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Sample records for traditional lecture curriculum

  1. Using theatre in education in a traditional lecture oriented medical curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hancıoğlu Sertaç

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lectures supported by theatrical performance may enhance learning and be an attractive alternative to traditional lectures. This study describes our experience with using theatre in education for medical students since 2001. Methods The volunteer students, coached by experienced students, were given a two-week preparation period to write and prepare different dramatized headache scenarios during three supervised meetings. A theatrical performance was followed by a student presentation about history taking and clinical findings in diagnosing headache. Finally, a group discussion led by students dealt with issues raised in the performance. The evaluation of the theatre in education lecture "A Primary Care Approach to Headache" was based on feedback from students. Results More than 90% of 43 responding students fully agreed with the statement "Theatrical performance made it easier to understand the topic". More than 90% disagreed with the statements "Lecture halls were not appropriate for this kind of interaction" and "Students as teachers were not appropriate". Open-ended questions showed that the lesson was thought of as fun, good and useful by most students. The headache questions in the final exam showed results that were similar to average exam results for other questions. Conclusion Using theatrical performance in medical education was appreciated by most students and may facilitate learning and enhance empathy and team work communication skills.

  2. Adding problem-based learning tutorials to a traditional lecture-based curriculum: a pilot study in a dental school.

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    Katsuragi, Hiroaki

    2005-09-01

    This article reports on the implementation of a problem-based learning (PBL) tutorial in our advanced program for second year students within an existing curriculum. The program was opened on the last 5 days of the summer vacation and students could volunteer to be part of the group. Students separated themselves into small groups by random sampling. The PBL tutorials were done during the first 3 days for medical problems according to our original scenarios (based on medical cases), and during the last 2 days, students made presentations of their learning outcomes, using information technology (IT) by themselves. Throughout this program, students were expected to engage in self-learning, except for a 1(1/2)-h group session with a tutor. Assessment was done by attendance at a group session and by portfolio analysis. Following the portfolio analysis, students identified the number of learning issues (group A, 26 +/- 7 issues; group B, 20 +/- 3 issues; group C, 21 +/- 7 issues). Research, by questionnaire, revealed that 84% of the students were strongly interested in each scenario and 95% of the students felt familiar with each scenario. The levels of satisfaction with the tutor were different in the three groups. All of the students were comfortable in the discussion room and IT center. These results suggested that PBL tutorials are supported by the scenario, the tutor, and the location of the group session, as well as by self-learning. Moreover, one of the most important factors for a PBL tutorial that the student is ready for the free discussions and has enough time for individual self-learning.

  3. Enhancing the Lecture: Revitalizing the Traditional Format.

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    Bonwell, Charles C.

    1996-01-01

    The traditional lecture format of college courses can be enhanced by including active learning designed to further course goals of learning knowledge, developing skills, or fostering attitudes. Techniques suggested include using pauses, short writing periods, think-pair-share activities, formative quizzes, lecture summaries, and several assessment…

  4. Web-based versus traditional lecture: are they equally effective as a flexible bronchoscopy teaching method?

    OpenAIRE

    Sterse Mata, Caio Augusto [UNIFESP; Ota, Luiz Hirotoshi [UNIFESP; Suzuki, Iunis [UNIFESP; Telles, Adriana [UNIFESP; Miotto, Andre [UNIFESP; Leao, Luiz Eduardo Villaca [UNIFESP

    2012-01-01

    This study compares the traditional live lecture to a web-based approach in the teaching of bronchoscopy and evaluates the positive and negative aspects of both methods. We developed a web-based bronchoscopy curriculum, which integrates texts, images and animations. It was applied to first-year interns, who were later administered a multiple-choice test. Another group of eight first-year interns received the traditional teaching method and the same test. the two groups were compared using the...

  5. College Students' Perceptions of the Traditional Lecture Method

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    Covill, Amy E.

    2011-01-01

    Fifty-one college students responded to survey questions regarding their perceptions of the traditional lecture method of instruction that they received in a 200-level psychology course. At a time when many professors are being encouraged to use active learning methods instead of lectures, it is important to consider the students' perspective. Do…

  6. Creativity and the Curriculum. Inaugural Professorial Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyse, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    Creativity is regarded by many as a vital aspect of the human world, and creative endeavours are seen as a central element of society. Hence student creativity is regarded as a desirable outcome of education. This inaugural professorial lecture examines the place of creativity in education and in national curricula. Beginning with examples of…

  7. Medical students preference of problem-based learning or traditional lectures in King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

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    Ibrahim, Nahla Khamis; Banjar, Shorooq; Al-Ghamdi, Amal; Al-Darmasi, Moroj; Khoja, Abeer; Turkistani, Jamela; Arif, Rwan; Al-Sebyani, Awatif; Musawa, Al-Anoud; Basfar, Wijdan

    2014-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is the most important educational innovations in the past 4 decades. The objective of the study was to compare between the preference of medical students for PBL and the preference for traditional lectures regarding learning outcomes (e.g., knowledge, attitude, and skills) gained from both methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted among medical students who studied the hybrid curriculum (PBL and traditional lectures) in King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, in 2011. Data was collected through a pre-constructed, validated, confidentially anonymous, and self-administered questionnaire. Students' perceptions toward PBL and traditional lectures were assessed through their response to 20 statements inquired about both methods of learning using a five-point Likert scale. Descriptive and analytic statistics were performed using SPSS, version 21 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, Ill., USA). Learners preferred PBL more to traditional lectures for better linking the knowledge of basic and clinical sciences (t test=10.15, P .05) was observed regarding the amount of basic knowledge recalled from both methods. Students preferred PBL more to lectures for better learning attitudes, skills, future outcomes, and learning satisfaction (P learn better than lecturing (P traditional lectures for improving most of learning outcome domains, especially, learning attitudes and skills. Introducing hybrid-PBL curriculum in all Saudi universities is highly recommended.

  8. The Web-Lecture - a viable alternative to the traditional lecture format?

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    Meibom, S.

    2004-12-01

    Educational research shows that students learn best in an environment with emphasis on teamwork, problem-solving, and hands-on experience. Still professors spend the majority of their time with students in the traditional lecture-hall setting where the combination of large classes and limited time prevents sufficient student-teacher interaction to foster an active learning environment. Can modern computer technology be used to provide "lecture-type" information to students via the World Wide Web? If so, will that help professors make better and/or different use of their scheduled time with the students? Answering these questions was the main motivation for the Extra-Solar Planet Project. The Extra-Solar Planet Project was designed to test the effectiveness of a lecture available to the student on the World Wide Web (Web-Lecture) and to engage the students in an active learning environment were their use the information presented in the Web-Lecture. The topic of the Web-Lecture was detection of extra-solar planets and the project was implemented into an introductory astronomy course at University of Wisconsin Madison in the spring of 2004. The Web-Lecture was designed to give an interactive presentation of synchronized video, audio and lecture notes. It was created using the eTEACH software developed at the University of Wisconsin Madison School of Engineering. In my talk, I will describe the project, show excerpts of the Web-Lecture, and present assessments of student learning and results of student evaluations of the web-lecture format.

  9. A Comparison of Online and Traditional Chemistry Lecture and Lab

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    Faulconer, E. K.; Griffith, J. C.; Wood, B. L.; Acharyya, S.; Roberts, D. L.

    2018-01-01

    While the equivalence between online and traditional classrooms has been well researched, very little effort has been expended to do such comparisons for college level introductory chemistry. The existing literature has only one study that investigated chemistry lectures at an entire course level as opposed to particular course components such as…

  10. A Comparison of Internet-Based Learning and Traditional Classroom Lecture to Learn CPR for Continuing Medical Education

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    Hemmati, Nima; Omrani, Soghra; Hemmati, Naser

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the satisfaction and effectiveness of Internet-based learning (IBL) and traditional classroom lecture (TCL) for continuing medical education (CME) programs by comparing final resuscitation exam results of physicians who received the newest cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) curriculum guidelines training…

  11. A Comparison of the Learning Outcomes of Traditional Lecturing with that of Computer-Based Learning in two Optometry Courses

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    H Kangari

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: The literature on distance education has provided different reports about the effectiveness of traditional lecture based settings versus computer based study settings. This studyis an attempt to compare the learning outcomes of the traditional lecture based teaching with that of the computer based learning in the optometry curriculum.Methods: Two courses in the optometry curriculum, Optometry I, with 24 students and Optometry II, with 27 students were used in this study. In each course, the students were randomly divided into two groups. In each scheduled class session, one group randomly attended the lecture, while the other studied in the computer stations. The same content was presented to both groups and at end of each session the same quiz was given to both. In the next session, the groups switched place. This processcontinued for four weeks. The quizzes were scored and a paired t-test was used to examine any difference. The data was analyzed by SPSS 15 software.Results: The mean score for Optometry I, lecture settings was 3.36 +0.59, for Optometry I computer based study was 3.27+0.63 , for Optometry II, in lecture setting was 3.22+0.57 and for Optometry II, computer based setting was 2.85+0.69. The paired sample t-test was performed on the scores, revealing no statistical significant difference between the two settings. However, the mean score for lecture sessions was slightly higher in lecture settings.Conclusion: Since this study reveals that the learning outcomes in traditional lecture based settings and computer based study are not significantly different, the lecture sessions can be safely replacedby the computer based study session. Further practice in the computer based setting might reveal better outcomes in computer study settings.Key words: LECTURING, COMPUTER BASED LEARNING, DISTANCE EDUCATION

  12. A Comparison Of Internet-Based Learning And Traditional Classroom Lecture To Learn Cpr For Continuing Medical Education

    OpenAIRE

    HEMMATI, Nima; OMRANI, Soghra; HEMMATI, Naser

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the satisfaction and effectiveness of Internet-based learning (IBL) and traditional classroom lecture (TCL) for continuing medical education (CME) programs by comparing final resuscitation exam results of physicians who received the newest cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) curriculum guidelines training either by traditional or by an Internet-based CME. A randomized two-group pretest-posttest quasi-experimental design was used. Postgraduate general ...

  13. Student Perceptions of Team-based Learning vs Traditional Lecture-based Learning.

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    Frame, Tracy R; Cailor, Stephanie M; Gryka, Rebecca J; Chen, Aleda M; Kiersma, Mary E; Sheppard, Lorin

    2015-05-25

    To evaluate pharmacy student perceptions of team-based learning (TBL) vs traditional lecture-based learning formats. First professional year pharmacy students (N=111) at two universities used TBL in different courses during different semesters (fall vs spring). Students completed a 22-item team perceptions instrument before and after the fall semester. A 14-item teaching style preference instrument was completed at the end of the spring semester. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon signed rank test and Mann-Whitney U test. Students who experienced TBL in the fall and went back to traditional format in the spring reported improved perceptions of teams and preferred TBL format over a traditional format more than students who experienced a traditional format followed by TBL. Students at both universities agreed that the TBL format assists with critical-thinking, problem-solving, and examination preparation. Students also agreed that teams should consist of individuals with different personalities and learning styles. When building teams, faculty members should consider ways to diversify teams by considering different views, perspectives, and strengths. Offering TBL early in the curriculum prior to traditional lecture-based formats is better received by students, as evidenced by anecdotal reports from students possibly because it allows students time to realize the benefits and assist them in building teamwork-related skills.

  14. Graduates from a traditional medical curriculum evaluate the effectiveness of their medical curriculum through interviews.

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    Watmough, Simon; O'Sullivan, Helen; Taylor, David

    2009-10-26

    In 1996 The University of Liverpool reformed its medical course from a traditional lecture-based course to an integrated PBL curriculum. A project has been underway since 2000 to evaluate this change. Part of this project has involved gathering retrospective views on the relevance of both types of undergraduate education according to graduates. This paper focuses on the views of traditional Liverpool graduates approximately 6 years after graduation. From February 2006 to June 2006 interviews took place with 46 graduates from the last 2 cohorts to graduate from the traditional Liverpool curriculum. The graduates were generally happy with their undergraduate education although they did feel there were some flaws in their curriculum. They felt they had picked up good history and examination skills and were content with their exposure to different specialties on clinical attachments. They were also pleased with their basic science teaching as preparation for postgraduate exams, however many complained about the overload and irrelevance of many lectures in the early years of their course, particular in biochemistry. There were many different views about how they integrated this science teaching into understanding disease processes and many didn't feel it was made relevant to them at the time they learned it. Retrospectively, they felt that they hadn't been clinically well prepared for the role of working as junior doctor, particularly the practical aspects of the job nor had enough exposure to research skills. Although there was little communication skills training in their course they didn't feel they would have benefited from this training as they managed to pick up had the required skills on clinical attachments. These interviews offer a historical snapshot of the views of graduates from a traditional course before many courses were reformed. There was some conflict in the interviews about the doctors enjoying their undergraduate education but then saying that they

  15. Graduates from a traditional medical curriculum evaluate the effectiveness of their medical curriculum through interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor David

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 1996 The University of Liverpool reformed its medical course from a traditional lecture-based course to an integrated PBL curriculum. A project has been underway since 2000 to evaluate this change. Part of this project has involved gathering retrospective views on the relevance of both types of undergraduate education according to graduates. This paper focuses on the views of traditional Liverpool graduates approximately 6 years after graduation. Methods From February 2006 to June 2006 interviews took place with 46 graduates from the last 2 cohorts to graduate from the traditional Liverpool curriculum. Results The graduates were generally happy with their undergraduate education although they did feel there were some flaws in their curriculum. They felt they had picked up good history and examination skills and were content with their exposure to different specialties on clinical attachments. They were also pleased with their basic science teaching as preparation for postgraduate exams, however many complained about the overload and irrelevance of many lectures in the early years of their course, particular in biochemistry. There were many different views about how they integrated this science teaching into understanding disease processes and many didn't feel it was made relevant to them at the time they learned it. Retrospectively, they felt that they hadn't been clinically well prepared for the role of working as junior doctor, particularly the practical aspects of the job nor had enough exposure to research skills. Although there was little communication skills training in their course they didn't feel they would have benefited from this training as they managed to pick up had the required skills on clinical attachments. Conclusion These interviews offer a historical snapshot of the views of graduates from a traditional course before many courses were reformed. There was some conflict in the interviews about the doctors

  16. Web-based versus traditional lecture: are they equally effective as a flexible bronchoscopy teaching method?

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    Mata, Caio Augusto Sterse; Ota, Luiz Hirotoshi; Suzuki, Iunis; Telles, Adriana; Miotto, Andre; Leão, Luiz Eduardo Vilaça

    2012-01-01

    This study compares the traditional live lecture to a web-based approach in the teaching of bronchoscopy and evaluates the positive and negative aspects of both methods. We developed a web-based bronchoscopy curriculum, which integrates texts, images and animations. It was applied to first-year interns, who were later administered a multiple-choice test. Another group of eight first-year interns received the traditional teaching method and the same test. The two groups were compared using the Student's t-test. The mean scores (± SD) of students who used the website were 14.63 ± 1.41 (range 13-17). The test scores of the other group had the same range, with a mean score of 14.75 ± 1. The Student's t-test showed no difference between the test results. The common positive point noted was the presence of multimedia content. The web group cited as positive the ability to review the pages, and the other one the role of the teacher. Web-based bronchoscopy education showed results similar to the traditional live lecture in effectiveness.

  17. Flippin' Fluid Mechanics - Comparison of Blended Classroom vs. Traditional Lecture

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    Webster, D. R.; Kadel, R. S.; Newstetter, W. C.

    2017-11-01

    We conducted a study of student performance in and perceptions of a blended classroom delivery of a junior-level fluid mechanics course. In the blended pedagogy, students watch short on-line videos before class, participate in interactive in-class problem solving (in dyads), and complete individualized on-line quizzes weekly. Comparisons are made among four sections of the blended classroom delivery in the period of 2013-2017 to eleven sections delivered in a traditional lecture-style format by the same instructor in 2002-2012. The results reveal dramatic improvement in student engagement, perceptions, and achievement in the blended pedagogy. For instance, the withdrawal/fail/barely-passing (WFD) rate is significantly lower for the blended classroom (8.6% vs. 16.3%; p self-perception of how-much-learned, perception of the value of the course activities, and the overall effectiveness of the course and instructor in the blended classroom.

  18. Perspective of Lecturers in Implementing PISMP Science Curriculum in Malaysia's IPG

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    Yahya, Fauziah Hj; Bin Hamdan, Abdul Rahim; Jantan, Hafsah Binti; Saleh, Halimatussadiah Binti

    2015-01-01

    The article aims to identify lecturers' perspectives in implementing PISMP science curriculum in IPG Malaysia based on teaching experience with KIPP model. The respondents consisted of 105 lecturers from 20 IPG Malaysia. The study used a questionnaire consisting of 74 items covering the four dimensions (Context, Input, Process and Product). Data…

  19. Impact of abbreviated lecture with interactive mini-cases vs traditional lecture on student performance in the large classroom.

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    Marshall, Leisa L; Nykamp, Diane L; Momary, Kathryn M

    2014-12-15

    To compare the impact of 2 different teaching and learning methods on student mastery of learning objectives in a pharmacotherapy module in the large classroom setting. Two teaching and learning methods were implemented and compared in a required pharmacotherapy module for 2 years. The first year, multiple interactive mini-cases with inclass individual assessment and an abbreviated lecture were used to teach osteoarthritis; a traditional lecture with 1 inclass case discussion was used to teach gout. In the second year, the same topics were used but the methods were flipped. Student performance on pre/post individual readiness assessment tests (iRATs), case questions, and subsequent examinations were compared each year by the teaching and learning method and then between years by topic for each method. Students also voluntarily completed a 20-item evaluation of the teaching and learning methods. Postpresentation iRATs were significantly higher than prepresentation iRATs for each topic each year with the interactive mini-cases; there was no significant difference in iRATs before and after traditional lecture. For osteoarthritis, postpresentation iRATs after interactive mini-cases in year 1 were significantly higher than postpresentation iRATs after traditional lecture in year 2; the difference in iRATs for gout per learning method was not significant. The difference between examination performance for osteoarthritis and gout was not significant when the teaching and learning methods were compared. On the student evaluations, 2 items were significant both years when answers were compared by teaching and learning method. Each year, students ranked their class participation higher with interactive cases than with traditional lecture, but both years they reported enjoying the traditional lecture format more. Multiple interactive mini-cases with an abbreviated lecture improved immediate mastery of learning objectives compared to a traditional lecture format, regardless of

  20. Incorporating Dynamical Systems into the Traditional Curriculum.

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    Natov, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Presents a brief overview of dynamical systems. Gives examples from dynamical systems and where they fit into the current curriculum. Points out that these examples are accessible to undergraduate freshmen and sophomore students, add continuity to the standard curriculum, and are worth including in classes. (MM)

  1. A COMPARISON OF INTERNET-BASED LEARNING AND TRADITIONAL CLASSROOM LECTURE TO LEARN CPR FOR CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION

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    Naser HEMMATI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the satisfaction and effectiveness of Internet-based learning (IBL and traditional classroom lecture (TCL for continuing medical education (CME programs by comparing final resuscitation exam results of physicians who received the newest cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR curriculum guidelines training either by traditional or by an Internet-based CME. A randomized two-group pretest-posttest quasi-experimental design was used. Postgraduate general physician trainees of Iran medical schools were participated. Two methods were compared for teaching the newest curriculum guidelines of the American Heart Association: lecture method in which the teacher follows a Power point presentation with linear layout, and with interactive self-assessment and Scenario-based learning, feedback, multimedia with linear and nonlinear layout with the same power point presentation as lecture in terms of text and photography. The data on final CPR exam grades, collected both groups trained physicians, were obtained for a total of 80 physicians in 2011. An independent sample t-test analysis indicated that participants in the IBL format reported significantly higher mean ratings for this format (62.5 ±2.32 than TCL format (54.6±2.18 (p=.001. There were no significant differences between the two groups in cognitive gains (p<0.05. well-designed IBL content can be effective or a supplement component to CME.

  2. Using lecture recordings to support curriculum changes in the European convergence process

    OpenAIRE

    Aguirre Herrera, Sandra; Barra Arias, Enrique; Quemada Vives, Juan; Pastor Caño, Jose Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the experience of using lecture recordings to support curriculum changes within the framework of the European convergence process, mainly courses that need to be promoted or discontinued. We will explain an integrated solution for recording lectures consisting of a web portal, a videoconferencing tool and an economical and easily transportable kit. The validation process was performed recording three different courses at the Universidad Politécnica of Madri...

  3. Student and faculty perceptions of lecture recording in a doctor of pharmacy curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynor, Lena M; Barrickman, Ashleigh Landis; Stamatakis, Mary K; Elliott, David P

    2013-10-14

    To describe students' and faculty members' perceptions of the impact of lecture recording in a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) curriculum. Second- and third-year pharmacy students and faculty members completed an anonymous survey instrument regarding their perceptions of lecture recording with 2 classroom lecture capture software programs, Camtasia Studio and Wimba Classroom. Most students (82%) responded that Camtasia was very helpful and almost half (49%) responded that Wimba Classroom was helpful (pstudents reported being more likely to miss a class that was recorded; however, few students (10%) reported using recordings as a substitute for attending class. The most common concern of faculty members was decreased student attendance (27%). Pharmacy students consider lecture recordings beneficial, and they use the recordings primarily to review the lecture. While faculty members reported concerns with decreased attendance, few students reported using recordings as an alternative to class attendance.

  4. Traditional games in primary school curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Popeska, Biljana; Jovanova-Mitkovska, Snezana

    2017-01-01

    Traditional games are cultural and national heritage. They, cultural and traditional activities transmitted from one generation to another, sharing different movement and cognitive games used in order to educate, to socialize, to share the experience and to influence toward development of young generation. The people create traditional games, and they represent the habits, culture and tradition of countries, region or even a town or village. There are lot of different traditional games. They ...

  5. COMPARISON OF PROBLEM BASED LEARNING WITH TRADITIONAL LECTURES AMONG FIRST YEAR MEDICAL STUDENTS IN PHYSIOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Problem based learning has emerged as an effective teaching learning method. Students taught by the problem based learning method have better problem solving skills and better long-term memory than those taught by traditional lectures. OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of problem based learning with that of traditional lecture method. METHODOLOGY: First MBBS students (n=127) were divided into two groups. One group was taught a topic from Applied Physiolog...

  6. Comparison of Pharmaceutical Calculations Learning Outcomes Achieved Within a Traditional Lecture or Flipped Classroom Andragogy

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    Frazier, Lisa; Anderson, Stephanie L.; Stanton, Robert; Gillette, Chris; Broedel-Zaugg, Kim; Yingling, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To compare learning outcomes achieved from a pharmaceutical calculations course taught in a traditional lecture (lecture model) and a flipped classroom (flipped model). Methods. Students were randomly assigned to the lecture model and the flipped model. Course instructors, content, assessments, and instructional time for both models were equivalent. Overall group performance and pass rates on a standardized assessment (Pcalc OSCE) were compared at six weeks and at six months post-course completion. Results. Student mean exam scores in the flipped model were higher than those in the lecture model at six weeks and six months later. Significantly more students passed the OSCE the first time in the flipped model at six weeks; however, this effect was not maintained at six months. Conclusion. Within a 6 week course of study, use of a flipped classroom improves student pharmacy calculation skill achievement relative to a traditional lecture andragogy. Further study is needed to determine if the effect is maintained over time. PMID:28630511

  7. Comparison of Pharmaceutical Calculations Learning Outcomes Achieved Within a Traditional Lecture or Flipped Classroom Andragogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, H Glenn; Frazier, Lisa; Anderson, Stephanie L; Stanton, Robert; Gillette, Chris; Broedel-Zaugg, Kim; Yingling, Kevin

    2017-05-01

    Objective. To compare learning outcomes achieved from a pharmaceutical calculations course taught in a traditional lecture (lecture model) and a flipped classroom (flipped model). Methods. Students were randomly assigned to the lecture model and the flipped model. Course instructors, content, assessments, and instructional time for both models were equivalent. Overall group performance and pass rates on a standardized assessment (Pcalc OSCE) were compared at six weeks and at six months post-course completion. Results. Student mean exam scores in the flipped model were higher than those in the lecture model at six weeks and six months later. Significantly more students passed the OSCE the first time in the flipped model at six weeks; however, this effect was not maintained at six months. Conclusion. Within a 6 week course of study, use of a flipped classroom improves student pharmacy calculation skill achievement relative to a traditional lecture andragogy. Further study is needed to determine if the effect is maintained over time.

  8. Motivating Change from Lecture-Tutorial Modes to Less Traditional Forms of Teaching

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    McLaren, Helen J.; Kenny, Paul L.

    2015-01-01

    Teaching academics are under pressure to move away from traditional lecture-tutorial teaching modes to less traditional forms. Such pressures are in addition to changes to funding arrangements and other developments that increasingly oblige universities to operate as businesses. The flow-on effects for teachers are increased student:staff ratios,…

  9. Stereoscopic Three-Dimensional Neuroanatomy Lectures Enhance Neurosurgical Training: Prospective Comparison with Traditional Teaching.

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    Clark, Anna D; Guilfoyle, Mathew R; Candy, Nicholas G; Budohoski, Karol P; Hofmann, Riikka; Barone, Damiano G; Santarius, Thomas; Kirollos, Ramez W; Trivedi, Rikin A

    2017-12-01

    Stereoscopic three-dimensional (3D) imaging is increasingly used in the teaching of neuroanatomy and although this is mainly aimed at undergraduate medical students, it has enormous potential for enhancing the training of neurosurgeons. This study aims to assess whether 3D lecturing is an effective method of enhancing the knowledge and confidence of neurosurgeons and how it compares with traditional two-dimensional (2D) lecturing and cadaveric training. Three separate teaching sessions for neurosurgical trainees were organized: 1) 2D course (2D lecture + cadaveric session), 2) 3D lecture alone, and 3) 3D course (3D lecture + cadaveric session). Before and after each session, delegates were asked to complete questionnaires containing questions relating to surgical experience, anatomic knowledge, confidence in performing procedures, and perceived value of 3D, 2D, and cadaveric teaching. Although both 2D and 3D lectures and courses were similarly effective at improving self-rated knowledge and understanding, the 3D lecture and course were associated with significantly greater gains in confidence reported by the delegates for performing a subfrontal approach and sylvian fissure dissection. Stereoscopic 3D lectures provide neurosurgical trainees with greater confidence for performing standard operative approaches and enhances the benefit of subsequent practical experience in developing technical skills in cadaveric dissection. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Blended Learning Versus Traditional Lecture in Introductory Nursing Pathophysiology Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blissitt, Andrea Marie

    2016-04-01

    Currently, many undergraduate nursing courses use blended-learning course formats with success; however, little evidence exists that supports the use of blended formats in introductory pathophysiology courses. The purpose of this study was to compare the scores on pre- and posttests and course satisfaction between traditional and blended course formats in an introductory nursing pathophysiology course. This study used a quantitative, quasi-experimental, nonrandomized control group, pretest-posttest design. Analysis of covariance compared pre- and posttest scores, and a t test for independent samples compared students' reported course satisfaction of the traditional and blended course formats. Results indicated that the differences in posttest scores were not statistically significant between groups. Students in the traditional group reported statistically significantly higher satisfaction ratings than students in the blended group. The results of this study support the need for further research of using blended learning in introductory pathophysiology courses in undergraduate baccalaureate nursing programs. Further investigation into how satisfaction is affected by course formats is needed. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Resident training for eclampsia and magnesium toxicity management: simulation or traditional lecture?

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    Fisher, Nelli; Bernstein, Peter S; Satin, Andrew; Pardanani, Setul; Heo, Hye; Merkatz, Irwin R; Goffman, Dena

    2010-10-01

    To compare eclampsia and magnesium toxicity management among residents randomly assigned to lecture or simulation-based education. Statified by year, residents (n = 38) were randomly assigned to 3 educational intervention groups: Simulation→Lecture, Simulation, and Lecture. Postintervention simulations were performed for all and scored using standardized lists. Maternal, fetal, eclampsia management, and magnesium toxcity scores were assigned. Mann-Whitney U, Wilcoxon rank sum and χ(2) tests were used for analysis. Postintervention maternal (16 and 15 vs 12; P < .05) and eclampsia (19 vs 16; P < .05) scores were significantly better in simulation based compared with lecture groups. Postintervention magnesium toxcitiy and fetal scores were not different among groups. Lecture added to simulation did not lead to incremental benefit when eclampsia scores were compared between Simulation→Lecture and Simulation (19 vs 19; P = nonsignificant). Simulation training is superior to traditional lecture alone for teaching crucial skills for the optimal management of both eclampsia and magnesium toxicity, 2 life-threatening obstetric emergencies. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  12. Assimilating Traditional Healing Into Preventive Medicine Residency Curriculum.

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    Kesler, Denece O; Hopkins, L Olivia; Torres, Eliseo; Prasad, Arti

    2015-11-01

    Comprehensive cultural competency includes knowledge and awareness of culturally based healing and wellness practices. Healthcare providers should be aware of the individual patient's beliefs, culture, and use of culturally based health practices because patients may adopt such practices for general wellness or as adjunct therapies without the benefit of discussion with their healthcare provider. This article describes the culturally based traditional healing curriculum that has been implemented in the University of New Mexico Public Health and General Preventive Medicine Residency Program in order to fulfill this knowledge necessity. Curricular elements were added in a stepwise manner starting in 2011, with the full content as described implemented starting in 2013. Data were collected annually with evaluation of the full curriculum occurring in 2015. New Mexico has a diverse population base that includes predominantly Hispanic and Native American cultures, making the inclusion of curriculum regarding traditional healing practices very pertinent. Residents at the University of New Mexico were educated through several curricular components about topics such as Curanderismo, the art of Mexican Folk Healing. An innovative approach was used, with a compendium of training methods that included learning directly from traditional healers and participation in healing practices. The incorporation of this residency curriculum resulted in a means to produce physicians well trained in approaching patient care and population health with knowledge of culturally based health practices in order to facilitate healthy patients and communities. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A New Comparison of Active Learning Strategies to Traditional Lectures for Teaching College Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPresto, Michael C.; Slater, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Although traditional lectures are still the dominant form of undergraduate instruction, there have been relatively few studies comparing various learner-centered and active learning teaching strategies to one another in order to guide professors in making informed instructional decisions. To study the impact of different active learning…

  14. Using Online Video Lectures to Enrich Traditional Face-to-Face Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarem, Suzanne C.

    2015-01-01

    University educators need to meet changing needs of the digital generation by integrating technology through online content delivery. Despite the many advantages of online education, a large number of university professors are reluctant to make the transition from traditional-face-to-face lectures to online delivery, mainly due to the time, cost,…

  15. Does the Room Matter? Active Learning in Traditional and Enhanced Lecture Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltzfus, Jon R.; Libarkin, Julie

    2016-01-01

    SCALE-UP–type classrooms, originating with the Student-Centered Active Learning Environment with Upside-down Pedagogies project, are designed to facilitate active learning by maximizing opportunities for interactions between students and embedding technology in the classroom. Positive impacts when active learning replaces lecture are well documented, both in traditional lecture halls and SCALE-UP–type classrooms. However, few studies have carefully analyzed student outcomes when comparable active learning–based instruction takes place in a traditional lecture hall and a SCALE-UP–type classroom. Using a quasi-experimental design, we compared student perceptions and performance between sections of a nonmajors biology course, one taught in a traditional lecture hall and one taught in a SCALE-UP–type classroom. Instruction in both sections followed a flipped model that relied heavily on cooperative learning and was as identical as possible given the infrastructure differences between classrooms. Results showed that students in both sections thought that SCALE-UP infrastructure would enhance performance. However, measures of actual student performance showed no difference between the two sections. We conclude that, while SCALE-UP–type classrooms may facilitate implementation of active learning, it is the active learning and not the SCALE-UP infrastructure that enhances student performance. As a consequence, we suggest that institutions can modify existing classrooms to enhance student engagement without incorporating expensive technology. PMID:27909018

  16. A comparative study of traditional lecture methods and interactive lecture methods in introductory geology courses for non-science majors at the college level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundley, Stacey A.

    In recent years there has been a national call for reform in undergraduate science education. The goal of this reform movement in science education is to develop ways to improve undergraduate student learning with an emphasis on developing more effective teaching practices. Introductory science courses at the college level are generally taught using a traditional lecture format. Recent studies have shown incorporating active learning strategies within the traditional lecture classroom has positive effects on student outcomes. This study focuses on incorporating interactive teaching methods into the traditional lecture classroom to enhance student learning for non-science majors enrolled in introductory geology courses at a private university. Students' experience and instructional preferences regarding introductory geology courses were identified from survey data analysis. The information gained from responses to the questionnaire was utilized to develop an interactive lecture introductory geology course for non-science majors. Student outcomes were examined in introductory geology courses based on two teaching methods: interactive lecture and traditional lecture. There were no significant statistical differences between the groups based on the student outcomes and teaching methods. Incorporating interactive lecture methods did not statistically improve student outcomes when compared to traditional lecture teaching methods. However, the responses to the survey revealed students have a preference for introductory geology courses taught with lecture and instructor-led discussions and students prefer to work independently or in small groups. The results of this study are useful to individuals who teach introductory geology courses and individuals who teach introductory science courses for non-science majors at the college level.

  17. Using Online Video Lectures to Enrich Traditional Face-to-Face Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne C. Makarem

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available University educators need to meet changing needs of the digital generation by integrating technology through online content delivery. Despite the many advantages of online education, a large number of university professors are reluctant to make the transition from traditional-face-to-face lectures to online delivery, mainly due to the time, cost, and technical competence requirements to make this transition, in addition to the lack of beliefs in the legitimacy of online education. This article demonstrates the use of online video lectures to adapt traditional university courses to a blended format. The study is implemented for a School of Business Marketing course. We illustrate a cost-effective and timeefficient way for faculty members to record and share online video lectures with limited training and technical support. Using a student sample from two sections of the same marketing course, the study findings support the use of online video lectures as an effective way to free class time for learner-centred activities, without sacrificing student performance outcomes or course satisfaction.

  18. Benefits of Case-Based versus Traditional Lecture-Based Instruction in a Preclinical Removable Prosthodontics Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelson, David B; Divaris, Kimon; De Kok, Ingeborg J

    2017-04-01

    This study compared the acceptability and relative effectiveness of case-based learning (CBL) versus traditional lecture-based (LB) instruction in a preclinical removable prosthodontics course in the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Dentistry DDS curriculum. The entire second-year class (N=82) comprised this crossover study's sample. Assessments of baseline comprehension and confidence in removable partial denture (RPD) treatment planning were conducted at the beginning of the course. Near the end of the course, half of the class received CBL and LB instruction in an RPD module in alternating sequence, with students serving as their own control group. Assessments of perceived RPD treatment planning efficacy, comprehension, and instruction method preference were administered directly after students completed the RPD module and six months later. Analyses of variance accounting for period, carryover, and sequence effects were used to determine the relative effects of each approach using a peffects, CBL was also associated with higher gains in RPD treatment planning comprehension (p=0.04) and perceived efficacy (p=0.01) compared to LB instruction. These gains diminished six months after the course-a finding based on a 49% follow-up response rate. Overall, the students overwhelmingly preferred CBL to LB instruction, and the findings suggest small albeit measurable educational benefits associated with CBL. This study's findings support the introduction and further testing of CBL in the preclinical dental curriculum, in anticipation of possible future benefits evident during clinical training.

  19. Social media adoption among lecturers at a traditional university in Eastern Cape Province of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obrain T. Murire

    2017-07-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to examine social media adoption among lecturers at a traditional university in Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. Method: The unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT framework was used as the theoretical foundation of the questionnaire that was distributed to 300 full-time staff members. A response rate of 39% was attained. Factor analysis was used to test the relationship between variables. Contribution: The study’s contribution is to the theoretical body of knowledge that affirms that the UTAUT framework is an appropriate tool to use to test adoption of social media at traditional universities. Conclusion: The findings indicated that academics are conversant with emerging technologies and could incorporate these technologies into academic settings with an aim to increase communication and interaction among lecturers and learners. The results revealed that performance expectancy, social influence, effort expectancy and behavioural intention have a positive influence on social media adoption and continued use by academics in teaching and learning at traditional university. The facilitating condition scale was not statistically significant, but must be considered by management in order to improve the adoption of social media among lecturers.

  20. Teaching medical students a clinical approach to altered mental status: simulation enhances traditional curriculum

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    Jeremy D. Sperling

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Simulation-based medical education (SBME is increasingly being utilized for teaching clinical skills in undergraduate medical education. Studies have evaluated the impact of adding SBME to third- and fourth-year curriculum; however, very little research has assessed its efficacy for teaching clinical skills in pre-clerkship coursework. To measure the impact of a simulation exercise during a pre-clinical curriculum, a simulation session was added to a pre-clerkship course at our medical school where the clinical approach to altered mental status (AMS is traditionally taught using a lecture and an interactive case-based session in a small group format. The objective was to measure simulation's impact on students’ knowledge acquisition, comfort, and perceived competence with regards to the AMS patient. Methods: AMS simulation exercises were added to the lecture and small group case sessions in June 2010 and 2011. Simulation sessions consisted of two clinical cases using a high-fidelity full-body simulator followed by a faculty debriefing after each case. Student participation in a simulation session was voluntary. Students who did and did not participate in a simulation session completed a post-test to assess knowledge and a survey to understand comfort and perceived competence in their approach to AMS. Results: A total of 154 students completed the post-test and survey and 65 (42% attended a simulation session. Post-test scores were higher in students who attended a simulation session compared to those who did not (p<0.001. Students who participated in a simulation session were more comfortable in their overall approach to treating AMS patients (p=0.05. They were also more likely to state that they could articulate a differential diagnosis (p=0.03, know what initial diagnostic tests are needed (p=0.01, and understand what interventions are useful in the first few minutes (p=0.003. Students who participated in a simulation session

  1. Combining traditional anatomy lectures with e-learning activities: how do students perceive their learning experience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochner, Lukas; Wieser, Heike; Waldboth, Simone; Mischo-Kelling, Maria

    2016-02-21

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how students perceived their learning experience when combining traditional anatomy lectures with preparatory e-learning activities that consisted of fill-in-the-blank assignments, videos, and multiple-choice quizzes. A qualitative study was conducted to explore changes in study behaviour and perception of learning. Three group interviews with students were conducted and thematically analysed. Data was categorized into four themes: 1. Approaching the course material, 2. Understanding the material, 3. Consolidating the material, and 4. Perceived learning outcome. Students appreciated the clear structure of the course, and reported that online activities encouraged them towards a first engagement with the material. They felt that they were more active during in-class sessions, described self-study before the end-of-term exam as easier, and believed that contents would remain in their memories for a longer time. By adjusting already existing resources, lectures can be combined fairly easily and cost-effectively with preparatory e-learning activities. The creation of online components promote well-structured courses, can help minimize 'student passivity' as a characteristic element of lectures, and can support students in distributing their studies throughout the term, thus suggesting enhanced learning. Further research work should be designed to confirm the afore-mentioned findings through objective measurements of student learning outcomes.

  2. A Case Study: Are Traditional Face-To-Face Lectures Still Relevant When Teaching Engineering Courses?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LillAnne Jackson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this rapidly changing age, with virtually all information available on the Internet including courses, students may not find any reason to physically attend the lectures. In spite of the many benefits the online lectures and materials bring to teaching, this drift from the traditional (norm face-to-face lectures is also creating further barriers, such as difficulty in communicating and building personal relationships, between students and instructor. In this paper we carry out a study that presents and analyzes factors that motivate students to attend a (1 face-to-face instruction in-class versus an (2 online class. This study is based on an anonymous and voluntary survey that was conducted in the School of Engineering at University of Victoria, BC, Canada. This paper presents and shares the detailed results and analysis of this survey that also includes some interesting and useful comments from the students. Based on the results, analysis and comments the paper suggests methodologies of how to improve face-to-face in-class instructions to make them more relevant to the current global information age.

  3. Combining traditional anatomy lectures with e-learning activities: how do students perceive their learning experience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Heike; Waldboth, Simone; Mischo-Kelling, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate how students perceived their learning experience when combining traditional anatomy lectures with preparatory e-learning activities that consisted of fill-in-the-blank assignments, videos, and multiple-choice quizzes. Methods A qualitative study was conducted to explore changes in study behaviour and perception of learning. Three group interviews with students were conducted and thematically analysed. Results Data was categorized into four themes: 1. Approaching the course material, 2. Understanding the material, 3. Consolidating the material, and 4. Perceived learning outcome.  Students appreciated the clear structure of the course, and reported that online activities encouraged them towards a first engagement with the material. They felt that they were more active during in-class sessions, described self-study before the end-of-term exam as easier, and believed that contents would remain in their memories for a longer time. Conclusions By adjusting already existing resources, lectures can be combined fairly easily and cost-effectively with preparatory e-learning activities. The creation of online components promote well-structured courses, can help minimize ‘student passivity’ as a characteristic element of lectures, and can support students in distributing their studies throughout the term, thus suggesting enhanced learning. Further research work should be designed to confirm the afore-mentioned findings through objective measurements of student learning outcomes. PMID:26897012

  4. A Comparison of Traditional and Engaging Lecture Methods in a Large, Professional-Level Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Cynthia J.; McNear, Jacquee; Metz, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    In engaging lectures, also referred to as broken or interactive lectures, students are given short periods of lecture followed by "breaks" that can consist of 1-min papers, problem sets, brainstorming sessions, or open discussion. While many studies have shown positive effects when engaging lectures are used in undergraduate settings,…

  5. Tradition and Change in the Social Studies Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Donald O.

    1980-01-01

    The historical development of curriculum materials in the social studies is outlined. Principles offering the potential to effect major changes are described and a set of guidelines for a rational social studies curriculum is established. (JMF)

  6. Enriching traditional biology lectures digital concept maps and their influence on cognition and motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Schaal

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Higher education deals with complex knowledge and university teaching should focus on conceptual understanding. Adequate knowledge structures are essential and active knowledge construction should be supported for meaningful learning. But traditional lectures mostly are structured by slides which may misleadingly cause linear representations of knowledge. In this study, a framework for digital concept maps was developed to complement lectures in human biology. The course was aimed at student science teachers at the undergraduate level. The work is based on theoretical research on computer-supported learning, on knowledge structures perspectives within learning environments as well as on self-determination theory. Each session was supplemented by a digital, multimedia-enriched concept map. After each single lecture, students had free access to the concept maps to reinforce the latest topics. The objective of the study was to examine if the use of complementary concept maps (i influences achievement and (ii if motivational variables influence the use of the concept maps. In both cases, influences of computer-user self-efficacy were expected (iii. The students’ (N = 171 concept map use was logged, achievement was tested and motivational variables were surveyed (e.g. interest/ enjoyment, perceived competence, effort/ importance, value/usefulness. The logfile-data allowed distinguishing learners according to their concept map use. Results reveal the benefit of additional concept maps for achievement, positive motivational aspects and computer-user self-efficacy as mediating factors showed some influence. The emphasize of further research should be on students’ active engagement in structuring their individual learning by constructing concept maps themselves, especially in science education courses.

  7. Stress predictors in two Asian dental schools with an integrated curriculum and traditional curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T T T; Seki, N; Morio, I

    2018-05-01

    This study explored stress predictors and the role of instructional methods and institutional differences in perceived stress levels amongst students at two Asian dental schools. An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to undergraduate dental students at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), Japan and the University of Medicine and Pharmacy (UMP), Hochiminh City, Vietnam in 2016. Data concerning the students' demographic information and grades, and responses to the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and Dental Environment Stress questionnaire (DES) were collected. The questionnaires were prepared in English and translated into Japanese and Vietnamese following a forward-backward translation process. Altogether 684 students answered the questionnaire with a response rate of 97% for TMDU and 89% for UMP. The mean DES score of UMP students was significantly higher than TMDU (P stress scores in several areas than UMP preclinical students. Having dentistry as their first choice of educational programme was a significant stress predictor for Japanese students whilst the clinical practicum was a significant stress predictor for Vietnamese students. Previous academic performance was not a significant stress predictor for students at either dental school. Dental students of an integrated, active-learning curriculum reported lower stress levels than students of a traditional, discipline-based curriculum. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. COMPARISON OF THE TRADITIONAL CHALK AND BOARD LECTURE SYSTEM VERSUS POWER POINT PRESENTATION AS A TEACHING TECHNIQUE FOR TEACHING GROSS ANATOMY TO THE FIRST PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Nusrat; Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally and conventionally, gross anatomy is taught by lectures and cadaveric dissection and the lectures are taken with chalk and board (C&B) or chalk and talk method in, India. But there is always a debate over the most effective method of lecture delivery. AIM : The aim of this study was to compare the role and effecti...

  9. Student performance and their perception of a patient-oriented problem-solving approach with audiovisual aids in teaching pathology: a comparison with traditional lectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun Singh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Arjun SinghDepartment of Pathology, Sri Venkateshwara Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, Pondicherry, IndiaPurpose: We use different methods to train our undergraduates. The patient-oriented problem-solving (POPS system is an innovative teaching–learning method that imparts knowledge, enhances intrinsic motivation, promotes self learning, encourages clinical reasoning, and develops long-lasting memory. The aim of this study was to develop POPS in teaching pathology, assess its effectiveness, and assess students’ preference for POPS over didactic lectures.Method: One hundred fifty second-year MBBS students were divided into two groups: A and B. Group A was taught by POPS while group B was taught by traditional lectures. Pre- and post-test numerical scores of both groups were evaluated and compared. Students then completed a self-structured feedback questionnaire for analysis.Results: The mean (SD difference in pre- and post-test scores of groups A and B was 15.98 (3.18 and 7.79 (2.52, respectively. The significance of the difference between scores of group A and group B teaching methods was 16.62 (P < 0.0001, as determined by the z-test. Improvement in post-test performance of group A was significantly greater than of group B, demonstrating the effectiveness of POPS. Students responded that POPS facilitates self-learning, helps in understanding topics, creates interest, and is a scientific approach to teaching. Feedback response on POPS was strong in 57.52% of students, moderate in 35.67%, and negative in only 6.81%, showing that 93.19% students favored POPS over simple lectures.Conclusion: It is not feasible to enforce the PBL method of teaching throughout the entire curriculum; However, POPS can be incorporated along with audiovisual aids to break the monotony of dialectic lectures and as alternative to PBL.Keywords: medical education, problem-solving exercise, problem-based learning

  10. Student performance and their perception of a patient-oriented problem-solving approach with audiovisual aids in teaching pathology: a comparison with traditional lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arjun

    2011-01-01

    We use different methods to train our undergraduates. The patient-oriented problem-solving (POPS) system is an innovative teaching-learning method that imparts knowledge, enhances intrinsic motivation, promotes self learning, encourages clinical reasoning, and develops long-lasting memory. The aim of this study was to develop POPS in teaching pathology, assess its effectiveness, and assess students' preference for POPS over didactic lectures. One hundred fifty second-year MBBS students were divided into two groups: A and B. Group A was taught by POPS while group B was taught by traditional lectures. Pre- and posttest numerical scores of both groups were evaluated and compared. Students then completed a self-structured feedback questionnaire for analysis. The mean (SD) difference in pre- and post-test scores of groups A and B was 15.98 (3.18) and 7.79 (2.52), respectively. The significance of the difference between scores of group A and group B teaching methods was 16.62 (P effectiveness of POPS. Students responded that POPS facilitates self-learning, helps in understanding topics, creates interest, and is a scientific approach to teaching. Feedback response on POPS was strong in 57.52% of students, moderate in 35.67%, and negative in only 6.81%, showing that 93.19% students favored POPS over simple lectures. It is not feasible to enforce the PBL method of teaching throughout the entire curriculum; However, POPS can be incorporated along with audiovisual aids to break the monotony of dialectic lectures and as alternative to PBL.

  11. COMPARISON OF EFFECTIVENESS OF TRADITIONAL AND INTERACTIVE LECTURE METHODS FOR TEACHING BIOCHEMISTRY AMONG FIRST YEAR MEDICAL STUDENTS IN GOVERNMENT MEDICAL COLLEGE, IDUKKI, KERALA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajeevan K. C

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Traditional lecture is the most common type of teaching learning method used in professional colleges of India. Interactive lecture seems to be an important and feasible teaching learning method to increase the effect of learning in medical education. MATERIALS & METHODS The study was performed from July 2015 to October 2015 among first year medical students in Government Medical College, Idukki. All fifty first year MBBS students of 2014 batch were divided into group A and group B by simple random method. Two topics of translation were taken to both groups by two different lecture methods. The first topic was taught by interactive lecture to group A and traditional lecture to group B on the first day. Pre-test and post-test were done to assess gain in knowledge by two lecture methods. Second topic was taken to both groups on the second day by exchanging lecture methods. Their increase in knowledge was assessed by pre-test and post-test. On the second day, their feedback regarding perceptions and preferences were taken. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS Mean scores of pre and post-test were analysed by paired t test. Level of knowledge gained among two lecture methods was compared by independent t test and qualitative data on feedback was analysed using Chi square test. RESULTS The level of knowledge gained by interactive lectures was significantly higher than traditional lectures. Students agreed that interactive lectures motivated them for self-learning and increased their confidence regarding study materials. It also helped them in the recollection of lecture content and clearing doubt than traditional lectures. CONCLUSIONS Interactive lectures were accepted and considered to be more useful than traditional lectures for teaching biochemistry at Government Medical College, Idukki.

  12. A Comparative Study on Power Point Presentation and Traditional Lecture Method in Material Understandability, Effectiveness and Attitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewasew, Daniel; Mengestle, Missaye; Abate, Gebeyehu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare PPT and traditional lecture method in material understandability, effectiveness and attitude among university students. Comparative descriptive survey research design was employed to answer the research questions raised. Four hundred and twenty nine participants were selected randomly using stratified sampling…

  13. Evaluating Views of Lecturers on the Consistency of Teaching Content with Teaching Approach: Traditional versus Reform Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevimli, Eyup

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the consistency of teaching content with teaching approaches in calculus on the basis of lecturers' views. In this sense, the structures of the examples given in two commonly used calculus textbooks, both in traditional and reform classrooms, are compared. The content analysis findings show that the examples in both…

  14. "Flipped classrooms" in training in maxillofacial surgery: preparation before the traditional didactic lecture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elledge, Ross; Houlton, Samantha; Hackett, Stephanie; Evans, Martin J

    2018-04-28

    While virtual learning environments (VLE) can be used in medical education as stand-alone educational interventions, they can also be used in preparation for traditional "face-to-face" training sessions as part of a "flipped classroom" model. We sought to evaluate the introduction of this model in a single module on maxillofacial radiology from a course on trauma skills. Course delegates were randomised into two groups: one was given access to an e-learning resource (test group) and the other attended a traditional didactic lecture (control group). Knowledge and confidence were assessed before and after the course with a 20-question single-best-answer paper and a 10-situation 100mm visual analogue scale (VAS) paper, respectively. All participants were then given free access to the VLE for 30days and were invited to take part in an e-survey. Neither group showed improvements in the single-best-answer scores, but both groups showed comparable improvements in VAS (control: median (range) values improved from 40.8 (17.7-82.5) mm to 62.8 (35.3-88.7) mm, p=0.001; test group: from 47.7 (10.9-58.1) mm to 60.5 (32.4-75.6) mm, p=0.005). Half of the respondents stated that they preferred the "flipped classroom" approach, and 22/22 stated that they would be "likely" or "very likely" to use an e-learning resource with expanded content. The "flipped classroom" approach was well received and there were comparable improvements in confidence. As maxillofacial radiology lends itself to online instruction with its reliance on the recognition of patterns, and problem-based approach to learning, a piloted e-learning resource could be developed in this area. Copyright © 2018 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Lecturing skills as predictors of tutoring skills in a problem-based medical curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassab, Salah Eldin; Hassan, Nahla; Abu-Hijleh, Marwan F; Sequeira, Reginald P

    2016-01-01

    Recruitment of tutors to work in problem-based learning (PBL) programs is challenging, especially in that most of them are graduated from discipline-based programs. Therefore, this study aims at examining whether lecturing skills of faculty could predict their PBL tutoring skills. This study included evaluation of faculty (n=69) who participated in both tutoring and lecturing within particular PBL units at the College of Medicine and Medical Sciences (CMMS), Arabian Gulf University, Bahrain. Each faculty was evaluated by medical students (n=45±8 for lecturing and 8±2 for PBL tutoring) using structured evaluation forms based on a Likert-type scale (poor to excellent). The prediction of tutoring skills using lecturing skills was statistically analyzed using stepwise linear regression. Among the parameters used to judge lecturing skills, the most important predictor for tutoring skills was subject matter mastery in the lecture by explaining difficult concepts and responding effectively to students' questions. Subject matter mastery in the lecture positively predicted five tutoring skills and accounted for 25% of the variance in overall effectiveness of the PBL tutors (F=22.39, P=0.000). Other important predictors for tutoring skills were providing a relaxed class atmosphere and effective use of audiovisual aids in the lecture. Predicting the tutoring skills based on lecturing skills could have implications for recruiting tutors in PBL medical programs and for tutor training initiatives.

  16. Lecturing skills as predictors of tutoring skills in a problem-based medical curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassab SE

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Salah Eldin Kassab,1 Nahla Hassan,1 Marwan F Abu-Hijleh,2 Reginald P Sequeira3 1Department of Medical Education, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt; 2College of Medicine, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar; 3College of Medicine and Medical Sciences, Arabian Gulf University, Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain Purpose: Recruitment of tutors to work in problem-based learning (PBL programs is challenging, especially in that most of them are graduated from discipline-based programs. Therefore, this study aims at examining whether lecturing skills of faculty could predict their PBL tutoring skills. Methods: This study included evaluation of faculty (n=69 who participated in both tutoring and lecturing within particular PBL units at the College of Medicine and Medical Sciences (CMMS, Arabian Gulf University, Bahrain. Each faculty was evaluated by medical students (n=45±8 for lecturing and 8±2 for PBL tutoring using structured evaluation forms based on a Likert-type scale (poor to excellent. The prediction of tutoring skills using lecturing skills was statistically analyzed using stepwise linear regression. Results: Among the parameters used to judge lecturing skills, the most important predictor for tutoring skills was subject matter mastery in the lecture by explaining difficult concepts and responding effectively to students' questions. Subject matter mastery in the lecture positively predicted five tutoring skills and accounted for 25% of the variance in overall effectiveness of the PBL tutors (F=22.39, P=0.000. Other important predictors for tutoring skills were providing a relaxed class atmosphere and effective use of audiovisual aids in the lecture. Conclusion: Predicting the tutoring skills based on lecturing skills could have implications for recruiting tutors in PBL medical programs and for tutor training initiatives. Keywords: PBL, tutor, tutoring skills, lecturing skills

  17. Traditional Lecture Versus an Activity Approach for Teaching Statistics: A Comparison of Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Loveland, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Many educational researchers have proposed teaching statistics with less lecture and more active learning methods. However, there are only a few comparative studies that have taught one section of statistics with lectures and one section with activity-based methods; of those studies, the results are contradictory. To address the need for more research on the actual effectiveness of active learning methods in introductory statistics, this research study was undertaken. An introductory, univ...

  18. Medical faculty and curriculum design - 'No, no, it's like this: You give your lectures...'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørcke, Anne Mette; Eika, Berit

    2009-01-01

    Background and aims: The purpose of this study was to understand more completely the (tacit) curriculum design models of medical faculty. We report on two research questions: (1) Can medical faculty give an account of their curriculum design assumptions? and (2) What are their assumptions...... concerning curriculum design? Method: We conducted an explorative, qualitative case study. We interviewed educational decision makers at the three Danish medical schools and associate professors from different courses concerning curriculum design. We carried out four individual, in-depth interviews and four...... focus groups with 20 participants in all. Results and conclusions: Only one decision maker had an explicit curriculum design model. However, all participants had assumptions concerning curriculum design. We displayed their assumptions as five essentially different and increasingly complex models...

  19. Analysis of Traditional versus Three-Dimensional Augmented Curriculum on Anatomical Learning Outcome Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Diana Coomes; Mlynarczyk, Gregory S.A.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether student learning outcome measures are influenced by the addition of three-dimensional and digital teaching tools to a traditional dissection and lecture learning format curricula. The study was performed in a semester long graduate level course that incorporated both gross anatomy and neuroanatomy curricula. Methods…

  20. Replacement of traditional lectures with computer-based tutorials: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Lavelle

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a pilot project with a group of 60 second-year undergraduates studying the use of standard forms of contract in the construction industry. The project entailed the replacement of two of a series of nine scheduled lectures with a computer-based tutorial. The two main aims of the project were to test the viability of converting existing lecture material into computer-based material on an in-house production basis, and to obtain feedback from the student cohort on their behavioural response to the change in media. The effect on student performance was not measured at this stage of development.

  1. Updating the CS Curriculum: Traditional vs. Market-Driven Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedzad Mehic

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a method of updating a curriculum of a typical computer science department. The suggested approach promotes the role of a university as an academic environment, targeting excellence in teaching degree programs, as well as a qualified partner in partnership with businesses, especially with industry, in sharing knowledge and skills, supporting the concept of a quality process and quality products. Cooperation with industry firms, through real problem solving approaches and using emerging technologies that might drive the best demand in future markets, will prepare students to take advantage of opportunities, gain experience, and make an impact immediately. As a case study, the paper describes how this approach is applied to Computer Science Department at University of Bahrain.

  2. Comparing Computer Game and Traditional Lecture Using Experience Ratings from High and Low Achieving Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimley, Michael; Green, Richard; Nilsen, Trond; Thompson, David

    2012-01-01

    Computer games are purported to be effective instructional tools that enhance motivation and improve engagement. The aim of this study was to investigate how tertiary student experiences change when instruction was computer game based compared to lecture based, and whether experiences differed between high and low achieving students. Participants…

  3. Does the Room Matter? Active Learning in Traditional and Enhanced Lecture Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltzfus, Jon R.; Libarkin, Julie

    2016-01-01

    SCALE-UP-type classrooms, originating with the Student-Centered Active Learning Environment with Upside-down Pedagogies project, are designed to facilitate active learning by maximizing opportunities for interactions between students and embedding technology in the classroom. Positive impacts when active learning replaces lecture are well…

  4. Re-living anatomy: medical student use of lecture capture

    OpenAIRE

    Diss, L; Sharp, A; Scott, F; Moore, L; Daniel, P; Memon, S; Smith, C

    2017-01-01

    Lecture capture resources have become common place within UK Higher education to enhance and support learning in addition to the tradition lecture. These resources can be particularly useful for medical students in anatomy teaching where time dedicated to anatomy within the curriculum has been reduced compared to previous generations(1).\\ud \\ud This study aimed to investigate how lecture capture aided student learning Qualitative feedback was also collected in view to further improve the reso...

  5. Promoting Student Learning through the Integration of Lab and Lecture: The Seamless Biology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrowes, Patricia; Nazario, Gladys

    2008-01-01

    The authors engaged in an education experiment to determine if the integration of lab and lecture activities in zoology and botany proved beneficial to student learning and motivation toward biology. Their results revealed that this strategy positively influenced students' academic achievement, conceptual understanding, and ability to apply…

  6. A Tale of Two Sections: An Experiment to Compare the Effectiveness of a Hybrid versus a Traditional Lecture Format in Introductory Microbiology

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Alison E. M.; Randall, Shelby; Traustad?ttir, Tinna

    2015-01-01

    Two sections of an introductory microbiology course were taught by one instructor. One was taught through a hybrid format and the other through a traditional format. Students were randomly assigned to the two sections. Both sections were provided with identical lecture materials, in-class worksheets, in-class assessments, and extra credit opportunities; the main difference was in the way the lecture material was delivered?online for the hybrid section and in person for the traditional section...

  7. Why Some School Subjects Have a Higher Status than Others: The Epistemology of the Traditional Curriculum Hierarchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleazby, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Inherent in most school curricula is some sort of curriculum hierarchy--that is, an assumption that some school subjects are more valuable than others. This paper examines the epistemological assumptions that underpin one such curriculum hierarchy, which I refer to as "the traditional curriculum hierarchy". It is a pervasive and…

  8. Developing an e-pedagogy for interprofessional learning: Lecturers' thinking on curriculum design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Frances; Booth, Karen; Bywater, Helen

    2010-09-01

    E-learning is seen as offering possible solutions to the barriers of large scale interprofessional education. This paper discusses a study that explored the underlying pedagogical thinking employed by lecturers when planning e-learning materials for interprofessional education. The themes uncovered in the data were: "reflective spaces for creativity"; "from logistics to learner autonomy"; "authentic"; "constructivist approaches"; "inter-active learning to promote collaboration" and "bringing the patient/service user into the classroom". Discussions about e-learning can focus on the technological aspects of design and delivery. However the findings of this study revealed that technology was not a consideration for the lecturers who saw e-learning as a vehicle to promote interactive learning. Their prime focus was revealed as the application of learning theory to the design of materials that would support students' acquisition of collaborative skills and the generation of new interprofessional knowledge.

  9. Comparison of the didactic lecture with the simulation/model approach for the teaching of a novel perioperative ultrasound curriculum to anesthesiology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsingh, Davinder; Alexander, Brenton; Le, Khanhvan; Williams, Wendell; Canales, Cecilia; Cannesson, Maxime

    2014-09-01

    To expose residents to two methods of education for point-of-care ultrasound, a traditional didactic lecture and a model/simulation-based lecture, which focus on concepts of cardiopulmonary function, volume status, and evaluation of severe thoracic/abdominal injuries; and to assess which method is more effective. Single-center, prospective, blinded trial. University hospital. Anesthesiology residents who were assigned to an educational day during the two-month research study period. Residents were allocated to two groups to receive either a 90-minute, one-on-one didactic lecture or a 90-minute lecture in a simulation center, during which they practiced on a human model and simulation mannequin (normal pathology). Data points included a pre-lecture multiple-choice test, post-lecture multiple-choice test, and post-lecture, human model-based examination. Post-lecture tests were performed within three weeks of the lecture. An experienced sonographer who was blinded to the education modality graded the model-based skill assessment examinations. Participants completed a follow-up survey to assess the perceptions of the quality of their instruction between the two groups. 20 residents completed the study. No differences were noted between the two groups in pre-lecture test scores (P = 0.97), but significantly higher scores for the model/simulation group occurred on both the post-lecture multiple choice (P = 0.038) and post-lecture model (P = 0.041) examinations. Follow-up resident surveys showed significantly higher scores in the model/simulation group regarding overall interest in perioperative ultrasound (P = 0.047) as well understanding of the physiologic concepts (P = 0.021). A model/simulation-based based lecture series may be more effective in teaching the skills needed to perform a point-of-care ultrasound examination to anesthesiology residents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of traditional versus three-dimensional augmented curriculum on anatomical learning outcome measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Diana Coomes; Mlynarczyk, Gregory S A

    2016-11-01

    This study examined whether student learning outcome measures are influenced by the addition of three-dimensional and digital teaching tools to a traditional dissection and lecture learning format curricula. The study was performed in a semester long graduate level course that incorporated both gross anatomy and neuroanatomy curricula. Methods compared student examination performance on material taught using lecture and cadaveric dissection teaching tools alone or lecture and cadaveric dissection augmented with computerized three-dimensional teaching tools. Additional analyses were performed to examine potential correlations between question difficulty and format, previous student performance (i.e., undergraduate grade point average), and a student perception survey. The results indicated that students performed better on material in which three-dimensional (3D) technologies are utilized in conjunction with lecture and dissection methodologies. The improvement in performance was observed across the student population primarily on laboratory examinations. Although, student performance was increased, students did not perceive that the use of the additional 3D technology significantly influenced their learning. The results indicate that the addition of 3D learning tools can influence long-term retention of gross anatomy material and should be considered as a beneficial supplement for anatomy courses. Anat Sci Educ 9: 529-536. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  11. Effectiveness of an adult-learning, self-directed model compared with traditional lecture-based teaching methods in out-of-hospital training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzo, Robert A; Abbott, Cynthia A

    2004-01-01

    Until recently, the U.S. Army Combat Medic School used a traditional teaching model with heavy emphasis on large group lectures. Skills were taught separately with minimal links to didactics. To evaluate whether the adult learning model improves student learning in terms of cognitive performance and perception of proficiency in military medic training. The study population was two sequential groups of randomly selected junior, enlisted, active duty soldiers with no prior formal emergency medical training who were enrolled in an experimental model of a U.S. Army Combat Medic School. The control population was a similar group of students enrolled in the traditional curriculum. Instructors were drawn from the same pool, with experimental group instructors receiving two weeks of training in adult-learning strategies. The study population was enrolled in the experimental program that emphasized the principles of adult learning, including small-group interactive approach, self-directed study, multimedia didactics, and intensive integrated practice of psychomotor skills. Instructors and students were also surveyed at the end of the course as to their confidence in performing four critical skills. The survey instrument used a five-point scale ranging from "strongly disagree" through "undecided" to "strongly agree." Proficiency for this survey was defined as the sum of the top two ratings of "agree" or "strongly agree" to questions regarding the particular skill. Both experimental and control programs lasted ten weeks and covered the same academic content and nonacademic (e.g., physical fitness) requirements, and the two groups of students had similar duty days. Evaluations included performance on internal and National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians (NREMT) written examinations and other measures of academic and nonacademic performance. One hundred fifty students (experimental n = 81, control n = 69) were enrolled in 1999-2000. The scores for internal course

  12. COMPARISON OF EFFECTIVENESS OF TRADITIONAL AND INTERACTIVE LECTURE METHODS FOR TEACHING BIOCHEMISTRY AMONG FIRST YEAR MEDICAL STUDENTS IN GOVERNMENT MEDICAL COLLEGE, IDUKKI, KERALA

    OpenAIRE

    Sajeevan K. C; Lyson Lonappan; Sajna MV; Geetha Devi M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Traditional lecture is the most common type of teaching learning method used in professional colleges of India. Interactive lecture seems to be an important and feasible teaching learning method to increase the effect of learning in medical education. MATERIALS & METHODS The study was performed from July 2015 to October 2015 among first year medical students in Government Medical College, Idukki. All fifty first year MBBS students of 2014 batch were divided into grou...

  13. Educational Outcomes of Small-Group Discussion Versus Traditional Lecture Format in Dental Students' Learning and Skills Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Ana; Scott, Raymond; Peters, Ove A; McClain, Elizabeth; Gluskin, Alan H

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this prospective quantitative study was to compare the effect of different instructional formats on dental students' skills and knowledge acquisition for access cavity preparation. All first-year dental students were invited to participate in this study conducted during the four consecutive two-week endodontic rotation courses at the University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry in spring semester 2015. Four alphabetically distributed intact groups of students were randomly allocated to two groups (n=70 each) that participated in either small-group discussion or a traditional lecture on access preparation. The first outcome measure was skill acquisition, measured by the quality of access cavities prepared in extracted teeth at the conclusion of the session. Two blinded raters scored direct observations on a continuous scale. Knowledge, the second outcome measure, was scored with a multiple-choice and open-ended question test at the end of each two-week session. Data were obtained for 134 of the 140 students, for a 96% response rate. The results showed that students in the small-group discussion groups scored significantly higher than those in the lecture groups when skill performance was tested (p=8.9 × 10(-7)). However, no significant differences were found in the acquisition of knowledge between the two groups on the written test. Active student participation was significantly related to improved manual skill acquisition, but the format of the session does not seem to have had a direct influence on acquired knowledge.

  14. Traditional Culture into Interactive Arts: The Cases of Lion Dance in Temple Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-Hui; Chen, Chih-Tung; He, Ming-Yu; Hsu, Tao-I.

    The lion dance in Chinese culture is one of profound arts. This work aims to bridge traditional culture and modern multimedia technology and application of network cameras for the interactive tool to design a set of activities to promote the lion as the main body. There consists of the imaging systems and interactive multimedia applications.

  15. The effectiveness of computer-managed instruction versus traditional classroom lecture on achievement outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, S M; Arndt, M J; Gaston, S; Miller, B J

    1991-01-01

    This controlled experimental study examines the effect of two teaching methods on achievement outcomes from a 15-week, 2 credit hour semester course taught at two midwestern universities. Students were randomly assigned to either computer-managed instruction in which faculty function as tutors or the traditional classroom course of study. In addition, the effects of age, grade point average, attitudes toward computers, and satisfaction with the course on teaching method were analyzed using analysis of covariance. Younger students achieved better scores than did older students. Regardless of teaching method, however, neither method appeared to be better than the other for teaching course content. Students did not prefer one method over the other as indicated by their satisfaction scores. With demands upon university faculty to conduct research and publish, alternative methods of teaching that free faculty from the classroom should be considered. This study suggests that educators can select such an alternative teaching method to traditional classroom teaching without sacrificing quality education for certain courses.

  16. A comparison of students who chose a traditional or a problem-based learning curriculum after failing year 2 in the traditional curriculum: a unique case study at the Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    To canvas perceptions and experiences of students who had failed Year 2 of a traditional medical program and who chose to remain in the conventional program (n = 6) or had swapped to Curriculum 2001 (C2001), a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum (n = 14). A year after their decision regarding curriculum choice, students were canvassed (largely open-ended survey) about this decision and about their perceptions of their curricular experiences. C2001 students were positive about their PBL experiences. Overwhelmingly, their decision to swap streams had been a good one. They identified PBL features as supporting their learning. Repeating traditional curriculum students were, however, more circumspect in their opinions. C2001 students had clearly embraced PBL. They were now medical students, largely because of PBL activities underpinned by a sound educational philosophy. This unique case study has provided additional evidence that PBL students are generally more content with their studies than their conventional curriculum counterparts.

  17. A Tale of Two Sections: An Experiment to Compare the Effectiveness of a Hybrid versus a Traditional Lecture Format in Introductory Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Alison E. M.; Randall, Shelby; Traustadóttir, Tinna

    2015-01-01

    Two sections of an introductory microbiology course were taught by one instructor. One was taught through a hybrid format and the other through a traditional format. Students were randomly assigned to the two sections. Both sections were provided with identical lecture materials, in-class worksheets, in-class assessments, and extra credit…

  18. Puzzle-based versus traditional lecture: comparing the effects of pedagogy on academic performance in an undergraduate human anatomy and physiology II lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetzik, Lucas; Deeter, Anthony; Parker, Jamie; Yukech, Christine

    2015-06-23

    A traditional lecture-based pedagogy conveys information and content while lacking sufficient development of critical thinking skills and problem solving. A puzzle-based pedagogy creates a broader contextual framework, and fosters critical thinking as well as logical reasoning skills that can then be used to improve a student's performance on content specific assessments. This paper describes a pedagogical comparison of traditional lecture-based teaching and puzzle-based teaching in a Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab. Using a single subject/cross-over design half of the students from seven sections of the course were taught using one type of pedagogy for the first half of the semester, and then taught with a different pedagogy for the second half of the semester. The other half of the students were taught the same material but with the order of the pedagogies reversed. Students' performance on quizzes and exams specific to the course, and in-class assignments specific to this study were assessed for: learning outcomes (the ability to form the correct conclusion or recall specific information), and authentic academic performance as described by (Am J Educ 104:280-312, 1996). Our findings suggest a significant improvement in students' performance on standard course specific assessments using a puzzle-based pedagogy versus a traditional lecture-based teaching style. Quiz and test scores for students improved by 2.1 and 0.4% respectively in the puzzle-based pedagogy, versus the traditional lecture-based teaching. Additionally, the assessments of authentic academic performance may only effectively measure a broader conceptual understanding in a limited set of contexts, and not in the context of a Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab. In conclusion, a puzzle-based pedagogy, when compared to traditional lecture-based teaching, can effectively enhance the performance of students on standard course specific assessments, even when the assessments only test a limited

  19. A comparison of two methods of teaching. Computer managed instruction and keypad questions versus traditional classroom lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halloran, L

    1995-01-01

    Computers increasingly are being integrated into nursing education. One method of integration is through computer managed instruction (CMI). Recently, technology has become available that allows the integration of keypad questions into CMI. This brings a new type of interactivity between students and teachers into the classroom. The purpose of this study was to evaluate differences in achievement between a control group taught by traditional classroom lecture (TCL) and an experimental group taught using CMI and keypad questions. Both control and experimental groups consisted of convenience samples of junior nursing students in a baccalaureate program taking a medical/surgical nursing course. Achievement was measured by three instructor-developed multiple choice examinations. Findings demonstrated that although the experimental group demonstrated increasingly higher test scores as the semester progressed, no statistical difference was found in achievement between the two groups. One reason for this may be phenomenon of vampire video. Initially, the method of presentation overshadowed the content. As students became desensitized to the method, they were able to focus and absorb more content. This study suggests that CMI and keypads are a viable teaching option for nursing education. It is equal to TCL in student achievement and provides a new level of interaction in the classroom setting.

  20. Video-Based Learning vs Traditional Lecture for Instructing Emergency Medicine Residents in Disaster Medicine Principles of Mass Triage, Decontamination, and Personal Protective Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Henry A; Trang, Karen; Chason, Kevin W; Biddinger, Paul D

    2018-02-01

    Introduction Great demands have been placed on disaster medicine educators. There is a need to develop innovative methods to educate Emergency Physicians in the ever-expanding body of disaster medicine knowledge. The authors sought to demonstrate that video-based learning (VBL) could be a promising alternative to traditional learning methods for teaching disaster medicine core competencies. Hypothesis/Problem The objective was to compare VBL to traditional lecture (TL) for instructing Emergency Medicine residents in the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP; Irving, Texas USA) disaster medicine core competencies of patient triage and decontamination. A randomized, controlled pilot study compared two methods of instruction for mass triage, decontamination, and personal protective equipment (PPE). Emergency Medicine resident learning was measured with a knowledge quiz, a Likert scale measuring comfort, and a practical exercise. An independent samples t-test compared the scoring of the VBL with the TL group. Twenty-six residents were randomized to VBL (n=13) or TL (n=13). Knowledge score improvement following video (14.9%) versus lecture (14.1%) did not differ significantly between the groups (P=.74). Comfort score improvement also did not differ (P=.64) between video (18.3%) and lecture groups (15.8%). In the practical skills assessment, the VBL group outperformed the TL group overall (70.4% vs 55.5%; Plearning vs traditional lecture for instructing emergency medicine residents in disaster medicine principles of mass triage, decontamination, and personal protective equipment. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2018;33(1):7-12.

  1. Lecture Capturing: Its Effects on Students' Absenteeism, Performance, and Impressions in a Traditional Marketing Research Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommeyer, Curt J.

    2017-01-01

    A quasiexperiment was conducted among marketing research students to determine the effects of lecture capturing (LC). One group of students (the LC group) was allowed access to video recordings of the class lectures whereas another group of students in a parallel class (the control group) was not given access to the recordings. When both groups…

  2. Problem-based learning interventions in a traditional curriculum are an effective learning tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Grant

    2011-12-01

    on the whole showed a benefit from using PBL, for example in critical reasoning, problem solving abilities and creativity. Some evidence exists that single PBL intervention in a traditional curriculum is an effective learning tool, though test results appear not to be affected.

  3. Cathedral outreach: student-led workshops for school curriculum enhancement in non-traditional environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Matthew T.; Jantzen, Alexander; van Putten, Lieke D.; Ravagli, Andrea; Donko, Andrei L.; Soper, Nathan; Wong, Nicholas H. L.; John, Pearl V.

    2017-08-01

    Universities in the United Kingdom have been driven to work with a larger pool of potential students than just the more traditional student (middle-class white male), in order to tackle the widely-accepted skills-shortage in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), whilst honoring their commitment to fair access to higher education. Student-led outreach programs have contributed significantly to this drive. Two such programs run by postgraduate students at the University of Southampton are the Lightwave Roadshow and Southampton Accelerate!, which focus on photonics and particle physics, respectively. The program ambassadors have developed activities to enhance areas of the national curriculum through presenting fundamental physical sciences and their applications to optics and photonics research. The activities have benefitted significantly from investment from international organizations, such as SPIE, OSA and the IEEE Photonics Society, and UK research councils, in conjunction with university recruitment and outreach strategies. New partnerships have been formed to expand outreach programs to work in non-traditional environments to challenge stereotypes of scientists. This paper presents two case studies of collaboration with education learning centers at Salisbury Cathedral and Winchester Cathedral. The paper outlines workshops and shows developed for pupils aged 6-14 years (UK key stages 2-4) on the electromagnetic spectrum, particle physics, telecommunications and the human eye using a combination of readily obtainable items, hand-built kits and elements from the EYEST Photonics Explorer kit. The activities are interactive to stimulate learning through active participation, complement the UK national curriculum and link the themes of science with the non-traditional setting of a cathedral. We present methods to evaluate the impact of the activity and tools to obtain qualitative feedback for continual program improvement. We also

  4. The Contribution of Zapin as One of Malay Traditional Arts in Curriculum 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellya Roza

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Zapin consists of three elements which are complementary to create movement harmony and rhythm that beautiful to look, heard and seen. They are music, song and dance. Zapin is one culture comes from Arab that developed in archipelago line with Islamization process. Zapin in Nusantara grew and developed in accordance with the customs and conditions of the local community. It becomes palace art for events such as welcoming guests and celebrations in the kingdom and also entertainment for society. The study aims to determine the contribution of Zapin in the Curricullum 2013. A Mixed research was used where the data taken from documentation, observation, and interview. The finding of the study showed that although modern art has been rife enter and expand in the archipelago but Zapin as cultural heritage still exist in society because of its content in accordance with teaching point and attitude of society that moral and spiritual precedence. It means that Zapin with all devices containing a core competence value contained in curriculum 2013. It is concluded that the contribution of Zapin as one of Malay traditional arts might contribute to the strengthening of curriculum 2013.

  5. Effects of problem-based learning vs. traditional lecture on Korean nursing students' critical thinking, problem-solving, and self-directed learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eunyoung; Lindquist, Ruth; Song, Yeoungsuk

    2014-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a method widely used in nursing education to develop students' critical thinking skills to solve practice problems independently. Although PBL has been used in nursing education in Korea for nearly a decade, few studies have examined its effects on Korean nursing students' learning outcomes, and few Korean studies have examined relationships among these outcomes. The objectives of this study are to examine outcome abilities including critical thinking, problem-solving, and self-directed learning of nursing students receiving PBL vs. traditional lecture, and to examine correlations among these outcome abilities. A quasi-experimental non-equivalent group pretest-posttest design was used. First-year nursing students (N=90) were recruited from two different junior colleges in two cities (GY and GJ) in South Korea. In two selected educational programs, one used traditional lecture methods, while the other used PBL methods. Standardized self-administered questionnaires of critical thinking, problem-solving, and self-directed learning abilities were administered before and at 16weeks (after instruction). Learning outcomes were significantly positively correlated, however outcomes were not statistically different between groups. Students in the PBL group improved across all abilities measured, while student scores in the traditional lecture group decreased in problem-solving and self-directed learning. Critical thinking was positively associated with problem-solving and self-directed learning (r=.71, and r=.50, respectively, plearning (r=.75, pLearning outcomes of PBL were not significantly different from traditional lecture in this small underpowered study, despite positive trends. Larger studies are recommended to study effects of PBL on critical student abilities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Bridging the gap in 1 st year dental material curriculum: A 3 year randomized cross over trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaranjani Gali

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Effectiveness of COSGD in terms of scores through MCQs is comparable to traditional lecture. However, most of the students perceive COSGD help them understand the theory better; co-relate clinically; more motivating and interesting than a traditional lecture. Feasibility in institution needs more time and resources to conduct COSGD within the dental material curriculum.

  7. Is lecture dead? A preliminary study of medical students' evaluation of teaching methods in the preclinical curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinski, Anne; Blackwell, Kristina T C Panizzi Woodley; Belue, F Mike; Brooks, William S

    2017-09-22

    To investigate medical students' perceptions of lecture and non-lecture-based instructional methods and compare preferences for use and quantity of each during preclinical training. We administered a survey to first- and second-year undergraduate medical students at the University of Alabama School of Medicine in Birmingham, Alabama, USA aimed to evaluate preferred instructional methods.  Using a cross-sectional study design, Likert scale ratings and student rankings were used to determine preferences among lecture, laboratory, team-based learning, simulation, small group case-based learning, large group case-based learning, patient presentation, and peer teaching. We calculated mean ratings for each instructional method and used chi-square tests to compare proportions of first- and second-year cohorts who ranked each in their top 5 preferred methods. Among participating students, lecture (M=3.6, SD=1.0), team based learning (M=4.2, SD=1.0), simulation (M=4.0, SD=1.0), small group case-based learning (M=3.8, SD=1.0), laboratory (M=3.6, SD=1.0), and patient presentation (M=3.8, SD=0.9) received higher scores than other instructional methods. Overall, second-year students ranked lecture lower (χ 2 (1, N=120) =16.33, p<0.0001) and patient presentation higher (χ 2 (1, N=120) =3.75, p=0.05) than first-year students. While clinically-oriented teaching methods were preferred by second-year medical students, lecture-based instruction was popular among first-year students. Results warrant further investigation to determine the ideal balance of didactic methods in undergraduate medical education, specifically curricula that employ patient-oriented instruction during the second preclinical year.

  8. Five years of lesson modification to implement non-traditional learning sessions in a traditional-delivery curriculum: A retrospective assessment using applied implementation variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Shaun E; McNair, Bryan; Kiser, Tyree H; Franson, Kari L

    Non-traditional learning (NTL), including aspects of self-directed learning (SDL), may address self-awareness development needs. Many factors can impact successful implementation of NTL. To share our multi-year experience with modifications that aim to improve NTL sessions in a traditional curriculum. To improve understanding of applied implementation variables (some of which were based on successful SDL implementation components) that impact NTL. We delivered a single lesson in a traditional-delivery curriculum once annually for five years, varying delivery annually in response to student learning and reaction-to-learning results. At year 5, we compared student learning and reaction-to-learning to applied implementation factors using logistic regression. Higher instructor involvement and overall NTL levels predicted correct exam responses (p=0.0007 and ptraditional and highest overall NTL deliveries. Students rated instructor presentation skills and teaching methods higher when greater instructor involvement (pmethods were most effective when lower student involvement and higher technology levels (ptraditional-delivery curriculum, instructor involvement appears essential, while the impact of student involvement and educational technology levels varies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of student confidence and perceptions of biochemistry concepts using a team-based learning versus traditional lecture-based format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryka, Rebecca; Kiersma, Mary E; Frame, Tracy R; Cailor, Stephanie M; Chen, Aleda M H

    To evaluate differences in student confidence and perceptions of biochemistry concepts using a team-based learning (TBL) format versus a traditional lecture-based format at two universities. Two pedagogies (TBL vs lecture-based) were utilized to deliver biochemistry concepts at two universities in a first-professional year, semester-long biochemistry course. A 21-item instrument was created and administered pre-post semester to assess changes in confidence in learning biochemistry concepts using Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory (eight items, 5-point, Likert-type) and changes in student perceptions of biochemistry utilizing the theory of planned behavior (TPB) domains (13 items, 7- point, Likert-type). Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to evaluate pre-post changes, and Mann Whitney U tests for differences between universities. All students (N=111) had more confidence in biochemistry concepts post-semester, but TBL students (N=53) were significantly more confident. TBL students also had greater agreement that they are expected to actively engage in science courses post-semester, according to the perceptions of biochemistry subscale. No other differences between lecture and TBL were observed post-semester. Students in a TBL course had greater gains in confidence. Since students often engage in tasks where they feel confident, TBL can be a useful pedagogy to promote student learning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robi Kroflič

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern curriculum theories emphasize that if we understand the curriculum as a real core substance of education. We have to bear in mind, when planning the curriculum, the whole multitude of factors (curricula which have an influence on the educational impact. In the field of andragogy, we especially have to consider educational needs, and linking the strategies of instruction with those of learning. The best way of realizing this principle is the open strategy of planning the national curriculum and process-developmental strategy of planning with the microandragogic situation. This planning strategy is S1m1lar to the system-integration strategy and Jarvis's model of negotiated curriculum, which derive from the basic andragogic principle: that the interests and capacities of adults for education increase if we enable them to cooperate in the planning and production of the curriculum.

  11. Discursive Dancing: Traditionalism and Social Realism in the 2013 English History Curriculum Wars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    This paper is an exploration of the debates surrounding the publication of a new National Curriculum for history in England. The draft curriculum was published in February 2013 and was withdrawn just 6 months later in the face of considerable opposition. This paper offers a tentative explanation for this example of a rare phenomenon: effective…

  12. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES IN EDUCATION: THE SYNTHESIS OF TRADITIONAL FORMAT AND E-LEARNING (AN EXPERIENCE OF DEVELOPING A NEW MODEL OF A LECTURE COURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla L. Nazarenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Russian system of education is undergoing a process of modernization where ICT play a decisive role. It presupposes not only providing advanced technical equipment but also integrating technologies into a traditional teaching and learning process based on a well-developed and scholarly-proven methodology. A sound didactic solution is the introduction of an element of e-learning for structuring and monitoring students’ autonomous active study.A lecture course in a traditional format can be transformed into a mode of blended learning via combining classroom face-to-face teaching with students’ self-preparation in an interactive learning environment to enhance the efficacy the educational process. An experience of such a transformation is considered. 

  13. A lecture on lecturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calnan, J

    1976-11-01

    There are major differences between a lecture and a paper for publication. Often the printed word is spoken at meetings, a kind of compulsive public reading which has robbed the lecturer of the chance of oratory and the audience of a little enjoyment. The simple fact is that although doctors read aloud badly (actors do this far better) most can learn to speak spontaneolsly and with animation; but this requires time and effort, both of which are donated in a miserly way. The successful lecturer is generous and considerate of his audience--a rare being at medical meetings.

  14. What Makes the Learning of Physiology in a PBL Medical Curriculum Challenging? Student Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufts, Mark A.; Higgins-Opitz, Susan B.

    2009-01-01

    Physiology is an integral component of any medical curriculum. Traditionally, the learning of physiology has relied heavily on systems-based didactic lectures. In 2001, the Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine (NRMSM; Durban, South Africa) embarked on a problem-based curriculum in which the learning of physiology was integrated with relevant…

  15. Repurposing traditional instructor-led lectures for continuing education: rewarding instructors as authors and maximizing return on investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushinek, Avi; Rushinek, Sara; Lippincott, Christine; Ambrosia, Todd

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the repurposing of classroom video surveillance and on-screen archives (RCVSOSA) model, which is an innovative, technology-enabled approach to continuing education in nursing. The RCVSOSA model leverages network Internet-protocol, high-definition surveillance cameras to record videos of classroom lectures that can be automatically uploaded to the Internet or converted to DVD, either in their entirety or as content-specific modules, with the production work embedded in the technology. The proposed model supports health care continuing education through the use of online assessments for focused education modules, access to archived online recordings and DVD training courses, voice-to-text transcripts, and possibly continuing education modules that may be translated into multiple languages. Potential benefits of this model include increased access to educational modules for students, instant authorship, and financial compensation for instructors and their respective organizations.

  16. Lecture notes of the technical training curriculum of the Institute of Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    This report is a transcript of lectures for the technical staff, held in the Institute of Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, from November 1990 to April 1992. Following themes are included in this report. (1) Cyclotron technology, (2) measuring technology of the peripheral devices for cyclotron, (3) heavy ion cyclotron technology, (4) beam cooling technology, (5) proton linac technology, (6) heavy ion linac technology, (7) measuring technology of electron and its equipments, (8) the latest high energy large experimental device and its measurement (HERA, ZENS experiment), (9) superconducting kaon spectrometer (SKS) and large superconducting magnet, (10) present status of the precision technology for accelerators, (11) the computer as basic technology of elementary particle and nuclear experiments, (12) present status of radiation management and measurement technology, (13) handling and processing method of the hazardous materials, (14) analog technology of the equipments for accelerators, and the summary of NIRS-Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). (T.F.)

  17. Traditional Lectures and Team-Based Learning in an Occupational Therapy Program: A Survey of Student Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne H. Zachry

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Team-Based Learning (TBL is an active instructional approach used in health care education that incorporates group work. Methods: Two occupational therapy professors adopted a TBL instructional approach in two courses for firstand second-year occupational therapy master’s degree level students. The investigators administered a survey to evaluate student perceptions of TBL and lecture-based instruction (LBI. A principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation identified two 5-item factors: “perceptions of LBI” and “perceptions of TBL.” Internal consistency for each factor was strong (Cronbach’s alpha 5 0.856 [preference for LBI]; 0.865 [preference of TBL]. A Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank test was conducted to determine whether there was a difference in the ranking of two teaching approaches. Results: The results indicated a significant difference in how the students ranked the instructional approaches, z = -3.19, p < .05, with the students having more positive perceptions of LBI than TBL. Conclusion: The implications for occupational therapy educators are discussed.

  18. Comparative clinical study testing the effectiveness of school based oral health education using experiential learning or traditional lecturing in 10 year-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelopoulou, Matina V; Kavvadia, Katerina; Taoufik, Konstantina; Oulis, Constantine J

    2015-04-28

    School based oral health education through traditional lecturing has been found successful only in improving oral health knowledge, while has low effectiveness in oral hygiene and gingival health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of experiential learning (EL) oral health education to traditional lecturing (TL), on enhancing oral health knowledge, attitude and behavior as well as oral hygiene, gingival health and caries of 10-year-old children. Eighty-four children were recruited for the EL and 100 for the TL group from 3 locations in Greece. Data regarding oral health knowledge, attitude and behavior were collected via questionnaires. Data regarding dental plaque, gingivitis and caries were collected by clinical examination. The evaluation using questionnaires and clinical examination was assessed at baseline and 6 and 18 months afterwards. Two calibrated pediatric dentists examined the students using a periodontal probe and artificial light. Modified hygiene index (HI) was used for dental plaque recording, the simplified gingival index (GI-S) was used for gingivitis and DMFT, based on BASCD criteria, for dental caries. Based on a dedicated manual, the teacher applied in the classroom the oral health educational program using EL. EL group had statistically significant better hygiene than the TL at 6 months (p 0.05) and attitude (p > 0.05) at 6 months in comparison to baseline. EL program was found more successful than TL in oral hygiene improvement. Both oral health education programs improved the oral health knowledge, attitude and behavior of children. ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02320162).

  19. China: Tradition and Transformation. Curriculum Projects. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad Program, 2002 (China).

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Committee on United States-China Relations, New York, NY.

    This collection of 15 curriculum projects is the result of a summer seminar in China for teachers and scholars. Projects in the collection are: (1) "Perspectives on Modern Political/Social Issues in China" (Sandy Conlon); (2) "Ancient History X Projects/China" (Michael Corey); (3) "Education and Development: China, a Case…

  20. China: Tradition and Transformation Curriculum Projects. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad Program, 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This collection of curriculum projects considers the change and modernization of China. The following 15 projects are in the collection: "Globalization in China" (Allan Cooper); "Religion and Identity in Contemporary China" (Wade H. Dazey); "China and the West: A Global Context for Chinese Immigration to the United…

  1. Scientific Skills and Processes in Curriculum Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Joe

    2017-11-01

    Increasingly, the science education community has recognized the need for curriculum resources that support student development of authentic scientific practices, rather than focusing exclusively on content knowledge. This paper proposes a tool for teachers and researchers to assess the degree to which certain curriculum resources and lessons achieve this goal. After describing a method for reflecting on and categorizing curriculum resources, I apply the method to highlight differences across three teaching methods: Modeling Instruction, Physics Union Mathematics, and a traditional, lecture-based approach.

  2. The development of self-regulated learning during the pre-clinical stage of medical school: a comparison between a lecture-based and a problem-based curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucieer, Susanna M; van der Geest, Jos N; Elói-Santos, Silvana M; de Faria, Rosa M Delbone; Jonker, Laura; Visscher, Chris; Rikers, Remy M J P; Themmen, Axel P N

    2016-03-01

    Society expects physicians to always improve their competencies and to be up to date with developments in their field. Therefore, an important aim of medical schools is to educate future medical doctors to become self-regulated, lifelong learners. However, it is unclear if medical students become better self-regulated learners during the pre-clinical stage of medical school, and whether students develop self-regulated learning skills differently, dependent on the educational approach of their medical school. In a cross-sectional design, we investigated the development of 384 medical students' self-regulated learning skills with the use of the Self-Regulation of Learning Self-Report Scale. Next, we compared this development in students who enrolled in two distinct medical curricula: a problem-based curriculum and a lectured-based curriculum. Analysis showed that more skills decreased than increased during the pre-clinical stage of medical school, and that the difference between the curricula was mainly caused by a decrease in the skill evaluation in the lecture-based curriculum. These findings seem to suggest that, irrespective of the curriculum, self-regulated learning skills do not develop during medical school.

  3. Tradition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otto, Ton

    2016-01-01

    : beliefs, practices, institutions, and also things. In this sense, the meaning of the term in social research is very close to its usage in common language and is not always theoretically well developed (see Shils, 1971: 123). But the concept of tradition has also been central to major theoretical debates...... on the nature of social change, especially in connection with the notion of modernity. Here tradition is linked to various forms of agency as a factor of both stability and intentional change....

  4. Effects of Changing the Pedagogical Concept of a Part-time BSc in Accounting from Traditional Lectures into an IT-supported Asyncronous and Flexible Learning Concept - Part 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Tage; Holm, Claus; Dalgas, Annemarie

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of a change of the pedagogical concept in the second part of a four-year BSc program in Accounting. The program started September 1 1999 when 82 students were enrolled. The change involves a move from traditional lectures to a concept partly based on asynchronous...

  5. Challenging traditional assumptions of high school science through the physics and Everyday Thinking Curriculum(TM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Michael J.

    Science education in the U.S. has failed for over a century to bring the experience of scientific induction to classrooms, from elementary science to undergraduate courses. The achievement of American students on international comparisons of science proficiency is unacceptable, and the disparities between groups underrepresented in STEM and others are large and resistant to reform efforts. This study investigated the enactment of a physics curriculum designed upon the inductive method in a high school serving mostly students from groups underrepresented in science. The Physics and Everyday Thinking curriculum was designed to model the central practices of science and to provide opportunities for students to both extract general principles of physics and to develop scientific models from laboratory evidence. The findings of this study suggest that scientific induction is not only a process that is well within the capacity of high school students, but they enjoy it as well. Students that engaged in the central practices of science through the inductive method reported a new sense of agency and control in their learning. These findings suggest that modeling the pedagogy of the science classroom upon the epistemology of science can result in a mode of learning that can lead to positive identification with physics and the development of scientific literacy.

  6. Finding the Right Fit: Assessing the Impact of Traditional v. Large Lecture/Small Lab Course Formats on a General Education Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildermuth, Susan M.; French, Tammy; Fredrick, Edward

    2013-01-01

    This study explores alternative approaches for teaching general education courses burdened with serving extremely large enrollments. It compares the effectiveness of a self-contained course in which each course section is taught by one instructor to a large lecture/small lab format in which all course enrollees attend one large lecture section and…

  7. Traditional Chinese Medicine: An Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources CME/CEU and Online Lectures Online Continuing Education Series Distinguished Lecture Series Integrated Medicine Research Lecture ... TCM, it is important to separate questions about traditional theories and ... of modern science-based medicine and health promotion practices. The ...

  8. CANDU lectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouben, B.

    1984-06-01

    This document is a compilation of notes prepared for two lectures given by the author in the winter of 1983 at the Institut de Genie Nucleaire, Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal. The first lecture gives a physical description of the CANDU reactor core: the nuclear lattice, the reactivity mechanisms, their functions and properties. This lecture also covers various aspects of reactor core physics and describes different calculational methods available. The second lecture studies the numerous facets of fuel management in CANDU reactors. The important variables in fuel management, and the rules guiding the refuelling strategy, are presented and illustrated by means of results obtained for the CANDU 600

  9. Evaluation of an Integrated Curriculum in Physics, Mathematics, Engineering, and Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beichner, Robert

    1997-04-01

    An experimental, student centered, introductory curriculum called IMPEC (for Integrated Mathematics, Physics, Engineering, and Chemistry curriculum) is in its third year of pilot-testing at NCSU. The curriculum is taught by a multidisciplinary team of professors using a combination of traditional lecturing and alternative instructional methods including cooperative learning, activity-based class sessions, and extensive use of computer modeling, simulations, and the world wide web. This talk will discuss the research basis for our design and implementation of the curriculum, the qualitative and quantitative methods we have been using to assess its effectiveness, and the educational outcomes we have noted so far.

  10. Attention span during lectures: 8 seconds, 10 minutes, or more?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Neil A

    2016-12-01

    In the current climate of curriculum reform, the traditional lecture has come under fire for its perceived lack of effectiveness. Indeed, several institutions have reduced their lectures to 15 min in length based upon the "common knowledge" and "consensus" that there is a decline in students' attention 10-15 min into lectures. A review of the literature on this topic reveals many discussions referring to prior studies but scant few primary investigations. Alarmingly, the most often cited source for a rapid decline in student attention during a lecture barely discusses student attention at all. Of the studies that do attempt to measure attention, many suffer from methodological flaws and subjectivity in data collection. Thus, the available primary data do not support the concept of a 10- to 15-min attention limit. Interestingly, the most consistent finding from a literature review is that the greatest variability in student attention arises from differences between teachers and not from the teaching format itself. Certainly, even the most interesting material can be presented in a dull and dry fashion, and it is the job of the instructor to enhance their teaching skills to provide not only rich content but also a satisfying lecture experience for the students. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Dreaming Up a New Grid: Two Lecturers' Reflections on Challenging Traditional Notions of Identity and Privilege in a South African Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoasheng, Asanda; Gachago, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    One of the biggest debates in South Africa is the use and usefulness of apartheid categories when analysing society and societal behaviour. This paper examines the process of learning and unlearning that took place when a political reporting lecturer and an academic staff developer sought to explain racially biased voting in South Africa and its…

  12. The Integrated Approach versus the Traditional Approach: Analyzing the Benefits of a Dance and Transportation Integrated Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMotte, Megan

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of a dance and transportation integrated curriculum on student learning and engagement. The curriculum, entitled Consequences of Our Actions: Dance and Transportation, synthesized transportation content with the art form of dance. The experimental and control groups were comprised of fifth-grade…

  13. Comparación del aprendizaje en internet con la clase convencional en estudiantes de medicina, en Argentina Comparative study between learning on line and traditional lectures for medical students in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Mihai Popescu

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Se considera que los estudiantes aprenden igual o mejor en la web que en clases tradicionales. Sin embargo no abundan ensayos randomizados que brinden evidencia al respecto, especialmente en Argentina. Objetivo: Comparar el aprendizaje sobre tratamiento de la diabetes(TDentre dos grupos de estudiantes avanzados de medicina, uno con clase tradicional y otro utilizando Internet. Materiales y métodos: 120 estudiantes de una Cátedra de Medicina de la Universidad Nacional del Nordeste, Argentina, contestaron un cuestionario con 20 preguntas sobre TD. Tres meses después, fueron randomizados en 2 grupos para participar en una clase o en un foro de Internet sobre (TD. Los estudiantes no conocían el objetivo del estudio. Todos utilizaron la misma bibliografía. La clase tuvo una duración de 2 horas, conectándose al mismo tiempo el grupo de Internet a un foro habilitado durante 48 hs. 70 horas después de finalizada la actividad realizaron el mismo cuestionario inicial sobre TD. Resultados: Fueron incluidos 107 estudiantes (13 fueron excluidos por no completar alguno de los 2 cuestionarios. La puntuación promedio del grupo clase, antes, fue de 8.30 ± 2.48 y después de 9.76 ± 2.17. El grupo Internet obtuvo una puntuación antes de 8.39 ± 2.14 y después de 9.76 ±2.8, p >0.10 en la comparación de los grupos. Conclusión: Se demuestra que el aprendizaje de un tema de terapéutica para estudiantes de medicina argentinos fue igualmente efectivo por Internet que con una clase convencional.It is not known if medical students can learn better or not with online methods than with traditional lectures. There are not many randomized studies that substantiate this belief, especially in Latin American settings. Purpose: To compare two different methods of learning diabetes’ treatments (DT in two groups of advanced medical students. One group used an online forum, the other group a traditional lecture. Method: We conducted surveys among 120 medical

  14. Comparing the effects of problem-based learning and the traditional lecture method on critical thinking skills and metacognitive awareness in nursing students in a critical care nursing course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Mohammad; Moghadam, Parastou Kordestani; Mohammadipoor, Fatemeh; Tarahi, Mohammad Javad; Sak, Mandana; Toulabi, Tahereh; Pour, Amir Hossein Hossein

    2016-10-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a method used to develop cognitive and metacognitive skills in nursing students. The present study was conducted to compare the effects of PBL and the traditional lecture method on critical thinking skills and metacognitive awareness in nursing students in a critical care nursing course. The present study was conducted with a quasi-experimental, single group, pretest-posttest design. A group of third-year nursing students (n=40) were recruited from Khorramabad School of Nursing and Midwifery in the west of Iran. The lecture method was used in one group over the first eight weeks of the first semester and PBL was adopted in the second eight weeks. Standardized self-report questionnaires including The California Critical Thinking Skills Test-B (CCTST-B) and the Metacognitive Awareness Inventory (MAI) were administered before and after the use of each of the instruction methods. Data were analyzed in SPSS using the paired t-test. No significant changes were observed in the students' critical thinking skills and metacognitive awareness after performing the lecture method. However, a significant increase was observed in the overall critical thinking score (Pmethod. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Evaluation of Teaching the Nursing Process Using Traditional Lecture, Campus Laboratory, Clinical, and the Addition of High Fidelity Human Simulation (HFHS) Unfolding Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Ruth E.

    2013-01-01

    It is not sufficient to just make changes in a nursing curriculum without a plan to evaluate the impact on program outcomes. This study sought to determine the outcomes of teaching the nursing process to Foundation of Nursing students in an Associate Degree Nursing program using a factorial design study. Four groups of students were taught the…

  16. Jubilee Lecture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-08-07

    Aug 7, 2017 ... E up V As a \\ Nipio with students, teachers and researchers in India. Nsp1 Nup8C Nup57. Nup57. Nup145N. High tea will be served after the lecture. For details contact: M. Ananth, Molecular Biophysics Unit, Indian Institute of Science. Email: ananthmuthiah Ogmail.com/ananthmOmbu..iscernet.in Mob. 984 ...

  17. Solar Technology Curriculum, 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seward County Community Coll., Liberal, KS.

    This curriculum guide contains lecture outlines and handouts for training solar technicians in the installation, maintenance, and repair of solar energy hot water and space heating systems. The curriculum consists of four modular units developed to provide a model through which community colleges and area vocational/technical schools can respond…

  18. The Utility of Curriculum-Based Measurement and Performance Assessment as Alternatives to Traditional Intelligence and Achievement Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Stephen N.; Fuchs, Lynn S.

    1997-01-01

    Curriculum-based measurement and performance assessments can provide valuable data for making special-education eligibility decisions. Reviews applied research on these assessment approaches and discusses the practical context of treatment validation and decisions about instructional services for students with diverse academic needs. (Author/JDM)

  19. Integrated lecturing within clerkship course, a new learning method in nurse-anesthesia teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Akhlaghi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Traditional lecture-based teaching has been long used to transit theoretical knowledge to the participants. Due to some problems of this didactic approach, some believe that integration within an active method is more valuable in nursing education. In this study, we hypothesized that integrating lecture-based teaching within clerkship course would enhance nurse-anesthesia students’ knowledge.Methods: A prospective randomized study was conducted. Twenty four students of two-year nurse-anesthesia participated in the study. All of the students received either didactic lectures or integrated lectures within clerkship course during a four-month semester of their educational curriculum. Their knowledge of anesthesia course was assessed at the end of the course using Wilcoxon Rank test.Results: The integrated method improved students’ final scores at the end of the semester (p=0.004. Moreover, their scores was much better when taxonomy-2 questions were compared (p=0.001.Conclusion: Incorporating didactic lecture within anesthesia clerkship course improves participants’ knowledge of anesthesia course.Keywords:  Anesthesia, Lecture, Knowledge, Anesthesia course, Clerkship course

  20. Special lecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, H.

    1998-01-01

    In his special lecture, given at the Artsimovich-Kadomtsev Memorial Session of the 17th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Yokohama, October 1998, Prof. H. Yoshikawa stated that the fusion program had come to a crossroads. He was wondering whether the future would lead to cooperation between nations, striving to overcome the difficulties the world is confronted with, or if it would lead to despair

  1. Five Lectures on Photosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1979-01-01

    These five lectures were held by E. Broda during the International Symposium on Alternative Energies, in September 1979. Lecture 1 – The Great Physicists and Photosynthesis; Lecture 2 – The Influence of Photosynthesis on the Biosphere. Past, Present and Future; Lecture 3 – The Origin of Photosynthesis; Lecture 4 – The Evolution from Photosynthetic Bacteria to Plants; Lecture 5 – Respiration and Photorespiration. (nowak)

  2. School of Medicine of Federal University of Rio Grande Do Norte: A traditional curriculum with innovative trends in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira, Daniel Fernandes Mello; Simas, Breno C C; Guimarães Caldeira, Adrian Lucca; Medeiros, Augusto De Galvão E Brito; Freitas, Marise Reis; Diniz, José; Diniz, Rosiane

    2018-02-28

    The Medical School of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN) is one of the biggest public medical schools in Northeast Brazil. In the last decade, significant investment in faculty development, innovative learning methodologies and student engagement has been key milestones in educational improvement at this medical school, harnessed to recent political changes that strengthened community-based and emergency education. This study describes how curriculum changes in UFRN Medical School have been responsible for major improvements in medical education locally and which impacts such transformations may have on the educational community. A group of students and teachers revised the new curriculum and established the key changes over the past years that have been responsible for the local enhancement of medical education. This information was compared and contrasted to further educational evidences in order to define patterns that can be reproduced in other institutions. Improvements in faculty development have been fairly observed in the institution, exemplified by the participation of a growing number of faculty members in programs for professional development and also by the creation of a local masters degree in health education. Alongside, strong student engagement in curriculum matters enhanced the teaching-learning process. Due to a deeper involvement of students and teachers in medical education, it has been possible to implement innovative teaching-learning and assessment strategies over the last ten years and place UFRN Medical School at a privileged position in relation to undergraduate training, educational research and professional development of faculty staff.

  3. Is a Team-based Learning Approach to Anatomy Teaching Superior to Didactic Lecturing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Naghme; Karbalay-Doust, Saied; Noorafshan, Ali

    2014-02-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) is used in the medical field to implement interactive learning in small groups. The learning of anatomy and its subsequent application requires the students to recall a great deal of factual content. The aims of this study were to evaluate the students' satisfaction, engagement and knowledge gain in anatomy through the medium of TBL in comparison to the traditional lecture method. This study, carried out from February to June 2012, included 30 physical therapy students of the Shiraz University of Medical Science, School of Rehabilitation Sciences. Classic TBL techniques were modified to cover lower limb anatomy topics in the first year of the physical therapy curriculum. Anatomy lectures were replaced with TBL, which required the preparation of assigned content, specific discussion topics, an individual self-assessment test (IRAT) and the analysis of discussion topics. The teams then subsequently retook the assessment test as a group (GRAT). The first eight weeks of the curriculum were taught using traditional didactic lecturing, while during the second eight weeks the modified TBL method was used. The students evaluated these sessions through a questionnaire. The impact of TBL on student engagement and educational achievement was determined using numerical data, including the IRAT, GRAT and final examination scores. Students had a higher satisfaction rate with the TBL teaching according to the Likert scale. Additionally, higher scores were obtained in the TBL-based final examination in comparison to the lecture-based midterm exam. The students' responses showed that the TBL technique could be used alone or in conjunction with traditional didactic lecturing in order to teach anatomy more effectively.

  4. Electronic voting to encourage interactive lectures: a randomised trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Background Electronic Voting Systems have been used for education in a variety of disciplines. Outcomes from these studies have been mixed. Because results from these studies have been mixed, we examined whether an EVS system could enhance a lecture's effect on educational outcomes. Methods A cohort of 127 Year 5 medical students at the University of Adelaide was stratified by gender, residency status and academic record then randomised into 2 groups of 64 and 63 students. Each group received consecutive 40-minute lectures on two clinical topics. One group received the EVS for both topics. The other group received traditional teaching only. Evaluation was undertaken with two, 15-question multiple-choice questionnaires (MCQ) assessing knowledge and problem solving and undertaken as a written paper immediately before and after the lectures and repeated online 8–12 weeks later. Standardised institutional student questionnaires were completed for each lecture and independent observers assessed student behaviour during the lectures. Lecturer's opinions were assessed by a questionnaire developed for this study. Results Two-thirds of students randomised to EVS and 59% of students randomised to traditional lectures attended. One-half of the students in the EVS group and 41% in the traditional group completed all questionnaires. There was no difference in MCQ scores between EVS and traditional lectures (p = 0.785). The cervical cancer lectures showed higher student ranking in favour of EVS in all parameters. The breast cancer lectures showed higher ranking in favour of traditional lectures in 5 of 7 parameters (p lecturer-students interactions were increased in the EVS lecture for one lecturer and reduced for the other. Both lecturers felt that the EVS lectures were difficult to prepare, that they were able to keep to time in the traditional lectures, that the educational value of both lecture styles was similar, and that they were neutral-to-slightly favourably disposed

  5. Software approach to minimizing problems of student-lecturer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lecturer Interaction in Higher institutions of learning. The Software was developed using PHP and hosted in the University web server, and the interaction between students and their lecturers was compared using both the traditional approaches ...

  6. Opening lecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.B.

    1997-01-01

    The opening lecture on the results of fifty years in the nuclear energy field, deals with the main principles underlying the CEA policy concerning the fission nuclear energy transformation, i.e. the design of a nuclear industry that is a safe, high-performance and reliable source of electric power, the development of an adaptive power generation tool with the capacity to progress according to new constraints, and the necessary anticipation for preparing to the effects of the next 50 year technological leaps

  7. Opening lecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.J.

    1979-01-01

    In his lecture, the author discusses the question as to whether our technical standards come up to the requirements of our legal system. It is true that acceptance of our technical standards is voluntary but, as in the case of standards issued by the Government, standardization will only prove useful when accepted by the majority of the citizens. This becomes evident in cases where the health and quality of life of the citizens has to be defended against the impacts of technical progress. Here, the state has to fulfil a protective function for the benefit of its citizens. Hence the 'standardization contract' has been agreed upon in order to guarantee compliance of technical standards and requirements with the interests of public life and health. (HSCH) [de

  8. An active learning curriculum improves fellows' knowledge and faculty teaching skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inra, Jennifer A; Pelletier, Stephen; Kumar, Navin L; Barnes, Edward L; Shields, Helen M

    2017-01-01

    Traditional didactic lectures are the mainstay of teaching for graduate medical education, although this method may not be the most effective way to transmit information. We created an active learning curriculum for Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) gastroenterology fellows to maximize learning. We evaluated whether this new curriculum improved perceived knowledge acquisition and knowledge base. In addition, our study assessed whether coaching faculty members in specific methods to enhance active learning improved their perceived teaching and presentation skills. We compared the Gastroenterology Training Exam (GTE) scores before and after the implementation of this curriculum to assess whether an improved knowledge base was documented. In addition, fellows and faculty members were asked to complete anonymous evaluations regarding their learning and teaching experiences. Fifteen fellows were invited to 12 lectures over a 2-year period. GTE scores improved in the areas of stomach ( p active learning curriculum. Scores in hepatology, as well as biliary and pancreatic study, showed a trend toward improvement ( p >0.05). All fellows believed the lectures were helpful, felt more prepared to take the GTE, and preferred the interactive format to traditional didactic lectures. All lecturers agreed that they acquired new teaching skills, improved teaching and presentation skills, and learned new tools that could help them teach better in the future. An active learning curriculum is preferred by GI fellows and may be helpful for improving transmission of information in any specialty in medical education. Individualized faculty coaching sessions demonstrating new ways to transmit information may be important for an individual faculty member's teaching excellence.

  9. [Evaluation of traditional German undergraduate surgical training. An analysis at Heidelberg University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürer, S; Schellberg, D; Schmidt, J; Kallinowski, F; Mehrabi, A; Herfarth, Ch; Büchler, M W; Kadmon, M

    2006-04-01

    The medical faculty of Heidelberg University implemented a new problem-based clinical curriculum (Heidelberg Curriculum Medicinale, or Heicumed) in 2001. The present study analyses the evaluation data of two student cohorts prior to the introduction of Heicumed. Its aim was to specify problems of the traditional training and to draw conclusions for implementation of a new curriculum. The evaluation instrument was the Heidelberg Inventory for the Evaluation of Teaching (HILVE-I). The data were analysed calculating differences in the means between defined groups, with the 13 primary scales of the HILVE I-instrument as dependent variables. Teaching method and subject had no systematic influence on evaluation results. Thus, didactic lecture in orthopedic surgery achieved better results than small group tutorials, while the data on vascular and general surgery showed opposite results. Major factors for success were continuity and didactic training of lecturers and tutors. This is convincingly reflected by the results of the lecture course "Differential diagnosis in general surgery". The good evaluation data on small group tutorials resulted largely from the "participation" and "discussion" scales, which represent interactivity in learning. The results of the present study suggest the importance of two major pedagogic ideas: continuity and didactic training of lecturers and tutors. These principles were widely implemented in Heicumed and have contributed to the success of the new curriculum.

  10. Lectures in medical educaton: what students think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Tajammal; Farooq, Zerwa; Asad, Zunaira; Amjad, Rabbia; Badar, Iffat; Chaudhry, Abdul Majeed; Khan, Mohammad Amer Zaman; Rafique, Farida

    2014-01-01

    The volume of medical knowledge has increased exponentially and so has the need to improve the efficiency of current teaching practices.With increasing emphasis on interactive and problem based learning, the place of lectures in modern medical education has become a questionable issue. Objectives were to assess the perspective of undergraduate medical students regarding the role and effectiveness of lectures as a mode of instruction as well as the ways and means that can be employed to enhance the effectiveness of lectures. A cross sectional study was carried out among 2nd to final year medical students from five medical colleges including both private and public sector institutions. A total of 347 students participated by completing a structured questionnaire. Data was analyzed using SPSS-17. Sixty seven percent students considered lectures as a useful mode of instruction (47% males and 77% females), whereas 83% of the students reported that clinical sessions were superior to lectures because of small number of students in clinical sessions, active student participation, enhanced clinical orientation, and interaction with patients. About 64% responded that lectures should be replaced by clinical sessions. Majority of the students (92%) reported not being able to concentrate during a lecture beyond 30 minutes, whereas 70% skipped lectures as they were boring. A significantly greater proportion of male respondents, students from clinical years, and those who skipped lectures, considered lectures to be boring, a poor utilization of time and resources, and could not concentrate for the full duration of a lecture compared to females, students from preclinical years, and those who do not skip lectures, respectively. Lecturing techniques need to be improvised. The traditional passive mode of instruction has to be replaced with active learning and inquiry based approach to adequately utilize the time and resources spent on lectures.

  11. Ethics education in research involving human beings in undergraduate medicine curriculum in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaes, Maria Rita Garbi; Guilhem, Dirce; Barragan, Elena; Mennin, Stewart

    2013-12-01

    The Brazilian national curriculum guidelines for undergraduate medicine courses inspired and influenced the groundwork for knowledge acquisition, skills development and the perception of ethical values in the context of professional conduct. The evaluation of ethics education in research involving human beings in undergraduate medicine curriculum in Brazil, both in courses with active learning processes and in those with traditional lecture learning methodologies. Curricula and teaching projects of 175 Brazilian medical schools were analyzed using a retrospective historical and descriptive exploratory cohort study. Thirty one medical schools were excluded from the study because of incomplete information or a refusal to participate. Active research for information from institutional sites and documents was guided by terms based on 69 DeCS/MeSH descriptors. Curriculum information was correlated with educational models of learning such as active learning methodologies, tutorial discussions with integrated curriculum into core modules, and traditional lecture learning methodologies for large classes organized by disciplines and reviewed by occurrence frequency of ethical themes and average hourly load per semester. Ninety-five medical schools used traditional learning methodologies. The ten most frequent ethical themes were: 1--ethics in research (26); 2--ethical procedures and advanced technology (46); 3--ethic-professional conduct (413). Over 80% of schools using active learning methodologies had between 50 and 100 hours of scheduled curriculum time devoted to ethical themes whereas more than 60% of traditional learning methodology schools devoted less than 50 hours in curriculum time to ethical themes. The data indicates that medical schools that employ more active learning methodologies provide more attention and time to ethical themes than schools with traditional discipline-based methodologies. Given the importance of ethical issues in contemporary medical

  12. Special Lectures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Indigenous knowledge system of water management in India. In India, traditionally, knowledge was transmitted through practical work under the direction of respected elders and gurus. Thus, the working people were really the pupils of an indigenous knowledge system. All pupils, poor and prosperous, and the State joined ...

  13. Comparing large lecture mechanics curricula using the Force Concept Inventory: A five thousand student study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Marcos D.; Greco, Edwin F.; Murray, Eric R.; Bujak, Keith R.; Jackson Marr, M.; Catrambone, Richard; Kohlmyer, Matthew A.; Schatz, Michael F.

    2012-07-01

    The performance of over 5000 students in introductory calculus-based mechanics courses at the Georgia Institute of Technology was assessed using the Force Concept Inventory (FCI). Results from two different curricula were compared: a traditional mechanics curriculum and the Matter & Interactions (M&I) curriculum. Both were taught with similar interactive pedagogy. Post-instruction FCI averages were significantly higher for the traditional curriculum than for the M&I curriculum; the differences between curricula persist after accounting for factors such as pre-instruction FCI scores, grade point averages, and SAT scores. FCI performance on categories of items organized by concepts was also compared; traditional averages were significantly higher in each concept. We examined differences in student preparation between the curricula and found that the relative fraction of homework and lecture topics devoted to FCI force and motion concepts correlated with the observed performance differences. Concept inventories, as instruments for evaluating curricular reforms, are generally limited to the particular choice of content and goals of the instrument. Moreover, concept inventories fail to measure what are perhaps the most interesting aspects of reform: the non-overlapping content and goals that are not present in courses without reform.

  14. Lectures Abandoned: Active Learning by Active Seminars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Corry, Aino Vonge

    2012-01-01

    Traditional lecture-based courses are widely criticised for be- ing less eective in teaching. The question is of course what should replace the lectures and various active learning tech- niques have been suggested and studied. In this paper, we report on our experiences of redesigning a software ......- tive seminars as a replacement of traditional lectures, an activity template for the contents of active seminars, an ac- count on how storytelling supported the seminars, as well as reports on our and the students' experiences....

  15. The role of environmental and individual characteristics in the development of student achievement: a comparison between a traditional and a problem-based-learning curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauber, Stefan K; Hecht, Martin; Nouns, Zineb M; Kuhlmey, Adelheid; Dettmer, Susanne

    2015-10-01

    In medical education, the effect of the educational environment on student achievement has primarily been investigated in comparisons between traditional and problem-based learning (PBL) curricula. As many of these studies have reached no clear conclusions on the superiority of the PBL approach, the effect of curricular reform on student performance remains an issue. We employed a theoretical framework that integrates antecedents of student achievement from various psychosocial domains to examine how students interact with their curricular environment. In a longitudinal study with N = 1,646 participants, we assessed students in a traditional and a PBL-centered curriculum. The measures administered included students' perception of the learning environment, self-efficacy beliefs, positive study-related affect, social support, indicators of self-regulated learning, and academic achievement assessed through progress tests. We compared the relations between these characteristics in the two curricular environments. The results are two-fold. First, substantial relations of various psychosocial domains and their associations with achievement were identified. Second, our analyses indicated that there are no substantial differences between traditional and PBL-based curricula concerning the relational structure of psychosocial variables and achievement. Drawing definite conclusions on the role of curricular-level interventions in the development of student's academic achievement is constrained by the quasi-experimental design as wells as the selection of variables included. However, in the specific context described here, our results may still support the view of student activity as the key ingredient in the acquisition of achievement and performance.

  16. Bridging the gap in 1(st) year dental material curriculum: A 3 year randomized cross over trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gali, Sivaranjani; Shetty, Vibha; Murthy, N S; Marimuthu, P

    2015-01-01

    Case-oriented small group discussions (COSGDs) can help students to correlate and integrate the basic science of dental materials into clinical application. We used COSGDs along with didactic lectures in dental material curriculum and hypothesized that case-oriented group discussions would be more effective than traditional lecture alone in terms of performance of students, student perception on the above two teaching methodologies and the feasibility in classes of 2010, 2011 and 2012. A total of 170 students were taught using both COSGD and didactic lecture in a randomized controlled crossover trial design. Their performance was assessed through multiple-choice questions (MCQs) as part of the formative assessment, and their perception was assessed through Likert scale questionnaire. The mean difference in the scores between case-oriented group discussions with lecture and didactic lecture showed significant difference only in few topics. Around 94-96% of students perceived COSGD with didactic lecture help them understand theory better; 76-92% of students feel more comfortable asking questions in a group discussion; 89-98% of students feel such discussions motivate them and 91-100% of students agree that discussions make the subject interesting in the respective years of 2010, 2011 and 2012. Effectiveness of COSGD in terms of scores through MCQs is comparable to traditional lecture. However, most of the students perceive COSGD help them understand the theory better; co-relate clinically; more motivating and interesting than a traditional lecture. Feasibility in institution needs more time and resources to conduct COSGD within the dental material curriculum.

  17. Replacing Lectures with Small Groups: The Impact of Flipping the Residency Conference Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Andrew M.; Mayer, Chad; Barrie, Michael; Greenberger, Sarah; Way, David P.

    2018-01-01

    The flipped classroom, an educational alternative to the traditional lecture, has been widely adopted by educators at all levels of education and across many disciplines. In the flipped classroom, learners prepare in advance of the face-to-face meeting by learning content material on their own. Classroom time is reserved for application of the learned content to solving problems or discussing cases. Over the past year, we replaced most residency program lectures with small-group discussions using the flipped-classroom model, case-based learning, simulation and procedure labs. In the new model, residents prepared for conference by reviewing a patient case and studying suggested learning materials. Conference day was set aside for facilitated small-group discussions about the case. This is a cross-cohort study of emergency medicine residents who experienced the lecture-based curriculum to residents in the new flipped-classroom curriculum using paired comparisons (independent t-tests) on in-training exam scores while controlling for program year level. We also compared results of the evaluation of various program components. We observed no differences between cohorts on in-training examination scores. Small-group methods were rated the same across program years. Two program components in the new curriculum, an updated format of both adult and pediatric case conferences, were rated significantly higher on program quality. In preparation for didactics, residents in the new curriculum report spending more time on average with outside learning materials, including almost twice as much time reviewing textbooks. Residents found the new format of the case conferences to be of higher quality because of the inclusion of rapid-fire case discussions with targeted learning points. PMID:29383050

  18. Graduates from a reformed undergraduate medical curriculum based on Tomorrow's Doctors evaluate the effectiveness of their curriculum 6 years after graduation through interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor David CM

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 1996 Liverpool reformed its medical curriculum from a traditional lecture based course to a curriculum based on the recommendations in Tomorrow's Doctors. A project has been underway since 2000 to evaluate this change. This paper focuses on the views of graduates from that reformed curriculum 6 years after they had graduated. Methods Between 2007 and 2009 45 interviews took place with doctors from the first two cohorts to graduate from the reformed curriculum. Results The interviewees felt like they had been clinically well prepared to work as doctors and in particular had graduated with good clinical and communication skills and had a good knowledge of what the role of doctor entailed. They also felt they had good self directed learning and research skills. They did feel their basic science knowledge level was weaker than traditional graduates and perceived they had to work harder to pass postgraduate exams. Whilst many had enjoyed the curriculum and in particular the clinical skills resource centre and the clinical exposure of the final year including the "shadowing" and A & E attachment they would have liked more "structure" alongside the PBL when learning the basic sciences. Conclusion According to the graduates themselves many of the aims of curriculum reform have been met by the reformed curriculum and they were well prepared clinically to work as doctors. However, further reforms may be needed to give confidence to science knowledge acquisition.

  19. Graduates from a reformed undergraduate medical curriculum based on Tomorrow's Doctors evaluate the effectiveness of their curriculum 6 years after graduation through interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watmough, Simon D; O'Sullivan, Helen; Taylor, David C M

    2010-09-29

    In 1996 Liverpool reformed its medical curriculum from a traditional lecture based course to a curriculum based on the recommendations in Tomorrow's Doctors. A project has been underway since 2000 to evaluate this change. This paper focuses on the views of graduates from that reformed curriculum 6 years after they had graduated. Between 2007 and 2009 45 interviews took place with doctors from the first two cohorts to graduate from the reformed curriculum. The interviewees felt like they had been clinically well prepared to work as doctors and in particular had graduated with good clinical and communication skills and had a good knowledge of what the role of doctor entailed. They also felt they had good self directed learning and research skills. They did feel their basic science knowledge level was weaker than traditional graduates and perceived they had to work harder to pass postgraduate exams. Whilst many had enjoyed the curriculum and in particular the clinical skills resource centre and the clinical exposure of the final year including the "shadowing" and A & E attachment they would have liked more "structure" alongside the PBL when learning the basic sciences. According to the graduates themselves many of the aims of curriculum reform have been met by the reformed curriculum and they were well prepared clinically to work as doctors. However, further reforms may be needed to give confidence to science knowledge acquisition.

  20. Electronic voting to encourage interactive lectures: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmer Edward

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electronic Voting Systems have been used for education in a variety of disciplines. Outcomes from these studies have been mixed. Because results from these studies have been mixed, we examined whether an EVS system could enhance a lecture's effect on educational outcomes. Methods A cohort of 127 Year 5 medical students at the University of Adelaide was stratified by gender, residency status and academic record then randomised into 2 groups of 64 and 63 students. Each group received consecutive 40-minute lectures on two clinical topics. One group received the EVS for both topics. The other group received traditional teaching only. Evaluation was undertaken with two, 15-question multiple-choice questionnaires (MCQ assessing knowledge and problem solving and undertaken as a written paper immediately before and after the lectures and repeated online 8–12 weeks later. Standardised institutional student questionnaires were completed for each lecture and independent observers assessed student behaviour during the lectures. Lecturer's opinions were assessed by a questionnaire developed for this study. Results Two-thirds of students randomised to EVS and 59% of students randomised to traditional lectures attended. One-half of the students in the EVS group and 41% in the traditional group completed all questionnaires. There was no difference in MCQ scores between EVS and traditional lectures (p = 0.785. The cervical cancer lectures showed higher student ranking in favour of EVS in all parameters. The breast cancer lectures showed higher ranking in favour of traditional lectures in 5 of 7 parameters (p Conclusion In this setting, EVS technology used in large group lectures did not offer significant advantages over the more traditional lecture format.

  1. Towards Automated Lecture Capture, Navigation and Delivery System for Web-Lecture on Demand

    OpenAIRE

    Kannan, Rajkumar; Andres, Frederic

    2010-01-01

    Institutions all over the world are continuously exploring ways to use ICT in improving teaching and learning effectiveness. The use of course web pages, discussion groups, bulletin boards, and e-mails have shown considerable impact on teaching and learning in significant ways, across all disciplines. ELearning has emerged as an alternative to traditional classroom-based education and training and web lectures can be a powerful addition to traditional lectures. They can even serve as a main c...

  2. Laughter in University Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesi, Hilary

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses laughter in spoken academic discourse, with the aim of discovering why lecturers provoke laughter in their lectures. A further purpose of the paper is to identify episodes in British data which may differ from those in other cultural contexts where other lecturing practices prevail, and thus to inform the design of study skills…

  3. Flipped classroom or an active lecture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, James D; Roberts, David J H

    2018-01-01

    Recent changes in anatomy education have seen the introduction of flipped classrooms as a replacement to the traditional didactic lecture. This approach utilizes the increasing availability of digital technology to create learning resources that can be accessed prior to attending class, with face-to-face sessions then becoming more student-centered via discussion, collaborative learning, and problem-solving activities. Although this approach may appear intuitive, this viewpoint commentary presents a counter opinion and highlights a simple alternative that utilizes evidence-based active learning approaches as part of the traditional lecture. The active lecture takes the traditional lecture, and (1) ensures the lecture content is relevant and has clear objectives, (2) contains lecture material that is designed according to the latest evidence-base, (3) complements it with additional supplementary material, (4) creates space to check prior understanding and knowledge levels, and (5) utilizes suitable technology to facilitate continual engagement and interaction. Clin. Anat. 31:118-121, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Mathematical omnibus thirty lectures on classic mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, Dmitry; Fuchs, Dmitry

    2007-01-01

    The book consists of thirty lectures on diverse topics, covering much of the mathematical landscape rather than focusing on one area. The reader will learn numerous results that often belong to neither the standard undergraduate nor graduate curriculum and will discover connections between classical and contemporary ideas in algebra, combinatorics, geometry, and topology. The reader's effort will be rewarded in seeing the harmony of each subject. The common thread in the selected subjects is their illustration of the unity and beauty of mathematics. Most lectures contain exercises, and solutions or answers are given to selected exercises. A special feature of the book is an abundance of drawings (more than four hundred), artwork by an accomplished artist, and about a hundred portraits of mathematicians. Almost every lecture contains surprises for even the seasoned researcher.

  5. In the Dirac tradition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1988-04-15

    It was Paul Dirac who cast quantum mechanics into the form we now use, and many generations of theoreticians openly acknowledge his influence on their thinking. When Dirac died in 1984, St. John's College, Cambridge, his base for most of his lifetime, instituted an annual lecture in his memory at Cambridge. The first lecture, in 1986, attracted two heavyweights - Richard Feynman and Steven Weinberg. Far from using the lectures as a platform for their own work, in the Dirac tradition they presented stimulating material on deep underlying questions.

  6. In the Dirac tradition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    It was Paul Dirac who cast quantum mechanics into the form we now use, and many generations of theoreticians openly acknowledge his influence on their thinking. When Dirac died in 1984, St. John's College, Cambridge, his base for most of his lifetime, instituted an annual lecture in his memory at Cambridge. The first lecture, in 1986, attracted two heavyweights - Richard Feynman and Steven Weinberg. Far from using the lectures as a platform for their own work, in the Dirac tradition they presented stimulating material on deep underlying questions

  7. Lectures on string theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorn, C.B.

    1988-01-01

    Several topics are discussed in string theory presented as three lectures to the Spring School on Superstrings at the ICTP at Trieste, Italy, in April, 1988. The first lecture is devoted to some general aspects of conformal invariance and duality. The second sketches methods for carrying out perturbative calculations in string field theory. The final lecture presents an alternative lattice approach to a nonperturbative formulation of the sum over world surfaces. 35 refs., 12 figs

  8. Testing Times for the Implementation of Curriculum Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Smeed

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available School curriculum change processes have traditionally been managed internally. However, in Queensland, Australia, as a response to the current high-stakes accountability regime, more and more principals are outsourcing this work to external change agents (ECAs. In 2009, one of the authors (a university lecturer and ECA developed a curriculum change model (the Controlled Rapid Approach to Curriculum Change [CRACC], specifically outlining the involvement of an ECA in the initiation phase of a school’s curriculum change process. The purpose of this article is to extend the CRACC model by unpacking the implementation phase, drawing on data from a pilot study of a single school. Interview responses revealed that during the implementation phase, teachers wanted to be kept informed of the wider educational context, use data to constantly track students, relate pedagogical practices to testing practices, share information between departments and professional levels, and own whole school performance. It is suggested that the findings would be transferable to other school settings and internal leadership of curriculum change. The article also strikes a chord of concern: Do the responses from teachers operating under thecurrent accountability regime live their professional lives within this corporate and globalized ideology whether they want to or not?

  9. A Geminoid as Lecturer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildgaard, Julie Rafn; Schärfe, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report our findings from an experiment with the teleoperated android Geminoid-DK. The geminoid took up the role of a university lecturer and delivered a 45 minute lecture in front of 150 freshmen students at Aalborg University. While considering the role of the geminoid in this e......In this paper we report our findings from an experiment with the teleoperated android Geminoid-DK. The geminoid took up the role of a university lecturer and delivered a 45 minute lecture in front of 150 freshmen students at Aalborg University. While considering the role of the geminoid...

  10. Business ethics across the curriculum?

    OpenAIRE

    Brinkmann, Johannes; Sims, Ronald R.; Nelson, Lawrence J.

    2011-01-01

    This is the authors’ final, accepted and refereed manuscript to the article. This article describes and discusses team teaching and particularly guest lectures as a way of integrating ethics into the business curriculum. After a brief discussion of business school responsibilities and the teaching of ethics, the article looks at efforts to integrate the teaching of ethics across the curriculum. Then, findings from a small pilot study among business ethics and business school co...

  11. Academic Training Lecture - Regular lecture programme

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    Wednesday 28, Thursday 29 and Friday 30 September 2011 Supersymmetric Recipes by Prof. Ben Allanech / University of Cambridge, UK  from 11:00 to 12:00 (Europe/Zurich) at CERN ( Main Auditorium, Bldg. 500 ) In these lectures, I shall describe the theory of supersymmetry accessible to people with a knowledge of basic quantum field theory. The lectures will contain recipes of how to calculate which interactions (and which special relations) are in supersymmetry, without providing detailed proofs of where they come from. We shall also cover: motivation for weak-scale supersymmetry and the minimal supersymmetric standard model.

  12. Learning and Celebrating: The Glamour of Design Lecture Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Lubomir

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight the celebratory aspect of the Design Lecture Series, a tradition in architecture schools and interior design programs, its meaning for all constituent parties, and its contributions to creating professional identity and community. The Design Lecture Series is a public event popular in design programs,…

  13. Universal Design for Learning in Teaching Large Lecture Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Tereza; Lee-Post, Anita; Hapke, Holly

    2017-01-01

    To augment traditional lecture with instructional tools that provide options for content representation, learner engagement, and learning expression, we followed the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) principles to design and implement a learning environment for teaching and learning in large lecture classes. To this end, we incorporated four…

  14. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel 73127

    2001-01-01

    28, 29, 30, 31 May and 1 June REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Quantum computing and Quantum cryptography T. Hey / University of Southampton, GB, and D. Ross / CERN-TH This course will give both an overview and a detailed introduction to quantum computing and quantum cryptography. The first lecture will survey the field, starting from its origins in Feyman's lecture in 1981. The next three lectures will explain in detail the relevance of Bell states and the workings of Grover's Quantum Search and Shor's quantum factorization algorithms. In addition, an explanation of quantum teleportation will be given. The last lecture will survey the recent progress towards realizing working quantum computers and quantum cryptographic systems.

  15. Curriculum Prototypes and the Seven Dwarfs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Shirley

    Jonathan Culler's notion, that each change of perspective a reader makes brings something different from the text, is explored by using four curricula. They are: the traditional language arts curriculum, an active reading comprehension curriculum, a psychology curriculum, and a feminist curriculum. By analyzing the same text, "Snow White and…

  16. Undergraduate medical student's perceptions on traditional and problem based curricula: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate and compare students' perceptions about teaching and learning, knowledge and skills, outcomes of course materials and their satisfaction in traditional Lecture Based learning versus Problem-Based Learning curricula in two different medical schools. The comparative cross-sectional questionnaire-based study was conducted in the Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from July 2009 to January 2011. Two different undergraduate medical schools were selected; one followed the traditional curriculum, while the other followed the problem-based learning curriculum. Two equal groups of first year medical students were selected. They were taught in respiratory physiology and lung function lab according to their curriculum for a period of two weeks. At the completion of the study period, a five-point Likert scale was used to assess students' perceptions on satisfaction, academic environment, teaching and learning, knowledge and skills and outcomes of course materials about effectiveness of problem-based learning compared to traditional methods. SPSS 19 was used for statistical analysis. Students used to problem-based learning curriculum obtained marginally higher scores in their perceptions (24.10 +/- 3.63) compared to ones following the traditional curriculum (22.67 +/- 3.74). However, the difference in perceptions did not achieve a level of statistical significance. Students following problem-based learning curriculum have more positive perceptions on teaching and learning, knowledge and skills, outcomes of their course materials and satisfaction compared to the students belonging to the traditional style of medical school. However, the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant.

  17. Complex Variables throughout the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, John P.

    2017-01-01

    We offer many specific detailed examples, several of which are new, that instructors can use (in lecture or as student projects) to revitalize the role of complex variables throughout the curriculum. We conclude with three primary recommendations: revise the syllabus of Calculus II to allow early introductions of complex numbers and linear…

  18. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    12, 13, 14, 15 & 16 March REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Telecommunication for the future Rob Parker / CERN-IT Few fields have experienced such a high level of technical advance over the last few decades as that of telecommunications. This lecture series will track the evolution of telecommunications systems since their inception, and consider how technology is likely to advance over the next years. A personal view will also be given of the effect of these innovations on our work and leisure activities.The lecture series will be aimed at an audience with no specific technical knowledge of telecommunications.

  19. Empowering the crowd: faculty discourse strategies for facilitating student reasoning in large lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaree, Dedra

    2012-02-01

    Oregon State University (OSU) has restructured its introductory calculus-based sequence including reformed curriculum modeled after the Interactive Science Learning Environment (ISLE). ISLE is driven by an experimental cycle roughly summarized as: observe phenomena, find patterns and devise explanations, test explanations, develop a model, apply the model to new observations. In implementing ISLE at OSU we have chosen to focus on student scientific reasoning, specifically student ability to develop and test models, make explicit judgments on how to approach open-ended tasks, and take an authoritative role in knowledge development. In order to achieve these goals, the lecture course heavily utilizes social engagement. During large-lecture group work, emphasis is placed on facilitating student discourse about issues such as what systems to choose or how to define an open-ended problem. Instructional strategies are aimed at building off the group discourse to create a full-class community where knowledge is developed through collaboration with peers. We are achieving these goals along with an increase in measured student conceptual knowledge and traditional problem solving abilities, and no loss of content coverage. It is an ongoing effort to understand ``best'' instructional strategies and to facilitate new faculty when they teach the curriculum. Our research has focused on understanding how to facilitate activities that promote this form of discourse. We have quantitative analysis of engagement based on video data, qualitative analysis of dialogue from audio data, classroom observations by an external researcher, and survey data. In this session we share a subset of what we have learned about how to engage students in scientific reasoning discourse during large lecture, both at the group-work and full-class level.

  20. Feynman Lectures on Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Feynman, Richard Phillips; Allen, Robin W

    1999-01-01

    "When, in 1984-86, Richard P. Feynman gave his famous course on computation at the California Institute of Technology, he asked Tony Hey to adapt his lecture notes into a book. Although led by Feynman,"

  1. An Interactive Mobile Lecturing Model: Enhancing Student Engagement with Face-to-Face Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyinbode, Olutayo; Ng'ambi, Dick; Bagula, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    Although use of podcasts and vodcasts are increasingly becoming popular in higher education, their use is usually unidirectional and therefore replicates the transmission mode of traditional face-to-face lectures. In this paper, the authors propose a tool, MOBILect, a mobile lecturing tool that enables users to comment on lecture vodcasts using…

  2. Flipped Statistics Class Results: Better Performance than Lecture over One Year Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winquist, Jennifer R.; Carlson, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we compare an introductory statistics course taught using a flipped classroom approach to the same course taught using a traditional lecture based approach. In the lecture course, students listened to lecture, took notes, and completed homework assignments. In the flipped course, students read relatively simple chapters and answered…

  3. Problem Based Learning, curriculum development and change ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Problem Based Learning, curriculum development and change process at ... was started in 1924 and has been running a traditional curriculum for 79 years. ... Methods: The stages taken during the process were described and analysed.

  4. Interactive lectures in engineering education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, L.A.; van den Berg, G.C.; van Keulen, H.

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses an alternative approach to lecturing: the interactive lecture. In the literature, interactive teaching is forwarded as a means to increase the effectiveness of lectures. Members of lecturing staff still seem, however, reluctant to incorporate interactive teaching in their

  5. Curriculum as a Discourse: Using Critical Discourse Analysis to Revive Curriculum Reconceptualists' Thought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harb, Majed

    2017-01-01

    Curriculum reconceptualists seek to reshape the field of curriculum studies. Unlike traditional curricularists, they reprobate the technical approach of curriculum development because of its pure functional and managerial tendency. Reconceptualists look at curriculum from various philosophy-saturated perspectives. One of their claims is…

  6. Students’ opinions about modern lecture: development path

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana A. Astashova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As an objective of the research, the author set the task of identifying students’ opinion and opinion of lecturers about the purpose of the lectures at the university, about the role of the lecturer and preferred form of lectures. As a result of the research, it was necessary to answer the following important questions: What are the objectives of the lecture and the role of the lecturer? Which lectures are more preferable: traditional or interactive? What do lecturers expect from the lecture, do they consider it an advantage or an unnecessary educational activity?The materials were developed for the survey (questionnaire to conduct the research and analyze the results obtained. The students were surveyed before training and after completion of the semester. The study involved 200 students of all areas of Mechanics and Technology Faculty of Novosibirsk State Technical University. Statistical analysis was used for the analysis of the results.As a result, the experiment revealed nonconformity of opinions of students about the purpose of the lecture and the role of a lecturer before the training and after the end of the semester. Lectures, according to students, should help to implement all kinds of practical and independent assignments.Educational standards imply a reduction in the hours of classroom training and an increase in independent work, and the majority of students are not ready (do not want to to study the materials on the topics of discipline completely independently or partially.It revealed a contradiction in opinion, what form of organization of the lecture classes is more interesting to students, which can increase the motivation of the visit and work on the lectures.The technology of designing the educational process in the conditions of the mixed training is proposed, applying the technological map.The technological map is presented in the form of stages of designing the educational process, including recommendations on the use of

  7. Are radiography lecturers, leaders?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendry, Julie Anne

    2013-01-01

    This review article aims to explore the concept of radiography lecturers acting as leaders to their student followers. Through a brief review of the literature, a definition of leadership is suggested and some leadership theories explored. The path-goal theory, leader–member exchange theory and the contemporary theory of transformational leadership are examined more closely. Links between lecturer-leader behaviour and student motivation and learning are tentatively suggested with transformational leadership appearing to offer the optimal leadership style for lecturers to adopt. The paucity of literature relating directly to radiography is acknowledged and areas for further research are suggested. The article concludes with some of the author's practical ideas for incorporating transformational leadership styles and behaviours into radiography education today

  8. Lectures on Chevalley groups

    CERN Document Server

    Steinberg, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Robert Steinberg's Lectures on Chevalley Groups were delivered and written during the author's sabbatical visit to Yale University in the 1967-1968 academic year. The work presents the status of the theory of Chevalley groups as it was in the mid-1960s. Much of this material was instrumental in many areas of mathematics, in particular in the theory of algebraic groups and in the subsequent classification of finite groups. This posthumous edition incorporates additions and corrections prepared by the author during his retirement, including a new introductory chapter. A bibliography and editorial notes have also been added. This is a great unsurpassed introduction to the subject of Chevalley groups that influenced generations of mathematicians. I would recommend it to anybody whose interests include group theory. -Efim Zelmanov, University of California, San Diego Robert Steinberg's lectures on Chevalley groups were given at Yale University in 1967. The notes for the lectures contain a wonderful exposition of ...

  9. Lectures for CERN pensioners

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2009-01-01

    The CERN Medical Service and the Pensioners Association are pleased to invite CERN pensioners to a series of lectures given by professors and specialists from the Teaching Hospitals and the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Geneva on the following topic: PROMOTION OF OPTIMUM BRAIN AGEING The lectures will take place in the Main CERN Auditorium (Building 60) from 2.30 p.m. to 4.30 p.m. on the following dates: Thursday 15 January 2009: Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer’s disease Pr Gabriel GOLD Wednesday 25 February 2009: What is the brain reserve? Speaker’s name to be announced at a later date. The lectures will be given in French, with transparencies in English, and will be followed by a wide-ranging debate with the participants. CERN Medical Service - Pensioners Association - CERN-ESO (GAC-EPA)

  10. Film documentaire, lecture documentarisante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Odin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Réfléchir sur la relation entre le cinéma et la réalité n’est pas, bien sûr, tenter de distinguer l’espace du documentaire de celui de la fiction, au point que l’opposition avec le film de fiction est devenu le critère de définition privilégié du film documentaire. Prenant acte l’existence, dans le espace de la lecture des films, d’une lecture documentaire ou, plus exactement, d’une lecture documentarisante, nous pensons qu’il y a un ensemble de films que s’affiche comme documentaire (tout le problème est précisément étudier comment s’effetue cet affichage.

  11. Albert Einstein memorial lectures

    CERN Document Server

    Mechoulam, Raphael; The Israel Academy for Sciences and Humanities

    2012-01-01

    This volume consists of a selection of the Albert Einstein Memorial Lectures presented annually at the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities. Delivered by eminent scientists and scholars, including Nobel laureates, they cover a broad spectrum of subjects in physics, chemistry, life science, mathematics, historiography and social issues. This distinguished memorial lecture series was inaugurated by the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities following an international symposium held in Jerusalem in March 1979 to commemorate the centenary of Albert Einstein's birth. Considering that Einstein's interests, activities and influence were not restricted to theoretical physics but spanned broad fields affecting society and the welfare of humankind, it was felt that these memorial lectures should be addressed to scientists, scholars and erudite laypersons rather than to physicists alone.

  12. Lectures on functor homology

    CERN Document Server

    Touzé, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    This book features a series of lectures that explores three different fields in which functor homology (short for homological algebra in functor categories) has recently played a significant role. For each of these applications, the functor viewpoint provides both essential insights and new methods for tackling difficult mathematical problems. In the lectures by Aurélien Djament, polynomial functors appear as coefficients in the homology of infinite families of classical groups, e.g. general linear groups or symplectic groups, and their stabilization. Djament’s theorem states that this stable homology can be computed using only the homology with trivial coefficients and the manageable functor homology. The series includes an intriguing development of Scorichenko’s unpublished results. The lectures by Wilberd van der Kallen lead to the solution of the general cohomological finite generation problem, extending Hilbert’s fourteenth problem and its solution to the context of cohomology. The focus here is o...

  13. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    26, 27, 28 February and 1, 2 March REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Recent Results on CP Violation and B Physics P.F. HARRISON / QMW, London, UK With the advent of the asymmetric B factories in Japan and the US, exciting new results on CP Violation and B Physics are starting to be achieved. In these lectures, we review the existing experimental and phenomenological context of these measurements, we compare and contrast the new experimental facilities and discuss the implications of the recent results on our understanding. Finally we summarise the prospects for future developments.

  14. Twenty lectures on thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Buchdahl, H A

    2013-01-01

    Twenty Lectures on Thermodynamics is a course of lectures, parts of which the author has given various times over the last few years. The book gives the readers a bird's eye view of phenomenological and statistical thermodynamics. The book covers many areas in thermodynamics such as states and transition; adiabatic isolation; irreversibility; the first, second, third and Zeroth laws of thermodynamics; entropy and entropy law; the idea of the application of thermodynamics; pseudo-states; the quantum-static al canonical and grand canonical ensembles; and semi-classical gaseous systems. The text

  15. Lectures on Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Dirac, Paul Adrien Maurice

    1964-01-01

    The author of this concise, brilliant series of lectures on mathematical methods in quantum mechanics was one of the shining intellects in the field, winning a Nobel prize in 1933 for his pioneering work in the quantum mechanics of the atom. Beyond that, he developed the transformation theory of quantum mechanics (which made it possible to calculate the statistical distribution of certain variables), was one of the major authors of the quantum theory of radiation, codiscovered the Fermi-Dirac statistics, and predicted the existence of the positron.The four lectures in this book were delivered

  16. Academic Training Lecture - Regular Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    Regular Lecture Programme 9 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Inner Tracking Detectors by Pippa Wells (CERN) 10 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Calorimeters (2/5) by Philippe Bloch (CERN) 11 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Muon systems (3/5) by Kerstin Hoepfner (RWTH Aachen) 12 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Particle Identification and Forward Detectors by Peter Krizan (University of Ljubljana and J. Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia) 13 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Trigger and Data Acquisition (5/5) by Dr. Brian Petersen (CERN) from 11:00 to 12:00 at CERN ( Bldg. 222-R-001 - Filtration Plant )

  17. Memory for Lectures: How Lecture Format Impacts the Learning Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varao-Sousa, Trish L; Kingstone, Alan

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated what impact the presentation style of a classroom lecture has on memory, mind wandering, and the subjective factors of interest and motivation. We examined if having a professor lecturing live versus on video alters the learning experience of the students in the classroom. During the lectures, students were asked to report mind wandering and later complete a memory test. The lecture format was manipulated such that all the students received two lectures, one live and one a pre-recorded video. Results indicate that lecture format affected memory performance but not mind wandering, with enhanced memory in the live lectures. Additionally, students reported greater interest and motivation in the live lectures. Given that a single change to the classroom environment, professor presence, impacted memory performance, as well as motivation and interest, the present results have several key implications for technology-based integrations into higher education classrooms.

  18. Memory for Lectures: How Lecture Format Impacts the Learning Experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trish L Varao-Sousa

    Full Text Available The present study investigated what impact the presentation style of a classroom lecture has on memory, mind wandering, and the subjective factors of interest and motivation. We examined if having a professor lecturing live versus on video alters the learning experience of the students in the classroom. During the lectures, students were asked to report mind wandering and later complete a memory test. The lecture format was manipulated such that all the students received two lectures, one live and one a pre-recorded video. Results indicate that lecture format affected memory performance but not mind wandering, with enhanced memory in the live lectures. Additionally, students reported greater interest and motivation in the live lectures. Given that a single change to the classroom environment, professor presence, impacted memory performance, as well as motivation and interest, the present results have several key implications for technology-based integrations into higher education classrooms.

  19. Summer Student Lecture Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 2 August 09:15 - 10:00 P. Wells (CERN) The Higgs Saga at LEP 10:15 - 11:00 G. Cowan (Univ. of London) Introduction to Statistics (2/3) 11:15 - 12:00 G. Cowan (Univ. of London) Introduction to Statistics (3/3) DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Tuesday 3 August 09:15 - 10:00 P. Sphicas (CERN) Trigger and Data Acquisition Systems (1/2) 10:15 - 11:00 R. Jacobsen (LBLN) From Raw Data to Physics Results (1/2) 11:15 - 12:00 R. Jacobsen (LBLN) G. Cowan (University of London) Discussion Session DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 4 August 09:15 - 10:00 P. Sphicas (CERN) Trigger and Data Acquisition Systems (2/2) 10:15 - 11:00 R. Jacobsen (LBLN) From Raw Data to Physics Results (2/2) 11:15 - 12:00 N. Palanque-Delabrouille (CEA) Astroparticle Physics (1/3) DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Thursday 5 August 09:15 - 10:00 N. Palanque-Delabrouille (CEA) Astroparticle Physics (2/3) 10:15 - 11:00 N. Palanque-Delabrouille (CEA) A...

  20. Impostor Syndrome 2014 lecture

    OpenAIRE

    Drew, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    A lecture given at the University of Rochester outlining what the Impostor Syndrome is, as well as how it can impact graduate student success. Other topics include how to build support networks in school as well as picking appropriately scaled projects

  1. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pines, A.

    1988-08-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 32 refs., 56 figs

  2. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pines, A.

    1986-09-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 55 figs

  3. Lecturer on tour!

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    Readers may recall the interview with Professor Peter Kalmus which appeared in the July issue of Physics Education and which indicated his latest role of lecturer for the 1998-9 Institute of Physics Schools and Colleges Lecture series. This year's lecture is entitled `Particles and the universe' and the tour was due to begin in St Andrews, Scotland, late in September. Professor Kalmus will be looking at various aspects of particle physics, quantum physics and relativity, and discussing how they reveal the secrets of the beginning of our universe. His own experience of working at CERN, the European centre for particle physics in Switzerland, as well as at other international research facilities will provide a unique insight into activity in one of the most exciting areas of physics. The talks are aimed at the 16-19 age group but members of the public are also welcome to attend. They will act as an opportunity to gain a sneak preview of the dynamic new topics that will soon feature in the A-level syllabus arising from the Institute's 16-19 project. Further details of attendance are available from the local organizers, a list of whom may be obtained from Catherine Wilson in the Education Department at the Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH (tel: 0171 470 4800, fax: 0171 470 4848). The published schedule (as of September) for the lecture series consists of the following: Dates

  4. Student Logical Implications and Connections between Symbolic Representations of a Linear System within the Context of an Introductory Linear Algebra Course Employing Inquiry-Oriented Teaching and Traditional Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, Spencer D.

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to explore how inquiry-oriented teaching could be implemented in an introductory linear algebra course that, due to various constraints, may not lend itself to inquiry-oriented teaching. In particular, the course in question has a traditionally large class size, limited amount of class time, and is often coordinated with other…

  5. Public Lecture: Human Space Exploration

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Should you wish to attend to this lecture only (and not the full colloquium), please register here: https://indico.cern.ch/event/386996/registration/ Participants to the full colloquium are automatically registered to the public lectures.

  6. Novel Emergency Medicine Curriculum Utilizing Self-Directed Learning and the Flipped Classroom Method: Gastrointestinal Emergencies Small Group Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew King

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Audience and type of curriculum: This curriculum created and implemented at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center was designed to educate our emergency medicine (EM residents, PGY-1 to PGY-3, as well as medical students and attending physicians. Introduction/Background: Gastrointestinal (GI emergencies comprise approximately 12% of emergency department (ED visits.1 Residents must be proficient in the differential diagnosis and management of the wide variety of GI emergencies. The flipped classroom curricular model emphasizes self-directed learning activities completed by learners, followed by small group discussions pertaining to the topic reviewed. The active learning fostered by this curriculum increases faculty and learner engagement and interaction time typically absent in traditional lecture-based formats.2-4 Studies have revealed that the application of knowledge through case studies, personal interaction with content experts, and integrated questions are effective learning strategies for emergency medicine residents.4-6 The Ohio State University EM Residency didactic curriculum recently transitioned to a “flipped classroom” approach.7-10 We created this innovative curriculum aimed to improve our residency education program and to share educational resources with other EM residency programs. This proposed curriculum utilizes an 18-month curricular cycle. The flipped classroom curriculum maximizes didactic time and resident engagement, fosters intellectual curiosity and active learning, and meets the needs of today’s learners. 3,6,11 Objectives: We aim to teach the presentation and management of GI emergencies through the creation of a flipped classroom design. This unique, innovative curriculum utilizes resources chosen by education faculty and resident learners, study questions, real-life experiences, and small group discussions in place of traditional lectures. In doing so, a goal of the curriculum is to encourage self

  7. Feynman Lectures on Gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borcherds, P

    2003-01-01

    In the early 1960s Feynman lectured to physics undergraduates and, with the assistance of his colleagues Leighton and Sands, produced the three-volume classic Feynman Lectures in Physics. These lectures were delivered in the mornings. In the afternoons Feynman was giving postgraduate lectures on gravitation. This book is based on notes compiled by two students on that course: Morinigo and Wagner. Their notes were checked and approved by Feynman and were available at Caltech. They have now been edited by Brian Hatfield and made more widely available. The book has a substantial preface by John Preskill and Kip Thorne, and an introduction entitled 'Quantum Gravity' by Brian Hatfield. You should read these before going on to the lectures themselves. Preskill and Thorne identify three categories of potential readers of this book. 1. Those with a postgraduate training in theoretical physics. 2. 'Readers with a solid undergraduate training in physics'. 3. 'Admirers of Feynman who do not have a strong physics background'. The title of the book is perhaps misleading: readers in category 2 who think that this book is an extension of the Feynman Lectures in Physics may be disappointed. It is not: it is a book aimed mainly at those in category 1. If you want to get to grips with gravitation (and general relativity) then you need to read an introductory text first e.g. General Relativity by I R Kenyon (Oxford: Oxford University Press) or A Unified Grand Tour of Theoretical Physics by Ian D Lawrie (Bristol: IoP). But there is no Royal Road. As pointed out in the preface and in the introduction, the book represents Feynman's thinking about gravitation some 40 years ago: the lecture course was part of his attempts to understand the subject himself, and for readers in all three categories it is this that makes the book one of interest: the opportunity to observe how a great physicist attempts to tackle some of the hardest challenges of physics. However, the book was written 40

  8. Developing sustainability curriculum using the PBL method in a Chinese context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Xiangyun; Su, Liya; Liu, Jingling

    2013-01-01

    traditional, lecture-based pedagogy. This paper reports an educational initiative and research project based on collaboration between Beijing Normal University, China and Aalborg University, Denmark: developing a sustainability curriculum using the methodology of Problem and Project Based Learning (PBL...... generation is based on multiple collection methods, such as survey of students’ feedbacks, interviews with students, and analysis of students’ project reports and reflection essays. This paper summarizes that a sustainability curriculum as proposed in this research can attract students’ interests in not only......Sustainability is receiving increasing amounts of attention in higher education in terms of how it can best be integrated with university curricula. Sustainability is closely related to complexity, innovation, and interdisciplinarity; therefore, it requires alternative approaches rather than...

  9. Embedding a Virtual Patient Simulator in an Interactive Surgical lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinert, Robert; Plum, Patrick; Heiermann, Nadine; Wahba, Roger; Chang, De-Huan; Hölscher, Arnulf H; Stippel, Dirk L

    2016-01-01

    Lectures are traditionally used for teaching declarative knowledge. One established tool for clinical education is the demonstration of a real patient. The use of real patients in the daily clinical environment is increasingly difficult. The use of a virtual patient simulator (VPS) can potentially circumvent these problems. Unlimited availability and the opportunity of an electronic feedback system could possibly enrich traditional lectures by enabling more interactivity that meets the expectations of the current student generation. As students face the consequences of their own decisions they take a more active role in the lecture. VPS links declarative knowledge with visual perception that is known to influence students' motivation. Until now, there have been no reports covering the usage and validation of interactive VPS for supporting traditional lectures. In this study, we (1) described the development of a custom-made three-dimensional (3D) VPS for supporting the traditional lecture and (2) performed a feasibility study including an initial assessment of this novel educational concept. Conceptualization included definition of curricular content, technical realization and validation. A custom-made simulator was validated with 68 students. The degree of student acceptance was evaluated. Furthermore, the effect on knowledge gain was determined by testing prelecture and postlecture performance. A custom-made simulator prototype that displays a 3D virtual clinic environment was developed and linked to a PowerPoint presentation. Students were able to connect to the simulator via electronic devices (smartphones and tablets) and to control the simulator via majority vote. The simulator was used in 6 lectures and validated in 2 lectures with 68 students each. Student acceptance and their opinion about effectiveness and applicability were determined. Students showed a high level of motivation when using the simulator as most of them had fun using it. Effect on

  10. TA Mentorship in Lecture significantly enhances students' learning in mechanics in large introductory physics classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, K.; Caglar, Mehmet

    2011-10-01

    Lab is an important component of students' learning in a traditional lecture-lab setting of introductory physics courses. Using standard mechanics concepts and baseline surveys as well as independent classroom observations, the effects of TA mentorship in Lecture on students' learning of physics concepts and problem-solving skills among different student subgroups taught by other TAs and lecturers using different level of student interactive engagement in classes have been analyzed. Our data indicate that in lecture training of TA promotes lecture/lab synergism in improvement students' learning of mechanics in large introductory physics classes.

  11. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    18, 19, 20, 21, 22 November LECTURE FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Telling the Truth with Statistics R. Barlow / Univ. of Manchester, UK This course of lectures will cover probability, distributions, fitting, errors and confidence levels, for practising High Energy Physicists who need to use Statistical techniques to express their results. Concentrating on these appropriate specialist techniques means that they can be covered in appropriate depth, while assuming only the knowledge and experience of a typical Particle Physicist. The different definitions of probability will be explained, and it will be appear why this basic subject is so controversial; there are several viewpoints and it is important to understand them all, rather than abusing the adherents of different beliefs. Distributions will be covered: the situations they arise in, their useful properties, and the amazing result of the Central Limit Theorem. Fitting a parametrisation to a set of data is one of the m...

  12. Lectures on Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gomberoff, Andres

    2006-01-01

    The 2002 Pan-American Advanced Studies Institute School on Quantum Gravity was held at the Centro de Estudios Cientificos (CECS),Valdivia, Chile, January 4-14, 2002. The school featured lectures by ten speakers, and was attended by nearly 70 students from over 14 countries. A primary goal was to foster interaction and communication between participants from different cultures, both in the layman’s sense of the term and in terms of approaches to quantum gravity. We hope that the links formed by students and the school will persist throughout their professional lives, continuing to promote interaction and the essential exchange of ideas that drives research forward. This volume contains improved and updated versions of the lectures given at the School. It has been prepared both as a reminder for the participants, and so that these pedagogical introductions can be made available to others who were unable to attend. We expect them to serve students of all ages well.

  13. Globe: Lecture series

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The LHC: an accelerator of science This series of lectures is all about understanding the scientific and technological challenges of the phenomenal LHC project and assessing its innovations through their everyday applications. Come and take a sneak preview of the LHC! Communicate: the Grid, a computer of global dimensions François Grey, head of communication in CERN’s Information Technology Department How will it be possible for the 15 million billion bytes of data generated by the LHC every year to be handled and stored by a computer that doesn’t have to be the size of a skyscraper? The computer scientists have the answer: the Grid, which will harness the power of tens of thousands of computers all over the world by creating a network of computers and making them operate as one. >>> Lectures are free and require no specialist knowledge. In french. 
 >>> By reservation only: tel. +41 (0)22 767 76 76

  14. Lectures on radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachsmann, F.; Consentius, K.

    1981-01-01

    All important subjects of radiation protection are presented in concise form; the explanations may serve as lecture manuscripts. The lectures are divided into 16 to 19 teaching units. Each teaching unit is supplemented by a slide to be projected on a screen while the text is read. This method of visual teaching has already been tried with good results in medicine and medical engineering. Pictures of the slides are given in the text so that the book may also be used for self-studies. The main facts are summarized at the end of each lesson. The finished book will consist of 8 lessons; the first three of these discuss 1. Radiation effects and hazards 2. Dose definitions and units and their role in radiology and radiation protection 3. Dose limits and legal specifications. (orig.) [de

  15. Lectures on dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seljak, U.

    2001-01-01

    These lectures concentrate on evolution and generation of dark matter perturbations. The purpose of the lectures is to present, in a systematic way, a comprehensive review of the cosmological parameters that can lead to observable effects in the dark matter clustering properties. We begin by reviewing the relativistic linear perturbation theory formalism. We discuss the gauge issue and derive Einstein's and continuity equations for several popular gauge choices. We continue by developing fluid equations for cold dark matter and baryons and Boltzmann equations for photons, massive and massless neutrinos. We then discuss the generation of initial perturbations by the process of inflation and the parameters of that process that can be extracted from the observations. Finally we discuss evolution of perturbations in various regimes and the imprint of the evolution on the dark matter power spectrum both in the linear and in the nonlinear regime. (author)

  16. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    23, 24, 25, 26 and 27 April REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500, on 23 April from 11:15 to 12:15 hrs Searches for Dark Matter F. Feinstein / CPPM, Marseille, F The fact that the mass of the visible stars could not account for the gravitational cohesion of the galaxy clusters was the first manifestation of non-radiating matter in the Universe. Since then, many observations imply that most of the matter is indeed dark. Its nature is still unknown and likely to have several contributions. Recent results indicate that most of it may not be composed of normal matter. These lectures will review the experimental methods, which have been developed to unravel this 70-year long mystery and confront their results with the current theoretical framework of cosmology.

  17. Lectures on dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seljak, U [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2001-11-15

    These lectures concentrate on evolution and generation of dark matter perturbations. The purpose of the lectures is to present, in a systematic way, a comprehensive review of the cosmological parameters that can lead to observable effects in the dark matter clustering properties. We begin by reviewing the relativistic linear perturbation theory formalism. We discuss the gauge issue and derive Einstein's and continuity equations for several popular gauge choices. We continue by developing fluid equations for cold dark matter and baryons and Boltzmann equations for photons, massive and massless neutrinos. We then discuss the generation of initial perturbations by the process of inflation and the parameters of that process that can be extracted from the observations. Finally we discuss evolution of perturbations in various regimes and the imprint of the evolution on the dark matter power spectrum both in the linear and in the nonlinear regime. (author)

  18. Lecture 2: Software Security

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Computer security has been an increasing concern for IT professionals for a number of years, yet despite all the efforts, computer systems and networks remain highly vulnerable to attacks of different kinds. Design flaws and security bugs in the underlying software are among the main reasons for this. This lecture addresses the following question: how to create secure software? The lecture starts with a definition of computer security and an explanation of why it is so difficult to achieve. It then introduces the main security principles (like least-privilege, or defense-in-depth) and discusses security in different phases of the software development cycle. The emphasis is put on the implementation part: most common pitfalls and security bugs are listed, followed by advice on best practice for security development, testing and deployment. Sebastian Lopienski is CERN’s deputy Computer Security Officer. He works on security strategy and policies; offers internal consultancy and audit services; develops and ...

  19. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    9, 10 and 11 May REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 10:00 to 12:00 hrs on 9 and 10 May and on 11 May from 11:00 to 12:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Cosmology and Particle Physics K. Olive / CERN-TH A general overview of the standard big bang model will be presented with special emphasis on astro-particle physics. Specific topics will include: Inflation, Baryoogenesis, Nucleosynthesis and Dark Matter.

  20. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 16 August 09:15 - 10:00 Student sessions (1/6) 10:15 - 11:00 Student sessions (2/6 11:15 - 12:00 Student sessions (3/6) Tuesday 17 August 09:15 - 10:00 Student sessions (4/6) 10:15 - 11:00 Student sessions (5/6) 11:15 - 12:00 Student sessions (6/6

  1. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 April REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 New Developments in Supersymmetry S. Raby / CERN-TH Introduction to supersymmetric grand unified theories. An introduction to the MSSM and different mechanisms for supersymmetry breaking. Then the details of SU(5) and SO(10) unification, the new gauge sector beyond the standard model, representations of quarks and leptons. Gauge and Yukawa coupling unification and some predictions.

  2. Lectures on LHC physics

    CERN Document Server

    Plehn, Tilman

    2012-01-01

    When we try to advance from a solid knowledge of field theory to LHC physics we usually encounter a frustrating problem: in particular Higgs physics and QCD techniques appear as a impenetrable granite block of phenomenological know-how, common lores, and historically grown intuition what works and what does not. I hope this lecture can drill a few holes into the rock and put you into a position to digest advanced writeups as well as some first research papers on the topic.

  3. Two lectures on neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramond, P.

    1992-01-01

    These notes are based on two lectures delivered at the School. A general description of neutrinos is presented, first in purely kinematic terms, then in the context of the Standard Model, focusing on the role of the global lepton numbers. Standard Model extensions with massive neutrinos are cataloged. Several popular mass matrices for neutrinos, and their consequences are presented. They proceed to give an extended discussion of neutrino oscillations in matter, and apply the results to the solar neutrinos

  4. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 March REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Tracking at the LHC K. Safarik / CERN-EP The lecture will start with a short history of particle tracking in high-energy physics. Then we will concentrate on tracking in the LHC experiments. We will discuss various tracking devices proposed for these experiments, dividing them into two large groups: solid state detectors and gas detectors. Their characteristics, as well as their behaviour in different external conditions (i.e. magnetic field, radiation) will be compared. Furthermore, we will turn to the question: how to design a tracker using these various technologies, what are the essential parameters to be taken into account and we will apply these considerations to the proposed the LHC detectors. The last part of the lecture will be devoted to tracking software. We will mention simulation and concentrate on track finding and reconstruction, reviewing different algorithms prototyped for the LHC experiments. We will ...

  5. Summer Student Lecture Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 More Information DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 7 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. Fayard, O. Ullaland, D. Heagerty (CERN) Programme Presentation Workshops presentation Information on Computing Rules 10:15 - 11:00 R. Aymar (CERN) Introduction to CERN (1/2) 11:15 - 12:00 J. Engelen (CERN) Introduction to CERN (2/2) 15:00 - 16:30 H. Menzel (CERN) An Introduction to Radiation Protection DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Thursday 8 july 09:15 - 10:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (1/4) 10:15 - 11:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (2/4) 11:15 - 12:00 P. Chomaz (GANIL / CERN) Fundamental questions in modern nuclear physics: The challenge of exotic nuclei (1/2) DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Friday 9 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (3/4) 10:15 - 11:00 P. Chomaz (GANIL / CERN) Fundamental questions in modern nuclear physics: The challenge of exotic nuclei (2/2) 11:15 - 12:00 P....

  6. Lectures for CERN pensioners

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    The CERN Medical Service and the Pensioners Association are pleased to invite CERN pensioners to a series of lectures given by professors and specialists from the Teaching Hospitals and the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Geneva on the following topic: PROMOTION OF OPTIMUM BRAIN AGEING The lectures will take place in the Main CERN Auditorium (Building 60) from 2.30 p.m. to 4.30 p.m. on the following dates: Wednesday 12 November 2008: Assessing the extent of brain ageing Dr Dina ZEKRY Friday 12 December 2008: Can memory decline be prevented? Pr Jean-Pierre MICHEL Thursday 15 January 2009: Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer’s disease Pr Gabriel GOLD Wednesday 25 February 2009: What is the brain reserve? Speaker’s name to be announced at a later date The lectures will be given in French, with transparencies in English, and will be followed by a wide-ranging debate with the participants. CERN Medical Service - Pensioners Association - CERN-ESO (GAC-EPA)

  7. Lectures on quasiconformal mappings

    CERN Document Server

    Ahlfors, Lars V

    2006-01-01

    Lars Ahlfors's Lectures on Quasiconformal Mappings, based on a course he gave at Harvard University in the spring term of 1964, was first published in 1966 and was soon recognized as the classic it was shortly destined to become. These lectures develop the theory of quasiconformal mappings from scratch, give a self-contained treatment of the Beltrami equation, and cover the basic properties of Teichm�ller spaces, including the Bers embedding and the Teichm�ller curve. It is remarkable how Ahlfors goes straight to the heart of the matter, presenting major results with a minimum set of prerequisites. Many graduate students and other mathematicians have learned the foundations of the theories of quasiconformal mappings and Teichm�ller spaces from these lecture notes. This edition includes three new chapters. The first, written by Earle and Kra, describes further developments in the theory of Teichm�ller spaces and provides many references to the vast literature on Teichm�ller spaces and quasiconformal ...

  8. Public Lectures | Events | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Public and special lectures. Academy Public Lectures · Public and special lectures in Mid-Year and Annual Meetings · Platinum Jubilee Lectures. Academy's annual and mid-year meetings include a special lecture by a senior Fellow in the morning of each meeting day and one public lecture by an eminent person, from ...

  9. Development of a British Road Safety Education Support Materials Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouck, Linda H.

    Road safety education needs to be a vital component in the school curriculum. This paper describes a planned road safety education support materials curriculum developed to aid educators in the Wiltshire County (England) primary schools. Teaching strategies include topic webs, lecture, class discussion, group activities, and investigative learning…

  10. Classroom Activities: Simple Strategies to Incorporate Student-Centered Activities within Undergraduate Science Lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lom, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The traditional science lecture, where an instructor delivers a carefully crafted monolog to a large audience of students who passively receive the information, has been a popular mode of instruction for centuries. Recent evidence on the science of teaching and learning indicates that learner-centered, active teaching strategies can be more effective learning tools than traditional lectures. Yet most colleges and universities retain lectures as their central instructional method. This article highlights several simple collaborative teaching techniques that can be readily deployed within traditional lecture frameworks to promote active learning. Specifically, this article briefly introduces the techniques of: reader's theatre, think-pair-share, roundtable, jigsaw, in-class quizzes, and minute papers. Each technique is broadly applicable well beyond neuroscience courses and easily modifiable to serve an instructor's specific pedagogical goals. The benefits of each technique are described along with specific examples of how each technique might be deployed within a traditional lecture to create more active learning experiences.

  11. Novel Emergency Medicine Curriculum Utilizing Self-Directed Learning and the Flipped Classroom Method: Genitourinary Emergencies Small Group Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew King

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This curriculum, created and implemented at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, was designed to educate our emergency medicine (EM residents, PGY-1 to PGY-3, as well as medical students. Introduction: In 2013, there were over 6 million Emergency Department visits in the United States which resulted in a primary diagnosis of the genitourinary system. This represents 5.2% of all Emergency Department visits.1 Residents must be proficient in the differential diagnosis and management of the wide variety of genitourinary emergencies. This flipped classroom curricular model emphasizes self-directed learning activities completed by learners, followed by small group discussions pertaining to the topic reviewed. The active learning fostered by this curriculum increases faculty and learner engagement and interaction time typically absent in traditional lecture-based formats.2-4 Studies have revealed that the application of knowledge through case studies, personal interaction with content experts, and integrated questions are effective learning strategies for emergency medicine residents.4-6 The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center EM Residency didactic curriculum recently transitioned to a “flipped classroom” approach.7-10 We created this innovative curriculum aimed to improve our residency education program and to share educational resources with other EM residency programs. Our curriculum utilizes an 18-month curricular cycle to cover the defined emergency medicine content. The flipped classroom curriculum maximizes didactic time and resident engagement, fosters intellectual curiosity and active learning, and meets the needs of today’s learners. 3,6,11 Objectives: We aim to teach the presentation and management of genitourinary emergencies through the creation of a flipped classroom design. This unique, innovative curriculum utilizes resources chosen by education faculty and resident learners, study questions, real

  12. Novel Emergency Medicine Curriculum Utilizing Self-Directed Learning and the Flipped Classroom Method: Psychiatric Emergencies Small Group Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew King

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This curriculum created and implemented at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center was designed to educate our emergency medicine (EM residents, PGY-1 to PGY-3, as well as medical students and attending physicians. Introduction: In 2007, there were 12 million adult Emergency Department visits for mental health and substance abuse complaints. This represents 12.5% of all adult emergency department visits.1 Residents must be proficient in the differential diagnosis and management of the wide variety of psychiatric emergencies. The flipped classroom curricular model emphasizes self-directed learning activities completed by learners, followed by small group discussions pertaining to the topic reviewed. The active learning fostered by this curriculum increases faculty and learner engagement and interaction time typically absent in traditional lecture-based formats.2-4 Studies have revealed that the application of knowledge through case studies, personal interaction with content experts, and integrated questions are effective learning strategies for emergency medicine residents.4-6 The Ohio State University EM Residency didactic curriculum recently transitioned to a “flipped classroom” approach.7-10 We created this innovative curriculum aimed to improve our residency education program and to share educational resources with other EM residency programs. Our curriculum utilizes an 18-month curricular cycle to cover the defined emergency medicine content. The flipped classroom curriculum maximizes didactic time and resident engagement, fosters intellectual curiosity and active learning, and meets the needs of today’s learners. 3,6,11 Objectives: We aim to teach the presentation and management of psychiatric emergencies through the creation of a flipped classroom design. This unique, innovative curriculum utilizes resources chosen by education faculty and resident learners, study questions, real-life experiences, and small group

  13. Exploring Tablet PC Lectures: Lecturer Experiences and Student Perceptions in Biomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choate, Julia; Kotsanas, George; Dawson, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    Lecturers using tablet PCs with specialised pens can utilise real-time changes in lecture delivery via digital inking. We investigated student perceptions and lecturer experiences of tablet PC lectures in large-enrolment biomedicine subjects. Lecturers used PowerPoint or Classroom Presenter software for lecture preparation and in-lecture pen-based…

  14. Joseph Mountin Lecture

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-26

    In this podcast, William H. Foege, MD, MPH delivers the 29th Annual Joseph W. Mountin Lecture. Dr. Foege was a key leader in the smallpox effort and worked as an epidemiologist in the successful eradication campaign in the 1970s. Dr. Foege became chief of the Smallpox Eradication Program at CDC, and was appointed director of CDC in 1977.  Created: 10/26/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 10/29/2009.

  15. Lectures on electromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    These lecture notes on electromagnetism have evolved from graduate and undergraduate EM theory courses given by the author at the University of Rochester, with the basics presented with clarity and his characteristic attention to detail. The thirteen chapters cover, in logical sequence, topics ranging from electrostatics, magnetostatics and Maxwell's equations to plasmas and radiation. Boundary value problems are treated extensively, as are wave guides, electromagnetic interactions and fields. This second edition comprises many of the topics expanded with more details on the derivation of vari

  16. Lectures in particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Dan

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this book on particle physics is to present the theory in a simple way. The style and organization of the material is unique in that intuition is employed, not formal theory or the Monte Carlo method. This volume attempts to be more physical and less abstract than other texts without degenerating into a presentation of data without interpretation.This book is based on four courses of lectures conducted at Fermilab. It should prove very useful to advanced undergraduates and graduate students.

  17. Lectures in Micro Meteorology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Søren Ejling

    This report contains the notes from my lectures on Micro scale meteorology at the Geophysics Department of the Niels Bohr Institute of Copenhagen University. In the period 1993-2012, I was responsible for this course at the University. At the start of the course, I decided that the text books...... available in meteorology at that time did not include enough of the special flavor of micro meteorology that characterized the work of the meteorology group at Risø (presently of the Institute of wind energy of the Danish Technical University). This work was focused on Boundary layer flows and turbulence...

  18. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    26, 27, 28, 29 and 30 March REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Introduction to General Relativity and Black Holes T. Damour / IHES, Bures-sur-Yvette, F. Conceptual foundations of General Relativity (GR). Uniqueness of GR. Mathematical framework: tensor calculus, Riemannian geometry, connection, 'spin' connection, curvature, Cartan's form calculus. Hilbert-Einstein action, Einstein equations. Weak gravitational fields. Post Newtonian Approximation. Gravitanional Waves. Exact solutions. Killing vectors. Experimental tests. Black Holes: extensions of the Schwarzschild solution; Kerr-Newman holes; no-hair theorems; energtics of black holes; the membrane approach; quantum mechanics of black holes; Bekenstein entropy; Hawking temperature; black holes and string theory.

  19. Lectures on quantum chromodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Smilga, Andrei

    2001-01-01

    Quantum chromodynamics is the fundamental theory of strong interactions. It is a physical theory describing Nature. Lectures on Quantum Chromodynamics concentrates, however, not on the phenomenological aspect of QCD; books with comprehensive coverage of phenomenological issues have been written. What the reader will find in this book is a profound discussion on the theoretical foundations of QCD with emphasis on the nonperturbative formulation of the theory: What is gauge symmetry on the classical and on the quantum level? What is the path integral in field theory? How to define the path integ

  20. Standardised simulation-based emergency and intensive care nursing curriculum to improve nursing students' performance during simulated resuscitation: A quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Yang, Jian; Hu, Fen; Yu, Si-Hong; Yang, Bing-Xiang; Liu, Qian; Zhu, Xiao-Ping

    2018-03-14

    Simulation-based curriculum has been demonstrated as crucial to nursing education in the development of students' critical thinking and complex clinical skills during a resuscitation simulation. Few studies have comprehensively examined the effectiveness of a standardised simulation-based emergency and intensive care nursing curriculum on the performance of students in a resuscitation simulation. To evaluate the impact of a standardised simulation-based emergency and intensive care nursing curriculum on nursing students' response time in a resuscitation simulation. Two-group, non-randomised quasi-experimental design. A simulation centre in a Chinese University School of Nursing. Third-year nursing students (N = 39) in the Emergency and Intensive Care course were divided into a control group (CG, n = 20) and an experimental group (EG, n = 19). The experimental group participated in a standardised high-technology, simulation-based emergency and intensive care nursing curriculum. The standardised simulation-based curriculum for third-year nursing students consists of three modules: disaster response, emergency care, and intensive care, which include clinical priorities (e.g. triage), basic resuscitation skills, airway/breathing management, circulation management and team work with eighteen lecture hours, six skill-practice hours and twelve simulation hours. The control group took part in the traditional curriculum. This course included the same three modules with thirty-four lecture hours and two skill-practice hours (trauma). Perceived benefits included decreased median (interquartile ranges, IQR) seconds to start compressions [CG 32 (25-75) vs. EG 20 (18-38); p  0.05] and defibrillation [CG 222 (194-254) vs. EG 221 (214-248); p > 0.05] at the beginning of the course. A simulation-based emergency and intensive care nursing curriculum was created and well received by third-year nursing students and associated with decreased response time in a

  1. Standardised Curriculum and Hermeneutics: The Case of Australian Vocational Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Steven

    2018-01-01

    Curriculum theorists have acknowledged the relevance of "hermeneutics", or theory of interpretation and understanding, to curriculum studies. In the European "Didaktik" tradition hermeneutics has also been applied to the curriculum work of educators, but such an extension is rarer in the Anglo-American tradition. Educators in…

  2. The 1979 Bernard Gregory lectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisskopf, V.F.

    1980-02-01

    This volume contains the texts of the lectures given by Professor V.F. Weisskopf at CERN and in Paris in the autumn of 1979, as the first Gregory lecturer. The titles of the three different texts are 'Growing up with Field Theory', 'Recent Trends in Particle Physics' and 'L'Art et la Science'. While the latter lecture was given in French, an English text here follows the French one. The volume starts with a short biographical note about Bernard Gregory. (orig.)

  3. Dynamic e-learning modules for student lecture preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy McIntyre

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We have developed and demonstrated the effectiveness of a set of online interactive learning modules to accompany physics courses at first- and second-year university levels. Students access the modules prior to attending lectures to familiarize themselves with content which is then discussed and reaffirmed in class. Student surveys and access data show that students were much more likely to use material presented in this form, rather than a textbook, when preparing for lectures given in an active learning format. The students found that interactive simulations, videos of problem-solving approaches prepared by course staff, and quick-check immediate feedback questions were all useful tools for lecture preparation–none of which are available when using a traditional textbook for lecture preparation.

  4. Vicarious Versus Traditional Learning in Biology: A Case of Sexually ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to compare between learning sexually transmitted infections in Biology by observation and traditional classroom lecture method ... The study found that observational method was more effective and preferred by students as compared to traditional lecture method ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  5. A Comparison of Collaborative and Traditional Instruction in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubera, Chip; Aruguete, Mara S.

    2013-01-01

    Although collaborative instructional techniques have become popular in college courses, it is unclear whether collaborative techniques can replace more traditional instructional methods. We examined the efficacy of collaborative courses (in-class, collaborative activities with no lectures) compared to traditional lecture courses (in-class,…

  6. The Oskar Klein memorial lectures

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    The series of Oskar Klein Memorial Lectures is a must-read for those keenly involved or simply interested in exploring the many fascinating aspects of Physics. This volume presents two landmark lectures given by Hans Bethe in October 1990 and Alan H. Guth in June 1991 under the series of Oskar Klein Memorial Lectures. Hans Bethe's lectures dealt with two themes: the astrophysical importance of neutrinos in supernova outbursts and a theoretical account of neutrinos through observations of the neutrino flux from the centre of the sun. Anyone interested in understanding the processes involved in

  7. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    14, 15 and 16 May REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME 14, 15 May from 10:00 to 12:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 16 May from 11:00 to 12:00 hrs - Council Chamber, bldg 503 Modern Signal Processing: Wavelets vs. Fourier M. Vetterli / EPFL, Lausanne, CH and UC Berkeley Wavelets have established themselves as an important tool in modern signal processing as well as in applied mathematics. This is linked to several facts, among others: New theoretical advances have been achieved, like new forms of 4 time-frequency bases for signal analysis. Efficient computational algorithms are available. Many applications either used similar ideas, like for example the concept of multiresolution, or took advantage of the unified framework provided by wavelets. This combination of elegant theory, efficient algorithms, and successful applications makes the field of wavelets and signal processing quite exciting. It is the purpose of these lectures to establish the theory necessary to understand wavelets and related constructions. A...

  8. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    14, 15 and 16 May REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME 14, 15 May from 10:00 to 12:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 16 May from 11:00 to 12:00 hrs - Council Chamber, bldg 503 Modern Signal Processing: Wavelets vs. Fourier M. Vetterli / EPFL, Lausanne, CH and UC Berkeley Wavelets have established themselves as an important tool in modern signal processing as well as in applied mathematics. This is linked to several facts, among others: i. New theoretical advances have been achieved, like new forms of 4 time-frequency bases for signal analysis. ii. Efficient computational algorithms are available. iii. Many applications either used similar ideas, like for example the concept of multiresolution, or took advantage of the unified framework provided by wavelets. This combination of elegant theory, efficient algorithms, and successful applications makes the field of wavelets and signal processing quite exciting. It is the purpose of these lectures to establish the theory necessary to understand wavelets and related construct...

  9. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 29 July 09:15 - 10:00 R. RATTAZZI Beyond the Standard Model (3/3) 10:15 - 11:00 P. WELLS Experimental test of the SM - LEP (3/3) 11:15 - 12:00 P. WELLS Discussion Session 14:00 - 16:00 R. ASSMANN The CLIC Concept for a Future Particle Collider at the Energy Frontier Tuesday 30 July 09:15 - 10:00 F. ANTINORI Heavy Ions (1/2) 10:15 - 12:00 F. DYDAK Neutrino Physics (1&2/4) Wednesday 31 July  09:15 - 10:00 F. ANTINORI Heavy Ions (2/2) 10:15 - 11:00 F. DYDAK Neutrino Physics (3/4) 11:15 - 12:00 F. DYDAK / F. ANTINORI Discussion Session Thursday 1 August 09:15 - 10:00 T. NAKADA CP Violation (1/4) 10:15 - 11:00 F. DYDAK Neutrino Physics (4/4) 11:15 - 12:00 F. BEDESCHI Experimental test of the SM Tevatron (1/2) Friday 2 August 09:15 - 10:00 T. NAKADA CP Violation (2/4) 10:15 ? 11:00 F. BEDESCHI Experimental test of the SM Tevatron (2/2) 11:15 ? 12:00 F. BEDESCHI / T. NAKADA Di...

  10. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 5 August 09:15-10:00 F. GIANOTTI LHC Physics (1/3) 10:15-12:00 T. NAKADA CP Violation (3&4/4) Tuesday 6 August 09:15-10:00 F. GIANOTTI LHC Physics (2/3) 10:15-11:00 R. JACOBSEN From Raw Data to Physics Results (1/3) 11:15-12:00 R. JACOBSEN / T. NAKADA Discussion Session Wednesday 7 August 09:15-10:00 F. GIANOTTI LHC Physics (3/3) 10:15-11:00 R. JACOBSEN From Raw Data to Physics Results (2/3) 11:15-12:00 J. LESGOURDES Cosmology (1/4) 14:00-16:00 C. BENVENUTI Basic Science, Society, and Technological Innovation (Council Chamber, bldg. 503) Thursday 8 August 09:15-10:00 J. LESGOURDES Cosmology (2/4) 10:15-11:00 R. JACOBSEN From Raw Data to Physics Results (3/3) 11:15-12:00 J. CARR / J. LESGOURDES Discussion Session Friday 9 August 09:15-11:00 J. LESGOURDES Cosmology (3&4/4) 11:15-12:00 C. JARLSKOG Historic Lecture 14:00-16:00 Course Review Monday 12 August 09:15-12:00 Students Sessi...

  11. Lectures on Lie groups

    CERN Document Server

    Hsiang, Wu-Yi

    2017-01-01

    This volume consists of nine lectures on selected topics of Lie group theory. We provide the readers a concise introduction as well as a comprehensive 'tour of revisiting' the remarkable achievements of S Lie, W Killing, É Cartan and H Weyl on structural and classification theory of semi-simple Lie groups, Lie algebras and their representations; and also the wonderful duet of Cartans' theory on Lie groups and symmetric spaces.With the benefit of retrospective hindsight, mainly inspired by the outstanding contribution of H Weyl in the special case of compact connected Lie groups, we develop the above theory via a route quite different from the original methods engaged by most other books.We begin our revisiting with the compact theory which is much simpler than that of the general semi-simple Lie theory; mainly due to the well fittings between the Frobenius-Schur character theory and the maximal tori theorem of É Cartan together with Weyl's reduction (cf. Lectures 1-4). It is a wonderful reality of the Lie t...

  12. Lectures on Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Basdevant, Jean-Louis

    2007-01-01

    Beautifully illustrated and engagingly written, Lectures on Quantum Mechanics presents theoretical physics with a breathtaking array of examples and anecdotes. Basdevant's style is clear and stimulating, in the manner of a brisk classroom lecture that students can follow with ease and enjoyment. Here is a sample of the book's style, from the opening of Chapter 1: "If one were to ask a passer-by to quote a great formula of physics, chances are that the answer would be 'E = mc2'. Nevertheless, the formula 'E=hV' which was written in the same year 1905 by the same Albert Einstein, and which started quantum theory, concerns their daily life considerably more. In fact, of the three watershed years for physics toward the beginning of the 20th century - 1905: the Special Relativity of Einstein, Lorentz and Poincaré; 1915: the General Relativity of Einstein, with its extraordinary reflections on gravitation, space and time; and 1925: the full development of Quantum Mechanics - it is surely the last which has the mos...

  13. Lecture Meets Laboratory - Experimental Experiences for Large Audiences: Concept and Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Temmen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Lecture courses are an integral part of academia with a long tradition. The efficiency of such courses can be notably increased by active participation of students in the learning process. This article will elaborate on a re-structuring of an engineering lecture attended by more than 400 students; during the course, laboratory experiments are integrated directly into the lecture, allowing students to gain their own practical experience.

  14. Forum: The Lecture and Student Learning. The Lecture's Absent Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciullo, Nick J.

    2017-01-01

    According to the "Oxford English Dictionary" ("OED"), the noun "lecture" dates from the 14th century and means the "action of reading, perusal. Also, that which is read or perused." This definition, while accurate and resonates today in many college classrooms, ignores a key feature of any lecture. The…

  15. The Evidence Base for Developing a Veterinary Business Management Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Jackson

    2016-06-01

    programmes have been.Conclusion:  Veterinarians have identified a need for greater inclusion of business skills in the veterinary curriculum, however successfully integrating business skills into the curriculum will mean that students learn business principles in non-traditional, non-lecture-style environments with materials inter-twining with clinical teaching. This will mean a significant shift from traditional classroom based delivery of business lectures to an integrated approach. This can only be achieved if business and clinical teaching staff work together in delivering business education to the next generation of veterinarians. That said, the evidence regarding the importance of business within the veterinary medical curriculum, coupled with increasing competition in the market for first-opinion veterinary services, means that changes in the approach to teaching business may be easier to achieve than ever before.Application: The results of this research are applicable to practicing veterinarians in both academic and private practice. It is clear that business management needs to be integrated throughout the veterinary curriculum and thus ‘owned’ by academics with both clinical and non-clinical roles. Veterinarians in private practice also have a critical role to play as these people are the gatekeepers to the real-world experience that placement students encounter. 

  16. Lecture classes in human anatomy: the students' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Maitreyee; Roy, Hironmoy; Ghosh, Anasuya; Tapadar, Arunabha; Chowdhury, Subhramoy; Mukherjee, Pranab; Jana, Tapan Kumar

    2013-06-01

    The human anatomy, or in brief, the body structure has fascinated man for ages. Due to the information explosion and the increase in specializations, this knowledge is available in a very sketchy manner in high school biology courses. The first comprehensive course on the human anatomy is taught to the first year medical students in medical colleges. This is in keeping with the regulations of the Medical Council of India. The anatomy lecture classes occupy a considerable time of the course, to provide the students with an effective knowledge of the gross anatomy, histology, embryology and the clinical anatomy. On the other hand, the students' feedback regarding the lecture methods and the teaching environment is crucial in judging the efficacy of the present curriculum. To obtain the students' feedback about the environment of the lecture classes, as regards the venue, the teaching and learning aids which are used, the lecture class schedule of the university (the number of classes per week, the durations of the lecture classes, etc.) and the existing departmental practices (display of the class routine in advance, synchronization between the lecture and the practical classes), so that their suggestions could help the faculty in planning the most effective teaching procedures. A semi structured questionnaire was supplied to the students to get their feedback. Most of the students found the air conditioned seminar room's environment to be more comfortable and they supported the existing durations of the lecture hours with the combined use of chalk and a board and overhead projectors (OHPs). The perceptions of the learners helped in modifying the departmental practice in the desired way.

  17. Evaluating learning among undergraduate medical students in schools with traditional and problem-based curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub

    2013-09-01

    This study aimed to assess knowledge and skills in a respiratory physiology course in traditional versus problem-based learning (PBL) groups in two different medical schools. Two different undergraduate medical schools were selected for this study. The first medical school followed the traditional [lecture-based learning (LBL)] curriculum, and the second medical school followed the PBL curriculum. Sixty first-year male medical students (30 students from each medical school) volunteered; they were apparently healthy and of the same age, sex, nationality, and regional and cultural background. Students were taught respiratory physiology according to their curriculum for a period of 2 wk. At the completion of the study period, knowledge was measured based on a single best multiple-choice question examination, and skill was measured based on the objective structured practical examination in the lung function laboratory (respiratory physiology). A Student's t-test was applied for the analysis of the data, and the level of significance was set at P schools.

  18. Primary exploration of the application of case based learning method in clinical probation teaching of the integrated curriculum of hematology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-zhen XU; Ye-fei WANG; Yan WANG; Shu CHENG; Yi-qun HU; Lei DING

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the application and the effect of the case based learning(CBL)method in clinical probation teaching of the integrated curriculum of hematology among eight-year-program medical students.Methods The CBL method was applied to the experimental group,and the traditional approach for the control group.After the lecture,a questionnaire survey was conducted to evaluate the teaching effect in the two groups.Results The CBL method efficiently increased the students’interest in learning and autonomous learning ability,enhanced their ability to solve clinical problems with basic theoretic knowledge and cultivated their clinical thinking ability.Conclusion The CBL method can improve the quality of clinical probation teaching of the integrated curriculum of hematology among eight-year-program medical students.

  19. Optimising Lecture Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst-Christensen, Bo

    interest in getting a degree, they prefer the educators to do the work for them. The focus of my experiments have therefore been to develop teaching techniques that ensures that the students study efficiently and at the same time moves the task of identifying which parts of the subjects that are giving...... the students problems from the educator to the students. By using techniques that put more weight on student participation, cooperation and preparation, I have been able to cut significantly down on the time used for lecturing, allowing more time for student work and reflection. As an example by getting...... the students to identify the parts of the subjects that need further explanation, I get the students to take ownership of the learning task and at the same time give me a more direct feedback. By creating teaching materials and exercises that can be used in a number of different ways, it is possible to involve...

  20. Lectures on algebraic statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Drton, Mathias; Sullivant, Seth

    2009-01-01

    How does an algebraic geometer studying secant varieties further the understanding of hypothesis tests in statistics? Why would a statistician working on factor analysis raise open problems about determinantal varieties? Connections of this type are at the heart of the new field of "algebraic statistics". In this field, mathematicians and statisticians come together to solve statistical inference problems using concepts from algebraic geometry as well as related computational and combinatorial techniques. The goal of these lectures is to introduce newcomers from the different camps to algebraic statistics. The introduction will be centered around the following three observations: many important statistical models correspond to algebraic or semi-algebraic sets of parameters; the geometry of these parameter spaces determines the behaviour of widely used statistical inference procedures; computational algebraic geometry can be used to study parameter spaces and other features of statistical models.

  1. Göttingen Lectures

    CERN Document Server

    Woyczyński, Wojbor A

    1998-01-01

    These lecture notes are woven around the subject of Burgers' turbulence/KPZ model of interface growth, a study of the nonlinear parabolic equation with random initial data. The analysis is conducted mostly in the space-time domain, with less attention paid to the frequency-domain picture. However, the bibliography contains a more complete information about other directions in the field which over the last decade enjoyed a vigorous expansion. The notes are addressed to a diverse audience, including mathematicians, statisticians, physicists, fluid dynamicists and engineers, and contain both rigorous and heuristic arguments. Because of the multidisciplinary audience, the notes also include a concise exposition of some classical topics in probability theory, such as Brownian motion, Wiener polynomial chaos, etc.

  2. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    21, 22, 23 November LECTURES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 11:00 hrs - Council Chamber bldg. 503 on 21 November Auditorium, bldg 500 on 22, 23 November Introduction to symmetry breaking phenomena in physics E. Brezin / ENS, Paris, F. The notion of broken symmetries started slowly to emerge in the 19th century. The early studies of Pasteur on the parity asymmetry of life, the studies of Curie on piezoelectricity and on the symmetries of effects versus the symmetry of causes (which clearly excluded spontaneous symmetry breaking), are important historical landmarks. However the possibility of spontaneous symmetry breaking within the usual principles of statistical mechanics, waited for the work of Peierls and Onsager. The whole theory of phase transitions and critical phenomena, as well as the construction of field theoretic models as long distance limit of yet unknown physics, relies nowadays on the concept of criticality associated to spontaneous symmetry breaking. The phenomena of Goldstone bosons, of Meissn...

  3. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 October LECTURES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 10:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Introduction to Field Theory R. Kleiss / University of Nijmegen, NL Starting from the notion of path integrals as developed by Feynman, we discuss field theory in zero spacetime dimensions. The concepts of perturbation expansions, connected amplitudes, Feynman diagrams, classical solutions, renormalization and the effective action are developed. The model is extended to four spacetime dimensions, and the full Feynman rules for relativisitc scalar theory derived. The S matrix and the concept of unitarity are discussed, leading to the amputation rules for S matrix elements from considerations of unitarity. The rules are extended to include particles with spin-1/2 and spin-1. The high-energy behaviour of the theory is discussed as a method to derive the gauge symmetry of the various models.

  4. Lectures on LHC physics

    CERN Document Server

    Plehn, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    With the discovery of the Higgs boson, the LHC experiments have closed the most important gap in our understanding of fundamental interactions, confirming that such interactions between elementary particles can be described by quantum field theory, more specifically by a renormalizable gauge theory. This theory is a priori valid for arbitrarily high energy scales and does not require an ultraviolet completion. Yet, when trying to apply the concrete knowledge of quantum field theory to actual LHC physics - in particular to the Higgs sector and certain regimes of QCD - one inevitably encounters an intricate maze of phenomenological know-how, common lore and other, often historically developed intuitions about what works and what doesn’t. These lectures cover three aspects to help understand LHC results in the Higgs sector and in searches for physics beyond the Standard Model: they discuss the many facets of Higgs physics, which is at the core of this significantly expanded second edition; then QCD, to the deg...

  5. Lectures on integral transforms

    CERN Document Server

    Akhiezer, N I

    1988-01-01

    This book, which grew out of lectures given over the course of several years at Kharkov University for students in the Faculty of Mechanics and Mathematics, is devoted to classical integral transforms, principally the Fourier transform, and their applications. The author develops the general theory of the Fourier transform for the space L^1(E_n) of integrable functions of n variables. His proof of the inversion theorem is based on the general Bochner theorem on integral transforms, a theorem having other applications within the subject area of the book. The author also covers Fourier-Plancherel theory in L^2(E_n). In addition to the general theory of integral transforms, connections are established with other areas of mathematical analysis--such as the theory of harmonic and analytic functions, the theory of orthogonal polynomials, and the moment problem--as well as to mathematical physics.

  6. Artsimovich memorial lecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellat, R.

    2003-01-01

    After half a century of work, mastering on earth thermonuclear fusion to produce energy is becoming a realistic challenge: despite its scientific and technological complexity, considerable progress has been obtained without encountering insurmountable roadblocks. Such progress is due for a great part to all the pioneers, as Academician Lev Andreevich Artsimovich, who, with their talents and a visionary mind, internationally promoted the civil use of thermonuclear fusion, a source which could help to face the long term energy demand. To honour their faith and their investment in this challenge which would solve humankind energy needs on a millenary scale, I will try in this Artsimovich Memorial Lecture to: situate the fusion contribution in the future energy mix contemplated today ; survey the state of the art of fusion physics and technology fields, giving some examples; underline the next priority, to study a burning plasma, launching the construction of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) as soon as possible

  7. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    11, 12, 13, 14 and 15 June REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 What have we learned from LEP J. Ellis / CERN-TH The basic formalism of the Standard Model will be reviewed, and the limited state of our knowledge before the start-up of LEP will be recalled. Neutrino counting at LEP will be compared with astrophysical and cosmological constraints. The interpretation of precision electroweak data will be discussed, including their predictions for the top quark and the Higgs boson, and the hints they offer for the future direction beyond the Standard Model: probably a weakly-interacting theory that may be extrapolated up to a grand unification scale. Topics in QCD and heavy-flavour physics will be discussed briefly, and topics in W physics at greater length. Direct LEP searches for the Higgs boson and supersymmetric particles will be discussed, and the prospects for their discoveries at future accelerators will be previewed.

  8. Lectures on quantum information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruss, D.; Leuchs, G.

    2007-01-01

    Quantum Information Processing is a young and rapidly growing field of research at the intersection of physics, mathematics, and computer science. Its ultimate goal is to harness quantum physics to conceive - and ultimately build - 'quantum' computers that would dramatically overtake the capabilities of today's 'classical' computers. One example of the power of a quantum computer is its ability to efficiently find the prime factors of a large integer, thus shaking the supposedly secure foundations of standard encryption schemes. This comprehensive textbook on the rapidly advancing field introduces readers to the fundamental concepts of information theory and quantum entanglement, taking into account the current state of research and development. It thus covers all current concepts in quantum computing, both theoretical and experimental, before moving on to the latest implementations of quantum computing and communication protocols. With its series of exercises, this is ideal reading for students and lecturers in physics and informatics, as well as experimental and theoretical physicists, and physicists in industry. (orig.)

  9. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    19, 20, 21, 22 and 23 February REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - 19, 20 and 21 February Main Auditorium bldg. 500, 22 and 23 February Council Chamber, bldg 503 Introduction to Cryogenic Engineering J.G. Weisend / SLAC, Stanford, USA Cryogenic engineering is an important speciality at CERN. With the construction of LHC, this technology will have an even greater impact on machine operations. The goal of the course is to give people not working in cryogenics an appreciation of the basic principals and problems associated with the field. The course will also provide a foundation for future learning in cryogenics. Topics to be covered will include: properties of cryogenic fluids and materials, refrigeration, cryostat design, instrumentation, safety and propertiesof He II. Examples of working cryogenic systems, many of them from high energy physics, will be presented.

  10. Co-ordinated Classroom Lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Darell Boyd

    From a series of lectures, a selection of eight are oriented principally toward the biologically developing child, and the physiological operations in visual process. The numbered lectures are--(1) The Coordinated Classroom, its Philosophy and Principles, (2) An Outline of a Biological Point of View, (3) The Evolution of Structure--despite man's…

  11. Three lectures on Newton's laws

    OpenAIRE

    Kokarev, Sergey S.

    2009-01-01

    Three small lectures are devoted to three Newton's laws, lying in the foundation of classical mechanics. These laws are analyzed from the viewpoint of our contemporary knowledge about space, time and physical interactions. The lectures were delivered for students of YarGU in RSEC "Logos".

  12. A Systematic Replication Comparing Interteaching and Lecture in the Community College Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felderman, Theresa A.

    2016-01-01

    Researchers demonstrated the effectiveness of interteaching relative to lecture in 4-year university classrooms, but exploration in other settings is deficient. This systematic replication examines the extent to which interteaching leads to increased exam scores compared to traditional lecture in the community college classroom. Participants in…

  13. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Lecture Capture: Lessons Learned from an Undergraduate Political Research Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James C.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the results of a 4-year quasi-experimental study of the effectiveness of lecture capture in an undergraduate political research class. Students self-enrolled in either a traditional in-class lecture-discussion section or a fully online section of a required political research course. The class sessions from the in-class…

  14. Evaluating the Benefits of Providing Archived Online Lectures to In-Class Math Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascaval, Radu C.; Fogler, Kethera A.; Abrams, Gene D.; Durham, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    The present study examines the impact of a novel online video lecture archiving system on in-class students enrolled in traditional math courses at a mid-sized, primarily undergraduate, university in the West. The archiving system allows in-class students web access to complete video recordings of the actual classroom lectures, and sometimes of…

  15. Using Clickers to Facilitate Interactive Engagement Activities in a Lecture Room for Improved Performance by Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlhoaele, Malefyane; Hofman, Adriaan; Naidoo, Ari; Winnips, Koos

    2014-01-01

    What impact can interactive engagement (IE) activities using clickers have on students' motivation and academic performance during lectures as compared to attending traditional types of lectures? This article positions the research on IE within the comprehensive model of educational effectiveness and Gagné's instructional events model. For the…

  16. The impact of online video lecture recordings and automated feedback on student performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieling, M. B.; Hofman, W. H. A.

    To what extent a blended learning configuration of face-to-face lectures, online on-demand video recordings of the face-to-face lectures and the offering of online quizzes with appropriate feedback has an additional positive impact on the performance of these students compared to the traditional

  17. Ethics instruction in the dental hygiene curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacerik, Mark G; Prajer, Renee G; Conrad, Cynthia

    2006-01-01

    Dental hygiene ethics is an essential component of the dental hygiene curriculum. The accreditation standards for dental hygiene education state that graduates must be competent in applying ethical concepts to the provision and/or support of oral health care services. Although the standards for entry into the profession of dental hygiene emphasize the importance of ethical reasoning, there is little published research specific to ethics instruction in dental hygiene programs. The purpose of this study was to assess how ethics is taught in the dental hygiene curriculum. A 17-item survey was designed and distributed to 261 accredited dental hygiene programs in the United States for a response rate of 56% (N=147). The survey requested that participants provide information on teaching and evaluation methodologies, didactic and clinical hours of instruction, individuals responsible for providing instruction, and the degree of emphasis placed on ethics and integration of ethical reasoning within the dental hygiene curriculum. Results of the survey reflect that dental hygiene programs devote a mean of 20. hours to teaching dental hygiene ethics in the didactic component of the curriculum. With regard to the clinical component of the curriculum, 63% of respondents indicated that 10 or less hours are devoted to ethics instruction. These results show an increase in didactic hours of instruction from previous studies where the mean hours of instruction ranged from 7 to 11.7 hours. Results showed 64% of respondents offered a separate course in ethics; however, 82% of programs surveyed indicated that ethics was incorporated into one or more dental hygiene courses with 98% utilizing dental hygiene faculty to provide instruction. Most programs utilized a variety of instructional methods to teach ethics with the majority employing class discussion and lecture (99% and 97% respectively). The type of institution-technical college, community college, four-year university with a

  18. Video-based lectures: An emerging paradigm for teaching human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Video-based teaching material is a rich and powerful medium being used in computer assisted learning. This paper aimed to assess the learning outcomes and student nurses' acceptance and satisfaction with the video-based lectures versus the traditional method of teaching human anatomy and physiology courses.

  19. (Role) Playing Politics in an Environmental Chemistry Lecture Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smythe, Meredith A.; Higgins, Daniel A.

    2007-01-01

    Participation of environmental chemistry students in mock congressional hearings is described, as a means of helping them better develop their speaking and debating skills. The activity brings active learning principles into the classroom and greatly increases student participation in an otherwise traditional lecture course.

  20. International Curriculums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Larry L.

    This workshop presentation on international curriculums in the field of parks, recreation, leisure, cultural services, and travel/tourism comments that the literature is replete with articles addressing what the field is about, but not about curriculum issues, models, and structure. It reports an international survey of 12 college educators…

  1. Complementary and alternative medicine in the undergraduate medical curriculum: a survey of Korean medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Yeun; Park, Wan Beom; Kang, Hee Cheol; Kim, Mi Jung; Park, Kyu-Hyun; Min, Byung-Il; Suh, Duk-Joon; Lee, Hye Won; Jung, Seung Pil; Chun, Mison; Lee, Soon Nam

    2012-09-01

    The current status of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) education in Korean medical schools is still largely unknown, despite a growing need for a CAM component in medical education. The prevalence, scope, and diversity of CAM courses in Korean medical school education were evaluated. Participants included academic or curriculum deans and faculty at each of the 41 Korean medical schools. A mail survey was conducted from 2007 to 2010. Replies were received from all 41 schools. CAM was officially taught at 35 schools (85.4%), and 32 schools (91.4%) provided academic credit for CAM courses. The most common courses were introduction to CAM or integrative medicine (88.6%), traditional Korean medicine (57.1%), homeopathy and naturopathy (31.4%), and acupuncture (28.6%). Educational formats included lectures by professors and lectures and/or demonstrations by practitioners. The value order of core competencies was attitude (40/41), knowledge (32/41), and skill (6/41). Reasons for not initiating a CAM curriculum were a non-evidence-based approach in assessing the efficacy of CAM, insufficiently reliable reference resources, and insufficient time to educate students in CAM. This survey reveals heterogeneity in the content, format, and requirements among CAM courses at Korean medical schools. Korean medical school students should be instructed in CAM with a more consistent educational approach to help patients who participate in or demand CAM.

  2. Curriculum content in geriatric dentistry in USA dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Ronald L; Goettsche, Zachary S; Qian, Fang

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to re-examine the teaching of geriatric dentistry in the USA dental schools, to identify curriculum content and compare the findings to previous reports. All dental schools in the United States were contacted via email with a questionnaire to assess the teaching of geriatric dentistry. Non-responding schools were sent a minimum of three reminder emails to complete the survey. A statistical analysis was performed. Descriptive statistics were conducted to profile the variables of interest. Bivariate analysis was performed to explore if any of the variables were related using Fisher's exact test, non-parametric Wilcoxon rank-sum test and the Kruskal-Wallis test. Fifty-six of the 67 dental schools completed the questionnaire. Geriatric dentistry was taught in all dental schools; for 92.8%, the course was compulsory. We found that 62.5% were teaching it as an independent course, 25% as an organised series of lectures and 8.9% as occasional lectures in parts of other courses. Clinically, 84.2% have some form of compulsory education in geriatric dentistry. Public schools were marginally associated with an increased interest in expanding the geriatric dentistry curriculum (P = .078). No differences were found between these variables and school location. Geriatric dentistry is now required in 92.8% of dental schools. The teaching of traditional topics has not changed much; however, the number of gerontological topics has increased. Clinical teaching needs to be expanded, as in only 57.1% of schools was it a requirement. The ageing imperative will require research to determine the impact of teaching on services to the geriatric community. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Web-based lecture technologies and learning and teaching: a study of change in four Australian universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gosper

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The uptake of web-based lecture technologies for recording and delivering live lectures has increased markedly in recent years. Students have responded positively, and for many their use has transformed learning – freeing them up from rigid timetables by providing choice in lecture attendance and supporting learning by extending the lecture experience and enabling them to revisit key concepts and ideas in their own time. Less transformational has been the impact on teaching. Although changing attendance patterns and disquiet about the quality of learning are of concern to many, lecturers have largely responded by simply modifying lectures. For most, the challenges of catering for the learning needs of a cohort with variable lecture attendance have not been addressed at a whole of the curriculum level. The technologies have been added on, rather than integrated into the curriculum. This paper will review the changes taking place in learning and teaching, explore the reluctance to embrace more wholesale change to the curriculum, and discuss the implications for institutions in the face of ongoing change.

  4. PDF Lecture Materials for Online and ``Flipped'' Format Astronomy Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kary, D. M.; Eisberg, J.

    2013-04-01

    Online astronomy courses typically rely on students reading the textbook and/or a set of text-based lecture notes to replace the “lecture” material. However, many of our students report that this is much less engaging than in-person lectures, especially given the amount of interactive work such as “think-pair-share” problems done in many astronomy classes. Students have similarly criticized direct lecture-capture. To address this, we have developed a set of PowerPoint-style presentations with embedded lecture audio combined with prompts for student interaction including think-pair-share questions. These are formatted PDF packages that can be used on a range of different computers using free software. The presentations are first developed using Microsoft PowerPoint software. Audio recordings of scripted lectures are then synchronized with the presentations and the entire package is converted to PDF using Adobe Presenter. This approach combines the ease of editing that PowerPoint provides along with the platform-independence of PDF. It's easy to add, remove, or edit individual slides as needed, and PowerPoint supports internal links so that think-pair-share questions can be inserted with links to feedback based on the answers selected. Modern PDF files support animated visuals with synchronized audio and they can be read using widely available free software. Using these files students in an online course can get many of the benefits of seeing and hearing the course material presented in an in-person lecture format. Students needing extra help in traditional lecture classes can use these presentations to help review the materials covered in lecture. Finally, the presentations can be used in a “flipped” format in which students work through the presentations outside of class time while spending the “lecture” time on in-class interaction.

  5. Effects of constructivist teaching strategies and traditional lecture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 9, No 1 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  6. TH-E-201-01: Diagnostic Radiology Residents Physics Curriculum and Updates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensakovic, W.

    2016-01-01

    The ABR Core Examination stresses integrating physics into real-world clinical practice and, accordingly, has shifted its focus from passive recall of facts to active application of physics principles. Physics education of radiology residents poses a challenge. The traditional method of didactic lectures alone is insufficient, yet it is difficult to incorporate physics teaching consistently into clinical rotations due to time constraints. Faced with this challenge, diagnostic medical physicists who teach radiology residents, have been thinking about how to adapt their teaching to the new paradigm, what to teach and meet expectation of the radiology resident and the radiology residency program. The proposed lecture attempts to discuss above questions. Newly developed diagnostic radiology residents physics curriculum by the AAPM Imaging Physics Curricula Subcommittee will be reviewed. Initial experience on hands-on physics teaching will be discussed. Radiology resident who will have taken the BAR Core Examination will share the expectation of physics teaching from a resident perspective. The lecture will help develop robust educational approaches to prepare radiology residents for safer and more effective lifelong practice. Learning Objectives: Learn updated physics requirements for radiology residents Pursue effective approaches to teach physics to radiology residents Learn expectation of physics teaching from resident perspective J. Zhang, This topic is partially supported by RSNA Education Scholar Grant

  7. TH-E-201-01: Diagnostic Radiology Residents Physics Curriculum and Updates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sensakovic, W. [Florida Hospital (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The ABR Core Examination stresses integrating physics into real-world clinical practice and, accordingly, has shifted its focus from passive recall of facts to active application of physics principles. Physics education of radiology residents poses a challenge. The traditional method of didactic lectures alone is insufficient, yet it is difficult to incorporate physics teaching consistently into clinical rotations due to time constraints. Faced with this challenge, diagnostic medical physicists who teach radiology residents, have been thinking about how to adapt their teaching to the new paradigm, what to teach and meet expectation of the radiology resident and the radiology residency program. The proposed lecture attempts to discuss above questions. Newly developed diagnostic radiology residents physics curriculum by the AAPM Imaging Physics Curricula Subcommittee will be reviewed. Initial experience on hands-on physics teaching will be discussed. Radiology resident who will have taken the BAR Core Examination will share the expectation of physics teaching from a resident perspective. The lecture will help develop robust educational approaches to prepare radiology residents for safer and more effective lifelong practice. Learning Objectives: Learn updated physics requirements for radiology residents Pursue effective approaches to teach physics to radiology residents Learn expectation of physics teaching from resident perspective J. Zhang, This topic is partially supported by RSNA Education Scholar Grant.

  8. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 22 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (6/8) 10:15 - 11:00 J. CARR  Astroparticles (1/3) 11:15 - 12:00 J. SHIERS Computing (1/3) Tuesday 23 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (7/8) 10:15 - 11:00 J. CARR  Astroparticles (2/3) 11:15 - 12:00 J. SHIERS Computing (2/3) Wednesday 24July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (8/8) 10:15 - 11:00 J. CARR  Astroparticles (3/3) 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session 14:00 - 16:00 O. GROBNER UHV Technology Thursday 25 July (Theory Auditorium) 09:15 - 10:00 R. RATTAZZI Beyond the Standard Model (1/3) (TH) 10:15 - 11:00 P. WELLS Experimental test of the SM - LEP (1/3) (TH) 11:15 - 12:00 J. SHIERS Computing (3/3) (TH) Friday 26 July 09:15 - 10:00 R. RATTAZZI Beyond the Standard Model (2/3) 10:15 - 11:00 P. WELLS Experimental test of the SM - LEP (2/3) 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session Monday 29 July 09:15 - 10:00  R...

  9. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    14, 15, 16, 17, 18 January LECTURES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 11:00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg 500 Superconducting materials suitable for magnets D.C. Larbalestier / Univ. of Wisconsin, USA The range of materials available for superconducting magnets is steadily expanding, even as the choice of material becomes potentially more complex. When virtually all magnets were cooled by helium at ~2-5 K it was easy to separate the domain of Nb-Ti from those of Nb3Sn applications and very little surprise that more than 90% of all magnets are still made from Nb-Ti. But the development of useful conductors of the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O and YBa2Cu3Ox high temperature superconductors, coupled to the recent discovery of the 39 K superconductor MgB2 and the developing availability of cryocoolers suggests that new classes of higher temperature, medium field magnets based on other than Nb-based conductors could become available in the next 5-10 years. My talks will discuss the essential physics and materials science of these 5 classes...

  10. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2002-01-01

    14, 15, 16, 17, 18 January LECTURE SERIES From 11:00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg 500 Superconducting materials suitable for magnets D.C. Larbalestier / Univ. of Wisconsin, USA The range of materials available for superconducting magnets is steadily expanding, even as the choice of material becomes potentially more complex. When virtually all magnets were cooled by helium at ~2-5 K it was easy to separate the domain of Nb-Ti from those of Nb3Sn applications and very little surprise that more than 90% of all magnets are still made from Nb-Ti. But the development of useful conductors of the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O and YBa2Cu3Ox high temperature superconductors, coupled to the recent discovery of the 39 K superconductor MgB2 and the developing availability of cryocoolers suggests that new classes of higher temperature, medium field magnets based on other than Nb-based conductors could become available in the next 5-10 years. My talks will discuss the essential physics and materials science of these 5 classes of material - Nb-Ti...

  11. John Adams Lecture

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    13 December 2010 14:30 - Council Chamber, Bldg.503-1-001 Accelerator Breakthroughs, Achievements and Lessons from the Tevatron Collider V. Shiltsev / Fermilab’s Accelerator Physics Centre This year we celebrate the 25th anniversary of the first proton-antiproton collisions in the Tevatron. For two and a half decades the Tevatron at Fermilab (Batavia, IL, USA) was a centerpiece of the US and world’s High Energy Physics as the world’s highest energy particle collider at 1.8 TeV center of mass energy. While funding agencies are deciding on a 3-year extension of the Collider Run II operation through 2014, we – in this 2010 John Adams Lecture - will take a look in exciting story of the Tevatron: the story of long preparations, great expectations, numerous difficulties, years of “blood and sweat”, continuous upgrades, exceeding original goals (by a factor of 400) and high emotions. An accelerator scientist prospective will be given on a wide spectrum o...

  12. Power plants 2010. Lectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The proceedings include the following lectures: Facing the challenges - new structures for electricity production. Renewable energies in Europe - chances and challenges. Nuclear outlook in the UK. Sustainable energy for Europe. Requirements of the market and the grid operator at the electricity production companies. Perspectives for the future energy production. Pumped storage plants - status and perspectives. Nuclear power/renewable energies -partners or opponents? New fossil fired power stations in Europe - status and perspectives. Nuclear energy: outlook for new build and lifetime extension in Europe. Biomass in the future European energy market - experiences for dong energy. Meeting the EU 20:20 renewable energy targets: the offshore challenges. DESERTEC: sustainable electricity for Europe, Middle East and North Africa. New power plants in Europe - a challenge for project and quality management. Consideration of safely in new build activities of power plants. Challenges to an integrated development in Maasvlakte, Netherlands. Power enhancement in EnBW power plants. Operational experiences of CCS pilot plants worldwide. Two years of operational experiences with Vattenfall's oxyfuel pilot plant. Pre-conditions for CCS. Storage technologies for a volatile generation. Overview: new generation of gas turbines.

  13. Lectures on general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Papapetrou, Achille

    1974-01-01

    This book is an elaboration of lecture notes for the graduate course on General Rela­ tivity given by the author at Boston University in the spring semester of 1972. It is an introduction to the subject only, as the time available for the course was limited. The author of an introduction to General Relativity is faced from the beginning with the difficult task of choosing which material to include. A general criterion as­ sisting in this choice is provided by the didactic character of the book: Those chapters have to be included in priority, which will be most useful to the reader in enabling him to understand the methods used in General Relativity, the results obtained so far and possibly the problems still to be solved. This criterion is not sufficient to ensure a unique choice. General Relativity has developed to such a degree, that it is impossible to include in an introductory textbook of a reasonable length even a very condensed treatment of all important problems which have been discussed unt...

  14. Lectures on quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Quantum mechanics represents the central revolution of modern natural science and reaches in its importance farely beyond physics. Neither chemistry nor biology on the molecular scale would be understandable without it. Modern information technology from the laptop over the mobile telephone and the flat screen until the supercomputer would be unthinkable without quantum-mechanical effects. It desribes the world on the atomic and subatomic scale and is by this the starting point of our modern worldview. The Nobel-prize carrier Steven Weinberg has done ever among others by his theory of the unification of the weak and the electromagnetic interaction one of the most important contributions to this revolution. In this book he reproduces his personal view of quantum mechanics, which captivates by its strictly logic construction, precise linguistic representation, and mathematical clearness and completeness. This book appeals to studyings of natural sciences, especially of physics. Accompanied is the test by exercise problems, which allow the studying to apply immediately the knowledge, but also test their understanding. Because of its precision and clearness ''Lectures on Quantum Mechanics'' by Weinberg is also essentially suited for the self-study.

  15. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    27, 28, 29 June and 2, 3 July REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Council Chamber bldg. 503 on 27, 28, 29 June and Auditorium, bldg 500 on 2, 3 July Particle Identification at the LHC P. Eerola / Lund University, SE The LHC experiments will explore new frontiers of particle physics. To maximize the physics potential of LHC, we need identification of leptons, hadrons, photons and 'invisible' particles. This is realized through reconstruction of electrons and muons, charged particle tracking and identification, b- and tau-tagging, and jet reconstruction. In addition, missing energy has to be measured in order to look for signatures of invisible particles. The experimental conditions posed by the collider, which will be operating at higher energy and luminosity than the present ones, are demanding. A large dynamical range is required in order to measure energies and momenta ranging from below one GeV to several TeVs. The detectors should be able to cope with the 40 MHz collision rate, with a large number ...

  16. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Monday 30 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 G. Guidice / CERN T. Nakada / CERN P. Wells / CERN Beyond the Standard Model (1/3) Violation of Particle Anti-particle Symmetry (3/3) LEP Physics (3/4) Tuesday 31 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 G. Guidice / CERN F. Dydak / CERN P. Wells / CERN P. Lebrun / CERN P. Lebrun / CERN Beyond the Standard Model (2/3) Neutrino Physics (1/4) LEP Physics (4/4) Superconducting Technology for particle accelerators (1/2) Superconducting Technology for particle accelerators (2/2) Wednesday 1 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 G. Guidice / CERN F. Dydak / CERN G. Guidice; P. Wells G. Guidice in main auditorium, P. Wells in TH auditorium) O. Grobner / CERN O. Grobner / CERN Beyond the Standard Model (3/3) Neutrino Physics (2/4) Discussion Session Ultra High Vacuum Technology (1/2) Ultra High Vacuum Technology (2/2) Thursday 2 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 F. Antinori / CERN F. Dydak / CERN J. Aysto / CERN Heavy Ions (1/2) Neutrino Physics (3/4) Isolde Physics O...

  17. The effect of podcast lectures on nursing students' knowledge retention and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Karen S

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study sought to evaluate the effectiveness of academic podcasts in promoting knowledge retention and application in nursing students. Nursing education no longer simply occurs in a fixed location or time. Computer-enhanced mobile learning technologies, such as academic podcasts, must be grounded in pedagogically sound characteristics to ensure effective implementation and learning in nursing education. A convenience sample of 35 female undergraduate nursing students was randomized into three groups: a traditional face-to-face lecture group, an unsegmented (non-stop) podcast lecture group, and a segmented podcast lecture group. Retention and application of information were measured through a multiple-choice quiz and a case study based on lecture content. Students in the segmented podcast lecture group demonstrated higher scores on multiple-choice and case-study assessments than those in the other two groups. Nurse educators should be aware of this finding when seeking to employ podcast lectures in nursing education.

  18. Curriculum theory in physical education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, Ann E.

    1989-03-01

    Primary current concerns of curriculum theorists in sport and physical education relate to clarification of value orientations underlying curricular decision-making, selection and statement of curriculum goals, identification and organization of programme content, and the process of curriculum change. Disciplinary mastery is the most traditional value orientation and that which is most frequently found in practice. Curriculum theorists have identified four other value orientations for study: social reconstruction, self-actualization, learning process, and ecological validity. Health-related fitness and the development of motor skills have long been the primary goals of physical education. In recent years, however, curriculum specialists have begun to assign higher priorities to goals of personal integration and challenge, of social development and multicultural understanding. There is general agreement that human movement activities constitute the subject-matter of the sport and physical education curriculum. Differences exist, however, as to how learning activities should be selected for particular programmes. The current trend in seeking better understanding of content is toward studying the operational curriculum with particular attention to the historical and social contexts. An important contemporary focus is the need to translate short-term results into lifestyle changes. The curriculum in sports and physical education should be viewed as a multitude of possibilities.

  19. Trends in National Emergency Medicine Conference Didactic Lectures Over a 6-Year Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Michael; Riddell, Jeff; Njie, Abdoulie

    2017-01-01

    National conference didactic lectures have traditionally featured hour-long lecture-based presentations. However, there is evidence that longer lectures can lead to both decreased attention and retention of information. The authors sought to identify trends in lecture duration, lecture types, and number of speakers at four national emergency medicine (EM) conferences over a 6-year period. The authors performed a retrospective analysis of the length, number of speakers, and format of didactic lectures at four different national EM conferences over 6 years. The authors abstracted data from the national academic assemblies for the four largest not-for-profit EM organizations in the United States: American Academy of Emergency Medicine, American College of Emergency Physicians, Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors, and Society for Academic Emergency Medicine. There was a significant yearly decrease in the mean lecture lengths for three of the four conferences. There was an increase in the percentage of rapid fire sessions over the preceding 2 years with a corresponding decrease in the percentage of general educational sessions. There was no significant difference in the mean number of speakers per lecture. An analysis of 4210 didactic lecture sessions from the annual meetings of four national EM organizations over a 6-year period showed significant decreases in mean lecture length. These findings can help to guide EM continuing medical education conference planning and research.

  20. Integrated Curriculum and Subject-based Curriculum: Achievement and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casady, Victoria

    The research conducted for this mixed-method study, qualitative and quantitative, analyzed the results of an academic year-long study to determine whether the use of an integrated fourth grade curriculum would benefit student achievement in the areas of English language arts, social studies, and science more than a subject-based traditional curriculum. The research was conducted based on the international, national, and state test scores, which show a slowing or lack of growth. Through pre- and post-assessments, student questionnaires, and administrative interviews, the researcher analyzed the phenomenological experiences of the students to determine if the integrated curriculum was a beneficial restructuring of the curriculum. The research questions for this study focused on the achievement and attitudes of the students in the study and whether the curriculum they were taught impacted their achievement and attitudes over the course of one school year. The curricula for the study were organized to cover the current standards, where the integrated curriculum focused on connections between subject areas to help students make connections to what they are learning and the world beyond the classroom. The findings of this study indicated that utilizing the integrated curriculum could increase achievement as well as students' attitudes toward specific content areas. The ANOVA analysis for English language arts was not determined to be significant; although, greater growth in the students from the integrated curriculum setting was recorded. The ANOVA for social studies (0.05) and the paired t-tests (0.001) for science both determined significant positive differences. The qualitative analysis led to the discovery that the experiences of the students from the integrated curriculum setting were more positive. The evaluation of the data from this study led the researcher to determine that the integrated curriculum was a worthwhile endeavor to increase achievement and attitudes

  1. Active Learning versus Traditional Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Azzalis

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In traditional teaching most of the class time is spent with the professor lecturing and the students watching and listening. The students work individually, and cooperation is discouraged. On the other hand,  active learning  changes the focus of activity from the teacher to the learners, in which students solve problems, answer questions, formulate questions of their own, discuss, explain, debate during class;  moreover, students work in teams on problems and projects under conditions that assure positive interdependence and individual accountability. Although student-centered methods have repeatedly been shown to be superior to the traditional teacher-centered approach to instruction, the literature regarding the efficacy of various teaching methods is inconclusive. The purpose of this study was to compare the student perceptions of course and instructor effectiveness, course difficulty, and amount learned between the active learning and lecture sections  in Health Sciences´ courses by statistical data from Anhembi Morumbi University. Results indicated significant  difference between active  learning and traditional  teaching. Our conclusions were that strategies promoting  active  learning to  traditional lectures could increase knowledge and understanding.

  2. Power plants 2009. Lectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Within the Annual Conference 2009 of the VGB PowerTech e.V. (Essen, Federal Republic of Germany) from 23rd to 25th May, 2009, in Lyon (France) the following lectures were held: (1) Electricity demand, consequences of the financial and economic crisis - Current overview 2020 for the EU-27 (Hans ten Berge); (2) Status and perspectives of the electricity generation mix in France (Bernard Dupraz); (3) European electricity grid - status and perspective (Dominique Maillard); (4) Technologies and acceptance in the European energy market (Gordon MacKerran); (5) EPR construction in Finland, China, France, (Claude Jaouen); (6) EPR Flamanville 3: A project on the path towards nuclear revival (Jacques Alary); (7) Worldwide nuclear Revival and acceptance (Luc Geraets); (8) An overview on the status of final disposal of radioactive wastes worldwide (Piet Zuidema); (9) Who needs pumped storage plants? PSP are partner to grid stability and renewable energies (Hans-Christoph Funke); (10) Sustainable use of water resources to generate electricity safely and efficiently (Patrick Tourasse); (11) The growth strategy of RWE Innogy - Role of RES in RWE strategy (Fritz Vahrenholt); (12) Solar technologies towards grid parity - key factors and timeframe (G. Gigliucci); (13) Overview on CCS technologies and results of Vattenfalls oxyfuel pilot plant (Philippe Paelinck); (14) Development perspectives of lignite-based IGCC-plants with CCS (Dietmar Keller); (15) Post combustion capture plants - concept and plant integration (Wolfgang Schreier); (16) CCS fossil power generation in a carbon constraint world (Daniel Hofmann); (17) CEZ group strategy in Central and South Eastern Europe (Jan Zizka); (18) Strategy and projects of DONG Energy (Jens Erik Pedersen); (19) E.ON coal-based power generation of the future - The highly efficient power plant and downstream separation of carbon dioxide (Gerhard Seibel); (20) Final sage of first supercritical 460 MW e l. CFB Boiler construction - firs

  3. Mineralogy: a modern approach to teaching a traditional discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, G. W.

    2011-12-01

    Mineralogy has traditionally been a primary component in undergraduate geoscience curriculum. In recent years, there has been a trend in which mineralogy and petrology have been combined into Earth Materials courses. This is unfortunate as these disciplines each have much to offer students, and content once considered essential is eliminated out of necessity. Mineralogy is still fundamental to students' understanding of the Earth and Earth processes. Using a modern approach to time-honored concepts, I teach a quarter-long Introductory Mineralogy class offered through the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego. Student evaluations of this course unequivocally indicate a high degree of learning and interest in the material, confirming that mineralogy continues to be a valuable class into the 21st century. While much of the content remains similar to what has been taught over the last century, my strategy involves a well-balanced approach to old and new. The first third of the course is background including the relevance of mineralogy, crystal chemistry, and crystallography; the second third of the course is systematic mineralogy using the Dana system; the last third of the course is devoted to understanding optical mineralogy, using modern analytical equipment such as XRD and SEM, and learning to use the petrographic microscope. Throughout the quarter, a strong emphasis is placed on the importance of hand-sample identification. Field work, traditionally not emphasized in mineralogy courses, has been re-introduced to the curriculum. I use modern technology to facilitate and support student learning. A lecture-based approach is employed with carefully crafted and organized PowerPoint presentations. PowerPoint lectures can be effective and highly engaging. The key is to ensure that the lectures are not overly reliant on text, instead relying on diagrams, charts, photos, and embedded media such as 3-D animations (ex. to teach

  4. A Discourse of Transformative Islam within Curriculum Transformation at State Institute for Islamic Studies of Purwokerto (IAIN Purwokerto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabarudin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This research is aimed to trace the thoughts and actions as efforts to achieve vision and mission of state institute for Islamic studies of Purwokerto (IAIN. The study is directed to answer following questions. Firstly, why transformative Islam becomes a discourse on curriculum development. Secondly, how a discourse of transformative Islam implicates in curriculum development at state institute for Islamic studies of Purwokerto (IAIN. Then, the findings show that a discourse of Islam tranformative in curriculum development at state institute for Islamic studies of Purwokerto (IAIN emerges as a result of an incapability of traditional and modern Islam perspective to resolve people’s problem due to lack of critical understanding of the meaning and message of the Qur’an and Hadith. Then, implication of Islamic transformative discourse in curriculum development at state institute for Islamic studies of Purwokerto can be seen in its intra curricular activities, co-curricular, and extra curricular activities. Through intra-curricular activities, transformative Islam is embodied in Islamic building lectures. In co-curricular program, Islam is indigenized through activity of knowledge and practice of worship (nationally abbreviated PPI, while within extra-curricular activities transformative Islamic values come into student activities which are strongly supported by policies of university leaders.

  5. Novel Emergency Medicine Curriculum Utilizing Self-Directed Learning and the Flipped Classroom Method: Obstetric and Gynecologic Emergencies Small Group Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jillian McGrath

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This curriculum, created and implemented at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, was primarily designed to educate our emergency medicine (EM residents (PGY1-3 and emergency medicine/internal medicine (EM/IM residents (PGY1-5 on core obstetrics and gynecology topics in EM. Additional audience members include medical students and faculty physicians. Introduction: In 2013, there were over 1 million emergency department visits in the United States which resulted in primary obstetric or gynecologic diagnoses.1 EM Residents must be proficient in the differential diagnosis and management of the wide variety of obstetric and gynecologic emergencies. To do this, we developed a flipped classroom curricular model, which consists of self-directed learning activities completed by learners, followed by small group discussions pertaining to the topic reviewed. The active learning fostered by this type of curriculum increases faculty and learner engagement and interaction time typically absent in traditional lecture-based formats.2-4 Studies have revealed that the application of knowledge through case studies, personal interaction with content experts, and integrated questions are effective learning strategies for EM residents.4-6 The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center EM residency didactic curriculum recently transitioned to a “flipped classroom” approach.7-10 Our didactic curriculum is delivered over the course of 18 months; however, it could easily be adapted to other academic calendar cycles. The flipped classroom curriculum maximizes didactic time and resident engagement, fosters intellectual curiosity and active learning, and meets the needs of today’s learners. 3,6,11 Objectives: We aim to teach the presentation and management of obstetric and gynecologic emergencies through the creation of a flipped classroom design. This unique, innovative curriculum utilizes resources chosen by education faculty and resident

  6. Efficacy of Role Play in Concert with Lecture to Enhance Student Learning of Immunology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha L. Elliott

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite numerous reports that active learning increases student understanding, many barriers still exist that prevent faculty from shedding the traditional passive lecture and adopting active learning strategies in the classroom. This study looks at the use of role play as an active learning technique to convey new material, or as reinforcement to traditional lecture. A pre- and post-test survey was utilized to determine student learning gains, along with an anonymous survey to determine student attitudes about role play. Student learning gains are similar regardless of class size, role-playing participation or learning style, and reflect an increase in lower order cognition. Attitudes and learning gains indicate role play is preferable as a reinforcement technique, although the order does not matter if both lecture and role play are utilized to convey information. These data provide insight into the best practices of role-playing implementation in concert with traditional lecture format.

  7. Construção de portfólios coletivos em currículos tradicionais: uma proposta inovadora de ensino-aprendizagem The construction of collective portfolios in traditional curriculums: an innovative approach in teaching-learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosângela Minardi Mitre Cotta

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Tradicionalmente, a educação em saúde se baseia em metodologias de transmissão de conhecimentos. Porém, agora se exige a formação de profissionais com perfil crítico-reflexivo e capazes de trabalhar em equipes. O que requer novas metodologias de ensino-aprendizagem, tendo na problematização um instrumento de transformação. É relatada experiência utilizando a construção de portfólios coletivos na aprendizagem, como mudança de atitudes e na avaliação de alunos de graduação, em contexto de estrutura curricular tradicional e por disciplinas. Estudo exploratório descritivo, com abordagem quali-quantitativa, fundamentado na análise de portfólios coletivos (n= 9, construídos pelos acadêmicos da disciplina Políticas de Saúde, complementado com a aplicação de um questionário aberto aos alunos (n=58 e com a realização de grupos focais (n=3. Os portfólios coletivos mobilizaram o pensamento crítico-reflexivo sobre a política do Sistema Único de Saúde, ampliando a concepção sobre o processo saúde-doença e as práticas relacionadas aos serviços de saúde, valorizando o trabalho em equipe e a busca ativa na construção do conhecimento, destacando-se os exercícios da alteridade, resiliência e empoderamento.Education to promote health has traditionally been based on knowledge transmission methodologies. However, the current scenario calls for the training of professionals with a critical-reflective profile, who are able to work in teams. We present the report of an innovative experience using the construction of collective portfolios as instruments of learning, changing attitudes and training of undergraduates, in a traditional subject-based curriculum structure context. It is a descriptive exploratory study, with a qualitative-quantitative approach, based on analysis of collective portfolios (n=9, built by Health Policy students, together with an open questionnaire to students who attended the course (n=58 and also

  8. The Effects of Instructional Design on Student Engagement with Video Lectures at Cyber Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Costley

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: The number of students enrolled in online courses that use video lectures is on the rise. However, research shows that the number of students watching video lectures is low, and the number watching videos to completion is even lower. Background: This paper seeks to understand this problem by looking for correlations between instructional design and student engagement with video lectures. Methodology: Students at a cyber-university in South Korea (n=1801 were surveyed on their perception of the instructional design used in the courses they took and their engagement with online video lectures. Contribution: This paper contributes to the body of knowledge by demonstrating positive correlations between instructional design, watching, and finishing video lectures. Findings: While most other research has found low levels of online lecture viewership, this paper found significantly higher numbers watching and finishing videos. Other major findings of the paper are that five key elements of instructional design for online learning environments (designing methods, setting the curriculum, establishing time parameters, establishing netiquette, and utilizing the medium effectively all correlated positively with students watching and finishing video lectures. Recommendations for Practitioners\t: Based on findings in this paper, it is recommended that practitioners consider taking actions when designing their instruction for online courses. These include batching their video lectures together by topic, devoting greater resources to helping students utilize the medium, and communicate time parameters in a way that encourages students to view video lectures in a timely manner. Recommendation for Researchers: As the watching of video lectures in this study was mandatory for learners, an interesting area of further research would be to examine whether that decision led to higher numbers of students watching them. Future Research: It is important for

  9. Preparing medical students for obstetrics and gynecology milestone level one: a description of a pilot curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Morgan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The implementation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME Milestones in the field of obstetrics and gynecology has arrived with Milestones Level One defined as the level expected of an incoming first-year resident. Purpose: We designed, implemented, and evaluated a 4-week elective for fourth-year medical school students, which utilized a multimodal approach to teaching and assessing the Milestones Level One competencies. Methods: The 78-hour curriculum utilized traditional didactic lectures, flipped classroom active learning sessions, a simulated paging curriculum, simulation training, embalmed cadaver anatomical dissections, and fresh-frozen cadaver operative procedures. We performed an assessment of student knowledge and surgical skills before and after completion of the course. Students also received feedback on their assessment and management of eight simulated paging scenarios. Students completed course content satisfaction surveys at the completion of each of the 4 weeks. Results: Students demonstrated improvement in knowledge and surgical skills at the completion of the course. Paging confidence trended toward improvement at the completion of the course. Student satisfaction was high for all of the course content, and the active learning components of the curriculum (flipped classroom, simulation, and anatomy sessions had higher scores than the traditional didactics in all six categories of our student satisfaction survey. Conclusions: This pilot study demonstrates a practical approach for preparing fourth-year medical students for the expectations of Milestones Level One in obstetrics and gynecology. This curriculum can serve as a framework as medical schools and specific specialties work to meet the first steps of the ACGME's Next Accreditation System.

  10. The development and implementation of an online applied biochemistry bridge course for a dental hygiene curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Overman, Pamela R; Crain, Geralyn

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a curricular change project designed to improve instruction in biochemistry. After years of unsatisfactory outcomes from a dental hygiene biochemistry course, a decision was made to change the traditional lecture-based course to an online format. Using online technology and principles of educational pedagogy, a course was developed that fosters application of biomaterials principles to dental hygiene practice and provides a bridge between prerequisite chemistry coursework and biochemistry in a health professions program. Members of the dental hygiene graduating Classes of 2007 and 2008 participated in the revised course. The outcome measures used to assess the effectiveness of the revised course were student end-of-semester course evaluations, graduating senior survey results, student course performance, and National Board examination performance. While the results are based on only two classes, the positive outcomes suggest that the revision was a worthwhile endeavor. The use of technology in teaching holds the potential for solving many of the curriculum and instruction issues currently under discussion: overcrowding of the curriculum, lack of active learning methods, and basic sciences taught in isolation from the rest of the curriculum. It is hoped that the results of this change will be helpful to other faculty members seeking curricular change and innovation.

  11. Predicting undergraduates' academic achievement : the role of the curriculum, time investment and self-regulated learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torenbeek, Marjolein; Jansen, Ellen; Suhre, Cor

    2013-01-01

    The time students invest in their studies and their resulting achievement is partly dependent on curriculum characteristics. Degree programmes differ greatly with respect to how the curriculum is organized, for example in the type (e.g. lectures, practicals) and the number of classes. The focus of

  12. Eight lectures on theoretical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Planck, Max

    1997-01-01

    In 1909 the great German physicist and Nobel Prize winner Max Planck (1858-1947) delivered a series of eight lectures at Columbia University giving a fascinating overview of the new state of physics, which he had played a crucial role in bringing about. The first, third, fifth, and sixth lectures present his account of the revolutionary developments occasioned when he first applied the quantum hypothesis to blackbody radiation. The reader is given an invaluable opportunity to witness Planck's thought processes both on the level of philosophical principles as well as their application to physi

  13. Lectures on strings and dualities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vafa, C.

    1997-01-01

    In this set of lectures I review recent developments in string theory emphasizing their non-perturbative aspects and their recently discovered duality symmetries. The goal of the lectures is to make the recent exciting developments in string theory accessible to those with no previous background in string theory who wish to join the research effort in this area. Topics covered include a brief review of string theory, its compactifications, solitons and D-branes, black hole entropy and wed of string dualities. (author)

  14. Computing for Decentralized Systems (lecture 2)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    With the rise of Bitcoin, Ethereum, and other cryptocurrencies it is becoming apparent the paradigm shift towards decentralized computing. Computer engineers will need to understand this shift when developing systems in the coming years. Transferring value over the Internet is just one of the first working use cases of decentralized systems, but it is expected they will be used for a number of different services such as general purpose computing, data storage, or even new forms of governance. Decentralized systems, however, pose a series of challenges that cannot be addressed with traditional approaches in computing. Not having a central authority implies truth must be agreed upon rather than simply trusted and, so, consensus protocols, cryptographic data structures like the blockchain, and incentive models like mining rewards become critical for the correct behavior of decentralized system. This series of lectures will be a fast track to introduce these fundamental concepts through working examples and pra...

  15. Computing for Decentralized Systems (lecture 1)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    With the rise of Bitcoin, Ethereum, and other cryptocurrencies it is becoming apparent the paradigm shift towards decentralized computing. Computer engineers will need to understand this shift when developing systems in the coming years. Transferring value over the Internet is just one of the first working use cases of decentralized systems, but it is expected they will be used for a number of different services such as general purpose computing, data storage, or even new forms of governance. Decentralized systems, however, pose a series of challenges that cannot be addressed with traditional approaches in computing. Not having a central authority implies truth must be agreed upon rather than simply trusted and, so, consensus protocols, cryptographic data structures like the blockchain, and incentive models like mining rewards become critical for the correct behavior of decentralized system. This series of lectures will be a fast track to introduce these fundamental concepts through working examples and pra...

  16. Secret Codes: The Hidden Curriculum of Semantic Web Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Richard; Carmichael, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    There is a long tradition in education of examination of the hidden curriculum, those elements which are implicit or tacit to the formal goals of education. This article draws upon that tradition to open up for investigation the hidden curriculum and assumptions about students and knowledge that are embedded in the coding undertaken to facilitate…

  17. Lecture notes on ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goedbloed, J.P.

    1983-03-01

    Notes, prepared for a course of lectures held at the Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Brazil (June-August 1978). An extensive theoretical treatment of the behaviour of hot plasmas caught in equations and mathematical models is presented in 12 chapters

  18. The 1978 Macmillan Education Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Shirley

    1978-01-01

    This is the text of the lecture of the British Secretary of State for Education and Science given at the 1978 Meeting of the Association for Science Education (ASE). Three themes are presented; (1) British innovative science curricula; (2) relationship between science and technology; and (3) science for non-scientist. (HM)

  19. Introduction lecture to magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conard, J.

    1980-01-01

    This lecture deals with all that is common either to electron paramagnetic resonance (E.P.R.) or to nuclear magnetic resonance (N.M.R.). It will present, in an as elementary form as possible, the main concepts used in magnetic resonance emphasizing some aspects, specific for interface science. (orig./BHO)

  20. Lecture I. Introduction to charm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Lectures are given on some manifestations of charm and some characteristics of the charmed particle. Various points of view in a cultural orientation, leptons, reasons for a belief in quarks, gauge theories of weak and electromagnetic and strong interactions, and lastly the viewpoint that there is not a systhesis at hand, but instead chaos are treated. 6 references

  1. Koshiba, Tanaka give Nobel lectures

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Masatoshi Kosiba and Koichi Tanaka presented lectures in English on Sunday, touching on topics ranging from particle physics, to teamwork to commemorate their reception of this year's Nobel Prize for Physics and Chemistry. The two will receive their respective prizes in an awards ceremony scheduled for Tuesday (1 page).

  2. Lectures on algebraic model theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hart, Bradd

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, model theory has had remarkable success in solving important problems as well as in shedding new light on our understanding of them. The three lectures collected here present recent developments in three such areas: Anand Pillay on differential fields, Patrick Speissegger on o-minimality and Matthias Clasen and Matthew Valeriote on tame congruence theory.

  3. The Oskar Klein memorial lectures

    CERN Document Server

    Bergström, Lars

    1991-01-01

    This is an invaluable collection of colloquium-type lectures given by some of the most prominent theoretical physicists of today. In a form accessible to the interested general physicist, it covers topics ranging from the use of field-theoretical methods in different contexts via duality symmetries between various field theories, to the Ads/CFT correspondence and cosmology.

  4. Lectures on cosmic topological defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vachaspati, T [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Colaba, Mumbai (India) and Physics Department, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland (United States)

    2001-11-15

    These lectures review certain topological defects and aspects of their cosmology. Unconventional material includes brief descriptions of electroweak defects, the structure of domain walls in non-Abelian theories, and the spectrum of magnetic monopoles in SU(5) Grand Unified theory. (author)

  5. Bayesian Data Analysis (lecture 2)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    framework but we will also go into more detail and discuss for example the role of the prior. The second part of the lecture will cover further examples and applications that heavily rely on the bayesian approach, as well as some computational tools needed to perform a bayesian analysis.

  6. Bayesian Data Analysis (lecture 1)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    framework but we will also go into more detail and discuss for example the role of the prior. The second part of the lecture will cover further examples and applications that heavily rely on the bayesian approach, as well as some computational tools needed to perform a bayesian analysis.

  7. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  8. Policy and Curriculum Development in Greece. the Case of Secondary School Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifanti, Amalia A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the politics and values of the secondary school curriculum in Greece and attempts to find out the influences of cultural tradition and centralized control on curriculum development. In particular, it studies the decision-making process and the politics of educational control, employing some theoretical elements from centralist…

  9. Public Lecture: The Odyssey of Voyager

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Should you wish to attend to this lecture only (and not the full colloquium), please register here: https://indico.cern.ch/event/387001/registration/ Participants to the full colloquium are automatically registered to the public lectures.

  10. Lectures on the inverse scattering method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharov, V.E.

    1983-06-01

    In a series of six lectures an elementary introduction to the theory of inverse scattering is given. The first four lectures contain a detailed theory of solitons in the framework of the KdV equation, together with the inverse scattering theory of the one-dimensional Schroedinger equation. In the fifth lecture the dressing method is described, while the sixth lecture gives a brief review of the equations soluble by the inverse scattering method. (author)

  11. Asynchronous vs didactic education: it’s too early to throw in the towel on tradition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Asynchronous, computer based instruction is cost effective, allows self-directed pacing and review, and addresses preferences of millennial learners. Current research suggests there is no significant difference in learning compared to traditional classroom instruction. Data are limited for novice learners in emergency medicine. The objective of this study was to compare asynchronous, computer-based instruction with traditional didactics for senior medical students during a week-long intensive course in acute care. We hypothesized both modalities would be equivalent. Methods This was a prospective observational quasi-experimental study of 4th year medical students who were novice learners with minimal prior exposure to curricular elements. We assessed baseline knowledge with an objective pre-test. The curriculum was delivered in either traditional lecture format (shock, acute abdomen, dyspnea, field trauma) or via asynchronous, computer-based modules (chest pain, EKG interpretation, pain management, trauma). An interactive review covering all topics was followed by a post-test. Knowledge retention was measured after 10 weeks. Pre and post-test items were written by a panel of medical educators and validated with a reference group of learners. Mean scores were analyzed using dependent t-test and attitudes were assessed by a 5-point Likert scale. Results 44 of 48 students completed the protocol. Students initially acquired more knowledge from didactic education as demonstrated by mean gain scores (didactic: 28.39% ± 18.06; asynchronous 9.93% ± 23.22). Mean difference between didactic and asynchronous = 18.45% with 95% CI [10.40 to 26.50]; p = 0.0001. Retention testing demonstrated similar knowledge attrition: mean gain scores −14.94% (didactic); -17.61% (asynchronous), which was not significantly different: 2.68% ± 20.85, 95% CI [−3.66 to 9.02], p = 0.399. The attitudinal survey revealed that 60.4% of students believed the asynchronous

  12. Asynchronous vs didactic education: it's too early to throw in the towel on tradition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jaime; Jalali, Azadeh; Clarke, Samuel; Dyne, Pamela; Spector, Tahlia; Coates, Wendy

    2013-08-08

    Asynchronous, computer based instruction is cost effective, allows self-directed pacing and review, and addresses preferences of millennial learners. Current research suggests there is no significant difference in learning compared to traditional classroom instruction. Data are limited for novice learners in emergency medicine. The objective of this study was to compare asynchronous, computer-based instruction with traditional didactics for senior medical students during a week-long intensive course in acute care. We hypothesized both modalities would be equivalent. This was a prospective observational quasi-experimental study of 4th year medical students who were novice learners with minimal prior exposure to curricular elements. We assessed baseline knowledge with an objective pre-test. The curriculum was delivered in either traditional lecture format (shock, acute abdomen, dyspnea, field trauma) or via asynchronous, computer-based modules (chest pain, EKG interpretation, pain management, trauma). An interactive review covering all topics was followed by a post-test. Knowledge retention was measured after 10 weeks. Pre and post-test items were written by a panel of medical educators and validated with a reference group of learners. Mean scores were analyzed using dependent t-test and attitudes were assessed by a 5-point Likert scale. 44 of 48 students completed the protocol. Students initially acquired more knowledge from didactic education as demonstrated by mean gain scores (didactic: 28.39% ± 18.06; asynchronous 9.93% ± 23.22). Mean difference between didactic and asynchronous = 18.45% with 95% CI [10.40 to 26.50]; p = 0.0001. Retention testing demonstrated similar knowledge attrition: mean gain scores -14.94% (didactic); -17.61% (asynchronous), which was not significantly different: 2.68% ± 20.85, 95% CI [-3.66 to 9.02], p = 0.399. The attitudinal survey revealed that 60.4% of students believed the asynchronous modules were educational and 95

  13. Brief, cooperative peer-instruction sessions during lectures enhance student recall and comprehension*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Niu; Henderson, Charles N.R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the academic impact of cooperative peer instruction during lecture pauses in an immunology/endocrinology course. Methods: Third-quarter students participated across iterations of the course. Each class offered 20 lectures of 50 minutes each. Classes were divided into a peer-instruction group incorporating cooperative peer instruction and a control group receiving traditional lectures. Peer-instruction group lectures were divided into 2–3 short presentations followed by a multiple-choice question (MCQ). Students recorded an initial answer and then had 1 minute to discuss answers with group peers. Following this, students could submit a revised answer. The control group received the same lecture material, but without MCQs or peer discussions. Final-exam scores were compared across study groups. A mixed-design analysis of covariance was used to analyze the data. Results: There was a statistically significant main effect for the peer-instruction activity (F(1, 93) = 6.573, p = .012, r = .257), with recall scores higher for MCQs asked after peer-instruction activities than for those asked before peer instruction. Final-exam scores at the end of term were greater in the peer-instruction group than the control group (F(1, 193) = 9.264, p = .003, r = .214; question type, F(1, 193) = 26.671, p = .000, r = .348). Conclusion: Lectures with peer-instruction pauses increase student recall and comprehension compared with traditional lectures. PMID:26967766

  14. Use of questioning during lectures in a dental hygiene didactic course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessheimer, Heather M; Rogo, Ellen J; Howlett, Bernadette

    2011-08-01

    The purposes of this quasi-experimental, one-group crossover study were to determine the effect of questioning during dental hygiene lectures on low-level and high-level learning and to evaluate student perceptions of questioning. Twenty-three dental hygiene students participated in two control lectures using traditional lecturing methods. The students served as their own controls by next participating in two experimental lectures with questions asked throughout the lecture at both low and high cognitive levels. Student performance was measured with an examination containing low- and high-level questions. The interaction between the group and the level of questions was analyzed using ANOVA, and no statistically significant difference was found. Based on a Likert scale (1 to 6), average ratings for student perceptions were as follows: enjoyment of use, 4.5; understanding the lecture material, 4.74; and questioning effectiveness, 4.35. Student perceptions of questioning were positive; however, this strategy was found to be no more effective than the traditional lecture in promoting retention of information.

  15. Metallurgy department publications and lectures 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder Pedersen, A.; Bilde-Soerensen, J.B.

    1988-04-01

    A presentation (including abstract) of scientific and technical publications and lectures by the staff of the Metallurgy Department during 1987 is given. The list comprises journal papers, conference papers, reports, lectures and poster presentations in the following categories: Publications, Lectures and Poster Presentations. (author)

  16. Video-based lectures: An emerging paradigm for teaching human anatomy and physiology to student nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Rabab El-Sayed Hassan El-Sayed; Samar El-Hoseiny Abd El-Raouf El-Sayed

    2013-01-01

    Video-based teaching material is a rich and powerful medium being used in computer assisted learning. This paper aimed to assess the learning outcomes and student nurses’ acceptance and satisfaction with the video-based lectures versus the traditional method of teaching human anatomy and physiology courses. Data were collected from 27 students in a Bachelor of Nursing program and experimental control was achieved using an alternating-treatments design. Overall, students experienced 10 lecture...

  17. Practice in a dispersed professional community : a case study of associate lecturers at the Open University

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Graham; Saunders, Murray

    2006-01-01

    This thesis examines in depth the work of four associate lecturers at the Open University. Given that they see colleagues infrequently, it explores how they resource their practice, in what has been termed a dispersed community that lacks the social interaction associated with more traditional lecturing. This research identifies what knowledge resources and professional practices are used, and what the relationships are between these and the process of occupational identity-building. It also ...

  18. Should Undergraduate Lectures be Compulsory? The Views of Dental and Medical Students from a UK University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Daud

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Formal lectures have been a traditional part of medical and dental education, but there is debate as to their compulsory status. This study was designed to explore dental and medical students’ views on compulsory lectures and the use of Video-Recorded Lectures (VRL. A cross-sectional study of University of Bristol students in Years 2 to 4 was conducted using an online questionnaire. The majority of both dental (76% and medical (66% students felt lectures should be non-compulsory. The most common learning resources used by both dental and medical students were live lectures, lecture handouts and VRL. The majority of both dental (84% and medical (88% students used VRL. Most students attended lectures all of the time both before and after the introduction of VRL, even though most dental and medical students believe lectures should be non-compulsory. VRL is a popular learning resource. These findings tie-in with General Dental Council and General Medical Council recommendations that encourage self-directed learning. Dental and Medical schools should offer a range of learning resources and make use of current technology, including the use of VRL.

  19. Lectures on Black Hole Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczek, Frank

    physics. (The macroscopic properties of large black holes, in particular those of astrophysical interest, are presumably well described by the familiar Einstein-Maxwell action which governs the massless fields. Heavy fields will at most provide Yukawa tails to the field surrounding the hole.) I will show how perturbations may be set up and analyzed completely, and why doing this is crucial for understanding the semiclassical physics of the hole including the Hawking radiation quantitatively. It will emerge that there is a class of dilaton black holes which behave as rather straightforward elementary particles. In the other two lectures I discussed the issue of hair on black holes, in particular the existence of hair associated with discrete gauge charges and its physical consequences. This hair is particularly interesting to analyze because it is invisible classically and to all order in ℏ. Its existence shows that black holes can have some "internal" quantum numbers in addition to their traditional classification by mass, charge, and angular momentum. The text that follows, follows the original papers closely.

  20. Comprehensive Health Care Economics Curriculum and Training in Radiology Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiper, Mark; Donovan, Timothy; DeVries, Matthew

    2018-06-01

    To investigate the ability to successfully develop and institute a comprehensive health care economics skills curriculum in radiology residency training utilizing didactic lectures, case scenario exercises, and residency miniretreats. A comprehensive health care economics skills curriculum was developed to significantly expand upon the basic ACGME radiology residency milestone System-Based Practice, SBP2: Health Care Economics requirements and include additional education in business and contract negotiation, radiology sales and marketing, and governmental and private payers' influence in the practice of radiology. A health care economics curriculum for radiology residents incorporating three phases of education was developed and implemented. Phase 1 of the curriculum constituted basic education through didactic lectures covering System-Based Practice, SBP2: Health Care Economics requirements. Phase 2 constituted further, more advanced didactic lectures on radiology sales and marketing techniques as well as government and private insurers' role in the business of radiology. Phase 3 applied knowledge attained from the initial two phases to real-life case scenario exercises and radiology department business miniretreats with the remainder of the radiology department. A health care economics skills curriculum in radiology residency is attainable and essential in the education of future radiology residents in the ever-changing climate of health care economics. Institution of more comprehensive programs will likely maximize the long-term success of radiology as a specialty by identifying and educating future leaders in the field of radiology. Copyright © 2018 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of Internet versus lecture instructional methods for teaching nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, M A; Kimmick, J V

    2000-01-01

    Although many higher education programs are using the Internet to teach classes, there are few published reports on the effectiveness of this method on test scores or student satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to compare test and student satisfaction scores of graduate nursing students who take a nursing research course via the Internet with those of students who take the same course via traditional lecture instruction. In addition, student technical support use and Internet student lecture attendance also were examined. A total of 97 students (Internet, 44; lectures, 53) participated. There were no significant differences in test scores and overall course student satisfaction (P > .05). However, the Internet students reported significantly higher (P = .04) stimulation of learning compared with the traditional lecture students. Technical support use by the Internet students was high initially and was related to software problems. Of interest were the large proportion of Internet students (73 percent) who attended at least 3 of the 10 lectures. Use of the Internet to teach graduate-level nursing research can provide comparable learning and student satisfaction to traditional lecture instructional methods.

  2. Video-based lectures: An emerging paradigm for teaching human anatomy and physiology to student nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabab El-Sayed Hassan El-Sayed

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Video-based teaching material is a rich and powerful medium being used in computer assisted learning. This paper aimed to assess the learning outcomes and student nurses’ acceptance and satisfaction with the video-based lectures versus the traditional method of teaching human anatomy and physiology courses. Data were collected from 27 students in a Bachelor of Nursing program and experimental control was achieved using an alternating-treatments design. Overall, students experienced 10 lectures, which delivered by the teacher as either video-based or PowerPoint-based lectures. Results revealed that video-based lectures offer more successes and reduce failures in the immediate and follow-up measures as compared with the traditional method of teaching human anatomy and physiology that was based on printout illustrations, but these differences were not statistically significant. Moreover, nurse students appeared positive about their learning experiences, as they rated highly all the items assessing their acceptance and satisfaction with the video-based lectures. KEYWORDS: Video-based lecture, Traditional, Print-based illustration

  3. Enhancing learning: A comparison of lecture and gaming outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, Mary; Bear, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Contrary to what we anticipated, our outcomes indicated that learning and satisfaction with learning were no different between the traditional lecture group and the educational gaming group. Learners in the gaming group scored on the examination just as well as, but no higher than, did those in the lecture group. Similarly, students in the gaming group were just as, but no more, satisfied with their learning than were students in the lecture group. Of note, both teaching/learning strategies were shown to be effective for learning with students earning a B average on the examination. Likewise, students in both groups were very satisfied with their respective teaching/learning strategies. Given that our assessment did not support gaming as a superior teaching/learning strategy over lecture, what remains now is the need for a longitudinal study to determine if there are differences in long-term learning. As we implement creative methods of instruction, it is also important to test their effectiveness to ensure that the teaching-learning process is evidence based.

  4. SOCIAL MEDIA USE AND PERCEPTION OF LIVE LECTURES BY MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Narendran

    2017-02-01

    lectures being more effective. CONCLUSION There should be active intervention from the authorities to conduct mass surveys and assessments regarding integration of elearning with traditional teaching methods among medical students of our country. The region specific changes accommodating the changing social persona of young adults have to be considered while planning the lecture schedule in medical education in our part of the world.

  5. Water Technology Lecture 1: Introducing Water Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Nicholas Frederick

    2017-01-01

    This is a full set of PowerPoint lectures for a course in Water Technology currently given at Trinity College, University of Dublin by professor N.F. Gray. The lectures cover all aspects of water and wastewater treatment and are available for use to lecturers or those interested in the subject. The lecture series is to be used in conjunction with the new textbook ?Water Science and Technology? (4th edition) published by CRC Press in 2017. Lecture 1 is an introduction to the water indust...

  6. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURES-QUESTIONNAIRE

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch SUGGEST AND WIN! Its time to plan the 2004-2005 lecture series. From today until March 19 you have the chance to give your contribution to planning for next year's Academic Training Lecture Series. At the web site: http://cern.ch/Academic.Training/questionnaire you will find questionnaires proposing topics in high energy physics, applied physics and science and society. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at the CERN bookshop.

  7. Lectures on matrix field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Ydri, Badis

    2017-01-01

    These lecture notes provide a systematic introduction to matrix models of quantum field theories with non-commutative and fuzzy geometries. The book initially focuses on the matrix formulation of non-commutative and fuzzy spaces, followed by a description of the non-perturbative treatment of the corresponding field theories. As an example, the phase structure of non-commutative phi-four theory is treated in great detail, with a separate chapter on the multitrace approach. The last chapter offers a general introduction to non-commutative gauge theories, while two appendices round out the text. Primarily written as a self-study guide for postgraduate students – with the aim of pedagogically introducing them to key analytical and numerical tools, as well as useful physical models in applications – these lecture notes will also benefit experienced researchers by providing a reference guide to the fundamentals of non-commutative field theory with an emphasis on matrix models and fuzzy geometries.

  8. Trieste lectures on mirror symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, K [Department of Physics and Department of Mathematics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2003-08-15

    These are pedagogical lectures on mirror symmetry given at the Spring School in ICTP, Trieste, March 2002. The focus is placed on worldsheet descriptions of the physics related to mirror symmetry. We start with the introduction to general aspects of (2,2) supersymmetric field theories in 1 + 1 dimensions. We next move on to the study and applications of linear sigma model. Finally, we provide a proof of mirror symmetry in a class of models. (author)

  9. The Feynman lectures on physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feynman, R.P.

    1979-01-01

    This set of lectures tries to elucidate from the beginning those features of the quantum mechanics which are most general. The first lectures tackle head on the ideas of a probability amplitude, the interference of amplitudes, the abstract notion of a state, and the superposition and resolution of states - and the Dirac notation is used from the start. In each instance the ideas are introduced together with a detailed discussion of some specific examples - to try to make the physical ideas as real as possible. The time dependence of states including states of definite energy comes next, and the ideas are applied at once to the study of two-state systems. A detailed discussion of the ammonia maser provides the framework for the introduction to radiation absorption and induced transitions. The lectures then go on to consider more complex systems, leading to a discussion of the propagation of electrons in a crystal, and to a rather complete treatment of the quantum mechanics of angular momentum. Our introduction to quantum mechanics ends in Chapter 20 with a discussion of the Schroedinger wave function, its differential equation, and the solution for the hydrogen atom. The last Chapter of this volume is not intended to be a part of the 'course.' It is a 'seminar' on superconductivity and was given in the spirit of some of the entertainment lectures of the first two volumes, with the intent of opening to the students a broader view of the relation of what they were learning to the general culture of physics. Feynman's 'epilogue' serves as the period to the three-volume series [fr

  10. Academic Training Lecture - Regular Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    Tuesday 25 & Wednesday 26 May 2010 from 11:00 to 12:30 - Main Auditorium, Bldg. 500-1-001 Baryon Asymmetry of the Universe by Prof. Hitoshi Murayama (University of California, Berkeley) In two lectures, the following topics will be discussed: (1) Why baryon asymmetry is a problem at all (2) Review of the Sakharov's conditions (3) Why old models based on GUT did not work (4) Electroweak baryogenesis (5) Leptogenesis (6) Connections to the near-future experiments

  11. The role of observational research in improving faculty lecturing skills: A qualitative study in an Italian dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visioli, Sonia; Lodi, Giovanni; Carrassi, Antonio; Zannini, Lucia

    2009-08-01

    This pilot study is based on observational research of lecturing skills during the annual Oral Medicine course at the Milan Dentistry School. Our goals were to explore how teachers exhibited desirable lecturing skills, to observe how their attitudes and lecturing skills affected students' attention and thereby learning, and to provide feedback. We prepared a structured observational grid divided into four categories: explaining, questioning, visual aids, and lecturer attitude. The grid was filled in by a participant, nonactive researcher. Two main types of lecture were observed: "traditional" and "interactive". Both of these can result in a high level of attention among students. Among the categories, only "lecturer attitude" appeared to affect student attention. In particular, the skills of "speaking aloud" and "sustaining verbal communication with vocal inflection" appeared to have the greatest impact on lecturer attitude. The data were then presented blindly to the five lecturers, who were able to identify their own lesson. Our grid proved to be a valid instrument although it was very expensive. When integrated with other strategies for improving lecturing, such as student scoring, peer evaluation, and microteaching, observational research can be a cost-effective method to stimulate guided reflection and to improve the lecturing skills of faculty members.

  12. A two-year experience of an integrated simulation residency curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittels, Kathleen A; Takayesu, James K; Nadel, Eric S

    2012-07-01

    Human Patient Simulation (HPS) is increasingly used in medical education, but its role in Emergency Medicine (EM) residency education is uncertain. The objective of this study was to evaluate the perceived effectiveness of HPS when fully integrated into an EM residency didactic curriculum. The study design was a cross-sectional survey performed in 2006, 2 years after the implementation of an integrated simulation curriculum. Fifty-four residents (postgraduate year [PGY] 1-4) of a 4-year EM residency were surveyed with demographic and curricular questions on the perceived value of simulation relative to other teaching formats. Survey items were rated on a bipolar linear numeric scale of 1 (strongly disagree) to 9 (strongly agree), with 5 being neutral. Data were analyzed using Student t-tests. Forty residents responded to the survey (74% response rate). The perceived effectiveness of HPS was higher for junior residents than senior residents (8.0 vs. 6.2, respectively, peffectiveness of lectures (7.8 vs. 7.9, respectively, p=0.1), morbidity and mortality conference (8.5 vs. 8.7, respectively, p=0.3), and trauma conference (8.4 vs. 8.8, respectively, p=0.2) between junior and senior residents. Scores for perceptions of improvement in residency training (knowledge acquisition and clinical decision-making) after the integration of HPS into the curriculum were positive for all residents. Residents' perceptions of HPS integration into an EM residency curriculum are positive for both improving knowledge acquisition and learning clinical decision-making. HPS was rated as more effective during junior years than senior years, while the perceived efficacy of more traditional educational modalities remained constant throughout residency training. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Classroom Activities: Simple Strategies to Incorporate Student-Centered Activities within Undergraduate Science Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lom, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The traditional science lecture, where an instructor delivers a carefully crafted monolog to a large audience of students who passively receive the information, has been a popular mode of instruction for centuries. Recent evidence on the science of teaching and learning indicates that learner-centered, active teaching strategies can be more effective learning tools than traditional lectures. Yet most colleges and universities retain lectures as their central instructional method. This article highlights several simple collaborative teaching techniques that can be readily deployed within traditional lecture frameworks to promote active learning. Specifically, this article briefly introduces the techniques of: reader’s theatre, think-pair-share, roundtable, jigsaw, in-class quizzes, and minute papers. Each technique is broadly applicable well beyond neuroscience courses and easily modifiable to serve an instructor’s specific pedagogical goals. The benefits of each technique are described along with specific examples of how each technique might be deployed within a traditional lecture to create more active learning experiences. PMID:23494568

  14. Mindfulness in higher education: awareness and attention in university students increase during and after participation in a mindfulness curriculum course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, E.I.; Meppelink, R.; Bögels, S.M.

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of a mindfulness course in the curriculum of international students (n = 104) from 16 different countries at the University of Amsterdam. The curriculum consisted of seven weekly lectures, as well as studying scientific articles on mindfulness research and gaining

  15. Envisioning Curriculum as Six Simultaneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Hanin; Conner, Lindsey; Mayo, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses the discourse of complexity thinking to envision curriculum as six partial and coupled facets that exist simultaneously: curriculum as structure, curriculum as process, curriculum as content, curriculum as teaching, curriculum as learning and curriculum as activity. Such a curriculum is emergent and self-organising. It is emergent…

  16. Indian medical students’ perspectives on problem-based learning experiences in the undergraduate curriculum: One size does not fit all

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijli Nanda

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Problem-based learning (PBL is a well-established method for facilitating the learning of basic science concepts in the context of clinical cases. Relevant evidence is lacking regarding PBL’s effectiveness and acceptability as perceived by students accustomed to classical traditional teaching in India. Hence, this study gathered students’ opinions on PBL versus Traditional teaching methods to generate a foundation for institutional policymaking and ultimately, changes in the policy of regulatory bodies. Methods: A total of 773 first year medical students admitted from 2007-2010 in Kasturba Medical College Manipal, Manipal University, India were asked to respond to a 15-item questionnaire evaluating their preferences for PBL or traditional methods such as lectures after undergoing a systematically conducted PBL session in physiology. Their responses were analyzed with an unpaired t-test. Their comments were also collected. Results: PBL scored significantly higher for most items in the questionnaire for “learning efficiency” and “student-teacher relationship”. The students’ comments highlighted the importance of a trained tutor/facilitator to enhance the learning process. Conclusion: Our students are willing to adapt to the PBL method, although they recognize certain benefits of traditional pedagogy. For learning efficiency and the student-teacher relationship, the students feel that neither method holds an advantage. We recommend that the future medical curriculum in India be a hybrid form of PBL and traditional methods with specific training on the unfamiliar PBL approach for both faculty and students.

  17. Indian medical students' perspectives on problem-based learning experiences in the undergraduate curriculum: One size does not fit all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Bijli; Manjunatha, Shankarappa

    2013-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a well-established method for facilitating the learning of basic science concepts in the context of clinical cases. Relevant evidence is lacking regarding PBL's effectiveness and acceptability as perceived by students accustomed to classical traditional teaching in India. Hence, this study gathered students' opinions on PBL versus Traditional teaching methods to generate a foundation for institutional policymaking and ultimately, changes in the policy of regulatory bodies. A total of 773 first year medical students admitted from 2007-2010 in Kasturba Medical College Manipal, Manipal University, India were asked to respond to a 15-item questionnaire evaluating their preferences for PBL or traditional methods such as lectures after undergoing a systematically conducted PBL session in physiology. Their responses were analyzed with an unpaired t-test. Their comments were also collected. PBL scored significantly higher for most items in the questionnaire for "learning efficiency" and "student-teacher relationship". The students' comments highlighted the importance of a trained tutor/facilitator to enhance the learning process. Our students are willing to adapt to the PBL method, although they recognize certain benefits of traditional pedagogy. For learning efficiency and the student-teacher relationship, the students feel that neither method holds an advantage. We recommend that the future medical curriculum in India be a hybrid form of PBL and traditional methods with specific training on the unfamiliar PBL approach for both faculty and students.

  18. Lecturers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    directed learning skills; and (iv) the increased motivation for learning'.[1,2]. Additional benefits of the PBL approach have been reported. These include improvement in problem-solving abilities, effective literature sourcing, increased ability to work in teams, as well as gaining the knowledge skills and expertise needed for ...

  19. Integrating Medical Simulation Into the Physician Assistant Physiology Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lixin; Lopes, John; Zhou, Joseph Yi; Xu, Biao

    2016-12-01

    Medical simulation has recently been used in medical education, and evidence indicates that it is a valuable tool for teaching and evaluation. Very few studies have evaluated the integration of medical simulation in medical physiology education, particularly in PA programs. This study was designed to assess the value of integrating medical simulation into the PA physiology curriculum. Seventy-five students from the PA program at Central Michigan University participated in this study. Mannequin-based simulation was used to simulate a patient with hemorrhagic shock and congestive heart failure to demonstrate the Frank-Starling force and cardiac function curve. Before and after the medical simulation, students completed a questionnaire as a self-assessment. A knowledge test was also delivered after the simulation. Our study demonstrated a significant improvement in student confidence in understanding congestive heart failure, hemorrhagic shock, and the Frank-Starling curve after the simulation. Medical simulation may be an effective way to enhance basic science learning experiences for students and an ideal supplement to traditional, lecture-based teaching in PA education.

  20. Undergraduate Competences as Labour Market Mechanism for Curriculum Alignment in Ghana: Case of University of Cape Coast School of Business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Owusu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The increasing graduate unemployment rate in Ghana is a matter of concern not only to government but also to stakeholders in education. In an era of globalisation, the issue has culminated in discourses about curriculum planning and alignment. Using a concurrent mixed method, the study purposely focused on exploring graduate competences as a labour market mechanism for curriculum alignment. In this regard, 63 participants comprising alumni, Human Resource Managers and lecturers were sampled using multiple procedures. In the end, the study showed that employers’ highly ranked integrated curriculum and their responses favoured an amalgamation of education and practical training tailored to promote organisational growth. A significant difference was found between responses of lecturers and alumni regarding their preference for graduate competences as the basis for curriculum alignment. The study finally advocated, among other things, for competency-based curriculum philosophy as the underpinning variable to underlie Business Education curriculum in Ghana.

  1. Percepción de los estudiantes de medicina del ambiente educativo en una facultad con currículo tradicional (UCH-Chile y otra con currículo basado en problemas (UNC-Argentina Medical students' perception of the educational environment in a faculty developing a traditional curriculum (UCH-Chile and another with a problem based learning curriculum (UNC-Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Díaz-Véliz

    2011-03-01

    (UNC, which develop a traditional curriculum and a problem based curriculum, respectively. Subjects and methods: A transversal study was performed in 465 students: 232 from the UCH and 233 from the UNC. The distribution was 84/70 for the first course, 77/97 for the third one and 71/66 for the fifth one, respectively. The DREEM questionnaire, which consists of 50 items, was applied. It covers 5 dimensions of the educational environment: perception about learning, perception about teachers, academic self-perception, perception about educational climate and social self-perception. Results: Total DREEM scores were significantly higher in the UNC. Scores were similar in all courses from both universities, with the exception of fifth course UCH. Regarding their perception about teachers, students of the fifth course UCH showed the lowest score, whereas students of the first course UNC had the best perception. Similar results were obtained for the academic auto-perception; while the perception of the learning environment obtained higher scores in the three courses from the UNC. Social auto-perception was similar in all courses tested in this study. Conclusions: Differences observed between both universities could be attributed to their different curricula. Problem based curriculum seems to be better appreciated than the traditional one. Our study corroborates the efficacy of the DREEM questionnaire to identify strengths and weaknesses of the curriculum and for the assessment of teaching quality in medical schools.

  2. The pedagogical toolbox: computer-generated visual displays, classroom demonstration, and lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockoven, Jerry

    2004-06-01

    This analogue study compared the effectiveness of computer-generated visual displays, classroom demonstration, and traditional lecture as methods of instruction used to teach neuronal structure and processes. Randomly assigned 116 undergraduate students participated in 1 of 3 classrooms in which they experienced the same content but different teaching approaches presented by 3 different student-instructors. Then participants completed a survey of their subjective reactions and a measure of factual information designed to evaluate objective learning outcomes. Participants repeated this factual measure 5 wk. later. Results call into question the use of classroom demonstration methods as well as the trend towards devaluing traditional lecture in favor of computer-generated visual display.

  3. Lecture notes of the Introductory course to the European Conference on Neutron Scattering, ECNS'99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadar, G.; Rosta, L.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this volume of Lecture Notes is to form and confirm a tradition of Introductory Courses in relation to the European Conferences on Neutron Scattering. The structure of the Lecture Notes is as follows: a general block of introduction of mainly experimental character is presented, then traditional diffraction methods are discussed. Some aspects of small angle neutron scattering and reflectometry are discussed, and in a final block the well-known techniques of inelastic neutron scattering is outlined. 12 items are indexed separately for the INIS database. (K.A.)

  4. Nobel Lecture: Topological quantum matter*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldane, F. Duncan M.

    2017-10-01

    Nobel Lecture, presented December 8, 2016, Aula Magna, Stockholm University. I will describe the history and background of three discoveries cited in this Nobel Prize: The "TKNN" topological formula for the integer quantum Hall effect found by David Thouless and collaborators, the Chern insulator or quantum anomalous Hall effect, and its role in the later discovery of time-reversal-invariant topological insulators, and the unexpected topological spin-liquid state of the spin-1 quantum antiferromagnetic chain, which provided an initial example of topological quantum matter. I will summarize how these early beginnings have led to the exciting, and currently extremely active, field of "topological matter."

  5. Mechanics lectures on theoretical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Sommerfeld, Arnold Johannes Wilhelm

    1952-01-01

    Mechanics: Lectures on Theoretical Physics, Volume I covers a general course on theoretical physics. The book discusses the mechanics of a particle; the mechanics of systems; the principle of virtual work; and d'alembert's principle. The text also describes oscillation problems; the kinematics, statics, and dynamics of a rigid body; the theory of relative motion; and the integral variational principles of mechanics. Lagrange's equations for generalized coordinates and the theory of Hamilton are also considered. Physicists, mathematicians, and students taking Physics courses will find the book

  6. Integratives versus traditionelles Lernen aus Sicht der Studierenden [Integrative vs. Traditional Learning from the Student Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadmon, Guni

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available [english] Background: The interdisciplinary surgery block of the reformed undergraduate curriculum HeiCuMed includes daily cycles of interactive case-based seminars, problem-based tutorials, case presentation by students, skills and communication training, and bedside teaching. The teaching doctors receive didactic training. In contrast, the previous traditional course was based on lectures with only two weekly hours of bedside teaching. Didactic training was not available.Objective: The present work aims at analysing the importance of active participation of students and the didactic components of the reformed and traditional curricula, which contribute to successful learning as evaluated by the students.Method: Differentiated student evaluations of the undergraduate surgical courses between 1999 and 2008 were examined by correlation and regression analyses. Results: The evaluation scores for organisation, dedication of the teaching staff, their ability to make lessons interesting and complex topics easily understandable, and the subjective gain of knowledge were significantly better in HeiCuMed than in the traditional curriculum. However, the dependence of knowledge gain on the didactic quality was the same in both curricula. The quality of discussions and the ability of the teaching doctors to promote active student participation were important to the subjective gain of knowledge in both seminars and practical courses of the reformed curriculum as well as for the overall evaluation of the practical courses but not the gain of knowledge in the traditional curriculum. Conclusion: The findings confirm psychological-educational perceptions, that competent implementation of integrative didactical methods is more important to successful teaching and the subjective gain of knowledge than knowledge transfer by traditional classroom teaching. [german] Hintergrund: Der interdisziplinäre Chirurgische Block des Heidelberger Reformcurriculums Hei

  7. An active learning curriculum improves fellows' knowledge and faculty teaching skills: a medical student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad M

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mubariz Ahmad, Nourah AlHennawi, Maaham AhmedManchester Medical School, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UKWe read with great interest the article by Inra et al1 which discusses the benefits of using an active learning curriculum to improve faculty teaching skills and help fellows retain more knowledge compared to traditional teaching methods. As current medical students, we can vouch for the effectiveness of this approach in improving the way material can be taught, hence would like to offer our perspective on this.  Authors’ replyJennifer A Inra,1,2 Stephen Pelletier,2 Navin L Kumar,1,2 Edward L Barnes,3,4 Helen M Shields1,21Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endoscopy, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 2Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 3Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, 4University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USAWe appreciate the thoughtful comments received from Ahmed et al regarding our article “An active learning curriculum improves fellows’ knowledge and faculty teaching”.1 The educational literature supports the recommendation that the optimal timing for a lecture is 10-15 minutes, as a student’s attention may wander or wane after that time.2 This ideal time limit stems from a paperby Hartley in 1978, which recommends this optimal time frame.3View the original paper by Inra and colleagues  

  8. Lectures on the Topological Vertex

    CERN Document Server

    Mariño, M

    2008-01-01

    In this lectures, I will summarize the approach to Gromov–Witten invariants on toric Calabi–Yau threefolds based on large N dualities. Since the large N duality/topological vertex approach computes Gromov–Witten invariants in terms of Chern–Simons knot and link invariants, Sect. 2 is devoted to a review of these. Section 3 reviews topological strings and Gromov–Witten invariants, and gives some information about the open string case. Section 4 introduces the class of geometries we will deal with, namely toric (noncompact) Calabi–Yau manifolds, and we present a useful graphical way to represent these manifolds which constitutes the geometric core of the theory of the topological vertex. Finally, in Sect. 5, we define the vertex and present some explicit formulae for it and some simple applications. A brief Appendix contains useful information about symmetric polynomials. It has not been possible to present all the relevant background and physical derivations in this set of lectures. However, these...

  9. Keeping Tradition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zenhong, C.; Buwalda, P.L.

    2011-01-01

    Chinese dumplings such as Jiao Zi and Bao Zi are two of the popular traditional foods in Asia. They are usually made from wheat flour dough (rice flour or starch is sometimes used) that contains fillings. They can be steamed, boiled and fried and are consumed either as a main meal or dessert. As

  10. Assessment and pedagogy: a case study of two oral hygiene lecturers in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergotine, G

    2012-08-01

    There is evidence that most South African oral hygiene lecturers lack appropriate qualifications in the field of education. Their teaching skills are based mainly on clinical and practical experience, and this may impact on their understanding of the educational foundations of teaching, learning and assessment. To explore oral hygiene lecturers' knowledge and use of pedagogy and assessment and its alignment. A qualitative descriptive study design was used and case studies of two oral hygiene lecturers, each with qualifications in Education, were analyzed according to three themes: curriculum, pedagogy and assessment. The results showed that both participants had a good understanding of formative assessment (FA) and summative assessment (SA). They made use of FA but in neither case was the application ideal. Both used a range of teaching and assessment strategies but felt accountable to external demands of meeting outcomes. They linked their understanding of pedagogy and assessment to assist in the development of their courses and reported that this alignment had improved the quality of their programmes. This alignment by oral hygiene lecturers can influence curricular and pedagogic strategies. The professional educational development of lecturers in oral hygiene could be influential in improving the profession within the country.

  11. Live lecture versus video-recorded lecture: are students voting with their feet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardall, Scott; Krupat, Edward; Ulrich, Michael

    2008-12-01

    In light of educators' concerns that lecture attendance in medical school has declined, the authors sought to assess students' perceptions, evaluations, and motivations concerning live lectures compared with accelerated, video-recorded lectures viewed online. The authors performed a cross-sectional survey study of all first- and second-year students at Harvard Medical School. Respondents answered questions regarding their lecture attendance; use of class and personal time; use of accelerated, video-recorded lectures; and reasons for viewing video-recorded and live lectures. Other questions asked students to compare how well live and video-recorded lectures satisfied learning goals. Of the 353 students who received questionnaires, 204 (58%) returned responses. Collectively, students indicated watching 57.2% of lectures live, 29.4% recorded, and 3.8% using both methods. All students have watched recorded lectures, and most (88.5%) have used video-accelerating technologies. When using accelerated, video-recorded lecture as opposed to attending lecture, students felt they were more likely to increase their speed of knowledge acquisition (79.3% of students), look up additional information (67.7%), stay focused (64.8%), and learn more (63.7%). Live attendance remains the predominant method for viewing lectures. However, students find accelerated, video-recorded lectures equally or more valuable. Although educators may be uncomfortable with the fundamental change in the learning process represented by video-recorded lecture use, students' responses indicate that their decisions to attend lectures or view recorded lectures are motivated primarily by a desire to satisfy their professional goals. A challenge remains for educators to incorporate technologies students find useful while creating an interactive learning culture.

  12. The Comparison of Learning Radiographic Extraoral Anatomic Landmarks through Lecture and blended method(Computer-Assisted teaching and Lecture:An interventional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T ahmine Razi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the main problems in learning extraoral radiographic anatomic indexes is the long interval between presentation of radiology and human anatomy courses, resulting in forgetting anatomic regions. Therefore, radiographic indexes are formed as complete abstract and transient images in students’ minds; as a result, their learning and retention decrease. The aim of this study was to compare lecture with combination of computer-assisted learning and lecture of extra-oral radiographic landmarks among dental students. Methods: This interventional study was carried out in 2009 on 51 dental students of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Students were randomly allocated into two groups. The first group was taught through a teaching method which involved lectures in the classroom. In the second group, a CD was given to the students. The teaching was accomplished through presentation using skull. Six months after finishing the teaching, both groups took a similar test for evaluation of long term learning. The data was analyzed by SPSS 16 using U Mann-Whitney test. Results: There was no significant differences in the mean scores between the two groups in the first exam after teaching (P=0.13, yet it was significant in the second exam (regarding retention (P=0.006, and average of non-traditional teaching method group (20.89±10.23 was higher than that of lecture group (13.48±6.39. Conclusion: Based on the results, non-traditional technique of teaching was not more effective than the lecture in short-term learning but in longterm learning, non-traditional technique was more effective than the lecture.

  13. Issues in Lecturing in a Second Language: Lecturer's Behaviour and Students' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lindsay

    2007-01-01

    This article explores how Hong Kong Chinese engineering students with low English language proficiency manage to cope with their lectures given in English. An ethnographic case study approach was used with multiple sources of data triangulated to provide a picture of the lecture event from both the students' and the lecturer's perspectives. One of…

  14. Online Lecture Recordings and Lecture Attendance: Investigating Student Preferences in a Large First Year Psychology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Alexandra; Raju, Sadhana; Sharma, Manjula D.

    2016-01-01

    While blended learning has been around for some time, the interplay between lecture recordings, lecture attendance and grades needs further examination particularly for large cohorts of over 1,000 students in 500 seat lecture theatres. This paper reports on such an investigation with a cohort of 1,450 first year psychology students' who indicated…

  15. The Use of Recorded Lectures in Education and the Impact on Lecture Attendance and Exam Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Nynke; Groeneveld, Caspar; van Bruggen, Jan; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    Universities increasingly record lectures and make them available online for students. Though the technology to record these lectures is now solidly implemented and embedded in many institutions, the impact of the usage of recorded lectures on exam performance is not clear. The purpose of the current study is to address the use of recorded…

  16. The use of recorded lectures in education and the impact on lecture attendance and exam performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Nynke; Groeneveld, Caspar; Van Bruggen, Jan; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia

    2017-01-01

    Universities increasingly record lectures and make them available online for students. Though the technology to record these lectures is now solidly implemented and embed- ded in many institutions, the impact of the usage of recorded lectures on exam perfor- mance is not clear. The purpose of the

  17. Lecture Attendance and Web Based Lecture Technologies: A Comparison of Student Perceptions and Usage Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Konsky, Brian R.; Ivins, Jim; Gribble, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of web based lecture recordings on learning and attendance at lectures. Student opinions regarding the perceived value of the recordings were evaluated in the context of usage patterns and final marks, and compared with attendance data and student perceptions regarding the usefulness of lectures. The availability…

  18. Anatomy as the Backbone of an Integrated First Year Medical Curriculum: Design and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klement, Brenda J.; Paulsen, Douglas F.; Wineski, Lawrence E

    2011-01-01

    Morehouse School of Medicine chose to restructure its first year medical curriculum in 2005. The anatomy faculty had prior experience in integrating courses, stemming from the successful integration of individual anatomical sciences courses into a single course called Human Morphology. The integration process was expanded to include the other first year basic science courses (Biochemistry, Physiology, and Neurobiology) as we progressed toward an integrated curriculum. A team, consisting of the course directors, a curriculum coordinator and the Associate Dean for Educational and Faculty Affairs, was assembled to build the new curriculum. For the initial phase, the original course titles were retained but the lecture order was reorganized around the Human Morphology topic sequence. The material from all four courses was organized into four sequential units. Other curricular changes included placing laboratories and lectures more consistently in the daily routine, reducing lecture time from 120 to 90 minute blocks, eliminating unnecessary duplication of content, and increasing the amount of independent study time. Examinations were constructed to include questions from all courses on a single test, reducing the number of examination days in each block from three to one. The entire restructuring process took two years to complete, and the revised curriculum was implemented for the students entering in 2007. The outcomes of the restructured curriculum include a reduction in the number of contact hours by 28%, higher or equivalent subject examination average scores, enhanced student satisfaction, and a first year curriculum team better prepared to move forward with future integration. PMID:21538939

  19. SU-F-E-08: Medical Physics as a Teaching Tool for High School Science Curriculum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, L [The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Ctr., Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Delivering high school science curriculum in a timely manner and in way that is accessible to all students is a challenge for teachers. Although many high schools offer career workshops, these are typically directed at senior students and do not relate directly to details of the curriculum. The objective of this initiative was to create a series of lectures that use medical physics to relate many aspects of the high school science curriculum to tangible clinical applications and to introduce students to alternate pathways into a career in health sciences. Methods: A series of lectures has been developed based on the Ontario High School Science Curriculum. Each lecture uses a career in radiotherapy medical physics as the framework for discussion of topics specific to the high school course being addressed. Results: At present, these lectures have been delivered in five area high schools to students ranging from sophomores to seniors. Survey documents are given to the students before and after the lecture to assess their awareness of careers in health care, applications of physics and their general interest in the subject areas. As expected, students have limited up front awareness of the wide variety of health related career paths. The idea of combining a career lecture with topics specific to the classroom curriculum has been well-received by teachers and students alike. Conclusion: Career talks for high school students are useful for students contemplating their post- secondary career path. Relating career discussion with direct course curriculum makes their studies more relevant and engaging. Students aspiring to a career in health sciences often focus their studies on life sciences due to limited knowledge of potential careers. An early introduction to medical physics presents them with an alternate path through the physical sciences into health care.

  20. SU-F-E-08: Medical Physics as a Teaching Tool for High School Science Curriculum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Delivering high school science curriculum in a timely manner and in way that is accessible to all students is a challenge for teachers. Although many high schools offer career workshops, these are typically directed at senior students and do not relate directly to details of the curriculum. The objective of this initiative was to create a series of lectures that use medical physics to relate many aspects of the high school science curriculum to tangible clinical applications and to introduce students to alternate pathways into a career in health sciences. Methods: A series of lectures has been developed based on the Ontario High School Science Curriculum. Each lecture uses a career in radiotherapy medical physics as the framework for discussion of topics specific to the high school course being addressed. Results: At present, these lectures have been delivered in five area high schools to students ranging from sophomores to seniors. Survey documents are given to the students before and after the lecture to assess their awareness of careers in health care, applications of physics and their general interest in the subject areas. As expected, students have limited up front awareness of the wide variety of health related career paths. The idea of combining a career lecture with topics specific to the classroom curriculum has been well-received by teachers and students alike. Conclusion: Career talks for high school students are useful for students contemplating their post- secondary career path. Relating career discussion with direct course curriculum makes their studies more relevant and engaging. Students aspiring to a career in health sciences often focus their studies on life sciences due to limited knowledge of potential careers. An early introduction to medical physics presents them with an alternate path through the physical sciences into health care.

  1. Systematic Changes in the Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum Progam Award and Course and Curriculum Development Program Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-06-01

    -friendly" software such as ODEPACK to deal with models involving "stiff" differential equations. The last exercise of the course will be a poster session, at which individuals and groups will present their project models to other members of the class and to guests. The main aims of the course will be to facilitate development of the students' insight with respect to types of functioning to be expected of complex networks of relationships, and therefore in important natural systems, and also to engender an appreciation of the power and limitations of modeling techniques. VizChem-Visualizing Chemistry. Leonard W. Fine Columbia University DUE 9555122 209,000 Multimedia computer modules suitable for undergraduate chemistry lecture and laboratory courses are being designed. The modules are both content and skills oriented, interdisciplinary and multidimensional, and take full advantage of the benefits of simulation, computation, and visualization. They are being designed and created as tools for the teacher and for the student and are primarily directed at general chemistry, organic chemistry, physical chemistry, inorganic chemistry, and materials science. Module topics will include the next version of IR Tutor and applicable and important spectroscopies and diagnostic devices such as electronic absorption (UV-vis) and electronic emission (fluorescence and phosphorescence); proton and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance; atomic absorption; thermal analysis; topics in polymer chemistry and materials science; and PCR technology. Secondary objectives of the project include: a broadening of the chemistry curriculum beyond traditional disciplinary boundaries, new undergraduate courses, enhanced effectiveness of teaching assistants, an expanded role for postdoctoral students in undergraduate education, and improved performance by classes of students. Connecting Undergraduate/Analytical Courses to Modern Analytical Chemistry. Thomas R. Gilbert Northeastern University DUE 9554906 200

  2. Improving Lecture Quality through Training in Public Speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowbray, Robert; Perry, Laura B.

    2015-01-01

    Lecturing is a common instructional format but poor lecturing skills can detract from students' learning experiences and outcomes. As lecturing is essentially a form of public communication, training in public speaking may improve lecture quality. Twelve university lecturers in Malaysia participated in a six-week public speaking skills training…

  3. Engineering the curriculum: Towards an adaptive curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns-Boast, Lynette Frances

    The curriculum is one of the most important artefacts produced by higher education institutions, yet it is one of the least studied. Additionally, little is known about the decision-making of academics when designing and developing their curricula, nor how they make use of them. This research investigates how 22 Australian higher education engineering, software engineering, computer science, and information systems academics conceive of curriculum, what approaches they take when designing, and developing course and program curricula, and what use they make of the curriculum. It also considers the implications of these conceptions and behaviour upon their curricula. Data were collected through a series of one-to-one, in-depth, qualitative interviews as well as small focus group sessions and were analysed following Charmaz’ (2006) approach to grounded theory. In this thesis, I argue that the development of curricula for new higher degree programs and courses and / or the updating and innovating of an existing curriculum is a design problem. I also argue that curriculum is a complex adaptive system. Surrounding the design and development of a curriculum is a process of design that leads to the creation of a designed object - the official-curriculum. The official-curriculum provides the guiding principles for its implementation, which involves the design and development of the curriculum-in-use, its delivery, and evaluation. Data show that while the participants conceive of curriculum as a problem of design involving a design process leading to the development of the official-curriculum, surprisingly, their behaviour does not match their conceptions. Over a very short period, their behaviour leads to a process I have called curriculum drift where the official-curriculum and the curriculum-in-use drift away from each other causing the curriculum to lose its integrity. Curricular integrity is characterised through the attributes of alignment, coherence, and

  4. Active Learning and Cooperative Learning in the Organic Chemistry Lecture Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Donald R.

    1999-08-01

    Faculty in the physical sciences are one of the academic groups least receptive to the use of active learning strategies and cooperative learning in their classrooms. This is particularly so in traditional lecture classes. It is the objective of this paper to show how effective these techniques can be in improving student performance in classes. The use of active learning strategies and cooperative learning groups in my organic chemistry lecture classes has increased the overall pass rate in my classes by an astounding 20-30% over the traditional lecture mode. This has been accomplished without any reduction in "standards". The actual methods employed are presented as well as a discussion of how I came to radically change the way I teach my classes.

  5. Problem based learning (PBL) vs. Case based curriculum in clinical clerkship, Internal Medicine innovated Curriculum, Student prospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljarallah, Badr; Hassan, Mohammad Saleh

    2015-04-01

    The vast majority of PBL experience is in basic science courses. Application of classic Problem based learning in clerkship phase is challenging. Although the clinical case is considered a problem, yet solving this problem following the burrow's law has faced hurdles. The difficulties are facing the learner, the teacher and curricula. We implement innovative curriculum for the clerkship year in internal medicine course. We surveyed the student just before coming to an internal medicine course to ask them about continuing PBL or other types of learning in clinical years. A committee was created to study the possible ways to integrate PBL in the course. After multiple brainstorming meeting, an innovated curriculum was implemented. Student surveyed again after they completed their course. The survey is asking them about what is the effect of the implemented curriculum in their skills, attitude, and knowledge. 70% of Students, who finished their basic science in PBL, preferred not to have classical PBL, but more a clinical oriented case based curriculum in the clinical years. After this innovated curriculum, 50-60 % of students who completed it showed a positive response in all aspects of effects including skill, attitude, and knowledge. The Innovated curriculum includes daily morning report, 3 bedside teaching, investigation session, and clinical reasoning weekly, and Lectures up to twice a week. We suggest implementing a curriculum with PBL and case-based criteria in clinical phase are feasible, we are providing a framework with this innovated curriculum.

  6. Curriculum integrated information literacy: a challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønløkke, Mette; Kobow, Else; Kristensen, Anne-Kirstine Østergaard

    2012-01-01

    Information literacy is a competence needed for students and for practitioners in the nursing profession. A curriculum integrated intervention was qualitatively evaluated by focus group interviews of students, lecturers and the university librarian. Information literacy makes sense for students...... when it is linked to assignments, timed right, prepared, systematic and continuous. Support is needed to help students understand the meaning of seeking information, to focus their problem and to make them reflect on their search and its results. Feedback on materials used is also asked for...

  7. "Conhecimento tradicional" e currículo multicultural: notas com base em uma experiência com estudantes indígenas Kaiowá/Guarani "Traditional knowledge" and the multicultural curriculum: notes from an experience with indigenous Kaiowá/Guarani students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida de Souza Perrelli

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo situa-se no campo dos estudos culturais que compreendem o currículo escolar como lugar de disputa pela legitimidade de expressão do conhecimento de distintas culturas. Nessa compreensão, e comprometido com o empoderamento do povo indígena Kaiowá/Guarani, este trabalho destina-se a conhecer as especificidades dos saberes das sociedades tradicionais e a levantar questões pertinentes à pesquisa e à inserção deste conhecimento no currículo escolar. Os dados foram obtidos com base em levantamento bibliográfico e por meio de depoimentos de estudantes do Curso de Formação de Professores Indígenas Kaiowá/Guarani de Mato Grosso do Sul. O texto traz uma breve apresentação desse povo indígena e da sua luta pela escola específica e intercultural. Caracteriza o conhecimento tradicional (formas de aquisição, distribuição e transmissão e remete a discussões que argumentam a favor de um currículo escolar aberto aos conhecimentos de culturas historicamente silenciadas.This article is positioned in the field of cultural studies that includes the school curriculum as a place of disputed legitimacy for the expression of the knowledge of different cultures. Based on this theory, and committed to the empowerment of indigenous Kaiowá/Guarani people, this work aims to understand the specific knowledge of traditional societies and raise issues that are relevant to research and the place of such knowledge in the school curriculum. The data were obtained from bibliographical research and through testimonials from students on the Course for Indigenous Kaiowá/Guarani Teachers of the Mato Grosso do Sul. This text provides a brief overview of indigenous people and their struggle for a schooling that is specific and intercultural. Also, it features traditional knowledge (forms of acquisition, distribution and transmission and refers to discussions which sustain a school curriculum open to the knowledge of cultures which are historically

  8. Lecture notes on diophantine analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Zannier, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    These lecture notes originate from a course delivered at the Scuola Normale in Pisa in 2006. Generally speaking, the prerequisites do not go beyond basic mathematical material and are accessible to many undergraduates. The contents mainly concern diophantine problems on affine curves, in practice describing the integer solutions of equations in two variables. This case historically suggested some major ideas for more general problems. Starting with linear and quadratic equations, the important connections with Diophantine Approximation are presented and Thue's celebrated results are proved in full detail. In later chapters more modern issues on heights of algebraic points are dealt with, and applied to a sharp quantitative treatment of the unit equation. The book also contains several Supplements, hinted exercises and an Appendix on recent work on heights.

  9. Two lectures on track structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waligorski, M.P.R.

    1987-01-01

    In a series of two lectures the principles of track structure theory, developed by Katz and collaborators, are reviewed. The text is intended to serve as an introduction to the theory. Applications of the model to c-hit physical detectors and to biological systems are reviewed. The model relates the signal of a detector after doses of X and gamma radiations to its signal after heavy charged particle irradiations, and is applicable to a variety of physical dosimeters: alanine, thermoluminescence and the Fricke dosimeters, to the inactivation of enzymes and viruses, and to biological systems: description of survival and neoplastic transformations in mammalian cells. Application of the model to heavy-ion cancer radiotherapy and to radiation protection is discussed as well as the controversies around the track structure approach. The model suggests new insights to fundamental research in detector theory and in radiobiology and in their applications in radiotherapy and radiation protection. 41 refs., 39 figs. (author)

  10. 1989 lectures in complex systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jen, E.

    1990-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Lectures on a Theory of Computation and Complexity over the Reals; Algorithmic Information Content, Church-Turing Thesis, Physical Entroph, and Maxwell's Demon; Physical Measures of Complexity; An Introduction to Chaos and Prediction; Hamiltonian Chaos in Nonlinear Polarized Optical Beam; Chemical Oscillators and Nonlinear Chemical Dynamics; Isotropic Navier-Stokes Turbulence. I. Qualitative Features and Basic Equations; Isotropic Navier-Stokes Turbulence. II. Statistical Approximation Methods; Lattice Gases; Data-Parallel Computation and the Connection Machine; Preimages and Forecasting for Cellular Automata; Lattice-Gas Models for Multiphase Flows and Magnetohydrodynamics; Probabilistic Cellular Automata: Some Statistical Mechanical Considerations; Complexity Due to Disorder and Frustration; Self-Organization by Simulated Evolution; Theoretical Immunology; Morphogenesis by Cell Intercalation; and Theoretical Physics Meets Experimental Neurobiology

  11. Collide@CERN - public lecture

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    CERN, the Republic and Canton of Geneva and the City of Geneva are delighted to invite you to a public lecture by Gilles Jobin, first winner of the Collide@CERN Geneva Dance and Performance Artist-in-residence Prize, and his CERN inspiration partner, Joao Pequenao. They will present their work in dance and science at the Globe of Science and Innovation on Wednesday, 23 May 2012 at 7 p.m. (doors open at 6.30 p.m.).   
                                                  Programme 19:00 Opening address by - Professor Rolf-Dieter Heuer, CERN Director-General, - Ariane Koek...

  12. Academic Training Lecture Regular Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (1/3), by Maria Teresa Dova (Universidad Nacional de La Plata & CONICET, Argentina).   Wednesday, April 25, 2012 from 11:00 to 12:00 (Europe/Zurich) at CERN (500-1-001 - Main Auditorium ) The origin of the highest energy cosmic rays (UHECR) with energies above 1000 TeV, is still unknown. The discovery of their sources will reveal the engines of the most energetic astrophysical accelerators in the universe. In these lectures we present the recent observational results from HiRes, Telescope Array and Pierre Auger Observatory as well as (some of) the possible astrophysical origins of UHECR. These experiments deal with particle interactions at energies orders of magnitude higher than achieved in terrestrial accelerators. Organised by Luis Alvarez-Gaume.

  13. Lecture 3: Web Application Security

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Computer security has been an increasing concern for IT professionals for a number of years, yet despite all the efforts, computer systems and networks remain highly vulnerable to attacks of different kinds. Design flaws and security bugs in the underlying software are among the main reasons for this. This lecture focuses on security aspects of Web application development. Various vulnerabilities typical to web applications (such as Cross-site scripting, SQL injection, cross-site request forgery etc.) are introduced and discussed. Sebastian Lopienski is CERN’s deputy Computer Security Officer. He works on security strategy and policies; offers internal consultancy and audit services; develops and maintains security tools for vulnerability assessment and intrusion detection; provides training and awareness raising; and does incident investigation and response. During his work at CERN since 2001, Sebastian has had various assignments, including designing and developing software to manage and support servic...

  14. Short lecture series in sustainable product development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAloone, Tim C.

    2005-01-01

    Three lectures in sustainable product development models, methods and mindsets should give insight into the way of thinking about the environment when developing products. The first two lectures will guide you through: . Environmental problems in industry & life-cycle thinking . Professional...... methods for analysing and changing products’ environmental profiles . Sustainability as a driver for innovation...

  15. Students' Perception of Live Lectures' Inherent Disadvantages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Juraj; Pale, Predrag

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to provide insight into various properties of live lectures from the perspective of sophomore engineering students. In an anonymous online survey conducted at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, University of Zagreb, we investigated students' opinions regarding lecture attendance, inherent disadvantages of live…

  16. What Predicts Skill in Lecture Note Taking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peverly, Stephen T.; Ramaswamy, Vivek; Brown, Cindy; Sumowski, James; Alidoost, Moona; Garner, Joanna

    2007-01-01

    Despite the importance of good lecture notes to test performance, very little is known about the cognitive processes that underlie effective lecture note taking. The primary purpose of the 2 studies reported (a pilot study and Study 1) was to investigate 3 processes hypothesized to be significantly related to quality of notes: transcription…

  17. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein's mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented

  18. Emergency Medicine Curriculum: Complications of Pregnancy Small Group Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda L Herman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This curriculum, created and implemented at Kaweah Delta HCD emergency medicine program, was designed to educate our emergency medicine (EM residents, PGY-1 to PGY-3, as well as medical students and attending physicians. Introduction: Obstetrical (OB emergencies pose a unique challenge to the EM physician. Given the relative rarity of these presentations within the Emergency Department (ED, it is important that residents are educated in a comprehensive manner to ensure understanding and retention.1 The exact prevalence of emergency department (ED visits that are associated with complications of pregnancy is unknown, but they are likely a sizeable portion of the patient population of the ED. Also, many hospitals in rural areas have closed their labor and delivery units due to higher operating costs and lack of available medical personnel.2 New models of high-quality teaching that ensure retention of clinically rare, but critical presentations are required. There is a body of research that suggests a small-group discussion model rather than traditional lecture-based content may improve learner engagement and retention. This model encourages active learning, which requires simultaneous instructor and learner engagement.3, 4, 5, 6, 7 Studies have revealed that the application of knowledge through case studies, personal interaction with content experts, and integrated questions are effective learning strategies for emergency medicine.3 The small group discussion classroom is facilitated by content experts with personal experience in the topic at hand. Objectives: We aim to teach the presentation and management of pregnancy complications through interactive teaching during small group discussions concerning patient cases. This curriculum utilizes resources chosen by education faculty, study questions, actual experience, and small group discussions in place of a traditional lecture-based format. In doing so, a goal of the curriculum is to

  19. Mathematizing: An Emergent Math Curriculum Approach for Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Allen C.

    2015-01-01

    Based on years of research with early childhood teachers, author Allen Rosales provides an approach to create an emergent math curriculum that integrates children's interests with math concepts. The mathematizing approach is different from traditional math curriculums, as it immerses children in a process that is designed to develop their…

  20. The Lifeworld of Christopher Nolan: Vitalizing the Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Rillah

    1989-01-01

    Asserts that curriculum design has traditionally been left to the experts who have forgotten or lost touch with the children. Explores an autobiographical account by Christopher Nolan, expressing the desire to build a curriculum that is richer, more energetic, and more truthful than the ones in the past. (MG)

  1. Curriculum Innovation in Undergraduate Accounting Degree Programmes through "Virtual Internships"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayerlein, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss major criticisms of traditional undergraduate accounting programmes and to introduce virtual internships as a curriculum innovation that addresses these criticisms. Design/methodology/approach: The main aim of the paper is to inspire curriculum innovation in accounting programmes though the…

  2. Anthropocentric Video Segmentation for Lecture Webcasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojas Raul

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many lecture recording and presentation systems transmit slides or chalkboard content along with a small video of the instructor. As a result, two areas of the screen are competing for the viewer's attention, causing the widely known split-attention effect. Face and body gestures, such as pointing, do not appear in the context of the slides or the board. To eliminate this problem, this article proposes to extract the lecturer from the video stream and paste his or her image onto the board or slide image. As a result, the lecturer acting in front of the board or slides becomes the center of attention. The entire lecture presentation becomes more human-centered. This article presents both an analysis of the underlying psychological problems and an explanation of signal processing techniques that are applied in a concrete system. The presented algorithm is able to extract and overlay the lecturer online and in real time at full video resolution.

  3. Anthropocentric Video Segmentation for Lecture Webcasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Rojas

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Many lecture recording and presentation systems transmit slides or chalkboard content along with a small video of the instructor. As a result, two areas of the screen are competing for the viewer's attention, causing the widely known split-attention effect. Face and body gestures, such as pointing, do not appear in the context of the slides or the board. To eliminate this problem, this article proposes to extract the lecturer from the video stream and paste his or her image onto the board or slide image. As a result, the lecturer acting in front of the board or slides becomes the center of attention. The entire lecture presentation becomes more human-centered. This article presents both an analysis of the underlying psychological problems and an explanation of signal processing techniques that are applied in a concrete system. The presented algorithm is able to extract and overlay the lecturer online and in real time at full video resolution.

  4. Self-directed learning can outperform direct instruction in the course of a modern German medical curriculum - results of a mixed methods trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peine, Arne; Kabino, Klaus; Spreckelsen, Cord

    2016-06-03

    Modernised medical curricula in Germany (so called "reformed study programs") rely increasingly on alternative self-instructed learning forms such as e-learning and curriculum-guided self-study. However, there is a lack of evidence that these methods can outperform conventional teaching methods such as lectures and seminars. This study was conducted in order to compare extant traditional teaching methods with new instruction forms in terms of learning effect and student satisfaction. In a randomised trial, 244 students of medicine in their third academic year were assigned to one of four study branches representing self-instructed learning forms (e-learning and curriculum-based self-study) and instructed learning forms (lectures and seminars). All groups participated in their respective learning module with standardised materials and instructions. Learning effect was measured with pre-test and post-test multiple-choice questionnaires. Student satisfaction and learning style were examined via self-assessment. Of 244 initial participants, 223 completed the respective module and were included in the study. In the pre-test, the groups showed relatively homogenous scores. All students showed notable improvements compared with the pre-test results. Participants in the non-self-instructed learning groups reached scores of 14.71 (seminar) and 14.37 (lecture), while the groups of self-instructed learners reached higher scores with 17.23 (e-learning) and 15.81 (self-study). All groups improved significantly (p learning group, whose self-assessment improved by 2.36. The study shows that students in modern study curricula learn better through modern self-instructed methods than through conventional methods. These methods should be used more, as they also show good levels of student acceptance and higher scores in personal self-assessment of knowledge.

  5. ASTRO's 2007 Core Physics Curriculum for Radiation Oncology Residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Eric E.; Gerbi, Bruce J.; Price, Robert A.; Balter, James M.; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Hughes, Lesley; Huang, Eugene

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) published a curriculum for physics education. The document described a 54-hour course. In 2006, the committee reconvened to update the curriculum. The committee is composed of physicists and physicians from various residency program teaching institutions. Simultaneously, members have associations with American Association of Physicists in Medicine, ASTRO, Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology, American Board of Radiology, and American College of Radiology. Representatives from the latter two organizations are key to provide feedback between the examining organizations and ASTRO. Subjects are based on Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requirements (particles and hyperthermia), whereas the majority of subjects and appropriated hours/subject were developed by consensus. The new curriculum is 55 hours, containing new subjects, redistribution of subjects with updates, and reorganization of core topics. For each subject, learning objectives are provided, and for each lecture hour, a detailed outline of material to be covered is provided. Some changes include a decrease in basic radiologic physics, addition of informatics as a subject, increase in intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and migration of some brachytherapy hours to radiopharmaceuticals. The new curriculum was approved by the ASTRO board in late 2006. It is hoped that physicists will adopt the curriculum for structuring their didactic teaching program, and simultaneously, American Board of Radiology, for its written examination. American College of Radiology uses the ASTRO curriculum for their training examination topics. In addition to the curriculum, the committee added suggested references, a glossary, and a condensed version of lectures for a Postgraduate Year 2 resident physics orientation. To ensure continued commitment to a current and relevant curriculum, subject matter will be updated again in 2 years

  6. Teaching innovation in organic chemistry: An inquiry into what happens when the lecturer stops lecturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Richard Charles

    1998-12-01

    In this dissertation the author presents findings from a study of an organic chemistry class in which the instructor changed his mode of content delivery. Instead of using a traditional lecture, the professor engaged students in discussions about chemical behavior, required students to complete cooperative learning activities in and out of class, and altered his examination format. The purpose of the research was to investigate the implementation of the changes made in content delivery, describe subsequent classroom interactions, and discuss participant responses to the innovations. Because of the research focus the author used a qualitative methodology to investigate this unique organic chemistry course. The study showed that the instructor's belief system and skills played an important role in overcoming barriers to implementation. Analysis of class transcripts revealed that the class was highly interactive with students freely offering responses to the instructor's questions and sometimes submitting insightful comments. The discussion format of the class also revealed some student misunderstanding that other teaching structures may not have identified. In general the instructor was able to pursue some concepts in more depth than allowed by a typical lecture mode of content delivery. Analysis of class transcripts also showed characteristics of organic chemistry teaching by Prof. Loudon that might be described as exemplary. He focused student attention on molecular structure and the chemical behavioral patterns that emerge from organic compounds that are structurally similar. Student response to Prof. Loudon's teaching style was quite favorable. A common remark from students was that his personal knowledge of them contributed to their class preparation and desire to learn. In general, students appreciated the opportunity to discuss exam questions in their groups before individual exam administration. On the final course evaluation, however, a couple students

  7. Lecturing and Loving It: Applying the Information-Processing Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jonathan K.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of lecturing, when done properly, in high schools. Describes the positive attributes of effective lecturers. Provides a human information-processing model applicable to the task of lecturing to students. (HB)

  8. Perceptions of Students and Self- assessment of Lecturers on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    assessments of lecturers on written essay error feedback. Overall 153 University of Botswana students and 20 lecturers participated in this study. All the students and 12 lecturers completed different but related questionnaires with both closed and ...

  9. A Quantitative Evaluation of the Flipped Classroom in a Large Lecture Principles of Economics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Rita A.; Gilleskie, Donna B.; Tran, Uyen

    2016-01-01

    This research provides evidence that the flipped classroom instructional format increases student final exam performance, relative to the traditional instructional format, in a large lecture principles of economics course. The authors find that the flipped classroom directly improves performance by 0.2 to 0.7 standardized deviations, depending on…

  10. Clickers, iPad, and Lecture Capture in One Semester: My Teaching Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latulippe, Joe

    2016-01-01

    Using technology to enhance the classroom environment can have a tremendous impact on student learning, as well as on an instructor's teaching. This paper describes one instructor's transition from traditional chalkboard lectures to a fully technological presentation of content. After carefully reviewing the literature, clicker technology was…

  11. Interteaching and Lecture: A Comparison of Long-Term Recognition Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saville, Bryan K.; Bureau, Alex; Eckenrode, Claire; Fullerton, Alison; Herbert, Reanna; Maley, Michelle; Porter, Allen; Zombakis, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Although a number of studies suggest that interteaching is an effective alternative to traditional teaching methods, no studies have systematically examined whether interteaching improves long-term memory. In this study, we assigned students to different teaching conditions--interteaching, lecture, or control--and then gave them a multiple-choice…

  12. A Video Lecture and Lab-Based Approach for Learning of Image Processing Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chiung-Fang; Lee, Greg C.

    2009-01-01

    The current practice of traditional in-class lecture for learning computer science (CS) in the high schools of Taiwan is in need of revamping. Teachers instruct on the use of commercial software instead of teaching CS concepts to students. The lack of more suitable teaching materials and limited classroom time are the main reasons for the…

  13. Pedagogical Applications of Smartphone Integration in Teaching: Lecturers, Pre-Service Teachers and Pupils' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Tami

    2015-01-01

    As the disparity between educational standards and reality outside educational institutions is increasing, alternative learning infrastructure are challenging traditional modes of teaching. This study was based on an experiment with middle school pupils, pre-service teachers and college lecturers. The aim of this study was to examine the extent to…

  14. The Lesotho curriculum and assessment policy: Opportunities and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hennie

    The Curriculum and Assessment Policy 2009 represents the latest education reform, which marks a departure ... out of the dissatisfaction with a traditional education that ..... polities to modern (Western) and knowledge-based polities. Is this the ...

  15. Hybrid Lecture-Online Format Increases Student Grades in an Undergraduate Exercise Physiology Course at a Large Urban University

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlin, Brian K.

    2008-01-01

    Hybrid courses allow students additional exposure to course content that is not possible in a traditional classroom environment. This exposure may lead to an improvement in academic performance. In this report, I describe the transition of a large undergraduate exercise physiology course from a traditional lecture format to a hybrid…

  16. Should Attendance Be Required in Lecture Classrooms in Dental Education? Two Viewpoints: Viewpoint 1: Attendance in the Lecture Classroom Should Be Required and Viewpoint 2: Attendance Should Not Be Required in the Lecture Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Christopher W; Parise, Mary; Seminario, Ana Lucia; Mendez, Maria Jose Cervantes; Piskorowski, Wilhelm; Silva, Renato

    2016-12-01

    This Point/Counterpoint discusses the long-argued debate over whether lecture attendance in dental school at the predoctoral level should be required. Current educational practice relies heavily on the delivery of content in a traditional lecture style. Viewpoint 1 asserts that attendance should be required for many reasons, including the positive impact that direct contact of students with faculty members and with each other has on learning outcomes. In lectures, students can more easily focus on subject matter that is often difficult to understand. A counter viewpoint argues that required attendance is not necessary and that student engagement is more important than physical classroom attendance. This viewpoint notes that recent technologies support active learning strategies that better engage student participation, fostering independent learning that is not supported in the traditional large lecture classroom and argues that dental education requires assimilation of complex concepts and applying them to patient care, which passing a test does not ensure. The two positions agree that attendance does not guarantee learning and that, with the surge of information technologies, it is more important than ever to teach students how to learn. At this time, research does not show conclusively if attendance in any type of setting equals improved learning or ability to apply knowledge.

  17. [Traditional nostrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Shigeru

    2006-01-01

    The commercialization of drugs started toward the end of Heian period (794-1192) when not only aristocrats and monks who were traditional patrons to drug makers, but also local clans and landlords who became powerful as a result of the disbanding of aristocratic manors accumulated enough wealth to spend money on medicine. Although traveling around the country was still a dangerous endeavor, merchants assembled groups to bring lucrative foreign drugs (mainly Chinese) to remote areas. The spread of commercial drugs to common people, however, did not happen until the early Edo period (1603-1867), when the so-called barrier system was installed nationwide to make domestic travel safe. Commercialization started in large cities and gradually spread to other areas. Many nostrums popular until recently appeared in the Genroku period (1688-1703) or later. Many such nostrums were all-cures, often consisting of such active ingredients as Saussureae radix, Agalloch, or Gambir. Even in the Edo period, many people living in agricultural or fishing villages, as well as those in the lower tier, were still poor. Much of the medication available to those people was therefore made of various plant or animal-derived substances that were traditionally used as folk medicines.

  18. Active Learning in PhysicsTechnology and Research-based Techniques Emphasizing Interactive Lecture Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Ronald

    2010-10-01

    Physics education research has shown that learning environments that engage students and allow them to take an active part in their learning can lead to large conceptual gains compared to traditional instruction. Examples of successful curricula and methods include Peer Instruction, Just in Time Teaching, RealTime Physics, Workshop Physics, Scale-Up, and Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs). An active learning environment is often difficult to achieve in lecture sessions. This presentation will demonstrate the use of sequences of Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs) that use real experiments often involving real-time data collection and display combined with student interaction to create an active learning environment in large or small lecture classes. Interactive lecture demonstrations will be done in the area of mechanics using real-time motion probes and the Visualizer. A video tape of students involved in interactive lecture demonstrations will be shown. The results of a number of research studies at various institutions (including international) to measure the effectiveness of ILDs and guided inquiry conceptual laboratories will be presented.

  19. Incorporation of peer learning in first MBBS curriculum to enhance metacognition skills

    OpenAIRE

    Manas Kanti Ray; Suranjana Ray

    2012-01-01

    Peer learning can be incorporated in the first MBBS curriculum along with didactic lectures and tutorials. Peer learning is when a student learns from another student who has been trained to explain the topic and discuss it. Peer learning improves domain-specific inquiry skills, supports self-directed learning, and improves metacognition skills. Metacognition is the ability to plan, reason, judge and regulate ways to approach learning a skill or concept. In the midst of curriculum reforms tha...

  20. Comparing the Effectiveness of a Supplemental Online Tutorial to Traditional Instruction with Nutritional Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubas, Patrice; Heiss, Cindy; Pedersen, Mary

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain if an online computer tutorial on diabetes mellitus, supplemented to traditional classroom lecture, is an effective tool in the education of nutrition students. Students completing a web-based tutorial as a supplement to classroom lecture displayed greater improvement in pre- vs. post-test scores compared…

  1. Evaluation of a cardiopulmonary resuscitation curriculum in a low resource environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mary P; Lyon, Camila B; Janiszewski, David; Aksamit, Deborah; Kateh, Francis; Sampson, John

    2015-11-07

    To evaluate whether a 2-day International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) Universal Algorithm-based curriculum taught in a tertiary care hospital in Liberia increases local health care provider knowledge and skill comfort level. A combined basic and advanced cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) curriculum was developed for low-resource settings that included lectures and low-fidelity manikin-based simulations. In March 2014, the curriculum was taught to healthcare providers in a tertiary care hospital in Liberia. In a quality assurance review, participants were evaluated for knowledge and comfort levels with resuscitation before and after the workshop. They were also videotaped during simulation sessions and evaluated on standardized performance metrics. Fifty-two hospital staff completed both pre-and post-curriculum surveys. The median score was 45% pre-curriculum and 82% post-curriculum (presuscitation in this low-resource setting.

  2. On track for success: an innovative behavioral science curriculum model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedy, John R; Carek, Peter J; Dickerson, Lori M; Mallin, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the behavioral science curriculum currently in place at the Trident/MUSC Family Medicine Residency Program. The Trident/MUSC Program is a 10-10-10 community-based, university-affiliated program in Charleston, South Carolina. Over the years, the Trident/MUSC residency program has graduated over 400 Family Medicine physicians. The current behavioral science curriculum consists of both required core elements (didactic lectures, clinical observation, Balint groups, and Resident Grand Rounds) as well as optional elements (longitudinal patient care experiences, elective rotations, behavioral science editorial experience, and scholars project with a behavioral science focus). All Trident/MUSC residents complete core behavioral science curriculum elements and are free to participate in none, some, or all of the optional behavioral science curriculum elements. This flexibility allows resident physicians to tailor the educational program in a manner to meet individual educational needs. The behavioral science curriculum is based upon faculty interpretation of existing "best practice" guidelines (Residency Review Committee-Family Medicine and AAFP). This article provides sufficient curriculum detail to allow the interested reader the opportunity to adapt elements of the behavioral science curriculum to other residency training programs. While this behavioral science track system is currently in an early stage of implementation, the article discusses track advantages as well as future plans to evaluate various aspects of this innovative educational approach.

  3. Lectures on functional analysis and the Lebesgue integral

    CERN Document Server

    Komornik, Vilmos

    2016-01-01

    This textbook, based on three series of lectures held by the author at the University of Strasbourg, presents functional analysis in a non-traditional way by generalizing elementary theorems of plane geometry to spaces of arbitrary dimension. This approach leads naturally to the basic notions and theorems. Most results are illustrated by the small ℓp spaces. The Lebesgue integral, meanwhile, is treated via the direct approach of Frigyes Riesz, whose constructive definition of measurable functions leads to optimal, clear-cut versions of the classical theorems of Fubini-Tonelli and Radon-Nikodým. Lectures on Functional Analysis and the Lebesgue Integral presents the most important topics for students, with short, elegant proofs. The exposition style follows the Hungarian mathematical tradition of Paul Erdős and others. The order of the first two parts, functional analysis and the Lebesgue integral, may be reversed. In the third and final part they are combined to study various spaces of continuous and integ...

  4. Paul Dirac lectures at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    When a group of physicists entered the Main Auditorium, during the evening of 29 June, they felt they had opened a time portal.   Paul Dirac in front of a blackboard showing his formula. ©Sandra Hoogeboom An attentive audience, dressed in early 1900 costumes, were watching a lecture by the elusive Paul Dirac, presenting for the first time his famous formula on the blackboard. Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac (1902-1984) was a British mathematical physicist at Cambridge, and one of the "fathers" of quantum mechanics. When he first wrote it, in 1928, Dirac was not sure what his formula really meant. As demonstrated by Andersson four year later, what Dirac had written on the blackboard was the first definition of a positron, hence he is credited with having anticipated the existence of antimatter. The actor John Kohl performs as Paul Dirac. ©Sandra Hoogeboom What the group of puzzled physicists were really observing when they entered the CERN Auditorium was the shoo...

  5. Lectures on probability and statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yost, G.P.

    1984-09-01

    These notes are based on a set of statistics lectures delivered at Imperial College to the first-year postgraduate students in High Energy Physics. They are designed for the professional experimental scientist. We begin with the fundamentals of probability theory, in which one makes statements about the set of possible outcomes of an experiment, based upon a complete a priori understanding of the experiment. For example, in a roll of a set of (fair) dice, one understands a priori that any given side of each die is equally likely to turn up. From that, we can calculate the probability of any specified outcome. We finish with the inverse problem, statistics. Here, one begins with a set of actual data (e.g., the outcomes of a number of rolls of the dice), and attempts to make inferences about the state of nature which gave those data (e.g., the likelihood of seeing any given side of any given die turn up). This is a much more difficult problem, of course, and one's solutions often turn out to be unsatisfactory in one respect or another

  6. Lectures on advances in combinatorics

    CERN Document Server

    Ahlswede, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    The main focus of these lectures is basis extremal problems and inequalities – two sides of the same coin. Additionally they prepare well for approaches and methods useful and applicable in a broader mathematical context. Highlights of the book include a solution to the famous 4m-conjecture of Erdös/Ko/Rado 1938, one of the oldest problems in combinatorial extremal theory, an answer to a question of Erdös (1962) in combinatorial number theory "What is the maximal cardinality of a set of numbers smaller than n with no k+1 of its members pair wise relatively prime?", and the discovery that the AD-inequality implies more general and sharper number theoretical inequalities than for instance Behrend's inequality. Several concepts and problems in the book arise in response to or by rephrasing questions from information theory, computer science, statistical physics. The interdisciplinary character creates an atmosphere rich of incentives for new discoveries and lends Ars Combinatoria a special status in mathemat...

  7. HIV Disease in the Psychology Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Ann R.

    2000-01-01

    Provides ideas for relating HIV topics to psychology content. Suggests three methods of curriculum integration: (1) using traditional course content (research methods, abnormal psychology, health psychology, gender and ethnic studies, drugs and behavior); (2) exploring diversity issues; and (3) challenging students' critical thinking skills. (CMK)

  8. Rethinking the Representation Problem in Curriculum Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Bill

    2010-01-01

    The consolidation of reconceptualism as a distinctive tradition in curriculum inquiry is commonly understood to go hand-in-hand with the decline and even eclipse of an explicit political orientation in such work. This paper offers an alternative argument, focusing on a re-assessment of what has been called the representation problem, and exploring…

  9. [Chicano Counselor Training: Curriculum and Beyond Curriculum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Ramon

    The particulars of the evolved curriculum and how the training has evolved around the change-agent concept are stressed in this presentation. The measure of success achieved in attempting to influence the staff and course of studies of the regular guidance department is also emphasized. The curriculum of this counselor training institute has, from…

  10. Sociology of Hidden Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Moradi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the concept of hidden curriculum in the sociological theories and wants to explain sociological aspects of formation of hidden curriculum. The main question concentrates on the theoretical approaches in which hidden curriculum is explained sociologically.For this purpose it was applied qualitative research methodology. The relevant data include various sociological concepts and theories of hidden curriculum collected by the documentary method. The study showed a set of rules, procedures, relationships and social structure of education have decisive role in the formation of hidden curriculum. A hidden curriculum reinforces by existed inequalities among learners (based on their social classes or statues. There is, in fact, a balance between the learner's "knowledge receptions" with their "inequality proportion".The hidden curriculum studies from different major sociological theories such as Functionalism, Marxism and critical theory, Symbolic internationalism and Feminism. According to the functionalist perspective a hidden curriculum has a social function because it transmits social values. Marxists and critical thinkers correlate between hidden curriculum and the totality of social structure. They depicts that curriculum prepares learners for the exploitation in the work markets. Symbolic internationalism rejects absolute hegemony of hidden curriculum on education and looks to the socialization as a result of interaction between learner and instructor. Feminism theory also considers hidden curriculum as a vehicle which legitimates gender stereotypes.

  11. Curriculum Development in Geomorphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Kenneth J.

    1988-01-01

    Examines the context of present curriculum development in geomorphology and the way in which it has developed in recent years. Discusses the content of the geomorphology curriculum in higher education and the consequences of curriculum development together with a consideration of future trends and their implications. (GEA)

  12. Lectures on the basis of physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, A.

    1990-09-01

    The paper contains the following three lectures given by Alan Cook at ICTP Trieste in August, 1990: ''Metrology and the Structure of Physics'', ''Why does Mathematical Physics Work?'' and ''Probability, Chaos and the Environment. 9 refs

  13. Recently Published Lectures and Tutorials for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Herr

    2006-01-01

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project, a collaboration between the University of Michigan and CERN, has developed a synchronized system for recording and publishing educational multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. The current system, including future developments for the project and the field in general, was recently presented at the CHEP 2006 conference in Mumbai, India. The relevant presentations and papers can be found here: The Web Lecture Archive Project A Web Lecture Capture System with Robotic Speaker Tracking This year, the University of Michigan team has been asked to record and publish all ATLAS Plenary sessions, as well as a large number of Physics and Computing tutorials. A significant amount of this material has already been published and can be accessed via the links below. All lectures can be viewed on any major platform with any common internet browser, either via streaming or local download (for limited bandwidth). Please enjoy the l...

  14. Recently Published Lectures and Tutorials for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Goldfarb, S.

    2006-01-01

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project, WLAP, a collaboration between the University of Michigan and CERN, has developed a synchronized system for recording and publishing educational multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. The current system, including future developments for the project and the field in general, was recently presented at the CHEP 2006 conference in Mumbai, India. The relevant presentations and papers can be found here: The Web Lecture Archive Project. A Web Lecture Capture System with Robotic Speaker Tracking This year, the University of Michigan team has been asked to record and publish all ATLAS Plenary sessions, as well as a large number of Physics and Computing tutorials. A significant amount of this material has already been published and can be accessed via the links below. All lectures can be viewed on any major platform with any common internet browser, either via streaming or local download (for limited bandwidth). Please e...

  15. Teaching Principles of Economics Without Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Campbell R.; Lamphear, Charles

    1969-01-01

    Presents important evidence thatstudents taking principles of economics with lectures, and those taking the course on a lectureless basis performed equally well on an intensive battery of objective examinations." (Editor)

  16. Perceptions of Engineering students, lecturers and academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perceptions of Engineering students, lecturers and academic development practitioners about academic development classes at a university of technology. ... development, engineering education, scaffolding, self-regulated learning, students ...

  17. Novel Emergency Medicine Curriculum Utilizing Self-Directed Learning and the Flipped Classroom Method: Head, Eyes, Ears, Nose and Throat Emergencies Small Group Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew King

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This curriculum created and implemented at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center was designed to educate our emergency medicine (EM residents, PGY-1 to PGY-3, as well as medical students and attending physicians. Introduction: Head, Eyes, Ears, Nose and Throat (HEENT complaints are very commonly seen in the Emergency Department. Numbers vary as to exact prevalence, but sources show that there are about 2 million annual emergency department (ED visits in the United States for non-traumatic dental problems, representing 1.5% of all ED visits.1 Other sources show that symptoms referable to the throat encompass 2,496,000 visits or 1.9% of total visits.2 Notably, about 8% of the written exam in emergency medicine covers the topic of head and neck complaints, making it the second most tested topic behind cardiovascular.3 Residents must be proficient in the differential diagnosis and management of the wide variety of HEENT emergencies. The flipped classroom curricular model emphasizes self-directed learning activities completed by learners, followed by small group discussions pertaining to the topic reviewed. The active learning fostered by this curriculum increases faculty and learner engagement and interaction time typically absent in traditional lecture-based formats.4-6 Studies have revealed that the application of knowledge through case studies, personal interaction with content experts, and integrated questions are effective learning strategies for emergency medicine residents.6-8 The Ohio State University EM Residency didactic curriculum recently transitioned to a “flipped classroom” approach.9-13 We created this innovative curriculum aimed to improve our residency education program and to share educational resources with other EM residency programs. Our curriculum utilizes an 18-month curricular cycle to cover the defined emergency medicine content. The flipped classroom curriculum maximizes didactic time and resident

  18. Knowledge and Attitude of Medical Students and Lecturers Toward Evidence-Based Medicine: Evidence from Shiraz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ghanizadeh

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: The application of diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic evidence in day-to-day management of patients has been in constant focus during the last two decades. This study is an attempt to investigate attitude and knowledge of post-graduated medical students and lecturers towards evidence-based medicine (EBM and assess their preferences to clinical practice guidelines.Methods: The designed questionnaire was posted to the randomly selected post-graduated medical students and lecturers of medical department at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences.Results: There were one hundred sixty subjects (60% who answered the questionnaire. Sixty nine percent were male, 46.3% were lecturers, and 53.2% were post-graduated medical students.About 66% of the respondents have heard of the term of EBM. Only 7.8% of the respondents have already attended to a course to learn the skills of EBM and one hundred twenty five (78.1% like to attend a course to learn the skills of EBM. The most common perceived reason for use of EBM was lack of enough motivation.Conclusion: They have not yet integrated the use of EBM into their practices widely. Their knowledge is at a high risk of becoming out of data. Education of EBM should be a hot topic among educationalplanning programmers until it becomes a part of university educational curriculum in Iran.Keywords: POST-GRADUATED MEDICAL STUDENT, LECTURER, KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE, EVIDENCE-BASED MEDICINE, IRAN.

  19. Video Lecture Capture Technology Helps Students Study without Affecting Attendance in Large Microbiology Lecture Courses?

    OpenAIRE

    McLean, Jennifer L.; Suchman, Erica L.

    2016-01-01

    Recording lectures using video lecture capture software and making them available for students to watch anytime, from anywhere, has become a common practice in many universities across many disciplines. The software has become increasingly easy to use and is commonly provided and maintained by higher education institutions. Several studies have reported that students use lecture capture to enhance their learning and study for assessments, as well as to catch up on material they miss when they...

  20. The Design Concept and Realization of University Library’s Online Lecture System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan Linbo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional library lectures are based on the physical space environment, which is problematic in terms of user needs analysis, time selection, and resource utilization, so that the value of the library unexploited.University library’s online lecture system adopts the three-tier architecture design pattern, which based on ASP.NET as the development platform and SQL Server as the back-end database, designing the system to solve the problems in the traditional library service.The design and implementation of the University library’s online lecture system broke the traditional library lecture mode, and further optimized the library service concept, improve the quality of service to meet the diverse needs of the user groups. Integrating online test, interactive question and answer, feedback mechanism to the system, the system has a good user experience, visual way to show the audience’s learning situation and other information, optimize the content and quality of services to make comments and suggestions.

  1. Lecture Notes in Statistics. 3rd Semester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The lecture note is prepared to meet the requirements for the 3rd semester course in statistics at the Aarhus School of Business. It focuses on multiple regression models, analysis of variance, and log-linear models.......The lecture note is prepared to meet the requirements for the 3rd semester course in statistics at the Aarhus School of Business. It focuses on multiple regression models, analysis of variance, and log-linear models....

  2. Water Technology Lecture 3: Water Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Nicholas Frederick

    2017-01-01

    This is the third lecture in the course Water Technology dealing with water distribution. This is a PowerPoint lecture which is free to use and modify. It was designed to be used in conjunction with the course text Gray, N.F. (2017) Water Science and Technology: An Introduction, published by CRC Press, Oxford. The basis of water distribution is explored including water pipe materials, distribution systems, leakage, water quality problems, pressure issue, water hydrants, effect of floods,...

  3. Machine Learning-Augmented Propensity Score-Adjusted Multilevel Mixed Effects Panel Analysis of Hands-On Cooking and Nutrition Education versus Traditional Curriculum for Medical Students as Preventive Cardiology: Multisite Cohort Study of 3,248 Trainees over 5 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dart, Lyn; Vanbeber, Anne; Smith-Barbaro, Peggy; Costilla, Vanessa; Samuel, Charlotte; Terregino, Carol A.; Abali, Emine Ercikan; Dollinger, Beth; Baumgartner, Nicole; Kramer, Nicholas; Seelochan, Alex; Taher, Sabira; Deutchman, Mark; Evans, Meredith; Ellis, Robert B.; Oyola, Sonia; Maker-Clark, Geeta; Budnick, Isadore; Tran, David; DeValle, Nicole; Shepard, Rachel; Chow, Erika; Petrin, Christine; Razavi, Alexander; McGowan, Casey; Grant, Austin; Bird, Mackenzie; Carry, Connor; McGowan, Glynis; McCullough, Colleen; Berman, Casey M.; Dotson, Kerri; Sarris, Leah; Harlan, Timothy S.; Co-investigators, on behalf of the CHOP

    2018-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) annually claims more lives and costs more dollars than any other disease globally amid widening health disparities, despite the known significant reductions in this burden by low cost dietary changes. The world's first medical school-based teaching kitchen therefore launched CHOP-Medical Students as the largest known multisite cohort study of hands-on cooking and nutrition education versus traditional curriculum for medical students. Methods This analysis provides a novel integration of artificial intelligence-based machine learning (ML) with causal inference statistics. 43 ML automated algorithms were tested, with the top performer compared to triply robust propensity score-adjusted multilevel mixed effects regression panel analysis of longitudinal data. Inverse-variance weighted fixed effects meta-analysis pooled the individual estimates for competencies. Results 3,248 unique medical trainees met study criteria from 20 medical schools nationally from August 1, 2012, to June 26, 2017, generating 4,026 completed validated surveys. ML analysis produced similar results to the causal inference statistics based on root mean squared error and accuracy. Hands-on cooking and nutrition education compared to traditional medical school curriculum significantly improved student competencies (OR 2.14, 95% CI 2.00–2.28, p < 0.001) and MedDiet adherence (OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.07–1.84, p = 0.015), while reducing trainees' soft drink consumption (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.37–0.85, p = 0.007). Overall improved competencies were demonstrated from the initial study site through the scale-up of the intervention to 10 sites nationally (p < 0.001). Discussion This study provides the first machine learning-augmented causal inference analysis of a multisite cohort showing hands-on cooking and nutrition education for medical trainees improves their competencies counseling patients on nutrition, while improving students' own diets. This study suggests that

  4. Machine Learning-Augmented Propensity Score-Adjusted Multilevel Mixed Effects Panel Analysis of Hands-On Cooking and Nutrition Education versus Traditional Curriculum for Medical Students as Preventive Cardiology: Multisite Cohort Study of 3,248 Trainees over 5 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monlezun, Dominique J; Dart, Lyn; Vanbeber, Anne; Smith-Barbaro, Peggy; Costilla, Vanessa; Samuel, Charlotte; Terregino, Carol A; Abali, Emine Ercikan; Dollinger, Beth; Baumgartner, Nicole; Kramer, Nicholas; Seelochan, Alex; Taher, Sabira; Deutchman, Mark; Evans, Meredith; Ellis, Robert B; Oyola, Sonia; Maker-Clark, Geeta; Dreibelbis, Tomi; Budnick, Isadore; Tran, David; DeValle, Nicole; Shepard, Rachel; Chow, Erika; Petrin, Christine; Razavi, Alexander; McGowan, Casey; Grant, Austin; Bird, Mackenzie; Carry, Connor; McGowan, Glynis; McCullough, Colleen; Berman, Casey M; Dotson, Kerri; Niu, Tianhua; Sarris, Leah; Harlan, Timothy S; Co-Investigators, On Behalf Of The Chop

    2018-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) annually claims more lives and costs more dollars than any other disease globally amid widening health disparities, despite the known significant reductions in this burden by low cost dietary changes. The world's first medical school-based teaching kitchen therefore launched CHOP-Medical Students as the largest known multisite cohort study of hands-on cooking and nutrition education versus traditional curriculum for medical students. This analysis provides a novel integration of artificial intelligence-based machine learning (ML) with causal inference statistics. 43 ML automated algorithms were tested, with the top performer compared to triply robust propensity score-adjusted multilevel mixed effects regression panel analysis of longitudinal data. Inverse-variance weighted fixed effects meta-analysis pooled the individual estimates for competencies. 3,248 unique medical trainees met study criteria from 20 medical schools nationally from August 1, 2012, to June 26, 2017, generating 4,026 completed validated surveys. ML analysis produced similar results to the causal inference statistics based on root mean squared error and accuracy. Hands-on cooking and nutrition education compared to traditional medical school curriculum significantly improved student competencies (OR 2.14, 95% CI 2.00-2.28, p < 0.001) and MedDiet adherence (OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.07-1.84, p = 0.015), while reducing trainees' soft drink consumption (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.37-0.85, p = 0.007). Overall improved competencies were demonstrated from the initial study site through the scale-up of the intervention to 10 sites nationally ( p < 0.001). This study provides the first machine learning-augmented causal inference analysis of a multisite cohort showing hands-on cooking and nutrition education for medical trainees improves their competencies counseling patients on nutrition, while improving students' own diets. This study suggests that the public health and medical sectors can

  5. Machine Learning-Augmented Propensity Score-Adjusted Multilevel Mixed Effects Panel Analysis of Hands-On Cooking and Nutrition Education versus Traditional Curriculum for Medical Students as Preventive Cardiology: Multisite Cohort Study of 3,248 Trainees over 5 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique J. Monlezun

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cardiovascular disease (CVD annually claims more lives and costs more dollars than any other disease globally amid widening health disparities, despite the known significant reductions in this burden by low cost dietary changes. The world’s first medical school-based teaching kitchen therefore launched CHOP-Medical Students as the largest known multisite cohort study of hands-on cooking and nutrition education versus traditional curriculum for medical students. Methods. This analysis provides a novel integration of artificial intelligence-based machine learning (ML with causal inference statistics. 43 ML automated algorithms were tested, with the top performer compared to triply robust propensity score-adjusted multilevel mixed effects regression panel analysis of longitudinal data. Inverse-variance weighted fixed effects meta-analysis pooled the individual estimates for competencies. Results. 3,248 unique medical trainees met study criteria from 20 medical schools nationally from August 1, 2012, to June 26, 2017, generating 4,026 completed validated surveys. ML analysis produced similar results to the causal inference statistics based on root mean squared error and accuracy. Hands-on cooking and nutrition education compared to traditional medical school curriculum significantly improved student competencies (OR 2.14, 95% CI 2.00–2.28, p<0.001 and MedDiet adherence (OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.07–1.84, p=0.015, while reducing trainees’ soft drink consumption (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.37–0.85, p=0.007. Overall improved competencies were demonstrated from the initial study site through the scale-up of the intervention to 10 sites nationally (p<0.001. Discussion. This study provides the first machine learning-augmented causal inference analysis of a multisite cohort showing hands-on cooking and nutrition education for medical trainees improves their competencies counseling patients on nutrition, while improving students’ own diets. This

  6. The Impact of Online Lecture Recordings on Student Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Andrew; Birch, Elisa; Hancock, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The use of online lecture recordings as a supplement to physical lectures is an increasingly popular tool at many universities. This paper combines survey data with student record data for students in a "Microeconomics Principles" class to examine the relative effects of lecture attendance and online lecture recordings. The main finding…

  7. Curriculum Outline for Introduction to Engineering Chemistry. First Edition. Review Cycle-Annual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This curriculum outline consists of behavioral objectives (called terminal and enabling objectives) for Introduction to Engineering Chemistry, a one-semester, post-secondary course consisting of four 1-hour lectures each week. Course goal is to introduce marine engineering students to the rudiments of basic/introductory inorganic chemistry. The…

  8. Curriculum design and German student exchange for Sino-German Bachelor program majored in optoelectronics engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jihong; Fuhrmann, Thomas; Xu, Boqing; Schreiner, Rupert; Jia, Hongzhi; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Ning; Seebauer, Gudrun; Zhu, Jiyan

    2017-08-01

    Different higher education backgrounds in China and Germany led to challenges in the curriculum design at the beginning of our cooperative bachelor program in Optoelectronics Engineering. We see challenges in different subject requirements from both sides and in the German language requirements for Chinese students. The curriculum was optimized according to the ASIIN criteria, which makes it acceptable and understandable by both countries. German students are integrated into the Chinese class and get the same lectures like their Chinese colleagues. Intercultural and curriculum challenges are successfully solved. The results are summarized to provide an example for other similar international programs.

  9. Argonne lectures on particles accelerator magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devred, A.

    1999-09-01

    The quest for elementary particles has promoted the development of particle accelerators producing beams of increasingly higher energies. In a synchrotron, the particle energy is directly proportional to the product of the machine's radius times the bending magnets' field strength. Present proton experiments at the TeV scale require facilities with circumferences ranging from a few to tens of kilometers and relying on a large number (several hundred to several thousand) high field dipole magnets and high field gradient quadrupole magnets. These electro-magnets use high-current-density, low-critical-temperature superconducting cables and are cooled down at liquid helium temperature. They are among the most costly and the most challenging components of the machine. After explaining what are the various types of accelerator magnets and why they are needed (lecture 1), we briefly recall the origins of superconductivity and we review the parameters of existing superconducting particle accelerators (lecture 2). Then, we review the superconducting materials that are available at industrial scale (chiefly, NbTi and Nb 3 Sn) and we explain in details the manufacturing of NbTi wires and cables (lecture 3). We also present the difficulties of processing and insulating Nb 3 Sn conductors, which so far have limited the use of this material in spite of its superior performances. We continue by discussing the two dimensional current distributions which are the most appropriate for generating pure dipole and quadrupole fields and we explain how these ideal distributions can be approximated by so called cosθ and cos 2θ coil designs (lecture 4). We also present a few alternative designs which are being investigated and we describe the difficulties of realizing coil ends. Next, we present the mechanical design concepts that are used in existing accelerator magnets (lecture 5) and we describe how the magnets are assembled (lecture 6). Some of the toughest requirements on the

  10. Argonne lectures on particles accelerator magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devred, A

    1999-09-01

    The quest for elementary particles has promoted the development of particle accelerators producing beams of increasingly higher energies. In a synchrotron, the particle energy is directly proportional to the product of the machine's radius times the bending magnets' field strength. Present proton experiments at the TeV scale require facilities with circumferences ranging from a few to tens of kilometers and relying on a large number (several hundred to several thousand) high field dipole magnets and high field gradient quadrupole magnets. These electro-magnets use high-current-density, low-critical-temperature superconducting cables and are cooled down at liquid helium temperature. They are among the most costly and the most challenging components of the machine. After explaining what are the various types of accelerator magnets and why they are needed (lecture 1), we briefly recall the origins of superconductivity and we review the parameters of existing superconducting particle accelerators (lecture 2). Then, we review the superconducting materials that are available at industrial scale (chiefly, NbTi and Nb{sub 3}Sn) and we explain in details the manufacturing of NbTi wires and cables (lecture 3). We also present the difficulties of processing and insulating Nb{sub 3}Sn conductors, which so far have limited the use of this material in spite of its superior performances. We continue by discussing the two dimensional current distributions which are the most appropriate for generating pure dipole and quadrupole fields and we explain how these ideal distributions can be approximated by so called cos{theta} and cos 2{theta} coil designs (lecture 4). We also present a few alternative designs which are being investigated and we describe the difficulties of realizing coil ends. Next, we present the mechanical design concepts that are used in existing accelerator magnets (lecture 5) and we describe how the magnets are assembled (lecture 6). Some of the toughest

  11. Using Delphi technique in a consensual curriculum for periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Hana; Leao, Anna Thereza

    2007-11-01

    Periodontics has experienced several important conceptual changes in the last few decades. As such, it is important to have a periodontics curriculum built upon the expertise of specialists in that discipline and reflecting those changes. The main goal of this study was to attain a consensus, through the use of the Delphi technique, on the topics that should be included in a periodontics curriculum for undergraduate dental students. A sample of periodontics lecturers from nine dental schools in two Brazilian cities was used, and a Delphi technique approach was followed to investigate sample member perceptions on the subject. Participants received four postal mail questionnaires asking them to rate and rerate eighty-nine topics for possible inclusion in the curriculum. A descriptive analysis was conducted, and topic frequencies were calculated. Topics rated as highly important for inclusion were the following: health, ailment, prevention, etiology, epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment. The Delphi technique approach proved successful in involving periodontics lecturers in the design of a periodontics curriculum for undergraduate dental students.

  12. Envisioning the Transformative Role of IT in Lectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telmo Zarraonandia

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the most widely used methods for teaching is the lecture. During the last few decades lecturers and students have taken advantage of the progressive introduction of new technology for supporting these lectures. As this trend is very likely to continue, in this paper we will try to anticipate some possible technology enriched future lecture scenarios. We also present ALFs, a system which aims to improve the communication between participants in a lecture making use of augmented reality techniques.

  13. Modeling of the time sharing for lecturers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yu. Shakhova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of modernization of the Russian system of higher education, it is necessary to analyze the working time of the university lecturers, taking into account both basic job functions as the university lecturer, and others.The mathematical problem is presented for the optimal working time planning for the university lecturers. The review of the documents, native and foreign works on the study is made. Simulation conditions, based on analysis of the subject area, are defined. Models of optimal working time sharing of the university lecturers («the second half of the day» are developed and implemented in the system MathCAD. Optimal solutions have been obtained.Three problems have been solved:1 to find the optimal time sharing for «the second half of the day» in a certain position of the university lecturer;2 to find the optimal time sharing for «the second half of the day» for all positions of the university lecturers in view of the established model of the academic load differentiation;3 to find the volume value of the non-standardized part of time work in the department for the academic year, taking into account: the established model of an academic load differentiation, distribution of the Faculty number for the positions and the optimal time sharing «the second half of the day» for the university lecturers of the department.Examples are given of the analysis results. The practical application of the research: the developed models can be used when planning the working time of an individual professor in the preparation of the work plan of the university department for the academic year, as well as to conduct a comprehensive analysis of the administrative decisions in the development of local university regulations.

  14. Teaching Grade Eight Science with Reference to the Science Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasel Babu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A mixed methodological approach was used to explore to what extent the science curriculum was being reflected in science teaching-learning of grade VIII students in Bangladesh. 160 students were randomly selected and 10 science teachers were purposively selected as study respondents. Fifteen science lessons were observed. Data were collected via student questionnaires, teacher interviews, and classroom observation checklists. Grade VIII science teaching-learning activities were not conducted according to the instructions of the science curriculum. Most teachers did not adhere to the curriculum and teacher's guide. Teachers mainly depended on lecture methods for delivering lessons. Learning by doing, demonstrating experiments, scientific inquiry, rational thinking, and analysing cause-effect relationships were noticeably absent. Teachers reported huge workloads and a lack of ingredients as reasons for not practising these activities. Teachers did not use teaching aids properly. Science teaching-learning was fully classroom centred, and students were never involved in any creative activities. 

  15. Implementing virtual field trips in the curriculum of geography students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steegen, An; Verstraeten, Gert; Martens, Lotte

    2016-04-01

    Current online geospatial databases and tools offer many opportunities in geoscience education. On the one hand a variety of geoscientific topics and regions can be studied without traditional fieldwork, and on the other hand, field-based learning activities can be prepared or post-processed. In this research, the use of Virtual Field Trips (VFTs) in Google EarthTM is studied. In the framework of geomorphology courses, undergraduate geography students were given VFTs as developed by the lecturers or had to develop VFTs themselves, after visiting a study area. Maps, photographs, GPS-tracks, literature and other spatial information were integrated in the VFTs. The effect of VFTs on learning outcomes, on the insight in the horizontal and vertical relationships between the spatially varying topics, and motivation were measured. Results confirm that students are positive about the use of VFTs. They indicate that VFTs significantly improve their mental map of the study area, whereby horizontal relationships were strengthened. Also the additional information in some VFTs proved to have positive effects on studying and structuring the learning content. Students also appreciated to work independently with the VFTs and saw possibilities for integrating various geoscientific topics. However, there are also some constraints in working with VFTs. It was clear from the study that VFTs have to be embedded in the curriculum as students do not use or develop VFTs spontaneously. Indeed, it takes a lot of time to develop a VFT, and students also appreciate a variety in work forms. Also some technical difficulties on sufficient wireless internet access and flexible work spaces have to be encountered. Besides this, curricula developers should be aware that VFTs are an interesting tool additionally to field trips, but that they cannot replace the field trips.

  16. How do Millennial Engineering and Technology Students Experience Learning Through Traditional Teaching Methods Employed in the University Setting?

    OpenAIRE

    Howard, Elizabeth A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to document and analyze how Millennial engineering and technology students experience learning in large lecture classrooms. To help achieve this purpose, perceptions Millennials have toward traditional teaching methods employed in large lecture classes were analyzed and discussed. Additionally, this study documented how Millennials experienced technology within large lecture classrooms. A learning model depicting how Millennials experience learning within the larg...

  17. Lecturers' and Students’ Perception on Learning Dijkstra’s Shortest Path Algorithm Through Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazyar Seraj

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, many studies have been carried out on how to engage and support students in e-learning environments. Portable devices such as Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs, Tablet PCs, mobile phones and other mobile equipment have been used as parts of electronic learning environments to facilitate learning and teaching for both lecturers and students. However, there is still a dearth of study investigating the effects of small screen interfaces on mobile-based learning environments. This study aims to address two objectives: (i investigate lecturer and student difficulties encountered in teaching-learning process in traditional face-to-face classroom settings, and (ii to explore lecturer and student perceptions about learning the subject through mobile devices. This paper presents the results of a qualitative study using structured interviews to investigate lecturer and student experiences and perceptions on teaching and learning Dijkstra’s shortest path algorithm via mobile devices. The interview insights were then used as inputs to define user requirements for a mobile learning prototype. The findings show that the lecturers and students raised many issues about interactivity and the flexibility of effective learning applications on small screen devices, especially for a technical subject.

  18. Live lecture versus video podcast in undergraduate medical education: A randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukuta Junaid

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information technology is finding an increasing role in the training of medical students. We compared information recall and student experience and preference after live lectures and video podcasts in undergraduate medical education. Methods We performed a crossover randomised controlled trial. 100 students were randomised to live lecture or video podcast for one clinical topic. Live lectures were given by the same instructor as the narrator of the video podcasts. The video podcasts comprised Powerpoint™ slides narrated using the same script as the lecture. They were then switched to the other group for a second clinical topic. Knowledge was assessed using multiple choice questions and qualitative information was collected using a questionnaire. Results No significant difference was found on multiple choice questioning immediately after the session. The subjects enjoyed the convenience of the video podcast and the ability to stop, review and repeat it, but found it less engaging as a teaching method. They expressed a clear preference for the live lecture format. Conclusions We suggest that video podcasts are not ready to replace traditional teaching methods, but may have an important role in reinforcing learning and aiding revision.

  19. Live lecture versus video podcast in undergraduate medical education: A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Benjamin E; Fukuta, Junaid; Gordon, Fabiana

    2010-10-08

    Information technology is finding an increasing role in the training of medical students. We compared information recall and student experience and preference after live lectures and video podcasts in undergraduate medical education. We performed a crossover randomised controlled trial. 100 students were randomised to live lecture or video podcast for one clinical topic. Live lectures were given by the same instructor as the narrator of the video podcasts. The video podcasts comprised Powerpoint™ slides narrated using the same script as the lecture. They were then switched to the other group for a second clinical topic. Knowledge was assessed using multiple choice questions and qualitative information was collected using a questionnaire. No significant difference was found on multiple choice questioning immediately after the session. The subjects enjoyed the convenience of the video podcast and the ability to stop, review and repeat it, but found it less engaging as a teaching method. They expressed a clear preference for the live lecture format. We suggest that video podcasts are not ready to replace traditional teaching methods, but may have an important role in reinforcing learning and aiding revision.

  20. Professionalism of Lecturers at Faculty of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangkere, T. F. S.; Langitan, F. W.; Maukar, S. M. D.; Roring, R. F.

    2018-02-01

    The main objective of this research was to get the picture pertaining to the professionalization of Lecturers at Faculty of Education in Manado State University, Indonesia. The research method was naturalistic inquiry with qualitative approach. The research techniques were: deep interview, participative observation and document study. The data were analyzed by: data reduction, data display and conclusions, while the validation of data was done by four criteria, namely: credibility, transferability, dependability and conformability. The collecting procedure and data recording were done through observation and interviews. From the findings and conclusions, it can be identified that professionalization of Lecturers at Faculty of Education in Manado State University has been well processed. This can be proved by fulfillment of the minimum academic standard Ninety-one out of the total l12 lecturers has been certified. Based on conclusions, the researcher recommends that the teacher always develop their capability through increasing their academic qualification, self-development through attending educational trainings, conducting more research and publishing those researches through accredited journals. Dean of every Faculty and also execute supporting activities which will support self-development of the lectures and increase the budget for research of the lecturers.

  1. Interactive lectures: Clickers or personal devices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Lesley J; Joyce, Domino A

    2015-01-01

    Audience response systems ('clickers') are frequently used to promote participation in large lecture classes, and evidence suggests that they convey a number of benefits to students, including improved academic performance and student satisfaction. The limitations of these systems (such as limited access and cost) can be overcome using students' personal electronic devices, such as mobile phones, tablets and laptops together with text message, web- or app-based polling systems. Using questionnaires, we compare student perceptions of clicker and smartphone based polling systems. We find that students prefer interactive lectures generally, but those that used their own device preferred those lectures over lectures using clickers. However, device users were more likely to report using their devices for other purposes (checking email, social media etc.) when they were available to answer polling questions. These students did not feel that this distracted them from the lecture, instead, concerns over the use of smartphones centred around increased battery usage and inclusivity for students without access to suitable technology. Our results suggest that students generally preferred to use their own devices over clickers, and that this may be a sensible way to overcome some of the limitations associated with clickers, although issues surrounding levels of distraction and the implications for retention and recall of information need further investigation.

  2. Active Learning in ASTR 101 Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, Grace L.

    1998-12-01

    The lecture is the most common teaching method used at colleges and universities, but does this format facilitate student learning? Lectures can be brilliantly delivered, but they are received by a passive audience. As time passes during a lecture, student attention and effective notetaking diminish. Many students become more interested in a subject and retain information longer in courses that rely on active rather than passive teaching methods. Interactive teaching strategies such as the think-pair-share-(write), the 3-minute paper, and the misconception confrontation can be used to actively engage students during lecture. As a cooperative learning strategy, the think-pair-share-(write) technique requires active discussion by everyone in the class. The "write" component structures individual accountability into the activity. The 3-minute paper is an expansion of the standard 1-minute paper feedback technique, but is required of all students rather than voluntary or anonymous. The misconception confrontation technique allows students to focus on how their pre- conceived notions differ from the scientific explanation. These techniques can be easily adopted by anyone currently using a standard lecture format for introductory astronomy. The necessary components are a commitment by the instructor to require active participation by all students and a willingness to try new teaching methods.

  3. Vocal intensity in lecturers: Results of measurements conducted during lecture sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Mikulski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Occupational voice users (inter alia: lecturers speak with different levels of vocal intensity. Speakers adjust this intensity knowingly (e.g. to underline the importance of fragments of the speech or unknowingly. The unknown adjustment of voice intensity occurs e.g. in the presence of high acoustic background noise (so-called Lombard effect, but it also results from many other factors: hearing loss, construction of the vocal tract, habits and others. The aim of the article is to confirm the thesis that in similar conditions of acoustic properties of the room different lecturers speak with different levels of vocal intensity. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a group of 10 lecturers in the same conference room. A-weighted sound pressure level determined at 1 m from the lecturer's mouth was adopted as a parameter defining the intensity of the lecturer's voice. The levels of all lecturers' voice intensity were compared and evaluated according to the criteria defined in EN ISO 9921. Results: Nine in ten lecturers were speaking with normal voice intensity (60-65 dB and only one full-time university lecturer was speaking with raised voice (66-71 dB. Conclusions: It was found that in the room of the same acoustic conditions the lecturers spoke with different intensities of voice. Some lecturers occasionally, and one all the time spoke with the voice intensity specified by PN-EN ISO 9921 as a raised voice. The results of the preliminary study warrant further studies in a larger group of teachers. Med Pr 2013;64(6:797–804

  4. Evaluation of a faculty development program aimed at increasing residents' active learning in lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desselle, Bonnie C; English, Robin; Hescock, George; Hauser, Andrea; Roy, Melissa; Yang, Tong; Chauvin, Sheila W

    2012-12-01

    Active engagement in the learning process is important to enhance learners' knowledge acquisition and retention and the development of their thinking skills. This study evaluated whether a 1-hour faculty development workshop increased the use of active teaching strategies and enhanced residents' active learning and thinking. Faculty teaching in a pediatrics residency participated in a 1-hour workshop (intervention) approximately 1 month before a scheduled lecture. Participants' responses to a preworkshop/postworkshop questionnaire targeted self-efficacy (confidence) for facilitating active learning and thinking and providing feedback about workshop quality. Trained observers assessed each lecture (3-month baseline phase and 3-month intervention phase) using an 8-item scale for use of active learning strategies and a 7-item scale for residents' engagement in active learning. Observers also assessed lecturer-resident interactions and the extent to which residents were asked to justify their answers. Responses to the workshop questionnaire (n  =  32/34; 94%) demonstrated effectiveness and increased confidence. Faculty in the intervention phase demonstrated increased use of interactive teaching strategies for 6 items, with 5 reaching statistical significance (P ≤ .01). Residents' active learning behaviors in lectures were higher in the intervention arm for all 7 items, with 5 reaching statistical significance. Faculty in the intervention group demonstrated increased use of higher-order questioning (P  =  .02) and solicited justifications for answers (P  =  .01). A 1-hour faculty development program increased faculty use of active learning strategies and residents' engagement in active learning during resident core curriculum lectures.

  5. Student perceptions of gamified audience response system interactions in large group lectures and via lecture capture technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Robin K; McCoy, Lise; Kinney, Marjorie; Schwartz, Frederic N

    2015-05-22

    Higher education students have positive attitudes about the use of audience response systems (ARS), but even technology-enhanced lessons can become tiresome if the pedagogical approach is exactly the same with each implementation. Gamification is the notion that gaming mechanics can be applied to routine activities. In this study, TurningPoint (TP) ARS interactions were gamified and implemented in 22 large group medical microbiology lectures throughout an integrated year 1 osteopathic medical school curriculum. A 32-item questionnaire was used to measure students' perceptions of the gamified TP interactions at the end of their first year. The survey instrument generated both Likert scale and open-ended response data that addressed game design and variety, engagement and learning features, use of TP questions after class, and any value of lecture capture technology for reviewing these interactive presentations. The Chi Square Test was used to analyze grouped responses to Likert scale questions. Responses to open-ended prompts were categorized using open-coding. Ninety-one students out of 106 (86 %) responded to the survey. A significant majority of the respondents agreed or strongly agreed that the games were engaging, and an effective learning tool. The questionnaire investigated the degree to which specific features of these interactions were engaging (nine items) and promoted learning (seven items). The most highly ranked engagement aspects were peer competition and focus on the activity (tied for highest ranking), and the most highly ranked learning aspect was applying theoretical knowledge to clinical scenarios. Another notable item was the variety of interactions, which ranked in the top three in both the engagement and learning categories. Open-ended comments shed light on how students use TP questions for exam preparation, and revealed engaging and non-engaging attributes of these interactive sessions for students who review them via lecture capture

  6. THE HIGHER SCHOOL LECTURE IN THE CONTEXT OF MODERN EDUCATIONAL PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Zagvyazinsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The current situation in the higher education requires both the extensive implementation of the new information and communications technologies and transformation of traditional forms and ways of teaching. The author emphasizes the vital necessity of redefining the types, functions, and place of the university lecture in educational process along with the related potentials and advantages. While the mere informative outcome of the lecture is losing its position, the functions related to adjustment, methodology, meaning-building, personal development and moral upbringing are likely to get additional meaning and importance. The author demonstrates the advantages of face-to-face communication between a lecturer and a student; the special emphasis is on the problem-setting lectures implementing the interactive techniques and methods. According to the author, the optimum educational methods and technologies require both the unity and integrity of traditional and modern approaches. The rejection of approbated and recognized methods of interpersonal face-to-face communications can generate the technocratic graduates with a selfish attitude to professional activity and lack of individuality.

  7. History Curriculum, Geschichtsdidaktik, and the Problem of the Nation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Parkes

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The field of curriculum studies has become increasingly sensitive to the “effects of global flows, transnational connections, and transcultural interactions” ([1], p. 43, and an international dialogue has begun to take shape between the European bildung-influenced tradition of Didaktiks and the Anglo-American psychologised Curriculum Studies tradition. As it stands, the dialogue has concentrated on a comparative analysis of the traditions at the level of general curriculum theory or Allgemeine Didaktik (see for example, [2], and has rarely, if ever, drilled down into an area of subject-specific pedagogy or fachdidaktiks. This special issue seeks to address this directly, by encouraging a dialogue between various regional and national traditions of history education or Geschichtsdidaktik. [...

  8. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURES QUESTIONNAIRE: SUGGEST AND WIN!

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Time to plan for the 2001-02 lecture series. From today until April 9 you have the chance to give your contribution to improved planning for next year's Academic Training Lectures Series. At the web site: http://wwwinfo/support/survey/academic-training/ you will find questionnaires concerning the following different categories: high energy physics, applied physics, science and society and post-graduate students lectures. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at CERN bookshop.

  9. Optoelectronic lessons as an interdisciplinary lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Wu, Maocheng; Gu, Jihua

    2017-08-01

    It is noticed that more and more students in college are passionately curious about the optoelectronic technology, since optoelectronic technology has advanced extremely quickly during the last five years and its applications could be found in a lot of domains. The students who are interested in this area may have different educational backgrounds and their majors cover science, engineering, literature and social science, etc. Our course "History of the Optoelectronic Technology" is set up as an interdisciplinary lecture of the "liberal education" at our university, and is available for all students with different academic backgrounds from any departments of our university. The main purpose of the course is to show the interesting and colorful historical aspects of the development of this technology, so that the students from different departments could absorb the academic nourishment they wanted. There are little complex derivations of physical formulas through the whole lecture, but there are still some difficulties about the lecture which is discussed in this paper.

  10. Lectures in the history of mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Bos, Henk J M

    1993-01-01

    "[These lectures] are about themes of the history of mathematics which, for various reasons, are dear to me. The early differential and integral calculus, the work of Christiaan Huygens, and the concept of construction in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century mathematics are the three themes around which much of my research has concentrated and which continue to fascinate me by the insights they offer in the development of that special human activity called mathematics." -from the Introduction This volume contains eleven lectures ranging over a variety of topics in the history of mathematics. The lectures, presented between 1970 and 1987, were delivered in a variety of venues and appeared only in less accessible publications. Those who teach mathematics, as well as mathematics historians, will appreciate this insightful, wide-ranging book.

  11. Teaching College Microeconomics: Online vs. Traditional Classroom Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Cynthia; Bennett, Doris; Carter, Shawn

    2013-01-01

    The use of online course offerings in college has grown sharply in recent years. Previous research, while limited, is inconclusive in determining expected student performance in online versus a traditional lecture format. This paper focuses specifically on student performance in introductory microeconomics classes, analyzing learning differences…

  12. Explicit constructivism: a missing link in ineffective lectures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, E S

    2010-06-01

    This study tested the possibility that interactive lectures explicitly based on activating learners' prior knowledge and driven by a series of logical questions might enhance the effectiveness of lectures. A class of 54 students doing the respiratory system course in the second year of the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery program in my university was randomized to two groups to receive one of two types of lectures, "typical" lectures (n = 28, 18 women and 10 men) or "constructivist" lectures (n = 26, 19 women and 7 men), on the same topic: the regulation of respiration. Student pretest scores in the two groups were comparable (P > 0.1). Students that received the constructivist lectures did much better in the posttest conducted immediately after the lectures (6.8 +/- 3.4 for constructivist lectures vs. 4.2 +/- 2.3 for typical lectures, means +/- SD, P = 0.004). Although both types of lectures were well received, students that received the constructivist lectures appeared to have been more satisfied with their learning experience. However, on a posttest conducted 4 mo later, scores obtained by students in the two groups were not any different (6.9 +/- 3 for constructivist lectures vs. 6.9 +/- 3.7 for typical lectures, P = 0.94). This study adds to the increasing body of evidence that there is a case for the use of interactive lectures that make the construction of knowledge and understanding explicit, easy, and enjoyable to learners.

  13. On performing concepts during science lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzer-Ardenghi, Lilian; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2007-01-01

    When lecturing, teachers make use of both verbal and nonverbal communication. What is called teaching, therefore, involves not only the words and sentences a teacher utters and writes on the board during a lesson, but also all the hands/arms gestures, body movements, and facial expressions a teacher performs in the classroom. All of these communicative modalities constitute resources that are made available to students for making sense of and learning from lectures. Yet in the literature on teaching science, these other means of communication are little investigated and understood - and, correspondingly, they are undertheorized. The purpose of this position paper is to argue for a different view of concepts in lectures: they are performed simultaneously drawing on and producing multiple resources that are different expressions of the same holistic meaning unit. To support our point, we provide examples from a database of 26 lectures in a 12th-grade biology class, where the human body was the main topic of study. We analyze how different types of resources - including verbal and nonverbal discourse and various material artifacts - interact during lectures. We provide evidence for the unified production of these various sense-making resources during teaching to constitute a meaning unit, and we emphasize particularly the use of gestures and body orientations inside this meaning unit. We suggest that proper analyses of meaning units need to take into account not only language and diagrams but also a lecturer's pointing and depicting gestures, body positions, and the relationships between these different modalities. Scientific knowledge (conceptions) exists in the concurrent display of all sense-making resources, which we, following Vygotsky, understand as forming a unit (identity) of nonidentical entities.

  14. Prospective randomized comparison of standard didactic lecture versus high-fidelity simulation for radiology resident contrast reaction management training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Carolyn L; Schopp, Jennifer G; Petscavage, Jonelle M; Paladin, Angelisa M; Richardson, Michael L; Bush, William H

    2011-06-01

    The objective of our study was to assess whether high-fidelity simulation-based training is more effective than traditional didactic lecture to train radiology residents in the management of contrast reactions. This was a prospective study of 44 radiology residents randomized into a simulation group versus a lecture group. All residents attended a contrast reaction didactic lecture. Four months later, baseline knowledge was assessed with a written test, which we refer to as the "pretest." After the pretest, the 21 residents in the lecture group attended a repeat didactic lecture and the 23 residents in the simulation group underwent high-fidelity simulation-based training with five contrast reaction scenarios. Next, all residents took a second written test, which we refer to as the "posttest." Two months after the posttest, both groups took a third written test, which we refer to as the "delayed posttest," and underwent performance testing with a high-fidelity severe contrast reaction scenario graded on predefined critical actions. There was no statistically significant difference between the simulation and lecture group pretest, immediate posttest, or delayed posttest scores. The simulation group performed better than the lecture group on the severe contrast reaction simulation scenario (p = 0.001). The simulation group reported improved comfort in identifying and managing contrast reactions and administering medications after the simulation training (p ≤ 0.04) and was more comfortable than the control group (p = 0.03), which reported no change in comfort level after the repeat didactic lecture. When compared with didactic lecture, high-fidelity simulation-based training of contrast reaction management shows equal results on written test scores but improved performance during a high-fidelity severe contrast reaction simulation scenario.

  15. Rawls on Dewey before the Dewey Lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    This article sheds light on John Rawls's views on John Dewey's philosophical temperament by investigating unpublished papers and lectures that Rawls wrote and delivered across the late 1940s, the 1950s, the 1960s, and the early 1970s. Moreover, the article shows that Rawls's rejection of Kant's dualisms predates by at least three decades the "Dewey Lectures" (1980) and that Dewey's notion of deliberation as "dramatic rehearsal in imagination" might have had an impact on Rawls's development of the notion of "reflective equilibrium" as a state of affairs that we strive to reach in ethical reflection.

  16. Algorithms and Data Structures (lecture 1)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    Algorithms have existed, in one form or another, for as long as humanity has. During the second half of the 20th century, the field was revolutionised with the introduction of ever faster computers. In these lectures we discuss how algorithms are designed, how to evaluate their speed, and how to identify areas of improvement in existing algorithms. An algorithm consists of more than just a series of instructions; almost as important is the memory structure of the data on which it operates. A part of the lectures will be dedicated to a discussion of the various ways one can store data in memory, and their advantages and disadvantages.

  17. Algorithms and Data Structures (lecture 2)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    Algorithms have existed, in one form or another, for as long as humanity has. During the second half of the 20th century, the field was revolutionised with the introduction of ever faster computers. In these lectures we discuss how algorithms are designed, how to evaluate their speed, and how to identify areas of improvement in existing algorithms. An algorithm consists of more than just a series of instructions; almost as important is the memory structure of the data on which it operates. A part of the lectures will be dedicated to a discussion of the various ways one can store data in memory, and their advantages and disadvantages.

  18. Medical Education and Curriculum Reform: Putting Reform Proposals in Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Kam Yin Chan, MD, MB.BS, MHA

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to elaborate criteria by which the principles of curriculum reform can be judged. To this end, the paper presents an overview of standard critiques of medical education and examines the ways medical curriculum reforms have responded to these critiques. The paper then sets out our assessment of these curriculum reforms along three parameters: pedagogy, educational context, and knowledge status. Following on from this evaluation of recent curriculum reforms, the paper puts forward four criteria with which to gauge the adequacy medical curriculum reform. These criteria enable us to question the extent to which new curricula incorporate methods and approaches for ensuring that its substance: overcomes the traditional opposition between clinical and resource dimensions of care; emphasizes that the clinical work needs to be systematized in so far as that it feasible; promotes multi-disciplinary team work, and balances clinical autonomy with accountability to non-clinical stakeholders.

  19. Music during Lectures: Will Students Learn Better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosseville, Fabrice; Laborde, Sylvain; Scelles, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the influence of music during learning on the academic performance of undergraduate students, and more particularly the influence of affects induced by music. Altogether 249 students were involved in the study, divided into a control group and an experimental group. Both groups attended the same videotaped lecture, with the…

  20. Academic Training: Summer Student Lecture Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 19 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH (IFIC) The Standard Model (1/8) 10:15 - 11:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (2/5) 11:15 - 12:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (3/5) DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Tuesday 20 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH (IFIC) The Standard Model (2/8) 10:15 - 11:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (4/5) 11:15 - 12:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) A. PICH (IFIC) Discussion Session DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 21 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH (IFIC) The Standard Model (3/8) 10:15 - 11:00 A. PICH (IFIC) The Standard Model (4/8) 11:15 - 12:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (5/5) 14:00 - 15:00 R. BRUN (CERN) ROOT: Introduction and Demonstration DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Thursday 22 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH (IFIC) The Standard Model (5/8) 10:15 - 11:00 C. De La Taille (Laboratoire de l'Accélérateur Linéaire) Introduction to Electronics (1/3) 11:15 - 12:00 A. PICH (IFIC) C. De La Taille (Laboratoi...

  1. Academic Training: Summer Student Lecture Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 26 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. Pich (IFIC) The Standard Model (7/8) 10:15 - 11:00 R. Rattazzi (CERN) Beyond the Standard Model (1/3) 11:15 - 12:00 K. Jacobs (Universität Freiburg) Physics in Hadronic Colliders (1/4) DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Tuesday 27 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. Pich (IFIC) The Standard Model (8/8) 10:15 - 11:00 R. Rattazzi (CERN) Beyond the Standard Model (2/3) 11:15 - 12:00 R. Rattazzi (CERN) A. Pich (IFIC) Discussion Session DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 28 July 09:15 - 10:00 K. Jacobs (Universität Freiburg) Physics in Hadronic Colliders (2/4) 10:15 - 11:00 K. Jacobs (Universität Freiburg) Physics in Hadronic Colliders (3/4) 11:15 - 12:00 R. Rattazzi (CERN) Beyond the Standard Model (3/3) 14:00 - 15:00 R. Assmann (CERN) The CLIC project DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Thursday 29 July 09:15 - 10:00 K. Jacobs (Universität Freiburg) Physics in Hadronic ...

  2. Movement and Character. Lecture, London, 1946

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesorri, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Montessori's words from the 1946 London Lectures describe principles of intelligence and character, the work of the hand, and movement with a purpose as being integral to self-construction. The perfection of movement is spiritual, says Dr. Montessori. Repetition of practical life exercises are exercises in movement with the dignity of human…

  3. Introductory lectures on quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez-Gaume, L.; Vasquez-Mozo, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    In these lectures we present a few topics in quantum field theory in detail. Some of them are conceptual and some more practical. They have been selected because they appear frequently in current applications to particle physics and string theory. (author)

  4. Lectures on quantization of gauge systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reshetikhin, N.; Booß-Bavnbek, B.; Esposito, G.; Lesch, M.

    2010-01-01

    A gauge system is a classical field theory where among the fields there are connections in a principal G-bundle over the space - time manifold and the classical action is either invariant or transforms appropriately with respect to the action of the gauge group. The lectures are focused on the path

  5. PEER INTERACTIONS AND POSITIVE STUDENT-LECTURER ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper sets out to interrogate the role played by peer interactions in the teaching and learning of College Algebra in a classroom setting. It also explores the impact of positive student-lecturer relationship on teaching and learning of College Algebra at the university level and the general improvement of student ...

  6. Lecture notes for Advanced Time Series Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik; Holst, Jan

    1997-01-01

    A first version of this notes was used at the lectures in Grenoble, and they are now extended and improved (together with Jan Holst), and used in Ph.D. courses on Advanced Time Series Analysis at IMM and at the Department of Mathematical Statistics, University of Lund, 1994, 1997, ...

  7. Lectures on controlled topology: Mapping cylinder neighborhoods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, F [Department of Mathematics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2002-08-15

    The existence theorem for mapping cylinder neighborhoods is discussed as a prototypical example of controlled topology and its applications. The first of a projected series developed from lectures at the Summer School on High-Dimensional Topology, Trieste, Italy 2001. (author)

  8. Lectures on controlled topology: Mapping cylinder neighborhoods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, F.

    2002-01-01

    The existence theorem for mapping cylinder neighborhoods is discussed as a prototypical example of controlled topology and its applications. The first of a projected series developed from lectures at the Summer School on High-Dimensional Topology, Trieste, Italy 2001. (author)

  9. Electromechanical Engineering Technology Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia State Univ., Atlanta. Dept. of Vocational and Career Development.

    This guide offers information and procedures necessary to train electromechanical engineering technicians. Discussed first are the rationale and objectives of the curriculum. The occupational field of electromechanical engineering technology is described. Next, a curriculum model is set forth that contains information on the standard…

  10. Mountain-Plains Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountain-Plains Education and Economic Development Program, Inc., Glasgow AFB, MT.

    The document lists the Mountain-Plains curriculum by job title (where applicable), including support courses. The curriculum areas covered are mathematics skills, communication skills, office education, lodging services, food services, marketing and distribution, welding support, automotive, small engines, career guidance, World of Work, health…

  11. The Galapagos Jason Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Science Teachers Association, Arlington, VA.

    The JASON Curriculum Project materials are designed to prepare teachers and students for an exploration around the Galapagos Islands via satellite transmission of live images and sound. This curriculum package contains five units, 25 lesson plans, and over 50 activities, along with teacher background material, student worksheets and readings, a…

  12. Equasions for Curriculum Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckenrod, James S.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the Technology in Curriculum (TIC) program resource guides which will be distributed to California schools in the fall of 1986. These guides match available instructional television programs and computer software to existing California curriculum guides in order to facilitate teachers' classroom use. (JDH)

  13. Introducing a technology-enabled problem-based learning approach into a health informatics curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Carolyn J; van Gyn, Geraldine H; Moehr, Jochen R; Lau, Francis Y; Coward, Patricia M

    2004-03-18

    To investigate the effect on learner satisfaction of introducing a technology-enabled problem-based learning (PBL) approach into a health informatics curriculum. Course redesign was undertaken to prepare students for three 4-month work terms and a rapidly changing professional environment upon graduation. Twenty-six Canadian undergraduate students of a redesigned course in biomedical fundamentals completed a midterm questionnaire in 2002. Eight of these students participated in a focus group. Students agreed that seven of nine functions provided by the web-based online course management system enhanced their learning: private email (92.3%), calendaring (88.5%), course notes (88.5%), discussion forums (84.5%), online grades (84.5%) assignment descriptions (80.8%) and online quizzes (80.8%). Although students agreed that two PBL activities enhanced learning (learning to present information) (84.5%) and learning to identify information needed (73.1%), the majority of students (69.2%) expressed a preference for the traditional lecture approach over the PBL approach. Students reported feeling uncertain of what was required of them and related anxiety accounted for most of the negative feedback. These findings give us clear goals for improvement in the course beginning with a comprehensive, carefully guided introduction to the processes of PBL. The positive trends are encouraging for the use of web-enabled courseware and for the further development of the PBL approach.

  14. Generating alternatives in nursing: turning curriculum into a living process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J; Moss, C

    The transfer of nursing education into higher education institutions is challenging nurses to re-think educational structures and processes. Traditionally, nursing education has used objective curriculum models which tend to reinforce bureaucratic rather than professional values. Critics suggest that these models, by their failure to incorporate social, political and cultural realities, contribute to theory-practice dichotomies. This paper shares the intentions of Deakin University's School of Nursing in developing alternative approaches to curriculum design and to learning and practising nursing.

  15. Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK): Exploring its Usefulness for Science Lecturers in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Sharon P.

    2016-02-01

    In the past 30 years, pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) frameworks have become important constructs in educational research undertaken in the school education system and a focus for research for curriculum and teacher education researchers. As regards science, PCK research has been plentiful, but thus far, the concept of PCK (significantly enhanced since its proposal) has only been validated in the school context (Kindergarten to Grade 12). Within this environment, however, it has proven to be a very useful construct for understanding teacher practice and contributing to the improvement of teacher education courses. Knowledge about whether PCK is useful as a conceptual framework for science lecturers (teachers) working in higher education is as yet unknown and represents a gap in the research literature; the research outlined here is a first step in exploring its usefulness in this context. This paper provides an analysis of data obtained from semi-structured interviews conducted with nine Australian science university lecturers from various disciplines and levels of seniority and experience of tertiary teaching, as well as an academic developer skilled in facilitating science academics' understanding of pedagogy in higher education. The research aimed to investigate the extent to which one version of a school-based science PCK framework resonated with the pedagogical thinking of university science lecturers and the ways in which it could influence their teaching practice.

  16. Programmed Multi-Image Lectures for College Biology Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, William A.; Knauft, Robert L.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the use of a programed multi-image lecture approach for teaching a botany course to nonmajor students at the University of California, Berkeley. Also considers the advantages, production, method of presentation, and design of the multimedia lectures. (HM)

  17. Lecture note on circuit technology for high energy physics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Hirokazu.

    1992-07-01

    This lecture gives basic ideas and practice of the circuit technology for high energy physics experiment. The program of this lecture gives access to the integrated circuit technology to be applied for a high luminosity hadron collider experiment. (author)

  18. The Effect of Interactive Lecture Demonstrations on Students' Understanding of Heat and Temperature: A Study from Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanahoung, Choksin; Chitaree, Ratchapak; Soankwan, Chernchok; Sharma, Manjula D.; Johnston, Ian D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of Interactive Lecture Demonstrations over traditional instruction on university students' understanding of heat and temperature. The participants were 327 first year undergraduate students from two science classes in two academic years from the same university in Thailand. One class…

  19. Effectiveness of a 2-year menopause medicine curriculum for obstetrics and gynecology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Mindy S; Washington, Chantel I; Stewart, Katherine I; Shen, Wen

    2016-03-01

    Previous work has shown American obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) residents are lacking in menopause training. Our objective was to assess the effectiveness of a 2-year menopause medicine curriculum in improving OB/GYN residents' knowledge and self-assessed competency in menopause topics. We developed a menopause medicine-teaching curriculum for OB/GYN residents at our academic hospital-based residency program. The 2-year curriculum was composed of year 1: four 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab with cases presentations, and year 2: three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab. Core topics included menopause physiology, hormone therapy, breast health, bone health, cardiovascular disease, and autoimmune disease. Pre- and posttests assessed resident knowledge and comfort in core topics, and a pre- and postcurriculum survey assessed utility and learning satisfaction. From July 2011 to June 2013, 34 OB/GYN residents completed the menopause curriculum annually with an average attendance at each module of 23 residents. Pre-/posttest scores improved from a mean pretest score of 57.3% to a mean posttest score of 78.7% (P menopause patients with 75.8% reporting feeling "barely comfortable" and 8.4% feeling "not at all comfortable." After the 2-year curriculum, 85.7% reported feeling "comfortable/very comfortable" taking care of menopause patients. The majority of residents (95.2%) reported the menopause curriculum was "extremely useful." A 2-year menopause medicine curriculum for OB/GYN residents utilizing lectures and a lab with case studies is an effective modality to improve resident knowledge required to manage menopause patients.

  20. Barriers to implementing a health policy curriculum in medical schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed R

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Raihan Mohammed, Jamil Shah Foridi, Innocent OgunmwonyiFaculty of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UKAs clinical medical students, we read with great interest the perspective by Malik et al.1 Although medical schools excel at educating students on the pathology and treatment of diseases, we agree on the severe deficiency in teaching health policy (HP in the medical curriculum. However, the authors fail to include challenges facing this implementation, which is an important aspect of the analysis. Thus, here we outline 3 key barriers that must be considered when including HP teaching in the medical curricula.First, as the authors mention, the medical curriculum is already saturated and there is insufficient space to add obligatory HP learning in timetables. The UK curriculum is so packed that lecturers resort to teaching facts, which students then rote-learn and commit to memory. This leaves little time for students to develop a deep understanding of the pathophysiology of diseases and subsequent management, and they also fail to develop core lifelong skills, including problem solving and critical thinking.2 It is well acknowledged that the medical course is extremely rigorous, and up to 90% of students have admitted to suffering from stress and up to 75% have complained of burnout.3 With mental health issues among students reaching epidemic levels, adding HP lectures to the timetable would put undue strain on both the medical school curricula and the students.View the original article by Malik et al.

  1. Systemic Changes in the Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum Program Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-07-01

    years of the chemistry curriculum, start with interdisciplinary questions important to students and to society (the molecular basis of life, the environment, technology), and in answering them develop an appreciation of how science is actually done. This approach is designed to reach a broader student audience more effectively than do traditional courses, an audience that includes students who are members of groups traditionally underrepresented in science, nonscience majors, and those taking chemistry as a supporting course, as well as chemistry majors. By providing a model for students preparing for careers in teaching, this approach has an impact on Teacher Preparation Programs. Collaboration among faculty from different disciplines and a number of institutions supports and reinforces those who want to make changes. These leading liberal arts colleges (Beloit, Carleton, Colorado, Grinnell, Hope, Kalamazoo, Knox, Lawrence, Macalester, Rhodes, Spelman, St. Olaf, Wooster) and research universities (Chicago, Washington - St. Louis) already have experience working together on chemistry curricular reform. An alliance with the Advanced Technology Environmental Education Center's coalition of 2-year institutions assures an impact on Advanced Technology Education Programs. By using the extensive Project Kaleidoscope network to promote reform, the ChemLinks Coalition involves a much larger and more diverse group of institutions in making systemic and sustainable changes in undergraduate chemistry education. A Workshop Chemistry Curriculum David K. Gosser CUNY City College, New York, NY 10031 DUE 9455920: FY1995, 425,000; FY1996, 400,000; FY1997, 400,000; FY1998, 150,000; FY1999, 150,000 The City College Consortium, which includes ten senior and community colleges at the City University of New York, and the Universities of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Rochester, is developing and applying widely a new model of teaching. This model, called Workshop Chemistry, introduces

  2. 45 CFR 73.735-706 - Teaching, lecturing, and speechmaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Teaching, lecturing, and speechmaking. 73.735-706... OF CONDUCT Outside Activities § 73.735-706 Teaching, lecturing, and speechmaking. (a) Employees are encouraged to engage in teaching and lecturing activities which are not part of their official duties when...

  3. The Lecture as a Transmedial Pedagogical Form: A Historical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Norm

    2011-01-01

    The lecture has been much maligned as a pedagogical form, yet it persists and even flourishes today in the form of the podcast, the TED talk, and the "smart" lecture hall. This article examines the lecture as a pedagogical genre, as "a site where differences between media are negotiated" (Franzel) as these media coevolve. This examination shows…

  4. Lecture on Female Masturbation Harassed Him, Male Student Says.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robin

    1995-01-01

    A male student in a California State University-Sacramento psychology lecture on female masturbation has filed a sexual harassment complaint, claiming the lecture violated institutional policy by creating an intimidating, hostile, and offensive learning environment. He felt the lecture was inappropriately graphic and political in intent. (MSE)

  5. Advice for New and Student Lecturers on Probability and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    Lecture is a common presentation style that gives instructors a lot of control over topics and time allocation, but can limit active student participation and learning. This article presents some ideas to increase the level of student involvement in lecture. The examples and suggestions are based on the author's experience as a senior lecturer for…

  6. Lecturers' Experience of Using Social Media in Higher Education Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seechaliao, Thapanee

    2015-01-01

    This research paper presents lecturers' experience of using social media in higher education courses. The research methodology used a survey approach. The research instrument was a questionnaire about lecturers' experience of using social media in higher education courses. Thirty-one lecturers completed the questionnaire. The data were scored by…

  7. Taxonomy of Lecture Note-Taking Skills and Subskills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Musalli, Alaa M.

    2015-01-01

    Note taking (NT) in lectures is as active a skill as listening, which stimulates it, and as challenging as writing, which is the end product. Literature on lecture NT misses an integration of the processes involved in listening with those in NT. In this article, a taxonomy is proposed of lecture NT skills and subskills based on a similar list…

  8. Student Use of Mobile Devices in University Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Neil; Rees, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mobile devices are increasingly used by students in university lectures. This has resulted in controversy and the banning of mobile devices in some lectures. Although there has been some research into how students use laptop computers in lectures, there has been little investigation into the wider use of mobile devices. This study was designed to…

  9. The Effect of Instant Messaging on Lecture Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVaugh, Nathan Kant

    2012-01-01

    The impact of instant message interruptions via computer on immediate lecture retention for college students was examined. While watching a 24-minute video of a classroom lecture, students received various numbers of related-to-lecture ("Is consistent use of the eye contact method necessary for success?") versus not-related-to lecture…

  10. The American Society for Radiation Oncology's 2010 core physics curriculum for radiation oncology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ying; Bernstein, Karen De Amorim; Chetty, Indrin J; Eifel, Patricia; Hughes, Lesley; Klein, Eric E; McDermott, Patrick; Prisciandaro, Joann; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Price, Robert A; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Palta, Jatinder R

    2011-11-15

    In 2004, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) published its first physics education curriculum for residents, which was updated in 2007. A committee composed of physicists and physicians from various residency program teaching institutions was reconvened again to update the curriculum in 2009. Members of this committee have associations with ASTRO, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology, the American Board of Radiology (ABR), and the American College of Radiology. Members reviewed and updated assigned subjects from the last curriculum. The updated curriculum was carefully reviewed by a representative from the ABR and other physics and clinical experts. The new curriculum resulted in a recommended 56-h course, excluding initial orientation. Learning objectives are provided for each subject area, and a detailed outline of material to be covered is given for each lecture hour. Some recent changes in the curriculum include the addition of Radiation Incidents and Bioterrorism Response Training as a subject and updates that reflect new treatment techniques and modalities in a number of core subjects. The new curriculum was approved by the ASTRO board in April 2010. We anticipate that physicists will use this curriculum for structuring their teaching programs, and subsequently the ABR will adopt this educational program for its written examination. Currently, the American College of Radiology uses the ASTRO curriculum for their training examination topics. In addition to the curriculum, the committee updated suggested references and the glossary. The ASTRO physics education curriculum for radiation oncology residents has been updated. To ensure continued commitment to a current and relevant curriculum, the subject matter will be updated again in 2 years. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The American Society for Radiation Oncology’s 2010 Core Physics Curriculum for Radiation Oncology Residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Ying; De Amorim Bernstein, Karen; Chetty, Indrin J.; Eifel, Patricia; Hughes, Lesley; Klein, Eric E.; McDermott, Patrick; Prisciandaro, Joann; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Price, Robert A.; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Palta, Jatinder R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In 2004, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) published its first physics education curriculum for residents, which was updated in 2007. A committee composed of physicists and physicians from various residency program teaching institutions was reconvened again to update the curriculum in 2009. Methods and Materials: Members of this committee have associations with ASTRO, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology, the American Board of Radiology (ABR), and the American College of Radiology. Members reviewed and updated assigned subjects from the last curriculum. The updated curriculum was carefully reviewed by a representative from the ABR and other physics and clinical experts. Results: The new curriculum resulted in a recommended 56-h course, excluding initial orientation. Learning objectives are provided for each subject area, and a detailed outline of material to be covered is given for each lecture hour. Some recent changes in the curriculum include the addition of Radiation Incidents and Bioterrorism Response Training as a subject and updates that reflect new treatment techniques and modalities in a number of core subjects. The new curriculum was approved by the ASTRO board in April 2010. We anticipate that physicists will use this curriculum for structuring their teaching programs, and subsequently the ABR will adopt this educational program for its written examination. Currently, the American College of Radiology uses the ASTRO curriculum for their training examination topics. In addition to the curriculum, the committee updated suggested references and the glossary. Conclusions: The ASTRO physics education curriculum for radiation oncology residents has been updated. To ensure continued commitment to a current and relevant curriculum, the subject matter will be updated again in 2 years.

  12. Thematic curriculum approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šefer Jasmina P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Thematic curriculum combines disciplines and media. The process is problem-oriented and the scenario most often follows the logic of exploring or storytelling. Those two approaches to teaching are appropriate because they fit into interdisciplinary and creative open-ended problem solving through play, as insisted upon by thematic curriculum. The matrix, where seven types of abilities intersect with five types of problems according to their degree of openness, defines well the outcomes of teaching. However, it did not prove to be suitable for planning the majority of activities in thematic curriculum, for it follows with difficulty the process of exploring or storytelling i.e. it disrupts the subject matter coherence of thematic curriculum. Therefore, it is suggested that matrix should be used for disciplinary curriculum planning but for that of thematic curriculum only in exclusive cases. The matrix should be used primarily as a framework for evaluating the distribution of various types of abilities and problem situations in teaching. The logic of diverse approaches to teaching reflects itself in the manner of planning and organizing the teaching process. Conceptual, visual-graphic, structural and other aids employed during educational process planning should suit the nature of the approach chosen. On the basis of qualitative investigations of educational process, in the present paper considerations are given to various approaches to teaching development of various drafts for the planning of teaching, and recognition of the logic of storytelling and exploring in thematic curriculum.

  13. Teaching Tree Thinking in an Upper Level Organismal Biology Course: Testing the Effectiveness of a Multifaceted Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, Laura R.; Catley, Kefyn M.

    2018-01-01

    The ability to interpret and reason from Tree of Life diagrams is a key component of twenty-first century science literacy. This article reports on the authors' continued development of a multifaceted research-based curriculum--including an instructional booklet, lectures, laboratories and a field activity--to teach such tree thinking to biology…

  14. Racism as a Unique Social Determinant of Mental Health: Development of a Didactic Curriculum for Psychiatry Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medlock, Morgan; Weissman, Anna; Wong, Shane Shucheng; Carlo, Andrew; Zeng, Mary; Borba, Christina; Curry, Michael; Shtasel, Derri

    2017-01-01

    Mental health disparities based on minority racial status are well characterized, including inequities in access, symptom severity, diagnosis, and treatment. For African Americans, racism may affect mental health through factors such as poverty and segregation, which have operated since slavery. While the need to address racism in medical training has been recognized, there are few examples of formal didactic curricula in the psychiatric literature. Antiracism didactics during psychiatry residency provide a unique opportunity to equip physicians to address bias and racism in mental health care. With advocacy by residents in the Massachusetts General Hospital/McLean Psychiatry residency program, the Division of Public and Community Psychiatry developed a curriculum addressing racial inequities in mental health, particularly those experienced by African Americans. Four 50-minute interactive didactic lectures were integrated into the required didactic curriculum (one lecture per postgraduate training class) during the 2015-2016 academic year. Of residents who attended lectures and provided anonymous feedback, 97% agreed that discussing racism in formal didactics was at least "somewhat" positive, and 92% agreed that it should "probably" or "definitely" remain in the curriculum. Qualitative feedback centered on a need for more time to discuss racism as well as a desire to learn more about minority mental health advocacy in general. Teaching about racism as part of required training conveys the explicit message that this is core curricular material and critical knowledge for all physicians. These lectures can serve as a springboard for dissemination and provide scaffolding for similar curriculum development in medical residency programs.

  15. Curriculum Evaluation in Online Education: The Case of Teacher Candidates Preparing Online for Public Personnel Selection Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacaoglu, Ömer Cem

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate the efficiency of an online curriculum based on the views of lecturers and students enrolled in the program. The study is mainly based on survey method. In order to collect qualitative data, interviews forms developed by the researcher were used. The reliability and validity of the interview forms were…

  16. Effect of Personal Response Systems on Student Perception and Academic Performance in Courses in a Health Sciences Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzPatrick, Kathleen A.; Finn, Kevin E.; Campisi, Jay

    2011-01-01

    To increase student engagement, active participation, and performance, personal response systems (clickers) were incorporated into six lecture-based sections of four required courses within the Health Sciences Department major curriculum: freshman-level Anatomy and Physiology I and II, junior-level Exercise Physiology, and senior-level Human…

  17. Engaging Stakeholders in Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jo Nell

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the importance of parent and community engagement in curriculum development, along with curriculum leadership, engaging stakeholders, and the importance of curriculum. Parent and community member engagement is examined in light of curriculum committee participation as reported by Missouri superintendents. Survey responses…

  18. Comparison of the effect of lecture and blended teaching methods on students' learning and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Roya; Sedaghat, Mohammad Mehdi; Sha Ahmadi, Faramarz

    2014-10-01

    Blended learning, a new approach in educational planning, is defined as an applying more than one method, strategy, technique or media in education. Todays, due to the development of infrastructure of Internet networks and the access of most of the students, the Internet can be utilized along with traditional and conventional methods of training. The aim of this study was to compare the students' learning and satisfaction in combination of lecture and e-learning with conventional lecture methods. This quasi-experimental study is conducted among the sophomore students of Public Health School, Tehran University of Medical Science in 2012-2013. Four classes of the school are randomly selected and are divided into two groups. Education in two classes (45 students) was in the form of lecture method and in the other two classes (48 students) was blended method with e-Learning and lecture methods. The students' knowledge about tuberculosis in two groups was collected and measured by using pre and post-test. This step has been done by sending self-reported electronic questionnaires to the students' email addresses through Google Document software. At the end of educational programs, students' satisfaction and comments about two methods were also collected by questionnaires. Statistical tests such as descriptive methods, paired t-test, independent t-test and ANOVA were done through the SPSS 14 software, and p≤0.05 was considered as significant difference. The mean scores of the lecture and blended groups were 13.18±1.37 and 13.35±1.36, respectively; the difference between the pre-test scores of the two groups was not statistically significant (p=0.535). Knowledge scores increased in both groups after training, and the mean and standard deviation of knowledge scores of the lectures and combined groups were 16.51±0.69 and 16.18±1.06, respectively. The difference between the post-test scores of the two groups was not statistically significant (p=0.112). Students

  19. Comparison of the effect of lecture and blended teaching methods on students’ learning and satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    SADEGHI, ROYA; SEDAGHAT, MOHAMMAD MEHDI; SHA AHMADI, FARAMARZ

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Blended learning, a new approach in educational planning, is defined as an applying more than one method, strategy, technique or media in education. Todays, due to the development of infrastructure of Internet networks and the access of most of the students, the Internet can be utilized along with traditional and conventional methods of training. The aim of this study was to compare the students’ learning and satisfaction in combination of lecture and e-learning with conventional lecture methods. Methods: This quasi-experimental study is conducted among the sophomore students of Public Health School, Tehran University of Medical Science in 2012-2013. Four classes of the school are randomly selected and are divided into two groups. Education in two classes (45 students) was in the form of lecture method and in the other two classes (48 students) was blended method with e-Learning and lecture methods. The students’ knowledge about tuberculosis in two groups was collected and measured by using pre and post-test. This step has been done by sending self-reported electronic questionnaires to the students' email addresses through Google Document software. At the end of educational programs, students' satisfaction and comments about two methods were also collected by questionnaires. Statistical tests such as descriptive methods, paired t-test, independent t-test and ANOVA were done through the SPSS 14 software, and p≤0.05 was considered as significant difference. Results: The mean scores of the lecture and blended groups were 13.18±1.37 and 13.35±1.36, respectively; the difference between the pre-test scores of the two groups was not statistically significant (p=0.535). Knowledge scores increased in both groups after training, and the mean and standard deviation of knowledge scores of the lectures and combined groups were 16.51±0.69 and 16.18±1.06, respectively. The difference between the post-test scores of the two groups was not statistically

  20. Comparison of effectiveness of class lecture versus workshop-based teaching of basic life support on acquiring practice skills among the health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Habib Md Reazaul; Yunus, Md; Bhattacharyya, Prithwis; Ahmed, Ghazal

    2016-01-01

    Basic life support (BLS) is an integral part of emergency medical care. Studies have shown poor knowledge of it among health care providers who are usually taught BLS by lecture-based teachings in classes. This study is designed to assess the effectiveness of class lecture versus workshop-based teaching of BLS on acquiring the practice skills on mannequin. After ethical approval and informed consent from the participants, the present study was conducted among the health care providers. Participants were grouped in lecture-based class teaching and workshop-based teaching. They were then asked to practice BLS on mannequin (Resusci Anne with QCPR) and evaluated as per performance parameters based on American Heart Association BLS. Statistical analyses are done by Fisher's exact t-test using GraphPad INSTAT software and P 0.05). Though more than 83% of lecture-based teaching group has started chest compression as compared 96% of workshop group; only 49% of the participants of lecture-based group performed quality chest compression as compared to 82% of other group (P = 0.0005). The workshop group also performed better bag mask ventilation and defibrillation (P < 0.0001). Workshop-based BLS teaching is more effective and lecture-based class teaching better is replaced in medical education curriculum.