to mitochondrial nucleoside diphosphate kinase D and mitochondrial creatine kinases, which emerge to have roles in both, membrane junction formation and lipid transfer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Evidence for methyl group transfer between the methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins in Bacillus subtilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedale, W.A.; Nettleton, D.O.; Sopata, C.S.; Thoelke, M.S.; Ordal, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present evidence for methyl (as methyl or methoxy) transfer from the methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins H1 and possibly H3 of Bacillus subtilis to the methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein H2. This methyl transfer, which has been observed in vitro was strongly stimulated by the chemoattractant aspartate and thus may plan an important role in the sensory processing system of this organism. Although radiolabeling of H1 and H3 began at once after the addition of [ 3 H] methionine, radiolabeling of H2 showed a lag. Furthermore, the addition of excess nonradioactive methionine caused immediate exponential delabeling of H1 and H3 while labeling of H2 continued to increase. Methylation of H2 required the chemotactic methyltransferase, probably to first methylate H1 and H3. Aspartate caused increased labeling of H2 and strongly decreased labeling of H1 and H3 after the addition of nonradioactive methionine. Without the addition of nonradioactive methionine, aspartate caused demethylation of H1 and to a lesser extent H3, with an approximately equal increase of methylation of H2

  12. Reversible assembly of protein-DNA nanostructures triggered by mediated electron transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, Stephan; Wenderhold-Reeb, Sabine; Nöll, Gilbert

    2017-01-01

    Stable protein-DNA nanostructures have been assembled by reconstitution of the multi-ligand binding flavoprotein dodecin on top of flavin-terminated dsDNA monolayers on gold electrodes. These structures could be disassembled by electrochemical flavin reduction via mediated electron transfer. For this purpose a negative potential was applied at the Au working electrode in the presence of the redox mediator bis-(ammoniumethyl)-4,4′-bipyridinium tetrabromide. The stepwise formation of the flavin-terminated dsDNA monolayers as well as the binding and electrochemically triggered release of apododecin were monitored by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements. The assembly and disassembly of the protein-DNA nanostructures were fully reversible processes, which could be carried out multiple times at the same flavin-dsDNA modified surface. When a negative potential was applied in the absence of a redox mediator apododecin could not be released, i.e. direct electron transfer was not possible. As alternative redox mediators also methylene blue and phenosafranine were studied, but in the presence of these molecules apododecin was released without applying a potential, probably because the tricyclic aromatic compounds are able to replace the flavins at the binding sites.

  13. [Cloning, mutagenesis and symbiotic phenotype of three lipid transfer protein encoding genes from Mesorhizobium huakuii 7653R].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanan; Zeng, Xiaobo; Zhou, Xuejuan; Li, Youguo

    2016-12-04

    Lipid transfer protein superfamily is involved in lipid transport and metabolism. This study aimed to construct mutants of three lipid transfer protein encoding genes in Mesorhizobium huakuii 7653R, and to study the phenotypes and function of mutations during symbiosis with Astragalus sinicus. We used bioinformatics to predict structure characteristics and biological functions of lipid transfer proteins, and conducted semi-quantitative and fluorescent quantitative real-time PCR to analyze the expression levels of target genes in free-living and symbiotic conditions. Using pK19mob insertion mutagenesis to construct mutants, we carried out pot plant experiments to observe symbiotic phenotypes. MCHK-5577, MCHK-2172 and MCHK-2779 genes encoding proteins belonged to START/RHO alpha_C/PITP/Bet_v1/CoxG/CalC (SRPBCC) superfamily, involved in lipid transport or metabolism, and were identical to M. loti at 95% level. Gene relative transcription level of the three genes all increased compared to free-living condition. We obtained three mutants. Compared with wild-type 7653R, above-ground biomass of plants and nodulenitrogenase activity induced by the three mutants significantly decreased. Results indicated that lipid transfer protein encoding genes of Mesorhizobium huakuii 7653R may play important roles in symbiotic nitrogen fixation, and the mutations significantly affected the symbiotic phenotypes. The present work provided a basis to study further symbiotic function mechanism associated with lipid transfer proteins from rhizobia.

  14. Intravascular local gene transfer mediated by protein-coated metallic stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, J; Gao, R; Shi, R; Song, L; Tang, J; Li, Y; Tang, C; Meng, L; Yuan, W; Chen, Z

    2001-10-01

    To assess the feasibility, efficiency and selectivity of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to local arterial wall by protein-coated metallic stent. A replication-defective recombinant adenovirus carrying the Lac Z reporter gene for nuclear-specific beta-galactosidase (Ad-beta gal) was used in this study. The coating for metallic stent was made by immersing it in a gelatin solution containing crosslinker. The coated stents were mounted on a 4.0 or 3.0 mm percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) balloon and submersed into a high-titer Ad-beta gal viral stock (2 x 10(10) pfu/ml) for 3 min, and then implanted into the carotid arteries in 4 mini-swines and into the left anterior descending branch of the coronary artery in 2 mini-swines via 8F large lumen guiding catheters. The animals were sacrificed 7 (n = 4), 14 (n = 1) and 21 (n = 1) days after implantation, respectively. The beta-galactosidase expression was assessed by X-gal staining. The results showed that the expression of transgene was detected in all animal. In 1 of carotid artery with an intact intima, the beta-gal expression was limited to endothelial cells. In vessels with denuded endothelium, gene expression was found in the sub-intima, media and adventitia. The transfection efficiency of medial smooth muscle cells was 38.6%. In 2 animals sacrificed 7 days after transfection, a microscopic examination of X-gal-stained samples did not show evidence of transfection in remote organs and arterial segments adjacent to the treated arterial site. Adenovirus-mediated arterial gene transfer to endothelial, smooth muscle cells and adventitia by protein-coated metallic stent is feasible. The transfection efficiency is higher. The coated stent may act as a good carrier of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer and have a potential to prevent restenosis following PTCA.

  15. Biomolecular Mechanisms of Mercury Transfers and Transformations by Proteins of the Mer Operon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S. M.; Hong, B.; Nauss, R.; Momany, C.; Summers, A. O.; Feng, X.; Harwood, I.; Stroud, R.

    2008-12-01

    Aerobic bacteria exhibiting resistance to the toxic effects of Hg(II) and organomercurials [RHg(I), e.g. MeHg(I)] and are widely found in both pristine and mercury contaminated environments. Resistance, afforded by a plasmid- or transposon-associated mer operon, involves an unusual pathway where Hg(II) and organomercurials [RHg(I)] undergo facilitated entry into the bacterial cytoplasm via an integral membrane transport protein (MerT) and are then "detoxified" by the concerted effort of two enzymes, organomercurial lyase (MerB), which catalyzes dealkylation (i.e., demethylation) of RHg(I) to Hg(II) and a hydrocarbon, and mercuric ion reductase (MerA), which catalyzes reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) as the ultimate detoxification for the organism. With a widespread distribution, these bacterial transformations play a significant role in the fate of mercury in the environment. Our focus is on elucidation of the molecular mechanisms for the transport and catalytic transformations of RHg(I) and Hg(II) by these proteins and the factors that influence the overall efficiency of the process. Current efforts are focused primarily on elucidating details of RHg(I) binding and dealkylation by MerB as well as the mechanism for transfer of the Hg(II) product to MerA. Key findings include the demonstration of a non-cysteine residue as essential for the catalytic activity and demonstration that direct transfer of Hg(II) to MerA proceeds more rapidly and more completely than transfer to small MW thiols such as cysteines or glutathione. Reuslts of these studies as well as an overview of our current understanding of the whole system will be presented.

  16. Protein Homeostasis Imposes a Barrier on Functional Integration of Horizontally Transferred Genes in Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershtein, Shimon; Serohijos, Adrian W R; Bhattacharyya, Sanchari; Manhart, Michael; Choi, Jeong-Mo; Mu, Wanmeng; Zhou, Jingwen; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2015-10-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) plays a central role in bacterial evolution, yet the molecular and cellular constraints on functional integration of the foreign genes are poorly understood. Here we performed inter-species replacement of the chromosomal folA gene, encoding an essential metabolic enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), with orthologs from 35 other mesophilic bacteria. The orthologous inter-species replacements caused a marked drop (in the range 10-90%) in bacterial growth rate despite the fact that most orthologous DHFRs are as stable as E.coli DHFR at 37°C and are more catalytically active than E. coli DHFR. Although phylogenetic distance between E. coli and orthologous DHFRs as well as their individual molecular properties correlate poorly with growth rates, the product of the intracellular DHFR abundance and catalytic activity (kcat/KM), correlates strongly with growth rates, indicating that the drop in DHFR abundance constitutes the major fitness barrier to HGT. Serial propagation of the orthologous strains for ~600 generations dramatically improved growth rates by largely alleviating the fitness barriers. Whole genome sequencing and global proteome quantification revealed that the evolved strains with the largest fitness improvements have accumulated mutations that inactivated the ATP-dependent Lon protease, causing an increase in the intracellular DHFR abundance. In one case DHFR abundance increased further due to mutations accumulated in folA promoter, but only after the lon inactivating mutations were fixed in the population. Thus, by apparently distinguishing between self and non-self proteins, protein homeostasis imposes an immediate and global barrier to the functional integration of foreign genes by decreasing the intracellular abundance of their products. Once this barrier is alleviated, more fine-tuned evolution occurs to adjust the function/expression of the transferred proteins to the constraints imposed by the intracellular

  17. Protein Homeostasis Imposes a Barrier on Functional Integration of Horizontally Transferred Genes in Bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimon Bershtein

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer (HGT plays a central role in bacterial evolution, yet the molecular and cellular constraints on functional integration of the foreign genes are poorly understood. Here we performed inter-species replacement of the chromosomal folA gene, encoding an essential metabolic enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR, with orthologs from 35 other mesophilic bacteria. The orthologous inter-species replacements caused a marked drop (in the range 10-90% in bacterial growth rate despite the fact that most orthologous DHFRs are as stable as E.coli DHFR at 37°C and are more catalytically active than E. coli DHFR. Although phylogenetic distance between E. coli and orthologous DHFRs as well as their individual molecular properties correlate poorly with growth rates, the product of the intracellular DHFR abundance and catalytic activity (kcat/KM, correlates strongly with growth rates, indicating that the drop in DHFR abundance constitutes the major fitness barrier to HGT. Serial propagation of the orthologous strains for ~600 generations dramatically improved growth rates by largely alleviating the fitness barriers. Whole genome sequencing and global proteome quantification revealed that the evolved strains with the largest fitness improvements have accumulated mutations that inactivated the ATP-dependent Lon protease, causing an increase in the intracellular DHFR abundance. In one case DHFR abundance increased further due to mutations accumulated in folA promoter, but only after the lon inactivating mutations were fixed in the population. Thus, by apparently distinguishing between self and non-self proteins, protein homeostasis imposes an immediate and global barrier to the functional integration of foreign genes by decreasing the intracellular abundance of their products. Once this barrier is alleviated, more fine-tuned evolution occurs to adjust the function/expression of the transferred proteins to the constraints imposed by the

  18. Evolutionary novelty in gravity sensing through horizontal gene transfer and high-order protein assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tu Anh Nguyen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer (HGT can promote evolutionary adaptation by transforming a species' relationship to the environment. In most well-understood cases of HGT, acquired and donor functions appear to remain closely related. Thus, the degree to which HGT can lead to evolutionary novelties remains unclear. Mucorales fungi sense gravity through the sedimentation of vacuolar protein crystals. Here, we identify the octahedral crystal matrix protein (OCTIN. Phylogenetic analysis strongly supports acquisition of octin by HGT from bacteria. A bacterial OCTIN forms high-order periplasmic oligomers, and inter-molecular disulphide bonds are formed by both fungal and bacterial OCTINs, suggesting that they share elements of a conserved assembly mechanism. However, estimated sedimentation velocities preclude a gravity-sensing function for the bacterial structures. Together, our data suggest that HGT from bacteria into the Mucorales allowed a dramatic increase in assembly scale and emergence of the gravity-sensing function. We conclude that HGT can lead to evolutionary novelties that emerge depending on the physiological and cellular context of protein assembly.

  19. Exosomes: vehicles for the transfer of toxic proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellingham, Shayne A; Guo, Belinda B; Coleman, Bradley M; Hill, Andrew F

    2012-01-01

    Exosomes are small membranous vesicles secreted by a number of cell types including neurons and can be isolated from conditioned cell media or bodily fluids such as urine and plasma. Exosome biogenesis involves the inward budding of endosomes to form multivesicular bodies (MVB). When fused with the plasma membrane, the MVB releases the vesicles into the extracellular environment as exosomes. Proposed functions of these vesicles include roles in cell-cell signaling, removal of unwanted proteins, and the transfer of pathogens between cells. One such pathogen which exploits this pathway is the prion, the infectious particle responsible for the transmissible neurodegenerative diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) of humans or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) of cattle. Similarly, exosomes are also involved in the processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) which is associated with Alzheimer's disease. Exosomes have been shown to contain full-length APP and several distinct proteolytically cleaved products of APP, including Aβ. In addition, these fragments can be modulated using inhibitors of the proteases involved in APP cleavage. These observations provide further evidence for a novel pathway in which PrP and APP fragments are released from cells. Other proteins such as superoxide dismutase I and alpha-synuclein (involved in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease, respectively) are also found associated with exosomes. This review will focus on the role of exosomes in neurodegenerative disorders and discuss the potential of these vesicles for the spread of neurotoxicity, therapeutics, and diagnostics for these diseases.

  20. Gene transfer of heterologous G protein-coupled receptors to cardiomyocytes: differential effects on contractility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugwitz, K L; Weig, H J; Moretti, A; Hoffmann, E; Ueblacker, P; Pragst, I; Rosport, K; Schömig, A; Ungerer, M

    2001-04-13

    In heart failure, reduced cardiac contractility is accompanied by blunted cAMP responses to beta-adrenergic stimulation. Parathyroid hormone (PTH)-related peptide and arginine vasopressin are released from the myocardium in response to increased wall stress but do not stimulate contractility or adenylyl cyclase at physiological concentrations. To bypass the defective beta-adrenergic signaling cascade, recombinant P1 PTH/PTH-related peptide receptors (rPTH1-Rs) and V(2) vasopressin receptors (rV(2)-Rs), which are normally not expressed in the myocardium and which are both strongly coupled to adenylyl cyclase, and recombinant beta(2)-adrenergic receptors (rbeta(2)-ARs) were overexpressed in cardiomyocytes by viral gene transfer. The capacity of endogenous hormones to increase contractility via the heterologous, recombinant receptors was compared. Whereas V(2)-Rs are uniquely coupled to Gs, PTH1-Rs and beta(2)-ARs are also coupled to other G proteins. Gene transfer of rPTH1-Rs or rbeta(2)-ARs to adult cardiomyocytes resulted in maximally increased basal contractility, which could not be further stimulated by adding receptor agonists. Agonists at rPTH1-Rs induced increased cAMP formation and phospholipase C activity. In contrast, healthy or failing rV(2)-R-expressing cardiomyocytes showed unaltered basal contractility. Their contractility and cAMP formation increased only at agonist exposure, which did not activate phospholipase C. In summary, we found that gene transfer of PTH1-Rs to cardiomyocytes results in constitutive activity of the transgene, as does that of beta(2)-ARS: In the absence of receptor agonists, rPTH1-Rs and rbeta(2)-ARs increase basal contractility, coupling to 2 G proteins simultaneously. In contrast, rV(2)-Rs are uniquely coupled to Gs and are not constitutively active, retaining their property to be activated exclusively on agonist stimulation. Therefore, gene transfer of V(2)-Rs might be more suited to test the effects of c

  1. Resonance Energy Transfer between protein and rhamnolipid capped ZnS quantum dots: Application in in-gel staining of proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janakiraman, Narayanan; Mohan, Abhilash; Kannan, Ashwin; Pennathur, Gautam

    The interaction of proteins with quantum dots is an interesting field of research. These interactions occur at the nanoscale. We have probed the interaction of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and Candida rugosa lipase (CRL) with rhamnolipid capped ZnS (RhlZnSQDs) using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Optical studies on mixtures of RhlZnSQDs and proteins resulted in Förster's Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) from proteins to QDs. This phenomenon has been exploited to detect proteins in agarose gel electrophoresis. The activity of the CRL was unaffected on the addition of QDs as revealed by zymography.

  2. Protein-membrane interaction and fatty acid transfer from intestinal fatty acid-binding protein to membranes. Support for a multistep process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falomir-Lockhart, Lisandro J; Laborde, Lisandro; Kahn, Peter C; Storch, Judith; Córsico, Betina

    2006-05-19

    Fatty acid transfer from intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (IFABP) to phospholipid membranes occurs during protein-membrane collisions. Electrostatic interactions involving the alpha-helical "portal" region of the protein have been shown to be of great importance. In the present study, the role of specific lysine residues in the alpha-helical region of IFABP was directly examined. A series of point mutants in rat IFABP was engineered in which the lysine positive charges in this domain were eliminated or reversed. Using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay, we analyzed the rates and mechanism of fatty acid transfer from wild type and mutant proteins to acceptor membranes. Most of the alpha-helical domain mutants showed slower absolute fatty acid transfer rates to zwitterionic membranes, with substitution of one of the lysines of the alpha2 helix, Lys27, resulting in a particularly dramatic decrease in the fatty acid transfer rate. Sensitivity to negatively charged phospholipid membranes was also reduced, with charge reversal mutants in the alpha2 helix the most affected. The results support the hypothesis that the portal region undergoes a conformational change during protein-membrane interaction, which leads to release of the bound fatty acid to the membrane and that the alpha2 segment is of particular importance in the establishment of charge-charge interactions between IFABP and membranes. Cross-linking experiments with a phospholipid-photoactivable reagent underscored the importance of charge-charge interactions, showing that the physical interaction between wild-type intestinal fatty acid-binding protein and phospholipid membranes is enhanced by electrostatic interactions. Protein-membrane interactions were also found to be enhanced by the presence of ligand, suggesting different collisional complex structures for holo- and apo-IFABP.

  3. Elucidating the design principles of photosynthetic electron-transfer proteins by site-directed spin labeling EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishara Silva, K; Jagannathan, Bharat; Golbeck, John H; Lakshmi, K V

    2016-05-01

    Site-directed spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance (SDSL EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool to determine solvent accessibility, side-chain dynamics, and inter-spin distances at specific sites in biological macromolecules. This information provides important insights into the structure and dynamics of both natural and designed proteins and protein complexes. Here, we discuss the application of SDSL EPR spectroscopy in probing the charge-transfer cofactors in photosynthetic reaction centers (RC) such as photosystem I (PSI) and the bacterial reaction center (bRC). Photosynthetic RCs are large multi-subunit proteins (molecular weight≥300 kDa) that perform light-driven charge transfer reactions in photosynthesis. These reactions are carried out by cofactors that are paramagnetic in one of their oxidation states. This renders the RCs unsuitable for conventional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy investigations. However, the presence of native paramagnetic centers and the ability to covalently attach site-directed spin labels in RCs makes them ideally suited for the application of SDSL EPR spectroscopy. The paramagnetic centers serve as probes of conformational changes, dynamics of subunit assembly, and the relative motion of cofactors and peptide subunits. In this review, we describe novel applications of SDSL EPR spectroscopy for elucidating the effects of local structure and dynamics on the electron-transfer cofactors of photosynthetic RCs. Because SDSL EPR Spectroscopy is uniquely suited to provide dynamic information on protein motion, it is a particularly useful method in the engineering and analysis of designed electron transfer proteins and protein networks. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Efficiency and fidelity of cell-free protein synthesis by transfer RNA from aged mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foote, R.S.; Stulberg, M.P.

    1980-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) from heart, kidney, liver, and spleen of mature (10 to 12 months old) and aged (29 months old) C57BL/6 mice were tested for their ability to translate encephalomyocarditis viral RNA in a tRNA-dependent cell-free system derived from mouse ascites tumor cells. The rates of in vitro protein synthesis were compared as a function of tRNA concentration, and the fidelity of translation was examined by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing of the viral polypeptides synthesized in vitro. No significant age-related differences in either the efficiency or fidelity of synthesis were discovered, indicating that alternations in tRNAs are probably not involved in the cellular aging of these tissues.

  5. How anacetrapib inhibits the activity of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein? Perspective through atomistic simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarja Äijänen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP mediates the reciprocal transfer of neutral lipids (cholesteryl esters, triglycerides and phospholipids between different lipoprotein fractions in human blood plasma. A novel molecular agent known as anacetrapib has been shown to inhibit CETP activity and thereby raise high density lipoprotein (HDL-cholesterol and decrease low density lipoprotein (LDL-cholesterol, thus rendering CETP inhibition an attractive target to prevent and treat the development of various cardiovascular diseases. Our objective in this work is to use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to shed light on the inhibitory mechanism of anacetrapib and unlock the interactions between the drug and CETP. The results show an evident affinity of anacetrapib towards the concave surface of CETP, and especially towards the region of the N-terminal tunnel opening. The primary binding site of anacetrapib turns out to reside in the tunnel inside CETP, near the residues surrounding the N-terminal opening. Free energy calculations show that when anacetrapib resides in this area, it hinders the ability of cholesteryl ester to diffuse out from CETP. The simulations further bring out the ability of anacetrapib to regulate the structure-function relationships of phospholipids and helix X, the latter representing the structural region of CETP important to the process of neutral lipid exchange with lipoproteins. Altogether, the simulations propose CETP inhibition to be realized when anacetrapib is transferred into the lipid binding pocket. The novel insight gained in this study has potential use in the development of new molecular agents capable of preventing the progression of cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Epidural ropivacaine hydrochloride during labour: protein binding, placental transfer and neonatal outcome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Porter, J M

    2012-02-03

    This study was undertaken: (i) to quantify the effects of labour and epidural analgesia on plasma alpha1-acid glycoprotein concentration, (ii) to examine the effects of changes in plasma alpha1-acid glycoprotein concentration on plasma protein binding and placental transfer of ropivacaine, and (iii) to examine the association between umbilical venous ropivacaine concentration and neurobehavioural function in the neonate. Multiparous patients undergoing induction of labour received a continuous epidural infusion of 0.1% ropivacaine following an epidural bolus. A significant association was demonstrated between maternal plasma alpha1-acid glycoprotein concentration and 1\\/free fraction of ropivacaine 60 min after starting ropivacaine administration (r(2) = 0.77) but not at delivery. No significant correlation was demonstrable between maternal unbound ropivacaine concentration and either neonatal (cord) ropivacaine concentration or UV\\/MV (a measure of placental transfer). Thirty minutes after delivery, 9\\/10 neonates had neurological and adaptive capacity scores < 35, whereas only three infants had scores < 35 at 2 h. All scores exceeded 35 16 h after delivery. No association between mean (SD) umbilical venous ropivacaine concentration [0.09 (0.08) mg x l(-1)] and neurological and adaptive capacity scores was demonstrated.

  7. Transfer of Immunity from Mother to Offspring Is Mediated via Egg-Yolk Protein Vitellogenin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heli Salmela

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Insect immune systems can recognize specific pathogens and prime offspring immunity. High specificity of immune priming can be achieved when insect females transfer immune elicitors into developing oocytes. The molecular mechanism behind this transfer has been a mystery. Here, we establish that the egg-yolk protein vitellogenin is the carrier of immune elicitors. Using the honey bee, Apis mellifera, model system, we demonstrate with microscopy and western blotting that vitellogenin binds to bacteria, both Paenibacillus larvae--the gram-positive bacterium causing American foulbrood disease--and to Escherichia coli that represents gram-negative bacteria. Next, we verify that vitellogenin binds to pathogen-associated molecular patterns; lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan and zymosan, using surface plasmon resonance. We document that vitellogenin is required for transport of cell-wall pieces of E. coli into eggs by imaging tissue sections. These experiments identify vitellogenin, which is distributed widely in oviparous species, as the carrier of immune-priming signals. This work reveals a molecular explanation for trans-generational immunity in insects and a previously undescribed role for vitellogenin.

  8. Characterization of G-protein coupled receptor kinase interaction with the neurokinin-1 receptor using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Rasmus; Holliday, Nicholas D; Hansen, Jakob L

    2007-01-01

    To analyze the interaction between the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor and G-protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), we performed bioluminescence resonance energy transfer(2) (BRET(2)) measurements between the family A NK-1 receptor and GRK2 and GRK5 as well as their respective kinase-inactive muta......To analyze the interaction between the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor and G-protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), we performed bioluminescence resonance energy transfer(2) (BRET(2)) measurements between the family A NK-1 receptor and GRK2 and GRK5 as well as their respective kinase...

  9. Toward Bayesian inference of the spatial distribution of proteins from three-cube Förster resonance energy transfer data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hooghoudt, Jan Otto; Barroso, Margarida; Waagepetersen, Rasmus Plenge

    2017-01-01

    Főrster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a quantum-physical phenomenon where energy may be transferred from one molecule to a neighbour molecule if the molecules are close enough. Using fluorophore molecule marking of proteins in a cell it is possible to measure in microscopic images to what....... In this paper we propose a new likelihood-based approach to statistical inference for FRET microscopic data. The likelihood function is obtained from a detailed modeling of the FRET data generating mechanism conditional on a protein configuration. We next follow a Bayesian approach and introduce a spatial point...

  10. PhosphoLipid transfer protein (PLTP) exerts a direct pro-inflammatory effect on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) fibroblasts-like-synoviocytes (FLS) independently of its lipid transfer activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckert, Valérie; Daien, Claire I.; Che, Hélène; Elhmioui, Jamila; Lemaire, Stéphanie; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Desrumaux, Catherine; Combe, Bernard; Hahne, Michael; Lagrost, Laurent; Morel, Jacques

    2018-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease with modification of lipids profile and an increased risk of cardiovascular events related to inflammation. Plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) exerts a lipid transfer activity through its active form. PLTP can also bind to receptors such as ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1). In addition to its role in lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis, the latest advances came in support of a complex role of PLTP in the regulation of the inflammatory response, both with pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of the present study was to decipher the role of PLTP in joint inflammation and to assess its relevance in the context of RA. PLTP expression was examined by western-blot and by immunochemistry. ABCA1 expression was analyzed by flow cytometry. Lipid transfer activity of PLTP and pro-inflammatory cytokines were measured in sera and synovial fluid (SF) from RA patients and controls (healthy subjects or osteoarthritis patients [OA]). FLS were treated with both lipid-transfer active form and inactive form of recombinant human PLTP. IL-8, IL-6, VEGF and MMP3 produced by FLS were assessed by ELISA, and proliferation by measuring 3H-Thymidine incorporation. RA synovial tissues showed higher PLTP staining than OA and PLTP protein levels were also significantly higher in RA-FLS. In addition, RA, unlike OA patients, displayed elevated levels of PLTP activity in SF, which correlated with pro-inflammatory cytokines. Both lipid-transfer active and inactive forms of PLTP significantly increased the production of cytokines and proliferation of FLS. ABCA1 was expressed on RAFLS and PLTP activated STAT3 pathway. To conclude, PLTP is highly expressed in the joints of RA patients and may directly trigger inflammation and FLS proliferation, independently of its lipid transfer activity. These results suggest a pro-inflammatory role for PLTP in RA. PMID:29565987

  11. Construction and analysis of a plant non-specific lipid transfer protein database (nsLTPDB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Nai-Jyuan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs are small and basic proteins. Recently, nsLTPs have been reported involved in many physiological functions such as mediating phospholipid transfer, participating in plant defence activity against bacterial and fungal pathogens, and enhancing cell wall extension in tobacco. However, the lipid transfer mechanism of nsLTPs is still unclear, and comprehensive information of nsLTPs is difficult to obtain. Methods In this study, we identified 595 nsLTPs from 121 different species and constructed an nsLTPs database -- nsLTPDB -- which comprises the sequence information, structures, relevant literatures, and biological data of all plant nsLTPs http://nsltpdb.life.nthu.edu.tw/. Results Meanwhile, bioinformatics and statistics methods were implemented to develop a classification method for nsLTPs based on the patterns of the eight highly-conserved cysteine residues, and to suggest strict Prosite-styled patterns for Type I and Type II nsLTPs. The pattern of Type I is C X2 V X5-7 C [V, L, I] × Y [L, A, V] X8-13 CC × G X12 D × [Q, K, R] X2 CXC X16-21 P X2 C X13-15C, and that of Type II is C X4 L X2 C X9-11 P [S, T] X2 CC X5 Q X2-4 C[L, F]C X2 [A, L, I] × [D, N] P X10-12 [K, R] X4-5 C X3-4 P X0-2 C. Moreover, we referred the Prosite-styled patterns to the experimental mutagenesis data that previously established by our group, and found that the residues with higher conservation played an important role in the structural stability or lipid binding ability of nsLTPs. Conclusions Taken together, this research has suggested potential residues that might be essential to modulate the structural and functional properties of plant nsLTPs. Finally, we proposed some biologically important sites of the nsLTPs, which are described by using a new Prosite-styled pattern that we defined.

  12. Construction and analysis of a plant non-specific lipid transfer protein database (nsLTPDB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nai-Jyuan; Lee, Chi-Ching; Cheng, Chao-Sheng; Lo, Wei-Cheng; Yang, Ya-Fen; Chen, Ming-Nan; Lyu, Ping-Chiang

    2012-01-01

    Plant non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) are small and basic proteins. Recently, nsLTPs have been reported involved in many physiological functions such as mediating phospholipid transfer, participating in plant defence activity against bacterial and fungal pathogens, and enhancing cell wall extension in tobacco. However, the lipid transfer mechanism of nsLTPs is still unclear, and comprehensive information of nsLTPs is difficult to obtain. In this study, we identified 595 nsLTPs from 121 different species and constructed an nsLTPs database--nsLTPDB--which comprises the sequence information, structures, relevant literatures, and biological data of all plant nsLTPs http://nsltpdb.life.nthu.edu.tw/. Meanwhile, bioinformatics and statistics methods were implemented to develop a classification method for nsLTPs based on the patterns of the eight highly-conserved cysteine residues, and to suggest strict Prosite-styled patterns for Type I and Type II nsLTPs. The pattern of Type I is C X2 V X5-7 C [V, L, I] × Y [L, A, V] X8-13 CC × G X12 D × [Q, K, R] X2 CXC X16-21 P X2 C X13-15C, and that of Type II is C X4 L X2 C X9-11 P [S, T] X2 CC X5 Q X2-4 C[L, F]C X2 [A, L, I] × [D, N] P X10-12 [K, R] X4-5 C X3-4 P X0-2 C. Moreover, we referred the Prosite-styled patterns to the experimental mutagenesis data that previously established by our group, and found that the residues with higher conservation played an important role in the structural stability or lipid binding ability of nsLTPs. Taken together, this research has suggested potential residues that might be essential to modulate the structural and functional properties of plant nsLTPs. Finally, we proposed some biologically important sites of the nsLTPs, which are described by using a new Prosite-styled pattern that we defined.

  13. Protein-induced geometric constraints and charge transfer in bacteriochlorophyll-histidine complexes in LH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzyniak, Piotr K; Alia, A; Schaap, Roland G; Heemskerk, Mattijs M; de Groot, Huub J M; Buda, Francesco

    2008-12-14

    Bacteriochlorophyll-histidine complexes are ubiquitous in nature and are essential structural motifs supporting the conversion of solar energy into chemically useful compounds in a wide range of photosynthesis processes. A systematic density functional theory study of the NMR chemical shifts for histidine and for bacteriochlorophyll-a-histidine complexes in the light-harvesting complex II (LH2) is performed using the BLYP functional in combination with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The computed chemical shift patterns are consistent with available experimental data for positive and neutral(tau) (N(tau) protonated) crystalline histidines. The results for the bacteriochlorophyll-a-histidine complexes in LH2 provide evidence that the protein environment is stabilizing the histidine close to the Mg ion, thereby inducing a large charge transfer of approximately 0.5 electronic equivalent. Due to this protein-induced geometric constraint, the Mg-coordinated histidine in LH2 appears to be in a frustrated state very different from the formal neutral(pi) (N(pi) protonated) form. This finding could be important for the understanding of basic functional mechanisms involved in tuning the electronic properties and exciton coupling in LH2.

  14. Refractive-index-based screening of membrane-protein-mediated transfer across biological membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brändén, Magnus; Tabaei, Seyed R; Fischer, Gerhard; Neutze, Richard; Höök, Fredrik

    2010-07-07

    Numerous membrane-transport proteins are major drug targets, and therefore a key ingredient in pharmaceutical development is the availability of reliable, efficient tools for membrane transport characterization and inhibition. Here, we present the use of evanescent-wave sensing for screening of membrane-protein-mediated transport across lipid bilayer membranes. This method is based on a direct recording of the temporal variations in the refractive index that occur upon a transfer-dependent change in the solute concentration inside liposomes associated to a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) active sensor surface. The applicability of the method is demonstrated by a functional study of the aquaglyceroporin PfAQP from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Assays of the temperature dependence of facilitated diffusion of sugar alcohols on a single set of PfAQP-reconstituted liposomes reveal that the activation energies for facilitated diffusion of xylitol and sorbitol are the same as that previously measured for glycerol transport in the aquaglyceroporin of Escherichia coli (5 kcal/mole). These findings indicate that the aquaglyceroporin selectivity filter does not discriminate sugar alcohols based on their length, and that the extra energy cost of dehydration of larger sugar alcohols, upon entering the pore, is compensated for by additional hydrogen-bond interactions within the aquaglyceroporin pore. Copyright 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Fragment-based discovery of novel pentacyclic triterpenoid derivatives as cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yongzhi; Zhou, Shuxi; Li, Enqin; Zhao, Wenfeng; Ji, Yanpeng; Wen, Xiaoan; Sun, Hongbin; Yuan, Haoliang

    2017-01-27

    Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP) is an important therapeutic target for the treatment of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Our molecular modeling study revealed that pentacyclic triterpenoid compounds could mimic the protein-ligand interactions of the endogenous ligand cholesteryl ester (CE) by occupying its binding site. Alignment of the docking conformations of oleanolic acid (OA), ursolic acid (UA) and the crystal conformations of known CETP inhibitor Torcetrapib in the active site proposed the applicability of fragment-based drug design (FBDD) approaches in this study. Accordingly, a series of pentacyclic triterpenoid derivatives have been designed and synthesized as novel CETP inhibitors. The most potent compound 12e (IC 50 :0.28 μM) validated our strategy for molecular design. Molecular dynamics simulations illustrated that the more stable hydrogen bond interaction of the UA derivative 12e with Ser191 and stronger hydrophobic interactions with Val198, Phe463 than those of OA derivative 12b mainly led to their significantly different CETP inhibitory activity. These novel potent CETP inhibitors based on ursane-type scaffold should deserve further investigation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Intrinsic Tryptophan Fluorescence in the Detection and Analysis of Proteins: A Focus on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar B. T. Ghisaidoobe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available F resonance energy transfer (FRET occurs when the distance between a donor fluorophore and an acceptor is within 10 nm, and its application often necessitates fluorescent labeling of biological targets. However, covalent modification of biomolecules can inadvertently give rise to conformational and/or functional changes. This review describes the application of intrinsic protein fluorescence, predominantly derived from tryptophan (\\(\\uplambda_{\\textsc{ex}}\\sim\\ nm, \\(\\uplambda_{\\textsc{em}}\\sim\\ 350 nm, in protein-related research and mainly focuses on label-free FRET techniques. In terms of wavelength and intensity, tryptophan fluorescence is strongly influenced by its (or the proteinlocal environment, which, in addition to fluorescence quenching, has been applied to study protein conformational changes. Intrinsic F resonance energy transfer (iFRET, a recently developed technique, utilizes the intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan in conjunction with target-specific fluorescent probes as FRET donors and acceptors, respectively, for real time detection of native proteins.

  17. Genetic ablation or chemical inhibition of phosphatidylcholine transfer protein attenuates diet-induced hepatic glucose production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishova, Ekaterina Y; Stoll, Janis M; Ersoy, Baran A; Shrestha, Sudeep; Scapa, Erez F; Li, Yingxia; Niepel, Michele W; Su, Ya; Jelicks, Linda A; Stahl, Gregory L; Glicksman, Marcie A; Gutierrez-Juarez, Roger; Cuny, Gregory D; Cohen, David E

    2011-08-01

    Phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (PC-TP, synonym StARD2) is a highly specific intracellular lipid binding protein that is enriched in liver. Coding region polymorphisms in both humans and mice appear to confer protection against measures of insulin resistance. The current study was designed to test the hypotheses that Pctp-/- mice are protected against diet-induced increases in hepatic glucose production and that small molecule inhibition of PC-TP recapitulates this phenotype. Pctp-/- and wildtype mice were subjected to high-fat feeding and rates of hepatic glucose production and glucose clearance were quantified by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp studies and pyruvate tolerance tests. These studies revealed that high-fat diet-induced increases in hepatic glucose production were markedly attenuated in Pctp-/- mice. Small molecule inhibitors of PC-TP were synthesized and their potencies, as well as mechanism of inhibition, were characterized in vitro. An optimized inhibitor was administered to high-fat-fed mice and used to explore effects on insulin signaling in cell culture systems. Small molecule inhibitors bound PC-TP, displaced phosphatidylcholines from the lipid binding site, and increased the thermal stability of the protein. Administration of the optimized inhibitor to wildtype mice attenuated hepatic glucose production associated with high-fat feeding, but had no activity in Pctp-/- mice. Indicative of a mechanism for reducing glucose intolerance that is distinct from commonly utilized insulin-sensitizing agents, the inhibitor promoted insulin-independent phosphorylation of key insulin signaling molecules. These findings suggest PC-TP inhibition as a novel therapeutic strategy in the management of hepatic insulin resistance. Copyright © 2011 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  18. Phosphatidylcholine transfer protein interacts with thioesterase superfamily member 2 to attenuate insulin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoy, Baran A; Tarun, Akansha; D'Aquino, Katharine; Hancer, Nancy J; Ukomadu, Chinweike; White, Morris F; Michel, Thomas; Manning, Brendan D; Cohen, David E

    2013-07-30

    Phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (PC-TP) is a phospholipid-binding protein that is enriched in liver and that interacts with thioesterase superfamily member 2 (THEM2). Mice lacking either protein exhibit improved hepatic glucose homeostasis and are resistant to diet-induced diabetes. Insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) are key effectors of insulin signaling, which is attenuated in diabetes. We found that PC-TP inhibited IRS2, as evidenced by insulin-independent IRS2 activation after knockdown, genetic ablation, or chemical inhibition of PC-TP. In addition, IRS2 was activated after knockdown of THEM2, providing support for a role for the interaction of PC-TP with THEM2 in suppressing insulin signaling. Additionally, we showed that PC-TP bound to tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) and stabilized the components of the TSC1-TSC2 complex, which functions to inhibit mTORC1. Preventing phosphatidylcholine from binding to PC-TP disrupted interactions of PC-TP with THEM2 and TSC2, and disruption of the PC-TP-THEM2 complex was associated with increased activation of both IRS2 and mTORC1. In livers of mice with genetic ablation of PC-TP or that had been treated with a PC-TP inhibitor, steady-state amounts of IRS2 were increased, whereas those of TSC2 were decreased. These findings reveal a phospholipid-dependent mechanism that suppresses insulin signaling downstream of its receptor.

  19. NMR of proteins (4Fe-4S): structural properties and intramolecular electron transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, J.G.

    1996-01-01

    NMR started to be applied to Fe-S proteins in the seventies. Its use has recently been enlarged as the problems arising from the paramagnetic polymetallic clusters ware overcome. Applications to [4Fe-4S] are presented herein. The information derived thereof deepens the understanding of the redox properties of these proteins which play a central role in the metabolism of bacterial cells. The secondary structure elements and the overall folding of Chromatium vinosum ferredoxin (Cv Fd) in solution have been established by NMR. The unique features of this sequence have been shown to fold as an α helix at the C-terminus and as a loop between two cysteines ligand of one cluster: these two parts localize in close proximity from one another. The interaction between nuclear and electronic spins is a source of additional structural information for (4Fe-AS] proteins. The conformation of the cysteine-ligands, as revealed by the Fe-(S γ -C β -H β )Cys dihedral angles, is related to the chemical shifts of the signals associated with the protons of these residues. The longitudinal relaxation times of the protons depend on their distance to the cluster. A quantitative relationship has been established and used to show that the solution structure of the high-potential ferredoxin from Cv differs significantly from the crystal structure around Phe-48. Both parameters (chemical shifts and longitudinal relaxation times) give also insight into the electronic and magnetic properties of the [4Fe-4S] clusters. The rate of intramolecular electron transfer between the two [4FE-4S] clusters of ferredoxins has been measured by NMR. It is far slower in the case of Cv Fd than for shorter ferredoxins. The difference may be associated with changes in the magnetic and/or electronic properties of one cluster. The strong paramagnetism of the [4Fe-4S] clusters, which originally limited the applicability of NMR to proteins containing these cofactors, has been proven instrumental in affording new

  20. The effect of driving force on intramolecular electron transfer in proteins. Studies on single-site mutated azurins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Skov, L K; van de Kamp, M

    1992-01-01

    -6972]. To further investigate the nature of this long-range electron transfer (LRET) proceeding within the protein matrix, we have now investigated it in two azurins where amino acids have been substituted by single-site mutation of the wild-type Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin. In one mutated protein, a methionine...... the reorganization energy, lambda and electronic coupling factor, beta. The calculated values fit very well with a through-bond LRET mechanism....

  1. Direct detection of ligand binding to Sepharose-immobilised protein using saturation transfer double difference (STDD) NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haselhorst, Thomas; Muenster-Kuehnel, Anja K.; Oschlies, Melanie; Tiralongo, Joe; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Itzstein, Mark von

    2007-01-01

    We report an easy and direct application of 'Saturation Transfer Double Difference' (STDD) NMR spectroscopy to identify ligands that bind to a Sepharose-immobilised target protein. The model protein, cytidine 5'-monophosphate sialic acid (CMP-Sia) synthetase, was expressed as a Strep-Tag II fusion protein and immobilised on Strep-Tactin Sepharose. STD NMR experiments of the protein-enriched Sepharose matrix in the presence of a binding ligand (cytidine 5'-triphosphate, CTP) and a non-binding ligand (α/β-glucose) clearly show that CTP binds to the immobilised enzyme, whereas glucose has no affinity. This approach has three major advantages: (a) only low quantities of protein are required, (b) no specialised NMR technology or the application of additional data analysis by non-routine methods is required, and (c) easy multiple use of the immobilised protein is available

  2. Tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of TA-8995, a selective cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitor, in healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ford, John; Lawson, Matt; Fowler, David; Maruyama, Nobuko; Mito, Seiji; Tomiyasu, Koichi; Kinoshita, Shuji; Suzuki, Chisa; Kawaguchi, Atsuhiro; Round, Patrick; Boyce, Malcolm; Warrington, Steve; Weber, Werner; van Deventer, Sander; Kastelein, John J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Two double-blind, randomized studies were conducted to assess the tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral TA-8995, a new cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitor, in healthy subjects. Study 1: Subjects received single doses of TA-8995 or placebo (fasted). Doses were 5,

  3. Correlation of repressed transcription of alpha-tocopherol transfer protein with serum alpha-tocopherol during hepatocarcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, C. G.; Hoek, F. J.; Groenink, M.; Reitsma, P. H.; van Deventer, S. J.; Chamuleau, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Using a subtraction-enhanced display technique, we identified a rodent alpha-tocopherol transfer protein (alpha-TTP) cDNA which exhibited markedly lower messenger RNA (mRNA) amounts in rat hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) than in healthy controls. Several lines of evidence have substantiated that

  4. Lipid transfer protein: a pan-allergen in plant-derived foods that is highly resistant to pepsin digestion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asero, R.; Mistrello, G.; Roncarolo, D.; de Vries, S. C.; Gautier, M. F.; Ciurana, C. L.; Verbeek, E.; Mohammadi, T.; Knul-Brettlova, V.; Akkerdaas, J. H.; Bulder, I.; Aalberse, R. C.; van Ree, R.

    2000-01-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are small molecules of approximately 10 kD that demonstrate high stability. They have recently been identified as allergens in the Rosaceae subfamilies of the Prunoideae (peach, apricot, plum) and of the Pomoideae (apple). They belong to a family of structurally highly

  5. Lipid transfer protein : a pan-allergen in plant-derived foods that is highly resistant to pepsin digestion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asero, R.; Mistrello, G.; Roncarolo, D.; Vries, de S.C.; Gautier, M.F.; Ciurana, C.L.; Verbeek, E.; Mohammadi, T.; Knul-Brettlova, V.; Akkerdaas, J.H.; Bulder, I.; Aalberse, R.C.; Ree, van R.

    2000-01-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are small molecules of approximately 10 kD that demonstrate high stability. They have recently been identified as allergens in the Rosaceae subfamilies of the Prunoideae (peach, apricot, plum) and of the Pomoideae (apple). They belong to a family of structurally highly

  6. The anti-apoptotic activity associated with phosphatidylinositol transfer protein α activates the MAPK and Akt/PKB pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schenning, M.; Goedhart, J.; Gadella (jr.), T.W.J.; Avram, D.; Wirtz, K.W.A.; Snoek, G.T.

    2008-01-01

    The conditioned medium (CM) from mouse NIH3T3 fibroblast cells overexpressing phosphatidylinositol transfer protein α (PI-TPα; SPIα cells) demonstrates an increased anti-apoptotic activity compared with CM from wild type NIH3T3 (wtNIH3T3) cells. As previously shown, the anti-apoptotic activity acts

  7. High plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein levels may favour reduced incidence of cardiovascular events in men with low triglycerides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borggreve, Susanna E.; Hillege, Hans L.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; de Jong, Paul E.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Grobbee, Diederik E.; van Tol, Arie; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    Aims High cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) concentrations are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in subjects with high triglycerides. We determined the relationship of plasma CETP with incident CVD in a population with relatively low triglycerides. Methods and

  8. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein decreases high-density lipoprotein and severely aggravates atherosclerosis in APOE*3-Leiden mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, M.; Hoogt, C.C. van der; Haan, W. de; Offerman, E.H.; Dallinga-Thie, G.M.; Jukema, J.W.; Havekes, L.M.; Rensen, P.C.N.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - The role of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) in the development of atherosclerosis is still undergoing debate. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of human CETP expression on atherosclerosis in APOE*3-Leiden (E3L) mice with a humanized lipoprotein profile. METHODS AND RESULTS -

  9. Plasma phospholipid transfer protein activity is independently determined by obesity and insulin resistance in non-diabetic subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Rindert; Kappelle, Paul J. W. H.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    2011-01-01

    Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) is an emerging cardio-metabolic risk factor which is intricately involved in lipoprotein metabolism. Elevated plasma PLTP activity levels are reported in obesity and diabetes mellitus, but the relative contributions of obesity and insulin resistance to plasma

  10. Plasma phospholipid transfer protein activity is independently determined by obesity and insulin resistance in non-diabetic subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Rindert; Kappelle, Paul J.W.H.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    Background: Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) is an emerging cardio-metabolic risk factor which is intricately involved in lipoprotein metabolism. Elevated plasma PLTP activity levels are reported in obesity and diabetes mellitus, but the relative contributions of obesity and insulin resistance

  11. ELEVATED CHOLESTERYL ESTER TRANSFER PROTEIN-ACTIVITY IN IDDM MEN WHO SMOKE - POSSIBLE FACTOR FOR UNFAVORABLE LIPOPROTEIN PROFILE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DULLAART, RPF; GROENER, JEM; DIKKESCHEI, BD; ERKELENS, DW; DOORENBOS, H

    Objectives: To determine the effect of cigarette smoking on the activity of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and high-density (HDL), low-density (LDL), and very-low-density (VLDL) lipoproteins in insulin-dependent diabetic (IDDM) men with microvascular complications. Research Design and

  12. Separating the Mechanism-Based and Off-Target Actions of Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Inhibitors With CETP Gene Polymorphisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sofat, Reecha; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Smeeth, Liam; Humphries, Steve E.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Cooper, Jackie; Shah, Tina; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Ricketts, Sally L.; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Wareham, Nicholas; Khaw, Kay Tee; Kumari, Meena; Kivimaki, Mika; Marmot, Michael; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; van der Harst, Pim; Dullaart, Robin P. F.; Navis, Gerjan; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Van Gilst, Wiek H.; Thompson, John F.; McCaskie, Pamela; Palmer, Lyle J.; Arca, Marcello; Quagliarini, Fabiana; Gaudio, Carlo; Cambien, Francois; Nicaud, Viviane; Poirer, Odette; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Isaacs, Aaron; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Pencina, Michael; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Ordovas, Jose; Li, Tricia Y.; Kakko, Sakari; Kauma, Heikki; Savolainen, Markku J.; Kesaniemi, Y. Antero; Sandhofer, Anton; Paulweber, Bernhard; Sorli, Jose V.; Goto, Akimoto; Yokoyama, Shinji; Okumura, Kenji; Horne, Benjamin D.; Packard, Chris; Freeman, Dilys; Ford, Ian; Sattar, Naveed; McCormack, Valerie; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Ebrahim, Shah; Smith, George Davey; Kastelein, John J. P.; Deanfield, John; Casas, Juan P.

    2010-01-01

    Background-Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors raise high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, but torcetrapib, the first-in-class inhibitor tested in a large outcome trial, caused an unexpected blood pressure elevation and increased cardiovascular events. Whether the hypertensive

  13. Maturity and storage influence on the apple (Malus domestica) allergen Mal d 3, a nonspecific lipid transfer protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sancho, Ana I.; Foxall, Robert; Rigby, Neil M.; Browne, Thomas; Zuidmeer, Laurian; van Ree, Ronald; Waldron, Keith W.; Mills, E. N. Clare

    2006-01-01

    Consumption of apples can provoke severe allergic reactions, in susceptible individuals, due to the presence of the allergen Mal d 3, a nonspecific lipid transfer protein, found largely in the fruit skin. Levels of Mal d 3 were determined in peel as a function of apple cultivar, position of the

  14. Quality Control System for Beer Developed with Monoclonal Antibodies Specific to Barley Lipid Transfer Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukie Murakami-Yamaguchi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Non-specific lipid transfer protein (LTP in barley grain reacted with the IgE in sera drawn from food allergy patients. A sandwich-type of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was developed with mouse monoclonal antibodies raised against LTP purified with barley flour. This ELISA showed a practical working range of 0.3–3 ng/mL and no cross-reactivity with wheat, adlay and rye. Using this ELISA, LTP was determined in several types of barley-foods, including fermented foods such as malt vinegar, barley-malt miso and beer. LTP content in beer of the same kind was approximately constant, even if manufacturing factory and production days were different. Not only as a factor of foam formation and stability but also as an allergen, controlling and monitoring of LTP in beer should be considered. Taken together, our LTP-detecting ELISA can be proposed as an appropriate system for the quality control of beer.

  15. Expression of Heat Shock Proteins in Human Fibroblast Cells under Magnetic Resonant Coupling Wireless Power Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Mizuno

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Since 2007, resonant coupling wireless power transfer (WPT technology has been attracting attention and has been widely researched for practical use. Moreover, dosimetric evaluation has also been discussed to evaluate the potential health risks of the electromagnetic field from this WPT technology based on the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP guidelines. However, there has not been much experimental evaluation of the potential health risks of this WPT technology. In this study, to evaluate whether magnetic resonant coupling WPT induces cellular stress, we focused on heat shock proteins (Hsps and determined the expression level of Hsps 27, 70 and 90 in WI38VA13 subcloned 2RA human fibroblast cells using a western blotting method. The expression level of Hsps under conditions of magnetic resonant coupling WPT for 24 h was not significantly different compared with control cells, although the expression level of Hsps for cells exposed to heat stress conditions was significantly increased. These results suggested that exposure to magnetic resonant coupling WPT did not cause detectable cell stress.

  16. Alpha-tocopherol transfer protein disruption confers resistance to malarial infection in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeya Motohiro

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various factors impact the severity of malaria, including the nutritional status of the host. Vitamin E, an intra and extracellular anti-oxidant, is one such nutrient whose absence was shown previously to negatively affect Plasmodium development. However, mechanisms of this Plasmodium inhibition, in addition to means by which to exploit this finding as a therapeutic strategy, remain unclear. Methods α-TTP knockout mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 or Plasmodium yoelii XL-17, parasitaemia, survival rate were monitored. In one part of the experiments mice were fed with a supplemented diet of vitamin E and then infected. In addition, parasite DNA damage was monitored by means of comet assay and 8-OHdG test. Moreover, infected mice were treated with chloroquine and parasitaemia and survival rate were monitored. Results Inhibition of α-tocopherol transfer protein (α-TTP, a determinant of vitamin E concentration in circulation, confers resistance to malarial infection as a result of oxidative damage to the parasites. Furthermore, in combination with the anti-malarial drug chloroquine results were even more dramatic. Conclusion Considering that these knockout mice lack observable negative impacts typical of vitamin E deficiency, these results suggest that inhibition of α-TTP activity in the liver may be a useful strategy in the prevention and treatment of malaria infection. Moreover, a combined strategy of α-TTP inhibition and chloroquine treatment might be effective against drug resistant parasites.

  17. The α-tocopherol transfer protein is essential for vertebrate embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galen W Miller

    Full Text Available The hepatic α-tocopherol transfer protein (TTP is required for optimal α-tocopherol bioavailability in humans; mutations in the human TTPA gene result in the heritable disorder ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED, OMIM #277460. TTP is also expressed in mammalian uterine and placental cells and in the human embryonic yolk-sac, underscoring TTP's significance during fetal development. TTP and vitamin E are essential for productive pregnancy in rodents, but their precise physiological role in embryogenesis is unknown. We hypothesize that TTP is required to regulate delivery of α-tocopherol to critical target sites in the developing embryo. We tested to find if TTP is essential for proper vertebrate development, utilizing the zebrafish as a non-placental model. We verify that TTP is expressed in the adult zebrafish and its amino acid sequence is homologous to the human ortholog. We show that embryonic transcription of TTP mRNA increases >7-fold during the first 24 hours following fertilization. In situ hybridization demonstrates that Ttpa transcripts are localized in the developing brain, eyes and tail bud at 1-day post fertilization. Inhibiting TTP expression using oligonucleotide morpholinos results in severe malformations of the head and eyes in nearly all morpholino-injected embryos (88% compared with 5.6% in those injected with control morpholinos or 1.7% in non-injected embryos. We conclude that TTP is essential for early development of the vertebrate central nervous system.

  18. Communication: Microsecond dynamics of the protein and water affect electron transfer in a bacterial bc1 complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2015-04-01

    Cross-membrane electron transport between cofactors localized in proteins of mitochondrial respiration and bacterial photosynthesis is the source of all biological energy. The statistics and dynamics of nuclear fluctuations in these protein/membrane/water heterogeneous systems are critical for their energetic efficiency. The results of 13 μs of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the membrane-bound bc1 bacterial complex are analyzed here. The reaction is affected by a broad spectrum of nuclear modes, with the slowest dynamics in the range of time-scales ˜0.1-1.6 μs contributing half of the reaction reorganization energy. Two reorganization energies are required to describe protein electron transfer due to dynamical arrest of protein conformations on the observation window. This mechanistic distinction allows significant lowering of activation barriers for reactions in proteins.

  19. Communication: Microsecond dynamics of the protein and water affect electron transfer in a bacterial bc1 complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2015-01-01

    Cross-membrane electron transport between cofactors localized in proteins of mitochondrial respiration and bacterial photosynthesis is the source of all biological energy. The statistics and dynamics of nuclear fluctuations in these protein/membrane/water heterogeneous systems are critical for their energetic efficiency. The results of 13 μs of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the membrane-bound bc 1 bacterial complex are analyzed here. The reaction is affected by a broad spectrum of nuclear modes, with the slowest dynamics in the range of time-scales ∼0.1-1.6 μs contributing half of the reaction reorganization energy. Two reorganization energies are required to describe protein electron transfer due to dynamical arrest of protein conformations on the observation window. This mechanistic distinction allows significant lowering of activation barriers for reactions in proteins

  20. Communication: Microsecond dynamics of the protein and water affect electron transfer in a bacterial bc{sub 1} complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V., E-mail: dmitrym@asu.edu [Department of Physics and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 871504, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2015-04-28

    Cross-membrane electron transport between cofactors localized in proteins of mitochondrial respiration and bacterial photosynthesis is the source of all biological energy. The statistics and dynamics of nuclear fluctuations in these protein/membrane/water heterogeneous systems are critical for their energetic efficiency. The results of 13 μs of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the membrane-bound bc{sub 1} bacterial complex are analyzed here. The reaction is affected by a broad spectrum of nuclear modes, with the slowest dynamics in the range of time-scales ∼0.1-1.6 μs contributing half of the reaction reorganization energy. Two reorganization energies are required to describe protein electron transfer due to dynamical arrest of protein conformations on the observation window. This mechanistic distinction allows significant lowering of activation barriers for reactions in proteins.

  1. Mechanism of phosphoryl transfer and protein-protein interaction in the PTS system-an NMR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopal, P.; Klevit, R.E. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    HPr and Enzyme IIA{sup Glc} are two of the components of the bacterial PTS (phosphoenolpyruvate: sugar phosphotranferase system) and are involved in the phosphorylation and concomitant translocation of sugars across the membrane. These PTS protein complexes also regulate sugar transport. HPr, phosphorylated at a histidine N1 site by Enzyme I and phosphoenol pyruvate, transfers the phosphoryl group to a histidine N3 position in Enzyme IIA{sup Glc}. HPrs from Gram-positive bacteria undergo regulatory phosphorylation at Ser{sup 46}, whereby phosphorylation of the histidine residue is inhibited. Conversely, histidine phosphorylation inhibits phosphorylation at Ser{sup 46}. HPrs from Gram-negative bacteria possess a serine residue at position 46, but do not undergo regulatory phosphorylation. HPr forms an open-faced sandwich structure with a four-strand S-sheet and 2 to 3 helices lying on top of the sheet. The active-site histidine and Ser{sup 46} occur in conformationally flexible regions. P-His-HPr from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilus has been investigated by both homonuclear and heteronuclear two-dimensional and three-dimensional NMR experiments using an in-situ enzymatic regeneration system to maintain a constant level of P-His-HPr. The results show that localized conformational changes occur in the vicinity of the active-site histidine and also near Ser{sup 46}. HPr-Enzyme IIA{sup Glc} complexes from both Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli were also studied by a variety of {sup 15}N-edited two-dimensional NMR experiments, which were performed on uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled HPr complexed to unlabeled Enzyme IIA{sup Glc}. The complex is in fast exchange with a molecular weight of about 27 kDa. The focus of our work is to assess the changes undergone by HPr (the smaller of the two components), and so all the experiments were performed with excess Enzyme IIA present in the system.

  2. A nonspecific Setaria italica lipid transfer protein gene plays a critical role under abiotic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanlin Pan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs are a class of cysteine-rich soluble proteins having small molecular weights. LTPs participate in flower and seed development, cuticular wax deposition, also play important roles in pathogen and abiotic stress responses. A nonspecific LTP gene (SiLTP was isolated from a foxtail millet (Setaria italica suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH library enriched for differentially expressed genes after abiotic stress treatments. A semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analysis showed that SiLTP was expressed in all foxtail millet tissues. Additionally, the SiLTP promoter drove GUS expression in root tips, stems, leaves, flowers and siliques of transgenic Arabidopsis. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated that the SiLTP expression was induced by NaCl, polyethylene glycol and abscisic acid. SiLTP was localized in the cytoplasm of tobacco leaf epidermal cells and maize protoplasts. The ectopic expression of SiLTP in tobacco resulted in higher levels of salt and drought tolerance than in the wild type (WT. To further assess the function of SiLTP, SiLTP overexpression (OE and RNA interference (RNAi-based transgenic foxtail millet were obtained. SiLTP-OE lines performed better under salt and drought stresses compared with WT plants. In contrast, the RNAi lines were much more sensitive to salt and drought compared than WT. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and yeast one-hybrids indicated that the transcription factor (TF ABA-responsive DRE-binding protein (SiARDP could bind to the dehydration-responsive element of SiLTP promoter in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Moreover, the SiLTP expression levels were higher in SiARDP-OE plants compared than the WT. These results confirmed that SiLTP plays important roles in improving salt and drought stress tolerance of foxtail millet, and may partly be up-regulated by SiARDP. SiLTP may provide an effective genetic resource for molecular breeding in crops to enhance salt and

  3. Effect of growth hormone replacement therapy on plasma lecithin : cholesterol acyltransferase and lipid transfer protein activities in growth hormone-deficient adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beentjes, JAM; van Tol, A; Sluiter, WJ; Dullaart, RPF

    The effects of growth hormone (GH) replacement on plasma lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), and phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), factors involved in high density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism, We unknown. We carried out a 6 mouths study in 24

  4. Using Förster-Resonance Energy Transfer to Measure Protein Interactions Between Bcl-2 Family Proteins on Mitochondrial Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogmore, Justin P; Pemberton, James M; Chi, Xiaoke; Andrews, David W

    2016-01-01

    The Bcl-2 family of proteins regulates the process of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, causing the release of cytochrome c and committing a cell to apoptosis. The majority of the functional interactions between these proteins occur at, on, or within the mitochondrial outer membrane, complicating structural studies of the proteins and complexes. As a result most in vitro studies of these protein-protein interactions use truncated proteins and/or detergents which can cause artificial interactions. Herein, we describe a detergent-free, fluorescence-based, in vitro technique to study binding between full-length recombinant Bcl-2 family proteins, particularly cleaved BID (cBID) and BCL-XL, on the membranes of purified mitochondria.

  5. Small-molecule inhibitors of phosphatidylcholine transfer protein/StarD2 identified by high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagle, Neil; Xian, Jun; Shishova, Ekaterina Y; Wei, Jie; Glicksman, Marcie A; Cuny, Gregory D; Stein, Ross L; Cohen, David E

    2008-12-01

    Phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (PC-TP, also referred to as StarD2) is a highly specific intracellular lipid-binding protein that catalyzes the transfer of phosphatidylcholines between membranes in vitro. Recent studies have suggested that PC-TP in vivo functions to regulate fatty acid and glucose metabolism, possibly via interactions with selected other proteins. To begin to address the relationship between activity in vitro and biological function, we undertook a high-throughput screen to identify small-molecule inhibitors of the phosphatidylcholine transfer activity of PC-TP. After adapting a fluorescence quench assay to measure phosphatidylcholine transfer activity, we screened 114,752 compounds of a small-molecule library. The high-throughput screen identified 14 potential PC-TP inhibitors. Of these, 6 compounds exhibited characteristics consistent with specific inhibition of PC-TP activity, with IC(50) values that ranged from 4.1 to 95.0muM under conditions of the in vitro assay. These compounds should serve as valuable reagents to elucidate the biological function of PC-TP. Because mice with homozygous disruption of the PC-TP gene (Pctp) are sensitized to insulin action and relatively resistant to the development of atherosclerosis, these inhibitors may also prove to be of value in the management of diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Impact of unhealthy lifestyle behaviors and obesity on cholesteryl ester transfer protein among adolescent males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschler, Valeria; Meroño, Tomas; Maccallini, Gustavo; Gomez Rosso, Leonardo; Aranda, Claudio; Brites, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) has been proposed to be associated with high risk of cardiovascular disease. Increased CETP activity was previously reported in obese adults, although its association with lifestyle behaviors has not been assessed in healthy adolescents. We undertook this study to determine the association between CETP activity and overweight/obesity, insulin resistance markers, components of the metabolic syndrome and lifestyle behaviors in healthy adolescent males. Data were collected from 164 adolescents from an amateur rugby club. Body mass index (BMI), blood pressure (BP), Tanner stages, lipids, glucose, insulin and CETP activity were measured. Questionnaires for daily intake of breakfast, sweet drinks, milk, and hours of TV watching were completed. About 26% of the adolescents were obese and 23% overweight. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 6.7%. CETP activity was higher in obese than in normal and overweight adolescents (174 ± 35, 141 ± 30, and 149 ± 38%/ml/min, respectively; p 2 h/day (r = 0.17; p 0.02), and milk intake >3 glasses/day (r = 0.16; p = 0.03). Multivariate analysis showed that triglycerides, LDL-C, HDL-C, TV watching >2 h/day, milk intake >3 glasses/day and BMI were significant independent predictors for CETP (R(2) = 0.41). Unhealthy lifestyle habits such as TV watching >2 h daily and milk intake higher than three glasses per day and the increase in BMI were shown to be closely associated with high CETP activity in apparently healthy adolescent males. Future longitudinal studies should be performed to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2011 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Intestine-specific deletion of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein increases mortality in aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhe; Xie, Yan; Dominguez, Jessica A; Breed, Elise R; Yoseph, Benyam P; Burd, Eileen M; Farris, Alton B; Davidson, Nicholas O; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2014-01-01

    Mice with conditional, intestine-specific deletion of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (Mttp-IKO) exhibit a complete block in chylomicron assembly together with lipid malabsorption. Young (8-10 week) Mttp-IKO mice have improved survival when subjected to a murine model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced sepsis. However, 80% of deaths in sepsis occur in patients over age 65. The purpose of this study was to determine whether age impacts outcome in Mttp-IKO mice subjected to sepsis. Aged (20-24 months) Mttp-IKO mice and WT mice underwent intratracheal injection with P. aeruginosa. Mice were either sacrificed 24 hours post-operatively for mechanistic studies or followed seven days for survival. In contrast to young septic Mttp-IKO mice, aged septic Mttp-IKO mice had a significantly higher mortality than aged septic WT mice (80% vs. 39%, p = 0.005). Aged septic Mttp-IKO mice exhibited increased gut epithelial apoptosis, increased jejunal Bax/Bcl-2 and Bax/Bcl-XL ratios yet simultaneously demonstrated increased crypt proliferation and villus length. Aged septic Mttp-IKO mice also manifested increased pulmonary myeloperoxidase levels, suggesting increased neutrophil infiltration, as well as decreased systemic TNFα compared to aged septic WT mice. Blocking intestinal chylomicron secretion alters mortality following sepsis in an age-dependent manner. Increases in gut apoptosis and pulmonary neutrophil infiltration, and decreased systemic TNFα represent potential mechanisms for why intestine-specific Mttp deletion is beneficial in young septic mice but harmful in aged mice as each of these parameters are altered differently in young and aged septic WT and Mttp-IKO mice.

  8. Intestine-specific deletion of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein increases mortality in aged mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Liang

    Full Text Available Mice with conditional, intestine-specific deletion of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (Mttp-IKO exhibit a complete block in chylomicron assembly together with lipid malabsorption. Young (8-10 week Mttp-IKO mice have improved survival when subjected to a murine model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced sepsis. However, 80% of deaths in sepsis occur in patients over age 65. The purpose of this study was to determine whether age impacts outcome in Mttp-IKO mice subjected to sepsis.Aged (20-24 months Mttp-IKO mice and WT mice underwent intratracheal injection with P. aeruginosa. Mice were either sacrificed 24 hours post-operatively for mechanistic studies or followed seven days for survival.In contrast to young septic Mttp-IKO mice, aged septic Mttp-IKO mice had a significantly higher mortality than aged septic WT mice (80% vs. 39%, p = 0.005. Aged septic Mttp-IKO mice exhibited increased gut epithelial apoptosis, increased jejunal Bax/Bcl-2 and Bax/Bcl-XL ratios yet simultaneously demonstrated increased crypt proliferation and villus length. Aged septic Mttp-IKO mice also manifested increased pulmonary myeloperoxidase levels, suggesting increased neutrophil infiltration, as well as decreased systemic TNFα compared to aged septic WT mice.Blocking intestinal chylomicron secretion alters mortality following sepsis in an age-dependent manner. Increases in gut apoptosis and pulmonary neutrophil infiltration, and decreased systemic TNFα represent potential mechanisms for why intestine-specific Mttp deletion is beneficial in young septic mice but harmful in aged mice as each of these parameters are altered differently in young and aged septic WT and Mttp-IKO mice.

  9. Short range photoinduced electron transfer in proteins: QM-MM simulations of tryptophan and flavin fluorescence quenching in proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callis, Patrik R.; Liu Tiqing

    2006-01-01

    Hybrid quantum mechanical-molecular mechanics (dynamics) were performed on flavin reductase (Fre) and flavodoxin reductase (Fdr), both from Escherichia coli. Each was complexed with riboflavin (Rbf) or flavin mononucleotide (FMN). During 50 ps trajectories, the relative energies of the fluorescing state (S 1 ) of the isoalloxazine ring and the lowest charge transfer state (CT) were assessed to aid prediction of fluorescence lifetimes that are shortened due to quenching by electron transfer from tyrosine. The simulations for the four cases display a wide range in CT-S 1 energy gap caused by the presence of phosphate, other charged and polar residues, water, and by intermolecular separation between donor and acceptor. This suggests that the Gibbs energy change (ΔG 0 ) and reorganization energy (λ) for the electron transfer may differ in different flavoproteins

  10. Erabulenols, inhibitors of cholesteryl ester transfer protein produced by Penicillium sp. FO-5637. I.Production, isolation and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomoda, H; Tabata, N; Masuma, R; Si, S Y; Omura, S

    1998-07-01

    Penicillium sp. FO-5637, a soil isolate, was found to produce a series of inhibitors of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP). Novel active compounds, designated erabulenols A and B, were isolated from the fermentation broth of the producing strain by solvent extraction, ODS column chromatography and HPLC. Erabulenols A and B inhibit human CETP activity with IC50 values of 47.7 and 58.2 microM in an in vitro assay system containing 200 microM BSA, respectively.

  11. A novel bi-protein bio-interphase of cytochrome c and glucose oxidase: Electron transfer and electrocatalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Yonghai; Liu, Hongyu; Wang, Yu; Wang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Glucose oxidase (GOD) and cytochrome c (Cyt c) were co-entrapped in the poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)–graphene nanosheets–gold nanoparticles (PDDA–Gp–AuNPs) nanocomposites modified glassy carbon electrode. Electron transfer and electrocatalysis of the novel bi-protein bio-interphase were investigated. The bio-interphase developed here not only successfully achieved DET of GOD, but also showed great potential for the fabrication of novel glucose biosensors with linear response up to 18 mM. Highlights: ► A bio-interphase composed of cytochrome c and glucose oxidase was developed. ► The electron transfer in the bio-interphase was investigated. ► Electrocatalytic performances of bio-interphase were explored. ► The bio-interphase exhibited good electrocatalytic response glucose. - Abstract: Glucose oxidase (GOD) and cytochrome c (Cyt c) were co-entrapped in the poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)–graphene nanosheets–gold nanoparticles (PDDA–Gp–AuNPs) hybrid nanocomposites modified glassy carbon electrode to prepare a novel bi-protein bio-interphase. Electron transfer and electrocatalysis of the bi-protein bio-interphase were investigated in detail. The results showed that the PDDA–Gp–AuNPs nanocomposites accelerated the electron transfer between proteins and electrode. The bi-protein exhibited effective direct electron transfer (DET) reaction with an apparent rate constant (k s ) of 2.36 s −1 . The optimal molar ratio and total amount of Cyt c and GOD in the bio-interphase for DET of GOD was estimated to be about 3:1 and 1.40 nmol, respectively. The bi-protein bio-interphase could be used to detect glucose based on the consumption of O 2 with the oxidation of glucose catalyzed by GOD. The resulted biosensor exhibits wide linear range from 2.0 to 18.0 mM. Thus, this study not only successfully achieved DET of GOD, but also constructed a novel biosensor for glucose detection

  12. Förster-type energy transfer as a probe for changes in local fluctuations of the protein matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, B; Matkó, J; Papp, S; Hevessy, J; Welch, G R; Damjanovich, S

    1984-07-17

    Much evidence, on both theoretical and experimental sides, indicates the importance of local fluctuations (in energy levels, conformational substates, etc.) of the macromolecular matrix in the biological activity of proteins. We describe here a novel application of the Förster-type energy-transfer process capable of monitoring changes both in local fluctuations and in conformational states of macromolecules. A new energy-transfer parameter, f, is defined as an average transfer efficiency, [E], normalized by the actual average quantum efficiency of the donor fluorescence, [phi D]. A simple oscillator model (for a one donor-one acceptor system) is presented to show the sensitivity of this parameter to changes in amplitudes of local fluctuations. The different modes of averaging (static, dynamic, and intermediate cases) occurring for a given value of the average transfer rate, [kt], and the experimental requirements as well as limitations of the method are also discussed. The experimental tests were performed on the ribonuclease T1-pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate conjugate (a one donor-one acceptor system) by studying the change of the f parameter with temperature, an environmental parameter expectedly perturbing local fluctuations of proteins. The parameter f increased with increasing temperature as expected on the basis of the oscillator model, suggesting that it really reflects changes of fluctuation amplitudes (significant changes in the orientation factor, k2, as well as in the spectral properties of the fluorophores can be excluded by anisotropy measurements and spectral investigations). Possibilities of the general applicability of the method are also discussed.

  13. Role of horizontal gene transfer as a control on the coevolution of ribosomal proteins and the genetic code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woese, Carl R.; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2011-03-31

    Our main goal is to develop the conceptual and computational tools necessary to understand the evolution of the universal processes of translation and replication and to identify events of horizontal gene transfer that occurred within the components. We will attempt to uncover the major evolutionary transitions that accompanied the development of protein synthesis by the ribosome and associated components of the translation apparatus. Our project goes beyond standard genomic approaches to explore homologs that are represented at both the structure and sequence level. Accordingly, use of structural phylogenetic analysis allows us to probe further back into deep evolutionary time than competing approaches, permitting greater resolution of primitive folds and structures. Specifically, our work focuses on the elements of translation, ranging from the emergence of the canonical genetic code to the evolution of specific protein folds, mediated by the predominance of horizontal gene transfer in early life. A unique element of this study is the explicit accounting for the impact of phenotype selection on translation, through a coevolutionary control mechanism. Our work contributes to DOE mission objectives through: (1) sophisticated computer simulation of protein dynamics and evolution, and the further refinement of techniques for structural phylogeny, which complement sequence information, leading to improved annotation of genomic databases; (2) development of evolutionary approaches to exploring cellular function and machinery in an integrated way; and (3) documentation of the phenotype interaction with translation over evolutionary time, reflecting the system response to changing selection pressures through horizontal gene transfer.

  14. Transfer-messenger RNA controls the translation of cell-cycle and stress proteins in Streptomyces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barends, Sharief; Zehl, Martin; Bialek, Sylwia

    2010-01-01

    coelicolor, trans-translation has a specialized role in stress management. Analysis of proteins that were carboxy-terminally His(8)-tagged by a recombinant tmRNA identified only 10 targets, including the stress proteins: DnaK heat-shock protein 70, thiostrepton-induced protein A, universal stress protein A...... functionality for tmRNA, promoting the translation of the same mRNA it targets, at the expense of sacrificing the first nascent protein. In streptomycetes, tmRNA has evolved into a dedicated task force that ensures the instantaneous response to the exposure to stress....

  15. Receptor-G Protein Interaction Studied by Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer: Lessons From Protease-Activated Receptor 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Akli eAYOUB

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Since its development, the bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET approach has been extensively applied to study G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs in real time and in live cells. One of the major aspects of GPCRs investigated in considerable details is their physical coupling to the heterotrimeric G proteins. As a result, new concepts have emerged, but few questions are still a matter of debate illustrating the complexity of GPCR-G protein interactions and coupling. Here, we summarized the recent advances on our understanding of GPCR-G protein coupling based on BRET approaches and supported by other FRET-based studies. We essentially focused on our recent studies in which we addressed the concept of preassembly versus the agonist-dependent interaction between the protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1 and its cognate G proteins. We discussed the concept of agonist-induced conformational changes within the preassembled PAR1-G protein complexes as well as the critical question how the multiple coupling of PAR1 with two different G proteins, Gi1 and G12, but also -arrestin 1, can be regulated.

  16. Analytical use of multi-protein Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer to demonstrate membrane-facilitated interactions within cytokine receptor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Christopher D; Izotova, Lara S; Pestka, Sidney

    2013-10-01

    Experiments measuring Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between cytokine receptor chains and their associated proteins led to hypotheses describing their organization in intact cells. These interactions occur within a larger protein complex or within a given nano-environment. To illustrate this complexity empirically, we developed a protocol to analyze FRET among more than two fluorescent proteins (multi-FRET). In multi-FRET, we model FRET among more than two fluorophores as the sum of all possible pairwise interactions within the complex. We validated our assumption by demonstrating that FRET among pairs within a fluorescent triplet resembled FRET between each pair measured in the absence of the third fluorophore. FRET between two receptor chains increases with increasing FRET between the ligand-binding chain (e.g., IFN-γR1, IL-10R1 and IFN-λR1) and an acylated fluorescent protein that preferentially resides within subsections of the plasma membrane. The interaction of IL-10R2 with IFN-λR1 or IL-10R1 results in decreased FRET between IL-10R2 and the acylated fluorescent protein. Finally, we analyzed FRET among four fluorescent proteins to demonstrate that as FRET between IFN-γR1 and IFN-γR2 or between IFN-αR1 and IFN-αR2c increases, FRET among other pairs of proteins changes within each complex. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. ARCHITECTURE OF A CHARGE-TRANSFER STATE REGULATING LIGHT HARVESTING IN A PLANT ANTENNA PROTEIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, Graham; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Avenson, Thomas J.; Ballottari, Matteo; Cheng, Yuan-Chung; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.

    2008-04-02

    Energy-dependent quenching of excess absorbed light energy (qE) is a vital mechanism for regulating photosynthetic light harvesting in higher plants. All of the physiological characteristics of qE have been positively correlated with charge-transfer between coupled chlorophyll and zeaxanthin molecules in the light-harvesting antenna of photosystem II (PSII). In this work, we present evidence for charge-transfer quenching in all three of the individual minor antenna complexes of PSII (CP29, CP26, and CP24), and we conclude that charge-transfer quenching in CP29 involves a de-localized state of an excitonically coupled chlorophyll dimer. We propose that reversible conformational changes in CP29 can `tune? the electronic coupling between the chlorophylls in this dimer, thereby modulating the energy of the chlorophylls-zeaxanthin charge-transfer state and switching on and off the charge-transfer quenching during qE.

  18. Setting up a Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer high throughput screening assay to search for protein/protein interaction inhibitors in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril eCouturier

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Each step of the cell life and its response or adaptation to its environment are mediated by a network of protein/protein interactions termed interactome. Our knowledge of this network keeps growing due to the development of sensitive techniques devoted to study these interactions. The bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET technique was primarily developed to allow the dynamic monitoring of protein-protein interactions in living cells, and has widely been used to study receptor activation by intra- or extra-molecular conformational changes within receptors and activated complexes in mammal cells. Some interactions are described as crucial in human pathological processes, and a new class of drugs targeting them has recently emerged. The BRET method is well suited to identify inhibitors of protein-protein interactions and here is described why and how to set up and optimize a High Throughput Screening assay based on BRET to search for such inhibitory compounds. The different parameters to take into account when developing such BRET assays in mammal cells are reviewed to give general guidelines: considerations on the targeted interaction, choice of BRET version, inducibility of the interaction, kinetic of the monitored interaction, and of the BRET reading, influence substrate concentration, number of cells and medium composition used on the Z’ factor, and expected interferences for colored or fluorescent compounds.

  19. Leading coordinate analysis of reaction pathways in proton chain transfer: Application to a two-proton transfer model for the green fluorescent protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Sufan; Smith, Sean C.

    2006-01-01

    The 'leading coordinate' approach to computing an approximate reaction pathway, with subsequent determination of the true minimum energy profile, is applied to a two-proton chain transfer model based on the chromophore and its surrounding moieties within the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Using an ab initio quantum chemical method, a number of different relaxed energy profiles are found for several plausible guesses at leading coordinates. The results obtained for different trial leading coordinates are rationalized through the calculation of a two-dimensional relaxed potential energy surface (PES) for the system. Analysis of the 2-D relaxed PES reveals that two of the trial pathways are entirely spurious, while two others contain useful information and can be used to furnish starting points for successful saddle-point searches. Implications for selection of trial leading coordinates in this class of proton chain transfer reactions are discussed, and a simple diagnostic function is proposed for revealing whether or not a relaxed pathway based on a trial leading coordinate is likely to furnish useful information

  20. The lumenal loop M672-P707 of the Menkes protein (ATP7A) transfers copper to peptidylglycine monooxygenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otoikhian, Adenike [Oregon Health & Sciences University; Barry, Amanda N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mayfield, Mary [Oregon Health & Science University; Nilges, Mark [Illinois EPR Center; Huang, Yiping [Johns Hopkins University; Lutsenko, Svetlana [Johns Hopkins University; Blackburn, Ninian [Oregon Health & Science University

    2012-05-14

    Copper transfer to cuproproteins located in vesicular compartments of the secretory pathway depends on activity of the copper translocating ATPase (ATP7A or ATP7B) but the mechanism of transfer is largely unexplored. Copper-ATPase ATP7A is unique in having a sequence rich in histidine and methionine residues located on the lumenal side of the membrane. The corresponding fragment binds Cu(I) when expressed as a chimera with a scaffold protein, and mutations or deletions of His and/or Met residues in its sequence inhibit dephosphorylation of the ATPase, a catalytic step associated with copper release. Here we present evidence for a potential role of this lumenal region of ATP7A in copper transfer to cuproenzymes. Both Cu(II) and Cu(I) forms were investigated since the form in which copper is transferred to acceptor proteins is currently unknown. Analysis of Cu(II) using EPR demonstrated that at Cu:P ratios below 1:1, 15N-substituted protein had Cu(II) bound by 4 His residues, but this coordination changed as the Cu(II) to protein ratio increased towards 2:1. XAS confirmed this coordination via analysis of the intensity of outer-shell scattering from imidazole residues. The Cu(II) complexes could be reduced to their Cu(I) counterparts by ascorbate, but here again, as shown by EXAFS and XANES spectroscopy, the coordination was dependent on copper loading. At low copper Cu(I) was bound by a mixed ligand set of His + Met while at higher ratios His coordination predominated. The copper-loaded loop was able to transfer either Cu(II) or Cu(I) to peptidylglycine monooxygenase in the presence of chelating resin, generating catalytically active enzyme in a process that appeared to involve direct interaction between the two partners. The variation of coordination with copper loading suggests copper-dependent conformational change which in turn could act as a signal for regulating copper release by the ATPase pump.

  1. Contact- and Protein Transfer-Dependent Stimulation of Assembly of the Gliding Motility Machinery in Myxococcus xanthus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Jakobczak

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria engage in contact-dependent activities to coordinate cellular activities that aid their survival. Cells of Myxococcus xanthus move over surfaces by means of type IV pili and gliding motility. Upon direct contact, cells physically exchange outer membrane (OM lipoproteins, and this transfer can rescue motility in mutants lacking lipoproteins required for motility. The mechanism of gliding motility and its stimulation by transferred OM lipoproteins remain poorly characterized. We investigated the function of CglC, GltB, GltA and GltC, all of which are required for gliding. We demonstrate that CglC is an OM lipoprotein, GltB and GltA are integral OM β-barrel proteins, and GltC is a soluble periplasmic protein. GltB and GltA are mutually stabilizing, and both are required to stabilize GltC, whereas CglC accumulate independently of GltB, GltA and GltC. Consistently, purified GltB, GltA and GltC proteins interact in all pair-wise combinations. Using active fluorescently-tagged fusion proteins, we demonstrate that GltB, GltA and GltC are integral components of the gliding motility complex. Incorporation of GltB and GltA into this complex depends on CglC and GltC as well as on the cytoplasmic AglZ protein and the inner membrane protein AglQ, both of which are components of the gliding motility complex. Conversely, incorporation of AglZ and AglQ into the gliding motility complex depends on CglC, GltB, GltA and GltC. Remarkably, physical transfer of the OM lipoprotein CglC to a ΔcglC recipient stimulates assembly of the gliding motility complex in the recipient likely by facilitating the OM integration of GltB and GltA. These data provide evidence that the gliding motility complex in M. xanthus includes OM proteins and suggest that this complex extends from the cytoplasm across the cell envelope to the OM. These data add assembly of gliding motility complexes in M. xanthus to the growing list of contact-dependent activities in bacteria.

  2. On the transfer of serum proteins to the rat intestinal juice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Norén, Ove; Poulsen, Mona D

    1994-01-01

    The in vivo pattern of serum proteins in the rat small-intestinal juice was characterized by crossed immunoelectrophoresis. Immunoglobulins and albumin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, transferrin, and orosomucoid were present. Larger serum proteins were absent (ceruloplasmin, haptoglobin, alpha-1-macroglob...... proteins in the intestinal juice is a selective passage through the capillary wall followed by passive intercellular transport via delivery of the serum in the interstitial space during disintegration of the enterocytes....

  3. EFFECT OF ADIPOSITY ON PLASMA-LIPID TRANSFER PROTEIN ACTIVITIES - A POSSIBLE LINK BETWEEN INSULIN-RESISTANCE AND HIGH-DENSITY-LIPOPROTEIN METABOLISM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DULLAART, RPF; SLUITER, WJ; DIKKESCHEI, LD; HOOGENBERG, K; VANTOL, A

    The mechanisms responsible for the decreased high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels associated with obesity and insulin resistance are not well understood. Lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) and cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) are key factors in the esterification of

  4. Protein adsorption resistance of PVP-modified polyurethane film prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Huihui; Qian, Bin; Zhang, Wei [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Functional Materials Chemistry and Research Center of Analysis and Test, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Lan, Minbo, E-mail: minbolan@ecust.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Functional Materials Chemistry and Research Center of Analysis and Test, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Antifouling PVP brushes were successfully grafted on PU films by SI-ATRP. • The effect of polymerization time on surface property and topography was studied. • Hydrophilicity and protein fouling resistance of PVP–PU films were greatly promoted. • Competitive adsorption of three proteins on PVP–PU films was evaluated. - Abstract: An anti-fouling surface of polyurethane (PU) film grafted with Poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) was prepared through surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). And the polymerization time was investigated to obtain PU films with PVP brushes of different lengths. The surface properties and protein adsorption of modified PU films were evaluated. The results showed that the hydrophilicity of PU–PVP films were improved with the increase of polymerization time, which was not positive correlation with the surface roughness due to the brush structure. Additionally, the protein resistance performance was promoted when prolonging the polymerization time. The best antifouling PU–PVP (6.0 h) film reduced the adsoption level of bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (LYS), and brovin serum fibrinogen (BFG) by 93.4%, 68.3%, 85.6%, respectively, compared to the unmodified PU film. The competitive adsorption of three proteins indicated that LYS preferentially adsorbed on the modified PU film, while BFG had the lowest adsorption selectivity. And the amount of BFG on PU–PVP (6.0 h) film reduced greatly to 0.08 μg/cm{sup 2}, which was almost one-tenth of its adsorption from the single-protein system. Presented results suggested that both hydrophilicity and surface roughness might be the important factors in all cases of protein adsorption, and the competitive or selective adsorption might be related to the size of the proteins, especially on the non-charged films.

  5. Protein adsorption resistance of PVP-modified polyurethane film prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Huihui; Qian, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Lan, Minbo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Antifouling PVP brushes were successfully grafted on PU films by SI-ATRP. • The effect of polymerization time on surface property and topography was studied. • Hydrophilicity and protein fouling resistance of PVP–PU films were greatly promoted. • Competitive adsorption of three proteins on PVP–PU films was evaluated. - Abstract: An anti-fouling surface of polyurethane (PU) film grafted with Poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) was prepared through surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). And the polymerization time was investigated to obtain PU films with PVP brushes of different lengths. The surface properties and protein adsorption of modified PU films were evaluated. The results showed that the hydrophilicity of PU–PVP films were improved with the increase of polymerization time, which was not positive correlation with the surface roughness due to the brush structure. Additionally, the protein resistance performance was promoted when prolonging the polymerization time. The best antifouling PU–PVP (6.0 h) film reduced the adsoption level of bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (LYS), and brovin serum fibrinogen (BFG) by 93.4%, 68.3%, 85.6%, respectively, compared to the unmodified PU film. The competitive adsorption of three proteins indicated that LYS preferentially adsorbed on the modified PU film, while BFG had the lowest adsorption selectivity. And the amount of BFG on PU–PVP (6.0 h) film reduced greatly to 0.08 μg/cm"2, which was almost one-tenth of its adsorption from the single-protein system. Presented results suggested that both hydrophilicity and surface roughness might be the important factors in all cases of protein adsorption, and the competitive or selective adsorption might be related to the size of the proteins, especially on the non-charged films.

  6. Engineering Designed Proteins for Light Capture, Energy Transfer, and Emissive Sensing In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Joshua A.

    Proteins that are used for photosynthetic light harvesting and biological signaling are critical to life. These types of proteins act as scaffolds that hold small, sometimes metal-containing organic molecules in precise locations for light absorption and successive use. For signaling proteins, this energy can be used to induce a photoisomerization of the small molecule that can turn on or off a signaling cascade that controls the physiology of an organism. Alternatively, photosynthetic light-harvesting proteins funnel this energy in a directional manner towards a charge separating catalytic component that can change this light energy into chemical energy. The protein environment also serves to tune the photophysical properties of the small molecules. This is seen extensively with the linear tetrapyrroles that are used in both photosynthetic and signaling proteins. Many efforts have been made to harness these natural proteins for societal use, including improving photophysical properties and interfacing capabilities with manmade catalytic components. Several methods of achieving improvement have entailed structurally guided mutation and directed evolution. However, these methods all have their limitations due to the inherent complexity and fragility of the natural proteins. This work presents an alternative more robust method to natural proteins. My thesis states: that man-made proteins, known as maquettes, employing basic rules of protein folding, can be designed to become light harvesting and signaling proteins that can be assembled fully in vivo providing an alternative, robust, and versatile platform for meeting the diverse array of societal "green chemistry" and biomedical needs. This in vivo assembly is carried out by interacting with cyanobacterial protein and pigment machinery, both as stand-alone units and as protein fusions with natural antenna complexes. Additionally, this work offers insight for fast and tight binding of circular and linear tetrapyrroles

  7. Deciphering the fluorescence resonance energy transfer from denatured transport protein to anthracene 1,5 disulphonate in reverse micellar environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singharoy, Dipti; Bhattacharya, Subhash Chandra

    2017-12-01

    Constrained environmental effect inside AOT reverse micellar media has been employed in this work to collect the information about energy transfer efficacy between sodium salt of anthracene 1,5 disulphonate (1,5-AS) with model transport proteins, bovine serum albumin (BSA), and human serum albumin (HSA). Steady state, time-resolved fluorescence and circular dichroism techniques have been used for this purpose and corresponding Fӧrster-type resonance energy transfer (FRET) from tryptophan residues to 1,5-AS indicates that 1,5-AS binds in the vicinity of the tryptophan residue (BSA and HSA) with equal strength. Indication of protein damage from fluorescence data and its confirmation has been measured from CD measurement. Molecular modeling study hereby plays a crucial role to predict the minimum energy docked conformation of the probe inside the protein environment. From the docked conformation the distance between 1,5-AS and tryptophan moiety of BSA/HSA has successfully explained the FRET possibility between them. A comparative modeling study between BSA and HSA with 1,5-AS assigning their binding site within specific amino acids plays a crucial role in support of the FRET study.

  8. Electron transfer patterns of the di-heme protein cytochrome c(4) from Pseudomonas stutzeri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffalt, Anders Christer; Schmidt, L.; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2009-01-01

    protein structural mobility in the overall two-ET process. We suggest that conformational protein mobility blocks intramolecular interheme ET in bulk homogeneous solution but triggers opening of this gated ET channel in the electrochemical environment or in the membrane environment of natural respiratory...

  9. Method for Targeted Therapeutic Delivery of Proteins into Cells | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Protein Expression Laboratory at the National Cancer Institute in Frederick, MD is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop a platform technology for the targeted intra-cellular delivery of proteins using virus-like particles (VLPs).

  10. Experimental myositis inducible with transfer of dendritic cells presenting a skeletal muscle C protein-derived CD8 epitope peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okiyama, Naoko; Hasegawa, Hisanori; Oida, Takatoku; Hirata, Shinya; Yokozeki, Hiroo; Fujimoto, Manabu; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Kohsaka, Hitoshi

    2015-07-01

    It is suggested that polymyositis, an autoimmune inflammatory myopathy, is mediated by autoaggressive CD8 T cells. Skeletal muscle C protein is a self-antigen that induces C protein-induced myositis, a murine model of polymyositis. To establish a new murine model of myositis inducible with a single CD8 T-cell epitope peptide that derives from the C protein, three internet-based prediction systems were employed to identify 24 candidate peptides of the immunogenic fragment of the C protein and bind theoretically to major histocompatibility complex class I molecules of C57BL/6 (B6) mice. RMA-S cell assay revealed that a HILIYSDV peptide, amino acid position 399-406 of the C protein, had the highest affinity to the H2-K(b) molecules. Transfer of mature bone marrow-derived dendritic cells pulsed with HILIYSDV induced myositis in naive B6 mice. This myositis was suppressed by anti-CD8-depleting antibodies but not by anti-CD4-depleting antibodies. Because this myositis model is mediated by CD8 T cells independently of CD4 T cells, it should be a useful tool to investigate pathology of polymyositis and develop therapies targeting CD8 T cells. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. A dark green fluorescent protein as an acceptor for measurement of Förster resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakoshi, Hideji; Shibata, Akihiro C E; Nakahata, Yoshihisa; Nabekura, Junichi

    2015-10-15

    Measurement of Förster resonance energy transfer by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM-FRET) is a powerful method for visualization of intracellular signaling activities such as protein-protein interactions and conformational changes of proteins. Here, we developed a dark green fluorescent protein (ShadowG) that can serve as an acceptor for FLIM-FRET. ShadowG is spectrally similar to monomeric enhanced green fluorescent protein (mEGFP) and has a 120-fold smaller quantum yield. When FRET from mEGFP to ShadowG was measured using an mEGFP-ShadowG tandem construct with 2-photon FLIM-FRET, we observed a strong FRET signal with low cell-to-cell variability. Furthermore, ShadowG was applied to a single-molecule FRET sensor to monitor a conformational change of CaMKII and of the light oxygen voltage (LOV) domain in HeLa cells. These sensors showed reduced cell-to-cell variability of both the basal fluorescence lifetime and response signal. In contrast to mCherry- or dark-YFP-based sensors, our sensor allowed for precise measurement of individual cell responses. When ShadowG was applied to a separate-type Ras FRET sensor, it showed a greater response signal than did the mCherry-based sensor. Furthermore, Ras activation and translocation of its effector ERK2 into the nucleus could be observed simultaneously. Thus, ShadowG is a promising FLIM-FRET acceptor.

  12. Structural basis of sterol recognition and nonvesicular transport by lipid transfer proteins anchored at membrane contact sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Junsen; Manik, Mohammad Kawsar; Im, Young Jun

    2018-01-30

    Membrane contact sites (MCSs) in eukaryotic cells are hotspots for lipid exchange, which is essential for many biological functions, including regulation of membrane properties and protein trafficking. Lipid transfer proteins anchored at membrane contact sites (LAMs) contain sterol-specific lipid transfer domains [StARkin domain (SD)] and multiple targeting modules to specific membrane organelles. Elucidating the structural mechanisms of targeting and ligand recognition by LAMs is important for understanding the interorganelle communication and exchange at MCSs. Here, we determined the crystal structures of the yeast Lam6 pleckstrin homology (PH)-like domain and the SDs of Lam2 and Lam4 in the apo form and in complex with ergosterol. The Lam6 PH-like domain displays a unique PH domain fold with a conserved N-terminal α-helix. The Lam6 PH-like domain lacks the basic surface for phosphoinositide binding, but contains hydrophobic patches on its surface, which are critical for targeting to endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondrial contacts. Structures of the LAM SDs display a helix-grip fold with a hydrophobic cavity and a flexible Ω1-loop as a lid. Ergosterol is bound to the pocket in a head-down orientation, with its hydrophobic acyl group located in the tunnel entrance. The Ω1-loop in an open conformation is essential for ergosterol binding by direct hydrophobic interaction. Structural comparison suggested that the sterol binding mode of the Lam2 SD2 is likely conserved among the sterol transfer proteins of the StARkin superfamily. Structural models of full-length Lam2 correlated with the sterol transport function at the membrane contact sites.

  13. The Golgi localization of phosphatidylinositol transfer protein beta requires the protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation of serine 262 and is essential for maintaining plasma membrane sphingomyelin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tiel, Claudia M; Westerman, Jan; Paasman, Marten A; Hoebens, Martha M; Wirtz, Karel W A; Snoek, Gerry T

    2002-06-21

    Recombinant mouse phosphatidylinositol transfer protein (PI-TP)beta is a substrate for protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent phosphorylation in vitro. Based on site-directed mutagenesis and two-dimensional tryptic peptide mapping, Ser(262) was identified as the major site of phosphorylation and Ser(165) as a minor phosphorylation site. The phospholipid transfer activities of wild-type PI-TP beta and PI-TP beta(S262A) were identical, whereas PI-TP beta(S165A) was completely inactive. PKC-dependent phosphorylation of Ser(262) also had no effect on the transfer activity of PI-TP beta. To investigate the role of Ser(262) in the functioning of PI-TP beta, wtPI-TP beta and PI-TP beta(S262A) were overexpressed in NIH3T3 fibroblast cells. Two-dimensional PAGE analysis of cell lysates was used to separate PI-TP beta from its phosphorylated form. After Western blotting, wtPI-TP beta was found to be 85% phosphorylated, whereas PI-TP beta(S262A) was not phosphorylated. In the presence of the PKC inhibitor GF 109203X, the phosphorylated form of wtPI-TP beta was strongly reduced. Immunolocalization showed that wtPI-TP beta was predominantly associated with the Golgi membranes. In the presence of the PKC inhibitor, wtPI-TP beta was distributed throughout the cell similar to what was observed for PI-TP beta(S262A). In contrast to wtPI-TP beta overexpressors, cells overexpressing PI-TP beta(S262A) were unable to rapidly replenish sphingomyelin in the plasma membrane upon degradation by sphingomyelinase. This implies that PKC-dependent association with the Golgi complex is a prerequisite for PI-TP beta to express its effect on sphingomyelin metabolism.

  14. Epididymosomes: transfer of fertility-modulating proteins to the sperm surface

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia A Martin-DeLeon

    2015-01-01

    A variety of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked proteins are acquired on spermatozoa from epididymal luminal fluids (ELF) during sperm maturation. These proteins serve roles in immunoprotection and in key steps of fertilization such as capacitation, acrosomal exocytosis and sperm-egg interactions. Their acquisition on sperm cells is mediated both by membrane vesicles (epididymosomes, EP) which were first reported to dock on the sperm surface, and by lipid carriers which facilitate the ...

  15. Regulation of gene expression for defensins and lipid transfer protein in Scots pine seedlings by necrotrophic pathogen Alternaria alternata (Fr.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrunyk Nataliya

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Damping-off disease in pine seedling, caused by fungi and oomycetes (Fusarium, Alternaria, Botrytis, Phytophthora and other species, is one of the most dangerous diseases in conifer nurseries and greenhouses worldwide. Alternaria alternata is a necrotrophic pathogen, which causes early blight in higher plants and results in massive economic losses in agro-industry as well as in forestry. Pine seedlings that lack strong lignificated and suberized cell walls at early stages of their growth are vulnerable to damping-off disease. So, triggering the synthesis of antimicrobial compounds, such as phytoalexins, anticipins and pathogenesis-related (PR proteins, is the main defense strategy to confine pathogens at early stages of pine ontogenesis. Defensins and lipid transfer proteins are members of two PR-protein families (PR-12 and PR-14 respectively and possess antimicrobial activities in vitro through contact toxicity, and the involvement in defense signalling. In this work, we describe the changes in the expression levels of four defensin genes and lipid transfer protein in Scots pine seedlings infected with A. alternata. The expression levels of PsDef1 and PsDef2 increased at 48 h.p.i. (hours post inoculation. The levels of PsDef4 transcripts have increased after 6 and 24 hours. Notably, at 48 h.p.i., the level of PsDef4 transcripts was decreased by 1.2 times compared to control. The level of PsDef3 transcripts was reduced at all three time points. On the other hand, the level of PsLTP1 transcripts increased at 6 h and 48 h.p.i.; while at 24 h.p.i., it decreased by 20% when compared to the control sample. Our results suggest that defensins and lipid transfer protein are involved in the defense response of young Scots pine to necrotrophic pathogen. Thus, those genes can be used as the molecular markers in forestry selection and development of the ecologically friendly remedies for coniferous seedlings cultivation in greenhouses and nurseries.

  16. The anti-apoptotic activity associated with phosphatidylinositol transfer protein alpha activates the MAPK and Akt/PKB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenning, Martijn; Goedhart, Joachim; Gadella, Theodorus W J; Avram, Diana; Wirtz, Karel W A; Snoek, Gerry T

    2008-10-01

    The conditioned medium (CM) from mouse NIH3T3 fibroblast cells overexpressing phosphatidylinositol transfer protein alpha (PI-TPalpha; SPIalpha cells) demonstrates an increased anti-apoptotic activity compared with CM from wild type NIH3T3 (wtNIH3T3) cells. As previously shown, the anti-apoptotic activity acts by activating a G protein-coupled receptor, most probably a cannabinoid 1 (CB1)-like receptor as the activity was blocked by both pertussis toxin and rimonabant [M. Schenning, C.M. van Tiel, D. Van Manen, J.C. Stam, B.M. Gadella, K.W. Wirtz and G.T. Snoek, Phosphatidylinositol transfer protein alpha regulates growth and apoptosis of NIH3T3 cells: involvement of a cannabinoid 1-like receptor, J. Lipid Res. 45 (2004) 1555-1564]. The CB1 receptor appears to be expressed in mouse fibroblast cells, at levels in the order SPIalpha>wtNIH3T3>SPIbeta cells (i.e. wild type cells overexpressing PI-TPbeta). Upon incubation of SPIbeta cells with the PI-TPalpha-dependent anti-apoptotic factors, both the ERK/MAP kinase and the Akt/PKB pathway are activated in a CB1 receptor dependent manner as shown by Western blotting. In addition, activation of ERK2 was also shown by EYFP-ERK2 translocation to the nucleus, as visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The subsequent activation of the anti-apoptotic transcription factor NF-kappaB is in line with the increased resistance towards UV-induced apoptosis. On the other hand, receptor activation by CM from SPIalpha cells was not linked to phospholipase C activation as the YFP-labelled C2-domain of protein kinase C was not translocated to the plasma membrane of SPIbeta cells as visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  17. Influence of extracellular matrix proteins on human keratinocyte attachment, proliferation and transfer to a dermal wound model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, R A; Goberdhan, N J; Freedlander, E; MacNeil, S

    1996-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether prior culture of cells on ECM proteins might positively influence the performance of keratinocytes when cells are transferred to a dermal in vitro wound bed model. Keratinocytes were cultured using a method for producing cultured epithelial autografts for severely burned patients (essentially using Green's medium, a mitogen-rich medium containing fetal calf serum, cholera toxin, EGF, insulin, transferrin and triiodothyronine). Cells were cultured either on irradiated 3T3 fibroblasts (as in the standard Rheinwald and Green technique) or, alternatively, on collagen I, collagen IV, matrigel, RGD, vitronectin or fibronectin. Under these conditions matrigel, collagen I and IV enhanced initial attachment, RGD, vitronectin, fibronectin and irradiated 3T3 fibroblasts did not. Proliferation of cells was positively influenced by matrigel, collagen I and IV and irradiated 3T3 fibroblasts; of these, however, only matrigel and 3T3 fibroblasts had sustained significant effects on keratinocyte proliferation over 4 days. Cells on fibronectin showed significantly reduced proliferation. An acellular non-viable dermis was then used to mimic the homograft allodermis onto which cultured epithelial autograft sheets are grafted clinically and cells cultured on the various ECM proteins for 96 h were transferred to this in vitro wound model. None of the substrates enhanced keratinocyte performance on this model. It was concluded that under these conditions some ECM proteins can significantly affect keratinocyte attachment and, to a lesser extent, proliferation but that the culture of keratinocytes on these ECM proteins does not appear to confer any lasting benefit to the attachment of these keratinocytes to an in vitro wound-bed model.

  18. Transferable coarse-grained potential for de novo protein folding and design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Coluzza

    Full Text Available Protein folding and design are major biophysical problems, the solution of which would lead to important applications especially in medicine. Here we provide evidence of how a novel parametrization of the Caterpillar model may be used for both quantitative protein design and folding. With computer simulations it is shown that, for a large set of real protein structures, the model produces designed sequences with similar physical properties to the corresponding natural occurring sequences. The designed sequences require further experimental testing. For an independent set of proteins, previously used as benchmark, the correct folded structure of both the designed and the natural sequences is also demonstrated. The equilibrium folding properties are characterized by free energy calculations. The resulting free energy profiles not only are consistent among natural and designed proteins, but also show a remarkable precision when the folded structures are compared to the experimentally determined ones. Ultimately, the updated Caterpillar model is unique in the combination of its fundamental three features: its simplicity, its ability to produce natural foldable designed sequences, and its structure prediction precision. It is also remarkable that low frustration sequences can be obtained with such a simple and universal design procedure, and that the folding of natural proteins shows funnelled free energy landscapes without the need of any potentials based on the native structure.

  19. Isolation and characterization of a tomato non-specific lipid transfer protein involved in polygalacturonase-mediated pectin degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassen, Monic M M; Barrett, Diane M; van der Valk, Henry C P M; Woltering, Ernst J

    2007-01-01

    An important aspect of the ripening process of tomato fruit is softening. Softening is accompanied by hydrolysis of the pectin in the cell wall by pectinases, causing loss of cell adhesion in the middle lamella. One of the most significant pectin-degrading enzymes is polygalacturonase (PG). Previous reports have shown that PG in tomato may exist in different forms (PG1, PG2a, PG2b, and PGx) commonly referred to as PG isoenzymes. The gene product PG2 is differentially glycosylated and is thought to associate with other proteins to form PG1 and PGx. This association is thought to modulate its pectin-degrading activity in planta. An 8 kDa protein that is part of the tomato PG1 multiprotein complex has been isolated, purified, and functionally characterized. This protein, designated 'activator' (ACT), belongs to the class of non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs). ACT is capable of 'converting' the gene product PG2 into a more active and heat-stable form, which increases PG-mediated pectin degradation in vitro and stimulates PG-mediated tissue breakdown in planta. This finding suggests a new, not previously identified, function for nsLTPs in the modification of hydrolytic enzyme activity. It is proposed that ACT plays a role in the modulation of PG activity during tomato fruit softening.

  20. INSITU BLOTTING - A NOVEL METHOD FOR DIRECT TRANSFER OF NATIVE PROTEINS FROM SECTIONED TISSUE TO BLOTTING MEMBRANE - PROCEDURE AND SOME APPLICATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OKABE, M; NYAKAS, C; BUWALDA, B; LUITEN, PGM

    We describe a novel technique for direct transfer of native proteins from unfixed frozen tissue sections to an immobilizing matrix, e.g., nitrocellulose, polyvinyliden difluoride, or positively charged nylon membranes. Proteins are directly blotted onto the membrane, providing optimal accessibility

  1. Wheat IgE-mediated food allergy in European patients: alpha-amylase inhibitors, lipid transfer proteins and low-molecular-weight glutenins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pastorello, Elide A; Farioli, Laura; Conti, Amedeo

    2007-01-01

    for sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis/immunoblotting of the three Osborne's protein fractions (albumin/globulin, gliadins and glutenins) of raw and cooked wheat. Thermal sensitivity of wheat lipid transfer protein (LTP) was investigated by spectroscopic approaches. IgE cross...

  2. Proteomic analysis of exosomes from nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell identifies intercellular transfer of angiogenic proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Chan, Yuk-kit

    2015-04-01

    Exosomes, a group of secreted extracellular nanovesicles containing genetic materials and signaling molecules, play a critical role in intercellular communication. During tumorigenesis, exosomes have been demonstrated to promote tumor angiogenesis and metastasis while their biological functions in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) are poorly understood. In this study, we focused on the role of NPC-derived exosomes on angiogenesis. Exosomes derived from the NPC C666-1 cells and immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cells (NP69 and NP460) were isolated using ultracentrifugation. The molecular profile and biophysical characteristics of exosomes were verified by Western blotting, sucrose density gradient, and electron microscopy. We showed that the C666-1 exosomes (10 and 20 μg/ml) could significantly increase the tubulogenesis, migration and invasion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependent manner. Subsequently, an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics was used to identify the differentially expressed proteins in C666-1 exosomes. Among the 640 identified proteins, 51 and 89 proteins were considered as up- and down-regulated (≥ 1.5-fold variations) in C666-1 exosomes compared to the normal counterparts, respectively. As expected, pro-angiogenic proteins including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and CD44 variant isoform 5 (CD44v5) are among the up-regulated proteins, whereas angio-suppressive protein, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) was down-regulated in C666-1 exosomes. Further confocal microscopic study and Western blotting clearly demonstrated that the alteration of ICAM-1, and TSP-1 expressions in recipient HUVECs are due to internalization of exosomes. Taken together, these data strongly indicated the critical roles of identified angiogenic proteins in the involvement of exosomes-induced angiogenesis, which could potentially be developed as therapeutic targets in future. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Proteomic analysis of exosomes from nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell identifies intercellular transfer of angiogenic proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Chan, Yuk-kit; Zhang, Huoming; Liu, Pei; Tsao, George Sai-wah; Li Lung, Maria; Mak, Nai-ki; Ngok-shun Wong, Ricky; Ying-kit Yue, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes, a group of secreted extracellular nanovesicles containing genetic materials and signaling molecules, play a critical role in intercellular communication. During tumorigenesis, exosomes have been demonstrated to promote tumor angiogenesis and metastasis while their biological functions in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) are poorly understood. In this study, we focused on the role of NPC-derived exosomes on angiogenesis. Exosomes derived from the NPC C666-1 cells and immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cells (NP69 and NP460) were isolated using ultracentrifugation. The molecular profile and biophysical characteristics of exosomes were verified by Western blotting, sucrose density gradient, and electron microscopy. We showed that the C666-1 exosomes (10 and 20 μg/ml) could significantly increase the tubulogenesis, migration and invasion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependent manner. Subsequently, an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics was used to identify the differentially expressed proteins in C666-1 exosomes. Among the 640 identified proteins, 51 and 89 proteins were considered as up- and down-regulated (≥ 1.5-fold variations) in C666-1 exosomes compared to the normal counterparts, respectively. As expected, pro-angiogenic proteins including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and CD44 variant isoform 5 (CD44v5) are among the up-regulated proteins, whereas angio-suppressive protein, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) was down-regulated in C666-1 exosomes. Further confocal microscopic study and Western blotting clearly demonstrated that the alteration of ICAM-1, and TSP-1 expressions in recipient HUVECs are due to internalization of exosomes. Taken together, these data strongly indicated the critical roles of identified angiogenic proteins in the involvement of exosomes-induced angiogenesis, which could potentially be developed as therapeutic targets in future. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Formation of W(3)A(1) electron-transferring flavoprotein (ETF) hydroquinone in the trimethylamine dehydrogenase x ETF protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, M H; Scrutton, N S; Hille, R

    2000-04-28

    The electron-transferring flavoprotein (ETF) from Methylophilus methylotrophus (sp. W(3)A(1)) exhibits unusual oxidation-reduction properties and can only be reduced to the level of the semiquinone under most circumstances (including turnover with its physiological reductant, trimethylamine dehydrogenase (TMADH), or reaction with strong reducing reagents such as sodium dithionite). In the present study, we demonstrate that ETF can be reduced fully to its hydroquinone form both enzymatically and chemically when it is in complex with TMADH. Quantitative titration of the TMADH x ETF protein complex with sodium dithionite shows that a total of five electrons are taken up by the system, indicating that full reduction of ETF occurs within the complex. The results indicate that the oxidation-reduction properties of ETF are perturbed upon binding to TMADH, a conclusion further supported by the observation of a spectral change upon formation of the TMADH x ETF complex that is due to a change in the environment of the FAD of ETF. The results are discussed in the context of ETF undergoing a conformational change during formation of the TMADH x ETF electron transfer complex, which modulates the spectral and oxidation-reduction properties of ETF such that full reduction of the protein can take place.

  5. Deciphering the Evolution and Development of the Cuticle by Studying Lipid Transfer Proteins in Mosses and Liverworts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiina A. Salminen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available When plants conquered land, they developed specialized organs, tissues, and cells in order to survive in this new and harsh terrestrial environment. New cell polymers such as the hydrophobic lipid-based polyesters cutin, suberin, and sporopollenin were also developed for protection against water loss, radiation, and other potentially harmful abiotic factors. Cutin and waxes are the main components of the cuticle, which is the waterproof layer covering the epidermis of many aerial organs of land plants. Although the in vivo functions of the group of lipid binding proteins known as lipid transfer proteins (LTPs are still rather unclear, there is accumulating evidence suggesting a role for LTPs in the transfer and deposition of monomers required for cuticle assembly. In this review, we first present an overview of the data connecting LTPs with cuticle synthesis. Furthermore, we propose liverworts and mosses as attractive model systems for revealing the specific function and activity of LTPs in the biosynthesis and evolution of the plant cuticle.

  6. A Quantitative Theoretical Framework For Protein-Induced Fluorescence Enhancement-Förster-Type Resonance Energy Transfer (PIFE-FRET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Eitan; Ploetz, Evelyn; Hohlbein, Johannes; Cordes, Thorben; Weiss, Shimon

    2016-07-07

    Single-molecule, protein-induced fluorescence enhancement (PIFE) serves as a molecular ruler at molecular distances inaccessible to other spectroscopic rulers such as Förster-type resonance energy transfer (FRET) or photoinduced electron transfer. In order to provide two simultaneous measurements of two distances on different molecular length scales for the analysis of macromolecular complexes, we and others recently combined measurements of PIFE and FRET (PIFE-FRET) on the single molecule level. PIFE relies on steric hindrance of the fluorophore Cy3, which is covalently attached to a biomolecule of interest, to rotate out of an excited-state trans isomer to the cis isomer through a 90° intermediate. In this work, we provide a theoretical framework that accounts for relevant photophysical and kinetic parameters of PIFE-FRET, show how this framework allows the extraction of the fold-decrease in isomerization mobility from experimental data, and show how these results provide information on changes in the accessible volume of Cy3. The utility of this model is then demonstrated for experimental results on PIFE-FRET measurement of different protein-DNA interactions. The proposed model and extracted parameters could serve as a benchmark to allow quantitative comparison of PIFE effects in different biological systems.

  7. High-Resolution Genetics Identifies the Lipid Transfer Protein Sec14p as Target for Antifungal Ergolines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ireos Filipuzzi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Invasive infections by fungal pathogens cause more deaths than malaria worldwide. We found the ergoline compound NGx04 in an antifungal screen, with selectivity over mammalian cells. High-resolution chemogenomics identified the lipid transfer protein Sec14p as the target of NGx04 and compound-resistant mutations in Sec14p define compound-target interactions in the substrate binding pocket of the protein. Beyond its essential lipid transfer function in a variety of pathogenic fungi, Sec14p is also involved in secretion of virulence determinants essential for the pathogenicity of fungi such as Cryptococcus neoformans, making Sec14p an attractive antifungal target. Consistent with this dual function, we demonstrate that NGx04 inhibits the growth of two clinical isolates of C. neoformans and that NGx04-related compounds have equal and even higher potency against C. neoformans. Furthermore NGx04 analogues showed fungicidal activity against a fluconazole resistant C. neoformans strain. In summary, we present genetic evidence that NGx04 inhibits fungal Sec14p and initial data supporting NGx04 as a novel antifungal starting point.

  8. Formation of long-lived radicals on proteins by radical transfer from heme enzymes--a common process?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostdal, H; Andersen, H J; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    concentrations were observed after limited digestion, although this effect was less marked with the HRP/H2O2/BSA system than with Fe(III)Mb/H2O2/BSA, consistent with different modes of radical transfer. More extensive digestion of BSA decreased the radical concentration to levels below those detected with native...... investigated using horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/H2O2, in the presence and absence of added tyrosine. Incubation of HRP with H2O2 and bovine or human serum albumins, in the presence and absence of tyrosine, gave long-lived albumin-derived radicals as detected by EPR spectroscopy. Evidence has been obtained...... for these albumin radicals being located on buried tyrosine residues on the basis of blocking experiments. The effect of protein conformation on radical transfer has been investigated using partial proteolytic digestion prior to protein oxidation. With HRP/H2O2/BSA and Fe(III)Mb/H2O2/BSA increased radical...

  9. Sequencing Larger Intact Proteins (30-70 kDa) with Activated Ion Electron Transfer Dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Nicholas M.; Westphall, Michael S.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2018-01-01

    The analysis of intact proteins via mass spectrometry can offer several benefits to proteome characterization, although the majority of top-down experiments focus on proteoforms in a relatively low mass range (AI-ETD) to proteins in the 30-70 kDa range. AI-ETD leverages infrared photo-activation concurrent to ETD reactions to improve sequence-informative product ion generation. This method generates more product ions and greater sequence coverage than conventional ETD, higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD), and ETD combined with supplemental HCD activation (EThcD). Importantly, AI-ETD provides the most thorough protein characterization for every precursor ion charge state investigated in this study, making it suitable as a universal fragmentation method in top-down experiments. Additionally, we highlight several acquisition strategies that can benefit characterization of larger proteins with AI-ETD, including combination of spectra from multiple ETD reaction times for a given precursor ion, multiple spectral acquisitions of the same precursor ion, and combination of spectra from two different dissociation methods (e.g., AI-ETD and HCD). In all, AI-ETD shows great promise as a method for dissociating larger intact protein ions as top-down proteomics continues to advance into larger mass ranges. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Protein hydrogen exchange measured at single-residue resolution by electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rand, Kasper D; Zehl, Martin; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2009-01-01

    Because of unparalleled sensitivity and tolerance to protein size, mass spectrometry (MS) has become a popular method for measuring the solution hydrogen (1H/2H) exchange (HX) of biologically relevant protein states. While incorporated deuterium can be localized to different regions by pepsin....... The deuterium labeling pattern of beta2-microglobulin is retained in the gaseous fragment ions by employing mild declustering conditions for electrospray ionization. A recently developed model peptide is used to arrive at such ion source declustering conditions that prevent the occurrence of intramolecular gas...

  11. Protein repellent hydrophilic grafts prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization from polypropylene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Charlotte Juel; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Eskimergen, Rüya

    2012-01-01

    with Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Water Contact Angle (WCA) measurements. Confocal fluorescence microscopy of modified and unmodified substrates immersed in labelled insulin aspart showed superior repulsion of this protein for the poly(PEGMA) grafts, due...

  12. Metal-like transport in proteins: A new paradigm for biological electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvankar, Nikhil; Vargas, Madeline; Tuominen, Mark; Lovley, Derek

    2012-02-01

    Electron flow in biologically proteins generally occurs via tunneling or hopping and the possibility of electron delocalization has long been discounted. Here we report metal-like transport in protein nanofilaments, pili, of bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens that challenges this long-standing belief [1]. Pili exhibit conductivities comparable to synthetic organic metallic nanostructures. The temperature, magnetic field and gate-voltage dependence of pili conductivity is akin to that of quasi-1D disordered metals, suggesting a metal-insulator transition. Magnetoresistance (MR) data provide evidence for quantum interference and weak localization at room temperature, as well as a temperature and field-induced crossover from negative to positive MR. Furthermore, pili can be doped with protons. Structural studies suggest the possibility of molecular pi stacking in pili, causing electron delocalization. Reducing the disorder increases the metallic nature of pili. These electronically functional proteins are a new class of electrically conductive biological proteins that can be used to generate future generation of inexpensive and environmentally-sustainable nanomaterials and nanolectronic devices such as transistors and supercapacitors. [1] Malvankar et al. Nature Nanotechnology, 6, 573-579 (2011)

  13. Web-based computational chemistry education with CHARMMing III: Reduction potentials of electron transfer proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Scott Perrin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A module for fast determination of reduction potentials, E°, of redox-active proteins has been implemented in the CHARMM INterface and Graphics (CHARMMing web portal (www.charmming.org. The free energy of reduction, which is proportional to E°, is composed of an intrinsic contribution due to the redox site and an environmental contribution due to the protein and solvent. Here, the intrinsic contribution is selected from a library of pre-calculated density functional theory values for each type of redox site and redox couple, while the environmental contribution is calculated from a crystal structure of the protein using Poisson-Boltzmann continuum electrostatics. An accompanying lesson demonstrates a calculation of E°. In this lesson, an ionizable residue in a [4Fe-4S]-protein that causes a pH-dependent E° is identified, and the E° of a mutant that would test the identification is predicted. This demonstration is valuable to both computational chemistry students and researchers interested in predicting sequence determinants of E° for mutagenesis.

  14. Sequential Proton Loss Electron Transfer in Deactivation of Iron(IV) Binding Protein by Tyrosine Based Food Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ning; Skibsted, Leif H

    2017-08-02

    The iron(IV) binding protein ferrylmyoglobin, MbFe(IV)═O, was found to be reduced by tyrosine based food components in aqueous solution through a sequential proton loss electron transfer reaction mechanism without binding to the protein as confirmed by isothermal titration calorimetry. Dopamine and epinephrine are the most efficient food components reducing ferrylmyoglobin to oxymyoglobin, MbFe(II)O 2 , and metmyoglobin, MbFe(III), as revealed by multivariate curve resolution alternating least-squares with second order rate constants of 33.6 ± 2.3 L/mol/s (ΔH ⧧ of 19 ± 5 kJ/mol, ΔS ⧧ of -136 ± 18 J/mol K) and 228.9 ± 13.3 L/mol/s (ΔH ⧧ of 110 ± 7 kJ/mol, ΔS ⧧ of 131 ± 25 J/mol K), respectively, at pH 7.4 and 25 °C. The other tyrosine based food components were found to reduce ferrylmyoglobin to metmyoglobin with similar reduction rates at pH 7.4 and 25 °C. These reduction reactions were enhanced by protonation of ferrylmyoglobin and facilitated proton transfer at acidic conditions. Enthalpy-entropy compensation effects were observed for the activation parameters (ΔH ⧧ and ΔS ⧧ ), indicating the common reaction mechanism. Moreover, principal component analysis combined with heat map were performed to understand the relationship between density functional theory calculated molecular descriptors and kinetic data, which was further modeled by partial least squares for quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis. In addition, a three tyrosine residue containing protein, lysozyme, was also found to be able to reduce ferrylmyoglobin with a second order rate constant of 66 ± 28 L/mol/s as determined by a competitive kinetic method.

  15. Direct transfer of viral and cellular proteins from varicella-zoster virus-infected non-neuronal cells to human axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryan, Sergei; Yee, Michael B; Glick, Yair; Gerber, Doron; Kepten, Eldad; Garini, Yuval; Yang, In Hong; Kinchington, Paul R; Goldstein, Ronald S

    2015-01-01

    Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV), the alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella upon primary infection and Herpes zoster (shingles) following reactivation in latently infected neurons, is known to be fusogenic. It forms polynuclear syncytia in culture, in varicella skin lesions and in infected fetal human ganglia xenografted to mice. After axonal infection using VZV expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in compartmentalized microfluidic cultures there is diffuse filling of axons with GFP as well as punctate fluorescence corresponding to capsids. Use of viruses with fluorescent fusions to VZV proteins reveals that both proteins encoded by VZV genes and those of the infecting cell are transferred in bulk from infecting non-neuronal cells to axons. Similar transfer of protein to axons was observed following cell associated HSV1 infection. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments provide evidence that this transfer is by diffusion of proteins from the infecting cells into axons. Time-lapse movies and immunocytochemical experiments in co-cultures demonstrate that non-neuronal cells fuse with neuronal somata and proteins from both cell types are present in the syncytia formed. The fusogenic nature of VZV therefore may enable not only conventional entry of virions and capsids into axonal endings in the skin by classical entry mechanisms, but also by cytoplasmic fusion that permits viral protein transfer to neurons in bulk.

  16. Horizontal transfer of a eukaryotic plastid-targeted protein gene to cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keeling Patrick J

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Horizontal or lateral transfer of genetic material between distantly related prokaryotes has been shown to play a major role in the evolution of bacterial and archaeal genomes, but exchange of genes between prokaryotes and eukaryotes is not as well understood. In particular, gene flow from eukaryotes to prokaryotes is rarely documented with strong support, which is unusual since prokaryotic genomes appear to readily accept foreign genes. Results Here, we show that abundant marine cyanobacteria in the related genera Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus acquired a key Calvin cycle/glycolytic enzyme from a eukaryote. Two non-homologous forms of fructose bisphosphate aldolase (FBA are characteristic of eukaryotes and prokaryotes respectively. However, a eukaryotic gene has been inserted immediately upstream of the ancestral prokaryotic gene in several strains (ecotypes of Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus. In one lineage this new gene has replaced the ancestral gene altogether. The eukaryotic gene is most closely related to the plastid-targeted FBA from red algae. This eukaryotic-type FBA once replaced the plastid/cyanobacterial type in photosynthetic eukaryotes, hinting at a possible functional advantage in Calvin cycle reactions. The strains that now possess this eukaryotic FBA are scattered across the tree of Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus, perhaps because the gene has been transferred multiple times among cyanobacteria, or more likely because it has been selectively retained only in certain lineages. Conclusion A gene for plastid-targeted FBA has been transferred from red algae to cyanobacteria, where it has inserted itself beside its non-homologous, functional analogue. Its current distribution in Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus is punctate, suggesting a complex history since its introduction to this group.

  17. Microvesicle and tunneling nanotube mediated intercellular transfer of g-protein coupled receptors in cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guescini, M.; Leo, G.; Genedani, S.; Carone, C.; Pederzoli, F.; Ciruela, F.; Guidolin, D.; Stocchi, V.; Mantuano, M.; Borroto-Escuela, D.O.; Fuxe, K.; Agnati, L.F.

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence shows that cells exchange collections of signals via microvesicles (MVs) and tunneling nano-tubes (TNTs). In this paper we have investigated whether in cell cultures GPCRs can be transferred by means of MVs and TNTs from a source cell to target cells. Western blot, transmission electron microscopy and gene expression analyses demonstrate that A 2A and D 2 receptors are present in released MVs. In order to further demonstrate the involvement of MVs in cell-to-cell communication we created two populations of cells (HEK293T and COS-7) transiently transfected with D 2 R-CFP or A 2A R-YFP. These two types of cells were co-cultured, and FRET analysis demonstrated simultaneously positive cells to the D 2 R-CFP and A 2A R-YFP. Fluorescence microscopy analysis also showed that GPCRs can move from one cell to another also by means of TNTs. Finally, recipient cells pre-incubated for 24 h with A 2A R positive MVs were treated with the adenosine A 2A receptor agonist CGS-21680. The significant increase in cAMP accumulation clearly demonstrated that A 2A Rs were functionally competent in target cells. These findings demonstrate that A 2A receptors capable of recognizing and decoding extracellular signals can be safely transferred via MVs from source to target cells.

  18. Microvesicle and tunneling nanotube mediated intercellular transfer of g-protein coupled receptors in cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guescini, M. [Department of Biomolecular Sciences, University of Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , 61029 Urbino (Italy); Leo, G.; Genedani, S. [Department Biomedical Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia (Italy); Carone, C. [Department Biomedical Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia (Italy); IRCCS San Camillo Lido, Venezia (Italy); Pederzoli, F. [Department Biomedical Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia (Italy); Ciruela, F. [Departament Patologia i Terapeutica Experimental, Universitat de Barcelona (Spain); Guidolin, D. [Department of Human Anatomy and Physiology, University of Padua (Italy); Stocchi, V.; Mantuano, M. [Department of Biomolecular Sciences, University of Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , 61029 Urbino (Italy); Borroto-Escuela, D.O.; Fuxe, K. [Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Agnati, L.F., E-mail: luigiagnati@tin.it [IRCCS San Camillo Lido, Venezia (Italy)

    2012-03-10

    Recent evidence shows that cells exchange collections of signals via microvesicles (MVs) and tunneling nano-tubes (TNTs). In this paper we have investigated whether in cell cultures GPCRs can be transferred by means of MVs and TNTs from a source cell to target cells. Western blot, transmission electron microscopy and gene expression analyses demonstrate that A{sub 2A} and D{sub 2} receptors are present in released MVs. In order to further demonstrate the involvement of MVs in cell-to-cell communication we created two populations of cells (HEK293T and COS-7) transiently transfected with D{sub 2}R-CFP or A{sub 2A}R-YFP. These two types of cells were co-cultured, and FRET analysis demonstrated simultaneously positive cells to the D{sub 2}R-CFP and A{sub 2A}R-YFP. Fluorescence microscopy analysis also showed that GPCRs can move from one cell to another also by means of TNTs. Finally, recipient cells pre-incubated for 24 h with A{sub 2A}R positive MVs were treated with the adenosine A{sub 2A} receptor agonist CGS-21680. The significant increase in cAMP accumulation clearly demonstrated that A{sub 2A}Rs were functionally competent in target cells. These findings demonstrate that A{sub 2A} receptors capable of recognizing and decoding extracellular signals can be safely transferred via MVs from source to target cells.

  19. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) imaging of protein–protein interactions within deep tissues of living subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragulescu-Andrasi, Anca; Chan, Carmel T.; Massoud, Tarik F.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2011-01-01

    Identifying protein–protein interactions (PPIs) is essential for understanding various disease mechanisms and developing new therapeutic approaches. Current methods for assaying cellular intermolecular interactions are mainly used for cells in culture and have limited use for the noninvasive assessment of small animal disease models. Here, we describe red light-emitting reporter systems based on bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) that allow for assaying PPIs both in cell culture and deep tissues of small animals. These BRET systems consist of the recently developed Renilla reniformis luciferase (RLuc) variants RLuc8 and RLuc8.6, used as BRET donors, combined with two red fluorescent proteins, TagRFP and TurboFP635, as BRET acceptors. In addition to the native coelenterazine luciferase substrate, we used the synthetic derivative coelenterazine-v, which further red-shifts the emission maxima of Renilla luciferases by 35 nm. We show the use of these BRET systems for ratiometric imaging of both cells in culture and deep-tissue small animal tumor models and validate their applicability for studying PPIs in mice in the context of rapamycin-induced FK506 binding protein 12 (FKBP12)-FKBP12 rapamycin binding domain (FRB) association. These red light-emitting BRET systems have great potential for investigating PPIs in the context of drug screening and target validation applications. PMID:21730157

  20. Fis protein induced λF-DNA bending observed by single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi-Cheng, Fu; Wunshain, Fann; Yuan Hanna, S.

    2006-03-01

    Fis, a site-specific DNA binding protein, regulates many biological processes including recombination, transcription, and replication in E.coli. Fis induced DNA bending plays an important role in regulating these functions and bending angle range from ˜50 to 95 dependent on the DNA sequence. For instance, the average bending angle of λF-DNA (26 bp, 8.8nm long, contained λF binding site on the center) measured by gel mobility shift assays was ˜ 94 . But the traditional method cannot provide information about the dynamics and the angle distribution. In this study, λF-DNA was labeled with donor (Alexa Fluor 546) and acceptor (Alexa Fluor 647) dyes on its two 5' ends and the donor-acceptor distances were measured using single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer (sp-FRET) with and without the present of Fis protein. Combing with structure information of Fis-DNA complex, the sp-FRET results are used to estimate the protein induced DNA bending angle distribution and dynamics.

  1. Virus-Like Particles That Can Deliver Proteins and RNA | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present invention describes novel virus-like particles (VLPs) that are capable of binding to and replicating within a target mammalian cell, including human cells. The claimed VLPs are safer than viral delivery because they are incapable of re-infecting target cells. The National Cancer Institute's Protein Expression Laboratory seeks parties interested in licensing the novel delivery of RNA to mammalian cells using virus-like particles.

  2. Liquid and vapour water transfer through whey protein/lipid emulsion films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokoszka, Sabina; Debeaufort, Frederic; Lenart, Andrzej; Voilley, Andree

    2010-08-15

    Edible films and coatings based on protein/lipid combinations are among the new products being developed in order to reduce the use of plastic packaging polymers for food applications. This study was conducted to determine the effect of rapeseed oil on selected physicochemical properties of cast whey protein films. Films were cast from heated (80 degrees C for 30 min) aqueous solutions of whey protein isolate (WPI, 100 g kg(-1) of water) containing glycerol (50 g kg(-1) of WPI) as a plasticiser and different levels of added rapeseed oil (0, 1, 2, 3 and 4% w/w of WPI). Measurements of film microstructure, laser light-scattering granulometry, differential scanning calorimetry, wetting properties and water vapour permeability (WVP) were made. The emulsion structure in the film suspension changed significantly during drying, with oil creaming and coalescence occurring. Increasing oil concentration led to a 2.5-fold increase in surface hydrophobicity and decreases in WVP and denaturation temperature (T(max)). Film structure and surface properties explain the moisture absorption and film swelling as a function of moisture level and time and consequently the WVP behaviour. Small amounts of rapeseed oil favourably affect the WVP of WPI films, particularly at higher humidities. Copyright (c) 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Impact of glutathione on the allergenicity of the peach lipid transfer protein Pru p 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Casado, C; Tordesillas, L; Kinkel, J; Starkl, P; Cuesta-Herranz, J; Roth-Walter F; Díaz-Perales, A; Jensen-Jarolim, E

    2015-01-01

    The allergenic potential of proteins can be altered under various physicochemical conditions. Glutathione (GSH) is a reducing agent that is used as an antioxidant in food products. We aimed to characterize the natural folding of peach proteins and test the allergenicity of reduced and natural Pru p 3, the major peach allergen. Pru p 3 was purified from peach, and its conformation was analyzed by means of circular dichroism. Using a thiol fluorescent probe, reduced proteins were detected in fresh peach. GSH-reduced Pru p 3 was tested in vitro for T-cell proliferation and in vivo using skin prick testing. GSH-reduced Pru p 3 produced variable skin prick reactions in peach-allergic patients. The proliferative response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from allergic patients to reduced Pru p 3 tended to be less intense, whereas secretion of the cytokines IFN-γ, IL-5, and IL-10 was comparable. In a pool of sera from peach-allergic patients, reduction hardly impaired IgE-binding. Moreover, the stability of reduced Pru p 3 to gastrointestinal digestion was similar to that of the natural form. GSH can at least transiently reduce Pru p 3. We found that the effect of reduction on the allergenicity of Pru p 3 varied. Therefore, as an additive, GSH does not seem to eliminate the risk of reactions for peach-allergic patients.

  4. Patient considerations and clinical impact of cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors in the management of dyslipidemia: focus on anacetrapib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyares MA

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Marta A Miyares, Kyle DavisPharmacy Department, Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL, USAAbstract: Cardiovascular disease (CVD is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality within the United States and worldwide. Although targeting low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C in the prevention of CVD has been shown to be effective, evidence exists to indicate that significant cardiovascular (CV risk remains in patients receiving 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins – a risk that may be correlated with low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C. Among the various tactics under investigation to increase HDL-C, inhibition of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP appears the most adept to raise these levels. Although torcetrapib, a CETP inhibitor, demonstrated significant beneficial changes in HDL-C and LDL-C after 12 months of therapy when coadministered with atorvastatin, patients in the torcetrapib arm experienced a rise in mortality, including increased risk of death from CV and non-CV causes as well as a significant rise in major CV events. Later studies established that the adverse effects of torcetrapib were produced from molecule-specific off-target effects and not to the mechanism of CETP inhibition. These untoward outcomes have not been detected with anacetrapib, the third of the CETP inhibitors to enter Phase III trials. Furthermore, treatment with anacetrapib revealed both a statistically significant decrease in LDL-C and increase in HDL-C over placebo. While the place in therapy of niacin and fibrates to reduce CV events is currently in question secondary to the Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome with Low HDL Cholesterol/High Triglyceride and Impact on Global Health Outcomes and the Action to Control CV Risk in Diabetes trials, the ongoing large-scale, randomized–placebo, controlled-outcomes study with anacetrapib coadministered with statin treatment will not

  5. Cardiac expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein is increased in obesity and serves to attenuate cardiac triglyceride accumulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Emil D; Nielsen, Jan M; Hellgren, Lars I

    2009-01-01

    Obesity causes lipid accumulation in the heart and may lead to lipotoxic heart disease. Traditionally, the size of the cardiac triglyceride pool is thought to reflect the balance between uptake and beta-oxidation of fatty acids. However, triglycerides can also be exported from cardiomyocytes via...... secretion of apolipoproteinB-containing (apoB) lipoproteins. Lipoprotein formation depends on expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP); the mouse expresses two isoforms of MTP, A and B. Since many aspects of the link between obesity-induced cardiac disease and cardiac lipid metabolism...... remain unknown, we investigated how cardiac lipoprotein synthesis affects cardiac expression of triglyceride metabolism-controlling genes, insulin sensitivity, and function in obese mice. Heart-specific ablation of MTP-A in mice using Cre-loxP technology impaired upregulation of MTP expression...

  6. CoMFA, CoMSIA and Eigenvalue Analysis on Dibenzodioxepinone and Dibenzodioxocinone Derivatives as Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-sheng Cheng

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: CoMFA, CoMSIA and eigenvalue analysis (EVA were performed to study the structural features of 61 diverse dibenzodioxepinone and dibenzodioxocinone analogues to probe cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP inhibitory activity. Three methods yielded statistically significant models upon assessment of cross-validation, bootstrapping, and progressive scrambling. This was further validated by an external set of 13 derivatives. Our results demonstrate that three models have a good interpolation as well as extrapolation. The hydrophobic features were confirmed to contribute significantly to inhibitor potencies, while a pre-oriented hydrogen bond provided by the hydroxyl group at the 3-position indicated a good correlation with previous SAR, and a hydrogen bond acceptor may play a crucial role in CETP inhibition. These derived models may help us to gain a deeper understanding of the binding interaction of these lactone-based compounds and aid in the design of new potent compounds against CETP.

  7. Lipid Exchange Mechanism of the Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Clarified by Atomistic and Coarse-grained Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koivuniemi, A.; Vuorela, T.; Kovanen, P. T.

    2012-01-01

    molecular dynamics simulations to unravel the mechanisms associated with the CETP-mediated lipid exchange. To this end we used both atomistic and coarse-grained models whose results were consistent with each other. We found CETP to bind to the surface of high density lipoprotein (HDL) -like lipid droplets......Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) transports cholesteryl esters, triglycerides, and phospholipids between different lipoprotein fractions in blood plasma. The inhibition of CETP has been shown to be a sound strategy to prevent and treat the development of coronary heart disease. We employed...... evidence that helix X acts as a lid which conducts lipid exchange by alternating the open and closed states. The findings have potential for the design of novel molecular agents to inhibit the activity of CETP....

  8. Effects of medium-chain fatty acids and oleic acid on blood lipids, lipoproteins, glucose, insulin, and lipid transfer protein activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tholstrup, T.; Ehnholm, C.; Jauhiainen, M.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Dietary medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) are of nutritional interest because they are more easily absorbed from dietary medium-chain triacylglycerols (MCTs) than are long-chain fatty acids from, for example, vegetable oils. It has generally been claimed that MCFAs do not increase plasma...... cholesterol, although this claim is poorly documented. Objective: We compared the effects of a diet rich in either MCFAs or oleic acid on fasting blood lipids, lipoproteins, glucose, insulin, and lipid transfer protein activities in healthy men. Design: In a study with a double-blind, randomized, crossover...... plasma total triacylglycerol (P = 0.0361), and higher plasma glucose (P = 0.033). Plasma HDL-cholesterol and insulin concentrations and activities of cholesterol ester transfer protein and phospholipid transfer protein did not differ significantly between the diets. Conclusions: Compared with fat high...

  9. [A history and review of cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors and their contribution to the understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of high density lipoprotein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, Pablo; Schreier, Laura

    2014-01-01

    There is irrefutable evidence that statins reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in a magnitude proportional to the intensity of the decrease in cholesterol transport by the low density lipoproteins. Despite this great advance there is still a residual risk of cardiovascular events. For this reason, an increase in the levels of high density lipoprotein is considered in order to boost the main action of this lipoprotein, which is reverse cholesterol transport. Distinct classes of evidence (epidemiological, genetic, and pathophysiological) show that the inhibition and/or modulation of cholesterol ester transfer protein increases plasma high density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels. The main reason for presenting this review is to look at the physiology of cholesterol ester transfer protein, its interrelationship with high density lipoproteins, and to give an update on the development of different cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitor/modulator molecules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEA. All rights reserved.

  10. Basal-bolus insulin therapy reduces maternal triglycerides in gestational diabetes without modifying cholesteryl ester transfer protein activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmos, Pablo R; Borzone, Gisella R

    2017-09-01

    Macrosomia in the offspring of overweight/obese mothers with glucose-controlled gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is due to excessive rise of maternal triglycerides (TG). We aimed to ascertain whether basal-bolus insulin therapy (BBIT), or other components of the treatment, could reduce TG in GDM. We studied the records of 131 singleton pregnancies with GDM, using stepwise multiple linear regression, Mann-Whitney, χ 2 , and Jonckheere-Terpstra tests. As maternal TG increased steadily during normal pregnancy, these were transformed as z-scores. The atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) was calculated as a measure of cholesteryl ester transfer protein activity. Multiple regression showed that only BBIT (but neither limitation of weight gain nor metformin) reduced maternal TG z-scores (P = 0.011). When the 131 pregnancies were split into two groups - without BBIT (n = 58; HbA1c = 5.3 ± 0.3%) and with BBIT (n = 73; HbA1c = 5.4 ± 0.6; P = 0.2005) - we observed that BBIT (n = 73) reduced maternal TG z-scores in a dose-related fashion (Jonckheere-Terpstra P = 0.03817). The atherogenic index of plasma remained within normal range in both groups. BBIT (but not weight gain control nor metformin) reduced maternal TG in mothers with glucose-controlled GDM. This beneficial effect of BBIT was not related to changes in the cholesteryl ester transfer protein activity. © 2017 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  11. Role of Tim50 in the transfer of precursor proteins from the outer to the inner membrane of mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokranjac, Dejana; Sichting, Martin; Popov-Celeketić, Dusan; Mapa, Koyeli; Gevorkyan-Airapetov, Lada; Zohary, Keren; Hell, Kai; Azem, Abdussalam; Neupert, Walter

    2009-03-01

    Transport of essentially all matrix and a number of inner membrane proteins is governed, entirely or in part, by N-terminal presequences and requires a coordinated action of the translocases of outer and inner mitochondrial membranes (TOM and TIM23 complexes). Here, we have analyzed Tim50, a subunit of the TIM23 complex that is implicated in transfer of precursors from TOM to TIM23. Tim50 is recruited to the TIM23 complex via Tim23 in an interaction that is essentially independent of the rest of the translocase. We find Tim50 in close proximity to the intermembrane space side of the TOM complex where it recognizes both types of TIM23 substrates, those that are to be transported into the matrix and those destined to the inner membrane, suggesting that Tim50 recognizes presequences. This function of Tim50 depends on its association with TIM23. We conclude that the efficient transfer of precursors between TOM and TIM23 complexes requires the concerted action of Tim50 with Tim23.

  12. NMR of proteins (4Fe-4S): structural properties and intramolecular electron transfer; RMN de proteines (4Fe-4S): proprietes structurales et transfert electronique intramoleculaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, J G

    1996-10-17

    NMR started to be applied to Fe-S proteins in the seventies. Its use has recently been enlarged as the problems arising from the paramagnetic polymetallic clusters ware overcome. Applications to [4Fe-4S] are presented herein. The information derived thereof deepens the understanding of the redox properties of these proteins which play a central role in the metabolism of bacterial cells. The secondary structure elements and the overall folding of Chromatium vinosum ferredoxin (Cv Fd) in solution have been established by NMR. The unique features of this sequence have been shown to fold as an {alpha} helix at the C-terminus and as a loop between two cysteines ligand of one cluster: these two parts localize in close proximity from one another. The interaction between nuclear and electronic spins is a source of additional structural information for (4Fe-AS] proteins. The conformation of the cysteine-ligands, as revealed by the Fe-(S{sub {gamma}}-C{sub {beta}}-H{sub {beta}})Cys dihedral angles, is related to the chemical shifts of the signals associated with the protons of these residues. The longitudinal relaxation times of the protons depend on their distance to the cluster. A quantitative relationship has been established and used to show that the solution structure of the high-potential ferredoxin from Cv differs significantly from the crystal structure around Phe-48. Both parameters (chemical shifts and longitudinal relaxation times) give also insight into the electronic and magnetic properties of the [4Fe-4S] clusters. The rate of intramolecular electron transfer between the two [4FE-4S] clusters of ferredoxins has been measured by NMR. It is far slower in the case of Cv Fd than for shorter ferredoxins. The difference may be associated with changes in the magnetic and/or electronic properties of one cluster. The strong paramagnetism of the [4Fe-4S] clusters, which originally limited the applicability of NMR to proteins containing these cofactors, has been proven

  13. Applying protein-based amide proton transfer MR imaging to distinguish solitary brain metastases from glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hao; Zou, Tianyu; Wang, Xianlong; Du, Yongxing; Jiang, Chunxiu; Ma, Ling; Zhu, Jianbin; He, Wen; Rui, Qihong; Wen, Zhibo [Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Department of Radiology, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Lou, Huiling [The First People' Hospital of Guangzhou, Department of Geriatrics, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Jiang, Shanshan [Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Department of Radiology, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of MR Research, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Huang, Zhongqing [Shantou University Medical College, Department of Medical Image Center, Yuebei People' s Hospital, Shantou, Guangdong (China); Zhou, Jianyuan [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of MR Research, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2017-11-15

    To determine the utility of amide proton transfer-weighted (APTw) MR imaging in distinguishing solitary brain metastases (SBMs) from glioblastomas (GBMs). Forty-five patients with SBMs and 43 patients with GBMs underwent conventional and APT-weighted sequences before clinical intervention. The APTw parameters and relative APTw (rAPTw) parameters in the tumour core and the peritumoral brain zone (PBZ) were obtained and compared between SBMs and GBMs. The receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to assess the best parameter for distinguishing between the two groups. The APTw{sub max}, APTw{sub min}, APTw{sub mean}, rAPTw{sub max}, rAPTw{sub min} or rAPTw{sub mean} values in the tumour core were not significantly different between the SBM and GBM groups (P = 0.141, 0.361, 0.221, 0.305, 0.578 and 0.448, respectively). However, the APTw{sub max}, APTw{sub min}, APTw{sub mean}, rAPTw{sub max}, rAPTw{sub min} or rAPTw{sub mean} values in the PBZ were significantly lower in the SBM group than in the GBM group (P < 0.001). The APTw{sub min} values had the highest area under the ROC curve 0.905 and accuracy 85.2% in discriminating between the two neoplasms. As a noninvasive imaging method, APT-weighted MR imaging can be used to distinguish SBMs from GBMs. (orig.)

  14. Submolecular Gates Self-Assemble for Hot-Electron Transfer in Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip-Granit, Neta; Goldberg, Eran; Samish, Ilan; Ashur, Idan; van der Boom, Milko E; Cohen, Hagai; Scherz, Avigdor

    2017-07-27

    Redox reactions play key roles in fundamental biological processes. The related spatial organization of donors and acceptors is assumed to undergo evolutionary optimization facilitating charge mobilization within the relevant biological context. Experimental information from submolecular functional sites is needed to understand the organization strategies and driving forces involved in the self-development of structure-function relationships. Here we exploit chemically resolved electrical measurements (CREM) to probe the atom-specific electrostatic potentials (ESPs) in artificial arrays of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) derivatives that provide model systems for photoexcited (hot) electron donation and withdrawal. On the basis of computations we show that native BChl's in the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) self-assemble at their ground-state as aligned gates for functional charge transfer. The combined computational and experimental results further reveal how site-specific polarizability perpendicular to the molecular plane enhances the hot-electron transport. Maximal transport efficiency is predicted for a specific, ∼5 Å, distance above the center of the metalized BChl, which is in remarkably close agreement with the distance and mutual orientation of corresponding native cofactors. These findings provide new metrics and guidelines for analysis of biological redox centers and for designing charge mobilizing machines such as artificial photosynthesis.

  15. Decay time shortening of fluorescence from donor-acceptor pair proteins using ultrafast time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Motoyoshi; Suzuki, Masayuki; Ganeev, Rashid A.; Kuroda, Hiroto; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Hamakubo, Takao; Masuda, Kazuyuki; Hayashi, Masahiro; Sakihama, Toshiko; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Kozasa, Tohru

    2007-01-01

    We improved an ultrafast time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy system and measured directly the decrease in the fluorescence decay time of the FRET signal, without any entanglement of components in the picosecond time scale from the donor-acceptor protein pairs (such as cameleon protein for calcium ion indicator, and ligand-activated GRIN-Go proteins pair). The drastic decrease in lifetime of the donor protein fluorescence under the FRET condition (e.g. a 47.8% decrease for a GRIN-Go protein pair) proves the deformation dynamics between donor and acceptor fluorescent proteins in an activated state of a mixed donor-acceptor protein pair. This study is the first clear evidence of physical contact of the GRIN-Go proteins pair using time-resolved FRET system. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most important protein family for the recognition of many chemical substances at the cell surface. They are the targets of many drugs. Simultaneously, we were able to observe the time-resolved spectra of luminous proteins at the initial stage under the FRET condition, within 10 ns from excitation. This new FRET system allows us to trace the dynamics of the interaction between proteins at the ligand-induced activated state, molecular structure change and combination or dissociation. It will be a key technology for the development of protein chip technology

  16. Regulation of energy substrate utilization and hepatic insulin sensitivity by phosphatidylcholine transfer protein/StarD2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scapa, Erez F; Pocai, Alessandro; Wu, Michele K; Gutierrez-Juarez, Roger; Glenz, Lauren; Kanno, Keishi; Li, Hua; Biddinger, Sudha; Jelicks, Linda A; Rossetti, Luciano; Cohen, David E

    2008-07-01

    Phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (PC-TP, also known as StarD2) is a highly specific intracellular lipid binding protein with accentuated expression in oxidative tissues. Here we show that decreased plasma concentrations of glucose and free fatty acids in fasting PC-TP-deficient (Pctp(-/-)) mice are attributable to increased hepatic insulin sensitivity. In hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies, Pctp(-/-) mice exhibited profound reductions in hepatic glucose production, gluconeogenesis, glycogenolysis, and glucose cycling. These changes were explained in part by the lack of PC-TP expression in liver per se and in part by marked alterations in body fat composition. Reduced respiratory quotients in Pctp(-/-) mice were indicative of preferential fatty acid utilization for energy production in oxidative tissues. In the setting of decreased hepatic fatty acid synthesis, increased clearance rates of dietary triglycerides and increased hepatic triglyceride production rates reflected higher turnover in Pctp(-/-) mice. Collectively, these data support a key biological role for PC-TP in the regulation of energy substrate utilization.

  17. Electrochemiluminescence resonance energy transfer between graphene quantum dots and graphene oxide for sensitive protein kinase activity and inhibitor sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Ru-Ping; Qiu, Wei-Bin; Zhao, Hui-Fang; Xiang, Cai-Yun; Qiu, Jian-Ding, E-mail: jdqiu@ncu.edu.cn

    2016-01-21

    Herein, a novel electrochemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (ECL-RET) biosensor using graphene quantum dots (GQDs) as donor and graphene oxide (GO) as acceptor for monitoring the activity of protein kinase was presented for the first time. Anti-phosphoserine antibody conjugated graphene oxide (Ab-GO) nonocomposite could be captured onto the phosphorylated peptide/GQDs modified electrode surface through antibody–antigen interaction in the presence of casein kinase II (CK2) and adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP), resulting in ECL from the GQDs quenching by closely contacting GO. This ECL quenching degree was positively correlated with CK2 activity. Therefore, on the basis of ECL-RET between GQDs and GO, the activity of protein kinase can be detected sensitively. This biosensor can also be used for quantitative analysis CK2 activity in serum samples and qualitative screening kinase inhibition, indicating the potential application of the developed method in biochemical fundamental research and clinical diagnosis. - Highlights: • We reported a novel ECL-RET biosensor for sensitive analysis of casein kinase II activity. • The successful ECL-RET between GQDs and GO could be established. • GQDs was employed for casein kinase II activity monitoring and inhibition assay. • Highly sensitive detection of CK2 activity and inhibition was achieved.

  18. Electrochemiluminescence resonance energy transfer between graphene quantum dots and graphene oxide for sensitive protein kinase activity and inhibitor sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ru-Ping; Qiu, Wei-Bin; Zhao, Hui-Fang; Xiang, Cai-Yun; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2016-01-21

    Herein, a novel electrochemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (ECL-RET) biosensor using graphene quantum dots (GQDs) as donor and graphene oxide (GO) as acceptor for monitoring the activity of protein kinase was presented for the first time. Anti-phosphoserine antibody conjugated graphene oxide (Ab-GO) nonocomposite could be captured onto the phosphorylated peptide/GQDs modified electrode surface through antibody-antigen interaction in the presence of casein kinase II (CK2) and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), resulting in ECL from the GQDs quenching by closely contacting GO. This ECL quenching degree was positively correlated with CK2 activity. Therefore, on the basis of ECL-RET between GQDs and GO, the activity of protein kinase can be detected sensitively. This biosensor can also be used for quantitative analysis CK2 activity in serum samples and qualitative screening kinase inhibition, indicating the potential application of the developed method in biochemical fundamental research and clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetic incorporation of the protein transduction domain of Tat into Ad5 fiber enhances gene transfer efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegal Gene P

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 has been widely explored as a gene delivery vector for a variety of diseases. Many target cells, however, express low levels of Ad5 native receptor, the Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor (CAR, and thus are resistant to Ad5 infection. The Protein Transduction Domain of the HIV Tat protein, namely PTDtat, has been shown to mediate protein transduction in a wide range of cells. We hypothesize that re-targeting Ad5 vector via the PTDtat motif would improve the efficacy of Ad5-mediated gene delivery. Results In this study, we genetically incorporated the PTDtat motif into the knob domain of Ad5 fiber, and rescued the resultant viral vector, Ad5.PTDtat. Our data showed the modification did not interfere with Ad5 binding to its native receptor CAR, suggesting Ad5 infection via the CAR pathway is retained. In addition, we found that Ad5.PTDtat exhibited enhanced gene transfer efficacy in all of the cell lines that we have tested, which included both low-CAR and high-CAR decorated cells. Competitive inhibition assays suggested the enhanced infectivity of Ad5.PTDtat was mediated by binding of the positively charged PTDtat peptide to the negatively charged epitopes on the cells' surface. Furthermore, we investigated in vivo gene delivery efficacy of Ad5.PTDtat using subcutaneous tumor models established with U118MG glioma cells, and found that Ad5.PTDtat exhibited enhanced gene transfer efficacy compared to unmodified Ad5 vector as analyzed by a non-invasive fluorescence imaging technique. Conclusion Genetic incorporation of the PTDtat motif into Ad5 fiber allowed Ad5 vectors to infect cells via an alternative PTDtat targeting motif while retaining the native CAR-mediated infection pathway. The enhanced infectivity was demonstrated in both cultured cells and in in vivo tumor models. Taken together, our study identifies a novel tropism expanded Ad5 vector that may be useful for clinical gene therapy

  20. Prevalence of sensitization to Cannabis sativa. Lipid-transfer and thaumatin-like proteins are relevant allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larramendi, Carlos H; López-Matas, M Ángeles; Ferrer, Angel; Huertas, Angel Julio; Pagán, Juan Antonio; Navarro, Luis Ángel; García-Abujeta, José Luis; Andreu, Carmen; Carnés, Jerónimo

    2013-01-01

    Although allergy to Cannabis sativa was first reported over 40 years ago, the allergenicity has scarcely been studied. The objectives of this study were to investigate the frequency of sensitization to this plant, to analyze the clinical characteristics and allergenic profile of sensitized individuals and to identify the allergens involved. Five hundred and forty-five individuals in Spain attending allergy clinics with respiratory or cutaneous symptoms underwent a skin-prick test (SPT) with C. sativa leaf extract. The extract was characterized by SDS-PAGE and 2-dimensional electrophoresis. Specific IgE to C. sativa was measured in positive SPT individuals. The clinical and allergenic profiles of sensitized individuals were investigated and the most-recognized allergens sequenced and characterized by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. Of this preselected population, 44 individuals had positive SPT to C. sativa (prevalence 8.1%). Prevalence was higher in individuals who were C. sativa smokers (14.6%). Two individuals reported mild symptoms with C. sativa. Twenty-one individuals from 32 available sera (65.6%) had positive specific IgE to C. sativa. Twelve sera recognized at least 6 different bands in a molecular-weight range of between 10 and 60 kDa. Six of them recognized a 10-kDa band, identified as a lipid transfer protein (LTP) and 8 recognized a 38-kDa band, identified as a thaumatin-like protein. There is a high prevalence of sensitization to C. sativa leaves. The clinical symptoms directly attributed to C. sativa were uncommon and mild. The sensitization profile observed suggests that C. sativa sensitization may be mediated by two mechanisms, i.e. cross-reactivity, mainly with LTP and thaumatin-like protein, and exposure-related 'de novo' sensitization. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Production of Fibronectin Binding Protein A at the surface of Lactococcus lactis increases plasmid transfer in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Pontes

    Full Text Available Lactococci are noninvasive lactic acid bacteria frequently used as protein delivery vectors and, more recently, as DNA delivery vehicles. We previously showed that Lactococcus lactis (LL expressing the Fibronectin-Binding Protein A of Staphylococcus aureus (LL-FnBPA+ showed higher internalization rates in vitro in Caco-2 cells than the native (wt lactococci and were able to deliver a eukaryotic Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP expression plasmid in 1% of human Caco-2 cells. Here, using the bovine beta-lactoglobulin (BLG, one of the major cow's milk allergen, and GFP we characterized the potential of LL-FnBPA+ as an in vivo DNA vaccine delivery vehicle. We first showed that the invasive strain LL-FnBPA+ carrying the plasmid pValac:BLG (LL-FnBPA+ BLG was more invasive than LL-BLG and showed the same invasivity as LL-FnBPA+. Then we demonstrated that the Caco-2 cells, co-incubated with LL-FnBPA+ BLG produced up to 30 times more BLG than the Caco-2 cells co-incubated with the non invasive LL-BLG. Using two different gene reporters, BLG and GFP, and two different methods of detection, EIA and fluorescence microscopy, we showed in vivo that: i in order to be effective, LL-FnBPA+ required a pre-coating with Fetal Calf Serum before oral administration; ii plasmid transfer occurred in enterocytes without regard to the strains used (invasive or not; iii the use of LL-FnBPA+ increased the number of mice producing BLG, but not the level of BLG produced. We thus confirmed the good potential of invasive recombinant lactic acid bacteria as DNA delivery vector in vivo.

  2. Characterization of membrane protein interactions in plasma membrane derived vesicles with quantitative imaging Förster resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Del Piccolo, Nuala; Hristova, Kalina

    2015-08-18

    Here we describe an experimental tool, termed quantitative imaging Förster resonance energy transfer (QI-FRET), that enables the quantitative characterization of membrane protein interactions. The QI-FRET methodology allows us to acquire binding curves and calculate association constants for complex membrane proteins in the native plasma membrane environment. The method utilizes FRET detection, and thus requires that the proteins of interest are labeled with florescent proteins, either FRET donors or FRET acceptors. Since plasma membranes of cells have complex topologies precluding the acquisition of two-dimensional binding curves, the FRET measurements are performed in plasma membrane derived vesicles that bud off cells as a result of chemical or osmotic stress. The results overviewed here are acquired in vesicles produced with an osmotic vesiculation buffer developed in our laboratory, which does not utilize harsh chemicals. The concentrations of the donor-labeled and the acceptor-labeled proteins are determined, along with the FRET efficiencies, in each vesicle. The experiments utilize transient transfection, such that a wide variety of concentrations is sampled. Then, data from hundreds of vesicles are combined to yield dimerization curves. Here we discuss recent findings about the dimerization of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), membrane proteins that control cell growth and differentiation via lateral dimerization in the plasma membrane. We focus on the dimerization of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3), a RTK that plays a critically important role in skeletal development. We study the role of different FGFR3 domains in FGFR3 dimerization in the absence of ligand, and we show that FGFR3 extracellular domains inhibit unliganded dimerization, while contacts between the juxtamembrane domains, which connect the transmembrane domains to the kinase domains, stabilize the unliganded FGFR3 dimers. Since FGFR3 has been documented to harbor many pathogenic

  3. Horizontal gene transfer of a chloroplast DnaJ-Fer protein to Thaumarchaeota and the evolutionary history of the DnaK chaperone system in Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitjean, Céline; Moreira, David; López-García, Purificación; Brochier-Armanet, Céline

    2012-11-26

    In 2004, we discovered an atypical protein in metagenomic data from marine thaumarchaeotal species. This protein, referred as DnaJ-Fer, is composed of a J domain fused to a Ferredoxin (Fer) domain. Surprisingly, the same protein was also found in Viridiplantae (green algae and land plants). Because J domain-containing proteins are known to interact with the major chaperone DnaK/Hsp70, this suggested that a DnaK protein was present in Thaumarchaeota. DnaK/Hsp70, its co-chaperone DnaJ and the nucleotide exchange factor GrpE are involved, among others, in heat shocks and heavy metal cellular stress responses. Using phylogenomic approaches we have investigated the evolutionary history of the DnaJ-Fer protein and of interacting proteins DnaK, DnaJ and GrpE in Thaumarchaeota. These proteins have very complex histories, involving several inter-domain horizontal gene transfers (HGTs) to explain the contemporary distribution of these proteins in archaea. These transfers include one from Cyanobacteria to Viridiplantae and one from Viridiplantae to Thaumarchaeota for the DnaJ-Fer protein, as well as independent HGTs from Bacteria to mesophilic archaea for the DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE system, followed by HGTs among mesophilic and thermophilic archaea. We highlight the chimerical origin of the set of proteins DnaK, DnaJ, GrpE and DnaJ-Fer in Thaumarchaeota and suggest that the HGT of these proteins has played an important role in the adaptation of several archaeal groups to mesophilic and thermophilic environments from hyperthermophilic ancestors. Finally, the evolutionary history of DnaJ-Fer provides information useful for the relative dating of the diversification of Archaeplastida and Thaumarchaeota.

  4. Horizontal gene transfer of a chloroplast DnaJ-Fer protein to Thaumarchaeota and the evolutionary history of the DnaK chaperone system in Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petitjean Céline

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2004, we discovered an atypical protein in metagenomic data from marine thaumarchaeotal species. This protein, referred as DnaJ-Fer, is composed of a J domain fused to a Ferredoxin (Fer domain. Surprisingly, the same protein was also found in Viridiplantae (green algae and land plants. Because J domain-containing proteins are known to interact with the major chaperone DnaK/Hsp70, this suggested that a DnaK protein was present in Thaumarchaeota. DnaK/Hsp70, its co-chaperone DnaJ and the nucleotide exchange factor GrpE are involved, among others, in heat shocks and heavy metal cellular stress responses. Results Using phylogenomic approaches we have investigated the evolutionary history of the DnaJ-Fer protein and of interacting proteins DnaK, DnaJ and GrpE in Thaumarchaeota. These proteins have very complex histories, involving several inter-domain horizontal gene transfers (HGTs to explain the contemporary distribution of these proteins in archaea. These transfers include one from Cyanobacteria to Viridiplantae and one from Viridiplantae to Thaumarchaeota for the DnaJ-Fer protein, as well as independent HGTs from Bacteria to mesophilic archaea for the DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE system, followed by HGTs among mesophilic and thermophilic archaea. Conclusions We highlight the chimerical origin of the set of proteins DnaK, DnaJ, GrpE and DnaJ-Fer in Thaumarchaeota and suggest that the HGT of these proteins has played an important role in the adaptation of several archaeal groups to mesophilic and thermophilic environments from hyperthermophilic ancestors. Finally, the evolutionary history of DnaJ-Fer provides information useful for the relative dating of the diversification of Archaeplastida and Thaumarchaeota.

  5. Effect of enhanced Renilla luciferase and fluorescent protein variants on the Foerster distance of Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dacres, Helen, E-mail: helen.dacres@csiro.au [CSIRO Food Futures Flagship and Ecosystem Sciences, Canberra (Australia); Michie, Michelle; Wang, Jian [CSIRO Food Futures Flagship and Ecosystem Sciences, Canberra (Australia); Pfleger, Kevin D.G. [Laboratory for Molecular Endocrinology-GPCRs, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research (WAIMR) and Centre for Medical Research, The University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia); Trowell, Stephen C. [CSIRO Food Futures Flagship and Ecosystem Sciences, Canberra (Australia)

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First experimental determination of Foerster distance (R{sub 0}) for enhanced BRET systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of brighter BRET components RLuc2, RLuc8 and Venus was assessed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using brighter BRET components substantially increased (25%) R{sub 0} of the BRET{sup 1} system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using brighter BRET components marginally increased (2-9%) R{sub 0} of the BRET{sup 2} system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Brighter BRET components improve the different weaknesses of BRET{sup 1} and BRET{sup 2} systems. -- Abstract: Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) is an important tool for monitoring macromolecular interactions and is useful as a transduction technique for biosensor development. Foerster distance (R{sub 0}), the intermolecular separation characterized by 50% of the maximum possible energy transfer, is a critical BRET parameter. R{sub 0} provides a means of linking measured changes in BRET ratio to a physical dimension scale and allows estimation of the range of distances that can be measured by any donor-acceptor pair. The sensitivity of BRET assays has recently been improved by introduction of new BRET components, RLuc2, RLuc8 and Venus with improved quantum yields, stability and brightness. We determined R{sub 0} for BRET{sup 1} systems incorporating novel RLuc variants RLuc2 or RLuc8, in combination with Venus, as 5.68 or 5.55 nm respectively. These values were approximately 25% higher than the R{sub 0} of the original BRET{sup 1} system. R{sub 0} for BRET{sup 2} systems combining green fluorescent proteins (GFP{sup 2}) with RLuc2 or RLuc8 variants was 7.67 or 8.15 nm, i.e. only 2-9% greater than the original BRET{sup 2} system despite being {approx}30-fold brighter.

  6. HDL cholesterol response to GH replacement is associated with common cholesteryl ester transfer protein gene variation (-629C>A) and modified by glucocorticoid treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullaart, Robin P. F.; van den Berg, Gerrit; van der Knaap, Aafke M.; Dijck-Brouwer, Janneke; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Zelissen, Peter M. J.; Sluiter, Wim J.; van Beek, André P.

    2010-01-01

    GH replacement lowers total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in GH-deficient adults, but effects on high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C) are variable. Both GH and glucocorticoids decrease cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) activity, which is important

  7. Linkage map positions and allelic diversity of two Mal d 3 (non-specific lipid transfer protein) genes in the cultivated apple (Malus domestica)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, Z.S.; Weg, van de W.E.; Schaart, J.G.; Meer, van der I.M.; Kodde, L.P.; Laimer, M.; Breiteneder, H.; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, K.; Gilissen, L.J.W.J.

    2005-01-01

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) of Rosaceae fruits, such as peach, apricot, cherry, plum and apple, represent major allergens for Mediterranean atopic populations. As a first step in elucidating the genetics of nsLTPs, we directed the research reported here towards identifying the

  8. Plasma pre beta-HDL formation is decreased by atorvastatin treatment in type 2 diabetes mellitus : Role of phospholipid transfer protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dallinga-Thie, G. M.; van Tol, A.; Dullaart, R. P. F.

    Atorvastatin lowers plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) activity, which stimulates pre-beta-HDL, generation in vitro. We determined the effect of atorvastatin on pre-beta-HDL formation and its relation with PLTP activity in type 2 diabetes. Methods: Plasma pre-beta-HDL formation as well as

  9. A novel microfluidic chip electrophoresis strategy for simultaneous, label-free, multi-protein detection based on a graphene energy transfer biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fengming; Zhao, Xiaochao; Wang, Jianshe; Yu, Shiyong; Deng, Yulin; Geng, Lina; Li, HuanJun

    2014-06-07

    A new type of high-throughput and parallel optical sensing platform with a single-color probe based on microfluidic chip electrophoresis combined with aptamer-carboxyfluorescein/graphene oxide energy transfer is reported here. Label-free protein multi-targets were detected, even in challenging complex samples without any pre-treatment.

  10. Cholesteryl ester transfer-protein modulator and inhibitors and their potential for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinkai H

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Hisashi ShinkaiCentral Pharmaceutical Research Institute, JT Inc, Osaka, JapanAbstract: Elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol and lowered high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol are important risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Accordingly, raising HDL cholesterol induced by cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP inhibition is an attractive approach for reducing the residual risk of cardiovascular events that persist in many patients receiving low-density LDL cholesterol-lowering therapy with statins. The development of torcetrapib, a CETP inhibitor, was terminated due to its adverse cardiovascular effects. These adverse effects did not influence the mechanism of CETP inhibition, but affected the molecule itself. Therefore a CETP modulator, dalcetrapib, and a CETP inhibitor, anacetrapib, are in Phase III of clinical trials to evaluate their effects on cardiovascular outcomes. In the dal-VESSEL (dalcetrapib Phase IIb endothelial function study and the dal-PLAQUE (safety and efficacy of dalcetrapib on atherosclerotic disease using novel non-invasive multimodality imaging clinical studies, dalcetrapib reduced CETP activity by 50% and increased HDL cholesterol levels by 31% without changing LDL cholesterol levels. Moreover, dalcetrapib was associated with a reduction in carotid vessel-wall inflammation at 6 months, as well as a reduced vessel-wall area at 24 months compared with the placebo. In the DEFINE (determining the efficacy and tolerability of CETP inhibition with anacetrapib clinical study, anacetrapib increased HDL cholesterol levels by 138% and decreased LDL cholesterol levels by 36%. In contrast with torcetrapib, anacetrapib had no adverse cardiovascular effects. The potential of dalcetrapib and anacetrapib in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases will be revealed by two large-scale clinical trials, the dal-OUTCOMES (efficacy and safety of dalcetrapib in patients with recent acute coronary syndrome study and the

  11. Polycystic ovary syndrome influences the level of serum amyloid A and activity of phospholipid transfer protein in HDL₂ and HDL₃.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidwani, S; Phelan, N; McGill, J; McGowan, A; O'Connor, A; Young, I S; Gibney, J; McEneny, J

    2014-07-01

    Is polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) associated with altered levels of pro-inflammatory high-density lipoproteins (HDL) and activity of HDL-associated enzymes? In PCOS, HDL contained increased levels of the inflammatory marker serum amyloid A (SAA) and altered functioning of HDL-associated phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), with these changes being independent of BMI, body fat and insulin resistance (IR). PCOS is associated with adipocyte-derived inflammation, which potentially increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. SAA is an inflammatory marker that is released from hypertrophic adipocytes and interacts with HDL, reducing their anti-atherogenic properties. No studies have previously investigated if SAA-associated HDL influences the HDL-associated enzymes namely, PLTP and cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) in women with PCOS. Obese women with PCOS were matched with controls for BMI and percentage body fat (n = 100/group; cohort-1); a subset of these women (n = 64/group; cohort-2) were further matched for IR. HDL in blood samples was subfractionated into HDL₂ and HDL₃ by rapid ultracentrifugation. SAA was measured in serum, HDL₂ and HDL₃ by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the activities of PLTP and CETP were measured in HDL₂ and HDL₃ by fluorimetric assays. In the PCOS women from cohort-1, SAA was increased in serum, HDL₂ and HDL₃ (P = 0.038, 0.008 and 0.001 versus control, respectively), as was the activity of PLTP in HDL₂ and HDL₃ (P = 0.006 and 0.009 versus controls, respectively). In the PCOS women from cohort-2, SAA was increased in serum, HDL₂ and HDL₃, although only significantly in HDL₃ (P = 0.083, 0.120 and 0.034 versus controls, respectively), as was the activity of PLTP in HDL₂ and HDL₃, although this was only significant in HDL₂ (P = 0.045 and 0.070 versus controls, respectively). First, insulin sensitivity was not determined by the euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp. Secondly, the

  12. Production of rhesus monkey cloned embryos expressing monomeric red fluorescent protein by interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Hai-Ying; Kang, Jin-Dan; Li, Suo; Jin, Jun-Xue; Hong, Yu; Jin, Long; Guo, Qing; Gao, Qing-Shan; Yan, Chang-Guo; Yin, Xi-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Rhesus monkey cells were electroporated with a plasmid containing mRFP1, and an mRFP1-expressing cell line was generated. • For the first time, mRFP1-expressing rhesus monkey cells were used as donor cells for iSCNT. • The effect of VPA on the development of embryos cloned using iSCNT was determined. - Abstract: Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) is a promising method to clone endangered animals from which oocytes are difficult to obtain. Monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1) is an excellent selection marker for transgenically modified cloned embryos during somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). In this study, mRFP-expressing rhesus monkey cells or porcine cells were transferred into enucleated porcine oocytes to generate iSCNT and SCNT embryos, respectively. The development of these embryos was studied in vitro. The percentage of embryos that underwent cleavage did not significantly differ between iSCNT and SCNT embryos (P > 0.05; 71.53% vs. 80.30%). However, significantly fewer iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reached the blastocyst stage (2.04% vs. 10.19%, P < 0.05). Valproic acid was used in an attempt to increase the percentage of iSCNT embryos that developed to the blastocyst stage. However, the percentages of embryos that underwent cleavage and reached the blastocyst stage were similar between untreated iSCNT embryos and iSCNT embryos treated with 2 mM valproic acid for 24 h (72.12% vs. 70.83% and 2.67% vs. 2.35%, respectively). These data suggest that porcine-rhesus monkey interspecies embryos can be generated that efficiently express mRFP1. However, a significantly lower proportion of iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reach the blastocyst stage. Valproic acid does not increase the percentage of porcine-rhesus monkey iSCNT embryos that reach the blastocyst stage. The mechanisms underling nuclear reprogramming and epigenetic modifications in iSCNT need to be investigated further

  13. Production of rhesus monkey cloned embryos expressing monomeric red fluorescent protein by interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Hai-Ying; Kang, Jin-Dan; Li, Suo; Jin, Jun-Xue; Hong, Yu; Jin, Long; Guo, Qing; Gao, Qing-Shan; Yan, Chang-Guo; Yin, Xi-Jun, E-mail: yinxj33@msn.com

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Rhesus monkey cells were electroporated with a plasmid containing mRFP1, and an mRFP1-expressing cell line was generated. • For the first time, mRFP1-expressing rhesus monkey cells were used as donor cells for iSCNT. • The effect of VPA on the development of embryos cloned using iSCNT was determined. - Abstract: Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) is a promising method to clone endangered animals from which oocytes are difficult to obtain. Monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1) is an excellent selection marker for transgenically modified cloned embryos during somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). In this study, mRFP-expressing rhesus monkey cells or porcine cells were transferred into enucleated porcine oocytes to generate iSCNT and SCNT embryos, respectively. The development of these embryos was studied in vitro. The percentage of embryos that underwent cleavage did not significantly differ between iSCNT and SCNT embryos (P > 0.05; 71.53% vs. 80.30%). However, significantly fewer iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reached the blastocyst stage (2.04% vs. 10.19%, P < 0.05). Valproic acid was used in an attempt to increase the percentage of iSCNT embryos that developed to the blastocyst stage. However, the percentages of embryos that underwent cleavage and reached the blastocyst stage were similar between untreated iSCNT embryos and iSCNT embryos treated with 2 mM valproic acid for 24 h (72.12% vs. 70.83% and 2.67% vs. 2.35%, respectively). These data suggest that porcine-rhesus monkey interspecies embryos can be generated that efficiently express mRFP1. However, a significantly lower proportion of iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reach the blastocyst stage. Valproic acid does not increase the percentage of porcine-rhesus monkey iSCNT embryos that reach the blastocyst stage. The mechanisms underling nuclear reprogramming and epigenetic modifications in iSCNT need to be investigated further.

  14. Cloning and expression analysis of 14 lipid transfer protein genes from Tamarix hispida responding to different abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Yang, Chuanping; Gao, Caiqiu; Wang, Yucheng

    2009-12-01

    Plant lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are ubiquitous lipid-binding proteins that are involved in various stress responses. In this study, we cloned 14 unique LTP genes (ThLTP 1-14) from Tamarix hispida Willd. (Tamaricaceae) to investigate their roles under various abiotic stress conditions. The expression profiles of the 14 ThLTPs in response to NaCl, polyethylene glycol (PEG), NaHCO(3), CdCl(2) and abscisic acid (ABA) exposure in root, stem and leaf tissues were investigated using real-time RT-PCR. The results showed that all 14 ThLTPs were expressed in root, stem and leaf tissues under normal growth conditions. However, under normal growth conditions, ThLTP abundance varied in each organ, with expression differences of 9000-fold in leaves, 540-fold in stems and 3700-fold in roots. These results indicated that activity and/or physiological importance of these ThLTPs are quite different. Differential expression of the 14 ThLTPs was observed (> 2-fold) for NaCl, PEG, NaHCO(3) and CdCl(2) in at least one tissue indicating that they were all involved in abiotic stress responses. All ThLTP genes were highly induced (> 2-fold) under ABA treatment in roots, stems and/or leaves, and particularly in roots, suggesting that ABA-dependent signaling pathways regulated ThLTPs. We hypothesize that ThLTP expression constitutes an adaptive response to abiotic stresses in T. hispida and plays an important role in abiotic stress tolerance.

  15. Overexpression of Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Increases Macrophage-Derived Foam Cell Accumulation in Atherosclerotic Lesions of Transgenic Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoucui Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High levels of plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C are inversely associated with the risk of atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases; thus, pharmacological inhibition of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP is considered to be a therapeutic method of raising HDL-C levels. However, many CETP inhibitors have failed to achieve a clinical benefit despite raising HDL-C. In the study, we generated transgenic (Tg rabbits that overexpressed the human CETP gene to examine the influence of CETP on the development of atherosclerosis. Both Tg rabbits and their non-Tg littermates were fed a high cholesterol diet for 16 weeks. Plasma lipids and body weight were measured every 4 weeks. Gross lesion areas of the aortic atherosclerosis along with lesional cellular components were quantitatively analyzed. Overexpression of human CETP did not significantly alter the gross atherosclerotic lesion area, but the number of macrophages in lesions was significantly increased. Overexpression of human CETP did not change the plasma levels of total cholesterol or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol but lowered plasma HDL-C and increased triglycerides. These data revealed that human CETP may play an important role in the development of atherosclerosis mainly by decreasing HDL-C levels and increasing the accumulation of macrophage-derived foam cells.

  16. The role of common variants of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein gene in left main coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannakopoulou Vasiliki

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP has a central role in the lipid metabolism and therefore may alter the susceptibility to atherosclerosis. Methods The DNA of 471 subjects [133 subjects with angiographically documented left main coronary artery disease (LMCAD, 241 subjects with more peripheral coronary artery disease (MPCAD and 97 subjects self reported healthy (Controls] was analyzed for the frequency of TaqIB and I405V polymorphisms in the gene coding CETP. Results There is no significant difference in CETP allele frequency or genotype distribution among LMCAD and MPCAD patients although there is statistical difference between LMCAD and Controls (p = 0.001. Specifically, patients with LMCAD and B1B1 genotype of TaqIB polymorphism were more frequent present compared to Controls (33.8% vs 22.9%, respectively. The frequency of B2B2 genotype was 3 times lower in the LMCAD group compared to Controls (10.5% vs 30.2%, respectively. In the LMCAD group the frequency of B1 allele compared to Controls was higher (62% vs 46%, respectively, p = 0.001. The relationship between TaqIB gene polymorphism and the LMCAD was independent of lipid profile, with the exception of apolipoprotein A. Conclusions These findings indicate that the TaqIB polymorphism may have potential importance in screening individuals at high risk for developing CAD. However, this polymorphism cannot distinguish between LMCAD and MPCAD. Further prospective investigations in larger populations are required to confirm these findings.

  17. Identification of a Stelar-Localized Transport Protein That Facilitates Root-to-Shoot Transfer of Chloride in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bo

    2015-12-11

    Under saline conditions, higher plants restrict the accumulation of chloride ions (Cl–) in the shoot by regulating their transfer from the root symplast into the xylem-associated apoplast. To identify molecular mechanisms underpinning this phenomenon, we undertook a transcriptional screen of salt stressed Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) roots. Microarrays, quantitative RT-PCR, and promoter-GUS fusions identified a candidate gene involved in Cl– xylem loading from the Nitrate transporter 1/Peptide Transporter family (NPF2.4). This gene was highly expressed in the root stele compared to the cortex, and its expression decreased after exposure to NaCl or abscisic acid. NPF2.4 fused to fluorescent proteins, expressed either transiently or stably, was targeted to the plasma membrane. Electrophysiological analysis of NPF2.4 in Xenopus laevis oocytes suggested that NPF2.4 catalyzed passive Cl– efflux out of cells and was much less permeable to NO3−. Shoot Cl– accumulation was decreased following NPF2.4 artificial microRNA knockdown, whereas it was increased by overexpression of NPF2.4. Taken together, these results suggest that NPF2.4 is involved in long-distance transport of Cl– in plants, playing a role in the loading and the regulation of Cl– loading into the xylem of Arabidopsis roots during salinity stress.

  18. Identification of a Stelar-Localized Transport Protein That Facilitates Root-to-Shoot Transfer of Chloride in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bo; Byrt, Caitlin; Qiu, Jiaen; Baumann, Ute; Hrmova, Maria; Evrard, Aurelie; Johnson, Alexander A T; Birnbaum, Kenneth D.; Mayo, Gwenda M.; Jha, Deepa; Henderson, Sam W.; Tester, Mark A.; Gilliham, Mathew; Roy, Stuart J.

    2015-01-01

    Under saline conditions, higher plants restrict the accumulation of chloride ions (Cl–) in the shoot by regulating their transfer from the root symplast into the xylem-associated apoplast. To identify molecular mechanisms underpinning this phenomenon, we undertook a transcriptional screen of salt stressed Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) roots. Microarrays, quantitative RT-PCR, and promoter-GUS fusions identified a candidate gene involved in Cl– xylem loading from the Nitrate transporter 1/Peptide Transporter family (NPF2.4). This gene was highly expressed in the root stele compared to the cortex, and its expression decreased after exposure to NaCl or abscisic acid. NPF2.4 fused to fluorescent proteins, expressed either transiently or stably, was targeted to the plasma membrane. Electrophysiological analysis of NPF2.4 in Xenopus laevis oocytes suggested that NPF2.4 catalyzed passive Cl– efflux out of cells and was much less permeable to NO3−. Shoot Cl– accumulation was decreased following NPF2.4 artificial microRNA knockdown, whereas it was increased by overexpression of NPF2.4. Taken together, these results suggest that NPF2.4 is involved in long-distance transport of Cl– in plants, playing a role in the loading and the regulation of Cl– loading into the xylem of Arabidopsis roots during salinity stress.

  19. Comparative effects of cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibition, statin or ezetimibe on lipid factors: The ACCENTUATE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Stephen J; Ray, Kausik K; Ballantyne, Christie M; Beacham, Lauren A; Miller, Debra L; Ruotolo, Giacomo; Nissen, Steven E; Riesmeyer, Jeffrey S

    2017-06-01

    The optimal approaches to management of patients treated with moderate statin doses on lipid parameters are unknown. The ACCENTUATE study aimed to compare the effects of adding the cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitor (CETP) evacetrapib, ezetimibe or increasing statin dose in atorvastatin-treated high-vascular risk patients on lipid parameters. 366 patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) and/or diabetes were treated with atorvastatin 40 mg/day for 28 days prior to randomization to atorvastatin 40 mg plus evacetrapib 130 mg, atorvastatin 80 mg, atorvastatin 40 mg plus ezetimibe 10 mg or atorvastatin 40 mg plus placebo, daily for 90 days at 64 centers in the United States. Lipid parameters, safety and tolerability were measured. Addition of evacetrapib significantly reduced LDL-C (-33%) compared with ezetimibe (-27%, p=0.045), increasing statin dose (-6%) and statin alone (0%, pstatin dose (pstatin dose, and p=0.004 vs. statin alone). Addition of evacetrapib to atorvastatin produced an increase in hsCRP compared with ezetimibe (p=0.02). While evacetrapib improved traditional atherogenic and putative protective lipid measures compared with ezetimibe and increasing statin dose in patients with ASCVD and/or diabetes, it also adversely affected novel atherogenic risk factors. These findings may contribute to the lack of clinical benefit observed in the ACCELERATE trial. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Pluronic L-81 ameliorates diabetic symptoms in db/db mice through transcriptional regulation of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Wo-Shing; Lu, Li-Wei; Tam, Sidney; Ko, Otis King Hung; Chow, Billy KC; He, Ming-Liang; Ng, Samuel S; Yeung, Chung-Man; Liu, Ching-Chiu; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Lin, Marie C

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To test whether oral L-81 treatment could improve the condition of mice with diabetes and to investigate how L-81 regulates microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) activity in the liver. METHODS: Genetically diabetic (db/db) mice were fed on chow supplemented with or without L-81 for 4 wk. The body weight, plasma glucose level, plasma lipid profile, and adipocyte volume of the db/db mice were assessed after treatment. Toxicity of L-81 was also evaluated. To understand the molecular mechanism, HepG2 cells were treated with L-81 and the effects on apolipoprotein B (apoB) secretion and mRNA level of the MTP gene were assessed. RESULTS: Treatment of db/db mice with L-81 significantly reduced and nearly normalized their body weight, hyperphagia and polydipsia. L-81 also markedly decreased the fasting plasma glucose level, improved glucose tolerance, and attenuated the elevated levels of plasma cholesterol and triglyceride. At the effective dosage, little toxicity was observed. Treatment of HepG2 cells with L-81 not only inhibited apoB secretion, but also significantly decreased the mRNA level of the MTP gene. Similar to the action of insulin, L-81 exerted its effect on the MTP promoter. CONCLUSION: L-81 represents a promising candidate in the development of a selective insulin-mimetic molecule and an anti-diabetic agent. PMID:19554651

  1. Farnesoid X receptor up-regulates expression of Lipid transfer inhibitor protein in liver cells and mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Liangpeng [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Basic Medical Science, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Liu, Hong [Department of Hematology, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China); Peng, Jiahe; Wang, Yongchao; Zhang, Yan; Dong, Jinyu; Liu, Xiaohua; Guo, Dongmei [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Basic Medical Science, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Jiang, Yu, E-mail: yujiang61@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Basic Medical Science, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •FXR up-regulates apoF. •It binds to ER1 element. •It activates apoF gene promoter. -- Abstract: Apolipoprotein F is a component protein mainly secreted by liver and resides on several lipoprotein classes. It can inhibit lipids transfer between different lipoproteins. FXR is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily which is also highly expressed in the liver. It modulates bile acids synthesis and lipids metabolism by transcriptional regulation. We aimed to determine whether apoF can be regulated by FXR. The FXR agonist Chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) and GW4064 both can activate the expression of apoF in liver cell lines and in C57/BL6 mouse liver. This is dependent on the binding of FXR to the FXR element ER1 (−2904 to −2892 bp) in the apoF gene promoter. Taken together, we have identified apoF as likely another target gene of FXR.

  2. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein alters liver and plasma triglyceride metabolism through two liver networks in female mice[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmisano, Brian T.; Le, Thao D.; Zhu, Lin; Lee, Yoon Kwang; Stafford, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated plasma TGs increase risk of cardiovascular disease in women. Estrogen treatment raises plasma TGs in women, but molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we explore the role of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) in the regulation of TG metabolism in female mice, which naturally lack CETP. In transgenic CETP females, acute estrogen treatment raised plasma TGs 50%, increased TG production, and increased expression of genes involved in VLDL synthesis, but not in nontransgenic littermate females. In CETP females, estrogen enhanced expression of small heterodimer partner (SHP), a nuclear receptor regulating VLDL production. Deletion of liver SHP prevented increases in TG production and expression of genes involved in VLDL synthesis in CETP mice with estrogen treatment. We also examined whether CETP expression had effects on TG metabolism independent of estrogen treatment. CETP increased liver β-oxidation and reduced liver TG content by 60%. Liver estrogen receptor α (ERα) was required for CETP expression to enhance β-oxidation and reduce liver TG content. Thus, CETP alters at least two networks governing TG metabolism, one involving SHP to increase VLDL-TG production in response to estrogen, and another involving ERα to enhance β-oxidation and lower liver TG content. These findings demonstrate a novel role for CETP in estrogen-mediated increases in TG production and a broader role for CETP in TG metabolism. PMID:27354419

  3. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein alters liver and plasma triglyceride metabolism through two liver networks in female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmisano, Brian T; Le, Thao D; Zhu, Lin; Lee, Yoon Kwang; Stafford, John M

    2016-08-01

    Elevated plasma TGs increase risk of cardiovascular disease in women. Estrogen treatment raises plasma TGs in women, but molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we explore the role of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) in the regulation of TG metabolism in female mice, which naturally lack CETP. In transgenic CETP females, acute estrogen treatment raised plasma TGs 50%, increased TG production, and increased expression of genes involved in VLDL synthesis, but not in nontransgenic littermate females. In CETP females, estrogen enhanced expression of small heterodimer partner (SHP), a nuclear receptor regulating VLDL production. Deletion of liver SHP prevented increases in TG production and expression of genes involved in VLDL synthesis in CETP mice with estrogen treatment. We also examined whether CETP expression had effects on TG metabolism independent of estrogen treatment. CETP increased liver β-oxidation and reduced liver TG content by 60%. Liver estrogen receptor α (ERα) was required for CETP expression to enhance β-oxidation and reduce liver TG content. Thus, CETP alters at least two networks governing TG metabolism, one involving SHP to increase VLDL-TG production in response to estrogen, and another involving ERα to enhance β-oxidation and lower liver TG content. These findings demonstrate a novel role for CETP in estrogen-mediated increases in TG production and a broader role for CETP in TG metabolism. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. A Non-specific Setaria italica Lipid Transfer Protein Gene Plays a Critical Role under Abiotic Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yanlin; Li, Jianrui; Jiao, Licong; Li, Cong; Zhu, Dengyun; Yu, Jingjuan

    2016-01-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are a class of cysteine-rich soluble proteins having small molecular weights. LTPs participate in flower and seed development, cuticular wax deposition, also play important roles in pathogen and abiotic stress responses. A non-specific LTP gene ( SiLTP ) was isolated from a foxtail millet ( Setaria italica ) suppression subtractive hybridization library enriched for differentially expressed genes after abiotic stress treatments. A semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analysis showed that SiLTP was expressed in all foxtail millet tissues. Additionally, the SiLTP promoter drove GUS expression in root tips, stems, leaves, flowers, and siliques of transgenic Arabidopsis . Quantitative real-time PCR indicated that the SiLTP expression was induced by NaCl, polyethylene glycol, and abscisic acid (ABA). SiLTP was localized in the cytoplasm of tobacco leaf epidermal cells and maize protoplasts. The ectopic expression of SiLTP in tobacco resulted in higher levels of salt and drought tolerance than in the wild type (WT). To further assess the function of SiLTP, SiLTP overexpression (OE) and RNA interference (RNAi)-based transgenic foxtail millet were obtained. SiLTP -OE lines performed better under salt and drought stresses compared with WT plants. In contrast, the RNAi lines were much more sensitive to salt and drought compared than WT. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and yeast one-hybrids indicated that the transcription factor ABA-responsive DRE-binding protein (SiARDP) could bind to the dehydration-responsive element of SiLTP promoter in vitro and in vivo , respectively. Moreover, the SiLTP expression levels were higher in SiARDP -OE plants compared than the WT. These results confirmed that SiLTP plays important roles in improving salt and drought stress tolerance of foxtail millet, and may partly be upregulated by SiARDP. SiLTP may provide an effective genetic resource for molecular breeding in crops to enhance salt and drought

  5. Photoinduced electron transfer for an eosin-tyrosine conjugate. Activity of the tyrosinate anion in long-range electron transfer in a protein-like polymer matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, G. II; Feng, Z.; Oh, C. [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    1995-03-23

    The Xanthene dye eosin Y has been modified via a thiohydantoin link to the amine terminus of the amino acid L-tyrosine. Photochemical electron transfer involving the singlet state of the dye and the attached phenol-containing residue led to a reduction in eosin fluorescence quantum yield and lifetime for aqueous solutions at elevated pH. The conjugate provided an electron transfer product of relatively long lifetime (1 {mu}s range) observed by flash photolysis of solutions at pH 12.0, conditions under which the tyrosine moiety is ionized. The effects of binding of the conjugate in the polymer poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) on the rates of electron transfer of species of different charge type were examined. 30 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Interaction of Protease-Activated Receptor 2 with G Proteins and Beta-Arrestin 1 Studied by Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Akli eAyoub

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are well recognized as being able to activate several signaling pathways through the activation of different G proteins as well as other signaling proteins such as beta-arrestins. Therefore, understanding how such multiple GPCR-mediated signaling can be integrated constitute an important aspect. Here, we applied bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET to shed more light on the G protein coupling profile of trypsin receptor, or protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2, and its interaction with beta-arrestin1. Using YFP and Rluc fusion constructs expressed in COS-7 cells, BRET data revealed a pre-assembly of PAR2 with both Galphai1 and Galphao and a rapid and transient activation of these G proteins upon receptor activation. In contrast, no preassembly of PAR2 with Galpha12 could be detected and their physical association can be measured with a very slow and sustained kinetics similar to that of beta-arrestin1 recruitment. These data demonstrate the coupling of PAR2 with Galphai1, Galphao and Galpha12 in COS-7 cells with differences in the kinetics of GPCR-G protein coupling, a parameter that very likely influences the cellular response. Moreover, this further illustrates that preassembly or agonist-induced G protein interaction depends on receptor-G protein pairs indicating another level of complexity and regulation of the signaling of GPCR-G protein complexes and its multiplicity.

  7. Hydrogen exchange kinetics in a membrane protein determined by 15N NMR spectroscopy: Use of the INEPT [insensitive nucleus enhancement by polarization transfer] experiment to follow individual amides in detergent-solubilized M13 coat protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, G.D.; Sykes, B.D.

    1990-01-01

    The coat protein of the filamentous coliphage M13 is a 50-residue polypeptide which spans the inner membrane of the Escherichia coli host upon infection. Amide hydrogen exchange kinetics have been used to probe the structure and dynamics of M13 coat protein which has been solubilized in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles. In a previous 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study, multiple exponential analysis of the unresolved amide proton envelope revealed the existence of two slow kinetic sets containing a total of about 30 protons. The slower set (15-20 amides) originates from the hydrophobic membrane-spanning region and exchanges at least 10 5 -fold slower than the unstructured, non-H-bonded model polypeptide poly(DL-alanine). Herein the authors use 15 N NMR spectroscopy of biosynthetically labeled coat protein to follow individual, assigned, slowly exchanging amides in or near the hydrophobic segment. The INEPT (insensitive nucleus enhancement by polarization transfer) experiments can be used to transfer magnetization to the 15 N nucleus from a coupled proton; when 15 N-labeled protonated protein is dissolved in 2 H 2 O, the INEPT signal disappears with time as the amide protons are replaced by solvent deuterons. Amide hydrogen exchange is catalyzed by both H + and OH - ions. The time-dependent exchange-out experiment is suitable for slow exchange rates (k ex ). The INEPT experiment was also adapted to measure some of the more rapidly exchanging amides in the coat protein using either saturation transfer from water or exchange effects on the polarization transfer step itself. The results of all of these experiments are consistent with previous models of the coat protein in which a stable segment extends from the hydrophobic membrane-spanning region through to the C-terminus, whereas the N-terminal region is undergoing more extensive dynamic fluctuations

  8. Highly Efficient Transfer of Chromosomes to a Broad Range of Target Cells Using Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells Expressing Murine Leukemia Virus-Derived Envelope Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruhiko Suzuki

    Full Text Available Microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT is an essential step for introducing chromosomes from donor cells to recipient cells. MMCT allows not only for genetic/epigenetic analysis of specific chromosomes, but also for utilization of human and mouse artificial chromosomes (HACs/MACs as gene delivery vectors. Although the scientific demand for genome scale analyses is increasing, the poor transfer efficiency of the current method has hampered the application of chromosome engineering technology. Here, we developed a highly efficient chromosome transfer method, called retro-MMCT, which is based on Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing envelope proteins derived from ecotropic or amphotropic murine leukemia viruses. Using this method, we transferred MACs to NIH3T3 cells with 26.5 times greater efficiency than that obtained using the conventional MMCT method. Retro-MMCT was applicable to a variety of recipient cells, including embryonic stem cells. Moreover, retro-MMCT enabled efficient transfer of MAC to recipient cells derived from humans, monkeys, mice, rats, and rabbits. These results demonstrate the utility of retro-MMCT for the efficient transfer of chromosomes to various types of target cell.

  9. Trans-activation of the 5' to 3' viral DNA strand transfer by nucleocapsid protein during reverse transcription of HIV1 RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlix, J L; Vincent, A; Gabus, C; de Rocquigny, H; Roques, B

    1993-08-01

    Two DNA strand transfer reactions take place during reverse transcription of the retroviral genome. The first transfer, that of the minus-strand strong stop DNA from the 5' end of the viral RNA to the 3' end, has been studied in vitro with two RNAs mimicking the 5' and 3' regions of the HIV1 genome and with nucleocapsid protein, NCp7, and reverse transcriptase. The results show that NCp7 strongly activates the 5' to 3' DNA strand transfer during reverse transcription while a basic peptide resembling NCp7 is inactive. Activation of the first transfer by several NCp7 derived peptides and the influence of the terminal redundancies (R) present at the 5' and 3' ends of HIV1 RNA were also examined. The first transfer is optimal in the presence of intact NCp7 and necessitates R on both the 5' and 3' RNAs. Sequencing of full length viral DNA products reveals approximately 40% misincorporations at the first nucleotide beyond the transfer point. If such base misincorporations occur during proviral DNA synthesis with possible homologous recombinations it may well contribute to the high level of genetic variability of HIV.

  10. Cardiac expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein is increased in obesity and serves to attenuate cardiac triglyceride accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil D Bartels

    Full Text Available Obesity causes lipid accumulation in the heart and may lead to lipotoxic heart disease. Traditionally, the size of the cardiac triglyceride pool is thought to reflect the balance between uptake and beta-oxidation of fatty acids. However, triglycerides can also be exported from cardiomyocytes via secretion of apolipoproteinB-containing (apoB lipoproteins. Lipoprotein formation depends on expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP; the mouse expresses two isoforms of MTP, A and B. Since many aspects of the link between obesity-induced cardiac disease and cardiac lipid metabolism remain unknown, we investigated how cardiac lipoprotein synthesis affects cardiac expression of triglyceride metabolism-controlling genes, insulin sensitivity, and function in obese mice. Heart-specific ablation of MTP-A in mice using Cre-loxP technology impaired upregulation of MTP expression in response to increased fatty acid availability during fasting and fat feeding. This resulted in cardiac triglyceride accumulation but unaffected cardiac insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Long-term fat-feeding of male C57Bl/6 mice increased cardiac triglycerides, induced cardiac expression of triglyceride metabolism-controlling genes and attenuated heart function. Abolishing cardiac triglyceride accumulation in fat-fed mice by overexpression of an apoB transgene in the heart prevented the induction of triglyceride metabolism-controlling genes and improved heart function. The results suggest that in obesity, the physiological increase of cardiac MTP expression serves to attenuate cardiac triglyceride accumulation albeit without major effects on cardiac insulin sensitivity. Nevertheless, the data suggest that genetically increased lipoprotein secretion prevents development of obesity-induced lipotoxic heart disease.

  11. Clinicopathological report of retinitis pigmentosa with vitamin E deficiency caused by mutation of the alpha-tocopherol transfer protein gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, J; Kiyosawa, M; Seko, Y; Yokota, T; Harino, S; Suzuki, J

    2001-01-01

    To discuss the clinicopathological findings in a patient with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) accompanied by a vitamin E deficiency caused by an H101Q mutation in the alpha-tocopherol transfer protein (alpha-TTP) gene. The clinical course of this patient was followed by conventional ophthalmological examinations over a 3-year period. After the patient died from pancreatic cancer, the eyes were obtained, and examined by light and electron microscopy. The patient complained of night blindness subsequent to adult-onset ataxia, although the ataxia was very mild. His visual acuity was 0.6 OU, and ophthalmoscopy revealed RP sine pigmento. Ring scotomas were detected, and the electroretinography, electro-oculography, and dark-adaptation were altered. Fluorescein angiography showed granular hyperfluorescence around the macula. No progression of the visual and neurological symptoms was observed during the 10 years he was taking oral vitamin E. Histopathological examination revealed the loss of the outer and inner segments of the photoreceptors in the area corresponding to the ring scotoma, as well as a disorganization and shortening of the outer segments in the peripheral retina. We conclude that the clinical and pathological findings in the eyes of this patient having RP with vitamin E deficiency caused by an H101Q mutation are similar to those of common autosomal recessive RP. However, special attention is required in making a diagnosis of RP with vitamin E deficiency because RP with vitamin E deficiency is medically treatable. The mild Friedreich-type ataxia accompanying the RP may be helpful in identifying this disease.

  12. Effects of whole grain, fish and bilberries on serum metabolic profile and lipid transfer protein activities: a randomized trial (Sysdimet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lankinen

    Full Text Available We studied the combined effects of wholegrain, fish and bilberries on serum metabolic profile and lipid transfer protein activities in subjects with the metabolic syndrome.Altogether 131 subjects (40-70 y, BMI 26-39 kg/m(2 with impaired glucose metabolism and features of the metabolic syndrome were randomized into three groups with 12-week periods according to a parallel study design. They consumed either: a wholegrain and low postprandial insulin response grain products, fatty fish 3 times a week, and bilberries 3 portions per day (HealthyDiet, b wholegrain and low postprandial insulin response grain products (WGED, or c refined wheat breads as cereal products (Control. Altogether 106 subjects completed the study. Serum metabolic profile was studied using an NMR-based platform providing information on lipoprotein subclasses and lipids as well as low-molecular-weight metabolites.There were no significant differences in clinical characteristics between the groups at baseline or at the end of the intervention. Mixed model analyses revealed significant changes in lipid metabolites in the HealthyDiet group during the intervention compared to the Control group. All changes reflected increased polyunsaturation in plasma fatty acids, especially in n-3 PUFAs, while n-6 and n-7 fatty acids decreased. According to tertiles of changes in fish intake, a greater increase of fish intake was associated with increased concentration of large HDL particles, larger average diameter of HDL particles, and increased concentrations of large HDL lipid components, even though total levels of HDL cholesterol remained stable.The results suggest that consumption of diet rich in whole grain, bilberries and especially fatty fish causes changes in HDL particles shifting their subclass distribution toward larger particles. These changes may be related to known protective functions of HDL such as reverse cholesterol transport and could partly explain the known protective

  13. The Relationship Between Genetic Variations of the Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Gene and Coronary Artery Disease in Turkish Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, Fuat; Gurlertop, Yekta; Pirim, Ibrahim; Sevimli, Serdar; Dogan, Hasan; Arslan, Sakir; Aksoy, Hulya; Karakelloglu, Sule; Senocak, Huseyin

    2009-01-01

    Objective Although the relationship between cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and cholesterol metabolism has been characterized in recent years, the effect of CETP genetic variants associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) is still unclear. Therefore, we investigated the association between CETP gene polymorphism and levels of lipid in patients with CAD. Materials and Methods We conducted a case-control study that included 194 unrelated subjects who underwent coronary angiography for suspected ischemic heart disease. This group was divided into 96 patients with angiographically documented CAD and 98 subjects (individuals matched for age and gender) without angiographically documented CAD (CAD-free subjects), all of whom were studied to examine the genotypic distribution of the CETP gene polymorphism in CAD. Genotyping was performed via polymerase chain reaction. Results Of the 96 patients with CAD, 38 (40%) were B1B1, 42 (44%) B1B2 and 16 (16%) B2B2, compared with the control subjects, of which 35 (36%) were B1B1, 44 (45%) B1B2 and 19 (19%) B2B2. There were no significant differences between patients with CAD and control subjects in the distribution of the CETP gene polymorphism. Patients with the B1B1 genotype had lower high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and higher triglyceride (TG) levels than patients with the B2B2 genotype (p<0.05). In addition, among control subjects HDL-C levels were significantly higher in subjects with the B2B2 genotype than in subjects with the B1B1 genotype (p<0.01). Conclusion Our results suggest that genetic variations of the CTEP gene may be responsible for low HDL-C levels but may not be considered as a risk factor for CAD in the Turkish population. PMID:25610061

  14. Transfer Zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Daniel; Wilson, Karl A; Tan-Wilson, Anna

    2017-01-01

    The technique described here, transfer zymography, was developed to overcome two limitations of conventional zymography. When proteolytic enzymes are resolved by nonreducing SDS-PAGE into a polyacrylamide gel with copolymerized protein substrate, the presence of the protein substrate can result in anomalous, often slower, migration of the protease and an estimated mass higher than its actual mass. A further drawback is that the presence of a high background of substrate protein interferes with proteomic analysis of the protease band by excision, tryptic digestion, and LC-MS/MS analysis. In transfer zymography, the proteolytic enzymes are resolved by conventional nonreducing SDS-PAGE, without protein substrate in the gel. The proteins in the resolving gel are then electrophoretically transferred to a receiving gel that contains the protein substrate, by a process similar to western blotting. The receiving gel is then processed in a manner similar to conventional zymography. SDS is removed by Triton X-100 and incubated in conditions suitable for the proteolytic activity. After protein staining, followed by destaining, bands representing regions with active protease are visualized as clear bands in a darkly stained background. For proteomic analysis, electrophoresis is carried out simultaneously on a second resolving gel, and the bands corresponding to the clear regions in the receiving gel after zymogram development are excised for proteomic analysis.

  15. β-chain of ATP synthase as a lipophorin binding protein and its role in lipid transfer in the midgut of Panstrongylus megistus (Hemiptera: Reduviidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruttero, Leonardo L; Demartini, Diogo R; Rubiolo, Edilberto R; Carlini, Célia R; Canavoso, Lilián E

    2014-09-01

    Lipophorin, the main lipoprotein in the circulation of the insects, cycles among peripheral tissues to exchange its lipid cargo at the plasma membrane of target cells, without synthesis or degradation of its apolipoprotein matrix. Currently, there are few characterized candidates supporting the functioning of the docking mechanism of lipophorin-mediated lipid transfer. In this work we combined ligand blotting assays and tandem mass spectrometry to characterize proteins with the property to bind lipophorin at the midgut membrane of Panstrongylus megistus, a vector of Chagas' disease. We further evaluated the role of lipophorin binding proteins in the transfer of lipids between the midgut and lipophorin. The β subunit of the ATP synthase complex (β-ATPase) was identified as a lipophorin binding protein. β-ATPase was detected in enriched midgut membrane preparations free of mitochondria. It was shown that β-ATPase partially co-localizes with lipophorin at the plasma membrane of isolated enterocytes and in the sub-epithelial region of the midgut tissue. The interaction of endogenous lipophorin and β-ATPase was also demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation assays. Blocking of β-ATPase significantly diminished the binding of lipophorin to the isolated enterocytes and to the midgut tissue. In vivo assays injecting the β-ATPase antibody significantly reduced the transfer of [(3)H]-diacylglycerol from the midgut to the hemolymph in insects fed with [9,10-(3)H]-oleic acid, supporting the involvement of lipophorin-β-ATPase association in the transfer of lipids. In addition, the β-ATPase antibody partially impaired the transfer of fatty acids from lipophorin to the midgut, a less important route of lipid delivery to this tissue. Taken together, the findings strongly suggest that β-ATPase plays a role as a docking lipophorin receptor at the midgut of P. megistus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Role of protein-glutathione contacts in defining glutaredoxin-3 [2Fe-2S] cluster chirality, ligand exchange and transfer chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sambuddha; Cowan, J A

    2017-10-01

    Monothiol glutaredoxins (Grx) serve as intermediate cluster carriers in iron-sulfur cluster trafficking. The [2Fe-2S]-bound holo forms of Grx proteins display cysteinyl coordination from exogenous glutathione (GSH), in addition to contact from protein-derived Cys. Herein, we report mechanistic studies that investigate the role of exogenous glutathione in defining cluster chirality, ligand exchange, and the cluster transfer chemistry of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Grx3. Systematic perturbations were introduced to the glutathione-binding site by substitution of conserved charged amino acids that form crucial electrostatic contacts with the glutathione molecule. Native Grx3 could also be reconstituted in the absence of glutathione, with either DTT, BME or free L-cysteine as the source of the exogenous Fe-S ligand contact, while retaining full functional reactivity. The delivery of the [2Fe-2S] cluster to Grx3 from cluster donor proteins such as Isa, Nfu, and a [2Fe-2S](GS) 4 complex, revealed that electrostatic contacts are of key importance for positioning the exogenous glutathione that in turn influences the chiral environment of the cluster. All Grx3 derivatives were reconstituted by standard chemical reconstitution protocols and found to transfer cluster to apo ferredoxin 1 (Fdx1) at rates comparable to native protein, even when using DTT, BME or free L-cysteine as a thiol source in place of GSH during reconstitution. Kinetic analysis of cluster transfer from holo derivatives to apo Fdx1 has led to a mechanistic model for cluster transfer chemistry of native holo Grx3, and identification of the likely rate-limiting step for the reaction.

  17. Effects of nucleic acid local structure and magnesium ions on minus-strand transfer mediated by the nucleic acid chaperone activity of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Tiyun; Heilman-Miller, Susan L.; Levin, Judith G.

    2007-01-01

    HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) is a nucleic acid chaperone, which is required for highly specific and efficient reverse transcription. Here, we demonstrate that local structure of acceptor RNA at a potential nucleation site, rather than overall thermodynamic stability, is a critical determinant for the minus-strand transfer step (annealing of acceptor RNA to (−) strong-stop DNA followed by reverse transcriptase (RT)-catalyzed DNA extension). In our system, destabilization of a stem-loop stru...

  18. High-resolution slab gel isoelectric focusing: methods for quantitative electrophoretic transfer and immunodetection of proteins as applied to the study of the multiple isoelectric forms of ornithine decarboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, S G; Cochran, B J; Worth, L L; Knutson, V P; Haddox, M K

    1994-04-01

    A high-resolution isoelectric focusing vertical slab gel method which can resolve proteins which differ by a single charge was developed and this method was applied to the study of the multiple isoelectric forms of ornithine decarboxylase. Separation of proteins at this high level of resolution was achieved by increasing the ampholyte concentration in the gels to 6%. Various lots of ampholytes, from the same or different commercial sources, differed significantly in their protein binding capacity. Ampholytes bound to proteins interfered both with the electrophoretic transfer of proteins from the gel to immunoblotting membranes and with the ability of antibodies to interact with proteins on the immunoblotting membranes. Increasing the amount of protein loaded into a gel lane also decreased the efficiency of the electrophoretic transfer and immunodetection. To overcome these problems, both gel washing and gel electrophoretic transfer protocols for disrupting the ampholyte-protein binding and enabling a quantitative electrophoretic transfer of proteins were developed. Two gel washing procedures, with either thiocyanate or borate buffers, and a two-step electrophoretic transfer method are described. The choice of which method to use to optimally disrupt the ampholyte-protein binding was found to vary with each lot of ampholytes employed.

  19. A novel lipid transfer protein from the pea Pisum sativum: isolation, recombinant expression, solution structure, antifungal activity, lipid binding, and allergenic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, Ivan V; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Finkina, Ekaterina I; Melnikova, Daria N; Rumynskiy, Eugene I; Arseniev, Alexander S; Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V

    2016-04-30

    Plant lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) assemble a family of small (7-9 kDa) ubiquitous cationic proteins with an ability to bind and transport lipids as well as participate in various physiological processes including defense against phytopathogens. They also form one of the most clinically relevant classes of plant allergens. Nothing is known to date about correlation between lipid-binding and IgE-binding properties of LTPs. The garden pea Pisum sativum is widely consumed crop and important allergenic specie of the legume family. This work is aimed at isolation of a novel LTP from pea seeds and characterization of its structural, functional, and allergenic properties. Three novel lipid transfer proteins, designated as Ps-LTP1-3, were found in the garden pea Pisum sativum, their cDNA sequences were determined, and mRNA expression levels of all the three proteins were measured at different pea organs. Ps-LTP1 was isolated for the first time from the pea seeds, and its complete amino acid sequence was determined. The protein exhibits antifungal activity and is a membrane-active compound that causes a leakage from artificial liposomes. The protein binds various lipids including bioactive jasmonic acid. Spatial structure of the recombinant uniformly (13)C,(15)N-labelled Ps-LTP1 was solved by heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. In solution the unliganded protein represents the mixture of two conformers (relative populations ~ 85:15) which are interconnected by exchange process with characteristic time ~ 100 ms. Hydrophobic residues of major conformer form a relatively large internal tunnel-like lipid-binding cavity (van der Waals volume comes up to ~1000 Å(3)). The minor conformer probably corresponds to the protein with the partially collapsed internal cavity. For the first time conformational heterogeneity in solution was shown for an unliganded plant lipid transfer protein. Heat denaturation profile and simulated gastrointestinal digestion assay showed that Ps

  20. Modulation of Intracellular Quantum Dot to Fluorescent Protein Förster Resonance Energy Transfer via Customized Ligands and Spatial Control of Donor–Acceptor Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren D. Field

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how to controllably modulate the efficiency of energy transfer in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET-based assemblies is critical to their implementation as sensing modalities. This is particularly true for sensing assemblies that are to be used as the basis for real time intracellular sensing of intracellular processes and events. We use a quantum dot (QD donor -mCherry acceptor platform that is engineered to self-assemble in situ wherein the protein acceptor is expressed via transient transfection and the QD donor is microinjected into the cell. QD-protein assembly is driven by metal-affinity interactions where a terminal polyhistidine tag on the protein binds to the QD surface. Using this system, we show the ability to modulate the efficiency of the donor–acceptor energy transfer process by controllably altering either the ligand coating on the QD surface or the precise location where the QD-protein assembly process occurs. Intracellularly, a short, zwitterionic ligand mediates more efficient FRET relative to longer ligand species that are based on the solubilizing polymer, poly(ethylene glycol. We further show that a greater FRET efficiency is achieved when the QD-protein assembly occurs free in the cytosol compared to when the mCherry acceptor is expressed tethered to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. In the latter case, the lower FRET efficiency is likely attributable to a lower expression level of the mCherry acceptor at the membrane combined with steric hindrance. Our work points to some of the design considerations that one must be mindful of when developing FRET-based sensing schemes for use in intracellular sensing.

  1. The multidrug resistance IncA/C transferable plasmid encodes a novel domain-swapped dimeric protein-disulfide isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premkumar, Lakshmanane; Kurth, Fabian; Neyer, Simon; Schembri, Mark A; Martin, Jennifer L

    2014-01-31

    The multidrug resistance-encoding IncA/C conjugative plasmids disseminate antibiotic resistance genes among clinically relevant enteric bacteria. A plasmid-encoded disulfide isomerase is associated with conjugation. Sequence analysis of several IncA/C plasmids and IncA/C-related integrative and conjugative elements (ICE) from commensal and pathogenic bacteria identified a conserved DsbC/DsbG homolog (DsbP). The crystal structure of DsbP reveals an N-terminal domain, a linker region, and a C-terminal catalytic domain. A DsbP homodimer is formed through domain swapping of two DsbP N-terminal domains. The catalytic domain incorporates a thioredoxin-fold with characteristic CXXC and cis-Pro motifs. Overall, the structure and redox properties of DsbP diverge from the Escherichia coli DsbC and DsbG disulfide isomerases. Specifically, the V-shaped dimer of DsbP is inverted compared with EcDsbC and EcDsbG. In addition, the redox potential of DsbP (-161 mV) is more reducing than EcDsbC (-130 mV) and EcDsbG (-126 mV). Other catalytic properties of DsbP more closely resemble those of EcDsbG than EcDsbC. These catalytic differences are in part a consequence of the unusual active site motif of DsbP (CAVC); substitution to the EcDsbC-like (CGYC) motif converts the catalytic properties to those of EcDsbC. Structural comparison of the 12 independent subunit structures of DsbP that we determined revealed that conformational changes in the linker region contribute to mobility of the catalytic domain, providing mechanistic insight into DsbP function. In summary, our data reveal that the conserved plasmid-encoded DsbP protein is a bona fide disulfide isomerase and suggest that a dedicated oxidative folding enzyme is important for conjugative plasmid transfer.

  2. Etiology of fatty liver in dairy cattle: effects of nutritional and hormonal status on hepatic microsomal triglyceride transfer protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremmer, D R; Trower, S L; Bertics, S J; Besong, S A; Bernabucci, U; Grummer, R R

    2000-10-01

    We conducted three experiments to determine the effects of nutritional and hormonal status on microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) activity and mass. In experiment 1, 18 nonlactating Holstein cows, 75 d before expected calving date, in their second gestation or greater were monitored from d 75 to 55 prepartum. Cows were fed a control diet from d 75 to 62 prepartum for covariable measurements. From d 61 to 55 prepartum, six cows continued to receive the control diet, six cows were restricted to 2.3 kg of grass hay/d, and six cows were fed the control diet plus 1.8 kg of concentrate/d and 500 ml of propylene glycol given 2 times/d as an oral drench. Plasma glucose and serum insulin concentrations were highest in cows that received propylene glycol and lowest in feed restricted cows. Plasma nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) and liver triglyceride (TG) concentrations were highest in feed restricted cows and not different between cows that received the control diet and cows that received propylene glycol. Hepatic MTP activity and mass were not affected by treatment in experiment 1. In experiment 2, bovine hepatocytes isolated from the caudate process of five preruminating Holstein bull calves were incubated with either 0, 0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 mM NEFA for 48 h. Intracellular TG increased linearly as NEFA concentration in the media increased. Concentration of NEFA in the incubation media had no effect on MTP activity or mass. There was a quadratic effect of concentration of NEFA in the incubation media on MTP mRNA. In experiment 3, bovine hepatocytes isolated from the caudate process of five preruminating Holstein bull calves were incubated with 2 mM [1-14C]oleate for 24 h to accumulate TG, followed by a 36-h period of TG depletion, during which hepatocytes were incubated with no hormone, 10 nM insulin, or 10 nM glucagon. There was no effect of insulin or glucagon on intracellular TG, MTP activity or mass. Cells incubated with no hormone had higher levels of MTP m

  3. General transfer matrix formalism to calculate DNA-protein-drug binding in gene regulation: application to OR operator of phage lambda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teif, Vladimir B

    2007-01-01

    The transfer matrix methodology is proposed as a systematic tool for the statistical-mechanical description of DNA-protein-drug binding involved in gene regulation. We show that a genetic system of several cis-regulatory modules is calculable using this method, considering explicitly the site-overlapping, competitive, cooperative binding of regulatory proteins, their multilayer assembly and DNA looping. In the methodological section, the matrix models are solved for the basic types of short- and long-range interactions between DNA-bound proteins, drugs and nucleosomes. We apply the matrix method to gene regulation at the O(R) operator of phage lambda. The transfer matrix formalism allowed the description of the lambda-switch at a single-nucleotide resolution, taking into account the effects of a range of inter-protein distances. Our calculations confirm previously established roles of the contact CI-Cro-RNAP interactions. Concerning long-range interactions, we show that while the DNA loop between the O(R) and O(L) operators is important at the lysogenic CI concentrations, the interference between the adjacent promoters P(R) and P(RM) becomes more important at small CI concentrations. A large change in the expression pattern may arise in this regime due to anticooperative interactions between DNA-bound RNA polymerases. The applicability of the matrix method to more complex systems is discussed.

  4. Interaction between the PH and START domains of ceramide transfer protein competes with phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate binding by the PH domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashek, Jennifer; Bouyain, Samuel; Fu, Mingui; Li, Yong; Berkes, Dusan; Yao, Xiaolan

    2017-08-25

    De novo synthesis of the sphingolipid sphingomyelin requires non-vesicular transport of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi by the multidomain protein ceramide transfer protein (CERT). CERT's N-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain targets it to the Golgi by binding to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns(4)P) in the Golgi membrane, whereas its C-terminal StAR-related lipid transfer domain (START) carries out ceramide transfer. Hyperphosphorylation of a serine-rich motif immediately after the PH domain decreases both PtdIns(4)P binding and ceramide transfer by CERT. This down-regulation requires both the PH and START domains, suggesting a possible inhibitory interaction between the two domains. In this study we show that isolated PH and START domains interact with each other. The crystal structure of a PH-START complex revealed that the START domain binds to the PH domain at the same site for PtdIns(4)P-binding, suggesting that the START domain competes with PtdIns(4)P for association with the PH domain. We further report that mutations disrupting the PH-START interaction increase both PtdIns(4)P-binding affinity and ceramide transfer activity of a CERT-serine-rich phosphorylation mimic. We also found that these mutations increase the Golgi localization of CERT inside the cell, consistent with enhanced PtdIns(4)P binding of the mutant. Collectively, our structural, biochemical, and cellular investigations provide important structural insight into the regulation of CERT function and localization. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. The effect of glutathione as chain transfer agent in PNIPAAm-based thermo-responsive hydrogels for controlled release of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapala, Pawel W; Jiang, Bin; Chiu, Yu-Chieh; Mieler, William F; Brey, Eric M; Kang-Mieler, Jennifer J; Pérez-Luna, Victor H

    2014-03-01

    To control degradation and protein release using thermo-responsive hydrogels for localized delivery of anti-angiogenic proteins. Thermo-responsive hydrogels derived from N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) and crosslinked with poly(ethylene glycol)-co-(L-lactic acid) diacrylate (Acry-PLLA-b-PEG-b-PLLA-Acry) were synthesized via free radical polymerization in the presence of glutathione, a chain transfer agent (CTA) added to modulate their degradation and release properties. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and the recombinant proteins Avastin® and Lucentis® were encapsulated in these hydrogels and their release was studied. The encapsulation efficiency of IgG was high (75-87%) and decreased with CTA concentration. The transition temperature of these hydrogels was below physiological temperature, which is important for minimally invasive therapies involving these materials. The toxicity from unreacted monomers and free radical initiators was eliminated with a minimum of three buffer extractions. Addition of CTA accelerated degradation and resulted in complete protein release. Glutathione caused the degradation products to become solubilized even at 37°C. Hydrogels prepared without glutathione did not disintegrate nor released protein completely after 3 weeks at 37°C. PEGylation of IgG postponed the burst release effect. Avastin® and Lucentis® released from degraded hydrogels retained their biological activity. These systems offer a promising platform for the localized delivery of proteins.

  6. Unveiling the excited state energy transfer pathways in peridinin-chlorophyll a-protein by ultrafast multi-pulse transient absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redeckas, Kipras; Voiciuk, Vladislava; Zigmantas, Donatas; Hiller, Roger G; Vengris, Mikas

    2017-04-01

    Time-resolved multi-pulse methods were applied to investigate the excited state dynamics, the interstate couplings, and the excited state energy transfer pathways between the light-harvesting pigments in peridinin-chlorophyll a-protein (PCP). The utilized pump-dump-probe techniques are based on perturbation of the regular PCP energy transfer pathway. The PCP complexes were initially excited with an ultrashort pulse, resonant to the S 0 →S 2 transition of the carotenoid peridinin. A portion of the peridinin-based emissive intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state was then depopulated by applying an ultrashort NIR pulse that perturbed the interaction between S 1 and ICT states and the energy flow from the carotenoids to the chlorophylls. The presented data indicate that the peridinin S 1 and ICT states are spectrally distinct and coexist in an excited state equilibrium in the PCP complex. Moreover, numeric analysis of the experimental data asserts ICT→Chl-a as the main energy transfer pathway in the photoexcited PCP systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Heterogeneous electron transfer of a two-centered heme protein: redox and electrocatalytic properties of surface-immobilized cytochrome C(4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monari, Stefano; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Borsari, Marco; Di Rocco, Giulia; Martini, Laura; Ranieri, Antonio; Sola, Marco

    2009-10-15

    The recombinant diheme cytochrome c(4) from the psycrophilic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC 125 and its Met64Ala and Met164Ala variants, which feature a hydroxide ion axially bound to the heme iron at the N- and C-terminal domains, respectively, were found to exchange electrons efficiently with a gold electrode coated with a SAM of 11-mercapto-1-undecanoic acid. The mutation-induced removal of the redox equivalence of the two heme groups and changes in the net charge of the protein lobes yield two-centered protein systems with unprecedented properties in the electrode-immobilized state. The heterogeneous and intraheme electron transfer processes were characterized for these species in which the high- and low-potential heme groups are swapped over in the bilobal protein framework and experience a constrained (M64A) and unconstrained (M164A) orientation toward the electrode. The reduction thermodynamics for the native and mutated hemes were measured for the first time for a diheme cytochrome c. In the diffusing regime, they reproduce closely those for the corresponding centers in single-heme class-I cytochromes c, despite the low sequence identity. Larger differences are observed in the thermodynamics of the immobilized species and in the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants. T-dependent kinetic measurements show that the proteins are positioned approximately 7 A from the HOOC-terminated SAM-coated electrode. Protein-electrode orientation and efficient intraheme ET enable the His,OH(-)-ligated heme A of the immobilized Met64Ala variant to carry out the reductive electrocatalysis of molecular oxygen. This system therefore constitutes a novel two-centered heme-based biocatalytic interface to be exploited for "third-generation" amperometric biosensing.

  8. Protein Delivery System Containing a Nickel-Immobilized Polymer for Multimerization of Affinity-Purified His-Tagged Proteins Enhances Cytosolic Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postupalenko, Viktoriia; Desplancq, Dominique; Orlov, Igor; Arntz, Youri; Spehner, Danièle; Mely, Yves; Klaholz, Bruno P; Schultz, Patrick; Weiss, Etienne; Zuber, Guy

    2015-09-01

    Recombinant proteins with cytosolic or nuclear activities are emerging as tools for interfering with cellular functions. Because such tools rely on vehicles for crossing the plasma membrane we developed a protein delivery system consisting in the assembly of pyridylthiourea-grafted polyethylenimine (πPEI) with affinity-purified His-tagged proteins pre-organized onto a nickel-immobilized polymeric guide. The guide was prepared by functionalization of an ornithine polymer with nitrilotriacetic acid groups and shown to bind several His-tagged proteins. Superstructures were visualized by electron and atomic force microscopy using 2 nm His-tagged gold nanoparticles as probes. The whole system efficiently carried the green fluorescent protein, single-chain antibodies or caspase 3, into the cytosol of living cells. Transduction of the protease caspase 3 induced apoptosis in two cancer cell lines, demonstrating that this new protein delivery method could be used to interfere with cellular functions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Gold nanoparticle assisted assembly of a heme protein for enhancement of long-range interfacial electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Palle Skovhus; Chi, Qijin; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg

    2007-01-01

    and characterization of water-soluble gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with core diameter 3-4 nm and their application for the enhancement of long-range interfacial ET of a heme protein. Gold nanoparticles were electrostatically conjugated with cyt c to form nanoparticle-protein hybrid ET systems with well...... and the protein molecule. When the nanoparticle-protein conjugates are assembled on Au(111) surfaces, long-range interfacial ET across a physical distance of over 50 A via the nanoparticle becomes feasible. Moreover, significant enhancement of the interfacial ET rate by more than an order of magnitude compared...... with that of cyt c in the absence of AuNPs is observed. AuNPs appear to serve as excellent ET relays, most likely by facilitating the electronic coupling between the protein redox center and the electrode surface....

  10. Treatment with Cefotaxime Affects Expression of Conjugation Associated Proteins and Conjugation Transfer Frequency of an IncI1 Plasmid in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thea S B; Liu, Gang; Boysen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    research suggests that the effect of antibiotic treatment on plasmid conjugation frequencies, and hence the spread of resistance plasmids, may have been overestimated. We addressed the question by quantifying transfer proteins and conjugation frequencies of a blaCTX-M-1 encoding IncI1 resistance plasmid....... The frequency of plasmid conjugation, measured in an antibiotic free environment, increased significantly when the donor was pre-grown in broth containing CTX compared to growth without this drug, regardless of whether blaCTX-M-1 was located on the plasmid or in trans on the chromosome. The results shows...

  11. Evaluation of five commercially available assays and measurement of serum total protein concentration via refractometry for the diagnosis of failure of passive transfer of immunity in foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Rachel; Giguère, Steeve

    2005-11-15

    To determine and compare sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and predictive values of measurement of serum total protein concentration by refractometry as well as 5 commercially available kits for the diagnosis of failure of passive transfer (FPT) of immunity in foals. Prospective study. 65 foals with various medical problems and 35 clinically normal foals. IgG concentration in serum was assessed by use of zinc sulfate turbidity (assay C), glutaraldehyde coagulation (assay D), 2 semiquantitative immunoassays (assays F and G), and a quantitative immunoassay (assay H). Serum total protein concentration was assessed by refractometry. Radial immunodiffusion (assays A and B) was used as the reference method. For detection of IgG or = 6.0 g/dL indicated adequate IgG concentrations. Most assays were adequate as initial screening tests. However, their use as a definitive test would result in unnecessary treatment of foals with adequate IgG concentrations.

  12. Interaction between Wine Phenolic Acids and Salivary Proteins by Saturation-Transfer Difference Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (STD-NMR) and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer-Gallego, Raúl; Hernández-Hierro, José Miguel; Brás, Natércia F; Vale, Nuno; Gomes, Paula; Mateus, Nuno; de Freitas, Victor; Heredia, Francisco J; Escribano-Bailón, María Teresa

    2017-08-09

    The interaction between phenolic compounds and salivary proteins is highly related to the astringency perception. Recently, it has been proven the existence of synergisms on the perceived astringency when phenolic acids were tested as mixtures in comparison to individual compounds, maintaining constant the total amount of the stimulus. The interactions between wine phenolic acids and the peptide fragment IB7 12 have been studied by saturation-transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy. This technique provided the dissociation constants and the percentage of interaction between both individual and mixtures of hydroxybenzoic and hydroxycinnamic acids and the model peptide. It is noteworthy that hydroxybenzoic acids showed higher affinity for the peptide than hydroxycinnamic acids. To obtain further insights into the mechanisms of interaction, molecular dynamics simulations have been performed. Results obtained not only showed the ability of these compounds to interact with salivary proteins but also may justify the synergistic effect observed in previous sensory studies.

  13. An in vitro tag-and-modify protein sample generation method for single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadani, Kambiz M; Howe, Jesse; Jensen, Madeleine K; Wu, Peng; Cate, Jamie H D; Marqusee, Susan

    2017-09-22

    Biomolecular systems exhibit many dynamic and biologically relevant properties, such as conformational fluctuations, multistep catalysis, transient interactions, folding, and allosteric structural transitions. These properties are challenging to detect and engineer using standard ensemble-based techniques. To address this drawback, single-molecule methods offer a way to access conformational distributions, transient states, and asynchronous dynamics inaccessible to these standard techniques. Fluorescence-based single-molecule approaches are parallelizable and compatible with multiplexed detection; to date, however, they have remained limited to serial screens of small protein libraries. This stems from the current absence of methods for generating either individual dual-labeled protein samples at high throughputs or protein libraries compatible with multiplexed screening platforms. Here, we demonstrate that by combining purified and reconstituted in vitro translation, quantitative unnatural amino acid incorporation via AUG codon reassignment, and copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition, we can overcome these challenges for target proteins that are, or can be, methionine-depleted. We present an in vitro parallelizable approach that does not require laborious target-specific purification to generate dual-labeled proteins and ribosome-nascent chain libraries suitable for single-molecule FRET-based conformational phenotyping. We demonstrate the power of this approach by tracking the effects of mutations, C-terminal extensions, and ribosomal tethering on the structure and stability of three protein model systems: barnase, spectrin, and T4 lysozyme. Importantly, dual-labeled ribosome-nascent chain libraries enable single-molecule co-localization of genotypes with phenotypes, are well suited for multiplexed single-molecule screening of protein libraries, and should enable the in vitro directed evolution of proteins with designer single-molecule conformational

  14. Front-End Electron Transfer Dissociation Coupled to a 21 Tesla FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer for Intact Protein Sequence Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbrod, Chad R.; Kaiser, Nathan K.; Syka, John E. P.; Early, Lee; Mullen, Christopher; Dunyach, Jean-Jacques; English, A. Michelle; Anderson, Lissa C.; Blakney, Greg T.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hendrickson, Christopher L.; Marshall, Alan G.; Hunt, Donald F.

    2017-09-01

    High resolution mass spectrometry is a key technology for in-depth protein characterization. High-field Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) enables high-level interrogation of intact proteins in the most detail to date. However, an appropriate complement of fragmentation technologies must be paired with FTMS to provide comprehensive sequence coverage, as well as characterization of sequence variants, and post-translational modifications. Here we describe the integration of front-end electron transfer dissociation (FETD) with a custom-built 21 tesla FT-ICR mass spectrometer, which yields unprecedented sequence coverage for proteins ranging from 2.8 to 29 kDa, without the need for extensive spectral averaging (e.g., 60% sequence coverage for apo-myoglobin with four averaged acquisitions). The system is equipped with a multipole storage device separate from the ETD reaction device, which allows accumulation of multiple ETD fragment ion fills. Consequently, an optimally large product ion population is accumulated prior to transfer to the ICR cell for mass analysis, which improves mass spectral signal-to-noise ratio, dynamic range, and scan rate. We find a linear relationship between protein molecular weight and minimum number of ETD reaction fills to achieve optimum sequence coverage, thereby enabling more efficient use of instrument data acquisition time. Finally, real-time scaling of the number of ETD reactions fills during method-based acquisition is shown, and the implications for LC-MS/MS top-down analysis are discussed. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Optimised purification and characterisation of lipid transfer protein 1 (LTP1) and its lipid-bound isoform LTP1b from barley malt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwoudt, Melanie; Lombard, Nicolaas; Rautenbach, Marina

    2014-08-15

    In beer brewing, brewers worldwide strive to obtain product consistency in terms of flavour, colour and foam. Important proteins contributing to beer foam are lipid transfer proteins (LTPs), in particular LTP1 and its lipid-bound isoform LTP1b, which are known to transport lipids in vivo and prevent lipids from destabilising the beer foam. LTP1 and LTP1b were successfully purified using only five purification steps with a high purified protein yield (160 mg LTP1 and LTP1b from 200 g barley). Circular dichroism of LTP1 and LTP1b confirmed that both proteins are highly tolerant to high temperatures (>90 °C) and are pH stable, particularly at a neutral to a more basic pH. Only LTP1 exhibited antiyeast and thermo-stable lytic activity, while LTP1b was inactive, indicating that the fatty acid moiety compromised the antimicrobial activity of LTP1. This lack in antiyeast activity and the positive foam properties of LTP1b would benefit beer fermentation and quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Protein resonance assignment at MAS frequencies approaching 100 kHz: a quantitative comparison of J-coupling and dipolar-coupling-based transfer methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penzel, Susanne; Smith, Albert A.; Agarwal, Vipin; Hunkeler, Andreas [ETH Zürich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Org, Mai-Liis; Samoson, Ago, E-mail: ago.samoson@ttu.ee [Tallinn University of Technology, NMR Instituut, Tartu Teadus, Tehnomeedikum (Estonia); Böckmann, Anja, E-mail: a.bockmann@ibcp.fr [UMR 5086 CNRS/Université de Lyon 1, Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Protéines (France); Ernst, Matthias, E-mail: maer@ethz.ch; Meier, Beat H., E-mail: beme@ethz.ch [ETH Zürich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    We discuss the optimum experimental conditions to obtain assignment spectra for solid proteins at magic-angle spinning (MAS) frequencies around 100 kHz. We present a systematic examination of the MAS dependence of the amide proton T{sub 2}′ times and a site-specific comparison of T{sub 2}′ at 93 kHz versus 60 kHz MAS frequency. A quantitative analysis of transfer efficiencies of building blocks, as they are used for typical 3D experiments, was performed. To do this, we compared dipolar-coupling and J-coupling based transfer steps. The building blocks were then combined into 3D experiments for sequential resonance assignment, where we evaluated signal-to-noise ratio and information content of the different 3D spectra in order to identify the best assignment strategy. Based on this comparison, six experiments were selected to optimally assign the model protein ubiquitin, solely using spectra acquired at 93 kHz MAS. Within 3 days of instrument time, the required spectra were recorded from which the backbone resonances have been assigned to over 96 %.

  17. Aspartame-fed zebrafish exhibit acute deaths with swimming defects and saccharin-fed zebrafish have elevation of cholesteryl ester transfer protein activity in hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Yong; Seo, Juyi; Cho, Kyung-Hyun

    2011-11-01

    Although many artificial sweeteners (AS) have safety issues, the AS have been widely used in industry. To determine the physiologic effect of AS in the presence of hyperlipidemia, zebrafish were fed aspartame or saccharin with a high-cholesterol diet (HCD). After 12 days, 30% of zebrafish, which consumed aspartame and HCD, died with exhibiting swimming defects. The aspartame group had 65% survivability, while the control and saccharin groups had 100% survivability. Under HCD, the saccharin-fed groups had the highest increase in the serum cholesterol level (599 mg/dL). Aspartame-fed group showed a remarkable increase in serum glucose (up to 125 mg/dL), which was 58% greater than the increase in the HCD alone group. The saccharin and HCD groups had the highest cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) activity (52% CE-transfer), while the HCD alone group had 42% CE-transfer. Histologic analysis revealed that the aspartame and HCD groups showed more infiltration of inflammatory cells in the brain and liver sections. Conclusively, under presence of hyperlipidemia, aspartame-fed zebrafish exhibited acute swimming defects with an increase in brain inflammation. Saccharin-fed zebrafish had an increased atherogenic serum lipid profile with elevation of CETP activity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Modification of quinone electrochemistry by the proteins in the biological electron transfer chains: examples from photosynthetic reaction centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunner, M. R.; Madeo, Jennifer; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2009-01-01

    Quinones such as ubiquinone are the lipid soluble electron and proton carriers in the membranes of mitochondria, chloroplasts and oxygenic bacteria. Quinones undergo controlled redox reactions bound to specific sites in integral membrane proteins such as the cytochrome bc1 oxidoreductase. The quinone reactions in bacterial photosynthesis are amongst the best characterized, presenting a model to understand how proteins modulate cofactor chemistry. The free energy of ubiquinone redox reactions in aqueous solution and in the QA and QB sites of the bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) are compared. In the primary QA site ubiquinone is reduced only to the anionic semiquinone (Q•−) while in the secondary QB site the product is the doubly reduced, doubly protonated quinol (QH2). The ways in which the protein modifies the relative energy of each reduced and protonated intermediate are described. For example, the protein stabilizes Q•− while destabilizing Q= relative to aqueous solution through electrostatic interactions. In addition, kinetic and thermodynamic mechanisms for stabilizing the intermediate semiquinones are compared. Evidence for the protein sequestering anionic compounds by slowing both on and off rates as well as by binding the anion more tightly is reviewed. PMID:18979192

  19. Estimating side-chain order in methyl-protonated, perdeuterated proteins via multiple-quantum relaxation violated coherence transfer NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Hechao; Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Tugarinov, Vitali

    2012-01-01

    Relaxation violated coherence transfer NMR spectroscopy (Tugarinov et al. in J Am Chem Soc 129:1743–1750, 2007) is an established experimental tool for quantitative estimation of the amplitudes of side-chain motions in methyl-protonated, highly deuterated proteins. Relaxation violated coherence transfer experiments monitor the build-up of methyl proton multiple-quantum coherences that can be created in magnetically equivalent spin-systems as long as their transverse magnetization components relax with substantially different rates. The rate of this build-up is a reporter of the methyl-bearing side-chain mobility. Although the build-up of multiple-quantum 1 H coherences is monitored in these experiments, the decay of the methyl signal during relaxation delays occurs when methyl proton magnetization is in a single-quantum state. We describe a relaxation violated coherence transfer approach where the relaxation of multiple-quantum 1 H– 13 C methyl coherences during the relaxation delay period is quantified. The NMR experiment and the associated fitting procedure that models the time-dependence of the signal build-up, are applicable to the characterization of side-chain order in [ 13 CH 3 ]-methyl-labeled, highly deuterated protein systems up to ∼100 kDa in molecular weight. The feasibility of extracting reliable measures of side-chain order is experimentally verified on methyl-protonated, perdeuterated samples of an 8.5-kDa ubiquitin at 10°C and an 82-kDa Malate Synthase G at 37°C.

  20. Mechanisms of zinc binding to the solute-binding protein AztC and transfer from the metallochaperone AztD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupane, Durga P; Avalos, Dante; Fullam, Stephanie; Roychowdhury, Hridindu; Yukl, Erik T

    2017-10-20

    Bacteria can acquire the essential metal zinc from extremely zinc-limited environments by using ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. These transporters are critical virulence factors, relying on specific and high-affinity binding of zinc by a periplasmic solute-binding protein (SBP). As such, the mechanisms of zinc binding and release among bacterial SBPs are of considerable interest as antibacterial drug targets. Zinc SBPs are characterized by a flexible loop near the high-affinity zinc-binding site. The function of this structure is not always clear, and its flexibility has thus far prevented structural characterization by X-ray crystallography. Here, we present intact structures for the zinc-specific SBP AztC from the bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans in the zinc-bound and apo-states. A comparison of these structures revealed that zinc loss prompts significant structural rearrangements, mediated by the formation of a sodium-binding site in the apo-structure. We further show that the AztC flexible loop has no impact on zinc-binding affinity, stoichiometry, or protein structure, yet is essential for zinc transfer from the metallochaperone AztD. We also found that 3 His residues in the loop appear to temporarily coordinate zinc and then convey it to the high-affinity binding site. Thus, mutation of any of these residues to Ala abrogated zinc transfer from AztD. Our structural and mechanistic findings conclusively identify a role for the AztC flexible loop in zinc acquisition from the metallochaperone AztD, yielding critical insights into metal binding by AztC from both solution and AztD. These proteins are highly conserved in human pathogens, making this work potentially useful for the development of novel antibiotics. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. A phosphatidylinositol transfer protein integrates phosphoinositide signaling with lipid droplet metabolism to regulate a developmental program of nutrient stress-induced membrane biogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Jihui; Lin, Coney Pei-Chen; Pathak, Manish C.; Temple, Brenda R.S.; Nile, Aaron H.; Mousley, Carl J.; Duncan, Mara C.; Eckert, Debra M.; Leiker, Thomas J.; Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Myers, David S.; Murphy, Robert C.; Brown, H. Alex; Verdaasdonk, Jolien; Bloom, Kerry S.; Ortlund, Eric A.; Neiman, Aaron M.; Bankaitis, Vytas A. [Emory-MED; (SBU); (TAM); (UNC); (Vanderbilt-MED); (Utah); (UCHSC)

    2014-07-11

    Lipid droplet (LD) utilization is an important cellular activity that regulates energy balance and release of lipid second messengers. Because fatty acids exhibit both beneficial and toxic properties, their release from LDs must be controlled. Here we demonstrate that yeast Sfh3, an unusual Sec14-like phosphatidylinositol transfer protein, is an LD-associated protein that inhibits lipid mobilization from these particles. We further document a complex biochemical diversification of LDs during sporulation in which Sfh3 and select other LD proteins redistribute into discrete LD subpopulations. The data show that Sfh3 modulates the efficiency with which a neutral lipid hydrolase-rich LD subclass is consumed during biogenesis of specialized membrane envelopes that package replicated haploid meiotic genomes. These results present novel insights into the interface between phosphoinositide signaling and developmental regulation of LD metabolism and unveil meiosis-specific aspects of Sfh3 (and phosphoinositide) biology that are invisible to contemporary haploid-centric cell biological, proteomic, and functional genomics approaches.

  2. A phosphatidylinositol transfer protein integrates phosphoinositide signaling with lipid droplet metabolism to regulate a developmental program of nutrient stress-induced membrane biogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Jihui; Lin, Coney Pei-Chen; Pathak, Manish C.; Temple, Brenda R.S.; Nile, Aaron H.; Mousley, Carl J.; Duncan, Mara C.; Eckert, Debra M.; Leiker, Thomas J.; Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Myers, David S.; Murphy, Robert C.; Brown, H. Alex; Verdaasdonk, Jolien; Bloom, Kerry S.; Ortlund, Eric A.; Neiman, Aaron M.; Bankaitis, Vytas A. (Emory-MED); (UNCSM); (UNC); (UCHSC); (TAM); (Vanderbilt-MED); (SBU); (Utah)

    2016-07-06

    Lipid droplet (LD) utilization is an important cellular activity that regulates energy balance and release of lipid second messengers. Because fatty acids exhibit both beneficial and toxic properties, their release from LDs must be controlled. Here we demonstrate that yeast Sfh3, an unusual Sec14-like phosphatidylinositol transfer protein, is an LD-associated protein that inhibits lipid mobilization from these particles. We further document a complex biochemical diversification of LDs during sporulation in which Sfh3 and select other LD proteins redistribute into discrete LD subpopulations. The data show that Sfh3 modulates the efficiency with which a neutral lipid hydrolase-rich LD subclass is consumed during biogenesis of specialized membrane envelopes that package replicated haploid meiotic genomes. These results present novel insights into the interface between phosphoinositide signaling and developmental regulation of LD metabolism and unveil meiosis-specific aspects of Sfh3 (and phosphoinositide) biology that are invisible to contemporary haploid-centric cell biological, proteomic, and functional genomics approaches.

  3. Membrane fusion between baculovirus budded virus-enveloped particles and giant liposomes generated using a droplet-transfer method for the incorporation of recombinant membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishigami, Misako; Mori, Takaaki; Tomita, Masahiro; Takiguchi, Kingo; Tsumoto, Kanta

    2017-07-01

    Giant proteoliposomes are generally useful as artificial cell membranes in biochemical and biophysical studies, and various procedures for their preparation have been reported. We present here a novel preparation technique that involves the combination of i) cell-sized lipid vesicles (giant unilamellar vesicles, GUVs) that are generated using the droplet-transfer method, where lipid monolayer-coated water-in-oil microemulsion droplets interact with oil/water interfaces to form enclosed bilayer vesicles, and ii) budded viruses (BVs) of baculovirus (Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus) that express recombinant transmembrane proteins on their envelopes. GP64, a fusogenic glycoprotein on viral envelopes, is activated by weak acids and is thought to cause membrane fusion with liposomes. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), we observed that the single giant liposomes fused with octadecyl rhodamine B chloride (R18)-labeled wild-type BV envelopes with moderate leakage of entrapped soluble compounds (calcein), and the fusion profile depended on the pH of the exterior solution: membrane fusion occurred at pH ∼4-5. We further demonstrated that recombinant transmembrane proteins, a red fluorescent protein (RFP)-tagged GPCR (corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1, CRHR1) and envelope protein GP64 could be partly incorporated into membranes of the individual giant liposomes with a reduction of the pH value, though there were also some immobile fluorescent spots observed on their circumferences. This combination may be useful for preparing giant proteoliposomes containing the desired membranes and inner phases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Long-range protein electron transfer observed at the single-molecule level: In situ mapping of redox-gated tunneling resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Qijin; Farver, O; Ulstrup, Jens

    2005-01-01

    on the redox potential. Maximum resonance appears around the equilibrium redox potential of azurin with an on/off current ratio of approximate to 9. Simulation analyses, based on a two-step interfacial ET model for the scanning tunneling microscopy redox process, were performed and provide quantitative......A biomimetic long-range electron transfer (ET) system consisting of the blue copper protein azurin, a tunneling barrier bridge, and a gold single-crystal electrode was designed on the basis of molecular wiring self-assembly principles. This system is sufficiently stable and sensitive in a quasi...... constants display tunneling features with distance-decay factors of 0.83 and 0.91 angstrom(-1) in H2O and D2O, respectively. Redox-gated tunneling resonance is observed in situ at the single-molecule level by using electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy, exhibiting an asymmetric dependence...

  5. Quantitative time domain analysis of lifetime-based Förster resonant energy transfer measurements with fluorescent proteins: Static random isotropic fluorophore orientation distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandrov, Yuriy; Nikolic, Dino Solar; Dunsby, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET) measurements are widely used to obtain information about molecular interactions and conformations through the dependence of FRET efficiency on the proximity of donor and acceptor fluorophores. Fluorescence lifetime measurements can provide quantitative...... into new software for fitting donor emission decay profiles. Calculated FRET parameters, including molar population fractions, are compared for the analysis of simulated and experimental FRET data under the assumption of static and dynamic fluorophores and the intermediate regimes between fully dynamic...... analysis of FRET efficiency and interacting population fraction. Many FRET experiments exploit the highly specific labelling of genetically expressed fluorescent proteins, applicable in live cells and organisms. Unfortunately, the typical assumption of fast randomization of fluorophore orientations...

  6. Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Intimately Involved in Dyslipidemia-Related Susceptibility to Cognitive Deficits in Type 2 Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jie; Cai, Rongrong; Huang, Rong; Wang, Pin; Tian, Sai; Sun, Haixia; Xia, Wenqing; Wang, Shaohua

    2016-08-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) is involved in diabetic dyslipidemia. We aim to test the hypothesis that CETP might be of importance in mediating dyslipidemia-related susceptibility to cognitive deficits in diabetic patients. We recruited 190 type 2 diabetic patients and divided them into two groups according to the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) score. The association between CETP and cognitive decline was analyzed with logistic regression and stratification. There were 110 diabetic patients with mild cognition impairment (MCI) and 80 healthy cognition subjects as controls. Dyslipidemia is more common among diabetic patients with MCI; they had a significant increase of serum CETP concentrations, which was negatively correlated with MoCA (r = -0.638; p dyslipidemia-related susceptibility to cognitive decline, especially memory function in type 2 diabetic patients.

  7. Characterisation, immunolocalisation and antifungal activity of a lipid transfer protein from chili pepper (Capsicum annuum) seeds with novel α-amylase inhibitory properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diz, Mariângela S; Carvalho, Andre O; Ribeiro, Suzanna F F; Da Cunha, Maura; Beltramini, Leila; Rodrigues, Rosana; Nascimento, Viviane V; Machado, Olga L T; Gomes, Valdirene M

    2011-07-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) were thus named because they facilitate the transfer of lipids between membranes in vitro. This study was triggered by the characterization of a 9-kDa LTP from Capsicum annuum seeds that we call Ca-LTP(1) . Ca-LTP(1) was repurified, and in the last chromatographic purification step, propanol was used as the solvent in place of acetonitrile to maintain the protein's biological activity. Bidimensional electrophoresis of the 9-kDa band, which corresponds to the purified Ca-LTP(1) , showed the presence of three isoforms with isoelectric points (pIs) of 6.0, 8.5 and 9.5. Circular dichroism (CD) analysis suggested a predominance of α-helices, as expected for the structure of an LTP family member. LTPs immunorelated to Ca-LTP(1) from C. annuum were also detected by western blotting in exudates released from C. annuum seeds and also in other Capsicum species. The tissue and subcellular localization of Ca-LTP(1) indicated that it was mainly localized within dense vesicles. In addition, isolated Ca-LTP(1) exhibited antifungal activity against Colletotrichum lindemunthianum, and especially against Candida tropicalis, causing several morphological changes to the cells including the formation of pseudohyphae. Ca-LTP(1) also caused the yeast plasma membrane to be permeable to the dye SYTOX green, as verified by fluorescence microscopy. We also found that Ca-LTP(1) is able to inhibit mammalian α-amylase activity in vitro. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2011.

  8. Upregulating reverse cholesterol transport with cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibition requires combination with the LDL-lowering drug berberine in dyslipidemic hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briand, François; Thieblemont, Quentin; Muzotte, Elodie; Sulpice, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibition promotes in vivo reverse cholesterol transport in dyslipidemic hamsters. In vivo reverse cholesterol transport was measured after an intravenous injection of (3)H-cholesteryl-oleate-labeled/oxidized low density lipoprotein particles ((3)H-oxLDL), which are rapidly cleared from plasma by liver-resident macrophages for further (3)H-tracer egress in plasma, high density lipoprotein (HDL), liver, and feces. A first set of hamsters made dyslipidemic with a high-fat and high-fructose diet was treated with vehicle or torcetrapib 30 mg/kg (TOR) over 2 weeks. Compared with vehicle, TOR increased apolipoprotein E-rich HDL levels and significantly increased (3)H-tracer appearance in HDL by 30% over 72 hours after (3)H-oxLDL injection. However, TOR did not change (3)H-tracer recovery in liver and feces, suggesting that uptake and excretion of cholesterol deriving from apolipoprotein E-rich HDL is not stimulated. As apoE is a potent ligand for the LDL receptor, we next evaluated the effects of TOR in combination with the LDL-lowering drug berberine, which upregulates LDL receptor expression in dyslipidemic hamsters. Compared with TOR alone, treatment with TOR+berberine 150 mg/kg resulted in lower apolipoprotein E-rich HDL levels. After (3)H-oxLDL injection, TOR+berberine significantly increased (3)H-tracer appearance in fecal cholesterol by 109%. Our data suggest that cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibition alone does not stimulate reverse cholesterol transport in dyslipidemic hamsters and that additional effects mediated by the LDL-lowering drug berberine are required to upregulate this process.

  9. Oxidoreduction reactions involving the electrostatic and the covalent complex of cytochrome c and plastocyanin: Importance of the protein rearrangement for the intracomplex electron-transfer reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peerey, L.M.; Kostic, N.M.

    1989-01-01

    Horse heart cytochrome c and French bean plastocyanin are cross-linked one-to-one by a carbodiimide in the same general orientation in which they associate electrostatically. The reduction potentials of the Fe and Cu atoms in the covalent diprotein complex are respectively 245 and 385 mV vs NHE; the EPR spectra of the two metals are not perturbed by cross-linking. For isomers of the covalent diprotein complex, which probably differ slightly from one another in the manner of cross-linking, are separated efficiently by cation-exchange chromatography. Stopped-flow spectrophotometric experiments with the covalent diprotein complex show that the presence of plastocyanin somewhat inhibits oxidation of ferrocytochrome c by [Fe(CN) 6 ] 3- and somewhat promotes oxidation of this protein by [Fe(C 5 H 5 ) 2 ] + . These changes in reactivity are explained in terms of electrostatic and steric effects. Pulse-radiolysis experiments with the electrostatic diprotein complex yield association constants of ≥5 x 10 6 and 1 x 10 5 M -1 at ionic strengths of 1 and 40 mM, respectively, and the rate constant of 1.05 x 10 3 s -1 , regardless of the ionic strength, for the intracomplex electron-transfer reaction. Analogous pulse-radiolysis experiments with each of the four isomers of the covalent diprotein complex, at ionic strengths of both 2 and 200 mM, show an absence of the intracomplex electron-transfer reaction. A rearrangement of the proteins for this reaction seems to be possible (or unnecessary) in the electrostatic complex but impossible in the covalent complex

  10. Three-color confocal Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer microscopy: Quantitative analysis of protein interactions in the nucleation of actin filaments in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallrabe, Horst; Sun, Yuansheng; Fang, Xiaolan; Periasamy, Ammasi; Bloom, George S

    2015-06-01

    Experiments using live cell 3-color Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy and corresponding in vitro biochemical reconstitution of the same proteins were conducted to evaluate actin filament nucleation. A novel application of 3-color FRET data is demonstrated, extending the analysis beyond the customary energy-transfer efficiency (E%) calculations. MDCK cells were transfected for coexpression of Teal-N-WASP/Venus-IQGAP1/mRFP1-Rac1, Teal-N-WASP/Venus-IQGAP1/mRFP1-Cdc42, CFP-Rac1/Venus-IQGAP1/mCherry-actin, or CFP-Cdc42/Venus-IQGAP1/mCherry-actin, and with single-label equivalents for spectral bleedthrough correction. Using confirmed E% as an entry point, fluorescence levels and related ratios were correlated at discrete accumulating levels at cell peripheries. Rising ratios of CFP-Rac1:Venus-IQGAP1 were correlated with lower overall actin fluorescence, whereas the CFP-Cdc42:Venus-IQGAP1 ratio correlated with increased actin fluorescence at low ratios, but was neutral at higher ratios. The new FRET analyses also indicated that rising levels of mRFP1-Cdc42 or mRFP1-Rac1, respectively, promoted or suppressed the association of Teal-N-WASP with Venus-IQGAP1. These 3-color FRET assays further support our in vitro results about the role of IQGAP1, Rac1, and Cdc42 in actin nucleation, and the differential impact of Rac1 and Cdc42 on the association of N-WASP with IQGAP1. In addition, this study emphasizes the power of 3-color FRET as a systems biology strategy for simultaneous evaluation of multiple interacting proteins in individual live cells. © 2015 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  11. Brix refractometry in serum as a measure of failure of passive transfer compared to measured immunoglobulin G and total protein by refractometry in serum from dairy calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, D; Nydam, D V; Godden, S M; Bristol, L S; Kryzer, A; Ranum, J; Schaefer, D

    2016-05-01

    A series of trials were conducted to evaluate Brix refractometry (Brix %) for the assessment of failure of passive transfer (FPT) in dairy calves compared to: (1) serum IgG (reference standard) when measured by radial immunodiffusion (RID) or a turbidometric immunoassay (TIA), and (2) serum total protein refractometry (STP). For the serum samples tested with TIA, STP, and Brix % (n = 310; Holstein calves), the median concentrations were 21.3 g/L IgG, 58 g/L STP, and 9.2%, respectively. For the serum samples tested with RID, STP and Brix % (n = 112; Jersey calves), the mean concentrations were 38 g/L IgG, 68 g/L STP, and 10.2%, respectively. For samples tested with only Brix % and STP (n = 265; Holstein calves), median STP and Brix % were 50 g/L STP and 8.5%, respectively. Correlations between Brix % and RID, and between Brix % and TIA were equal (r = 0.79, respectively). Brix % and STP were positively correlated (r = 0.99). Brix % estimated serum IgG concentrations determined by TIA and RID (r(2) = 0.63, 0.62, respectively). When FPT was defined as serum IgG refractometry predicted successful transfer of passive immunity in dairy calves, but further evaluation as a diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of FPT is warranted. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Increased accumulation of cuticular wax and expression of lipid transfer protein in response to periodic drying events in leaves of tree tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Kimberly D; Teece, Mark A; Smart, Lawrence B

    2006-01-01

    Cuticular wax deposition and composition affects drought tolerance and yield in plants. We examined the relationship between wax and dehydration stress by characterizing the leaf cuticular wax of tree tobacco (Nicotiana glauca L. Graham) grown under periodic dehydration stress. Total leaf cuticular wax load increased after each of three periods of dehydration stress using a CH2Cl2 extraction process. Overall, total wax load increased 1.5- to 2.5-fold, but composition of the wax was not altered. Homologous series of wax components were classified into organic groups; n-hentriacontane was the largest component (>75%) with alcohols and fatty acids representing drying event. Leaves excised from plants subjected to multiple drying events were more resistant to water loss compared to leaves excised from well-watered plants, indicating that there is a negative relationship between total wax load and epidermal conductance. Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are thought to be involved in the transfer of lipids through the extracellular matrix for the formation of cuticular wax. Using northern analysis, a 6-fold increase of tree tobacco LTP gene transcripts was observed after three drying events, providing further evidence that LTP is involved in cuticle deposition. The simplicity of wax composition and the dramatic wax bloom displayed by tree tobacco make this an excellent species in which to study the relationship between leaf wax deposition and drought tolerance.

  13. Role of Zinc and Magnesium Ions in the Modulation of Phosphoryl Transfer in Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellomo, Elisa; Abro, Asma; Hogstrand, Christer; Maret, Wolfgang; Domene, Carmen

    2018-03-28

    While the majority of phosphatases are metalloenzymes, the prevailing model for the reactions catalyzed by protein tyrosine phosphatases does not involve any metal ion, yet both metal cations and oxoanions affect their enzymatic activity. Mg 2+ and Zn 2+ activate and inhibit, respectively, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). Molecular dynamics simulations, metadynamics, and quantum chemical calculations in combination with experimental investigations demonstrate that Mg 2+ and Zn 2+ compete for the same binding site in the active site only in the closed conformation of the enzyme in its phosphorylated state. The two cations have different effects on the arrangements and activities of water molecules that are necessary for the hydrolysis of the phosphocysteine intermediate in the second catalytic step of the reaction. Remarkable differences between the established structural enzymology of PTP1B investigated ex vivo and the function of PTP1B in vivo become evident. Different reaction pathways are viable when the presence of metal ions and their cellular concentrations are considered. The findings suggest that the substrate delivers the inhibitory Zn 2+ ion to the active site. The inhibition and activation can be ascribed to the different coordination chemistries of Zn 2+ and Mg 2+ ions and the orientation of the metal-coordinated water molecules. Metallochemistry adds an additional dimension to the regulation of PTP1B and presumably other members of this enzyme family.

  14. Graph Based Study of Allergen Cross-Reactivity of Plant Lipid Transfer Proteins (LTPs) Using Microarray in a Multicenter Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacín, Arantxa; Gómez-Casado, Cristina; Rivas, Luis A.; Aguirre, Jacobo; Tordesillas, Leticia; Bartra, Joan; Blanco, Carlos; Carrillo, Teresa; Cuesta-Herranz, Javier; de Frutos, Consolación; Álvarez-Eire, Genoveva García; Fernández, Francisco J.; Gamboa, Pedro; Muñoz, Rosa; Sánchez-Monge, Rosa; Sirvent, Sofía; Torres, María J.; Varela-Losada, Susana; Rodríguez, Rosalía; Parro, Victor; Blanca, Miguel; Salcedo, Gabriel; Díaz-Perales, Araceli

    2012-01-01

    The study of cross-reactivity in allergy is key to both understanding. the allergic response of many patients and providing them with a rational treatment In the present study, protein microarrays and a co-sensitization graph approach were used in conjunction with an allergen microarray immunoassay. This enabled us to include a wide number of proteins and a large number of patients, and to study sensitization profiles among members of the LTP family. Fourteen LTPs from the most frequent plant food-induced allergies in the geographical area studied were printed into a microarray specifically designed for this research. 212 patients with fruit allergy and 117 food-tolerant pollen allergic subjects were recruited from seven regions of Spain with different pollen profiles, and their sera were tested with allergen microarray. This approach has proven itself to be a good tool to study cross-reactivity between members of LTP family, and could become a useful strategy to analyze other families of allergens. PMID:23272072

  15. Graph based study of allergen cross-reactivity of plant lipid transfer proteins (LTPs using microarray in a multicenter study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arantxa Palacín

    Full Text Available The study of cross-reactivity in allergy is key to both understanding. the allergic response of many patients and providing them with a rational treatment In the present study, protein microarrays and a co-sensitization graph approach were used in conjunction with an allergen microarray immunoassay. This enabled us to include a wide number of proteins and a large number of patients, and to study sensitization profiles among members of the LTP family. Fourteen LTPs from the most frequent plant food-induced allergies in the geographical area studied were printed into a microarray specifically designed for this research. 212 patients with fruit allergy and 117 food-tolerant pollen allergic subjects were recruited from seven regions of Spain with different pollen profiles, and their sera were tested with allergen microarray. This approach has proven itself to be a good tool to study cross-reactivity between members of LTP family, and could become a useful strategy to analyze other families of allergens.

  16. Introduction to protein blotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Biji T; Scofield, R Hal

    2009-01-01

    Protein blotting is a powerful and important procedure for the immunodetection of proteins following electrophoresis, particularly proteins that are of low abundance. Since the inception of the protocol for protein transfer from an electrophoresed gel to a membrane in 1979, protein blotting has evolved greatly. The scientific community is now confronted with a variety of ways and means to carry out this transfer.

  17. Transfer of the human NKG2D ligands UL16 binding proteins (ULBP) 1-3 is related to lytic granule release and leads to ligand retransfer and killing of ULBP-recipient natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cobo, Sheila; Romera-Cárdenas, Gema; García-Cuesta, Eva M; Reyburn, Hugh T; Valés-Gómez, Mar

    2015-09-01

    After immune interactions, membrane fragments can be transferred between cells. This fast transfer of molecules is transient and shows selectivity for certain proteins; however, the constraints underlying acquisition of a protein are unknown. To characterize the mechanism and functional consequences of this process in natural killer (NK) cells, we have compared the transfer of different NKG2D ligands. We show that human NKG2D ligands can be acquired by NK cells with different efficiencies. The main findings are that NKG2D ligand transfer is related to immune activation and receptor-ligand interaction and that NK cells acquire these proteins during interactions with target cells that lead to degranulation. Our results further demonstrate that NK cells that have acquired NKG2D ligands can stimulate activation of autologous NK cells. Surprisingly, NK cells can also re-transfer the acquired molecule to autologous effector cells during this immune recognition that leads to their death. These data demonstrate that transfer of molecules occurs as a consequence of immune recognition and imply that this process might play a role in homeostatic tuning-down of the immune response or be used as marker of interaction. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Homogeneous competitive assay of ligand affinities based on quenching fluorescence of tyrosine/tryptophan residues in a protein via Főrster-resonance-energy-transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yanling; Yang, Xiaolan; Pu, Jun; Zhao, Yunsheng; Zhang, Ying; Xie, Guoming; Zheng, Jun; Yuan, Huidong; Liao, Fei

    2010-11-01

    A new homogeneous competitive assay of ligand affinities was proposed based on quenching the fluorescence of tryptophan/tyrosine residues in a protein via Főrster-resonance-energy-transfer using a fluorescent reference ligand as the acceptor. Under excitation around 280 nm, the fluorescence of a protein or a bound acceptor was monitored upon competitive binding against a nonfluorescent candidate ligand. Chemometrics for deriving the binding ratio of the acceptor with either fluorescence signal was discussed; the dissociation constant ( Kd) of a nonfluorescent candidate ligand was calculated from its concentration to displace 50% binding of the acceptor. N-biotinyl-N'-(1-naphthyl)-ethylenediamine (BNEDA) and N-biotinyl-N'-dansyl-ethylenediamine (BDEDA) were used as the reference ligands and acceptors to streptavidin to test this new homogeneous competitive assay. Upon binding of an acceptor to streptavidin, there were the quench of streptavidin fluorescence at 340 nm and the characteristic fluorescence at 430 nm for BNEDA or at 525 nm for BDEDA. Kd of BNEDA and BDEDA was obtained via competitive binding against biotin. By quantifying BNEDA fluorescence, Kd of each tested nonfluorescent biotin derivative was consistent with that by quantifying streptavidin fluorescence using BNEDA or BDEDA as the acceptor. The overall coefficients of variation were about 10%. Therefore, this homogeneous competitive assay was effective and promising to high-throughput-screening.

  19. In-vivo identification of direct electron transfer from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to electrodes via outer-membrane OmcA-MtrCAB protein complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Akihiro [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Nakamura, Ryuhei, E-mail: nakamura@light.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Hashimoto, Kazuhito, E-mail: hashimoto@light.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); ERATO/JST, HASHIMOTO Light Energy Conversion Project (Japan)

    2011-06-30

    Graphical abstract: . Display Omitted Highlights: > Monolayer biofilm of Shewanella cells was prepared on an ITO electrode. > Extracellular electron transfer (EET) process was examined with series of mutants. > Direct ET was confirmed with outer-membrane-bound OmcA-MtrCAB complex. > The EET process was not prominently influenced by capsular polysaccharide. - Abstract: The direct electron-transfer (DET) property of Shewanella bacteria has not been resolved in detail due to the complexity of in vivo electrochemistry in whole-cell systems. Here, we report the in vivo assignment of the redox signal indicative of the DET property in biofilms of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 by cyclic voltammetry (CV) with a series of mutants and a chemical marking technique. The CV measurements of monolayer biofilms formed by deletion mutants of c-type cytochromes ({Delta}mtrA, {Delta}mtrB, {Delta}mtrC/{Delta}omcA, and {Delta}cymA), and pilin ({Delta}pilD), capsular polysaccharide ({Delta}SO3177) and menaquinone ({Delta}menD) biosynthetic proteins demonstrated that the electrochemical redox signal with a midpoint potential at 50 mV (vs. SHE) was due to an outer-membrane-bound OmcA-MtrCAB protein complex of decaheme cytochromes, and did not involve either inner-membrane-bound CymA protein or secreted menaquinone. Using the specific binding affinity of nitric monoxide for the heme groups of c-type cytochromes, we further confirmed this conclusion. The heterogeneous standard rate constant for the DET process was estimated to be 300 {+-} 10 s{sup -1}, which was two orders of magnitude higher than that previously reported for the electron shuttling process via riboflavin. Experiments using a mutant unable to produce capsular polysaccharide ({Delta}SO3177) revealed that the DET property of the OmcA-MtrCAB complex was not influenced by insulating and hydrophilic extracellular polysaccharide. Accordingly, under physiological conditions, S. oneidensis MR-1 utilizes a high density of outer

  20. Deregulated Expression of Mitochondrial Proteins Mfn2 and Bcnl3L in Placentae from Sheep Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer (SCNT Conceptuses.

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    Marta Czernik

    Full Text Available In various animal species, the main cause of pregnancy loss in conceptuses obtained by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT are placental abnormalities. Most abnormalities described in SCNT pregnancies (such as placentomegaly, reduced vascularisation, hypoplasia of trophoblastic epithelium suggest that placental cell degeneration may be triggered by mitochondrial failure. We hypothesized that placental abnormalities of clones obtained by SCNT are related to mitochondrial dysfunction. To test this, early SCNT and control (CTR, from pregnancies obtained by in vitro fertilization placentae were collected from pregnant ewes (at day 20 and 22 of gestation and subjected to morphological, mRNA and protein analysis. Here, we demonstrated swollen and fragmented mitochondria and low expression of mitofusin 2 (Mfn2, the protein which plays a crucial role in mitochondrial functionality, in SCNT early placentae. Furthermore, reduced expression of the Bcnl3L/Nix protein, which plays a crucial role in selective elimination of damaged mitochondria, was observed and reflected by the accumulation of numerous damaged mitochondria in SCNT placental cells. Likely, this accumulation of damaged organelles led to uncontrolled apoptosis in SCNT placentae, as demonstrated by the high number of apoptotic bodies, fragmented cytoplasm, condensed chromatin, lack of integrity of the nuclear membrane and the perturbed mRNA expression of apoptotic genes (BCL2 and BAX. In conclusion, our data indicate that deregulated expression of Mfn2 and Bcnl3L is responsible for placental abnormalities in SCNT conceptuses. Our results suggest that some nuclear genes, that are involved in the regulation of mitochondrial function, do not work well and consequently this influence the function of mitochondria.

  1. Induction of Immune Tolerance to Foreign Protein via Adeno-Associated Viral Vector Gene Transfer in Mid-Gestation Fetal Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Marcus G.; Riley, John S.; Andrews, Abigail; Tyminski, Alec; Limberis, Maria; Pogoriler, Jennifer E.; Partridge, Emily; Olive, Aliza; Hedrick, Holly L.; Flake, Alan W.; Peranteau, William H.

    2017-01-01

    A major limitation to adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy is the generation of host immune responses to viral vector antigens and the transgene product. The ability to induce immune tolerance to foreign protein has the potential to overcome this host immunity. Acquisition and maintenance of tolerance to viral vector antigens and transgene products may also permit repeat administration thereby enhancing therapeutic efficacy. In utero gene transfer (IUGT) takes advantage of the immunologic immaturity of the fetus to induce immune tolerance to foreign antigens. In this large animal study, in utero administration of AAV6.2, AAV8 and AAV9 expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) to ~60 day fetal sheep (term: ~150 days) was performed. Transgene expression and postnatal immune tolerance to GFP and viral antigens were assessed. We demonstrate 1) hepatic expression of GFP 1 month following in utero administration of AAV6.2.GFP and AAV8.GFP, 2) in utero recipients of either AAV6.2.GFP or AAV8.GFP fail to mount an anti-GFP antibody response following postnatal GFP challenge and lack inflammatory cellular infiltrates at the intramuscular site of immunization, 3) a serotype specific anti-AAV neutralizing antibody response is elicited following postnatal challenge of in utero recipients of AAV6.2 or AAV8 with the corresponding AAV serotype, and 4) durable hepatic GFP expression was observed up to 6 months after birth in recipients of AAV8.GFP but expression was lost between 1 and 6 months of age in recipients of AAV6.2.GFP. The current study demonstrates, in a preclinical large animal model, the potential of IUGT to achieve host immune tolerance to the viral vector transgene product but also suggests that a single exposure to the vector capsid proteins at the time of IUGT is inadequate to induce tolerance to viral vector antigens. PMID:28141818

  2. TRANSFERENCE BEFORE TRANSFERENCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaminio, Vincenzo

    2017-10-01

    This paper is predominantly a clinical presentation that describes the transmigration of one patient's transference to another, with the analyst functioning as a sort of transponder. It involves an apparently accidental episode in which there was an unconscious intersection between two patients. The author's aim is to show how transference from one case may affect transference in another, a phenomenon the author calls transference before transference. The author believes that this idea may serve as a tool for understanding the unconscious work that takes place in the clinical situation. In a clinical example, the analyst finds himself caught up in an enactment involving two patients in which he becomes the medium of what happens in session. © 2017 The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, Inc.

  3. The levels of plasma low density lipoprotein are independent of cholesterol ester transfer protein in fish-oil fed F1B hamsters

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    Davis Phillip J

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP plays a major role in regulating the levels of LDL- and HDL-cholesterol. We previously observed a fish-oil-induced elevation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL-and very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL-cholesterol concentrations and a decrease in high-density lipoprotein (HDL-cholesterol concentration in F1B hamsters. The molecular mechanism/s by which fish oil induces hyperlipidaemic effect was investigated in this study. We examined whether the effects of dietary fish oil on plasma lipoprotein concentrations are due to fish-oil-induced alterations in plasma CETP activity. MIX diet, a diet supplemented with a mixture of lard and safflower oil, was used as the control diet. Results We found that fish oil feeding in hamsters reduced CETP mass as well as CETP activity. Increasing the dietary fat level of fish-oil from 5% to 20% (w/w led to a further decrease in CETP mass. Supplementation with dietary cholesterol increased both CETP mass and CETP activity in fish-oil and MIX-diet fed hamsters. However, there was no correlation between CETP mass as well as CETP activity and LDL-cholesterol concentrations. Conclusion These findings suggest that cholesterol ester transfer between HDL and LDL is not likely to play a major role in determining fish-oil-induced changes in LDL- and HDL-cholesterol concentrations in F1B hamsters. A possible role of reduced clearance of LDL-particles as well as dietary fat level and dietary cholesterol dependent changes in LDL-lipid composition have been discussed.

  4. A Broad G Protein-Coupled Receptor Internalization Assay that Combines SNAP-Tag Labeling, Diffusion-Enhanced Resonance Energy Transfer, and a Highly Emissive Terbium Cryptate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levoye, Angélique; Zwier, Jurriaan M; Jaracz-Ros, Agnieszka; Klipfel, Laurence; Cottet, Martin; Maurel, Damien; Bdioui, Sara; Balabanian, Karl; Prézeau, Laurent; Trinquet, Eric; Durroux, Thierry; Bachelerie, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Although G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) internalization has long been considered as a major aspect of the desensitization process that tunes ligand responsiveness, internalization is also involved in receptor resensitization and signaling, as well as the ligand scavenging function of some atypical receptors. Internalization thus contributes to the diversity of GPCR-dependent signaling, and its dynamics and quantification in living cells has generated considerable interest. We developed a robust and sensitive assay to follow and quantify ligand-induced and constitutive-induced GPCR internalization but also receptor recycling in living cells. This assay is based on diffusion-enhanced resonance energy transfer (DERET) between cell surface GPCRs labeled with a luminescent terbium cryptate donor and a fluorescein acceptor present in the culture medium. GPCR internalization results in a quantifiable reduction of energy transfer. This method yields a high signal-to-noise ratio due to time-resolved measurements. For various GPCRs belonging to different classes, we demonstrated that constitutive and ligand-induced internalization could be monitored as a function of time and ligand concentration, thus allowing accurate quantitative determination of kinetics of receptor internalization but also half-maximal effective or inhibitory concentrations of compounds. In addition to its selectivity and sensitivity, we provided evidence that DERET-based internalization assay is particularly suitable for characterizing biased ligands. Furthermore, the determination of a Z'-factor value of 0.45 indicates the quality and suitability of DERET-based internalization assay for high-throughput screening (HTS) of compounds that may modulate GPCRs internalization.

  5. A broad G protein-coupled receptor internalization assay that combines SNAP-tag labeling, diffusion-enhanced resonance energy transfer, and a highly emissive terbium cryptate acceptor

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    Angélique eLEVOYE

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR internalization has long been considered a major aspect of the desensitization process that tunes ligand responsiveness, internalization is also involved in receptor resensitization and signaling, as well as the ligand scavenging function of some atypical receptors. Internalization thus contributes to the diversity of GPCR-dependent signaling, and its dynamics and quantification in living cells has generated considerable interest. We developed a robust and sensitive assay to follow and quantify ligand-induced and constitutive GPCR internalization but also receptor recycling in living cells. This assay is based on diffusion-enhanced resonance energy transfer (DERET between cell surface GPCRs labeled with a luminescent terbium cryptate donor and a fluorescein acceptor present in the culture medium. GPCR internalization results in a quantifiable reduction of energy transfer. This method yields a high signal-to-noise ratio due to time-resolved measurements. For various GPCRs belonging to different classes, we demonstrated that constitutive and ligand-induced internalization could be monitored as a function of time and ligand concentration, thus allowing accurate quantitative determination of kinetics of receptor internalization but also half-maximal effective or inhibitory concentrations of compounds. In addition to its selectivity and sensitivity, we provided evidence that DERET-based internalization assay is particularly suitable for characterizing biased ligands. Furthermore, the determination of a Z’-factor value of 0.45 indicates the quality and suitability of DERET-based internalization assay for high-throughput screening (HTS of compounds that may modulate GPCRs internalization.

  6. Structural studies of a bacterial tRNA(HIS guanylyltransferase (Thg1-like protein, with nucleotide in the activation and nucleotidyl transfer sites.

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    Samantha J Hyde

    Full Text Available All nucleotide polymerases and transferases catalyze nucleotide addition in a 5' to 3' direction. In contrast, tRNA(His guanylyltransferase (Thg1 enzymes catalyze the unusual reverse addition (3' to 5' of nucleotides to polynucleotide substrates. In eukaryotes, Thg1 enzymes use the 3'-5' addition activity to add G-1 to the 5'-end of tRNA(His, a modification required for efficient aminoacylation of the tRNA by the histidyl-tRNA synthetase. Thg1-like proteins (TLPs are found in Archaea, Bacteria, and mitochondria and are biochemically distinct from their eukaryotic Thg1 counterparts TLPs catalyze 5'-end repair of truncated tRNAs and act on a broad range of tRNA substrates instead of exhibiting strict specificity for tRNA(His. Taken together, these data suggest that TLPs function in distinct biological pathways from the tRNA(His maturation pathway, perhaps in tRNA quality control. Here we present the first crystal structure of a TLP, from the gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (BtTLP. The enzyme is a tetramer like human THG1, with which it shares substantial structural similarity. Catalysis of the 3'-5' reaction with 5'-monophosphorylated tRNA necessitates first an activation step, generating a 5'-adenylylated intermediate prior to a second nucleotidyl transfer step, in which a nucleotide is transferred to the tRNA 5'-end. Consistent with earlier characterization of human THG1, we observed distinct binding sites for the nucleotides involved in these two steps of activation and nucleotidyl transfer. A BtTLP complex with GTP reveals new interactions with the GTP nucleotide in the activation site that were not evident from the previously solved structure. Moreover, the BtTLP-ATP structure allows direct observation of ATP in the activation site for the first time. The BtTLP structural data, combined with kinetic analysis of selected variants, provide new insight into the role of key residues in the activation step.

  7. Impact of the lipid bilayer on energy transfer kinetics in the photosynthetic protein LH2† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc04814a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogren, John I.; Tong, Ashley L.; Gordon, Samuel C.; Chenu, Aurélia; Lu, Yue; Blankenship, Robert E.; Cao, Jianshu

    2018-01-01

    Photosynthetic purple bacteria convert solar energy to chemical energy with near unity quantum efficiency. The light-harvesting process begins with absorption of solar energy by an antenna protein called Light-Harvesting Complex 2 (LH2). Energy is subsequently transferred within LH2 and then through a network of additional light-harvesting proteins to a central location, termed the reaction center, where charge separation occurs. The energy transfer dynamics of LH2 are highly sensitive to intermolecular distances and relative organizations. As a result, minor structural perturbations can cause significant changes in these dynamics. Previous experiments have primarily been performed in two ways. One uses non-native samples where LH2 is solubilized in detergent, which can alter protein structure. The other uses complex membranes that contain multiple proteins within a large lipid area, which make it difficult to identify and distinguish perturbations caused by protein–protein interactions and lipid–protein interactions. Here, we introduce the use of the biochemical platform of model membrane discs to study the energy transfer dynamics of photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes in a near-native environment. We incorporate a single LH2 from Rhodobacter sphaeroides into membrane discs that provide a spectroscopically amenable sample in an environment more physiological than detergent but less complex than traditional membranes. This provides a simplified system to understand an individual protein and how the lipid–protein interaction affects energy transfer dynamics. We compare the energy transfer rates of detergent-solubilized LH2 with those of LH2 in membrane discs using transient absorption spectroscopy and transient absorption anisotropy. For one key energy transfer step in LH2, we observe a 30% enhancement of the rate for LH2 in membrane discs compared to that in detergent. Based on experimental results and theoretical modeling, we attribute this difference

  8. Gestation-related gene expression and protein localization in endometrial tissue of Suffolk and Cheviot ewes at gestation Day 19, after transfer of Suffolk or Cheviot embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequeira, M; Pain, S J; de Brun, V; Meikle, A; Kenyon, P R; Blair, H T

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the gene expression of progesterone and estrogen receptor α (PR, ERα), insulin-like growth factor (IGF) 1, IGF-2, their receptor (IGFR1), IGF-binding proteins (BP) 1 to 6, insulin receptor, adiponectin receptors (AdipoR1/2), cyclooxygenase 2 (PTGS2), mucin 1 and to localize PR, ERα, IGF-1, IGFR1, PTGS2, and proliferating cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA) in the endometrium of pregnant (Day 19) Suffolk and Cheviot ewes carrying Suffolk and Cheviot embryos transferred within and reciprocally between breeds. Gene expression was determined by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), and antigen determination was measured by immunohistochemistry in the luminal epithelium (LE), superficial and deep glands (SG, DG, respectively) and superficial and deep stroma. Gene expression of PR, IGF-1, IGFBP2, and IGFBP5 was higher in Suffolk than that in Cheviot ewes (P ewes carrying Cheviot embryos than Cheviot ewes carrying Suffolk embryos (P ewes had higher ERα staining intensity than Suffolk ewes (P ewe and embryo breed affected PTGS2 staining (P ewes carrying Suffolk embryos had a lower PTGS2 staining than Suffolk ewes carrying Suffolk embryos. Positive staining of PCNA was found in LE and SG. Suffolk ewes carrying Suffolk embryos showed lower PCNA immunostaining than Cheviot ewes carrying Suffolk embryos (P ewes carrying Cheviot embryos. This study showed that gestation-related protein expression in the endometrium of Suffolk and Cheviot ewes is affected by both ewe and embryo breed at Day 19 of pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Overexpression and deletion of phospholipid transfer protein reduce HDL mass and cholesterol efflux capacity but not macrophage reverse cholesterol transport[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwano, Takashi; Bi, Xin; Cipollari, Eleonora; Yasuda, Tomoyuki; Lagor, William R.; Szapary, Hannah J.; Tohyama, Junichiro; Millar, John S.; Billheimer, Jeffrey T.; Lyssenko, Nicholas N.; Rader, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) may affect macrophage reverse cholesterol transport (mRCT) through its role in the metabolism of HDL. Ex vivo cholesterol efflux capacity and in vivo mRCT were assessed in PLTP deletion and PLTP overexpression mice. PLTP deletion mice had reduced HDL mass and cholesterol efflux capacity, but unchanged in vivo mRCT. To directly compare the effects of PLTP overexpression and deletion on mRCT, human PLTP was overexpressed in the liver of wild-type animals using an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector, and control and PLTP deletion animals were injected with AAV-null. PLTP overexpression and deletion reduced plasma HDL mass and cholesterol efflux capacity. Both substantially decreased ABCA1-independent cholesterol efflux, whereas ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux remained the same or increased, even though preβ HDL levels were lower. Neither PLTP overexpression nor deletion affected excretion of macrophage-derived radiocholesterol in the in vivo mRCT assay. The ex vivo and in vivo assays were modified to gauge the rate of cholesterol efflux from macrophages to plasma. PLTP activity did not affect this metric. Thus, deviations in PLTP activity from the wild-type level reduce HDL mass and ex vivo cholesterol efflux capacity, but not the rate of macrophage cholesterol efflux to plasma or in vivo mRCT. PMID:28137768

  10. JTT-130, a microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP inhibitor lowers plasma triglycerides and LDL cholesterol concentrations without increasing hepatic triglycerides in guinea pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrestha Sudeep

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microsomal transfer protein inhibitors (MTPi have the potential to be used as a drug to lower plasma lipids, mainly plasma triglycerides (TG. However, studies with animal models have indicated that MTPi treatment results in the accumulation of hepatic TG. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether JTT-130, a unique MTPi, targeted to the intestine, would effectively reduce plasma lipids without inducing a fatty liver. Methods Male guinea pigs (n = 10 per group were used for this experiment. Initially all guinea pigs were fed a hypercholesterolemic diet containing 0.08 g/100 g dietary cholesterol for 3 wk. After this period, animals were randomly assigned to diets containing 0 (control, 0.0005 or 0.0015 g/100 g of MTPi for 4 wk. A diet containing 0.05 g/100 g of atorvastatin, an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor was used as the positive control. At the end of the 7th week, guinea pigs were sacrificed to assess drug effects on plasma and hepatic lipids, composition of LDL and VLDL, hepatic cholesterol and lipoprotein metabolism. Results Plasma LDL cholesterol and TG were 25 and 30% lower in guinea pigs treated with MTPi compared to controls (P Conclusion These results suggest that JTT-130 could have potential clinical applications due to its plasma lipid lowering effects with no alterations in hepatic lipid concentrations.

  11. A chimeric peptide of intestinal trefoil factor containing cholesteryl ester transfer protein B cell epitope significantly inhibits atherosclerosis in rabbits after oral administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Gaofu; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Shengying; Xin, Shanshan; Du, Peng; Zhang, Qingye; Zhao, Xiuyun

    2011-04-01

    Vaccination against cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) is proven to be effective for inhibiting atherosclerosis in animal models. In this study, the proteases-resistant intestinal trefoil factor (TFF3) was used as a molecular vehicle to construct chimeric TFF3 (cTFF3) containing CETP B cell epitope and tetanus toxin helper T cell epitope. It was found that cTFF3 still preserved a trefoil structure, and can resist proteases digestion in vitro. After oral immunization with cTFF3, the CETP-specific IgA and IgG could be found in intestine lavage fluid and serum, and the anti-CETP antibodies could inhibit partial CETP activity to increase high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, decrease low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and inhibit atherosclerosis in animals. Therefore, TFF3 is a potential molecular vehicle for developing oral peptide vaccines. Our research highlights a novel strategy for developing oral peptide vaccines in the future. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Induced Förster resonance energy transfer by encapsulation of DNA-scaffold based probes inside a plant virus based protein cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, Mark V.; Overeem, Nico J.; Singhai, Gaurav; Cornelissen, Jeroen J. L. M.

    2018-05-01

    Insight into the assembly and disassembly of viruses can play a crucial role in developing cures for viral diseases. Specialized fluorescent probes can benefit the study of interactions within viruses, especially during cell studies. In this work, we developed a strategy based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to study the assembly of viruses without labeling the exterior of viruses. Instead, we exploit their encapsulation of nucleic cargo, using three different fluorescent ATTO dyes linked to single-stranded DNA oligomers, which are hybridised to a longer DNA strand. FRET is induced upon assembly of the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus, which forms monodisperse icosahedral particles of about 22 nm, thereby increasing the FRET efficiency by a factor of 8. Additionally, encapsulation of the dyes in virus-like particles induces a two-step FRET. When the formed constructs are disassembled, this FRET signal is fully reduced to the value before encapsulation. This reversible behavior makes the system a good probe for studying viral assembly and disassembly. It, furthermore, shows that multi-component supramolecular materials are stabilized in the confinement of a protein cage.

  13. Overexpression of wheat lipid transfer protein gene TaLTP5 increases resistances to Cochliobolus sativus and Fusarium graminearum in transgenic wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiuliang; Li, Zhao; Xu, Huijun; Zhou, Miaoping; Du, Lipu; Zhang, Zengyan

    2012-08-01

    The fungus Cochliobolus sativus is the main pathogen of common root rot, a serious soil-borne disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The fungus Fusarium graminearum is the primary pathogen of Fusarium head blight, a devastating disease of wheat worldwide. In this study, the wheat lipid transfer protein gene, TaLTP5, was cloned and evaluated for its ability to suppress disease development in transgenic wheat. TaLTP5 expression was induced after C. sativus infection. The TaLTP5 expression vector, pA25-TaLTP5, was constructed and bombarded into Chinese wheat variety Yangmai 18. Six TaLTP5 transgenic wheat lines were established and characterized. PCR and Southern blot analyses indicated that the introduced TaLTP5 gene was integrated into the genomes of six transgenic wheat lines by distinct patterns, and heritable. RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR revealed that the TaLTP5 gene was over-expressed in the transgenic wheat lines compared to segregants lacking the transgene and wild-type wheat plants. Following challenge with C. sativus or F. graminearum, all six transgenic lines overexpressing TaLTP5 exhibited significantly enhanced resistance to both common root rot and Fusarium head blight compared to the untransformed wheat Yangmai 18.

  14. Effects of the Distributions of Energy or Charge Transfer Rates on Spectral Hole Burning in Pigment-Protein Complexes at Low Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herascu, N.; Ahmouda, S.; Picorel, R.; Seibert, M.; Jankowiak, R.; Zazubovich, V.

    2011-12-22

    Effects of the distributions of excitation energy transfer (EET) rates (homogeneous line widths) on the nonphotochemical (resonant) spectral hole burning (SHB) processes in photosynthetic chlorophyll-protein complexes (reaction center [RC] and CP43 antenna of Photosystem II from spinach) are considered. It is demonstrated that inclusion of such a distribution results in somewhat more dispersive hole burning kinetics. More importantly, however, inclusion of the EET rate distributions strongly affects the dependence of the hole width on the fractional hole depth. Different types of line width distributions have been explored, including those resulting from Foerster type EET between weakly interacting pigments as well as Gaussian ones, which may be a reasonable approximation for those resulting, for instance, from so-called extended Foerster models. For Gaussian line width distributions, it is possible to determine the parameters of both line width and tunneling parameter distributions from SHB data without a priori knowledge of any of them. Concerning more realistic asymmetric distributions, we demonstrate, using the simple example of CP43 antenna, that one can use SHB modeling to estimate electrostatic couplings between pigments and support or exclude assignment of certain pigment(s) to a particular state.

  15. TSA and BIX-01294 Induced Normal DNA and Histone Methylation and Increased Protein Expression in Porcine Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zubing; Hong, Renyun; Ding, Biao; Zuo, Xiaoyuan; Li, Hui; Ding, Jianping; Li, Yunsheng; Huang, Weiping; Zhang, Yunhai

    2017-01-01

    The poor efficiency of animal cloning is mainly attributed to the defects in epigenetic reprogramming of donor cells' chromatins during early embryonic development. Previous studies indicated that inhibition of histone deacetylases or methyltransferase, such as G9A, using Trichostatin A (TSA) or BIX-01294 significantly enhanced the developmental efficiency of porcine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos. However, potential mechanisms underlying the improved early developmental competence of SCNT embryos exposed to TSA and BIX-01294 are largely unclear. Here we found that 50 nM TSA or 1.0 μM BIX-01294 treatment alone for 24 h significantly elevated the blastocyst rate (P TSA treatment alone significantly reduced H3K9me2 level at the 4-cell stage, which is comparable with that in in vivo and in vitro fertilized counterparts. However, only co-treatment significantly decreased the levels of 5mC and H3K9me2 in trophectoderm lineage and subsequently increased the expression of OCT4 and CDX2 associated with ICM and TE lineage differentiation. Altogether, these results demonstrate that co-treatment of TSA and BIX-01294 enhances the early developmental competence of porcine SCNT embryos via improvements in epigenetic status and protein expression.

  16. Mechanism of action of hypoglycemic effects of an intestine-specific inhibitor of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) in obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Shohei; Katsumi, Sohei; Mera, Yasuko; Kuroki, Yukiharu; Nashida, Reiko; Kakutani, Makoto; Ohta, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Diminished insulin sensitivity in the peripheral tissues and failure of pancreatic beta cells to secrete insulin are known major determinants of type 2 diabetes mellitus. JTT-130, an intestine-specific microsomal transfer protein inhibitor, has been shown to suppress high fat-induced obesity and ameliorate impaired glucose tolerance while enhancing glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. We investigated the effects of JTT-130 on glucose metabolism and elucidated the mechanism of action, direct effects on insulin sensitivity and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in a high fat diet-induced obesity rat model. Male Sprague Dawley rats fed a high-fat diet were treated with a single administration of JTT-130. Glucose tolerance, hyperglycemic clamp and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic testing were performed to assess effects on insulin sensitivity and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, respectively. Plasma GLP-1 and tissue triglyceride content were also determined under the same conditions. A single administration of JTT-130 suppressed plasma glucose elevations after oral glucose loading and increased the disposition index while elevating GLP-1. JTT-130 also enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in hyperglycemic clamp tests, whereas increased insulin sensitivity was observed in hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp tests. Single-dose administration of JTT-130 decreased lipid content in the liver and skeletal muscle. JTT-130 demonstrated acute and direct hypoglycemic effects by enhancing insulin secretion and/or insulin sensitivity. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Pharmacological Society. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Site-selective probing of cTAR destabilization highlights the necessary plasticity of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein to chaperone the first strand transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godet, Julien; Kenfack, Cyril; Przybilla, Frédéric; Richert, Ludovic; Duportail, Guy; Mély, Yves

    2013-01-01

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NCp7) is a nucleic acid chaperone required during reverse transcription. During the first strand transfer, NCp7 is thought to destabilize cTAR, the (−)DNA copy of the TAR RNA hairpin, and subsequently direct the TAR/cTAR annealing through the zipping of their destabilized stem ends. To further characterize the destabilizing activity of NCp7, we locally probe the structure and dynamics of cTAR by steady-state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. NC(11–55), a truncated NCp7 version corresponding to its zinc-finger domain, was found to bind all over the sequence and to preferentially destabilize the penultimate double-stranded segment in the lower part of the cTAR stem. This destabilization is achieved through zinc-finger–dependent binding of NC to the G10 and G50 residues. Sequence comparison further revealed that C•A mismatches close to the two G residues were critical for fine tuning the stability of the lower part of the cTAR stem and conferring to G10 and G50 the appropriate mobility and accessibility for specific recognition by NC. Our data also highlight the necessary plasticity of NCp7 to adapt to the sequence and structure variability of cTAR to chaperone its annealing with TAR through a specific pathway. PMID:23511968

  18. Interaction of cholesterol ester transfer protein polymo- rphisms, body mass index, and birth weight with the risk of dyslipidemia in children and adolescents: the CASPIAN-III study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motahar Heidari-Beni

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: This study aims to investigate joint association between cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP polymorphisms and body mass index (BMI or birth weight with the risk of dyslipidemia in Iranian children and adolescents. Materials and Methods:This study was conducted as a sub-study of the “school-based nationwide health survey” (CASPIAN-III. We randomly selected 750 samples from the whole blood samples. Real-time PCR and high resolution melt (HRM analysis were performed to determine Taq1B (rs708272 and A373P (rs5880 polymorphisms. Results:Taq1B polymorphism increased HDL-C, and total cholesterol (TC as well as decreased triglyceride and LDL-C concentrations. LDL-C and triglyceride levels were significantly higher and HDL-C and TC levels were significantly lower among those with A373P polymorphism. CT/TT genotype in Taq1B polymorphism showed a protective effect on dyslipidemia (OR= 0.12, 95%CI: 0.07-0.20. G allele of A373P polymorphism increased the risk of dyslipidemia (OR=4.10, 95%CI: 2.14, 7.83 after adjusting the confounders. We observed interactive effects of CETP gene polymorphisms and BMI or birth weight on dyslipidemia. Conclusion:Findings showed Taq1B polymorphism might have a protective effect and A373P polymorphism had deleterious effect on dyslipidemia in Iranian children and adolescents. These associations interacted with BMI and birth weight.

  19. Selective binding of pyrene in subdomain IB of human serum albumin: Combining energy transfer spectroscopy and molecular modelling to understand protein binding flexibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Irene; Taha, Mohamed; Al-Sharji, Nada A.; Abou-Zied, Osama K.

    2018-04-01

    The ability of human serum albumin (HSA) to bind medium-sized hydrophobic molecules is important for the distribution, metabolism, and efficacy of many drugs. Herein, the interaction between pyrene, a hydrophobic fluorescent probe, and HSA was thoroughly investigated using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques, ligand docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A slight quenching of the fluorescence signal from Trp214 (the sole tryptophan residue in the protein) in the presence of pyrene was used to determine the ligand binding site in the protein, using Förster's resonance energy transfer (FRET) theory. The estimated FRET apparent distance between pyrene and Trp214 was 27 Å, which was closely reproduced by the docking analysis (29 Å) and MD simulation (32 Å). The highest affinity site for pyrene was found to be in subdomain IB from the docking results. The calculated equilibrium structure of the complex using MD simulation shows that the ligand is largely stabilized by hydrophobic interaction with Phe165, Phe127, and the nonpolar moieties of Tyr138 and Tyr161. The fluorescence vibronic peak ratio I1/I3 of bound pyrene inside HSA indicates the presence of polar effect in the local environment of pyrene which is less than that of free pyrene in buffer. This was clarified by the MD simulation results in which an average of 5.7 water molecules were found within 0.5 nm of pyrene in the binding site. Comparing the fluorescence signals and lifetimes of pyrene inside HSA to that free in buffer, the high tendency of pyrene to form dimer was almost completely suppressed inside HSA, indicating a high selectivity of the binding pocket toward pyrene monomer. The current results emphasize the ability of HSA, as a major carrier of several drugs and ligands in blood, to bind hydrophobic molecules in cavities other than subdomain IIA which is known to bind most hydrophobic drugs. This ability stems from the nature of the amino acids forming the binding

  20. Transfer of C-terminal residues of human apolipoprotein A-I to insect apolipophorin III creates a two-domain chimeric protein with enhanced lipid binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, James V C; Ellena, Rachel A; Tran, Jesse J; Beck, Wendy H J; Narayanaswami, Vasanthy; Weers, Paul M M

    2017-08-01

    Apolipophorin III (apoLp-III) is an insect apolipoprotein (18kDa) that comprises a single five-helix bundle domain. In contrast, human apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) is a 28kDa two-domain protein: an α-helical N-terminal domain (residues 1-189) and a less structured C-terminal domain (residues 190-243). To better understand the apolipoprotein domain organization, a novel chimeric protein was engineered by attaching residues 179 to 243 of apoA-I to the C-terminal end of apoLp-III. The apoLp-III/apoA-I chimera was successfully expressed and purified in E. coli. Western blot analysis and mass spectrometry confirmed the presence of the C-terminal domain of apoA-I within the chimera. While parent apoLp-III did not self-associate, the chimera formed oligomers similar to apoA-I. The chimera displayed a lower α-helical content, but the stability remained similar compared to apoLp-III, consistent with the addition of a less structured domain. The chimera was able to solubilize phospholipid vesicles at a significantly higher rate compared to apoLp-III, approaching that of apoA-I. The chimera was more effective in protecting phospholipase C-treated low density lipoprotein from aggregation compared to apoLp-III. In addition, binding interaction of the chimera with phosphatidylglycerol vesicles and lipopolysaccharides was considerably improved compared to apoLp-III. Thus, addition of the C-terminal domain of apoA-I to apoLp-III created a two-domain protein, with self-association, lipid and lipopolysaccharide binding properties similar to apoA-I. The apoA-I like behavior of the chimera indicate that these properties are independent from residues residing in the N-terminal domain of apoA-I, and that they can be transferred from apoA-I to apoLp-III. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Cholesterol-dependent energy transfer between fluorescent proteins-insights into protein proximity of APP and BACE1 in different membranes in Niemann-Pick type C disease cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Einem, Bjoern; Weber, Petra; Wagner, Michael; Malnar, Martina; Kosicek, Marko; Hecimovic, Silva; Arnim, Christine A F von; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    2012-11-26

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) -based techniques have recently been applied to study the interactions between β-site APP-cleaving enzyme-GFP (BACE1-GFP) and amyloid precursor protein-mRFP (APP-mRFP) in U373 glioblastoma cells. In this context, the role of APP-BACE1 proximity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis has been discussed. FRET was found to depend on intracellular cholesterol levels and associated alterations in membrane stiffness. Here, NPC1 null cells (CHO-NPC1-/-), exhibiting increased cholesterol levels and disturbed cholesterol transport similar to that observed in Niemann-Pick type C disease (NPC), were used to analyze the influence of altered cholesterol levels on APP-BACE1 proximity. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of whole CHO-wild type (WT) and CHO-NPC1-/- cells (EPI-illumination microscopy), as well as their plasma membranes (total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, TIRFM), were performed. Additionally, generalized polarization (GP) measurements of CHO-WT and CHO-NPC1-/- cells incubated with the fluorescence marker laurdan were performed to determine membrane stiffness of plasma- and intracellular-membranes. CHO-NPC1-/- cells showed higher membrane stiffness at intracellular- but not plasma-membranes, equivalent to cholesterol accumulation in late endosomes/lysosomes. Along with higher membrane stiffness, the FRET efficiency between BACE1-GFP and APP-mRFP was reduced at intracellular membranes, but not within the plasma membrane of CHO-NPC1-/-. Our data show that FRET combined with TIRF is a powerful technique to determine protein proximity and membrane fluidity in cellular models of neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Induction and Persistence of Large γH2AX Foci by High Linear Energy Transfer Radiation in DNA-Dependent protein kinase–Deficient Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracalente, Candelaria; Ibañez, Irene L.; Molinari, Beatriz; Palmieri, Mónica; Kreiner, Andrés; Valda, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the cell response to DNA double-strand breaks induced by low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations when the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), an essential protein of the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway, lacks kinase activity. Methods and Materials: CHO10B2, a Chinese hamster ovary cell line, and its derived radiosensitive mutant cell line, irs-20, lacking DNA-PKcs activity, were evaluated after 0 to 3 Gy of γ-rays, plateau and Bragg peak protons, and lithium beams by clonogenic assay, and as a measurement of double-strand breaks, phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX) foci number and size were quantified by immunocytofluorescence. Results: Irs-20 exhibited greater radiosensitivity and a higher amount of γH2AX foci than CHO10B2 at 6 hours after irradiation for all types of radiations. Remarkably, CHO10B2 and irs-20 maintained their difference in radiosensitivity after high-LET radiation. Six hours after low-LET radiations, irs-20 did not reach basal levels of γH2AX at high doses, whereas CHO10B2 recovered basal levels for all doses. After high-LET radiation, only CHO10B2 exhibited a reduction in γH2AX foci, but it never reached basal levels. Persistent foci in irs-20 confirmed a repair deficiency. Interestingly, after 30 minutes of high-LET radiation both cell lines exhibited large foci (size >0.9 μm 2 ) related to the damage nature, whereas at 6 hours irs-20 showed a higher amount of large foci than CHO10B2, with a 7-fold increase at 3 Gy, that could also be associated to radiosensitivity. Conclusions: We demonstrated, for the first time, an association between deficient DNA-PKcs activity and not only high levels of H2AX phosphorylation but also persistence and size increase of γH2AX foci after high-LET irradiation

  3. Induction and Persistence of Large γH2AX Foci by High Linear Energy Transfer Radiation in DNA-Dependent protein kinase–Deficient Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracalente, Candelaria; Ibañez, Irene L. [Departamento de Micro y Nanotecnología, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Molinari, Beatriz [Departamento de Radiobiología, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Palmieri, Mónica [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kreiner, Andrés [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de San Martín, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Valda, Alejandro [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de San Martín, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); and others

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the cell response to DNA double-strand breaks induced by low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations when the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), an essential protein of the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway, lacks kinase activity. Methods and Materials: CHO10B2, a Chinese hamster ovary cell line, and its derived radiosensitive mutant cell line, irs-20, lacking DNA-PKcs activity, were evaluated after 0 to 3 Gy of γ-rays, plateau and Bragg peak protons, and lithium beams by clonogenic assay, and as a measurement of double-strand breaks, phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX) foci number and size were quantified by immunocytofluorescence. Results: Irs-20 exhibited greater radiosensitivity and a higher amount of γH2AX foci than CHO10B2 at 6 hours after irradiation for all types of radiations. Remarkably, CHO10B2 and irs-20 maintained their difference in radiosensitivity after high-LET radiation. Six hours after low-LET radiations, irs-20 did not reach basal levels of γH2AX at high doses, whereas CHO10B2 recovered basal levels for all doses. After high-LET radiation, only CHO10B2 exhibited a reduction in γH2AX foci, but it never reached basal levels. Persistent foci in irs-20 confirmed a repair deficiency. Interestingly, after 30 minutes of high-LET radiation both cell lines exhibited large foci (size >0.9 μm{sup 2}) related to the damage nature, whereas at 6 hours irs-20 showed a higher amount of large foci than CHO10B2, with a 7-fold increase at 3 Gy, that could also be associated to radiosensitivity. Conclusions: We demonstrated, for the first time, an association between deficient DNA-PKcs activity and not only high levels of H2AX phosphorylation but also persistence and size increase of γH2AX foci after high-LET irradiation.

  4. Genetic ablation of phosphatidylcholine transfer protein/StarD2 in ob/ob mice improves glucose tolerance without increasing energy expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krisko, Tibor I; LeClair, Katherine B; Cohen, David E

    2017-03-01

    Phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (PC-TP; synonym StarD2) is highly expressed in liver and oxidative tissues. PC-TP promotes hepatic glucose production during fasting and aggravates glucose intolerance in high fat fed mice. However, because PC-TP also suppresses thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT), its direct contribution to obesity-associated diabetes in mice remains unclear. Here we examined the effects of genetic PC-TP ablation on glucose homeostasis in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice, which exhibit both diabetes and altered thermoregulation. Mice lacking both PC-TP and leptin (Pctp -/- ;ob/ob) were prepared by crossing Pctp -/- with ob/+ mice. Glucose homeostasis was assessed by standard assays, and energy expenditure was determined by indirect calorimetry using a comprehensive laboratory animal monitoring system, which also recorded physical activity and food intake. Body composition was determined by NMR and hepatic lipids by enzymatic assays. Core body temperature was measured using a rectal thermocouple probe. Pctp -/- ;ob/ob mice demonstrated improved glucose homeostasis, as evidenced by markedly improved glucose and pyruvate tolerance tests, without changes in insulin tolerance. However, there were no differences in EE at any ambient temperature. There were also no effects of PC-TP expression on physical activity, food intake or core body temperature. Improved glucose tolerance in Pctp -/- ;ob/ob mice in the absence of increases in energy expenditure or core body temperature indicates a direct pathogenic role for PC-TP in diabetes in leptin deficient mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Associations of Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein TaqIB Polymorphism with the Composite Ischemic Cardiovascular Disease Risk and HDL-C Concentrations: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-xia Guo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous studies have evaluated the associations between the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP TaqIB polymorphism (rs708272, the risk of developing composite ischemic cardiovascular disease (CVD and the concentration of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, but results remain controversial. The objective of this study was to investigate whether a relationship exists between these factors. Methods: We conducted a meta-analysis of available studies to clarify the associations of the CETP TaqIB polymorphism with HDL-C concentration and the composite ischemic CVD risk in both Asians and Caucasians. All statistical analyses were done with Stata 12.0. Results: Through utilization of the Cochrane Library, Embase, PubMed, Web of Science, Springer, China Science and Technology Journal Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Google Scholar, and Baidu Library, a total of 45 studies from 44 papers with 20,866 cases and 21,298 controls were combined showing a significant association between the CETP TaqIB variant and composite ischemic CVD risk. Carriers of allele TaqIB-B1 were found to have a higher risk of composite ischemic CVD than non-carriers: OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.09–1.21, p < 0.001. Meanwhile, 28 studies with 23,959 subjects were included in the association between the CETP TaqIB polymorphism and the concentration of HDL-C. Results suggested that carriers of the B1B1 genotype had lower concentrations of HDL-C than those of the B2B2 genotype: SMD = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.36–0.65, p < 0.001. Conclusions: The synthesis of available evidence demonstrates that the CETP TaqIB polymorphism protects against composite ischemic CVD risk and is associated with a higher HDL-C concentration in both Asians and Caucasians.

  6. Acceleration of lipid peroxidation in alpha-tocopherol transfer protein-knockout mice following the consumption of drinking water containing a radical initiator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yasukazu; Hayakawa, Mieko; Cynshi, Osamu; Jishage, Kou-ichi; Niki, Etsuo

    2008-01-01

    To assess the antioxidative role of vitamin E (VE) in a mouse model of severe VE deficiency by using biomarkers, alpha-tocopherol transfer protein (alpha-TTP(-/-))-knockout mice were maintained on a VE-deficient diet for 28 weeks [KO group, n = 6]. Wild-type C57BL/6 mice were maintained on a diet containing 0.002% alpha-tocopherol [WT group, n = 6]. The animals were housed individually in a metabolic cage from the age of 9 weeks (Week 0) to 27 weeks. Urine was collected every week, and the levels of total hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (tHODE), 7-hydroxycholesterol (t7-OHCh), and 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2alpha)(t8-isoPGF(2alpha)), which are biomarkers for lipid peroxidation, were measured by gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry. From the age of 21 weeks (Week 12), three mice in each group were provided drinking water containing the water-soluble radical initiator 2,2'-azobis[2-(2-imidazolin-2-yl)propane] dihydrochloride (AIPH) until the end of the study (Week 19). Blood and tissue samples were collected, and the levels of the abovementioned biomarkers therein were assessed. AIPH consumption clearly elevated the plasma and erythrocyte levels of tHODE and t8-isoPGF(2alpha) in both the WT and KO groups except for the erythrocyte level of tHODE in the WT group. Furthermore, this elevation was more prominent in the KO group than in the WT group. Interestingly, AIPH consumption reduced the stereoisomer ratio of HODE (ZE/EE), which is reflective of the efficacy of a compound as an antioxidant in vivo; this suggests that free radical-mediated oxidation reduces the antioxidant capacity in vivo. The urine levels of tHODE, t7-OHCh, and t8-isoPGF(2alpha) tended to increase with AIPH consumption, but these individual levels fluctuated. It was clearly demonstrated by the proposed biomarkers that maintaining alpha-TTP(-/-) mice on a VE-deficient diet results in a severe VE deficiency and promotes lipid peroxidation.

  7. Redox activity distinguishes solid-state electron transport from solution-based electron transfer in a natural and artificial protein: cytochrome C and hemin-doped human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amdursky, Nadav; Ferber, Doron; Pecht, Israel; Sheves, Mordechai; Cahen, David

    2013-10-28

    Integrating proteins in molecular electronic devices requires control over their solid-state electronic transport behavior. Unlike "traditional" electron transfer (ET) measurements of proteins that involve liquid environments and a redox cycle, no redox cofactor is needed for solid-state electron transport (ETp) across the protein. Here we show the fundamental difference between these two approaches by macroscopic area measurements, which allow measuring ETp temperature dependence down to cryogenic temperatures, via cytochrome C (Cyt C), an ET protein with a heme (Fe-porphyrin) prosthetic group as a redox centre. We compare the ETp to electrochemical ET measurements, and do so also for the protein without the Fe (with metal-free porphyrin) and without porphyrin. As removing the porphyrin irreversibly alters the protein's conformation, we repeat these measurements with human serum albumin (HSA), 'doped' (by non-covalent binding) with a single hemin equivalent, i.e., these natural and artificial proteins share a common prosthetic group. ETp via Cyt C and HSA-hemin are very similar in terms of current magnitude and temperature dependence, which suggests similar ETp mechanisms via these two systems, thermally activated hopping (with ~0.1 eV activation energy) >190 K and tunneling by superexchange Fe(3+) + e(-)), measured by electrochemistry of HSA-hemin are only 4 times lower than those for Cyt C. However, while removing the Fe redox centre from the porphyrin ring markedly affects the ET rate, it hardly changes the ETp currents through these proteins, while removing the macrocycle (from HSA, which retains its conformation) significantly reduces ETp efficiency. These results show that solid-state ETp across proteins does not require the presence of a redox cofactor, and that while for ET the Fe ion is the main electron mediator, for ETp the porphyrin ring has this function.

  8. A new signal-on method for the detection of protein based on binding-induced strategy and photoinduced electron transfer between Ag nanoclusters and split G-quadruplex-hemin complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kai, E-mail: zhangkai@jsinm.org; Wang, Ke; Zhu, Xue; Xie, Minhao

    2015-08-05

    Proteins play important roles in biological and cellular processes. The levels of proteins can be useful biomarkers for cellular events or disease diagnosis, thus the method for sensitive and selective detection of proteins is imperative to proteins express, study, and clinical diagnosis. Herein, we report a “signal-on” platform for the assay of protein based on binding-induced strategy and photoinduced electron transfer between Ag nanoclusters and split G-quadruplex-hemin complexes. By using biotin as the affinity ligand, this simple protocol could sensitively detect streptavidin with a detection limit down to 10 pM. With the use of an antibody as the affinity ligand, a method for homogeneous fluorescence detection of Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) was also proposed with a detection limit of 10 pM. The one-step and wash-free assay showed good selectivity. Its high sensitivity, acceptable accuracy, and satisfactory versatility of analytes led to various applications in bioanalysis. - Highlights: • AgNCs have great potential for application in biomedicine. • Binding of two affinity ligands can result in binding-induced DNA assemblies. • PET can be happened between DNA/AgNCs and G-quadruplex/hemin complexes. • A platform for the detection of proteins was proposed by using PET and binding-induced strategy.

  9. Interaction between dietary content of protein and sodium chloride on milk urea concentration, urinary urea excretion, renal recycling of urea, and urea transfer to the gastrointestinal tract in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spek, J W; Bannink, A; Gort, G; Hendriks, W H; Dijkstra, J

    2013-09-01

    Dietary protein and salt affect the concentration of milk urea nitrogen (MUN; mg of N/dL) and the relationship between MUN and excretion of urea nitrogen in urine (UUN; g of N/d) of dairy cattle. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of dietary protein and sodium chloride (NaCl) intake separately, and their interaction, on MUN and UUN, on the relationship between UUN and MUN, on renal recycling of urea, and on urea transfer to the gastrointestinal tract. Twelve second-parity cows (body weight of 645±37 kg, 146±29 d in milk, and a milk production of 34.0±3.28 kg/d), of which 8 were previously fitted with a rumen cannula, were fitted with catheters in the urine bladder and jugular vein. The experiment had a split-plot arrangement with dietary crude protein (CP) content as the main plot factor [116 and 154 g of CP/kg of dry matter (DM)] and dietary NaCl content as the subplot factor (3.1 and 13.5 g of Na/kg of DM). Cows were fed at 95% of the average ad libitum feed intake of cows receiving the low protein diets. Average MUN and UUN were, respectively, 3.90 mg of N/dL and 45 g of N/d higher for the high protein diets compared with the low protein diets. Compared with the low NaCl diets, MUN was, on average, 1.74 mg of N/dL lower for the high NaCl diets, whereas UUN was unaffected. We found no interaction between dietary content of protein and NaCl on performance characteristics or on MUN, UUN, urine production, and renal clearance characteristics. The creatinine clearance rate was not affected by dietary content of protein and NaCl. Urea transfer to the gastrointestinal tract, expressed as a fraction of plasma urea entry rate, was negatively related to dietary protein, whereas it was not affected by dietary NaCl content. We found no interaction between dietary protein and NaCl content on plasma urea entry rate and gastrointestinal urea entry rate or their ratio. The relationship between MUN and UUN was significantly affected by the class variable

  10. Heat transfer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Heat transfer. Heat conduction in solid slab. Convective heat transfer. Non-linear temperature. variation due to flow. HEAT FLUX AT SURFACE. conduction/diffusion.

  11. Heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saad, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Heat transfer takes place between material systems as a result of a temperature difference. The transmission process involves energy conversions governed by the first and second laws of thermodynamics. The heat transfer proceeds from a high-temperature region to a low-temperature region, and because of the finite thermal potential, there is an increase in entropy. Thermodynamics, however, is concerned with equilibrium states, which includes thermal equilibrium, irrespective of the time necessary to attain these equilibrium states. But heat transfer is a result of thermal nonequilibrium conditions, therefore, the laws of thermodynamics alone cannot describe completely the heat transfer process. In practice, most engineering problems are concerned with the rate of heat transfer rather than the quantity of heat being transferred. Resort then is directed to the particular laws governing the transfer of heat. There are three distinct modes of heat transfer: conduction, convection, and radiation. Although these modes are discussed separately, all three types may occur simultaneously

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of phospholipid-bound Sfh1p, a member of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sec14p-like phosphatidylinositol transfer protein family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaaf, Gabriel; Betts, Laurie; Garrett, Teresa A.; Raetz, Christian R. H.; Bankaitis, Vytas A.

    2006-01-01

    Yeast Sfh1p, a close homolog of the Sec14p phosphatidylinositol transfer protein, was crystallized in the absence of detergent. X-ray data have been collected to 2.5 Å. Sec14p is the major phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns)/phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) transfer protein in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is the founding member of a large eukaryotic protein superfamily. This protein catalyzes the exchange of either PtdIns or PtdCho between membrane bilayers in vitro and this exchange reaction requires no external input of energy or of other protein cofactors. Despite the previous elucidation of the crystal structure of a detergent-bound form of Sec14p, the conformational changes that accompany the phospholipid-exchange reaction remain undefined. Moreover, a structural appreciation of how Sec14p or its homologs bind their various phospholipid substrates remains elusive. Here, the purification and crystallization of yeast Sfh1p, the protein most closely related to Sec14p, are reported. A combination of electrospray ionization mass-spectrometry and collision-induced decomposition mass-spectrometry methods indicate that recombinant Sfh1p loads predominantly with phosphatidylethanolamine. Unlike phospholipid-bound forms of Sec14p, this form of Sfh1p crystallizes readily in the absence of detergent. Sfh1p crystals diffract to 2.5 Å and belong to the orthorhombic primitive space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 49.40, b = 71.55, c = 98.21 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. One Sfh1p molecule is present in the asymmetric unit (V M = 2.5 Å 3 Da −1 ; V s = 50%). Crystallization of a phospholipid-bound Sec14p-like protein is a critical first step in obtaining the first high-resolution picture of how proteins of the Sec14p superfamily bind their phospholipid ligands. This information will significantly extend our current understanding of how Sec14p-like proteins catalyze phospholipid exchange

  13. Transfer Pricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Bo

    2014-01-01

    Against a background of rather mixed evidence about transfer pricing practices in multinational enterprises (MNEs) and varying attitudes on the part of tax authorities, this paper explores how multiple aims in transfer pricing can be pursued across four different transfer pricing regimes. A MNE h...

  14. Comparison of the rate constants for energy transfer in the light-harvesting protein, C-phycocyanin, calculated from Foerster`s theory and experimentally measured by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debreczeny, Martin Paul [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    We have measured and assigned rate constants for energy transfer between chromophores in the light-harvesting protein C-phycocyanin (PC), in the monomeric and trimeric aggregation states, isolated from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. In order to compare the measured rate constants with those predicted by Fdrster`s theory of inductive resonance in the weak coupling limit, we have experimentally resolved several properties of the three chromophore types ({beta}{sub 155} {alpha}{sub 84}, {beta}{sub 84}) found in PC monomers, including absorption and fluorescence spectra, extinction coefficients, fluorescence quantum yields, and fluorescence lifetimes. The cpcB/C155S mutant, whose PC is missing the {beta}{sub 155} chromophore, was, useful in effecting the resolution of the chromophore properties and in assigning the experimentally observed rate constants for energy transfer to specific pathways.

  15. Evaluation of the transfer of passive immunity by the analysis of immunoglobulin and serum proteins of Holstein calvesAvaliação da transferência de imunidade passiva através da análise de imunoglobulinas e proteínas séricas em bezerras da raça holandês

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Augusto Naylor Lisbôa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This present study evaluated the serum concentrations of the fractional and total proteins, the immunoglobulin concentrations, and the dynamics of passive immune transfer in 25 female Holstein calves. All calves were maintained with their respective dams for 24 hours during which the ingestion of colostrum was done ad libitum. The determinations were done within 24 hours after suckling and at 30 days of age. The gamma fraction of proteins was the predominant immunoglobulin observed 24 hrs after the suckling of colostrum, followed by beta, alpha 2, and alpha1. 30 days later, the beta fraction was more elevated, followed by gamma, and the alpha fractions. The concentrations of serum albumin increased proportionally with age, but the concentrations of total proteins remained unaltered. Most calves (56%; 14/25 demonstrated effective passive immune transfer of immunoglobulins; transfer was within acceptable limits for 36% (9/25 but was inadequate in 8% (2/25 of the calves evaluated. Este presente estudo avaliou as concentrações séricas da proteína total, suas frações, as concentrações de imunoglobulinas e a dinâmica de transferência da imunidade passiva em 25 bezerras da raça Holandês variedade preto e branco. Todas as bezerras permaneceram com suas respectivas mães até 24 horas após o nascimento, durante este período a ingestão de colostro foi realizada ad libitum. As determinações foram feitas após a ingestão do colostro às 24 horas após o nascimento e aos 30 dias de idade. As gamaglobulinas foram predominantes às 24 horas após a ingestão de colostro, seguida pelas frações beta e alfa. Aos 30 dias a fração beta foi a mais elevada, seguida pela gama e as frações alfa. A concentração de albumina sérica aumentou proporcionalmente com a idade, mas a concentração de proteína total manteve-se inalterada. A maior parte das bezerras (56%; 14/25 demonstrou transferência passiva imune eficaz de imunoglobulinas; a

  16. 2,2'-Bis(monoacylglycero) PO4 (BMP), but Not 3,1'-BMP, increases membrane curvature stress to enhance α-tocopherol transfer protein binding to membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptist, Matilda; Panagabko, Candace; Nickels, Jonathan D; Katsaras, John; Atkinson, Jeffrey

    2015-03-01

    Previous work revealed that α-tocopherol transfer protein (α-TTP) co-localizes with bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP) in late endosomes. BMP is a lipid unique to late endosomes and is believed to induce membrane curvature and support the multivesicular nature of this organelle. We examined the effect of BMP on α-TTP binding to membranes using dual polarization interferometry and vesicle-binding assay. α-TTP binding to membranes is increased by the curvature-inducing lipid BMP. α-TTP binds to membranes with greater affinity when they contain the 2,2'-BMP versus 3,1'-BMP isomers.

  17. Proton transfer events in GFP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Donato, M.; van Wilderen, L.J.G.W.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Cohen Stuart, T.A.; Kennis, J.T.M.; Hellingwerf, K.J.; van Grondelle, R.; Groot, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Proton transfer is one of the most important elementary processes in biology. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) serves as an important model system to elucidate the mechanistic details of this reaction, because in GFP proton transfer can be induced by light absorption. Illumination initiates proton

  18. Transfer Pricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Carsten; Rossing, Christian Plesner

    trade internally as the units have to decide what prices should be paid for such inter-unit transfers. One important challenge is to uncover the consequences that different transfer prices have on the willingness in the organizational units to coordinate activities and trade internally. At the same time...... the determination of transfer price will affect the size of the profit or loss in the organizational units and thus have an impact on the evaluation of managers‟ performance. In some instances the determination of transfer prices may lead to a disagreement between coordination of the organizational units...

  19. Horizontal gene transfer contributed to the evolution of extracellular surface structures: the freshwater polyp Hydra is covered by a complex fibrous cuticle containing glycosaminoglycans and proteins of the PPOD and SWT (sweet tooth families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Böttger

    Full Text Available The single-cell layered ectoderm of the fresh water polyp Hydra fulfills the function of an epidermis by protecting the animals from the surrounding medium. Its outer surface is covered by a fibrous structure termed the cuticle layer, with similarity to the extracellular surface coats of mammalian epithelia. In this paper we have identified molecular components of the cuticle. We show that its outermost layer contains glycoproteins and glycosaminoglycans and we have identified chondroitin and chondroitin-6-sulfate chains. In a search for proteins that could be involved in organising this structure we found PPOD proteins and several members of a protein family containing only SWT (sweet tooth domains. Structural analyses indicate that PPODs consist of two tandem β-trefoil domains with similarity to carbohydrate-binding sites found in lectins. Experimental evidence confirmed that PPODs can bind sulfated glycans and are secreted into the cuticle layer from granules localized under the apical surface of the ectodermal epithelial cells. PPODs are taxon-specific proteins which appear to have entered the Hydra genome by horizontal gene transfer from bacteria. Their acquisition at the time Hydra evolved from a marine ancestor may have been critical for the transition to the freshwater environment.

  20. Automated and high confidence protein phosphorylation site localization using complementary collision-activated dissociation and electron transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas A; Sylvester, Marc; Jensen, Ole N

    2012-01-01

    -site localization and the number of assigned phospho-sites at a fixed false-localization rate. The average calculated Cscore from a large data set (>7000 phosphopeptide MS/MS spectra) was ∼32 compared to ∼23 and ∼17 for the Ascore using collision-activated dissociation (CAD) or electron transfer dissociation (ETD...... peptide fragmentation and the loss of labile phosphate groups complicate identification of the site of the phosphate motif. Here, we have implemented and evaluated a novel approach for phospho-site localization by the combined use of peptide tandem mass spectrometry data obtained using both collision......-activated dissociation and electron transfer dissociation, an approach termed the Cscore. The scoring algorithm used in the Cscore was adapted from the widely used Ascore method. The analytical benefit of integrating the product ion information of both ETD and CAD data are evident by increased confidence in phospho...

  1. A cytosolic cytochrome b 5-like protein in yeast cell accelerating the electron transfer from NADPH to cytochrome c catalyzed by Old Yellow Enzyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Manabu; Yamano, Toshio; Kuroda, Kiyo; Nonaka, Yasuki; Tojo, Hiromasa; Fujii, Shigeru

    2005-01-01

    A 410-nm absorbing species which enhanced the reduction rate of cytochrome c by Old Yellow Enzyme (OYE) with NADPH was found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It was solubilized together with OYE by the treatment of yeast cells with 10% ethyl acetate. The purified species showed visible absorption spectra in both oxidized and reduced forms, which were the same as those of the yeast microsomal cytochrome b 5 . At least 14 amino acid residues of the N-terminal region coincided with those of yeast microsomal b 5 , but the protein had a lower molecular weight determined to be 12,600 by SDS-PAGE and 9775 by mass spectrometry. The cytochrome b 5 -like protein enhanced the reduction rate of cytochrome c by OYE, and a plot of the reduction rates against its concentration showed a sigmoidal curve with an inflexion point at 6 x 10 -8 M of the protein

  2. Vaccination of pregnant cows with EspA, EspB, γ-intimin, and Shiga toxin 2 proteins from Escherichia coli O157:H7 induces high levels of specific colostral antibodies that are transferred to newborn calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovitz, B C; Gerhardt, E; Tironi Farinati, C; Abdala, A; Galarza, R; Vilte, D A; Ibarra, C; Cataldi, A; Mercado, E C

    2012-06-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 is a major cause of intestinal disease and hemolytic uremic syndrome, a serious systemic complication that particularly affects children. Cattle are primary reservoirs for EHEC O157:H7 and the main source of infection for humans. Vaccination of cattle with different combinations of bacterial virulence factors has shown efficacy in decreasing EHEC O157:H7 shedding. It is, therefore, important to demonstrate whether vaccination of pregnant cows with EHEC O157:H7 induces high titers of transferable antibodies to avoid early colonization of calves by the bacteria. In this study we evaluated the ability of EspA, EspB, the C-terminal fragment of 280 amino acids of γ-intimin (γ-intimin C₂₈₀) and inactivated Shiga toxin (Stx) 2 proteins to induce specific antibodies in colostrum and their passive transference to colostrum-fed calves. Friesian pregnant cows immunized by the intramuscular route mounted significantly high serum and colostrum IgG responses against EspB and γ-intimin C₂₈₀ that were efficiently transferred to their calves. Antibodies to EspB and γ-intimin C₂₈₀ were detected in milk samples of vaccinated cows at d 40 postparturition. Significant Stx2-neutralizing titers were also observed in colostrum from Stx2-vaccinated cows and sera from colostrum-fed calves. The results presented showed that bovine colostrum with increased levels of antibodies against EHEC O157:H7 may be obtained by systemic immunization of pregnant cows, and that these specific antibodies are efficiently transferred to newborn calves by feeding colostrum. Hyperimmune colostrum and milk may be an alternative to protect calves from early colonization by EHEC O157:H7 and a possible key source of antibodies to block colonization and toxic activity of this bacterium. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. An Introduction to Drug Discovery by Probing Protein-Substrate Interactions Using Saturation Transfer Difference-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (STD-NMR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guegan, Jean-Paul; Daniellou, Richard

    2012-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for characterizing and identifying molecules and nowadays is even used to characterize complex systems in biology. In the experiment presented here, students learned how to apply this modern technique to probe interactions between small molecules and proteins. With the use of simple organic synthesis, students…

  4. Efficient expression of a soluble lipid transfer protein (LTP) of Platanus orientalis using short peptide tags and structural comparison with the natural form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salari, Farhad; Vahedi, Fatemeh; Chamani, Jamshidkhan; Varasteh, Abdolreza; Ketabdar, Hanieh; Sankian, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Successful recombinant allergen-based immunotherapy has drawn a great deal of attention to use recombinant allergens for new therapeutic and/or diagnostic strategies. The Escherichia coli expression system is frequently used to produce recombinant allergens; however, protein expression in E. coli often results in inclusion bodies. Here, we focused on the expression of two recombinant soluble forms of Pla or 3 using solubility-enhancing peptide tags, human immune deficiency virus type 1 transactivator of transcription core domain and poly-arginine-lysine: rTAT-Pla or 3 and rPoly-Arg-Lys-Pla or 3. Structural characteristics and IgE reactivity of purified recombinant proteins were compared with natural Pla or 3 (nPla or 3) isolated from Platanus orientalis using circular dichroism spectra, fluorescence spectroscopy, and immunoblotting. Likewise, intrinsic viscosity and Stokes radius of the natural and recombinant Pla or 3 allergens were determined to analyze structural compactness in aqueous media. The results indicate high-level solubility and efficient expression of the fusion proteins (rTAT-Pla or 3 and rPoly-Arg-Lys-Pla or 3) compared with the wild-type recombinant. Furthermore, the similar structural characteristics and IgE-binding activities of the fusion proteins to nPla or 3 provide a promising tool for allergy diagnosis and treatment. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. "Transfer Shock" or "Transfer Ecstasy?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickens, John M.

    The alleged characteristic drop in grade point average (GPA) of transfer students and the subsequent rise in GPA was investigated in this study. No statistically significant difference was found in first term junior year GPA between junior college transfers and native Florida State University students after the variance accounted for by the…

  6. Immunocytochemical localization of HrpA and HrpZ supports a role for the Hrp pilus in the transfer of effector proteins from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato across the host plant cell wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I R; Mansfield, J W; Taira, S; Roine, E; Romantschuk, M

    2001-03-01

    The Hrp pilus, composed of HrpA subunits, is an essential component of the type III secretion system in Pseudomonas syringae. We used electron microscopy (EM) and immunocytochemistry to examine production of the pilus in vitro from P. syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 grown under hrp-inducing conditions on EM grids. Pili, when labeled with antibodies to HrpA, developed rapidly in a nonpolar manner shortly after the detection of the hrpA transcript and extended up to 5 microm into surrounding media. Structures at the base of the pilus were clearly differentiated from the basal bodies of flagella. The HrpZ protein, also secreted via the type III system, was found by immunogold labeling to be associated with the pilus in vitro. Accumulation and secretion of HrpA and HrpZ were also examined quantitatively after the inoculation of wild-type DC3000 and hrpA and hrpZ mutants into leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. The functional pilus crossed the plant cell wall to generate tracks of immunogold labeling for HrpA and HrpZ. Mutants that produced HrpA but did not assemble pili were nonpathogenic, did not secrete HrpA protein, and were compromised for the accumulation of HrpZ. A model is proposed in which the rapidly elongating Hrp pilus acts as a moving conveyor, facilitating transfer of effector proteins from bacteria to the plant cytoplasm across the formidable barrier of the plant cell wall.

  7. PODCAST: From Lost in Translation to Paradise Found: Enabling Protein Biomarker Method Transfer by Mass Spectrometry | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Translation of novel biomarkers into clinical care for the evaluation of therapeutic safety and efficacy has been slow, partly attributable to the cost and complexity of immunoassay development.  The potential for liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to streamline the translation of novel protein biomarkers is profound.  Drs. Henry Rodriguez and Andrew Hoofnagle discuss what the future may be for clinical proteomics. This is an American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) podcast.

  8. Transfer of plasma lipoprotein components and of plasma proteins into aortas of cholesterol-fed rabbits. Molecular size as a determinant of plasma lipoprotein influx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stender, S.; Zilversmit, D.B.

    1981-01-01

    The arterial influx of esterified and free cholesterol from low density lipoproteins and very low density lipoproteins in 20 hypercholesterolemic rabbits was measured simultaneously by the use of lipoproteins labeled in vivo with [ 3 H]- and [ 14 C]-cholesterol. The simultaneous arterial influx of either [ 3 H]-leucine-labeled very low density lipoproteins, low density lipoproteins, high density lipoproteins, or plasma proteins was also measured in each rabbit. The arterial influx was calculated as intimal clearance, i.e., the influx of a given fraction divided by its plasma concentration. The intimal clearance of low density lipoprotein esterified cholesterol was equal to that for the apolipoproteins of that fraction, which is compatible with an arterial influx of intact low density lipoprotein molecules. The intimal clearance of very low density apolipoprotein or cholesteryl ester was less than that for low density lipoprotein, whereas high density lipoprotein and albumin clearances exceeded low density lipoprotein clearance by 1.5- to 3-fold. The intimal clearances of plasma proteins, high density, low density, and very low density lipoproteins decreased linearly with the logarithm of the macromolecular diameter. This indicates that the arterial influx of three plasma lipoprotein fractions and of plasma proteins proceeds by similar mechanisms. Apparently the relative intimal clearances of lipoproteins are more dependent on their size relative to pores or vesicular diameters at the plasma-artery interface than on specific interactions between lipoproteins and the arterial intimal surface

  9. Station Transfers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — ixed rail transit external system transfers for systems within the Continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The modes of...

  10. Technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    On the base of technological opportunities and of the environmental target of the various sectors of energy system this paper intend to conjugate the opportunity/objective with economic and social development through technology transfer and information dissemination [it

  11. High-yield production of biologically active recombinant protein in shake flask culture by combination of enzyme-based glucose delivery and increased oxygen transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ukkonen Kaisa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This report describes the combined use of an enzyme-based glucose release system (EnBase® and high-aeration shake flask (Ultra Yield Flask™. The benefit of this combination is demonstrated by over 100-fold improvement in the active yield of recombinant alcohol dehydrogenase expressed in E. coli. Compared to Terrific Broth and ZYM-5052 autoinduction medium, the EnBase system improved yield mainly through increased productivity per cell. Four-fold increase in oxygen transfer by the Ultra Yield Flask contributed to higher cell density with EnBase but not with the other tested media, and consequently the product yield per ml of EnBase culture was further improved.

  12. The mitochondrial outer membrane protein mitoNEET is a redox enzyme catalyzing electron transfer from FMNH2 to oxygen or ubiquinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiming; Landry, Aaron P; Ding, Huangen

    2017-06-16

    Increasing evidence suggests that mitoNEET, a target of the type II diabetes drug pioglitazone, is a key regulator of energy metabolism in mitochondria. MitoNEET is anchored to the mitochondrial outer membrane via its N-terminal α helix domain and hosts a redox-active [2Fe-2S] cluster in its C-terminal cytosolic region. The mechanism by which mitoNEET regulates energy metabolism in mitochondria, however, is not fully understood. Previous studies have shown that mitoNEET specifically interacts with the reduced flavin mononucleotide (FMNH 2 ) and that FMNH 2 can quickly reduce the mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters. Here we report that the reduced mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters can be readily oxidized by oxygen. In the presence of FMN, NADH, and flavin reductase, which reduces FMN to FMNH 2 using NADH as the electron donor, mitoNEET mediates oxidation of NADH with a concomitant reduction of oxygen. Ubiquinone-2, an analog of ubiquinone-10, can also oxidize the reduced mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters under anaerobic or aerobic conditions. Compared with oxygen, ubiquinone-2 is more efficient in oxidizing the mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters, suggesting that ubiquinone could be an intrinsic electron acceptor of the reduced mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters in mitochondria. Pioglitazone or its analog NL-1 appears to inhibit the electron transfer activity of mitoNEET by forming a unique complex with mitoNEET and FMNH 2 The results suggest that mitoNEET is a redox enzyme that may promote oxidation of NADH to facilitate enhanced glycolysis in the cytosol and that pioglitazone may regulate energy metabolism in mitochondria by inhibiting the electron transfer activity of mitoNEET. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Inhibitory activity of diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) by the flavonoid, taxifolin, in HepG2 cells: potential role in the regulation of apolipoprotein B secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaschi, Adele; Rubio, Brent K; Maiyoh, Geoffrey K; Theriault, Andre G

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of taxifolin, a plant flavonoid, on several aspects involving apolipoprotein B (apoB) secretion and triglyceride (TG) availability in HepG2 cells. Taxifolin was shown by ELISA to markedly reduce apoB secretion under basal and lipid-rich conditions up to 63% at 200 micromol/L. As to the mechanism underlying this effect, we examined whether taxifolin exerted its effect by limiting TG availability in the microsomal lumen essential for lipoprotein assembly. Taxifolin was shown to inhibit microsomal TG synthesis by 37% and its subsequent transfer into the lumen (-26%). The reduction in synthesis was due to a decrease in diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) activity (-35%). The effect on DGAT activity was found to be non-competitive and non-transcriptional in nature. Both DGAT-1 and DGAT-2 mRNA expression remained essentially unchanged suggesting the point of regulation may be at the post-transcriptional level. Evidence is accumulating that microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is also involved in determining the amount of lumenal TG available for lipoprotein assembly and secretion. Taxifolin was shown to inhibit this enzyme by 41%. Whether the reduction in TG accumulation in the microsomal lumen is predominantly due to DGAT and/or MTP activity remains to be addressed. In summary, taxifolin reduced apoB secretion by limiting TG availability via DGAT and MTP activity.

  14. Seven fundamental, unsolved questions in molecular biology. Cooperative storage and bi-directional transfer of biological information by nucleic acids and proteins: an alternative to "central dogma".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biro, J C

    2004-01-01

    The Human Genome Mapping Project provided us a large amount of sequence data. However our understanding of these data did not grow proportionally, because old dogmas still set the limits of our thinking. The gene-centric, reductionistical side of molecular biology is reviewed and seven problems are formulated, each indicating the insufficiency of the "central dogma". The following is concluded and suggested: 1. Genes are located and expressed on both DNA strands; 2. Introns are the source of important biological regulation and diversity; 3. Repeats are the frame of the chromatin structure and participate in the chromatin regulation; 4. The molecular accessibility of the canonical dsDNA structure is poor; 5. The genetic code is co-evolved with the amino acids and there is a stereochemical matching between the codes andamino acids; 6. The flow of information between nucleic acids and proteins is bi-directional and reverse translation might exist; 7. Complex genetic information is always carried and stored by nucleic acids and proteins together.

  15. The SOS Response Master Regulator LexA Regulates the Gene Transfer Agent of Rhodobacter capsulatus and Represses Transcription of the Signal Transduction Protein CckA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchinski, Kevin S; Brimacombe, Cedric A; Westbye, Alexander B; Ding, Hao; Beatty, J Thomas

    2016-02-01

    The gene transfer agent of Rhodobacter capsulatus (RcGTA) is a genetic exchange element that combines central aspects of bacteriophage-mediated transduction and natural transformation. RcGTA particles resemble a small double-stranded DNA bacteriophage, package random ∼4-kb fragments of the producing cell genome, and are released from a subpopulation (SOS response in many bacteria, as a regulator of RcGTA activity. Deletion of the lexA gene resulted in the abolition of detectable RcGTA production and an ∼10-fold reduction in recipient capability. A search for SOS box sequences in the R. capsulatus genome sequence identified a number of putative binding sites located 5' of typical SOS response coding sequences and also 5' of the RcGTA regulatory gene cckA, which encodes a hybrid histidine kinase homolog. Expression of cckA was increased >5-fold in the lexA mutant, and a lexA cckA double mutant was found to have the same phenotype as a ΔcckA single mutant in terms of RcGTA production. The data indicate that LexA is required for RcGTA production and maximal recipient capability and that the RcGTA-deficient phenotype of the lexA mutant is largely due to the overexpression of cckA. This work describes an unusual phenotype of a lexA mutant of the alphaproteobacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus in respect to the phage transduction-like genetic exchange carried out by the R. capsulatus gene transfer agent (RcGTA). Instead of the expected SOS response characteristic of prophage induction, this lexA mutation not only abolishes the production of RcGTA particles but also impairs the ability of cells to receive RcGTA-borne genes. The data show that, despite an apparent evolutionary relationship to lambdoid phages, the regulation of RcGTA gene expression differs radically. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Distortions of the Xanthophylls Caused by Interactions with Neighboring Pigments and the LHCII Protein Are Crucial for Studying Energy Transfer Pathways within the Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, K F; Bricker, William P; Lo, Cynthia; Duffy, C D P

    2015-12-24

    It has been proposed that photoprotective non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) in higher plants arises from a conformational change in the antenna which alters pigment-pigment interactions. This brings about the formation of energy quenching "traps" that capture and dissipate excitation energy as heat. We have used the semiempirical AM1-CAS-CI method combined with the transition density cube (TDC) approach to model chlorophyll (Chl) to xanthophyll (Xanth) resonant Coulomb couplings in the crystal structure of LHCII. Due to its proposed role as the NPQ quenching site we have focused on lutein interactions and have explored how distortions to lutein conformation, as well as interpigment distances and relative orientations, affect this coupling. Our calculations indicate that distortions as well as Chl-lutein angle have a significant effect on coupling, whereas interpigment distances have a relatively minor effect. We therefore conclude that particular attention to the distortions of the Xanths should be given for calculation of energy transfer pathways and study of the NPQ mechanism.

  17. Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nanette R.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this summer's work was to attempt to enhance Technology Application Group (TAG) ability to measure the outcomes of its efforts to transfer NASA technology. By reviewing existing literature, by explaining the economic principles involved in evaluating the economic impact of technology transfer, and by investigating the LaRC processes our William & Mary team has been able to lead this important discussion. In reviewing the existing literature, we identified many of the metrics that are currently being used in the area of technology transfer. Learning about the LaRC technology transfer processes and the metrics currently used to track the transfer process enabled us to compare other R&D facilities to LaRC. We discuss and diagram impacts of technology transfer in the short run and the long run. Significantly, it serves as the basis for analysis and provides guidance in thinking about what the measurement objectives ought to be. By focusing on the SBIR Program, valuable information regarding the strengths and weaknesses of this LaRC program are to be gained. A survey was developed to ask probing questions regarding SBIR contractors' experience with the program. Specifically we are interested in finding out whether the SBIR Program is accomplishing its mission, if the SBIR companies are providing the needed innovations specified by NASA and to what extent those innovations have led to commercial success. We also developed a survey to ask COTR's, who are NASA employees acting as technical advisors to the SBIR contractors, the same type of questions, evaluating the successes and problems with the SBIR Program as they see it. This survey was developed to be implemented interactively on computer. It is our hope that the statistical and econometric studies that can be done on the data collected from all of these sources will provide insight regarding the direction to take in developing systematic evaluations of programs like the SBIR Program so that they can

  18. The Au-S bond and SAM-protein contact in long-range electron transfer of pure and biomimetic metalloproteins via functionalized alkanethiol linkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Qijin; Ford, Michael J.; Halder, Arnab

    disentangled a wealth of data to identify the nature of the crucial Au-S contact, all suggesting prevalence of a Au(0)-thiyl radical unit. Molecular packing is further determined by the SAM molecular structure and involves binding either to Au-atoms mined out of the surface or directly to a flat surface. We...... functionalized alkanethiols have emerged as core linkers. We have studied molecular linking in the long-range ET (LRET) processes in detail using electrochemistry, in situ STM and AFM, and electronic structure computations. A focus is the electronic structure of the Au-S link and the SAM packing. We have...... is exceedingly sensitive to the structure of the thiol-based SAM molecules, testifying to the crucial importance of SAM packing and Au-S binding, and of the SAM link to the protein. Some of the subtleties are illustrated simpler by similar size (5-6 nm) nanoparticles (NPs). Biomimetic NPs must possess a certain...

  19. Application of quality by design principles to the development and technology transfer of a major process improvement for the manufacture of a recombinant protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looby, Mairead; Ibarra, Neysi; Pierce, James J; Buckley, Kevin; O'Donovan, Eimear; Heenan, Mary; Moran, Enda; Farid, Suzanne S; Baganz, Frank

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the application of quality by design (QbD) principles to the development and implementation of a major manufacturing process improvement for a commercially distributed therapeutic protein produced in Chinese hamster ovary cell culture. The intent of this article is to focus on QbD concepts, and provide guidance and understanding on how the various components combine together to deliver a robust process in keeping with the principles of QbD. A fed-batch production culture and a virus inactivation step are described as representative examples of upstream and downstream unit operations that were characterized. A systematic approach incorporating QbD principles was applied to both unit operations, involving risk assessment of potential process failure points, small-scale model qualification, design and execution of experiments, definition of operating parameter ranges and process validation acceptance criteria followed by manufacturing-scale implementation and process validation. Statistical experimental designs were applied to the execution of process characterization studies evaluating the impact of operating parameters on product quality attributes and process performance parameters. Data from process characterization experiments were used to define the proven acceptable range and classification of operating parameters for each unit operation. Analysis of variance and Monte Carlo simulation methods were used to assess the appropriateness of process design spaces. Successful implementation and validation of the process in the manufacturing facility and the subsequent manufacture of hundreds of batches of this therapeutic protein verifies the approaches taken as a suitable model for the development, scale-up and operation of any biopharmaceutical manufacturing process. Copyright © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  20. Towards a thermodynamic definition of efficacy in partial agonism: The thermodynamics of efficacy and ligand proton transfer in a G protein-coupled receptor of the rhodopsin class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadley, Kenneth J; Sykes, Shane C; Davies, Robin H

    2010-11-15

    The thermodynamic binding profiles of agonist and antagonist complexes of the 4-hydroxypropanolamine partial agonist, prenalterol, on the chronotropic adrenergic response in guinea-pig right atria were determined over a 15 °C temperature range. The tissue response was compared with data on the ethanolamine agonist, isoprenaline, given by binding studies in a number of rat tissues. Utilising the residue conservatism surrounding the known active conformers bound to either of two aspartate residues (α-helices II, III) in both receptors (β(1), β(2)) and species (guinea-pig, rat and human), no significant deformation in the extended side chain could be found in prenalterol's agonist binding compared to isoprenaline. Antagonist binding gave a highly favourable entropy contribution at 30.0 °C of -4.7±1.2 kcal/mol. The enthalpy change between bound agonist and antagonist complexes, a function of the efficacy alone, was -6.4±1.1 kcal/mol, coincident with the calculated intrinsic preference of a primary/secondary amine-aspartate interaction for a neutral hydrogen-bonded form over its ion pair state, giving values of 6.3-6.6 kcal/mol with calculations of good quality, a figure expected to be close to that shown within a hydrophobic environment. Delivery of a proton to a conserved aspartate anion (α-helix II) becomes the critical determinant for agonist action with resultant proton transfer stabilisation dominating the enthalpy change. A proposed monocation-driven ligand proton pumping mechanism within the ternary complex is consistent with the data, delivery between two acid groups being created by the movement of the cation and the counter-movement of the ligand protonated amine moving from Asp 138 (α-helix III) to Asp 104 (α-helix II). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boury, C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper emphasizes in the specific areas of design, engineering and component production. This paper presents what Framatome has to offer in these areas and its export oriented philosophy. Then, a typical example of this technology transfer philosophy is the collaboration with the South Korean firm, Korea Heavy Industries Corporation (KHIC) for the supply of KNU 9 and KNU 10 power stations

  2. Lipid transfer proteins and protease inhibitors as key factors in the priming of barley responses to Fusarium head blight disease by a biocontrol strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petti, Carloalberto; Khan, Mojibur; Doohan, Fiona

    2010-11-01

    Strains of non-pathogenic pseudomonad bacteria, can elicit host defence responses against pathogenic microorganisms. Pseudomonas fluorescens strain MKB158 can protect cereals from pathogenesis by Fusarium fungi, including Fusarium head blight which is an economically important disease due to its association with both yield loss and mycotoxin contamination of grain. Using the 22 K barley Affymetrix chip, trancriptome studies were undertaken to determine the local effect of P. fluorescens strain MKB158 on the transcriptome of barley head tissue, and to discriminate transcripts primed by the bacterium to respond to challenge by Fusarium culmorum, a causal agent of the economically important Fusarium head blight disease of cereals. The bacterium significantly affected the accumulation of 1203 transcripts and primed 74 to positively, and 14 to negatively, respond to the pathogen (P = 0.05). This is the first study to give insights into bacterium priming in the Triticeae tribe of grasses and associated transcripts were classified into 13 functional classes, associated with diverse functions, including detoxification, cell wall biosynthesis and the amplification of host defence responses. In silico analysis of Arabidopsis homologs of bacterium-primed barley genes indicated that, as is the case in dicots, jasmonic acid plays a role in pseudomonad priming of host responses. Additionally, the transcriptome studies described herein also reveal new insights into bacterium-mediated priming of host defences against necrotrophs, including the positive effects on grain filling, lignin deposition, oxidative stress responses, and the inhibition of protease inhibitors and proteins that play a key role in programmed cell death.

  3. Genome mining in Sorangium cellulosum So ce56: identification and characterization of the homologous electron transfer proteins of a myxobacterial cytochrome P450.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewen, Kerstin Maria; Hannemann, Frank; Khatri, Yogan; Perlova, Olena; Kappl, Reinhard; Krug, Daniel; Hüttermann, Jürgen; Müller, Rolf; Bernhardt, Rita

    2009-10-16

    Myxobacteria, especially members of the genus Sorangium, are known for their biotechnological potential as producers of pharmaceutically valuable secondary metabolites. The biosynthesis of several of those myxobacterial compounds includes cytochrome P450 activity. Although class I cytochrome P450 enzymes occur wide-spread in bacteria and rely on ferredoxins and ferredoxin reductases as essential electron mediators, the study of these proteins is often neglected. Therefore, we decided to search in the Sorangium cellulosum So ce56 genome for putative interaction partners of cytochromes P450. In this work we report the investigation of eight myxobacterial ferredoxins and two ferredoxin reductases with respect to their activity in cytochrome P450 systems. Intriguingly, we found not only one, but two ferredoxins whose ability to sustain an endogenous So ce56 cytochrome P450 was demonstrated by CYP260A1-dependent conversion of nootkatone. Moreover, we could demonstrate that the two ferredoxins were able to receive electrons from both ferredoxin reductases. These findings indicate that S. cellulosum can alternate between different electron transport pathways to sustain cytochrome P450 activity.

  4. New food allergies in a European non-Mediterranean region: is Cannabis sativa to blame?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebo, D G; Swerts, S; Sabato, V; Hagendorens, M M; Bridts, C H; Jorens, P G; De Clerck, L S

    2013-01-01

    Allergy to fruit and vegetables exhibit geographic variation regarding the severity of symptoms and depending on the sensitization profile of the patient. These sensitization profiles and routes remain incompletely understood. Cannabis is a very popular drug and derived from Cannabis sativa, a plant containing lipid transfer proteins (LTP) also known as important allergens in plant and fruit allergies. In this study we sought to elucidate a potential connection between C. sativa allergy and plant food allergies. A case-control study involving 21 patients consulting for plant food allergies. Twelve patients were cannabis allergic and 9 had a pollen or latex allergy without cannabis allergy. Testing for cannabis IgE implied measurement of specific IgE, skin testing and basophil activation tests. Allergen component analysis was performed with a microarray technique. Plant food allergy in patients with documented cannabis allergy had more severe reactions than patients without cannabis allergy and frequently implied fruits and vegetables that are not observed in a (birch) pollen-related food syndrome. With the exception of 1 patient with cannabis allergy, all were sensitized to nonspecific (ns)-LTP. Our data suggest that illicit cannabis abuse can result in cannabis allergy with sensitization to ns-LTP. This sensitization might result in various plant-food allergies. Additional collaborative studies in different geographical areas are needed to further elucidate on this hypothesis. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Tunneling Kinetics and Nonadiabatic Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Proteins: The Effect of Electric Fields and Anharmonic Donor-Acceptor Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salna, Bridget; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Russo, Douglas; Champion, Paul M

    2017-07-20

    A proper description of proton donor-acceptor (D-A) distance fluctuations is crucial for understanding tunneling in proton-coupled electron transport (PCET). The typical harmonic approximation for the D-A potential results in a Gaussian probability distribution, which does not appropriately reflect the electronic repulsion forces that increase the energetic cost of sampling shorter D-A distances. Because these shorter distances are the primary channel for thermally activated tunneling, the analysis of tunneling kinetics depends sensitively on the inherently anharmonic nature of the D-A interaction. Thus, we have used quantum chemical calculations to account for the D-A interaction and developed an improved model for the analysis of experimental tunneling kinetics. Strong internal electric fields are also considered and found to contribute significantly to the compressive forces when the D-A distance distribution is positioned below the van der Waals contact distance. This model is applied to recent experiments on the wild type (WT) and a double mutant (DM) of soybean lipoxygenase-1 (SLO). The compressive force necessary to prepare the tunneling-active distribution in WT SLO is found to fall in the ∼ nN range, which greatly exceeds the measured values of molecular motor and protein unfolding forces. This indicates that ∼60-100 MV/cm electric fields, aligned along the D-A bond axis, must be generated by an enzyme conformational interconversion that facilitates the PCET tunneling reaction. Based on the absolute value of the measured tunneling rate, and using previously calculated values of the electronic matrix element, the population of this tunneling-active conformation is found to lie in the range 10 -5 -10 -7 , indicating this is a rare structural fluctuation that falls well below the detection threshold of recent ENDOR experiments. Additional analysis of the DM tunneling kinetics leads to a proposal that a disordered (high entropy) conformation could be

  6. Technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Illustrated by the example of the FRG's nuclear energy exports, it is shown that the nuclear technology transfer leads to new dimensions of intergovernmental relations, which hold within themselves on account of multiple state-to-state, scientific, industrial and - last but not least - personal contacts the chance of far-reaching friendships between countries and people. If the chance is taken, this can also be seen as an important contribution towards maintaining the peace. (orig.) [de

  7. Facilitating Transfers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Poul F.

    to specific logics of temporalisation and spatial expansion of a diverse set of social processes in relation to, for example, the economy, politics, science and the mass media. On this background, the paper will more concretely develop a conceptual framework for classifying different contextual orders...... that the essential functional and normative purpose of regulatory governance is to facilitate, stabilise and justify the transfer of condensed social components (such as economic capital and products, political decisions, legal judgements, religious beliefs and scientific knowledge) from one social contexts...

  8. Part I---Evaluating Effects of Oligomer Formation on Cytochrome P450 2C9 Electron Transfer and Drug Metabolism, Part II---Utilizing Molecular Modeling Techniques to Study the Src-Interacting Proteins Actin Filament Associated Protein of 110 kDa (AFAP-110) and Cortactin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jett, John Edward, Jr.

    The dissertation has been divided into two parts to accurately reflect the two distinct areas of interest pursued during my matriculation in the School of Pharmacy at West Virginia University. In Part I, I discuss research probing the nature of electron transfer in the Cytochrome P450 family of proteins, a group of proteins well-known for their role in drug metabolism. In Part II, I focus on in silico and in vitro work developed in concert to probe protein structure and protein-protein interactions involved in actin filament reorganization and cellular motility. Part I. Cytochrome P450s (P450s) are an important class of enzymes known to metabolize a variety of endogenous and xenobiotic compounds. P450s are most commonly found in liver and intestinal endothelial cells and are responsible for the metabolism of approximately 75% of pharmaceutical drugs on the market. CYP2C9---one of the six major P450 isoforms---is responsible for ˜20% of drug metabolism. Elucidation of the factors that affect in vitro drug metabolism is crucial to the accurate prediction of in vivo drug metabolism kinetics. Currently, the two major techniques for studying in vitro drug metabolism are solution-based. However, it is known that the results of solution-based studies can vary from in vivo drug metabolism. One reason suggested to account for this variation is the state of P450 oligomer formation in solution compared to the in vivo environment, where P450s are membrane-bound. To understand the details of how oligomer formation affects in vitro drug metabolism, it is imperative that techniques be developed which will allow for the unequivocal control of oligomer formation without altering other experimental parameters. Our long term goal of this research is to develop methods to more accurately predict in vivo drug metabolism from in vitro data. This section of the dissertation will discuss the development of a platform consisting of a doped silicon surface containing a large array of gold

  9. Radionuclide transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, G.B.

    1993-01-01

    The research project described here had the aim to obtain further information on the transfer of nuclides during pregnancy and lactation. The tests were carried out in mini-pigs and rats receiving unchanging doses of radionuclides with the food. The following findings were revealed for the elements examined: Fe, Se, Cs and Zn were characterized by very high transfer levels in the mother, infant and foetus. A substantial uptake by the mother alone was observed for Co, Ag and Mn. The uptake by the foetus and infant here was 1 to 10 times lower. A preferential concentration in certain tissues was seen for Sr and Tc; the thyroid levels of Tc were about equally high in mothers and infants, while Sr showed less accumulation in the maternal bone. The lanthanide group of substances (Ce, Eu and Gd as well as Y and Ru) were only taken up to a very limited extent. The uptake of the examined radionuclides (Fe, Co, Ag, Ce) with the food ingested was found here to be ten times greater in rats as compared to mini-pigs. This showed that great caution must be observed, if the behaviour of radionuclides in man is extrapolated from relevant data obtained in rodents. (orig./MG) [de

  10. Facilitating Transfers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Poul F.

    2018-01-01

    Departing from the paradox that globalisation has implied an increase, rather than a decrease, in contextual diversity, this paper re-assesses the function, normative purpose and location of Regulatory Governance Frameworks in world society. Drawing on insights from sociology of law and world...... society studies, the argument advanced is that Regulatory Governance Frameworks are oriented towards facilitating transfers of condensed social components, such as economic capital and products, legal acts, political decisions and scientific knowledge, from one legally-constituted normative order, i.......e. contextual setting, to another. Against this background, it is suggested that Regulatory Governance Frameworks can be understood as schemes which act as ‘rites of passage’ aimed at providing legal stabilisation to social processes characterised by liminality, i.e ambiguity, hybridity and in-betweenness....

  11. Folding Membrane Proteins by Deep Transfer Learning

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Sheng; Li, Zhen; Yu, Yizhou; Xu, Jinbo

    2017-01-01

    contacts by learning from non-MPs and then predicts 3D structure models using the predicted contacts as distance restraints. Tested on 510 non-redundant MPs, our method has contact prediction accuracy at least 0.18 better than existing methods, predicts

  12. Relations Between Atherogenic Index of Plasma, Ratio of Small Dense Low Density Lipoprotein/Lecithin Cholesterol Acyl Transferase and Ratio of Small Dense Low Density Lipoprotein/Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein of Controlled and Uncontrolled Type 2 DM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellis Susanti

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with Diabetes Melitus are proven to be prone to atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease, especially type 2 Diabetes Melitus (T2DM patient who have higher risk and mortality for cardiovascular risk factor. The Dyslipidemia condition is very common in T2DM as one of the risk factors. Diabetic dyslipidemia is marked by the increased triglyceride (TG, low HDL cholesterol (HDL-C, and increased small dense LDL and apolipoprotein B. Therefore the aim of this study is to assess the differential and correlation between Atherogenic Index of Plasma (AIP, ratio of small dense low density lipoprotein (sdLDL/lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT and ratio of sdLDL/cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP of controlled and uncontrolled T2DM. METHODS: This study was observational with cross sectional design. In total of 72 patients with T2DM consist of 36 controlled and 36 uncontrolled, participated in this study. The serum TG, HDL-C, sdLDL, LCAT and CETP were examined in their relationship with to T2DM risk. RESULTS: The results of the study indicate that the AIP (p<0.001 increase controlled and uncontrolled T2DM and the ratio of sdLDL/CETP (p=0.004, odds ratio of AIP was 4 (95% CI: 1.501-10.658 and odds ratio of sdLDL/CETP ratio was 4 (95% CI: 1.501-10.658 in uncontrolled T2DM. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that the AIP and ratio of small dense LDL/CETP had a significant correlation with the uncontrolled T2DM. The AIP and ratio of small dense LDL/CETP increase was found at the uncontrolled T2DM to be 4 times greater than the controlled T2DM. KEYWORDS: T2DM, atherosclerosis, atherogenic index of plasma, small dense LDL, LCAT, CETP, ratio of sdLDL/LCAT, ratio of sdLDL/CETP.

  13. Heat transfer: Pittsburgh 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyczkowski, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers divided among the following sections: Process Heat Transfer; Thermal Hydraulics and Phase Change Phenomena; Analysis of Multicomponent Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer; Heat Transfer in Advanced Reactors; General Heat Transfer in Solar Energy; Numerical Simulation of Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer; High Temperature Heat Transfer; Heat Transfer Aspects of Severe Reactor Accidents; Hazardous Waste On-Site Disposal; and General Papers

  14. Hierarchical control of electron-transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerhoff, Hans V.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Egger, Louis

    1997-01-01

    In this chapter the role of electron transfer in determining the behaviour of the ATP synthesising enzyme in E. coli is analysed. It is concluded that the latter enzyme lacks control because of special properties of the electron transfer components. These properties range from absence of a strong...... back pressure by the protonmotive force on the rate of electron transfer to hierarchical regulation of the expression of the gens that encode the electron transfer proteins as a response to changes in the bioenergetic properties of the cell.The discussion uses Hierarchical Control Analysis...

  15. Transfer and Social Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billett, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    Transfer involves disembodying knowledge and transferring it for use in different contexts. Vocational knowledge arises in communities of practice, and difficulties arise in transferring it from one distinct community, such as a workplace, to another, such as a classroom. (SK)

  16. International technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Won Gi

    1991-11-01

    This book introduces technology progress and economic growth, theoretical consideration of technology transfer, policy and mechanism on technology transfer of a developed country and a developing country, reality of international technology transfer technology transfer and industrial structure in Asia and the pacific region, technology transfer in Russia, China and Eastern Europe, cooperation of science and technology for development of Northeast Asia and strategy of technology transfer of Korea.

  17. Technology transfer by multinationals

    OpenAIRE

    Kostyantyn Zuzik

    2003-01-01

    The paper analyses the issue of technology transfer by multinational corporations. The following questions are explored: (a) world market of technologies, the role of MNCs (b) Choice of the technology transfer mode, Dunning's OLI-theory as a factor of the choice of the mode of transfer (c) measurement and profitability of technology transfer (d) transfer of technology through partnerships, JVs, alliances and through M&As (e) aspects of technology transfer by services multinationals. Paper uti...

  18. Horizontal gene transfer in chromalveolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Debashish

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Horizontal gene transfer (HGT, the non-genealogical transfer of genetic material between different organisms, is considered a potentially important mechanism of genome evolution in eukaryotes. Using phylogenomic analyses of expressed sequence tag (EST data generated from a clonal cell line of a free living dinoflagellate alga Karenia brevis, we investigated the impact of HGT on genome evolution in unicellular chromalveolate protists. Results We identified 16 proteins that have originated in chromalveolates through ancient HGTs before the divergence of the genera Karenia and Karlodinium and one protein that was derived through a more recent HGT. Detailed analysis of the phylogeny and distribution of identified proteins demonstrates that eight have resulted from independent HGTs in several eukaryotic lineages. Conclusion Recurring intra- and interdomain gene exchange provides an important source of genetic novelty not only in parasitic taxa as previously demonstrated but as we show here, also in free-living protists. Investigating the tempo and mode of evolution of horizontally transferred genes in protists will therefore advance our understanding of mechanisms of adaptation in eukaryotes.

  19. Cryogenic heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Barron, Randall F

    2016-01-01

    Cryogenic Heat Transfer, Second Edition continues to address specific heat transfer problems that occur in the cryogenic temperature range where there are distinct differences from conventional heat transfer problems. This updated version examines the use of computer-aided design in cryogenic engineering and emphasizes commonly used computer programs to address modern cryogenic heat transfer problems. It introduces additional topics in cryogenic heat transfer that include latent heat expressions; lumped-capacity transient heat transfer; thermal stresses; Laplace transform solutions; oscillating flow heat transfer, and computer-aided heat exchanger design. It also includes new examples and homework problems throughout the book, and provides ample references for further study.

  20. Analysis of Heat Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    This book deals with analysis of heat transfer which includes nonlinear analysis examples, radiation heat transfer, analysis of heat transfer in ANSYS, verification of analysis result, analysis of heat transfer of transition with automatic time stepping and open control, analysis of heat transfer using arrangement of ANSYS, resistance of thermal contact, coupled field analysis such as of thermal-structural interaction, cases of coupled field analysis, and phase change.

  1. Molecular cloning of plane pollen allergen Pla a 3 and its utility as diagnostic marker for peach associated plane pollen allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangorsch, A; Larsson, H; Messmer, M; García-Moral, A; Lauer, I; Wolfheimer, S; Schülke, S; Bartra, J; Vieths, S; Lidholm, J; Scheurer, S

    2016-05-01

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTP) are considered to provoke allergic symptoms to plane tree pollen, which are frequently associated with peach allergy. The objective was to clone the cDNA of plane pollen nsLTP Pla a 3, to characterize IgE-binding and allergenic potency of recombinant Pla a 3 in comparison to its natural counterpart and peach nsLTP Pru p 3. Natural Pla a 3 was purified from plane pollen and analysed by mass spectrometry (MS). Recombinant Pla a 3 was characterized by SDS-PAGE and CD spectroscopy. Specific IgE to extract, components of plane pollen and Pru p 3 was measured by ImmunoCAP in sera of patients allergic to either plane pollen (n = 10), peach (n = 15) or both (n = 15). Biological potency of the proteins was investigated by in vitro mediator release assays and IgE cross-reactivity by competitive ELISA. Two Pla a 3 isoforms were identified. Recombinant Pla a 3 showed high purity, structural integrity, IgE-binding capacity comparable to nPla a 3 and biological potency. Sensitization to plane pollen extract was confirmed in 24/25 plane pollen allergics. The frequency of sensitization to Pla a 3 was 53% among patients allergic to both plane pollen and peach and 10% among plane pollen allergics tolerating peach where most patients were sensitized to Pla a 1. Pla a 3 and Pru p 3 showed strong bi-directional IgE cross-reactivity in patients allergic to peach and plane pollen, but not in peach allergics tolerating plane pollen. Levels of IgE-binding were generally higher to Pru p 3 than to Pla a 3. Sensitization to Pla a 3 is relevant in a subgroup of plane pollen allergics with concomitant peach allergy. IgE testing with Pla a 3 may serve as a marker to identify plane pollen allergic patients at risk of LTP-mediated food reactions and thereby improve in vitro diagnostic procedures. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Optimization of the southern electrophoretic transfer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, M.A.; Fujimura, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    The technique of separating DNA fragments using agarose gel electrophoresis is essential in the analysis of nucleic acids. Further, after the method of transferring specific DNA fragments from those agarose gels to cellulose nitrate membranes was developed in 1975, a method was developed to transfer DNA, RNA, protein and ribonucleoprotein particles from various gels onto diazobenzyloxymethyl (DBM) paper using electrophoresis as well. This paper describes the optimum conditions for quantitative electrophoretic transfer of DNA onto nylon membranes. This method exemplifies the ability to hybridize the membrane more than once with specific RNA probes by providing sufficient retention of the DNA. Furthermore, the intrinsic properties of the nylon membrane allow for an increase in the efficiency and resolution of transfer while using somewhat harsh alkaline conditions. The use of alkaline conditions is of critical importance since we can now denature the DNA during transfer and thus only a short pre-treatment in acid is required for depurination. 9 refs., 7 figs

  3. Actividad de la proteína transportadora de ésteres de colesterol. Polimorfismos del gen en pacientes colombianos con enfermedad coronaria Activity of cholesteryl ester transfer protein. Gene polymorphism in colombian patients with coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra M Giraldo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: la literatura relaciona la actividad de la proteína transportadora de ésteres de colesterol (CETP con enfermedad coronaria, por reducir el colesterol en las lipoproteínas de alta densidad. Adicionalmente, estudios recientes han identificado variaciones en el gen de la CETP, aunque el papel funcional de algunas de estas variantes sobre la actividad enzimática y la enfermedad coronaria, es desconocido. Objetivos: examinar la asociación de los polimorfismos TaqIB, MspI y RsaI del gen de la CETP y la actividad de la enzima con enfermedad coronaria. Métodos: se evaluó la asociación entre la actividad de la enzima y los polimorfismos TaqIB, MspI y RsaI, en pacientes con obstrucción coronaria documentada por angiografía. Resultados: la angiografía permitió clasificar a los pacientes en dos grupos: uno (213 individuos con obstrucción coronaria no significativa (OC 50%. La edad fue significantemente mayor en el último grupo en comparación con el primero. La actividad de la CETP fue 95,8 y 94,7 pmol/μL.h, para los grupos OC 50%, respectivamente. Solo se encontró diferencia significativa entre los alelos M1 y M2 en la población general. Conclusión: no se halló asociación entre la actividad de la CETP, los polimorfismos TaqBI, MspI, Rsal y la obstrucción coronaria. En este trabajo se describen por primera vez los niveles de CETP en los polimorfismos TaqIB, MspI, Rsal para un grupo de pacientes colombianos. Se debe refinar la descripción del evento coronario, el contexto metabólico de los pacientes y el estudio de haplotipos para encontrar relaciones con enfermedad coronaria.Introduction: literature links the activity of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP with coronary heart disease by lowering cholesterol in high density lipoproteins. Additionally, recent studies have identified variations in the CETP gene, although the functional role of some of these variants on enzyme activity and coronary heart disease is

  4. In vitro production of beta-very low density lipoproteins and small, dense low density lipoproteins in mildly hypertriglyceridemic plasma: role of activities of lecithin:cholester acyltransferase, cholesterylester transfer proteins and lipoprotein lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, B H; Segrest, J P; Franklin, F

    1998-12-01

    As a model for the formation of beta-very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and small, dense LDL by the intraplasma metabolic activities in vivo, lipoproteins in fresh plasma were interacted in vitro with endogenous lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) and cholesterylester transfer proteins (CETP) and subsequently with purified lipoprotein lipase (LpL). The LCAT and CETP reactions in a mildly hypertriglyceridemic (HTG) plasma at 37 degrees C for 18 h resulted in (1) esterification of about 45% plasma unesterified cholesterol (UC), (2) a marked increase in cholesterylester (CE) (+129%) and a decrease in triglyceride (TG) (-45%) in VLDL, and (3) a marked increase of TG (+ 341%) with a small net decrease of CE (-3.6%) in LDL, causing a significant alteration in the TG/CE of VLDL (from 8.0 to 1.9) and of LDL (from 0.20 to 0.93). The LDL in LCAT and CETP-reacted plasma is larger and more buoyant than that in control plasma. In vitro lipolysis of control and LCAT and CETP-reacted plasma by LpL, which hydrolyzed >90% of VLDL-TG and about 50-60% of LDL-TG, converted most of VLDL in control plasma (>85%) but less than half (40%) of VLDL in LCAT and CETP-reacted plasma into the IDL-LDL density fraction and transformed the large, buoyant LDL in the LCAT and CETP-reacted plasma into particles smaller and denser than those in the control plasma. The remnants that accumulated in the VLDL density region of the postlipolysis LCAT and CETP-reacted plasma contained apo B-100 and E but little or no detectable apo Cs and consisted of particles having pre-beta and beta-electrophoretic mobilities. The inhibition of LCAT during incubation of plasma, which lessened the extent of alteration in VLDL and LDL core lipids, increased the extent of lipolytic removal of VLDL from the VLDL density region but lowered the extent of alteration in the size and density of LDL. The LCAT, CETP and/or LpL-mediated alterations in the density of LDL in normolipidemic fasting plasma were less pronounced

  5. Interaction between dietary content of protein and sodium chloride on milk urea concentration, urinary urea excretion, renal recycling of urea, and urea transfer to the gastrointestinal tract in dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spek, J.W.; Bannink, A.; Gort, G.; Hendriks, W.H.; Dijkstra, J.

    2013-01-01

    Dietary protein and salt affect the concentration of milk urea nitrogen (MUN; mg of N/dL) and the relationship between MUN and excretion of urea nitrogen in urine (UUN; g of N/d) of dairy cattle. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of dietary protein and sodium chloride (NaCl)

  6. Long-Term Fungal Inhibition by Pisum sativum Flour Hydrolysate during Storage of Wheat Flour Bread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavecchia, Anna; Gramaglia, Valerio; Gobbetti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In order to identify antifungal compounds from natural sources to be used as ingredients in the bakery industry, water/salt-soluble extracts (WSE) from different legume flour hydrolysates obtained by the use of a fungal protease were assayed against Penicillium roqueforti DPPMAF1. The agar diffusion assays allowed the selection of the pea (Pisum sativum) hydrolysate as the most active. As shown by the hyphal radial growth rate, the WSE had inhibitory activity towards several fungi isolated from bakeries. The MIC of the WSE was 9.0 mg/ml. Fungal inhibition was slightly affected by heating and variations in pH. The antifungal activity was attributed to three native proteins (pea defensins 1 and 2 and a nonspecific lipid transfer protein [nsLTP]) and a mixture of peptides released during hydrolysis. The three proteins have been reported previously as components of the defense system of the plant. Five peptides were purified from WSE and were identified as sequences encrypted in leginsulin A, vicilin, provicilin, and the nsLTP. To confirm antifungal activity, the peptides were chemically synthesized and tested. Freeze-dried WSE were used as ingredients in leavened baked goods. In particular, breads made by the addition of 1.6% (wt/wt) of the extract and fermented by baker's yeast or sourdough were characterized for their main chemical, structural, and sensory features, packed in polyethylene bags, stored at room temperature, and compared to controls prepared without pea hydrolysate. Artificially inoculated slices of a bread containing the WSE did not show contamination by fungi until at least 21 days of storage and behaved like the bread prepared with calcium propionate (0.3%, wt/wt). PMID:25862230

  7. Expert Performance Transfer: Making Knowledge Transfer Count

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, C.L.; Braudt, T.E.

    2011-01-01

    'Knowledge Transfer' is a high-priority imperative as the nuclear industry faces the combined effects of an aging workforce and economic pressures to do more with less. Knowledge Transfer is only a part of the solution to these challenges, however. The more compelling and immediate need faced by industry is Accomplishment Transfer, or the transference of the applied knowledge necessary to assure optimal performance transfer from experienced, high-performing staff to inexperienced staff. A great deal of industry knowledge and required performance information has been documented in the form of procedures. Often under-appreciated either as knowledge stores or as drivers of human performance, procedures, coupled with tightly-focused and effective training, are arguably the most effective influences on human and plant performance. (author)

  8. Waste Transfer Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    tion and transport is usually the most costly part of any waste management system; and when waste is transported over a considerable distance or for a long time, transferring the waste from the collection vehicles to more efficient transportation may be economically beneficial. This involves...... a transfer station where the transfer takes place. These stations may also be accessible by private people, offering flexibility to the waste system, including facilities for bulky waste, household hazardous waste and recyclables. Waste transfer may also take place on the collection route from small...... describes the main features of waste transfer stations, including some considerations about the economical aspects on when transfer is advisable....

  9. Convective heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Kakac, Sadik; Pramuanjaroenkij, Anchasa

    2014-01-01

    Intended for readers who have taken a basic heat transfer course and have a basic knowledge of thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, and differential equations, Convective Heat Transfer, Third Edition provides an overview of phenomenological convective heat transfer. This book combines applications of engineering with the basic concepts of convection. It offers a clear and balanced presentation of essential topics using both traditional and numerical methods. The text addresses emerging science and technology matters, and highlights biomedical applications and energy technologies. What’s New in the Third Edition: Includes updated chapters and two new chapters on heat transfer in microchannels and heat transfer with nanofluids Expands problem sets and introduces new correlations and solved examples Provides more coverage of numerical/computer methods The third edition details the new research areas of heat transfer in microchannels and the enhancement of convective heat transfer with nanofluids....

  10. Introduction to heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    SUNDÉN, B

    2012-01-01

    Presenting the basic mechanisms for transfer of heat, Introduction to Heat Transfer gives a deeper and more comprehensive view than existing titles on the subject. Derivation and presentation of analytical and empirical methods are provided for calculation of heat transfer rates and temperature fields as well as pressure drop. The book covers thermal conduction, forced and natural laminar and turbulent convective heat transfer, thermal radiation including participating media, condensation, evaporation and heat exchangers.

  11. Water-Transfer Slows Aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aviv Cohen

    Full Text Available Transferring Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to water is known to extend their lifespan. However, it is unclear whether this lifespan extension is due to slowing the aging process or merely keeping old yeast alive. Here we show that in water-transferred yeast, the toxicity of polyQ proteins is decreased and the aging biomarker 47Q aggregates at a reduced rate and to a lesser extent. These beneficial effects of water-transfer could not be reproduced by diluting the growth medium and depended on de novo protein synthesis and proteasomes levels. Interestingly, we found that upon water-transfer 27 proteins are downregulated, 4 proteins are upregulated and 81 proteins change their intracellular localization, hinting at an active genetic program enabling the lifespan extension. Furthermore, the aging-related deterioration of the heat shock response (HSR, the unfolded protein response (UPR and the endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation (ERAD, was largely prevented in water-transferred yeast, as the activities of these proteostatic network pathways remained nearly as robust as in young yeast. The characteristics of young yeast that are actively maintained upon water-transfer indicate that the extended lifespan is the outcome of slowing the rate of the aging process.

  12. Water-Transfer Slows Aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Aviv; Weindling, Esther; Rabinovich, Efrat; Nachman, Iftach; Fuchs, Shai; Chuartzman, Silvia; Gal, Lihi; Schuldiner, Maya; Bar-Nun, Shoshana

    2016-01-01

    Transferring Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to water is known to extend their lifespan. However, it is unclear whether this lifespan extension is due to slowing the aging process or merely keeping old yeast alive. Here we show that in water-transferred yeast, the toxicity of polyQ proteins is decreased and the aging biomarker 47Q aggregates at a reduced rate and to a lesser extent. These beneficial effects of water-transfer could not be reproduced by diluting the growth medium and depended on de novo protein synthesis and proteasomes levels. Interestingly, we found that upon water-transfer 27 proteins are downregulated, 4 proteins are upregulated and 81 proteins change their intracellular localization, hinting at an active genetic program enabling the lifespan extension. Furthermore, the aging-related deterioration of the heat shock response (HSR), the unfolded protein response (UPR) and the endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation (ERAD), was largely prevented in water-transferred yeast, as the activities of these proteostatic network pathways remained nearly as robust as in young yeast. The characteristics of young yeast that are actively maintained upon water-transfer indicate that the extended lifespan is the outcome of slowing the rate of the aging process.

  13. Intramolecular Energy Transfer, Charge Transfer & Hydrogen Bond

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ultrafast Dynamics of Chemical Reactions in Condensed Phase: Intramolecular Energy Transfer, Charge Transfer & Hydrogen Bond · PowerPoint Presentation · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · Slide 6 · Slide 7 · Slide 8 · Slide 9 · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Slide 14 · Slide 15 · Slide 16 · Slide 17 · Slide 18 · Slide 19.

  14. Out-and-back {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C scalar transfers in protein resonance assignment by proton-detected solid-state NMR under ultra-fast MAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbet-Massin, Emeline; Pell, Andrew J. [University of Lyon, CNRS/ENS Lyon/UCB Lyon 1, Centre de RMN a Tres Hauts Champs (France); Jaudzems, Kristaps [Latvian Institute of Organic Synthesis (Latvia); Franks, W. Trent; Retel, Joren S. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (Germany); Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Tars, Kaspars [Biomedical Research and Study Center (Latvia); Emsley, Lyndon [University of Lyon, CNRS/ENS Lyon/UCB Lyon 1, Centre de RMN a Tres Hauts Champs (France); Oschkinat, Hartmut [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (Germany); Lesage, Anne; Pintacuda, Guido, E-mail: guido.pintacuda@ens-lyon.fr [University of Lyon, CNRS/ENS Lyon/UCB Lyon 1, Centre de RMN a Tres Hauts Champs (France)

    2013-08-15

    We present here {sup 1}H-detected triple-resonance H/N/C experiments that incorporate CO-CA and CA-CB out-and-back scalar-transfer blocks optimized for robust resonance assignment in biosolids under ultra-fast magic-angle spinning (MAS). The first experiment, (H)(CO)CA(CO)NH, yields {sup 1}H-detected inter-residue correlations, in which we record the chemical shifts of the CA spins in the first indirect dimension while during the scalar-transfer delays the coherences are present only on the longer-lived CO spins. The second experiment, (H)(CA)CB(CA)NH, correlates the side-chain CB chemical shifts with the NH of the same residue. These high sensitivity experiments are demonstrated on both fully-protonated and 100 %-H{sup N} back-protonated perdeuterated microcrystalline samples of Acinetobacter phage 205 (AP205) capsids at 60 kHz MAS.

  15. The transfer of radiocaesium to ewes through a breeding cycle - an illustration of the pitfalls of the transfer coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beresford, N.A. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, CEH-Lancaster, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom)], E-mail: nab@ceh.ac.uk; Mayes, R.W. [Macaulay Land Use Research Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH (United Kingdom); Barnett, C.L.; Howard, B.J. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, CEH-Lancaster, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    A study to measure the transfer of radiocaesium to adult female sheep through a breeding cycle is described. The transfer of radiocaesium from the diet to muscle (estimated as the equilibrium transfer coefficient) was significantly lower to pregnant, and especially lactating, animals compared to non-lactating and barren animals. High dry matter intake rates were also associated with significantly lower transfer coefficients. Known relationships between dry matter intake rates and protein turnover could credibly explain some of these differences. However, when described as the concentration ratio, radiocaesium transfer to meat was apparently highest during lactation. The apparent difference in results obtained by the two approaches of determining transfer is the consequence of daily dry matter intake being a denominator within the estimation of transfer coefficient. A wider discussion of transfer coefficients and concentration ratios leads us to suggest that the concentration ratio is the more robust and potentially generic parameter.

  16. The transfer of radiocaesium to ewes through a breeding cycle - an illustration of the pitfalls of the transfer coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beresford, N.A.; Mayes, R.W.; Barnett, C.L.; Howard, B.J.

    2007-01-01

    A study to measure the transfer of radiocaesium to adult female sheep through a breeding cycle is described. The transfer of radiocaesium from the diet to muscle (estimated as the equilibrium transfer coefficient) was significantly lower to pregnant, and especially lactating, animals compared to non-lactating and barren animals. High dry matter intake rates were also associated with significantly lower transfer coefficients. Known relationships between dry matter intake rates and protein turnover could credibly explain some of these differences. However, when described as the concentration ratio, radiocaesium transfer to meat was apparently highest during lactation. The apparent difference in results obtained by the two approaches of determining transfer is the consequence of daily dry matter intake being a denominator within the estimation of transfer coefficient. A wider discussion of transfer coefficients and concentration ratios leads us to suggest that the concentration ratio is the more robust and potentially generic parameter

  17. Heat transfer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Not Available

    1980-03-07

    A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor is described. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

  18. Fuel transfer machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, I.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear fuel transfer machine for transferring fuel assemblies through the fuel transfer tube of a nuclear power generating plant containment structure is described. A conventional reversible drive cable is attached to the fuel transfer carriage to drive it horizontally through the tube. A shuttle carrying a sheave at each end is arranged in parallel with the carriage to also travel into the tube. The cable cooperating with the sheaves permit driving a relatively short fuel transfer carriage a large distance without manually installing sheaves or drive apparatus in the tunnel. 8 claims, 3 figures

  19. Electron transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, R D

    2013-01-01

    Electron Transfer Reactions deals with the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions between metal ions in solution, as well as the electron exchange between atoms or molecules in either the gaseous or solid state. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 covers the electron transfer between atoms and molecules in the gas state. Part 2 tackles the reaction paths of oxidation states and binuclear intermediates, as well as the mechanisms of electron transfer. Part 3 discusses the theories and models of the electron transfer process; theories and experiments involving bridged electron transfe

  20. Transfer function combinations

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Liang; Schott, Mathias; Hansen, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Direct volume rendering has been an active area of research for over two decades. Transfer function design remains a difficult task since current methods, such as traditional 1D and 2D transfer functions, are not always effective for all data sets. Various 1D or 2D transfer function spaces have been proposed to improve classification exploiting different aspects, such as using the gradient magnitude for boundary location and statistical, occlusion, or size metrics. In this paper, we present a novel transfer function method which can provide more specificity for data classification by combining different transfer function spaces. In this work, a 2D transfer function can be combined with 1D transfer functions which improve the classification. Specifically, we use the traditional 2D scalar/gradient magnitude, 2D statistical, and 2D occlusion spectrum transfer functions and combine these with occlusion and/or size-based transfer functions to provide better specificity. We demonstrate the usefulness of the new method by comparing to the following previous techniques: 2D gradient magnitude, 2D occlusion spectrum, 2D statistical transfer functions and 2D size based transfer functions. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Heat transfer enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasatani, Masanobu; Itaya, Yoshinori

    1985-01-01

    In order to develop energy-saving techniques and new energy techniques, and also most advanced techniques by making industrial equipment with high performance, heat transfer performance frequently becomes an important problem. In addition, the improvement of conventional heat transfer techniques and the device of new heat transfer techniques are often required. It is most proper that chemical engineers engage in the research and development for enhancing heat transfer. The research and development for enhancing heat transfer are important to heighten heat exchange efficiency or to cool equipment for preventing overheat in high temperature heat transfer system. In this paper, the techniques of enhancing radiative heat transfer and the improvement of radiative heat transfer characteristics are reported. Radiative heat transfer is proportional to fourth power of absolute temperature, and it does not require any heat transfer medium, but efficient heat-radiation converters are necessary. As the techniques of enhancing radiative heat transfer, the increase of emission and absorption areas, the installation of emissive structures and the improvement of radiative characteristics are discussed. (Kako, I.)

  2. Transfer function combinations

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Liang

    2012-10-01

    Direct volume rendering has been an active area of research for over two decades. Transfer function design remains a difficult task since current methods, such as traditional 1D and 2D transfer functions, are not always effective for all data sets. Various 1D or 2D transfer function spaces have been proposed to improve classification exploiting different aspects, such as using the gradient magnitude for boundary location and statistical, occlusion, or size metrics. In this paper, we present a novel transfer function method which can provide more specificity for data classification by combining different transfer function spaces. In this work, a 2D transfer function can be combined with 1D transfer functions which improve the classification. Specifically, we use the traditional 2D scalar/gradient magnitude, 2D statistical, and 2D occlusion spectrum transfer functions and combine these with occlusion and/or size-based transfer functions to provide better specificity. We demonstrate the usefulness of the new method by comparing to the following previous techniques: 2D gradient magnitude, 2D occlusion spectrum, 2D statistical transfer functions and 2D size based transfer functions. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Making benefit transfers work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bateman, I.J.; Brouwer, R.; Ferrini, S.

    We develop and test guidance principles for benefits transfers. These argue that when transferring across relatively similar sites, simple mean value transfers are to be preferred but that when sites are relatively dissimilar then value function transfers will yield lower errors. The paper also...... provides guidance on the appropriate specification of transferable value functions arguing that these should be developed from theoretical rather than ad-hoc statistical principles. These principles are tested via a common format valuation study of water quality improvements across five countries. Results...... support our various hypotheses providing a set of principles for future transfer studies. The application also considers new ways of incorporating distance decay, substitution and framing effects within transfers and presents a novel water quality ladder....

  4. Glia to axon RNA transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, José Roberto; Canclini, Lucía; Kun, Alejandra; Sotelo-Silveira, José Roberto; Calliari, Aldo; Cal, Karina; Bresque, Mariana; Dipaolo, Andrés; Farias, Joaquina; Mercer, John A

    2014-03-01

    The existence of RNA in axons has been a matter of dispute for decades. Evidence for RNA and ribosomes has now accumulated to a point at which it is difficult to question, much of the disputes turned to the origin of these axonal RNAs. In this review, we focus on studies addressing the origin of axonal RNAs and ribosomes. The neuronal soma as the source of most axonal RNAs has been demonstrated and is indisputable. However, the surrounding glial cells may be a supplemental source of axonal RNAs, a matter scarcely investigated in the literature. Here, we review the few papers that have demonstrated that glial-to-axon RNA transfer is not only feasible, but likely. We describe this process in both invertebrate axons and vertebrate axons. Schwann cell to axon ribosomes transfer was conclusively demonstrated (Court et al. [2008]: J. Neurosci 28:11024-11029; Court et al. [2011]: Glia 59:1529-1539). However, mRNA transfer still remains to be demonstrated in a conclusive way. The intercellular transport of mRNA has interesting implications, particularly with respect to the integration of glial and axonal function. This evolving field is likely to impact our understanding of the cell biology of the axon in both normal and pathological conditions. Most importantly, if the synthesis of proteins in the axon can be controlled by interacting glia, the possibilities for clinical interventions in injury and neurodegeneration are greatly increased. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Proton transfer events in GFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Donato, Mariangela; van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Stuart, Thomas Cohen; Kennis, John T M; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; van Grondelle, Rienk; Groot, Marie Louise

    2011-09-28

    Proton transfer is one of the most important elementary processes in biology. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) serves as an important model system to elucidate the mechanistic details of this reaction, because in GFP proton transfer can be induced by light absorption. Illumination initiates proton transfer through a 'proton-wire', formed by the chromophore (the proton donor), water molecule W22, Ser205 and Glu222 (the acceptor), on a picosecond time scale. To obtain a more refined view of this process, we have used a combined approach of time resolved mid-infrared spectroscopy and visible pump-dump-probe spectroscopy to resolve with atomic resolution how and how fast protons move through this wire. Our results indicate that absorption of light by GFP induces in 3 ps (10 ps in D(2)O) a shift of the equilibrium positions of all protons in the H-bonded network, leading to a partial protonation of Glu222 and to a so-called low barrier hydrogen bond (LBHB) for the chromophore's proton, giving rise to dual emission at 475 and 508 nm. This state is followed by a repositioning of the protons on the wire in 10 ps (80 ps in D(2)O), ultimately forming the fully deprotonated chromophore and protonated Glu222.

  6. Cholesterol transfer at endosomal-organelle membrane contact sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, Neale D; Zhao, Kexin

    2018-06-01

    Cholesterol is delivered to the limiting membrane of late endosomes by Niemann-Pick Type C1 and C2 proteins. This review summarizes recent evidence that cholesterol transfer from endosomes to the endoplasmic reticulum and other organelles is mediated by lipid-binding proteins that localize to membrane contact sites (MCS). LDL-cholesterol in the late endosomal/lysosomes is exported to the plasma membrane, where most cholesterol resides, and the endoplasmic reticulum, which harbors the regulatory complexes and enzymes that control the synthesis and esterification of cholesterol. A major advance in dissecting these cholesterol transport pathways was identification of frequent and dynamic MCS between endosomes and the endoplasmic reticulum, peroxisomes and plasma membrane. Positioned at these MCS are members of the oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein-related lipid-transfer family of lipid transfer proteins that bridge the opposing membranes and directly or indirectly mediate cholesterol transfer. OSBP-related protein 1L (ORP1L), ORP5 and ORP6 mediate cholesterol transfer to the endoplasmic reticulum that regulates cholesterol homeostasis. ORP1L and STARD3 also move cholesterol from the endoplasmic reticulum-to-late endosomal/lysosomes under low-cholesterol conditions to facilitate intraluminal vesicle formation. Cholesterol transport also occurs at MCS with peroxisomes and possibly the plasma membrane. Frequent contacts between organelles and the endo-lysosomal vesicles are sites for bidirectional transfer of cholesterol.

  7. Phospholipid transfer activities in toad oocytes and developing embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusinol, A.; Salomon, R.A.; Bloj, B.

    1987-01-01

    The role of lipid transfer proteins during plasma membrane biogenesis was explored. Developing amphibia embryos were used because during their growth an active plasma membrane biosynthesis occurs together with negligible mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum proliferation. Sonicated vesicles, containing 14 C-labeled phospholipids and 3 H-labeled triolein, as donor particles and cross-linked erythrocyte ghosts as acceptor particles were used to measure phospholipid transfer activities in unfertilized oocytes and in developing embryos of the toad Bufo arenarum. Phosphatidylcholine transfer activity in pH 5.1 supernatant of unfertilized oocytes was 8-fold higher than the activity found in female toad liver supernatant, but dropped steadily after fertilization. After 20 hr of development, at the stage of late blastula, the phosphatidylcholine transfer activity had dropped 4-fold. Unfertilized oocyte supernatant exhibited phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylethanolamine transfer activity also, but at the late blastula stage the former had dropped 18-fold and the latter was no longer detectable under our assay conditions. Our results show that fertilization does not trigger a phospholipid transport process catalyzed by lipid transfer proteins. Moreover, they imply that 75% of the phosphatidylcholine transfer activity and more than 95% of the phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylethanolamine transfer activities present in pH 5.1 supernatants of unfertilized oocytes may not be essential for toad embryo development. Our findings do not rule out, however, that a phosphatidylcholine-specific lipid transfer protein could be required for embryo early growth

  8. Pulse radiolysis studies of intramolecular electron transfer in model peptides and proteins. 7. Trp -> TyrO radical transformation in hen egg-white lysozyme. Effects of pH, temperature, Trp62 oxidation and inhibitor binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bobrowski, K.; Holcman, J.; Poznanski, J.

    1997-01-01

    Intramolecular long-range electron transfer (LRET) in hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) accompanying Trp --> TyrO radical transformation was investigated in aqueous solution by pulse radiolysis as a function of pH (5.2-7.4) and temperature (283-328K). The reaction was induced by highly selective...... below its denaturation temperature. Selective oxidation by ozone of the Trp62 indole side-chain in HEWL to N'-formylkynurenine (NFKyn62-HEWL) caused a large drop in the initial yield of Trp(.) radicals, G(Trp(.))(i). This was accompanied by a relatively small decrease in k(5) but selective oxidation...

  9. Detection of Heteromers Formed by Cannabinoid CB1, Dopamine D2, and Adenosine A2A G-Protein-Coupled Receptors by Combining Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation and Bioluminescence Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Gemma; Carriba, Paulina; Gandí, Jorge; Ciruela, Francisco; Casadó, Vicent; Cortés, Antoni; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I.; Lluis, Carmen; Franco, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    Functional interactions in signaling occur between dopamine D2 (D2R) and cannabinoid CB1 (CB1R) receptors, between CB1R and adenosine A2A (A2AR) receptors, and between D2R and A2AR. Furthermore, direct molecular interactions have been reported for the pairs CB1R-D2R, A2AR-D2R, and CB1R-A2AR. Here a combination of bimolecular fluorescence complementation and bioluminescence energy transfer techniques was used to identify the occurrence of D2R-CB1R-A2AR hetero-oligomers in living cells. PMID:18956124

  10. Detection of Heteromers Formed by Cannabinoid CB1, Dopamine D2, and Adenosine A2A G-Protein-Coupled Receptors by Combining Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation and Bioluminescence Energy Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Navarro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional interactions in signaling occur between dopamine D2 (D2R and cannabinoid CB1 (CB1R receptors, between CB1R and adenosine A2A (A2AR receptors, and between D2R and A2AR. Furthermore, direct molecular interactions have been reported for the pairs CB1R-D2R, A2AR-D2R, and CB1R-A2AR. Here a combination of bimolecular fluorescence complementation and bioluminescence energy transfer techniques was used to identify the occurrence of D2R-CB1R-A2AR hetero-oligomers in living cells.

  11. Wireless adiabatic power transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangelov, A.A.; Suchowski, H.; Silberberg, Y.; Vitanov, N.V.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Efficient and robust mid-range wireless energy transfer between two coils. → The adiabatic energy transfer is analogous to adiabatic passage in quantum optics. → Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to any resonant constraints. → Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to noise in the neighborhood of the coils. - Abstract: We propose a technique for efficient mid-range wireless power transfer between two coils, by adapting the process of adiabatic passage for a coherently driven two-state quantum system to the realm of wireless energy transfer. The proposed technique is shown to be robust to noise, resonant constraints, and other interferences that exist in the neighborhood of the coils.

  12. Radioecology. Transfers of radioelements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulquier, L.

    2002-01-01

    The study of the cycle of radioelements in the environment requires the measurement of the radionuclides present in all parts of the ecosystems. The knowledge of the mechanisms of radioactive pollutant transfers and of the kinetics of the exchanges between a source term, the vectors and the constituents of the biosphere represents heart of the work of radio-ecologists. This article describes briefly the techniques used for the measurement of radionuclides in the environment and for the study of their physical dispersion mechanisms. Then, it treats more carefully of the transfer mechanisms in different environments: 1 - tools for the evaluation of transfers: metrology, atmospheric and liquid dispersion phenomena; 2 - processes of radioelement transfers: transfers in aquatic ecosystems, transfers in terrestrial environment. (J.S.)

  13. Gas transfer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberlin, J.C.; Frick, G.; Kempfer, C.; North, C.

    1988-09-01

    The state of work on the Vivitron gas transfer system and the system functions are summarized. The system has to: evacuate the Vivitron reservoir; transfer gas from storage tanks to the Vivitron; recirculate gas during operation; transfer gas from the Vivitron to storage tanks; and assure air input. The system is now being installed. Leak alarms are given by SF6 detectors, which set off a system of forced ventilation. Another system continuously monitors the amount of SF6 in the tanks [fr

  14. Transfer vibration through spine

    OpenAIRE

    Benyovszky, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Transfer Vibration through Spine Abstract In the bachelor project we deal with the topic of Transfer Vibration through Spine. The problem of TVS is trying to be solved by the critical review method. We analyse some diagnostic methods and methods of treatment based on this principle. Close attention is paid to the method of Transfer Vibration through Spine that is being currently solved by The Research Institute of Thermomechanics in The Czech Academy of Sciences in cooperation with Faculty of...

  15. Nonparametric Transfer Function Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun M.; Chen, Rong; Yao, Qiwei

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a class of nonparametric transfer function models is proposed to model nonlinear relationships between ‘input’ and ‘output’ time series. The transfer function is smooth with unknown functional forms, and the noise is assumed to be a stationary autoregressive-moving average (ARMA) process. The nonparametric transfer function is estimated jointly with the ARMA parameters. By modeling the correlation in the noise, the transfer function can be estimated more efficiently. The parsimonious ARMA structure improves the estimation efficiency in finite samples. The asymptotic properties of the estimators are investigated. The finite-sample properties are illustrated through simulations and one empirical example. PMID:20628584

  16. Basic heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bacon, D H

    2013-01-01

    Basic Heat Transfer aims to help readers use a computer to solve heat transfer problems and to promote greater understanding by changing data values and observing the effects, which are necessary in design and optimization calculations.The book is concerned with applications including insulation and heating in buildings and pipes, temperature distributions in solids for steady state and transient conditions, the determination of surface heat transfer coefficients for convection in various situations, radiation heat transfer in grey body problems, the use of finned surfaces, and simple heat exc

  17. Containment condensing heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gido, R.G.; Koestel, A.

    1983-01-01

    This report presents a mechanistic heat-transfer model that is valid for large scale containment heat sinks. The model development is based on the determination that the condensation is controlled by mass diffusion through the vapor-air boundary layer, and the application of the classic Reynolds' analogy to formulate expressions for the transfer of heat and mass based on hydrodynamic measurements of the momentum transfer. As a result, the analysis depends on the quantification of the shear stress (momentum transfer) at the interface between the condensate film and the vapor-air boundary layer. In addition, the currently used Tagami and Uchida test observations and their range of applicability are explained

  18. Markers of protein oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Headlam, Henrietta A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Exposure of proteins to radicals in the presence of O2 gives both side-chain oxidation and backbone fragmentation. These processes can be interrelated, with initial side-chain oxidation giving rise to backbone damage via transfer reactions. We have shown previously that alkoxyl radicals formed...... of this process depends on the extent of oxidation at C-3 compared with other sites. HO*, generated by gamma radiolysis, gave the highest total carbonyl yield, with protein-bound carbonyls predominating over released. In contrast, metal ion/H2O2 systems, gave more released than bound carbonyls, with this ratio...... modulated by EDTA. This is ascribed to metal ion-protein interactions affecting the sites of initial oxidation. Hypochlorous acid gave low concentrations of released carbonyls, but high yields of protein-bound material. The peroxyl radical generator 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride...

  19. A Chip-Capillary Hybrid Device for Automated Transfer of Sample Pre-Separated by Capillary Isoelectric Focusing to Parallel Capillary Gel Electrophoresis for Two-Dimensional Protein Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Joann J.; Wang, Shili; Li, Guanbin; Wang, Wei; Pu, Qiaosheng; Liu, Shaorong

    2012-01-01

    In this report, we introduce a chip-capillary hybrid device to integrate capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF) with parallel capillary sodium dodecyl sulfate – polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) or capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) toward automating two-dimensional (2D) protein separations. The hybrid device consists of three chips that are butted together. The middle chip can be moved between two positions to re-route the fluidic paths, which enables the performance of CIEF and injection of proteins partially resolved by CIEF to CGE capillaries for parallel CGE separations in a continuous and automated fashion. Capillaries are attached to the other two chips to facilitate CIEF and CGE separations and to extend the effective lengths of CGE columns. Specifically, we illustrate the working principle of the hybrid device, develop protocols for producing and preparing the hybrid device, and demonstrate the feasibility of using this hybrid device for automated injection of CIEF-separated sample to parallel CGE for 2D protein separations. Potentials and problems associated with the hybrid device are also discussed. PMID:22830584

  20. Technology Transfer and Technology Transfer Intermediaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Stephen M.; Flagg, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    A standard and comprehensive model is needed to evaluate and compare technology transfer systems and the stakeholders within these systems. The principle systems considered include federal laboratories, U.S. universities, the rehabilitation engineering research centers (RERCs), and large small business innovation research programs. An earlier…

  1. Spectroscopic and molecular docking studies on the charge transfer complex of bovine serum albumin with quinone in aqueous medium and its influence on the ligand binding property of the protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satheshkumar, Angupillai; Elango, Kuppanagounder P.

    2014-09-01

    The spectral techniques such as UV-Vis, 1H NMR and fluorescence and electrochemical experiments have been employed to investigate the interaction between 2-methoxy-3,5,6-trichloro-1,4-benzoquinone (MQ; a water soluble quinone) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) in aqueous medium. The fluorescence of BSA was quenched by MQ via formation of a 1:1 BSA-MQ charge transfer adduct with a formation constant of 3.3 × 108 L mol-1. Based on the Forster’s theory the binding distance between them is calculated as 2.65 nm indicating high probability of binding. For the first time, influence of quinone on the binding property of various types of ligands such as aspirin, ascorbic acid, nicotinimide and sodium stearate has also been investigated. The results indicated that the strong and spontaneous binding existing between BSA and MQ, decreased the intensity of binding of these ligands with BSA. Since Tryptophan (Trp) is the basic residue present in BSA, a comparison between binding property of Trp-MQ adduct with that of BSA-MQ with these ligands has also been attempted. 1H NMR titration study indicated that the Trp forms a charge transfer complex with MQ, which reduces the interaction of Trp with the ligands. Molecular docking study supported the fact that the quinone interacts with the Trp212 unit of the BSA and the free energy change of binding (ΔG) for the BSA-MQ complex was found to be -46 kJ mol-1, which is comparable to our experimental free energy of binding (-49 kJ mol-1) obtained from fluorescence study.

  2. An Interdistrict Transfer Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Norman

    1975-01-01

    This testimony, before the May 1974 public hearings of the New York City Commission on Human Rights by the Administrator, Urban-Suburban Transfer Program and Inter district Transfer Program, West Irondequoit School District, New York, reviews a program which began with 25 minority group youngsters from one racially-imbalanced Rochester school…

  3. Transfer involving deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, J.O.; Guidry, M.W.; Canto, L.F.

    1985-03-01

    Results are reviewed of 1- and 2-neutron transfer reactions at near-barrier energies for deformed nuclei. Rotational angular momentum and excitation patterns are examined. A strong tendency to populating high spin states within a few MeV of the yrast line is noted, and it is interpreted as preferential transfer to rotation-aligned states. 16 refs., 12 figs

  4. Sustainable technology transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punter, H.T.; Krikhaar, R.L.; Bril, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    In this position paper we address the issue of transferring a technology from research into an industrial organization by presenting a refined process for technology transfer. Based on over two decades of industrial experience, we identified the need for a dedicated technology engineering phase for

  5. Adsorption and Interfacial Electron Transfer of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Boisen, Anja; Nielsen, Jens Ulrik

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the adsorption and electron-transfer dynamics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) iso-l-cytochrome c adsorbed on Au(lll) electrodes in aqueous phosphate buffer media. This cytochrome possesses a thiol group dos e to the protein surface (Cysl02) suitable for linking the protein...

  6. Protein function prediction using neighbor relativity in protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, Sobhan; Rahgozar, Masoud; Rahimi, Amir

    2013-04-01

    There is a large gap between the number of discovered proteins and the number of functionally annotated ones. Due to the high cost of determining protein function by wet-lab research, function prediction has become a major task for computational biology and bioinformatics. Some researches utilize the proteins interaction information to predict function for un-annotated proteins. In this paper, we propose a novel approach called "Neighbor Relativity Coefficient" (NRC) based on interaction network topology which estimates the functional similarity between two proteins. NRC is calculated for each pair of proteins based on their graph-based features including distance, common neighbors and the number of paths between them. In order to ascribe function to an un-annotated protein, NRC estimates a weight for each neighbor to transfer its annotation to the unknown protein. Finally, the unknown protein will be annotated by the top score transferred functions. We also investigate the effect of using different coefficients for various types of functions. The proposed method has been evaluated on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Homo sapiens interaction networks. The performance analysis demonstrates that NRC yields better results in comparison with previous protein function prediction approaches that utilize interaction network. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Radiative heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Modest, Michael F

    2013-01-01

    The third edition of Radiative Heat Transfer describes the basic physics of radiation heat transfer. The book provides models, methodologies, and calculations essential in solving research problems in a variety of industries, including solar and nuclear energy, nanotechnology, biomedical, and environmental. Every chapter of Radiative Heat Transfer offers uncluttered nomenclature, numerous worked examples, and a large number of problems-many based on real world situations-making it ideal for classroom use as well as for self-study. The book's 24 chapters cover the four major areas in the field: surface properties; surface transport; properties of participating media; and transfer through participating media. Within each chapter, all analytical methods are developed in substantial detail, and a number of examples show how the developed relations may be applied to practical problems. It is an extensive solution manual for adopting instructors. Features: most complete text in the field of radiative heat transfer;...

  8. Technology Transfer Issues and a New Technology Transfer Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hee Jun

    2009-01-01

    The following are major issues that should be considered for efficient and effective technology transfer: conceptions of technology, technological activity and transfer, communication channels, factors affecting transfer, and models of transfer. In particular, a well-developed model of technology transfer could be used as a framework for…

  9. Baculovirus-mediated gene transfer and recombinant protein expression do not interfere with insulin dependent phosphorylation of PKB/Akt in human SHSY-5Y and C3A cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selander Martin

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant adenovirus vectors and transfection agents comprising cationic lipids are widely used as gene delivery vehicles for functional expression in cultured cells. Consequently, these tools are utilized to investigate the effects of functional over-expression of proteins on insulin mediated events. However, we have previously reported that cationic lipid reagents cause a state of insulin unresponsiveness in cell cultures. In addition, we have found that cultured cells often do not respond to insulin stimulation following adenovirus treatment. Infection with adenovirus compromises vital functions of the host cell leading to the activation of protein kinases central to insulin signalling, such as protein kinase B/Akt. Therefore, we investigated the effect of adenovirus infection on insulin unresponsiveness by means of Akt activation in cultured cells. Moreover, we investigated the use of baculovirus as a heterologous viral gene delivery vehicle to circumvent these phenomena. Since the finding that baculovirus can efficiently transduce mammalian cells, the applications of this viral system in gene delivery has greatly expanded and one advantage is the virtual absence of cytotoxicity in mammalian cells. Results We show that infection of human neuroblastoma SHSY-5Y and liver C3A cells with recombinant adenovirus results in the activation of Akt in a dose dependent manner. In addition, this activation makes treated cells unresponsive to insulin stimulation as determined by an apparent lack of differential phosphorylation of Akt on serine-473. Our data further indicate that the use of recombinant baculovirus does not increase the phosphorylation of Akt in SHSY-5Y and C3A cells. Moreover, following infection with baculovirus, SHSY-5Y and C3A cells respond to insulin by means of phosphorylation of Akt on serine-473 in the same manner as uninfected cells. Conclusion Widely-used adenovirus vectors for gene delivery cause a state of

  10. Transfer of DNA from Bacteria to Eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Lacroix

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the members of the Agrobacterium genus have been considered the only bacterial species naturally able to transfer and integrate DNA into the genomes of their eukaryotic hosts. Yet, increasing evidence suggests that this ability to genetically transform eukaryotic host cells might be more widespread in the bacterial world. Indeed, analyses of accumulating genomic data reveal cases of horizontal gene transfer from bacteria to eukaryotes and suggest that it represents a significant force in adaptive evolution of eukaryotic species. Specifically, recent reports indicate that bacteria other than Agrobacterium, such as Bartonella henselae (a zoonotic pathogen, Rhizobium etli (a plant-symbiotic bacterium related to Agrobacterium, or even Escherichia coli, have the ability to genetically transform their host cells under laboratory conditions. This DNA transfer relies on type IV secretion systems (T4SSs, the molecular machines that transport macromolecules during conjugative plasmid transfer and also during transport of proteins and/or DNA to the eukaryotic recipient cells. In this review article, we explore the extent of possible transfer of genetic information from bacteria to eukaryotic cells as well as the evolutionary implications and potential applications of this transfer.

  11. Characterization of redox proteins using electrochemical methods

    OpenAIRE

    Verhagen, M.

    1995-01-01

    The use of electrochemical techniques in combination with proteins started approximately a decade ago and has since then developed into a powerfull technique for the study of small redox proteins. In addition to the determination of redox potentials, electrochemistry can be used to obtain information about the kinetics of electron transfer between proteins and about the dynamic behaviour of redox cofactors in proteins. This thesis describes the results of a study, initiated to get a ...

  12. Knowledge transfer isn’t simply transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dao, Li; Napier, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines micro dynamic aspects of knowledge sharing and learning in international joint venture settings. Learning of expatriate and local managers appears far more complex and mutually dependent than conventionally speculated in existing literature. The paper proposes that the effect ...... Danish and Vietnamese firms. The paper suggests that learning in IJVs, even in the context of one-way knowledge transfer from the foreign parent, should be managed in a mutual perspective and with thoughtful coordination of individual learning....... and outcome of knowledge transfer from joint venture parents and learning in IJVs are dependent on how individual managers (including both expatriate and local) learn, perceive their learning roles, and enact a learning agenda. Empirical evidence is drawn from two cases of international joint ventures between...

  13. Fluorescence energy transfer on erythrocyte membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, H.M.; Hof, M.; Lawaczeck, R.

    1995-08-01

    Stationary and time-dependent fluorescence have been measured for a donor/acceptor (DA) pair bound to membrane proteins of bovine erythrocyte ghosts. The donor N-(p-(2-benzoxazolyl)phenyl)-maleimid (BMI) and the acceptor fluram bind to SH- and NH 2 -residues, respectively. The fluorescence spectra and the time-dependent emission are consistent with a radiationless fluorescence energy transfer (RET). The density of RET-effective acceptor binding sites c=0.072 nm -2 was calculated on the basis of the two-dimensional Foerster-kinetic. Band3 protein is the only membrane spanning protein with accessible SH-groups, and therefore only effective binding sites on the band3 protein are counted for the RET measurements performed. (author). 23 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  14. Large momentum transfer phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imachi, Masahiro; Otsuki, Shoichiro; Matsuoka, Takeo; Sawada, Shoji.

    1978-01-01

    The large momentum transfer phenomena in hadron reaction drastically differ from small momentum transfer phenomena, and are described in this paper. Brief review on the features of the large transverse momentum transfer reactions is described in relation with two-body reactions, single particle productions, particle ratios, two jet structure, two particle correlations, jet production cross section, and the component of momentum perpendicular to the plane defined by the incident protons and the triggered pions and transverse momentum relative to jet axis. In case of two-body process, the exponent N of the power law of the differential cross section is a value between 10 to 11.5 in the large momentum transfer region. The breaks of the exponential behaviors into the power ones are observed at the large momentum transfer region. The break would enable to estimate the order of a critical length. The large momentum transfer phenomena strongly suggest an important role of constituents of hadrons in the hard region. Hard rearrangement of constituents from different initial hadrons induces large momentum transfer reactions. Several rules to count constituents in the hard region have been proposed so far to explain the power behavior. Scale invariant quark interaction and hard reactions are explained, and a summary of the possible types of hard subprocess is presented. (Kato, T.)

  15. Technology transfer 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    This document, Technology Transfer 94, is intended to communicate that there are many opportunities available to US industry and academic institutions to work with DOE and its laboratories and facilities in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. It has seven major sections: Introduction, Technology Transfer Activities, Access to Laboratories and Facilities, Laboratories and Facilities, DOE Office, Technologies, and an Index. Technology Transfer Activities highlights DOE`s recent developments in technology transfer and describes plans for the future. Access to Laboratories and Facilities describes the many avenues for cooperative interaction between DOE laboratories or facilities and industry, academia, and other government agencies. Laboratories and Facilities profiles the DOE laboratories and facilities involved in technology transfer and presents information on their missions, programs, expertise, facilities, and equipment, along with data on whom to contact for additional information on technology transfer. DOE Offices summarizes the major research and development programs within DOE. It also contains information on how to access DOE scientific and technical information. Technologies provides descriptions of some of the new technologies developed at DOE laboratories and facilities.

  16. Dexter energy transfer pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skourtis, Spiros S; Liu, Chaoren; Antoniou, Panayiotis; Virshup, Aaron M; Beratan, David N

    2016-07-19

    Energy transfer with an associated spin change of the donor and acceptor, Dexter energy transfer, is critically important in solar energy harvesting assemblies, damage protection schemes of photobiology, and organometallic opto-electronic materials. Dexter transfer between chemically linked donors and acceptors is bridge mediated, presenting an enticing analogy with bridge-mediated electron and hole transfer. However, Dexter coupling pathways must convey both an electron and a hole from donor to acceptor, and this adds considerable richness to the mediation process. We dissect the bridge-mediated Dexter coupling mechanisms and formulate a theory for triplet energy transfer coupling pathways. Virtual donor-acceptor charge-transfer exciton intermediates dominate at shorter distances or higher tunneling energy gaps, whereas virtual intermediates with an electron and a hole both on the bridge (virtual bridge excitons) dominate for longer distances or lower energy gaps. The effects of virtual bridge excitons were neglected in earlier treatments. The two-particle pathway framework developed here shows how Dexter energy-transfer rates depend on donor, bridge, and acceptor energetics, as well as on orbital symmetry and quantum interference among pathways.

  17. Soy protein and formulated meat products

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoogenkamp, Henk W

    2005-01-01

    ... vii About the Author Henk W. Hoogenkamp was born and raised in The Netherlands. Throughout his professional life he has been a proponent of transferring protein technology systems to the world's f...

  18. Malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD) is differentially regulated in subcellular compartments by 5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Studies using H9c2 cells overexpressing MCD and AMPK by adenoviral gene transfer technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambandam, Nandakumar; Steinmetz, Michael; Chu, Angel; Altarejos, Judith Y; Dyck, Jason R B; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2004-07-01

    Malonyl-CoA, a potent inhibitor of carnitine pamitoyl transferase-I (CPT-I), plays a pivotal role in fuel selection in cardiac muscle. Malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD) catalyzes the degradation of malonyl-CoA, removes a potent allosteric inhibition on CPT-I and thereby increases fatty acid oxidation in the heart. Although MCD has several Ser/Thr phosphorylation sites, whether it is regulated by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been controversial. We therefore overexpressed MCD (Ad.MCD) and constitutively active AMPK (Ad.CA-AMPK) in H9c2 cells, using an adenoviral gene delivery approach in order to examine if MCD is regulated by AMPK. Cells infected with Ad.CA-AMPK demonstrated a fourfold increase in AMPK activity as compared with control cells expressing green fluorescent protein (Ad.GFP). MCD activity increased 40- to 50-fold in Ad.MCD + Ad.GFP cells when compared with Ad.GFP control. Co-expressing AMPK with MCD further augmented MCD expression and activity in Ad.MCD + Ad.CA-AMPK cells compared with the Ad.MCD + Ad.GFP control. Subcellular fractionation further revealed that 54.7 kDa isoform of MCD expression was significantly higher in cytosolic fractions of Ad.MCD + Ad.CA-AMPK cells than of the Ad.MCD +Ad.GFP control. However, the MCD activities in cytosolic fractions were not different between the two groups. Interestingly, in the mitochondrial fractions, MCD activity significantly increased in Ad.MCD + Ad.CA-AMPK cells when compared with Ad.MCD + Ad.GFP cells. Using phosphoserine and phosphothreonine antibodies, no phosphorylation of MCD by AMPK was observed. The increase in MCD activity in mitochondria-rich fractions of Ad.MCD + Ad.CA-AMPK cells was accompanied by an increase in the level of the 50.7 kDa isoform of MCD protein in the mitochondria. This differential regulation of MCD expression and activity in the mitochondria by AMPK may potentially regulate malonyl-CoA levels at sites nearby CPT-I on the mitochondria.

  19. Fast multilevel radiative transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paletou, Frédéric; Léger, Ludovick

    2007-01-01

    The vast majority of recent advances in the field of numerical radiative transfer relies on approximate operator methods better known in astrophysics as Accelerated Lambda-Iteration (ALI). A superior class of iterative schemes, in term of rates of convergence, such as Gauss-Seidel and Successive Overrelaxation methods were therefore quite naturally introduced in the field of radiative transfer by Trujillo Bueno & Fabiani Bendicho (1995); it was thoroughly described for the non-LTE two-level atom case. We describe hereafter in details how such methods can be generalized when dealing with non-LTE unpolarised radiation transfer with multilevel atomic models, in monodimensional geometry.

  20. A heat transfer textbook

    CERN Document Server

    Lienhard, John H

    2011-01-01

    This introduction to heat transfer offers advanced undergraduate and graduate engineering students a solid foundation in the subjects of conduction, convection, radiation, and phase-change, in addition to the related topic of mass transfer. A staple of engineering courses around the world for more than three decades, it has been revised and updated regularly by the authors, a pair of recognized experts in the field. The text addresses the implications, limitations, and meanings of many aspects of heat transfer, connecting the subject to its real-world applications and developing students' ins

  1. Excavating a transfer tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    The transfer tunnel being dug here will take the 450 GeV beam from the SPS and inject it into the LHC where the beam energies will be increased to 7 TeV. In order to transfer this beam from the SPS to the LHC, two transfer tunnels are used to circulate the beams in opposite directions. When excavated, the accelerator components, including magnets, beam pipes and cryogenics will be installed and connected to both the SPS and LHC ready for operation to begin in 2008.

  2. [Countertransference in homoerotic transference].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junkert-Tress, B; Reister, G

    1995-01-01

    Until now psychoanalytic training and literature have hardly considered the transference love of homosexual patients. We summarized the scarce literature and related it to the background of our knowledge of heterosexual transference love. The discussion leaves no doubt that, like the heterosexual, homosexual transference love must be read on all levels of psychosexual development instead of reading it on only one and definitely not on an amorphous "preoedipal" level. This is particularly true for the level of the adult homosexual patient, as the case history demonstrates.

  3. Comparisons of power transfer functions and flow transfer functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1987-01-01

    Transfer functions may be used to calculate component feedbacks or temperature increments by convolution of the transfer function with the appropriate fractional change in system-quantity. Power-change transfer functions have been reported. The corresponding flow transfer functions for this case, and comparison with the power transfer functions, are reported here. Results of feedback simulation of ramped flow transients using flow transfer functions are also described

  4. Liquefied Natural Gas Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Chicago Bridge & Iron Company's tanks and associated piping are parts of system for transferring liquefied natural gas from ship to shore and storing it. LNG is a "cryogenic" fluid meaning that it must be contained and transferred at very low temperatures, about 260 degrees below Fahrenheit. Before the LNG can be pumped from the ship to the storage tanks, the two foot diameter transfer pipes must be cooled in order to avoid difficulties associated with sharp differences of temperature between the supercold fluid and relatively warm pipes. Cooldown is accomplished by sending small steady flow of the cryogenic substance through the pipeline; the rate of flow must be precisely controlled or the transfer line will be subjected to undesirable thermal stress.

  5. Industrial technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulger, W.

    1982-06-01

    The transfer of industrial technology is an essential part of the CANDU export marketing program. Potential customers require the opportunity to become self-sufficient in the supply of nuclear plant and equipment in the long term and they require local participation to the maximum extent possible. The Organization of CANDU Industries is working closely with Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. in developing comprehensive programs for the transfer of manufacturing technology. The objectives of this program are: 1) to make available to the purchasing country all nuclear component manufacturing technology that exists in Canada; and 2) to assure that the transfer of technology takes place in an efficient and effective way. Technology transfer agreements may be in the form of joint ventures or license agreements, depending upon the requirements of the recipient

  6. Fast multilevel radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paletou, Frederic; Leger, Ludovick

    2007-01-01

    The vast majority of recent advances in the field of numerical radiative transfer relies on approximate operator methods better known in astrophysics as Accelerated Lambda-Iteration (ALI). A superior class of iterative schemes, in term of rates of convergence, such as Gauss-Seidel and successive overrelaxation methods were therefore quite naturally introduced in the field of radiative transfer by Trujillo Bueno and Fabiani Bendicho [A novel iterative scheme for the very fast and accurate solution of non-LTE radiative transfer problems. Astrophys J 1995;455:646]; it was thoroughly described for the non-LTE two-level atom case. We describe hereafter in details how such methods can be generalized when dealing with non-LTE unpolarised radiation transfer with multilevel atomic models, in monodimensional geometry

  7. Technology transfer quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hood, F.C.

    1991-03-01

    The results of research conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the DOE are regularly transferred from the laboratory to the private sector. The principal focus of PNL is on environmental research and waste management technology; other programs of emphasis include molecular science research. The technology transfer process is predicated on Quality to achieve its objectives effectively. Total quality management (TQM) concepts and principles readily apply to the development and translation of new scientific concepts into commercial products. The concept of technology transfer epitomizes the TQM tenet of continuous improvement: always striving for a better way to do things and always satisfying the customer. A successful technology transfer process adds value to society by providing new or enhanced processes, products, and services to government and commercial customers, with a guarantee of product pedigree and process validity. 2 refs

  8. Analytical heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Je-Chin

    2012-01-01

    … it will complete my library … [and] complement the existing literature on heat transfer. It will be of value for both graduate students and faculty members.-Bengt Sunden, Lund University, Sweden

  9. Technology transfer for adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagini, Bonizella; Kuhl, Laura; Gallagher, Kelly Sims; Ortiz, Claudia

    2014-09-01

    Technology alone will not be able to solve adaptation challenges, but it is likely to play an important role. As a result of the role of technology in adaptation and the importance of international collaboration for climate change, technology transfer for adaptation is a critical but understudied issue. Through an analysis of Global Environment Facility-managed adaptation projects, we find there is significantly more technology transfer occurring in adaptation projects than might be expected given the pessimistic rhetoric surrounding technology transfer for adaptation. Most projects focused on demonstration and early deployment/niche formation for existing technologies rather than earlier stages of innovation, which is understandable considering the pilot nature of the projects. Key challenges for the transfer process, including technology selection and appropriateness under climate change, markets and access to technology, and diffusion strategies are discussed in more detail.