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Sample records for transduction pathways downstream

  1. Which downstream signal transduction pathway(s) of H-ras are necessary for the cellular response(s) to ionizing radiation? (Results of an astro research fellowship year)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudoltz, Marc S.; Muschel, Ruth J.; McKenna, W. Gillies

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Background: The H-ras oncogene encodes a protein which is an essential component of multiple downstream effector pathways required for induction of proliferation and differentiation. Ras plays a role in the control some of these signal transduction pathways, such as the MAP kinase pathway which controls gene expression and the Rac-Rho pathway which controls cell morphology. Previous work from our laboratory has associated H-ras expression with radiation resistance, a prolonged delay in G2 following exposure to ionizing radiation, and suppression of radiation-induced apoptosis. In addition, H-ras cooperates with myc in transformation. Recent work by White et al. (Cell 80:533-541, 1995) and Joneson et al. (Science 271: 810-812, 1996) describes three mutations in H-ras which were engineered to eliminate different downstream signal transduction pathways of H-ras. T35S contains a serine in place of threonine at amino acid 35 and is defective for ras-induced cytoskeletal changes and initiation of DNA synthesis. E37G contains a glutamic acid in place of glycine at amino acid 37 which eliminates interaction of H-ras with a GDP/GTP exchange factor. C40 contains a substitution of cysteine for tyrosine at amino acid 40 and is defective for H-ras induction of the MAP kinase pathway. We propose that by expressing these mutant H-ras proteins in immortalized cells the downstream pathways of H-ras which regulate the cellular response(s) to ionizing radiation may be determined. Materials and Methods: pHP-5 plasmids encoding these H-ras mutant genes (see White et al.) were transfected by calcium phosphate precipitation into MR4 cells, rat embryo fibroblasts immortalized by expression of v-myc. In this vector, the cDNA for H-ras is placed under the control of a CMV constitutive promoter, and selection is provided by hygromycin. The transfections performed were as follows: V12Ras (no mutation), T35S, E37G, C40, T35S + E37G, and T35S + C40. Twenty four hours after transfection

  2. Umami taste in mice uses multiple receptors and transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasumatsu, Keiko; Ogiwara, Yoko; Takai, Shingo; Yoshida, Ryusuke; Iwatsuki, Ken; Torii, Kunio; Margolskee, Robert F; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2012-03-01

    The distinctive umami taste elicited by l-glutamate and some other amino acids is thought to be initiated by G-protein-coupled receptors. Proposed umami receptors include heteromers of taste receptor type 1, members 1 and 3 (T1R1+T1R3), and metabotropic glutamate receptors 1 and 4 (mGluR1 and mGluR4). Multiple lines of evidence support the involvement of T1R1+T1R3 in umami responses of mice. Although several studies suggest the involvement of receptors other than T1R1+T1R3 in umami, the identity of those receptors remains unclear. Here, we examined taste responsiveness of umami-sensitive chorda tympani nerve fibres from wild-type mice and mice genetically lacking T1R3 or its downstream transduction molecule, the ion channel TRPM5. Our results indicate that single umami-sensitive fibres in wild-type mice fall into two major groups: sucrose-best (S-type) and monopotassium glutamate (MPG)-best (M-type). Each fibre type has two subtypes; one shows synergism between MPG and inosine monophosphate (S1, M1) and the other shows no synergism (S2, M2). In both T1R3 and TRPM5 null mice, S1-type fibres were absent, whereas S2-, M1- and M2-types remained. Lingual application of mGluR antagonists selectively suppressed MPG responses of M1- and M2-type fibres. These data suggest the existence of multiple receptors and transduction pathways for umami responses in mice. Information initiated from T1R3-containing receptors may be mediated by a transduction pathway including TRPM5 and conveyed by sweet-best fibres, whereas umami information from mGluRs may be mediated by TRPM5-independent pathway(s) and conveyed by glutamate-best fibres.

  3. Expression of the cholinergic signal-transduction pathway components during embryonic rat heart development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franco, D.; Moorman, A. F.; Lamers, W. H.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies showed that acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity is present in the downstream (arterial) part of the embryonic chick and rat heart, but its functional significance was unclear. To establish whether other components of a cholinergic signal-transduction pathway are present

  4. DMPD: LPS/TLR4 signal transduction pathway. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18304834 LPS/TLR4 signal transduction pathway. Lu YC, Yeh WC, Ohashi PS. Cytokine. ...2008 May;42(2):145-51. Epub 2008 Mar 4. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show LPS/TLR4 signal transduction path...way. PubmedID 18304834 Title LPS/TLR4 signal transduction pathway. Authors Lu YC, Yeh WC, Ohashi PS. Publica

  5. The SUMOylation Pathway Restricts Gene Transduction by Adeno-Associated Viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Hölscher

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Adeno-associated viruses are members of the genus dependoviruses of the parvoviridae family. AAV vectors are considered promising vectors for gene therapy and genetic vaccination as they can be easily produced, are highly stable and non-pathogenic. Nevertheless, transduction of cells in vitro and in vivo by AAV in the absence of a helper virus is comparatively inefficient requiring high multiplicity of infection. Several bottlenecks for AAV transduction have previously been described, including release from endosomes, nuclear transport and conversion of the single stranded DNA into a double stranded molecule. We hypothesized that the bottlenecks in AAV transduction are, in part, due to the presence of host cell restriction factors acting directly or indirectly on the AAV-mediated gene transduction. In order to identify such factors we performed a whole genome siRNA screen which identified a number of putative genes interfering with AAV gene transduction. A number of factors, yielding the highest scores, were identified as members of the SUMOylation pathway. We identified Ubc9, the E2 conjugating enzyme as well as Sae1 and Sae2, enzymes responsible for activating E1, as factors involved in restricting AAV. The restriction effect, mediated by these factors, was validated and reproduced independently. Our data indicate that SUMOylation targets entry of AAV capsids and not downstream processes of uncoating, including DNA single strand conversion or DNA damage signaling. We suggest that transiently targeting SUMOylation will enhance application of AAV in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Signaling transduction pathways involved in basophil adhesion and histamine release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sha, Quan; Poulsen, Lars K.; Gerwien, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about basophil with respect to the different signaling transduction pathways involved in spontaneous, cytokine or anti-IgE induced adhesion and how this compares to IgE-dependent and IgE-independent mediator secretion. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the roles ...... of beta1 and beta2 integrins in basophil adhesion as well as hosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), src-kinases and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 in basophil adhesion and histamine release (HR)....

  7. Sensors and signal transduction pathways in vertebrate cell volume regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else K; Pedersen, Stine F

    2006-01-01

    to the identification of transporter binding partners such as protein kinases and phosphatases, cytoskeletal elements and lipids. Considerable progress has also been made recently in understanding the upstream elements in volume sensing and volume-sensitive signal transduction, and salient features of these systems...... will be discussed. In contrast to the simple pathway of osmosensing in yeast, cells from vertebrate organisms appear to exhibit multiple volume sensing systems, the specific mechanism(s) activated being cell type- and stimulus-dependent. Candidate sensors include integrins and growth factor receptors, while other...

  8. Phosphoinositide signal transduction pathway in rat liver mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasupathy, K.; Krishna, M.; Bhattacharya, R.K.

    1997-01-01

    Phosphorylation of endogenous phospholipids of rat liver mitochondrial fractions with γ[ 32 P]ATP revealed formation of all the known inositol phospholipids, such as phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol phosphate and phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate. Additionally, a new inositol phospholipid was detected. Incorporation of [ 3 H]-labelled inositol followed a similar profile. Enzymatic experiments indicated that the new lipid could possibly be phosphatidylinositoltrisphosphate. The presence of phosphoinositides-generated second messengers such as diacylglycerol and inositol trisphosphate was also confirmed. Protein kinase C, which acts as mediator between second messengers and nuclear factors, was also found to be present in mitochondria in significant amount. These results suggest that phosphoinositide signal transduction pathway is operative in rat liver mitochondria. (author)

  9. Targeting pathways downstream of KRAS in lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zehua; Golay, Hadrien G; Barbie, David A

    2014-08-01

    Oncogenic KRAS activation is responsible for the most common genetic subtype of lung cancer. Although many of the major downstream signaling pathways that KRAS engages have been defined, these discoveries have yet to translate into effective targeted therapy. Much of the current focus has been directed at inhibiting the activation of RAF/MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling, but clinical trials combining multiple different agents that target these pathways have failed to show significant activity. In this article, we will discuss the evidence for RAF and PI3K as key downstream RAS effectors, as well as the RAL guanine exchange factor, which is equally essential for transformation. Furthermore, we will delineate alternative pathways, including cytokine activation and autophagy, which are co-opted by oncogenic RAS signaling and also represent attractive targets for therapy. Finally, we will present strategies for combining inhibitors of these downstream KRAS signaling pathways in a rational fashion, as multitargeted therapy will be required to achieve a cure.

  10. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chory, Joanne

    2004-12-31

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  11. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chory, Joanne

    2006-01-16

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  12. New insights into transduction pathways that regulate boar sperm function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado de Llera, A; Martin-Hidalgo, D; Gil, M C; Garcia-Marin, L J; Bragado, M J

    2016-01-01

    Detailed molecular mechanisms mediating signal transduction cascades that regulate boar sperm function involving Ser/Thr and tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins have been reviewed previously. Therefore, this review will focus in those kinase pathways identified recently (functional spermatozoa processes. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a cell energy sensor kinase that was first identified in mammalian spermatozoa in 2012, and since then it has emerged as an essential regulator of boar sperm function. Signaling pathways leading to AMPK activation in boar sperm are highlighted in this review (PKA, CaMKKα/β, and PKC as well as Ca(2+) and cAMP messengers as upstream regulators). Interestingly, stimuli considered as cell stress (hyperosmotic stress, inhibition of mitochondrial activity, absence of intracellular Ca(2+)) markedly activate AMPK in boar spermatozoa. Moreover, AMPK plays a remarkable and necessary regulatory role in mammalian sperm function, controlling essential boar sperm functional processes such as motility, viability, mitochondrial membrane potential, organization and fluidity of plasma membrane, and outer acrosome membrane integrity. These mentioned processes are all required under fluctuating environment of spermatozoa when transiting through the female reproductive tract to achieve fertilization. An applied role of AMPK in artificial insemination techniques is also suggested as during boar seminal doses preservation at 17 °C, physiological levels of AMPK activity markedly increase (maximum on Day 7) and result essential to maintain the aforementioned fundamental sperm processes. Moreover, regulation of sperm function exerted by the glycogen synthase kinase 3 and Src family kinase pathways is summarized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cell type specificity of signaling: view from membrane receptors distribution and their downstream transduction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ying; Yu, Zhonghao; Ge, Dongya; Wang-Sattler, Rui; Thiesen, Hans-Jürgen; Xie, Lu; Li, Yixue

    2012-09-01

    Studies on cell signaling pay more attention to spatial dynamics and how such diverse organization can relate to high order of cellular capabilities. To overview the specificity of cell signaling, we integrated human receptome data with proteome spatial expression profiles to systematically investigate the specificity of receptors and receptor-triggered transduction networks across 62 normal cell types and 14 cancer types. Six percent receptors showed cell-type-specific expression, and 4% signaling networks presented enriched cell-specific proteins induced by the receptors. We introduced a concept of "response context" to annotate the cell-type dependent signaling networks. We found that most cells respond similarly to the same stimulus, as the "response contexts" presented high functional similarity. Despite this, the subtle spatial diversity can be observed from the difference in network architectures. The architecture of the signaling networks in nerve cells displayed less completeness than that in glandular cells, which indicated cellular-context dependent signaling patterns are elaborately spatially organized. Likewise, in cancer cells most signaling networks were generally dysfunctional and less complete than that in normal cells. However, glioma emerged hyper-activated transduction mechanism in malignant state. Receptor ATP6AP2 and TNFRSF21 induced rennin-angiotensin and apoptosis signaling were found likely to explain the glioma-specific mechanism. This work represents an effort to decipher context-specific signaling network from spatial dimension. Our results indicated that although a majority of cells engage general signaling response with subtle differences, the spatial dynamics of cell signaling can not only deepen our insights into different signaling mechanisms, but also help understand cell signaling in disease.

  14. Creating and analyzing pathway and protein interaction compendia for modelling signal transduction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirouac Daniel C

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the information-processing capabilities of signal transduction networks, how those networks are disrupted in disease, and rationally designing therapies to manipulate diseased states require systematic and accurate reconstruction of network topology. Data on networks central to human physiology, such as the inflammatory signalling networks analyzed here, are found in a multiplicity of on-line resources of pathway and interactome databases (Cancer CellMap, GeneGo, KEGG, NCI-Pathway Interactome Database (NCI-PID, PANTHER, Reactome, I2D, and STRING. We sought to determine whether these databases contain overlapping information and whether they can be used to construct high reliability prior knowledge networks for subsequent modeling of experimental data. Results We have assembled an ensemble network from multiple on-line sources representing a significant portion of all machine-readable and reconcilable human knowledge on proteins and protein interactions involved in inflammation. This ensemble network has many features expected of complex signalling networks assembled from high-throughput data: a power law distribution of both node degree and edge annotations, and topological features of a “bow tie” architecture in which diverse pathways converge on a highly conserved set of enzymatic cascades focused around PI3K/AKT, MAPK/ERK, JAK/STAT, NFκB, and apoptotic signaling. Individual pathways exhibit “fuzzy” modularity that is statistically significant but still involving a majority of “cross-talk” interactions. However, we find that the most widely used pathway databases are highly inconsistent with respect to the actual constituents and interactions in this network. Using a set of growth factor signalling networks as examples (epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor-beta, tumor necrosis factor, and wingless, we find a multiplicity of network topologies in which receptors couple to downstream

  15. Analysis of diverse signal transduction pathways using the genetic model system Caenorhabditis elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moorman, Celine

    2003-01-01

    Signal transduction allows cells to respond to signals from their environment and is therefore important for most biological processes. The binding of an extracellular signalling molecule to a cell-surface receptor is the first step in most signal transduction pathways. Cell-surface receptors

  16. DMPD: Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of CpG DNA withToll-like receptor 9. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14751759 Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of CpG DNA withTo...;16(1):17-22. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of... CpG DNA withToll-like receptor 9. PubmedID 14751759 Title Signal transduction pathways

  17. Characterization of the ABA signal transduction pathway in Vitis vinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boneh, Uri; Biton, Iris; Schwartz, Amnon; Ben-Ari, Giora

    2012-05-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates many key processes in plants including the response to abiotic stress. ABA signal transduction consists of a double-negative regulatory mechanism, whereby ABA-bound PYR/RCARs inhibit PP2C activity, and PP2Cs inactivate SnRK2s. We studied and analyzed the various genes participating in the ABA signaling cascade of the grape (Vitis vinifera). The grape ABA signal transduction consists of at least six SnRK2s. Yeast two-hybrid system was used to test direct interactions between core components of grape ABA signal transduction. We found that a total of forty eight interactions can occur between the various components. Exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) and abiotic stresses such as drought, high salt concentration and cold, were applied to vines growing in a hydroponic system. These stresses regulated the expression of various grape SnRK2s as well as ABFs in leaves and roots. Based on the interactions between SnRK2s and its targets and the expression pattern, we suggest that VvSnRK2.1 and VvSnRK2.6, can be considered the major VvSnRK2 candidates involved in the stomata response to abiotic stress. Furthermore, we found that the expression pattern of the two grape ABF genes indicates organ specificity of these genes. The key role of ABA signaling in response to abiotic stresses makes the genes involve in this signaling potential candidates for manipulation in programs designed to improve fruit tree performance in extreme environments. © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mitogen Activated Protein kinase signal transduction pathways in the prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koul Sweaty

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The biochemistry of the mitogen activated protein kinases ERK, JNK, and p38 have been studied in prostate physiology in an attempt to elucidate novel mechanisms and pathways for the treatment of prostatic disease. We reviewed articles examining mitogen-activated protein kinases using prostate tissue or cell lines. As with other tissue types, these signaling modules are links/transmitters for important pathways in prostate cells that can result in cellular survival or apoptosis. While the activation of the ERK pathway appears to primarily result in survival, the roles of JNK and p38 are less clear. Manipulation of these pathways could have important implications for the treatment of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hypertrophy.

  19. Robustness and fragility in the yeast high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) signal-transduction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, Marcus; Ahmadpour, Doryaneh; Ottosson, Lars-Göran; Warringer, Jonas; Waltermann, Christian; Nordlander, Bodil; Klipp, Edda; Blomberg, Anders; Hohmann, Stefan; Kitano, Hiroaki

    2009-01-01

    Cellular signalling networks integrate environmental stimuli with the information on cellular status. These networks must be robust against stochastic fluctuations in stimuli as well as in the amounts of signalling components. Here, we challenge the yeast HOG signal-transduction pathway with systematic perturbations in components' expression levels under various external conditions in search for nodes of fragility. We observe a substantially higher frequency of fragile nodes in this signal-transduction pathway than that has been observed for other cellular processes. These fragilities disperse without any clear pattern over biochemical functions or location in pathway topology and they are largely independent of pathway activation by external stimuli. However, the strongest toxicities are caused by pathway hyperactivation. In silico analysis highlights the impact of model structure on in silico robustness, and suggests complex formation and scaffolding as important contributors to the observed fragility patterns. Thus, in vivo robustness data can be used to discriminate and improve mathematical models.

  20. DMPD: When signaling pathways collide: positive and negative regulation of toll-likereceptor signal transduction. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18631453 When signaling pathways collide: positive and negative regulation of toll-...uction. PubmedID 18631453 Title When signaling pathways collide: positive and neg...l) Show When signaling pathways collide: positive and negative regulation of toll-likereceptor signal transd...likereceptor signal transduction. O'Neill LA. Immunity. 2008 Jul 18;29(1):12-20. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csm

  1. Effects of matrine on JAK-STAT signaling transduction pathways in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current study aims to investigate the effects of matrine on the JAK-STAT signaling transduction pathways in bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis (PF) and to explore its action mechanism. A total of 72 male C57BL/6 mice were randomized into the control, model, and treatment groups. PF models were ...

  2. The Drosophila rolled locus encodes a MAP kinase required in the sevenless signal transduction pathway.

    OpenAIRE

    Biggs, W H; Zavitz, K H; Dickson, B; van der Straten, A; Brunner, D; Hafen, E; Zipursky, S L

    1994-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases have been proposed to play a critical role in receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-mediated signal transduction pathways. Although genetic and biochemical studies of RTK pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster and mammals have revealed remarkable similarities, a genetic requirement for MAP kinases in RTK signaling has not been established. During retinal development in Drosophila, the sevenless (Sev) RTK is required for development of the ...

  3. Multiple sweet receptors and transduction pathways revealed in knockout mice by temperature dependence and gurmarin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkuri, Tadahiro; Yasumatsu, Keiko; Horio, Nao; Jyotaki, Masafumi; Margolskee, Robert F; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2009-04-01

    Sweet taste transduction involves taste receptor type 1, member 2 (T1R2), taste receptor type 1, member 3 (T1R3), gustducin, and TRPM5. Because knockout (KO) mice lacking T1R3, gustducin's Galpha subunit (Galphagust), or TRPM5 exhibited greatly reduced, but not abolished responses of the chorda tympani (CT) nerve to sweet compounds, it is likely that multiple sweet transduction pathways exist. That gurmarin (Gur), a sweet taste inhibitor, inhibits some but not all mouse CT responses to sweet compounds supports the existence of multiple sweet pathways. Here, we investigated Gur inhibition of CT responses to sweet compounds as a function of temperature in KO mice lacking T1R3, Galphagust, or TRPM5. In T1R3-KO mice, responses to sucrose and glucose were Gur sensitive (GS) and displayed a temperature-dependent increase (TDI). In Galphagust-KO mice, responses to sucrose and glucose were Gur-insensitive (GI) and showed a TDI. In TRPM5-KO mice, responses to glucose were GS and showed a TDI. All three KO mice exhibited no detectable responses to SC45647, and their responses to saccharin displayed neither GS nor a TDI. For all three KO mice, the lingual application of pronase, another sweet response inhibitor, almost fully abolished responses to sucrose and glucose but did not affect responses to saccharin. These results provide evidence for 1) the existence of multiple transduction pathways underlying responses to sugars: a T1R3-independent GS pathway for sucrose and glucose, and a TRPM5-independent temperature sensitive GS pathway for glucose; 2) the requirement for Galphagust in GS sweet taste responses; and 3) the existence of a sweet independent pathway for saccharin, in mouse taste cells on the anterior tongue.

  4. Pharmacological analysis of feeding in a caterpillar: different transduction pathways for umami and saccharin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pszczolkowski, Maciej A.; Durden, Kevin; Marquis, Juleah; Ramaswamy, Sonny B.; Brown, John J.

    2009-05-01

    Neonate larvae of codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), modify their behavior in the presence of saccharin, monosodium glutamate (MSG), or L(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (L-AP4) by commencing their feeding earlier. Previously published pharmacological analysis demonstrated that phagostimulatory effects of MSG and L-AP4 (which elicit umami taste sensation in humans) are reversed by adenylate cyclase activator and phosphodiesterase inhibitor. In this study, by measuring the time needed to start ingestion of foliage treated with mixtures of phagostimulants and signal transduction modulators, we show that phagostimulatory effects of l-aspartate (the third hallmark umami substance) are also abolished by both adenylate cyclase activator and phosphodiesterase inhibitor, but not by phospholipase C inhibitor. However, stimulatory effects of hemicalcium saccharin were affected only by phospholipase C inhibitor. The results suggest that codling moth neonates use different transduction pathways for perception of hemicalcium saccharin and umami.

  5. Jasmonates differentially affect interconnected signal-transduction pathways of Pieris rapae-induced defenses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoeren, T.A.L.; Broekgaarden, C.; Dicke, M.

    2011-01-01

    The jasmonic acid (JA) pathway is the main signal-transduction pathway induced by insect folivory. Mutant plants affected in the jasmonate pathway (18:0 and/or 16:0-oxylipin routes) were studied to assess the effects of JA and its oxylipin intermediates 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA) and dinor-OPDA

  6. The ubiquitin–proteasome system and signal transduction pathways regulating Epithelial Mesenchymal transition of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voutsadakis Ioannis A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Epithelial to Mesenchymal transition (EMT in cancer, a process permitting cancer cells to become mobile and metastatic, has a signaling hardwire forged from development. Multiple signaling pathways that regulate carcinogenesis enabling characteristics in neoplastic cells such as proliferation, resistance to apoptosis and angiogenesis are also the main players in EMT. These pathways, as almost all cellular processes, are in their turn regulated by ubiquitination and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System (UPS. Ubiquitination is the covalent link of target proteins with the small protein ubiquitin and serves as a signal to target protein degradation by the proteasome or to other outcomes such as endocytosis, degradation by the lysosome or specification of cellular localization. This paper reviews signal transduction pathways regulating EMT and being regulated by ubiquitination.

  7. A computational approach for ordering signal transduction pathway components from genomics and proteomics Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Hongyu

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal transduction is one of the most important biological processes by which cells convert an external signal into a response. Novel computational approaches to mapping proteins onto signaling pathways are needed to fully take advantage of the rapid accumulation of genomic and proteomics information. However, despite their importance, research on signaling pathways reconstruction utilizing large-scale genomics and proteomics information has been limited. Results We have developed an approach for predicting the order of signaling pathway components, assuming all the components on the pathways are known. Our method is built on a score function that integrates protein-protein interaction data and microarray gene expression data. Compared to the individual datasets, either protein interactions or gene transcript abundance measurements, the integrated approach leads to better identification of the order of the pathway components. Conclusions As demonstrated in our study on the yeast MAPK signaling pathways, the integration analysis of high-throughput genomics and proteomics data can be a powerful means to infer the order of pathway components, enabling the transformation from molecular data into knowledge of cellular mechanisms.

  8. Non Linear Programming (NLP formulation for quantitative modeling of protein signal transduction pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Mitsos

    Full Text Available Modeling of signal transduction pathways plays a major role in understanding cells' function and predicting cellular response. Mathematical formalisms based on a logic formalism are relatively simple but can describe how signals propagate from one protein to the next and have led to the construction of models that simulate the cells response to environmental or other perturbations. Constrained fuzzy logic was recently introduced to train models to cell specific data to result in quantitative pathway models of the specific cellular behavior. There are two major issues in this pathway optimization: i excessive CPU time requirements and ii loosely constrained optimization problem due to lack of data with respect to large signaling pathways. Herein, we address both issues: the former by reformulating the pathway optimization as a regular nonlinear optimization problem; and the latter by enhanced algorithms to pre/post-process the signaling network to remove parts that cannot be identified given the experimental conditions. As a case study, we tackle the construction of cell type specific pathways in normal and transformed hepatocytes using medium and large-scale functional phosphoproteomic datasets. The proposed Non Linear Programming (NLP formulation allows for fast optimization of signaling topologies by combining the versatile nature of logic modeling with state of the art optimization algorithms.

  9. Non Linear Programming (NLP) formulation for quantitative modeling of protein signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsos, Alexander; Melas, Ioannis N; Morris, Melody K; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Alexopoulos, Leonidas G

    2012-01-01

    Modeling of signal transduction pathways plays a major role in understanding cells' function and predicting cellular response. Mathematical formalisms based on a logic formalism are relatively simple but can describe how signals propagate from one protein to the next and have led to the construction of models that simulate the cells response to environmental or other perturbations. Constrained fuzzy logic was recently introduced to train models to cell specific data to result in quantitative pathway models of the specific cellular behavior. There are two major issues in this pathway optimization: i) excessive CPU time requirements and ii) loosely constrained optimization problem due to lack of data with respect to large signaling pathways. Herein, we address both issues: the former by reformulating the pathway optimization as a regular nonlinear optimization problem; and the latter by enhanced algorithms to pre/post-process the signaling network to remove parts that cannot be identified given the experimental conditions. As a case study, we tackle the construction of cell type specific pathways in normal and transformed hepatocytes using medium and large-scale functional phosphoproteomic datasets. The proposed Non Linear Programming (NLP) formulation allows for fast optimization of signaling topologies by combining the versatile nature of logic modeling with state of the art optimization algorithms.

  10. Evolution of multiple phosphodiesterase isoforms in stickleback involved in cAMP signal transduction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yukuto; Hashiguchi, Yasuyuki; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2009-02-20

    Duplicate genes are considered to have evolved through the partitioning of ancestral functions among duplicates (subfunctionalization) and/or the acquisition of novel functions from a beneficial mutation (neofunctionalization). Additionally, an increase in gene dosage resulting from duplication may also confer an advantageous effect, as has been suggested for histone, tRNA, and rRNA genes. Currently, there is little understanding of the effect of increased gene dosage on subcellular networks like signal transduction pathways. Addressing this issue may provide further insights into the evolution by gene duplication. We analyzed the evolution of multiple stickleback phosphodiesterase (PDE, EC: 3.1.4.17) 1C genes involved in the cyclic nucleotide signaling pathway. Stickleback has 8-9 copies of this gene, whereas only one or two loci exist in other model vertebrates. Our phylogenetic and synteny analyses suggested that the multiple PDE1C genes in stickleback were generated by repeated duplications of >100-kbp chromosome segments. Sequence evolution analysis did not provide strong evidence for neofunctionalization in the coding sequences of stickleback PDE1C isoforms. On the other hand, gene expression analysis suggested that the derived isoforms acquired expression in new organs, implying their neofunctionalization in terms of expression patterns. In addition, at least seven isoforms of the stickleback PDE1C were co-expressed with olfactory-type G-proteins in the nose, suggesting that PDE1C dosage is increased in the stickleback olfactory transduction (OT) pathway. In silico simulations of OT implied that the increased PDE1C dosage extends the longevity of the depolarization signals of the olfactory receptor neuron. The predicted effect of the increase in PDE1C products on the OT pathway may play an important role in stickleback behavior and ecology. However, this possibility should be empirically examined. Our analyses imply that an increase in gene product sometimes

  11. Evolution of multiple phosphodiesterase isoforms in stickleback involved in cAMP signal transduction pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishida Mutsumi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duplicate genes are considered to have evolved through the partitioning of ancestral functions among duplicates (subfunctionalization and/or the acquisition of novel functions from a beneficial mutation (neofunctionalization. Additionally, an increase in gene dosage resulting from duplication may also confer an advantageous effect, as has been suggested for histone, tRNA, and rRNA genes. Currently, there is little understanding of the effect of increased gene dosage on subcellular networks like signal transduction pathways. Addressing this issue may provide further insights into the evolution by gene duplication. Results We analyzed the evolution of multiple stickleback phosphodiesterase (PDE, EC: 3.1.4.17 1C genes involved in the cyclic nucleotide signaling pathway. Stickleback has 8–9 copies of this gene, whereas only one or two loci exist in other model vertebrates. Our phylogenetic and synteny analyses suggested that the multiple PDE1C genes in stickleback were generated by repeated duplications of >100-kbp chromosome segments. Sequence evolution analysis did not provide strong evidence for neofunctionalization in the coding sequences of stickleback PDE1C isoforms. On the other hand, gene expression analysis suggested that the derived isoforms acquired expression in new organs, implying their neofunctionalization in terms of expression patterns. In addition, at least seven isoforms of the stickleback PDE1C were co-expressed with olfactory-type G-proteins in the nose, suggesting that PDE1C dosage is increased in the stickleback olfactory transduction (OT pathway. In silico simulations of OT implied that the increased PDE1C dosage extends the longevity of the depolarization signals of the olfactory receptor neuron. Conclusion The predicted effect of the increase in PDE1C products on the OT pathway may play an important role in stickleback behavior and ecology. However, this possibility should be empirically examined. Our

  12. [Progress on Hedgehog signaling transduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ying; Cheng, Steven

    2014-08-25

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays an important role during embryonic development and pattern formation. Disruption of Hh pathway results in various developmental disorders and increasing cancer incidence. Here we provide a comprehensive review of the pathway members, focusing on how mammalian Hh regulates the Gli family of transcription factors through its downstream members, the so-called "canonical signaling pathway". Hh signaling pathway is highly conserved among species, and primary cilia plays an important role as a "signaling center" during vertebrate signal transduction. Further, in the past few years, numerous studies have shown that Hh signal can also be transduced through Gli-independent ways collectively referred to as "non-canonical signaling pathways", which can be subdivided into two modules: (i) those not requiring Smo and (ii) those downstream of Smo that do not require Gli transcription factors. Thus, we review the rapid progress on canonical and non-canonical Hh pathways.

  13. Developing Itô stochastic differential equation models for neuronal signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Tiina; Linne, Marja-Leena; Ruohonen, Keijo

    2006-08-01

    Mathematical modeling and simulation of dynamic biochemical systems are receiving considerable attention due to the increasing availability of experimental knowledge of complex intracellular functions. In addition to deterministic approaches, several stochastic approaches have been developed for simulating the time-series behavior of biochemical systems. The problem with stochastic approaches, however, is the larger computational time compared to deterministic approaches. It is therefore necessary to study alternative ways to incorporate stochasticity and to seek approaches that reduce the computational time needed for simulations, yet preserve the characteristic behavior of the system in question. In this work, we develop a computational framework based on the Itô stochastic differential equations for neuronal signal transduction networks. There are several different ways to incorporate stochasticity into deterministic differential equation models and to obtain Itô stochastic differential equations. Two of the developed models are found most suitable for stochastic modeling of neuronal signal transduction. The best models give stable responses which means that the variances of the responses with time are not increasing and negative concentrations are avoided. We also make a comparative analysis of different kinds of stochastic approaches, that is the Itô stochastic differential equations, the chemical Langevin equation, and the Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm. Different kinds of stochastic approaches can be used to produce similar responses for the neuronal protein kinase C signal transduction pathway. The fine details of the responses vary slightly, depending on the approach and the parameter values. However, when simulating great numbers of chemical species, the Gillespie algorithm is computationally several orders of magnitude slower than the Itô stochastic differential equations and the chemical Langevin equation. Furthermore, the chemical

  14. Identification of signal transduction pathways used by orphan g protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresnick, Janine N; Skynner, Heather A; Chapman, Kerry L; Jack, Andrew D; Zamiara, Elize; Negulescu, Paul; Beaumont, Kevin; Patel, Smita; McAllister, George

    2003-04-01

    The superfamily of GPCRs have diverse biological roles, transducing signals from a range of stimuli, from photon recognition by opsins to neurotransmitter regulation of neuronal function. Of the many identified genes encoding GPCRs, >130 are orphan receptors ( i.e., their endogenous ligands are unknown), and this subset represents putative novel therapeutic targets for pharmaceutical intervention in a variety of diseases. As an initial step toward drug discovery, determining a biological function for these newly identified receptors is of vital importance, and thus identification of a natural ligand(s) is a primary aim. There are several established methods for doing this, but many have drawbacks and usually require some in-depth knowledge about how the receptor functions. The technique described here utilizes a transcription-based reporter assay in live cells. This allows the determination of the signal transduction pathway any given oGPCR uses, without any prior knowledge of the endogenous ligand. This can therefore reduce the redundancy of effort involved in screening ligands at a given receptor in multiple formats (i.e., Galpha(s), Galpha(i/0), and Galpha(q) assays), as well as ensuring that the receptor targeted is capable of signaling if appropriately activated. Such knowledge is often laboriously obtained, and for almost all oGPCRs, this kind of information is not yet available. This technology can also be used to develop inverse agonist as well as agonist sensitive high throughput assays for oGPCRs. The veracity of this approach is demonstrated, using a number of known GPCRs. The likely signaling pathways of the GPR3, GPR12, GPR19, GPR21, and HG55 oGPCRs are shown, and a high throughput assay for GPR26 receptors developed. The methods outlined here for elucidation of the signal transduction pathways for oGPCRs and development of functional assays should speed up the process of identification of ligands for this potentially therapeutically useful group of

  15. Targeting specific cell signaling transduction pathways by dietary and medicinal phytochemicals in cancer chemoprevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neergheen, Vidushi S.; Bahorun, Theeshan; Taylor, Ethan Will; Jen, Ling-Sun; Aruoma, Okezie I.

    2010-01-01

    Natural phytochemicals derived from dietary sources or medicinal plants have gained significant recognition in the potential management of several human clinical conditions. Much research has also been geared towards the evaluation of plant extracts as effective prophylactic agents since they can act on specific and/or multiple molecular and cellular targets. Plants have been an abundant source of highly effective phytochemicals which offer great potential in the fight against cancer by inhibiting the process of carcinogenesis through the upregulation of cytoprotective genes that encode for carcinogen detoxifying enzymes and antioxidant enzymes. The mechanistic insight into chemoprevention further includes induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis or inhibition of signal transduction pathways mainly the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), protein kinases C (PKC), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), glycogen synthase kinase (GSK) which lead to abnormal cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), activator protein-1 (AP-1), nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and c-myc expression. Effectiveness of chemopreventive agents reflects their ability to counteract certain upstream signals that leads to genotoxic damage, redox imbalances and other forms of cellular stress. Targeting malfunctioning molecules along the disrupted signal transduction pathway in cancer represent a rational strategy in chemoprevention. NF-κB and AP-1 provide mechanistic links between inflammation and cancer, and moreover regulate tumor angiogenesis and invasiveness, indicating that signaling pathways that mediate their activation provide attractive targets for new chemotherapeutic approaches. Thus cell signaling cascades and their interacting factors have become important targets of chemoprevention and phenolic phytochemicals and plant extracts seem to be promising in this endeavor.

  16. Elucidation of the Signal Transduction Pathways Activated by the Plant Natriuretic Peptide AtPNP-A

    KAUST Repository

    Turek, Ilona

    2014-11-01

    Plant natriuretic peptides (PNPs) comprise a novel class of hormones that share some sequence similarity in the active site with their animal analogues that function as regulators of salt and water balance. A PNP present in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPNP-A) has been assigned a role in abiotic and biotic stress responses, and the recombinant protein has been demonstrated to elicit cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent stomatal guard cell opening, regulate ion movements, and induce osmoticum-dependent water uptake. Although the importance of the hormone in maintaining ion and fluid homeostasis has been established, key components of the AtPNP-A-dependent signal transduction pathway remain unknown. Since identification of the binding partners of AtPNP-A, including its receptor(s), is fundamental to understanding the mode of its action at the molecular level, comprehensive protein-protein interaction studies, involving yeast two-hybrid screening, affinity-based assays, protein cross-linking and co-immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometric (MS) analyses have been performed. Several candidate binding partners of AtPNP-A identified with at least two independent methods were subsequently expressed as recombinant proteins, purified, and the specificity of their interactions with the recombinant AtPNP-A was verified using surface plasmon resonance. Several specific binary interactants of AtPNP-A were subjected to functional assays aimed at unraveling the consequences of the interactions in planta. These experiments have revealed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are novel secondary messengers involved in the transduction of AtPNP-A signal in suspension-cultured cells of A. thaliana (Col-0). Further insight into the AtPNP-A dependent signalling events occurring in suspension-cultured cells in ROS-dependent or ROS-independent manner have been obtained from the large-scale proteomics study employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labelling followed by MS analysis to

  17. DMPD: Toll-like receptor signal transduction. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17934330 Toll-like receptor signal transduction. Krishnan J, Selvarajoo K, Tsuchiya... M, Lee G, Choi S. Exp Mol Med. 2007 Aug 31;39(4):421-38. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Toll-like receptor sign...al transduction. PubmedID 17934330 Title Toll-like receptor signal transduction. Authors Krishnan J,

  18. Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction in the ICE-CBF-COR Signaling Pathway during Cold Stress in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Da-Zhi; Jin, Ya-Nan; Ding, Xi-Han; Wang, Wen-Jia; Zhai, Shan-Shan; Bai, Li-Ping; Guo, Zhi-Fu

    2017-10-01

    Low temperature is an abiotic stress that adversely affects the growth and production of plants. Resistance and adaptation of plants to cold stress is dependent upon the activation of molecular networks and pathways involved in signal transduction and the regulation of cold-stress related genes. Because it has numerous and complex genes, regulation factors, and pathways, research on the ICE-CBF-COR signaling pathway is the most studied and detailed, which is thought to be rather important for cold resistance of plants. In this review, we focus on the function of each member, interrelation among members, and the influence of manipulators and repressors in the ICE-CBF-COR pathway. In addition, regulation and signal transduction concerning plant hormones, circadian clock, and light are discussed. The studies presented provide a detailed picture of the ICE-CBF-COR pathway.

  19. Induction of postmitotic neuroretina cell proliferation by distinct Ras downstream signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyssonnaux, C; Provot, S; Felder-Schmittbuhl, M P; Calothy, G; Eychène, A

    2000-10-01

    Ras-induced cell transformation is mediated through distinct downstream signaling pathways, including Raf, Ral-GEFs-, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase)-dependent pathways. In some cell types, strong activation of the Ras-Raf-MEK-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade leads to cell cycle arrest rather than cell division. We previously reported that constitutive activation of this pathway induces sustained proliferation of primary cultures of postmitotic chicken neuroretina (NR) cells. We used this model system to investigate the respective contributions of Ras downstream signaling pathways in Ras-induced cell proliferation. Three RasV12 mutants (S35, G37, and C40) which differ by their ability to bind to Ras effectors (Raf, Ral-GEFs, and the p110 subunit of PI 3-kinase, respectively) were able to induce sustained NR cell proliferation, although none of these mutants was reported to transform NIH 3T3 cells. Furthermore, they all repressed the promoter of QR1, a neuroretina growth arrest-specific gene. Overexpression of B-Raf or activated versions of Ras effectors Rlf-CAAX and p110-CAAX also induced NR cell division. The mitogenic effect of the RasC40-PI 3-kinase pathway appears to involve Rac and RhoA GTPases but not the antiapoptotic Akt (protein kinase B) signaling. Division induced by RasG37-Rlf appears to be independent of Ral GTPase activation and presumably requires an unidentified mechanism. Activation of either Ras downstream pathway resulted in ERK activation, and coexpression of a dominant negative MEK mutant or mKsr-1 kinase domain strongly inhibited proliferation induced by the three Ras mutants or by their effectors. Similar effects were observed with dominant negative mutants of Rac and Rho. Thus, both the Raf-MEK-ERK and Rac-Rho pathways are absolutely required for Ras-induced NR cell division. Activation of these two pathways by the three distinct Ras downstream effectors possibly relies on an autocrine or paracrine loop

  20. The blue light signal transduction pathway is involved in anthocyanin accumulation in 'Red Zaosu' pear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ruiyan; Bai, Songling; Ni, Junbei; Yang, Qinsong; Zhao, Yuan; Teng, Yuanwen

    2018-03-15

    A conserved blue light sensing and transduction pathway contributes to blue light-induced anthocyanin accumulation in the peel of red pear. Peel color is an economically important characteristic that influences the appearance quality of red pear, whose red color is due to anthocyanin accumulation. The process of coloration in the fruit peel is strongly influenced by light. However, how light quality influences color development remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the effects of different light qualities on color development in the red pear 'Red Zaosu', a mutant of the hybrid cultivar 'Zaosu' of Pyrus pyrifolia and P. communis. The results showed that blue light increased anthocyanin accumulation after 72 h of light treatment, while red light had almost no effect. The expression of anthocyanin biosynthesis-related genes showed a similar trend to the anthocyanin accumulation. To clarify the mechanism of blue-light induced coloration, PpCRYs, PpCOP1 and PpHY5 genes were cloned. Gene expression analysis showed that their transcript abundance did not correlate with the expression of anthocyanin-related genes or anthocyanin content, but the yeast two-hybrid system revealed conserved physical interactions among these proteins. In addition, PpHY5 directly bound to the promoters of the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes PpCHS, PpDFR, PpANS and PpMYB10, and activated the transcription of PpCHS in a Nicotiana benthamiana-based dual-luciferase assay. In summary, our results preliminarily revealed that the conserved blue light signal transduction module CRY-COP1-HY5 contributed to the anthocyanin biosynthesis induced by blue light in red pear. However, our results did not provide evidence for why red light had no effect on anthocyanin accumulation, which needs further study.

  1. Viral Infection: An Evolving Insight into the Signal Transduction Pathways Responsible for the Innate Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish J. Kotwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune response is initiated by the interaction of stereotypical pathogen components with genetically conserved receptors for extracytosolic pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs or intracytosolic nucleic acids. In multicellular organisms, this interaction typically clusters signal transduction molecules and leads to their activations, thereby initiating signals that activate innate immune effector mechanisms to protect the host. In some cases programmed cell death—a fundamental form of innate immunity—is initiated in response to genotoxic or biochemical stress that is associated with viral infection. In this paper we will summarize innate immune mechanisms that are relevant to viral pathogenesis and outline the continuing evolution of viral mechanisms that suppress the innate immunity in mammalian hosts. These mechanisms of viral innate immune evasion provide significant insight into the pathways of the antiviral innate immune response of many organisms. Examples of relevant mammalian innate immune defenses host defenses include signaling to interferon and cytokine response pathways as well as signaling to the inflammasome. Understanding which viral innate immune evasion mechanisms are linked to pathogenesis may translate into therapies and vaccines that are truly effective in eliminating the morbidity and mortality associated with viral infections in individuals.

  2. Viral Infection: An Evolving Insight into the Signal Transduction Pathways Responsible for the Innate Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwal, Girish J.; Hatch, Steven; Marshall, William L.

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune response is initiated by the interaction of stereotypical pathogen components with genetically conserved receptors for extracytosolic pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or intracytosolic nucleic acids. In multicellular organisms, this interaction typically clusters signal transduction molecules and leads to their activations, thereby initiating signals that activate innate immune effector mechanisms to protect the host. In some cases programmed cell death—a fundamental form of innate immunity—is initiated in response to genotoxic or biochemical stress that is associated with viral infection. In this paper we will summarize innate immune mechanisms that are relevant to viral pathogenesis and outline the continuing evolution of viral mechanisms that suppress the innate immunity in mammalian hosts. These mechanisms of viral innate immune evasion provide significant insight into the pathways of the antiviral innate immune response of many organisms. Examples of relevant mammalian innate immune defenses host defenses include signaling to interferon and cytokine response pathways as well as signaling to the inflammasome. Understanding which viral innate immune evasion mechanisms are linked to pathogenesis may translate into therapies and vaccines that are truly effective in eliminating the morbidity and mortality associated with viral infections in individuals. PMID:22997518

  3. Signal transduction of p53-independent apoptotic pathway induced by hexavalent chromium in U937 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Yoko; Kondo, Takashi; Zhao Qingli; Ogawa Ryohei; Cui Zhengguo; Feril, Loreto B.; Teranishi, Hidetoyo; Kasuya, Minoru

    2004-01-01

    It has been reported that the hexavalent chromium compound (Cr(VI)) can induce both p53-dependent and p53-independent apoptosis. While a considerable amount of information is available on the p53-dependent pathway, only little is known about the p53-independent pathway. To elucidate the p53-independent mechanism, the roles of the Ca 2+ -calpain- and mitochondria-caspase-dependent pathways in apoptosis induced by Cr(VI) were investigated. When human lymphoma U937 cells, p53 mutated cells, were treated with 20 μM Cr(VI) for 24 h, nuclear morphological changes and DNA fragmentation were observed. Production of hydroxyl radicals revealed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-spin trapping, and increase of intracellular calcium ion concentration monitored by digital imaging were also observed in Cr(VI)-treated cells. An intracellular Ca 2+ chelator, BAPTA-AM, and calpain inhibitors suppressed the Cr(VI)-induced DNA fragmentation. The number of cells showing low mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), high level of superoxide anion radicals (O 2 - ), and high activity of caspase-3, which are indicators of mitochondria-caspase-dependent pathway, increased significantly in Cr(VI)-treated cells. An antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), decreased DNA fragmentation and inhibited the changes in MMP, O 2 - formation, and activation of caspase-3 induced by Cr(VI). No increase of the expressions of Fas and phosphorylated JNK was observed after Cr(VI) treatment. Cell cycle analysis revealed that the fraction of G2/M phase tended to increase after 24 h of treatment, suggesting that Cr(VI)-induced apoptosis is related to the G2 block. These results indicate that Ca 2+ -calpain- and mitochondria-caspase-dependent pathways play significant roles in the Cr(VI)-induced apoptosis via the G2 block, which are independent of JNK and Fas activation. The inhibition of apoptosis and all its signal transductions by NAC suggests that intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) are

  4. The Drosophila secreted protein Argos regulates signal transduction in the Ras/MAPK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawamoto, K; Okabe, M; Tanimura, T; Mikoshiba, K; Nishida, Y; Okano, H

    1996-08-25

    The Drosophila argos gene encodes a secreted protein with an EGF motif which acts as an inhibitor of cellular differentiation in multiple developmental processes. To investigate the cellular pathways regulated by Argos, we screened for mutations which could modify the phenotype caused by overexpression of argos. We show that the effects of argos overexpression on the eye and wing vein development are suppressed by gain-of-function mutations of the MAPKK/D-MEK gene (Dsor1/D-mek) and the MAPK/ERK-A gene (rolled) and were enhanced by loss-of-function mutations of Star. Loss-of-function mutations in components of the Ras/MAPK signaling cascade act as dominant suppressors of the phenotype caused by the argos null mutations. A loss-of-function argos mutation enhanced the overproduction of R7 neurons caused by gain-of-function alleles of Son of sevenless and Dsor1. Conversely, overexpression of argos inhibited formation of the extra R7 cells that was caused by high-level MAPK/ERK-A activity. A phenotype of the sev; argos double mutants revealed that sev is epistatic to argos. These results provide evidence that Argos negatively regulates signal transduction events in the Ras/MAPK cascade.

  5. Involvement of SGT1 in COR-mediated signal transduction pathway leading to disease symptom development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiga, Yasuhiro; Uppalapati, Srinivasa Rao; Ishiga, Takako; Mysore, Kirankumar S

    2011-07-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000), that causes bacterial speck disease on tomato, produces a non-host-specific virulence effector, coronatine (COR). COR functions as a jasmonic acid (JA)-isoleucine mimic in planta and has multiple roles in the pathogenicity of Pst DC3000. One of the hallmarks of bacterial speck disease on tomato is the formation of necrotic lesions surrounded by chlorosis and COR is required for disease development. However, the molecular basis of COR-mediated disease symptom development including chlorosis and necrosis is still largely unknown. In our recent publication in New Phytologist, using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) based reverse genetics screen, we demonstrated that SGT1 (suppressor of G2 allele of skp1) is required for COR-induced chlorosis in Nicotiana benthamiana. SGT1-silenced tomato leaves showed a complete loss of COR-induced chlorosis and reduced disease symptom development after the inoculation with Pst DC3000. Furthermore, Arabidopsis sgt1b mutant was less sensitive to COR-induced root growth inhibition and showed delayed Pst DC3000 disease symptoms. In this addendum, we discuss the possible contribution of SGT1 to COR-mediated signal transduction pathway leading to disease symptom development during Pst DC3000 pathogenesis in tomato and Arabidopsis.

  6. Universality and diversity in the signal transduction pathway that regulates seasonal reproduction in vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke eNakane

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Most vertebrates living outside the tropical zone show robust physiological responses in response to seasonal changes in photoperiod, such as seasonal reproduction, molt, and migration. The highly sophisticated photoperiodic mechanism in Japanese quail has been used to uncover the mechanism of seasonal reproduction. Molecular analysis of quail mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH revealed that local thyroid hormone activation within the MBH plays a critical role in the photoperiodic response of gonads. This activation is accomplished by two gene switches: thyroid hormone-activating (DIO2 and thyroid hormone-inactivating enzymes (DIO3. Functional genomics studies have shown that long-day induced thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH in the pars tuberalis (PT of the pituitary gland regulates DIO2/3 switching. In birds, light information received directly by deep brain photoreceptors regulates PT TSH. Recent studies demonstrated that Opsin 5-positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF-contacting neurons are deep brain photoreceptors that regulate avian seasonal reproduction. Although the involvement of TSH and DIO2/3 in seasonal reproduction has been confirmed in various mammals, the light input pathway that regulates PT TSH in mammals differs from that of birds. In mammals, the eye is the only photoreceptor organ and light information received by the eye is transmitted to the pineal gland through the circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Nocturnal melatonin secretion from the pineal gland indicates the length of night and regulates the PT TSH. In fish, the regulatory machinery for seasonal reproduction, from light input to neuroendocrine output, has been recently demonstrated in the coronet cells of the saccus vasculosus (SV. The SV is unique to fish and coronet cells are CSF-contacting neurons. Here, we discuss the universality and diversity of signal transduction pathways that regulate vertebrate seasonal reproduction.

  7. Analysis of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and downstream pathways in chordomas†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborini, Elena; Virdis, Emanuela; Negri, Tiziana; Orsenigo, Marta; Brich, Silvia; Conca, Elena; Gronchi, Alessandro; Stacchiotti, Silvia; Manenti, Giacomo; Casali, Paolo G.; Pierotti, Marco A.; Pilotti, Silvana

    2010-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that chordomas express activated platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFRB) and that treatment with imatinib, which is capable of switching off the activation of various receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) including PDGFRB, benefits a number of patients. The aim of this study was to identify the possible presence of other activated RTKs and their downstream signaling effectors. Cryopreserved material from 22 naïve sporadic chordomas was investigated for the presence of activated RTKs and their cognate ligands and downstream signaling effectors by means of human phospho-RTK antibody arrays, Western blotting, and molecular analysis; immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization were used to analyze the corresponding formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded samples. We detected activated PDGFRB, FLT3, and colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) of the PDGFR family and highly phosphorylated EGFR, HER2/neu, and (to a lesser extent) HER4 of the EGFR family. The detection of PDGFRB/PDGFB confirmed our previous data. The presence of activated EGFR was paralleled by the finding of high levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor α (TGFα) and PDGFB co-expression and PDGFRB co-immunoprecipitation. Of the downstream effectors, the PI3K/AKT and RAS/MAPK pathways were both activated, thus leading to the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and 4E-BP1 among the regulators involved in translational control. Taken together, our results (i) provide a rationale for tailored treatments targeting upstream activated receptors, including the PDGFR and EGFR families; (ii) support the idea that a combination of upstream antagonists and mTOR inhibitors enhances the control of tumor growth; and (iii) indicate that the 4E-BP1/eIF4E pathway is a major regulator of protein synthesis in chordoma. PMID:20164240

  8. Analysis of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and downstream pathways in chordomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborini, Elena; Virdis, Emanuela; Negri, Tiziana; Orsenigo, Marta; Brich, Silvia; Conca, Elena; Gronchi, Alessandro; Stacchiotti, Silvia; Manenti, Giacomo; Casali, Paolo G; Pierotti, Marco A; Pilotti, Silvana

    2010-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that chordomas express activated platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFRB) and that treatment with imatinib, which is capable of switching off the activation of various receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) including PDGFRB, benefits a number of patients. The aim of this study was to identify the possible presence of other activated RTKs and their downstream signaling effectors. Cryopreserved material from 22 naïve sporadic chordomas was investigated for the presence of activated RTKs and their cognate ligands and downstream signaling effectors by means of human phospho-RTK antibody arrays, Western blotting, and molecular analysis; immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization were used to analyze the corresponding formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded samples. We detected activated PDGFRB, FLT3, and colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) of the PDGFR family and highly phosphorylated EGFR, HER2/neu, and (to a lesser extent) HER4 of the EGFR family. The detection of PDGFRB/PDGFB confirmed our previous data. The presence of activated EGFR was paralleled by the finding of high levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor alpha (TGFalpha) and PDGFB co-expression and PDGFRB co-immunoprecipitation. Of the downstream effectors, the PI3K/AKT and RAS/MAPK pathways were both activated, thus leading to the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and 4E-BP1 among the regulators involved in translational control. Taken together, our results (i) provide a rationale for tailored treatments targeting upstream activated receptors, including the PDGFR and EGFR families; (ii) support the idea that a combination of upstream antagonists and mTOR inhibitors enhances the control of tumor growth; and (iii) indicate that the 4E-BP1/eIF4E pathway is a major regulator of protein synthesis in chordoma.

  9. The down-stream effects of mannan-induced lectin complement pathway activation depend quantitatively on alternative pathway amplification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Morten; Garred, Peter; Karlstrøm, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    was not observed even at high mannan concentrations since addition of the inhibiting anti-MBL mAb 3F8 completely abolished generation of the terminal C5b-9 complex (TCC). However, selective blockade of AP by anti-factor D inhibited more than 80% of TCC release into the fluid phase after LP activation showing...... that AP amplification is quantitatively responsible for the final effect of initial specific LP activation. TCC generation on the solid phase was distinctly but less inhibited by anti-fD. C2 bypass of the LP pathway could be demonstrated, and AP amplification was also essential during C2 bypass in LP...... as shown by complete inhibition of TCC generation in C2-deficient serum by anti-fD and anti-properdin antibodies. In conclusion, the down-stream effect of LP activation depends strongly on AP amplification in normal human serum and in the C2 bypass pathway....

  10. Estrogen Stimulates Proliferation and Differentiation of Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells through Different Signal Transduction Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makiko Okada

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Our previous study indicated that both 17β-estradiol (E2, known to be an endogenous estrogen, and bisphenol A (BPA, known to be a xenoestrogen, could positively influence the proliferation or differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NS/PCs. The aim of the present study was to identify the signal transduction pathways for estrogenic activities promoting proliferation and differentiation of NS/PCs via well known nuclear estrogen receptors (ERs or putative membrane-associated ERs. NS/PCs were cultured from the telencephalon of 15-day-old rat embryos. In order to confirm the involvement of nuclear ERs for estrogenic activities, their specific antagonist, ICI-182,780, was used. The presence of putative membrane-associated ER was functionally examined as to whether E2 can activate rapid intracellular signaling mechanism. In order to confirm the involvement of membrane-associated ERs for estrogenic activities, a cell-impermeable E2, bovine serum albumin-conjugated E2 (E2-BSA was used. We showed that E2 could rapidly activate extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK 1/2, which was not inhibited by ICI-182,780. ICI-182,780 abrogated the stimulatory effect of these estrogens (E2 and BPA on the proliferation of NS/PCs, but not their effect on the differentiation of the NS/PCs into oligodendroglia. Furthermore, E2-BSA mimicked the activity of differentiation from NS/PCs into oligodendroglia, but not the activity of proliferation. Our study suggests that (1 the estrogen induced proliferation of NS/PCs is mediated via nuclear ERs; (2 the oligodendroglial generation from NS/PCs is likely to be stimulated via putative membrane‑associated ERs.

  11. Candidate genes and pathways downstream of PAX8 involved in ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Di Palma, Tina; Soriano, Amata Amy; Monticelli, Antonella; Affinito, Ornella; Cocozza, Sergio; Zannini, Mariastella

    2016-07-05

    Understanding the biology and molecular pathogenesis of ovarian epithelial cancer (EOC) is key to developing improved diagnostic and prognostic indicators and effective therapies. Although research has traditionally focused on the hypothesis that high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) arises from the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE), recent studies suggest that additional sites of origin exist and a substantial proportion of cases may arise from precursor lesions located in the Fallopian tubal epithelium (FTE). In FTE cells, the transcription factor PAX8 is a marker of the secretory cell lineage and its expression is retained in 96% of EOC. We have recently reported that PAX8 is involved in the tumorigenic phenotype of ovarian cancer cells. In this study, to uncover genes and pathways downstream of PAX8 involved in ovarian carcinoma we have determined the molecular profiles of ovarian cancer cells and in parallel of Fallopian tube epithelial cells by means of a silencing approach followed by an RNA-seq analysis. Interestingly, we highlighted the involvement of pathways like WNT signaling, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, p53 and apoptosis. We believe that our analysis has led to the identification of candidate genes and pathways regulated by PAX8 that could be additional targets for the therapy of ovarian carcinoma.

  12. A reverse signaling pathway downstream of Sema4A controls cell migration via Scrib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tianliang; Yang, Lida; Kaur, Harmandeep; Pestel, Jenny; Looso, Mario; Nolte, Hendrik; Krasel, Cornelius; Heil, Daniel; Krishnan, Ramesh K; Santoni, Marie-Josée; Borg, Jean-Paul; Bünemann, Moritz; Offermanns, Stefan; Swiercz, Jakub M; Worzfeld, Thomas

    2017-01-02

    Semaphorins comprise a large family of ligands that regulate key cellular functions through their receptors, plexins. In this study, we show that the transmembrane semaphorin 4A (Sema4A) can also function as a receptor, rather than a ligand, and transduce signals triggered by the binding of Plexin-B1 through reverse signaling. Functionally, reverse Sema4A signaling regulates the migration of various cancer cells as well as dendritic cells. By combining mass spectrometry analysis with small interfering RNA screening, we identify the polarity protein Scrib as a downstream effector of Sema4A. We further show that binding of Plexin-B1 to Sema4A promotes the interaction of Sema4A with Scrib, thereby removing Scrib from its complex with the Rac/Cdc42 exchange factor βPIX and decreasing the activity of the small guanosine triphosphatase Rac1 and Cdc42. Our data unravel a role for Plexin-B1 as a ligand and Sema4A as a receptor and characterize a reverse signaling pathway downstream of Sema4A, which controls cell migration. © 2017 Sun et al.

  13. T-plastin expression downstream to the calcineurin/NFAT pathway is involved in keratinocyte migration.

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    Cécilia Brun

    Full Text Available Cutaneous wound healing requires keratinocyte proliferation, migration and differentiation to restore the barrier function of the skin. The calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated-T-cell (NFAT signaling pathway has been recently shown to be involved in keratinocyte growth, differentiation and migration. It is induced by an increased intracellular calcium rate and its inhibition results in decreased capacities of keratinocytes to migrate. Nevertheless, the link between calcineurin activation and keratinocyte migration remains unknown. Recently, Orai1, a pore subunit of a store-operated calcium channel that favors calcium influx, was shown to play a critical role to control proliferation and migration of basal keratinocytes. Of interest, the actin-bundling T-plastin is crucial in cell motility through cross-linking to actin filament and its synthesis was shown to be induced by calcium influx and regulated by the calcineurin/NFAT pathway in tumor Sezary cells. We investigated herein the role of the calcineurin/NFAT pathway-dependent T-plastin in keratinocyte migration, by quantifying T-plastin expression in keratinocytes and by analyzing their migration under calcineurin inhibition or knockdown of NFAT2 or T-plastin. We did confirm the role of the calcineurin/NFAT pathway in keratinocyte migration as shown by their decreased capacities to migrate after FK506 treatment or siNFAT2 transfection in both scratching and Boyden assays. The expression of NFAT2 and T-plastin in keratinocytes was decreased under FK506 treatment, suggesting that T-plastin plays a role in keratinocyte migration downstream to the calcineurin/NFAT pathway. Accordingly, siRNA knockdown of T-plastin expression also decreased their migration capacities. Actin lamellipodia formation as well as FAK and β6-integrin expression were also significantly decreased after treatment with FK506 or siRNA, reinforcing that NFAT2-dependent T-plastin expression plays a role in keratinocyte

  14. The vasorelaxant mechanisms of methanol on isolated rat aortic rings: Involvement of ion channels and signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Y; Zhang, Q; Yang, Z; Meng, Z; Zhao, Q

    2017-10-01

    It is reported that methanol is generally used as an industrial solvent, antifreeze, windshield washer fluid, cooking fuel and perfume. Methanol ingestion can lead to severe metabolic disturbances, blindness, or even death. So far, few studies about its negative effects on cardiovascular system have been reported. The purpose of this study was to determine the vasoactive effect of methanol and roles of ion channels and signal transduction pathways on isolated rat aorta. The results suggested that the mechanism of methanol-induced vasorelaxation at low concentrations (600 mM) was related to K ATP , voltage-dependent K + , big-conductance Ca 2+ -activated K + , L-type Ca 2+ channels as well as prostacyclin, protein kinase C, β-adrenoceptors pathways. In addition, methanol induced a dose-dependent inhibition of vasoconstrictions caused by calcium chloride, potassium chloride, or norepinephrine. Further work is needed to investigate the relative contribution of each channel and pathway in methanol-induced vasoactive effect.

  15. AS101 prevents diabetic nephropathy progression and mesangial cell dysfunction: regulation of the AKT downstream pathway.

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    Itay Israel Shemesh

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN is characterized by proliferation of mesangial cells, mesangial expansion, hypertrophy and extracellular matrix accumulation. Previous data have cross-linked PKB (AKT to TGFβ induced matrix modulation. The non-toxic compound AS101 has been previously shown to favorably affect renal pathology in various animal models and inhibits AKT activity in leukemic cells. Here, we studied the pharmacological properties of AS101 against the progression of rat DN and high glucose-induced mesangial dysfunction. In-vivo administration of AS101 to Streptozotocin injected rats didn't decreased blood glucose levels but ameliorated kidney hypotrophy, proteinuria and albuminuria and downregulated cortical kidney phosphorylation of AKT, GSK3β and SMAD3. AS101 treatment of primary rat glomerular mesangial cells treated with high glucose significantly reduced their elevated proliferative ability, as assessed by XTT assay and cell cycle analysis. This reduction was associated with decreased levels of p-AKT, increased levels of PTEN and decreased p-GSK3β and p-FoxO3a expression. Pharmacological inhibition of PI3K, mTORC1 and SMAD3 decreased HG-induced collagen accumulation, while inhibition of GSK3β did not affect its elevated levels. AS101 also prevented HG-induced cell growth correlated to mTOR and (rpS6 de-phosphorylation. Thus, pharmacological inhibition of the AKT downstream pathway by AS101 has clinical potential in alleviating the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  16. The signal transduction pathway of PKC/NF-κB/c-fos may be involved in the influence of high glucose on the cardiomyocytes of neonatal rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhu

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High glucose could induce structure and function change in cardiomyocytes, PKC plays a core effect in the onset and progression of diabetic cardiomyopathy, but its underlying downstream signal transduction pathway is still not completely understood. Objectives To study the influence of high glucose on the structure, function and signal transduction pathway of PKC (Protein Kinase C/NF-κB(Nuclear factor-κB/c-fos in cultured cardiomyocytes. Methods Using cultured cardiomyocytes of neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats as a model, groups were divided into: control group (glucose: 5 mmol/L; high glucose group (glucose: 10 mmol/L, 15 mmol/L, 20 mmol/L, 25.5 mmol/L; equimolar mannital group (5 mmol/L glucose + 20.5 mmol/L maninital; high glucose(25.5 mmol/L add PKC inhibitor (Ro-31-8220, 50 nmol/L; high glucose (25.5 mmol/L add NF-κB inhibitor (BAY11-7082, 5 μmol/L. The cellular contracting frequency and volumes were measured and the expression of PKC-α, PKC-β2, p-PKC-α, p-PKC-β2, NF-κB, p-NF-κB, TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α and c-fos were measured by western blot or RT-PCR. Results Cardiomyocytes cultured in high glucose level, but not iso-osmotic mannital, showed an increased pulsatile frequency and higher cellular volumes consistent with the increased glucose levels, and also higher expression of PKC-α, PKC-β2, p-PKC-α, p-PKC-β2, NF-κB, p-NF-κB, TNF-α and c-fos. The addition of Ro-31-8220 and BAY11-7082 could partly reverse these changes induced by high glucose level. Conclusion High glucose significantly increased the pulsatile frequency and cellular volumes of cultured cardiomyocytes via PKC/NF-κB/c-fos pathway, which might lead to diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  17. Dissecting blue light signal transduction pathway in leaf epidermis using a pharmacological approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zivanovic, Branka D.; Shabala, Lana I.; Elzenga, Theo J. M.; Shabala, Sergey N.

    2015-01-01

    Blue light signalling pathway in broad bean leaf epidermal cells includes key membrane transporters: plasma- and endomembrane channels and pumps of H (+) , Ca (2+) and K (+) ions, and plasma membrane redox system. Blue light signalling pathway in epidermal tissue isolated from the abaxial side of

  18. Reestablishing the Dominance of Biogeochemical Pathways for Reducing Downstream Nutrient Losses from Aged Impounded Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, S.; Shukla, A.

    2017-12-01

    Water and phosphorus (P) dynamics and loss pathways at two stormwater impoundments (SIs) were analyzed using measured fluxes between 2008 and 2011. These SIs are a decade old. Analyses of water and P budgets along with the discernment of various P pools and characterization of the intermediary processes revealed that soil adsorption and plant uptake are secondary to volume reduction apropos of P treatment. At one site, extreme wet conditions in a year combined with soil P saturation resulted in it being a P source rather than a sink. The impoundment (SI-1) discharged 12% more P than incoming due to soil P desorption, a consequence of dilution of incoming stormwater with large water input from an extreme tropical rain event. The second impoundment (SI-2) was a consistent sink of P; 55% and 95% of the incoming total P was retained in the two years, mainly as a result of 49% and 84% volume retention, respectively. Analysis of plant available aluminum, iron, and phosphorus showed the surface soil to be P saturated and at risk of releasing P to a limit of environmental concern. These results when seen in light of more frequent extreme precipitation events under the changed climate scenario call for alternatives to revive the role of biogeochemical processes in P treatment because volume reduction may not always be the viable option, especially for wet conditions. Aboveground biomass harvesting and removal was evaluated to transform the SIs from a frequent P source to sink and maintain the long-term sink functions of the SIs. Use of harvested biomass as a source of nutrients (N and P) and carbon to agricultural soil can result in beneficial use of biomass and offset the cost of harvesting. Other avenues such as altering the hydrology of the SIs by compartmentalizing the system and increasing the storage were also explored for short-term benefits. Results provided a combination of hydraulic and biochemical options for achieving long-term water and nutrient retentions in

  19. Insulin sensitivity predictions in individuals with obesity and type II diabetes mellitus using mathematical model of the insulin signal transduction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Clark K; Sriram, Ganesh; Dipple, Katrina M

    2016-11-01

    Mathematical modeling approaches have been commonly used in complex signaling pathway studies such as the insulin signal transduction pathway. Our expanded mathematical model of the insulin signal transduction pathway was previously shown to effectively predict glucose clearance rates using mRNA levels of key components of the pathway in a mouse model. In this study, we re-optimized and applied our expanded model to study insulin sensitivity in other species and tissues (human skeletal muscle) with altered protein activities of insulin signal transduction pathway components. The model has now been optimized to predict the effect of short term exercise on insulin sensitivity for human test subjects with obesity or type II diabetes mellitus. A comparison between our extended model and the original model showed that our model better simulates the GLUT4 translocation events of the insulin signal transduction pathway and glucose uptake as a clinically relevant model output. Results from our extended model correlate with O'Gorman's published in-vivo results. This study demonstrates the ability to adapt this model to study insulin sensitivity to many biological systems (human skeletal muscle and mouse liver) with minimal changes in the model parameters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The ARG1-LIKE2 gene of Arabidopsis functions in a gravity signal transduction pathway that is genetically distinct from the PGM pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Changhui; Rosen, Elizabeth S.; Boonsirichai, Kanokporn; Poff, Kenneth L.; Masson, Patrick H.

    2003-01-01

    The arl2 mutants of Arabidopsis display altered root and hypocotyl gravitropism, whereas their inflorescence stems are fully gravitropic. Interestingly, mutant roots respond like the wild type to phytohormones and an inhibitor of polar auxin transport. Also, their cap columella cells accumulate starch similarly to wild-type cells, and mutant hypocotyls display strong phototropic responses to lateral light stimulation. The ARL2 gene encodes a DnaJ-like protein similar to ARG1, another protein previously implicated in gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis seedlings. ARL2 is expressed at low levels in all organs of seedlings and plants. arl2-1 arg1-2 double mutant roots display kinetics of gravitropism similar to those of single mutants. However, double mutants carrying both arl2-1 and pgm-1 (a mutation in the starch-biosynthetic gene PHOSPHOGLUCOMUTASE) at the homozygous state display a more pronounced root gravitropic defect than the single mutants. On the other hand, seedlings with a null mutation in ARL1, a paralog of ARG1 and ARL2, behave similarly to the wild type in gravitropism and other related assays. Taken together, the results suggest that ARG1 and ARL2 function in the same gravity signal transduction pathway in the hypocotyl and root of Arabidopsis seedlings, distinct from the pathway involving PGM.

  1. DMPD: Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15379975 Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor... Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. PubmedID 15379975 Title Signa...l transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. Authors

  2. Activation of CNTF/CNTFRα signaling pathway by hRheb(S16H transduction of dopaminergic neurons in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung Hoon Jeong

    Full Text Available Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF is one of representative neurotrophic factors for the survival of dopaminergic neurons. Its effects are primarily mediated via CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα. It is still unclear whether the levels of CNTFRα change in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease (PD patients, but CNTF expression shows the remarkable decrease in dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc, suggesting that the support of CNTF/CNTFRα signaling pathway may be a useful neuroprotective strategy for the nigrostriatal dopaminergic projection in the adult brain. Here, we report that transduction of rat SNpc dopaminergic neurons by adeno-associated virus with a gene encoding human ras homolog enriched in brain (hRheb, with an S16H mutation [hRheb(S16H], significantly upregulated the levels of both CNTF and CNTFRα in dopaminergic neurons. Moreover, the hRheb(S16H-activated CNTF/CNTFRα signaling pathway was protective against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium-induced neurotoxicity in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic projections. These results suggest that activation of CNTF/CNTFRα signaling pathway by specific gene delivery such as hRheb(S16H may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of PD.

  3. Activation of CNTF/CNTFRα Signaling Pathway by hRheb(S16H) Transduction of Dopaminergic Neurons In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Nam, Jin Han; Jin, Byung Kwan; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2015-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is one of representative neurotrophic factors for the survival of dopaminergic neurons. Its effects are primarily mediated via CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα). It is still unclear whether the levels of CNTFRα change in the substantia nigra of Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients, but CNTF expression shows the remarkable decrease in dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc), suggesting that the support of CNTF/CNTFRα signaling pathway may be a useful neuroprotective strategy for the nigrostriatal dopaminergic projection in the adult brain. Here, we report that transduction of rat SNpc dopaminergic neurons by adeno-associated virus with a gene encoding human ras homolog enriched in brain (hRheb), with an S16H mutation [hRheb(S16H)], significantly upregulated the levels of both CNTF and CNTFRα in dopaminergic neurons. Moreover, the hRheb(S16H)-activated CNTF/CNTFRα signaling pathway was protective against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium-induced neurotoxicity in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic projections. These results suggest that activation of CNTF/CNTFRα signaling pathway by specific gene delivery such as hRheb(S16H) may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of PD. PMID:25799580

  4. Signal transduction pathway mediated by the novel regulator LoiA for low oxygen tension induced Salmonella Typhimurium invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lingyan; Feng, Lu; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Wenwen; Wang, Peisheng; Jiang, Xiaohan; Wang, Lei

    2017-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a major intestinal pathogen of both humans and animals. Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1)-encoded virulence genes are required for S. Typhimurium invasion. While oxygen (O2) limitation is an important signal for SPI-1 induction under host conditions, how the signal is received and integrated to the central SPI-1 regulatory system in S. Typhimurium is not clear. Here, we report a signal transduction pathway that activates SPI-1 expression in response to low O2. A novel regulator encoded within SPI-14 (STM14_1008), named LoiA (low oxygen induced factor A), directly binds to the promoter and activates transcription of hilD, leading to the activation of hilA (the master activator of SPI-1). Deletion of loiA significantly decreased the transcription of hilA, hilD and other representative SPI-1 genes (sipB, spaO, invH, prgH and invF) under low O2 conditions. The response of LoiA to the low O2 signal is mediated by the ArcB/ArcA two-component system. Deletion of either arcA or arcB significantly decreased transcription of loiA under low O2 conditions. We also confirmed that SPI-14 contributes to S. Typhimurium virulence by affecting invasion, and that loiA is the virulence determinant of SPI-14. Mice infection assays showed that S. Typhimurium virulence was severely attenuated by deletion of either the entire SPI-14 region or the single loiA gene after oral infection, while the virulence was not affected by either deletion after intraperitoneal infection. The signal transduction pathway described represents an important mechanism for S. Typhimurium to sense and respond to low O2 conditions of the host intestinal tract for invasion. SPI-14-encoded loiA is an essential element of this pathway that integrates the low O2 signal into the SPI-1 regulatory system. Acquisition of SPI-14 is therefore crucial for the evolution of S. Typhimurium as an intestinal pathogen.

  5. Signal transduction pathway mediated by the novel regulator LoiA for low oxygen tension induced Salmonella Typhimurium invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyan Jiang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium is a major intestinal pathogen of both humans and animals. Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1-encoded virulence genes are required for S. Typhimurium invasion. While oxygen (O2 limitation is an important signal for SPI-1 induction under host conditions, how the signal is received and integrated to the central SPI-1 regulatory system in S. Typhimurium is not clear. Here, we report a signal transduction pathway that activates SPI-1 expression in response to low O2. A novel regulator encoded within SPI-14 (STM14_1008, named LoiA (low oxygen induced factor A, directly binds to the promoter and activates transcription of hilD, leading to the activation of hilA (the master activator of SPI-1. Deletion of loiA significantly decreased the transcription of hilA, hilD and other representative SPI-1 genes (sipB, spaO, invH, prgH and invF under low O2 conditions. The response of LoiA to the low O2 signal is mediated by the ArcB/ArcA two-component system. Deletion of either arcA or arcB significantly decreased transcription of loiA under low O2 conditions. We also confirmed that SPI-14 contributes to S. Typhimurium virulence by affecting invasion, and that loiA is the virulence determinant of SPI-14. Mice infection assays showed that S. Typhimurium virulence was severely attenuated by deletion of either the entire SPI-14 region or the single loiA gene after oral infection, while the virulence was not affected by either deletion after intraperitoneal infection. The signal transduction pathway described represents an important mechanism for S. Typhimurium to sense and respond to low O2 conditions of the host intestinal tract for invasion. SPI-14-encoded loiA is an essential element of this pathway that integrates the low O2 signal into the SPI-1 regulatory system. Acquisition of SPI-14 is therefore crucial for the evolution of S. Typhimurium as an intestinal pathogen.

  6. MAPK Signal Transduction Pathway Regulation: A Novel Mechanism of Rat HSC-T6 Cell Apoptosis Induced by FUZHENGHUAYU Tablet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available FUZHENGHUAYU Tablets have been widely used in the treatment of liver fibrosis in China. Here, we investigate the apoptotic effect of FUZHENGHUAYU Tablet in rat liver stellate cell line HSC-T6. HSC-T6 cells were incubated with control serum or drug serum from rats fed with 0.9% NaCl or FUZHENGHUAYU Tablet, respectively. Cells exposed to drug serum showed higher proportions of early and late apoptotic cells than controls. The mRNA levels of collagens I and III, TGF-β1 and α-SMA were reduced by drug serum compared to control serum. Differentially expressed mRNAs and miRNAs were analyzed by microarray and sequencing, respectively. We identified 334 differentially expressed mRNAs and also 60 GOs and two pathways related to the mRNAs. Seventy-five differentially expressed miRNAs were down-regulated by drug serum and 1963 target genes were predicted. 134 GOs up-regulated in drug serum group were linked to miRNA targets, and drug serum also regulated 43 miRNA signal transduction pathways. Protein levels were evaluated by Western blot. Drug serum down-regulated (phospho-SAPK/JNK/(SAPK/JNK and up-regulated phospho-p38/p38 ratios. The study showed that FUZHENGHUAYU Tablet induced apoptosis in rat HSC-T6 cells possibly in part by activating p38 and inhibiting SAPK/JNK.

  7. Trichoderma Biocontrol: Signal Transduction Pathways Involved in Host Sensing and Mycoparasitism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Zeilinger

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungi of the genus Trichoderma are used as biocontrol agents against several plant pathogenic fungi like Rhizoctonia spp., Pythium spp., Botrytis cinerea and Fusarium spp. which cause both soil-borne and leaf- or flower-borne diseases of agricultural plants. Plant disease control by Trichoderma is based on complex interactions between Trichoderma, the plant pathogen and the plant. Until now, two main components of biocontrol have been identified: direct activity of Trichoderma against the plant pathogen by mycoparasitism and induced systemic resistance in plants. As the mycoparasitic interaction is host-specific and not merely a contact response, it is likely that signals from the host fungus are recognised by Trichoderma and provoke transcription of mycoparasitism-related genes.In the last few years examination of signalling pathways underlying Trichoderma biocontrol started and it was shown that heterotrimeric G-proteins and mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases affected biocontrol-relevant processes such as the production of hydrolytic enzymes and antifungal metabolites and the formation of infection structures. MAPK signalling was also found to be involved in induction of plant systemic resistance in Trichoderma virens and in the hyperosmotic stress response in Trichoderma harzianum. Analyses of the function of components of the cAMP pathway during Trichoderma biocontrol revealed that mycoparasitism-associated coiling and chitinase production as well as secondary metabolism are affected by the internal cAMP level; in addition, a cross talk between regulation of light responses and the cAMP signalling pathway was found in Trichoderma atroviride.

  8. Targeting of the Hedgehog signal transduction pathway suppresses survival of malignant pleural mesothelioma cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Min; Varona-Santos, Javier; Singh, Samer; Robbins, David J; Savaraj, Niramol; Nguyen, Dao M

    2014-01-01

    The present study sought to determine whether the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is active and regulates the cell growth of cultured malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) cells and to evaluate the efficacy of pathway blockade using smoothened (SMO) antagonists (SMO inhibitor GDC-0449 or the antifungal drug itraconazole [ITRA]) or Gli inhibitors (GANT61 or the antileukemia drug arsenic trioxide [ATO]) in suppressing MPM viability. Selective knockdown of SMO to inhibit Hh signaling was achieved by small interfering RNA in 3 representative MPM cells. The growth inhibitory effect of GDC-0449, ITRA, GANT61, and ATO was evaluated in 8 MPM lines, with cell viability quantified using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Cell death was determined by annexinV/propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry. SMO small interfering RNA mediated a two- to more than fivefold reduction of SMO and Gli1 gene expression as determined by real-time quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, indicating significant Hh pathway blockade. This was associated with significantly reduced cell viability (34% ± 7% to 61% ± 14% of nontarget small interfering RNA controls; P = .0024 to P = .043). Treating MPM cells with Hh inhibitors resulted in a 1.5- to 4-fold reduction of Gli1 expression. These 4 Hh antagonists strongly suppressed MPM cell viability. More importantly, ITRA, ATO, GANT61 induced significant apoptosis in the representative MPM cells. Hh signaling is active in MPM and regulates cell viability. ATO and ITRA were as effective as the prototypic SMO inhibitor GDC-0449 and the Gli inhibitor GANT61 in suppressing Hh signaling in MPM cells. Pharmaceutical agents Food and Drug Administration-approved for other indications but recently found to have anti-Hh activity, such as ATO or ITRA, could be repurposed to treat MPM. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  9. Failure of signal transduction pathway of DNA damage in hereditary microcephaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Tatsuo; Matsuura, Shinya

    2009-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying the brain size determination are considered from an aspect of DNA-damage signaling recently revealed by studies on hereditary microcephaly (M), in relation to the radiation-induced M. International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) assesses the risk of M by in utero exposure as 40%/Sv, the threshold dose is about 0.2 Gy (deterministic effect), A-bomb M is conceived to be due to the exposure at 8-5 weeks of gestation, and M is induced by radiation at 10 days after fertilization in the mouse. Recent studies on causing genes of M have revealed its particular connection with signaling pathways: in ataxia-telangiectasia (AT), genes of ATM; in Seckel syndrome, of ATR (AT and Rad3-related) and pericentrin (PCNT); Nijmegen syndrome (NBS), of NBS1; NBS-like disease, of Rad50 and Mre11; AT-like disease, of Mre11; Lig4 syndrome, of Lig4; immunodeficiency combined with M, of XLF; primary M, of MCPH1, ASPM, CdkRap2, CENP-J and STIL. Single and double strand breaks of DNA respectively activate the signaling pathway of ATR where PCNT and MCPH1 participate, and pathway of ATM where NBS1, Mre11 and Rad50 do. PCNT is a major protein, pericentrin, composing the centrosome, of which defect results in the Seckel disease with spindle dysfunction. At present, M can be thus said to be of the cellular common features of failure of ATM/ATR signaling and of dysfunction of centrosome. As well, ASPM gene expression is recently reported to be suppressed by radiation. Thus future studies on M will spread to wider biological field of cell and development as well as radiation and inheritance. (K.T.)

  10. The kinetics of root gravitropism in PIN mutants suggest redundancy in the signal transduction pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolverton, Chris

    plays a role in efflux to the columella. Pin4 mutants showed no deficiencies in gravitropism, in fact responding at a greater rate than wild-type roots over the first hour (22 deg h-1 ). PIN7 has been localized to the vascular tissue of the elongation zone and to the central columella. Like pin4 mutants, pin7 mutants did not show a significantly reduced gravitropic response relative to wild-type roots. Interestingly, roots of pin3pin7 double mutants showed curvature and growth rates similar to pin7 single mutants and wild-type roots, suggesting a genetic interaction between PIN3 and PIN7 in this pathway. These results suggest a significant degree of redundancy in the regulation of directional auxin transport and perhaps in the gravity signaling pathway in roots in general.

  11. Comprehensive logic based analyses of Toll-like receptor 4 signal transduction pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Kumar Padwal

    Full Text Available Among the 13 TLRs in the vertebrate systems, only TLR4 utilizes both Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88 and Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR-domain-containing adapter interferon-β-inducing Factor (TRIF adaptors to transduce signals triggering host-protective immune responses. Earlier studies on the pathway combined various experimental data in the form of one comprehensive map of TLR signaling. But in the absence of adequate kinetic parameters quantitative mathematical models that reveal emerging systems level properties and dynamic inter-regulation among the kinases/phosphatases of the TLR4 network are not yet available. So, here we used reaction stoichiometry-based and parameter independent logical modeling formalism to build the TLR4 signaling network model that captured the feedback regulations, interdependencies between signaling kinases and phosphatases and the outcome of simulated infections. The analyses of the TLR4 signaling network revealed 360 feedback loops, 157 negative and 203 positive; of which, 334 loops had the phosphatase PP1 as an essential component. The network elements' interdependency (positive or negative dependencies in perturbation conditions such as the phosphatase knockout conditions revealed interdependencies between the dual-specific phosphatases MKP-1 and MKP-3 and the kinases in MAPK modules and the role of PP2A in the auto-regulation of Calmodulin kinase-II. Our simulations under the specific kinase or phosphatase gene-deficiency or inhibition conditions corroborated with several previously reported experimental data. The simulations to mimic Yersinia pestis and E. coli infections identified the key perturbation in the network and potential drug targets. Thus, our analyses of TLR4 signaling highlights the role of phosphatases as key regulatory factors in determining the global interdependencies among the network elements; uncovers novel signaling connections; identifies potential drug targets for

  12. Neurospora crassa female development requires the PACC and other signal transduction pathways, transcription factors, chromatin remodeling, cell-to-cell fusion, and autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Chinnici

    Full Text Available Using a screening protocol we have identified 68 genes that are required for female development in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. We find that we can divide these genes into five general groups: 1 Genes encoding components of the PACC signal transduction pathway, 2 Other signal transduction pathway genes, including genes from the three N. crassa MAP kinase pathways, 3 Transcriptional factor genes, 4 Autophagy genes, and 5 Other miscellaneous genes. Complementation and RIP studies verified that these genes are needed for the formation of the female mating structure, the protoperithecium, and for the maturation of a fertilized protoperithecium into a perithecium. Perithecia grafting experiments demonstrate that the autophagy genes and the cell-to-cell fusion genes (the MAK-1 and MAK-2 pathway genes are needed for the mobilization and movement of nutrients from an established vegetative hyphal network into the developing protoperithecium. Deletion mutants for the PACC pathway genes palA, palB, palC, palF, palH, and pacC were found to be defective in two aspects of female development. First, they were unable to initiate female development on synthetic crossing medium. However, they could form protoperithecia when grown on cellophane, on corn meal agar, or in response to the presence of nearby perithecia. Second, fertilized perithecia from PACC pathway mutants were unable to produce asci and complete female development. Protein localization experiments with a GFP-tagged PALA construct showed that PALA was localized in a peripheral punctate pattern, consistent with a signaling center associated with the ESCRT complex. The N. crassa PACC signal transduction pathway appears to be similar to the PacC/Rim101 pathway previously characterized in Aspergillus nidulans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In N. crassa the pathway plays a key role in regulating female development.

  13. Distinct UV-B and UV-A/blue light signal transduction pathways induce chalcone synthase gene expression in Arabidopsis cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, J.M.; Jenkins, G.I.

    1996-01-01

    UV and blue light control the expression of flavonoid biosynthesis genes in a range of higher plants. To investigate the signal transduction processes involved in the induction of chalcone synthase (CHS) gene expression by UV-B and UV-A/blue light, we examined the, effects of specific agonists and inhibitors of known signaling components in mammalian systems in a photomixotrophic Arabidopsis cell suspension culture. CHS expression is induced specifically by these wavelengths in the cell culture, in a manner similar to that in mature Arabidopsis leaf tissue. Both the UV-B and UV-A/blue phototransduction processes involve calcium, although the elevation of cytosolic calcium is insufficient on its own to stimulate CHS expression. The UV-A/blue light induction of CHS expression does not appear to involve calmodulin, whereas the UV-B response does; this difference indicates that the signal transduction pathways are, at least in part, distinct. We provide evidence that both pathways involve reversible protein phosphorylation and require protein synthesis. The UV-B and UV-A/blue light signaling pathways are therefore different from the phytochrome signal transduction pathway regulating CHS expression in other species

  14. Unravelling pathways downstream Sox6 induction in K562 erythroid cells by proteomic analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Barbarani, Gloria

    2017-10-20

    The Sox6 transcription factor is crucial for terminal maturation of definitive red blood cells. Sox6-null mouse fetuses present misshapen and nucleated erythrocytes, due to impaired actin assembly and cytoskeleton stability. These defects are accompanied with a reduced survival of Sox6-/- red blood cells, resulting in a compensated anemia. Sox6-overexpression in K562 cells and in human primary ex vivo erythroid cultures enhances erythroid differentiation and leads to hemoglobinization, the hallmark of erythroid maturation. To obtain an overview on processes downstream to Sox6 expression, we performed a differential proteomic analysis on human erythroid K562 cells overexpressing Sox6. Sox6-overexpression induces dysregulation of 64 proteins, involved in cytoskeleton remodeling and in protein synthesis, folding and trafficking, key processes for erythroid maturation. Moreover, 43 out of 64 genes encoding for differentially expressed proteins contain within their proximal regulatory regions sites that are bound by SOX6 according to ENCODE ChIP-seq datasets and are possible direct SOX6 targets. SAR1B, one of the most induced proteins upon Sox6 overexpression, shares a conserved regulatory module, composed by a double SOX6 binding site and a GATA1 consensus, with the adjacent SEC24 A gene. Since both genes encode for COPII components, this element could concur to the coordinated expression of these proteins during erythropoiesis.

  15. Phage Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages mediate horizontal gene transfer through a mechanism known as transduction. Phage transduction carried out in the laboratory involves a bacterial donor and a recipient, both of which are susceptible to infection by the phage of interest. Phage is propagated in the donor, concentrated, and exposed transiently to recipient at different multiplicity of infection ratios. Transductants are selected for the desired phenotype by culture on selective medium. Here we describe transduction of ermB conferring resistance to erythromycin by the C. difficile phage ϕC2.

  16. [Effect of total glucosides of paeony on Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction pathway expression in kidney of diabetic rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Bao-Chao; Chen, Wei-Dong; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Ping; Liu, Lei; Wang, Jing

    2014-10-01

    The study is to explore the effect of total glucosides of paeony (TGP)on Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction pathway expression in kidney of diabetic rats, and discuss the protection of TGP in diabetic nephropathy and possible mechanism. Ninety male SD rats of 8 weeks age were randomly divided into normal control group (n = 10) and model group (n = 80). Rats of the normal control group were fed with regular diet, while rats of the model group were fed with high-fat high-sugar diet and 4 weeks later were given an intraperitoneal injection of 35 mg x kg(-1) streptozotocin (STZ). The successfully induced type 2 diabetic rat models were then randomly divided into DM group, three TGP (50, 100, 200 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1)) treatment group and tripterygium wilfordii glycosides (8 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1)) control group. Rats of DM group and each treatment group were given high-fat high-sugar diet. At week 14, the levels of blood sugar, 24 hour urine protein, serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen were tested. The rats were then sacrificed. Renal pathological changes were examined. Renal tissue Wnt-1 and β-catenin expressions were detected by immunohistochemical assay. Wnt-1 mRNA and β-catenin mRNA expression was semi-quantified by RT-PCR. Wnt-1 protein and β-catenin protein expression was semi-quantified by Western blot. The Result show that Wnt-1 and β-catenin expression increased in kidney of high-fat high-sugar induced type 2 diabetic rats. Compared with diabetic group, the level of serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, 24 h urine protein, mean glomerular area and mean glomerular volume were decreased, renal histopathology were improved, expression of Wnt-1 and β-catenin mRNA and protein was reduced in TGP group. Tripterygium wilfordii glycosides had the similar effect. In conclusion, these results showed that Wnt/β-catenin abnormal activation in kidney of type 2 diabetic rats, TGP can improve kidney damage in diabetic rats and delay the development of diabetic

  17. Adducts of Oxylipin Electrophiles to Glutathione Reflect a 13 Specificity of the Downstream Lipoxygenase Pathway in the Tobacco Hypersensitive Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoine, Céline; Falletti, Olivier; Douki, Thierry; Iacazio, Gilles; Ennar, Najla; Montillet, Jean-Luc; Triantaphylidès, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The response to reactive electrophile species (RES) is now considered as part of the plant response to pathogen and insect attacks. Thanks to a previously established high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry methodology, we have investigated the production of oxylipin RES adducts to glutathione (GSH) during the hypersensitive response (HR) of plants. We have observed that RES conjugation to GSH in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves is facile and nonspecific. In cryptogein-elicited tobacco leaves, we show that the oxylipin RES adducts to GSH are produced in correlation with GSH consumption, increase in glutathione S-transferase activity, and the appearance of the cell death symptoms. In this model, the adducts arise mainly from the downstream 13 lipoxygenase (LOX) metabolism, although the induced 9 LOX pathway leads massively to the accumulation of upstream metabolites. The main adducts were obtained from 2-hexenal and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid. They accumulate transiently as 1-hexanol-3-GSH, a reduced adduct, and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid-GSH, respectively. RES conjugation does not initiate cell death but explains part of the GSH depletion that accompanies HR cell death. The nature of these GSH conjugates shows the key role played by the 13 LOX pathway in RES signaling in the tobacco HR. PMID:16500992

  18. DMPD: Gram-negative endotoxin: an extraordinary lipid with profound effects oneukaryotic signal transduction. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1916089 Gram-negative endotoxin: an extraordinary lipid with profound effects oneuk...ep;5(12):2652-60. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Gram-negative endotoxin: an extraordinary lipid with pr...tive endotoxin: an extraordinary lipid with profound effects oneukaryotic signal transduction. Authors Raetz

  19. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis reveals system-wide signaling pathways downstream of SDF-1/CXCR4 in breast cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Tingfang; Zhai, Bo; Yu, Yonghao; Kiyotsugu, Yoshikawa; Raschle, Thomas; Etzkorn, Manuel; Seo, Hee-Chan; Nagiec, Michal; Luna, Rafael E.; Reinherz, Ellis L.; Blenis, John; Gygi, Steven P.; Wagner, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in women worldwide, with an estimated 1.7 million new cases and 522,000 deaths around the world in 2012 alone. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are essential for tumor reoccurrence and metastasis which is the major source of cancer lethality. G protein-coupled receptor chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) is critical for tumor metastasis. However, stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1)/CXCR4–mediated signaling pathways in breast CSCs are largely unknown. Using isotope reductive dimethylation and large-scale MS-based quantitative phosphoproteome analysis, we examined protein phosphorylation induced by SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling in breast CSCs. We quantified more than 11,000 phosphorylation sites in 2,500 phosphoproteins. Of these phosphosites, 87% were statistically unchanged in abundance in response to SDF-1/CXCR4 stimulation. In contrast, 545 phosphosites in 266 phosphoproteins were significantly increased, whereas 113 phosphosites in 74 phosphoproteins were significantly decreased. SDF-1/CXCR4 increases phosphorylation in 60 cell migration- and invasion-related proteins, of them 43 (>70%) phosphoproteins are unrecognized. In addition, SDF-1/CXCR4 upregulates the phosphorylation of 44 previously uncharacterized kinases, 8 phosphatases, and 1 endogenous phosphatase inhibitor. Using computational approaches, we performed system-based analyses examining SDF-1/CXCR4–mediated phosphoproteome, including construction of kinase–substrate network and feedback regulation loops downstream of SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling in breast CSCs. We identified a previously unidentified SDF-1/CXCR4-PKA-MAP2K2-ERK signaling pathway and demonstrated the feedback regulation on MEK, ERK1/2, δ-catenin, and PPP1Cα in SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling in breast CSCs. This study gives a system-wide view of phosphorylation events downstream of SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling in breast CSCs, providing a resource for the study of CSC-targeted cancer therapy. PMID

  20. Selection of personalized patient therapy through the use of knowledge-based computational models that identify tumor-driving signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaegh, Wim; van Ooijen, Henk; Inda, Márcia A; Hatzis, Pantelis; Versteeg, Rogier; Smid, Marcel; Martens, John; Foekens, John; van de Wiel, Paul; Clevers, Hans; van de Stolpe, Anja

    2014-06-01

    Increasing knowledge about signal transduction pathways as drivers of cancer growth has elicited the development of "targeted drugs," which inhibit aberrant signaling pathways. They require a companion diagnostic test that identifies the tumor-driving pathway; however, currently available tests like estrogen receptor (ER) protein expression for hormonal treatment of breast cancer do not reliably predict therapy response, at least in part because they do not adequately assess functional pathway activity. We describe a novel approach to predict signaling pathway activity based on knowledge-based Bayesian computational models, which interpret quantitative transcriptome data as the functional output of an active signaling pathway, by using expression levels of transcriptional target genes. Following calibration on only a small number of cell lines or cohorts of patient data, they provide a reliable assessment of signaling pathway activity in tumors of different tissue origin. As proof of principle, models for the canonical Wnt and ER pathways are presented, including initial clinical validation on independent datasets from various cancer types. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Predictive and prognostic factors in non small cell lung cancer: identification of new genes and signal transduction pathways in the study of genomic and oncoproteomic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crino, L.; Martelli, M.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the project is the comprehension of resistance and survival mechanisms of the neoplastic cell in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) in both patients subjected to surgery or with advanced disease. In order to identify new genes, proteins and signal transduction pathways, involved in the establishment of the treatment resistance of neoplastic cells, cellular cohort derived from lung cancers will be compared, by gene expression profiling, to normal cells and cells derived from cancer relapse. Twenty patients with NSCLC surgically resected and one patient with advanced NSCLC have been enrolled in this study

  2. Low-dose occupational exposure to benzene and signal transduction pathways involved in the regulation of cellular response to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenga, Concettina; Gangemi, Silvia; Giambò, Federica; Tsitsimpikou, Christina; Golokhvast, Kirill; Tsatsakis, Aristidis; Costa, Chiara

    2016-02-15

    Benzene metabolism seems to modulate NF-κB, p38-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signalling pathways via the production of reactive oxygen species. This study aims to evaluate the effects of low-dose, long-term exposure on NF-κB, STAT3, p38-MAPK and stress-activated protein kinase/Jun amino-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) signal transduction pathways in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in gasoline station attendants. The influence of consumption of vegetables and fruits on these pathways has also been evaluated. A total of 91 men, employed in gasoline stations located in eastern Sicily, were enrolled for this study and compared with a control group of 63 male office workers with no history of exposure to benzene. The exposure was assessed by measuring urinary trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA) concentration. Quantitative analyses were performed for proteins NF-κB p65, phospho-NF-κB p65, phospho-IκB-α, phospho-SAPK/JNK, phospho-p38 MAPK and phospho-STAT3 using an immunoenzymatic assay. The results of this study indicate significantly higher t,t-MA levels in gasoline station attendants. With regard to NF-κB, phospho-IκB-α and phospho-STAT3 proteins, statistically significant differences were observed in workers exposed to benzene. However, no differences were observed in SAPK/JNK and p38-MAPK activation. These changes were positively correlated with t,t-MA levels, but only phospho-NF-κB p65 was associated with the intake of food rich in antioxidant active principles. Chronic exposure to low-dose benzene can modulate signal transduction pathways activated by oxidative stress and involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis. This could represent a possible mechanism of carcinogenic action of chronic benzene exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Upstream and Downstream Co-inhibition of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase and PI3K/Akt/mTOR Pathways in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew H. Wong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Extensive cross talk exists between PI3K/Akt/mTOR and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways, and both are upregulated in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC. Our previous study suggested that epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor erlotinib which acts upstream of these pathways acts synergistically with PI3K inhibitors in PDAC. Horizontal combined blockade upstream and downstream of these two pathways is therefore explored. METHODS: Erlotinib paired with PI3K inhibitor (BYL719 was tested against erlotinib plus dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor BEZ-235, and MEK inhibitor (PD98059 plus BEZ235, on five primary PDAC cell lines and on two pairs of parent and erlotinib-resistant (ER cell lines. A range of in vitro assays including cell proliferation, Western blotting, migration, clonogenic, cell cycle, and apopotic assays was used to test for the efficacy of combined blockade. RESULTS: Dual downstream blockade of the MAPK and PAM pathways was more effective in attenuating downstream molecular signals. Synergy was demonstrated for erlotinib and BEZ235 and for PD-98059 and BEZ-235. This resulted in a trend of increased growth cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, cell proliferation, and colony and migration suppression. This combination showed more efficacy in cell lines with acquired resistance to erlotinib. CONCLUSIONS: The additional mTOR blockade provided by BEZ235 in combined blockade resulted in increased anticancer effect. The hypersensitivity of ER cell lines to additional mTOR blockade suggested PAM pathway oncogenic dependence via mTOR. Dual downstream combined blockade of MAPK and PAM pathways with MEK and PI3K/mTOR inhibitor appeared most effective and represents an attractive therapeutic strategy against pancreatic cancer and its associated drug resistance.

  4. The human keratinocyte two-dimensional gel protein database (update 1995): mapping components of signal transduction pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, J E; Rasmussen, H H; Gromov, P

    1995-01-01

    )vaccinia virus expression of full length cDNAs, and (vi) in vitro transcription/translation of full-length cDNAs. This year, special emphasis has been given to the identification of signal transduction components by using 2-D gel immunoblotting of crude keratinocyte lysates in combination with enhanced...... chemoluminescence (ECL) detection. Identified proteins are listed both in alphabetical order and with increasing SSP number, together with their M(r), pI, cellular localization and credit to the investigator(s) that aided in the identification. Ultimately, the aim of the comprehensive database is to gather--through......The master two-dimensional (2-D) gel database of human keratinocytes currently lists 3154 cellular proteins (2224 isoelectric focusing, IEF; and 930 nonequilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis, NEPHGE), many of which correspond to post-translational modifications. 1082 polypeptides have been...

  5. Induction of interferon-gamma and downstream pathways during establishment of fetal persistent infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Natalia P; Webb, Brett T; McGill, Jodi L; Schaut, Robert G; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Van Campen, Hana; Sacco, Randy E; Hansen, Thomas R

    2014-04-01

    Development of transplacental infection depends on the ability of the virus to cross the placenta and replicate within the fetus while counteracting maternal and fetal immune responses. Unfortunately, little is known about this complex process. Non-cytopathic (ncp) strains of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), a pestivirus in the Flaviviridae family, cause persistent infection in early gestational fetuses (gestational fetuses (>150 days; transiently infected, TI). Evasion of innate immune response and development of immunotolerance to ncp BVDV have been suggested as possible mechanisms for the establishment of the persistent infection. Previously we have observed a robust temporal induction of interferon (IFN) type I (innate immune response) and upregulation of IFN stimulated genes (ISGs) in BVDV TI fetuses. Modest chronic upregulation of ISGs in PI fetuses and calves reflects a stimulated innate immune response during persistent BVDV infection. We hypothesized that establishing persistent fetal BVDV infection is also accompanied by the induction of IFN-gamma (IFN-γ). The aims of the present study were to determine IFN-γ concentration in blood and amniotic fluid from control, TI and PI fetuses during BVDV infection and analyze induction of the IFN-γ downstream pathways in fetal lymphoid tissues. Two experiments with in vivo BVDV infections were completed. In Experiment 1, pregnant heifers were infected with ncp BVDV type 2 on day 75 or 175 of gestation or kept naïve to generate PI, TI and control fetuses, respectively. Fetuses were collected by Cesarean section on day 190. In Experiment 2, fetuses were collected on days 82, 89, 97, 192 and 245 following infection of pregnant heifers on day 75 of gestation. The results were consistent with the hypothesis that ncp BVDV infection induces IFN-γ secretion during acute infection in both TI and PI fetuses and that lymphoid tissues such as spleen, liver and thymus, serve both as possible sources of IFN-γ and target

  6. Effect of Lipoglycans from Mycobacterium Chelonae on the expression of inflammatory factors IL-8 and IL-6 in human corneal epithelial cells and its possible signal transduction pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Zhou Tang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To study the influence of Lipoglycans from Mycobacterium Chelonae(Cheon the expression of IL-6 and IL-8 in human corneal epithelia cells and its possible signal transduction pathway.METHODS: Lipoglycans was extracted by the Triton X-114 phase partitioning. Lipoglycans from Che were purified, by successive detergent and phenol extractions. Lipoglycans were separated by gel filtration on a Sephacryl 200 column and Sephacryl 100 column in series, followed by extensive dialisis. Purified Lipoglycans(50μg/mLwere added into culture medium to stimulate primary human corneal epithelial(HCEcells. Cells and supernatant were collected at 0, 6, 12, 24h after the stimulation. The IL-6 and IL-8 expression at mRNA level was assayed by using real time RT-PCR and the secreted IL-6 and IL-8 in the supernatants was measured by ELISA. Immunochemistry was used to detect the expression and location of NF-κB in HCE cells.RESULTS: After the treatment of Lipoglycans, the expression of IL-8 and IL-6 at mRNA level obviouly increased within 12h, and reached peak level at 6h(IL-8 was 36.8 times that of the blank control, and IL-6 was 32.7 times. Compared with the blank control group, the expression of IL-8 at protein level in the supernatant increased 2.8 folds at 6h(P>0.05, 13.4 folds at 12h(PPPPPCONCLUSION: Lipoglycans from Che can induce HCE cells to produce inflammatory factors(IL-6 and IL-8, and its signal transduction pathway probably is mediated by NF-κB.

  7. Sugar-induced cephalic-phase insulin release is mediated by a T1r2+T1r3-independent taste transduction pathway in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Sarah; Holter, Marlena; Azenkot, Tali; Goldman, Olivia; Margolskee, Robert F.; Vasselli, Joseph R.; Sclafani, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Sensory stimulation from foods elicits cephalic phase responses, which facilitate digestion and nutrient assimilation. One such response, cephalic-phase insulin release (CPIR), enhances glucose tolerance. Little is known about the chemosensory mechanisms that activate CPIR. We studied the contribution of the sweet taste receptor (T1r2+T1r3) to sugar-induced CPIR in C57BL/6 (B6) and T1r3 knockout (KO) mice. First, we measured insulin release and glucose tolerance following oral (i.e., normal ingestion) or intragastric (IG) administration of 2.8 M glucose. Both groups of mice exhibited a CPIR following oral but not IG administration, and this CPIR improved glucose tolerance. Second, we examined the specificity of CPIR. Both mouse groups exhibited a CPIR following oral administration of 1 M glucose and 1 M sucrose but not 1 M fructose or water alone. Third, we studied behavioral attraction to the same three sugar solutions in short-term acceptability tests. B6 mice licked more avidly for the sugar solutions than for water, whereas T1r3 KO mice licked no more for the sugar solutions than for water. Finally, we examined chorda tympani (CT) nerve responses to each of the sugars. Both mouse groups exhibited CT nerve responses to the sugars, although those of B6 mice were stronger. We propose that mice possess two taste transduction pathways for sugars. One mediates behavioral attraction to sugars and requires an intact T1r2+T1r3. The other mediates CPIR but does not require an intact T1r2+T1r3. If the latter taste transduction pathway exists in humans, it should provide opportunities for the development of new treatments for controlling blood sugar. PMID:26157055

  8. Portulaca oleracea extract can inhibit nodule formation of colon cancer stem cells by regulating gene expression of the Notch signal transduction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Heiying; Chen, Li; Wang, Shuiming; Chao, Deng

    2017-07-01

    To investigate whether Portulaca oleracea extract affects tumor formation in colon cancer stem cells and its chemotherapy sensitivity. In addition, to analyze associated genetic changes within the Notch signal transduction pathway. Serum-free cultures of colon cancer cells (HT-29) and HT-29 cancer stem cells were treated with the chemotherapeutic drug 5-fluorouracil to assess sensitivity. Injections of the stem cells were also given to BALB/c mice to confirm tumor growth and note its characteristics. In addition, the effect of different concentrations of P. oleracea extract was tested on the growth of HT-29 colon cancer cells and HT-29 cancer stem cells, as determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method. The effects of P. oleracea extract on the expression of β-catenin, Notch1, and Notch2 in the HT-29 cells were studied using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. The tumor volume of the HT29 cells was two times larger than that of HT29 cancer stem cells. Treatment with P. oleracea extract inhibited the proliferation of both HT-29 cancer cells and HT-29 cancer stem cells at doses from 0.07 to 2.25 µg/mL. Apoptosis of HT-29 cancer cells and HT-29 cancer stem cells was assessed by flow cytometry; it was enhanced by the addition of P. oleracea extract. Finally, treatment with P. oleracea extract significantly downregulated the expression of the Notch1 and β-catenin genes in both cell types. The results of this study show that P. oleracea extract inhibits the growth of colon cancer stem cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, it inhibits the expression of the Notch1 and β-catenin genes. Taken together, this suggests that it may elicit its effects through regulatory and target genes that mediate the Notch signal transduction pathway.

  9. Sugar-induced cephalic-phase insulin release is mediated by a T1r2+T1r3-independent taste transduction pathway in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendinning, John I; Stano, Sarah; Holter, Marlena; Azenkot, Tali; Goldman, Olivia; Margolskee, Robert F; Vasselli, Joseph R; Sclafani, Anthony

    2015-09-01

    Sensory stimulation from foods elicits cephalic phase responses, which facilitate digestion and nutrient assimilation. One such response, cephalic-phase insulin release (CPIR), enhances glucose tolerance. Little is known about the chemosensory mechanisms that activate CPIR. We studied the contribution of the sweet taste receptor (T1r2+T1r3) to sugar-induced CPIR in C57BL/6 (B6) and T1r3 knockout (KO) mice. First, we measured insulin release and glucose tolerance following oral (i.e., normal ingestion) or intragastric (IG) administration of 2.8 M glucose. Both groups of mice exhibited a CPIR following oral but not IG administration, and this CPIR improved glucose tolerance. Second, we examined the specificity of CPIR. Both mouse groups exhibited a CPIR following oral administration of 1 M glucose and 1 M sucrose but not 1 M fructose or water alone. Third, we studied behavioral attraction to the same three sugar solutions in short-term acceptability tests. B6 mice licked more avidly for the sugar solutions than for water, whereas T1r3 KO mice licked no more for the sugar solutions than for water. Finally, we examined chorda tympani (CT) nerve responses to each of the sugars. Both mouse groups exhibited CT nerve responses to the sugars, although those of B6 mice were stronger. We propose that mice possess two taste transduction pathways for sugars. One mediates behavioral attraction to sugars and requires an intact T1r2+T1r3. The other mediates CPIR but does not require an intact T1r2+T1r3. If the latter taste transduction pathway exists in humans, it should provide opportunities for the development of new treatments for controlling blood sugar. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Characterization of Cell Surface and EPS Remodeling of Azospirillum brasilense Chemotaxis-like 1 Signal Transduction Pathway mutants by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billings, Amanda N [ORNL; Siuti, Piro [ORNL; Bible, Amber [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Alexandre, Gladys [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    To compete in complex microbial communities, bacteria must quickly sense environmental changes and adjust cellular functions for optimal growth. Chemotaxis-like signal transduction pathways are implicated in the modulation of multiple cellular responses, including motility, EPS production, and cell-to-cell interactions. Recently, the Che1 chemotaxis-like pathway from Azospirillum brasilense was shown to modulate flocculation. In A. brasilense, cell surface properties, including EPS production, are thought to play a direct role in promoting flocculation. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we have detected distinct changes in the surface morphology of flocculating A. brasilense Che1 mutant strains that are absent in the wild type strain. Whereas the wild type strain produces a smooth mucosal extracellular matrix, the flocculating Che1 mutant strains produce distinctive extracellular fibril structures. Further analyses using flocculation inhibition and lectin-binding assays suggest that the composition of EPS components in the extracellular matrix differs between the cheA1 and cheY1 mutants, despite an apparent similarity in the macroscopic floc structures. Collectively, these data indicate that mutations in the Che1 pathway that result in increased flocculation are correlated with distinctive changes in the extracellular matrix structure produced by the mutants, including likely changes in the EPS structure and/or composition.

  11. Characterization of cell surface and extracellular matrix remodeling of Azospirillum brasilense chemotaxis-like 1 signal transduction pathway mutants by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    To compete in complex microbial communities, bacteria must sense environmental changes and adjust cellular functions for optimal growth. Chemotaxis-like signal transduction pathways are implicated in the regulation of multiple behaviors in response to changes in the environment, including motility patterns, exopolysaccharide production, and cell-to-cell interactions. In Azospirillum brasilense, cell surface properties, including exopolysaccharide production, are thought to play a direct role in promoting flocculation. Recently, the Che1 chemotaxis-like pathway from A. brasilense was shown to modulate flocculation, suggesting an associated modulation of cell surface properties. Using atomic force microscopy, distinct changes in the surface morphology of flocculating A. brasilense Che1 mutant strains were detected. Whereas the wild-type strain produces a smooth mucosal extracellular matrix after 24 h, the flocculating Che1 mutant strains produce distinctive extracellular fibril structures. Further analyses using flocculation inhibition, lectin-binding assays, and comparison of lipopolysaccharides profiles suggest that the extracellular matrix differs between the cheA1 and the cheY1 mutants, despite an apparent similarity in the macroscopic floc structures. Collectively, these data indicate that disruption of the Che1 pathway is correlated with distinctive changes in the extracellular matrix, which likely result from changes in surface polysaccharides structure and/or composition.

  12. Characterization of cell surface and extracellular matrix remodeling of Azospirillum brasilense chemotaxis-like 1 signal transduction pathway mutants by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Amanda Nicole; Siuti, Piro; Bible, Amber N; Alexandre, Gladys; Retterer, Scott T; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L

    2011-01-01

    To compete in complex microbial communities, bacteria must sense environmental changes and adjust cellular functions for optimal growth. Chemotaxis-like signal transduction pathways are implicated in the regulation of multiple behaviors in response to changes in the environment, including motility patterns, exopolysaccharide production, and cell-to-cell interactions. In Azospirillum brasilense, cell surface properties, including exopolysaccharide production, are thought to play a direct role in promoting flocculation. Recently, the Che1 chemotaxis-like pathway from A. brasilense was shown to modulate flocculation, suggesting an associated modulation of cell surface properties. Using atomic force microscopy, distinct changes in the surface morphology of flocculating A. brasilense Che1 mutant strains were detected. Whereas the wild-type strain produces a smooth mucosal extracellular matrix after 24 h, the flocculating Che1 mutant strains produce distinctive extracellular fibril structures. Further analyses using flocculation inhibition, lectin-binding assays, and comparison of lipopolysaccharides profiles suggest that the extracellular matrix differs between the cheA1 and the cheY1 mutants, despite an apparent similarity in the macroscopic floc structures. Collectively, these data indicate that disruption of the Che1 pathway is correlated with distinctive changes in the extracellular matrix, which likely result from changes in surface polysaccharides structure and/or composition. FEMS Microbiology Letters © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. No claim to original US government works.

  13. [6]-Gingerol Prevents Disassembly of Cell Junctions and Activities of MMPs in Invasive Human Pancreas Cancer Cells through ERK/NF-κB/Snail Signal Transduction Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Ok Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the effects of [6]-gingerol, a ginger phytochemical, on tight junction (TJ molecules, we investigated TJ tightening and signal transduction pathways in human pancreatic duct cell-derived cancer cell line PANC-1. The following methods were utilized: MTT assay to determine cytotoxicity; zymography to examine matrix metalloproteinase (MMP activities; transepithelial electrical resistance (TER and paracellular flux for TJ measurement; RT-PCR and immunoblotting for proteins related to TJ and invasion; and EMSA for NF-κB activity in PANC-1 cells. Results revealed that TER significantly increased and claudin 4 and MMP-9 decreased compared to those of the control. TJ protein levels, including zonula occludens (ZO- 1, occludin, and E-cadherin, increased in [6]-gingerol-treated cells, which correlated with a decrease in paracellular flux and MMP activity. Furthermore, NF-κB/Snail nuclear translocation was suppressed via downregulation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK pathway in response to [6]-gingerol treatment. Moreover, treatment with U0126, an ERK inhibitor, completely blocked NF-κB activity. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that [6]-gingerol regulates TJ-related proteins and suppresses invasion and metastasis through NF-κB/Snail inhibition via inhibition of the ERK pathway. Therefore, [6]-gingerol may suppress the invasive activity of PANC-1 cells.

  14. Physiological and Pathogenic Roles of Prolyl Isomerase Pin1 in Metabolic Regulations via Multiple Signal Transduction Pathway Modulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Nakatsu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Prolyl isomerases are divided into three groups, the FKBP family, Cyclophilin and the Parvulin family (Pin1 and Par14. Among these isomerases, Pin1 is a unique prolyl isomerase binding to the motif including pSer/pThr-Pro that is phosphorylated by kinases. Once bound, Pin1 modulates the enzymatic activity, protein stability or subcellular localization of target proteins by changing the cis- and trans-formations of proline. Several studies have examined the roles of Pin1 in the pathogenesis of cancers and Alzheimer’s disease. On the other hand, recent studies have newly demonstrated Pin1 to be involved in regulating glucose and lipid metabolism. Interestingly, while Pin1 expression is markedly increased by high-fat diet feeding, Pin1 KO mice are resistant to diet-induced obesity, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and diabetic vascular dysfunction. These phenomena result from the binding of Pin1 to several key factors regulating metabolic functions, which include insulin receptor substrate-1, AMPK, Crtc2 and NF-κB p65. In this review, we focus on recent advances in elucidating the physiological roles of Pin1 as well as the pathogenesis of disorders involving this isomerase, from the viewpoint of the relationships between signal transductions and metabolic functions.

  15. Physiological and Pathogenic Roles of Prolyl Isomerase Pin1 in Metabolic Regulations via Multiple Signal Transduction Pathway Modulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsu, Yusuke; Matsunaga, Yasuka; Yamamotoya, Takeshi; Ueda, Koji; Inoue, Yuki; Mori, Keiichi; Sakoda, Hideyuki; Fujishiro, Midori; Ono, Hiraku; Kushiyama, Akifumi; Asano, Tomoichiro

    2016-09-07

    Prolyl isomerases are divided into three groups, the FKBP family, Cyclophilin and the Parvulin family (Pin1 and Par14). Among these isomerases, Pin1 is a unique prolyl isomerase binding to the motif including pSer/pThr-Pro that is phosphorylated by kinases. Once bound, Pin1 modulates the enzymatic activity, protein stability or subcellular localization of target proteins by changing the cis- and trans-formations of proline. Several studies have examined the roles of Pin1 in the pathogenesis of cancers and Alzheimer's disease. On the other hand, recent studies have newly demonstrated Pin1 to be involved in regulating glucose and lipid metabolism. Interestingly, while Pin1 expression is markedly increased by high-fat diet feeding, Pin1 KO mice are resistant to diet-induced obesity, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and diabetic vascular dysfunction. These phenomena result from the binding of Pin1 to several key factors regulating metabolic functions, which include insulin receptor substrate-1, AMPK, Crtc2 and NF-κB p65. In this review, we focus on recent advances in elucidating the physiological roles of Pin1 as well as the pathogenesis of disorders involving this isomerase, from the viewpoint of the relationships between signal transductions and metabolic functions.

  16. Differences in radiosensitivity of the respiratory burst generated in HL-60 cells via different signal transduction pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaffenberger, W.; Beuningen, D. van

    1994-01-01

    Induced differentiation of the promyelocytic leukaemia cell line, HL-60, is associated with the acquisition of functional properties, like the expression of specific receptors and the competence to exert the respiratory burst (RB). In this system we evaluated the effects of ionizing radiation on the signal transduction processes involved in the activation of the respiratory burst/NADPH oxidase. HL-60 cells were X-irradiated with up to 1 Gy and induced towards granulocytic differentiation by treatment with 1.25% DMSO on day 0. The expression of the formyl peptide receptor (FPR), the development of responsiveness of the cells to its ligand (f-MLP) and to 4 β-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) were measured up to day 7 postinduction/irradiation. Using flow cytometry, fluorescinated formyl-hexapeptide or unlabelled f-MLP as ligands and dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR 123) as an indicator of RB activity, respectively, the acquisition of functional responsiveness to both stimuli was determined. (author)

  17. Disruption of Microtubules Post-Virus Entry Enhances Adeno-Associated Virus Vector Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ping-Jie; Mitchell, Angela M.; Huang, Lu; Li, Chengwen; Samulski, R. Jude

    2016-01-01

    Perinuclear retention of viral particles is a poorly understood phenomenon observed during many virus infections. In this study, we investigated whether perinuclear accumulation acts as a barrier to limit recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) transduction. After nocodazole treatment to disrupt microtubules at microtubule-organization center (MT-MTOC) after virus entry, we observed higher rAAV transduction. To elucidate the role of MT-MTOC in rAAV infection and study its underlying mechanisms, we demonstrated that rAAV's perinuclear localization was retained by MT-MTOC with fluorescent analysis, and enhanced rAAV transduction from MT-MTOC disruption was dependent on the rAAV capsid's nuclear import signals. Interestingly, after knocking down RhoA or inhibiting its downstream effectors (ROCK and Actin), MT-MTOC disruption failed to increase rAAV transduction or nuclear entry. These data suggest that enhancement of rAAV transduction is the result of increased trafficking to the nucleus via the RhoA-ROCK-Actin pathway. Ten-fold higher rAAV transduction was also observed by disrupting MT-MTOC in brain, liver, and tumor in vivo. In summary, this study indicates that virus perinuclear accumulation at MT-MTOC is a barrier-limiting parameter for effective rAAV transduction and defines a novel defense mechanism by which host cells restrain viral invasion. PMID:26942476

  18. Brassinosteriod Insensitive 2 (BIN2) acts as a downstream effector of the Target of Rapamycin (TOR) signaling pathway to regulate photoautotrophic growth in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Fangjie; Zhang, Rui; Meng, Zhigang; Deng, Kexuan; Que, Yumei; Zhuo, Fengping; Feng, Li; Guo, Sundui; Datla, Raju; Ren, Maozhi

    2017-01-01

    The components of the target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling pathway have been well characterized in heterotrophic organisms from yeast to humans. However, because of rapamycin insensitivity, embryonic lethality in tor null mutants and a lack of reliable ways of detecting TOR protein kinase in higher plants, the key players upstream and downstream of TOR remain largely unknown in plants. Using engineered rapamycin-sensitive Binding Protein 12-2 (BP12-2) plants, the present study showed that combined treatment with rapamycin and active-site TOR inhibitors (asTORis) results in synergistic inhibition of TOR activity and plant growth in Arabidopsis. Based on this system, we revealed that TOR signaling plays a crucial role in modulating the transition from heterotrophic to photoautotrophic growth in Arabidopsis. Ribosomal protein S6 kinase 2 (S6K2) was identified as a direct downstream target of TOR, and the growth of TOR-suppressed plants could be rescued by up-regulating S6K2. Systems, genetic, and biochemical analyses revealed that Brassinosteriod Insensitive 2 (BIN2) acts as a novel downstream effector of S6K2, and the phosphorylation of BIN2 depends on TOR-S6K2 signaling in Arabidopsis. By combining pharmacological with genetic and biochemical approaches, we determined that the TOR-S6K2-BIN2 signaling pathway plays important roles in regulating the photoautotrophic growth of Arabidopsis. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  19. Microglial Janus kinase/signal transduction and activator of transcription 3 pathway activity directly impacts astrocyte and spinal neuron characteristics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Molet, J.; Mauborgne, A.; Diallo, Michael; Armand, V.; Geny, D.; Villanueva, L.; Boucher, Y.; Pohl, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 136, č. 1 (2016), s. 133-147 ISSN 0022-3042 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : astrocytes * cell plasticity * JAK/STAT3 pathway * microglia conditioned media * spinal cord neurons Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.083, year: 2016

  20. The role of the PI3K-Akt signal transduction pathway in Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus infection of Spodoptera frugiperda cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Wei; Yang Yi; Weng Qingbei; Lin Tiehao; Yuan Meijin; Yang Kai; Pang Yi

    2009-01-01

    Many viruses activate the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling pathway, thereby modulating diverse downstream signaling pathways associated with antiapoptosis, proliferation, cell cycling, protein synthesis and glucose metabolism, in order to augment their replication. To date, the role of the PI3K-Akt pathway in Baculovirus replication has not been defined. In the present study, we demonstrate that infection of Sf9 cells with Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) elevated cellular Akt phosphorylation at 1 h post-infection. The maximum Akt phosphorylation occurred at 6 h post-infection and remained unchanged until 18 h post-infection. The PI3K-specific inhibitor, LY294002, suppressed Akt phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that AcMNPV-induced Akt phosphorylation is PI3K-dependent. The inhibition of PI3K-Akt activation by LY294002 significantly reduced the viral yield, including a reduction in budded viruses and occlusion bodies. The virus production was reduced only when the inhibitor was added within 24 h of infection, implying that activation of PI3K occurred early in infection. Correspondingly, both viral DNA replication and late (VP39) and very late (POLH) viral protein expression were impaired by LY294002 treatment; LY294002 had no effect on immediate-early (IE1) and early-late (GP64) protein expression. These results demonstrate that the PI3K-Akt pathway is required for efficient Baculovirus replication.

  1. Fos- and Jun-related transcription factors are involved in the signal transduction pathway of mechanical loading in condylar chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papachristou, Dionisios; Pirttiniemi, Pertti; Kantomaa, Tuomo; Agnantis, Niki; Basdra, Efthimia K

    2006-02-01

    The chondrocytes of the articular condylar cartilage proliferate, hypertrophy and ultimately undergo apoptosis (programmed cell death), being replaced by osteoblasts. Converging results consolidate activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factor as the pivotal downstream effector in the early response of stress-sensitive cells to mechanical loading, and the Fra-1, Fra-2, JunB and JunD members of the AP-1 transcription factor family, as mediators in bone remodelling and apoptotic phenomena. The aim of the present study was to examine the involvement of the Fra-1, Fra-2, JunB and JunD proteins in the biochemical response of functionally loaded mandibular condylar cartilage, and the subsequent initiation of cartilage maturation and apoptotic phenomena. Thirty, female, 14-day-old Wistar rats were assigned to two groups: one group was fed a soft diet and the other a hard diet. At day 21 after weaning, experimental animals from both groups were killed at 6, 12 and 48 hours and their condyles harvested. The condylar cartilage of both groups was immunostained using specific antibodies against Fra-1, Fra-2, JunB and JunD. Statistical analysis of the data revealed over-expression of Fra-1, Fra-2, JunB and JunD proteins in all stages of differentiation of chondrocytes derived from the mandibular condylar cartilage of animals fed on a hard diet. Moreover, the involvement of these proteins significantly increased with time in both groups. Since the aforementioned proteins play key roles in remodelling phenomena of bone and cartilage tissue, influencing pivotal cellular functions such as maturation, differentiation and apoptosis, the results of the present study suggest that mandibular condylar chondrocytes sense functional loading changes and respond by induction of proteins associated with biological phenomena that ultimately influence the growth of the condylar cartilage.

  2. Protection of the Crayfish Mechanoreceptor Neuron and Glial Cells from Photooxidative Injury by Modulators of Diverse Signal Transduction Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzdensky, Anatoly; Berezhnaya, Elena; Khaitin, Andrej; Kovaleva, Vera; Komandirov, Maxim; Neginskaya, Maria; Rudkovskii, Mikhail; Sharifulina, Svetlana

    2015-10-01

    Oxidative stress is the reason of diverse neuropathological processes. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), an effective inducer of oxidative stress, is used for cancer treatment, including brain tumors. We studied the role of various signaling pathways in photodynamic injury and protection of single neurons and satellite glial cells in the isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor. It was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine Photosens in the presence of inhibitors or activators of various signaling proteins. PDT eliminated neuronal activity and killed neurons and glial cells. Inhibitory analysis showed the involvement of protein kinases Akt, glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases 1 and 2 (MEK1/2), calmodulin, calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), adenylate cyclase, and nuclear factor NF-κB in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons. Nitric oxide (NO) and glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) reduced neuronal necrosis. In glial cells, protein kinases Akt, calmodulin, and CaMKII; protein kinases C and G, adenylate cyclase, and p38; and nuclear transcription factor NF-κB also mediated PDT-induced necrosis. In contrast, NO and neurotrophic factors nerve growth factor (NGF) and GDNF demonstrated anti-necrotic activity. Phospholipase Cγ, protein kinase C, GSK-3β, mTOR, NF-κB, mitochondrial permeability transition pores, and NO synthase mediated PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells, whereas protein kinase A, tyrosine phosphatases, and neurotrophic factors NGF, GDNF, and neurturin were involved in protecting glial cells from photoinduced apoptosis. Signaling pathways that control cell survival and death differed in neurons and glia. Inhibitors or activators of some signaling pathways may be used as potential protectors of neurons and glia from photooxidative stress and following death.

  3. Growth inhibition and apoptosis in cancer cells induced by polyphenolic compounds of Acacia hydaspica: Involvement of multiple signal transduction pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, Tayyaba; Trembley, Janeen H.; Salomon, Christine E.; Razak, Suhail; Khan, Muhammad Rashid; Ahmed, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Acacia hydaspica R. Parker is known for its medicinal uses in multiple ailments. In this study, we performed bioassay-guided fractionation of cytotoxic compounds from A. hydaspica and investigated their effects on growth and signaling activity in prostate and breast cancer cell lines. Four active polyphenolic compounds were identified as 7-O-galloyl catechin (GC), catechin (C), methyl gallate (MG), and catechin-3-O-gallate (CG). The four compounds inhibited prostate cancer PC-3 cell growth in a dose-dependent manner, whereas CG and MG inhibited breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell growth. All tested compounds inhibited cell survival and colony growth in both cell lines, and there was evidence of chromatin condensation, cell shrinkage and apoptotic bodies. Further, acridine orange, ethidium bromide, propidium iodide and DAPI staining demonstrated that cell death occurred partly via apoptosis in both PC-3 and MDA-MB-231 cells. In PC-3 cells treatment repressed the expression of anti-apoptotic molecules Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and survivin, coupled with down-regulation of signaling pathways AKT, NFκB, ERK1/2 and JAK/STAT. In MDA-MB-231 cells, treatment induced reduction of CK2α, Bcl-xL, survivin and xIAP protein expression along with suppression of NFκB, JAK/STAT and PI3K pathways. Our findings suggest that certain polyphenolic compounds derived from A. hydaspica may be promising chemopreventive/therapeutic candidates against cancer. PMID:26975752

  4. Melatonin Signal Transduction Pathways Require E-Box-Mediated Transcription of Per1 and Per2 to Reset the SCN Clock at Dusk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patty C Kandalepas

    Full Text Available Melatonin is released from the pineal gland into the circulatory system at night in the absence of light, acting as "hormone of darkness" to the brain and body. Melatonin also can regulate circadian phasing of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN. During the day-to-night transition, melatonin exposure advances intrinsic SCN neural activity rhythms via the melatonin type-2 (MT2 receptor and downstream activation of protein kinase C (PKC. The effects of melatonin on SCN phasing have not been linked to daily changes in the expression of core genes that constitute the molecular framework of the circadian clock. Using real-time RT-PCR, we found that melatonin induces an increase in the expression of two clock genes, Period 1 (Per1 and Period 2 (Per2. This effect occurs at CT 10, when melatonin advances SCN phase, but not at CT 6, when it does not. Using anti-sense oligodeoxynucleotides (α ODNs to Per 1 and Per 2, as well as to E-box enhancer sequences in the promoters of these genes, we show that their specific induction is necessary for the phase-altering effects of melatonin on SCN neural activity rhythms in the rat. These effects of melatonin on Per1 and Per2 were mediated by PKC. This is unlike day-active non-photic signals that reset the SCN clock by non-PCK signal transduction mechanisms and by decreasing Per1 expression. Rather, this finding extends roles for Per1 and Per2, which are critical to photic phase-resetting, to a nonphotic zeitgeber, melatonin, and suggest that the regulation of these clock gene transcripts is required for clock resetting by diverse regulatory cues.

  5. Is autoinducer-2 a universal signal for interspecies communication: a comparative genomic and phylogenetic analysis of the synthesis and signal transduction pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner-Döbler Irene

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quorum sensing is a process of bacterial cell-to-cell communication involving the production and detection of extracellular signaling molecules called autoinducers. Recently, it has been proposed that autoinducer-2 (AI-2, a furanosyl borate diester derived from the recycling of S-adenosyl-homocysteine (SAH to homocysteine, serves as a universal signal for interspecies communication. Results In this study, 138 completed genomes were examined for the genes involved in the synthesis and detection of AI-2. Except for some symbionts and parasites, all organisms have a pathway to recycle SAH, either using a two-step enzymatic conversion by the Pfs and LuxS enzymes or a one-step conversion using SAH-hydrolase (SahH. 51 organisms including most Gamma-, Beta-, and Epsilonproteobacteria, and Firmicutes possess the Pfs-LuxS pathway, while Archaea, Eukarya, Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Cyanobacteria prefer the SahH pathway. In all 138 organisms, only the three Vibrio strains had strong, bidirectional matches to the periplasmic AI-2 binding protein LuxP and the central signal relay protein LuxU. The initial two-component sensor kinase protein LuxQ, and the terminal response regulator luxO are found in most Proteobacteria, as well as in some Firmicutes, often in several copies. Conclusions The genomic analysis indicates that the LuxS enzyme required for AI-2 synthesis is widespread in bacteria, while the periplasmic binding protein LuxP is only present in Vibrio strains. Thus, other organisms may either use components different from the AI-2 signal transduction system of Vibrio strains to sense the signal of AI-2, or they do not have such a quorum sensing system at all.

  6. dMyc functions downstream of Yorkie to promote the supercompetitive behavior of hippo pathway mutant cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Ziosi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Genetic analyses in Drosophila epithelia have suggested that the phenomenon of "cell competition" could participate in organ homeostasis. It has been speculated that competition between different cell populations within a growing organ might play a role as either tumor promoter or tumor suppressor, depending on the cellular context. The evolutionarily conserved Hippo (Hpo signaling pathway regulates organ size and prevents hyperplastic disease from flies to humans by restricting the activity of the transcriptional cofactor Yorkie (yki. Recent data indicate also that mutations in several Hpo pathway members provide cells with a competitive advantage by unknown mechanisms. Here we provide insight into the mechanism by which the Hpo pathway is linked to cell competition, by identifying dMyc as a target gene of the Hpo pathway, transcriptionally upregulated by the activity of Yki with different binding partners. We show that the cell-autonomous upregulation of dMyc is required for the supercompetitive behavior of Yki-expressing cells and Hpo pathway mutant cells, whereas the relative levels of dMyc between Hpo pathway mutant cells and wild-type neighboring cells are critical for determining whether cell competition promotes a tumor-suppressing or tumor-inducing behavior. All together, these data provide a paradigmatic example of cooperation between tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in tumorigenesis and suggest a dual role for cell competition during tumor progression depending on the output of the genetic interactions occurring between confronted cells.

  7. Reg-2, a downstream signaling protein in the ciliary neurotrophic factor survival pathway, alleviates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong eJiang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF, originally described as a neurocytokine that could support the survival of neurons, has been recently found to alleviate demyelination, prevent axon loss, and improve functional recovery in a rat model of acute experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. However, poor penetration into the brain parenchyma and unfavorable side effects limit the utility of CNTF. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of a protein downstream of CNTF, regeneration gene protein 2 (Reg-2. Using multiple morphological, molecular biology, and electrophysiological methods to assess neuroinflammation, axonal loss, demyelination, and functional impairment, we observed that Reg-2 and CNTF exert similar effects in the acute phase of EAE. Both treatments attenuated axonal loss and demyelination, improved neuronal survival, and produced functional improvement. With a smaller molecular weight and improved penetration into the brain parenchyma, Reg-2 may be a useful substitute for CNTF therapy in EAE and multiple sclerosis.

  8. Tamarind Seed Xyloglucans Promote Proliferation and Migration of Human Skin Cells through Internalization via Stimulation of Proproliferative Signal Transduction Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, W.; Deters, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Xyloglucans (XGs) of Tamarindus indica L. Fabaceae are used as drug vehicles or as ingredients of cosmetics. Two xyloglucans were extracted from T. indica seed with cold water (TSw) and copper complex precipitation (TSc). Both were analyzed in regard to composition and influence on cell viability, proliferation, cell cycle progression, migration, MAPK phosphorylation, and gene expression of human skin keratinocytes (NHEK and HaCaT) and fibroblasts (NHDF) in vitro. TSw and TSc differed in molecular weight, rhamnose content, and ratios of xylose, arabinose, galactose, and glucose. Both XGs improved keratinocytes and fibroblast proliferation, promoted the cell cycle, and stimulated migration and intracellular enzyme activity of NHDF after endosomal uptake. Only TSw significantly enhanced HaCaT migration and extracellular enzyme activity of NHDF and HaCaT. TSw and TSc predominantly enhanced the phosphorylation of molecules that referred to Erk signaling in NHEK. In NHDF parts of the integrin signaling and SAPK/JNK pathway were affected. Independent of cell type TSw marginally regulated the expression of genes, which referred to membrane proteins, cytoskeleton, cytokine signaling, and ECM as well as to processes of metabolism and transcription. Results show that T. indica xyloglucans promote skin regeneration by a direct influence on cell proliferation and migration. PMID:24106497

  9. Tamarind Seed Xyloglucans Promote Proliferation and Migration of Human Skin Cells through Internalization via Stimulation of Proproliferative Signal Transduction Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Nie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Xyloglucans (XGs of Tamarindus indica L. Fabaceae are used as drug vehicles or as ingredients of cosmetics. Two xyloglucans were extracted from T. indica seed with cold water (TSw and copper complex precipitation (TSc. Both were analyzed in regard to composition and influence on cell viability, proliferation, cell cycle progression, migration, MAPK phosphorylation, and gene expression of human skin keratinocytes (NHEK and HaCaT and fibroblasts (NHDF in vitro. TSw and TSc differed in molecular weight, rhamnose content, and ratios of xylose, arabinose, galactose, and glucose. Both XGs improved keratinocytes and fibroblast proliferation, promoted the cell cycle, and stimulated migration and intracellular enzyme activity of NHDF after endosomal uptake. Only TSw significantly enhanced HaCaT migration and extracellular enzyme activity of NHDF and HaCaT. TSw and TSc predominantly enhanced the phosphorylation of molecules that referred to Erk signaling in NHEK. In NHDF parts of the integrin signaling and SAPK/JNK pathway were affected. Independent of cell type TSw marginally regulated the expression of genes, which referred to membrane proteins, cytoskeleton, cytokine signaling, and ECM as well as to processes of metabolism and transcription. Results show that T. indica xyloglucans promote skin regeneration by a direct influence on cell proliferation and migration.

  10. A distinct profile of tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine pathway downstream of Toll-like receptor activation in irritable bowel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard eClarke

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, a disorder of the brain-gut axis, is characterised by the absence of reliable biological markers. Tryptophan is an essential amino acid that serves as a precursor to serotonin but which can alternatively be metabolised along the kynurenine pathway leading to the production of other neuroactive agents. We previously reported an increased degradation of tryptophan along this immunoresponsive pathway in IBS. Recently, altered cytokine production following activation of specific members of the toll-like receptor (TLR family (TLR1-9 has also been demonstrated in IBS. However, the relationship between TLR activation and kynurenine pathway activity in IBS is unknown. In this study, we investigated whether activation of specific TLRs elicits exaggerated kynurenine production in IBS patients compared to controls. Whole blood from IBS patients and healthy controls was cultured with a panel of nine different TLR agonists for 24 hours. Cell culture supernatants were then analysed for both tryptophan and kynurenine concentrations, as were plasma samples from both cohorts. IBS subjects had an elevated plasma kynurenine:tryptophan ratio compared to healthy controls. Furthermore, we demonstrated a differential downstream profile of kynurenine production subsequent to TLR activation in IBS patients compared to healthy controls. This profile included alterations at TLR1/2, TLR2, TLR3, TLR5, TLR7 and TLR8. Our data expands on our previous understanding of altered tryptophan metabolism in IBS and suggests that measurement of tryptophan metabolites downstream of TLR activation may ultimately find utility as components of a biomarker panel to aid gastroenterologists in the diagnosis of IBS. Furthermore, these studies implicate the modulation of TLRs as means through which aberrant tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine pathway can be controlled, a novel potential therapeutic strategy in this and other disorders.

  11. The pre-clinical absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion properties of IPI-926, an orally bioavailable antagonist of the hedgehog signal transduction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sherri; Hoyt, Jennifer; Whitebread, Nigel; Manna, Joseph; Peluso, Marisa; Faia, Kerrie; Campbell, Veronica; Tremblay, Martin; Nair, Somarajan; Grogan, Michael; Castro, Alfredo; Campbell, Matthew; Ferguson, Jeanne; Arsenault, Brendan; Nevejans, Jylle; Carter, Bennett; Lee, John; Dunbar, Joi; McGovern, Karen; Read, Margaret; Adams, Julian; Constan, Alexander; Loewen, Gordon; Sydor, Jens; Palombella, Vito; Soglia, John

    2013-10-01

    1. IPI-926 is a novel semisynthetic cyclopamine derivative that is a potent and selective Smoothened inhibitor that blocks the hedgehog signal transduction pathway. 2. The in vivo clearance of IPI-926 is low in mouse and dog and moderate in monkey. The volume of distribution is high across species. Oral bioavailability ranges from moderate in monkey to high in mouse and dog. Predicted human clearance using simple allometry is low (24 L h(-1)), predicted volume of distribution is high (469 L) and predicted half-life is long (20 h). 3. IPI-926 is highly bound to plasma proteins and has minimal interaction with human α-1-acid glycoprotein. 4. In vitro metabolic stability ranges from stable to moderately stable. Twelve oxidative metabolites were detected in mouse, rat, dog, monkey and human liver microsome incubations and none were unique to human. 5. IPI-926 is not a potent reversible inhibitor of CYP1A2, 2C8, 2C9 or 3A4 (testosterone). IPI-926 is a moderate inhibitor of CYP2C19, 2D6 and 3A4 (midazolam) with KI values of 19, 16 and 4.5 µM, respectively. IPI-926 is both a substrate and inhibitor (IC50 = 1.9 µM) of P-glycoprotein. 6. In summary, IPI-926 has desirable pre-clinical absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion properties.

  12. Molecular characterization of the cold- and heat-induced Arabidopsis PXL1 gene and its potential role in transduction pathways under temperature fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Chang Gyo; Hwang, Sun-Goo; Park, Yong Chan; Park, Hyeon Mi; Kim, Dong Sub; Park, Duck Hwan; Jang, Cheol Seong

    2015-03-15

    LRR-RLK (Leucine-Rich Repeat Receptor-Like Kinase) proteins are believed to play essential roles in cell-to-cell communication during various cellular processes including development, hormone perception, and abiotic stress responses. We isolated an LRR-RLK gene previously named Arabidopsis PHLOEM INTERCALATED WITH XYLEM-LIKE 1 (AtPXL1) and examined its expression patterns. AtPXL1 was highly induced by cold and heat stress, but not by drought. The fluorescence signal of 35S::AtPXL1-EGFP was closely localized to the plasma membrane. A yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay exhibited that AtPXL1 interacts with both proteins, A. thaliana histidine-rich dehydrin1 (AtHIRD1) and A. thaliana light-harvesting protein complex I (AtLHCA1). We found that AtPXL1 possesses autophosphorylation activity and phosphorylates AtHIRD1 and AtLHCA1 in an in vitro assay. Subsequently, we found that the knockout line (atpxl1) showed hypersensitive phenotypes when subjected to cold and heat during the germination stage, while the AtPXL1 overexpressing line as well as wild type plants showed high germination rates compared to the knockout plants. These results provide an insight into the molecular function of AtPXL1 in the regulation of signal transduction pathways under temperature fluctuations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on signal transduction pathway-related protein expression in liver and cerebrum of rhesus monkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, Mari; Akema, Satoshi; Tsuzuki, Masami; Kubota, Shunichiro [Tokyo Univ. (Japan); Korenaga, Tatsumi; Fukusato, Toshio [Teikyo Univ. of School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Asaoka, Kazuo [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Murata, Nobuo [Teikyo Univ. of School of Medicine, Kawasaki (Japan); Nomizu, Motoyoshi [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan); Arima, Akihiro [Shin Nippon Biomedical Laboratories, Ltd., Kagoshima (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is known to produce a wide range of toxic and biochemical effects in experimental animals, including immunological dysfunctions, chloracne, tetragenecity and carcinogenesis. Recently, the potential impact of dioxins on neurological disorders with particular focus on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are concerned. Although a lot of information is available from studies in rodents, not much is known of the low dose effects of TCDD in non-human primates. In higher animals, dioxins are metabolized slowly, as evidenced by the estimated TCDD half-life of 5.8 to 14.1 years. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the long-term effects of TCDD on human health. Considering the pronounced species differences observed in some studies of TCDD, the studies using primates are needed for assessment of TCDD exposure on human health. We have been studying the metabolism and the effects of single administration of TCDD on pregnant monkey (F0) and F1 rhesus monkey. The focus of the present study is to study the effects of TCDD on signal transduction pathway-related protein levels in various organs, especially in liver and brain of F0 monkeys.

  14. EZH2 is downstream of the pRB-E2F pathway, essential for proliferation and amplified in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bracken, Adrian P; Pasini, Diego; Capra, Maria

    2003-01-01

    expression during embryonic development. Here we demonstrate that both EZH2 and EED are essential for the proliferation of both transformed and non-transformed human cells. In addition, the pRB-E2F pathway tightly regulates their expression and, consistent with this, we find that EZH2 is highly expressed...

  15. Acquisition of apoptotic resistance in cadmium-induced malignant transformation: specific perturbation of JNK signal transduction pathway and associated metallothionein overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Wei; Fuquay, Richard; Sakurai, Teruaki; Waalkes, Michael P

    2006-08-01

    Prior work has shown that chronic cadmium exposed rat liver epithelial cells (CCE-LE) become malignantly transformed after protracted low level cadmium exposure. Acquisition of apoptotic resistance is common in oncogenesis and the present work explores this possibility in CCE-LE cells. CCE-LE cells were resistant to apoptosis induced by etoposide or an acute high concentration of cadmium as assessed by flow cytometry with annexin/FITC. Three key mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), namely ERK1/2, JNK1/2, and p38, were phosphorylated in CCE-LE cells after acute cadmium exposure. However, the levels of phosphorylated JNK1/2 were markedly decreased in CCE-LE cells compared to control. JNK kinase activity was also suppressed in CCE-LE cells exposed to cadmium. Epidermal growth factor (EGF), used as a positive control for stimulating JNK phosphorylation, was much less effective in CCE-LE cells than control cells. Ro318220 (Ro), a strong activator of JNK, increased phosphorylated JNK1/2 to levels similar to the cadmium-treated control cells and also enhanced apoptosis in response to cadmium in CCE-LE cells. Metallothionein (MT), which is thought to potentially inhibit apoptosis, was strongly overexpressed in CCE-LE cells. Further, in MT knockout (MT-/-) fibroblasts, JNK1/2 phosphorylation was markedly increased after cadmium exposure compared with similarly treated wild-type (MT+/+) cells. These results indicate cadmium-transformed cells acquired apoptotic resistance, which may be linked to the specific suppression of the JNK pathway and is associated with MT overexpression, which, in turn, may impact this signal transduction pathway. The acquisition of apoptotic resistance may play an important role in cadmium carcinogenesis by contributing to both tumor initiation and malignant progression.

  16. Molecular pathway profiling of T lymphocyte signal transduction pathways; Th1 and Th2 genomic fingerprints are defined by TCR and CD28-mediated signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, Ruben L.; Fleuren, Wilco W. M.; He, Xuehui; Vink, Paul M.; Wijnands, Frank; Gorecka, Monika; Klop, Henri; Bauerschmidt, Sussane; Garritsen, Anja; Koenen, Hans J. P. M.; Joosten, Irma; Boots, Annemieke M. H.; Alkema, Wynand

    2012-01-01

    Background: T lymphocytes are orchestrators of adaptive immunity. Naive T cells may differentiate into Th1, Th2, Th17 or iTreg phenotypes, depending on environmental co-stimulatory signals. To identify genes and pathways involved in differentiation of Jurkat T cells towards Th1 and Th2 subtypes we

  17. Molecular pathway profiling of T lymphocyte signal transduction pathways; Th1 and Th2 genomic fingerprints are defined by TCR and CD28-mediated signaling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, R.L.; Fleuren, W.W.M.; He, X.; Vink, P.M.; Wijnands, F.; Gorecka, M.; Klop, H.; Bauerschmidt, S.; Garritsen, A.; Koenen, H.J.P.M.; Joosten, I.; Boots, A.M.H.; Alkema, W.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: T lymphocytes are orchestrators of adaptive immunity. Naive T cells may differentiate into Th1, Th2, Th17 or iTreg phenotypes, depending on environmental co-stimulatory signals. To identify genes and pathways involved in differentiation of Jurkat T cells towards Th1 and Th2 subtypes we

  18. Overexpression of extracellular superoxide dismutase reduces severity of radiation-induced lung toxicity through downregulation of the TGF-β signal transduction pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabbani, Z.N.; Anscher, M.S.; Archer, E.; Chen, L.; Samulski, T.V.; Folz, R.J.; Dewhirst, M.W.; Vujaskovic, Z.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether overexpression of ECSOD, ameliorates acute radiation induced lung injury by inhibiting activation of TGF-β and down regulating phosphorylation of (p)Smad 3 signal transduction protein. Transgenic (TG) B6C3 mice that overexpress human EC-SOD (hEC-SOD) and wild-type (WT) littermates received single dose of 15 Gy to the whole thorax and sacrificed at 1day, 1wk, 2wk, 3wk, 6wk, 10 and 14 weeks. Different endpoints were assessed to look for lung damage. Starting at 3rd week after radiation, there was significant increase in breathing rates, right lung wet weights and lung tissue damage score of XRT-WT vs. XRT-TG (p<0.05). In BALF, total cell counts per ml were significantly increased in XRT-WT whereas XRT-TG animals did not show any significant increase except at 14 weeks after irradiation (p<0.05). Macrophages and lymphocytes were the predominant inflammatory cells in BALF of XRT-WT compared to XRT-TG (p<0.05). XRT-WT group had a significantly higher percentage of activated TGF-β1 than the XRT-TG (p=0.04) at 14 weeks. There was a mild immunoreactivity of pSmad3 in bronchial epithelium and type II pneumocytes of control animals. In XRT-WT pSmad3 immunostaining was moderate at 1 week and moderate to strong at 3, 6 and 10 weeks whereas in XRT-TG mice immmunostaining was mild to moderate. This study shows that, the overexpression of ECSOD in transgenic animals is radioprotective in acute phase of radiation induced lung injury. Fewer inflammatory cells in XRT-TG group confirms the deprivation of important source for free radicals and TGF-β cytokine. Significant reduction in TGF-β activation in ECSOD overexpressing animals, followed by downregulation of pSmad3 indicates important role of reactive oxygen species in activation of TGF-β signal transduction pathway

  19. Spargel/dPGC-1 is a new downstream effector in the insulin-TOR signaling pathway in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Subhas; Duttaroy, Atanu

    2013-10-01

    Insulin and target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling pathways converge to maintain growth so a proportionate body form is attained. Insufficiency in either insulin or TOR results in developmental growth defects due to low ATP level. Spargel is the Drosophila homolog of PGC-1, which is an omnipotent transcriptional coactivator in mammals. Like its mammalian counterpart, Spargel/dPGC-1 is recognized for its role in energy metabolism through mitochondrial biogenesis. An earlier study demonstrated that Spargel/dPGC-1 is involved in the insulin-TOR signaling, but a comprehensive analysis is needed to understand exactly which step of this pathway Spargel/PGC-1 is essential. Using genetic epistasis analysis, we demonstrated that a Spargel gain of function can overcome the TOR and S6K mediated cell size and cell growth defects in a cell autonomous manner. Moreover, the tissue-restricted phenotypes of TOR and S6k mutants are rescued by Spargel overexpression. We have further elucidated that Spargel gain of function sets back the mitochondrial numbers in growth-limited TOR mutant cell clones, which suggests a possible mechanism for Spargel action on cells and tissue to attain normal size. Finally, excess Spargel can ameliorate the negative effect of FoxO overexpression only to a limited extent, which suggests that Spargel does not share all of the FoxO functions and consequently cannot significantly rescue the FoxO phenotypes. Together, our observation established that Spargel/dPGC-1 is indeed a terminal effector in the insulin-TOR pathway operating below TOR, S6K, Tsc, and FoxO. This led us to conclude that Spargel should be incorporated as a new member of this growth-signaling pathway.

  20. Signaling Pathways in Pathogenesis of Diamond Blackfan Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    hours in culture. Cells were sorted for green fluorescent protein (GFP) after 3 to 5 days and harvested for downstream assays as indicated in the...hours after transduction, and culture media was harvested 5 days after transduction. TNF-a was detected with a human TNF-a high sensitivity enzyme...cells involving p38 MAPK pathway, GATA-1 and FOG -1 downregulation and GATA-2 upregulation. Biochem Pharmacol. 2008;76(10):1229-1239. 19. Vassilev LT

  1. Identification of Novel Signal Transduction, Immune Function, and Oxidative Stress Genes and Pathways by Topiramate for Treatment of Methamphetamine Dependence Based on Secondary Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhua Niu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundTopiramate (TPM is suggested to be a promising medication for treatment of methamphetamine (METH dependence, but the molecular basis remains to be elucidated.MethodsAmong 140 METH-dependent participants randomly assigned to receive either TPM (N = 69 or placebo (N = 71 in a previously conducted randomized controlled trial, 50 TPM- and 49 placebo-treated participants had a total 212 RNA samples available at baseline, week 8, and week 12 time points. Following our primary analysis of gene expression data, we reanalyzed the microarray expression data based on a latent class analysis of binary secondary outcomes during weeks 1–12 that provided a classification of 21 responders and 31 non-responders with consistent responses at both time points.ResultsBased on secondary outcomes, 1,381, 576, 905, and 711 differentially expressed genes at nominal P values < 0.05 were identified in responders versus non-responders for week 8 TPM, week 8 placebo, week 12 TPM, and week 12 placebo groups, respectively. Among 1,381 genes identified in week 8 TPM responders, 359 genes were identified in both week 8 and week 12 TPM groups, of which 300 genes were exclusively detected in TPM responders. Of them, 32 genes had nominal P values < 5 × 10−3 at either week 8 or week 12 and false discovery rates < 0.15 at both time points with consistent directions of gene expression changes, which include GABARAPL1, GPR155, and IL15RA in GABA receptor signaling that represent direct targets for TPM. Analyses of these 300 genes revealed 7 enriched pathways belonging to neuronal function/synaptic plasticity, signal transduction, inflammation/immune function, and oxidative stress response categories. No pathways were enriched for 72 genes exclusively detected in both week 8 and week 12 placebo groups.ConclusionThis secondary analysis study of gene expression data from a TPM clinical trial not only yielded consistent results with those of primary

  2. Molecular pathway profiling of T lymphocyte signal transduction pathways; Th1 and Th2 genomic fingerprints are defined by TCR and CD28-mediated signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smeets Ruben L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T lymphocytes are orchestrators of adaptive immunity. Naïve T cells may differentiate into Th1, Th2, Th17 or iTreg phenotypes, depending on environmental co-stimulatory signals. To identify genes and pathways involved in differentiation of Jurkat T cells towards Th1 and Th2 subtypes we performed comprehensive transcriptome analyses of Jurkat T cells stimulated with various stimuli and pathway inhibitors. Results from these experiments were validated in a human experimental setting using whole blood and purified CD4+ Tcells. Results Calcium-dependent activation of T cells using CD3/CD28 and PMA/CD3 stimulation induced a Th1 expression profile reflected by increased expression of T-bet, RUNX3, IL-2, and IFNγ, whereas calcium-independent activation via PMA/CD28 induced a Th2 expression profile which included GATA3, RXRA, CCL1 and Itk. Knock down with siRNA and gene expression profiling in the presence of selective kinase inhibitors showed that proximal kinases Lck and PKCθ are crucial signaling hubs during T helper cell activation, revealing a clear role for Lck in Th1 development and for PKCθ in both Th1 and Th2 development. Medial signaling via MAPkinases appeared to be less important in these pathways, since specific inhibitors of these kinases displayed a minor effect on gene expression. Translation towards a primary, whole blood setting and purified human CD4+ T cells revealed that PMA/CD3 stimulation induced a more pronounced Th1 specific, Lck and PKCθ dependent IFNγ production, whereas PMA/CD28 induced Th2 specific IL-5 and IL-13 production, independent of Lck activation. PMA/CD3-mediated skewing towards a Th1 phenotype was also reflected in mRNA expression of the master transcription factor Tbet, whereas PMA/CD28-mediated stimulation enhanced GATA3 mRNA expression in primary human CD4+ Tcells. Conclusions This study identifies stimulatory pathways and gene expression profiles for in vitro skewing of T helper cell

  3. Investigating the Potential Signaling Pathways That Regulate Activation of the Novel PKC Downstream of Serotonin in Aplysia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole A Farah

    Full Text Available Activation of the novel PKC Apl II in sensory neurons by serotonin (5HT underlies the ability of 5HT to reverse synaptic depression, but the pathway from 5HT to PKC Apl II activation remains unclear. Here we find no evidence for the Aplysia-specific B receptors, or for adenylate cyclase activation, to translocate fluorescently-tagged PKC Apl II. Using an anti-PKC Apl II antibody, we monitor translocation of endogenous PKC Apl II and determine the dose response for PKC Apl II translocation, both in isolated sensory neurons and sensory neurons coupled with motor neurons. Using this assay, we confirm an important role for tyrosine kinase activation in 5HT mediated PKC Apl II translocation, but rule out roles for intracellular tyrosine kinases, epidermal growth factor (EGF receptors and Trk kinases in this response. A partial inhibition of translocation by a fibroblast growth factor (FGF-receptor inhibitor led us to clone the Aplysia FGF receptor. Since a number of related receptors have been recently characterized, we use bioinformatics to define the relationship between these receptors and find a single FGF receptor orthologue in Aplysia. However, expression of the FGF receptor did not affect translocation or allow it in motor neurons where 5HT does not normally cause PKC Apl II translocation. These results suggest that additional receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs or other molecules must also be involved in translocation of PKC Apl II.

  4. Neuroprotective effect of G14-humanin on global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion by activation of SOCS3 - STAT3 - MCL-1 signal transduction pathway in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guangsheng; Fan, Huaihai; Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Fusen; Wu, Haiyan; Qi, Feng; Zhao, Lei; Li, Yun

    2017-10-01

    Humanin (HN) has been identified to suppress neuron death. Gly 14 -HN (HNG), as a variant of HN, can decrease infarct volume after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. This study aimed to investigate the neuroprotective mechanism of HNG on global cerebral I/R (GI) in rats. Rats were randomly divided into 13 groups: Sham group, GI groups and HNG groups. Both GI group and HNG groups included six time points (1, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 72 h). At 24 h after reperfusion, Nissl staining was used to observe positive neurons, and p-STAT3, MCL-1, SOCS3, Bax and Caspase-3 in different groups were detected by immunohistochemistry. qRT-PCR and western blot were used to evaluate the expression of STAT3, p-STAT3, MCL-1, and SOCS3. The immunohistochemistry also showed a significant increase in Bax (0.29 ± 0.007 vs. 0.22 ± 0.007, P < 0.01) and Caspase-3 (0.24 ± 0.02 vs. 0.18 ± 0.006, P < 0.01) in GI group compared with Sham group, while Bax (0.26 ± 0.01 vs. 0.29 ± 0.008, P < 0.01) and Caspase-3 (0.20 ± 0.008 vs. 0.24 ± 0.02, P < 0.01) were significantly decreased by HNG-treatment compared with GI group. Along with immunohistochemistry, western blot and qRT-PCR indicated that the protein and mRNA levels of STAT3, MCL-1, and SOCS3 were up-regulated after administration of HNG at six time points after global cerebral I/R in rat. HNG might exert neuroprotective effects through alleviating apoptosis and activating of SOCS3 - STAT3 - MCL-1 signal transduction pathway. Highlights (1) Cerebral ischemia led to neuronal loss in hippocampal CA1 region of rats. (2) HNG had neuroprotective effects on ischemia/reperfusion rats. (3) The protective effect of HNG might be related to the SOCS3 - STAT3 - MCL-1 pathway.

  5. Downstream modulation of extrinsic apoptotic pathway in streptozotocin-induced Alzheimer's dementia in rats: Erythropoietin versus curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samy, Doaa M; Ismail, Cherine A; Nassra, Rasha A; Zeitoun, Teshreen M; Nomair, Azhar M

    2016-01-05

    Erythropoietin and curcumin showed promising neuroprotective effects in various models of Alzheimer's dementia. This study was designed to compare the beneficial effects of erythropoietin and/or curcumin in intracerebro-ventricular (ICV) streptozotocin-induced Alzheimer's like disease in rats. Rats received ICV injection of either saline (control, n=8 rats), or streptozotocin. Three weeks following surgery, streptozotocin-injected rats were assigned into 4 groups (8 rats each); vehicle, curcumin (80mg/kg/day, orally), erythropoietin (500 IU/kg every other day, intraperitoneally) and combined (curcumin and erythropoietin)-treated groups. After 3 months of treatment, rats were subjected to neurobehavioral testing, and then killed for biochemical and histological assessment of hippocampus. Fas ligand protein and caspase-8 activity as mediators of extrinsic apoptotic pathway, oxidative stress markers (malondialdehyde and reduced glutathione) and β-amyloid (1-40 and 1-42) peptides were measured. The results showed that administration of erythropoietin suppressed extrinsic apoptosis better than curcumin, while curcumin was more effective in combating oxidative stress in ICV-streptozotocin injected rats. Both erythropoietin and curcumin treatments (individually or combined) equally reduced the hippocampal β-amyloid accumulation and improved cognitive impairment in Morris water maze and passive avoidance tasks. The combined treatment was the most effective in ameliorating apoptosis and oxidative stress rather than behavioral responses or β-amyloid burden. In conclusion, ICV-streptozotocin-induced Alzheimer's dementia activates hippocampal Fas ligand-mediated apoptosis, which could be reduced by erythropoietin and/or curcumin treatment. Curcumin supplementation alone could ameliorate cognitive deficits and reverse biochemical alterations in ICV-streptozotocin Alzheimer's rat model without the hazardous polycythemic effect of long-term erythropoietin injection. Copyright

  6. A conditional form of Bruton's tyrosine kinase is sufficient to activate multiple downstream signaling pathways via PLC Gamma 2 in B cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witte Owen N

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk is essential for B cell development and function. Mutations of Btk elicit X-linked agammaglobulinemia in humans and X-linked immunodeficiency in the mouse. Btk has been proposed to participate in B cell antigen receptor-induced signaling events leading to activation of phospholipase C-γ2 (PLCγ2 and calcium mobilization. However it is unclear whether Btk activation is alone sufficient for these signaling events, and whether Btk can activate additional pathways that do not involve PLCγ2. To address such issues we have generated Btk:ER, a conditionally active form of the kinase, and expressed it in the PLCγ2-deficient DT40 B cell line. Results Activation of Btk:ER was sufficient to induce multiple B cell signaling pathways in PLCγ2-sufficient DT40 cells. These included tyrosine phosphorylation of PLCγ2, mobilization of intracellular calcium, activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways, and apoptosis. In DT40 B cells deficient for PLCγ2, Btk:ER activation failed to induce the signaling events described above with the consequence that the cells failed to undergo apoptosis. Conclusions These data suggest that Btk:ER regulates downstream signaling pathways primarily via PLCγ2 in B cells. While it is not known whether activated Btk:ER precisely mimics activated Btk, this conditional system will likely facilitate the dissection of the role of Btk and its family members in a variety of biological processes in many different cell types.

  7. Mutations in MAP3K1 cause 46,XY disorders of sex development and implicate a common signal transduction pathway in human testis determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, Alexander; Loke, Johnny; Le Caignec, Cedric; White, Stefan; Chin, Lisa; Friedman, Andrew; Warr, Nicholas; Willan, John; Brauer, David; Farmer, Charles; Brooks, Eric; Oddoux, Carole; Riley, Bridget; Shajahan, Shahin; Camerino, Giovanna; Homfray, Tessa; Crosby, Andrew H; Couper, Jenny; David, Albert; Greenfield, Andy; Sinclair, Andrew; Ostrer, Harry

    2010-12-10

    Investigations of humans with disorders of sex development (DSDs) resulted in the discovery of many of the now-known mammalian sex-determining genes, including SRY, RSPO1, SOX9, NR5A1, WT1, NR0B1, and WNT4. Here, the locus for an autosomal sex-determining gene was mapped via linkage analysis in two families with 46,XY DSD to the long arm of chromosome 5 with a combined, multipoint parametric LOD score of 6.21. A splice-acceptor mutation (c.634-8T>A) in MAP3K1 segregated with the phenotype in the first family and disrupted RNA splicing. Mutations were demonstrated in the second family (p.Gly616Arg) and in two of 11 sporadic cases (p.Leu189Pro, p.Leu189Arg)-18% prevalence in this cohort of sporadic cases. In cultured primary lymphoblastoid cells from family 1 and the two sporadic cases, these mutations altered the phosphorylation of the downstream targets, p38 and ERK1/2, and enhanced binding of RHOA to the MAP3K1 complex. Map3k1 within the syntenic region was expressed in the embryonic mouse gonad prior to, and after, sex determination. Thus, mutations in MAP3K1 that result in 46,XY DSD with partial or complete gonadal dysgenesis implicate this pathway in normal human sex determination. Copyright © 2010 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of sur-2, a Novel Ras-Mediated Signal Transduction Component in C. elegans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DesJardins, Edward

    1999-01-01

    ... (oncogenes). A subset of proto-oncogenes comprise the RAS signal transduction pathway. Vulval development in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans is controlled by a RAS signal transduction pathway. C...

  9. Characterization of sur-2, a Novel Ras-Mediated Signal Transduction Component in C. elegans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DesJardins, Edward

    1998-01-01

    ... (oncogenes). A subset of proto-oncogenes comprise the RAS signal transduction pathway. Vulval development in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans is controlled by a RAS signal transduction pathway...

  10. Naringenin induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress by regulating MAPK and AKT signal transduction pathways in endometriosis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunwoo; Lim, Whasun; Bazer, Fuller W; Song, Gwonhwa

    2017-12-01

    Does the flavonoid naringenin inhibit proliferation of human endometriosis cells? Naringenin suppresses proliferation and increases apoptosis via depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human endometriosis cells. For management of endometriosis, hormonal therapy is commonly used to decrease production of estrogens by the ovaries, but that has limitations including undesirable side effects with long-term therapies. To overcome these limitations, it is important to discover novel compounds which have no adverse effects, but inhibit expression of target molecules involved in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. Well-established endometriosis cell lines (VK2/E6E7 and End1/E6E7) were purchased from the American Type Culture Collection. Effects of naringenin on VK2/E6E7 and End1/E6E7 cells were assessed in diverse assays in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Effects of naringenin on viability, apoptosis (Annexin V expression, propidium iodide staining, TUNEL and invasion assays), mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, production of ROS and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress proteins of VK2/E6E7 and End1/E6E7 cells were determined. Signal transduction pathways in VK2/E6E7 and End1/E6E7 cells in response to naringenin were determined by western blot analyses. In the present study, we demonstrated that naringenin suppressed proliferation and increased apoptosis through depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and inducing pro-apoptotic proteins, Bax and Bak, in both endometriosis cell lines. In addition, naringenin increased ROS, ER stress, through activation of eIF2α and IRE1α, GADD153 and GRP78 proteins in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the induction of apoptosis by naringenin involved activation of MAPK and inactivation of PI3K pathways in VK2/E6E7 and End1/E6E7 cells. Lack of in vivo animal studies is a major limitation of this research. Effectiveness of naringenin to induce apoptosis of human

  11. Quantitative insight into models of Hedgehog signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzan, Shohreh F; Ogden, Stacey K; Robbins, David J

    2010-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is an essential regulator of embryonic development and a key factor in carcinogenesis.(1,2) Hh, a secreted morphogen, activates intracellular signaling events via downstream effector proteins, which translate the signal to regulate target gene transcription.(3,4) In a recent publication, we quantitatively compared two commonly accepted models of Hh signal transduction.(5) Each model requires a different ratio of signaling components to be feasible. Thus, we hypothesized that knowing the steady-state ratio of core signaling components might allow us to distinguish between models. We reported vast differences in the molar concentrations of endogenous effectors of Hh signaling, with Smo present in limiting concentrations.(5) This extra view summarizes the implications of this endogenous ratio in relation to current models of Hh signaling and places our results in the context of recent work describing the involvement of guanine nucleotide binding protein Galphai and Cos2 motility.

  12. Geniposide plays an anti-inflammatory role via regulating TLR4 and downstream signaling pathways in lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaojing; Zhang, Wen; Wang, Tiancheng; Jiang, Haichao; Zhang, Zecai; Fu, Yunhe; Yang, Zhengtao; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2014-10-01

    Geniposide is a medicine isolated from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, which is a traditional Chinese herb that is widely used in Asia for the treatment of inflammation, brain diseases, and hepatic disorders. Mastitis is a highly prevalent and important infectious disease. In this study, we used a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mouse mastitis model and LPS-stimulated primary mouse mammary epithelial cells (mMECs) to explore the anti-inflammatory effect and the mechanism of action of geniposide. Using intraductal injection of LPS as a mouse model of mastitis, we found that geniposide significantly reduced the infiltration of inflammatory cells and downregulated the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-6 (IL-6). To further investigate the anti-inflammatory mechanism, we used LPS-stimulated mMECs as an in vitro mastitis model. The results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) showed that geniposide inhibited the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot analysis demonstrated that geniposide could suppress the phosphorylation of inhibitory kappa B (IκBα), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Geniposide also inhibited the expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the LPS-stimulated mMECs. In conclusion, geniposide exerted its anti-inflammatory effect by regulating TLR4 expression, which affected the downstream NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. Thus, geniposide may be a potential drug for mastitis therapy.

  13. Rsf-1 Influences the Sensitivity of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer to Paclitaxel by Regulating NF-κB Pathway and Its Downstream Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xitao Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The therapeutic efficacy of paclitaxel is hampered by chemotherapeutic resistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Rsf-1 enhanced paclitaxel resistance via nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB in ovarian cancer cells and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. This study assessed the function of Rsf-1 in the modulation of the sensitivity of NSCLC to paclitaxel via the NF-κB pathway. Methods: The mRNA and protein levels of the related genes were quantified by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Rsf-1 silencing was achieved with CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. Cell cycle, migration and proliferation were tested with flow cytometry, transwell test and CCK8 test. Cell apoptosis was analyzed with flow cytometry and quantification of C-capase3. The parameters of the tumors were measured in H460 cell xenograft mice. Results: Rsf-1 was highly expressed in H460 and H1299 cells. Rsf-1 knockout caused cell arrest at the G1 phase, increased cell apoptosis, and decreased migration and cell proliferation. Rsf-1 knockout increased the inhibition of cell proliferation, the reduction in cell migration and the augment in cell apoptosis in paclitaxel treated H460 and H1299 cells. Rsf-1 knockout further enhanced the paclitaxel-mediated decrease in the volume and weight of the tumors in H460 cell xenograft mice. Helenalin and Rsf-1 knockout decreased the protein levels of p-P65, BcL2, CFLAR, and XIAP; hSNF2H knockout decreased the protein level of NF-κB p-P65 without altering Rsf-1 and p65 protein levels, while Rsf-1 and hSNF2H double knockout decreased the level of NF-κB p-P65, in H1299 and H460 cells. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that Rsf-1 influences the sensitivity of NSCLC to paclitaxel via regulation of the NF-κB pathway and its downstream genes.

  14. The role of MAPK signal transduction pathways in the response to oxidative stress in the fungal pathogen Candida albicans: implications in virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dios, Carmen Herrero; Román, Elvira; Monge, Rebeca Alonso; Pla, Jesús

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) pathways have emerged as major regulators of cellular physiology. In the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, three different MAPK pathways have been characterized in the last years. The HOG pathway is mainly a stress response pathway that is activated in response to osmotic and oxidative stress and also participates regulating other pathways. The SVG pathway (or mediated by the Cek1 MAPK) is involved in cell wall formation under vegetative and filamentous growth, while the Mkc1-mediated pathway is involved in cell wall integrity. Oxidative stress is one of the types of stress that every fungal cell has to face during colonization of the host, where the cell encounters both hypoxia niches (i.e. gut) and high concentrations of reactive oxygen species (upon challenge with immune cells). Two pathways have been shown to be activated in response to oxidative stress: the HOG pathway and the MKC1-mediated pathway while the third, the Cek1 pathway is deactivated. The timing, kinetics, stimuli and functional responses generated upon oxidative stress differ among them; however, they have essential functional consequences that severely influence pathogenesis. MAPK pathways are, therefore, valuable targets to be explored in antifungal research.

  15. On the nanotoxicity of PAMAM dendrimers: Superfect® stimulates the EGFR-ERK1/2 signal transduction pathway via an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism in HEK 293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Saghir; Chandrasekhar, Bindu; Attur, Sreeja; Yousif, Mariam H M; Benter, Ibrahim F

    2013-05-01

    Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers are cationic branch-like macromolecules that may serve as drug delivery systems for gene-based therapies such as RNA interference. For their safe use in the clinic, they should ideally only enhance drug delivery to target tissues and exhibit no adverse effects. However, little is known about their toxicological profiles in terms of their interactions with cellular signal transduction pathways such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The EGFR is an important signaling cascade that regulates cell growth, differentiation, migration, survival and apoptosis. Here, we investigated the impact of naked, unmodified Superfect (SF), a commercially available generation 6 PAMAM dendrimer, on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase-extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathway in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) cells. At concentrations routinely used for transfection, SF exhibited time and dose-dependent stimulation of EGFR and ERK1/2 phosphorylation whereas AG1478, a selective EGFR tyrosine kinase antagonist, inhibited EGFR-ERK1/2 signaling. SF-induced phosphorylation of EGFR for 1h was partly reversible upon removal of the dendrimer and examination of cells 24 later. Co-treatment of SF with epidermal growth factor (EGF) ligand resulted in greater EGFR stimulation than either agent alone implying that the stimulatory effects of SF and the ligand are synergistic. Dendrimer-induced stimulation of EGFR-ERK1/2 signaling could be attenuated by the antioxidants apocynin, catalase and tempol implying that an oxidative stress dependent mechanism was involved. These results show for the first time that PAMAM dendrimers, aside from their ability to improve drug delivery, can modulate the important EGFR-ERK1/2 cellular signal transduction pathway - a novel finding that may have a bearing on their safe application as drug delivery systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Dielectric Transduction of NEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Howell, Kaitlin

    2017-01-01

    We report on a four-mask process flow for creating resonant NanoElectroMechanical Systems (NEMS) based on dielectric transduction. Current transduction mechanisms for NEMS include piezoelectricity, flexoelectricity and dielectric force. While piezoelectricity gives the highest electromechanical efficiency in, NEMS using flexoelectricity and dielectric force are interesting alternatives with a larger range of possible active materials and potentially simpler fabrication. In this four-mask proc...

  17. Multiple signal transduction pathways regulate TNF-induced actin reorganization in macrophages: inhibition of Cdc42-mediated filopodium formation by TNF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peppelenbosch, M.; Boone, E.; Jones, G. E.; van Deventer, S. J.; Haegeman, G.; Fiers, W.; Grooten, J.; Ridley, A. J.

    1999-01-01

    TNF is known to regulate macrophage (Mphi) migration, but the signaling pathways mediating this response have not been established. Here we report that stimulation of the 55-kDa TNF receptor (TNFR-1) induced an overall decrease in filamentous actin (F-actin), inhibited CSF-1- and Cdc42-dependent

  18. Temporal pattern of loss/persistence of duplicate genes involved in signal transduction and metabolic pathways after teleost-specific genome duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sato Yukuto

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent genomic studies have revealed a teleost-specific third-round whole genome duplication (3R-WGD event occurred in a common ancestor of teleost fishes. However, it is unclear how the genes duplicated in this event were lost or persisted during the diversification of teleosts, and therefore, how many of the duplicated genes contribute to the genetic differences among teleosts. This subject is also important for understanding the process of vertebrate evolution through WGD events. We applied a comparative evolutionary approach to this question by focusing on the genes involved in long-term potentiation, taste and olfactory transduction, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, based on the whole genome sequences of four teleosts; zebrafish, medaka, stickleback, and green spotted puffer fish. Results We applied a state-of-the-art method of maximum-likelihood phylogenetic inference and conserved synteny analyses to each of 130 genes involved in the above biological systems of human. These analyses identified 116 orthologous gene groups between teleosts and tetrapods, and 45 pairs of 3R-WGD-derived duplicate genes among them. This suggests that more than half [(45×2/(116+45] = 56.5% of the loci, probably more than ten thousand genes, present in a common ancestor of the four teleosts were still duplicated after the 3R-WGD. The estimated temporal pattern of gene loss suggested that, after the 3R-WGD, many (71/116 of the duplicated genes were rapidly lost during the initial 75 million years (MY, whereas on average more than half (27.3/45 of the duplicated genes remaining in the ancestor of the four teleosts (45/116 have persisted for about 275 MY. The 3R-WGD-derived duplicates that have persisted for a long evolutionary periods of time had significantly larger number of interacting partners and longer length of protein coding sequence, implying that they tend to be more multifunctional than the singletons after the 3R-WGD. Conclusion

  19. TRPM5 and taste transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liman, E R

    2007-01-01

    TRPM5 is a cation channel that it is essential for transduction of bitter, sweet and umami tastes. Signaling of these tastes involves the activation of G protein-coupled receptors that stimulate phospholipase C (PLC) beta2, leading to the breakdown of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2) into diacylglycerol (DAG) and inositol trisphosphate (IP3), and release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. TRPM5 forms a nonselective cation channel that is directly activated by Ca2+ and it is likely to be the downstream target of this signaling cascade. Therefore, study of TRPM5 promises to provide insight into fundamental mechanisms of taste transduction. This review highlights recent work on the mechanisms of activation of the TRPM5 channel. The mouse TRPM5 gene encodes a protein of 1,158 amino acids that is proposed to have six transmembrane domains and to function as a tetramer. TRPM5 is structurally most closely related to the Ca(2+)-activated channel TRPM4 and it is more distantly related to the cold-activated channel TRPM8. In patch clamp recordings, TRPM5 channels are activated by micromolar concentrations of Ca2+ and are permeable to monovalent but not divalent cations. TRPM5 channel activity is strongly regulated by voltage, phosphoinositides and temperature, and is blocked by acid pH. Study of TRPM4 and TRPM8, which show similar modes of regulation, has yielded insights into possible structural domains of TRPM5. Understanding the structural basis for TRPM5 function will ultimately allow the design of pharmaceuticals to enhance or interfere with taste sensations.

  20. Substance P Activates the Wnt Signal Transduction Pathway and Enhances the Differentiation of Mouse Preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Mei

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent experiments have explored the impact of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and Substance P (SP on the regulation of osteogenesis. However, the molecular regulatory mechanisms of SP on the formation of osteoblasts is still unknown. In this study, we investigated the impact of SP on the differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. The osteogenic effect of SP was observed at different SP concentrations (ranging from 10−10 to 10−8 M. To unravel the underlying mechanism, the MC3T3-E1 cells were treated with SP after the pretreatment by neurokinin-1 (NK1 antagonists and Dickkopf-1 (DKK1 and gene expression levels of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway components, as well as osteoblast differentiation markers (collagen type I, alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and Runx2, were measured using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Furthermore, protein levels of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway were detected using Western blotting and the effects of SP, NK1 antagonist, and DKK1 on β-catenin activation were investigated by immunofluorescence staining. Our data indicated that SP (10−9 to 10−8 M significantly up-regulated the expressions of osteoblastic genes. SP (10−8 M also elevated the mRNA level of c-myc, cyclin D1, and lymphocyte enhancer factor-1 (Lef1, as well as c-myc and β-catenin protein levels, but decreased the expression of Tcf7 mRNA. Moreover, SP (10−8 M promoted the transfer of β-catenin into nucleus. The effects of SP treatment were inhibited by the NK1 antagonist and DKK1. These findings suggest that SP may enhance differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells via regulation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  1. cAMP and EPAC Are Key Players in the Regulation of the Signal Transduction Pathway Involved in the α-Hemolysin Autophagic Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, María Belén; Colombo, María Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a microorganism that causes serious diseases in the human being. This microorganism is able to escape the phagolysosomal pathway, increasing intracellular bacterial survival and killing the eukaryotic host cell to spread the infection. One of the key features of S. aureus infection is the production of a series of virulence factors, including secreted enzymes and toxins. We have shown that the pore-forming toxin α-hemolysin (Hla) is the S. aureus–secreted factor responsible for the activation of the autophagic pathway and that this response occurs through a PI3K/Beclin1-independent form. In the present report we demonstrate that cAMP has a key role in the regulation of this autophagic response. Our results indicate that cAMP is able to inhibit the autophagy induced by Hla and that PKA, the classical cAMP effector, does not participate in this regulation. We present evidence that EPAC and Rap2b, through calpain activation, are the proteins involved in the regulation of Hla-induced autophagy. Similar results were obtained in cells infected with different S. aureus strains. Interestingly, in this report we show, for the first time to our knowledge, that both EPAC and Rap2b are recruited to the S. aureus–containing phagosome. We believe that our findings have important implications in understanding innate immune processes involved in intracellular pathogen invasion of the host cell. PMID:22654658

  2. cAMP and EPAC are key players in the regulation of the signal transduction pathway involved in the α-hemolysin autophagic response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Belén Mestre

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a microorganism that causes serious diseases in the human being. This microorganism is able to escape the phagolysosomal pathway, increasing intracellular bacterial survival and killing the eukaryotic host cell to spread the infection. One of the key features of S. aureus infection is the production of a series of virulence factors, including secreted enzymes and toxins. We have shown that the pore-forming toxin α-hemolysin (Hla is the S. aureus-secreted factor responsible for the activation of the autophagic pathway and that this response occurs through a PI3K/Beclin1-independent form. In the present report we demonstrate that cAMP has a key role in the regulation of this autophagic response. Our results indicate that cAMP is able to inhibit the autophagy induced by Hla and that PKA, the classical cAMP effector, does not participate in this regulation. We present evidence that EPAC and Rap2b, through calpain activation, are the proteins involved in the regulation of Hla-induced autophagy. Similar results were obtained in cells infected with different S. aureus strains. Interestingly, in this report we show, for the first time to our knowledge, that both EPAC and Rap2b are recruited to the S. aureus-containing phagosome. We believe that our findings have important implications in understanding innate immune processes involved in intracellular pathogen invasion of the host cell.

  3. Signal Transduction Pathways (MAPKs, NF-κB, and C/EBP) Regulating COX-2 Expression in Nasal Fibroblasts from Asthma Patients with Aspirin Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Garcia, Francesc Josep; Mullol, Joaquim; Perez-Gonzalez, Maria; Pujols, Laura; Alobid, Isam

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent studies have revealed that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression is down-regulated in aspirin-induced asthma (AIA). Various signal pathways (MAPKs, NF-κB and C/EBP) are involved in COX-2 regulation. Objective To investigate the regulation of COX-2 expression through MAP-kinase pathway activation and nuclear factor translocation in aspirin-induced asthma (AIA). Methods Fibroblasts were isolated from specimens of nasal mucosa (NM, N = 5) and nasal polyps (NP, N = 5). After IL-1β (1 ng/ml) incubation, COX-2 and phosphorylated forms of ERK, JNK and p38 MAPK were measured by Western blot. MAPK’s role in IL-1β-induced COX-2 expression was assessed by treating cells with ERK (PD98059), JNK (SP600125) and p38 MAPK (SB203580) inhibitors (0.1–10 µM) prior to IL-1β exposure. NF-κB and C/EBP nuclear translocation was measured by Western blot and TransAM® after IL-1β (10 ng/ml) exposure. Results No differences were observed in the MAPK phosphorylation time-course between NM and NP-AIA fibroblasts. The p38 MAPK inhibitor at 10 µM significantly reduced IL-1β-induced COX-2 expression in NM fibroblasts (85%). In NP-AIA fibroblasts the COX-2 inhibition (65%) at 1 and 10 µM was not statistically significant compared to non-treated cells. ERK and JNK inhibitors had no significant effect in either the NM or NP-AIA cultures. The effect of IL-1β on NF-κB and C/EBP subunits’ nuclear translocation was similar between NM and NP-AIA fibroblasts. Conclusions These results suggest that p38 MAPK is the only MAPK involved in IL-1β-induced COX-2 expression. NM and NP-AIA fibroblasts have similar MAPK phosphorylation dynamics and nuclear factor translocation (NF-κB and C/EBP). COX-2 downregulation observed in AIA patients appears not to be caused by differences in MAPK dynamics or transcription factor translocation. PMID:23240010

  4. Effect of Momordica charantia protein on proliferation, apoptosis and the AKT signal transduction pathway in the human endometrial carcinoma Ishikawa H cell line in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Hang-Zhi; Lin, Rong-Rong; Wang, Han-Chu; Zhu, Xue-Jie; Hu, Yan; Zheng, Fei-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Endometrial carcinoma (EC) is one of the most common female malignancies, and there is an urgent requirement to explore new therapeutic strategies. In the present study, Ishikawa H cells were treated with Momordica charantia protein (MCP30). The cell morphology, growth inhibition rate, cell cycle distribution, and expression of phosphate and tensin homolog, P-AKT and AKT were measured. DNA fragmentation analysis and Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide double staining assay were used to analyze cell apoptosis. MCP30 decreased the viability of Ishikawa H cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The early apoptotic rates of Ishikawa H cells treated with MCP30 at 666.67 pM reached to 16.07±0.15%, following 72 h of treatment. DNA ladder was observed in cells treated with 333.33 and 666.67 pM MCP30 following 72 h of treatment. MCP30 blocks Ishikawa H cells from progressing between the S-phase and the G2/M-phase in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Western blotting revealed that MCP30 treatment decreased the levels of P-AKT in a dose-dependent manner. It was revealed that MCP30 decreases cell proliferation, and induces apoptosis and S-phase cell cycle arrest through the AKT signaling pathway in Ishikawa H cells. PMID:28521410

  5. Dissociation of Akt1 from its negative regulator JIP1 is mediated through the ASK1-MEK-JNK signal transduction pathway during metabolic oxidative stress: a negative feedback loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jae J; Lee, Yong J

    2005-07-04

    We have previously observed that metabolic oxidative stress-induced death domain-associated protein (Daxx) trafficking is mediated by the ASK1-SEK1-JNK1-HIPK1 signal transduction pathway. The relocalized Daxx from the nucleus to the cytoplasm during glucose deprivation participates in a positive regulatory feedback loop by binding to apoptosis signal-regulating kinase (ASK) 1. In this study, we report that Akt1 is involved in a negative regulatory feedback loop during glucose deprivation. Akt1 interacts with c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK)-interacting protein (JIP) 1, and Akt1 catalytic activity is inhibited. The JNK2-mediated phosphorylation of JIP1 results in the dissociation of Akt1 from JIP1 and subsequently restores Akt1 enzyme activity. Concomitantly, Akt1 interacts with stress-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (SEK) 1 (also known as MKK4) and inhibits SEK1 activity. Knockdown of SEK1 leads to the inhibition of JNK activation, JIP1-JNK2 binding, and the dissociation of Akt1 from JIP1 during glucose deprivation. Knockdown of JIP1 also leads to the inhibition of JNK activation, whereas the knockdown of Akt1 promotes JNK activation during glucose deprivation. Altogether, our data demonstrate that Akt1 participates in a negative regulatory feedback loop by interacting with the JIP1 scaffold protein.

  6. Blocking Modification of Eukaryotic Initiation 5A2 Antagonizes Cervical Carcinoma via Inhibition of RhoA/ROCK Signal Transduction Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojun; Chen, Dong; Liu, Jiamei; Chu, Zhangtao; Liu, Dongli

    2017-10-01

    Cervical carcinoma is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death for female worldwide. Eukaryotic initiation factor 5A2 belongs to the eukaryotic initiation factor 5A family and is proposed to be a key factor involved in the development of diverse cancers. In the current study, a series of in vivo and in vitro investigations were performed to characterize the role of eukaryotic initiation factor 5A2 in oncogenesis and metastasis of cervical carcinoma. The expression status of eukaryotic initiation factor 5A2 in 15 cervical carcinoma patients was quantified. Then, the effect of eukaryotic initiation factor 5A2 knockdown on in vivo tumorigenicity ability, cell proliferation, cell cycle distribution, and cell mobility of HeLa cells was measured. To uncover the mechanism driving the function of eukaryotic initiation factor 5A2 in cervical carcinoma, expression of members within RhoA/ROCK pathway was detected, and the results were further verified with an RhoA overexpression modification. The level of eukaryotic initiation factor 5A2 in cervical carcinoma samples was significantly higher than that in paired paratumor tissues ( P ROCK I, and ROCK II were downregulated. The above-mentioned changes in eukaryotic initiation factor 5A2 knockdown cells were alleviated by the overexpression of RhoA. The major findings outlined in the current study confirmed the potential of eukaryotic initiation factor 5A2 as a promising prognosis predictor and therapeutic target for cervical carcinoma treatment. Also, our data inferred that eukaryotic initiation factor 5A2 might function in carcinogenesis of cervical carcinoma through an RhoA/ROCK-dependent manner.

  7. Arsenic interferes with the signaling transduction pathway of T cell receptor activation by increasing basal and induced phosphorylation of Lck and Fyn in spleen cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto-Pena, Gerson A.; Vega, Libia

    2008-01-01

    Arsenic is known to produce inhibition as well as induction of immune cells proliferative responses depending on the doses as one of its mechanisms of immunotoxicity. Here we evaluate the effect of arsenic exposure on the activation of splenic mononuclear cells (SMC) in male CD57BL6N mice. Intra-gastric exposure to arsenic (as sodium arsenite) for 30 days (1, 0.1, or 0.01 mg/kg/day), reduced the proportion of CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio in the spleen, increasing the proportion of CD11b+ cells. Arsenic exposure did not modify the proportion of B cells. SMC showed an increased level of phosphorylation of lck and fyn kinases (first kinases associated to TCR complex when activated). Although normal levels of apoptosis were observed on freshly isolated SMC, an increase in apoptotic cells related with the increase in phosphorylation of lck and fyn was observed when SMC were activated with Concanavalin-A (Con-A). Arsenic exposure reduced the proliferative response of SMC to Con-A, and also reduced secretion of IL-2, IL-6, IL-12 and IFNγ. No effect was observed on IL-4, and IL-10 secretion. The same effects were observed when SMC of exposed animals were activated with anti-CD3/CD28 antibodies for 24 h, but these effects were transitory since a recovery, up to control levels or even higher, were observed after 72 h of stimulation. This study demonstrates that repeated and prolonged exposure to arsenic alters cell populations and produces functional changes depending on the specific activation pathway, and could be related with the phosphorylation status of lck and fyn kinases

  8. Effects of inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and downstream pathways of receptor tyrosine kinases involving phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin or mitogen-activated protein kinase in canine hemangiosarcoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Mami; Hoshino, Yuki; Izumi, Yusuke; Sakai, Hiroki; Takagi, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    Canine hemangiosarcoma (HSA) is a progressive malignant neoplasm with no current effective treatment. Previous studies showed that receptor tyrosine kinases and molecules within their downstream pathways involving phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (m-TOR) or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) were overexpressed in canine, human, and murine tumors, including HSA. The present study investigated the effects of inhibitors of these pathways in canine splenic and hepatic HSA cell lines using assays of cell viability and apoptosis. Inhibitors of the MAPK pathway did not affect canine HSA cell viability. However, cell viability was significantly reduced by exposure to inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and the PI3K/Akt/m-TOR pathway; these inhibitors also induced apoptosis in these cell lines. These results suggest that these inhibitors reduce the proliferation of canine HSA cells by inducing apoptosis. Further study of these inhibitors, using xenograft mouse models of canine HSA, are warranted to explore their potential for clinical application.

  9. Complex cisplatin-double strand break (DSB) lesions directly impair cellular non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) independent of downstream damage response (DDR) pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Catherine R; Turchi, John J

    2012-07-13

    The treatment for advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) often includes platinum-based chemotherapy and IR. Cisplatin and IR combination therapy display schedule and dose-dependent synergy, the mechanism of which is not completely understood. In a series of in vitro and cell culture assays in a NSCLC model, we investigated both the downstream and direct treatment and damage effects of cisplatin on NHEJ catalyzed repair of a DNA DSB. The results demonstrate that extracts prepared from cisplatin-treated cells are fully capable of NHEJ catalyzed repair of a DSB using a non-cisplatin-damaged DNA substrate in vitro. Similarly, using two different host cell reactivation assays, treatment of cells prior to transfection of a linear, undamaged reporter plasmid revealed no reduction in NHEJ compared with untreated cells. In contrast, transfection of a linear GFP-reporter plasmid containing site-specific, cisplatin lesions 6-bp from the termini revealed a significant impairment in DSB repair of the cisplatin-damaged DNA substrates in the absence of cellular treatment with cisplatin. Together, these data demonstrate that impaired NHEJ in combined cisplatin-IR treated cells is likely the result of a direct effect of cisplatin-DNA lesions near a DSB and that the indirect cellular effects of cisplatin treatment are not significant contributors to the synergistic cytotoxicity observed with combination cisplatin-IR treatment.

  10. The MSX1 homeobox transcription factor is a downstream target of PHOX2B and activates the Delta-Notch pathway in neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revet, Ingrid; Huizenga, Gerda; Chan, Alvin; Koster, Jan; Volckmann, Richard; Sluis, Peter van; Ora, Ingrid; Versteeg, Rogier; Geerts, Dirk

    2008-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is an embryonal tumour of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system (SNS). One of the master regulator genes for peripheral SNS differentiation, the homeobox transcription factor PHOX2B, is mutated in familiar and sporadic neuroblastomas. Here we report that inducible expression of PHOX2B in the neuroblastoma cell line SJNB-8 down-regulates MSX1, a homeobox gene important for embryonic neural crest development. Inducible expression of MSX1 in SJNB-8 caused inhibition of both cell proliferation and colony formation in soft agar. Affymetrix micro-array and Northern blot analysis demonstrated that MSX1 strongly up-regulated the Delta-Notch pathway genes DLK1, NOTCH3, and HEY1. In addition, the proneural gene NEUROD1 was down-regulated. Western blot analysis showed that MSX1 induction caused cleavage of the NOTCH3 protein to its activated form, further confirming activation of the Delta-Notch pathway. These experiments describe for the first time regulation of the Delta-Notch pathway by MSX1, and connect these genes to the PHOX2B oncogene, indicative of a role in neuroblastoma biology. Affymetrix micro-array analysis of a neuroblastic tumour series consisting of neuroblastomas and the more benign ganglioneuromas showed that MSX1, NOTCH3 and HEY1 are more highly expressed in ganglioneuromas. This suggests a block in differentiation of these tumours at distinct developmental stages or lineages

  11. Lipopolysaccharide Adsorbed to the Bio-Corona of TiO2 Nanoparticles Powerfully Activates Selected Pro-inflammatory Transduction Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano G. Bianchi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the adsorption of bioactive molecules provides engineered nanoparticles (NPs with novel biological activities. However, the biological effects of the adsorbed molecules may also be modified by the interaction with NP. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, a powerful pro-inflammatory compound, is a common environmental contaminant and is present in several body compartments such as the gut. We recently observed that the co-incubation of LPS with TiO2 NPs markedly potentiates its pro-inflammatory effects on murine macrophages, suggesting that, when included in a NP bio-corona, LPS activity is enhanced. To distinguish the effects of adsorbed LPS from those of the free endotoxin, a pellet fraction, denominated P25/LPS, was isolated by centrifugation from a mixture of P25 TiO2 NP (128 µg/ml and LPS (10 ng/ml in the presence of fetal bovine serum. Western blot analysis of the pellet eluate indicated that the P25/LPS fraction contained, besides proteins, also LPS, pointing to the presence of LPS-doped NP. The effects of adsorbed or free LPS were then compared in Raw264.7 murine macrophages. RT-PCR was used to evaluate the induction of cytokine genes, whereas active, phosphorylated isoforms of proteins involved in signaling pathways were assessed with western blot. At a nominal LPS concentration of 40 pg/ml, P25/LPS induced the expression of both NF-κB and IRF3-dependent cytokines at levels comparable with those observed with free LPS (10 ng/ml, although with different time courses. Moreover, compared to free LPS, P25/LPS caused a more sustained phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and a more prolonged induction of STAT1-dependent genes. Cytochalasin B partially inhibited the induction of Tnfa by P25/LPS, but not by free LPS, and suppressed the induction of IRF3-dependent genes by either P25/LPS or free LPS. These data suggest that, when included in the bio-corona of TiO2 NP, LPS exhibits enhanced and time-shifted pro-inflammatory effects

  12. Transcription factor HIF1A: downstream targets, associated pathways, polymorphic hypoxia response element (HRE) sites, and initiative for standardization of reporting in scientific literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemc, Lucija; Kunej, Tanja

    2016-11-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) has crucial role in adapting cells to hypoxia through expression regulation of many genes. Identification of HIF-1α target genes (HIF-1α-TGs) is important for understanding the adapting mechanism. The aim of the present study was to collect known HIF-1α-TGs and identify their associated pathways. Targets and associated genomics data were retrieved using PubMed, WoS ( http://apps.webofknowledge.com/ ), HGNC ( http://www.genenames.org/ ), NCBI ( http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/ ), Ensemblv.84 ( http://www.ensembl.org/index.html ), DAVID Bioinformatics Resources ( https://david.ncifcrf.gov /), and Disease Ontology database ( http://disease-ontology.org/ ). From 51 papers, we collected 98 HIF-1α TGs found to be associated with 20 pathways, including metabolism of carbohydrates and pathways in cancer. Reanalysis of genomic coordinates of published HREs (hypoxia response elements) revealed six polymorphisms within HRE sites (HRE-SNPs): ABCG2, ACE, CA9, and CP. Due to large heterogeneity of results presentation in scientific literature, we also propose a first step towards reporting standardization of HIF-1α-target interactions consisting of ten relevant data types. Suggested minimal checklist for reporting will enable faster development of a complete catalog of HIF-1α-TGs, data sharing, bioinformatics analyses, and setting novel more targeted hypotheses. The proposed format for data standardization is not yet complete but presents a baseline for further optimization of the protocol with additional details, for example, regarding the experimental validation.

  13. The freeze-thaw stress response of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is growth phase specific and is controlled by nutritional state via the RAS-cyclic AMP signal transduction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J I; Grant, C M; Attfield, P V; Dawes, I W

    1997-10-01

    The ability of cells to survive freezing and thawing is expected to depend on the physiological conditions experienced prior to freezing. We examined factors affecting yeast cell survival during freeze-thaw stress, including those associated with growth phase, requirement for mitochondrial functions, and prior stress treatment(s), and the role played by relevant signal transduction pathways. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was frozen at -20 degrees C for 2 h (cooling rate, less than 4 degrees C min-1) and thawed on ice for 40 min. Supercooling occurred without reducing cell survival and was followed by freezing. Loss of viability was proportional to the freezing duration, indicating that freezing is the main determinant of freeze-thaw damage. Regardless of the carbon source used, the wild-type strain and an isogenic petite mutant ([rho 0]) showed the same pattern of freeze-thaw tolerance throughout growth, i.e., high resistance during lag phase and low resistance during log phase, indicating that the response to freeze-thaw stress is growth phase specific and not controlled by glucose repression. In addition, respiratory ability and functional mitochondria are necessary to confer full resistance to freeze-thaw stress. Both nitrogen and carbon source starvation led to freeze-thaw tolerance. The use of strains affected in the RAS-cyclic AMP (RAS-cAMP) pathway or supplementation of an rca1 mutant (defective in the cAMP phosphodiesterase gene) with cAMP showed that the freeze-thaw response of yeast is under the control of the RAS-cAMP pathway. Yeast did not adapt to freeze-thaw stress following repeated freeze-thaw treatment with or without a recovery period between freeze-thaw cycles, nor could it adapt following pretreatment by cold shock. However, freeze-thaw tolerance of yeast cells was induced during fermentative and respiratory growth by pretreatment with H2O2, cycloheximide, mild heat shock, or NaCl, indicating that cross protection between freeze-thaw stress

  14. Induction of PD-L1 Expression by the EML4-ALK Oncoprotein and Downstream Signaling Pathways in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Keiichi; Azuma, Koichi; Kawahara, Akihiko; Hattori, Satoshi; Iwama, Eiji; Tanizaki, Junko; Harada, Taishi; Matsumoto, Koichiro; Takayama, Koichi; Takamori, Shinzo; Kage, Masayoshi; Hoshino, Tomoaki; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Okamoto, Isamu

    2015-09-01

    Therapies targeted to the immune checkpoint mediated by PD-1 and PD-L1 show antitumor activity in a subset of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We have now examined PD-L1 expression and its regulation in NSCLC positive for the EML4-ALK fusion gene. The expression of PD-L1 at the protein and mRNA levels in NSCLC cell lines was examined by flow cytometry and by reverse transcription and real-time PCR analysis, respectively. The expression of PD-L1 in 134 surgically resected NSCLC specimens was evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis. The PD-L1 expression level was higher in NSCLC cell lines positive for EML4-ALK than in those negative for the fusion gene. Forced expression of EML4-ALK in Ba/F3 cells markedly increased PD-L1 expression, whereas endogenous PD-L1 expression in EML4-ALK-positive NSCLC cells was attenuated by treatment with the specific ALK inhibitor alectinib or by RNAi with ALK siRNAs. Furthermore, expression of PD-L1 was downregulated by inhibitors of the MEK-ERK and PI3K-AKT signaling pathways in NSCLC cells positive for either EML4-ALK or activating mutations of the EGFR. Finally, the expression level of PD-L1 was positively associated with the presence of EML4-ALK in NSCLC specimens. Our findings that both EML4-ALK and mutant EGFR upregulate PD-L1 by activating PI3K-AKT and MEK-ERK signaling pathways in NSCLC reveal a direct link between oncogenic drivers and PD-L1 expression. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Modulation of signal transduction by tea catechins and related phytochemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Masahito [Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center and Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, HHSC-1509, 701 West 168 Street, NY 10032-2704 (United States); Weinstein, I. Bernard [Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center and Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, HHSC-1509, 701 West 168 Street, NY 10032-2704 (United States)]. E-mail: ibw1@columbia.edu

    2005-12-11

    Epidemiologic studies in human populations and experimental studies in rodents provide evidence that green tea and its constituents can inhibit both the development and growth of tumors at a variety of tissue sites. In addition, EGCG, a major biologically active component of green tea, inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in a variety of cancer cell lines. The purpose of this paper is to review evidence that these effects are mediated, at least in part, through inhibition of the activity of specific receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and related downstream pathways of signal transduction. We also review evidence indicating that the antitumor effects of the related polyphenolic phytochemicals resveratrol, genistein, curcumin, and capsaicin are exerted via similar mechanisms. Some of these agents (EGCG, genistein, and curcumin) appear to directly target specific RTKs, and all of these compounds cause inhibition of the activity of the transcription factors AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B, thus inhibiting cell proliferation and enhancing apoptosis. Critical areas of future investigation include: (1) identification of the direct molecular target(s) of EGCG and related polyphenolic compounds in cells; (2) the in vivo metabolism and bioavailability of these compounds; (3) the ancillary effects of these compounds on tumor-stromal interactions; (4) the development of synergistic combinations with other antitumor agents to enhance efficacy in cancer prevention and therapy, and also minimize potential toxicities.

  16. Brazilin plays an anti-inflammatory role with regulating Toll-like receptor 2 and TLR 2 downstream pathways in Staphylococcus aureus-induced mastitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xue-jiao; Wang, Tian-cheng; Zhang, Ze-cai; Cao, Yong-guo; Zhang, Nai-sheng; Guo, Meng-yao

    2015-07-01

    Mastitis, which commonly occurs during the postpartum period, is caused by the infection of the mammary glands. The most common infectious bacterial pathogen of mastitis is Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) in both human and animals. Brazilin, a compound isolated from the traditional herbal medicine Caesalpinia sappan L., has been shown to exhibit multiple biological properties. The present study was performed to determine the effect of brazilin on the inflammatory response in the mouse model of S. aureus mastitis and to confirm the mechanism of action involved. Brazilin treatment was applied in both a mouse model and cells. After brazilin treatment of cells, Western blotting and qPCR were performed to detect the protein levels and mRNA levels, respectively. Brazilin treatment significantly attenuated inflammatory cell infiltration and inhibited the expressions of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of brazilin in mice suppressed S. aureus-induced inflammatory injury and the production of proinflammatory mediators. This suppression was achieved by reducing the increased expression of TLR2 and regulating the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways in the mammary gland tissues and cells with S. aureus-induced mastitis. These results suggest that brazilin appears to be an effective drug for the treatment of mastitis and may be applied as a clinical therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. RETRACTED: Sophocarpine displays anti-inflammatory effect via inhibiting TLR4 and TLR4 downstream pathways on LPS-induced mastitis in the mammary gland of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dehai; Xu, Niannian; Zhang, Zhenbiao; Yang, Shijin; Qiu, Changwei; Li, Chengye; Deng, Ganzhen; Guo, Mengyao

    2016-06-01

    Mastitis is defined as the inflammation of the mammary gland. LPS, which is widely used to induce mastitis models for the study of this disease, triggers similar inflammation as Escherichia coli. Sophocarpine, isolated from Sophora alopecuroides L., exhibits multiple biological properties. The aim of the present study was to determine the anti-inflammatory effect and mechanism of action of sophocarpine on mastitis within an LPS-induced mouse model. ELISA and western blotting were performed to detect protein levels. The qPCR was performed to detect mRNA levels. The ELISA and qRT-PCR results showed that sophocarpine inhibited the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 in a dose-dependent manner. However, sophocarpine suppressed TLR4 expression. Further study showed that sophocarpine could suppress the phosphorylation of IκBα, p65 and p38. These results confirm that sophocarpine played an anti-inflammatory role in LPS-induced mastitis by regulating TLR4 and the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways in mammary gland tissues. Therefore, sophocarpine may be a potential therapeutic drug for the treatment of mastitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Genes involved in brassinosteroids's metabolism and signal transduction pathways Genes envolvidos nas vias de biossíntese e de transdução de sinal de brassinoesteróides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adaucto Bellarmino Pereira-Netto

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Brassinosteroids (BRs are plant steroids essential for the normal growth and development, which carry an oxygen moiety at C-3 and additional ones at one or more of the C-2, C-6, C-22 and C-23 carbon atoms. In the past few years, application of molecular genetics allowed significant progress on the understanding of the BRs biosynthetic pathway regulation and on the identification of several components of their signal transduction pathway, as well. Search in eletronic databases show dozens of records for brassinosteroid-related genes for the last twelve months, demonstrating the big efforts being carried out in this field. This review highlights the recent advances on the characterization of genes and mutations that are helping to unravel the molecular mechanisms involved in the BRs synthesis/metabolism, perception and response, with especial emphasis on their role in plant cell elongation. Aspects of the involvement of BRs on the regulation of cell cycle-controlling proteins are discussed as well.Brassinoesteróides são esteróides vegetais, essenciais para o crescimento e o desenvolvimento, que apresentam um oxigênio no carbono C-3 e oxigênios adicionais em um ou mais dos átomos de carbono C-2, C-6, C-22 e C-23. Nos últimos anos, a aplicação de técnicas de genética molecular possibilitou progresso significativo no entendimento da regulação da via biossintética e na identificação de vários componentes da via de transdução de sinal de brassinoesteróides. Buscas em bases de dados eletrônicas mostram dúzias de registros para genes relacionados a brassinoesteróides nos últimos doze meses, demonstrando os grandes esforços desenvolvidos neste campo. Esta revisão destaca os recentes avanços na caracterização de genes e mutações que estão auxiliando na elucidação dos mecanismos moleculares envolvidos na síntese/metabolismo, e percepção e resposta de brassinoesteróides, com ênfase especial no seu papel no alongamento

  19. Controlling Signal Transduction with Synthetic Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, David M.; Wandless, Thomas J.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Crabtree, Gerald R.

    1993-11-01

    Dimerization and oligomerization are general biological control mechanisms contributing to the activation of cell membrane receptors, transcription factors, vesicle fusion proteins, and other classes of intra- and extracellular proteins. Cell permeable, synthetic ligands were devised that can be used to control the intracellular oligomerization of specific proteins. To demonstrate their utility, these ligands were used to reduce intracellular oligomerization of cell surface receptors that lacked their transmembrane and extracellular regions but contained intracellular signaling domains. Addition of these ligands to cells in culture resulted in signal transmission and specific target gene activation. Monomeric forms of the ligands blocked the pathway. This method of ligandregulated activation and termination of signaling pathways has the potential to be applied wherever precise control of a signal transduction pathway is desired.

  20. Expression of EGFR and Molecules Downstream to PI3K/Akt, Raf-1-MEK-1-MAP (Erk1/2, and JAK (STAT3 Pathways in Invasive Lung Adenocarcinomas Resected at a Single Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Fabiola Torres

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Therapies targeting EGFR are effective in treating tumors that harbor molecular alterations; however, there is heterogeneity in long-term response to these therapies. We retrospectively analyzed protein expression of EGFR, Stat3, phospho-Akt, and phospho-Erk1/2 by immunohistochemistry in a series of resected cases from a single institution, correlated with clinicopathological variables. There were 96 patients, with the majority of cases being of low stage tumors (17 pT1a, 23 pT1b, 30 pT2a, and 18 pT2b. Histologic subtypes were 45 acinar predominant, 2 cribriform, 25 solid, 7 papillary, 11 lepidic, and 4 mucinous tumors. The EGFR score was higher in tumors with vascular invasion (P=0.013, in solid and cribriform acinar histology, and in high stage tumors (P=0.006 and P=0.01. EGFR was more likely overexpressed in solid compared to lepidic tumors (P=0.02. Acinar tumors had the highest rate of ERK1/2 positivity (19%. There was a strong correlation among positivity for ERCC1 and other markers, including STAT3 (P=0.003, Akt (P=0.02, and ERK1/ERK2 (P=0.0005. Expression of molecules downstream to EGFR varied from 12% to 31% of tumors; however, the expression did not directly correlate to EGFR expression, which may suggest activation of the cascades through different pathways. The correlation of protein expression and the new lung adenocarcinoma classification may help in the understanding of activated pathways of each tumor type, which may act in the oncogenesis and drug resistance of these tumors.

  1. Pheromone transduction in moths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Stengl

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Calling female moths attract their mates late at night with intermittent release of a species-specific sex-pheromone blend. Mean frequency of pheromone filaments encodes distance to the calling female. In their zig-zagging upwind search male moths encounter turbulent pheromone blend filaments at highly variable concentrations and frequencies. The male moth antennae are delicately designed to detect and distinguish even traces of these sex pheromones amongst the abundance of other odors. Its olfactory receptor neurons sense even single pheromone molecules and track intermittent pheromone filaments of highly variable frequencies up to about 30 Hz over a wide concentration range. In the hawkmoth Manduca sexta brief, weak pheromone stimuli as encountered during flight are detected via a metabotropic PLCβ-dependent signal transduction cascade which leads to transient changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations. Strong or long pheromone stimuli, which are possibly perceived in direct contact with the female, activate receptor-guanylyl cyclases causing long-term adaptation. In addition, depending on endogenous rhythms of the moth´s physiological state, hormones such as the stress hormone octopamine modulate second messenger levels in sensory neurons. High octopamine levels during the activity phase maximize temporal resolution cAMP-dependently as a prerequisite to mate location. Thus, I suggest that sliding adjustment of odor response threshold and kinetics is based upon relative concentration ratios of intracellular Ca2+ and cyclic nucleotide levels which gate different ion channels synergistically. In addition, I propose a new hypothesis for the cyclic nucleotide-dependent ion channel formed by insect olfactory receptor/coreceptor complexes. Instead of being employed for an ionotropic mechanism of odor detection it is proposed to control subthreshold membrane potential oscillation of sensory neurons, as a basis for temporal encoding of odors.

  2. Neuropeptide FF activates ERK and NF kappa B signal pathways in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-long; Zhang, Xiao-yuan; He, Ning; Sun, Tao; Zhuang, Yan; Fang, Quan; Wang, Kai-rong; Wang, Rui

    2012-11-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) has been reported to play important roles in regulating diverse biological processes. However, little attention has been focused on the downstream signal transduction pathway of NPFF. Here, we used the differentiated neuroblastoma cell line, dSH-SY5Y, which endogenously expresses hNPFF2 receptor, to investigate the signal transduction downstream of NPFF. In particular we investigated the regulation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathways by NPFF in these cells. NPFF rapidly and transiently stimulated ERK. H89, a selective inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), inhibited the NPFF-activated ERK pathway, indicating the involvement of PKA in the NPFF-induced ERK activation. Down-regulation of nitric oxide synthases also attenuated NPFF-induced ERK activation, suggesting that a nitric oxide synthase-dependent pathway is involved. Moreover, the core upstream components of the NF-κB pathway were also significantly activated in response to NPFF, suggesting that the NF-κB pathway is involved in the signal transduction pathway of NPFF. Collectively, these data demonstrate that nitric oxide synthases are involved in the signal transduction pathway of NPFF, and provide the first evidence for the interaction between NPFF and the NF-κB pathway. These advances in our interpretation of the NPFF pathway mechanism will aid the comprehensive understanding of its function and provide novel molecular insight for further study of the NPFF system. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of the human oncogene SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil) mediated Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling transduction in proliferating mammalian dopaminergic neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Lei [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Physiology, Nankai University School of Medicine, Tianjin 300071 (China); Carr, Aprell L. [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Center for Zebrafish Research, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Li, Ping; Lee, Jessica; McGregor, Mary [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Li, Lei, E-mail: Li.78@nd.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Center for Zebrafish Research, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Stil is a human oncogene that is conserved in vertebrate species. • Stil functions in the Shh pathway in mammalian cells. • The expression of Stil is required for mammalian dopaminergic cell proliferation. - Abstract: The human oncogene SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil) is highly conserved in all vertebrate species. In humans, the expression of Stil is involved in cancer cell survival, apoptosis and proliferation. In this research, we investigated the roles of Stil expression in cell proliferation of mammalian dopaminergic (DA) PC12 cells. Stil functions through the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signal transduction pathway. Co-immunoprecipitation tests revealed that STIL interacts with Shh downstream components, which include SUFU and GLI1. By examining the expression of Stil, Gli1, CyclinD2 (cell-cycle marker) and PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen), we found that up-regulation of Stil expression (transfection with overexpression plasmids) increased Shh signaling transduction and PC12 cell proliferation, whereas down-regulation of Stil expression (by shRNA) inhibited Shh signaling transduction, and thereby decreased PC12 cell proliferation. Transient transfection of PC12 cells with Stil knockdown or overexpression plasmids did not affect PC12 cell neural differentiation, further indicating the specific roles of Stil in cell proliferation. The results from this research suggest that Stil may serve as a bio-marker for neurological diseases involved in DA neurons, such as Parkinson’s disease.

  4. RET ligand-induced internalization and its consequences for downstream signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, D S; Lai, A Z; Mulligan, L M

    2006-05-25

    RET is a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) with roles in cell growth, differentiation and survival. Ligand-induced activation of RET results in stimulation of multiple signal transduction pathways, including the MAP kinase/Erk and PI3 kinase/Akt pathways. However, the mechanisms governing receptor internalization and signal down- regulation have not been explored. As other RTKs are internalized through the clathrin-coated pit pathway in a ligand-dependant manner, we have investigated whether RET is internalized through a similar process. Using a highly sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based assay, we have shown that RET is internalized from the plasma membrane in a ligand-dependant manner that requires RET kinase activity as well as the GTPase activity of the clathrin-coated vesicle scission protein dynamin 2. Further, we have demonstrated that RET colocalizes with Rab5a, a marker of clathrin-coated vesicles and early endosomes, after internalization. Finally, we demonstrated that RET internalization is required for complete activation of Erk1/2, but not for activation of Akt signaling. Our data suggest that ligand-induced internalization of RET not only plays an overall role in downregulation and termination of signaling, but also functions to traffic RET to subcellular locations where it can fully activate certain downstream signaling pathways.

  5. Energy metabolism and transduction in smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, R M; Paul, R J

    1985-08-15

    Early investigations into the nature of the coupling between energy transduction and metabolism in smooth muscle, particularly from the laboratories of Bülbring and Lundholm, suggested that specific metabolic pathways could independently supply energy for ion transport and actin-myosin interactions. Subsequent work has solidified the concept that oxidative phosphorylation is specifically coupled to tension generation and maintenance, whereas, aerobic glycolysis is not only a vital characteristic of smooth muscle metabolism, but also is likely to be independently coupled to Na-K transport at the plasmalemma. The independence of oxidative and glycolytic metabolism is reflected as a compartmentation of carbohydrate metabolism in the porcine carotid artery. The coupling of these independent metabolic pathways with specific energy utilizing processes, indicates a means by which energy production and transduction can be closely and efficiently regulated. The coupling of glycogenolysis to mitochondrial respiration may have evolved as a direct response to the energetic needs of VSM. That is, the large glycogenolytic response in the initial minutes of stimulation may be necessary to maximize the cellular production of ATP during the presteady state. Likewise, the coupling between aerobic glycolysis and Na-K transport indicates a sensitive and efficient means of coordinating energy metabolism with ion transport at the membrane level. Additionally, the regulation of substrate supply, i.e. glucose transport, also may be closely coordinated with changes in ion transport. One may speculate that alterations in the microenvironment of each compartment can independently regulate intermediary metabolism and therefore allow the cell to quickly and efficiently respond to localized stimuli. Thus, stimulation of Na-K transport could effectively regulate energy production at the membrane level without mobilizing or competing with the energy transduction of other cellular processes. This

  6. Retroactive signaling in short signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques-Alexandre Sepulchre

    Full Text Available In biochemical signaling pathways without explicit feedback connections, the core signal transduction is usually described as a one-way communication, going from upstream to downstream in a feedforward chain or network of covalent modification cycles. In this paper we explore the possibility of a new type of signaling called retroactive signaling, offered by the recently demonstrated property of retroactivity in signaling cascades. The possibility of retroactive signaling is analysed in the simplest case of the stationary states of a bicyclic cascade of signaling cycles. In this case, we work out the conditions for which variables of the upstream cycle are affected by a change of the total amount of protein in the downstream cycle, or by a variation of the phosphatase deactivating the same protein. Particularly, we predict the characteristic ranges of the downstream protein, or of the downstream phosphatase, for which a retroactive effect can be observed on the upstream cycle variables. Next, we extend the possibility of retroactive signaling in short but nonlinear signaling pathways involving a few covalent modification cycles.

  7. Simulated evolution of signal transduction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mobashir

    Full Text Available Signal transduction is the process of routing information inside cells when receiving stimuli from their environment that modulate the behavior and function. In such biological processes, the receptors, after receiving the corresponding signals, activate a number of biomolecules which eventually transduce the signal to the nucleus. The main objective of our work is to develop a theoretical approach which will help to better understand the behavior of signal transduction networks due to changes in kinetic parameters and network topology. By using an evolutionary algorithm, we designed a mathematical model which performs basic signaling tasks similar to the signaling process of living cells. We use a simple dynamical model of signaling networks of interacting proteins and their complexes. We study the evolution of signaling networks described by mass-action kinetics. The fitness of the networks is determined by the number of signals detected out of a series of signals with varying strength. The mutations include changes in the reaction rate and network topology. We found that stronger interactions and addition of new nodes lead to improved evolved responses. The strength of the signal does not play any role in determining the response type. This model will help to understand the dynamic behavior of the proteins involved in signaling pathways. It will also help to understand the robustness of the kinetics of the output response upon changes in the rate of reactions and the topology of the network.

  8. Cellular semiotics and signal transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruni, Luis Emilio

    2007-01-01

    (s)" in signal transduction; i.e.: how specificity is determined, how ubiquitous signals or messengers convey specific information, how undesired cross-talk is avoided, how redundancy integrates the system. This chapter proposes a basic conceptual toolbox for interpreting empirical data that deals...

  9. Modeling evolution of crosstalk in noisy signal transduction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tareen, Ammar; Wingreen, Ned S.; Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan

    2018-02-01

    Signal transduction networks can form highly interconnected systems within cells due to crosstalk between constituent pathways. To better understand the evolutionary design principles underlying such networks, we study the evolution of crosstalk for two parallel signaling pathways that arise via gene duplication. We use a sequence-based evolutionary algorithm and evolve the network based on two physically motivated fitness functions related to information transmission. We find that one fitness function leads to a high degree of crosstalk while the other leads to pathway specificity. Our results offer insights on the relationship between network architecture and information transmission for noisy biomolecular networks.

  10. Signal transduction of MCP-1 expression induced by pancreatitis-associated ascitic fluid in pancreatic acinar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramudo, Laura; Yubero, Sara; Manso, Manuel A; Vicente, Secundino; De Dios, Isabel

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatitis-associated ascitic fluid (PAAF) is known to contribute to the progression of acute pancreatitis (AP). We have investigated the capability of PAAF to activate the expression of MCP-1 in pancreatic acinar cells and the involvement of MAPK, NF-κB and STAT3 as downstream signalling transduction pathways. The actions of dexamethasone (Dx) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on the PAAF’s acinar effects have also been evaluated. Acinar cells were incubated for 1 hr with PAAF collected from rats with severe AP induced by sodium taurocholate in the absence or presence of Dx (10−7 M) or NAC (30 mM). MCP-1 mRNA expression, phospho-p38-MAPK, IκBα, nuclear p65 levels and nuclear translocation of STAT3 were analysed. In response to PAAF, overexpression of MCP-1, phosphorylation of p38-MAPK, degradation of IκBα and increases in p65 nuclear levels and STAT3 activity were found in acinar cells. PAAF-mediated MCP-1 up-regulation was completely suppressed by Dx and NAC. MAPK activation was only inhibited by NAC, NF-κB activation was repressed by Dx and NAC, and STAT3 pathway was strongly blocked by Dx and significantly reduced by NAC. In conclusion, acinar cells were activated by PAAF to produce MCP-1, mainly via NF-κB and STAT3 pathways. Both downstream pathways were targeted by Dx and NAC to repress the PAAF-mediated acinar MCP-1 up-regulation. PMID:19604316

  11. Radioinduced intestinal fibrosis: from molecular mechanisms to therapy applications. Contribution of the TGF--{beta}1, of the CTGF and of the transduction pathway of the Rho/ROCK signal; La fibrose intestinale radio-induite: des mecanismes moleculaires aux applications therapeutiques. Roles du TGF-{beta}1, du CTGF et de la voie de transduction du signal Rho/ROCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haydont, V

    2006-12-15

    Delayed radiation enteritis is an intestinal fibrosis induced by accidental or therapeutic radiation for pelvic and abdominal cancer treatments. Studies of molecular mechanisms involved in the development and maintenance of fibrosis have showed the respective contribution of CTGF, low TGF-{beta}1 concentrations and Rho/ROCK pathway. Thus, based on the relationship between CTGF, TGF-{beta}1 and Rho pathway, 2 therapeutics strategies have been develop. First, a pravastatin curative gift leads to a fibro-lysis involving an inhibition of Rho and in cascade a reduction of CTGF expression and extracellular matrix deposition. The data suggest that reversal of established radiation fibrosis in the gut is possible. Second, a pravastatin prophylactic gift prevents the installation of a chronic fibrosis but does not protect the tumor. On the base of these results, the radiation therapy department of the Institut Gustave Roussy will soon initiate 2 clinical trials. (author)

  12. Dynamic disorder and the energetic costs of information transduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thill, Peter

    2014-01-01

    We study a model of dynamic disorder relevant for signal transduction pathways in which enzymatic reaction rates fluctuate over several orders of magnitude. For the simple networks we consider, dynamic disorder drives the system far from equilibrium and imposes an energetic burden for high fidelity signaling capability. We study how the dynamics of the underlying stochastic behavior in the reaction rate process is related to the energetic cost of transmitting information through the network

  13. Organizing signal transduction through A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logue, Jeremy S; Scott, John D

    2010-11-01

    A fundamental role for protein-protein interactions in the organization of signal transduction pathways is evident. Anchoring, scaffolding and adapter proteins function to enhance the precision and directionality of these signaling events by bringing enzymes together. The cAMP signaling pathway is organized by A-kinase anchoring proteins. This family of proteins assembles enzyme complexes containing the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, phosphoprotein phosphatases, phosphodiesterases and other signaling effectors to optimize cellular responses to cAMP and other second messengers. Selected A-kinase anchoring protein signaling complexes are highlighted in this minireview. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 FEBS.

  14. Sensory Transduction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Austin L.; Ramot, Daniel; Goodman, Miriam B.

    The roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans has a well-defined and comparatively simple repertoire of sensory-guided behaviors, all of which rely on its ability to detect chemical, mechanical or thermal stimuli. In this chapter, we review what is known about the ion channels that mediate sensation in this remarkable model organism. Genetic screens for mutants defective in sensory-guided behaviors have identified genes encoding channel proteins, which are likely transducers of chemical, thermal, and mechanical stimuli. Such classical genetic approaches are now being coupled with molecular genetics and in vivo cellular physiology to elucidate how these channels are activated in specific sensory neurons. The ion channel superfamilies implicated in sensory transduction in C. elegans - CNG, TRP, and DEG/ENaC - are conserved across phyla and also appear to contribute to sensory transduction in other organisms, including vertebrates. What we learn about the role of these ion channels in C. elegans sensation is likely to illuminate analogous processes in other animals, including humans.

  15. Regulation of autophagy by amino acids and MTOR-dependent signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Alfred J.; Lorin, Séverine; Blommaart, Edward F.; Codogno, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids not only participate in intermediary metabolism but also stimulate insulin-mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR)-mediated signal transduction which controls the major metabolic pathways. Among these is the pathway of autophagy which takes care of the degradation of long-lived proteins

  16. Radioinduced intestinal fibrosis: from molecular mechanisms to therapy applications. Contribution of the TGF--β1, of the CTGF and of the transduction pathway of the Rho/ROCK signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haydont, V.

    2006-12-01

    Delayed radiation enteritis is an intestinal fibrosis induced by accidental or therapeutic radiation for pelvic and abdominal cancer treatments. Studies of molecular mechanisms involved in the development and maintenance of fibrosis have showed the respective contribution of CTGF, low TGF-β1 concentrations and Rho/ROCK pathway. Thus, based on the relationship between CTGF, TGF-β1 and Rho pathway, 2 therapeutics strategies have been develop. First, a pravastatin curative gift leads to a fibro-lysis involving an inhibition of Rho and in cascade a reduction of CTGF expression and extracellular matrix deposition. The data suggest that reversal of established radiation fibrosis in the gut is possible. Second, a pravastatin prophylactic gift prevents the installation of a chronic fibrosis but does not protect the tumor. On the base of these results, the radiation therapy department of the Institut Gustave Roussy will soon initiate 2 clinical trials. (author)

  17. Use of Intraductal Adenovins Transduction to Assess the Mammary Tumorigenic Potential of a Constitutively Active Prolactin Receptor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    ... are expressed. Transgenic technology has been used to evaluate the effects of an activated prolactin receptor, aPRLR, and an activated member of the prolactin signal transduction pathway, Akt, on the mammary...

  18. Quantum Transduction with Adaptive Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mengzhen; Zou, Chang-Ling; Jiang, Liang

    2018-01-12

    Quantum transducers play a crucial role in hybrid quantum networks. A good quantum transducer can faithfully convert quantum signals from one mode to another with minimum decoherence. Most investigations of quantum transduction are based on the protocol of direct mode conversion. However, the direct protocol requires the matching condition, which in practice is not always feasible. Here we propose an adaptive protocol for quantum transducers, which can convert quantum signals without requiring the matching condition. The adaptive protocol only consists of Gaussian operations, feasible in various physical platforms. Moreover, we show that the adaptive protocol can be robust against imperfections associated with finite squeezing, thermal noise, and homodyne detection, and it can be implemented to realize quantum state transfer between microwave and optical modes.

  19. Endothelial cell oxidative stress and signal transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROCIO FONCEA

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial dysfunction (ED is an early event in atherosclerotic disease, preceding clinical manifestations and complications. Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS have been implicated as important mechanisms that contribute to ED, and ROS’s may function as intracellular messengers that modulate signaling pathways. Several intracellular signal events stimulated by ROS have been defined, including the identification of two members of the mitogen activated protein kinase family (ERK1/2 and big MAP kinase, BMK1, tyrosine kinases (Src and Syk and different isoenzymes of PKC as redox-sensitive kinases. ROS regulation of signal transduction components include the modification in the activity of transcriptional factors such as NFkB and others that result in changes in gene expression and modifications in cellular responses. In order to understand the intracellular mechanisms induced by ROS in endothelial cells (EC, we are studying the response of human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells to increased ROS generation by different pro-atherogenic stimuli. Our results show that Homocysteine (Hcy and oxidized LDL (oxLDL enhance the activity and expression of oxidative stress markers, such as NFkB and heme oxygenase 1. These results suggest that these pro-atherogenic stimuli increase oxidative stress in EC, and thus explain the loss of endothelial function associated with the atherogenic process

  20. Human hematopoietic cell culture, transduction, and analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Wirthlin, Louisa; Kohn, Donald B

    2008-01-01

    This unit provides methods for introducing genes into human hematopoietic progenitor cells. The Basic Protocol describes isolation of CD34(+) cells, transduction of these cells with a retroviral vector on fibronectin-coated plates, assaying the efficiency of transduction, and establishing long-te...

  1. Architectures and representations for string transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chrupala, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    String transduction problems are ubiquitous in natural language processing: they include transliteration, grapheme-to-phoneme conversion, text normalization and translation. String transduction can be reduced to the simpler problems of sequence labeling by expressing the target string as a sequence

  2. Suppression of breast cancer proliferation and induction of apoptosis via AKT and ERK1/2 signal transduction pathways by synthetic polypeptide derived from viral macrophage inflammatory protein II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qingling; Chen, Changjie; Yang, Zhifeng; Gao, Yangjun; Tang, Jie

    2011-08-01

    SDF-1α, a ligand for the chemokine receptor CXCR4, is well known for mediating the migration of breast cancer cells. In a previous study we demonstrated that a synthetic 21-mer peptide antagonist of CXCR4 (NT21MP) derived from the viral macrophage inflammatory protein II could antagonize tumor growth in vivo by inhibiting cellular proliferation and inducing apoptosis in breast cancer cells. However, the role of SDF-1α in the signaling pathways underlying the proliferation of human breast cancer cells and associated signaling pathways and inhibiting signal pathways of NT21MP remained unclear. The present study investigated the mechanism of NT21MP on anti-tumor in breast cancer in vitro. The effect of NT21MP on the viability of cells was determined by the MTT assay. Annexin V-FITC and PI staining was performed to detect early stage apoptosis in SKBR3 cells treated with SDF-1α and AMD3100 or NT21MP. Western blotting techniques were used to assay the composition of phosphoproteomics and total proteins present in the SKBR3 breast cancer cells. RT-PCR and Western blotting technique were used to detect the effect of NT21MP and AMD3100 on Bcl-2 and Bax expression. The results indicated that SDF-1α prevented apoptosis and promoted the proliferation of SKBR3 human breast cancer cells. As compared with untreated SKBR3 cells, Treatment with SDF-1α significantly increased cell viability, and NT21MP abolished the protective effects of SDF-1α dose-dependently (PSKBR3 cells with NT21MP significantly attenuated the antiapoptotic effects of SDF-1α as compared with SKBR3 cells without NT21MP pretreatment. The proliferative and anti-apoptotic effects of SDF-1α in SKBR3 cells were associated with an increase in AKT and ERK1/2 phosphorylation as well as a decrease in Bax expression and an increase in Bcl-2 expression. These changes in intracellular processes were blocked by NT21MP in a dose-dependent manner(PSKBR3 cells by reducing the levels of phosphorylated AKT and ERK1/2, as

  3. COMP-angiopoietin 1 increases proliferation, differentiation, and migration of stem-like cells through Tie-2-mediated activation of p38 MAPK and PI3K/Akt signal transduction pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kook, Sung-Ho [Cluster for Craniofacial Development and Regeneration Research, Institute of Oral Biosciences and School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Shin-Saeng [School of Dentistry and Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Eui-Sic; Lee, Young-Hoon; Han, Seong-Kyu; Lee, Kyung-Yeol [Cluster for Craniofacial Development and Regeneration Research, Institute of Oral Biosciences and School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Jungkee [College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jae-Won; Bae, Cheol-Hyeon [Cluster for Craniofacial Development and Regeneration Research, Institute of Oral Biosciences and School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Young-Kwon [Research Institute of Biotechnology, Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong-Chae, E-mail: leejc88@jbnu.ac.kr [Cluster for Craniofacial Development and Regeneration Research, Institute of Oral Biosciences and School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • COMP-Ang1 induces Tie-2 activation in BMMSCs, but not in primary osteoblasts. • Tie-2 knockdown inhibits COMP-Ang1-stimulated proliferation and osteoblastogenesis. • Tie-2 knockdown prevents COMP-Ang1-induced activation of PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK. • COMP-Ang1 induces migration of cells via activation of PI3K/Akt and CXCR4 pathways. • COMP-Ang1 stimulates in vivo migration of PDLSCs into a calvarial defect site of rats. - Abstract: Recombinant COMP-Ang1, a chimera of angiopoietin-1 (Ang1) and a short coiled-coil domain of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), is under consideration as a therapeutic agent capable of inducing the homing of cells with increased angiogenesis. However, the potentials of COMP-Ang1 to stimulate migration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and the associated mechanisms are not completely understood. We examined the potential of COMP-Ang1 on bone marrow (BM)-MSCs, human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), and calvarial osteoblasts. COMP-Ang1 augmented Tie-2 induction at protein and mRNA levels and increased proliferation and expression of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), osterix, and CXCR4 in BMMSCs, but not in osteoblasts. The COMP-Ang1-mediated increases were inhibited by Tie-2 knockdown and by treating inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), LY294002, or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), SB203580. Phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and Akt was prevented by siRNA-mediated silencing of Tie-2. COMP-Ang1 also induced in vitro migration of BMMSCs and PDLSCs. The induced migration was suppressed by Tie-2 knockdown and by CXCR4-specific peptide antagonist or LY294002, but not by SB203580. Furthermore, COMP-Ang1 stimulated the migration of PDLSCs into calvarial defect site of rats. Collectively, our results demonstrate that COMP-Ang1-stimulated proliferation, differentiation, and migration of progenitor cells may involve the Tie-2-mediated activation of p38 MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways.

  4. COMP-angiopoietin 1 increases proliferation, differentiation, and migration of stem-like cells through Tie-2-mediated activation of p38 MAPK and PI3K/Akt signal transduction pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kook, Sung-Ho; Lim, Shin-Saeng; Cho, Eui-Sic; Lee, Young-Hoon; Han, Seong-Kyu; Lee, Kyung-Yeol; Kwon, Jungkee; Hwang, Jae-Won; Bae, Cheol-Hyeon; Seo, Young-Kwon; Lee, Jeong-Chae

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • COMP-Ang1 induces Tie-2 activation in BMMSCs, but not in primary osteoblasts. • Tie-2 knockdown inhibits COMP-Ang1-stimulated proliferation and osteoblastogenesis. • Tie-2 knockdown prevents COMP-Ang1-induced activation of PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK. • COMP-Ang1 induces migration of cells via activation of PI3K/Akt and CXCR4 pathways. • COMP-Ang1 stimulates in vivo migration of PDLSCs into a calvarial defect site of rats. - Abstract: Recombinant COMP-Ang1, a chimera of angiopoietin-1 (Ang1) and a short coiled-coil domain of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), is under consideration as a therapeutic agent capable of inducing the homing of cells with increased angiogenesis. However, the potentials of COMP-Ang1 to stimulate migration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and the associated mechanisms are not completely understood. We examined the potential of COMP-Ang1 on bone marrow (BM)-MSCs, human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), and calvarial osteoblasts. COMP-Ang1 augmented Tie-2 induction at protein and mRNA levels and increased proliferation and expression of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), osterix, and CXCR4 in BMMSCs, but not in osteoblasts. The COMP-Ang1-mediated increases were inhibited by Tie-2 knockdown and by treating inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), LY294002, or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), SB203580. Phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and Akt was prevented by siRNA-mediated silencing of Tie-2. COMP-Ang1 also induced in vitro migration of BMMSCs and PDLSCs. The induced migration was suppressed by Tie-2 knockdown and by CXCR4-specific peptide antagonist or LY294002, but not by SB203580. Furthermore, COMP-Ang1 stimulated the migration of PDLSCs into calvarial defect site of rats. Collectively, our results demonstrate that COMP-Ang1-stimulated proliferation, differentiation, and migration of progenitor cells may involve the Tie-2-mediated activation of p38 MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways

  5. Signal transduction by growth factor receptors: signaling in an instant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dengjel, Joern; Akimov, Vyacheslav; Blagoev, Blagoy

    2007-01-01

    -out by mass spectrometry-based proteomics has allowed exciting views on the very early events in signal transduction. Activation profiles of regulated phosphorylation sites on epidermal growth factor receptor and downstream signal transducers showed different kinetics within the first ten seconds......Phosphorylation-based signaling events happening within the first minute of receptor stimulation have so far only been analyzed by classical cell biological approaches like live-cell microscopy. The development of a quench flow system with a time resolution of one second coupled to a read...... of stimulation. This new technique opens the perspectives for accurate analysis of rapid cellular processes and will help to establish models describing signal initiation at the plasma membrane....

  6. PTHLH coupling upstream negative regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis and Wnt receptor signal to downstream peptidase activity-induced apoptosis network in human hepatocellular carcinoma by systems-theoretical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Juxiang; Wang, Lin; Jiang, Minghu; Lin, Hong; Qi, Lianxiu; Diao, Haizhen

    2012-10-01

    Studies were done on the analysis of biological processes in the same high expression (fold change ≥ 2) PTHLH-activated feedback negative regulation-mediated apoptosis gene ontology (GO) network of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared with the corresponding low expression activated GO network of no-tumor hepatitis/cirrhotic tissues [hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection]. We proposed PTHLH-activated network that upstream included the regulation of apoptosis, signal transduction resulting in induction of apoptosis, signal transduction by p53 class mediator resulting in transcription of p21 class mediator, negative regulation of centriole replication, negative regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis, negative regulation of Wnt receptor signaling pathway, anaphase-promoting complex-dependent proteasomal ubiquitin-dependent protein catabolism, apoptosis, induction of apoptosis, and negative regulation of phosphorylation. Downstream-network negative regulation of peptidase activity, anaphase-promoting complex-dependent proteasomal ubiquitin-dependent protein catabolism, apoptosis, induction of apoptosis and negative regulation of phosphorylation, as a result of coupling upstream negative regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis and Wnt receptor signal to downstream peptidase activity-induced apoptosis in HCC. Our hypothesis was verified by the different PTHLH-activated feedback negative regulation-mediated apoptosis GO network of HCC compared with the corresponding inhibited GO network of no-tumor hepatitis/cirrhotic tissues, or the same compared with the corresponding inhibited GO network of HCC. PTHLH coupling upstream negative regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis and Wnt receptor signal to downstream peptidase activity-induced apoptosis network was constructed that upstream BRCA1, DKK1, BUB1B activated PTHLH, and downstream PTHLH-activated CST6, BUB1B, NTN1, PHLDA2 in HCC from GEO data set using gene regulatory network inference method

  7. Signal transduction and activation of the NADPH oxidase in eosinophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Lindsay

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the eosinophil NADPH oxidase and the subsequent release of toxic oxygen radicals has been implicated in the mechanism of parasite killing and inflammation. At present, little is known of the signal transduction pathway that govern agonist-induced activation of the respiratory burst and is the subject of this review. In particular, we focus on the ability of leukotrine B4 to activate the NADPH oxidase in guinea-pig peritoneal eosinophils which can be obtained in sufficient number and purity for detailed biochemical experiments to be performed.

  8. Cancer, signal transduction and nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Poulomi; Basu, Sudipta; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2011-05-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying different cellular signaling pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer are leading to the identification of novel drug targets as well as novel drug candidates. Multiple targeted therapeutics that modulate aberrant molecular pathways have already reached the clinic. However, targeted therapeutics can exert mechanism-driven side effects as a result of the implication of the molecular target in normal physiological functions besides tumorigenesis. We hypothesize that targeted therapeutics can be optimized by merging them with nanotechnology, which offers the potential for preferential targeting to the tumor, resulting in increased intratumoral concentrations of the active agent with reduced distribution to other parts of the body. This review will address some of the emerging concepts that integrate these two disciplines to engineer novel nanovectors that target different signaling pathways.

  9. Arm-in-Arm Response Regulator Dimers Promote Intermolecular Signal Transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Anna W.; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Morales, Neydis Moreno; Forest, Katrina T. (UW)

    2016-02-01

    ABSTRACT

    Bacteriophytochrome photoreceptors (BphPs) and their cognate response regulators make up two-component signal transduction systems which direct bacteria to mount phenotypic responses to changes in environmental light quality. Most of these systems utilize single-domain response regulators to transduce signals through unknown pathways and mechanisms. Here we describe the photocycle and autophosphorylation kinetics of RtBphP1, a red light-regulated histidine kinase from the desert bacteriumRamlibacter tataouinensis. RtBphP1 undergoes red to far-red photoconversion with rapid thermal reversion to the dark state. RtBphP1 is autophosphorylated in the dark; this activity is inhibited under red light. The RtBphP1 cognate response regulator, theR. tataouinensisbacteriophytochrome response regulator (RtBRR), and a homolog, AtBRR fromAgrobacterium tumefaciens, crystallize unexpectedly as arm-in-arm dimers, reliant on a conserved hydrophobic motif, hFWAhL (where h is a hydrophobic M, V, L, or I residue). RtBRR and AtBRR dimerize distinctly from four structurally characterized phytochrome response regulators found in photosynthetic organisms and from all other receiver domain homodimers in the Protein Data Bank. A unique cacodylate-zinc-histidine tag metal organic framework yielded single-wavelength anomalous diffraction phases and may be of general interest. Examination of the effect of the BRR stoichiometry on signal transduction showed that phosphorylated RtBRR is accumulated more efficiently than the engineered monomeric RtBRR (RtBRRmon) in phosphotransfer reactions. Thus, we conclude that arm-in-arm dimers are a relevant signaling intermediate in this class of two-component regulatory systems.

  10. Protein Transduction Based Therapies for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robbins, Paul D

    2006-01-01

    We have demonstrated that certain transduction peptides such as 12 lysines and 12 arginines can facilitateinternalization into breast tumor lines with higher efficiency than smaller polymers of cationic amino acids...

  11. Capacitive axial position and speed transduction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez D, H.; Flores Ll, H.; Cabral P, A.; Ramirez J, F.J.; Galindo, S.

    1984-01-01

    A new and inexpensive circuit arrangement of a capacitive axial position and speed transduction system is described. Design details and the theory of operation of the device are briefly outlined together with performance results. (author)

  12. Protein Transduction Based Therapies for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robbins, Paul D

    2004-01-01

    We have demonstrated that certain transduction peptides such as 12 lysines and 12 arginines can facilitate internalization into breast tumor lines with higher efficiency than smaller polymers of cationic amino acids...

  13. Protein Transduction Based Therapies for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robbins, Paul D

    2005-01-01

    We have demonstrated that certain transduction peptides such as 12 lysines and 12 arginines can facilitate internalization into breast tumor lines with higher efficiency than smaller polymers of cationic amino acids...

  14. Minireview: Targeting GPCR Activated ERK Pathways for Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eishingdrelo, Haifeng; Kongsamut, Sathapana

    2013-01-01

    It has become clear in recent years that multiple signal transduction pathways are employed upon GPCR activation. One of the major cellular effectors activated by GPCRs is extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Both G-protein and β-arrestin mediated signaling pathways can lead to ERK activation. However, depending on activation pathway, the subcellular destination of activated ERK1/2 may be different. G-protein -dependent ERK activation results in the translocation of active ERK to the nucleus, whereas ERK activated via an arrestin-dependent mechanism remains largely in the cytoplasm. The subcellular location of activated ERK1/2 determines the downstream signaling cascade. Many substrates of ERK1/2 are found in the nucleus: nuclear transcription factors that participate in gene transcription, cell proliferation and differentiation. ERK1/2 substrates are also found in cytosol and other cellular organelles: they may play roles in translation, mitosis, apoptosis and cross-talk with other signaling pathways. Therefore, determining specific subcellular locations of activated ERK1/2 mediated by GPCR ligands would be important in correlating signaling pathways with cellular physiological functions. While GPCR-stimulated selective ERK pathway activation has been studied in several receptor systems, exploitation of these different signaling cascades for therapeutics has not yet been seriously pursued. Many old drug candidates were identified from screens based on G-protein signaling assays, and their activity on β-arrestin signaling pathways being mostly unknown, especially regarding their subcellular ERK pathways. With today's knowledge of complicated GPCR signaling pathways, drug discovery can no longer rely on single-pathway approaches. Since ERK activation is an important signaling pathway and associated with many physiological functions, targeting the ERK pathway, especially specific subcellular activation pathways should provide new avenues for GPCR drug

  15. Evidence that membrane transduction of oligoarginine does not require vesicle formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaro, Jennica L.; Shen Weichiang

    2005-01-01

    The involvement of vesicular formation processes in the membrane transduction and nuclear transport of oligoarginine is currently a subject of controversy. In this report, a novel quantitative method which allows for the selective measurement of membrane transduction excluding concurrent endocytosis was used to determine the effects of temperature, endosomal acidification, endosomolysis, and several known inhibitors of endocytic pathways on the internalization of oligoarginine. The results show that, unlike endocytosis, transduction of oligoarginine was not affected by incubation at 16 deg. C as compared to the 37 deg. C control, and was only partially inhibited at 4 deg. C incubation. Additionally, membrane transduction was not inhibited to the same extent as endocytosis following treatment with ammonium chloride, hypertonic medium, amiloride, or filipin. The endosomolytic activity of oligoarginine was investigated by examining the leakage of FITC-dextran into the cytosolic compartment, which was not higher in the presence of oligoarginine. Furthermore, ammonium chloride showed no effect on the nuclear transport of oligoarginine. The data presented in this report indicate that membrane transduction is likely to occur at the plasma membrane without the formation of membrane vesicles, and the nuclear localization involves membrane transduction, rather than endocytosis of oligoarginine

  16. The sugarcane signal transduction (SUCAST catalogue: prospecting signal transduction in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucia Mendes Souza

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available EST sequencing has enabled the discovery of many new genes in a vast array of organisms, and the utility of this approach to the scientific community is greatly increased by the establishment of fully annotated databases. The present study aimed to identify sugarcane ESTs sequenced in the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST project (http://sucest.lad.ic.unicamp.br that corresponded to signal transduction components. We also produced a sugarcane signal transduction (SUCAST catalogue (http://sucest.lad.ic.unicamp.br/private/mining-reports/QG/QG-mining.htm that covered the main categories and pathways. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs encoding enzymes for hormone (gibberellins, ethylene, auxins, abscisic acid and jasmonic acid biosynthetic pathways were found and tissue specificity was inferred from their relative frequency of occurrence in the different libraries. Whenever possible, transducers of hormones and plant peptide signaling were catalogued to the respective pathway. Over 100 receptors were found in sugarcane, which contains a large family of Ser/Thr kinase receptors and also photoreceptors, histidine kinase receptors and their response regulators. G-protein and small GTPases were analyzed and compared to known members of these families found in mammalian and plant systems. Major kinase and phosphatase pathways were mapped, with special attention being given to the MAP kinase and the inositol pathway, both of which are well known in plants.O sequenciamento de ESTs (etiquetas de sequencias transcritas tem possibilitado a descoberta de muitos novos genes em uma ampla variedade de organismos. Um aumento do aproveitamento desta informação pela comunidade científica tem sido possível graças ao desenvolvimento de base de dados contendo seqüências completamente anotadas. O trabalho aqui relatado teve como objetivo a identificação de ESTs de cana de açúcar seqüenciadas através do projeto SUCEST (http://sucest.lad.ic. unicamp.br que

  17. Single-cell analysis of G-protein signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clister, Terri; Mehta, Sohum; Zhang, Jin

    2015-03-13

    The growing use of fluorescent biosensors to directly probe the spatiotemporal dynamics of biochemical processes in living cells has revolutionized the study of intracellular signaling. In this review, we summarize recent developments in the use of biosensors to illuminate the molecular details of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling pathways, which have long served as the model for our understanding of signal transduction, while also offering our perspectives on the future of this exciting field. Specifically, we highlight several ways in which biosensor-based single-cell analyses are being used to unravel many of the enduring mysteries that surround these diverse signaling pathways. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Proposed Role for KaiC-Like ATPases as Major Signal Transduction Hubs in Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, Kira S; Galperin, Michael Y; Koonin, Eugene V

    2017-12-05

    All organisms must adapt to ever-changing environmental conditions and accordingly have evolved diverse signal transduction systems. In bacteria, the most abundant networks are built around the two-component signal transduction systems that include histidine kinases and receiver domains. In contrast, eukaryotic signal transduction is dominated by serine/threonine/tyrosine protein kinases. Both of these systems are also found in archaea, but they are not as common and diversified as their bacterial and eukaryotic counterparts, suggesting the possibility that archaea have evolved other, still uncharacterized signal transduction networks. Here we propose a role for KaiC family ATPases, known to be key components of the circadian clock in cyanobacteria, in archaeal signal transduction. The KaiC family is notably expanded in most archaeal genomes, and although most of these ATPases remain poorly characterized, members of the KaiC family have been shown to control archaellum assembly and have been found to be a stable component of the gas vesicle system in Halobacteria Computational analyses described here suggest that KaiC-like ATPases and their homologues with inactivated ATPase domains are involved in many other archaeal signal transduction pathways and comprise major hubs of complex regulatory networks. We predict numerous input and output domains that are linked to KaiC-like proteins, including putative homologues of eukaryotic DEATH domains that could function as adapters in archaeal signaling networks. We further address the relationships of the archaeal family of KaiC homologues to the bona fide KaiC of cyanobacteria and implications for the existence of a KaiC-based circadian clock apparatus in archaea. IMPORTANCE Little is currently known about signal transduction pathways in Archaea Recent studies indicate that KaiC-like ATPases, known as key components of the circadian clock apparatus in cyanobacteria, are involved in the regulation of archaellum assembly and

  19. Discovery of GPCR ligands for probing signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogi, Simone; Tafi, Andrea; Désaubry, Laurent; Nebigil, Canan G

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven integral transmembrane proteins that are the primary targets of almost 30% of approved drugs and continue to represent a major focus of pharmaceutical research. All of GPCR targeted medicines were discovered by classical medicinal chemistry approaches. After the first GPCR crystal structures were determined, the docking screens using these structures lead to discovery of more novel and potent ligands. There are over 360 pharmaceutically relevant GPCRs in the human genome and to date about only 30 of structures have been determined. For these reasons, computational techniques such as homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations have proven their usefulness to explore the structure and function of GPCRs. Furthermore, structure-based drug design and in silico screening (High Throughput Docking) are still the most common computational procedures in GPCRs drug discovery. Moreover, ligand-based methods such as three-dimensional quantitative structure-selectivity relationships, are the ideal molecular modeling approaches to rationalize the activity of tested GPCR ligands and identify novel GPCR ligands. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances for the computational approaches to effectively guide selectivity and affinity of ligands. We also describe novel approaches in medicinal chemistry, such as the development of biased agonists, allosteric modulators, and bivalent ligands for class A GPCRs. Furthermore, we highlight some knockout mice models in discovering biased signaling selectivity.

  20. Discovery of GPCR ligands for probing signal transduction pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogi, Simone; Tafi, Andrea; Désaubry, Laurent; Nebigil, Canan G.

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven integral transmembrane proteins that are the primary targets of almost 30% of approved drugs and continue to represent a major focus of pharmaceutical research. All of GPCR targeted medicines were discovered by classical medicinal chemistry approaches. After the first GPCR crystal structures were determined, the docking screens using these structures lead to discovery of more novel and potent ligands. There are over 360 pharmaceutically relevant GPCRs in the human genome and to date about only 30 of structures have been determined. For these reasons, computational techniques such as homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations have proven their usefulness to explore the structure and function of GPCRs. Furthermore, structure-based drug design and in silico screening (High Throughput Docking) are still the most common computational procedures in GPCRs drug discovery. Moreover, ligand-based methods such as three-dimensional quantitative structure–selectivity relationships, are the ideal molecular modeling approaches to rationalize the activity of tested GPCR ligands and identify novel GPCR ligands. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances for the computational approaches to effectively guide selectivity and affinity of ligands. We also describe novel approaches in medicinal chemistry, such as the development of biased agonists, allosteric modulators, and bivalent ligands for class A GPCRs. Furthermore, we highlight some knockout mice models in discovering biased signaling selectivity. PMID:25506327

  1. Experimental studies on signal transduction pathways in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl-Westra, Johanna

    2005-01-01

    Reumatoïde artritis (RA) is een chronische ontstekingsziekte, die met name gelocaliseerd is in de gewrichten. De ziekte komt voor bij 0.5 - 1% van de bevolking, en komt meer voor bij vrouwen dan bij mannen. Door de ontsteking in de gewrichten raken kraakbeen en bot beschadigd en dit kan leiden tot

  2. Effects of thyroid hormone on the GH signal transduction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaranza, Paula; Lammoglia, Juan Javier; Iñiguez, Germán; Román, Rossana; Cassorla, Fernando

    2014-02-01

    The importance of thyroid hormone on growth and development in children is well recognized. In addition, linear growth is highly dependent on the response of peripheral tissues to growth hormone, a process known as GH sensitivity, but little is known about the possible effects of T4 on this process. We determined the effect of stimulation with recombinant human GH (rhGH; 200 ng/mL) alone or in combination with two different concentrations of T4 (250 nM and 500 nM for 24 h) on JAK2 and STAT5 activation in skin fibroblast cultures obtained from prepubertal boys with normal height. JAK2 and STAT5 were activated under co-incubation with T4 (at both concentrations) and rhGH in the non-nuclear fraction of the fibroblasts. In addition, after 24h of co-incubation with rhGH and T4 (500 nM), we observed an increase in phospho-STAT5 in the nuclear fraction, when compared to GH and T4 stimulation alone. This effect was not observed when the fibroblasts were co-incubated with GH and the lower concentration of T4 (250 nM). Combined stimulation with GH and T4 at a concentration of 500 nM increases synergistically nuclear phospho-STAT5 in skin fibroblasts, which may amplify tissue sensitivity to GH. These findings may help to explain the effect of T4 administration on growth velocity in some children with idiopathic short stature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Signal transduction pathways involved in intestinal salt and water secretion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. van den Berghe (Nina)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis describes some novel aspects of the regulation of salt and water secretion in the intestinal epithelium. This process is not unique for the intestine, but a common and necessary function of many other organs, including the stomach (gastric juice), kidney (urine), sweatglands

  4. Activation of a Non-cAMP/PKA Signaling Pathway Downstream of the PTH/PTHrP Receptor Is Essential for a Sustained Hypophosphatemic Response to PTH Infusion in Male Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lige; Liu, Minlin; Segawa, Hiroko; Miyamoto, Ken-Ichi; Bringhurst, F. Richard; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Jüppner, Harald

    2013-01-01

    PTH increases urinary Pi excretion by reducing expression of two renal cotransporters [NaPi-IIa (Npt2a) and NaPi-IIc (Npt2c)]. In contrast to acute transporter regulation that is cAMP/protein kinase A dependent, long-term effects require phospholipase C (PLC) signaling by the PTH/PTHrP receptor (PPR). To determine whether the latter pathway regulates Pi through Npt2a and/or Npt2c, wild-type mice (Wt) and animals expressing a mutant PPR incapable of PLC activation (DD) were tested in the absence of one (Npt2a−/− or Npt2c−/−) or both phosphate transporters (2a/2c-dko). PTH infusion for 8 days caused a rapid and persistent decrease in serum Pi in Wt mice, whereas serum Pi in DD mice fell only transiently for the first 2 days. Consistent with these findings, fractional Pi excretion index was increased initially in both animals, but this increase persisted only when the PPR Wt was present. The hypophosphatemic response to PTH infusion was impaired only slightly in PPR Wt/Npt2c−/− or DD/Npt2c−/− mice. Despite lower baselines, PTH infusion in PPR Wt/Npt2a−/− mice decreased serum Pi further, an effect that was attenuated in DD/Npt2a−/− mice. Continuous PTH had no effect on serum Pi in 2a/2c-dko mice. PTH administration increased serum 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 levels in Wt and DD mice and increased levels above the elevated baseline with ablation of either but not of both transporters. Continuous PTH elevated serum fibroblast growth factor 23 and blood Ca2+ equivalently in all groups of mice. Our data indicate that PLC signaling at the PPR contributes to the long-term effect of PTH on Pi homeostasis but not to the regulation of 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3, fibroblast growth factor 23, or blood Ca2+. PMID:23515284

  5. Activation of salicylic acid metabolism and signal transduction can enhance resistance to Fusarium wilt in banana (Musa acuminata L. AAA group, cv. Cavendish).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Jia, Caihong; Li, Jingyang; Huang, Suzhen; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium wilt caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubens (Foc) is the most serious disease that attacks banana plants. Salicylic acid (SA) can play a key role in plant-microbe interactions. Our study is the first to examine the role of SA in conferring resistance to Foc TR4 in banana (Musa acuminata L. AAA group, cv. Cavendish), which is the greatest commercial importance cultivar in Musa. We used quantitative real-time reverse polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to analyze the expression profiles of 45 genes related to SA biosynthesis and downstream signaling pathways in a susceptible banana cultivar (cv. Cavendish) and a resistant banana cultivar (cv. Nongke No. 1) inoculated with Foc TR4. The expression of genes involved in SA biosynthesis and downstream signaling pathways was suppressed in a susceptible cultivar and activated in a resistant cultivar. The SA levels in each treatment arm were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. SA levels were decreased in the susceptible cultivar and increased in the resistant cultivar. Finally, we examined the contribution of exogenous SA to Foc TR4 resistance in susceptible banana plants. The expression of genes involved in SA biosynthesis and signal transduction pathways as well as SA levels were significantly increased. The results suggest that one reason for banana susceptibility to Foc TR4 is that expression of genes involved in SA biosynthesis and SA levels are suppressed and that the induced resistance observed in banana against Foc TR4 might be a case of salicylic acid-dependent systemic acquired resistance.

  6. Towards the systematic discovery of signal transduction networks using phosphorylation dynamics data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yachie Nozomu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphorylation is a ubiquitous and fundamental regulatory mechanism that controls signal transduction in living cells. The number of identified phosphoproteins and their phosphosites is rapidly increasing as a result of recent mass spectrometry-based approaches. Results We analyzed time-course phosphoproteome data obtained previously by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry with the stable isotope labeling using amino acids in cell culture (SILAC method. This provides the relative phosphorylation activities of digested peptides at each of five time points after stimulating HeLa cells with epidermal growth factor (EGF. We initially calculated the correlations between the phosphorylation dynamics patterns of every pair of peptides and connected the strongly correlated pairs to construct a network. We found that peptides extracted from the same intracellular fraction (nucleus vs. cytoplasm tended to be close together within this phosphorylation dynamics-based network. The network was then analyzed using graph theory and compared with five known signal-transduction pathways. The dynamics-based network was correlated with known signaling pathways in the NetPath and Phospho.ELM databases, and especially with the EGF receptor (EGFR signaling pathway. Although the phosphorylation patterns of many proteins were drastically changed by the EGF stimulation, our results suggest that only EGFR signaling transduction was both strongly activated and precisely controlled. Conclusions The construction of a phosphorylation dynamics-based network provides a useful overview of condition-specific intracellular signal transduction using quantitative time-course phosphoproteome data under specific experimental conditions. Detailed prediction of signal transduction based on phosphoproteome dynamics remains challenging. However, since the phosphorylation profiles of kinase-substrate pairs on the specific pathway were localized in the dynamics

  7. Operational optimization in the downstream; Otimizacao operacional no downstream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silberman, Luis; Cunha, Filipe Silveira Ramos da [Petroleo Ipiranga, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    On the present competitive down stream's market, there is a great necessity of optimization aiming to guarantee the best price and quality of our clients. Our goal is to attend these expectations while we guarantee an efficient operation. The greatest question is how far we are from the ideal model. This way, a lot of projects have been executed during the last years aiming the operational optimization of all our activities. We divide the projects in 4 areas: Logistic (new modals distribution), Transport (transport optimization - quality and more deliveries with less trucks), Client Support (Internet Ipiranga and Support Center), Distribution Terminals Productivity (automation and environment). This work intend to present our ideal, perfect and complete Downstream Operation model. We will talk about how close we are of this ideal model and we will present the projects that we had already developed and implanted on the automation of the terminals and the logistics area. (author)

  8. The application of multiple biophysical cues to engineer functional neocartilage for treatment of osteoarthritis. Part II: signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Mariea A; Waldman, Stephen D; Ethier, C Ross

    2015-02-01

    The unique mechanoelectrochemical environment of cartilage has motivated researchers to investigate the effect of multiple biophysical cues, including mechanical, magnetic, and electrical stimulation, on chondrocyte biology. It is well established that biophysical stimuli promote chondrocyte proliferation, differentiation, and maturation within "biological windows" of defined dose parameters, including mode, frequency, magnitude, and duration of stimuli (see companion review Part I: Cellular Response). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms and signal transduction pathways activated in response to multiple biophysical stimuli remain to be elucidated. Understanding the mechanisms of biophysical signal transduction will deepen knowledge of tissue organogenesis, remodeling, and regeneration and aiding in the treatment of pathologies such as osteoarthritis. Further, this knowledge will provide the tissue engineer with a potent toolset to manipulate and control cell fate and subsequently develop functional replacement cartilage. The aim of this article is to review chondrocyte signal transduction pathways in response to mechanical, magnetic, and electrical cues. Signal transduction does not occur along a single pathway; rather a number of parallel pathways appear to be activated, with calcium signaling apparently common to all three types of stimuli, though there are different modes of activation. Current tissue engineering strategies, such as the development of "smart" functionalized biomaterials that enable the delivery of growth factors or integration of conjugated nanoparticles, may further benefit from targeting known signal transduction pathways in combination with external biophysical cues.

  9. Purinergic mechanosensory transduction and visceral pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burnstock Geoffrey

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this review, evidence is presented to support the hypothesis that mechanosensory transduction occurs in tubes and sacs and can initiate visceral pain. Experimental evidence for this mechanism in urinary bladder, ureter, gut, lung, uterus, tooth-pulp and tongue is reviewed. Potential therapeutic strategies are considered for the treatment of visceral pain in such conditions as renal colic, interstitial cystitis and inflammatory bowel disease by agents that interfere with mechanosensory transduction in the organs considered, including P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptor antagonists that are orally bioavailable and stable in vivo and agents that inhibit or enhance ATP release and breakdown.

  10. Nonmuscle Myosin II Is Required for Internalization of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Modulation of Downstream Signaling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Wang, Aibing; Conti, Mary Anne; Adelstein, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Ligand-induced internalization of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is an important process for regulating signal transduction, cellular dynamics, and cell-cell communication. Here, we demonstrate that nonmuscle myosin II (NM II) is required for the internalization of the EGFR and to trigger the EGFR-dependent activation of ERK and AKT. The EGFR was identified as a protein that interacts with NM II by co-immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis. This interaction requires both the regulatory light chain 20 (RLC20) of NM II and the kinase domain of the EGFR. Two paralogs of NM II, NM II-A, and NM II-B can act to internalize the EGFR, depending on the cell type and paralog content of the cell line. Loss (siRNA) or inhibition (25 μm blebbistatin) of NM II attenuates the internalization of the EGFR and impairs EGFR-dependent activation of ERK and AKT. Both internalization of the EGFR and downstream signaling to ERK and AKT can be partially restored in siRNA-treated cells by introduction of wild type (WT) GFP-NM II, but cannot be restored by motor mutant NM II. Taken together, these results suggest that NM II plays a role in the internalization of the EGFR and EGFR-mediated signaling pathways. PMID:22718763

  11. Sensory Transduction of the CO2 Response of Guard Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Eduardo Zeiger

    2003-06-30

    Stomata have a key role in the regulation of gas exchange and intercellular CO2 concentrations of leaves. Guard cells sense internal and external signals in the leaf environment and transduce these signals into osmoregulatory processes that control stomatal apertures. This research proposal addresses the characterization of the sensory transduction of the CO2 signal in guard cells. Recent studies have shown that in Vicia leaves kept at constant light and temperature in a growth chamber, changes in ambient CO2 concentrations cause large changes in guard cell zeaxanthin that are linear with CO2-dependent changes in stomatal apertures. Research proposed here will test the hypothesis that zeaxanthin function as a transducer of CO2 signals in guard cells. Three central aspects of this hypothesis will be investigated: CO2 sensing by the carboxylation reaction of Rubisco in the guard cell chloroplast, which would modulate zeaxanthin concentrations via changes in lumen pH; transduction of the CO2 signal by zeaxanthin via a transducing cascade that controls guard cell osmoregulation; and blue light dependence of the CO2 signal transduction by zeaxanthin, required for the formation of an isomeric form of zeaxanthin that is physiologically active as a transducer. The role of Rubisco in CO2 sensing will be investigated in experiments characterizing the stomatal response to CO2 in the Arabidopsis mutants R100 and rca-, which have reduced rates of Rubisco-dependent carboxylation. The role of zeaxanthin as a CO2 transducer will be studied in npq1, a zeaxanthin-less mutant. The blue light-dependence of CO2 sensing will be studied in experiments characterizing the stomatal response to CO2 under red light. Arabidopsis mutants will also be used in further studies of an acclimation of the stomatal response to CO2, and a possible role of the xanthophyll cycle of the guard cell chloroplast in acclimations of the stomatal response to CO2. Studies on the osmoregulatory role of sucrose in

  12. Systematic Prediction of Scaffold Proteins Reveals New Design Principles in Scaffold-Mediated Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianfei; Neiswinger, Johnathan; Zhang, Jin; Zhu, Heng; Qian, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Scaffold proteins play a crucial role in facilitating signal transduction in eukaryotes by bringing together multiple signaling components. In this study, we performed a systematic analysis of scaffold proteins in signal transduction by integrating protein-protein interaction and kinase-substrate relationship networks. We predicted 212 scaffold proteins that are involved in 605 distinct signaling pathways. The computational prediction was validated using a protein microarray-based approach. The predicted scaffold proteins showed several interesting characteristics, as we expected from the functionality of scaffold proteins. We found that the scaffold proteins are likely to interact with each other, which is consistent with previous finding that scaffold proteins tend to form homodimers and heterodimers. Interestingly, a single scaffold protein can be involved in multiple signaling pathways by interacting with other scaffold protein partners. Furthermore, we propose two possible regulatory mechanisms by which the activity of scaffold proteins is coordinated with their associated pathways through phosphorylation process. PMID:26393507

  13. Energy transduction in lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poolman, Bert

    In the discovery of some general principles of energy transduction, lactic acid bacteria have played an important role. In this review, the energy transducing processes of lactic acid bacteria are discussed with the emphasis on the major developments of the past 5 years. This work not only includes

  14. VEGF-A isoforms program differential VEGFR2 signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth W. Fearnley

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR2 triggers multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate endothelial cell responses that control vascular development. Multiple isoforms of VEGF-A can elicit differential signal transduction and endothelial responses. However, it is unclear how such cellular responses are controlled by isoform-specific VEGF-A–VEGFR2 complexes. Increasingly, there is the realization that the membrane trafficking of receptor–ligand complexes influences signal transduction and protein turnover. By building on these concepts, our study shows for the first time that three different VEGF-A isoforms (VEGF-A165, VEGF-A121 and VEGF-A145 promote distinct patterns of VEGFR2 endocytosis for delivery into early endosomes. This differential VEGFR2 endocytosis and trafficking is linked to VEGF-A isoform-specific signal transduction events. Disruption of clathrin-dependent endocytosis blocked VEGF-A isoform-specific VEGFR2 activation, signal transduction and caused substantial depletion in membrane-bound VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 levels. Furthermore, such VEGF-A isoforms promoted differential patterns of VEGFR2 ubiquitylation, proteolysis and terminal degradation. Our study now provides novel insights into how different VEGF-A isoforms can bind the same receptor tyrosine kinase and elicit diverse cellular outcomes.

  15. VEGF-A isoforms program differential VEGFR2 signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnley, Gareth W; Smith, Gina A; Abdul-Zani, Izma; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Mughal, Nadeem A; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Kearney, Mark T; Zachary, Ian C; Tomlinson, Darren C; Harrison, Michael A; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2016-05-15

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR2 triggers multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate endothelial cell responses that control vascular development. Multiple isoforms of VEGF-A can elicit differential signal transduction and endothelial responses. However, it is unclear how such cellular responses are controlled by isoform-specific VEGF-A-VEGFR2 complexes. Increasingly, there is the realization that the membrane trafficking of receptor-ligand complexes influences signal transduction and protein turnover. By building on these concepts, our study shows for the first time that three different VEGF-A isoforms (VEGF-A165, VEGF-A121 and VEGF-A145) promote distinct patterns of VEGFR2 endocytosis for delivery into early endosomes. This differential VEGFR2 endocytosis and trafficking is linked to VEGF-A isoform-specific signal transduction events. Disruption of clathrin-dependent endocytosis blocked VEGF-A isoform-specific VEGFR2 activation, signal transduction and caused substantial depletion in membrane-bound VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 levels. Furthermore, such VEGF-A isoforms promoted differential patterns of VEGFR2 ubiquitylation, proteolysis and terminal degradation. Our study now provides novel insights into how different VEGF-A isoforms can bind the same receptor tyrosine kinase and elicit diverse cellular outcomes. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction regulates the actin cytoskeleton through the downregulation of WAVE2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C-L; Ueno, M; Liu, D; Masuya, D; Nakano, J; Yokomise, H; Nakagawa, T; Miyake, M

    2006-10-19

    Motility-related protein-1 (MRP-1/CD9) is involved in cell motility. We studied the change in the actin cytoskeleton, and the expression of actin-related protein (Arp) 2 and Arp3 and the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) family according to MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction into HT1080 cells. The frequency of cells with lamellipodia was significantly lower in MRP-1/CD9-transfected HT1080 cells than in control HT1080 cells (PMRP-1/CD9 gene transduction affected the subcellular localization of Arp2 and Arp3 proteins. Furthermore, MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction induced a downregulation of WAVE2 expression (PMRP-1/CD9 monoclonal antibody inhibited downregulation of WAVE2 in MRP-1/CD9-transfected HT1080 cells (PMRP-1/CD9 gene transduction. Furthermore, downregulation of WAVE2 by transfection of WAVE2-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) mimicked the morphological effects of MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction and suppressed cell motility. However, transfection of each siRNA for Wnt1, Wnt2b1 or Wnt5a did not affect WAVE2 expression. Transfection of WAVE2-specific siRNA also did not affect expressions of these Wnts. These results indicate that MRP-1/CD9 regulates the actin cytoskeleton by downregulating of the WAVE2, through the Wnt-independent signal pathway.

  17. A downstream voyage with mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Retrospective essay for the Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology.As I look back on my paper, “Effects of Low Dietary Levels of Methyl Mercury on Mallard Reproduction,” published in 1974 in the Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, a thought sticks in my mind. I realize just how much my mercury research was not unlike a leaf in a stream, carried this way and that, sometimes stalled in an eddy, restarted, and carried downstream at a pace and path that was not completely under my control. I was hired in 1969 by the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center to study the effects of environmental pollutants on the behavior of wildlife. A colleague was conducting a study on the reproductive effects of methylmercury on mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), and he offered to give me some of the ducklings. I conducted a pilot study, testing how readily ducklings approached a tape-recorded maternal call. Sample sizes were small, but the results suggested that ducklings from mercury-treated parents behaved differently than controls. That’s how I got into mercury research—pretty much by chance.

  18. Rare earth industries: Downstream business

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The value chain of the rare earths business involves mining, extraction, processing, refining and the manufacture of an extensive range of downstream products which find wide applications in such industries including aerospace, consumer electronics, medical, military, automotive, renewable wind and solar energy and telecommunications. In fact the entire gamut of the high-tech industries depends on a sustainable supply of rare earths elements. The explosive demand in mobile phones is an excellent illustration of the massive potential that the rare earths business offers. In a matter of less than 20 years, the number of cell phones worldwide has reached a staggering 5 billion. Soon, going by the report of their growth in sales, the world demand for cell phones may even exceed the global population. Admittedly, the rare earths business does pose certain risks. Top among the risks are the health and safety risks. The mining, extraction and refining of rare earths produce residues and wastes which carry health and safety risks. The residues from the extraction and refining are radioactive, while their effluent waste streams do pose pollution risks to the receiving rivers and waterways. But, as clearly elaborated in a recent report by IAEA experts, there are technologies and systems available to efficiently mitigate such risks. The risks are Rare Earth manageable. However, it is crucial that the risk and waste management procedures are strictly followed and adhered to. This is where effective monitoring and surveillance throughout the life of all such rare earths facilities is crucial. Fortunately, Malaysia's regulatory standards on rare earths follow international standards. In some areas, Malaysia's regulatory regime is even more stringent than the international guidelines. (author)

  19. Molecular electroporation and the transduction of oligoarginines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Kevin

    2010-03-01

    Certain short polycations, such as TAT and polyarginine, rapidly pass through the plasma membranes of mammalian cells by an unknown mechanism called transduction as well as by endocytosis and macropinocytosis. These cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) promise to be medically useful when fused to biologically active peptides. I offer a simple model in which one or more CPPs and the phosphatidylserines of the inner leaflet form a kind of capacitor with a voltage in excess of about 200 mV, high enough to create a molecular electropore. The model is consistent with an empirical upper limit on the cargo peptide of 40-60 amino acids and with experimental data on how the transduction of a polyarginine-fluorophore into mouse C2C12 myoblasts depends on the number of arginines in the CPP and on the CPP concentration. The model makes three testable predictions.

  20. Signal transduction and chemotaxis in mast cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dráber, Petr; Hálová, Ivana; Polakovičová, Iva; Kawakami, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 778, jaro (2016), s. 11-23 ISSN 0014-2999 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-09807S; GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-00703S Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Mast cell * IgE receptor * KIT receptor * Signal transduction * Chemotaxis * Plasma membrane Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.896, year: 2016

  1. Effect of okadaic acid on cultured clam heart cells: involvement of MAPkinase pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houda Hanana

    2012-09-01

    Okadaic acid (OA is one of the main diarrhetic shellfish poisoning toxins and a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A. The downstream signal transduction pathways following the protein phosphatase inhibition are still unknown and the results of most of the previous studies are often conflicting. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of OA on heart clam cells and to analyse its possible mechanisms of action by investigating the signal transduction pathways involved in OA cytotoxicity. We showed that OA at 1 µM after 24 h of treatment induces disorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, rounding and detachment of fibroblastic cells. Moreover, treatment of heart cells revealed a sequential activation of MAPK proteins depending on the OA concentration. We suggest that the duration of p38 and JNK activation is a critical factor in determining cell apoptosis in clam cardiomyocytes. In the opposite, ERK activation could be involved in cell survival. The cell death induced by OA is a MAPK modulated pathway, mediated by caspase 3-dependent mechanism. OA was found to induce no significant effect on spontaneous beating rate or inward L-type calcium current in clam cardiomyocytes, suggesting that PP1 was not inhibited even by the highest dose of OA.

  2. Mechanism of active transport: free energy dissipation and free energy transduction.

    OpenAIRE

    Tanford, C

    1982-01-01

    The thermodynamic pathway for "chemiosmotic" free energy transduction in active transport is discussed with an ATP-driven Ca2+ pump as an illustrative example. Two innovations are made in the analysis. (i) Free energy dissipated as heat is rigorously excluded from overall free energy bookkeeping by focusing on the dynamic equilibrium state of the chemiosmotic process. (ii) Separate chemical potential terms for free energy donor and transported ions are used to keep track of the thermodynamic ...

  3. Glycation & the RAGE axis: targeting signal transduction through DIAPH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhtman, Alexander; Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Schmidt, Ann Marie

    2017-02-01

    The consequences of chronic disease are vast and unremitting; hence, understanding the pathogenic mechanisms mediating such disorders holds promise to identify therapeutics and diminish the consequences. The ligands of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) accumulate in chronic diseases, particularly those characterized by inflammation and metabolic dysfunction. Although first discovered and reported as a receptor for advanced glycation end products (AGEs), the expansion of the repertoire of RAGE ligands implicates the receptor in diverse milieus, such as autoimmunity, chronic inflammation, obesity, diabetes, and neurodegeneration. Areas covered: This review summarizes current knowledge regarding the ligand families of RAGE and data from human subjects and animal models on the role of the RAGE axis in chronic diseases. The recent discovery that the cytoplasmic domain of RAGE binds to the formin homology 1 (FH1) domain, DIAPH1, and that this interaction is essential for RAGE ligand-stimulated signal transduction, is discussed. Finally, we review therapeutic opportunities targeting the RAGE axis as a means to mitigate chronic diseases. Expert commentary: With the aging of the population and the epidemic of cardiometabolic disease, therapeutic strategies to target molecular pathways that contribute to the sequelae of these chronic diseases are urgently needed. In this review, we propose that the ligand/RAGE axis and its signaling nexus is a key factor in the pathogenesis of chronic disease and that therapeutic interruption of this pathway may improve quality and duration of life.

  4. Inquiry into Chemotherapy-Induced P53 Activation in Cancer Cells as a Model for Teaching Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srougi, Melissa C.; Carson, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular and extracellular communication is conducted through an intricate and interwoven network of signal transduction pathways. The mechanisms for how cells speak with one another are of significant biological importance to both basic and industrial scientists from a number of different disciplines. We have therefore developed and…

  5. Adenovirus transduction: More complicated than receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Priyanka; Martis, Prithy C; Excoffon, Katherine J D A

    2017-02-01

    The abundance and accessibility of a primary virus receptor are critical factors that impact the susceptibility of a host cell to virus infection. The Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) has two transmembrane isoforms that occur due to alternative splicing and differ in localization and function in polarized epithelia. To determine the relevance of isoform-specific expression across cell types, the abundance and localization of both isoforms were determined in ten common cell lines, and correlated with susceptibility to adenovirus transduction relative to polarized primary human airway epithelia. Data show that the gene and protein expression for each isoform of CAR varies significantly between cell lines and polarization, as indicated by high transepithelial resistance, is inversely related to adenovirus transduction. In summary, the variability of polarity and isoform-specific expression among model cells are critical parameters that must be considered when evaluating the clinical relevance of potential adenovirus-mediated gene therapy and anti-adenovirus strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Prenatal Alcohol Exposure Damages Brain Signal Transduction Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Caldwell, Kevin

    2001-01-01

    .... One and twenty-four hours following fear conditioning this learning deficit is associated with altered brain signal transduction mechanisms that are dependent on an enzyme termed phosphatidylinositol...

  7. Transductive Ridge Regression in Structure-activity Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcou, Gilles; Delouis, Grace; Mokshyna, Olena; Horvath, Dragos; Lachiche, Nicolas; Varnek, Alexandre

    2018-01-01

    In this article we consider the application of the Transductive Ridge Regression (TRR) approach to structure-activity modeling. An original procedure of the TRR parameters optimization is suggested. Calculations performed on 3 different datasets involving two types of descriptors demonstrated that TRR outperforms its non-transductive analogue (Ridge Regression) in more than 90 % of cases. The most significant transductive effect was observed for small datasets. This suggests that transduction may be particularly useful when the data are expensive or difficult to collect. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. G-protein-coupled receptors mediate 14-3-3 signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Eishingdrelo, Alex; Kongsamut, Sathapana; Eishingdrelo, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-interacting proteins likely participate in regulating GPCR signaling by eliciting specific signal transduction cascades, inducing cross-talk with other pathways, and fine tuning the signal. However, except for G-proteins and β-arrestins, other GPCR-interacting proteins are poorly characterized. 14-3-3 proteins are signal adaptors, and their participation in GPCR signaling is not well understood or recognized. Here we demonstrate that GPCR-mediated 14-3-3 signaling is ligand-regulated and is likely to be a more general phenomenon than suggested by the previous reports of 14-3-3 involvement with a few GPCRs. For the first time, we can pharmacologically characterize GPCR/14-3-3 signaling. We have shown that GPCR-mediated 14-3-3 signaling is phosphorylation-dependent, and that the GPCR/14-3-3 interaction likely occurs later than receptor desensitization and internalization. GPCR-mediated 14-3-3 signaling can be β-arrestin-independent, and individual agonists can have different potencies on 14-3-3 and β-arrestin signaling. GPCRs can also mediate the interaction between 14-3-3 and Raf-1. Our work opens up a new broad realm of previously unappreciated GPCR signal transduction. Linking GPCRs to 14-3-3 signal transduction creates the potential for the development of new research directions and provides a new signaling pathway for drug discovery.

  9. The cellular response to vascular endothelial growth factors requires co-ordinated signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gina A; Fearnley, Gareth W; Tomlinson, Darren C; Harrison, Michael A; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2015-08-18

    VEGFs (vascular endothelial growth factors) are a family of conserved disulfide-linked soluble secretory glycoproteins found in higher eukaryotes. VEGFs mediate a wide range of responses in different tissues including metabolic homoeostasis, cell proliferation, migration and tubulogenesis. Such responses are initiated by VEGF binding to soluble and membrane-bound VEGFRs (VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases) and co-receptors. VEGF and receptor splice isoform diversity further enhances complexity of membrane protein assembly and function in signal transduction pathways that control multiple cellular responses. Different signal transduction pathways are simultaneously activated by VEGFR-VEGF complexes with membrane trafficking along the endosome-lysosome network further modulating signal output from multiple enzymatic events associated with such pathways. Balancing VEGFR-VEGF signal transduction with trafficking and proteolysis is essential in controlling the intensity and duration of different intracellular signalling events. Dysfunction in VEGF-regulated signal transduction is important in chronic disease states including cancer, atherosclerosis and blindness. This family of growth factors and receptors is an important model system for understanding human disease pathology and developing new therapeutics for treating such ailments. © 2015 Authors.

  10. Therapeutic effects of cell-permeant peptides that activate G proteins downstream of growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Gary S; Aznar, Nicolas; Kalogriopoulos, Nicholas; Midde, Krishna K; Lopez-Sanchez, Inmaculada; Sato, Emi; Dunkel, Ying; Gallo, Richard L; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2015-05-19

    In eukaryotes, receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and trimeric G proteins are two major signaling hubs. Signal transduction via trimeric G proteins has long been believed to be triggered exclusively by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). This paradigm has recently been challenged by several studies on a multimodular signal transducer, Gα-Interacting Vesicle associated protein (GIV/Girdin). We recently demonstrated that GIV's C terminus (CT) serves as a platform for dynamic association of ligand-activated RTKs with Gαi, and for noncanonical transactivation of G proteins. However, exogenous manipulation of this platform has remained beyond reach. Here we developed cell-permeable GIV-CT peptides by fusing a TAT-peptide transduction domain (TAT-PTD) to the minimal modular elements of GIV that are necessary and sufficient for activation of Gi downstream of RTKs, and used them to engineer signaling networks and alter cell behavior. In the presence of an intact GEF motif, TAT-GIV-CT peptides enhanced diverse processes in which GIV's GEF function has previously been implicated, e.g., 2D cell migration after scratch-wounding, invasion of cancer cells, and finally, myofibroblast activation and collagen production. Furthermore, topical application of TAT-GIV-CT peptides enhanced the complex, multireceptor-driven process of wound repair in mice in a GEF-dependent manner. Thus, TAT-GIV peptides provide a novel and versatile tool to manipulate Gαi activation downstream of growth factors in a diverse array of pathophysiologic conditions.

  11. A Prize-Collecting Steiner Tree Approach for Transduction Network Inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly-Bechet, Marc; Braunstein, Alfredo; Zecchina, Riccardo

    Into the cell, information from the environment is mainly propagated via signaling pathways which form a transduction network. Here we propose a new algorithm to infer transduction networks from heterogeneous data, using both the protein interaction network and expression datasets. We formulate the inference problem as an optimization task, and develop a message-passing, probabilistic and distributed formalism to solve it. We apply our algorithm to the pheromone response in the baker’s yeast S. cerevisiae. We are able to find the backbone of the known structure of the MAPK cascade of pheromone response, validating our algorithm. More importantly, we make biological predictions about some proteins whose role could be at the interface between pheromone response and other cellular functions.

  12. Evaluation of Intracellular Signaling Downstream Chimeric Antigen Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Karlsson

    Full Text Available CD19-targeting CAR T cells have shown potency in clinical trials targeting B cell leukemia. Although mainly second generation (2G CARs carrying CD28 or 4-1BB have been investigated in patients, preclinical studies suggest that third generation (3G CARs with both CD28 and 4-1BB have enhanced capacity. However, little is known about the intracellular signaling pathways downstream of CARs. In the present work, we have analyzed the signaling capacity post antigen stimulation in both 2G and 3G CARs. 3G CAR T cells expanded better than 2G CAR T cells upon repeated stimulation with IL-2 and autologous B cells. An antigen-driven accumulation of CAR+ cells was evident post antigen stimulation. The cytotoxicity of both 2G and 3G CAR T cells was maintained by repeated stimulation. The phosphorylation status of intracellular signaling proteins post antigen stimulation showed that 3G CAR T cells had a higher activation status than 2G. Several proteins involved in signaling downstream the TCR were activated, as were proteins involved in the cell cycle, cell adhesion and exocytosis. In conclusion, 3G CAR T cells had a higher degree of intracellular signaling activity than 2G CARs which may explain the increased proliferative capacity seen in 3G CAR T cells. The study also indicates that there may be other signaling pathways to consider when designing or evaluating new generations of CARs.

  13. Cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP): New approach for the delivery of biomolecules into cytoplasm in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Daeyou; Jeon, Choonju; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Mi-Seon; Yoon, Cheol-Hee; Choi, In-Soo; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Bae, Yong-Soo

    2006-01-01

    The protein transduction domain (PTD) of HIV-1 TAT has been extensively documented with regard to its membrane transduction potential, as well as its efficient delivery of biomolecules in vivo. However, the majority of PTD and PTD-conjugated molecules translocate to the nucleus rather than to the cytoplasm after transduction, due to the functional nuclear localization sequence (NLS). Here, we report a cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP), which was deliberately designed to ensure the efficient cytoplasmic delivery of the CTP-fused biomolecules. In comparison with PTD, CTP and its fusion partners exhibited a clear preference for cytoplasmic localization, and also markedly enhanced membrane transduction potential. Unlike the mechanism underlying PTD-mediated transduction, CTP-mediated transduction occurs independently of the lipid raft-dependent macropinocytosis pathway. The CTP-conjugated Smac/DIABLO peptide (Smac-CTP) was also shown to be much more efficient than Smac-PTD in the blockage of the antiapoptotic properties of XIAP, suggesting that cytoplasmic functional molecules can be more efficiently targeted by CTP-mediated delivery. In in vivo trafficking studies, CTP-fused β-gal exhibited unique organ tropisms to the liver and lymph nodes when systemically injected into mice, whereas PTD-β-gal exhibited no such tropisms. Taken together, our findings implicate CTP as a novel delivery peptide appropriate for (i) molecular targeting to cytoplasmic compartments in vitro, (ii) the development of class I-associated CTL vaccines, and (iii) special drug delivery in vivo, without causing any untoward effects on nuclear genetic material

  14. Ubiquitination of basal VEGFR2 regulates signal transduction and endothelial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gina A; Fearnley, Gareth W; Abdul-Zani, Izma; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Tomlinson, Darren C; Harrison, Michael A; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2017-10-15

    Cell surface receptors can undergo recycling or proteolysis but the cellular decision-making events that sort between these pathways remain poorly defined. Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) regulate signal transduction and angiogenesis, but how signaling and proteolysis is regulated is not well understood. Here, we provide evidence that a pathway requiring the E1 ubiquitin-activating enzyme UBA1 controls basal VEGFR2 levels, hence metering plasma membrane receptor availability for the VEGF-A-regulated endothelial cell response. VEGFR2 undergoes VEGF-A-independent constitutive degradation via a UBA1-dependent ubiquitin-linked pathway. Depletion of UBA1 increased VEGFR2 recycling from endosome-to-plasma membrane and decreased proteolysis. Increased membrane receptor availability after UBA1 depletion elevated VEGF-A-stimulated activation of key signaling enzymes such as PLCγ1 and ERK1/2. Although UBA1 depletion caused an overall decrease in endothelial cell proliferation, surviving cells showed greater VEGF-A-stimulated responses such as cell migration and tubulogenesis. Our study now suggests that a ubiquitin-linked pathway regulates the balance between receptor recycling and degradation which in turn impacts on the intensity and duration of VEGF-A-stimulated signal transduction and the endothelial response. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Ubiquitination of basal VEGFR2 regulates signal transduction and endothelial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina A. Smith

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell surface receptors can undergo recycling or proteolysis but the cellular decision-making events that sort between these pathways remain poorly defined. Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2 regulate signal transduction and angiogenesis, but how signaling and proteolysis is regulated is not well understood. Here, we provide evidence that a pathway requiring the E1 ubiquitin-activating enzyme UBA1 controls basal VEGFR2 levels, hence metering plasma membrane receptor availability for the VEGF-A-regulated endothelial cell response. VEGFR2 undergoes VEGF-A-independent constitutive degradation via a UBA1-dependent ubiquitin-linked pathway. Depletion of UBA1 increased VEGFR2 recycling from endosome-to-plasma membrane and decreased proteolysis. Increased membrane receptor availability after UBA1 depletion elevated VEGF-A-stimulated activation of key signaling enzymes such as PLCγ1 and ERK1/2. Although UBA1 depletion caused an overall decrease in endothelial cell proliferation, surviving cells showed greater VEGF-A-stimulated responses such as cell migration and tubulogenesis. Our study now suggests that a ubiquitin-linked pathway regulates the balance between receptor recycling and degradation which in turn impacts on the intensity and duration of VEGF-A-stimulated signal transduction and the endothelial response.

  16. The interleukin-4 receptor: signal transduction by a hematopoietin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, A D; Pierce, J H

    1994-02-01

    Over the last several years, the receptors for numerous cytokines have been molecularly characterized. Analysis of their amino acid sequences shows that some of these receptors bear certain motifs in their extracellular domains that define a family of receptors called the Hematopoietin receptor superfamily. Significant advances in characterizing the structure, function, and mechanisms of signal transduction have been made for several members of this family. The purpose of this review is to discuss the recent advances made for one of the family members, the interleukin (IL) 4 receptor. Other receptor systems have recently been reviewed elsewhere. The IL-4 receptor consists of, at the minimum, the cloned 140 kDa IL-4-binding chain with the potential for associating with other chains. The IL-4 receptor transduces its signal by activating a tyrosine kinase that phosphorylates cellular substrates, including the receptor itself, and the 170 kDa substrate called 4PS. Phosphorylated 4PS interacts with the SH2 domain of the enzyme PI-3'-kinase and increases its enzymatic activity. These early events in the IL-4 receptor initiated signaling pathway may trigger a series of signals that will ultimately lead to an IL-4 specific biologic outcome.

  17. Phosphoproteomics-based systems analysis of signal transduction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko eKozuka-Hata

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Signal transduction systems coordinate complex cellular information to regulate biological events such as cell proliferation and differentiation. Although the accumulating evidence on widespread association of signaling molecules has revealed essential contribution of phosphorylation-dependent interaction networks to cellular regulation, their dynamic behavior is mostly yet to be analyzed. Recent technological advances regarding mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics have enabled us to describe the comprehensive status of phosphorylated molecules in a time-resolved manner. Computational analyses based on the phosphoproteome dynamics accelerate generation of novel methodologies for mathematical analysis of cellular signaling. Phosphoproteomics-based numerical modeling can be used to evaluate regulatory network elements from a statistical point of view. Integration with transcriptome dynamics also uncovers regulatory hubs at the transcriptional level. These omics-based computational methodologies, which have firstly been applied to representative signaling systems such as the epidermal growth factor receptor pathway, have now opened up a gate for systems analysis of signaling networks involved in immune response and cancer.

  18. A microfluidic platform for regulating signal transduction in single cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Pak Kin; Yu, Fuqu; Sun, Ren; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2004-11-01

    Recent progress in micro cell culture systems has lead to new approaches in cell biology studies. Using micro devices for cell culturing possesses distinctive advantages over traditional methods. Length scale matching facilitates manipulation and detection at the single cell level. Previously, we have demonstrated generation of various stimulations such as spatial chemical gradient, electric field, and shear stress to study the dynamic responses of individual cells. Dynamic stimulations and continuous monitoring in a microfluidic system can be useful in studying different aspects of cellular process. In this work, we present a microfluidic platform for regulating nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) signal transduction in human embryonic kidney 293T cells. Time-varying bio-chemical stimulants, such as interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor, are introduced into the microchannel to activate the NF-kB signaling pathway. The dynamic responses of individual cells are monitored with the expression of reporter gene, green fluorescent protein. Regulation of the NF-kB activity is successfully demonstrated. This work is supported by CMISE through NASA URETI program.

  19. Philippines' downstream sector poised for growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the Philippines' downstream sector is poised for sharp growth. Despite a slip in refined products demand in recent years, Philippines products demand will rebound sharply by 2000, East-West Center (EWC), Honolulu, predicts. Philippines planned refinery expansions are expected to meet that added demand, EWC Director Fereidun Fesharaki says. Like the rest of the Asia-Pacific region, product specifications are changing, but major refiners in the area expect to meet the changes without major case outlays. At the same time, Fesharaki says, push toward deregulation will further bolster the outlook for the Philippines downstream sector

  20. FCJ-124 Interactive Environments as Fields of Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristoph Brunner

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a critical inquiry of interactive environments as fields of transduction. It is argued that Gilbert Simondon’s concepts of individuation, transduction, in-formation, the preindividual, and the associated milieu enable a processual thinking of the analysis and design of interactive technologies as technogenetic emergence. These concepts offer a way for interaction design to understand interactive environments through the dynamics between fields of transduction and fields of experience in relational and affective terms. The article analyses the way in which two technological assemblages, Voz Alta and the Impossible Room, provide different experiential fields experimenting with the transductive power of digital and interactive media. We emphasise the potential for creating new modes of experience. Our aim is to underline the necessary convergences between practices of design and thought; to enable affectively engaging fields of transduction.

  1. Tyrosine kinase Btk regulates E-selectin–mediated integrin activation and neutrophil recruitment by controlling phospholipase C (PLC) γ2 and PI3Kγ pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Helena; Stadtmann, Anika; Van Aken, Hugo; Hirsch, Emilio; Wang, Demin; Ley, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Selectins mediate leukocyte rolling, trigger β2-integrin activation, and promote leukocyte recruitment into inflamed tissue. E-selectin binding to P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL-1) leads to activation of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)–dependent pathway, which in turn activates the spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk). However, the signaling pathway linking Syk to integrin activation after E-selectin engagement is unknown. To identify the pathway, we used different gene-deficient mice in autoperfused flow chamber, intravital microscopy, peritonitis, and biochemical studies. We report here that the signaling pathway downstream of Syk divides into a phospholipase C (PLC) γ2– and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) γ–dependent pathway. The Tec family kinase Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) is required for activating both pathways, generating inositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3), and inducing E-selectin–mediated slow rolling. Inhibition of this signal-transduction pathway diminished Gαi-independent leukocyte adhesion to and transmigration through endothelial cells in inflamed postcapillary venules of the cremaster. Gαi-independent neutrophil recruitment into the inflamed peritoneal cavity was reduced in Btk−/− and Plcg2−/− mice. Our data demonstrate the functional importance of this newly identified signaling pathway mediated by E-selectin engagement. PMID:20167705

  2. CesRK, a two-component signal transduction system in Listeria monocytogenes, responds to the presence of cell wall-acting antibiotics and affects beta-lactam resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallipolitis, Birgitte H; Ingmer, Hanne; Gahan, Cormac G

    2003-01-01

    of a putative two-component signal transduction system that plays a role in the virulence and ethanol tolerance of L. monocytogenes. Here we present evidence that the response regulator, CesR, and a histidine protein kinase, CesK, which is encoded by the gene downstream from cesR, are involved in the ability...

  3. Wake characterization downstream of a fog collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresci, E.

    The problem of wake geometry characterization downstream of a collector for getting water out of advection fog is investigated combining the results coming from wind tunnel trials and an experimental campaign in Peru ( Lomas de Mejia), where a fog collection project was running. Results from a physical model of the fog collector at a 1:100 scale tested in a wind tunnel through anemometer velocity measurements and flow visualization techniques showed, at different heights from the ground, the general direction of the flow in the vicinity of the obstacle and the extension of the downstream-disturbed area. Wind speed data collection in Peru showed the reduction in wind speed depending on its intensity. The preliminary results show the utility of such an approach in order to improve the understanding of the flow motion downstream of permeable surfaces. The possibility of spatially characterizing the wake presence has a practical utilization whenever the knowledge of the geometry of the wake downstream of an obstacle is required.

  4. Scleroglucan: Fermentative Production, Downstream Processing and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikant A. Survase

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Exopolysaccharides produced by a variety of microorganisms find multifarious industrial applications in foods, pharmaceutical and other industries as emulsifiers, stabilizers, binders, gelling agents, lubricants, and thickening agents. One such exopolysaccharide is scleroglucan, produced by pure culture fermentation from filamentous fungi of genus Sclerotium. The review discusses the properties, fermentative production, downstream processing and applications of scleroglucan.

  5. Downstream bioprocess characterisation within microfluidic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marques, Marco; Krühne, Ulrich; Szita, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Miniaturising bioprocess unit operation steps is a well-established approach to find novel routes for process intensification and improved process economics. While a number of microbioreactors have been presented over the last 15 years, miniaturised downstream unit operations (mDUO) are less...

  6. TMC function in hair cell transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Jeffrey R.; Pan, Bifeng; Koussa, Mounir A.; Asai, Yukako

    2014-01-01

    Transmembrane channel-like (TMC) proteins 1 and 2 are necessary for hair cell mechanotransduction but their precise function is controversial. A growing body of evidence supports a direct role for TMC1 and TMC2 as components of the transduction complex. However, a number of important questions remain and alternate hypotheses have been proposed. Here we present an historical overview of the identification and cloning of Tmc genes, a discussion of mutations in TMC1 that cause deafness in mice and humans and a brief review of other members of the Tmc gene superfamily. We also examine expression of Tmc mRNAs and localization of the protein products. The review focuses on potential functions of TMC proteins and the evidence from Beethoven mice that suggests a direct role for TMC1 in hair cell mechanotransduction. Data that support alternate interpretations are also considered. The article concludes with a discussion of outstanding questions and future directions for TMC research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled “Annual Reviews 2014”. PMID:24423408

  7. Self-organization of signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    We propose a model of parameter learning for signal transduction, where the objective function is defined by signal transmission efficiency. We apply this to learn kinetic rates as a form of evolutionary learning, and look for parameters which satisfy the objective. This is a novel approach compared to the usual technique of adjusting parameters only on the basis of experimental data. The resulting model is self-organizing, i.e. perturbations in protein concentrations or changes in extracellular signaling will automatically lead to adaptation. We systematically perturb protein concentrations and observe the response of the system. We find compensatory or co-regulation of protein expression levels. In a novel experiment, we alter the distribution of extracellular signaling, and observe adaptation based on optimizing signal transmission. We also discuss the relationship between signaling with and without transients. Signaling by transients may involve maximization of signal transmission efficiency for the peak response, but a minimization in steady-state responses. With an appropriate objective function, this can also be achieved by concentration adjustment. Self-organizing systems may be predictive of unwanted drug interference effects, since they aim to mimic complex cellular adaptation in a unified way.

  8. Glycosphingolipid–Protein Interaction in Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Russo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Glycosphingolipids (GSLs are a class of ceramide-based glycolipids essential for embryo development in mammals. The synthesis of specific GSLs depends on the expression of distinctive sets of GSL synthesizing enzymes that is tightly regulated during development. Several reports have described how cell surface receptors can be kept in a resting state or activate alternative signalling events as a consequence of their interaction with GSLs. Specific GSLs, indeed, interface with specific protein domains that are found in signalling molecules and which act as GSL sensors to modify signalling responses. The regulation exerted by GSLs on signal transduction is orthogonal to the ligand–receptor axis, as it usually does not directly interfere with the ligand binding to receptors. Due to their properties of adjustable production and orthogonal action on receptors, GSLs add a new dimension to the control of the signalling in development. GSLs can, indeed, dynamically influence progenitor cell response to morphogenetic stimuli, resulting in alternative differentiation fates. Here, we review the available literature on GSL–protein interactions and their effects on cell signalling and development.

  9. Concise Review: Reprogramming, Behind the Scenes: Noncanonical Neural Stem Cell Signaling Pathways Reveal New, Unseen Regulators of Tissue Plasticity With Therapeutic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poser, Steven W; Chenoweth, Josh G; Colantuoni, Carlo; Masjkur, Jimmy; Chrousos, George; Bornstein, Stefan R; McKay, Ronald D; Androutsellis-Theotokis, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Interest is great in the new molecular concepts that explain, at the level of signal transduction, the process of reprogramming. Usually, transcription factors with developmental importance are used, but these approaches give limited information on the signaling networks involved, which could reveal new therapeutic opportunities. Recent findings involving reprogramming by genetic means and soluble factors with well-studied downstream signaling mechanisms, including signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and hairy and enhancer of split 3 (Hes3), shed new light into the molecular mechanisms that might be involved. We examine the appropriateness of common culture systems and their ability to reveal unusual (noncanonical) signal transduction pathways that actually operate in vivo. We then discuss such novel pathways and their importance in various plastic cell types, culminating in their emerging roles in reprogramming mechanisms. We also discuss a number of reprogramming paradigms (mouse induced pluripotent stem cells, direct conversion to neural stem cells, and in vivo conversion of acinar cells to β-like cells). Specifically for acinar-to-β-cell reprogramming paradigms, we discuss the common view of the underlying mechanism (involving the Janus kinase-STAT pathway that leads to STAT3-tyrosine phosphorylation) and present alternative interpretations that implicate STAT3-serine phosphorylation alone or serine and tyrosine phosphorylation occurring in sequential order. The implications for drug design and therapy are important given that different phosphorylation sites on STAT3 intercept different signaling pathways. We introduce a new molecular perspective in the field of reprogramming with broad implications in basic, biotechnological, and translational research. Reprogramming is a powerful approach to change cell identity, with implications in both basic and applied biology. Most efforts involve the forced expression of key transcription

  10. Immunohistochemical analysis of receptor tyrosine kinase signal transduction activity in chordoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasig, J H; Dupont, W D; LaFleur, B J; Olson, S J; Cates, J M M

    2008-02-01

    Currently, there are no effective chemotherapeutic protocols for chordoma. Reports of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) expression in chordoma suggest that these tumours may respond to kinase inhibitor therapy. However, RTK signalling activity has not been extensively investigated in chordoma. A tissue microarray containing 21 cases of chordoma was analysed for expression of a number of proteins involved in signal transduction from RTKs by immunohistochemistry. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-beta, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), KIT and HER2 were detected in 100%, 67%, 33% and 0% of cases, respectively. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-beta staining was of moderate-to-strong intensity in 20 of 21 cases. In contrast, KIT immunoreactivity was weak and focal in each of the seven positive cases. Total EGFR staining was variable; weak staining for phosphorylated EGFR was detected in nine cases. Phosphorylated isoforms of p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase, Akt and STAT3, indicative of tyrosine kinase activity, were detected in 86%, 76% and 67% of cases, respectively. Chordomas commonly express RTKs and activated signal transduction molecules. Although there were no statistically significant correlations between the expression of any of the markers studied and disease-free survival or tumour location, the results nonetheless indicate that chordomas may respond to RTK inhibitors or modulators of other downstream signalling molecules.

  11. Uncovering signal transduction networks from high-throughput data by integer linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xing-Ming; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Chen, Luonan; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2008-05-01

    Signal transduction is an important process that transmits signals from the outside of a cell to the inside to mediate sophisticated biological responses. Effective computational models to unravel such a process by taking advantage of high-throughput genomic and proteomic data are needed to understand the essential mechanisms underlying the signaling pathways. In this article, we propose a novel method for uncovering signal transduction networks (STNs) by integrating protein interaction with gene expression data. Specifically, we formulate STN identification problem as an integer linear programming (ILP) model, which can be actually solved by a relaxed linear programming algorithm and is flexible for handling various prior information without any restriction on the network structures. The numerical results on yeast MAPK signaling pathways demonstrate that the proposed ILP model is able to uncover STNs or pathways in an efficient and accurate manner. In particular, the prediction results are found to be in high agreement with current biological knowledge and available information in literature. In addition, the proposed model is simple to be interpreted and easy to be implemented even for a large-scale system.

  12. Elementary signaling modes predict the essentiality of signal transduction network components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui-Sheng; Albert, Réka

    2011-03-22

    Understanding how signals propagate through signaling pathways and networks is a central goal in systems biology. Quantitative dynamic models help to achieve this understanding, but are difficult to construct and validate because of the scarcity of known mechanistic details and kinetic parameters. Structural and qualitative analysis is emerging as a feasible and useful alternative for interpreting signal transduction. In this work, we present an integrative computational method for evaluating the essentiality of components in signaling networks. This approach expands an existing signaling network to a richer representation that incorporates the positive or negative nature of interactions and the synergistic behaviors among multiple components. Our method simulates both knockout and constitutive activation of components as node disruptions, and takes into account the possible cascading effects of a node's disruption. We introduce the concept of elementary signaling mode (ESM), as the minimal set of nodes that can perform signal transduction independently. Our method ranks the importance of signaling components by the effects of their perturbation on the ESMs of the network. Validation on several signaling networks describing the immune response of mammals to bacteria, guard cell abscisic acid signaling in plants, and T cell receptor signaling shows that this method can effectively uncover the essentiality of components mediating a signal transduction process and results in strong agreement with the results of Boolean (logical) dynamic models and experimental observations. This integrative method is an efficient procedure for exploratory analysis of large signaling and regulatory networks where dynamic modeling or experimental tests are impractical. Its results serve as testable predictions, provide insights into signal transduction and regulatory mechanisms and can guide targeted computational or experimental follow-up studies. The source codes for the algorithms

  13. India's Downstream Petroleum Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This study provides a holistic examination of pricing and investment dynamics in India's downstream petroleum sector. It analyses the current pricing practices, highlights the tremendous fiscal cost of current pricing and regulatory arrangements, and examines the sectoral investment dynamics. It also looks at potential paths towards market-based reform along which the Indian government may move, while at the same time protecting energy market access for India's large poor population.

  14. Transduction mechanisms and their applications in micromechanical devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elwenspoek, Michael Curt; Blom, F.R.; Bouwstra, S.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; van de Pol, F.C.M.; Tilmans, H.A.C.; Popma, T.J.A.; Fluitman, J.H.J.

    1989-01-01

    Transduction mechanisms and their applications in micromechanical actuators and resonating sensors are presented. They include piezoelectric, dielectric, electro-thermo-mechanic, opto-thermo-mechanic, and thermo-pneumatic mechanisms. Advantages and disadvantages with respect to technology and

  15. Further evidence supporting a role for gs signal transduction in severe malaria pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Auburn

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available With the functional demonstration of a role in erythrocyte invasion by Plasmodium falciparum parasites, implications in the aetiology of common conditions that prevail in individuals of African origin, and a wealth of pharmacological knowledge, the stimulatory G protein (Gs signal transduction pathway presents an exciting target for anti-malarial drug intervention. Having previously demonstrated a role for the G-alpha-s gene, GNAS, in severe malaria disease, we sought to identify other important components of the Gs pathway. Using meta-analysis across case-control and family trio (affected child and parental controls studies of severe malaria from The Gambia and Malawi, we sought evidence of association in six Gs pathway candidate genes: adenosine receptor 2A (ADORA2A and 2B (ADORA2B, beta-adrenergic receptor kinase 1 (ADRBK1, adenylyl cyclase 9 (ADCY9, G protein beta subunit 3 (GNB3, and regulator of G protein signalling 2 (RGS2. Our study amassed a total of 2278 cases and 2364 controls. Allele-based models of association were investigated in all genes, and genotype and haplotype-based models were investigated where significant allelic associations were identified. Although no significant associations were observed in the other genes, several were identified in ADORA2A. The most significant association was observed at the rs9624472 locus, where the G allele (approximately 20% frequency appeared to confer enhanced risk to severe malaria [OR = 1.22 (1.09-1.37; P = 0.001]. Further investigation of the ADORA2A gene region is required to validate the associations identified here, and to identify and functionally characterize the responsible causal variant(s. Our results provide further evidence supporting a role of the Gs signal transduction pathway in the regulation of severe malaria, and request further exploration of this pathway in future studies.

  16. Regulation of autophagy by amino acids and MTOR-dependent signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Alfred J; Lorin, Séverine; Blommaart, Edward F; Codogno, Patrice

    2015-10-01

    Amino acids not only participate in intermediary metabolism but also stimulate insulin-mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR)-mediated signal transduction which controls the major metabolic pathways. Among these is the pathway of autophagy which takes care of the degradation of long-lived proteins and of the elimination of damaged or functionally redundant organelles. Proper functioning of this process is essential for cell survival. Dysregulation of autophagy has been implicated in the etiology of several pathologies. The history of the studies on the interrelationship between amino acids, MTOR signaling and autophagy is the subject of this review. The mechanisms responsible for the stimulation of MTOR-mediated signaling, and the inhibition of autophagy, by amino acids have been studied intensively in the past but are still not completely clarified. Recent developments in this field are discussed.

  17. Regulation of TGF-β Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bing; Chen, Ye-Guang

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling regulates diverse cellular processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, cell plasticity, and migration. TGF-β signaling can be mediated by Smad proteins or other signaling proteins such as MAP kinases and Akt. TGF-β signaling is tightly regulated at different levels along the pathways to ensure its proper physiological functions in different cells and tissues. Deregulation of TGF-β signaling has been associated with various kinds of diseases, such as cancer and tissue fibrosis. This paper focuses on our recent work on regulation of TGF-β signaling.

  18. DARHT-II Downstream Transport Beamline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westenskow, G A; Bertolini, L R; Duffy, P T; Paul, A C

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design of the downstream beam transport line for the second axis of the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT II) Facility. The DARHT-II project is a collaboration between LANL, LBNL and LLNL. DARHT II is a 18.4-MeV, 2000-Amperes, 2-(micro)sec linear induction accelerator designed to generate short bursts of x-rays for the purpose of radiographing dense objects. The downstream beam transport line is approximately 22-meter long region extending from the end of the accelerator to the bremsstrahlung target. Within this proposed transport line there are 12 conventional solenoid, quadrupole and dipole magnets; as well as several specialty magnets, which transport and focus the beam to the target and to the beam dumps. There are two high power beam dumps, which are designed to absorb 80-kJ per pulse during accelerator start-up and operation. Aspects of the mechanical design of these elements are presented

  19. Alternative Mating Type Configurations (a/α versus a/a or α/α) of Candida albicans Result in Alternative Biofilms Regulated by Different Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikantha, Thyagarajan; Huang, Guanghua; Garnaas, Adam M.; Soll, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Similar multicellular structures can evolve within the same organism that may have different evolutionary histories, be controlled by different regulatory pathways, and play similar but nonidentical roles. In the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, a quite extraordinary example of this has occurred. Depending upon the configuration of the mating type locus (a/α versus a/a or α/α), C. albicans forms alternative biofilms that appear similar morphologically, but exhibit dramatically different characteristics and are regulated by distinctly different signal transduction pathways. Biofilms formed by a/α cells are impermeable to molecules in the size range of 300 Da to 140 kDa, are poorly penetrated by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), and are resistant to antifungals. In contrast, a/a or α/α biofilms are permeable to molecules in this size range, are readily penetrated by PMNs, and are susceptible to antifungals. By mutational analyses, a/α biofilms are demonstrated to be regulated by the Ras1/cAMP pathway that includes Ras1→Cdc35→cAMP(Pde2—|)→Tpk2(Tpk1)→Efg1→Tec1→Bcr1, and a/a biofilms by the MAP kinase pathway that includes Mfα→Ste2→ (Ste4, Ste18, Cag1)→Ste11→Hst7→Cek2(Cek1)→Tec1. These observations suggest the hypothesis that while the upstream portion of the newly evolved pathway regulating a/a and α/α cell biofilms was derived intact from the upstream portion of the conserved pheromone-regulated pathway for mating, the downstream portion was derived through modification of the downstream portion of the conserved pathway for a/α biofilm formation. C. albicans therefore forms two alternative biofilms depending upon mating configuration. PMID:21829325

  20. Integrated Electromechanical Transduction Schemes for Polymer MEMS Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Thuau

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Polymer Micro ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS have the potential to constitute a powerful alternative to silicon-based MEMS devices for sensing applications. Although the use of commercial photoresists as structural material in polymer MEMS has been widely reported, the integration of functional polymer materials as electromechanical transducers has not yet received the same amount of interest. In this context, we report on the design and fabrication of different electromechanical schemes based on polymeric materials ensuring different transduction functions. Piezoresistive transduction made of carbon nanotube-based nanocomposites with a gauge factor of 200 was embedded within U-shaped polymeric cantilevers operating either in static or dynamic modes. Flexible resonators with integrated piezoelectric transduction were also realized and used as efficient viscosity sensors. Finally, piezoelectric-based organic field effect transistor (OFET electromechanical transduction exhibiting a record sensitivity of over 600 was integrated into polymer cantilevers and used as highly sensitive strain and humidity sensors. Such advances in integrated electromechanical transduction schemes should favor the development of novel all-polymer MEMS devices for flexible and wearable applications in the future.

  1. Theory and modeling of cylindrical thermo-acoustic transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Lihong, E-mail: lhtong@ecjtu.edu.cn [School of Civil Engineering and Architecture, East China Jiaotong University, Nanchang, Jiangxi (China); Lim, C.W. [Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR (China); Zhao, Xiushao; Geng, Daxing [School of Civil Engineering and Architecture, East China Jiaotong University, Nanchang, Jiangxi (China)

    2016-06-03

    Models both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions are proposed and the corresponding acoustic pressure solutions are obtained. The acoustic pressure for an individual carbon nanotube (CNT) as a function of input power is investigated analytically and it is verified by comparing with the published experimental data. Further numerical analysis on the acoustic pressure response and characteristics for varying input frequency and distance are also examined both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions. Through detailed theoretical and numerical studies on the acoustic pressure solution for thinfilm-solid cylindrical transduction, it is concluded that a solid with smaller thermal conductivity favors to improve the acoustic performance. In general, the proposed models are applicable to a variety of cylindrical thermo-acoustic devices performing in different gaseous media. - Highlights: • Theory and modeling both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions are proposed. • The modeling is verified by comparing with the published experimental data. • Acoustic response characteristics of cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions are predicted by the proposed model.

  2. The effect of CD4 receptor downregulation and its downstream signaling molecules on HIV-1 latency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung-Chang; Kim, Hyeon Guk; Roh, Tae-Young; Park, Jihwan; Jung, Kyung-Min; Lee, Joo-Shil; Choi, Sang-Yun; Kim, Sung Soon; Choi, Byeong-Sun

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → CD4 receptors were downregulated on the surface of HIV-1 latently infected cells. → CD4 downstream signaling molecules were suppressed in HIV-1 latently infected cells. → HIV-1 progeny can be reactivated by induction of T-cell activation signal molecules. → H3K4me3 and H3K9ac were highly enriched in CD4 downstream signaling molecules. → HIV-1 latency can be maintained by the reduction of downstream signaling molecules. -- Abstract: HIV-1 can establish a latent infection in memory CD4 + T cells to evade the host immune response. CD4 molecules can act not only as the HIV-1 receptor for entry but also as the trigger in an intracellular signaling cascade for T-cell activation and proliferation via protein tyrosine kinases. Novel chronic HIV-1-infected A3.01-derived (NCHA) cells were used to examine the involvement of CD4 downstream signaling in HIV-1 latency. CD4 receptors in NCHA cells were dramatically downregulated on its surface but were slightly decreased in whole-cell lysates. The expression levels of CD4 downstream signaling molecules, including P56 Lck , ZAP-70, LAT, and c-Jun, were sharply decreased in NCHA cells. The lowered histone modifications of H3K4me3 and H3K9ac correlated with the downregulation of P56 Lck , ZAP-70, and LAT in NCHA cells. AP-1 binding activity was also reduced in NCHA cells. LAT and c-Jun suppressed in NCHA cells were highly induced after PMA treatment. In epigenetic analysis, other signal transduction molecules which are associated with active and/or latent HIV-1 infection showed normal states in HIV-1 latently infected cells compared to A3.01 cells. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the HIV-1 latent state is sustained by the reduction of downstream signaling molecules via the downregulation of CD4 and the attenuated activity of transcription factor as AP-1. The HIV-1 latency model via T-cell deactivation may provide some clues for the development of the new antireservoir therapy.

  3. The jet membrane-experiment: downstream sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campargue, R.

    1976-01-01

    The invasion separation effect of the free jet structure was found in 1966 at Saclay. In the Downstream Sampling Configuration patended by Campargue (1967), the light fraction is withdrawn from the supersonic central core, by skimming the separating free jet. From experimental and theoretical results obtained for gas and isotopic mixtures, the following points linked to operation and equipment costs, are considered: system description; influence of mass ratio, expansion ratio, nature of separating gas, ratio of upflow to separating jet flow, rarefaction. Fron an uninteresting aspect of Jet Membrane (elimination of background penetration), a new principle has been discovered to produce nozzle beams which may be of great interest for other separation processes involving free jets and/or molecular beams [fr

  4. Downstream hydraulic geometry and hydraulic similitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, George A.

    2003-04-01

    A theoretical basis is provided for the empirical equations of downstream hydraulic geometry, written as scaling relations, using the equations for momentum, flow resistance, and continuity of gradually varied open channel flow. Width, depth, velocity, and bed slope are expressed as power functions of water discharge and bed sediment size. These theoretical relations apply in alluvial, ice, and bedrock channels and hold for any value of water discharge as opposed to just mean or bank-full values used in empirical equations. A scaling relation for bed load transport rate in alluvial channels is also derived using dimensional analysis. Threshold and regime theories of stable channel design are shown to be consistent with the requirements of hydraulic similitude as defined by the scaling relations. If field measurements confirm that the scaling relations apply in braided alluvial channels, then predictions of a threshold bed slope between states of meandering and braiding will not be valid.

  5. Downstream effects of intermittent power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bretschko, G. (Austrian Academy of Sciences, Lunz (AT). Inst. fuer Limnologie); Moog, O. (Univ. Agric., Vienna (AT). Inst. Water Prov., Water Quality and Fisheries Management)

    1990-01-01

    Intermittent hydro-power generation creates frequent and dramatic discharge peaks combined with intervening extremely low water conditions downstream of the plant. Studies of the two Austrian rivers showed that whereas no alterations were found in the qualitative composition of zoobenthos, the decrease in abundance and biomass may amount up to 95%. The mismatch between the hydrography of surface water and groundwater might well be a cause of the detrimental effects of frequent and artificially created spates. The drastic reduction of zoobenthic biomass affects not only fish production but minimizes self-purification processes as well. Until tributaries diminish the effects of intermittent power generation, the river is reduced to a mere transport vehicle. (author).

  6. Innovation in Downstream Fashion Retail Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tambo, Torben

    2012-01-01

    While product marketers and brand owners struggle to make new products, manufacturing processes and inbound logistics, innovation taking place in retail networks is often overlooked. Networks in retailing are comprised by varieties of single- and multi-brand stores, chains and departments stores......, technology and service providers, ownership structures and local level supply chain facilities. This paper analyses theoretical and empirical views of innovation in international retail networks using the fashion industry as a case because this industry better than other industries maintain branded stores......-depth studies of the biggest Danish fashion brand owners and their respective retail networks. The study shows how brand owners can emphasise change by shifting from a passive and narrow observation of its downstream retail network to an active and broad observation, or at least develop a conscious approach...

  7. Signal Transduction in Histidine Kinases: Insights from New Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhate, Manasi P.; Molnar, Kathleen S.; Goulian, Mark; DeGrado, William F.

    2015-01-01

    Histidine kinases (HKs) are major players in bacterial signaling. There has been an explosion of new HK crystal structures in the last five years. We globally analyze the structures of HKs to yield insights into the mechanisms by which signals are transmitted to and across protein structures in this family. We interpret known enzymological data in the context of new structural data to show how asymmetry across the dimer interface is a key feature of signal transduction in HKs, and discuss how different HK domains undergo asymmetric-to-symmetric transitions during signal transduction and catalysis. A thermodynamic framework for signaling that encompasses these various properties is presented and the consequences of weak thermodynamic coupling are discussed. The synthesis of observations from enzymology, structural biology, protein engineering and thermodynamics paves the way for a deeper molecular understanding of histidine kinase signal transduction. PMID:25982528

  8. Physical aspects of sensory transduction on seeing, hearing and smelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Tohru; Sakakibara, Manabu

    2013-01-01

    What is the general principle of sensory transduction? Sensory transduction is defined as energy transformation from the external world to the internal world. The energy of the external world, such as thermal energy (heat), electro-magnetic energy (light), mechanical energy (sound) and the energy from molecules (chemicals), is converted into electrochemical events in the animal nervous system. The following five classes of special sense receptors are utilized for energy conversion: vision (photo); audition (sound); taste and smell (chemo); and tactile (mechano). There are also other special sense receptors, including thermo and noxious receptors. The focus of this study is on photoreceptors, sound-receptors and odorant-receptors because the transduction mechanisms of these receptors are explained biochemically and understood by a common physical principle; these biochemical models are well known in neuroscience. The following notable problems are inherent in these biochemical models: the cGMP ionophore model of the vertebrate photoreceptor cannot explain the fast photo-response (∼msec); the tip links connection model of stereocilia in the basilar membrane for opening the K(+) channel on the tip of a hair has difficulty explaining the high frequency vibration of hair cells without a damping of the oscillation, and the odorant shape-specific receptor model for olfactory transduction has difficulty in discriminating the minute differences among similar fragrant smells of essential oils with different molecular shapes. These difficulties might arise from a lack of the physical sense when the transduction models were proposed. This article will reconsider these problems and propose rational models for visual, olfactory and auditory transduction.

  9. c-di-AMP: An Essential Molecule in the Signaling Pathways that Regulate the Viability and Virulence of Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, Tazin; Port, Gary C; Cho, Kyu Hong

    2017-08-07

    Signal transduction pathways enable organisms to monitor their external environment and adjust gene regulation to appropriately modify their cellular processes. Second messenger nucleotides including cyclic adenosine monophosphate (c-AMP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (c-GMP), cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), and cyclic di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) play key roles in many signal transduction pathways used by prokaryotes and/or eukaryotes. Among the various second messenger nucleotides molecules, c-di-AMP was discovered recently and has since been shown to be involved in cell growth, survival, and regulation of virulence, primarily within Gram-positive bacteria. The cellular level of c-di-AMP is maintained by a family of c-di-AMP synthesizing enzymes, diadenylate cyclases (DACs), and degradation enzymes, phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Genetic manipulation of DACs and PDEs have demonstrated that alteration of c-di-AMP levels impacts both growth and virulence of microorganisms. Unlike other second messenger molecules, c-di-AMP is essential for growth in several bacterial species as many basic cellular functions are regulated by c-di-AMP including cell wall maintenance, potassium ion homeostasis, DNA damage repair, etc. c-di-AMP follows a typical second messenger signaling pathway, beginning with binding to receptor molecules to subsequent regulation of downstream cellular processes. While c-di-AMP binds to specific proteins that regulate pathways in bacterial cells, c-di-AMP also binds to regulatory RNA molecules that control potassium ion channel expression in Bacillus subtilis . c-di-AMP signaling also occurs in eukaryotes, as bacterially produced c-di-AMP stimulates host immune responses during infection through binding of innate immune surveillance proteins. Due to its existence in diverse microorganisms, its involvement in crucial cellular activities, and its stimulating activity in host immune responses, c-di-AMP signaling pathway has become

  10. Transfer functions for protein signal transduction: application to a model of striatal neural plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel formulation for biochemical reaction networks in the context of protein signal transduction. The model consists of input-output transfer functions, which are derived from differential equations, using stable equilibria. We select a set of "source" species, which are interpreted as input signals. Signals are transmitted to all other species in the system (the "target" species) with a specific delay and with a specific transmission strength. The delay is computed as the maximal reaction time until a stable equilibrium for the target species is reached, in the context of all other reactions in the system. The transmission strength is the concentration change of the target species. The computed input-output transfer functions can be stored in a matrix, fitted with parameters, and even recalled to build dynamical models on the basis of state changes. By separating the temporal and the magnitudinal domain we can greatly simplify the computational model, circumventing typical problems of complex dynamical systems. The transfer function transformation of biochemical reaction systems can be applied to mass-action kinetic models of signal transduction. The paper shows that this approach yields significant novel insights while remaining a fully testable and executable dynamical model for signal transduction. In particular we can deconstruct the complex system into local transfer functions between individual species. As an example, we examine modularity and signal integration using a published model of striatal neural plasticity. The modularizations that emerge correspond to a known biological distinction between calcium-dependent and cAMP-dependent pathways. Remarkably, we found that overall interconnectedness depends on the magnitude of inputs, with higher connectivity at low input concentrations and significant modularization at moderate to high input concentrations. This general result, which directly follows from the properties of individual transfer

  11. Transfer functions for protein signal transduction: application to a model of striatal neural plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Scheler

    Full Text Available We present a novel formulation for biochemical reaction networks in the context of protein signal transduction. The model consists of input-output transfer functions, which are derived from differential equations, using stable equilibria. We select a set of "source" species, which are interpreted as input signals. Signals are transmitted to all other species in the system (the "target" species with a specific delay and with a specific transmission strength. The delay is computed as the maximal reaction time until a stable equilibrium for the target species is reached, in the context of all other reactions in the system. The transmission strength is the concentration change of the target species. The computed input-output transfer functions can be stored in a matrix, fitted with parameters, and even recalled to build dynamical models on the basis of state changes. By separating the temporal and the magnitudinal domain we can greatly simplify the computational model, circumventing typical problems of complex dynamical systems. The transfer function transformation of biochemical reaction systems can be applied to mass-action kinetic models of signal transduction. The paper shows that this approach yields significant novel insights while remaining a fully testable and executable dynamical model for signal transduction. In particular we can deconstruct the complex system into local transfer functions between individual species. As an example, we examine modularity and signal integration using a published model of striatal neural plasticity. The modularizations that emerge correspond to a known biological distinction between calcium-dependent and cAMP-dependent pathways. Remarkably, we found that overall interconnectedness depends on the magnitude of inputs, with higher connectivity at low input concentrations and significant modularization at moderate to high input concentrations. This general result, which directly follows from the properties of

  12. Genome-wide association and pathway analysis of feed efficiency in pigs reveal candidate genes and pathways for residual feed intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do, Duy Ngoc; Strathe, Anders Bjerring; Ostersen, Tage

    2014-01-01

    implied porcine RFI is regulated by multiple biological mechanisms, although the metabolic processes might be the most important. Olfactory transduction pathway controlling the perception of feed via smell, insulin pathway controlling food intake might be important pathways for RFI. Furthermore, our study....... Metabolic pathway was significantly associated with both RFIs. Other biological pathways regulating phagosome, tight junctions, olfactory transduction, and insulin secretion were significantly associated with both RFI traits when relaxed threshold for cut-off p-value was used (p ≤ 0.05). These results...

  13. Salicylic acid-independent plant defence pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, C.M.J.; Loon, L.C. van

    1999-01-01

    Salicylic acid is an important signalling molecule involved in both locally and systemically induced disease resistance responses. Recent advances in our understanding of plant defence signalling have revealed that plants employ a network of signal transduction pathways, some of which are

  14. Downstream Processing of Synechocystis for Biofuel Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jie

    Lipids and free fatty acids (FFA) from cyanobacterium Synechocystis can be used for biofuel (e.g. biodiesel or renewable diesel) production. In order to utilize and scale up this technique, downstream processes including culturing and harvest, cell disruption, and extraction were studied. Several solvents/solvent systems were screened for lipid extraction from Synechocystis. Chloroform + methanol-based Folch and Bligh & Dyer methods were proved to be "gold standard" for small-scale analysis due to their highest lipid recoveries that were confirmed by their penetration of the cell membranes, higher polarity, and stronger interaction with hydrogen bonds. Less toxic solvents, such as methanol and MTBE, or direct transesterification of biomass (without preextraction step) gave only slightly lower lipid-extraction yields and can be considered for large-scale application. Sustained exposure to high and low temperature extremes severely lowered the biomass and lipid productivity. Temperature stress also triggered changes of lipid quality such as the degree of unsaturation; thus, it affected the productivities and quality of Synechocystis-derived biofuel. Pulsed electric field (PEF) was evaluated for cell disruption prior to lipid extraction. A treatment intensity > 35 kWh/m3 caused significant damage to the plasma membrane, cell wall, and thylakoid membrane, and it even led to complete disruption of some cells into fragments. Treatment by PEF enhanced the potential for the low-toxicity solvent isopropanol to access lipid molecules during subsequent solvent extraction, leading to lower usage of isopropanol for the same extraction efficiency. Other cell-disruption methods also were tested. Distinct disruption effects to the cell envelope, plasma membrane, and thylakoid membranes were observed that were related to extraction efficiency. Microwave and ultrasound had significant enhancement of lipid extraction. Autoclaving, ultrasound, and French press caused significant

  15. Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Ubiquitination and De-Ubiquitination in Signal Transduction and Receptor Trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Critchley

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs are membrane-based sensors that enable rapid communication between cells and their environment. Evidence is now emerging that interdependent regulatory mechanisms, such as membrane trafficking, ubiquitination, proteolysis and gene expression, have substantial effects on RTK signal transduction and cellular responses. Different RTKs exhibit both basal and ligand-stimulated ubiquitination, linked to trafficking through different intracellular compartments including the secretory pathway, plasma membrane, endosomes and lysosomes. The ubiquitin ligase superfamily comprising the E1, E2 and E3 enzymes are increasingly implicated in this post-translational modification by adding mono- and polyubiquitin tags to RTKs. Conversely, removal of these ubiquitin tags by proteases called de-ubiquitinases (DUBs enables RTK recycling for another round of ligand sensing and signal transduction. The endocytosis of basal and activated RTKs from the plasma membrane is closely linked to controlled proteolysis after trafficking and delivery to late endosomes and lysosomes. Proteolytic RTK fragments can also have the capacity to move to compartments such as the nucleus and regulate gene expression. Such mechanistic diversity now provides new opportunities for modulating RTK-regulated cellular responses in health and disease states.

  16. Grouper (Epinephelus coioides) MyD88 and Tollip: intracellular localization and signal transduction function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Wei; Wang, Zheng; Mo, Ze-Quan; Li, Xia; Luo, Xiao-Chun; Dan, Xue-Ming; Li, An-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and Toll-interacting protein (Tollip) are two important regulatory proteins of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways. In this paper, a Tollip sequence of grouper (Epinephelus coioides) was identified and the signal transduction functions of Tollip and MyD88 were studied. The full length of E. coioides Tollip (EcTollip) cDNA with an open reading frame (ORF) of 1734 nucleotides encoded a putative protein of 274 amino acid residues. The EcTollip protein had conservative domains with mammalian homologous proteins, and high identity (78%-95%) with other vertebrates. MyD88 and Tollip were distributed in the HeLa cytoplasm in a highly condensed form. Over-expression of MyD88 could activate nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and its function was dependent on the death domain and ID domain on the N-terminal. Some important functional sites of mammalian MyD88 also affected fish MyD88 signal transduction. Tollip impaired NF-κB signals activated by MyD88, and its activity was dependent on the coupling of ubiquitin to the endoplasmic reticulum degradation (CUE) domain on the C-terminal. These results suggest that MyD88 and Tollip of fish and mammals are conservative on function during evolution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Ubiquitination and De-Ubiquitination in Signal Transduction and Receptor Trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchley, William R.; Pellet-Many, Caroline; Ringham-Terry, Benjamin; Zachary, Ian C.; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2018-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are membrane-based sensors that enable rapid communication between cells and their environment. Evidence is now emerging that interdependent regulatory mechanisms, such as membrane trafficking, ubiquitination, proteolysis and gene expression, have substantial effects on RTK signal transduction and cellular responses. Different RTKs exhibit both basal and ligand-stimulated ubiquitination, linked to trafficking through different intracellular compartments including the secretory pathway, plasma membrane, endosomes and lysosomes. The ubiquitin ligase superfamily comprising the E1, E2 and E3 enzymes are increasingly implicated in this post-translational modification by adding mono- and polyubiquitin tags to RTKs. Conversely, removal of these ubiquitin tags by proteases called de-ubiquitinases (DUBs) enables RTK recycling for another round of ligand sensing and signal transduction. The endocytosis of basal and activated RTKs from the plasma membrane is closely linked to controlled proteolysis after trafficking and delivery to late endosomes and lysosomes. Proteolytic RTK fragments can also have the capacity to move to compartments such as the nucleus and regulate gene expression. Such mechanistic diversity now provides new opportunities for modulating RTK-regulated cellular responses in health and disease states. PMID:29543760

  18. Dynamic receptor team formation can explain the high signal transduction gain in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Réka; Chiu, Yu-Wen; Othmer, Hans G

    2004-05-01

    Evolution has provided many organisms with sophisticated sensory systems that enable them to respond to signals in their environment. The response frequently involves alteration in the pattern of movement, either by directed movement, a process called taxis, or by altering the speed or frequency of turning, which is called kinesis. Chemokinesis has been most thoroughly studied in the peritrichous bacterium Escherichia coli, which has four helical flagella distributed over the cell surface, and swims by rotating them. When rotated counterclockwise the flagella coalesce into a propulsive bundle, producing a relatively straight "run," and when rotated clockwise they fly apart, resulting in a "tumble" which reorients the cell with little translocation. A stochastic process generates the runs and tumbles, and in a chemoeffector gradient, runs that carry the cell in a favorable direction are extended. The cell senses spatial gradients as temporal changes in receptor occupancy and changes the probability of counterclockwise rotation (the bias) on a fast timescale, but adaptation returns the bias to baseline on a slow timescale, enabling the cell to detect and respond to further concentration changes. The overall structure of the signal transduction pathways is well characterized in E. coli, but important details are still not understood. Only recently has a source of gain in the signal transduction network been identified experimentally, and here we present a mathematical model based on dynamic assembly of receptor teams that can explain this observation.

  19. The taste transduction channel TRPM5 is a locus for bitter-sweet taste interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talavera, Karel; Yasumatsu, Keiko; Yoshida, Ryusuke; Margolskee, Robert F; Voets, Thomas; Ninomiya, Yuzo; Nilius, Bernd

    2008-05-01

    Ordinary gustatory experiences, which are usually evoked by taste mixtures, are determined by multiple interactions between different taste stimuli. The most studied model for these gustatory interactions is the suppression of the responses to sweeteners by the prototype bitter compound quinine. Here we report that TRPM5, a cation channel involved in sweet taste transduction, is inhibited by quinine (EC(50)=50 microM at -50 mV) owing to a decrease in the maximal whole-cell TRPM5 conductance and an acceleration of channel closure. Notably, quinine inhibits the gustatory responses of sweet-sensitive gustatory nerves in wild-type (EC(50)= approximately 1.6 mM) but not in Trpm5 knockout mice. Quinine induces a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of TRPM5-dependent responses of single sweet-sensitive fibers to sucrose, according to the restricted diffusion of the drug into the taste tissue. Quinidine, the stereoisomer of quinine, has similar effects on TRPM5 currents and on sweet-induced gustatory responses. In contrast, the chemically unrelated bitter compound denatonium benzoate has an approximately 100-fold weaker effect on TRPM5 currents and, accordingly, at 10 mM it does not alter gustatory responses to sucrose. The inhibition of TRPM5 by bitter compounds constitutes the molecular basis of a novel mechanism of taste interactions, whereby the bitter tastant inhibits directly the sweet transduction pathway.

  20. Cell biology symposium: Membrane trafficking and signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    In general, membrane trafficking is a broad group of processes where proteins and other large molecules are distributed throughout the cell as well as adjacent extracellular spaces. Whereas signal transduction is a process where signals are transmitted through a series of chemical or molecular event...

  1. A new dynamic electrochemical transduction mechanism for interdigitated array microelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoshan; Choi, Jin-Woo; Ahn, Chong H

    2004-12-01

    A dynamic electrochemical transduction mechanism for interdigitated array microelectrodes using an electrical charge pumping method is presented in this paper. In this dynamic transduction mechanism, a charged external capacitor is used as the charge supplier for the electrochemical reaction of the reversible redox species at the interdigitated array electrodes. The charges stored in the capacitor are consumed as the electrochemical reaction current, which causes the capacitor potential decay. The theoretical analysis has shown that the species concentration has a decisive effect on the capacitor potential decay, and therefore the characteristics of the capacitor potential decay are recorded and analyzed to evaluate the concentration of redox species. The new transduction mechanism has the advantages of achieving high sensitivity with small sensor area and simplifying the measurement instrumentation. As a demonstration device, interdigitated array microelectrodes (approximately 0.2 mm(2) electrode surface area) have been fabricated and successfully characterized using p-aminophenol as the redox species under this dynamic mechanism. The detection limit of p-aminophenol was calculated to be approximately 4 x 10(-7) M for the sensor with the new dynamic transduction mechanism.

  2. Protein phosphorylation and its role in archaeal signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Dominik; Hoffmann, Lena; Pham, Trong Khoa; Bräsen, Christopher; Qiu, Wen; Wright, Phillip C.; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Siebers, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the main mechanism of signal transduction that enables cells to rapidly respond to environmental changes by controlling the functional properties of proteins in response to external stimuli. However, whereas signal transduction is well studied in Eukaryotes and Bacteria, the knowledge in Archaea is still rather scarce. Archaea are special with regard to protein phosphorylation, due to the fact that the two best studied phyla, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeaota, seem to exhibit fundamental differences in regulatory systems. Euryarchaeota (e.g. halophiles, methanogens, thermophiles), like Bacteria and Eukaryotes, rely on bacterial-type two-component signal transduction systems (phosphorylation on His and Asp), as well as on the protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr and Tyr by Hanks-type protein kinases. Instead, Crenarchaeota (e.g. acidophiles and (hyper)thermophiles) only depend on Hanks-type protein phosphorylation. In this review, the current knowledge of reversible protein phosphorylation in Archaea is presented. It combines results from identified phosphoproteins, biochemical characterization of protein kinases and protein phosphatases as well as target enzymes and first insights into archaeal signal transduction by biochemical, genetic and polyomic studies. PMID:27476079

  3. Diffusion wave and signal transduction in biological live cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Tian You; Fan, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Transduction of mechanical stimuli into biochemical signals is a fundamental subject for cell physics. In the experiments of FRET signal in cells a wave propagation in nanoscope was observed. We here develop a diffusion wave concept and try to give an explanation to the experimental observation. The theoretical prediction is in good agreement to result of the experiment.

  4. Exploring signal transduction networks using mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, L.A.T.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics can be used to answer a diversity of biological questions. In this thesis, we describe the application of several MS-based proteomics approaches to get insight into several aspects of signal transduction. In Chapter 2, quantitative global phosphoproteomics are

  5. Mitogen-activated protein kinase and abscisic acid signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heimovaara-Dijkstra, S.; Testerink, C.; Wang, M.

    1998-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) is a classical plant hormone, responsible for regulation of abscission, diverse aspects of plant and seed development, stress responses and germination. It was found that ABA signal transduction in plants can involve the activity of type 2C-phosphatases (PP2C),

  6. Signal transduction by the major histocompatibility complex class I molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Skov, S; Bregenholt, S

    1999-01-01

    Ligation of cell surface major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) proteins by antibodies, or by their native counter receptor, the CD8 molecule, mediates transduction of signals into the cells. MHC-I-mediated signaling can lead to both increased and decreased activity of the MHC-I-expressing cell...

  7. Downstream fish passage on Black River system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downstream fish passage of juvenile alewife at the Black River hydroelectric system has traditionally been directed by a major screen assembly to a route avoiding altogether four out of five small hydroelectric power plants. This system includes retention of larvae/juveniles in a lake until mid July, diversion of fish via a major screen assembly and by-passing of a station using a fish ladder. However, difficulties with the arrangement have resulted in increasing numbers of fish passing by all five stations. A second option which reduces labour and maintenance activities and promotes increased growth of fish as they pass from reservoir to reservoir involves use of simple fishways coupled with fish pulsers to deflect fish from the station intakes. The fish pulsers use 100 Hz frequency at 20 pulses per minute placed directly in front of the station intake at a depth of 3 m. Both strategies have contributed to increased fish production and migration such that the present run is 5 million to 8 million fish. 4 refs., 4 figs

  8. Microbial production of scleroglucan and downstream processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Alejandra Castillo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic petroleum-based polymers and natural plant polymers have the disadvantage of restricted sources, in addition to the non-biodegradability of the former ones. In contrast, eco-sustainable microbial polysaccharides, of low-cost and standardized production, represent an alternative to address this situation. With a strong global market, they attracted worldwide attention because of their novel and unique physico-chemical properties as well as varied industrial applications, and many of them are promptly becoming economically competitive. Scleroglucan, a beta-1,3-beta-1,6-glucan secreted by Sclerotium fungi, exhibits high potential for commercialization and may show different branching frequency, side-chain length and/or molecular weight depending on the producing strain or culture conditions. Water-solubility, viscosifying ability and wide stability over temperature, pH and salinity make scleroglucan useful for different biotechnological (enhanced oil recovery, food additives, drug delivery, cosmetic and pharmaceutical products, biocompatible materials, etc., and biomedical (immunoceutical, antitumor, etc. applications. It can be copiously produced at bioreactor scale under standardized conditions, where a high EPS concentration normally governs the process optimization. Operative and nutritional conditions, as well as the incidence of scleroglucan downstream processing will be discussed in this chapter. The relevance of using standardized inocula from selected strains and experiences concerning the intricate scleroglucan scaling-up will be also herein outlined.

  9. Schnurri-3 regulates ERK downstream of WNT signaling in osteoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jae-Hyuck; Greenblatt, Matthew B.; Zou, Weiguo; Huang, Zhiwei; Wein, Marc N.; Brady, Nicholas; Hu, Dorothy; Charron, Jean; Brodkin, Heather R.; Petsko, Gregory A.; Zaller, Dennis; Zhai, Bo; Gygi, Steven; Glimcher, Laurie H.; Jones, Dallas C.

    2013-01-01

    Mice deficient in Schnurri-3 (SHN3; also known as HIVEP3) display increased bone formation, but harnessing this observation for therapeutic benefit requires an improved understanding of how SHN3 functions in osteoblasts. Here we identified SHN3 as a dampener of ERK activity that functions in part downstream of WNT signaling in osteoblasts. A D-domain motif within SHN3 mediated the interaction with and inhibition of ERK activity and osteoblast differentiation, and knockin of a mutation in Shn3 that abolishes this interaction resulted in aberrant ERK activation and consequent osteoblast hyperactivity in vivo. Additionally, in vivo genetic interaction studies demonstrated that crossing to Lrp5–/– mice partially rescued the osteosclerotic phenotype of Shn3–/– mice; mechanistically, this corresponded to the ability of SHN3 to inhibit ERK-mediated suppression of GSK3β. Inducible knockdown of Shn3 in adult mice resulted in a high–bone mass phenotype, providing evidence that transient blockade of these pathways in adults holds promise as a therapy for osteoporosis. PMID:23945236

  10. Gellan Gum: Fermentative Production, Downstream Processing and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishwar B. Bajaj

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The microbial exopolysaccharides are water-soluble polymers secreted by microorganisms during fermentation. The biopolymer gellan gum is a relatively recent addition to the family of microbial polysaccharides that is gaining much importance in food, pharmaceutical and chemical industries due to its novel properties. It is commercially produced by C. P. Kelco in Japan and the USA. Further research and development in biopolymer technology is expected to expand its use. This article presents a critical review of the available information on the gellan gum synthesized by Sphingomonas paucimobilis with special emphasis on its fermentative production and downstream processing. Rheological behaviour of fermentation broth during fermentative production of gellan gum and problems associated with mass transfer have been addressed. Information on the biosynthetic pathway of gellan gum, enzymes and precursors involved in gellan gum production and application of metabolic engineering for enhancement of yield of gellan gum has been specified. Characteristics of gellan gum with respect to its structure, physicochemical properties, rheology of its solutions and gel formation behaviour are discussed. An attempt has also been made to review the current and potential applications of gellan gum in food, pharmaceutical and other industries.

  11. MiR-200c increases the radiosensitivity of non-small-cell lung cancer cell line A549 by targeting VEGF-VEGFR2 pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangliang Shi

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been demonstrated to participate in many important cellular processes including radiosensitization. VEGF family, an important regulator of angiogenesis, also plays a crucial role in the regulation of cancer cell radiosensitivity. VEGFR2 mediates the major growth and permeability actions of VEGF in a paracrine/autocrine manner. MiR-200c, at the nexus of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, is predicted to target VEGFR2. The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that regulation of VEGFR2 pathway by miR-200c could modulate the radiosensitivity of cancer cells. Bioinformatic analysis, luciferase reporter assays and biochemical assays were carried out to validate VEGFR2 as a direct target of miR-200c. The radiosensitizing effects of miR-200c on A549 cells were determined by clonogenic assays. The downstream regulating mechanism of miR-200c was explored with western blotting assays, FCM, tube formation assays and migration assays. We identified VEGFR2 as a novel target of miR-200c. The ectopic miR-200c increased the radiosensitivity of A549 while miR-200c down-regulation decreased it. Besides, we proved that miR-200c radiosensitized A549 cells by targeting VEGF-VEGFR2 pathway specifically, thus leading to inhibition of its downstream pro-survival signaling transduction and angiogenesis, and serves as a potential target for radiosensitizition research.

  12. Linker for activation of T cells is displaced from lipid rafts and decreases in lupus T cells after activation via the TCR/CD3 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoel, Nursamaa; Brun, Susana; Bracho, Carmen; Rodríguez, Martín A; Blasini, Ana M

    2012-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by abnormal signal transduction mechanisms in T lymphocytes. Linker for activation of T cells (LAT) couples TCR/CD3 activation with downstream signaling pathways. We reported diminished ERK 1/2 kinase activity in TCR/CD3 stimulated lupus T cells. In this study we evaluated the expression, phosphorylation, lipid raft and immunological synapse (IS) localization and colocalization of LAT with key signalosome molecules. We observed a diminished expression and an abnormal localization of LAT in lipid rafts and at the IS in activated lupus T cells. LAT phosphorylation, capture by GST-Grb2 fusion protein, and coupling to Grb2 and PLCγ1, was similar in healthy control and lupus T cells. Our results suggest that an abnormal localization of LAT within lipid rafts and its accelerated degradation after TCR/CD3 activation may compromise the assembly of the LAT signalosome and downstream signaling pathways required for full MAPK activation in lupus T cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Defining a Novel Role for the Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor in Human Adenovirus Serotype 5 TransductionIn Vitroin the Presence of Mouse Serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Gordo, Estrella; Doszpoly, Andor; Duffy, Margaret R; Coughlan, Lynda; Bradshaw, Angela C; White, Katie M; Denby, Laura; Nicklin, Stuart A; Baker, Andrew H

    2017-06-15

    Human adenoviral serotype 5 (HAdV-5) vectors have predominantly hepatic tropism when delivered intravascularly, resulting in immune activation and toxicity. Coagulation factor X (FX) binding to HAdV-5 mediates liver transduction and provides protection from virion neutralization in mice. FX is dispensable for liver transduction in mice lacking IgM antibodies or complement, suggesting that alternative transduction pathways exist. To identify novel factor(s) mediating HAdV-5 FX-independent entry, we investigated HAdV-5 transduction in vitro in the presence of serum from immunocompetent C57BL/6 or immunocompromised mice lacking IgM antibodies (Rag 2 -/- and NOD-scid-gamma [NSG]). Sera from all three mouse strains enhanced HAdV-5 transduction of A549 cells. While inhibition of HAdV-5-FX interaction with FX-binding protein (X-bp) inhibited transduction in the presence of C57BL/6 serum, it had negligible effect on the enhanced transduction observed in the presence of Rag 2 -/- or NSG serum. Rag 2 -/- serum also enhanced transduction of the FX binding-deficient HAdV-5HVR5*HVR7*E451Q (AdT*). Interestingly, Rag 2 -/- serum enhanced HAdV-5 transduction in a FX-independent manner in CHO-CAR and SKOV3-CAR cells (CHO or SKOV3 cells transfected to stably express human coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor [CAR]). Additionally, blockade of CAR with soluble HAdV-5 fiber knob inhibited mouse serum-enhanced transduction in A549 cells, suggesting a potential role for CAR. Transduction of HAdV-5 KO1 and HAdV-5/F35 (CAR binding deficient) in the presence of Rag 2 -/- serum was equivalent to that of HAdV-5, indicating that direct interaction between HAdV-5 and CAR is not required. These data suggest that FX may protect HAdV-5 from neutralization but has minimal contribution to HAdV-5 transduction in the presence of immunocompromised mouse serum. Alternatively, transduction occurs via an unidentified mouse serum protein capable of bridging HAdV-5 to CAR. IMPORTANCE The intravascular

  14. Differential effects of bitter compounds on the taste transduction channels TRPM5 and IP3 receptor type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gees, Maarten; Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Luyten, Tomas; Parys, Jan B; Nilius, Bernd; Bultynck, Geert; Voets, Thomas; Talavera, Karel

    2014-05-01

    Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M member 5 (TRPM5) is a Ca(2+)-activated nonselective cation channel involved in the transduction of sweet, bitter, and umami tastes. We previously showed that TRPM5 is a locus for the modulation of taste perception by temperature changes, and by quinine and quinidine, 2 bitter compounds that suppress gustatory responses. Here, we determined whether other bitter compounds known to modulate taste perception also affect TRPM5. We found that nicotine inhibits TRPM5 currents with an effective inhibitory concentration of ~1.3mM at -50 mV. This effect may contribute to the inhibitory effect of nicotine on gustatory responses in therapeutic and experimental settings, where nicotine is often employed at millimolar concentrations. In addition, it implies the existence of a TRPM5-independent pathway for the detection of nicotine bitterness. Nicotine seems to act from the extracellular side of the channel, reducing the maximal whole-cell conductance and inducing an acceleration of channel closure that leads to a negative shift of the activation curve. TRPM5 currents were unaffected by nicotine's metabolite cotinine, the intensive sweetener saccharin or by the bitter xanthines caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline. We also tested the effects of bitter compounds on another essential element of the sweet taste transduction pathway, the type 3 IP3 receptor (IP3R3). We found that IP3R3-mediated Ca(2+) flux is slightly enhanced by nicotine, not affected by saccharin, modestly inhibited by caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline, and strongly inhibited by quinine. Our results demonstrate that bitter compounds have differential effects on key elements of the sweet taste transduction pathway, suggesting for heterogeneous mechanisms of bitter-sweet taste interactions.

  15. Identifying Drug Effects via Pathway Alterations using an Integer Linear Programming Optimization Formulation on Phosphoproteomic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsos, Alexander; Melas, Ioannis N.; Siminelakis, Paraskeuas; Chairakaki, Aikaterini D.; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Alexopoulos, Leonidas G.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of cell function and drug action is a major endeavor in the pharmaceutical industry. Drug effects are governed by the intrinsic properties of the drug (i.e., selectivity and potency) and the specific signaling transduction network of the host (i.e., normal vs. diseased cells). Here, we describe an unbiased, phosphoproteomic-based approach to identify drug effects by monitoring drug-induced topology alterations. With our proposed method, drug effects are investigated under diverse stimulations of the signaling network. Starting with a generic pathway made of logical gates, we build a cell-type specific map by constraining it to fit 13 key phopshoprotein signals under 55 experimental conditions. Fitting is performed via an Integer Linear Program (ILP) formulation and solution by standard ILP solvers; a procedure that drastically outperforms previous fitting schemes. Then, knowing the cell's topology, we monitor the same key phosphoprotein signals under the presence of drug and we re-optimize the specific map to reveal drug-induced topology alterations. To prove our case, we make a topology for the hepatocytic cell-line HepG2 and we evaluate the effects of 4 drugs: 3 selective inhibitors for the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and a non-selective drug. We confirm effects easily predictable from the drugs' main target (i.e., EGFR inhibitors blocks the EGFR pathway) but we also uncover unanticipated effects due to either drug promiscuity or the cell's specific topology. An interesting finding is that the selective EGFR inhibitor Gefitinib inhibits signaling downstream the Interleukin-1alpha (IL1α) pathway; an effect that cannot be extracted from binding affinity-based approaches. Our method represents an unbiased approach to identify drug effects on small to medium size pathways which is scalable to larger topologies with any type of signaling interventions (small molecules, RNAi, etc). The method can reveal drug effects on pathways

  16. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis identifies activation of the RET and IGF-1R/IR signaling pathways in neuroblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley D DeNardo

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma is an embryonal tumor of childhood with a heterogenous clinical presentation that reflects differences in activation of complex biological signaling pathways. Protein phosphorylation is a key component of cellular signal transduction and plays a critical role in processes that control cancer cell growth and survival. We used shotgun LC/MS to compare phosphorylation between a human MYCN amplified neuroblastoma cell line (NB10, modeling a resistant tumor, and a human neural precursor cell line (NPC, modeling a normal baseline neural crest cell. 2181 unique phosphorylation sites representing 1171 proteins and 2598 phosphopeptides were found. Protein kinases accounted for 6% of the proteome, with a predominance of tyrosine kinases, supporting their prominent role in oncogenic signaling pathways. Highly abundant receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK phosphopeptides in the NB10 cell line relative to the NPC cell line included RET, insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor/insulin receptor (IGF-1R/IR, and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1. Multiple phosphorylated peptides from downstream mediators of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR and RAS pathways were also highly abundant in NB10 relative to NPC. Our analysis highlights the importance of RET, IGF-1R/IR and FGFR1 as RTKs in neuroblastoma and suggests a methodology that can be used to identify potential novel biological therapeutic targets. Furthermore, application of this previously unexploited technology in the clinic opens the possibility of providing a new wide-scale molecular signature to assess disease progression and prognosis.

  17. Mechanisms of hypoxic signal transduction regulated by reactive nitrogen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumbayev, V V; Yasinska, I M

    2007-05-01

    Recent reports devoted to the field of oxygen sensing outline that signalling molecules such as nitric oxide/nitric oxide derived species as well as cytokines and other inflammatory mediators participate in hypoxic signal transduction. In the present review, we summarize the current knowledge about the role of nitric oxide and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) derived from it in hypoxic signal transduction and particularly in accumulation/de-accumulation of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1alpha) protein, which is critical not only for cellular adaptation to low oxygen availability but also for generation of inflammatory and innate immune responses. After brief description of nitric oxide and other RNS as multifunctional messengers we analyse and discuss the RNS-dependent accumulation of HIF-1alpha protein under normoxia followed by discussion of the mechanisms of nitric oxide (NO)-dependent enzyme-regulated degradation of HIF-1alpha protein under low oxygen availability.

  18. Molecular methods for the study of signal transduction in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Helen R; Gehring, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Novel and improved analytical methods have led to a rapid increase in our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying plant signal transduction. Progress has been made both at the level of single-component analysis and in vivo imaging as well as at the systems level where transcriptomics and particularly phosphoproteomics afford a window into complex biological responses. Here we review the role of the cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP in plant signal transduction as well as the discovery and biochemical and biological characterization of an increasing number of complex multi-domain nucleotide cyclases that catalyze the synthesis of cAMP and cGMP from ATP and GTP, respectively.

  19. Transductive Regression for Data With Latent Dependence Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gornitz, Nico; Lima, Luiz Alberto; Varella, Luiz Eduardo; Muller, Klaus-Robert; Nakajima, Shinichi

    2017-05-18

    Analyzing data with latent spatial and/or temporal structure is a challenge for machine learning. In this paper, we propose a novel nonlinear model for studying data with latent dependence structure. It successfully combines the concepts of Markov random fields, transductive learning, and regression, making heavy use of the notion of joint feature maps. Our transductive conditional random field regression model is able to infer the latent states by combining limited labeled data of high precision with unlabeled data containing measurement uncertainty. In this manner, we can propagate accurate information and greatly reduce uncertainty. We demonstrate the usefulness of our novel framework on generated time series data with the known temporal structure and successfully validate it on synthetic as well as real-world offshore data with the spatial structure from the oil industry to predict rock porosities from acoustic impedance data.

  20. Molecular methods for the study of signal transduction in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Irving, Helen R.

    2013-09-03

    Novel and improved analytical methods have led to a rapid increase in our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying plant signal transduction. Progress has been made both at the level of single-component analysis and in vivo imaging as well as at the systems level where transcriptomics and particularly phosphoproteomics afford a window into complex biological responses. Here we review the role of the cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP in plant signal transduction as well as the discovery and biochemical and biological characterization of an increasing number of complex multi-domain nucleotide cyclases that catalyze the synthesis of cAMP and cGMP from ATP and GTP, respectively. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  1. Efficiency of Free Energy Transduction in Autonomous Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Kawaguchi, Kyogo; Sano, Masaki

    2011-01-01

    We consider the thermodynamics of chemical coupling from the viewpoint of free energy transduction efficiency. In contrast to an external parameter-driven stochastic energetics setup, the dynamic change of the equilibrium distribution induced by chemical coupling, adopted, for example, in biological systems, is inevitably an autonomous process. We found that the efficiency is bounded by the ratio between the non-symmetric and the symmetrized Kullback-Leibler distance, which is significantly l...

  2. Tuning piezoresistive transduction in nanomechanical resonators by geometrical asymmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llobet, J.; Sansa, M.; Lorenzoni, M.; Pérez-Murano, F., E-mail: francesc.perez@csic.es [Institut de Microelectrònica de Barcelona (IMB-CNM CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Borrisé, X. [Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia (ICN2), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra Spain (Spain); San Paulo, A. [Instituto de Microelectrónica de Madrid (IMM-CSIC), 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-08-17

    The effect of geometrical asymmetries on the piezoresistive transduction in suspended double clamped beam nanomechanical resonators is investigated. Tapered silicon nano-beams, fabricated using a fast and flexible prototyping method, are employed to determine how the asymmetry affects the transduced piezoresistive signal for different mechanical resonant modes. This effect is attributed to the modulation of the strain in pre-strained double clamped beams, and it is confirmed by means of finite element simulations.

  3. Signal Transduction in Histidine Kinases: Insights from New Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Bhate, Manasi P.; Molnar, Kathleen S.; Goulian, Mark; DeGrado, William F.

    2015-01-01

    Histidine kinases (HKs) are major players in bacterial signaling. There has been an explosion of new HK crystal structures in the last five years. We globally analyze the structures of HKs to yield insights into the mechanisms by which signals are transmitted to and across protein structures in this family. We interpret known enzymological data in the context of new structural data to show how asymmetry across the dimer interface is a key feature of signal transduction in HKs, and discuss how...

  4. Piezotransistive transduction of femtoscale displacement for photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Abdul; Faheem Khan, M.; Lee, Dongkyu; Kim, Seonghwan; Thundat, Thomas; Koley, Goutam

    2015-08-01

    Measurement of femtoscale displacements in the ultrasonic frequency range is attractive for advanced material characterization and sensing, yet major challenges remain in their reliable transduction using non-optical modalities, which can dramatically reduce the size and complexity of the transducer assembly. Here we demonstrate femtoscale displacement transduction using an AlGaN/GaN heterojunction field effect transistor-integrated GaN microcantilever that utilizes piezoelectric polarization-induced changes in two-dimensional electron gas to transduce displacement with very high sensitivity. The piezotransistor demonstrated an ultra-high gauge factor of 8,700 while consuming an extremely low power of 1.36 nW, and transduced external excitation with a superior noise-limited resolution of 12.43 fm Hz-1/2 and an outstanding responsivity of 170 nV fm-1, which is comparable to the optical transduction limits. These extraordinary characteristics, which enabled unique detection of nanogram quantity of analytes using photoacoustic spectroscopy, can be readily exploited in realizing a multitude of novel sensing paradigms.

  5. Transduction of normal and malignant oral epithelium by particle bombardment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shillitoe, E J; Noonan, S; Hinkle, C C; Marini, F C; Kellman, R M

    1998-01-01

    Although genetic approaches to the treatment and prevention of oral cancer are being developed, there are no suitable methods of transduction of the oral mucosa or early cancers. We therefore tested the technique of particle bombardment for its ability to transduce oral cancer cells in vitro and normal epithelium of the hamster cheek pouch in vivo. A gene gun was used to transfer a plasmid that encoded a marker/suicide fusion gene, beta-galactosidase-thymidine kinase (GAL-TEK), under control of a CMV promoter. For comparison we used the method of lipofection and an adenovirus vector. Particle bombardment transduced up to 13% of cells in culture, resulting in a 24.3% reduction in growth in the presence of ganciclovir. The efficiency of transduction was similar to that of lipofection but was much less than that of the adenovirus vector, which transduced 54% of cells and completely inhibited their growth in the presence of ganciclovir. Transduction of the hamster cheek pouch by particle bombardment produced expression of beta-galactosidase as judged by macroscopic staining, for up to 5 days. However, histological examination showed that the transduced cells were rare and superficial, and that administration of systemic ganciclovir did not lead to any changes in the tissue. Improvements in efficiency are necessary before the gene gun can be used in the management of oral cancer.

  6. Non-Smad pathways in TGF-β signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ying E

    2009-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β utilizes a multitude of intracellular signaling pathways in addition to Smads to regulate a wide array of cellular functions. These non-canonical, non-Smad pathways are activated directly by ligand-occupied receptors to reinforce, attenuate, or otherwise modulate downstream cellular responses. These non-Smad pathways include various branches of MAP kinase pathways, Rho-like GTPase signaling pathways, and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/AKT pathways. This review focu...

  7. Hepatitis C virus E2 protein promotes human hepatoma cell proliferation through the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway via cellular receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Lanjuan; Wang Lu; Ren Hao; Cao Jie; Li Li; Ke Jinshan; Qi Zhongtian

    2005-01-01

    Dysregulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways by various viruses has been shown to be responsible for viral pathogenicity. The molecular mechanism by which hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection caused human liver diseases has been investigated on the basis of abnormal intracellular signal events. Current data are very limited involved in transmembrane signal transduction triggered by HCV E2 protein. Here we explored regulation of the MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) signaling pathway by E2 expressed in Chinese hamster oval cells. In human hepatoma Huh-7 cells, E2 specifically activated the MAPK/ERK pathway including downstream transcription factor ATF-2 and greatly promoted cell proliferation. CD81 and low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) on the cell surface mediated binding of E2 to Huh-7 cells. The MAPK/ERK activation and cell proliferation driven by E2 were suppressed by blockage of CD81 as well as LDLR. Furthermore, pretreatment with an upstream kinase MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 also impaired the MAPK/ERK activation and cell proliferation induced by E2. Our results suggest that the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway triggered by HCV E2 via its receptors maintains survival and growth of target cells

  8. A floating trap for sampling downstream migrant fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl E. McLemore; Fred H. Everest; William R. Humphreys; Mario F. Solazzi

    1989-01-01

    Fishery scientists and managers are interested in obtaining information about downstream movements of fish species for biological and economic reasons. Different types of nets and traps have been used for this purpose with only partial success. The floating, self-cleaning downstream migrant trap described here proved successful for sampling several salmoniform and...

  9. Exploring transduction mechanisms of protein transduction domains (PTDs) in living cells utilizing single-quantum dot tracking (SQT) technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Specific protein domains known as protein transduction domains (PTDs) can permeate cell membranes and deliver proteins or bioactive materials into living cells. Various approaches have been applied for improving their transduction efficacy. It is, therefore, crucial to clarify the entry mechanisms and to identify the rate-limiting steps. Because of technical limitations for imaging PTD behavior on cells with conventional fluorescent-dyes, how PTDs enter the cells has been a topic of much debate. Utilizing quantum dots (QDs), we recently tracked the behavior of PTD that was derived from HIV-1 Tat (TatP) in living cells at the single-molecule level with 7-nm special precision. In this review article, we initially summarize the controversy on TatP entry mechanisms; thereafter, we will focus on our recent findings on single-TatP-QD tracking (SQT), to identify the major sequential steps of intracellular delivery in living cells and to discuss how SQT can easily provide direct information on TatP entry mechanisms. As a primer for SQT study, we also discuss the latest findings on single particle tracking of various molecules on the plasma membrane. Finally, we discuss the problems of QDs and the challenges for the future in utilizing currently available QD probes for SQT. In conclusion, direct identification of the rate-limiting steps of PTD entry with SQT should dramatically improve the methods for enhancing transduction efficiency.

  10. Exploring Transduction Mechanisms of Protein Transduction Domains (PTDs in Living Cells Utilizing Single-Quantum Dot Tracking (SQT Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Suzuki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Specific protein domains known as protein transduction domains (PTDs can permeate cell membranes and deliver proteins or bioactive materials into living cells. Various approaches have been applied for improving their transduction efficacy. It is, therefore, crucial to clarify the entry mechanisms and to identify the rate-limiting steps. Because of technical limitations for imaging PTD behavior on cells with conventional fluorescent-dyes, how PTDs enter the cells has been a topic of much debate. Utilizing quantum dots (QDs, we recently tracked the behavior of PTD that was derived from HIV-1 Tat (TatP in living cells at the single-molecule level with 7-nm special precision. In this review article, we initially summarize the controversy on TatP entry mechanisms; thereafter, we will focus on our recent findings on single-TatP-QD tracking (SQT, to identify the major sequential steps of intracellular delivery in living cells and to discuss how SQT can easily provide direct information on TatP entry mechanisms. As a primer for SQT study, we also discuss the latest findings on single particle tracking of various molecules on the plasma membrane. Finally, we discuss the problems of QDs and the challenges for the future in utilizing currently available QD probes for SQT. In conclusion, direct identification of the rate-limiting steps of PTD entry with SQT should dramatically improve the methods for enhancing transduction efficiency.

  11. Plant gravitropic signal transduction: A network analysis leads to gene discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Sarah

    Gravity plays a fundamental role in plant growth and development. Although a significant body of research has helped define the events of gravity perception, the role of the plant growth regulator auxin, and the mechanisms resulting in the gravity response, the events of signal transduction, those that link the biophysical action of perception to a biochemical signal that results in auxin redistribution, those that regulate the gravitropic effects on plant growth, remain, for the most part, a “black box.” Using a cold affect, dubbed the gravity persistent signal (GPS) response, we developed a mutant screen to specifically identify components of the signal transduction pathway. Cloning of the GPS genes have identified new proteins involved in gravitropic signaling. We have further exploited the GPS response using a multi-faceted approach including gene expression microarrays, proteomics analysis, and bioinformatics analysis and continued mutant analysis to identified additional genes, physiological and biochemical processes. Gene expression data provided the foundation of a regulatory network for gravitropic signaling. Based on these gene expression data and related data sets/information from the literature/repositories, we constructed a gravitropic signaling network for Arabidopsis inflorescence stems. To generate the network, both a dynamic Bayesian network approach and a time-lagged correlation coefficient approach were used. The dynamic Bayesian network added existing information of protein-protein interaction while the time-lagged correlation coefficient allowed incorporation of temporal regulation and thus could incorporate the time-course metric from the data set. Thus the methods complemented each other and provided us with a more comprehensive evaluation of connections. Each method generated a list of possible interactions associated with a statistical significance value. The two networks were then overlaid to generate a more rigorous, intersected

  12. The two-component signal transduction system YvcPQ regulates the bacterial resistance to bacitracin in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shumeng; Li, Xinfeng; Wang, Xun; Li, Zhou; He, Jin

    2016-10-01

    YvcPQ is one of the two-component signal transduction systems that respond to specific stimuli and enable cells to adjust multiple cellular functions. It consists of a histidine kinase YvcQ and a response regulator YvcP. In this study, through searching the consensus sequence recognized by YvcP, we found four YvcP-binding motifs in the promoter regions of genes yvcR (BMB171_C4100), BMB171_C4385, kapD (BMB171_C4525) and BMB171_C4835 in Bacillus thuringiensis BMB171 which is a representative of Bacillus cereus group, and confirmed that these genes are regulated by YvcP. We compared the sequence of yvcPQ and its downstream genes in genus Bacillus, and found two different kinds of yvc locus, one was the yvcPQ-RS in B. subtilis species and the other was the yvcPQ-R-S1S2 in B. cereus group. Furthermore, we found that YvcP activates the transcription of yvcS1S2 (downstream of yvcR) to promote bacterial resistance to bacitracin and deletion of either yvcPQ operon or yvcS1S2 operon renders the bacterial cells more sensitive to bacitracin. This study enriched our understanding of both the YvcPQ's function and the mechanism of bacterial resistance to bacitracin.

  13. Regulation of Early Steps of GPVI Signal Transduction by Phosphatases: A Systems Biology Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne L Dunster

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a data-driven mathematical model of a key initiating step in platelet activation, a central process in the prevention of bleeding following Injury. In vascular disease, this process is activated inappropriately and causes thrombosis, heart attacks and stroke. The collagen receptor GPVI is the primary trigger for platelet activation at sites of injury. Understanding the complex molecular mechanisms initiated by this receptor is important for development of more effective antithrombotic medicines. In this work we developed a series of nonlinear ordinary differential equation models that are direct representations of biological hypotheses surrounding the initial steps in GPVI-stimulated signal transduction. At each stage model simulations were compared to our own quantitative, high-temporal experimental data that guides further experimental design, data collection and model refinement. Much is known about the linear forward reactions within platelet signalling pathways but knowledge of the roles of putative reverse reactions are poorly understood. An initial model, that includes a simple constitutively active phosphatase, was unable to explain experimental data. Model revisions, incorporating a complex pathway of interactions (and specifically the phosphatase TULA-2, provided a good description of the experimental data both based on observations of phosphorylation in samples from one donor and in those of a wider population. Our model was used to investigate the levels of proteins involved in regulating the pathway and the effect of low GPVI levels that have been associated with disease. Results indicate a clear separation in healthy and GPVI deficient states in respect of the signalling cascade dynamics associated with Syk tyrosine phosphorylation and activation. Our approach reveals the central importance of this negative feedback pathway that results in the temporal regulation of a specific class of protein tyrosine phosphatases in

  14. The iPhone Goes Downstream: Mandatory Universal Distribution∗

    OpenAIRE

    Karp, Larry; Perloff, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Apple’s original decision to market iPhones using a single downstream vendor prompted calls for mandatory universal distribution (MUD), whereby all downstream vendors would sell the iPhone under the same contract terms. The upstream monopoly may want either one or more downstream vendors, and, in either case, consumer welfare may be higher with either one or more firms. If the income elasticity of demand for the new good is greater than the income elasticity of the existing generic good, the ...

  15. Studies of the mechanism of mIg-mediated signal transduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggeshall, K.M.

    1985-01-01

    B lymphocytes express surface immunoglobulins (Ig) which act as antigen receptors. Antigen binding by these receptors appears to lead to B cell receptivity to the regulatory signals. Transduction of the surface Ig-derived signal is manifest by B cell depolarization and increased expression of surface I-A antigen. This dissertation describes studies of the biochemical mechanism by which surface Ig occupancy induces these cell biologic changes in B cells. Using [32P]Pi as label to monitor phospholipid metabolism, the authors have observed that crosslinking of B cell surface Ig results in the activation of a common signal transduction pathway called the phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) cycle. The PtdIns cycle, through the generation of the PtdIns metabolite diacyglycerol (DG), has been proposed to be a regulatory mechanism for the enzyme protein kinase C (PK-C). The observation that the PtdIns cycle is activated upon receptor occupancy in B cells suggest that this cycle and subsequent PK-C activation regulates B cell depolarization and increased I-A expression. Although studies indicate that extracellular Ca ++ does not appear to be required for anti-immunoglobulin induced events, they demonstrate that the Ca ++ ionophore is able to induce depolarization and increased I-A antigen. Studies on the role of protein kinase C in surface Ig-mediated signalling indicated that this ability of Ca ++ ionophore as well as that of LPS and PMA is due to cation of PK-C. These results support the notion that occupancy of antigen receptors on B cells is linked to subsequent biologic responses by the PtdIns cycle and protein kinase C activation

  16. Salinity stress induces the production of 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromones and regulates novel classes of responsive genes involved in signal transduction in Aquilaria sinensis calli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohui; Gao, Bowen; Liu, Xiao; Dong, Xianjuan; Zhang, Zhongxiu; Fan, Huiyan; Zhang, Le; Wang, Juan; Shi, Shepo; Tu, Pengfei

    2016-05-26

    Agarwood, is a resinous portion derived from Aquilaria sinensis, has been widely used in traditional medicine and incense. 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromones are principal components responsible for the quality of agarwood. However, the molecular basis of 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromones biosynthesis and regulation remains almost unknown. Our research indicated that salt stress induced production of several of 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromones in A. sinensis calli. Transcriptome analysis of A. sinensis calli treated with NaCl is required to further facilitate the multiple signal pathways in response to salt stress and to understand the mechanism of 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromones biosynthesis. Forty one 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromones were identified from NaCl-treated A. sinensis calli. 93 041 unigenes with an average length of 1562 nt were generated from the control and salt-treated calli by Illmunina sequencing after assembly, and the unigenes were annotated by comparing with the public databases including NR, Swiss-Prot, KEGG, COG, and GO database. In total, 18 069 differentially expressed transcripts were identified by the transcriptome comparisons on the control calli and calli induced by 24 h or 120 h salinity stress. Numerous genes involved in signal transduction pathways including the genes responsible for hormone signal transduction, receptor-like kinases, MAPK cascades, Ca(2+) signal transduction, and transcription factors showed clear differences between the control calli and NaCl-treated calli. Furthermore, our data suggested that the genes annotated as chalcone synthases and O-methyltransferases may contribute to the biosynthesis of 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromones. Salinity stress could induce the production of 41 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromones in A. sinensis calli. We conducted the first deep-sequencing transcriptome profiling of A. sinensis under salt stress and observed a large number of differentially expressed genes in response to salinity stress. Moreover, salt stress induced

  17. Signal transduction by the major histocompatibility complex class I molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A E; Skov, Svend; Bregenholt, S

    1999-01-01

    Ligation of cell surface major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) proteins by antibodies, or by their native counter receptor, the CD8 molecule, mediates transduction of signals into the cells. MHC-I-mediated signaling can lead to both increased and decreased activity of the MHC-I-expressing cell...... and functioning, MHC-I molecules might be of importance for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis not only within the immune system, but also in the interplay between the immune system and other organ systems....

  18. Myosin individualized: single nucleotide polymorphisms in energy transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieben Eric D

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myosin performs ATP free energy transduction into mechanical work in the motor domain of the myosin heavy chain (MHC. Energy transduction is the definitive systemic feature of the myosin motor performed by coordinating in a time ordered sequence: ATP hydrolysis at the active site, actin affinity modulation at the actin binding site, and the lever-arm rotation of the power stroke. These functions are carried out by several conserved sub-domains within the motor domain. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs affect the MHC sequence of many isoforms expressed in striated muscle, smooth muscle, and non-muscle tissue. The purpose of this work is to provide a rationale for using SNPs as a functional genomics tool to investigate structurefunction relationships in myosin. In particular, to discover SNP distribution over the conserved sub-domains and surmise what it implies about sub-domain stability and criticality in the energy transduction mechanism. Results An automated routine identifying human nonsynonymous SNP amino acid missense substitutions for any MHC gene mined the NCBI SNP data base. The routine tested 22 MHC genes coding muscle and non-muscle isoforms and identified 89 missense mutation positions in the motor domain with 10 already implicated in heart disease and another 8 lacking sequence homology with a skeletal MHC isoform for which a crystallographic model is available. The remaining 71 SNP substitutions were found to be distributed over MHC with 22 falling outside identified functional sub-domains and 49 in or very near to myosin sub-domains assigned specific crucial functions in energy transduction. The latter includes the active site, the actin binding site, the rigid lever-arm, and regions facilitating their communication. Most MHC isoforms contained SNPs somewhere in the motor domain. Conclusions Several functional-crucial sub-domains are infiltrated by a large number of SNP substitution sites suggesting these

  19. A Model for Direction Sensing in Dictyostelium discoideum: Ras Activity and Symmetry Breaking Driven by a Gβγ-Mediated, Gα2-Ric8 -- Dependent Signal Transduction Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yougan; Othmer, Hans

    2016-05-01

    Chemotaxis is a dynamic cellular process, comprised of direction sensing, polarization and locomotion, that leads to the directed movement of eukaryotic cells along extracellular gradients. As a primary step in the response of an individual cell to a spatial stimulus, direction sensing has attracted numerous theoretical treatments aimed at explaining experimental observations in a variety of cell types. Here we propose a new model of direction sensing based on experiments using Dictyostelium discoideum (Dicty). The model is built around a reaction-diffusion-translocation system that involves three main component processes: a signal detection step based on G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) for cyclic AMP (cAMP), a transduction step based on a heterotrimetic G protein Gα2βγ, and an activation step of a monomeric G-protein Ras. The model can predict the experimentally-observed response of cells treated with latrunculin A, which removes feedback from downstream processes, under a variety of stimulus protocols. We show that [Formula: see text] cycling modulated by Ric8, a nonreceptor guanine exchange factor for [Formula: see text] in Dicty, drives multiple phases of Ras activation and leads to direction sensing and signal amplification in cAMP gradients. The model predicts that both [Formula: see text] and Gβγ are essential for direction sensing, in that membrane-localized [Formula: see text], the activated GTP-bearing form of [Formula: see text], leads to asymmetrical recruitment of RasGEF and Ric8, while globally-diffusing Gβγ mediates their activation. We show that the predicted response at the level of Ras activation encodes sufficient 'memory' to eliminate the 'back-of-the wave' problem, and the effects of diffusion and cell shape on direction sensing are also investigated. In contrast with existing LEGI models of chemotaxis, the results do not require a disparity between the diffusion coefficients of the Ras activator GEF and the Ras inhibitor GAP. Since

  20. Targeting Wnt Pathways in Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Zachary F.; Moon, Randall T.

    2012-01-01

    Wnt-mediated signal transduction pathways have long been recognized for their roles in regulating embryonic development, and have more recently been linked to cancer, neurologic diseases, inflammatory diseases, and disorders of endocrine function and bone metabolism in adults. Although therapies targeting Wnt signaling are attractive in theory, in practice it has been difficult to obtain specific therapeutics because many components of Wnt signaling pathways are also involved in other cellular processes, thereby reducing the specificity of candidate therapeutics. New technologies, and advances in understanding the mechanisms of Wnt signaling, have improved our understanding of the nuances of Wnt signaling and are leading to promising new strategies to target Wnt signaling pathways. PMID:23001988

  1. Aberrant Signaling Pathways in Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Mitsutoshi; Kita, Daisuke; Watanabe, Takuya; Hayashi, Yutaka; Teng, Lei; Pyko, Ilya V.; Hamada, Jun-Ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a WHO grade IV malignant glioma, is the most common and lethal primary brain tumor in adults; few treatments are available. Median survival rates range from 12–15 months. The biological characteristics of this tumor are exemplified by prominent proliferation, active invasiveness, and rich angiogenesis. This is mainly due to highly deregulated signaling pathways in the tumor. Studies of these signaling pathways have greatly increased our understanding of the biology and clinical behavior of GBM. An integrated view of signal transduction will provide a more useful approach in designing novel therapies for this devastating disease. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of GBM signaling pathways with a focus on potential molecular targets for anti-signaling molecular therapies

  2. Signal transduction pathways participating in homeostasis and malignant transformation of the intestinal tissue

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krausová, Michaela; Kořínek, Vladimír

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 6 (2012), s. 708-718 ISSN 0028-2685 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/1780; GA ČR GAP305/12/2347; GA ČR GAP304/11/1252; GA ČR GD204/09/H058 Keywords : colorectal cancer * epithelium * gut * intestine * mouse models * stem cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.574, year: 2012

  3. Intersection of interferon and hypoxia signal transduction pathways in nitric oxide-induced tumor apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendler, D S; Bao, C; Wang, T; Huang, E L; Ratovitski, E A; Pardoll, D A; Lowenstein, C J

    2001-05-01

    Activated macrophages play a central role in antitumor immunity. However, the stimuli that activate macrophages to kill tumor cells are not completely understood. Because the center of solid tumors can be hypoxic, we hypothesized that hypoxia may be an important signal in activating macrophages to kill tumor cells. Hypoxia stimulates IFN-primed macrophages to express the inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) and to synthesize nitric oxide (NO). We show that this synergy between IFN and hypoxia is mediated by the direct interaction of the hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and IFN regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1), which are both required for the hypoxic transcription of NOS2. This interaction between HIF-1 and IRF-1 may explain the mechanism by which macrophages infiltrating into tumors are activated to express NOS2 and to produce NO, a mediator of tumor apoptosis.

  4. Developmental evolutionary biology of the vertebrate ear: conserving mechanoelectric transduction and developmental pathways in diverging morphologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsch, B.; Beisel, K. W.; Bermingham, N. A.

    2000-01-01

    This brief overview shows that a start has been made to molecularly dissect vertebrate ear development and its evolutionary conservation to the development of the insect hearing organ. However, neither the patterning process of the ear nor the patterning process of insect sensory organs is sufficiently known at the moment to provide more than a first glimpse. Moreover, hardly anything is known about otocyst development of the cephalopod molluscs, another triploblast lineage that evolved complex 'ears'. We hope that the apparent conserved functional and cellular components present in the ciliated sensory neurons/hair cells will also be found in the genes required for vertebrate ear and insect sensory organ morphogenesis (Fig. 3). Likewise, we expect that homologous pre-patterning genes will soon be identified for the non-sensory cell development, which is more than a blocking of neuronal development through the Delta/Notch signaling system. Generation of the apparently unique ear could thus represent a multiplication of non-sensory cells by asymmetric and symmetric divisions as well as modification of existing patterning process by implementing novel developmental modules. In the final analysis, the vertebrate ear may come about by increasing the level of gene interactions in an already existing and highly conserved interactive cascade of bHLH genes. Since this was apparently achieved in all three lineages of triploblasts independently (Fig. 3), we now need to understand how much of the morphogenetic cascades are equally conserved across phyla to generate complex ears. The existing mutations in humans and mice may be able to point the direction of future research to understand the development of specific cell types and morphologies in the formation of complex arthropod, cephalopod, and vertebrate 'ears'.

  5. Expansion of Signal Transduction Pathways in Fungi by Extensive Genome Duplication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corrochano, Luis M; Kuo, Alan; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Polaino, Silvia; Salamov, Asaf; Villalobos-Escobedo, José M; Grimwood, Jane; Álvarez, M Isabel; Avalos, Javier; Bauer, Diane; Benito, Ernesto P; Benoit, Isabelle; Burger, Gertraud; Camino, Lola P; Cánovas, David; Cerdá-Olmedo, Enrique; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Domínguez, Angel; Eliáš, Marek; Eslava, Arturo P; Glaser, Fabian; Gutiérrez, Gabriel; Heitman, Joseph; Henrissat, Bernard; Iturriaga, Enrique A; Lang, B Franz; Lavín, José L; Lee, Soo Chan; Li, Wenjun; Lindquist, Erika; López-García, Sergio; Luque, Eva M; Marcos, Ana T; Martin, Joel; McCluskey, Kevin; Medina, Humberto R; Miralles-Durán, Alejandro; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Muñoz-Torres, Elisa; Oguiza, José A; Ohm, Robin A; Olmedo, María; Orejas, Margarita; Ortiz-Castellanos, Lucila; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Rodríguez-Romero, Julio; Ruiz-Herrera, José; Ruiz-Vázquez, Rosa; Sanz, Catalina; Schackwitz, Wendy; Shahriari, Mahdi; Shelest, Ekaterina; Silva-Franco, Fátima; Soanes, Darren; Syed, Khajamohiddin; Tagua, Víctor G; Talbot, Nicholas J; Thon, Michael R; Tice, Hope; de Vries, Ronald P; Wiebenga, Ad; Yadav, Jagjit S; Braun, Edward L; Baker, Scott E; Garre, Victoriano; Schmutz, Jeremy; Horwitz, Benjamin A; Torres-Martínez, Santiago; Idnurm, Alexander; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo; Gabaldón, Toni; Grigoriev, Igor V

    2016-01-01

    Plants and fungi use light and other signals to regulate development, growth, and metabolism. The fruiting bodies of the fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus are single cells that react to environmental cues, including light, but the mechanisms are largely unknown [1]. The related fungus Mucor

  6. The hexokinase 2-dependent glucose signal transduction pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Fernando; Herrero, Pilar

    2002-03-01

    Sugars, predominantly glucose, evoke a variety of responses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These responses are elicited through a complex network of regulatory mechanisms that transduce the signal of presence of external glucose to their final intracellular targets. The HXK2 gene, encoding hexokinase 2 (Hxk2), the enzyme that initiates glucose metabolism, is highly expressed during growth in glucose and plays a pivotal role in the control of the expression of numerous genes, including itself. The mechanism of this autocontrol of expression is not completely understood. Hxk2 is found both in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm of S. cerevisiae; the nuclear localization is dependent on the presence of a stretch of amino acids located from lysine-6 to methionine-15. Although serine-14, within this stretch, can be phosphorylated in the absence of glucose, it is still unsettled whether this phosphorylation plays a role in the cellular localization of Hxk2. The elucidation of the mechanism of transport of Hxk2 to and from the nucleus, the influence of the oligomeric state of the protein on the nuclear transport and the fine mechanism of regulation of transcription of HXK2 are among the important unanswered questions in relation with the regulatory role of Hxk2.

  7. Signal transduction pathways in hepatocyte cell death : new targets for therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karimian, Golnar

    2012-01-01

    Cholestatische en steatotische leverziekten hebben een significant aandeel in het totaal van leverziekten. Zowel cholestatische als steatotische leverziekten zijn geassocieerd met hoge morbiditeit en sterftecijfers. Bestaande therapieën zijn of niet erg effectief of zijn geassocieerd met hun eigen

  8. Signal Transduction Pathways Involved in Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli-Induced Alterations in T84 Epithelial Permeability

    OpenAIRE

    Philpott, Dana J.; McKay, Derek M.; Mak, Walter; Perdue, Mary H.; Sherman, Philip M.

    1998-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) infection is associated with watery diarrhea and can lead to complications, including hemorrhagic colitis and the hemolytic-uremic syndrome. The mechanisms by which these organisms produce diarrheal disease remain to be elucidated. Changes in T84 epithelial cell electrophysiology were examined following EHEC infection. T84 cell monolayers infected with EHEC O157:H7 displayed a time-dependent decrease in transepithelial resistance. Increases in the tra...

  9. DMPD: Endotoxin signal transduction in macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available File (.html) CSML File (.csml) Open .csml file with CIOPlayer Open .csml file with CIOPlayer - ※CIO Playerのご利用上の注意 Open .csml file with CIO Open .csml file with CIO - ※CIOのご利用上の注意 ...

  10. Control of Mammary Differentiation by Ras-Dependent Signal Transduction Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    NM_012519.1 calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase I1, delta 5.719155211 0.0004807 NM_009976.1 cystatin C 5.416841983 0.0001758 NM010286.1...Unclassified Unclassified Unlimited NSN 7540-01-280-5500 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 2-89) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 298-102 Table of Contents C over...first pregnancy and lactation have an impact on later development of breast cancer . Mammary epithelial cells undergo periodic cycles of growth

  11. Downstream-based Scheduling for Energy Conservation in Green EPONs

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Shen

    2012-05-01

    Maximizing the optical network unit’s (ONU) sleep time is an effective approach for achieving maximum energy conservation in green Ethernet passive optical networks (EPONs). While overlapping downstream and upstream ONU transmissions can maximize the ONU sleep time, it jeopardizes the quality of service (QoS) performance of the network, especially for downstream traffic in case the overlapping is based on the upstream time slot. In this paper, we study the downstream traffic performance in green EPONs under the limited service discipline and the upstream-based overlapped time window. Specifically, we first derive the expected mean packet delay, and then present a closed-form expression of the ONU sleep time, setting identical upstream/downstream transmission cycle times based on a maximum downstream traffic delay re-quirement. With the proposed system model, we present a novel downstream bandwidth allocation scheme for energy conservation in green EPONs. Simulation results verify the proposed model and highlight the advantages of our scheme over conventional approaches.

  12. Control of Delta Avulsion by Downstream Sediment Sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Gerard; Paola, Chris; Voller, Vaughan R.

    2018-01-01

    Understanding how fluxes are partitioned at delta bifurcations is critical for predicting patterns of land loss and gain in deltas worldwide. Although the dynamics of river deltas are influenced from both upstream and downstream, previous studies of bifurcations have focused on upstream controls. Using a quasi-1-D bifurcation model, we show that flow switching in bifurcations is strongly influenced by downstream sediment sinks. We find that coupling between upstream and downstream feedbacks can lead to oscillations in water and sediment flux partitioning. The frequency and initial rate of growth/decay of the oscillations depend on both upstream and downstream conditions, with dimensionless bifurcate length and bypass fraction emerging as key downstream parameters. With a strong offshore sink, causing bypass in the bifurcate branches, we find that bifurcation dynamics become "frozen"; that is, the bifurcation settles on a permanent discharge ratio. In contrast, under depositional conditions, we identify three dynamical regimes: symmetric; soft avulsion, where both branches remain open but the dominant branch switches; and full avulsion. Finally, we show that differential subsidence alters these regimes, with the difference in average sediment supply to each branch exactly compensating for the difference in accommodation generation. Additionally, the model predicts that bifurcations with shorter branches are less asymmetric than bifurcations with longer branches, all else equal, providing a possible explanation for the difference between backwater length distributaries, which tend to be avulsive, and relatively stable mouth-bar-scale networks. We conclude that bifurcations are sensitive both quantitatively and qualitatively to downstream sinks.

  13. Transport of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) from an arctic glacier to downstream locations: implications for sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Karen Y; Yamazaki, Eriko; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Taniyasu, Sachi; Murphy, Margaret B; Horii, Yuichi; Petrick, Gert; Kallerborn, Roland; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Murano, Kentaro; Lam, Paul K S

    2013-03-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) have been globally detected in various environmental matrices, yet their fate and transport to the Arctic is still unclear, especially for the European Arctic. In this study, concentrations of 17 PFAS were quantified in two ice cores (n=26), surface snow (n=9) and surface water samples (n=14) collected along a spatial gradient in Svalbard, Norway. Concentrations of selected ions (Na(+), SO4(2-), etc.) were also determined for tracing the origins and sources of PFAS. Perfluorobutanoate (PFBA), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorononanoate (PFNA) were the dominant compounds found in ice core samples. Taking PFOA, PFNA and perfluorooctane-sulfonate (PFOS) as examples, higher concentrations were detected in the middle layers of the ice cores representing the period of 1997-2000. Lower concentrations of C8-C12 perfluorocarboxylates (PFCAs) were detected in comparison with concentrations measured previously in an ice core from the Canadian Arctic, indicating that contamination levels in the European Arctic are lower. Average PFAS concentrations were found to be lower in surface snow and melted glacier water samples, while increased concentrations were observed in river water downstream near the coastal area. Perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS) was detected in the downstream locations, but not in the glacier, suggesting existence of local sources of this compound. Long-range atmospheric transport of PFAS was the major deposition pathway for the glaciers, while local sources (e.g., skiing activities) were identified in the downstream locations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Signal transduction by interferon-α through arachidonic acid metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannigan, G.E.; Williams, B.R.G.

    1991-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms that mediate signal transduction by growth inhibitory cytokines are poorly understood. Type 1 (α and β) interferons (IFNs) are potent growth inhibitory cytokines whose biological activities depend on induced changes in gene expression. IFN-α induced the transient activation of phospholipase A 2 in 3T3 fibroblasts and rapid hydrolysis of [ 3 H]arachidonic acid (AA) from prelabeled phospholipid pools. The phospholipase inhibitor, bromophenacyl bromide (BPB), specifically blocked IFN-induced binding of nuclear factors to a conserved, IFN-regulated enhancer element, the interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE). BPB also caused a dose-dependent inhibition of IFN-α-induced ISRE-dependent transcription in transient transfection assays. Specific inhibition of AA oxygenation by eicosatetraynoic acid prevented IFN-α induction of factor binding to the ISRE. Treatment of intact cells with inhibitors of fatty acid cyclooxygenase or lipoxygenase enzymes resulted in amplification of IFN-α-induced ISRE binding and gene expression. Thus, IFN-α receptor-coupled AA hydrolysis may function in activation of latent transcription factors by IFN-α and provides a system for studying the role of AA metabolism in transduction of growth inhibitory signals

  15. Molecular mechanisms of root gravity sensing and signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Allison K; Baldwin, Katherine L; Masson, Patrick H

    2012-01-01

    Plants use gravity as a guide to direct their roots down into the soil to anchor themselves and to find resources needed for growth and development. In higher plants, the columella cells of the root tip form the primary site of gravity sensing, and in these cells the sedimentation of dense, starch-filled plastids (amyloplasts) triggers gravity signal transduction. This generates an auxin gradient across the root cap that is transmitted to the elongation zone where it promotes differential cell elongation, allowing the root to direct itself downward. It is still not well understood how amyloplast sedimentation leads to auxin redistribution. Models have been proposed to explain how mechanosensitive ion channels or ligand-receptor interactions could connect these events. Although their roles are still unclear, possible second messengers in this process include protons, Ca(2+), and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate. Upon gravistimulation, the auxin efflux facilitators PIN3 and PIN7 relocalize to the lower side of the columella cells and mediate auxin redistribution. However, evidence for an auxin-independent secondary mechanism of gravity sensing and signal transduction suggests that this physiological process is quite complex. Furthermore, plants must integrate a variety of environmental cues, resulting in multifaceted relationships between gravitropism and other directional growth responses such as hydro-, photo-, and thigmotropism. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Fetus Sound Stimulation: Cilia Memristor Effect of Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Jankovic-Raznatovic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This experimental study evaluates fetal middle cerebral artery (MCA circulation after the defined prenatal acoustical stimulation (PAS and the role of cilia in hearing and memory and could explain signal transduction and memory according to cilia optical-acoustical properties. Methods. PAS was performed twice on 119 no-risk term pregnancies. We analyzed fetal MCA circulation before, after first and second PAS. Results. Analysis of the Pulsatility index basic (PIB and before PAS and Pulsatility index reactive after the first PAS (PIR 1 shows high statistical difference, representing high influence on the brain circulation. Analysis of PIB and Pulsatility index reactive after the second PAS (PIR 2 shows no statistical difference. Cilia as nanoscale structure possess magnetic flux linkage that depends on the amount of charge that has passed between two-terminal variable resistors of cilia. Microtubule resistance, as a function of the current through and voltage across the structure, leads to appearance of cilia memory with the “memristor” property. Conclusion. Acoustical and optical cilia properties play crucial role in hearing and memory processes. We suggest that fetuses are getting used to sound, developing a kind of memory patterns, considering acoustical and electromagnetically waves and involving cilia and microtubules and try to explain signal transduction.

  17. Rapid Downstream Discharge Attenuation During Recent Icelandic Jokulhlaups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, A. J.; Roberts, M. J.; Tweed, F. S.; Knudsen, O.; Harris, T. D.; Rushmer, E. L.; Marren, P. M.; Carrivick, J. L.

    2002-12-01

    Little attention has been paid to downstream discharge attenuation during glacier outburst floods (jokulhlaups). In non-glacial environments, floods resulting from dam failure exhibit major downstream reduction of peak discharge. Transmission losses within ephemeral rivers are also well-known for generating large reductions in peak discharge. We report on three recent jokulhlaups associated with major downstream discharge attenuation: (1) Solheimajokull July 1999; (2) Kverkjokull January 2002; and (3) Tungnaarjokull July 2002. Peak discharges calculated using slope area techniques showed that the 1999 Solheimahlaup decreased in discharge from 4400 m3s-1 to 1700 m3s-1 over a downstream distance of less than 7 km. The Kverkhlaup was gauged at 400 m3s-1, 40 km downstream of the glacier snout. By contrast, less than 1 km from the glacier snouta peak discharge of 2000 m3s-1 was reconstructed using slope-area techniques. The July 2002 jokulhlaup from Tungnaarjokull had a gauged peak discharge of 600 m3s-1 23 km downstream of the glacier snout. Discharge reconstructed at the glacier snout was ~2-3 times greater than the downstream gauged value. The degree of downstream attenuation of these jokulhlaups reflects a number of factors. The rapidity of rising stage water release. The drainage of warm water during these three jokulhlaups is thought to have resulted in a characteristic sudden, short-lived, rise to peak discharge. In the case of the 1999 Solheimahlaup the hydrograph peak was enhanced by a wave-like burst from a flood-filled ice-dammed lake basin. Flow through high resistance complex bedrock (lava) and braided channels is effective in damping j”kulhlaup peak discharge. Transmission loss into highly permeable substrate materials such as lava flows and alluvium visibly reduce peak discharge under normal flow conditions will also be significant during jokulhlaups which flow through wide reaches. Our study of three recent Icelandic jokulhlaups illustrates the

  18. A novel link between the proteasome pathway and the signal transduction pathway of the Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Richard H

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intracellular signaling events of the Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs involve the R-Smad family members Smad1, Smad5, Smad8 and the Co-Smad, Smad4. Smads are currently considered to be DNA-binding transcriptional modulators and shown to recruit the master transcriptional co-activator CBP/p300 for transcriptional activation. SNIP1 is a recently discovered novel repressor of CBP/p300. Currently, the detailed molecular mechanisms that allow R-Smads and Co-Smad to co-operatively modulate transcription events are not fully understood. Results Here we report a novel physical and functional link between Smad1 and the 26S proteasome that contributes to Smad1- and Smad4-mediated transcriptional regulation. Smad1 forms a complex with a proteasome β subunit HsN3 and the ornithine decarboxylase antizyme (Az. The interaction is enhanced upon BMP type I receptor activation and occur prior to the incorporation of HsN3 into the mature 20S proteasome. Furthermore, BMPs trigger the translocation of Smad1, HsN3 and Az into the nucleus, where the novel CBP/p300 repressor protein SNIP1 is further recruited to Smad1/HsN3/Az complex and degraded in a Smad1-, Smad4- and Az-dependent fashion. The degradation of the CBP/p300 repressor SNIP1 is likely an essential step for Smad1-, Smad4-mediated transcriptional activation, since increased SNIP1 expression inhibits BMP-induced gene responses. Conclusions Our studies thus add two additional important functional partners of Smad1 into the signaling web of BMPs and also suggest a novel mechanism for Smad1 and Smad4 to co-modulate transcription via regulating proteasomal degradation of CBP/p300 repressor SNIP1.

  19. Osteoprotegerin Disruption Attenuates HySu-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension Through Integrin αvβ3/FAK/AKT Pathway Suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Daile; Zhu, Qian; Liu, Huan; Zuo, Caojian; He, Yuhu; Chen, Guilin; Lu, Ankang

    2017-02-01

    Pulmonary arterial remodeling characterized by increased vascular smooth muscle proliferation is commonly seen in life-threatening disease, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Clinical studies have suggested a correlation between osteoprotegerin serum levels and PAH severity. Here, we aimed to invhestigate vascular osteoprotegerin expression and its effects on pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, as well as examine the signal transduction pathways mediating its activity. Serum osteoprotegerin levels were significantly elevated in patients with PAH and correlated with disease severity as determined by the World Health Organization (WHO) functional classifications and 6-minute walking distance tests. Similarly, increased osteoprotegerin expression was observed in the pulmonary arteries of hypoxia plus SU5416- and monocrotaline-induced PAH animal models. Moreover, osteoprotegerin disruption attenuated hypoxia plus SU5416-induced PAH progression by reducing pulmonary vascular remodeling, whereas lentiviral osteoprotegerin reconstitution exacerbated PAH by increasing pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell proliferation. Furthermore, pathway analysis revealed that osteoprotegerin induced pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell proliferation by interacting with integrin α v β 3 to elicit downstream focal adhesion kinase and AKT pathway activation. Osteoprotegerin facilitates PAH pathogenesis by regulating pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell proliferation, suggesting that it may be a potential biomarker and therapeutic target in this disease. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. A G-protein-coupled receptor regulation pathway in cytochrome P450-mediated permethrin-resistance in mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Cao, Chuanwang; Yang, Ting; Zhang, Lee; He, Lin; Xi, Zhiyong; Bian, Guowu; Liu, Nannan

    2015-12-10

    Rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are known to be involved in the GPCR signal transduction system and regulate many essential physiological processes in organisms. This study, for the first time, revealed that knockdown of the rhodopsin-like GPCR gene in resistant mosquitoes resulted in a reduction of mosquitoes' resistance to permethrin, simultaneously reducing the expression of two cAMP-dependent protein kinase A genes (PKAs) and four resistance related cytochrome P450 genes. The function of rhodopsin-like GPCR was further confirmed using transgenic lines of Drosophila melanogaster, in which the tolerance to permethrin and the expression of Drosophila resistance P450 genes were both increased. The roles of GPCR signaling pathway second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and downstream effectors PKAs in resistance were investigated using cAMP production inhibitor Bupivacaine HCl and the RNAi technique. Inhibition of cAMP production led to significant decreases in both the expression of four resistance P450 genes and two PKA genes and mosquito resistance to permethrin. Knockdown of the PKA genes had shown the similar effects on permethrin resistance and P450 gene expression. Taken together, our studies revealed, for the first time, the role of the GPCR/cAMP/PKA-mediated regulatory pathway governing P450 gene expression and P450-mediated resistance in Culex mosquitoes.

  1. A G-protein-coupled receptor regulation pathway in cytochrome P450-mediated permethrin-resistance in mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Cao, Chuanwang; Yang, Ting; Zhang, Lee; He, Lin; Xi, Zhiyong; Bian, Guowu; Liu, Nannan

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are known to be involved in the GPCR signal transduction system and regulate many essential physiological processes in organisms. This study, for the first time, revealed that knockdown of the rhodopsin-like GPCR gene in resistant mosquitoes resulted in a reduction of mosquitoes’ resistance to permethrin, simultaneously reducing the expression of two cAMP-dependent protein kinase A genes (PKAs) and four resistance related cytochrome P450 genes. The function of rhodopsin-like GPCR was further confirmed using transgenic lines of Drosophila melanogaster, in which the tolerance to permethrin and the expression of Drosophila resistance P450 genes were both increased. The roles of GPCR signaling pathway second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and downstream effectors PKAs in resistance were investigated using cAMP production inhibitor Bupivacaine HCl and the RNAi technique. Inhibition of cAMP production led to significant decreases in both the expression of four resistance P450 genes and two PKA genes and mosquito resistance to permethrin. Knockdown of the PKA genes had shown the similar effects on permethrin resistance and P450 gene expression. Taken together, our studies revealed, for the first time, the role of the GPCR/cAMP/PKA-mediated regulatory pathway governing P450 gene expression and P450-mediated resistance in Culex mosquitoes. PMID:26656663

  2. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) involvement in successful growth hormone (GH) signaling in GH transduction defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostopoulou, Eirini; Rojas-Gil, Andrea Paola; Karvela, Alexia; Spiliotis, Bessie E

    2017-02-01

    Growth hormone (GH) transduction defect (GHTD) is a growth disorder with impaired signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation mediated by overexpression of cytokine-inducible SH2-containing protein (CIS), which causes increased growth hormone receptor (GHR) degradation. This study investigated the role of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in the restoration of normal GH signaling in GHTD. Protein expression, cellular localization and physical contact of proteins of the GH and EGF signaling pathways were studied by Western immunoblotting, immunofluorescence and co-immunoprecipitation, respectively. These were performed in fibroblasts of one GHTD patient (P) and one control child (C) at the basal state and after induction with human GH (hGH) 200 μg/L (GH200), either with or without silencing of CIS mRNA, and after induction with hGH 1000 μg/L (GH1000) or 50 ng/mL EGF. The membrane availability of the EGF receptor (EGFR) and the activated EGFR (pEGFR) was increased in P only after simultaneous GH200 and silencing of CIS mRNA or with GH1000, whereas this occurred in C after GH200 alone. After EGF induction, the membrane localization of GHR, STAT3 and that of EGFR were increased in P more than in C. In conclusion, in GHTD, the EGFR seems to participate in successful GH signaling, but induction of GHTD fibroblasts with a higher dose of hGH is needed. The EGF/EGFR pathway, in contrast to the GH/GHR pathway, seems to function normally in P and is more primed compared to C. The involvement of the EGFR in successful GH signaling may explain the catch-up growth seen in the Ps when exogenous hGH is administered.

  3. Multidrug resistance and retroviral transduction potential in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, M D; Gram, G J; Jensen, P B

    1999-01-01

    for the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV-1) receptor or had specificity for the amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV-A) receptor were used for transduction of five SCLC cell lines differing by a range of MDR mechanisms. Transduction efficiencies in these cell lines were compared by calculating the percentage...... of blue colonies after X-Gal staining of the cells grown in soft agar. All examined SCLC cell lines were transducible with either vector. Transduction efficiencies varied from 5.7% to 33.5% independent of the presence of MDR. These results indicate that MDR does not severely impair transduction of SCLC...

  4. Analysis of the gravitaxis signal transduction chain in Euglena gracilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Adeel

    Abstract Euglena gracilis is a photosynthetic, eukaryotic flagellate. It can adapt autotrophic and heterotrophic mode of growth and respond to different stimuli, this makes it an organism of choice for different research disciplines. It swims to reach a suitable niche by employing different stimuli such as oxygen, light, gravity and different chemicals. Among these stimuli light and gravity are the most important. Phototaxis (locomotion under light stimulus) and gravitaxis (locomotion under gravity stimulus) synergistically help cells to attain an optimal niche in the environment. However, in the complete absence of light or under scarcity of detectable light, cells can totally depend on gravity to find its swimming path. Therefore gravity has certain advantages over other stimuli.Unlike phototatic signal transduction chain of Euglena gracilis no clear primary gravity receptor has been identified in Euglena cells so far. However, there are some convincing evidence that TRP like channels act as a primary gravity receptor in Euglena gracilis.Use of different inhibitors gave rise to the involvement of protein kinase and calmodulin proteins in signal transduction chain of Euglena gracilis. Recently, specific calmodulin (Calmodulin 2) and protein kinase (PKA) have been identified as potential candidates of gravitactic signal transduction chain. Further characterization and investigation of these candidates was required. Therefore a combination of biochemical and genetic techniques was employed to localize proteins in cells and also to find interacting partners. For localization studies, specific antibodies were raised and characterized. Specificity of antibodies was validated by knockdown mutants, Invitro-translated proteins and heterologously expressed proteins. Cell fractionation studies, involving separation of the cell body and flagella for western blot analysis and confocal immunofluorescence studies were performed for subcellular localization. In order to find

  5. Downstream Yangtze River levels impacted by Three Gorges Dam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jida; Sheng, Yongwei; Gleason, Colin J; Wada, Yoshihide

    2013-01-01

    Changes in the Yangtze River level induced by large-scale human water regulation have profound implications on the inundation dynamics of surrounding lakes/wetlands and the integrity of related ecosystems. Using in situ measurements and hydrological simulation, this study reveals an altered Yangtze level regime downstream from the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) to the Yangtze estuary in the East China Sea as a combined result of (i) TGD’s flow regulation and (ii) Yangtze channel erosion due to reduced sediment load. During the average annual cycle of TGD’s regular flow control in 2009–2012, downstream Yangtze level variations were estimated to have been reduced by 3.9–13.5% at 15 studied gauging stations, manifested as evident level decrease in fall and increase in winter and spring. The impacts on Yangtze levels generally diminished in a longitudinal direction from the TGD to the estuary, with a total time lag of ∼9–12 days. Chronic Yangtze channel erosion since the TGD closure has lowered water levels in relation to flows at most downstream stations, which in turn counteracts the anticipated level increase by nearly or over 50% in winter and spring while reinforcing the anticipated level decrease by over 20% in fall. Continuous downstream channel erosion in the near future may further counteract the benefit of increased Yangtze levels during TGD’s water supplement in winter and accelerate the receding of inundation areas/levels of downstream lakes in fall. (letter)

  6. Mortality of zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha, veligers during downstream transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, T.G.; Lamberti, G.A.

    1999-01-01

    1. Streams flowing from lakes which contain zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha, provide apparently suitable habitats for mussel colonization and downstream range expansion, yet most such streams contain few adult mussels. We postulated that mussel veligers experience high mortality during dispersal via downstream transport. They tested this hypothesis in Christiana Creek, a lake-outlet stream in south-western Michigan, U.S.A., in which adult mussel density declined exponentially with distance downstream. 2. A staining technique using neutral red was developed and tested to distinguish quickly live and dead veligers. Live and dead veligers were distinguishable after an exposure of fresh samples to 13.3 mg L-1 of neutral red for 3 h. 3. Neutral red was used to determine the proportion of live veligers in samples taken longitudinally along Christiana Creek. The proportion of live veligers (mean ?? SE) declined from 90 ?? 3% at the lake outlet to 40 ?? 8% 18 km downstream. 4. Veligers appear to be highly susceptible to damage by physical forces (e.g. shear), and therefore, mortality in turbulent streams could be an important mechanism limiting zebra mussel dispersal to downstream reaches. Predictions of zebra mussel spread and population growth should consider lake-stream linkages and high mortality in running waters.

  7. Proteomic Analysis Reveals Coordinated Regulation of Anthocyanin Biosynthesis through Signal Transduction and Sugar Metabolism in Black Rice Leaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linghua Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Black rice (Oryza sativa L. is considered to be a healthy food due to its high content of anthocyanins in the pericarp. The synthetic pathway of anthocyanins in black rice grains has been identified, however, the proteomic profile of leaves during grain development is still unclear. Here, isobaric Tags Relative and Absolute Quantification (iTRAQ MS/MS was carried out to identify statistically significant changes of leaf proteome in the black rice during grain development. Throughout three sequential developmental stages, a total of 3562 proteins were detected and 24 functional proteins were differentially expressed 3–10 days after flowering (DAF. The detected proteins are known to be involved in various biological processes and most of these proteins were related to gene expression regulatory (33.3%, signal transduction (16.7% and developmental regulation and hormone-like proteins (12.5%. The coordinated changes were consistent with changes in regulatory proteins playing a leading role in leaves during black rice grain development. This indicated that signal transduction between leaves and grains may have an important role in anthocyanin biosynthesis and accumulation during grain development of black rice. In addition, four identified up-regulated proteins associated with starch metabolism suggested that the remobilization of nutrients for starch synthesis plays a potential role in anthocyanin biosynthesis of grain. The mRNA transcription for eight selected proteins was validated with quantitative real-time PCR. Our results explored the proteomics of the coordination between leaf and grain in anthocyanins biosynthesis of grain, which might be regulated by signal transduction and sugar metabolism in black rice leaf.

  8. Oxidative Stress, Signal Transduction, Cell-Cell Communication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Trosko, James

    1999-01-01

    .... The integration of intercellular communication through gap junctions and intracellular pathways plays a role in maintaining the homeostasis by controlling the expression of genes that control cell...

  9. Piezoelectric Multilayer-Stacked Hybrid Actuation/Transduction System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Jiang, Xiaoning (Inventor); Su, Ji (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A novel full piezoelectric multilayer stacked hybrid actuation/transduction system. The system demonstrates significantly-enhanced electromechanical performance by utilizing the cooperative contributions of the electromechanical responses of multilayer stacked negative and positive strain components. Both experimental and theoretical studies indicate that for this system, the displacement is over three times that of a same-sized conventional flextensional actuator/transducer. The system consists of at least 2 layers which include electromechanically active components. The layers are arranged such that when electric power is applied, one layer contracts in a transverse direction while the second layer expands in a transverse direction which is perpendicular to the transverse direction of the first layer. An alternate embodiment includes a third layer. In this embodiment, the outer two layers contract in parallel transverse directions while the middle layer expands in a transverse direction which is perpendicular to the transverse direction of the outer layers.

  10. Utilizing ras signaling pathway to direct selective replication of herpes simplex virus-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihong Pan

    Full Text Available Re-engineering the tropism of viruses is an attractive translational strategy for targeting cancer cells. The Ras signal transduction pathway is a central hub for a variety of pro-oncogenic events with a fundamental role in normal and neoplastic physiology. In this work we were interested in linking Ras activation to HSV-1 replication in a direct manner in order to generate a novel oncolytic herpes virus which can target cancer cells. To establish such link, we developed a mutant HSV-1 in which the expression of ICP4 (infected cell protein-4, a viral protein necessary for replication is controlled by activation of ELK, a transcription factor down-stream of the Ras pathway and mainly activated by ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase, an important Ras effector pathway. This mutant HSV-1 was named as Signal-Smart 1 (SS1. A series of prostate cells were infected with the SS1 virus. Cells with elevated levels of ELK activation were preferentially infected by the SS1 virus, as demonstrated by increased levels of viral progeny, herpetic glycoprotein C and overall SS1 viral protein production. Upon exposure to SS1, the proliferation, invasiveness and colony formation capabilities of prostate cancer cells with increased ELK activation were significantly decreased (p<0.05, while the rate of apoptosis/necrosis in these cells was increased. Additionally, high Ras signaling cells infected with SS1 showed a prominent arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle as compared to cells exposed to parental HSV-1. The results of this study reveal the potential for re-modeling the host-herpes interaction to specifically interfere with the life of cancer cells with increased Ras signaling. SS1 also serves as a "prototype" for development of a family of signal-smart viruses which can target cancer cells on the basis of their signaling portfolio.

  11. Utilizing ras signaling pathway to direct selective replication of herpes simplex virus-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Weihong; Bodempudi, Vidya; Esfandyari, Tuba; Farassati, Faris

    2009-08-04

    Re-engineering the tropism of viruses is an attractive translational strategy for targeting cancer cells. The Ras signal transduction pathway is a central hub for a variety of pro-oncogenic events with a fundamental role in normal and neoplastic physiology. In this work we were interested in linking Ras activation to HSV-1 replication in a direct manner in order to generate a novel oncolytic herpes virus which can target cancer cells. To establish such link, we developed a mutant HSV-1 in which the expression of ICP4 (infected cell protein-4, a viral protein necessary for replication) is controlled by activation of ELK, a transcription factor down-stream of the Ras pathway and mainly activated by ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase, an important Ras effector pathway). This mutant HSV-1 was named as Signal-Smart 1 (SS1). A series of prostate cells were infected with the SS1 virus. Cells with elevated levels of ELK activation were preferentially infected by the SS1 virus, as demonstrated by increased levels of viral progeny, herpetic glycoprotein C and overall SS1 viral protein production. Upon exposure to SS1, the proliferation, invasiveness and colony formation capabilities of prostate cancer cells with increased ELK activation were significantly decreased (p<0.05), while the rate of apoptosis/necrosis in these cells was increased. Additionally, high Ras signaling cells infected with SS1 showed a prominent arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle as compared to cells exposed to parental HSV-1. The results of this study reveal the potential for re-modeling the host-herpes interaction to specifically interfere with the life of cancer cells with increased Ras signaling. SS1 also serves as a "prototype" for development of a family of signal-smart viruses which can target cancer cells on the basis of their signaling portfolio.

  12. Prolactin receptor and signal transduction to milk protein genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djiane, J.; Daniel, N.; Bignon, C. [Unite d`Endocrinologie Moleculaire, Jouy en Josas (France)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    After cloning of the mammary gland prolactin (PRL) receptor cDNA, a functional assay was established using co-transfection of PRL receptor cDNA together with a milk protein promoter/chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) construct in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Different mutants of the PRL receptor were tested in this CAT assay to delimit the domains in the receptor necessary for signal transduction to milk protein genes. In CHO cells stably transfected with PRL receptor cDNA, high numbers of PRL receptor are expressed. By metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation, expressed PRL receptor was identified as a single species of 100 kDa. Using these cells, we analyzed the effects of PRL on intracellular free Ca{sup ++} concentration. PRL stimulates Ca{sup ++} entry and induces secondary Ca{sup ++} mobilization. The entry of Ca{sup ++} is a result of an increase in K{sup +} conductance that hyperpolarizes the membranes. We have also analyzed tyrosine phosphorylation induced by PRL. In CHO cells stably transfected with PRL receptor cDNA, PRL induced a very rapid and transient tyrosine phosphorylation of a 100-kDa protein which is most probably the PRL receptor. The same finding was obtained in mammary membranes after PRL injection to lactating rabbits. Whereas tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and lavendustin were without effect, PRL stimulation of milk protein gene promoters was partially inhibited by 2 {mu}M herbimycin in CHO cells co-transfected with PRL receptor cDNA and the {Beta} lactoglobulin CAT construct. Taken together these observations indicate that the cytoplasmic domain of the PRL receptor interacts with one or several tyrosine kinases, which may represent early postreceptor events necessary for PRL signal transduction to milk protein genes. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Critical effects of downstream boundary conditions on vortex breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Osama; Kandil, Hamdy A.; Liu, C. H.

    1992-01-01

    The unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are used to study the critical effects of the downstream boundary conditions on the supersonic vortex breakdown. The present study is applied to two supersonic vortex breakdown cases. In the first case, quasi-axisymmetric supersonic swirling flow is considered in a configured circular duct, and in the second case, quasi-axisymmetric supersonic swirling jet, that is issued from a nozzle into a supersonic jet of lower Mach number, is considered. For the configured duct flow, four different types of downstream boundary conditions are used, and for the swirling jet flow from the nozzle, two types of downstream boundary conditions are used. The solutions are time accurate which are obtained using an implicit, upwind, flux-difference splitting, finite-volume scheme.

  14. Transition duct with divided upstream and downstream portions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahan, Kevin Weston; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; Maldonado, Jaime Javier; Dillard, Daniel Jackson; Flanagan, James Scott

    2015-07-14

    Turbine systems are provided. In one embodiment, a turbine system includes a transition duct comprising an inlet, an outlet, and a duct passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The duct passage includes an upstream portion extending from the inlet and a downstream portion extending from the outlet. The turbine system further includes a rib extending from an outer surface of the duct passage, the rib dividing the upstream portion and the downstream portion.

  15. Patents and Downstream Innovation Suppression - Facts or Fiction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howells, John

    Merges and Nelson have proposed that pioneer patents have enabled their owners to 'block' or 'hold-up' downstream innovation in cases as important as the car, radio, aircraft and electric lighting (Merges and Nelson 1990, ; Merges and Nelson 1994). Merges and Nelson use their work to question...... the value of Kitch's prospect theory of patents, a theory that the social value of patents is that they enable the efficient coordination of technological development.    I re-examine history and legal sources bearing on Merges and Nelson's illustrative cases and find no case to illustrate downstream...

  16. Downstream Processability of Crystal Habit-Modified Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pudasaini, Nawin; Upadhyay, Pratik Pankaj; Parker, Christian Richard

    2017-01-01

    Efficient downstream processing of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) can depend strongly on their particulate properties, such as size and shape distributions. Especially in drug products with high API content, needle-like crystal habit of an API may show compromised flowability...... and tabletability, creating significant processability difficulties on a production scale. However, such a habit can be adapted to the needs of downstream processing. To this end, we modified the needle-like crystal habit of the model API 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA). This study reports processability assessment...

  17. Modelling and simulation of signal transductions in an apoptosis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2006-12-12

    Dec 12, 2006 ... This paper first presents basic Petri net components representing molecular interactions and mechanisms of signalling pathways, and introduces a method to construct a Petri net model of a signalling pathway with these components. Then a simulation method of determining the delay time of transitions, ...

  18. MODULATING LPS SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION AT THE LPS RECEPTOR COMPLEX WITH SYNTHETIC LIPID A ANALOGUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Aileen F. B.; Demchenko, Alexei V.

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis, defined as a clinical syndrome brought about by an amplified and dysregulated inflammatory response to infections, is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Despite persistent attempts to develop treatment strategies to manage sepsis in the clinical setting, the basic elements of treatment have not changed since the 1960s. As such, the development of effective therapies for reducing inflammatory reactions and end-organ dysfunction in critically ill patients with sepsis remains a global priority. Advances in understanding of the immune response to sepsis provide the opportunity to develop more effective pharmaceuticals. This article details current information on the modulation of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) receptor complex with synthetic Lipid A mimetics. As the initial and most critical event in sepsis pathophysiology, the LPS receptor provides an attractive target for antisepsis agents. One of the well-studied approaches to sepsis therapy involves the use of derivatives of Lipid A, the membrane-anchor portion of an LPS, which is largely responsible for its endotoxic activity. This article describes the structural and conformational requirements influencing the ability of Lipid A analogues to compete with LPS for binding to the LPS receptor complex and to inhibit the induction of the signal transduction pathway by impairing LPS-initiated receptor dimerization. PMID:25480508

  19. Multidrug resistance and retroviral transduction potential in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, M D; Gram, G J; Jensen, P B

    1999-01-01

    of blue colonies after X-Gal staining of the cells grown in soft agar. All examined SCLC cell lines were transducible with either vector. Transduction efficiencies varied from 5.7% to 33.5% independent of the presence of MDR. These results indicate that MDR does not severely impair transduction of SCLC...

  20. Identifying pathways affected by cancer mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iengar, Prathima

    2017-12-16

    Mutations in 15 cancers, sourced from the COSMIC Whole Genomes database, and 297 human pathways, arranged into pathway groups based on the processes they orchestrate, and sourced from the KEGG pathway database, have together been used to identify pathways affected by cancer mutations. Genes studied in ≥15, and mutated in ≥10 samples of a cancer have been considered recurrently mutated, and pathways with recurrently mutated genes have been considered affected in the cancer. Novel doughnut plots have been presented which enable visualization of the extent to which pathways and genes, in each pathway group, are targeted, in each cancer. The 'organismal systems' pathway group (including organism-level pathways; e.g., nervous system) is the most targeted, more than even the well-recognized signal transduction, cell-cycle and apoptosis, and DNA repair pathway groups. The important, yet poorly-recognized, role played by the group merits attention. Pathways affected in ≥7 cancers yielded insights into processes affected. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Streptococcus cristatus attenuates Fusobacterium nucleatum-induced cytokine expression by influencing pathways converging on nuclear factor-κB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G.; Rudney, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY We previously reported that Streptococcus cristatus, an oral commensal, was able to downregulate the interleukin-8 (IL-8) response to Fusobacterium nucleatum, a putative oral pathogen in oral epithelial cells. The aim of this study was to extend the understanding of how S. cristatus regulates cytokine expression in oral epithelial cells on a broad basis, and investigate whether the modulation of a Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway was involved in this process. KB and TERT-2 cells were co-cultured with F. nucleatum and S. cristatus, either alone or in combination. Total RNA was extracted and pathway-specific focused microarrays were used to profile the transcriptional responses of various cytokine genes and those related to TLR-mediated signal transduction. Reverse transcription–polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) and protein assays were performed to confirm the microarray results for selected genes. We found that exposure to either S. cristatus or F. nucleatum alone led to distinct changes in cytokine expression patterns. Fusobacterium nucleatum induced a greater number of gene expression changes than S. cristatus (15% vs 4%, respectively). The presence of S. cristatus with F. nucleatum attenuated the expression of a number of inflammatory cytokines, and upregulated several anti-inflammatory mediators. The RT-PCR confirmed the messenger RNA attenuation of IL-1α, tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-6 by S. cristatus. Profiling of TLR-signaling-related genes revealed that S. cristatus most significantly impacted the downstream pathways, especially nuclear factor-κB, rather than altering TLRs and their adaptors and interacting proteins. Our data suggest that S. cristatus may attenuate the epithelial proinflammatory cytokine response to F. nucleatum by influencing pathways converging on nuclear factor-κB. PMID:21375705

  2. Transcription factors down-stream of Ras as molecular indicators for targeting malignancies with oncolytic herpes virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandyari, Tuba; Tefferi, Ayalew; Szmidt, Anna; Alain, Tommy; Zwolak, Pawel; Lasho, Terra; Lee, Patrick W; Farassati, Faris

    2009-12-01

    Overactivation in Ras signaling has been under intensive study as the molecular basis for development of cancer. Such overactivation can occur in the presence or absence of mutations in Ras gene resulting in activation of a series of down-stream effectors such as transcription factors. Different studies have shown the activation of Ras down-stream effectors in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) although mutations in Ras are not prevalent in this malignancy. Since overactivation in Ras signaling also increases permissiveness of cancer cells to infection by oncolytic versions of herpes simplex virus (e.g. R3616), we were interested in evaluating the value of transcription factors down-stream of Ras as molecular indicators for permissiveness to herpes therapy. In order to accomplish this, and also to assess the permissiveness of lymphoma cells to infection with R3616, we used NHL cell lines Daudi, Jurkat, NC37, Raji, Ramos and ST486. Once the levels of phosphorylation (activation) of extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK, a Ras effector pathway) and its down-stream transcription factor ELK were evaluated, Raji and NC37 showed a significant increase in the phosphorylation levels of both molecules while ATF2 (another transcription factor down-stream of p38-kinase pathway) seemed to be activated in all studied cells. Raji and NC37 cells were also most permissive cells to infection with R3616 while their permissiveness was decreased upon treatment of cells with an inhibitor of ELK-DNA binding portraying ERK/ELK as a suitable predictive indicator for selection of cancer cells with increased sensitivity to R3616. This study, therefore, for the first time documents permissiveness of lymphoma cells to oncolytic herpes viruses and introduces ELK as a suitable factor for predicting tumor susceptibility to these novel anticancer agents.

  3. Hippocampal neuronal cyclooxygenase-2 downstream signaling imbalance in a rat model of chronic aluminium gluconate administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Ye, Mengliang; Yu, Lijuan; Wang, Jianfeng; Guo, Yuanxin; Lei, Wenjuan; Yang, Junqing

    2015-02-18

    Acute and chronic brain damages including neurodegenerative diseases are a group of neuroinflammation-associated diseases characterized by cognitive function defect and progressive neuron loss. The pathophysiological procession of brain damages involves the overexpression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2. Owing to the limited benefit to chronic brain damage and the late adverse effect of COX-2 inhibitors, the COX downstream signaling pathway has become a focus in neurological research. In order to explore the mechanism of aluminum neurotoxicity and the importance of COX2 downstream signaling pathways to chronic brain damage, the present study was designed to simultaneously observe the prostaglandin (PG) contents, and the expressions of PG synthases and PG receptors of hippocampus in a rat model induced by chronic administration of aluminium gluconate. A rat model of chronic brain damage was established by chronic intragastric administration of aluminium gluconate (Al3+ 200 mg/kg per day, 5d a week for 20 weeks). PG contents, the expressions of PG synthases, and the expressions of PG receptors in rats were measured by ELISA, RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Chronic aluminium gluconate administration resulted in hippocampal neuron injury and learning and memory disorders in rats. Aluminium gluconate administration also resulted in increased levels of PGE2, PGD2, TXA2, PGI2, and PGF2α in rat hippocampus. The DP1, EP2, IP, mPGES-1, EP4, PGIS and TXAS mRNA expressions, and the DP1, EP2 and IP protein expressions significantly increased in the Al-treated hippocampus, while the EP3 and FP mRNA and protein expressions and the TP mRNA expression decreased. The PGS/PGs/PG receptors signaling pathway in chronic aluminium gluconate-overloaded rat hippocampus is disturbed, which may be involved in the mechanism of aluminium neurotoxicity.

  4. The Role of Cgrp-Receptor Component Protein (Rcp in Cgrp-Mediated Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Prado

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP-receptor component protein (RCP is a 17-kDa intracellular peripheral membrane protein required for signal transduction at CGRP receptors. To determine the role of RCP in CGRP-mediated signal transduction, RCP was depleted from NIH3T3 cells using antisense strategy. Loss of RCP protein correlated with loss of cAMP production by CGRP in the antisense cells. In contrast, loss of RCP had no effect on CGRP-mediated binding; therefore RCP is not acting as a chaperone for the CGRP receptor. Instead, RCP is a novel signal transduction molecule that couples the CGRP receptor to the cellular signal transduction machinery. RCP thus represents a prototype for a new class of signal transduction proteins that are required for regulation of G protein-coupled receptors.

  5. The information highways of a biotechnological workhorse – signal transduction in Hypocrea jecorina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmoll Monika

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ascomycete Hypocrea jecorina (anamorph Trichoderma reesei is one of the most prolific producers of biomass-degrading enzymes and frequently termed an industrial workhorse. To compete for nutrients in its habitat despite its shortcoming in certain degradative enzymes, efficient perception and interpretation of environmental signals is indispensable. A better understanding of these signals as well as their transmission machinery can provide sources for improvement of biotechnological processes. Results The genome of H. jecorina was analysed for the presence and composition of common signal transduction pathways including heterotrimeric G-protein cascades, cAMP signaling, mitogen activated protein kinases, two component phosphorelay systems, proteins involved in circadian rhythmicity and light response, calcium signaling and the superfamily of Ras small GTPases. The results of this survey are discussed in the context of current knowledge in order to assess putative functions as well as potential impact of alterations of the respective pathways. Conclusion Important findings include an additional, bacterial type phospholipase C protein and an additional 6-4 photolyase. Moreover the presence of 4 RGS-(Regulator of G-protein Signaling proteins and 3 GprK-type G-protein coupled receptors comprising an RGS-domain suggest a more complex posttranslational regulation of G-protein signaling than in other ascomycetes. Also the finding, that H. jecorina, unlike yeast possesses class I phosducins which are involved in phototransduction in mammals warrants further investigation. An alteration in the regulation of circadian rhythmicity may be deduced from the extension of both the class I and II of casein kinases, homologues of which are implicated in phosphorylation of FRQ in Neurospora crassa. On the other hand, a shortage in the number of the pathogenicity related PTH11-type G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs as well as a lack of

  6. Downstream processing of Isochrysis galbana: a step towards microalgal biorefinery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilbert-López, B.; Mendiola, J.A.; Fontecha, J.; Broek, van den L.A.M.; Sijtsma, L.; Cifuentes, A.; Herrero, M.; Ibáñez, E.

    2015-01-01

    An algae-based biorefinery relies on the efficient use of algae biomass through its fractionation of several valuable/bioactive compounds that can be used in industry. If this biorefinery includes green platforms as downstream processing technologies able to fulfill the requirements of green

  7. Testicular dysgenesis syndrome: mechanistic insights and potential new downstream effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharpe, R.M.; Skakkebæk, Niels Erik

    2008-01-01

    Reproductive disorders of newborn (cryptorchidism, hypospadias) and young adult males (low sperm counts, testicular germ cell cancer) are common and/or increasing in incidence. It has been hypothesized that these disorders may comprise a testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS) with a common origin...... androgen production/action during fetal testis development, may play in the origin of downstream disorders Udgivelsesdato: 2008/2...

  8. Downstream flow top width prediction in a river system | Choudhury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ANFIS, ARIMA and Hybrid Multiple Inflows Muskingum models (HMIM) were applied to simulate and forecast downstream discharge and flow top widths in a river system. The ANFIS model works on a set of linguistic rules while the ARIMA model uses a set of past values to predict the next value in a time series. The HMIM ...

  9. The Nigerian petroleum downstream sector and product pricing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research has been designed to explore critically the history of the downstream petroleum sector and the trend of pricing of Nigeria's petroleum products - looking closely at the contentious issue of subsidy and formulate a statistical model for the appropriate pricing of locally produced petroleum products.

  10. Connectivity of Streams and Wetlands to Downstream Waters ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Office of Research and Development has finalized the report Connectivity of Streams and Wetlands to Downstream Waters: A Review and Synthesis of the Scientific Evidence. The report reviews more than 1,200 peer-reviewed publications and summarizes current scientific understanding about the connectivity and mechanisms by which streams and wetlands, singly or in aggregate, affect the physical, chemical, and biological integrity of downstream waters. The focus of the report is on surface and shallow subsurface connections by which small or temporary streams, nontidal wetlands, and open waters affect larger waters such as rivers, lakes, reservoirs, and estuaries. This report represents the state-of-the-science on the connectivity and isolation of waters in the United States. It makes five major conclusions, summarized below, that are drawn from a broad range of peer reviewed scientific literature. The scientific literature unequivocally demonstrates that streams, regardless of their size or frequency of flow, are connected to downstream waters and strongly influence their function. The scientific literature clearly shows that wetlands and open waters in riparian areas (transitional areas between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems) and floodplains are physically, chemically, and biologically integrated with rivers via functions that improve downstream water quality. These system

  11. Flow diagnostics downstream of a tribladed rotor model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naumov, I. V.; Rahmanov, V. V.; Okulov, Valery

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents results of a study of vortex wake structures and measurements of instantaneous 3D velocity fields downstream of a triblade turbine model. Two operation modes of flow around the rotor with different tip speed ratios were tested. Initially the wake structures were visualized and...

  12. Extreme wave phenomena in down-stream running modulated waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andonowati, A.; Karjanto, N.; van Groesen, Embrecht W.C.

    Modulational, Benjamin-Feir, instability is studied for the down-stream evolution of surface gravity waves. An explicit solution, the soliton on finite background, of the NLS equation in physical space is used to study various phenomena in detail. It is shown that for sufficiently long modulation

  13. Using stable isotopes to examine watershed connectivity to downstream waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water bodies within the USA are protected by the US Clean Water Act when they have a significant nexus to downstream navigable waters. As a research scientist with the US Environmental Protection Agency, I have used water stable isotopes to examine hydrologic connectivity dynami...

  14. Peru's Downstream Natural Gas Sector : A Preliminary Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    David Reinstein; Daniel A. Benítez Benítez; Todd M. Johnson

    2011-01-01

    This study assesses the natural gas market in Peru. In the process of evaluating the downstream market, the study identifies opportunities for meeting the Government s aspirational goals with respect to energy and natural gas development, including the efficient use of natural gas in the power and other sectors, strengthening and coordinating national energy planning for the gas sector, in...

  15. Imaging for monitoring downstream processing of fermentation broths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moiseyenko, Rayisa; Baum, Andreas; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini

    In relation to downstream processing of a fermentation broth coagulation/flocculation is a typical pretreatment method for separating undesirable particles/impurities from the wanted product. In the coagulation process the negatively charged impurities are destabilized by adding of a clarifying...

  16. Ecological linkages between headwaters and downstream ecosystems: Transport of organic matter, invertebrates, and wood down headwater channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wipfli, M.S.; Richardson, J.S.; Naiman, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Headwater streams make up a large proportion of the total length and watershed area of fluvial networks, and are partially characterized by the large volume of organic matter (large wood, detritus, and dissolved organic matter) and invertebrate inputs from the riparian forest, relative to stream size. Much of those inputs are exported to downstream reaches through time where they potentially subsidize river communities. The relative rates, timing, and conversion processes that carry inputs from small streams to downstream reaches are reasonably well quantified. For example, larger particles are converted to smaller particles, which are more easily exported. Also, dissolved organic matter and surface biofilms are converted to larger particles which can be more easily intercepted by consumers. However, the quality of these materials as it affects biological activity downstream is not well known, nor is the extent to which timing permits biological use of those particles. These ecological unknowns need to be resolved. Further, land uses may disrupt and diminish material transport to downstream reaches by removing sources (e.g., forest harvest), by affecting transport and decomposition processes (e.g., flow regulation, irrigation, changes in biotic communities), and by altering mechanisms of storage within headwaters (e.g., channelization). We present conceptual models of energy and nutrient fluxes that outline small stream processes and pathways important to downstream communities, and we identify informational gaps that, if filled, could significantly advance the understanding of linkages between headwater streams and larger rivers. The models, based on empirical evidence and best professional judgment, suggest that navigable waters are significantly influenced by headwater streams through hydrological and ecological connectivities, and land use can dramatically influence these natural connectivities, impacting downstream riverine ecosystems. ?? 2007 American Water

  17. A novel virtual hub approach for multisource downstream service integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previtali, Mattia; Cuca, Branka; Barazzetti, Luigi

    2016-08-01

    A large development of downstream services is expected to be stimulated starting from earth observations (EO) datasets acquired by Copernicus satellites. An important challenge connected with the availability of downstream services is the possibility for their integration in order to create innovative applications with added values for users of different categories level. At the moment, the world of geo-information (GI) is extremely heterogeneous in terms of standards and formats used, thus preventing a facilitated access and integration of downstream services. Indeed, different users and data providers have also different requirements in terms of communication protocols and technology advancement. In recent years, many important programs and initiatives have tried to address this issue even on trans-regional and international level (e.g. INSPIRE Directive, GEOSS, Eye on Earth and SEIS). However, a lack of interoperability between systems and services still exists. In order to facilitate the interaction between different downstream services, a new architectural approach (developed within the European project ENERGIC OD) is proposed in this paper. The brokering-oriented architecture introduces a new mediation layer (the Virtual Hub) which works as an intermediary to bridge the gaps linked to interoperability issues. This intermediation layer de-couples the server and the client allowing a facilitated access to multiple downstream services and also Open Data provided by national and local SDIs. In particular, in this paper an application is presented integrating four services on the topic of agriculture: (i) the service given by Space4Agri (providing services based on MODIS and Landsat data); (ii) Gicarus Lab (providing sample services based on Landsat datasets) and (iii) FRESHMON (providing sample services for water quality) and services from a several regional SDIs.

  18. Group VII Ethylene Response Factors Coordinate Oxygen and Nitric Oxide Signal Transduction and Stress Responses in Plants1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Daniel J.; Conde, Jorge Vicente; Berckhan, Sophie; Prasad, Geeta; Mendiondo, Guillermina M.; Holdsworth, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The group VII ethylene response factors (ERFVIIs) are plant-specific transcription factors that have emerged as important regulators of abiotic and biotic stress responses, in particular, low-oxygen stress. A defining feature of ERFVIIs is their conserved N-terminal domain, which renders them oxygen- and nitric oxide (NO)-dependent substrates of the N-end rule pathway of targeted proteolysis. In the presence of these gases, ERFVIIs are destabilized, whereas an absence of either permits their accumulation; ERFVIIs therefore coordinate plant homeostatic responses to oxygen availability and control a wide range of NO-mediated processes. ERFVIIs have a variety of context-specific protein and gene interaction partners, and also modulate gibberellin and abscisic acid signaling to regulate diverse developmental processes and stress responses. This update discusses recent advances in our understanding of ERFVII regulation and function, highlighting their role as central regulators of gaseous signal transduction at the interface of ethylene, oxygen, and NO signaling. PMID:25944828

  19. The carboxyl terminal tyrosine 417 residue of NOK has an autoinhibitory effect on NOK-mediated signaling transductions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yinghua; Zhong Shan; Rong Zhili; Ren Yongming; Li Zhiyong; Zhang Shuping; Chang Zhijie; Liu Li

    2007-01-01

    Receptor protein tyrosine kinases (RPTKs) are essential mediators of cell growth, differentiation, migration, and metabolism. Recently, a novel RPTK named NOK has been cloned and characterized. In current study, we investigated the role of the carboxyl terminal tyrosine 417 residue of NOK in the activations of different signaling pathways. A single tyrosine to phenylalanine point mutation at Y417 site (Y417 F) not only dramatically enhanced the NOK-induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), but also markedly promoted the NOK-mediated activation of both signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 and 3 (STAT1 and 3). Moreover, the proliferation potential of NIH3T3-NOK (Y417F) stable cells were significantly elevated as compared with that of NIH3T3-NOK. Overall, our results demonstrate that the tyrosine Y417 residue at the carboxyl tail of NOK exhibits an autoinhibitory role in NOK-mediated signaling transductions

  20. The DNA damage response pathway contributes to the stability of chromosome III derivatives lacking efficient replicators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James F Theis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic chromosomes, DNA replication initiates at multiple origins. Large inter-origin gaps arise when several adjacent origins fail to fire. Little is known about how cells cope with this situation. We created a derivative of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome III lacking all efficient origins, the 5ORIΔ-ΔR fragment, as a model for chromosomes with large inter-origin gaps. We used this construct in a modified synthetic genetic array screen to identify genes whose products facilitate replication of long inter-origin gaps. Genes identified are enriched in components of the DNA damage and replication stress signaling pathways. Mrc1p is activated by replication stress and mediates transduction of the replication stress signal to downstream proteins; however, the response-defective mrc1(AQ allele did not affect 5ORIΔ-ΔR fragment maintenance, indicating that this pathway does not contribute to its stability. Deletions of genes encoding the DNA-damage-specific mediator, Rad9p, and several components shared between the two signaling pathways preferentially destabilized the 5ORIΔ-ΔR fragment, implicating the DNA damage response pathway in its maintenance. We found unexpected differences between contributions of components of the DNA damage response pathway to maintenance of ORIΔ chromosome derivatives and their contributions to DNA repair. Of the effector kinases encoded by RAD53 and CHK1, Chk1p appears to be more important in wild-type cells for reducing chromosomal instability caused by origin depletion, while Rad53p becomes important in the absence of Chk1p. In contrast, RAD53 plays a more important role than CHK1 in cell survival and replication fork stability following treatment with DNA damaging agents and hydroxyurea. Maintenance of ORIΔ chromosomes does not depend on homologous recombination. These observations suggest that a DNA-damage-independent mechanism enhances ORIΔ chromosome stability. Thus, components of the DNA damage

  1. Metformin selectively targets redox control of complex I energy transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy R. Cameron

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Many guanide-containing drugs are antihyperglycaemic but most exhibit toxicity, to the extent that only the biguanide metformin has enjoyed sustained clinical use. Here, we have isolated unique mitochondrial redox control properties of metformin that are likely to account for this difference. In primary hepatocytes and H4IIE hepatoma cells we found that antihyperglycaemic diguanides DG5-DG10 and the biguanide phenformin were up to 1000-fold more potent than metformin on cell signalling responses, gluconeogenic promoter expression and hepatocyte glucose production. Each drug inhibited cellular oxygen consumption similarly but there were marked differences in other respects. All diguanides and phenformin but not metformin inhibited NADH oxidation in submitochondrial particles, indicative of complex I inhibition, which also corresponded closely with dehydrogenase activity in living cells measured by WST-1. Consistent with these findings, in isolated mitochondria, DG8 but not metformin caused the NADH/NAD+ couple to become more reduced over time and mitochondrial deterioration ensued, suggesting direct inhibition of complex I and mitochondrial toxicity of DG8. In contrast, metformin exerted a selective oxidation of the mitochondrial NADH/NAD+ couple, without triggering mitochondrial deterioration. Together, our results suggest that metformin suppresses energy transduction by selectively inducing a state in complex I where redox and proton transfer domains are no longer efficiently coupled. Keywords: Diabetes, Metformin, Mitochondria, NADH, NAD+

  2. Oxygen sensing and signal transduction in hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Natascha; Strielkov, Ievgen; Pak, Oleg; Weissmann, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV), also known as the von Euler-Liljestrand mechanism, is an essential response of the pulmonary vasculature to acute and sustained alveolar hypoxia. During local alveolar hypoxia, HPV matches perfusion to ventilation to maintain optimal arterial oxygenation. In contrast, during global alveolar hypoxia, HPV leads to pulmonary hypertension. The oxygen sensing and signal transduction machinery is located in the pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) of the pre-capillary vessels, albeit the physiological response may be modulated in vivo by the endothelium. While factors such as nitric oxide modulate HPV, reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been suggested to act as essential mediators in HPV. ROS may originate from mitochondria and/or NADPH oxidases but the exact oxygen sensing mechanisms, as well as the question of whether increased or decreased ROS cause HPV, are under debate. ROS may induce intracellular calcium increase and subsequent contraction of PASMCs via direct or indirect interactions with protein kinases, phospholipases, sarcoplasmic calcium channels, transient receptor potential channels, voltage-dependent potassium channels and L-type calcium channels, whose relevance may vary under different experimental conditions. Successful identification of factors regulating HPV may allow development of novel therapeutic approaches for conditions of disturbed HPV. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  3. Signal transduction in cells of the immune system in microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber Kathrin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Life on Earth developed in the presence and under the constant influence of gravity. Gravity has been present during the entire evolution, from the first organic molecule to mammals and humans. Modern research revealed clearly that gravity is important, probably indispensable for the function of living systems, from unicellular organisms to men. Thus, gravity research is no more or less a fundamental question about the conditions of life on Earth. Since the first space missions and supported thereafter by a multitude of space and ground-based experiments, it is well known that immune cell function is severely suppressed in microgravity, which renders the cells of the immune system an ideal model organism to investigate the influence of gravity on the cellular and molecular level. Here we review the current knowledge about the question, if and how cellular signal transduction depends on the existence of gravity, with special focus on cells of the immune system. Since immune cell function is fundamental to keep the organism under imnological surveillance during the defence against pathogens, to investigate the effects and possible molecular mechanisms of altered gravity is indispensable for long-term space flights to Earth Moon or Mars. Thus, understanding the impact of gravity on cellular functions on Earth will provide not only important informations about the development of life on Earth, but also for therapeutic and preventive strategies to cope successfully with medical problems during space exploration.

  4. Mutations of TMC1 cause deafness by disrupting mechanoelectrical transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Kurima, Kiyoto; Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Griffith, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Mutations of transmembrane channel-like 1 gene (TMC1) can cause dominant (DFNA36) or recessive (DFNB7/B11) deafness. In this article, we describe the characteristics of DFNA36 and DFNB7/B11 deafness, the features of the Tmc1 mutant mouse strains, and recent advances in our understanding of TMC1 function. Methods Publications related to TMC1, DFNA36 or DFNB7/B11 were identified through PubMed. Results All affected DFNA36 subjects showed post-lingual, progressive, sensorineural hearing loss (HL), initially affecting high frequencies. In contrast, almost all affected DFNB7/B11 subjects demonstrated congenital or prelingual severe to profound sensorineural HL. The mouse Tmc1 gene also has dominant and recessive mutant alleles that cause HL in mutant strains, including Beethoven, deafness and Tmc1 knockout mice. These mutant mice have been instrumental for revealing that Tmc1 and its closely related paralog Tmc2 are expressed in cochlear and vestibular hair cells, and are required for hair cell mechanoelectrical transduction (MET). Recent studies suggest that TMC1 and TMC2 may be components of the long-sought hair cell MET channel. Conclusion TMC1 mutations disrupt hair cell MET. PMID:24933710

  5. Signal transduction by the platelet-derived growth factor receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, L.T.; Escobedo, J.A.; Keating, M.T.; Coughlin, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    The mitogenic effects of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) are mediated by the PDGF receptor. The mouse PDGF receptor was recently purified on the basis of its ability to become tyrosine phosphorylated in response to the A-B human platelet form of PDGF, and the receptor amino acid sequence was determined from a full-length cDNA clone. Both the human and mouse receptor cDNA sequences have been expressed in Chinese hamster ovary fibroblast (CHO) cells that normally lack PDGF receptors. This paper summarizes recent results using this system to study signal transduction by the PDGF receptor. Some of the findings show that the KI domain of the PDGF receptor plays an important role in the stimulation of DNA synthesis by PDGF. Surprisingly, the kinase insert region is not essential for PDGF stimulation of PtdIns turnover, pH change, increase in cellular calcium, and receptor autophosphorylation. In addition, PDGF stimulates a conformational change in the receptor

  6. Mutations of TMC1 cause deafness by disrupting mechanoelectrical transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Kurima, Kiyoto; Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Griffith, Andrew J

    2014-10-01

    Mutations of transmembrane channel-like 1 gene (TMC1) can cause dominant (DFNA36) or recessive (DFNB7/B11) deafness. In this article, we describe the characteristics of DFNA36 and DFNB7/B11 deafness, the features of the Tmc1 mutant mouse strains, and recent advances in our understanding of TMC1 function. Publications related to TMC1, DFNA36, or DFNB7/B11 were identified through PubMed. All affected DFNA36 subjects showed post-lingual, progressive, sensorineural hearing loss (HL), initially affecting high frequencies. In contrast, almost all affected DFNB7/B11 subjects demonstrated congenital or prelingual severe to profound sensorineural HL. The mouse Tmc1 gene also has dominant and recessive mutant alleles that cause HL in mutant strains, including Beethoven, deafness, and Tmc1 knockout mice. These mutant mice have been instrumental for revealing that Tmc1 and its closely related paralog Tmc2 are expressed in cochlear and vestibular hair cells, and are required for hair cell mechanoelectrical transduction (MET). Recent studies suggest that TMC1 and TMC2 may be components of the long-sought hair cell MET channel. TMC1 mutations disrupt hair cell MET. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Signal transduction around thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP in atopic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuepper Michael

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP, a novel interleukin-7-like cytokine, triggers dendritic cell-mediated inflammatory responses ultimately executed by T helper cells of the Th2 subtype. TSLP emerged as a central player in the development of allergic symptoms, especially in the airways, and is a prime regulatory cytokine at the interface of virus- or antigen-exposed epithelial cells and dendritic cells (DCs. DCs activated by epithelium-derived TSLP can promote naïve CD4+ T cells to adopt a Th2 phenotype, which in turn recruite eosinophilic and basophilic granulocytes as well as mast cells into the airway mucosa. These different cells secrete inflammatory cytokines and chemokines operative in inducing an allergic inflammation and atopic asthma. TSLP is, thus, involved in the control of both an innate and an adaptive immune response. Since TSLP links contact of allergen with the airway epithelium to the onset and maintainance of the asthmatic syndrome, defining the signal transduction underlying TSLP expression and function is of profound interest for a better understandimg of the disease and for the development of new therapeutics.

  8. Tiron Inhibits UVB-Induced AP-1 Binding Sites Transcriptional Activation on MMP-1 and MMP-3 Promoters by MAPK Signaling Pathway in Human Dermal Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Guo, Jia-Hui; Tu, Xue-Liang; Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Mei; Zhang, Quan-Wu; Gao, Feng-Hou

    2016-01-01

    Recent research found that Tiron was an effective antioxidant that could act as the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger or alleviate the acute toxic metal overload in vivo. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of Tiron on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-3 expression in human dermal fibroblast cells. Western blot and ELISA analysis revealed that Tiron inhibited ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced protein expression of MMP-1 and MMP-3. Real-time quantitative PCR confirmed that Tiron could inhibit UVB-induced mRNA expression of MMP-1 and MMP-3. Furthermore, Tiron significantly blocked UVB-induced activation of the MAPK signaling pathway and activator protein (AP)-1 in the downstream of this transduction pathway in fibroblasts. Through the AP-1 binding site mutation, it was found that Tiron could inhibit AP-1-induced upregulation of MMP-1 and MMP-3 expression through blocking AP-1 binding to the AP-1 binding sites in the MMP-1 and MMP-3 promoter region. In conclusion, Tiron may be a novel antioxidant for preventing and treating skin photoaging UV-induced.

  9. The NFP locus of Medicago truncatula controls an early step of Nod factor signal transduction upstream of a rapid calcium flux and root hair deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Besma Ben; Shaw, Sidney L; Oldroyd, Giles E D; Maillet, Fabienne; Penmetsa, R Varma; Cook, Douglas; Long, Sharon R; Dénarié, Jean; Gough, Clare

    2003-05-01

    Establishment of the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis depends on a molecular dialogue, in which rhizobial nodulation (Nod) factors act as symbiotic signals, playing a key role in the control of specificity of infection and nodule formation. Using nodulation-defective (Nod-) mutants of Medicago truncatula to study the mechanisms controlling Nod factor perception and signalling, we have previously identified five genes that control components of a Nod factor-activated signal transduction pathway. Characterisation of a new M. truncatula Nod- mutant led to the identification of the Nod Factor Perception (NFP) locus. The nfp mutant has a novel phenotype among Nod- mutants of M. truncatula, as it does not respond to Nod factors by any of the responses tested. The nfp mutant thus shows no rapid calcium flux, the earliest detectable Nod factor response of wild-type plants, and no root hair deformation. The nfp mutant is also deficient in Nod factor-induced calcium spiking and early nodulin gene expression. While certain genes controlling Nod factor signal transduction also control the establishment of an arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, the nfp mutant shows a wild-type mycorrhizal phenotype. These data indicate that the NFP locus controls an early step of Nod factor signal transduction, upstream of previously identified genes and specific to nodulation.

  10. Drosophila CHIP protects against mitochondrial dysfunction by acting downstream of Pink1 in parallel with Parkin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia; Xue, Jin; Ruan, Jingsong; Zhao, Juan; Tang, Beisha; Duan, Ranhui

    2017-12-01

    Mitochondrial kinase PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin function in a common pathway to regulate mitochondrial homeostasis contributing to the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease. The carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) acts as a heat shock protein 70/heat shock protein 90 cochaperone to mediate protein folding or as an E3 ubiquitin ligase to target proteins for degradation. In this study, overexpression of Drosophila CHIP suppressed a range of Pink1 mutant phenotypes in flies, including abnormal wing posture, thoracic indentation, locomotion defects, muscle degeneration, and loss of dopaminergic neurons. Mitochondrial defects of Pink1 mutant, such as excessive fusion, reduced ATP content, and crista disorganization, were rescued by CHIP but not its ligase-dead mutants. Similar phenotypes and mitochondrial impairment were ameliorated in Parkin mutant flies by wild-type CHIP. Inactivation of CHIP with null fly mutants resulted in mitochondrial defects, such as reduced thoracic ATP content at 3 d old, decreased thoracic mitochondrial DNA content, and defective mitochondrial morphology at 60 d old. CHIP mutants did not exacerbate the phenotypes of Pink1 mutant flies but markedly shortened the life span of Parkin mutant flies. These results indicate that CHIP is involved in mitochondrial integrity and may act downstream of Pink1 in parallel with Parkin.-Chen, J., Xue, J., Ruan, J., Zhao, J., Tang, B., Duan, R. Drosophila CHIP protects against mitochondrial dysfunction by acting downstream of Pink1 in parallel with Parkin. © FASEB.

  11. Manipulation of Light Signal Transduction Factors as a Means of Modifying Steroidal Glycoalkaloids Accumulation in Tomato Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui-cui Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGAs are cholesterol-derived specialized metabolites produced by Solanaceous plant species. They contribute to pathogen defense but are considered as anti-nutritional compounds and toxic to humans. Although the genes involved in the SGA biosynthetic pathway have been successfully cloned and identified, transcription factors regulating this pathway are still poorly understood. We report that silencing tomato light signal transduction transcription factors ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (SlHY5 and PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR3 (SlPIF3, by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS, altered glycoalkaloids levels in tomato leaves compared to control plant. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA and Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP analysis confirmed that SlHY5 and SlPIF3 bind to the promoter of target genes of GLYCOALKALOID METABOLISM (GAME1, GAME4, GAME17, affecting the steady-state concentrations of transcripts coding for SGA pathway enzymes. The results indicate that light-signaling transcription factors HY5 and PIF3 regulate the abundance of SGAs by modulating the transcript levels of these GAME genes. This insight into the regulation of SGA biosynthesis can be used for manipulating the level of these metabolites in crops.

  12. Dead zone area at the downstream flow of barrages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed F. Sauida

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Flow separation is a natural phenomenon encountered at some cases downstream of barrages. The main flow is divided into current and dead zone flows. The percentage area of dead zone flow must be taken into consideration downstream of barrages, due to its negative effect on flow characteristics. Experimental studies were conducted in the Hydraulic Research Institute (HRI, on a physical regulator model with five vents. Theoretically the separation zone is described as a part of an ellipse which is practically verified by plotting velocity vectors. The results show that the percentage area of dead zone to the area through length of separation depends mainly on the expansion ratio [channel width to width of opened vents], with maximum value of 81% for operated side gates. A statistical analysis was derived, to predict the percentage area of dead zone flow to the area through length of separation.

  13. Upstream-downstream cooperation approach in Guanting Reservoir watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi-Feng; Zhang, Wen-Guo

    2005-01-01

    A case study is introduced and discussed concerning water dispute of misuse and pollution between up- and down-stream parts. The relations between water usage and local industrial structures are analyzed. Results show it is important to change industrial structures of the target region along with controlling water pollution by technical and engineering methods. Three manners of upstream-downstream cooperation are presented and discussed based on the actual conditions of Guangting Reservoir watershed. Two typical scenarios are supposed and studied along with the local plan on water resources development. The best solution for this cooperation presents a good way to help the upstream developing in a new pattern of eco-economy.

  14. Surfactant Distribution Measurements Downstream of a Reynolds Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, J. S.; Korenowski, G. M.; Vogel, M. J.; Hirsa, A. H.

    1999-11-01

    Minuscule amounts of surface-active agents, of the order of 1 mg/m^2, are sufficient to change the characteristics of flow at an air/water interface. Specifically, the intrinsic viscoelastic interfacial properties, which are a strong function of the concentration of the surfactant, appear in essential terms of the boundary conditions of the flow equations. The noninvasive laser-based technique of second harmonic generation (SHG) is used to determine the surfactant concentration profile downstream of a contamination front in real time. In this experiment, a Reynolds ridge marks the leading edge of a contaminated region upstream of a surface barrier. The SHG technique allows for the nonintrusive characterization of the top molecular layer over the subsurface flow. Results include the concentration gradient and surface tension profiles downstream of the Reynolds ridge. The SHG results, along with simultaneous DPIV measurements, will be related to the interfacial viscosities.

  15. International Retailing Operations: Downstream Entry and Expansion via Franchising

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Bent; Welch, Lawrence S.

    1999-01-01

    In this article, the shift into international franchising from other forms of operation, rather than the typical home market franchising base is explored. The focus is international retail franchising, based on a study of the Danish clothing and footwear industry. In this study it was found that Danish companies were moving into international franchising as an outcome of a more general shift from upstream wholesaling and subcontracting activities to downstream involvement in retailing activit...

  16. Demand Forecasting in Downstream Supply Chain Telco Product

    OpenAIRE

    Ratih Hendayani; Adrian Darmanda

    2014-01-01

    This study aims is to manage the uncertainty demand in the downstream supply chain for a starter pack Telco product by measuring demand forecasting in one area of West Sumatra at PT. Pioneering Citra Pratama and its outlets as a distributor of PT. Indosat, one of the biggest operational cellular in Indonesia. With demand forecasting, the operator cellular can avoid a big gap between orders and demand and lower their lost opportunity. This research is a descriptive study and data collection te...

  17. Graph Regularized Meta-path Based Transductive Regression in Heterogeneous Information Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Mengting; Ouyang, Yunbo; Kaplan, Lance; Han, Jiawei

    2015-01-01

    A number of real-world networks are heterogeneous information networks, which are composed of different types of nodes and links. Numerical prediction in heterogeneous information networks is a challenging but significant area because network based information for unlabeled objects is usually limited to make precise estimations. In this paper, we consider a graph regularized meta-path based transductive regression model ( Grempt ), which combines the principal philosophies of typical graph-based transductive classification methods and transductive regression models designed for homogeneous networks. The computation of our method is time and space efficient and the precision of our model can be verified by numerical experiments.

  18. Sodic alkaline stress mitigation by exogenous melatonin in tomato needs nitric oxide as a downstream signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Na; Gong, Biao; Jin, Zhiyong; Wang, Xiufeng; Wei, Min; Yang, Fengjuan; Li, Yan; Shi, Qinghua

    2015-08-15

    The present study was designed to determine the interactive effect of exogenous melatonin and nitric oxide (NO) on sodic alkaline stress mitigation in tomato seedlings. It was observed that exogenous melatonin treatment elevated NO levels in alkaline-stressed tomato roots. However, exogenous NO had little effects on melatonin levels. Importantly, melatonin-induced NO generation was accompanied by increased tolerance to alkaline stress. Chemical scavenging of NO reduced melatonin-induced alkaline stress tolerance and defense genes' expression. However, inhibition of melatonin biosynthesis had a little effect on NO-induced alkaline stress tolerance. These results strongly suggest that NO, acting as a downstream signal, is involved in the melatonin-induced tomato tolerance to alkaline stress. This process creates a new signaling pathway for improving stress tolerance in plant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Signal transduction through CsrRS confers an invasive phenotype in group A Streptococcus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hien J Tran-Winkler

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The CsrRS (or CovRS two component system controls expression of up to 15% of the genome of group A Streptococcus (GAS. While some studies have suggested that the sensor histidine kinase CsrS responds to membrane perturbations as a result of various environmental stresses, other data have implicated the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37 and extracellular Mg(2+ as specific signals. We now report that Mg(2+ and LL-37 have opposite effects on expression of multiple genes that are activated or repressed by the transcriptional regulator CsrR. Using a GAS isolate representative of the recently emerged and widely disseminated M1T1 clone implicated in severe invasive disease, we found marked up-regulation by CsrRS of multiple virulence factors including pyrogenic exotoxin A, DNase Sda1, streptolysin O, and the hyaluronic acid capsular polysaccharide, among others. Topology and surface protein labeling studies indicated that CsrS is associated with the bacterial cell membrane and has a surface-exposed extracellular domain accessible to environmental ligands. Replacement of a cluster of three acidic amino acids with uncharged residues in the extracellular domain of CsrS abrogated LL-37 signaling and conferred a hyporesponsive phenotype consistent with tonic activation of CsrS autokinase activity, an effect that could be overridden by mutation of the CsrS active site histidine. Both loss- and gain-of-function mutations of a conserved site in the receiver domain of CsrR established an essential role for lysine 102 in CsrS-to-CsrR signal transduction. These results provide strong evidence that Mg(2+ and LL-37 are specific signals that function by altering CsrS autokinase activity and downstream phosphotransfer to CsrR to modulate its activity as a transcriptional regulator. The representation of multiple antiphagocytic and cytotoxic factors in the CsrRS regulon together with results of in vitro phagocytic killing assays support the hypothesis that Csr

  20. Genomic Targets and Features of BarA-UvrY (-SirA Signal Transduction Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesfalem R Zere

    Full Text Available The two-component signal transduction system BarA-UvrY of Escherichia coli and its orthologs globally regulate metabolism, motility, biofilm formation, stress resistance, virulence of pathogens and quorum sensing by activating the transcription of genes for regulatory sRNAs, e.g. CsrB and CsrC in E. coli. These sRNAs act by sequestering the RNA binding protein CsrA (RsmA away from lower affinity mRNA targets. In this study, we used ChIP-exo to identify, at single nucleotide resolution, genomic sites for UvrY (SirA binding in E. coli and Salmonella enterica. The csrB and csrC genes were the strongest targets of crosslinking, which required UvrY phosphorylation by the BarA sensor kinase. Crosslinking occurred at two sites, an inverted repeat sequence far upstream of the promoter and a site near the -35 sequence. DNAse I footprinting revealed specific binding of UvrY in vitro only to the upstream site, indicative of additional binding requirements and/or indirect binding to the downstream site. Additional genes, including cspA, encoding the cold-shock RNA-binding protein CspA, showed weaker crosslinking and modest or negligible regulation by UvrY. We conclude that the global effects of UvrY/SirA on gene expression are primarily mediated by activating csrB and csrC transcription. We also used in vivo crosslinking and other experimental approaches to reveal new features of csrB/csrC regulation by the DeaD and SrmB RNA helicases, IHF, ppGpp and DksA. Finally, the phylogenetic distribution of BarA-UvrY was analyzed and found to be uniquely characteristic of γ-Proteobacteria and strongly anti-correlated with fliW, which encodes a protein that binds to CsrA and antagonizes its activity in Bacillus subtilis. We propose that BarA-UvrY and orthologous TCS transcribe sRNA antagonists of CsrA throughout the γ-Proteobacteria, but rarely or never perform this function in other species.

  1. Effects of obesity and exercise on testicular leptin signal transduction and testosterone biosynthesis in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xuejie; Gao, Haining; Chen, Dequan; Tang, Donghui; Huang, Wanting; Li, Tao; Ma, Tie; Chang, Bo

    2017-04-01

    To explore the role of the testicular leptin and JAK-STAT[leptin (LEP)-JAK-STAT] pathway in testosterone biosynthesis during juvenile stages and exercise for weight loss, male C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into normal-diet and high-fat diet groups. After 10 wk, mice in the high-fat diet-fed group were further divided randomly into obese control, obese moderate-volume exercise, and obese high-volume exercise groups. Mice in the obese moderate-volume exercise group were provided with 2 h/day, 6 days/wk swimming exercise for 8 wk, and mice in the obese high-volume exercise group underwent twice the amount of daily exercise intervention as the obese moderate-volume exercise group. The results showed that a high-fat diet causes obesity, leptin resistance, inhibition of the testicular LEP-JAK-STAT pathway, decreased mRNA and protein expression of steroidogenic factor-1, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, and the P -450 side-chain cleavage enzyme, a decrease in the serum testosterone-to-estradiol ratio, and declines in sperm quality parameters. Both moderate and high-volume exercise were able to reduce body fat and increase the mRNA and protein expression of LEP-JAK-STAT, but only moderate exercise significantly increased the mRNA and protein expression of steroidogenic factor-1, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, and P -450 side-chain cleavage enzyme and significantly reversed the serum testosterone-to-estradiol ratio and sperm quality parameters. These findings suggest that by impairing the testicular LEP-JAK-STAT pathway, early-stage obesity inhibits the biosynthesis of testosterone and sexual development and reduces male reproductive potential. Long-term moderate and high-volume exercise can effectively reduce body fat and improve obesity-induced abnormalities in testicular leptin signal transduction, whereas only moderate-volume exercise can reverse the negative impacts of obesity on male reproductive function. Copyright © 2017 the American

  2. Analysis of Petroleum Downstream Industry Potential in Riau Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomi Erfando

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum downstream industry in Riau Province is still not optimal. The data shows that from 98,892,755 barrels lifting oil each year only 62,050,000 barrels could be processed in refinery unit II Dumai operated by PT Pertamina. There is a potential of 35-40% of downstream industry. Indonesian Government through The Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources declared the construction of a mini refinery to boost oil processing output in the downstream sector. A feasibility study of development plan mini refinery is needed. The study includes production capacity analysis, product analysis, development & operational refinery  analysis and economic analysis. The results obtained by the mini refinery capacity is planned to process crude oil 6000 BOPD with the products produced are gasoline, kerosene, diesel and oil. Investment cost consist of is capital cost US $ 104419784 and operating cost US $ 13766734 each year with net profit earned US $ 12330063/year and rate of return from investment 11.63%

  3. ARG1 and ARL2 contribute to gravity signal transduction in the statocytes of Arabidopsis thaliana roots and hypocotyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Patrick; Harrison, Benjamin; Stanga, John; Otegui, Marisa; Sedbrook, John

    Gravity is an important cue that plant organs use to guide their growth. Each organ is characterized by a defined gravity set point angle that dictates its optimal orientation within the gravity field. Specialized cells, named statocytes, enable this directional growth response by perceiving gravity via the sedimentation of, and/or tension/pressure exerted by, starch-filled plastids within their cytoplasm. Located in the columella region of the cap in roots and in the endodermis of hypocotyls and stems, these cells modulate the lateral transport of auxin across the corresponding organ in a gravistimulus-dependent manner. Upon plant reorientation within the gravity field, a gravity signal transduction pathway is activated within those cells, which in roots leads to a relocalization of the PIN3 auxin efflux carrier toward the lower membrane and an alkalinization of the cytoplasm. In turn, these events appear to promote a lateral transport of auxin toward the bottom side of the stimulated organ, which promotes a curvature. We previously uncovered ARG1 and ARL2 as essential contributors to these cellular processes. Mutations in these genes result in altered root and hypocotyl gravitropism. In roots, this abnormal growth behavior is associated with a lack of PIN3 relocalization within the statocytes and an absence of preferential downward auxin transport upon gravistimulation. These two genes encode paralogous J-domain proteins that are associated with the plasma membrane and other membranes of the vesicular trafficking pathway, and appear to modulate protein trafficking within the statocytes. An analysis of the root gravitropic phenotypes associated with different double mutant configurations affecting ARG1, ARL2 and PIN3 suggest that all three proteins function in a common gravity-signaling pathway. Surprisingly, when a mutation that affects starch biosynthesis (pgm) is introgressed into an arg1-2 mutant, the gravitropic defects are dramatically enhanced relative to

  4. Signal transduction through the IL-4 and insulin receptor families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L M; Keegan, A; Frankel, M; Paul, W E; Pierce, J H

    1995-07-01

    Activation of tyrosine kinase-containing receptors and intracellular tyrosine kinases by ligand stimulation is known to be crucial for mediating initial and subsequent events involved in mitogenic signal transduction. Receptors for insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) contain cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase domains that undergo autophosphorylation upon ligand stimulation. Activation of these receptors also leads to pronounced and rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) in cells of connective tissue origin. A related substrate, designated 4PS, is similarly phosphorylated by insulin and IGF-1 stimulation in many hematopoietic cell types. IRS-1 and 4PS possess a number of tyrosine phosphorylation sites that are within motifs that bind specific SH2-containing molecules known to be involved in mitogenic signaling such as PI-3 kinase, SHPTP-2 (Syp) and Grb-2. Thus, they appear to act as docking substrates for a variety of signaling molecules. The majority of hematopoietic cytokines bind to receptors that do not possess intrinsic kinase activity, and these receptors have been collectively termed as members of the hematopoietin receptor superfamily. Despite their lack of tyrosine kinase domains, stimulation of these receptors has been demonstrated to activate intracellular kinases leading to tyrosine phosphorylation of multiple substrates. Recent evidence has demonstrated that activation of different members of the Janus family of tyrosine kinases is involved in mediating tyrosine phosphorylation events by specific cytokines. Stimulation of the interleukin 4 (IL-4) receptor, a member of the hematopoietin receptor superfamily, is thought to result in activation of Jak1, Jak3, and/or Fes tyrosine kinases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Transduction-like gene transfer in the methanogen Methanococcus voltae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertani, G.

    1999-01-01

    Strain PS of Methanococcus voltae (a methanogenic, anaerobic archaebacterium) was shown to generate spontaneously 4.4-kbp chromosomal DNA fragments that are fully protected from DNase and that, upon contact with a cell, transform it genetically. This activity, here called VTA (voltae transfer agent), affects all markers tested: three different auxotrophies (histidine, purine, and cobalamin) and resistance to BES (2-bromoethanesulfonate, an inhibitor of methanogenesis). VTA was most effectively prepared by culture filtration. This process disrupted a fraction of the M. voltae cells (which have only an S-layer covering their cytoplasmic membrane). VTA was rapidly inactivated upon storage. VTA particles were present in cultures at concentrations of approximately two per cell. Gene transfer activity varied from a minimum of 2 x 10(-5) (BES resistance) to a maximum of 10(-3) (histidine independence) per donor cell. Very little VTA was found free in culture supernatants. The phenomenon is functionally similar to generalized transduction, but there is no evidence, for the time being, of intrinsically viral (i.e., containing a complete viral genome) particles. Consideration of VTA DNA size makes the existence of such viral particles unlikely. If they exist, they must be relatively few in number;perhaps they differ from VTA particles in size and other properties and thus escaped detection. Digestion of VTA DNA with the AluI restriction enzyme suggests that it is a random sample of the bacterial DNA, except for a 0.9-kbp sequence which is amplified relative to the rest of the bacterial chromosome. A VTA-sized DNA fraction was demonstrated in a few other isolates of M. voltae.

  6. Comparative genomics and transduction potential of Enterococcus faecalis temperate bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasmin, Azra; Kenny, John G; Shankar, Jayendra; Darby, Alistair C; Hall, Neil; Edwards, Clive; Horsburgh, Malcolm J

    2010-02-01

    To determine the relative importance of temperate bacteriophage in the horizontal gene transfer of fitness and virulence determinants of Enterococcus faecalis, a panel of 47 bacteremia isolates were treated with the inducing agents mitomycin C, norfloxacin, and UV radiation. Thirty-four phages were purified from culture supernatants and discriminated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and restriction mapping. From these analyses the genomes of eight representative phages were pyrosequenced, revealing four distinct groups of phages. Three groups of phages, PhiFL1 to 3, were found to be sequence related, with PhiFL1A to C and PhiFL2A and B sharing the greatest identity (87 to 88%), while PhiFL3A and B share 37 to 41% identity with PhiFL1 and 2. PhiFL4A shares 3 to 12% identity with the phages PhiFL1 to 3. The PhiFL3A and B phages possess a high DNA sequence identity with the morphogenesis and lysis modules of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris prophages. Homologs of the Streptococcus mitis platelet binding phage tail proteins, PblA and PblB, are encoded on each sequenced E. faecalis phage. Few other phage genes encoding potential virulence functions were identified, and there was little evidence of carriage of lysogenic conversion genes distal to endolysin, as has been observed with genomes of many temperate phages from the opportunist pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. E. faecalis JH2-2 lysogens were generated using the eight phages, and these were examined for their relative fitness in Galleria mellonella. Several lysogens exhibited different effects upon survival of G. mellonella compared to their isogenic parent. The eight phages were tested for their ability to package host DNA, and three were shown to be very effective for generalized transduction of naive host cells of the laboratory strains OG1RF and JH2-2.

  7. Transduction on Directed Graphs via Absorbing Random Walks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Jaydeep; Zhang, Xiaowei; Lin, Feng; Cheng, Li

    2017-08-11

    In this paper we consider the problem of graph-based transductive classification, and we are particularly interested in the directed graph scenario which is a natural form for many real world applications.Different from existing research efforts that either only deal with undirected graphs or circumvent directionality by means of symmetrization, we propose a novel random walk approach on directed graphs using absorbing Markov chains, which can be regarded as maximizing the accumulated expected number of visits from the unlabeled transient states. Our algorithm is simple, easy to implement, and works with large-scale graphs on binary, multiclass, and multi-label prediction problems. Moreover, it is capable of preserving the graph structure even when the input graph is sparse and changes over time, as well as retaining weak signals presented in the directed edges. We present its intimate connections to a number of existing methods, including graph kernels, graph Laplacian based methods, and interestingly, spanning forest of graphs. Its computational complexity and the generalization error are also studied. Empirically our algorithm is systematically evaluated on a wide range of applications, where it has shown to perform competitively comparing to a suite of state-of-the-art methods. In particular, our algorithm is shown to work exceptionally well with large sparse directed graphs with e.g. millions of nodes and tens of millions of edges, where it significantly outperforms other state-of-the-art methods. In the dynamic graph setting involving insertion or deletion of nodes and edge-weight changes over time, it also allows efficient online updates that produce the same results as of the batch update counterparts.

  8. Computational study of noise in a large signal transduction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruohonen Keijo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biochemical systems are inherently noisy due to the discrete reaction events that occur in a random manner. Although noise is often perceived as a disturbing factor, the system might actually benefit from it. In order to understand the role of noise better, its quality must be studied in a quantitative manner. Computational analysis and modeling play an essential role in this demanding endeavor. Results We implemented a large nonlinear signal transduction network combining protein kinase C, mitogen-activated protein kinase, phospholipase A2, and β isoform of phospholipase C networks. We simulated the network in 300 different cellular volumes using the exact Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm and analyzed the results in both the time and frequency domain. In order to perform simulations in a reasonable time, we used modern parallel computing techniques. The analysis revealed that time and frequency domain characteristics depend on the system volume. The simulation results also indicated that there are several kinds of noise processes in the network, all of them representing different kinds of low-frequency fluctuations. In the simulations, the power of noise decreased on all frequencies when the system volume was increased. Conclusions We concluded that basic frequency domain techniques can be applied to the analysis of simulation results produced by the Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm. This approach is suited not only to the study of fluctuations but also to the study of pure noise processes. Noise seems to have an important role in biochemical systems and its properties can be numerically studied by simulating the reacting system in different cellular volumes. Parallel computing techniques make it possible to run massive simulations in hundreds of volumes and, as a result, accurate statistics can be obtained from computational studies.

  9. Pathway Model of the Kinetics of the TGFbeta Antagonist Smad7 and Cross-Talk with the ATM and WNT Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carra, Claudio; Wang, Minli; Huff, Janice L.; Hada, Megumi; ONeill, Peter; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    Signal transduction controls cellular and tissue responses to radiation. Transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) is an important regulator of cell growth and differentiation and tissue homeostasis, and is often dis-regulated in tumor formation. Mathematical models of signal transduction pathways can be used to elucidate how signal transduction varies with radiation quality, and dose and dose-rate. Furthermore, modeling of tissue specific responses can be considered through mechanistic based modeling. We developed a mathematical model of the negative feedback regulation by Smad7 in TGFbeta-Smad signaling and are exploring possible connections to the WNT/beta -catenin, and ATM/ATF2 signaling pathways. A pathway model of TGFbeta-Smad signaling that includes Smad7 kinetics based on data in the scientific literature is described. Kinetic terms included are TGFbeta/Smad transcriptional regulation of Smad7 through the Smad3-Smad4 complex, Smad7-Smurf1 translocation from nucleus to cytoplasm, and Smad7 negative feedback regulation of the TGFO receptor through direct binding to the TGFO receptor complex. The negative feedback controls operating in this pathway suggests non-linear responses in signal transduction, which are described mathematically. We then explored possibilities for cross-talk mediated by Smad7 between DNA damage responses mediated by ATM, and with the WNT pathway and consider the design of experiments to test model driven hypothesis. Numerical comparisons of the mathematical model to experiments and representative predictions are described.

  10. IMPACT (Imaging and Molecular Markers for Patients with Lung Cancer: Approaches with Molecular Targets and Complementary, Innovative and Therapeutic Modalities)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hong, Waun K; Herbst, Roy

    2008-01-01

    The projects in this proposal specifically target several signal transduction pathways known to be critical for NSCLC pathogenesis including the EGFR pathway and the more downstream ras/raf/Mek/ERK pathway...

  11. IMPACT (Imaging and Molecular Markers for Patients with Lung Cancer: Approaches with Molecular Targets and Complementary, Innovative and Therapeutic Modalities)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hong, Waun Ki; Herbst, Roy

    2006-01-01

    The projects in this proposal specifically target several signal transduction pathways known to be critical for NSCLC pathogenesis including the EGFR pathway and the more downstream ras/raf/Mek/ERK pathway...

  12. IMPACT (Imaging and Molecular Markers for Patients with Lung Cancer: Approaches with Molecular Targets and Complementary, Innovative and Therapeutic Modalities)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hong, Waun K; Herbst, Roy

    2007-01-01

    The projects in this proposal specifically target several signal transduction pathways known to be critical for NSCLC pathogenesis including the EGFR pathway and the more downstream ras/raf/Mek/ERK pathway...

  13. Downstream Toll-like receptor signaling mediates adaptor-specific cytokine expression following focal cerebral ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolanle Famakin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deletion of some Toll-like receptors (TLRs affords protection against cerebral ischemia, but disruption of their known major downstream adaptors does not. To determine whether compensation in the production of downstream effectors by one pathway when the other is disrupted can explain these findings, we examined cytokine/chemokine expression and inflammatory infiltrates in wild-type (WT, MyD88−/− and TRIF-mutant mice following permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO. Methods Cytokine/chemokine expression was measured with a 25-plex bead array in the serum and brains of all three groups of mice at baseline (no surgery/naïve and at 3 hours and 24 hours following pMCAO. Brain inflammatory and neutrophil infiltrates were examined 24 hours following pMCAO. Results IL-6, keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF and IL-10 were significantly decreased in MyD88−/− mice compared to WT mice following pMCAO. Significantly, decreased levels of the neutrophil chemoattractants KC and G-CSF corresponded with a trend toward fewer neutrophils in the brains of MyD88−/− mice. IP-10 was significantly decreased when either pathway was disrupted. MIP-1α was significantly decreased in TRIF-mutant mice, consistent with TRIF-dependent production. MyD88−/− mice showed elevations of a number of Th2 cytokines, such as IL-13, at baseline, which became significantly decreased following pMCAO. Conclusions Both MyD88 and TRIF mediate pathway-specific cytokine production following focal cerebral ischemia. Our results also suggest a compensatory Th2-type skew at baseline in MyD88−/− mice and a paradoxical switch to a Th1 phenotype following focal cerebral ischemia. The MyD88 pathway directs the expression of neutrophil chemoattractants following cerebral ischemia.

  14. The Regulatory Role of MeAIB in Protein Metabolism and the mTOR Signaling Pathway in Porcine Enterocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulong Tang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Amino acid transporters play an important role in cell growth and metabolism. MeAIB, a transporter-selective substrate, often represses the adaptive regulation of sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2, which may act as a receptor and regulate cellular amino acid contents, therefore modulating cellular downstream signaling. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of MeAIB to SNAT2 on cell proliferation, protein turnover, and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathway in porcine enterocytes. Intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-J2 cells were cultured in a high-glucose Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s (DMEM-H medium with 0 or 5 mmoL/L System A amino acid analogue (MeAIB for 48 h. Cells were collected for analysis of proliferation, cell cycle, protein synthesis and degradation, intracellular free amino acids, and the expression of key genes involved in the mTOR signaling pathway. The results showed that SNAT2 inhibition by MeAIB depleted intracellular concentrations of not only SNAT2 amino acid substrates but also of indispensable amino acids (methionine and leucine, and suppressed cell proliferation and impaired protein synthesis. MeAIB inhibited mTOR phosphorylation, which might be involved in three translation regulators, EIF4EBP1, IGFBP3, and DDIT4 from PCR array analysis of the 84 genes related to the mTOR signaling pathway. These results suggest that SNAT2 inhibition treated with MeAIB plays an important role in regulating protein synthesis and mTOR signaling, and provide some information to further clarify its roles in the absorption of amino acids and signal transduction in the porcine small intestine.

  15. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles stimulate sea urchin immune cell phagocytic activity involving TLR/p38 MAPK-mediated signalling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsino, Annalisa; Russo, Roberta; Bonaventura, Rosa; Brunelli, Andrea; Marcomini, Antonio; Matranga, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) are one of the most widespread-engineered particles in use for drug delivery, cosmetics, and electronics. However, TiO2NP safety is still an open issue, even for ethical reasons. In this work, we investigated the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus immune cell model as a proxy to humans, to elucidate a potential pathway that can be involved in the persistent TiO2NP-immune cell interaction in vivo. Morphology, phagocytic ability, changes in activation/inactivation of a few mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 MAPK, ERK), variations of other key proteins triggering immune response (Toll-like receptor 4-like, Heat shock protein 70, Interleukin-6) and modifications in the expression of related immune response genes were investigated. Our findings indicate that TiO2NPs influence the signal transduction downstream targets of p38 MAPK without eliciting an inflammatory response or other harmful effects on biological functions. We strongly recommend sea urchin immune cells as a new powerful model for nano-safety/nano-toxicity investigations without the ethical normative issue. PMID:26412401

  16. Biphasic activation of the mTOR pathway in the gustatory cortex is correlated with and necessary for taste learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belelovsky, Katya; Kaphzan, Hanoch; Elkobi, Alina; Rosenblum, Kobi

    2009-06-10

    Different forms of memories and synaptic plasticity require synthesis of new proteins at the time of acquisition or immediately after. We are interested in the role of translation regulation in the cortex, the brain structure assumed to store long-term memories. The mammalian target of rapamycin, mTOR (also known as FRAP and RAFT-1), is part of a key signal transduction mechanism known to regulate translation of specific subset of mRNAs and to affect learning and synaptic plasticity. We report here that novel taste learning induces two waves of mTOR activation in the gustatory cortex. Interestingly, the first wave can be identified both in synaptoneurosomal and cellular fractions, whereas the second wave is detected in the cellular fraction but not in the synaptic one. Inhibition of mTOR, specifically in the gustatory cortex, has two effects. First, biochemically, it modulates several known downstream proteins that control translation and reduces the expression of postsynaptic density-95 in vivo. Second, behaviorally, it attenuates long-term taste memory. The results suggest that the mTOR pathway in the cortex modulates both translation factor activity and protein expression, to enable normal taste memory consolidation.

  17. Bitter, sweet and umami taste receptors and downstream signaling effectors: Expression in embryonic and growing chicken gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheled-Shoval, Shira L; Druyan, Shelly; Uni, Zehava

    2015-08-01

    Taste perception is a crucial biological mechanism affecting food and water choices and consumption in the animal kingdom. Bitter taste perception is mediated by a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family-the taste 2 receptors (T2R)-and their downstream proteins, whereas sweet and umami tastes are mediated by the GPCR family -taste 1 receptors (T1R) and their downstream proteins. Taste receptors and their downstream proteins have been identified in extra-gustatory tissues in mammals, such as the lungs and gastrointestinal tract (GIT), and their GIT activation has been linked with different metabolic and endocrinic pathways in the GIT. The chicken genome contains three bitter taste receptors termed ggTas2r1, ggTas2r2, and ggTas2r7, and the sweet/umami receptors ggTas1r1 and ggTas1r3, but it lacks the sweet receptor ggTas1r2. The aim of this study was to identify and determine the expression of genes related to taste perception in the chicken GIT, both at the embryonic stage and in growing chickens. The results of this study demonstrate for the first time, using real-time PCR, expression of the chicken taste receptor genes ggTas2r1, ggTas2r2, ggTas2r7, ggTas1r1, and ggTas1r3 and of their downstream protein-encoding genes TRPM5, α-gustducin, and PLCβ2 in both gustatory tissues-the palate and tongue, and extra-gustatory tissues-the proventriculus, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, and colon of embryonic day 19 (E19) and growing (21 d old) chickens. Expression of these genes suggests the involvement of taste pathways for sensing carbohydrates, amino acids and bitter compounds in the chicken GIT. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  18. Molecular mechanisms of novel regulators in cytokine signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiaofei, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    By identifying and studying novel regulators, the studies described in this thesis give substantive insights into the molecular mechanisms and different levels of control of TGF-β/BMP, IL-1β and Wnt signaling pathways. Crucially, our work for the first time demonstrated the monoubiquitination of an

  19. [Cellular adhesion signal transduction network of tumor necrosis factor-alpha induced hepatocellular carcinoma cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yongchang; Du, Shunda; Xu, Haifeng; Xu, Yiyao; Zhao, Haitao; Chi, Tianyi; Lu, Xin; Sang, Xinting; Mao, Yilei

    2014-11-18

    To systemically explore the cellular adhesion signal transduction network of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-induced hepatocellular carcinoma cells with bioinformatics tools. Published microarray dataset of TNF-α-induced HepG2, human transcription factor database HTRI and human protein-protein interaction database HPRD were used to construct and analyze the signal transduction network. In the signal transduction network, MYC and SP1 were the key nodes of signaling transduction. Several genes from the network were closely related with cellular adhesion.Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a possible key gene of effectively regulating cellular adhesion during the induction of TNF-α. EGFR is a possible key gene for TNF-α-induced metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  20. Multidrug resistance and retroviral transduction potential in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, M D; Gram, G J; Jensen, P B

    1999-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a major problem in the successful treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). New treatment strategies are needed, such as gene therapy specifically targeting the MDR cells in the tumor. Retroviral LacZ gene-containing vectors that were either pseudotyped...... for the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV-1) receptor or had specificity for the amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV-A) receptor were used for transduction of five SCLC cell lines differing by a range of MDR mechanisms. Transduction efficiencies in these cell lines were compared by calculating the percentage...... of blue colonies after X-Gal staining of the cells grown in soft agar. All examined SCLC cell lines were transducible with either vector. Transduction efficiencies varied from 5.7% to 33.5% independent of the presence of MDR. These results indicate that MDR does not severely impair transduction of SCLC...

  1. Topology of the network integrating salicylate and jasmonate signal transduction derived from global expression phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazebrook, Jane; Chen, Wenqiong; Estes, Bram; Chang, Hur-Song; Nawrath, Christiane; Métraux, Jean-Pierre; Zhu, Tong; Katagiri, Fumiaki

    2003-04-01

    The signal transduction network controlling plant responses to pathogens includes pathways requiring the signal molecules salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), and ethylene (ET). The network topology was explored using global expression phenotyping of wild-type and signaling-defective mutant plants, including eds3, eds4, eds5, eds8, pad1, pad2, pad4, NahG, npr1, sid2, ein2, and coi1. Hierarchical clustering was used to define groups of mutations with similar effects on gene expression and groups of similarly regulated genes. Mutations affecting SA signaling formed two groups: one comprised of eds4, eds5, sid2, and npr1-3 affecting only SA signaling; and the other comprised of pad2, eds3, npr1-1, pad4, and NahG affecting SA signaling as well as another unknown process. Major differences between the expression patterns in NahG and the SA biosynthetic mutant sid2 suggest that NahG has pleiotropic effects beyond elimination of SA. A third group of mutants comprised of eds8, pad1, ein2, and coi1 affected ethylene and jasmonate signaling. Expression patterns of some genes revealed mutual inhibition between SA- and JA-dependent signaling, while other genes required JA and ET signaling as well as the unknown signaling process for full expression. Global expression phenotype similarities among mutants suggested, and experiments confirmed, that EDS3 affects SA signaling while EDS8 and PAD1 affect JA signaling. This work allowed modeling of network topology, definition of co-regulated genes, and placement of previously uncharacterized regulatory genes in the network.

  2. Signal transduction induced in Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes during the invasion of mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yoshida

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Penetration of Trypanosoma cruzi into mammalian cells depends on the activation of the parasite's protein tyrosine kinase and on the increase in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration. We used metacyclic trypomastigotes, the T. cruzi developmental forms that initiate infection in mammalian hosts, to investigate the association of these two events and to identify the various components of the parasite signal transduction pathway involved in host cell invasion. We have found that i both the protein tyrosine kinase activation, as measured by phosphorylation of a 175-kDa protein (p175, and Ca2+ mobilization were induced in the metacyclic forms by the HeLa cell extract but not by the extract of T. cruzi-resistant K562 cells; ii treatment of parasites with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein blocked both p175 phosphorylation and the increase in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration; iii the recombinant protein J18, which contains the full-length sequence of gp82, a metacyclic stage surface glycoprotein involved in target cell invasion, interfered with tyrosine kinase and Ca2+ responses, whereas the monoclonal antibody 3F6 directed at gp82 induced parasite p175 phosphorylation and Ca2+ mobilization; iv treatment of metacyclic forms with phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 blocked Ca2+ signaling and impaired the ability of the parasites to enter HeLa cells, and v drugs such as heparin, a competitive IP3-receptor blocker, caffeine, which affects Ca2+ release from IP3-sensitive stores, in addition to thapsigargin, which depletes intracellular Ca2+ compartments and lithium ion, reduced the parasite infectivity. Taken together, these data suggest that protein tyrosine kinase, phospholipase C and IP3 are involved in the signaling cascade that is initiated on the parasite cell surface by gp82 and leads to Ca2+ mobilization required for target cell invasion.

  3. Finite-State Channel Models for Signal Transduction in Neural Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Eckford, Andrew W.; Loparo, Kenneth A.; Thomas, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Information theory provides powerful tools for understanding communication systems. This analysis can be applied to intercellular signal transduction, which is a means of chemical communication among cells and microbes. We discuss how to apply information-theoretic analysis to ligand-receptor systems, which form the signal carrier and receiver in intercellular signal transduction channels. We also discuss the applications of these results to neuroscience.

  4. A design of the acoustic electric transduction system with piezoelectric ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Qingyu

    2017-05-01

    Based on the theory of acoustic-electric transduction, a piezoelectric acoustic electric transduction system was designed, aiming at recycling the noise of turbine generator sets. The frequency response characteristic of the equivalent input impedance and output voltage. And the simulation was conducted with MATLAB. Then the conclusion was drawn that when the equivalent input impedance reached the minimum, the output voltage amplitude reached the maximum. The resonance frequency of Helmholtz resonator is the primary factor to the whole system.

  5. Investigation of the charge effect on the electrochemical transduction in a quinone-based DNA sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisberg, S.; Piro, B.; Noel, V.

    2008-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism involved in the electrochemical transduction process of a conducting polymer-based DNA sensor, peptide nucleic acids (PNA) were used. PNA are DNA analogues having similar hybridization properties but are neutral. This allows to discriminate the electrostatic effect of D...... strands from the steric hindrance generated on the bioelectrode upon hybridization. It can be concluded that DNA conformational changes are determinant in the transduction process and that the electrostatic effect is negligible....

  6. Intracellular Ca2+ and the phospholipid PIP2 regulate the taste transduction ion channel TRPM5

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Dan; Liman, Emily R.

    2003-01-01

    The transduction of taste is a fundamental process that allows animals to discriminate nutritious from noxious substances. Three taste modalities, bitter, sweet, and amino acid, are mediated by G protein-coupled receptors that signal through a common transduction cascade: activation of phospholipase C β2, leading to a breakdown of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) into diacylglycerol and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, which causes release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. The ion c...

  7. Misoprostol Reverse Hippocampal Neuron Cyclooxygenase-2 Downstream Signaling Imbalance in Aluminum-Overload Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuanxin; Lei, Wenjuan; Wang, Jianfeng; Hu, Xinyue; Wei, Yuling; Ji, Chaonan; Yang, Junqing

    2016-01-01

    Although COX-2 inhibition in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases has shown neuroprotection, recent studies have revealed some serious side effects (ulcers, bleeding, fatal cerebrovascular diseases etc.) and the limited benefits of COX-2 inhibitors. A more focused approach is necessary to explore the therapeutic effect of the COX downstream signaling pathway in neurological research. The aim of this study was to explore the alterations of the PGES-PGE2-EP signal pathway and the effect of misoprostol on neurodegeneration by chronic aluminum-overload in rats. Adult rats were treated by intragastric administration of aluminum gluconate. The PGE2 content and expression of PGES and EPs in the hippocampi of rats were detected using ELISA, q-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. The content of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the rat hippocampi were also detected. The misoprostol treatment dose-dependently improved spatial learning and memory function as well as healing after hippocampal neuron damage induced by chronic aluminum-overload in rats. Meanwhile, the administration of misoprostol resulted in a decrease in the PGE2 level and down-regulation of the mPGES-1, EP2 and EP4 expression levels, while there was a dose-dependent up-regulation of EP3 expression. These results suggest that misoprostol possesses a neuroprotective property, and the mechanism involves affecting the EP3 level and reducing the endogenous production of PGE2 through a negative feedback mechanism, increasing the EP3 expression level, decreasing the EP2 and EP4 expression levels, and rebuilding the mPGES-1-PGE2-EP1-4 signal pathway balance. In this way, misoprostol has a counteractive effect on oxidant stress and inflammation in the central nervous system. The PGES-PGE2-EPs signaling pathway is a potential therapeutic strategy for treating neurodegeneration in patients. PMID:27033056

  8. The transformation of rivers’ temperature regime downstream of reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirvel Ivan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the problem of the transformation of rivers’ temperature conditions influenced by artificial reservoirs. A quantitative estimation of average water temperatures over ten days, and maximum and average annual water temperatures of regulated rivers downstream of reservoirs was made on the basis of the data analysis of a complete period of instrumental observations of the Republican Hydrometeorological Centre of the Republic of Belarus. It is established that the character and the parameters of the transformation of temperature conditions of the regulated rivers along with morphometric features of the reservoirs are determined by the meteorological conditions of the year and the operating conditions of the water-engineering system. The length of the cooling period effect varies from 20 days downstream of small reservoirs to 50-70 days downstream of small and average size reservoirs. The warming effect is less significant by temperature, but lasts longer and is appreciable around 200-240 days in a year. An increase in the average annual water temperature up to 0.5°C and a decrease in maximum temperature down to 1.1°C are observed in the tail-water of average size storage pools. Small size storage pools demonstrate an annual increase in annual water temperature up to 0.3°C and a decrease in maximum temperature down to 0.3°C. Small size water pools show an increase both in annual water temperature up to 0.5°C and maximum water temperature up to 0.3°C. Typical changes in temperature conditions of rivers are observed for a distance of 130 kilometres below the dam of average size water pools, along 70 kilometres in small water pools and along 30 kilometres in tiny ones.

  9. The Signaling Pathway of Caenorhabditis elegans Mediates Chemotaxis Response to the Attractant 2-Heptanone in a Trojan Horse-like Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunmei; Zhao, Ninghui; Chen, Yao; Zhang, Donghua; Yan, Jinyuan; Zou, Wei; Zhang, Keqin; Huang, Xiaowei

    2016-11-04

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits behavioral responses to a wide range of odorants associated with food and pathogens. A previous study described a Trojan Horse-like strategy of pathogenesis whereby the bacterium Bacillus nematocida B16 emits the volatile organic compound 2-heptanone to trap C. elegans for successful infection. Here, we further explored the receptor for 2-heptanone as well as the pathway involved in signal transduction in C. elegans Our experiments showed that 2-heptanone sensing depended on the function of AWC neurons and a GPCR encoded by str-2 Consistent with the above observation, the HEK293 cells expressing STR-2 on their surfaces showed a transient elevation in intracellular Ca 2+ levels after 2-heptanone applications. After combining the assays of RNA interference and gene mutants, we also identified the Gα subunits and their downstream components in the olfactory signal cascade that are necessary for responding to 2-heptanone, including Gα subunits of egl-30 and gpa-3, phospholipase C of plc-1and egl-8, and the calcium channel of cmk-1 and cal-1. Our work demonstrates for the first time that an integrated signaling pathway for 2-heptanone response in C. elegans involves recognition by GPCR STR-2, activation by Gα subunits of egl-30/gpa-3 and transfer to the PLC pathway, indicating that a potentially novel olfactory pathway exists in AWC neurons. Meanwhile, since 2-heptanone, a metabolite from the pathogenic bacterium B. nematocida B16, can be sensed by C. elegans and thus strongly attract its host, our current work also suggested coevolution between the pathogenic microorganism and the chemosensory system in C. elegans. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Recent Molecular Advances on Downstream Plant Responses to Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Regina Batista de Souza

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses such as extremes of temperature and pH, high salinity and drought, comprise some of the major factors causing extensive losses to crop production worldwide. Understanding how plants respond and adapt at cellular and molecular levels to continuous environmental changes is a pre-requisite for the generation of resistant or tolerant plants to abiotic stresses. In this review we aimed to present the recent advances on mechanisms of downstream plant responses to abiotic stresses and the use of stress-related genes in the development of genetically engineered crops.

  11. Patents and Downstream Innovation Suppresion - Facts or Fiction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howells, John

    Merges and Nelson have proposed that pioneer patents of "broad" scope (where the claimed scope is typically broader than that strictly justified by the invention) enable their owners to "block" or "hold-up" downstream innovation.[1] They claim to have illustrated this thesis in such important cases...... of development as aircraft, the car, radio and electric lighting. Merges and Nelson quite logically use their work to question the value of Kitch's prospect theory of patents,[2] a theory that emphasises that the social value of patents is that they enable the coordination of technological development...

  12. Enhanced mixing downstream of a pile in an estuarine flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lass, H. U.; Mohrholz, V.; Knoll, M.; Prandke, H.

    2008-11-01

    We studied the impact on stratification and mixing of a bridge pile in a stratified shear flow at the Western Bridge of the Great Belt Fixed Link, Denmark, in January and April 2006. Stratification was measured with high horizontal resolution by towed CTD chains and dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy was measured by a free-falling MSS 90 microstructure profiler equipped with shear probes. Background stratification and current were measured by standard CTD and a bottom-mounted ADCP, respectively. The spatial and temporal variability of the flow field close behind a single pile was measured by an ADCP mounted on a small catamaran tethered to this pile. A shear background flow of varying strength was observed with an inflow of up to 80 cm s - 1 in the surface layer and an outflow of 10 cm s - 1 in the bottom layer. The brackish surface layer was separated from the saline Kattegat water in the bottom layer by an intermediate layer resulting in a Brunt-Väisälä frequency of up to 100 cycles per hour (cph). The maximum Reynolds number ( Re) and internal Froude number ( Fr) were 4.6 × 10 6 and 1.3, respectively. Eddies occurred downstream of a pile with a characteristic diameter of the pile and a frequency corresponding to a von Kármán vortex street when near-surface Fr > 0.7. Enhanced mixing was observed in the von Kármán vortex streets, which caused an increase in salinity by a few psu in the surface mixed layer of the eddy up to 400 m downstream of the piles. Differential advection by cross-channel circulation smeared out laterally from the wakes' salinity anomalies and turbulence. The dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy in the intermediate layer increased by an order of magnitude downstream of the piles as a function of Fr when Fr > 0.7. This enhanced mixing reduced the mean potential energy anomaly downstream by some 10 Jm - 3 in the upper 15 m depth and caused an upstream-directed baroclinic pressure gradient of the same order as the barotropic

  13. Mechanical transduction by ion channels: A cautionary tale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Frederick

    2015-09-28

    Mechanical transduction by ion channels occurs in all cells. The physiological functions of these channels have just begun to be elaborated, but if we focus on the upper animal kingdom, these channels serve the common sensory services such as hearing and touch, provide the central nervous system with information on the force and position of muscles and joints, and they provide the autonomic system with information about the filling of hollow organs such as blood vessels. However, all cells of the body have mechanosensitive channels (MSCs), including red cells. Most of these channels are cation selective and are activated by bilayer tension. There are also K + selective MSCs found commonly in neurons where they may be responsible for both general anesthesia and knockout punches in the boxing ring by hyperpolarizing neurons to reduce excitability. The cationic MSCs are typically inactive under normal mechanical stress, but open under pathologic stress. The channels are normally inactive because they are shielded from stress by the cytoskeleton. The cationic MSCs are specifically blocked by the externally applied peptide GsMtx4 (aka, AT-300). This is the first drug of its class and provides a new approach to many pathologies since it is nontoxic, non-immunogenic, stable in a biological environment and has a long pharmacokinetic lifetime. Pathologies involving excessive stress are common. They produce cardiac arrhythmias, contraction in stretched dystrophic muscle, xerocytotic and sickled red cells, etc . The channels seem to function primarily as "fire alarms", providing feedback to the cytoskeleton that a region of the bilayer is under excessive tension and needs reinforcing. The eukaryotic forms of MSCs have only been cloned in recent years and few people have experience working with them. "Newbies" need to become aware of the technology, potential artifacts, and the fundamentals of mechanics. The most difficult problem in studying MSCs is that the actual stimulus

  14. Signal transduction during mating and meiosis in S. pombe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O; Nielsen, Olaf

    1993-01-01

    When starved, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe responds by producing mating factors or pheromones that signal to cells of the opposite sex to initiate mating. Like its distant relative Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cells of the two mating types of S. pombe each produce a distinct pheromone...... that binds to receptors on the opposite cell type to induce the morphological changes required for mating. While the pathways are basically very similar in the two yeasts, pheromone signalling in S. pombe differs in several important ways from that of the more familiar budding yeast. In this article, Olaf...... Nielsen describes the pheromones and their effects in S. pombe, and compares the signalling pathways of the two yeasts....

  15. Phospholipases and the network of auxin signal transduction with ABP1 and TIR1 as two receptors: a comprehensive and provocative model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günther F. E. Scherer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Phospholipase D (PLD, secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2 and patatin-related phospholipase A (pPLA are important elements in auxin signal transduction. PLDζ2 has a function in auxin transport. PLD's potential link to upstream receptors ABP1 or TIR1, and to cytosolic calcium as an activator of PLDζ2, is outlined. A link from PLDζ2 to activation of PINOID, a kinase activating PIN proteins, is suggested. The activation mechanism of sPLA2, also involved in auxin transport-related functions, is unknown. New experiments show that not only ABP1 but also pPLA isoforms are tied to rapid activation of early auxin-induced genes, the functional domain of the other auxin receptor TIR1. Post-translational activation mechanisms for pPLAs are suggested to be tied to ABP1. We propose pPLAs and PLDζ2 are mediators in auxin signaling. The downstream targets of regulation by ABP1 as the receptor we propose to be primarily PIN proteins. This coordinates gene expression regulation by TIR1 in the nucleus. A clear separation of cytosolic mechanisms of auxin signalling is suggested with ABP1 as receptor, and phospholipases A and D and PIN proteins as downstream targets on the on hand, and TIR1 and regulation of early auxin-induced genes on the other. At the same time, this separation is coordinated by auxin transport creating the auxin concentration in the nucleus suitable for gene regulation.

  16. Correlation of body mass index with Th1/Th2 balance, adhesion molecules and insulin signal transduction in infertile patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Juan Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the correlation of body mass index with Th1/Th2 balance, adhesion molecules and insulin signal transduction in infertile patients. Methods: A total of 132 patients who received diagnostic curettage due to infertility in Tangshan Maternal and Child Health Hospital between June 2015 and March 2016 were selected as the research subjects and divided into the normal group with BMI 30 kg/m 2 according to BMI, and the levels of Th1/ Th2 cytokines in serum as well as the expression of Th1/Th2 transcription factors, adhesion molecules and insulin signal pathway molecules in endometrial tissue were detected. Results: IFN-γ and TNF-α levels in serum of obesity group and overweight group were significantly higher than those of control group while IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 levels in serum as well as CD44V6, N-cadherin, FAK, ICAM-1, GLUT-4, IRS-1, PI3K and AKT mRNA expression in endometrial tissue were significantly lower than those of control group; IFN-γ and TNF-α levels in serum of obesity group were significantly higher than those of overweight group while IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 levels in serum as well as CD44V6, N-cadherin, FAK, ICAM-1, GLUT-4, IRS-1, PI3K and AKT mRNA expression in endometrial tissue were significantly lower than those of overweight group. Conclusion: Weight gain can aggravate the Th1/Th2 disorder, reduce the adhesion molecule expression and hinder the insulin signal transduction in infertile patients.

  17. Mutations in the gravity persistence signal loci in Arabidopsis disrupt the perception and/or signal transduction of gravitropic stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Sarah E.; Rashotte, Aaron M.; Shipp, Matthew J.; Robertson, Dominique; Muday, Gloria K.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Gravity plays a fundamental role in plant growth and development, yet little is understood about the early events of gravitropism. To identify genes affected in the signal perception and/or transduction phase of the gravity response, a mutant screen was devised using cold treatment to delay the gravity response of inflorescence stems of Arabidopsis. Inflorescence stems of Arabidopsis show no response to gravistimulation at 4 degrees C for up to 3 h. However, when gravistimulated at 4 degrees C and then returned to vertical at room temperature (RT), stems bend in response to the previous, horizontal gravistimulation (H. Fukaki, H. Fujisawa, M. Tasaka [1996] Plant Physiology 110: 933-943). This indicates that gravity perception, but not the gravitropic response, occurs at 4 degrees C. Recessive mutations were identified at three loci using this cold effect on gravitropism to screen for gravity persistence signal (gps) mutants. All three mutants had an altered response after gravistimulation at 4 degrees C, yet had phenotypically normal responses to stimulations at RT. gps1-1 did not bend in response to the 4 degrees C gravity stimulus upon return to RT. gps2-1 responded to the 4 degrees C stimulus but bent in the opposite direction. gps3-1 over-responded after return to RT, continuing to bend to an angle greater than wild-type plants. At 4 degrees C, starch-containing statoliths sedimented normally in both wild-type and the gps mutants, but auxin transport was abolished at 4 degrees C. These results are consistent with GPS loci affecting an aspect of the gravity signal perception/transduction pathway that occurs after statolith sedimentation, but before auxin transport.

  18. Deregulation of c-Src tyrosine kinase and its downstream targets in pre-eclamptic placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irtegun, Sevgi; Akcora-Yıldız, Dilara; Pektanc, Gulsum; Karabulut, Cagla

    2017-08-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a serious pregnancy disorder characterized by the new onset of hypertension and proteinuria in the second trimester of pregnancy. The determination of a key signaling regulatory mechanism involved in placental functions is critical to understanding the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia. The aim of this study was to examine the activity of c-Src and its downstream targets, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, p38 and Jun N-terminal kinase, as well as nuclear factor (NF)-ĸB in placental tissues collected from women with pre-eclampsia. Ten pre-eclamptic (PE) placentas and 10 control placentas were used in this study. The Western blot method was performed to evaluate the c-Src/ mitogen activated protein kinase/NF-ĸB signaling pathway in each group. c-Src phosphorylation at Tyr-416, used as a measure of c-Src activity, was significantly decreased in PE placentas relative to the control. Reduced c-Src activity resulted in the suppression of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation and a significant reduction in the phosphorylation of p38 and Jun N-terminal kinase in PE placentas. Moreover, IĸBα phosphorylation was significantly elevated, while NF-ĸB phosphorylation was suppressed in PE placentas. The c-Src/MAPK/NF-ĸB signaling pathway may contribute to the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia. © 2017 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  19. Tidal Influence on Water Quality of Kapuas Kecil River Downstream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnaini, Rizki; Sudarmadji; Purwono, Suryo

    2018-02-01

    The Kapuas Kecil River is strongly influenced by tidal, in the dry season the intrusion of surface water is often a problem for the WTP because it causes the change of raw water quality to be processed. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of sea tides on water quality of the Kapuas Kecil River. The study was conducted in Kapuas River downstream along ± 30 km from the upper boundary to the estuary. Water sampling is carried out during the dry and rainy season, when the tidal conditions at 7 (seven) locations of the monitoring station. Descriptive analysis methods and regression-correlation statistics are used to determine the effect of tides on water quality in Kapuas River downstream. In general, the water quality of the Kapuas Kecil River has exceeded the criteria of first class water quality, ie water that can be used for drinking water. The status of water quality of the Kapuas Kecil River based on the pollution index calculation shows the condition of the river is "mild to medium pollutants". The result of multiple linear regression analysis got the value of coefficient of determination (adjusted R square) = 0,760, which in whole show that independent variable (tidal and distance) influence to dependent variable (value of TDS) equal to 76%.

  20. Kappa-Electrons Downstream of the Solar Wind Termination Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahr, H. J.

    2017-12-01

    A theoretical description of the solar wind electron distribution function downstream of the termination shock under the influence of the shock-induced injection of overshooting KeV-energetic electrons will be presented. A kinetic phasespace transport equation in the bulk frame of the heliosheath plasma flow is developed for the solar wind electrons, taking into account shock-induced electron injection, convective changes, magnetic cooling processes and whistler wave-induced energy diffusion. Assuming that the local electron distribution under the prevailing Non-LTE conditions can be represented by a local kappa function with a local kappa parameter that varies with the streamline coordinates, we determine the parameters of the resulting, initial kappa distribution for the downstream electrons. From this initial function spectral electron fluxes can be derived and can be compared with those measured by the VOYAGER-1 spacecraft in the range between 40 to 70 KeV. It can then be shown that with kappa values around kappa = 6 one can in fact fit these data very satisfactorily. In addition it is shown that for isentropic electron flows kappa-distributed electrons have to undergo simultaneous changes of both parameters, i.e. kappa and theta, of the electron kappa function. It is also shown then that under the influence of energy sinks and sources the electron flux becomes non-isentropic with electron entropies changing along the streamline.

  1. The tomato kinome and the tomato kinase library ORFeome: novel resources for the study of kinases and signal transduction in tomato and solanaceae species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dharmendra K; Calviño, Mauricio; Brauer, Elizabeth K; Fernandez-Pozo, Noe; Strickler, Susan; Yalamanchili, Roopa; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Aoki, Koh; Shibata, Daisuke; Stratmann, Johannes W; Popescu, George V; Mueller, Lukas A; Popescu, Sorina C

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinase-driven phosphorylation constitutes the core of cellular signaling. Kinase components of signal transduction pathways are often targeted for inactivation by pathogens. The study of kinases and immune signal transduction in the model crop tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) would benefit from the availability of community-wide resources for large scale and systems-level experimentation. Here, we defined the tomato kinome and performed a comprehensive comparative analysis of the tomato kinome and 15 other plant species. We constructed a tomato kinase library (TOKN 1.0) of over 300 full-length open reading frames (ORF) cloned into a recombination-based vector. We developed a high-throughput pipeline to isolate and transform tomato protoplasts. A subset of the TOKN 1.0 library kinases were expressed in planta, were purified, and were used to generate a functional tomato protein microarray. All resources created were utilized to test known and novel associations between tomato kinases and Pseudomonas syringae DC3000 effectors in a large-scale format. Bsk7 was identified as a component of the plant immune response and a candidate effector target. These resources will enable comprehensive investigations of signaling pathways and host-pathogen interactions in tomato and other Solanaceae spp.

  2. Rod Outer Segment Development Influences AAV-Mediated Photoreceptor Transduction After Subretinal Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Lolita; Ma, Shan; Cheng, Shun-Yun; Gao, Guangping; Punzo, Claudio

    2017-06-01

    Vectors based on the adeno-associated virus (AAV) are currently the preferred tools for delivering genes to photoreceptors (PR) in small and large animals. AAVs have been applied successfully in various models of PR dystrophies. However, unknown barriers still limit AAV's efficient application in several forms of severe PR degenerations due to insufficient transgene expression and/or treated cells at the time of injection. Optimizations of PR gene therapy strategies will likely benefit from the identification of the cellular factors that influence PR transduction. Interestingly, recent studies have shown that the AAV transduction profile of PRs differs significantly between neonatal and adult mouse retinas after subretinal injection. This phenomenon may provide clues to identify host factors that influence the efficiency of AAV-mediated PR transduction. This study demonstrates that rod outer segments are critical modulators of efficient AAV-mediated rod transduction. During retinal development, rod transduction correlated temporally and spatially with the differentiation order of PRs when vectors were introduced subretinally but not when introduced intravitreally. All subretinally injected vectors had an initial preference to transduce cones in the absence of formed rod outer segments and then displayed a preference for rods as the cells matured, independently of the expression cassette or AAV serotype. Consistent with this observation, altered development of rod outer segments was associated with a strong reduction of rod transduction and an increase in the percentage of transduced cones by 2- to 2.8-fold. A similar increase of cone transduction was observed in the adult retinal degeneration 1 (rd1) retina compared to wild-type mice. These results suggest that the loss of rod outer segments in diseased retinas could markedly affect gene transfer efficiency of AAV vectors by limiting the ability of AAVs to infect dying rods efficiently. This information could be

  3. A transductive neuro-fuzzy controller: application to a drilling process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajate, Agustín; Haber, Rodolfo E; Vega, Pastora I; Alique, José R

    2010-07-01

    Recently, new neuro-fuzzy inference algorithms have been developed to deal with the time-varying behavior and uncertainty of many complex systems. This paper presents the design and application of a novel transductive neuro-fuzzy inference method to control force in a high-performance drilling process. The main goal is to study, analyze, and verify the behavior of a transductive neuro-fuzzy inference system for controlling this complex process, specifically addressing the dynamic modeling, computational efficiency, and viability of the real-time application of this algorithm as well as assessing the topology of the neuro-fuzzy system (e.g., number of clusters, number of rules). A transductive reasoning method is used to create local neuro-fuzzy models for each input/output data set in a case study. The direct and inverse dynamics of a complex process are modeled using this strategy. The synergies among fuzzy, neural, and transductive strategies are then exploited to deal with process complexity and uncertainty through the application of the neuro-fuzzy models within an internal model control (IMC) scheme. A comparative study is made of the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and the suggested method inspired in a transductive neuro-fuzzy inference strategy. The two neuro-fuzzy strategies are evaluated in a real drilling force control problem. The experimental results demonstrated that the transductive neuro-fuzzy control system provides a good transient response (without overshoot) and better error-based performance indices than the ANFIS-based control system. In particular, the IMC system based on a transductive neuro-fuzzy inference approach reduces the influence of the increase in cutting force that occurs as the drill depth increases, reducing the risk of rapid tool wear and catastrophic tool breakage.

  4. Guard Cell Signal Transduction Network: Advances in Understanding Abscisic Acid, CO2, and Ca2+ Signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Tae-Houn

    2010-05-04

    Stomatal pores are formed by pairs of specialized epidermal guard cells and serve as major gateways for both CO2 influx into plants from the atmosphere and transpirational water loss of plants. Because they regulate stomatal pore apertures via integration of both endogenous hormonal stimuli and environmental signals, guard cells have been highly developed as a model system to dissect the dynamics and mechanisms of plant-cell signaling. The stress hormone ABA and elevated levels of CO2 activate complex signaling pathways in guard cells that are mediated by kinases/phosphatases, secondary messengers, and ion channel regulation. Recent research in guard cells has led to a new hypothesis for how plants achieve specificity in intracellular calcium signaling: CO2 and ABA enhance (prime) the calcium sensitivity of downstream calcium-signaling mechanisms. Recent progress in identification of early stomatal signaling components are reviewed here, including ABA receptors and CO2-binding response proteins, as well as systems approaches that advance our understanding of guard cell-signaling mechanisms.

  5. Environmental radiological studies downstream from Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Wong, K.M.; Eagle, R.J.; Dawson, J.W.; Brunk, J.L.; Jokela, T.A.

    1985-01-01

    This report summarizes the information compiled in 1984 while assessing the environmental impact of radionuclides in aquatic releases from the Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Generating Station. Gamma-emitting radionuclides discharged since 1981 are found in many of the dietary components derived from the creeks receiving the effluent wastewater. Some soils and crops are found to contain radionuclides that originate from the contaminated water that was transferred to land during the irrigation season. 134 Cs and 137 Cs are the primary gamma-emitting radionuclides detected in the edible flesh of fish from the creeks. Concentrations in the flesh of fish decreased exponentially with distance from the plant. No significant differences in the 137 Cs activity were found between male and female fish of equal size, but concentrations may vary in fish of different size, with the season and diet. 21% of the total 137 Cs and 134 Cs discharged between 1981 and 1984 is associated with the creek sediments to a distance of 27 km from the plant. Fractions of the missing inventory have been transferred to land during the irrigation season or to downstream regions more distant than 27 km from the plant. The radiocesium content of the sediments in 1984 decreased significantly in a downstream direction, much in the same manner as concentrations decreased in fish. Radioactivity originating from the plant was not above detection limits in any terrestrial food item sampled beyond 6.5 km from the plant. Based on the usage factors provided by individuals interviewed in a 1984 survey, the fish and aquatic-organism ingestion pathway contributed the largest radiological dose to humans utilizing products contaminated with the radionuclides in the liquid wastes discharged from the Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Generating Station in 1984

  6. Columbia River pathway report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes the river-pathway portion of the first phase of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The HEDR Project is estimating radiation doses that could have been received by the public from the Department of Energy's Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the river-pathway dose reconstruction effort sought to determine whether dose estimates could be calculated for populations in the area from above the Hanford Site at Priest Rapids Dam to below the site at McNary Dam from January 1964 to December 1966. Of the potential sources of radionuclides from the river, fish consumption was the most important. Doses from drinking water were lower at Pasco than at Richland and lower at Kennewick than at Pasco. The median values of preliminary dose estimates calculated by HEDR are similar to independent, previously published estimates of average doses to Richland residents. Later phases of the HEDR Project will address dose estimates for periods other than 1964--1966 and for populations downstream of McNary Dam. 17 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab

  7. The downstream externalities of harvesting rainwater in semi-arid watersheds: an Indian case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, J.A.; Biggs, T.W.; Bouwer, L.M.

    2011-01-01

    Water-related investment projects affect downstream water availability, and therefore should account for these externalities. Few projects do, however, owing to lack of awareness, lack of data and difficulty in linking upstream investments to downstream effects. This article assesses the downstream

  8. Discovery of intramolecular signal transduction network based on a new protein dynamics model of energy dissipation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Wei Ma

    Full Text Available A novel approach to reveal intramolecular signal transduction network is proposed in this work. To this end, a new algorithm of network construction is developed, which is based on a new protein dynamics model of energy dissipation. A key feature of this approach is that direction information is specified after inferring protein residue-residue interaction network involved in the process of signal transduction. This enables fundamental analysis of the regulation hierarchy and identification of regulation hubs of the signaling network. A well-studied allosteric enzyme, E. coli aspartokinase III, is used as a model system to demonstrate the new method. Comparison with experimental results shows that the new approach is able to predict all the sites that have been experimentally proved to desensitize allosteric regulation of the enzyme. In addition, the signal transduction network shows a clear preference for specific structural regions, secondary structural types and residue conservation. Occurrence of super-hubs in the network indicates that allosteric regulation tends to gather residues with high connection ability to collectively facilitate the signaling process. Furthermore, a new parameter of propagation coefficient is defined to determine the propagation capability of residues within a signal transduction network. In conclusion, the new approach is useful for fundamental understanding of the process of intramolecular signal transduction and thus has significant impact on rational design of novel allosteric proteins.

  9. The effect of antimicrobials on verocytotoxin bacteriophage transduction under bovine rumen fluid and broth conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyambe S.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The verocytotoxin genes in verocytotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC are carried by bacteriophages, incorporated into the bacterial genome (prophage. Antibiotics may promote phage replication and release to infect other cells (transduction, thus leading to the emergence of new VTEC strains. This study investigated transduction of a verocytotoxin2-encoding bacteriophage (3538(vtx2::cat under laboratory conditions, including the effect of antibiotic treatments. Luria-Bertani Miller broth and rumen fluid (raw and sterilised by irradiation were inoculated with the donor (C600φ3538(Δvtx2::cat and recipient (E. coli C600::kanamycinR strains (4 log10 cfu/mL and incubated at 38°C. Antibiotic treatments (minimal inhibitory and sub-inhibitory concentrations of ampicillin, cefquinome, oxytetracycline and sodium sulfamethazine were applied after 3 h. Samples were tested for donor, recipient, cell-free phage and transductants at times t = 0, 3, 4, 6, 27 (24 h post-antibiotic treatment and 51 h. Free phage was detected in the untreated broth and rumen samples, as were the transductants confirmed by polymerase chain reaction. The antibiotic treatments did not significantly (P > 0.01 increase the concentrations of free phage or transductants detected. It was therefore concluded that, under laboratory conditions, the antibiotics tested did not induce bacteriophage lysis, release and infection of new bacterial cells beyond that constitutively found in the phage population.

  10. Suppression of tumorigenicity and metastatic potential of melanoma cells by transduction of interferon gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lykhova A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate an inhibitory effect of baculovirus-mediated transduction of the murine interferon-beta gene on mouse melanoma in vitro and in vivo. Methods. Studies were performed on B16 mouse melanoma (MM-4 cell line. Transduction, immunocytochemical and tumor cell biology approaches have been used in this study. Results. Transduction of MM-4 cells by the recombinant baculovirus with IFN-beta gene is accompanied by morphological changes of tumor cells, suppression of cell proliferation, significant inhibition of platting efficiency of cells and their colonies formation in semisolid agar. Moreover, transduction of melanoma MM-4 cells by the baculovirus IFN-transgene leads to inhibition of tumorigenicity and metastatic ability of the cells in vivo. The intravenous administration of recombinant baculovirus vector with IFN gene inhibits growth of metastases induced in the lungs of mice by intravenously injected tumor cells. Conclusions. Transduction of mouse melanoma cells by the recombinant baculovirus with murine IFN-beta gene inhibits their proliferative potential, tumorigenicity and metastatic activity.

  11. Allogeneic cell therapy bioprocess economics and optimization: downstream processing decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Sally; Simaria, Ana S; Varadaraju, Hemanthram; Gupta, Siddharth; Warren, Kim; Farid, Suzanne S

    2015-01-01

    To develop a decisional tool to identify the most cost effective process flowsheets for allogeneic cell therapies across a range of production scales. A bioprocess economics and optimization tool was built to assess competing cell expansion and downstream processing (DSP) technologies. Tangential flow filtration was generally more cost-effective for the lower cells/lot achieved in planar technologies and fluidized bed centrifugation became the only feasible option for handling large bioreactor outputs. DSP bottlenecks were observed at large commercial lot sizes requiring multiple large bioreactors. The DSP contribution to the cost of goods/dose ranged between 20-55%, and 50-80% for planar and bioreactor flowsheets, respectively. This analysis can facilitate early decision-making during process development.

  12. 'Patents and Downstream Innovation Suppression - Fact or Fiction?'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howells, John

    1977), a theory that is a version of the classic justification for the award of the exclusive right - that it should protect the incentive to develop property. Merges and Nelson insist that their thesis should be supported by empirical evidence and they turn to historical accounts as an important form......Merges and Nelson have provided an empirically grounded argument that firms use pioneer patents of 'broad' scope to block downstream technological development (Merges and Nelson 1990). If this is a regular occurrence then, as they claim, they have faulted Kitch's 'prospect theory' of patents (Kitch....... This interpretation restores the credibility of Kitch's prospect theory of patent function and emphasises that maintenance of the prospect function should be an object of patent policy....

  13. Upstream and downstream strategies to economize biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasheminejad, Meisam; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Mansourpanah, Yaghoub; Khatami far, Mahdi; Javani, Azita

    2011-01-01

    In recent years biodiesel has drawn considerable amount of attention as a clean and renewable fuel. Biodiesel is produced from renewable sources such as vegetable oils and animal fat mainly through catalytic or non-catalytic transesterification method as well as supercritical method. However, as a consequence of disadvantages of these methods, the production cost increases dramatically. This article summarizes different biodiesel production methods with a focus on their advantages and disadvantages. The downstream and upstream strategies such as using waste cooking oils, application of non-edible plant oils, plant genetic engineering, using membrane separation technology for biodiesel production, separation and purification, application of crude glycerin as an energy supplement for ruminants, glycerin ultra-purification and their consequent roles in economizing the production process are fully discussed in this article. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Biological Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Biological Pathways Fact Sheet Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research News Features ...

  15. A Copernicus downstream service for surface displacement monitoring in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahyadi Kalia, Andre; Frei, Michaela; Lege, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    SAR Interferometry is a powerful technique able to detect and monitor various surface displacements caused by e.g. gravitative mass movement, subrosion, groundwater extraction, fluid injection, natural gas extraction. These processes can e.g. cause damage to buildings, infrastructure, affect ecosystems, agriculture and the economic use of the geological underground by influencing the hydro(geo)logical setting. Advanced techniques of interferometric processing (Persistent Scatterer Interferometry, PSI) allow highly precise displacement measurements (mm precision) by analyzing stacks of SAR imagery. The PSI mapping coverage can be increased to entire nations by using several adjacent satellite tracks. In order to assist the operational use of this technique a German-wide, officially approved, PSI dataset is under development. The intention of this presentation is to show i) the concept of the Copernicus downstream service for surface displacement monitoring in Germany and ii) a pilot study to exemplarily demonstrate the workflow and potential products from the Copernicus downstream service. The pilot study is focusing on the built up of an officially approved wide-area PSI dataset. The study area covers an area of more than 30.000 km² and is located in the Northwest German Basin. Several natural processes (e.g. compaction of marine sediments, peat loss) and anthropogenic activities (e.g. natural gas extraction, rock salt mining) are causing surface displacements in the study area. The PSI analysis is based on six ERS-1/-2 data stacks covering the timespan from 1992 until 2001. Each data stack consists of 49 to 73 ERS-1/-2 SAR images. A comparison of the PSI results with thematic data (e.g. volume and location of extracted natural gas) strongly indicates that a part of the detected land subsidence is caused by natural gas extraction. Furthermore, land subsidence caused by e.g. fluid injection and rock salt mining were successfully detected by the PSI analysis.

  16. Increased entropy of signal transduction in the cancer metastasis phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teschendorff Andrew E

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The statistical study of biological networks has led to important novel biological insights, such as the presence of hubs and hierarchical modularity. There is also a growing interest in studying the statistical properties of networks in the context of cancer genomics. However, relatively little is known as to what network features differ between the cancer and normal cell physiologies, or between different cancer cell phenotypes. Results Based on the observation that frequent genomic alterations underlie a more aggressive cancer phenotype, we asked if such an effect could be detectable as an increase in the randomness of local gene expression patterns. Using a breast cancer gene expression data set and a model network of protein interactions we derive constrained weighted networks defined by a stochastic information flux matrix reflecting expression correlations between interacting proteins. Based on this stochastic matrix we propose and compute an entropy measure that quantifies the degree of randomness in the local pattern of information flux around single genes. By comparing the local entropies in the non-metastatic versus metastatic breast cancer networks, we here show that breast cancers that metastasize are characterised by a small yet significant increase in the degree of randomness of local expression patterns. We validate this result in three additional breast cancer expression data sets and demonstrate that local entropy better characterises the metastatic phenotype than other non-entropy based measures. We show that increases in entropy can be used to identify genes and signalling pathways implicated in breast cancer metastasis and provide examples of de-novo discoveries of gene modules with known roles in apoptosis, immune-mediated tumour suppression, cell-cycle and tumour invasion. Importantly, we also identify a novel gene module within the insulin growth factor signalling pathway, alteration of which may

  17. Sensory Transduction in Microorganisms 2008 Gordon Research Conference (January 2008)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ann M. Stock

    2009-04-08

    Research into the mechanisms involved in the sensing and responses of microorganisms to changes in their environments is currently very active in a large number of laboratories worldwide. An increasingly wide range of prokaryotic and eukaryotic species are being studied with regard to their sensing of diverse chemical and physical stimuli, including nutrients, toxins, intercellular signaling molecules, redox indicators, light, pressure, magnetic fields, and surface contact, leading to adaptive responses affecting motile behavior, gene expression and/or development. The ease of manipulation of microorganisms has facilitated application of a broad range of techniques that have provided comprehensive descriptions of cellular behavior and its underlying molecular mechanisms. Systems and their molecular components have been probed at levels ranging from the whole organism down to atomic resolution using behavioral analyses; electrophysiology; genetics; molecular biology; biochemical and biophysical characterization; structural biology; single molecule, fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy; computational modeling; bioinformatics and genomic analyses. Several model systems such as bacterial chemotaxis and motility, fruiting body formation in Myxococcus xanthus, and motility and development in Dictyostelium discoideum have traditionally been a focus of this meeting. By providing a basis for assessment of similarities and differences in mechanisms, understanding of these pathways has advanced the study of many other microbial sensing systems. This conference aims to bring together researchers investigating different prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial systems using diverse approaches to compare data, share methodologies and ideas, and seek to understand the fundamental principles underlying sensory responses. Topic areas include: (1) Receptor Sensing and Signaling; (2) Intracellular Signaling (two-component, c-di-GMP, c-AMP, etc.); (3) Intracellular Localization and

  18. Genetic incorporation of the protein transduction domain of Tat into Ad5 fiber enhances gene transfer efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegal Gene P

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 has been widely explored as a gene delivery vector for a variety of diseases. Many target cells, however, express low levels of Ad5 native receptor, the Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor (CAR, and thus are resistant to Ad5 infection. The Protein Transduction Domain of the HIV Tat protein, namely PTDtat, has been shown to mediate protein transduction in a wide range of cells. We hypothesize that re-targeting Ad5 vector via the PTDtat motif would improve the efficacy of Ad5-mediated gene delivery. Results In this study, we genetically incorporated the PTDtat motif into the knob domain of Ad5 fiber, and rescued the resultant viral vector, Ad5.PTDtat. Our data showed the modification did not interfere with Ad5 binding to its native receptor CAR, suggesting Ad5 infection via the CAR pathway is retained. In addition, we found that Ad5.PTDtat exhibited enhanced gene transfer efficacy in all of the cell lines that we have tested, which included both low-CAR and high-CAR decorated cells. Competitive inhibition assays suggested the enhanced infectivity of Ad5.PTDtat was mediated by binding of the positively charged PTDtat peptide to the negatively charged epitopes on the cells' surface. Furthermore, we investigated in vivo gene delivery efficacy of Ad5.PTDtat using subcutaneous tumor models established with U118MG glioma cells, and found that Ad5.PTDtat exhibited enhanced gene transfer efficacy compared to unmodified Ad5 vector as analyzed by a non-invasive fluorescence imaging technique. Conclusion Genetic incorporation of the PTDtat motif into Ad5 fiber allowed Ad5 vectors to infect cells via an alternative PTDtat targeting motif while retaining the native CAR-mediated infection pathway. The enhanced infectivity was demonstrated in both cultured cells and in in vivo tumor models. Taken together, our study identifies a novel tropism expanded Ad5 vector that may be useful for clinical gene therapy

  19. AHP2, AHP3, and AHP5 act downstream of CKI1 in Arabidopsis female gametophyte development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenning; Yuan, Li; Song, Xiaoya; Yu, Xiaolin; Sundaresan, Venkatesan

    2017-06-15

    Histidine phosphotransfer proteins (HPs) are key elements of the two-component signaling system, which act as a shuttle to transfer phosphorylation signals from histidine kinases (HKs) to response regulators (RRs). CYTOKININ INDEPENDENT 1 (CKI1), a key regulator of central cell specification in the Arabidopsis female gametophyte, activates the cytokinin signaling pathway through the Arabidopsis histidine phosphotransfer proteins (AHPs). There are five HP genes in Arabidopsis, AHP1-AHP5, but it remains unknown which AHP genes act downstream of CKI1 in Arabidopsis female gametophyte development. Promoter activity analysis of AHP1-AHP5 in embryo sacs revealed AHP1, AHP2, AHP3, and AHP5 expression in the central cell. Phenotypic studies of various combinations of ahp mutants showed that triple mutations in AHP2, AHP3, and AHP5 resulted in defective embryo sac development. Using cell-specific single and double markers in the female gametophyte, the ahp2-2 ahp3 ahp5-2/+ triple mutant ovules showed loss of central cell and antipodal cell fates and gain of egg cell or synergid cell attributes, resembling the cki1 mutant phenotypes. These data suggest that AHP2, AHP3, and AHP5 are the major factors acting downstream of CKI1 in the two-component cytokinin signaling pathway to promote Arabidopsis female gametophyte development. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  20. Ebf1 and c-Myb repress rag transcription downstream of Stat5 during early B cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timblin, Greg A; Schlissel, Mark S

    2013-11-01

    The temporal control of RAG (Rag) expression in developing lymphocytes prevents DNA breaks during periods of proliferation that could threaten genomic integrity. In developing B cells, the IL-7R and precursor B cell Ag receptor (pre-BCR) synergize to induce proliferation and the repression of Rag at the protein and mRNA levels for a brief period following successful Ig H chain gene rearrangement. Whereas the mechanism of RAG2 protein downregulation is well defined, little is known about the pathways and transcription factors that mediate transcriptional repression of Rag. Using Abelson murine leukemia virus-transformed B cells to model this stage of development, we identified early B cell factor 1 (Ebf1) as a strong repressor of Rag transcription. Short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of either Ebf1 or its downstream target c-Myb was sufficient to induce Rag transcription in these highly proliferative cells. Ebf1 and c-Myb antagonize Rag transcription by negatively regulating the binding of Foxo1 to the Rag locus. Ebf1 accomplishes this through both direct negative regulation of Foxo1 expression and direct positive regulation of Gfi1b expression. Ebf1 expression is driven by the IL-7R downstream effector Stat5, providing a link between the negative regulation of Rag transcription by IL-7 and a novel repressive pathway involving Ebf1 and c-Myb.

  1. Regulation of HTLV-1 Tax Stability, Cellular Trafficking and NF-κB Activation by the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavorgna, Alfonso; Harhaj, Edward William

    2014-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a complex retrovirus that infects CD4+ T cells and causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) in 3%–5% of infected individuals after a long latent period. HTLV-1 Tax is a trans-activating protein that regulates viral gene expression and also modulates cellular signaling pathways to enhance T-cell proliferation and cell survival. The Tax oncoprotein promotes T-cell transformation, in part via constitutive activation of the NF-κB transcription factor; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Ubiquitination is a type of post-translational modification that occurs in a three-step enzymatic cascade mediated by E1, E2 and E3 enzymes and regulates protein stability as well as signal transduction, protein trafficking and the DNA damage response. Emerging studies indicate that Tax hijacks the ubiquitin machinery to activate ubiquitin-dependent kinases and downstream NF-κB signaling. Tax interacts with the E2 conjugating enzyme Ubc13 and is conjugated on C-terminal lysine residues with lysine 63-linked polyubiquitin chains. Tax K63-linked polyubiquitination may serve as a platform for signaling complexes since this modification is critical for interactions with NEMO and IKK. In addition to NF-κB signaling, mono- and polyubiquitination of Tax also regulate its subcellular trafficking and stability. Here, we review recent advances in the diverse roles of ubiquitin in Tax function and how Tax usurps the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway to promote oncogenesis. PMID:25341660

  2. Magnetic Nanocomposite Scaffold-Induced Stimulation of Migration and Odontogenesis of Human Dental Pulp Cells through Integrin Signaling Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Mun Yun

    Full Text Available Magnetism is an intriguing physical cue that can alter the behaviors of a broad range of cells. Nanocomposite scaffolds that exhibit magnetic properties are thus considered useful 3D matrix for culture of cells and their fate control in repair and regeneration processes. Here we produced magnetic nanocomposite scaffolds made of magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs and polycaprolactone (PCL, and the effects of the scaffolds on the adhesion, growth, migration and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells (HDPCs were investigated. Furthermore, the associated signaling pathways were examined in order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms in the cellular events. The magnetic scaffolds incorporated with MNPs at varying concentrations (up to 10%wt supported cellular adhesion and multiplication over 2 weeks, showing good viability. The cellular constructs in the nanocomposite scaffolds played significant roles in the stimulation of adhesion, migration and odontogenesis of HDPCs. Cells were shown to adhere to substantially higher number when affected by the magnetic scaffolds. Cell migration tested by in vitro wound closure model was significantly enhanced by the magnetic scaffolds. Furthermore, odontogenic differentiation of HDPCs, as assessed by the alkaline phosphatase activity, mRNA expressions of odontogenic markers (DMP-1, DSPP,osteocalcin, and ostepontin, and alizarin red staining, was significantly stimulated by the magnetic scaffolds. Signal transduction was analyzed by RT-PCR, Western blotting, and confocal microscopy. The magnetic scaffolds upregulated the integrin subunits (α1, α2, β1 and β3 and activated downstream pathways, such as FAK, paxillin, p38, ERK MAPK, and NF-κB. The current study reports for the first time the significant impact of magnetic scaffolds in stimulating HDPC behaviors, including cell migration and odontogenesis, implying the potential usefulness of the magnetic scaffolds for dentin-pulp tissue engineering.

  3. Identification of key uric acid synthesis pathway in a unique mutant silkworm Bombyx mori model of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Tabunoki

    Full Text Available Plasma uric acid (UA levels decrease following clinical progression and stage development of Parkinson's disease (PD. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying decreases in plasma UA levels remain unclear, and the potential to apply mutagenesis to a PD model has not previously been discovered. We identified a unique mutant of the silkworm Bombyx mori (B.mori op. Initially, we investigated the causality of the phenotypic "op" by microarray analysis using our constructed KAIKO functional annotation pipeline. Consequently, we found a novel UA synthesis-modulating pathway, from DJ-1 to xanthine oxidase, and established methods for large-scale analysis of gene expression in B. mori. We found that the mRNA levels of genes in this pathway were significantly lower in B. mori op mutants, indicating that downstream events in the signal transduction cascade might be prevented. Additionally, levels of B.mori tyrosine hydroxylase (TH and DJ-1 mRNA were significantly lower in the brain of B. mori op mutants. UA content was significantly lower in the B. mori op mutant tissues and hemolymph. The possibility that the B. mori op mutant might be due to loss of DJ-1 function was supported by the observed vulnerability to oxidative stress. These results suggest that UA synthesis, transport, elimination and accumulation are decreased by environmental oxidative stress in the B. mori op mutant. In the case of B. mori op mutants, the relatively low availability of UA appears to be due both to the oxidation of DJ-1 and to its expenditure to mitigate the effects of environmental oxidative stress. Our findings are expected to provide information needed to elucidate the molecular mechanism of decreased plasma UA levels in the clinical stage progression of PD.

  4. Doublesex: a conserved downstream gene controlled by diverse ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... product of a constitutive gene tra-2, ensures doublesex (dsx) pre-mRNA to follow the female splicing pathway, producing female-specific dsx mRNA (Hoshijima et al. 1991; Tian and. Maniatis 1992). In males, the dsx pre-mRNA splices in a de- fault manner to produce male-specific mRNA (Hoshijima et al.

  5. Mechanical regulation of a molecular clutch defines force transmission and transduction in response to matrix rigidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elosegui-Artola, Alberto; Oria, Roger; Chen, Yunfeng; Kosmalska, Anita; Pérez-González, Carlos; Castro, Natalia; Zhu, Cheng; Trepat, Xavier; Roca-Cusachs, Pere

    2016-05-01

    Cell function depends on tissue rigidity, which cells probe by applying and transmitting forces to their extracellular matrix, and then transducing them into biochemical signals. Here we show that in response to matrix rigidity and density, force transmission and transduction are explained by the mechanical properties of the actin-talin-integrin-fibronectin clutch. We demonstrate that force transmission is regulated by a dynamic clutch mechanism, which unveils its fundamental biphasic force/rigidity relationship on talin depletion. Force transduction is triggered by talin unfolding above a stiffness threshold. Below this threshold, integrins unbind and release force before talin can unfold. Above the threshold, talin unfolds and binds to vinculin, leading to adhesion growth and YAP nuclear translocation. Matrix density, myosin contractility, integrin ligation and talin mechanical stability differently and nonlinearly regulate both force transmission and the transduction threshold. In all cases, coupling of talin unfolding dynamics to a theoretical clutch model quantitatively predicts cell response.

  6. Estimating Network Kinetics of the MAPK/ERK Pathway Using Biochemical Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purutcuoglu, Vilda; Wit, Ernst

    2012-01-01

    The MAPK/ERK pathway is a major signal transduction system which regulates many fundamental cellular processes including the growth control and the cell death. As a result of these roles, it has a crucial importance in cancer as well as normal developmental processes. Therefore, it has been

  7. Tyrosinase kinetics in epidermal melanocytes: analysis of DAG-PKC-dependent signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolnitz, Mikhail M.; Peshkova, Anna Y.

    2001-05-01

    Tyrosinase is the key enzyme of melanogenesis with unusual enzyme kinetics. Protein kinase C plays an important role in regulating of tyrosinase activity. In the paper the mathematical model of PKC-DAG-dependent signal transduction pathway for UV-radiation is presented.

  8. Actin filaments as the fast pathways for calcium ions involved in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We investigated the polyelectrolyte properties of actin filaments which are in interaction with myosin motors, basic participants in mechano-electrical transduction in the stereocilia of the inner ear. Here, we elaborated a model in which actin filaments play the role of guides or pathways for localized flow of calcium ions.

  9. A structured approach for the engineering of biochemical network models, illustrated for signalling pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breitling, Rainer; Gilbert, David; Heiner, Monika; Orton, Richard

    Quantitative models of biochemical networks (signal transduction cascades, metabolic pathways, gene regulatory circuits) are a central component of modern systems biology. Building and managing these complex models is a major challenge that can benefit from the application of formal methods adopted

  10. Effects of pergolide mesylate on transduction efficiency of PEP-1-catalase protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Eun Jeong; Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Young Nam; Kim, So Mi [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Soon Sung [Department of Food Science and Nutrition and RIC Center, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Tae-Cheon [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hyeok Yil [Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Duk-Soo [Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan-Si 330-090 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sung-Woo [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Kyu Hyung; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Hyun Sook, E-mail: wazzup@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Soo Young, E-mail: sychoi@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} We studied effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on in vitro and in vivo transduction of PEP-1-catalase. {yields} PEP-1-catatase inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation. {yields} PM enhanced the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells and skin tissue. {yields} PM increased anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catalase. {yields} PM stimulated therapeutic action of anti-oxidant enzyme catalase in oxidative-related diseases. -- Abstract: The low transduction efficiency of various proteins is an obstacle to their therapeutic application. However, protein transduction domains (PTDs) are well-known for a highly effective tool for exogenous protein delivery to cells. We examined the effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT human keratinocytes and mice skin and on the anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catatase against 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation using Western blot and histological analysis. PM enhanced the time- and dose-dependent transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells without affecting the cellular toxicity. In a mouse edema model, PEP-1-catalase inhibited the increased expressions of inflammatory mediators and cytokines such as cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin-6 and -1{beta}, and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} induced by TPA. On the other hand, PM alone failed to exert any significant anti-inflammatory effects. However, the anti-inflammatory effect of co-treatment with PEP-1-catalase and PM was more potent than that of PEP-1-catalase alone. Our results indicate that PM may enhance the delivery of PTDs fusion therapeutic proteins to target cells and tissues and has potential to increase their therapeutic effects of such drugs against various diseases.

  11. Effects of pergolide mesylate on transduction efficiency of PEP-1-catalase protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Eun Jeong; Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Young Nam; Kim, So Mi; Lim, Soon Sung; Kang, Tae-Cheon; Kwon, Hyeok Yil; Kim, Duk-Soo; Cho, Sung-Woo; Han, Kyu Hyung; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Hwang, Hyun Sook; Choi, Soo Young

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We studied effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on in vitro and in vivo transduction of PEP-1-catalase. → PEP-1-catatase inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation. → PM enhanced the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells and skin tissue. → PM increased anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catalase. → PM stimulated therapeutic action of anti-oxidant enzyme catalase in oxidative-related diseases. -- Abstract: The low transduction efficiency of various proteins is an obstacle to their therapeutic application. However, protein transduction domains (PTDs) are well-known for a highly effective tool for exogenous protein delivery to cells. We examined the effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT human keratinocytes and mice skin and on the anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catatase against 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation using Western blot and histological analysis. PM enhanced the time- and dose-dependent transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells without affecting the cellular toxicity. In a mouse edema model, PEP-1-catalase inhibited the increased expressions of inflammatory mediators and cytokines such as cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin-6 and -1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α induced by TPA. On the other hand, PM alone failed to exert any significant anti-inflammatory effects. However, the anti-inflammatory effect of co-treatment with PEP-1-catalase and PM was more potent than that of PEP-1-catalase alone. Our results indicate that PM may enhance the delivery of PTDs fusion therapeutic proteins to target cells and tissues and has potential to increase their therapeutic effects of such drugs against various diseases.

  12. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation attenuates CFA-induced hyperalgesia and inhibits spinal ERK1/2-COX-2 pathway activation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jun-Fan; Liang, Yi; Du, Jun-Ying; Fang, Jian-Qiao

    2013-06-15

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a non-pharmacologic treatment for pain relief. In previous animal studies, TENS effectively alleviated Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA)- or carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain. Although TENS is known to produce analgesia via opioid activation in the brain and at the spinal level, few reports have investigated the signal transduction pathways mediated by TENS. Prior studies have verified the importance of the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signal transduction pathway in the spinal cord dorsal horn (SCDH) in acute and persistent inflammatory pains. Here, by using CFA rat model, we tested the efficacy of TENS on inhibiting the expressions of p-ERK1/2 and of its downstream cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and the level of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) at spinal level. Rats were randomly divided into control, model and TENS groups, and injected subcutaneously with 100 μl CFA or saline in the plantar surface of right hind paw. Rats in the TENS group were treated with TENS (constant aquare wave, 2 Hz and 100 Hz alternating frequencies, intensities ranging from 1 to 2 mA, lasting for 30 min each time) at 5 h and 24 h after injection. Paw withdrawal thresholds (PWTs) were measured with dynamic plantar aesthesiometer at 3d before modeling and 5 h, 6 h, and 25 h after CFA injection. The ipsilateral sides of the lumbar spinal cord dosral horns were harvested for detecting the expressions of p-ERK1/2 and COX-2 by western blot analysis and qPCR, and PGE2 by ELISA. CFA-induced periphery inflammation decreased PWTs and increased paw volume of rats. TENS treatment significantly alleviated mechanical hyperalgesia caused by CFA. However, no anti-inflammatory effect of TENS was observed. Expression of p-ERK1/2 protein and COX-2 mRNA was significantly up-regualted at 5 h and 6 h after CFA injection, while COX-2 and PGE2 protein level only increased at 6 h after modeling. Furthermore, the high expression of p-ERK1

  13. Gravity persistent signal 1 reveals a novel cytochrome P450 involved in gravitropic signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Sarah

    Understanding gene expression that occurs during gravitopism is important for studying the processes that link the perception of gravity to the growth response. Arabidopsis plants with a mutation in the GRAVITY PERSISTENT SIGNAL (GPS)1 locus show a "no response" phenotype during gravistimulation experiments. Basepital auxin transport in gps1 mutant was unaffected by the mutation, but auxin was not laterally redistributed after gravistimulation. GPS1 encodes CYP705A22, a cytochrome P450 protein (P450) of unknown function. The wild type CYP705A22 gene was transformed into the gps1 mutant background and successfully rescued the mutant phenotype. Data mining of microarray data collected from gravistimulated root tips of Arabidopsis indicated that although CYP705A22 was not expressed in roots, a family member CYP705A5 was up-regulated within 3 minutes after gravistimulation. Expression profiling of CYP705A5, using real-time quantitative PCR, showed that CYP705A5 was up-regulated nearly five fold within minutes of gravity stimulation. And reporter gene fusions that link the CYP705A5 gene to the green fluorescent protein showed that CYP705A5 was expressed in the root zones of elongation and maturation. Computer modeling of the catalytic domain of CYP705A22 and CYP705A5 and in silico substrate docking simulations generated a list of 130 compounds that are potential substrates of the P450s. Many of the compounds are phenylpropanoid derivatives. Heterologous expression of CYP705A5 in baculovirus and Type 1 binding studies indicate the substrate of the P450 may be quercitin or myricetin. A mutation affecting CYP705A5 expression resulted in a delayed gravity response in roots. The mutant phenotype could be chemically complemented, and DPBA staining in the CYP705A5 mutant indicated a 1.5 fold accumulation of quercetin in mutant roots as compared to WT. These data, taken together, may indicate that we have identified a flavonoid pathway that regulates auxin distribution and thus

  14. 3,3'-Diindolylmethane downregulates pro-survival pathway in hormone independent prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garikapaty, Venkata P.S.; Ashok, Badithe T.; Tadi, Kiranmayi; Mittelman, Abraham; Tiwari, Raj K.

    2006-01-01

    Epidemiological evidences suggest that the progression and promotion of prostate cancer (CaP) can be modulated by diet. Since all men die with prostate cancer rather than of the disease, it is of particular interest to prevent or delay the progression of the disease by chemopreventive strategies. We have been studying the anticancer properties of compounds present in cruciferous vegetables such as indole-3-carbinol (I3C). Diindolylmethane (DIM) is a dimer of I3C that is formed under acidic conditions and unlike I3C is more stable with higher anti-cancer effects. In the present report, we demonstrate that DIM is a potent anti-proliferative agent compared to I3C in the hormone independent DU 145 CaP cells. The anti-prostate cancer effect is mediated by the inhibition of the Akt signal transduction pathway as DIM, in sharp contrast to I3C, induces the downregulation of Akt, p-Akt, and PI3 kinase. DIM also induced a G1 arrest in DU 145 cells by flow cytometry and downstream concurrent inhibition of cell cycle parameters such as cyclin D1, cdk4, and cdk6. Our data suggest a need for further development of DIM, as a chemopreventive agent for CaP, which justifies epidemiological evidences and molecular targets that are determinants for CaP dissemination/progression. The ingestion of DIM may benefit CaP patients and reduce disease recurrence by eliminating micro-metastases that may be present in patients who undergo radical prostatectomy

  15. Corrosion impact of reductant on DWPF and downstream facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J. I. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Imrich, K. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jantzen, C. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Murphy, T. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilderman, J. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-12-01

    Glycolic acid is being evaluated as an alternate reductant in the preparation of high level waste for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). During processing, the glycolic acid is not completely consumed and small quantities of the glycolate anion are carried forward to other high level waste (HLW) facilities. The impact of the glycolate anion on the corrosion of the materials of construction throughout the waste processing system has not been previously evaluated. A literature review had revealed that corrosion data in glycolate-bearing solution applicable to SRS systems were not available. Therefore, testing was recommended to evaluate the materials of construction of vessels, piping and components within DWPF and downstream facilities. The testing, conducted in non-radioactive simulants, consisted of both accelerated tests (electrochemical and hot-wall) with coupons in laboratory vessels and prototypical tests with coupons immersed in scale-up and mock-up test systems. Eight waste or process streams were identified in which the glycolate anion might impact the performance of the materials of construction. These streams were 70% glycolic acid (DWPF feed vessels and piping), SRAT/SME supernate (Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) vessels and piping), DWPF acidic recycle (DWPF condenser and recycle tanks and piping), basic concentrated recycle (HLW tanks, evaporators, and transfer lines), salt processing (ARP, MCU, and Saltstone tanks and piping), boric acid (MCU separators), and dilute waste (HLW evaporator condensate tanks and transfer line and ETF components). For each stream, high temperature limits and worst-case glycolate concentrations were identified for performing the recommended tests. Test solution chemistries were generally based on analytical results of actual waste samples taken from the various process facilities or of prototypical simulants produced in the laboratory. The materials of construction for most vessels

  16. Molecular pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine Terra

    2014-01-01

    that 45% of deaths in the developed world are linked to fibrotic disease. Fibrosis and cancer are known to be inextricably linked; however, we are only just beginning to understand the common and overlapping molecular pathways between the two. Here, we discuss what is known about the intersection...... of fibrosis and cancer, with a focus on cancer metastasis, and highlight some of the exciting new potential clinical targets that are emerging from analysis of the molecular pathways associated with these two devastating diseases. Clin Cancer Res; 20(14); 3637-43. ©2014 AACR....

  17. Parainfluenza Virus 3 Blocks Antiviral Mediators Downstream of the Interferon Lambda Receptor by Modulating Stat1 Phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Kirsten C; McGill, Jodi L; Reinhardt, Timothy A; Sacco, Randy E

    2015-12-30

    Parainfluenza viruses are known to inhibit type I interferon (IFN) production; however, there is a lack of information regarding the type III IFN response during infection. Type III IFNs signal through a unique heterodimeric receptor, IFN-λR1/interleukin-10R2 (IL-10R2), which is primarily expressed by epithelial cells. Parainfluenza virus 3 (PIV-3) infection is highly restricted to the airway epithelium. We therefore sought to examine type III IFN signaling pathways during PIV-3 infection of epithelial cells. We used three strains of PIV-3: human PIV-3 (HPIV-3), bovine PIV-3 (BPIV-3), and dolphin PIV-1 (Tursiops truncatus PIV-1, or TtPIV-1). Here, we show that message levels of IL-29 are significantly increased during PIV-3 infection, yet downstream antiviral signaling molecules are not upregulated to levels similar to those of the positive control. Furthermore, in Vero cells infected with PIV-3, stimulation with recombinant IL-29/-28A/-28B does not cause upregulation of downstream antiviral molecules, suggesting that PIV-3 interferes with the JAK/STAT pathway downstream of the IFN-λR1/IL-10R2 receptor. We used Western blotting to examine the phosphorylation of Stat1 and Stat2 in Vero cells and the bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B. In Vero cells, we observed reduced phosphorylation of the serine 727 (S727) site on Stat1, while in BEAS-2B cells Stat1 phosphorylation was decreased at the tyrosine 701 (Y701) site during PIV-3 infection. PIV-3 therefore interferes with the phosphorylation of Stat1 downstream of the type III IFN receptor. These data provide new evidence regarding strategies employed by parainfluenza viruses to effectively circumvent respiratory epithelial cell-specific antiviral immunity. Parainfluenza virus (PIV) in humans is associated with bronchiolitis and pneumonia and can be especially problematic in infants and the elderly. Also seen in cattle, bovine PIV-3 causes respiratory infections in young calves. In addition, PIV-3 is one of a

  18. Energy taxes and subsidies downstream: transparency and dissemination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aissaour, A.

    2001-01-01

    The reasons why governments levy taxes are discussed with special reference to the energy sector. The article focuses on the quantitative aspect of policies and gives a guide to the relevant statistical sources. It summarises the basis of taxes and subsidies and discusses the incidence of energy taxation together with the structure of taxes and subsidies in energy downstream. It reviews the main sources of data and issues highlighted by published statistics and the impact of taxes levied on the consumption of energy products and other taxes (e.g. VAT) which directly affect end-user prices. Production-based levies such as royalties, petroleum revenue taxes, windfall taxes and import and export taxes on fuels are not discussed. The paper is presented under the sub-headings of (i) theoretical foundations in a nutshell; (ii) the incidence of taxation; (iii) the structure and main features of energy taxation (iv) base rate and level of taxation (v) sources of data and methods and (vi) observability and comparability

  19. Hydroeconomic optimization of reservoir management under downstream water quality constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidsen, Claus; Liu, Suxia; Mo, Xingguo; Holm, Peter E.; Trapp, Stefan; Rosbjerg, Dan; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2015-10-01

    A hydroeconomic optimization approach is used to guide water management in a Chinese river basin with the objectives of meeting water quantity and water quality constraints, in line with the China 2011 No. 1 Policy Document and 2015 Ten-point Water Plan. The proposed modeling framework couples water quantity and water quality management and minimizes the total costs over a planning period assuming stochastic future runoff. The outcome includes cost-optimal reservoir releases, groundwater pumping, water allocation, wastewater treatments and water curtailments. The optimization model uses a variant of stochastic dynamic programming known as the water value method. Nonlinearity arising from the water quality constraints is handled with an effective hybrid method combining genetic algorithms and linear programming. Untreated pollutant loads are represented by biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), and the resulting minimum dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration is computed with the Streeter-Phelps equation and constrained to match Chinese water quality targets. The baseline water scarcity and operational costs are estimated to 15.6 billion CNY/year. Compliance to water quality grade III causes a relatively low increase to 16.4 billion CNY/year. Dilution plays an important role and increases the share of surface water allocations to users situated furthest downstream in the system. The modeling framework generates decision rules that result in the economically efficient strategy for complying with both water quantity and water quality constraints.

  20. Flume experiments on scour downstream of wood stream restoration structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliara, Stefano; Kurdistani, Sahameddin Mahmoudi

    2017-02-01

    River restoration aims to improve physical natural form and processes of a river. Techniques to control the riverbed, stabilize channel alignment, protect stream banks, and rebuild the natural habitat are an important part of river restoration projects. Rivers can be stabilized and habitat restored through techniques such as rebuilding meanders and pool-riffle sequences and managing large wood. Structures that limit channel width to accelerate the normal flows through the constricted section are referred to as stream deflectors. Single-wing, double-wing and triangular deflectors are the most commonly used types of this measure. Log-frame deflectors consist of a triangular log frame filled with rock. Deflector constructions singly or in series in low gradient meandering streams, divert base flows toward the center of the channel and, under certain conditions, increase the depth and velocity of flow thereby creating scour pools and enhancing fish habitat. Scour characteristics and morphologies downstream of log-frame deflectors have been analyzed at the hydraulic laboratory of the University of Pisa. All experiments have been carried out in clear water conditions. The results showed that the tailwater depth plays an important role on scour characteristics. In addition, it was experimentally proven that using log-frame deflectors instead of log-deflectors result in a better river bank protection. In this case, for all the tested hydraulic conditions, the scour hole never occurred close to the channel bank. Useful empirical relationships have been proposed in order to evaluate the main features of the scour geometry.

  1. Evolution and Design Governing Signal Precision and Amplification in a Bacterial Chemosensory Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Guzzo, Mathilde; Agrebi, Rym; Espinosa, Leon; Baronian, Gr?gory; Molle, Virginie; Mauriello, Emilia M. F.; Brochier-Armanet, C?line; Mignot, T?m

    2015-01-01

    Author Summary Deciphering the circuit design of signal transduction networks is a fundamental question in cell biology. This task is challenging because many pathways are branched and control multiple cellular processes in response to one or several environmental signals. Studying pathway diversification in bacteria could be a powerful approach because these organisms contain so-called chemosensory systems, modular signaling units that have been adapted multiple times independently to regula...

  2. Turtle functions downstream of Cut in differentially regulating class specific dendrite morphogenesis in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikolaj J Sulkowski

    Full Text Available Dendritic morphology largely determines patterns of synaptic connectivity and electrochemical properties of a neuron. Neurons display a myriad diversity of dendritic geometries which serve as a basis for functional classification. Several types of molecules have recently been identified which regulate dendrite morphology by acting at the levels of transcriptional regulation, direct interactions with the cytoskeleton and organelles, and cell surface interactions. Although there has been substantial progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms of dendrite morphogenesis, the specification of class-specific dendritic arbors remains largely unexplained. Furthermore, the presence of numerous regulators suggests that they must work in concert. However, presently, few genetic pathways regulating dendrite development have been defined.The Drosophila gene turtle belongs to an evolutionarily conserved class of immunoglobulin superfamily members found in the nervous systems of diverse organisms. We demonstrate that Turtle is differentially expressed in Drosophila da neurons. Moreover, MARCM analyses reveal Turtle acts cell autonomously to exert class specific effects on dendritic growth and/or branching in da neuron subclasses. Using transgenic overexpression of different Turtle isoforms, we find context-dependent, isoform-specific effects on mediating dendritic branching in class II, III and IV da neurons. Finally, we demonstrate via chromatin immunoprecipitation, qPCR, and immunohistochemistry analyses that Turtle expression is positively regulated by the Cut homeodomain transcription factor and via genetic interaction studies that Turtle is downstream effector of Cut-mediated regulation of da neuron dendrite morphology.Our findings reveal that Turtle proteins differentially regulate the acquisition of class-specific dendrite morphologies. In addition, we have established a transcriptional regulatory interaction between Cut and Turtle, representing

  3. Chromosome locations of genes encoding human signal transduction adapter proteins, Nck (NCK), Shc (SHC1), and Grb2 (GRB2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huebner, K; Kastury, K; Druck, T

    1994-01-01

    Abnormalities due to chromosomal aberration or point mutation in gene products of growth factor receptors or in ras gene products, which lie on the same signaling pathway, can cause disease in animals and humans. Thus, it can be important to determine chromosomal map positions of genes encoding...... "adapter" proteins, which are involved in transducing signals from receptor tyrosine kinases to downstream signal recipients such as ras, because adaptor protein genes could also, logically, serve as targets of mutation, rearrangement, or other aberration in disease. Therefore, DNAs from panels of rodent...... hybridization. The NCK locus is at chromosome region 3q21, a region involved in neoplasia-associated changes; the SHC cognate locus, SHC1, is at 1q21, and the GRB2 locus is at 17q22-qter telomeric to the HOXB and NGFR loci. Both SHC1 and GRB2 are in chromosome regions that may be duplicated in some tumor types....

  4. EGR1 Regulates Transcription Downstream of Mechanical Signals during Tendon Formation and Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delalande, Antony; Bonnin, Marie-Ange; Pichon, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Background Tendon is a mechanical tissue that transmits forces generated by muscle to bone in order to allow body motion. The molecular pathways that sense mechanical forces during tendon formation, homeostasis and repair are not known. EGR1 is a mechanosensitive transcription factor involved in tendon formation, homeostasis and repair. We hypothesized that EGR1 senses mechanical signals to promote tendon gene expression. Methodology/Principal findings Using in vitro and in vivo models, we show that the expression of Egr1 and tendon genes is downregulated in 3D-engineered tendons made of mesenchymal stem cells when tension is released as well as in tendon homeostasis and healing when mechanical signals are reduced. We further demonstrate that EGR1 overexpression prevents tendon gene downregulation in 3D-engineered tendons when tension is released. Lastly, ultrasound and microbubbles mediated EGR1 overexpression prevents the downregulation of tendon gene expression during tendon healing in reduced load conditions. Conclusion/Significance These results show that Egr1 expression is sensitive to mechanical signals in tendon cells. Moreover, EGR1 overexpression prevents the downregulation of tendon gene expression in the absence of mechanical signals in 3D-engineered tendons and tendon healing. These results show that EGR1 induces a transcriptional response downstream of mechanical signals in tendon cells and open new avenues to use EGR1 to promote tendon healing in reduced load conditions. PMID:27820865

  5. Perturbation biolog