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Sample records for traditional japanese music

  1. A MISCELLANY ON INDIAN TRADITIONAL MUSIC

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    Rauf Kerimov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Indian music has a very long, unbroken tradition and is an accumulated heritage of centuries. Music in India was popular among all the sections of society and intertwined in life and culture from birth to death. Indian music was formed with the evolution of ancient religious and secular music. The Indian culture absorbed all the best that was brought by other nations in the process of historical development. The Indian music is quite diverse: there are classical instrumental and vocal works and traditional singing of sacred hymns, folk songs and music of different nations. In contrast to the music scholarship, where typically image is a certain regularity, discipline and harmony, beauty of the traditional Indian music in the free improvisation, which is used by the performer. Listening carefully of this music, the man in a new world, a different sounds and explore a different idea of music for himself. The aim of the Indian music, unlike European musical culture define, explore, create and move depths to people's moods. And the Indian instruments is a miracle, that could reflect all these philosophical and aesthetic views. Along with the vocal art, this musical tradition has rich variety of melodic and rhythmic instruments.

  2. The teaching of music history in Japanese music education

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    Midori Sonoda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the leading institutions in the field of musicology in Japan is the one hosted by “Tokyo University of the Arts” (previously Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music. The musicology course, started in 1949, was, and still is, the main promoter of music history teaching in the Japanese university system. A reflection on the over 60 years of its existence, which has been characterized by the fortunate coexistence of musicology students and students of ‘practical’ musical courses, might contribute to raise awareness among European musicologists about the pedagogic-didactic task that is expected of them in the current situation of Western musical culture.

  3. Vulgarization of popular music tradition in Serbia

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    Božilović, Nikola

    2011-01-01

    The vulgarization of tradition in this paper implies the alteration, false representation, and adaptation of tradition in line with the interests of certain individuals or groups in power. The author observes popular music in Serbia (jazz, pop, rock) under a sociological magnifying glass, attempting to explain and motivate the thesis which proposes a valid historical foundation of popular culture and music in the social life of Serbia. In his opinion, this kind of tradition is being 'swept un...

  4. Psychotherapeutic Function of the Kazakh Traditional Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakerimova, Zere S.; Nussupova, Aizada S.; Burambaeva, Maryam N.; Yermanov, Zhanat R.; Emreyeva, Akmaral E.; Janseitova, Sveta S.

    2016-01-01

    This article considers the psychotherapeutic parameters of traditional Kazakh music, best practices that were achieved in practical psychology. From the one hand, it allows us to see the music features in a new light, and from the other hand--to identify the ethnic psychology of the Kazakh nation. An important step in the study of the…

  5. Reception of the Istrian musical tradition(s

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    Marušić Dario

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The successive colonization of Istria with culturally differentiated populations, and peripheral position of the peninsula regarding both the Latin and Slav worlds, has conditioned interesting phenomena which defines the traditional life of the province. On the spiritual level it is primarily reflected in two cultural dimensions: the language and traditional music.

  6. New rurality, traditional music and tourist experience

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    Margarida Vaz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Fernando Lopes-Graça, a prolific Portuguese composer, joined the French musicologist Michel Giacometti (1929-1990 in the effort of collecting and cataloguing popular songs, culminating in a collection of recordings, unique in Europe, which covered all Portugal. In the context of this paper we intend to show how the work of Lopes-Graça, challenging the traditional music, can allow a touring through traditions, while allowing design a cultural environment for the most demanding tourists. The purpose of this research is to develop a tourism product in the near future based on Lopes-Graça and Giacometti’s (musical and spatial journey through Portuguese traditional music, which portray a rural Portugal in all its dimensions including beliefs, uses and activities.

  7. Music Therapy Through Irish Eyes: A Student Therapist’s Experience of Irish Traditional Music

    OpenAIRE

    Ruth Armstrong

    2008-01-01

    This article outlines my personal experience of Irish traditional music and considers how it can inform music therapy practice. The use of Irish music may be particularly meaningful for some clients and help them connect with their culture and identity. Music therapy can also draw on specific features; including the melodic, rhythmic and social aspects of the music. The melody is prominent in Irish traditional music, and its expression is very important. The word draíoght (meaning "spell" or ...

  8. Music preferences and personality among Japanese university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R A

    2012-01-01

    Little research has been conducted outside of the European-North American cultural area concerning the personality-based determinants of musical genre preferences The present research investigated the personality profiles and general music genre preferences of 268 Japanese college students. Six dimensions and 24 facets of personality, and 12 music genres, were assessed. Results indicated that, consistent with much previous research, openness (to experience) and particularly the facet of "aesthetic appreciation" were associated with a preference for "reflective" music (jazz, classical, opera, gospel, enka), while one extraversion facet (sociability) was associated with the preference for pop music. Other personality dimensions were less consistently associated with musical preferences, pointing to cultural differences and the need to assess both personality and music genres at more specific levels.

  9. Complex transmission in a literate music tradition: a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, R.

    2008-01-01

    How is it possible to arrive at musical sound from a written document? Is it possible by reading only? Usually a clear distinction is made between oral and written traditions in music. However, written music traditions cannot work by transmission through writing alone. Oral transmission is always

  10. (Redefining tradition: the example of the world music phenomenon

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    Marija Ristivojević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper problematizes the understanding of the concept of tradition in the context of the world music phenomenon. Marketed as a hybrid music genre, from the perspective of anthropological theory, the world music genre is a complex cultural phenomenon, the result of mixing global and local influences which are reflected not only in the creation of a specific sound, but through different perceptions of music itself (the audience, musicians, producers, creators of cultural policies etc. By analyzing the Serbian world music scene as exemplified by the work of the World Music association of Serbia, as well as the Serbia World Music Festival in Takovo, I will attempt to determine the way in which the concept of world music is perceived in local narratives, whether it is experienced as a form of musical tradition and if so, what is signified and represented as tradition in this context.

  11. The value of traditional African religious music into liturgy: Lobethal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-04

    Jun 4, 2015 ... It was concluded that introducing traditional African religious music into Evangelical. Lutheran .... framework of music; the changes occurring through introduction of .... continuity of culture is vital to a smooth transition and thus.

  12. Investigation of cerebral metabolism by positron CT in Japanese following musical stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakasugi, Naotoshi

    1994-01-01

    Cerebral metabolic responses to Japanese and Western instrumental music were examined using 11 C-glucose and positron CT. Eight right-handed subjects were studied in both Japanese and Western music-stimulated states. Biaural musical stimulation with a Japanese instrument, the 'shakuhachi', produced diffuse metabolic changes in the left temporal lobe in all subjects. Biaural musical stimulation with a Western instrument, the 'violin', produced metabolic changes in the right temporal lobe in 3 subjects, changes in the left in 4, and changes on both sides in one. It was considered previously that all musical stimulation led to hypermetabolism in the right hemisphere of human beings. However, the present results indicated that Japanese music produced activation of the left hemisphere in Japanese. On the other hand, Western music produced right hemispheric hypermetabolism in Japanese with no emotion. The laterality of the hemisphere stimulated by Western music was apparently incidentally changed according to the state of mind the Japanese subjects. (author)

  13. Bringing the Family Tradition in Bluegrass Music to the Music Classroom

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    Mills, Susan W.

    2009-01-01

    National Standard 9, "understanding music in relation to history and culture," forms the basis for this article about family traditions found in bluegrass music. With historical information about the roots of bluegrass music in the Old Time tradition, the author provides helpful links and instructional strategies to help general music…

  14. Learning and Teaching Traditional Music in Cambodia: Challenges and Incentives

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    Grant, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Substantial efforts have been made since the Khmer Rouge regime to revitalize traditional Cambodian music genres. While they have met with some success, local circumstances still present many difficulties for the transmission of traditional music to the younger generations. This study explores the challenges in learning and teaching traditional…

  15. Metaphorical Perceptions of Prospective Music Teachers towards "Traditional Turkish Classical Music Course" Concept

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    Eldemir, Abdurrahim Can

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the perceptions of prospective music teachers towards Traditional Turkish Art Music course by means of metaphors. Phenomenological design, one of qualitative study methods, was used in the study. The study group of our research consists of juniors and seniors studying in the Music Education Division,…

  16. Traditional Music of East Africa: Experiencing "Ngoma" in Tanzania

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    Howard, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The concept of ngoma is present throughout Eastern and Southern Africa. Ngoma refers to the tradition of expression via music, drumming, dance, and storytelling. History, values, education, and even identity can be transmitted between generations. This article traces the experiences of a music teacher from the United States traveling and studying…

  17. Nigerian Traditional Music Education in the Context of Global ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The changes have happened more on the approaches to education than on the essence. This paper looks at the traditional music education in the face of the global challenges facing education. It makes a phenomenological appraisal of the trends and shows how there are shared and regional concerns of music education.

  18. Twelve Girls' Band' A Modern Miracle of Traditional Music

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YaoZhanxiong

    2004-01-01

    Twelve antique traditional instruments. Twelve spirited, pretty girls. "Twelve Girls' Band" is a traditional instrument orchestra playing well-known folk music in the form of pop. Besides age-old traditional instruments peculiar to China, such as zheng (ancient 21 to 25-stringed plucked instrument), qin (seven-stringed plucked instrument) and erhu (two-stringed Chinese fiddle),

  19. [Traditional medicine under Japanese rule after 1930s].

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    Shin, Dong-won

    2003-12-01

    Japan, which occupied Korea from 1910 through the end of World War II, transformed traditional medicine. Japanese colonialists propagandized the "benefits of modern civilization such as western medicine" and rejected the advantages of traditional medicine. This bias against Korean traditional medicine mirrored the government's rejection of its own traditional medicine. So, Korean traditional medicine was marginalized in the national health care system: traditional doctors were excluded from public institutions and references to traditional medicine were purged from school textbooks and newspapers. The wars that Japan waged between 1931 and 1944 effected a favorable change toward traditional medicines, however. The wars created a severe shortage of drugs and medical personnel. Thus the colonial government was eager for Koreans to cultivate and gather herbal drugs; it also built a large research institute for herbalism at the Keijo Imperial University in 1938. The colonial government made pharmacopoeia for traditional herbal drugs including plant and animal drugs from 1937 to 1942, independently from Japan. Under these conditions, the prestige of traditional medicine was greatly improved. Influential newspapers and magazines covered the traditional medicine and public lectures on traditional medicine drew large audiences. The wartime government abandoned its opposition to traditional medicine, and appointed a traditional practitioner to the staff of the public hospital in 1934. Moreover, the government allowed the association of the traditional medical doctors in Seoul to train three hundred more practitioners between 1937 and 1942. Japanese colonial policy toward traditional medicine reflected the contradiction between modernizing ideology and the reality of poor colonial medical care. Japanese propaganda promised that the colonial regime would provide more advanced medicine to Korea, but the promise was an empty one. In this situation, traditional medical doctors

  20. Oral Transmission: A Marriage of Music, Language, Tradition, and Culture

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    Emma E. Patterson

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There are a number of misunderstandings about ancient oral transmission that negatively affect the way musicians view music history but also the process of how music was and currently is conceived, recorded, and shared. A common misconception is that oral transmission of music is an ancient practice that occurred before written notation of music was developed. However, I seek to prove that there is a false dichotomy between oral transmission and written notation and I focus on the changing definition and importance of oral tradition. Firstly, I discuss the misconceptions of ancient oral transmission. Secondly, I examine the continuing development of research and definitions of oral transmission—which is changing our concept of ancient as well contemporary oral traditions. Thirdly, I demonstrate how these traditions are still relevant in present, late modern times. Thoughout this discussion I examine and engage with the pivotal specialists and research that has developed our view of oral tradition through time. To better understand these scholars’ commentary as well as my own, it is important to note the combined concepts of oral and aural tradition. Oral culture refers to what is spoken and sung, and aural culture refers to what is heard and comprehended. Both are necessary for effective transmission to occur, and oral and aural methods are almost always simultaneously present in most societies. When aural culture is discussed here, it refers to the combination of both elements and is closely related to aural tradition. The most notable terms to differentiate are oral transmission and oral tradition. Typically oral transmission refers to the basic action of passing information, in this case music, through oral and aural means. Oral tradition, however, is the more general concept that synthesizes oral transmission, tradition, and culture. Despite misconceptions that music was primitive before composers started documenting it, oral

  1. Prevalence of absolute pitch: a comparison between Japanese and Polish music students.

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    Miyazaki, Ken'ichi; Makomaska, Sylwia; Rakowski, Andrzej

    2012-11-01

    Comparable large-scale surveys including an on-site pitch-naming test were conducted with music students in Japan and Poland to obtain more convincing estimates of the prevalence of absolute pitch (AP) and examine how musical experience relates to AP. Participants with accurate AP (95% correct identification) accounted for 30% of the Japanese music students, but only 7% of the Polish music students. This difference in the performance of pitch naming was related to the difference in musical experience. Participants with AP had begun music training at an earlier age (6 years or earlier), and the average year of commencement of musical training was more than 2 years earlier for the Japanese music students than for the Polish students. The percentage of participants who had received early piano lessons was 94% for the Japanese musically trained students but was 72% for the Polish music students. Approximately one-third of the Japanese musically trained students had attended the Yamaha Music School, where lessons on piano or electric organ were given to preschool children in parallel with fixed-do solfège singing training. Such early music instruction was not as common in Poland. The relationship of AP with early music training is discussed.

  2. BESSARABIAN RELIGIOUS MUSIC OF BYZANTINE TRADITION REFLECTED IN AUTOCHTHONOUS MUSICOLOGY

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    BARBANOI HRISTINA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article below presents an overview of the main musicological studies that aim Bessarabian religious music of Byzantine tradition, developed by musicologists from the Republic of Moldova and Romania. The author emphasizes the idea that although the study of Byzantine religious music in the Bessarabian space is carried out by a limited number of people, their research results deserve attention, being of high scientific value. Some of these results are even internationally recognized. At the same time, the author notes that Bessarabian religious music of Byzantine tradition is not sufficiently researched.

  3. Effects of Koto Performance Seminar on Music Teacher Training

    OpenAIRE

    伊藤, 真; 平山, 裕基

    2017-01-01

    Music teachers need to have wide range of knowledge and teaching skills. This includes knowledge of world music such as Japanese traditional music, methods of instruction and performance skill. The department of Music Culture Education in Hiroshima University provides a variety of lectures and seminars on Japanese traditional music as a part of music teacher training, of which playing the koto (a long Japanese zither with 13 strings) is especially stressed as a continuous learning opportunity...

  4. Modified traditional Japanese timber joint system with retrofitting abilities

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    Shiratori, T.; Komatsu, K.; Leijten, A.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Embedment is a key feature of timber joints envisioned as the ultimate solution in avoiding the devastating full collapse of timber structures in seismic countries. The Japanese traditional timber post-and-beam structural system utilizes moment-resisting joints based on embedment. Despite the

  5. Investigation of cerebral metabolism by positron CT in Japanese following musical stimulation

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    Wakasugi, Naotoshi (Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1994-02-01

    Cerebral metabolic responses to Japanese and Western instrumental music were examined using [sup 11]C-glucose and positron CT. Eight right-handed subjects were studied in both Japanese and Western music-stimulated states. Biaural musical stimulation with a Japanese instrument, the 'shakuhachi', produced diffuse metabolic changes in the left temporal lobe in all subjects. Biaural musical stimulation with a Western instrument, the 'violin', produced metabolic changes in the right temporal lobe in 3 subjects, changes in the left in 4, and changes on both sides in one. It was considered previously that all musical stimulation led to hypermetabolism in the right hemisphere of human beings. However, the present results indicated that Japanese music produced activation of the left hemisphere in Japanese. On the other hand, Western music produced right hemispheric hypermetabolism in Japanese with no emotion. The laterality of the hemisphere stimulated by Western music was apparently incidentally changed according to the state of mind the Japanese subjects. (author).

  6. Criteria of ‘authenticity’ in traditional Georgian musical performance

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    Gabisonia Tamaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Today we often use term ‘authentic’ in relation to different appearances of Georgian folk music. Along with the unambiguous meaning ‘real’ this term also has other meanings: ‘ethnic’, ‘rural’, ‘old’, ‘function of usual environment’, ‘traditional-stylistic’, ‘authoritative’, or ‘reproductive’. In spite of some interconnections that arise from the term ‘authentic’ and its other meanings, the most relevant way to apply this popular term for performers and audiences of ‘real folklore’ is traditionality. This factor is manifested in the following contexts: a performer (receiver and distributor of tradition, unobtrusively and orally, b motivation/function (representative and spontaneous function, hereditary, utilitarian and aesthetic-daily motivation, c repertoire (compliance of musical and verbal text’s sample with its social function, eluding canonized versions, d expression (adequate articulation, performing regulation which is not determined by the stage, traditional instrument etc.. The problem of authenticity is more successfully regulated in traditional Georgian church music than in folk music. For the latter, in this regard the special difficulty is caused by identification of modern trends that contain folk motifs. The most popular among them is distinctive, with its stylistic reminiscent layer from the Eastern Georgian Mountains, which we refer as ‘para-folkore’. Notwithstanding the fact that Georgian folklore is not centrally authorized, modernization of folklore samples and also those manifestations of post-folklore that are further away from the traditional motifs attract a wide range of listeners. Essentially, the meaning of ‘authentic’ in the Georgian ethno-musical context is presented as performance of the traditional rural repertoire with traditional articulation. However, we think that it is convenient for the criteria of traditional, usual environment to be added to this

  7. Towards Applied Ethnomusicology – The Traditional Music Laboratory of the Institute of Music and Dance

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    Weronika Grozdew-Kołacińska

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The text describes the activities of Traditional Music Laboratory of the Institute of Music and Dance, which was established on 17 June 2015 in Warsaw. The main objective of the Laboratory’s programs is to support traditional music transmission in a direct „master-apprentice” relationship and to facilitate an interdisciplinary, long-term collaboration between animators, researchers, scholars, artists, pedagogues and civil servants under subsidy of Polish Ministry of Culture and National Heritage. Ideas discussed in this paper arise from the content of the UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage (2003 as well as the assumptions of applied ethnomusicology (the International Council for Traditional Music, Study Group on Applied Ethnomusicology. The question that needs to be asked in the context of the above-mentioned perspectives is how to describe the problem of the continuity of the traditional forms of musical practices in the context of new phenomena, such as the “revival”, “return”, “revitalization” or “reconstruction”, in Poland. The paper focuses on a brief overview of educational and cultural actions taken by chosen NGOs, foundations and associations organized in an informal initiative known as the Forum of Traditional Music.

  8. Genotoxicity of extracts of Japanese traditional herbal medicines (Kampo)

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    Makoto, Katami; Haruo, Kuboniwa; Shunichi, Maemura; Toshihiko, Yanagisawa; New Drug Discovery Laboratory, R & D Division, TSUMURA & Co.; New Drug Discovery Laboratory, R & D Division, TSUMURA & Co.; New Drug Discovery Laboratory, R & D Division, TSUMURA & Co.; New Drug Discovery Laboratory, R & D Division, TSUMURA & Co.

    2002-01-01

    The possible genotoxicity potential of 128 Japanese traditional herbal medicines (Kampo) was investigated using a bacterial reverse mutation test (the Ames test), an in vivo micronucleus test (MN test) in mouse bone marrow cells and an unscheduled DNA synthesis test (UDS test) in rat hepatocytes. Of 128 Kampo extracts examined, 98 did not induce mutations in bacteria while 30 induced mutations weakly in Salmonella typhimurium TA1537. Extracts of Scutellariae Radix, a common herbal drug, and i...

  9. The value of traditional African religious music into liturgy: Lobethal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Handclapping was seen to act almost as a metronome, which steadily maintained the tempo. It was concluded that introducing traditional African religious music into Evangelical Lutheran liturgical church services has increased attendance and participation of church members. Therefore, the introduction of African religious ...

  10. "The Next Level": Investigating Teaching and Learning within an Irish Traditional Music Online Community

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    Kenny, Ailbhe

    2013-01-01

    Online music communities offer a new context and culture for musical participation globally. This article, employing a socio-cultural theoretical lens, examines how the Online Academy of Irish Music (OAIM) functions as a teaching and learning online community for Irish traditional music. Findings from qualitative case study research present…

  11. Traditional Music in Igbo Culture: A Case Study of Idu Cultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Igbo people are endowed with numerous dance music performances which portray the culture of the people. Traditional music is so much a part of Igbo culture that majority of the people who live in big cities and other places outside their home town organize traditional music ensembles as a mark of identity, to preserve ...

  12. Athens: New capital of traditional Greek music: Testimonies on musical life at the beginning of the twentieth century

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    Peno Vesna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available During its long Byzantine and Post-Byzantine history Constantinople was the center for church art in general, but especially for music. This old city on the Bosporus maintained its prime position until the beginning of the 20th century when, because of new political and social conditions, the Greek people started to acquire their independence and freedom, and Athens became the new capital in the cultural as well as the political sense. During the first decades of the 20th century the Athenian music scene was marked by an intensive dispute between those musicians who leaned towards the European musical heritage and its methods in musical pedagogy, and those who called themselves traditionalists and were engaged in the preservation of traditional values of church and folk music. The best insight into the circumstances in which Greek musical life was getting a new direction are offered by the numerous musical journals published in Athens before the First World War. Among them, The Formigs is of the special interest, firstly because of the long period during which it was published (1901-1912, and secondly because of its main orientation. The editor Ioannes Tsoklis, a church chanter, and his main collaborator, the famous Constantinopolitan musician and theorist and later Principal of the Department for Byzantine music at Athens musical school Konstantinos Psahos, with other associates firmly represented the traditional position. That is why most of the published articles and the orientation of the journal generally were dedicated to the controversial problems and current musical events that were attracting public attention. The editorial board believed that there was a connection between the preservation of musical traditions and their development on one side, and foreign musical influences that were evident in the promotion of polyphonic church music, which had been totally foreign to the Greek Orthodox church until the end of the 19th century, on

  13. Sexual Orientation and Music Education: Continuing a Tradition

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    Bergonzi, Louis

    2014-01-01

    This article offers an overview of sexual orientation and music education, in particular how sexual orientation--specifically, heterosexuality--has been dominant in the teaching of music in the United States. Scenarios of heterosexual privilege related to music students, music teachers, and instructional content are presented. After acknowledging…

  14. "Music for a National Defense": Making Martial Music during the Anti-Japanese War

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    Joshua H. Howard

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the popularization of “mass songs” among Chinese Communist troops during the Anti-Japanese War by highlighting the urban origins of the National Salvation Song Movement and the key role it played in bringing songs to the war front. The diffusion of a new genre of march songs pioneered by Nie Er was facilitated by compositional devices that reinforced the ideological message of the lyrics, and by the National Salvation Song Movement. By the mid-1930s, this grassroots movement, led by Liu Liangmo, converged with the tail end of the proletarian arts movement that sought to popularize mass art and create a “music for national defense.” Once the war broke out, both Nationalists and Communists provided organizational support for the song movement by sponsoring war zone service corps and mobile theatrical troupes that served as conduits for musicians to propagate their art in the hinterland. By the late 1930s, as the United Front unraveled, a majority of musicians involved in the National Salvation Song Movement moved to the Communist base areas. Their work for the New Fourth Route and Eighth Route Armies, along with Communist propaganda organizations, enabled their songs to spread throughout the ranks.

  15. An analysis of rhythm in Japanese and English popular music

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadakata, M.; Desain, P.W.M.; Honing, H.J.; Patel, A.D.; Iversen, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, there has been evidence that the rhythm in English and French non-vocal musical themes are significantly different in their contrastiveness of successive durations in the same manner as those of spoken language, suggesting that acomposer's native language exerts an influence on the music

  16. Traditional Japanese Medicine Daikenchuto Improves Functional Constipation in Poststroke Patients

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    Takehiro Numata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Poststroke patients with functional constipation, assessed by the Rome III criteria, from 6 hospitals were recruited in a study on the effects of the traditional Japanese medicine Daikenchuto (DKT on constipation. Thirty-four patients (17 men and 17 women; mean age: 78.1 ± 11.6 years were randomly assigned to 2 groups; all patients received conventional therapy for constipation, and patients in the DKT group received 15 g/day of DKT for 4 weeks. Constipation scoring system (CSS points and the gas volume score (GVS (the measure of the intestinal gas volume calculated from plain abdominal radiographs were recorded before and after a 4-week observation period. The total score on the CSS improved significantly in the DKT group compared to the control (P<0.01. In addition, scores for some CSS subcategories (frequency of bowel movements, feeling of incomplete evacuation, and need for enema/disimpaction significantly improved in the DKT group (P<0.01, P=0.049, and P=0.03, resp.. The GVS was also significantly reduced in the DKT group compared to the control (P=0.03. DKT in addition to conventional therapy is effective in treating functional constipation in poststroke patients. This study was a randomized controlled trial and was registered in the UMIN Clinical Trial Registry (no. UMIN000007393.

  17. Traditional Japanese medicine daikenchuto improves functional constipation in poststroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Takehiro; Takayama, Shin; Tobita, Muneshige; Ishida, Shuichi; Katayose, Dai; Shinkawa, Mitsutoshi; Oikawa, Takashi; Aonuma, Takanori; Kaneko, Soichiro; Tanaka, Junichi; Kanemura, Seiki; Iwasaki, Koh; Ishii, Tadashi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2014-01-01

    Poststroke patients with functional constipation, assessed by the Rome III criteria, from 6 hospitals were recruited in a study on the effects of the traditional Japanese medicine Daikenchuto (DKT) on constipation. Thirty-four patients (17 men and 17 women; mean age: 78.1 ± 11.6 years) were randomly assigned to 2 groups; all patients received conventional therapy for constipation, and patients in the DKT group received 15 g/day of DKT for 4 weeks. Constipation scoring system (CSS) points and the gas volume score (GVS) (the measure of the intestinal gas volume calculated from plain abdominal radiographs) were recorded before and after a 4-week observation period. The total score on the CSS improved significantly in the DKT group compared to the control (P DKT group (P DKT group compared to the control (P = 0.03). DKT in addition to conventional therapy is effective in treating functional constipation in poststroke patients. This study was a randomized controlled trial and was registered in the UMIN Clinical Trial Registry (no. UMIN000007393).

  18. Number 13 / Part I. Music. 6. Requiem by Karl Jenkins. An Analytical Approach to The Interweaving of Various Traditions in Music

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    Iațeșen Loredana Viorica

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the diverse space of contemporary music, the fascinating and controversial personality of the Welsh composer Karl Jenkins, which is surprising from several perspectives, stands out. Open to assimilating and processing music from various sources (academic, liturgical, folk, entertainment, oriental, exotic, the all-round musician Karl Jenkins impresses the public with unexpected artistic choices, giving up the hypostasis of instrumentalist of the jazz-rock band Nucleus and of the group Softmachine in favour of the postmodern creator he has become today, synthetizing trends from musical compositions of the last decades of the 20th century. Once with the return to the functional system, either through minimalism or through neo-romanticism, the artist has successfully covered a potential sonority path of modern opposites, also evoking references to creative models of the past. We are referring to the musical valorizing of the sacred in a synthetic vision between tradition and innovation, in the works included in the Adiemus cycle, in the opus choir Missa for Peace and, more particularly, in the Requiem (2005, a significant score in the contemporaneity. The manner in which the composer, while resorting to a musical genre originating from the Roman Catholic cult and drawing on the liturgical text of the Mass for the dead, inserted Japanese poetry, written following the structure of haiku, belonging to representative authors - Gozan Koshigaya, Issho Kosughi, Hokusai Katsushika, Kaga-no-Chiyo, is highly surprising. This study aims to highlight the interweaving imagined by Karl Jenkins between the two cultures as well as to conduct a semantic analysis of an opus in which the relationships between music and words entail a highly emotional response.

  19. The value of traditional African religious music into liturgy: Lobethal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-04

    Jun 4, 2015 ... Singing is linked to religious experience and expression. In both the Lutheran .... data were gathered in Sepedi, the home language of the interviewees ... training either in music education or music composition. It is noticeable ...

  20. THE PROGRESS STUDY OF TRADITIONAL TURKISH MUSIC LESSONS SELF-EFFICACY PERCEPTION SCALE FOR MUSIC TEACHING PROGRAMME

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    Koray Celenk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to develop a scale in order to determine the perspective of self-efficacy related to the course Traditional Turkish Music (Traditional Turkish Folk Music/Traditional Turkish Classical Music, which takes place in the curriculum of Faculty of Education, Department of Fine Arts Education, Division of Music Education. The working group of this research consists of 97 students who receive training in the division of Music Education in Atatürk, Niğde (Ömer Halisdemir, Uludağ and Pamukkale Universities. The research is a descriptive study. In the research, general scanning method has been used, self efficacy- scale both in and non-area have been examined, literature review has been done and a scale, as research result, has been developed in order to determine possible Music teachers’ perspective of self-efficacy related to the course Traditional Turkish Music. An item pool has been formed for the validity of the scale, having prepared an expert opinion form the items have been submitted for consideration, getting the content validity ratios (CVR of the items and the content validity index of the whole scale, taking the margin of error of 5 percent, statistical significance has been tested. To determine the construct validity of the scale the factor analysis has been made and it has been confirmed that the scale has a single factor structure and establishes construct validity. Pilot scheme has been done to check the validity of the scale. Within this scope, the reliability coefficient of the scale has been calculated as 0.842 cronbach’s alpha and the scale developed is highly reliable. As a result, the scale developed is a valid and reliable tool to determine possible Music teachers’ perspective of self-efficacy related to the course Traditional Turkish Music.

  1. The Effectiveness of Using Vocal Music as the Content Area of English Immersion Classes for Japanese Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Steven Gene

    2012-01-01

    This study set out to determine if English can be taught effectively to Japanese children through a content-based instruction program that uses vocal music as the content area. A total of 240 children participated in the study. The treatment group at a private elementary school in Tokyo received weekly vocal music lessons taught in English for one…

  2. Aural and written music traditions: a drumming ensemble case study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The transcription draws attention to the structure and arrangement of 'Creative\\', and provides an accurate score for educational use to correct memory errors. I discuss transcription as facilitating internalisation and understanding, fitting together with transmission, memory and preservation of music. Journal of the Musical ...

  3. The traditional Japanese dietary pattern and longitudinal changes in cardiovascular disease risk factors in apparently healthy Japanese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Kaijun; Momma, Haruki; Kobayashi, Yoritoshi; Guan, Lei; Chujo, Masahiko; Otomo, Atsushi; Ouchi, Eriko; Nagatomi, Ryoichi

    2016-02-01

    Few epidemiological studies have assessed the relationship between the traditional Japanese dietary pattern and longitudinal changes in cardiovascular disease risk factors among Japanese people. We designed a 3-year longitudinal study of 980 subjects living in Japan to evaluate how the Japanese dietary pattern is related to longitudinal changes in well-recognized risk factors for cardiovascular disease among apparently healthy Japanese adults. Dietary consumption was assessed via a validated food frequency questionnaire. Principal component analysis was used to derive three major dietary patterns-"Japanese," "sweets-fruits-cooked wheaten food," and "Izakaya (Japanese Pub)" from 39 food groups. After adjustment for potential confounders, the mean (95% confidence interval) for the change per year in diastolic blood pressure for men, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure for women related to the "Japanese" dietary pattern factor score tertiles were 0.89 (0.10, 1.68), 2.25 (0.19, 4.31), and 0.75 (-1.00, 2.50) for the lowest tertile, 0.77 (-0.02, 1.56), 1.01 (-1.13, 3.15), and 0.44 (-1.38, 2.26) for the middle tertile and - 0.04 (-0.81, 0.72), -0.48 (-2.52, 1.56), and -0.77 (-2.51, 0.96) for the highest tertile (trend P value = 0.03, pattern factor score tertiles and the longitudinal change in serum triglyceride concentration only in men (trend P value = 0.02). Greater adherence to a traditional Japanese diet was independently related to a decreased change every year in diastolic blood pressure in men and women and in systolic blood pressure in women over a 3-year follow-up period. The findings suggest that the "Japanese" dietary pattern appeared to be related to a fall in blood pressure, which might have a beneficial effect on cardiovascular disease. A randomized trial is required to clarify the underlying mechanism.

  4. The Functions and Spiritual Connotations of Traditional Music ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2013-07-07

    Jul 7, 2013 ... implication, aesthetics, rejuvenation, identity and solidarity, entertainment ... Ufie music also enhances education in the cultural norms and practices. Through it ... common aspirations, beliefs and socio-cultural value systems.

  5. Effects of traditional Japanese massage therapy on gene expression: preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoyama, Nozomi; Ohkoshi, Norio

    2011-06-01

    Changes in gene expression after traditional Japanese massage therapy were investigated to clarify the mechanisms of the clinical effects of traditional Japanese massage therapy. This was a pilot experimental study. The study was conducted in a laboratory at Tsukuba University of Technology. The subjects were 2 healthy female volunteers (58-year-old Participant A, 55-year-old Participant B). The intervention consisted of a 40-minute full-body massage using standard traditional Japanese massage techniques through the clothing and a 40-minute rest as a control, in which participants lie on the massage table without being massaged. Before and after an intervention, blood was taken and analyzed by microarray: (1) The number of genes whose expression was more than double after the intervention than before was examined; (2) For those genes, gene ontology analysis identified statistically significant gene ontology terms. The gene expression count in the total of 41,000 genes was 1256 genes for Participant A and 1778 for Participant B after traditional Japanese massage, and was 157 and 82 after the control, respectively. The significant gene ontology terms selected by both Participants A and B after massage were "immune response" and "immune system," whereas no gene ontology terms were selected by them in the control. It is implied that traditional Japanese massage therapy may affect the immune function. Further studies with more samples are necessary.

  6. Element analysis of Japanese traditional papers by PIXE method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Tatsuya; Yasuda, Keisuke; Tani, Teruhiro

    2000-01-01

    The Japanese papers, 'washi', are made from the bast fibers of the plants. Since washi have the informations of the raw material plants, there is potentiality of the identification of the production place by the element analysis of the washi. Three kinds of washi made of kozo, which have different habitats, were prepared. The elements in their washi were measured by the PIXE. It was confirmed that the amount of elements included in the washi depend on the habitats of their raw material plants. (author)

  7. JAVANESE TRADITIONAL MUSIC ON THE FULFILLMENT OF THE NEED OF SLEEP OF ELDERLY

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    Nursalam Nursalam

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Quality and quantity of sleep dissorder are the commonest problems that faced by elderly. These problems can increase activity of sympathetic nerve and muscle stress. Javanese traditional music is one of the method to increase the fulfillment of the need of sleep. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of Javanese traditional music on the fulfillment of the need of sleep in elderly. Method: Design of this study was a pre experimental design. The population was elderly with sleep disorders in Panti Sosial Tresna Werdha Blitar. There were 12 respondents which recruited by using purposive sampling who met to the inclusion criteria. The independent variable of this study was the Javanese traditional music and the dependent variable was the fulfillment of sleep in elderly. Data were collected by using structured questionnaire and biophysiological measurement and then analyzed by using Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test and Paired t-Test with level of significance α≤0.05. Result: The result showed that there was an effect of Javanese traditional music on quality of sleep (p=0.001, had an effect to increase the duration of sleep (p=0.00001, beside that it could reduce heart rate (p=0.001 and respiratory rate (p=0.00001. However, Javanese traditional music did not had significant effect to reduce sistolic blood pressure (p=0,104 and diastolic blood pressure (p=0339. Discussion: Conclution: Javanese traditional music had significant effect on the fulfillment of the need of sleep in elderly. Further research should measure the effect of Javanese traditional music on the fulfillment of the need of sleep with the rate of melatonin and EEG (Electro Encephalo Graphy.

  8. The Functions and Spiritual Connotations of Traditional Music ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work examines the spiritual connotations of ufie music, socio-cultural implications, performance norms and prescriptions. This descriptive survey employed musicological tools. It provides information on ways and means of preservation and maintenance of the instrument for the well-being of the society and posterity.

  9. Defining African traditional musical traits: Resource material for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... descending melodic line, the pentatonic and non-pentatonic scales, speech inflected melody, melisma and embellishment, preference for thirds, form, lack of modulations and texture. It could be concluded that indigenous African music has a potential for development from a utilitarian (functional) to an abstract (art for art's ...

  10. Music and movement education as a form of motivation in teaching Greek traditional dances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likesas, G; Zachopoulou, E

    2006-04-01

    Research has shown that motivation for participating in physical education, particularly in traditional dances, has decreased dramatically. The aim of this research was to examine whether a music and movement program would increase pleasure and intrinsic motivation of students in elementary education while teaching them Greek traditional dances. 232 students were divided into two groups, a trained group of 135 participants (72 boys, 63 girls) and a control group of 97 (53 boys, 44 girls). The trained group was taught using the music and movement teaching model of traditional dances. The control group was taught using the instructional or guided teaching method of traditional Greek dances. To measure effectiveness of the two methods was accomplished by the completion of McAuley's Intrinsic Motivation Inventory. Analysis of scores showed use of music and movement education had a positive effect on intrinsic motivation for dancing and active participation of students, especially of the trained boys' group.

  11. Parental Involvement in the Musical Education of Violin Students: Suzuki and "Traditional" Approaches Compared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugeja, Clare

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates parental involvement in the musical education of violin students and the changing role of the parents' across the learning process. Two contexts were compared, one emphasising the Suzuki methodology and the other a "traditional" approach. Students learning "traditionally" are typically taught note reading from the…

  12. Integration of religious traditions in Japanese children's view of death and afterlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagara-Rosemeyer, Miharu; Davies, Betty

    2007-03-01

    Open and public discussion of death, particularly among children, remains one of the greatest Japanese societal taboos; therefore, little is known about Japanese children's perceptions of death. To explore Japanese children's notions of life and death, 16 healthy children (7 girls and 9 boys, mean age 8.9) were each interviewed 3 times and asked to draw and describe pictures of what "to live" and "to die" meant to them. Transcribed interviews were interpreted based on thematic analysis, incorporating paradigm cases and exemplars within the hermeneutical tradition. The children perceived life as an evolving process that leads to death, and regarded death as a transitional point to an afterlife. Some children perceived this process, or flow, as linear; others as circular. Their notions of death and the afterlife incorporated three main religious traditions in Japan (Shintoism, Buddhism, and Confucianism) as well as Christianity, as illustrated by 3 case examples and children's drawings.

  13. A discourse on the master musician and informal music education in yoruba Traditional culture

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    OLUSOJI STEPHEN Ph.D

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available  This paper discusses issues relating to informal education in Yoruba traditional music using the master musician as an important agent for propagating traditional knowledge and values. The study is an ethnographic research and uses oral interviews and other qualitative techniques for eliciting information. As part of its findings, the study found out that informal education in Yoruba culture follows a typical pattern of instruction which is acquired through heredity, apprentice under a well-known artist, observation and participation in communal activities. In the case of music, which is the focus of the study, it is promoted by the master musician, a position that could be occupied by men or women depending on the nature of the ensemble and the societal norms approved for such groups. In conclusion, it was suggested in the study that contemporary music educators and curriculum planners should tailor their curriculum to reflect the traditional values and practices of their people.

  14. A discourse on the master musician and informal music education in yoruba Traditional culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLUSOJI STEPHEN Ph.D

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses issues relating to informal education in Yoruba traditional music using the master musician as an important agent for propagating traditional knowledge and values. The study is an ethnographic research and uses oral interviews and other qualitative techniques for eliciting information. As part of its findings, the study found out that informal education in Yoruba culture follows a typical pattern of instruction which is acquired through heredity, apprentice under a well-known artist, observation and participation in communal activities. In the case of music, which is the focus of the study, it is promoted by the master musician, a position that could be occupied by men or women depending on the nature of the ensemble and the societal norms approved for such groups. In conclusion, it was suggested in the study that contemporary music educators and curriculum planners should tailor their curriculum to reflect the traditional values and practices of their people.

  15. Traditional Japanese herbal medicines for treatment of odontopathy

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    Kojiro eYamaguchi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights several refractory oral diseases, such as stomatitis, burning mouth syndrome (BMS, glossalgia, atypical facial pain (AFP, oral cancer, dry mouth, and Sjögren’s syndrome(SJS, in which use of Japanese herbal medicines, Kampo medicines(KM, on the basis of Kampo theory could exert the maximum effects on human body. 1 In acute stomatitis, heat because of agitated vital energy may affect the head, chest, and middle abdominal region. Stomatitis is also related to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. There are many antioxidants in the crude extracts of KM. Thus, we can control environmental factors (cold, heat, dampness, dryness and vital energy, blood, and fluid of the organ systemically using KM to treat stomatitis and eliminate local ROS accumulation.2 BMS, glossalgia, and AFP are multifactorial syndromes involving the interaction of biological and psychological factors. Local temperature decrease and edema often occur in chronic pain. These are local circulatory disturbances that can be resolved by improving the flow of blood and fluid. Several KM, such as Tokishakuyakusan and Kamishoyosan(KSS, are effective for enhancing peripheral circulation. Those such as Saikokaryukotuboreito, Yokukansan, KSS, and Saibokutou can reduce stress and associated pain by altering glutamatergic and monoaminergic transmission in the brain. The clinical efficacy of KM for BMS and AFP may depend on the regulation of the mesolimbic dopaminergic and descending glutamatergic pain modulation systems.3 Regarding oral cancer treatment, I introduce 4 possible applications of KM, inhibition of the proliferation of cancer cells, complementation of the main cancer therapy, reduction of side effect caused by the main anti-cancer therapy and improvement of quality of life such as the overall status and/or oral discomfort. This review explains in more details Hozai such as Hochuekkito(HET, Juzendaihoto, and Ninjinyoeito(NYT that are frequently

  16. A multidisciplinary view on cultural primatology: behavioral innovations and traditions in Japanese macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leca, Jean-Baptiste; Gunst, Noëlle; Pelletier, Amanda N; Vasey, Paul L; Nahallage, Charmalie A D; Watanabe, Kunio; Huffman, Michael A

    2016-07-01

    Cultural primatology (i.e., the study of behavioral traditions in nonhuman primates as a window into the evolution of human cultural capacities) was founded in Japan by Kinji Imanishi in the early 1950s. This relatively new research area straddles different disciplines and now benefits from collaborations between Japanese and Western primatologists. In this paper, we return to the cradle of cultural primatology by revisiting our original articles on behavioral innovations and traditions in Japanese macaques. For the past 35 years, our international team of biologists, psychologists and anthropologists from Japan, France, Sri Lanka, the USA and Canada, has been taking an integrative approach to addressing the influence of environmental, sociodemographic, developmental, cognitive and behavioral constraints on the appearance, diffusion, and maintenance of behavioral traditions in Macaca fuscata across various domains; namely, feeding innovation, tool use, object play, and non-conceptive sex.

  17. GENDER IDENTITY: A Force in Igbo Traditional Musical Practices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This essay views some of such gender ascribed roles as they concern Igbo traditional .... weaning songs and lullabies are purely women's business due to the type of bond ... Sadiq, M. “Socialization and Gender Stereotyping”. Gender Issues.

  18. NKWA MUSIC OF ACHINA TRADITIONAL SOCIETY IN IGBO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    imitch

    Royalty in Igbo traditional society is accorded inestimable prominence that every .... The study adopted the survey research method while data collection was ... The paper recommends the teaching and learning of Esan in institutions of higher ...

  19. The effect of traditional Persian music on the cardiac functioning of young Iranian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, Behzad; Abbasi, Ataollah; Goshvarpour, Atefeh; Khosroshai, Hamid Tayebi; Javanshir, Elnaz

    In the past few decades, several studies have reported the physiological effects of listening to music. The physiological effects of different music types on different people are not similar. Therefore, in the present study, we have sought to examine the effects of traditional Persian music on the cardiac function in young women. Twenty-two healthy females participated in this study. ECG signals were recorded in two conditions: rest and music. For each of the 21 ECG signals (15 morphological and six wavelet based feature) features were extracted. SVM classifier was used for the classification of ECG signals during and before the music. The results showed that the mean of heart rate, the mean amplitude of R-wave, T-wave, and P-wave decreased in response to music. Time-frequency analysis revealed that the mean of the absolute values of the detail coefficients at higher scales increased during rest. The overall accuracy of 91.6% was achieved using polynomial kernel and RBF kernel. Using linear kernel, the best result (with the accuracy rate of 100%) was attained. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Tradition, Modernity and the Role of Confucianism in the Creation of the Japanese Nation-State

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    Luka Culiberg

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores the development of Confucian thought in Japan, showing that Confucianism, with its key concept of the Way, remained the foundation of Japanese intellectual circles even as it underwent numerous transformations and reinterpretations. The universal Way as a natural Principle was transformed into a product of the sages within the framework of the kogaku school, whereas the kokugaku school applied the concept of the Way to the Japanese Shinto tradition. The adherents of the rangaku school, on the other hand, adopted Western science and technology in the Confucian intellectual universe. The new nation-state built by the Meiji revolutionaries thus became a mixture of all these intellectual currents. The Meiji state was a modern, industrial and technologically advanced state that identified itself with the imperial system and native Shinto tradition while being held together institutionally by a firm Confucian ideology.

  1. The value of traditional African religious music into liturgy: Lobethal Congregation

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    Morakeng E.K. Lebaka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to discover whether the integration of traditional African religious music into Evangelical Lutheran liturgical church services, could effect a change in member attendance and/or participation. To achieve this, the study employed direct observation, video recordings and informal interviews. In addition, church records of attendance during Holy Communion once a month between 2008 and 2013 were accessed. The study was done at the Evangelical Lutheran Church of the Lobethal Congregation (Arkona Parish, Northern Diocese, Sekhukhune District, Limpopo Province, South Africa. It was demonstrated that church attendance increased dramatically after traditional African religious music was introduced into the Evangelical Lutheran liturgical services in 2011. Observations and video recordings showed that drums, rattles, horns and whistles were used. Handclapping was seen to act almost as a metronome, which steadily maintained the tempo. It was concluded that introducing traditional African religious music into Evangelical Lutheran liturgical church services has increased attendance and participation of church members. Therefore, the introduction of African religious music could be considered for other Evangelical Lutheran congregations in Africa.

  2. Traditional Japanese medicines inhibit compound action potentials in the frog sciatic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Akitomo; Fujita, Tsugumi; Ohtsubo, Sena; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2016-02-03

    Traditional Japanese (Kampo) medicines have a variety of clinical effects including pain alleviation, but evidence for a mechanism for their pain relief has not yet been elucidated fully. Considering that Kampo medicine contains many plant-derived chemicals having an ability to inhibit nerve action potential conduction, it is possible that this medicine inhibits nerve conduction. The purpose of the present study was to know how various Kampo medicines affect nerve conduction. We examined the effects of Kampo and crude medicines on compound action potentials (CAPs) recorded from the frog sciatic nerve by using the air-gap method. Daikenchuto, rikkosan, kikyoto, rikkunshito, shakuyakukanzoto and kakkonto concentration-dependently reduced the peak amplitude of the CAP. Among the Kampo medicines, daikenchuto was the most effective in inhibiting CAPs. Daikenchuto is composed of three kinds of crude medicine, Japanese pepper, processed ginger and ginseng radix. When the crude medicines were tested, Japanese pepper and processed ginger reduced CAP peak amplitudes, while ginseng radix hardly affected CAPs. Moreover, there was an interaction between the Japanese pepper and processed ginger activities in such that one medicine at low but not high concentrations increased the extent of the inhibition by the other one that was co-applied. Kampo medicines have an ability to inhibit nerve conduction. This action of daikenchuto is due to Japanese pepper and processed ginger but not ginseng radix, probably through an interaction between Japanese pepper and processed ginger in a manner dependent on their concentrations. Nerve conduction inhibition could contribute to at least a part of Kampo medicine's clinical effects such as pain alleviation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Music, Myths and Rituals: Traditional Societies of African Lobi Peoples and Environmental Issues

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    Hien Sié

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The practice of music in societies with oral tradition, in general, and particularly in black Africa, was rooted in the mythological beliefs, concerning the body of myth stories retold among people in those societies and interdictions/taboos and totems, which do not have grounds in logic and reason, that attempt to explain the nature of the human beings and their surrounding. Being the crucial elements that structure and regulate all sphres of life, as well as the manifestations and consequences of religious beliefs, those were the attempts to describe and explain the origins and fundamenatal values of a given culture and /or religious considerations of the people in the given society. If those extra-musical features were influential and inspiring enough, then that made it possible to establish the relations, i. e. the allusions to mythology and rituals which could be expressed in the music. When thinking about this particular fact, then it must be allowed that the music is likely to provide a primary document for understanding the sysems of thoughts and for teaching us lessons on certain facets of the life of those societies/ cultures. In particular, it can be used as a means to learn about their relationship to the environmental, natural occurances and the humanity, the fact the researchers have not been sufficiently focused on when research about the music. This researh aims to reflect on how well musical art has contributed to addressing that goal, namely, based on the concrete examples drawn from the music of Lobi peoples/tribes, the author is trying to shine a light on how these peoples, consciously or instictively, convey an often complex set of problems, and communicate with an immediacy and universality that often sit outside of common language, particularly the environmental problems they encounter in their existence.

  4. Writers and chanters in the nineteenth century as keepers of the tradition of Serbian church music

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    Marjanović Nataša

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, parts of the memoir literary works from the second half of the nineteenth century are presented as important sources for the research of Serbian traditional church chant. The testimonies on church music from diaries, memoirs and autobiographical notes by famous Serbian writers, statesmen and politicians, namely Jovan Subotić, Jakov Ignjatović, Milan Savić, Milica Stojadinović Srpkinja, Todor Stefanović Vilovski, Vladimir Jovanović and Kosta Hristić, were analyzed. Those writings bring to light a time when church chant was appreciated as an important part of the spiritual, folk heritage and had an important role in everyday culture of Serbian people both in the Habsburg Monarchy and in the Principality and Kingdom of Serbia. The authors wrote about musical skills of chanters from clerical, church circles and about the practice of chanting among school teachers. They also described different kinds of musical performances of church chant among laymen and children. These sources testify to writers’ general and musical education and experiences, to their environment and its relation to the aesthetics of spiritual folk tradition. This paper also analyzes sources in the context of the history and theory of literature, having in mind the authors’ commentary techniques and narrative style. Those issues are discussed in relation to the poetics of romanticism, Biedermeier and realism in Serbian literature. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 177004: Identiteti srpske muzike od lokalnih do globalnih okvira: tradicije, promene, izazovi

  5. Conjoint analysis on the purchase intent for traditional fermented soy product (natto) among Japanese housewives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Atsushi; Kuwazawa, Shigetaka; Wada, Yuji; Kyutoku, Yasushi; Okamoto, Masako; Yamaguchi, Yui; Masuda, Tomohiro; Dan, Ippeita

    2011-04-01

    The effect of sensory and extrinsic attributes on consumer intentions to purchase the Japanese traditional fermented soybean product natto was evaluated using conjoint analysis. Six attributes with 2 levels each were chosen and manipulated: price (high compared with low), the country of origin of the soybeans (domestic compared with imported), stickiness (strong compared with moderate), smell (rich compared with moderate), attached seasonings (attached compared with no attached seasonings), and the environmental friendliness of the packaging (high compared with low). A fractional factorial design was applied and 8 hypothetical product labels were produced. A sample of 479 Japanese housewives ranked these product labels based on their purchase intentions. Overall purchase intention was affected by country of origin, attached seasonings, and price; those attributes accounted for 81.0%, while the sensory attributes of the product accounted for 19.0% of purchase intents. In order to estimate market segments for the natto products based on consumer preference, a cluster analysis was performed. It identified 4 segments of consumers: 1 oriented to attached seasonings, another conscious of the price, and the other 2 oriented to origins. The behavioral and demographic characteristics of the respondents had a limited influence on segment membership.   This research was conducted to understand how consumers valuate various sensory and nonsensory product attributes based on their assessment of the overall product in the case of Japanese fermented soy product (natto). The data of this research would be of great importance both in understanding consumer behavior and in designing strategies for product development.

  6. Effect of 34 kinds of traditional Japanese herbal medicines on prolongation of cardiac allograft survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, X; Uchiyama, M; Zhang, Q; Harada, T; Otsuka, K; Shimokawa, T; Niimi, M

    2014-05-01

    Herbal medicines have been used for over 3,000 years in Asian as alternative therapy for their variety effects and have recently become popular in Europe and the United States. In the last 30 years, Japanese herbal medicines were widely used for treatment of diseases after been recognized officially by Japanese government. In this study, we investigated the effect of 34 kinds of traditional Japanese herbal medicines on alloimmune responses in a murine model of cardiac allograft transplantation. CBA mice (H2(k)) underwent transplantation of a C57BL/6 (H2(b)) heart and received oral administration of 2 g/kg/d of the 34 kinds of herbal medicines from the day of transplantation until 7 days afterward. Naïve CBA mice rejected B6 cardiac grafts acutely (median survival time [MST], 7 days). CBA transplant recipients given 2 g/kg/d of Sairei-to (TJ-114) and Tokishakuyaku-san (TJ-23) had prolonged C57BL/6 allograft survival indefinitely (both MSTs > 100 days). Moreover, CBA transplant recipients given Seisinrensiin (TJ-111), Tokishigyakukagoshuyushokyoto (TJ-38), Rikkunshito (TJ-43), Maobushisaishinto (TJ-127), Ninjin-yoei-to (TJ-108), Ryokan-kyomi-shinge-nin-to (TJ-119), Inchingorei-san (TJ-117), Hochuekkito (TJ-41), Kihi-to (TJ-65), and Sinbu-to (TJ-30) had also prolonged C57BL/6 allograft survival significantly (MSTs of 28, 22, 16, 14, 14, 13, 12, 9.5, 9 and 9 days, respectively). However, none of other 22 kinds of herbal medicines could prolong the allograft survival. Furthermore, oral administration of 2 g/kg/d of Daikenchuto (TJ-100) induced sudden death (within 1 minute) in CBA mice. In conclusion, 12 kinds of Japanese herbal medicines prolonged allograft survival and one showed toxic effect in mice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparative Analysis of Music Recordings from Western and Non-Western traditions by Automatic Tonal Feature Extraction

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    Emilia Gómez

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The automatic analysis of large musical corpora by means of computational models overcomes some limitations of manual analysis, and the unavailability of scores for most existing music makes necessary to work with audio recordings. Until now, research on this area has focused on music from the Western tradition. Nevertheless, we might ask if the available methods are suitable when analyzing music from other cultures. We present an empirical approach to the comparative analysis of audio recordings, focusing on tonal features and data mining techniques. Tonal features are related to the pitch class distribution, pitch range and employed scale, gamut and tuning system. We provide our initial but promising results obtained when trying to automatically distinguish music from Western and non- Western traditions; we analyze which descriptors are most relevant and study their distribution over 1500 pieces from different traditions and styles. As a result, some feature distributions differ for Western and non-Western music, and the obtained classification accuracy is higher than 80% for different classification algorithms and an independent test set. These results show that automatic description of audio signals together with data mining techniques provide means to characterize huge music collections from different traditions and complement musicological manual analyses.

  8. Extent of Playing-Related Musculoskeletal Problems in the Irish Traditional Music Community: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Mark; Wilson, Iseult M; Doherty, Liz; Magee, Justin

    2018-03-01

    The literature related to playing-related musculoskeletal disorders (PRMDs) primarily includes classical musicians and instrument-specific studies. Previous work by our team identified that PRMDs are an issue for Irish traditional fiddle players; however, the extent of the problem was not known. To identify the type and extent of PRMDs in the Irish traditional music population, specifically fiddle players. A questionnaire was developed and administered to faculty and students related to all Irish traditional music courses in all higher education institutions in Ireland. Seven institutions were included. The response rate was 77.5% (n=79 of 102 possible respondents). A fifth of respondents never had a PRMD, 36.7% (n=29) currently had a PRMD, and 34.2% (n=27) had a previous experience of a PRMD. The main symptoms were pain (62%, n=49), stiffness (41.8%, n=33), and tingling (35.4%, n=28). There was a positive association between the development of PRMDs and increased hours of play (p=0.017). PRMDs are a problem for Irish traditional fiddle players, especially during times of intense playing such as festivals.

  9. ARSIS AND THESIS: A REVIEW OF TWO ELEMENTS OF RHYTHM IN NON-TRADITIONAL MUSIC WRITTEN BY F. H. SMITH VAN WAESBERGHE D.J

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    Sunarto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to discuss the comparative terms of arsis and thesis in the study of Western music. The purpose of the study is to study the forms of music from the terms of language and its application, because there are many elements of music that are not understandable. Method of this study uses classical literature and musicology approach in which the great phrase rhythm of Gregorian music was more appropriately take a literary term; arsis and thesis. The focus of this study is to discuss the terms of Arsis and Thesis used in the section of rhythm elements of non-traditional music. This study reveals several musical terms in which there are similarities and differences between the rhythm and bars of music. The similarities and differences in the analysis are based on the history of Western music from Gregorian music. Gregorian was monophonic music that still existed in Europe until the 19th century. There were only two phrases in Gregorian music; when the melody moved up and when it moved down. In this case, there were two main elements in Gregorian music; they were different in rhythmic and they were in one rhythm of music. Arsis is a hard melody while thesis is a soft melody. It could be said that arsis and thesis are also parts of the dynamics form of music work. Keywords: arsis; Thesis; music rhythm; non-traditional music.

  10. KULINTANG STATESIDE: ISSUES ON AUTHENTICITY OF TRANSFORMED MUSICAL TRADITIONS CONTEXTUALIZED WITHIN THE GLOBAL/LOCAL TRAFFIC

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    Pamela Costes Onishi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A resurgence of interest in the Philippine gongs and drum tradition called kulintang took place in the United States from the late twentieth century. It is performed in its traditional style but has also seen several transformations. This study examines the popularity of the kulintang among Filipino American academics, artists, and the youth. It seeks to answer questions about the authenticity of traditions, as they are transported into an unfamiliar territory and given new forms of dynamism by individuals or groups for their own immediate needs to locate their identities. The concepts of authenticity and the traditional are becoming more and more slippery in this globalized age. When situated within the phenomena of transnational movements of people and swift exchanges between cultural practices, it becomes impossible to adhere to a fixed definition of what are authentic and traditional without essentializing the culture bearers or “ethnic artists.” This paper takes into account the present transnational and global conditions in answering the questions of “what is authentic” and “what is traditional” in music. It acknowledges the inevitability of redefining these concepts as personal needs change in historical and cultural contexts, and how individual choices for creativity and self-identification are limited and affected by transnational flows. The paper calls for a pluralistic view of the kulintang tradition, as it is bounded by the authenticity of its new bearers.

  11. Traditional music of Prizren Gora in the shadow of the Ottoman empire

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    Ranković Sanja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Located at the southernmost part of Kosovo and Metohija, on the slopes of the Sharr Mountains, Gora represents a place once inhabited by the Serbian Orthodox population, who converted to Islam under the Turkish occupation of the Balkans. The faith conversion began in the 16th and ended in the 19th century, at which point there had still been some remains of Orthodox churches left on the territory of Gora. The acceptance of the new religion and other values passed on by the Ottoman Empire brought about changes in terms of identity, so, nowadays, inhabitants identify themselves as the Goranci/Gorani people. To this very day, their cultural matrix reflects a combination of musical creations which probably preceded the change of religion as well as those variations established by the Turkish domination. These phenomena can be tracked on the level of both their context and the musical text. The Gorani celebrate Christian holidays (Christmas and St George’s Day, and keep those holidays that are part of Islamic practice (Sunnah and Bayram. As an example of an older, traditional manner of musical expression, the two-part “aloud” (na glas singing has a dominant second interval in a narrow tonal ambitus and a free metro-rhythmical organization. This form of singing is usually shaped into octosyllable and it is characterized by text improvisation which happens simultaneously with a certain action. Its interpretation is associated with St George’s Day, wedding, Sunnah, and other holidays. Songs that accompany the dance are sung in a heterophonic manner or in unison, accompanied by the tambourine (emic term: daire or def. Unlike the two-part “aloud” singing, performing the songs in unison with the tambourine and dance has wider tonal systems with a periodical case of an excessive second. However, the very emergence of numerous instruments such as the tambourine, kaval, tambura and zurla, shows a considerable Turkish-Eastern influence. This

  12. Change Management in Indo-Japanese Cross-Cultural Collaborative Contexts: Parallels between Traditional Indian Philosophy and Contemporary Japanese Management

    OpenAIRE

    Ashok Ashta; Stokes, Peter; Hughes, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link. Abstract Purpose: Within the globalised commercial context, Japanese business activity in India has increased significantly. The purpose of this research paper is to highlight common attitudinal traits that would facilitate orientation of Indian executives towards Japanese management methods through, for instance, ‘reverse adaptation’ using ...

  13. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. sunkii subsp. nov., isolated from sunki, a traditional Japanese pickle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Yuko; Oki, Kaihei; Watanabe, Koichi

    2012-11-01

    Although four strains of bacteria isolated from sunki, a traditional Japanese, non-salted pickle, were initially identified as Lactobacillus delbrueckii, the molecular and phenotypic characteristics of the strains did not match those of any of the four recognized subspecies of L. delbrueckii. Together, the results of phenotypic characterization, DNA-DNA hybridizations (in which the relatedness values between the novel strains and type strains of the recognized subspecies of L. delbrueckii were all >88.7%) and 16S rRNA gene sequence, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and whole-cell MALDI-TOF/MS spectral pattern analyses indicated that the four novel strains represented a single, novel subspecies, for which the name Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. sunkii subsp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is YIT 11221(T) (=JCM 17838(T) =DSM 24966(T)).

  14. Cosmogonic Perceptions in the Armenian Traditional Musical Instrument-crafting Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikichian, Hripsime

    2015-07-01

    Based on research data and materials recorded by folk musicians and craftsmen, the article presents the musical instrument-crafting in traditional culture, its contribution in to re-establishment of cosmic order. In this context, the several issues are reviewed in detail: individuality of craftsmen and musicians, the raw materials for the creation of instrument, the instrument structure, the manufacturing process, the ornaments and application. According to the traditional view, using the elements of nature and imitating the sounds of nature and human psychological states the master imitates God repeating the process of creation of the Universe. So, the Instrument is held capable to influence the society contributing to the eternity of life.

  15. The Role of the Japanese Traditional Diet in Healthy and Sustainable Dietary Patterns around the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Ana San; Ninomiya, Kumiko; Uneyama, Hisayuki

    2018-02-03

    As incomes steadily increase globally, traditional diets have been displaced by diets that are usually animal-based with a high content of "empty calories" or refined sugars, refined fats, and alcohol. Dietary transition coupled with the expansion of urbanization and lower physical activity have been linked to the global growth in the prevalence of obesity, overweight and life style-related non-communicable diseases. The challenge is in how to reverse the trend of high consumption of less healthy food by more healthful and more environmentally sustainable diets. The increasing recognition that each individual has specific needs depending on age, metabolic condition, and genetic profile adds complexity to general nutritional considerations. If we were to promote the consumption of low-energy and low salt but nutritious diets, taste becomes a relevant food quality. The Japanese traditional diet (Washoku), which is characterized by high consumption of fish and soybean products and low consumption of animal fat and meat, relies on the effective use of umami taste to enhance palatability. There may be a link between Washoku and the longevity of the people in Japan. Thus Washoku and umami may be valuable tools to support healthy eating.

  16. The Role of the Japanese Traditional Diet in Healthy and Sustainable Dietary Patterns around the World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana San Gabriel

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available As incomes steadily increase globally, traditional diets have been displaced by diets that are usually animal-based with a high content of “empty calories” or refined sugars, refined fats, and alcohol. Dietary transition coupled with the expansion of urbanization and lower physical activity have been linked to the global growth in the prevalence of obesity, overweight and life style-related non-communicable diseases. The challenge is in how to reverse the trend of high consumption of less healthy food by more healthful and more environmentally sustainable diets. The increasing recognition that each individual has specific needs depending on age, metabolic condition, and genetic profile adds complexity to general nutritional considerations. If we were to promote the consumption of low-energy and low salt but nutritious diets, taste becomes a relevant food quality. The Japanese traditional diet (Washoku, which is characterized by high consumption of fish and soybean products and low consumption of animal fat and meat, relies on the effective use of umami taste to enhance palatability. There may be a link between Washoku and the longevity of the people in Japan. Thus Washoku and umami may be valuable tools to support healthy eating.

  17. The Integration of Religious Traditions in Japanese Children's View of Death and Afterlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagara-Rosemeyer, Miharu; Davies, Betty

    2007-01-01

    Open and public discussion of death, particularly among children, remains one of the greatest Japanese societal taboos; therefore, little is known about Japanese children's perceptions of death. To explore Japanese children's notions of life and death, 16 healthy children (7 girls and 9 boys, mean age 8.9) were each interviewed 3 times and asked…

  18. Music

    OpenAIRE

    Deinert, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    The musical ending [of Goethe's Novelle] recalls the fascination with "music as metaphor", "the power of music", among recent and contemporary poets from Pope and Dryden and Collins to E.T.A. Hoffmann and Kleist and, of course to Goethe himself. Music saves Faust's life on Easter morning at the end of a dreadful night, and we'll encounter a similar role of music in his Trilogie der Leidenschaft which we'll read in this context.

  19. The Traditional/Acoustic Music Project: a study of vocal demands and vocal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Molly L

    2012-09-01

    The Traditional/Acoustic Music Project seeks to identify the musical and performance characteristics of traditional/acoustic musicians and determine the vocal demands they face with the goals of (1) providing information and outreach to this important group of singers and (2) providing information to physicians, speech-language pathologists, and singing teachers who will enable them to provide appropriate services. Descriptive cross-sectional study. Data have been collected through administration of a 53-item questionnaire. The questionnaire was administered to artists performing at local venues in Knoxville, Tennessee and also to musicians attending the 2008 Folk Alliance Festival in Memphis, Tennessee. Approximately 41% of the respondents have had no vocal training, whereas approximately 34% of the respondents have had some form of formal vocal training (private lessons or group instruction). About 41% of the participants had experienced a tired voice, whereas about 30% of the participants had experienced either a loss of the top range of the voice or a total loss of voice at least once in their careers. Approximately 31% of the respondents had no health insurance. Approximately 69% of the respondents reported that they get their information about healthy singing practices solely from fellow musicians or that they do not get any information at all. Traditional/acoustic musicians are a poorly studied population at risk for the development of voice disorders. Continued research is necessary with the goal of a large sample that can be analyzed for associations, identification of subpopulations, and formulation of specific hypotheses that lend themselves to experimental research. Appropriate models of information and service delivery tailored for the singer-instrumentalist are needed. Copyright © 2012 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Investigating the effect of traditional Persian music on ECG signals in young women using wavelet transform and neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, Behzad; Abbasi, Ataollah; Goshvarpour, Atefeh

    2017-05-01

    In the past few decades, several studies have reported the physiological effects of listening to music. The physiological effects of different music types on different people are different. In the present study, we aimed to examine the effects of listening to traditional Persian music on electrocardiogram (ECG) signals in young women. Twenty-two healthy females participated in this study. ECG signals were recorded under two conditions: rest and music. For each ECG signal, 20 morphological and wavelet-based features were selected. Artificial neural network (ANN) and probabilistic neural network (PNN) classifiers were used for the classification of ECG signals during and before listening to music. Collected data were separated into two data sets: train and test. Classification accuracies of 88% and 97% were achieved in train data sets using ANN and PNN, respectively. In addition, the test data set was employed for evaluating the classifiers, and classification rates of 84% and 93% were obtained using ANN and PNN, respectively. The present study investigated the effect of music on ECG signals based on wavelet transform and morphological features. The results obtained here can provide a good understanding on the effects of music on ECG signals to researchers.

  1. Music in Kamigata Rakugo Performance

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    Catherine Hallett

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rakugo is the Japanese tradition of staged comic storytelling presented by highly trained hanashika storytellers associated with small urban variety theatres called yose, found in the Kamigata and Edo regions. Although yose theatres are associated with spoken rather than musical events, music is an integral component of Kamigata rakugo performance. It is central both to the rendering of a storyteller’s performance and to creating the overall atmosphere in the yose theatre. This paper addresses the lack of detailed research on music in Kamigata rakugo performance, particularly in English. It demonstrates and documents the centrality of music in Kamigata rakugo performance, specifically the way that this music, which is rich in symbolism, aids a storyteller’s performance and is intrinsically bound up in the hierarchical structure of the storytellers and yose-bayashi ensemble musicians. It focuses on how the music functions in the performances, transmitting meanings and supporting the social structure of the ensemble.

  2. Mediators of the effects of rice intake on health in individuals consuming a traditional Japanese diet centered on rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Minori; Toyomaki, Atsuhito; Miyazaki, Akane; Nakai, Yukiei; Yamaguchi, Atsuko; Kubo, Chizuru; Suzuki, Junko; Ohkubo, Iwao; Shimizu, Mari; Musashi, Manabu; Kiso, Yoshinobu; Kusumi, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    Although the Japanese diet is believed to be balanced and healthy, its benefits have been poorly investigated, especially in terms of effects on mental health. We investigated dietary patterns and physical and mental health in the Japanese population using an epidemiological survey to determine the health benefits of the traditional Japanese diet. Questionnaires to assess dietary habits, quality of life, sleep quality, impulsivity, and depression severity were distributed to 550 randomly selected middle-aged and elderly individuals. Participants with any physical or mental disease were excluded. Two-hundred and seventy-eight participants were selected for the final statistical analysis. We determined rice to be one of the most traditional foods in Japanese cuisine. Scores for each questionnaire were computed, and the correlations between rice intake and health indices were assessed. When analyzing the direct correlations between rice intake and health indices, we found only two correlations, namely those with quality of life (vitality) and sleep quality. Path analysis using structural equation modeling was performed to investigate the association between rice intake and health, with indirect effects included in the model. Additional associations between rice intake and health were explained using this model when compared to those using direct correlation analysis. Path analysis was used to identify mediators of the rice-health association. These mediators were miso (soybean paste) soup, green tea, and natto (fermented soybean) intake. Interestingly, these mediators have been major components of the Japanese diet since 1975, which has been considered one of the healthiest diets since the 1960s. Our results indicate that the combination of rice with other healthy foods, which is representative of the traditional Japanese diet, may contribute to improvements in physical and mental health.

  3. Mediators of the effects of rice intake on health in individuals consuming a traditional Japanese diet centered on rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minori Koga

    Full Text Available Although the Japanese diet is believed to be balanced and healthy, its benefits have been poorly investigated, especially in terms of effects on mental health. We investigated dietary patterns and physical and mental health in the Japanese population using an epidemiological survey to determine the health benefits of the traditional Japanese diet. Questionnaires to assess dietary habits, quality of life, sleep quality, impulsivity, and depression severity were distributed to 550 randomly selected middle-aged and elderly individuals. Participants with any physical or mental disease were excluded. Two-hundred and seventy-eight participants were selected for the final statistical analysis. We determined rice to be one of the most traditional foods in Japanese cuisine. Scores for each questionnaire were computed, and the correlations between rice intake and health indices were assessed. When analyzing the direct correlations between rice intake and health indices, we found only two correlations, namely those with quality of life (vitality and sleep quality. Path analysis using structural equation modeling was performed to investigate the association between rice intake and health, with indirect effects included in the model. Additional associations between rice intake and health were explained using this model when compared to those using direct correlation analysis. Path analysis was used to identify mediators of the rice-health association. These mediators were miso (soybean paste soup, green tea, and natto (fermented soybean intake. Interestingly, these mediators have been major components of the Japanese diet since 1975, which has been considered one of the healthiest diets since the 1960s. Our results indicate that the combination of rice with other healthy foods, which is representative of the traditional Japanese diet, may contribute to improvements in physical and mental health.

  4. Traditional music and the anatomy of the festival network between Yugoslavian cultural politics and vernacular values

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    Jakovljević Rastko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As official policies in the post-war Yugoslavia were oriented towards economy, mainly tied to towns, rural areas were focused on agriculture to a large extent, as it had been before. However, the Party was determined to revive villages, being of the opinion that life in those areas should be purified from “primitivism” so that it could be set to a higher level concerning issues of education, political structure, local organization and cultural life. Since people in villages felt determined to maintain their local culture, customs and music, the State officials had to find ways to articulate uncanny social behaviors. At the time, folklore and vernacular creative impulse in Serbia was sustained as a “hard cultural form” that by accident or on purpose converted into “soft cultural form” through a wide range of festival activities in Yugoslavia. This significant turn permitted “relatively easy separation of embodied performance from meaning and value, and relatively successful transformation at each level” (Appadurai 1996: 90. The discussion of this paper intends to form a dialogue on the transformation of social structure and politics, which gradually led to severe changes in the areas of traditional musical practice.

  5. A cross-cultural study of the rhythm in English and Japanese popular music

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadakata, M.; Desain, P.W.M.; Honing, H.J.; Patel, A.D.; Iversen, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the linguistic impact on rhythm in music. It has been shown that the composer’s native language exerts an influence on the music composed [10] using the normalized Pairwise Variability Index [5]. Our project aims at finding more evidence for the linguistic

  6. Traditional Japanese Formula Kigikenchuto Accelerates Healing of Pressure-Loading Skin Ulcer in Rats

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    Mari Kimura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the effect of kigikenchuto (KKT, a traditional Japanese formula, in a modified rat pressure-loading skin ulcer model. Rats were divided into three groups, KKT extract orally administered (250 or 500 mg/kg/day for 35 days and control. KKT shortened the duration until healing. Immunohistochemically, KKT increased CD-31-positive vessels in early phase and increased α-smooth muscle actin-(α-SMA- positive fibroblastic cells in early phase and decreased them in late phase of wound healing. By Western blotting, KKT showed the potential to decrease inflammatory cytokines (MCP-1, IL-1β, and TNF-α in early phase, decrease vascular endothelial growth factor in early phase and increase it in late phase, and modulate the expression of extracellular protein matrix (α-SMA, TGF-β1, bFGF, collagen III, and collagen I. These results suggested the possibility that KKT accelerates pressure ulcer healing through decreases of inflammatory cytokines, increase of angiogenesis, and induction of extracellular matrix remodeling.

  7. Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lech, Marcel Lysgaard

    2017-01-01

    Old Comedy was a musical experience of great variety. Accompanied by the piper, both choruses and actors sang frequently during the performance. Music in Old comedy reflects to some extend the importance of music in Athenian everyday life, but as Greek Comedy evolved and detached it self more...... and more from the everyday topics, music similarly lost part of its importance within the plays themselves....

  8. A Corpus of Annotated Irish Traditional Dance Music Recordings: Design and Benchmark Evaluations

    OpenAIRE

    Beauguitte, Pierre; Duggan, Bryan; Kelleher, John

    2016-01-01

    An emerging trend in music information retrieval (MIR) is the use of supervised machine learning to train automatic music transcription models. A prerequisite of adopting a machine learning methodology is the availability of annotated corpora. However, different genres of music have different characteristics and modelling these characteristics is an important part of creating state of the art MIR systems. Consequently, although some music corpora are available the use of these corpora is tied...

  9. The Dynamics of Music and Culture in Traditional Ibibio Society of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the degree of inter-relationship between music and culture with a view to establishing that there can be no thought of culture particularly in a typical African community without reference to music. The paper focuses on the extent to which musical recreation is an integral aspect of the life style of the ...

  10. Watching cows : invention of tradition and construction of identity in the Frisian folk music revival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschop Boele, Evert

    2013-01-01

    From the 1960s, in several Western European countries folk music revivals took place. In The Netherlands, the folk music revival was heavily inspired by the folk music revival movements in the United States, the United Kingdom and Ireland, and later by the revivals in France and Flanders (Belgium)

  11. Traditional Japanese Kampo Medicine: Clinical Research between Modernity and Traditional Medicine—The State of Research and Methodological Suggestions for the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Watanabe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Japanese traditional herbal medicine, Kampo, has gradually reemerged and 148 different formulations (mainly herbal extracts can be prescribed within the national health insurance system. The objective of this article is to introduce Kampo and to present information from previous clinical studies that tested Kampo formulae. In addition, suggestions on the design of future research will be stated. The literature search was based on a summary, up until January 2009, by the Japanese Society of Oriental Medicine and included only those trials which were also available in either Pubmed or ICHUSHI (Japan Medical Abstracts Society. We included 135 studies, half of these studies (n=68 used a standard control and 28 a placebo control. Thirty-seven trials were published in English [all randomized controlled trials (RCTs] and the remaining articles were in Japanese only. The sample size for most studies was small (two-third of the studies included less than 100 patients and the overall methodological quality appeared to be low. None of the studies used Kampo diagnosis as the basis for the treatment. In order to evaluate Kampo as a whole treatment system, certain aspects should be taken into account while designing studies. RCTs are the appropriate study design to test efficacy or effectiveness; however, within the trial the treatment could be individualized according to the Kampo diagnosis. Kampo is a complex and individualized treatment with a long tradition, and it would be appropriate for further research on Kampo medicine to take this into account.

  12. Universal and culture-specific factors in the recognition and performance of musical affect expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laukka, Petri; Eerola, Tuomas; Thingujam, Nutankumar S; Yamasaki, Teruo; Beller, Grégory

    2013-06-01

    We present a cross-cultural study on the performance and perception of affective expression in music. Professional bowed-string musicians from different musical traditions (Swedish folk music, Hindustani classical music, Japanese traditional music, and Western classical music) were instructed to perform short pieces of music to convey 11 emotions and related states to listeners. All musical stimuli were judged by Swedish, Indian, and Japanese participants in a balanced design, and a variety of acoustic and musical cues were extracted. Results first showed that the musicians' expressive intentions could be recognized with accuracy above chance both within and across musical cultures, but communication was, in general, more accurate for culturally familiar versus unfamiliar music, and for basic emotions versus nonbasic affective states. We further used a lens-model approach to describe the relations between the strategies that musicians use to convey various expressions and listeners' perceptions of the affective content of the music. Many acoustic and musical cues were similarly correlated with both the musicians' expressive intentions and the listeners' affective judgments across musical cultures, but the match between musicians' and listeners' uses of cues was better in within-cultural versus cross-cultural conditions. We conclude that affective expression in music may depend on a combination of universal and culture-specific factors.

  13. Comparative analysis of energy impacts of traditional and partly electronic environmental auditing: Learning from the Japanese automotive industry case

    OpenAIRE

    Mbohwa, C

    2008-01-01

    This paper does a comparative analysis and assessment of energy impacts of traditional and partly electronic ISO 14001 environmental management system auditing that using videoconferencing systems. The focus is on the Japanese automotive industry. The idea is to quantify the environmental impacts of auditing and resolve the important question on whether or not the use of information and communication technology (ICT) in environmental auditing reduces environmental impacts in IS...

  14. A Study on the Music Features of Guizhou Yi’s Traditional Love Song (Qugu)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Ran; Lei Rui

    2016-01-01

    Being one of the most ancient eth-nic groups in China, the ‘Yi’ have a long history and an abundant culture. Yi folk songs, which are widely sung in many regions of China, have vari-ous forms and styles. These folk songs reflect the lengthy history of the Yi society; indeed they ex-press the happiness and misery, the dreams and desires of the Yi people. Within this context, this article focuses on‘Qugu’ which is a unique type of music belonging to the Yi people. In fact most Yi people of Guizhou live in the Wumeng Mountains. In their quest for survival, over time the Yi had developed a series of natural worship rites which became one of the sources of their traditional mu-sic. In addition, Yi people formed a unique way to express their love: in times past they developed a tradition of singing in the mountains and forests as to convey their love to their beloved;the‘Qugu’ is one of these Yi’ s traditional love song genres.‘Qugu’ means ‘singing’ and this genre has its own social functioning. According to traditional Yi culture and habits, a ‘Qugu ’ should not be sung in front of parents, brothers, or other rela-tives;instead it should only be sung in a place sur-rounded by mountains and forests and on certain singing sites, called ‘Guji’(in Yi language). In most of the Yi settlements, such ‘singing sites ’ were placed far away from the villages, sometimes on flat areas and sometimes in the remote wilder-ness, in forests or caves. The singing activities on those special sites took place according to specific rules and calen-dars. During the so-called ‘singing festival’ peri-od ( from the 1 st to the 15 th day of the 1 st lunar month and on the 5th day of the 5th lunar month), the singing performances were particularly magnifi-cent. People of all ages, young and old, would gather together from all directions and would sing without interruption for several days. Moreover , the singing festival also had certain traditional rites

  15. Music Therapy with Ethnic Music for Dementia Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Tanaka

    2012-12-01

    Conclusion: Our results revealed characteristic responses of dementia patients onto the Japanese music, and we expect our result provides an evidence for better music therapy for dementia patients with Japanese culture.

  16. Acute effects of traditional Japanese alcohol beverages on blood glucose and polysomnography levels in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megumi Kido

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Alcohol consumption is a lifestyle factor associated with type 2 diabetes. This relationship is reportedly different depending on the type of alcohol beverage. The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of traditional Japanese alcohol beverages on biochemical parameters, physical and emotional state, and sleep patterns. Methods. Six healthy subjects (three men and three women; age, 28.8 ± 9.5 years; body mass index, 21.4 ± 1.6 kg/m2 consumed three different types of alcohol beverages (beer, shochu, and sake, each with 40 g ethanol or mineral water with dinner on different days in the hospital. Blood samples were collected before and 1, 2, and 12 h after drinking each beverage, and assessments of physical and emotional state were administered at the same time. In addition, sleep patterns and brain waves were examined using polysomnography. Results. Blood glucose levels at 1 h and the 12-h area under the curve (AUC value after drinking shochu were significantly lower than that with water and beer. The 12-h blood insulin AUC value after drinking shochu was significantly lower than that with beer. Blood glucose × insulin level at 1 h and the 2-h blood glucose × insulin AUC value with shochu were significantly lower than that with beer. The insulinogenic indexes at 2 h with beer and sake, but not shochu, were significantly higher than that with water. The visual analogue scale scores of physical and emotional state showed that the tipsiness levels with beer, shochu, and sake at 1 h were significantly higher than that with water. These tipsiness levels were maintained at 2 h. The polysomnography showed that the rapid eye movement (REM sleep latency with shochu and sake were shorter than that with water and beer. Conclusions. Acute consumption of alcohol beverages with a meal resulted in different responses in postprandial glucose and insulin levels as well as REM sleep latency. Alcohol beverage type should be taken into

  17. The Relation between Hepatotoxicity and the Total Coumarin Intake from Traditional Japanese Medicines Containing Cinnamon Bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Naohiro; Kainuma, Mosaburo; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kubota, Toshio; Sugawara, Naoko; Uchida, Aiko; Ozono, Sahoko; Yamamuro, Yuki; Furusyo, Norihiro; Ueda, Koso; Tahara, Eiichi; Shimazoe, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamon bark is commonly used in traditional Japanese herbal medicines (Kampo medicines). The coumarin contained in cinnamon is known to be hepatotoxic, and a tolerable daily intake (TDI) of 0.1 mg/kg/day, has been quantified and used in Europe to insure safety. Risk assessments for hepatotoxicity by the cinnamon contained in foods have been reported. However, no such assessment of cinnamon bark has been reported and the coumarin content of Kampo medicines derived from cinnamon bark is not yet known. To assess the risk for hepatotoxicity by Kampo medicines, we evaluated the daily coumarin intake of patients who were prescribed Kampo medicines and investigated the relation between hepatotoxicity and the coumarin intake. The clinical data of 129 outpatients (18 male and 111 female, median age 58 years) who had been prescribed keishibukuryogankayokuinin (TJ-125) between April 2008 and March 2013 was retrospectively investigated. Concurrent Kampo medicines and liver function were also surveyed. In addition to TJ-125, the patients took some of the other 32 Kampo preparations and 22 decoctions that include cinnamon bark. The coumarin content of these Kampo medicines was determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). TJ-125 had the highest daily content of coumarin (5.63 mg/day), calculated from the daily cinnamon bark dosage reported in the information leaflet inserted in each package of Kampo medicine. The coumarin content in 1g cinnamon bark decoction was 3.0 mg. The daily coumarin intake of the patients was 0.113 (0.049-0.541) mg/kg/day, with 98 patients (76.0%) exceeding the TDI. Twenty-three patients had an abnormal change in liver function test value, but no significant difference was found in the incidence of abnormal change between the group consuming less than the TDI value (6/31, 19.4%) and the group consuming equal to or greater than the TDI value (17/98, 17.3%). In addition, no abnormal change related to cinnamon bark was found for individual

  18. Acute effects of traditional Japanese alcohol beverages on blood glucose and polysomnography levels in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Megumi; Asakawa, Akihiro; Koyama, Ken-Ichiro K; Takaoka, Toshio; Tajima, Aya; Takaoka, Shigeru; Yoshizaki, Yumiko; Okutsu, Kayu; Takamine, Kazunori T; Sameshima, Yoshihiro; Inui, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Background. Alcohol consumption is a lifestyle factor associated with type 2 diabetes. This relationship is reportedly different depending on the type of alcohol beverage. The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of traditional Japanese alcohol beverages on biochemical parameters, physical and emotional state, and sleep patterns. Methods. Six healthy subjects (three men and three women; age, 28.8 ± 9.5 years; body mass index, 21.4 ± 1.6 kg/m(2)) consumed three different types of alcohol beverages (beer, shochu, and sake, each with 40 g ethanol) or mineral water with dinner on different days in the hospital. Blood samples were collected before and 1, 2, and 12 h after drinking each beverage, and assessments of physical and emotional state were administered at the same time. In addition, sleep patterns and brain waves were examined using polysomnography. Results. Blood glucose levels at 1 h and the 12-h area under the curve (AUC) value after drinking shochu were significantly lower than that with water and beer. The 12-h blood insulin AUC value after drinking shochu was significantly lower than that with beer. Blood glucose × insulin level at 1 h and the 2-h blood glucose × insulin AUC value with shochu were significantly lower than that with beer. The insulinogenic indexes at 2 h with beer and sake, but not shochu, were significantly higher than that with water. The visual analogue scale scores of physical and emotional state showed that the tipsiness levels with beer, shochu, and sake at 1 h were significantly higher than that with water. These tipsiness levels were maintained at 2 h. The polysomnography showed that the rapid eye movement (REM) sleep latency with shochu and sake were shorter than that with water and beer. Conclusions. Acute consumption of alcohol beverages with a meal resulted in different responses in postprandial glucose and insulin levels as well as REM sleep latency. Alcohol beverage type should be taken into consideration

  19. Fernando de Almeida (d. 1660: Tradition and Innovation in Mid-Seventeenth-Century Portuguese Sacred Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaz, João

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Library of the Ducal Palace at Vila Viçosa preserves three large choirbooks of polyphonic repertoire intended for Holy Week, prepared between 1735 and 1736 by a copyist of the Patriarchal Church. These choirbooks contain all the known extant works by Fernando de Almeida (died in 1660. When comparing the music of Fernando de Almeida with that of his near contemporary João Lourenço Rebelo (1610-1661, the different trends in Portuguese early- to mid-seventeenth-century church music become clear, especially if viewed in the light of the acknowledged aesthetic and compositional premises explained in the 1649 Defensa de la mvsica moderna by King João IV. Rebelo’s concertato works incline towards the style of north-Italian composers. The ingenuity of Fernando de Almeida’s style, which is particularly noticeable in his eight-voice Holy Week responsories, lays in the integration of prominent Baroque features within the mould of Iberian Mannerist tradition.La Biblioteca del Palacio Ducal de Vila Viçosa posee tres grandes libros de coro con repertorio polifónico destinado a la Semana Santa, preparados entre 1735 y 1736 por un copista de la Iglesia Patriarcal. Estos libros de coro contienen todas las obras de Fernando de Almeida (m. 1660 que hayan sobrevivido hasta los días de hoy. La comparación de la música de Fernando de Almeida con la de su cási contemporáneo João Lourenço Rebelo (1610-1661 evidencia las distintas orientaciones en la música sacra portuguesa de principios a mediados del siglo XVII, especialmente cuando observadas bajo las premisas estéticas y composicionales explanadas en la Defensa de la mvsica moderna (1649 del Rey D. João IV. El estilo concertato de Rebelo se acerca de los compositores del Norte de Italia. La inventiva del estilo de Fernando de Almeida, particularmente notable en sus Responsorios a ocho voces para la Semana Santa, incorpora prominentes características barrocas en el molde de la tradici

  20. Analysis of the eukaryotic community and metabolites found in clay wall material used in the construction of traditional Japanese buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Sakihito; Kamei, Kaeko; Nishitani, Maiko; Sato, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    Clay wall (tsuchikabe in Japanese) material for Japanese traditional buildings is manufactured by fermenting a mixture of clay, sand, and rice straw. The aim of this study was to understand the fermentation process in order to gain insight into the ways waste biomass can be used to produce useful materials. In this study, in addition to Clostridium, we suggested that the family Nectriaceae and the Scutellinia sp. of fungi were important in degrading cell wall materials of rice straw, such as cellulose and/or lignin. The microorganisms in the clay wall material produced sulfur-containing inorganic compounds that may sulfurate minerals in clay particles, and polysaccharides that give viscosity to clay wall material, thus increasing workability for plastering, and possibly giving water-resistance to the dried clay wall.

  1. Musical Acculturation through Primary School Activities during Japanese Colonial Rule of Korea (1910-1945)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Ha

    2014-01-01

    Global colonialism and continuing post-colonial influences caused widespread cultural change at the interface of different cultures. Musical acculturation can be observed in most colonised countries. Some pro-colonialists apologetically allege that through colonisation the colonised territories would receive developmental aid and economical…

  2. Gympie's Country Music Muster: Creating a Cultural Economy from a Local Tradition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Rob

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an historical analysis of the National Country Music Muster, a country music festival held in a forest outside of Gympie, a town in rural southeast Queensland, Australia, between the period 1982 and 2006 (the first twenty-five years of the event). This article analyses the origins of the Muster, demonstrating how local events…

  3. Effects of traditional Japanese massage therapy on various symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease: a case-series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoyama, Nozomi; Ohkoshi, Norio

    2012-03-01

    Massage therapy is one of the most commonly used complementary therapies for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of this preliminary study was to evaluate the effects of traditional Japanese massage therapy on various symptoms of patients with PD. The study design was a case series study. The study was conducted at the Center for Integrative Medicine, Tsukuba University of Technology, Japan. The subjects were 10 patients with idiopathic PD (mean age, 69.6±7.7 years; range, 55-85 years) who presented for consultation with a neurologist between February and April 2009 and who desired massage therapy in conjunction with standard pharmaceutical treatment. The intervention comprised a 30-minute session of traditional Japanese massage in conjunction with standard conventional medication. The outcome measures were as follows: Gait speed in the 20-m walk test (10-m walk and return) for gait disturbance, angular range of shoulder joint motion for frozen shoulder, and a visual analogue scale (VAS) for assessing the severity of each of various symptoms (hypophonia, shoulder stiffness, muscle pain, heaviness or lassitude of a body part, and fatigue), as determined before and after the massage session. (1) Patients with gait disturbance showed improved gait speed, (2) those with frozen shoulder showed improved range of motion of the shoulder joint, and (3) VAS scores for assessing the severity of other subjective symptoms were improved. These results suggest that traditional Japanese massage therapy used in combination with medication is effective for alleviating various symptoms in patients with PD and may contribute to enhancing their health-related quality of life. Larger studies with a control group are required to verify these findings.

  4. The traditional and modern in church music: A study in canon and creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peno Vesna

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Definitions of the terms "traditional" and "modern", relating to the chanting tradition of the Eastern Church, sprang from research into so-called kalophony – a specific compositional method that established melismatic melody. Despite differing academic opinions about the origins of this melody in the liturgical practice of the Eastern Church, it is evident that very embellished and elaborate kalophonic melodies appeared frequently from the mid-13th century onwards. The compositional treatment of various genres of these melodies began historically with partial respect for the established hymnographic text. This was followed by a more liberal arrangement, ending in a total departure from any textual base (kratema. The fact that the melody in melismatic mode superseded the text suggests that kalophony represented a certain kind of modernity. Even though musical manuscripts in neumatic notation had no written rules about methods of composition or how to balance tones and words, in the tradition of the Easternchanting practice, melody was always recognized as a helpful addition, an exegesis of the textus receptus. In order to fully comprehend the introduction of this "new sound" and "new style", this study focuses on the work of a major protagonist of them, a monk from the Great Lavra, blessed John Koukouzeles. I consider the following questions: 1 The purpose and function of chant in the art of Byzantium in general 2 The role of the composer/ artist and his creative freedom 3 Evaluating criteria for church-related arts/composition 4 Criteria which immortalized or buried artwork/composition of the time Allowing for what possibly motivated John Koukouzeles and his contemporaries to compose kalophonic melodies or to kalophonically modify old, traditional melodies this study focuses on the effects that hesychasm had on the chanting practice of the time. Considering the theological validation of kalophonic modifications of some liturgical hymns, an

  5. Traditional Music in Igbo Culture: A Case Study of Idu Cultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DrNneka

    research work reveals that despite the alarming influences of the western technology on Igbo culture, dance music performance has remained the climax of every cultural .... grade, title groups, palm wine tappers, hunters, carvers, women, men, ...

  6. THE FOLCLOR ORCHESTRA AS A CONSERVATION, VALIRIZATION, CAPITALIZATION FACTOR AND MEDIA DISSEMINATION OF TRADITIONAL MUSIC IN THE REPUBLIC OF MOLDOVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHISELIŢĂ VASILE

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at motivating the necessity to study the professional folk orchestras from the Republic of Moldova as a factor of identifying, institutionalizing, urbanizing, media disseminating, promoting the modern traditional (oral musical sources in the context of the process of negotiating the cultural identities from the modern society (the second half of the 20th and the first decade of the 21st centuries. The author focuses his attention to the theoretical and methodologic instrument of studying the repertory of the professional folk orchestra „Folclor” as a paradigm of a new stylistic trend of the cultural identity in the sphere of contemporary folk art — neotraditional music.

  7. News Particle Physics: ATLAS unveils mural at CERN Prize: Corti Trust invites essay entries Astrophysics: CERN holds cosmic-ray conference Researchers in Residence: Lord Winston returns to school Music: ATLAS scientists record physics music Conference: Champagne flows at Reims event Competition: Students triumph at physics olympiad Teaching: Physics proves popular in Japanese schools Forthcoming Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Particle Physics: ATLAS unveils mural at CERN Prize: Corti Trust invites essay entries Astrophysics: CERN holds cosmic-ray conference Researchers in Residence: Lord Winston returns to school Music: ATLAS scientists record physics music Conference: Champagne flows at Reims event Competition: Students triumph at physics olympiad Teaching: Physics proves popular in Japanese schools Forthcoming Events

  8. Composing art songs based on Igbo traditional music:concept and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Composing modern African art music from the African stock has drawn the attention of many African and non-African composers and scholars alike in recent times. The common interest to decipher the creative concept and process of the new works emerging from the attempts of African composers at creative continuum of ...

  9. Profiling of the compounds absorbed in human plasma and urine after oral administration of a traditional Japanese (kampo) medicine, daikenchuto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwabu, Jun; Watanabe, Junko; Hirakura, Kazuhiro; Ozaki, Yoshinori; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2010-11-01

    Daikenchuto (DKT), a pharmaceutical-grade traditional Japanese (Kampo) medicine, has been widely used for the treatment of various gastrointestinal disorders including postoperative ileus and has been integrated into the modern medical care system in Japan as a prescription drug. DKT is a multiherbal medicine consisting of Japanese pepper (zanthoxylum fruit), processed ginger, and ginseng with maltose as an additive. Despite substantial research on the pharmacological activities of DKT and its ingredients, the lack of studies on absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of DKT has made it difficult to obtain a consistent picture of its mechanism of action. In the present study, we constructed an analysis procedure consisting of seven conditions of liquid chromatography and mass spectrometric analysis, which enabled the identification of 44 ingredients of DKT component herbs. We investigated the plasma and urine profiles of these ingredients 0.5 to 8 h after oral administration of 15.0 g of DKT in four healthy volunteers. The results indicated that 1) hydroxy-α-sanshool and [6]-shogaol, the prominent peaks in plasma derived from Japanese pepper and ginger, respectively, were detected at 0.5 h and thereafter decreased throughout the sampling period; 2) ginsenoside Rb(1), a prominent peak derived from ginseng, increased gradually during the sampling period; 3) glucuronide conjugates of hydroxy-sanshools, shogaols, and gingerols were detected in plasma and urine; and 4) no obvious differences between samples from the two male and the two female individuals were observed. These results provide a strong basis for future studies on pharmacokinetics and pharmacology of DKT.

  10. The Aesthetic Implication of Chinese Traditional Music%中国传统音乐的审美意蕴探究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨冉

    2014-01-01

    Music is a way of entertainment and a way to express feelings since ancient times. It is a abstract way to express people's inner thoughts. In ancient times, there were a variety of instruments and many types of music form in our country. Music, as an abstract art form, through its rhythm and melody, expresses people's real life as well as people's mood. And also, there is a big difference between music. In terms of Chinese ancient music, our country has a long history. For traditional music, the aesthetic implication of traditional music can improve the traditional music appreciation level to a certain extent and display one's own ideas by appreciating the traditional music. By exploration of the aesthetic connotation of Chinese traditional music in this article, it is hoped that people can have a further understanding of traditional music.%音乐自古以来就是人们休闲娱乐,表达心声的一种方式。其是一种通过抽象的方式来表达人们内心想法的方式,在古代我国就已经有多种乐器出现,音乐形式也有很多种的类型。引起其作为一种抽象的艺术形式,其通过节奏和旋律来将人们现实生活以及人们的心情等表达出来。而音乐之间也有很大的差异,就我国古代音乐来说,我国有着悠久的历史,在这五千年的历史中,中国传统音乐也有着很多的历史,对于传统音乐来说,对传统音乐的审美意蕴探究可以让人们对传统音乐的欣赏水平有一定提高,能够通过欣赏传统音乐将自身的想法等都展示出来。本文就对中国传统音乐的审美意蕴进行探究,希望能够使大家对传统音乐有进一步的认识。

  11. 11. Traditional and Innovative Methods in Approaching Music Styles. Pedagogical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iaţeşen Loredana Viorica

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The approach to music styles entails an in-depth musicological analysis aimed at synthesizing numerous bibliographical sources belonging to different fields and directions of research. A chronological overview of studies (Jean Molino, Fait musical et sémiologie de la musique, 1975; Jean Jaques Nattiez, Quelques reflexions du style, 1993; R. J. Pascall, Style, in The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, 1994; Jean Jaques Nattiez, La musique de l’avenir, in Musique. Une Encyclopédie pour le XXI siècle, 2003; Mario Baroni, Stil şi mutaţii stilistice în tradiţia muzicală europeană, in Musique Une encyclopédie pour le XXI siècle, 2006 and of universal (Leonard Meyer, Explaining Music, 1973; Charles Rosen, Le style classique: Haydn. Mozart, Beethoven, 1978; Leonard B. Meyer, Style and Music. Theory, History and Ideology, 1989; and Romanian specialised literature (Cornel Ţăranu, Elemente de stilistică muzicală (sec. XX, 1981; Edgar Papu, Despre stiluri, 1986; Valentina Sandu-Dediu, Alegeri Atitudini Afecte, 2010; Vasile Iliuţ, O carte a stilurilor muzicale, 2011; Valentin Timaru, Stilistică muzicală, 2014 from the late 20th century and the beginning of the 21st century, reveal the different and, more often than not, contrasting views of historians, analysts, aestheticians, philosophers, scholars and educators, starting from the meaning of the very idea of style, to the reception of this phenomenon in contemporaneity. On these grounds, this study proposes a systematization of the most relevant landmarks in documentation to date, for the purpose of applying them from a didactic perspective.

  12. Of Packs & Lone Wolves: Interview with Ellis Amdur Regarding Japanese Martial Traditions, by Peter Hobart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hobart

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There are some significant differences in the manner that the classical Japanese martial arts are practiced in the East and in the West. Among these are the student-teacher relationship, the degree of formality and the level of emphasis on etiquette in the dojo. In this interview, noted martial arts teacher Ellis Amdur, who spent thirteen of his more than forty years of martial practice studying in Japan, explores these and other concepts, vital to anyone who wishes to understand the way these arts are (or were taught in the country of their origin. He also discusses the two particular martial systems (koryu which he is licensed to teach: Araki-ryu, a rugged system that emphasizes close combat; and Toda-ha Buko-ryu, a system specializing in the use of the naginata against a variety of weapons.

  13. Application of synchrotron-radiation soft x-ray spectroscopy for food analysis. Oxidation of the Japanese traditional sweets 'Karinto'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Yasuji; Kamamoto, Keishi; Nozawa, Jiro; Amano, Osamu; Gullikson, Eric M.

    2008-01-01

    To establish synchrotron-radiation soft X-ray spectroscopy as a reliable method for food analysis, we measured the X-ray absorption spectra of Japanese traditional sweets 'Karinto' and monitored the oxidation process. We prepared oxidized Karinto samples; The oxidation conditions such as UV/Vis-irradiation/shading and air/nitrogen-atmosphere were controlled for nine months at room temperature. The soft X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) of Karinto samples were measured in the beamline BL-6.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). The XAS of the Karinto samples oxidized with UV/Vis-irradiation in air show that the relative peak intensity ratio, π*/σ*, of the nine-month-oxidized sample clearly increases relative to the initial sample. This demonstrates that Karinto can be oxidized with UV/Vis-irradiation. (author)

  14. Context-Related Melodies in Oral Culture: An Attempt to Describe Words-and-Music Relationships in Local Singing Tradition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taive Särg

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In oral folk song traditions we often find many lyrics, but not nearly as many melodies. The terms “polyfunctionalism”, “group melodies” or “general melodies” have been used by Estonian researches to indicate the phenomenon that many lyrics were sung to only one, or a small handful, of tunes. The scarcity of melodies is supposed to be one of several related phenomena characteristic to an oral, text-centred singing culture.In this article the Estonian folk song tradition will be analysed against a quantity of melodies and their usage in the following aspects: word-and-melody relationships and context-and-melody relationships in Karksi parish (south Estonia; a singer; and native musical terms and the process of singing and (recreation.

  15. Comparison of Effects Produced by Physiological Versus Traditional Vocal Warm-up in Contemporary Commercial Music Singers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, María Priscilla; Rojas, Sandra; Guzman, Marco; Quezada, Camilo

    2018-03-01

    The present study aimed to observe whether physiological warm-up and traditional singing warm-up differently affect aerodynamic, electroglottographic, acoustic, and self-perceived parameters of voice in Contemporary Commercial Music singers. Thirty subjects were asked to perform a 15-minute session of vocal warm-up. They were randomly assigned to one of two types of vocal warm-up: physiological (based on semi-occluded exercises) or traditional (singing warm-up based on open vowel [a:]). Aerodynamic, electroglottographic, acoustic, and self-perceived voice quality assessments were carried out before (pre) and after (post) warm-up. No significant differences were found when comparing both types of vocal warm-up methods, either in subjective or in objective measures. Furthermore, the main positive effect observed in both groups when comparing pre and post conditions was a better self-reported quality of voice. Additionally, significant differences were observed for sound pressure level (decrease), glottal airflow (increase), and aerodynamic efficiency (decrease) in the traditional warm-up group. Both traditional and physiological warm-ups produce favorable voice sensations. Moreover, there are no evident differences in aerodynamic and electroglottographic variables when comparing both types of vocal warm-ups. Some changes after traditional warm-up (decreased intensity, increased airflow, and decreased aerodynamic efficiency) could imply an early stage of vocal fatigue. Copyright © 2018 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Music of a Lost Kingdom: W.B. Yeats and the Japanese Nō Drama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Peter Jochum

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article I approach some of Yeats’s later dance plays, written under the influence of the Japanese Nō drama, by asking and answering the following questions: What did Yeats think he was doing when in February 1916 he began drafting At the Hawk’s Well, the first play written after he had been introduced to the Nō and the first of his Four Plays for Dancers (1921? How and what did Yeats learn about the Nō? How did he explain the attraction that the Nō had for him and how does this explanation relate to his earlier writings on drama and theatre? How can the plays he wrote before Four Plays for Dancers be seen as preparations for his encounter with the Nō? Apart from At the Hawk’s Well (1917, I consider The Dreaming of the Bones (1919 and The Death of Cuchulain (1939; I also pay attention to the role played by Ezra Pound in shaping Yeats’s plays and his ideas about the Nō.

  17. The Power of Traditional Design Techniques: The Effects of Viewing a Japanese Garden on Individuals With Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Seiko; Gianfagia, Thomas J; Munafo, John P; Fujii, Eijiro; Shen, Xuting; Sun, Minkai; Shi, Bertram Emil; Liu, Congcong; Hamano, Hiroshi; Herrup, Karl

    2017-07-01

    This study is to examine how viewing a Japanese garden affects Japanese patients with dementia. In a previous study, authors explored the effect on individuals with Alzheimer's disease of viewing an indoor Japanese garden at a nursing home in the United States and reported that viewing the garden significantly reduced the heart rate, evoked short-term and long-term memories, and improved behavioral symptoms. However, it was unclear whether these effects were caused by the design of Japanese garden or unfamiliarity of the design to Caucasians. We constructed a Japanese garden on the rooftop of a hospital in Japan and assessed with a total of 25 subjects on the following categories: (1) eye movement, (2) heart rate, and (3) behavior under four different conditions: (a) open view of the site before construction of the Japanese garden (the control space), (b) open view of the Japanese garden, (c) view of the Japanese garden through closed door, and (d) view of Japanese garden through closed door with the chrysanthemum scent. Findings/Results: Viewers' eyes scanned larger area while viewing the Japanese garden, and viewing the Japanese garden significantly reduced heart rate and improved behavioral symptoms than the control space. We also found that the effect of viewing the same Japanese garden differed across three conditions: the view through an open door, a closed door, and a closed door with added scent.

  18. KULINTANG STATESIDE: ISSUES ON AUTHENTICITY OF TRANSFORMED MUSICAL TRADITIONS CONTEXTUALIZED WITHIN THE GLOBAL/LOCAL TRAFFIC

    OpenAIRE

    Pamela Costes Onishi

    2010-01-01

    A resurgence of interest in the Philippine gongs and drum tradition called kulintang took place in the United States from the late twentieth century. It is performed in its traditional style but has also seen several transformations. This study examines the popularity of the kulintang among Filipino American academics, artists, and the youth. It seeks to answer questions about the authenticity of traditions, as they are transported into an unfamiliar territory and given new forms of dynamism ...

  19. Gluconacetobacter kakiaceti sp. nov., an acetic acid bacterium isolated from a traditional Japanese fruit vinegar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iino, Takao; Suzuki, Rei; Tanaka, Naoto; Kosako, Yoshimasa; Ohkuma, Moriya; Komagata, Kazuo; Uchimura, Tai

    2012-07-01

    Two novel acetic acid bacteria, strains G5-1(T) and I5-1, were isolated from traditional kaki vinegar (produced from fruits of kaki, Diospyros kaki Thunb.), collected in Kumamoto Prefecture, Japan. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strains G5-1(T) and I5-1 formed a distinct subline in the genus Gluconacetobacter and were closely related to Gluconacetobacter swingsii DST GL01(T) (99.3% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). The isolates showed 96-100% DNA-DNA relatedness with each other, but genus Gluconacetobacter. The isolates could be distinguished from closely related members of the genus Gluconacetobacter by not producing 2- and 5-ketogluconic acids from glucose, producing cellulose, growing without acetic acid and with 30% (w/v) d-glucose, and producing acid from sugars and alcohols. Furthermore, the genomic DNA G+C contents of strains G5-1(T) and I5-1 were a little higher than those of their closest phylogenetic neighbours. On the basis of the phenotypic characteristics and phylogenetic position, strains G5-1(T) and I5-1 are assigned to a novel species, for which the name Gluconacetobacter kakiaceti sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is G5-1(T) (=JCM 25156(T)=NRIC 0798(T)=LMG 26206(T)).

  20. Tradition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otto, Ton

    2016-01-01

    : beliefs, practices, institutions, and also things. In this sense, the meaning of the term in social research is very close to its usage in common language and is not always theoretically well developed (see Shils, 1971: 123). But the concept of tradition has also been central to major theoretical debates...... on the nature of social change, especially in connection with the notion of modernity. Here tradition is linked to various forms of agency as a factor of both stability and intentional change....

  1. New possibility of traditional Chinese and Japanese medicine as treatment for behavioral and psychiatric symptoms in dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kung FC

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Fan-Chin Kung,1 Ryouhei Ishii,2 Hsing-Cheng Liu,3 Masatoshi Takeda21Yuli Hospital, DOH, Hualien, Taiwan; 2Department of Psychiatry, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan; 3Department of General Psychiatry, Taipei City Psychiatric Center, Taipei, TaiwanAbstract: Yokukansan, one of the Kampo prescriptions, is composed of seven herbaceous plants and was developed in China in the 16th century as a cure for restlessness and agitation in children. Yokukansan has also become a popular drug combination in Japan, especially for the behavioral and psychiatric symptoms of dementia (BPSD. Recent studies have shown that yokukansan might also be quite effective against BPSD occurring in association with other types of dementia, such as Alzheimer's disease, Lewy body disease, Parkinson's disease with dementia, frontotemporal dementia, and vascular dementia. Researchers have intensively investigated yokukansan, focusing on the pharmacological mechanisms against glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity. This traditional Chinese and Japanese medicine holds potential promise for improving BPSD in elderly patients suffering from dementia.Keywords: yokukansan, dementia, Alzheimer's disease, behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, Kampo, glutamate

  2. A Review of Evidence for a Therapeutic Application of Traditional Japanese Kampo Medicine for Oral Diseases/Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilleux, Marie-Pier; Moriyama, Satomi; Yoshioka, Masami; Hinode, Daisuke; Grenier, Daniel

    2018-04-18

    Kampo medicines prescribed by specialized medical practitioners and Japanese physicians have gradually reemerged in Japan as alternatives to Western medications. Kampo formulations are composed of several plant extracts and, as such, the broad variety of phytochemicals they contain likely act synergistically to provide their beneficial effects. Kampo medicines have traditionally been prescribed for a number of health conditions, including chronic hepatitis, bronchial asthma, anemia, etc. The aim of this article is to review the beneficial effects of Kampos with respect to oral health. Pertinent papers published between 1970 and 2017 were retrieved by searching in PubMed, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, and Scopus using key words followed by evaluation of the relevant articles. In vitro studies have identified a number of properties that give credence to the potential of Kampos for treating or preventing oral diseases/disorders. Given their anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties, they may be promising agents for controlling periodontal diseases, oral mucositis, xerostomia, and drug-induced gingival overgrowth. Since some oral diseases have a complex etiology that involves microbial pathogens and the host immune response, agents with dual functionality such as Kampo phytochemicals may offer a therapeutic advantage.

  3. Pharmacokinetic Study of Bioactive Flavonoids in the Traditional Japanese Medicine Keigairengyoto Exerting Antibacterial Effects against Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Matsumoto

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that flavonoid glucuronides can be deconjugated to the active form aglycone by β-glucuronidase-expressing macrophages. Keigairengyoto (KRT is a flavonoid-rich traditional Japanese medicine reported to enhance bacterial clearance through immune modulation. Our aims are to examine the pharmacokinetics of KRT flavonoids and to identify active flavonoids contributing to the adjuvant effects of KRT. KRT was evaluated at pharmacokinetic analysis to quantify absorbed flavonoids, and cutaneous infection assay induced in mice by inoculation of Staphylococcus aureus. Preventive or therapeutic KRT administration reduced the number of bacteria in the infection site as well as macroscopic and microscopic lesion scores with efficacies similar to antibiotics. Pharmacokinetic study revealed low plasma levels of flavonoid aglycones after KRT administration; however, plasma concentrations were enhanced markedly by β-glucuronidase treatment, with baicalein the most abundant (Cmax, 1.32 µg/mL. In random screening assays, flavonoids such as bacalein, genistein, and apigenin enhanced bacteria phagocytosis by macrophages. Glucuronide bacalin was converted to aglycone baicalein by incubation with living macrophages, macrophage lysate, or skin homogenate. Taken together, the adjuvant effect of KRT may be due to some blood-absorbed flavonoids which enhance macrophage functions in host defense. Flavonoid-rich KRT may be a beneficial treatment for infectious skin inflammation.

  4. Plasma Pharmacokinetics of Polyphenols in a Traditional Japanese Medicine, Jumihaidokuto, Which Suppresses Propionibacterium acnes-Induced Dermatitis in Rats

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    Takashi Matsumoto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Most orally administered polyphenols are metabolized, with very little absorbed as aglycones and/or unchanged forms. Metabolic and pharmacokinetic studies are therefore necessary to understand the pharmacological mechanisms of polyphenols. Jumihaidokuto (JHT, a traditional Japanese medicine, has been used for treatment of skin diseases including inflammatory acne. Because JHT contains various types of bioactive polyphenols, our aim was to clarify the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of the polyphenols in JHT and identify active metabolites contributing to its antidermatitis effects. Orally administered JHT inhibited the increase in ear thickness in rats induced by intradermal injection of Propionibacterium acnes. Quantification by LC-MS/MS indicated that JHT contains various types of flavonoids and is also rich in hydrolysable tannins, such as 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl glucose. Pharmacokinetic and antioxidant analyses showed that some flavonoid conjugates, such as genistein 7-O-glucuronide and liquiritigenin 7-O-glucuronide, appeared in rat plasma and had an activity to inhibit hydrogen peroxide-dependent oxidation. Furthermore, 4-O-methylgallic acid, a metabolite of Gallic acid, appeared in rat plasma and inhibited the nitric oxide reaction. JHT has numerous polyphenols; it inhibited dermatitis probably via the antioxidant effect of its metabolites. Our study is beneficial for understanding in vivo actions of orally administered polyphenol drugs.

  5. Comparative analysis of energy impacts of traditional and partly electronic environmental auditing: learning from the Japanese automotive industry case

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    Charles Mbohwa

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper does a comparative analysis and assessment of energy impacts of traditional and partly electronic ISO 14001 environmental management system auditing that using videoconferencing systems. The focus is on the Japanese automotive industry. The idea is to quantify the environmental impacts of auditing and resolve the important question on whether or not the use of information and communication technology (ICT in environmental auditing reduces environmental impacts in ISO 14001 environmental management systems. The main results show that there are no clear energy savings or environmental advantages associated with ICT use in environmental auditing for the set system boundary. However electronic auditing is shown to have clear advantages for stated variables within the model, for example when the distance travelled by the auditors by train and by car is less than 75 km and 17 km per day respectively. A comparison of modes of travel by auditors, shows that rail travel offers the most environmental and energy benefits. It is also noted that travel dominates in terms of energy consumption and environmental burdens compared to all other environmental aspects associated with auditing. The study contributes to knowledge in that among other things, it enables researchers to draw parallels from it applicable to other industrial sectors and other countries. Southern African countries can use this methodology in analysing auditing methods with little or no changes in the model used.

  6. Inhibition of angiotensin I converting enzyme by subtilisin NAT (nattokinase) in natto, a Japanese traditional fermented food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Keiko; Yamanaka, Naoki; Ohnishi, Katsunori; Fukayama, Minoru; Yoshino, Masataka

    2012-06-01

    Angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) was inhibited by the culture medium of Bacillus subtilis subsp. natto, which ferments boiled soy beans to natto, a Japanese traditional food. Subtilisin NAT (nattokinase) produced by B. subtilis also inhibited ACE, and the inhibition was markedly stimulated by heat treatment of subtilisin at 120 °C for 15 min. Inhibition of ACE by subtilisin was of a mixed type: the decrease in V(max) and the increase in K(m) value. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that heat treatment of subtilisin caused inactivation with fragmentation of the enzyme protein into small peptides. The inhibitory action of subtilisin was not due to an enzymatic action of protease, but may be ascribed to the potent ACE-inhibitory peptides such as LY and FY, amino acid sequences in subtilisin. HPLC-MS analysis of heat-inactivated subtilisin confirmed that LY and FY were liberated by fragmentation of the enzyme. Inhibition of ACE by subtilisin and its degradation peptides such as LY and FY may participate in the suppression of blood pressure by ingestion of natto.

  7. Popular Music Genres, Music Producers, and Song Creation in the General Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colquhoun, Shane

    2018-01-01

    In secondary general music classes, music educators have the opportunity to bridge the gap between the music students' experiences in school and the music they engage with outside of school. According to Williams, nontraditional music students have musical lives outside of school but choose not to participate in traditional ensembles. In this…

  8. Preference of reverberation time for musicians and audience of the Javanese traditional gamelan music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyatno; Tjokronegoro, H. A.; Merthayasa, I. G. N.; Supanggah, R.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents results of an investigation of room acoustic parameters those are appropriated particularly to perform a Javanese gamelan. The acoustic parameters were obtained by analysing simulated sounds of performance. Those simulated sounds were obtained by sound convolution technique of a dry sound signal of Javanese gamelan performance with impulse responses rooms whose appropriated reverberation time. The reverberation time were varied between 1.0s to 1.8s, those belong to the characteristic of Pendopo Mangkunegaran Surakarta. In this case, Pendopo Mangkunegaran is assumed as one of the most suitable concert halls for Javanese gamelan performance. To obtain the acoustic parameters, we used a psycho-acoustics measurement based on paired comparison test that having different of acoustic parameters to determine the most comfortable one to majority of respondents. The respondents who have participated in this research composed of a group of professional musicians of Javanese gamelan and groups of audience who are not musician, nevertheless part of them were familiar with Javanese gamelan music. The comparison test gave results and showed majority of respondents of group of musicians had a notion sound reverberation time of 1.2s was most comfortable. This corresponds to +6.2dB, clarity and 74% definition. It means the appropriate acoustic condition allows musicians to recognize and distinguish clearly sound of each instrument being played. Meanwhile, group of audience had a notion reverberation time in a range of 1.2s - 1.6s was most comfortable. This range of reverberation time corresponds to +4dB to +6.2dB of clarity, and 66% to 74% of definition.

  9. A Proteomic Approach for the Diagnosis of ‘Oketsu’ (blood stasis, a Pathophysiologic Concept of Japanese Traditional (Kampo Medicine

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    Chinami Matsumoto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available ‘Oketsu’ is a pathophysiologic concept in Japanese traditional (Kampo medicine, primarily denoting blood stasis/stagnant syndrome. Here we have explored plasma protein biomarkers and/or diagnostic algorithms for ‘Oketsu’. Sixteen rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients were treated with keishibukuryogan (KBG, a representative Kampo medicine for improving ‘Oketsu’. Plasma samples were diagnosed as either having an ‘Oketsu’ (n = 19 or ‘non-Oketsu’ (n = 29 state according to Terasawa's ‘Oketsu’ scoring system. Protein profiles were obtained by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS and hierarchical clustering and decision tree analyses were performed. KBG treatment for 4 or 12 weeks decreased the ‘Oketsu’ scores significantly. SELDI protein profiles gave 266 protein peaks, whose expression was significantly different between the ‘Oketsu’ and ‘non-Oketsu’ states. Hierarchical clustering gave three major clusters (I, II, III. The majority (68.4% of ‘Oketsu’ samples were clustered into one cluster as the principal component of cluster I. The remaining ‘Oketsu’ profiles constituted a minor component of cluster II and were all derived from patients cured of the ‘Oketsu’ state at 12 weeks. Construction of the decision tree addressed the possibility of developing a diagnostic algorithm for ‘Oketsu’. A reduction in measurement/pre-processing conditions (from 55 to 16 gave a similar outcome in the clustering and decision tree analyses. The present study suggests that the pathophysiologic concept of Kampo medicine ‘Oketsu’ has a physical basis in terms of the profile of blood proteins. It may be possible to establish a set of objective criteria for diagnosing ‘Oketsu’ using a combination of proteomic and bioinformatics-based classification methods.

  10. Cultural Heritage Digitalization on Traditional Sundanese Music Instrument Using Augmented Reality Markerless Marker Method

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    Budi Arifitama

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Research into cultural heritage which implements augmented reality technology is limited. Most recent research on cultural heritage are limited on storing data and information in the form of databases, this creates a disadvantage for people who wants to see and feel at the same moment on actual cultural heritage objects. This paper, proposes a solution which could merge the existing cultural object with people using augmented reality technology. This technology would preserve traditional instrument in the form of 3D object which can be digitally protected. The result showed that the use of augmented reality on preserving cultural heritage would benefit people who try to protect their culture.

  11. Differences in Mathematics Scores Between Students Who Receive Traditional Montessori Instruction and Students Who Receive Music Enriched Montessori Instruction

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Maureen Ann

    2007-01-01

    While a growing body of research reveals the beneficial effects of music on education performance the value of music in educating the young child is not being recognized. If research of students in the school system indicates that learning through the arts can benefit the ‘whole’ child, that math achievement scores are significantly higher for those students studying music, and if Montessori education produces a more academically accomplished child, then what is the potential for the child wh...

  12. A Closer Look at Eduardo M. Torner's Bibliographic Survey of Spain's Traditional Music and Dance

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    J. Katz, Israel

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Eduardo M. Torner (1881-1955 was among the most notable pioneers who contributed to the nascent field of ethnomusicology in Spain. His early field researches in Asturias and Galicia yielded exemplary publications and his associates included such outstanding figures as Ramón Menéndez Pidal, Manuel Manrique de Lara, Jesús Bal y Gay, and Kurt Schindler. The two bibliographies contained in this article, which Torner included among the essays in his classic Temas folklóricos: Música y Poesía (Madrid, 1935, represent but a mere sampling of the 4,000 entries he is purported to have gathered concering Spain's tradidonal music and dance. Fleeing first to Valencia and then to Barcelona at the outbreak of the Civil War, he utlimately sought refuge in London, where he continued his researches until his death. During the transitional period from Valencia to England, he lost his precious collection of photographs, historical documents, and personal manuscripts, together with his massive bibliographical compilation. Here I have reordered the bibliographies from Temas folklóricos, insuring that all his entries are accurate and complete, adding personal comments to Tomer's observations, and providing four indices: 1 Abbreviations and publications surveyed; 2 Authors; 3 Geographic locales, and 4 Subject matter.

    Eduardo M. Torner (1881-1935 fue uno de los más notables pioneros que contribuyeron al surgimiento de la etnomusicología en España. Sus primeras investigaciones de campo en Asturias y Galicia produjeron publicaciones modélicas, y se relacionó por su trabajo con figuras tan eminentes como Ramón Menéndez Pidal, Manuel Manrique de Lara, Jesús Bal y Gay y Kurt Schindler. Las dos bibliografías contenidas en este artículo que Torner incluyó entre los ensayos de su trabajo clásico Temas folklóricos: Música y Poesía (Madrid, 1935, no representan sino una mera muestra de las 4.000 entradas que se cree que recogi

  13. A New Look at Teaching Music History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borroff, Edith

    1992-01-01

    Contends that teaching music history has traditionally focused on five eras of Western music. Relates these periods to concepts of form, space, and understanding. Acknowledges that music education has been ethnocentric and recommends a more universal music education. (CFR)

  14. Music and Music Education: Theory and Praxis for "Making a Difference"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regelski, Thomas A.

    2005-01-01

    The "music appreciation as contemplation" paradigm of traditional aesthetics and music education assumes that music exists to be contemplated for itself. The resulting distantiation of music and music education from life creates a legitimation crisis for music education. Failing to make a noteworthy musical difference for society, a politics of…

  15. Tuvan music and World Music

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    Maxim V. Chaposhnikov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The essay presents the author’s observations about the ingression of Tuvan music into the World Music – a niche of world musical culture covering ethnical music traditions. The author has witnessed the rise of interest to traditional musical culture of Tuva and Russia as well as globalization of Tuvan music. He is endeavoring to interpret these changes and reveal their affect on traditional music and xöömei. In the late Soviet period, traditional music in Tuva, like in many republics of the Union, has been as if put on hold. During the Perestroika and national revival processes, traditionalism became of high demand. Symposia and festivals started off in Tuva where amateur participants took the same stage with professionals. Special honor was paid to old masters of xöömei. Scholars started engaging in  discussions about the origins and a role of xöömei and its genres. Хöömei attracted a good deal of market interest from outside Russia. In the late 1980s American scientist and producer T. Levin made first field records of xöömei to be released on a disk. Ethnographic ensemble “Tuva” was established. Later, members of “Tuva” started their own musical bands. Musical programs were compiled as an ethnographic variety show – a principle that the public has been seeking for both in Tuva and abroad. Disks were realeased and artists started active touring in foreign countries. Boosting interest in World Music was marked with hallmark attention to the phenomenon of throat-singing and overtone music, and further evolution of Tuvan music has since been tightly linked to Western musical market. The author traces the peculiarities of such bands as “Huun Huur Tu”, “Yat-Kha”, etc. and remarks that the value of Tuvan music is not only in star performers shining on the Western skies, but in the rise of a stable community of people inspired by Tuvan music and culture, and seeking new ways of aesthetic and spiritual perception of

  16. Daikenchuto, a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, ameliorates postoperative ileus by anti-inflammatory action through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Endo, Mari; Hori, Masatoshi; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Oikawa, Tetsuro; Hanawa, Toshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Background Daikenchuto (DKT), a gastrointestinal prokinetic Japanese herbal medicine, is prescribed for patients with postoperative ileus (POI) and adhesive bowel obstruction following abdominal surgery. Several mechanisms for the amelioration of POI by DKT have been suggested; however, it has remained unclear whether DKT shows anti-inflammatory effects in POI. In the present study, we investigated the effects of DKT in a mouse POI model and attempted to clarify the detailed mechanisms of act...

  17. Issues of academic study and practical acquisition of Tuvan music (a case study of Tuvan instrumental music

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    Valentina Yu. Suzukey

    2017-06-01

    musicians have mastered musical notation and are familiar with the masterpieces of global music classics. But the author suggests that a parallel training in traditional oral and audial culture will be most beneficial. Some of these worldwide recognized methods are discussed in the article, such as German composer Carl Orff’s improvisation-based music; Japanese violinist Shinichi Suzuki’s method based on imitation; notationless education at J. Sibelius Academy in Helsinki, etc.

  18. Tangible music composer for children

    OpenAIRE

    Francesconi, Juan Ignacio; Larrea, Martín Leonardo; Manresa-Yee, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Music education should start from an early age. Theories of child development and learning emphasize the importance of manipulating physical objects. Music learning and teaching has traditionally been carried out mainly by visual and auditory activities. With this in mind, we combine music learning with tangible interfaces to stimulate senses toward music in children over six years old. We present a token+constraint tangible interface for children to learn musical skills such as musical notes...

  19. Tradition and Melodism in Género Chico: The Musical Scenic Production of José Serrano

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    José Salvador Blasco Magraner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the characteristics of the lyrical work of the maestro José Serrano Simeon, probably the most important zarzuelas composer of the twentieth century, and the opinions that the critics of the time carried out on its flagship production. The melodic richness of his works, which had its origin in the Spanish popular music, the rhythmic variety of the same and simple and effective implementation are just some of the most representative of his magnum opus features.

  20. Investigating Music Information Objects

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    Weissenberger, Lynnsey K.

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation, titled "Investigating Music Information Objects," is a study of the nature, description, representations, and ideas related to music information objects (MIOs). This research study investigates how music practitioners from various traditions describe and conceptualize MIOs, using a theoretical framework to classify…

  1. MUSIC OF ANTIQUITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JENNIFER; LIM

    1998-01-01

    BEAUTIFUL music is flowing out from the fingertips of a dozen old men. They hail from the remote snowcapped Yulong mountain of Lijiang, located in southwestern China’s Yunnan Province. The music that they play has a history of more than one thousand years. Performed in traditional costume with antique-looking musical instruments, the thoroughly original concert of ancient

  2. Music therapy for mental disorder and mental health: the untapped potential of Indian classical music

    OpenAIRE

    Hegde, Shantala

    2017-01-01

    Music is a universal human trait. The healing power of music has been acknowledged in almost all traditions of music. Music therapy is moving from a social-science model focusing on overall health and well-being towards a neuroscience model focusing on specific elements of music and its effect on sensorimotor, language and cognitive functions. The handful of evidence-based music therapy studies on psychiatric conditions have shown promising results. Traditional music, such as Indian classical...

  3. Patient safety incident reports related to traditional Japanese Kampo medicines: medication errors and adverse drug events in a university hospital for a ten-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yutaka; Fujimoto, Makoto; Nogami, Tatsuya; Watari, Hidetoshi; Kitahara, Hideyuki; Misawa, Hiroki; Kimbara, Yoshiyuki

    2017-12-21

    Kampo medicine is traditional Japanese medicine, which originated in ancient traditional Chinese medicine, but was introduced and developed uniquely in Japan. Today, Kampo medicines are integrated into the Japanese national health care system. Incident reporting systems are currently being widely used to collect information about patient safety incidents that occur in hospitals. However, no investigations have been conducted regarding patient safety incident reports related to Kampo medicines. The aim of this study was to survey and analyse incident reports related to Kampo medicines in a Japanese university hospital to improve future patient safety. We selected incident reports related to Kampo medicines filed in Toyama University Hospital from May 2007 to April 2017, and investigated them in terms of medication errors and adverse drug events. Out of 21,324 total incident reports filed in the 10-year survey period, we discovered 108 Kampo medicine-related incident reports. However, five cases were redundantly reported; thus, the number of actual incidents was 103. Of those, 99 incidents were classified as medication errors (77 administration errors, 15 dispensing errors, and 7 prescribing errors), and four were adverse drug events, namely Kampo medicine-induced interstitial pneumonia. The Kampo medicine (crude drug) that was thought to induce interstitial pneumonia in all four cases was Scutellariae Radix, which is consistent with past reports. According to the incident severity classification system recommended by the National University Hospital Council of Japan, of the 99 medication errors, 10 incidents were classified as level 0 (an error occurred, but the patient was not affected) and 89 incidents were level 1 (an error occurred that affected the patient, but did not cause harm). Of the four adverse drug events, two incidents were classified as level 2 (patient was transiently harmed, but required no treatment), and two incidents were level 3b (patient was

  4. Daikenchuto, a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, ameliorates postoperative ileus by anti-inflammatory action through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Mari; Hori, Masatoshi; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Oikawa, Tetsuro; Hanawa, Toshihiko

    2014-06-01

    Daikenchuto (DKT), a gastrointestinal prokinetic Japanese herbal medicine, is prescribed for patients with postoperative ileus (POI) and adhesive bowel obstruction following abdominal surgery. Several mechanisms for the amelioration of POI by DKT have been suggested; however, it has remained unclear whether DKT shows anti-inflammatory effects in POI. In the present study, we investigated the effects of DKT in a mouse POI model and attempted to clarify the detailed mechanisms of action. Intestinal manipulation (IM) was applied to the distal ileum of mice. DKT was administered orally to the animals 4 times before and after IM. Gastrointestinal transit in vivo, leukocyte infiltration, cytokine mRNA expression and gastrointestinal motility were analyzed. We also investigated the effects of the α7nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine citrate (MLA) on the DKT-mediated ameliorative action against POI, and we studied the effects of DKT on inflammatory activity in α7nAChR knockout mice. DKT treatment led to recovery of the delayed intestinal transit induced by IM. DKT significantly inhibited the infiltration of neutrophils and CD68-positive macrophages, and inhibited mRNA expressions of TNF-α and MCP-1. MLA significantly reduced the anti-inflammatory action of DKT, and the amelioration of macrophage infiltration by DKT was partially suppressed in α7nAChR knockout mice. In conclusion, in addition to the gastrointestinal prokinetic action, DKT serves as a novel therapeutic agent for POI characterized by its anti-inflammatory potency. The DKT-induced anti-inflammatory activity may be partly mediated by activation of α7nAChR.

  5. Games Unplugged! "Dolanan Anak," Traditional Javanese Children's Singing Games in the 21st-Century General Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jui-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Educated in a digital world, millennial children lack social interaction and actual hands-on activities involving tactile and kinesthetic training. To counteract this educational trend, traditional singing games that allow children to explore and make sense of their world physically can be valuable. This article introduces the traditional Javanese…

  6. Rituals of creativity: tradition, modernity, and the "acoustic unconscious" in a U.S. collegiate jazz music program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilf, Eitan

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I seek to complicate the distinction between imitation and creativity, which has played a dominant role in the modern imaginary and anthropological theory. I focus on a U.S. collegiate jazz music program, in which jazz educators use advanced sound technologies to reestablish immersive interaction with the sounds of past jazz masters against the backdrop of the disappearance of performance venues for jazz. I analyze a key pedagogical practice in the course of which students produce precise replications of the recorded improvisations of past jazz masters and then play them in synchrony with the recordings. Through such synchronous iconization, students inhabit and reenact the creativity epitomized by these recordings. I argue that such a practice, which I call a “ritual of creativity,” suggests a coconstitutive relationship between imitation and creativity, which has intensified under modernity because of the availability of new technologies of digital reproduction.

  7. A Study on the Korean Medicine Education and the Changes in the Traditional Korean Medicine during the Japanese Colonial Era: Focused on the Korean Medicine Training Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yongyuan

    2018-04-01

    The modern education institutes play an important role in fostering professional talents, reproducing knowledge and studies, and forming the identities of certain academic fields and vocational communities. It is a matter of common knowledge that the absence of an official Korean medicine medical school during the Japanese colonial era was a severely disadvantageous factor in the aspects of academic progress, fostering follow-up personnel, and establishment of social capability. Therefore, the then Korean medicine circle put emphasis on inadequate official education institutes as the main factor behind oppression. Furthermore, as the measure to promote the continuance of Korean medicine, the circle regarded establishing civilian Korean medicine training schools as their long-cherished wish and strived to accomplish the mission even after liberation. This study looked into how the Korean medicine circle during the Japanese colonial era utilized civilian training schools to conduct the Korean medicine education conforming to modern medical school and examined how the operation of these training schools influenced the changes in the traditional Korean medicine. After the introduction of the Western medical science, the Korean medicine circle aimed to improve the quality of Korean medicine doctors by establishing modern Korean medicine medical schools. However, after the annexation of Korea and Japan, official Korean medicine medical schools were not established since policies were organized centered on the Western medical science. In this light, the Korean medicine circle strived to nurture the younger generation of Korean medicine by establishing and operating the civilian Korean medicine training schools after the annexation between Korea and Japan. The schools were limited in terms of scale and status but possessed the forms conforming to the modern medical schools in terms of education system. In other words, the civilian training schools not only adhered to the

  8. An Experiment on Heat Recovery Performance Improvements in Well-Water Heat-Pump Systems for a Traditional Japanese House

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    Chiemi Iba

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Concerns about resource depletion have prompted several countries to promote the usage of renewable energy, such as underground heat. In Japan, underground heat-pump technology has begun to be utilized in large-scale office buildings; however, several economic problems are observed to still exist, such as high initial costs that include drilling requirements. Further, most of the traditional dwellings “Kyo-machiya” in Kyoto, Japan have a shallow well. This study intends to propose an effective ground-source heat-pump system using the well water from a “Kyo-machiya” home that does not contain any drilling works. In previous research, it was depicted that the well-water temperature decreases as the heat pump (HP is operated and that the heat extraction efficiency steadily becomes lower. In this study, an experiment is conducted to improve efficiency using a drainage pump. Based on the experimental results, the effect of efficiency improvement and the increase in the electric power consumption of the drainage pump are examined. It is indicated that short-time drainage could help to improve efficiency without consuming excessive energy. Thus, continuous use of the heat pump becomes possible.

  9. Effect of a dietary supplement containing kurozu (a Japanese traditional health drink concentrate on several obesity-related parameters in obese Japanese adults: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

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    Naobumi Hamadate

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTObjective: This study was undertaken to examine the Kurozu concentrate (KC based dietary supplement on several obesity-related parameters in obese Japanese male and female adults.Background: Kurozu, which is a specific type of rice vinegar produced by fermentation of unpolished brown rice, has long been used as a traditional health food and folk medicine in Japan. A recent animal study and our preliminary human study suggest that the KC supplement has potential for use in the management of obesity.Materials and Methods: A 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted involving 48 Japanese adult subjects (28 males and 20 females with obesity. Subjects were either assigned to the group consuming the KC supplement for 12 weeks (870mg/day; 480 mg/day as KC (n=24; 14 males and 10 females or the placebo group (n=24; 14 males and 10 females. All test participants were assessed using several obesity-related parameters, including body weight, BMI, waist circumference, and abdominal fat computed tomography (CT sections. These measurements took place at baseline and at week 12. Results: At week 12, a significant decrease in body weight (P<0.043 and nearly significant decreased values of BMI (P=0.052 were observed in the KC group compared to the placebo group. The reduction in waist circumference at week 12 within the KC group was not significantly greater than the placebo group. Examination of abdominal CT sections around the navel indicated that, although most of the values of the total fat area, subcutaneous fat area, and visceral fat area for both of the placebo and KC groups significantly increased during the 12-week intervention, the magnitude of increase in the total fat area for all subjects and that of the total fat area, subcutaneous fat area, and visceral fat area for females on one or more of three CT sections were significantly lower in the KC group than the placebo group (P<0.05.Conclusion: Although the

  10. Music therapy for mental disorder and mental health: the untapped potential of Indian classical music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Shantala

    2017-05-01

    Music is a universal human trait. The healing power of music has been acknowledged in almost all traditions of music. Music therapy is moving from a social-science model focusing on overall health and well-being towards a neuroscience model focusing on specific elements of music and its effect on sensorimotor, language and cognitive functions. The handful of evidence-based music therapy studies on psychiatric conditions have shown promising results. Traditional music, such as Indian classical music, has only recently been evaluated in evidence-based research into music therapy. The need for systematic research in this area is underscored.

  11. Comparison of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) versus traditional textbook methods for training in abdominal examination (Japanese experience).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qayumi, A K; Kurihara, Y; Imai, M; Pachev, G; Seo, H; Hoshino, Y; Cheifetz, R; Matsuura, K; Momoi, M; Saleem, M; Lara-Guerra, H; Miki, Y; Kariya, Y

    2004-10-01

    This study aimed to compare the effects of computer-assisted, text-based and computer-and-text learning conditions on the performances of 3 groups of medical students in the pre-clinical years of their programme, taking into account their academic achievement to date. A fourth group of students served as a control (no-study) group. Participants were recruited from the pre-clinical years of the training programmes in 2 medical schools in Japan, Jichi Medical School near Tokyo and Kochi Medical School near Osaka. Participants were randomly assigned to 4 learning conditions and tested before and after the study on their knowledge of and skill in performing an abdominal examination, in a multiple-choice test and an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE), respectively. Information about performance in the programme was collected from school records and students were classified as average, good or excellent. Student and faculty evaluations of their experience in the study were explored by means of a short evaluation survey. Compared to the control group, all 3 study groups exhibited significant gains in performance on knowledge and performance measures. For the knowledge measure, the gains of the computer-assisted and computer-assisted plus text-based learning groups were significantly greater than the gains of the text-based learning group. The performances of the 3 groups did not differ on the OSCE measure. Analyses of gains by performance level revealed that high achieving students' learning was independent of study method. Lower achieving students performed better after using computer-based learning methods. The results suggest that computer-assisted learning methods will be of greater help to students who do not find the traditional methods effective. Explorations of the factors behind this are a matter for future research.

  12. Comparison of the Effects on Rib Fracture between the Traditional Japanese Medicine Jidabokuippo and Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs: A Randomized Controlled Trial

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    Hajime Nakae

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Jidabokuippo is a traditional Japanese medicine used for contusion-induced swelling and pain. This open multicenter randomized study was designed to compare the efficacies of jidabokuippo and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in patients with rib fracture by analyzing the treatment duration. Our study involved 170 rib fracture patients capable of oral ingestion divided randomly into 2 groups: the jidabokuippo and NSAID groups. We compared the duration of treatment and healthcare expenditure between these 2 groups. Medication was continued in both groups until the visual analogue scale score decreased to less than 50% of the pretreatment score. We excluded the patients in whom medication was prematurely discontinued. We analyzed 81 patients belonging to the jidabokuippo and NSAIDs groups. No significant intergroup differences were observed in age, gender, severity (injury severity score, and presence/absence of underlying disease. The treatment duration was significantly shorter in the jidabokuippo group than in the NSAIDs group (P=0.0003. Healthcare expenditure was significantly lower in the jidabokuippo group than in the NSAIDs group (P<0.0001. Our results suggest that compared to NSAIDs, jidabokuippo can shorten the duration of treatment in patients with rib fracture and is a promising analgesic agent based on the medical economic viewpoint.

  13. Therapeutic Effects of Saireito (Chai-Ling-Tang, a Traditional Japanese Herbal Medicine, on Lymphedema Caused by Radiotherapy: A Case Series Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiko Nagai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the development of radiotherapy machines and technologies, a proportion of patients suffer from radiation-induced lymphedema. Saireito (SRT is a traditional Japanese herbal medicine that has been used for treating edema and inflammation in conditions such as nephritic disease. This study investigated the effect of SRT on lymphedema caused by radiotherapy. Four patients were treated with SRT at a dose of 9 g/day. The severity of lymphedema was evaluated using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4 and Numerical Rating Scale before and after SRT treatment. After the treatment with SRT, 2 of 4 patients (50% showed apparent improvement in lymphedema. One of the cases had difficulty in wearing the custom-made thermoplastic cast, but after SRT administration, he could wear the mask easily. One case decided to stop taking SRT 3 days after initiation because cough and fever appeared. In conclusion, it is important to control the side effects of radiotherapy, which leads to improved tumor control rates. Prospective randomized studies are necessary to confirm the findings of this case series study.

  14. Oral Administration of the Japanese Traditional Medicine Keishibukuryogan-ka-yokuinin Decreases Reactive Oxygen Metabolites in Rat Plasma: Identification of Chemical Constituents Contributing to Antioxidant Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Matsubara

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Insufficient detoxification and/or overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS induce cellular and tissue damage, and generated reactive oxygen metabolites become exacerbating factors of dermatitis. Keishibukuryogan-ka-yokuinin (KBGY is a traditional Japanese medicine prescribed to treat dermatitis such as acne vulgaris. Our aim was to verify the antioxidant properties of KBGY, and identify its active constituents by blood pharmacokinetic techniques. Chemical constituents were quantified in extracts of KBGY, crude components, and the plasma of rats treated with a single oral administration of KBGY. Twenty-three KBGY compounds were detected in plasma, including gallic acid, prunasin, paeoniflorin, and azelaic acid, which have been reported to be effective for inflammation. KBGY decreased level of the diacron-reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs in plasma. ROS-scavenging and lipid hydroperoxide (LPO generation assays revealed that gallic acid, 3-O-methylgallic acid, (+-catechin, and lariciresinol possess strong antioxidant activities. Gallic acid was active at a similar concentration to the maximum plasma concentration, therefore, our findings indicate that gallic acid is an important active constituent contributing to the antioxidant effects of KBGY. KBGY and its active constituents may improve redox imbalances induced by oxidative stress as an optional treatment for skin diseases.

  15. Identification of a Predictive Biomarker for the Beneficial Effect of Keishibukuryogan, a Kampo (Japanese Traditional Medicine, on Patients with Climacteric Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Namiki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Keishibukuryogan (KBG; Guizhi-Fuling-Wan in Chinese is one of the Kampo (Japanese traditional medicines used to treat patients with climacteric syndrome. KBG can be used by patients who cannot undergo hormone replacement therapy due to a history of breast cancer. We evaluated whether cytosine-adenine (CA repeat polymorphism of the estrogen receptor β gene can be a predictor of the beneficial effect of KBG on climacteric syndrome. We also investigated the relationship between CA repeat polymorphism, the patients’ profiles, and the therapeutic effect. We found that CA was an SS, SL, or LL genotype according to the number of repeats. We studied 39 consecutive patients with climacteric disorders who took KBG for 12 weeks. The diagnosis of climacteric disorders was made on the basis of the Kupperman index. KBG significantly improved the patients’ climacteric symptoms (i.e., vasomotor symptoms in the patients with the LL genotype and melancholia in the patients with the SL genotype. No relationship between the patients’ profiles and CA repeat polymorphism was recognized. CA repeat polymorphism could thus be a potential biomarker to predict the efficacy of KBG in climacteric syndrome, and its use will help to reduce the cost of treating this syndrome by focusing the administration of KBG on those most likely to benefit from it.

  16. NATIONAL FOLK MUSIC TRADITIONS IN TEODOR ZGUREANU’S CONCERTO FOR NAI (ROMANIAN PAN FLUTE AND ORCHESTRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUZÎCA TATIANA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the first musicological analysis of Teodor Zgureanu’s concerto for nai (Romanian pan flute and orchestra. The analysis places the concerto within the context of the neofolkloric and polystylistic tradition. Its main focus is to identify the concerto’s dramatic structure and its main means of expression in relation to the modern compositional techniques.

  17. A Primer on Chinese Music Instruments Released

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SuSan

    2005-01-01

    Chinese traditional musical instruments, with a history of 8,000 years, are known for their diverse forms and types. The qualities, functions and materials of these instrunents reflect the unique aesthetic value of Chinese traditional music.

  18. The anthropology of music: contemporary theoretical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Kovačević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The anthropological study of music focuses on meanings which music hah and produces in a specific sociocultural context. Preferences toward a certain genre of music are tightly linked to the preference of certain cultural values, so music represents an important factor of identification in everyday life. In Serbian ethnology and anthropology music was long viewed as part of Serbian traditional culture, so the interests of researchers focused on “traditional music”. In the 1980’s first papers analyzing music which went outside the traditional frameworks appeared (new folk music – turbofolk, and this tendency has increased in the last ten years.

  19. Contradiction and Fusion between Tradition and Modernity: In Discussion of Popularity of Original Ecological Music%传统和现代的矛盾与融合——原生态音乐流行性的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王黔

    2011-01-01

    原生态音乐的研究视角往往基于民族音乐学或音乐人类学,但实际上原生态音乐自90年代开始,已经广泛地用于流行音乐中,尤其是近些年以世界音乐的形式呈现在国际舞台上。因为原生态音乐已经不可避免地进入了文化产业,所以从音乐社会学的角度来探讨原生态音乐的流行性不仅有助于原生态音乐的保护,同时也懂得其不断变化的发展性。原生态音乐所代表的传统和流行音乐所代表的现代之间没有绝对的矛盾,原生态音乐和流行音乐之间的重叠证明了文化的融合性,以及社会发展对于音乐发展的影响力。%Research on original ecological music is normally from the angle of ethnomusicology or music anthropology,but in fact,since the 1990s,original ecological music has been widely used within modern popular music,especially in recent years where it has been presented as world music to the international audiences.Because original ecological music has inevitably become a product of the cultural industry,to discuss its popularity will help protect original ecological music,and understand its unstoppable development.There is no absolute contradiction between tradition presented by original ecological music and modernity presented by popular music.The overlap between two of them demonstrates the fusion of different types of music,and the impact of social development in music.

  20. A Review on the British Rock Music

    OpenAIRE

    Hutapea, Alfian Hadi Pranata

    2011-01-01

    Music has an important role in people’s life. In people’s daily, music is often hearing of course and in people’s customs and traditions music is also be used. Music has many genres, one of them is rock music. Many people like rock music especially youngman because rock music has given a message in a song through enthusiasm expression. Rock music has many subgenres and each of subgenres have a distinctive feature. The developing of rock music is very wide in the world, especially in Great Bri...

  1. Topic theory and Brazilian musicality: Considerations on rhetoricity in music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acácio T. C. Piedade

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an application of the topic theory to the analyses of Brazilian music. It starts with a reflection on the concepts of musicality, friction of musicalities in Brazilian jazz, and the fusion of musicalities that emerges from the invention of tradition. The discussion follows with the question of the adaptability of topic theory to national musics. Then, some musical examples are used in order to present some of the universes of topics of Brazilian music. In this article I argue that the concept of rhetoricity brings good results to the study of musical signification, and that the theory of topics is useful for other contexts than classical music, being an interesting route to the investigation of sociocultural connections in musicalities.

  2. Narratives about music and health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddholm, Mats; Nilsson, Bo

    involving music therapists or music educators, such as: with clients, students, children, elder people; among nurses, deacons, social workers, preschools teachers or care assistants. The field of Music and Health is not necessarily about illness or care, but can as well be understood as an aspect of quality......Narratives about music and health Dr Bo Nilsson, Kristianstad University, Sweden Dr Mats Uddholm, University College Nordjylland, Denmark Music is used in many professional contexts that are not associated with music therapy or music education in a traditional sense. How do professionals...... in different contexts use music and how do they describe their thoughts about music in their professional work? Those are the main questions in our study focusing on narratives about music and health in professional relations. In a pilot study six strategically chosen participants from Sweden and Denmark...

  3. Perioperative Administration of Traditional Japanese Herbal Medicine Daikenchuto Relieves Postoperative Ileus in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Gastrointestinal Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Mitsuru; Shibuya, Norisuke; Nagata, Hitoshi; Takagi, Kazutoshi; Iwasaki, Yoshimi; Hachiya, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Taku; Kubota, Keiichi

    2017-11-01

    Although it has been widely demonstrated that administration of Daikenchuto (DKT), a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, improves gastrointestinal (GI) motility in patients undergoing abdominal surgery, few studies have investigated the efficacy of perioperative DKT administration for relief of postoperative ileus (PI) in patients undergoing surgery for GI cancer. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether perioperative administration of DKT relieves PI in patients with GI cancer. We performed a comprehensive electronic search of the literature (Cochrane Library, PubMed, the Web of Science and ICHUSHI) up to December 2016 to identify studies that had shown the efficacy of perioperative DKT administration for relief of PI in patients with GI cancer. To integrate the individual effect of DKT, a meta-analysis was performed using random-effects models to calculate the risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI), and heterogeneity was analyzed using I 2 statistics. Seven studies involving a total of 1,134 patients who had undergone GI cancer surgery were included in this meta-analysis. Among 588 patients who received DKT perioperatively, 67 (11.4%) had PI, whereas among 546 patients who did not receive DKT perioperatively, 87 (15.9%) had PI. Perioperative administration of DKT significantly reduced the occurrence of PI (RR=0.58, 95% CI=0.35-0.97, p=0.04, I 2 =48%) in comparison to patients who did not receive DKT or received placebo. The result of this meta-analysis suggests that perioperative administration of DKT relieves PI in patients undergoing surgery for GI cancer. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  4. Polysaccharide-Containing Macromolecules in a Kampo (Traditional Japanese Herbal Medicine, Hochuekkito: Dual Active Ingredients for Modulation of Immune Functions on Intestinal Peyer's Patches and Epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Kiyohara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A traditional Japanese herbal (Kampo medicine, Hochuekkito (Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang in Chinese, TJ-41 is a well-known Kampo formula, and has been found to enhance antigen-specific antibody response in not only local mucosal immune system in upper respiratory tract, but also systemic immune system through upper respiratory mucosal immune system. Although this immunopharmacological effect has been proposed to express by modulation of intestinal immune system including Peyer's patches and intestinal epithelial cells, active ingredients are not known. TJ-41 directly affected the production of bone marrow cell-proliferative growth factors from murine Peyer's patch immunocompetent cells in vitro. Among low molecular, intermediate size and macromolecular weight fractions prepared from TJ-41, only fraction containing macromolecular weight ingredients showed Peyer's patch-mediated bone marrow cell-proliferation enhancing activity. Anion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration gave 17 subfractions comprising polysaccharides and lignins from the macromolecular weight fraction of TJ-41, and some of the subfractions showed significant enhancing activities having different degrees. Some of the subfractions also expressed stimulating activity on G-CSF-production from colonic epithelial cells, and statistically significant positive correlation was observed among enhancing activities of the subfractions against Peyer's patch immunocompetent cells and epithelial cells. Among the fractions from TJ-41 oral administration of macromolecular weight ingredient fraction to mice succeeded to enhance antigen-specific antibody response in systemic immune system through upper respiratory mucosal immune system, but all the separated fractions failed to enhance the in vivo antibody response in upper respiratory tract.

  5. Nation and Classical Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Benedikte

    The last book Anthony D. Smith wrote before he died, and which will be published in Spring 2017, has the title Nation and Classical Music. Smith had for a long time been intrigued by the intimate relationship between the nation and classical music. At the most manifest level it involves...... them into their compositions thus challenging the romantic musical style searching for an authentic national musical expression. Against the backdrop of the extensive research carried out by Anthony Smith into the relationship between the nation and classical music, the present paper seeks to add...... cultural centers. In doing this, the paper seeks to unfold how composers channeled musical inspiration embedded in cultural environments that cut across national boundaries into national musical traditions thus catering to specific national audiences. The paper is written as a tribute to a great mentor...

  6. Clarification of Tradition and Its Enlightenment to Folk Music Development%“传统”概念之厘定及其对民族音乐发展的启示

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘瑾

    2012-01-01

    传统并不是某种具体可感的客观之物,而是一种内在的、抽象的存在。传统也不等同于传统物。有了对“传统”之概念的澄清,我们可以看到,仅仅依靠留存的方式不可能让民族音乐得以传承,只有在积极的表演与创作中,民族音乐才能焕发出旺盛的生命力。当然,传统物不是金科玉律,我们应该宽容地对待不同类型的实践。%Tradition is not a specific or perceivable object, but an immanent and abstract existence. Tradition is not equal to the object, either. Clarification of the concept of tradition shows that development of the Chinese folk music cannot just depend on the music legacy, and that life of the folk music derives from active performance and composition. Of course, traditional rules are not golden rules. We should treat different types of practice with for- bearance.

  7. Nigerian Contemporary Music Practice: A New Musical Culture in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the 1960s, there were reports from post colonial West Africa of a somewhat unflinching loyalty to western standards and traditions by music educators and western-trained music composers who did not take kindly to reforms in certain directions in the practice of their music profession. Today‟s reality is that we have come ...

  8. Music-Making and Musical Comprehension with Robotic Building Blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Being able to express oneself musically and experiment with music composition is traditionally determined by one’s ability to play an actual instrument with a certain degree of craftsmanship. Lack of skills may cause difficulties for children and young people to experience the joy of musical crea...

  9. Music, Movement, and Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Karla D.

    This paper's premise is that music, movement, and poetry are unique and creative methods to be used by the counselor in working with both children and adults. Through these media, the counselor generates material for the counseling session that may not be available through more traditional "talk therapies." The choice of music as a counseling…

  10. Digital Music Lab: A Framework for Analysing Big Music Data

    OpenAIRE

    Abdallah, S.; Benetos, E.; Gold, N. E.; Hargreaves, S.; Weyde, T.; Wolff, D.

    2016-01-01

    In the transition from traditional to digital musicology, large scale music data are increasingly becoming available which require research methods that work on the collection level and at scale. In the Digital Music Lab (DML) project, a software system has been developed that provides large-scale analysis of music audio with an interactive interface. The DML system includes distributed processing of audio and other music data, remote analysis of copyright-restricted data, logical inference o...

  11. Cultural Consciousness in Teaching General Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Patricia Shehan; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Addresses the need to present a multiculturalist approach in elementary and secondary school general music classes. Suggests connections between particular music teaching methods and ethnic musical traditions. Includes lesson plans concerning the teaching of Native American, African-American, Filipino, and Latin American music. (SG)

  12. A trial of cross-disciplinary classes at the university and the high school on the seasonal transition and the seasonal feeling from autumn to winter in East Asia (joint activity of meteorology with Japanese classical literature, music and art)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, K.; Sato, S.; Kato, H.; Akagi, R.; Sueishi, N.; Mori, T.; Nakakura, T.; Irie, I.

    2012-04-01

    There are many steps of the rapid seasonal transitions in East Asia influenced by the seasonal cycle of the Asian monsoon system, resulting in the variety of "seasonal feeling" there. For example, the extremely cold air flowing from the Siberian continent to the Japan Islands is transformed by the huge supply of heat and moisture from the underlying sea (the Japan Sea) in midwinter, which brings the large amount of snowfall in the Japan Sea side of the Japan Islands. However, although the air temperature there is still rather higher from November to early December than in the midwinter, such wintertime weather pattern often appears due to the early development of the Siberian high (however, the precipitation is brought not as in snow but as rain). The intermittent rainfall in such situation due to the shallow cumulus clouds from late autumn to early winter is called the word "Shi-gu-re" in Japanese. It is also well known that the "Shi-gu-re" is often used for expression of the "seasonal feeling" in the Japanese classical literature (especially we can see in the Japanese classic poems called "Wa-Ka"). The present study reports a trial of cross-disciplinary class on the seasonal cycle in East Asia in association with the "seasonal feeling" from autumn to winter, by the joint activity of meteorology with the Japanese classical literature, the music, and the art. Firstly, we will summarize the characteristics of the large-scale climate systems and the daily weather situations from autumn to winter. We will also introduce some examples of the expression of the weather situation found in the Japanese classical poems. Next the outline of the cross-disciplinary classes on such topics at the Faculty of Education, Okayama University, and those at Okayama-Ichinomiya High School and Attached Junior High School of Okayama University will be presented together with the analyses of these practices. We should note that the present trial of the classes might also contribute to

  13. Yokukansan, a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, enhances the anxiolytic effect of fluvoxamine and reduces cortical 5-HT2A receptor expression in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Rintaro; Miyagishi, Hiroko; Tsuji, Minoru; Saito, Atsumi; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2018-04-24

    Yokukansan is a traditional Japanese herbal medicine that has been approved in Japan as a remedy for neurosis, insomnia, and irritability in children. It has also been reported to improve behavioral and psychological symptoms in patients with various forms of dementia. To evaluate the usefulness of co-treatment with an antidepressant and an herbal medicine in the psychiatric field, the current study examined the effect of yokukansan on the anxiolytic-like effect of fluvoxamine in mice. The anxiolytic-like effect in mice was estimated by the contextual fear conditioning paradigm. Contextual fear conditioning consisted of two sessions, i.e., day 1 for the conditioning session and day 2 for the test session. The expression levels of 5-HT 1A and 5-HT 2A receptor in the mouse brain regions were quantified by western blot analysis. A single administration of fluvoxamine (5-20 mg/kg, i.p.) before the test session dose-dependently and significantly suppressed freezing behavior in mice. In the combination study, a sub-effective dose of fluvoxamine (5 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly suppressed freezing behavior in mice that had been repeatedly pretreated with yokukansan (0.3 and 1 g/kg, p.o.) once a day for 6 days after the conditioning session. Western blot analysis revealed that the expression level of 5-HT 2A receptor was specifically decreased in the prefrontal cortex of mice that had been administered yokukansan and fluvoxamine. Furthermore, microinjection of the 5-HT 2A receptor antagonist ketanserin (5 nmol/mouse) into the prefrontal cortex significantly suppressed freezing behavior. The present findings indicate that repeated treatment with yokukansan synergistically enhances the anxiolytic-like effect of fluvoxamine in the contextual fear conditioning paradigm in mice in conjunction with a decrease in 5-HT 2A receptor-mediated signaling in the prefrontal cortex. Therefore, combination therapy with fluvoxamine and yokukansan may be beneficial for the treatment of

  14. Music Researchers' Musical Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollner, Clemens; Ginsborg, Jane; Williamon, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness of the importance of reflexivity across various disciplines, which encourages researchers to scrutinize their research perspectives. In order to contextualize and reflect upon research in music, this study explores the musical background, current level of musical engagement and the listening habits of music…

  15. Principles of musical acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Hartmann, William M

    2013-01-01

    Principles of Musical Acoustics focuses on the basic principles in the science and technology of music. Musical examples and specific musical instruments demonstrate the principles. The book begins with a study of vibrations and waves, in that order. These topics constitute the basic physical properties of sound, one of two pillars supporting the science of musical acoustics. The second pillar is the human element, the physiological and psychological aspects of acoustical science. The perceptual topics include loudness, pitch, tone color, and localization of sound. With these two pillars in place, it is possible to go in a variety of directions. The book treats in turn, the topics of room acoustics, audio both analog and digital, broadcasting, and speech. It ends with chapters on the traditional musical instruments, organized by family. The mathematical level of this book assumes that the reader is familiar with elementary algebra. Trigonometric functions, logarithms and powers also appear in the book, but co...

  16. Music Education and/in Rural Social Space: Making Space for Musical Diversity beyond the City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In this paper I argue that there are established vernacular music traditions in rural communities that can be productively integrated into a hybrid music education curriculum. I draw on my own informal education in folk music, which bore an ambivalent relationship to the kind of formal music education on offer in my youth. I argue that music…

  17. Analyzing Music Services Positioning Through Qualitative Research

    OpenAIRE

    Cuadrado, Manuel; Miquel, María José; Montoro, Juan D.

    2015-01-01

    Information technologies have produced new ways of distributing and consuming music, mainly by youth, in relation to both goods and services. In the case of goods, there has been a dramatic shift from traditional ways of buying and listening to music to new digital platforms. There has also been an evolution in relation to music services. In this sense, live music concerts have been losing their audiences over the past few years, as have music radio stations, in favor of streaming platforms. ...

  18. [Amusia and aphasia of Bolero's creator--influence of the right hemisphere on music].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, Lorraine; Sikirić, Predrag; Tudor, Katarina Ivana; Cambi-Sapunar, Liana; Radonić, Vedran; Tudor, Mario; Buca, Ante; Carija, Robert

    2008-07-01

    The experience with cortical localization (BA 44, 45, 22) of language (Broca, Wernicke and others) in the left hemisphere has been repeatedly tested over the last 150 years and is now generally accepted. A single case report with autopsy findings (Leborgne, Tan tan), has enabled to localize the seat of spoken language in the left third frontal convolution. As music and language have a lot in common and even share the same hearing system, it is logical to try to localize the cognitive centers for music too. The disabling neurological disease illness of Maurice Ravel (1875-1937), a French impressionist composer, is not the right example to localize music center as that of Broca's language center, but it demonstrates the role of the right hemisphere in music production. In the last five years of his life, Ravel suffered from an unknown disease that affected the left hemisphere causing aphasia, apraxia, alexia, agraphia and amusia. It was the reason why Ravel could not compose during the last years of his life. In contrast to Ravel, Shebalin and Britten continued writing music works of their own although aphasic after having sustained two strokes to the left hemisphere. While lacking clinical cases with selective ablative brain lesions, research into the music localization can be done using modern imaging technologies such as fMRI and PET. Exercising music (professionally) develops analytical process in the left hemisphere whereas other individuals process music in their right hemisphere. There is right ear (left hemisphere) predominance in musicians and vice versa in musical amateurs. Music lateralization towards the right hemisphere is seen in women and in inattentive listeners. It can be subject to cultural influence, so the Japanese process their traditional popular music in the left hemisphere, whereas Westerners process the same music in the right hemisphere. Music and language are processed separately; they are localized in homologous regions of the opposite

  19. Usage and Attitudes of Physicians in Japan Concerning Traditional Japanese Medicine (Kampo Medicine: A Descriptive Evaluation of a Representative Questionnaire-Based Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Moschik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Kampo medicine has been the primary medical model in Japan until the mid 1800s, regained a prominent role in today's Japanese medical system. Today, 148 herbal Kampo formulas can be prescribed under the national health insurance system, allowing physicians to integrate Kampo in their daily practice. This article aims to provide information about the extent to which Kampo is now used in clinics throughout Japan and about physician's current attitudes toward Kampo. We used the results of a 2008 survey that was administered to physicians throughout Japan (n = 684. The data showed that 83.5% of physicians currently use Kampo in the clinic, although the distribution of physicians who use Kampo differ widely depending on the specialty and provided a breakdown of Kampo usage by specialty. It will be interesting to see how each specialty incorporates Kampo into its respective field as Kampo continues to play a pertinent role in Japanese medical system.

  20. Music, advertising and transmedia storytelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cande SÁNCHEZ-OLMOS

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquity of advertising in everyday life and the importance of music demand a critical study on how brands use music for commercial purposes. In a context of convergence and participatory culture, it is necessary to develop new strategies, codes and narratives that brands and artists are creating to connect with consumers. Music is the basis of the collective experience and, in addition, it connects intensely and emotionally with the identity of groups that are its potential target. Brands use music to generate memorable experiences for consumers who reject traditional advertising forms. In addition, music, as a product of the cultural industry, needs marketing strategies to connect with fans.

  1. A socio-musical analysis of Ayo Bankole's choral music: Fun Mi N ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... diverse African elements and major features of African music are present in the melody, rhythm and harmony of the vocal work. The paper concluded that Fun Mi N'Ibeji contained both elements of traditional Nigerian music and Western classical music which are employed in expressing the traditional beliefs of the Yoruba ...

  2. Music and Visual Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Julie Borup

    2017-01-01

    , ethnographic video observation was chosen as a way of handling complex data and analysing complex interaction. Preliminary analyses of the findings indicates the ability of music to both contain and express experiential, sensory, emotional and cognitive complexity in ways that allow for differences......The paper explores the potential of video ethnography concerning educational research on music as contributing to an inclusive learning environment in elementary school (research objective). In music education research, the use of visual data provided by video seems to be a relevant choice...... of method, because music as a school subject encompasses multiple ways for the pupils to participate and interact in the learning environment, and music itself provides a whole set of complex linguistic rules that will escape traditional observation and interview methods in ethnographic research. Therefore...

  3. Cross-cultural perspectives on music and musicality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehub, Sandra E; Becker, Judith; Morley, Iain

    2015-03-19

    Musical behaviours are universal across human populations and, at the same time, highly diverse in their structures, roles and cultural interpretations. Although laboratory studies of isolated listeners and music-makers have yielded important insights into sensorimotor and cognitive skills and their neural underpinnings, they have revealed little about the broader significance of music for individuals, peer groups and communities. This review presents a sampling of musical forms and coordinated musical activity across cultures, with the aim of highlighting key similarities and differences. The focus is on scholarly and everyday ideas about music--what it is and where it originates--as well the antiquity of music and the contribution of musical behaviour to ritual activity, social organization, caregiving and group cohesion. Synchronous arousal, action synchrony and imitative behaviours are among the means by which music facilitates social bonding. The commonalities and differences in musical forms and functions across cultures suggest new directions for ethnomusicology, music cognition and neuroscience, and a pivot away from the predominant scientific focus on instrumental music in the Western European tradition. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of the Safety and Adverse Effects of Goreisan/Wulingsan, a Traditional Japanese-Chinese Herbal Formulation (Kampo), in a Rat Model: a Toxicological Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Selim; Uchida, Ryuichi; Hussain, Maleeha; Kabir, ARM Luthful; Rahman, Mohammed Zakiur; Rahman, Mohammad Sharifur; Honda, Sumihisa; Rashid, Mohammad Abdur

    2014-01-01

    Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death among children less than 5 years of age. Most of these deaths occur in developing countries in the tropical areas of Africa and South Asia. Goreisan/Wulingsan, a formula of Japanese-Chinese medicinal herbs (Kampo), has been used for the treatment of diarrhea and vomiting from ancient times in East Asia. Therefore, we planned a randomized controlled clinical trial of Goreisan/Wulingsan in Bangladeshi children. Although it is believed to be safe in ...

  5. THE INFLUENCE OF MUSIC ON CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Biagi Almeida Santos

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This present paper shows the influence of music used in a retail environment in relation to consumer behavior. For obtaining the information, we based this research on a literature review in national and international journals, by 4 databases including: Proquest, EBSCO Host, CAPES periódicos and Mendeley, in the period of 2008 and 2012, by the keywords: music behavior, music in retail environment, background music, music consumer, environmental music, music and consumer behavior and music in purchase decision. The use of music has been applied in traditional areas such as psychology, trough the discipline of environmental psychology (DONOVAN & ROSSITER, 1982.; marketers use this tool as a motivator in a purchase decision in different shopping environments. This paper shows that there is an influence of background music in purchase decision but it’s still needs an explanations of some variables. At the end this paper will present some suggestions for future research.

  6. MUSICAL LANDSCAPE IN THE CULTURAL LIFE OF CHISINAU AT THE BEGINNING OF THE 21st CENTURY (PRELIMINARY TO A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BADRAJAN SVETLANA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article covers some aspects of the cultural musical phenomenon at the beginning of the 21st century in the social area of Chisinau, which represents is a kaleidoscope of musical events; these address a specific audience and reflect the fashion, needs and preferences of different social strata. We outlined some musical landscapes, which we consider to be representative, having continuity, history, and tradition in the cultural life of Chisinau or even perhaps they are relatively new, but prominent and the results of modern technological advancements: Western literate music; Secular choral music with rich local traditions; Religious worship music; Music related to state representation; Music for film and dramatic performance; Band music; Jazz-pop-rock music; Western pop music and Latin American music; Folk music; Traditional romance music; Concert café music; Mainstream pop music; Music used in advertising; Street music; Intonations used by street sellers.

  7. Musical agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlstedt, Palle; McBurney, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The authors, a composer and a computer scientist, discuss their collaborative research on the use of multiagent systems and their applicability to music and musical composition. They describe the development of software and techniques for the composition of generative music.......The authors, a composer and a computer scientist, discuss their collaborative research on the use of multiagent systems and their applicability to music and musical composition. They describe the development of software and techniques for the composition of generative music....

  8. Umbanda, Music and Music Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Gregorio José Pereira de Queiroz

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the use of music in religious rites of Umbanda and the possible correlations among the role played by music in this rite and its role in music therapy process, especially in some of its approaches.

  9. What Is Music Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login About Music Therapy & AMTA What is Music Therapy? Definition and ... is Music Therapy? Print Email Share What is Music Therapy What is Music Therapy? Music Therapy is ...

  10. Japanese language and Japanese science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanikawa, Kiyotaka

    2003-08-01

    Japanese mathematical scientists including astronomers, physicists, and mathematicians obtain ideas in Japanese, discuss their problems in Japanese, and arrive at conclusions in Japanese, and yet they write their results in foreign languages such as English. This uncomfortable situation has continued for nearly one hundred years and has had serious effects on Japanese science. In this short report, the author discusses and analyses these effects. In order to put Japanese science on a sound basis, the author proposes to increase the number of articles, reviews and textbooks in Japanese, first by translation and second by the voluntary efforts of scientists themselves. As centers devoted to this activity, the author proposes to construct "Airborne Libraries" which are maintained and accumulate in an electronic form the scientific documents written in Japanese.

  11. Mentoring Music Educators in Gospel Music Pedagogy in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Patrice Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Since the early 20th century, gospel music has become increasingly popular in the United States. The popularity is making it appealing to perform in public schools. However, many choral and general music educators did not experience the tradition during their formative years and/or have not received training or background in its instruction. …

  12. Diminuendo: Classical Music and the Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asia, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    How is the tradition of Western classical music faring on university campuses? Before answering this question, it is necessary to understand what has transpired with classical music in the wider culture, as the relationship between the two is so strong. In this article, the author discusses how classical music has taken a big cultural hit in…

  13. Music Teacher as Writer and Producer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randles, Clint

    2012-01-01

    In this article I attempt to redefine the role of a music teacher as being more than a director, the more traditional term ascribed to this position. I do this by using descriptions of the role of "writer" and "producer" of student lives borrowed from music education philosophy, screenwriting, and professional music producers. This vision is…

  14. 'Rhythmic Music' in Danish Music Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Peder Kaj

    In Danish state schools from elementary to upper secondary school music is part of curricula at all levels. It is widely accepted that both individuals and culture benefit from art subjects, creative activities etc. This type of motivation was sufficient support for maintaining music as a subject...... and to avoid what was associated with jazz, especially by its opponents. This paper aims at taking stock of the situation in Danish music education during the last decade and at specifying the situation of ‘rhythmic music’ within this context....... at all levels of the educational system from around 1960 to around 2000. This tradition dates back to the 1920s, when the first Social Democratic government in Danish history (1924-26), with Nina Bang as minister of education (probably the first female minister worldwide), in the field of music made...... genre of music, and in Denmark this interest manifested itself in attempts to integrate jazz in the musical education of the youth. A unique genre, the so-called ‘jazz oratorios’, was created by the composer Bernhard Christensen (1906-2004) and the librettist Sven Møller Kristensen (1909- 91...

  15. Blackletter logotypes and metal music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Vitus

    2016-01-01

    Text and band logos based on blackletter scripts are a common sight in visual metal music culture such as on album covers. This article develops a framework for analysing the affinity between blackletter script and metal music. The analytical framework includes five themes: genre tradition, relig...

  16. Agua Caliente and Their Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryterband, Roman

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the traditional music of the Agua Caliente band of California's Desert Cahuilla Indian tribe, including accompanying instruments, types of songs, thematic material, and performance routines. Exploring the structure of the music, the article describes meter, tempo, harmony and tonal gravitations, and use of words. (DS)

  17. Intuitive Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2009-01-01

    Handbook for people who wish to play or teach freely improvised music and improvisation pieces. With sections on how to start with different types of groups, training of musical awareness, parameters of the musical sound, the history of improvised music and some improvisational pieces....

  18. Music therapy in Japan: an 11-year update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, C

    1987-01-01

    In the past 10 years, music therapy in Japan has begun to make an impact in the mental health field. An increase in research and publication can be attributed in part to the efforts of the Japan Society for the Study of Music Therapy and the Japanese Association of Music Psychology and Therapy. The Japanese still face the same difficulties now, however, as they did a decade ago. These difficulties include the lack of music therapy college degree programs and an absence of certification requirements for practitioners.

  19. Sourcing data in popular music research in Nigeria | Ogisi | OGIRISI ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The dependence of popular music on the media for its dissemination throws up a new set of challenges for scholars operating with traditional music and art music. However being music he/she still has to investigate the time tested sources along with new sources that are now usually used or looked up to for data. However ...

  20. Toward Hip-Hop Pedagogies for Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    Music education scholarship in the areas of popular, vernacular, and participatory musicianship has grown in the past decades; however, music education research concerned specifically with hip-hop has been relatively scarce. Because hip-hop music can differ tremendously from the traditional western genres with which many music educators are most…

  1. Japanese culture as a paradigm in the formation of minimalism in architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilski Dragana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimalism is now accepted as the definition of culture by way of reasoning, that is, as an aesthetic approach to navigating through the different fields, such as art, architecture, music, fashion design and critical discussions. It is a contemporary need for simplicity, order and purity of the individual come from history, examples of which is essential for the growing emergency needs, and which may be a way to throw a new light. In Japanese culture, architecture has the longest history. The ideal of simplicity in the Japanese architectural tradition is specific - from the Ise shrine or the heroic simplicity of architecture and rituals, as well as aesthetic ideals through the ceremony of tea and Katsura Palace Rikju to this great names on the international architectural scene: Tadao Ando, or SANAA. Japanese concept of a zen, who was in the minimum way of life always offered a sense of liberation, a chance to be in touch with the essence of being, influenced by traditional Japanese architecture in a way that not only left an indelible mark in the past, but present a new way today, not only in Japan but also abroad. Minimalism in architecture is a contemporary sensitivity that living beyond all religions, rejects superior materialism and takes the search for spirituality as a new principle of progress.

  2. Computer Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Perry R.

    This chapter covers algorithms, technologies, computer languages, and systems for computer music. Computer music involves the application of computers and other digital/electronic technologies to music composition, performance, theory, history, and the study of perception. The field combines digital signal processing, computational algorithms, computer languages, hardware and software systems, acoustics, psychoacoustics (low-level perception of sounds from the raw acoustic signal), and music cognition (higher-level perception of musical style, form, emotion, etc.).

  3. Opportunistic Music

    OpenAIRE

    Hachet , Martin; Kian , Arash; Berthaut , Florent; Franco , Jean-Sébastien; Desainte-Catherine , Myriam

    2009-01-01

    International audience; While mixed reality has inspired the development of many new musical instruments, few approaches explore the potential of mobile setups. We present a new musical interaction concept, called "opportunistic music". It allows musicians to recreate a hardware musical controller using any objects of their immediate environment. This approach benefits from the physical properties of real objects for controlling music. Our prototype is based on a stereo-vision tracking system...

  4. Saved from the Teeth of Time. Folk music on historical sound recordings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kratochvíl, Matěj

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 3 (2007), s. 24-26 ISSN 1211-0264 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z90580513 Keywords : traditional music * recording * wax cylinders * Bohemian music * Moravian music Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  5. Pedagogical Challenges in Folk Music Teaching in Higher Education: A Case Study of Hua'er Music in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Welch, Graham

    2016-01-01

    Recent literature suggests that traditional approaches in folk music education are not necessarily compatible with the pedagogical conventions of formal music education. Whilst several recent studies have tended to define these non-classical-music learning contexts as "informal", the practice of folk music that was recently introduced…

  6. Imagining Nature during Music Listening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole; Beck, Bolette Daniels

    2018-01-01

    Nature, its delights and horrors, its creatures, its challenges and affordances play an underrated role in receptive music therapy, especially Guided Imagery and Music (GIM). In general, people from Western cultures are challenged in their mostly recreational relationship with nature, while ancient...... and traditional cultures worship nature as a place of holiness and wholeness. In GIM, a client or a group listens to music in a relaxed state and multi-modal imagery is evoked and supported by the music. The imagery is shared with the guide/therapist. This chapter will focus on ‘nature imagery’ in GIM through...... a primarily qualitative, exploratory study....

  7. Evaluation of the safety and adverse effects of goreisan/wulingsan, a traditional Japanese-chinese herbal formulation (kampo), in a rat model: a toxicological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Selim; Uchida, Ryuichi; Hussain, Maleeha; Kabir, Arm Luthful; Rahman, Mohammed Zakiur; Rahman, Mohammad Sharifur; Honda, Sumihisa; Rashid, Mohammad Abdur

    2014-09-01

    Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death among children less than 5 years of age. Most of these deaths occur in developing countries in the tropical areas of Africa and South Asia. Goreisan/Wulingsan, a formula of Japanese-Chinese medicinal herbs (Kampo), has been used for the treatment of diarrhea and vomiting from ancient times in East Asia. Therefore, we planned a randomized controlled clinical trial of Goreisan/Wulingsan in Bangladeshi children. Although it is believed to be safe in East Asia, information regarding its toxicity on animals is scarce. Since Goreisan/Wulingsan has never been used in Bangladesh, it was necessary to ensure the safety of the formula in an animal experiment. Rats were assigned to a control group (normal saline, n = 4) or various Goreisan/Wulingsan groups (n = 26) receiving doses of 1 to 8 mg/g/day (7.7 to 61.5 times the recommended pediatric dose) over a period of 25 days. Their activities and health conditions were observed until they were sacrificed, after which blood samples were collected for biochemical liver function tests. The kidneys, liver and heart tissue were collected for histopathological study. No lethality was observed during the experiment. All of the rats consumed the doses completely and no constipation was observed, suggesting the absence of any inhibitory effect on intestinal motion. Also, no abnormal neurological activity was detected, nor any significant elevation of AST, ALT or ALP levels, except for AST and ALT at the highest dose of 8 mg/g/day. Histopathological studies of the kidneys, liver and heart tissues revealed no abnormalities. In conclusion, our results showed that Goreisan/Wulingsan is safe for rats, thereby justifying the use of the drug in a human trial.

  8. Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trondalen, Gro; Bonde, Lars Ole

    2012-01-01

    music therapy orientations/models (Guided Imagery and Music, Nordoff-Robbins, Psychoanalytic, Cognitive-behavioral etc), their theoretical foundations and their practical approaches to health and wellbeing or ‘health musicking’. The relational context – the interplay of (expressive as well as receptive......Music therapy (MT) is most commonly defined as an intervention where “the therapist helps the client to promote health, using music experiences and the relationships developing through them” (Bruscia 1998). Also other definitions of MT agree that a therapeutic relationship is important for a music...... intervention to be considered MT. Other interventions that “use music for health-related goals, but in ways that do not qualify as music therapy” (Gold 2009), may be described as music medicine, or simply as music listening. In this text we elaborate on an overview chapter covering some of the different major...

  9. Art Music by Caribbean Composers: Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LeGrand, Cathleen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Haïti has by far the longest history of independence of any of its Caribbean neighbors, having gained independence from France in 1804. Haïti's tradition of classical music takes root in its colonial heritage. Haïtian classical music, "mizik savant ayisyen," is derived from that "desire to retain European standards while including local features" of indigenous musical traditions (Grenier & Averill, 2007-2011.

  10. Art Music by Caribbean Composers: Haiti

    OpenAIRE

    LeGrand, Cathleen; Gangelhoff, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Haïti has by far the longest history of independence of any of its Caribbean neighbors, having gained independence from France in 1804. Haïti's tradition of classical music takes root in its colonial heritage. Haïtian classical music, "mizik savant ayisyen," is derived from that "desire to retain European standards while including local features" of indigenous musical traditions (Grenier & Averill, 2007-2011).

  11. Music publishing

    OpenAIRE

    Simões, Alberto; Almeida, J. J.

    2003-01-01

    Current music publishing in the Internet is mainly concerned with sound publishing. We claim that music publishing is not only to make sound available but also to define relations between a set of music objects like music scores, guitar chords, lyrics and their meta-data. We want an easy way to publish music in the Internet, to make high quality paper booklets and even to create Audio CD's. In this document we present a workbench for music publishing based on open formats, using open-source t...

  12. Influences and Retentions of West African Musical Concepts in U.S. Black Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maultsby, Portia K.

    1979-01-01

    Current research reveals that West African musical concepts provided the foundation for the various musical genres created by Black Americans. The Black musical tradition continues to evolve and mirror new values, attitudes, philosophies, and life-styles without the loss of a West African identity. (RLV)

  13. Anthropology of music: Paradigms and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rašić Miloš

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Music represents a relational category, in the sense that people write meaning into it, and later by the means of the same music they write the meaning into other people. Therefore, I regard music as a cultural construct. Music does not possess universal meanings, but it forms its numerous meanings in different cultural environments, as well as in different individual perceptions. In anthropology, music is not studied in relation to its musical characteristics or aesthetical values. Anthropologists study its role in a wider social system, and strive to understand, by analysing the role of music in a society, the social and cultural system it belongs to - musical structure is less important here. The goal of the paper is to give an overview of the paradigms in ethnology and anthropology which have been used in studying music. In addition, a hypothetical-theoretical framework for studying music in institutions is set. Although the theory of hubs, which is presented here as a potential framework for studying music in institutions, is exemplified by traditional music, it can be applied to any genre of music. The basic theoretical framework offered by the authors Nadia Kiwan and Hanna Mainhof has been supplemented by certain parts which the author thought appropriate for studying music in institutions, both in ethnological and anthropological discourse.

  14. The Diversity of African Musics: Zulu Kings, Xhosa Clicks, and Gumboot Dancing in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Nicola F.

    2014-01-01

    Multicultural curricula that explore African musics often focus on the commonalities among its musical traditions. Exploring the diversity of individual African musical traditions provides a pathway to the multiplicity of sounds, cultures, beliefs, and uses inherent within African and all multicultural musics. Deeper insights into the diversity of…

  15. Geleneksel Japon Kabuki Dans Tiyatrosunun Aykırı Bedenleri “Onnagatalar” / Traversal Bodies of Traditional Japanese Kabuki Dance Theatre “Onnagatas”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin KILINÇARSLAN

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Kabuki dans tiyatrosu Japonya’nın, tarihi dört asra kadar uzanan en önemli gösteri sanatlarından birisidir. Bu lirik tiyatro tarzı son derece stilistiktir ve etkileyici görsellere ve ses performanslarına dayanır. Kabuki dans tiyatrosunda dokunma duyusu ve bakış, yüksek-alçak müzik sesi ve haraketli sahnelerle uyarılır. Bu avangard tiyatro stilinde makyaj, rol yapma gücüyle bağlantılı olarak performans eşliğinde kullanılır. Bu durum, karakterlerin temsilinde ve vurgulanmasında en önemli araçlardan birisidir. Onnagata terimi, kadın karakterlerin erkek oyuncular tarafından canlandırılmasıdır. Onnagata rolündeki erkek oyuncu kadın taklidi yapmaz, gerçek bir kadınmış gibi kadın karakteri temsil eder. Bu noktada, bir kadın karakterin canlandırılması, kadının feminen güzelliğinden ve estetiğinden daha da önemli hale gelir. Bu çalışma, onnagatalığın Kabuki sahnesinde canlandırılması, temsili, onnagata bedeninin kuruluşu ve farklı bir beden sunumu olarak önemi üzerinde durmaktadır. Çalışmada, tiyatral iletişim modeli aracılığıyla onnagata temsillerinin fiziksel ve içeriksel boyutu analiz edilmiştir. / Kabuki dance theatre is one of the most important performance arts of Japan culture for four hundred years. This lyric theatre style is extremly stylistic and based on enchanting visual and sound performance. Tactual sense and eyesight are stimulated through high and low music sound, effects and moving stage in Kabuki. Make-up is one of the most important presentation mediums for introducing and emphasising the characters. The power of performance depends on perfection of acting in this avangard theatre style. The term Onnagata is a situation and it means personation of woman characters by man performers. In Onnagata situation, actors don’t pretend like a woman, they represent the woman character like a real woman. In this point, personation of a woman character is more important

  16. Music listening and the experience of surrender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole; Blom, Katarina Mårtenson

    2016-01-01

    This article explores two fairly independent questions on the psychological and cultural aspects of music listening, focusing on music-evoked imagery in a therapeutic context: 1) Is imagery evoked by listening to selected classical music from the Western tradition always and only determined...... by culture, or can universal aspects of the imagery be observed and identified?; 2) Can imagery evoked by classical music from the Western tradition faciltate modes of surrender in listeners from Western cultures (in which a hypothesized universal, deeply human wish to surrender is often buried in culturally...... influenced psychological modes and scripts of control and self-centeredness)? The first question is explored in a literature review with focus on listerners’ experience of music (programs) used in the Bonny Method of Guided Imagery and Music (GIM), a receptive music therapy model known worldwide. The second...

  17. Music Warehouses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deliege, Francois; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2006-01-01

    Music Information Retrieval has received increasing attention from both the industrial and the research communities in recent years. Many audio extraction techniques providing content-based music information have been developed, sparking the need for intelligent storage and retrieval facilities. ...

  18. Folk Music, Song and Dance in Bohemia and Moravia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vejvoda, Zdeněk

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 3 (2007), s. 14-23 ISSN 1211-0264 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z90580513 Keywords : Traditional Music * Roma Folk Music * Bagpipe * Dulcimer * Folklorism Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  19. Boys Boys Boys: Gender, Race and the English Music Question

    OpenAIRE

    Laurie, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    A review of Laurie Stras (ed.), She’s So Fine: Reflections on Whiteness, Femininity, Adolescence and Class in 1960s Music and Andy Bennett and Jon Stratton (eds), Britpop and the English Music Tradition.

  20. Boys Boys Boys: Gender, Race and the English Music Question

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Laurie

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A review of Laurie Stras (ed., She’s So Fine: Reflections on Whiteness, Femininity, Adolescence and Class in 1960s Music and Andy Bennett and Jon Stratton (eds, Britpop and the English Music Tradition.

  1. Music & Wellbeing

    OpenAIRE

    Garrido, Gemma; Camps, Laia; Herrera, Isabel Herrera; Guillamat, Roser; Vallés, Vicenç; Sanz, Maite; Martínez, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Scientific literature suggests that music may serve as therapeutic function among populations with different illnesses or disorders. Functional neuroimaging studies that incorporate music activity or music method shown an increase activation in several brain areas, with widespread bilateral hemodynamic responses in occipital lobe, bilateral cerebellum, temporal lobe, in the right lateral prefrontal cortex as well hemodynamic responses in the left middle frontal gyrus.Music activ...

  2. An investigation into the relevance of gamelan music to the practice of music therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Loth, Helen

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the use of Indonesian gamelan with participants who have special needs or with special populations, and considers what the playing of gamelan music has to offer music therapy practice. The gamelan is an ensemble of instruments on which the traditional music of Indonesia is played, consisting of mainly tuned and un-tuned percussion instruments tuned to four, five or seven tone scales. Gamelan are being increasingly used for music activities with participants who have sp...

  3. Predicting the emotions expressed in music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens

    With the ever-growing popularity and availability of digital music through streaming services and digital download, making sense of the millions of songs, is ever more pertinent. However the traditional approach of creating music systems has treated songs like items in a store, like books...... and movies. However music is special, having origins in a number of evolutionary adaptations. The fundamental needs and goals of a users use of music, was investigated to create the next generation of music systems. People listen to music to regulate their mood and emotions was found to be the most important...... fundamental reason. (Mis)matching peoples mood with the emotions expressed in music was found to be an essential underlying mechanism, people use to regulate their emotions. This formed the basis and overall goal of the thesis, to investigate how to create a predictive model of emotions expressed in music...

  4. Music Teachers' Everyday Conceptions of Musicality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstrom, Sture

    1999-01-01

    Investigates music teachers' everyday conceptions of musicality through (1) a pilot study involving music teachers in higher education and (2) interviews with teachers in music teacher education and in compulsory school. Finds in the pilot the categories of musical achievement, musical experience, and musical communication, while the interviews…

  5. Traces of 'Simple Psalmody' in late- and post-Byzantine musical manuscripts. Melodic, modal and textual analysis of the Kekragarion tradition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanfratello, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    The study of the Kekragarion chant tradition has over time become an important aspect of Byzantine musicology, especially regarding the development of “simple psalmody”. Simple psalmody describes the functional side of Byzantine “psalm tones”, pointing out a set of recurrent behaviours in the ada......The study of the Kekragarion chant tradition has over time become an important aspect of Byzantine musicology, especially regarding the development of “simple psalmody”. Simple psalmody describes the functional side of Byzantine “psalm tones”, pointing out a set of recurrent behaviours......, but for the actual analysis two manuscripts representing the Kekragaria versions contained in the whole group of manuscripts were selected for transcription. My survey shows how the melodic tradition of the late medieval Kekragarion has been partly maintained and partly developed over four centuries, and it also...

  6. Efficacy of keishibukuryogan, a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, in treating cold sensation and numbness after stroke: clinical improvement and skin temperature normalization in 22 stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Keishi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Kamezaki, Takao; Matsumura, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Cold sensation and numbness have been reported as post-stroke sensory sequelae attributable to distal axonopathy, which is caused by chronic ischemia of diseased limbs resulting from dysfunction of vasomotor regulatory systems. Keishibukuryogan is a traditional herbal medicine used to treat symptoms of peripheral ischemia such as cold extremities. This study investigated clinical improvement and skin temperature in peripheral ischemia patients to determine the efficacy of keishibukuryogan in alleviating post-stroke cold sensation and numbness. Twenty-two stroke patients with cold sensation and/or numbness were enrolled in this study. Subjective cold sensation and numbness, evaluated using the visual analogue scale, were found in 21 and 31 limbs, respectively. The skin temperature of diseased and healthy limbs was recorded. We observed all patients for 4 weeks and 17 patients for 8 weeks after administration of keishibukuryogan. The skin temperature of diseased limbs was significantly higher than baseline at 4 weeks and 8 weeks, whereas that of healthy limbs did not change significantly. Cold sensation and numbness were significantly improved at 4 weeks and 8 weeks compared to baseline. Keishibukuryogan administration resulted in warming of diseased limbs and improved cold sensation and numbness, probably by increasing peripheral blood flow.

  7. Cultural constraints on music perception and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Steven J; Demorest, Steven M

    2009-01-01

    Research suggests that music, like language, is both a biological predisposition and a cultural universal. While humans naturally attend to and process many of the psychophysical cues present in musical information, there is a great - and often culture-specific - diversity of musical practices differentiated in part by form, timbre, pitch, rhythm, and other structural elements. Musical interactions situated within a given cultural context begin to influence human responses to music as early as one year of age. Despite the world's diversity of musical cultures, the majority of research in cognitive psychology and the cognitive neuroscience of music has been conducted on subjects and stimuli from Western music cultures. From the standpoint of cognitive neuroscience, identification of fundamental cognitive and neurological processes associated with music requires ascertaining that such processes are demonstrated by listeners from a broad range of cultural backgrounds and in relation to various musics across cultural traditions. This chapter will review current research regarding the role of enculturation in music perception and cognition and the degree to which cultural influences are reflected in brain function. Exploring music cognition from the standpoint of culture will lead to a better understanding of the core processes underlying perception and how those processes give rise to the world's diversity of music forms and expressions.

  8. The Traditional Japanese Herbal Medicine Hachimijiogan Elicits Neurite Outgrowth Effects in PC12 Cells and Improves Cognitive in AD Model Rats via Phosphorylation of CREB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Kubota

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Hachimijiogan (HJG is a traditional herbal medicine that improves anxiety disorders in patients with dementia. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that HJG exerts neurotrophic factor-like effects to ameliorate memory impairment in Alzheimer disease (AD model rats. First, we describe that HJG acts to induce neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells (a rat pheochromocytoma cell line like nerve growth factor (NGF in a concentration-dependent manner (3 μg/ml HJG, p < 0.05; 10–500 μg/ml HJG, p < 0.001. While six herbal constituents of HJG, Rehmannia root, Dioscorea rhizome, Rhizoma Alismatis, Poria sclerotium, Moutan bark, and Cinnamon bark, could induce neurite outgrowth effects, the effect was strongest with HJG (500 μg/ml. Second, we demonstrated that HJG-induced neurite outgrowth was blocked by an inhibitor of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB, KG-501 (10 μM, p < 0.001. Moreover, HJG was observed to induce CREB phosphorylation 20–90 min after treatment (20 min, 2.50 ± 0.58-fold and CRE-mediated transcription in cultured PC12 cells (500 μg/ml, p < 0.01; 1000 μg/ml, p < 0.001. These results suggest a CREB-dependent mechanism underlies the neurotrophic effects of HJG. Finally, we examined improvements of memory impairment following HJG treatment using a Morris water maze in AD model animals (CI + Aβ rats. Repeated oral administration of HJG improved memory impairment (300 mg/kg, p < 0.05; 1000 mg/kg, p < 0.001 and induced CREB phosphorylation within the hippocampus (1000 mg/kg, p < 0.01. Together, our results suggest that HJG possesses neurotrophic effects similar to those of NGF, and can ameliorate cognitive dysfunction in a rat dementia model via CREB activation. Thus, HJG could potentially be a substitute for neurotrophic factors as a treatment for dementia.

  9. Japanese dreams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejrup, Jens

    2018-01-01

    This paper traces the history of a Japanese-funded annex to the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam over the past twenty-five years. The analysis focuses on three key years in the building’s history: 1991, 1999, and 2015. Critically examining public debate and media coverage of the building in contempor......This paper traces the history of a Japanese-funded annex to the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam over the past twenty-five years. The analysis focuses on three key years in the building’s history: 1991, 1999, and 2015. Critically examining public debate and media coverage of the building...... in contemporary Dutch- and Japanese-language sources, I argue that changing claims and public perceptions of Japan reflected the country’s shifting economic fortunes and international position during the period. The sources consistently framed the Japanese-designed building within a language of dreams. However...

  10. Empirical Music Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grund, Cynthia M.

    The toolbox for empirically exploring the ways that artistic endeavors convey and activate meaning on the part of performers and audiences continues to expand. Current work employing methods at the intersection of performance studies, philosophy, motion capture and neuroscience to better understand...... musical performance and reception is inspired by traditional approaches within aesthetics, but it also challenges some of the presuppositions inherent in them. As an example of such work I present a research project in empirical music aesthetics begun last year and of which I am a team member....

  11. Music Therapy: A Career in Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    About Music Therapy & Music Therapy Training M usic therapy is a healthcare profession that uses music to help individuals of all ages improve physical, cognitive, emotional, and social functioning. Music therapists work with children and adults with developmental ...

  12. How music affects soundscape: Musical preferences in Skadarlija

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumnić Marija

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article I analyze musical preferences in the context of tavern performances in Skadarlija, a popular tourist quarter in Belgrade, Serbia, on the basis of ethnographic data collection. I argue that this specific musicscape relies on communicative and affective aspects of particular performances. I pay special attention to the repertoires performed and the way in which they interweave. The aim of this article is to demonstrate how musical preferences influence sound environment, especially in the context of the tourism industry. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 177004: Serbian Musical Identities Within Local and Global Frameworks: Traditions, Changes, Challenges

  13. Musical journey: a virtual world gamification experience for music learning

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, José; Figueiredo, Mauro; Amante, Lúcia

    2014-01-01

    Games are an integral part of the learning process of humans, in particular for children, who exploit the imagery as an intrinsic part of their lives. Features from games have been successfully implemented as a means to captivate and motivate students to perform learning at various levels of education in traditional schools. This paper presents a virtual world – Musical Journey – representing the Aesthetic Periods of Music History. This virtual environment allows students to freely explore an...

  14. Construction and communication of meanings in popular music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Céspedes Guevara

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Both musicology and the psychology of music have traditionally approached the construction and communication of musical meanings using a functionalist model of communication. The purpose of this research is to study these phenomena within the context of popular music, using a constructivist theoretical framework. Two songs from a funk-rock band and 2 songs from a jazz band were heard individually by 6 members of the bands and by 14 participants without formal musical training. The participants were asked to indicate the moments in which the music called their attention, and to elaborate on the meaning of each song. The findings were interpreted as evidence that musical meaning is not inherent to music, that popular music is not always perceived an expression of emotions, and that musical communication depends on the existence of shared symbolic referents by musicians and listeners. As a conclusion, a constructivist conceptual model of musical communication is proposed

  15. A New Social Portrait of the Japanese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, Nathaniel B.

    1977-01-01

    A series of surveys taken from 1953-73 assessed postwar attitudes of the Japanese toward religion, tradition, culture, politics, and aesthetics. Findings indicate that Japanese attitudes have become more oriented to the individual than to society. Available from: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC…

  16. Music Therapy and Music Therapy Research. Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This response to Keynote by Prof. Even Ruud (N)"Music Education and Music Therapy seeks to define these two areas with specific focus on tools and methods for analysis of music as these methods are developed in music therapy. This includes that the music therapist, the music and the client create...

  17. The musical brain: brain waves reveal the neurophysiological basis of musicality in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervaniemi, M; Ilvonen, T; Karma, K; Alho, K; Näätänen, R

    1997-04-18

    To reveal neurophysiological prerequisites of musicality, auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded from musical and non-musical subjects, musicality being here defined as the ability to temporally structure auditory information. Instructed to read a book and to ignore sounds, subjects were presented with a repetitive sound pattern with occasional changes in its temporal structure. The mismatch negativity (MMN) component of ERPs, indexing the cortical preattentive detection of change in these stimulus patterns, was larger in amplitude in musical than non-musical subjects. This amplitude enhancement, indicating more accurate sensory memory function in musical subjects, suggests that even the cognitive component of musicality, traditionally regarded as depending on attention-related brain processes, in fact, is based on neural mechanisms present already at the preattentive level.

  18. Proceedings of the 6th International Workshop on Folk Music Analysis, 15-17 June, 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Beauguitte, Pierre; Duggan, Bryan; Kelleher, John

    2016-01-01

    The Folk Music Analysis Workshop brings together computational music analysis and ethnomusicology. Both symbolic and audio representations of music are considered, with a broad range of scientific approaches being applied (signal processing, graph theory, deep learning). The workshop features a range of interesting talks from international researchers in areas such as Indian classical music, Iranian singing, Ottoman-Turkish Makam music scores, Flamenco singing, Irish traditional music, Georgi...

  19. Contemporary Challenges in Learning and Teaching Folk Music in a Higher Education Context: A Case Study of Hua'er Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Welch, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Literature reviews suggest that traditional approaches in folk music education are not necessarily compatible with the conventions of formal music education. Whilst many recent studies have tended to define these non-classical music learning contexts as "informal", the practice of folk transmission music appears to be much more complex…

  20. The Disappearance of Music Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ægidius, Andreas Lenander

    This paper focuses on the distinct technologies that operate behind, beyond, and below the concept of media. I theorize that the intricate complex of platforms, channels and formats for the consumption of cultural content is better understood through the lens of format theory (Aegidius, 2017; Ste...... we elaborate on the post-media conditions of the music industry through the use of format theory......., experience, and workings of a medium. It also names a set of rules according to which a technology can operate´ (Sterne, 2012, 7). Music consumption in the East Asian countries and especially Japan provides a remarkable and unique case for the continued and global disappearance of music media. But formats...... persist and govern the music experience. Here I focus on the ways in which traditional and physical music formats (CD) intersect with new media formats, e.g. the micromaterial music file and the music stream, here conceptualised as the internet protocols plus music file (Aegidius, 2017). I suggest...

  1. The convergence and convenience of talent, traditional knowledge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The convergence and convenience of talent, traditional knowledge and performance in the Chewa drumming tradition. ... the elements that constitute the Chewa art of drumming, the application of this art in the traditional medium of music and dance, and the adaptation of the art by Malawi's contemporary music performers.

  2. Music Aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søderberg, Ene Alicia; Odgaard, Rasmus Emil; Bitsch, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the possibility of breaking the barrier between deaf and hearing people when it comes to the subject of making music. Suggestions on how deaf and hearing people can collaborate in creating music together, are presented. The conducted research will focus on deaf people...... with a general interest in music as well as hearing musicians as target groups. Through reviewing different related research areas, it is found that visualization of sound along with a haptic feedback can help deaf people interpret and interact with music. With this in mind, three variations of a collaborative...

  3. Generational Differences in Japanese Attitudes toward Women's Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, John W.

    Traditional ideals discourage Japanese women from working outside the home. This study was conducted to explore generational differences in Japanese attitudes toward women's employment and to interpret those differences in terms of social change. Questionnaires were distributed to approximately 900 Japanese men and women. Subjects were classified…

  4. Research trends on music and advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Ruth, Nicolas; Spangardt, Benedikt

    2017-01-01

    Research on music and advertising is diverse and unstructured. Looking at the most important factors that define related research, this article aims to introduce a typology of four research fields that reflect the interplay of the complex relationship between music and advertising. An analysis of relevant studies revealed diverse research gaps and clustered the main research traditions. Eventually, we identified four types of research, namely advertising with music, advertising with musicians...

  5. The role of traditional Japanese medicine (Kampo) in the practice of psychosomatic medicine: the usefulness of Kampo in the treatment of the stress-related symptoms of women, especially those with peri-menopausal disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushiroyama, Takahisa

    2013-10-22

    A serious problem currently plaguing the medical field is the widening gap between academic medicine, which studies the features and causes of illness, and the medical care that patients desire. An example of this gap can be observed in the practice of psychotherapy, which is effective only for certain patients. Kampo medicine that combines the advantages of Western medicine with those of traditional Japanese medicine is currently undergoing a revival in the healthcare sector. The therapeutic policies underlying Kampo medicine are based on the physical constitution and current symptoms of each patient. For this reason, Kampo medicine is referred to as "tailor-made medicine" and has properties similar to "mind and body" or psychosomatic medicine. Some women exhibit multiple undefined stress-related symptoms during the peri-menopausal period. In order to accurately diagnose and provide patient-specific treatment, physicians should not only investigate the various stress factors in patients' lives but should also provide a Sho, or a Kampo diagnosis. The therapeutic approach in Kampo medicine is aimed at harmonizing the mind, body, and spirit; this practice involves the use of narrative and holistic medication that treats the entire being of the patient, resulting in an increased number of specialized treatment plans.There are many Kampo prescriptions tailored to treat women who exhibit various stress-related symptoms. Both Kampo and psychosomatic medicine are based on the principles of narrative-based medicine, and by integrating these two medical systems, an ideal system can be devised to better cope with the various needs of patients. This new medical system established by integrating and harmonizing Western and Eastern medicine can be used for the treatment of women with stress-related symptoms.

  6. Der Begriff des "Ki" und die japanische Padagogik: Uber Konflikte zwischen westlicher und japanischer Padagogik (The Concept of "Ki" and Japanese Pedagogy: On Conflicts between Western and Japanese Pedagogics).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Nobuo

    1997-01-01

    Sketches the characteristics of the Japanese educational tradition and analyzes conflicts between modern western pedagogies and traditional education. Argues that Japanese socialization processes stress a specifically Japanese construction of the "self" and of behavior. Concludes that Japanese educators should be more aware of this…

  7. Music and epilepsy: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Melissa Jane

    2012-06-01

    The effect of music on patients with epileptic seizures is complex and at present poorly understood. Clinical studies suggest that the processing of music within the human brain involves numerous cortical areas, extending beyond Heschl's gyrus and working within connected networks. These networks could be recruited during a seizure manifesting as musical phenomena. Similarly, if certain areas within the network are hyperexcitable, then there is a potential that particular sounds or certain music could act as epileptogenic triggers. This occurs in the case of musicogenic epilepsy, whereby seizures are triggered by music. Although it appears that this condition is rare, the exact prevalence is unknown, as often patients do not implicate music as an epileptogenic trigger and routine electroencephalography does not use sound in seizure provocation. Music therapy for refractory epilepsy remains controversial, and further research is needed to explore the potential anticonvulsant role of music. Dopaminergic system modulation and the ambivalent action of cognitive and sensory input in ictogenesis may provide possible theories for the dichotomous proconvulsant and anticonvulsant role of music in epilepsy. The effect of antiepileptic drugs and surgery on musicality should not be underestimated. Altered pitch perception in relation to carbamazepine is rare, but health care professionals should discuss this risk or consider alternative medication particularly if the patient is a professional musician or native-born Japanese. Studies observing the effect of epilepsy surgery on musicality suggest a risk with right temporal lobectomy, although the extent of this risk and correlation to size and area of resection need further delineation. This potential risk may bring into question whether tests on musical perception and memory should form part of the preoperative neuropsychological workup for patients embarking on surgery, particularly that of the right temporal lobe. Wiley

  8. Pitch and tonality in contemporary African music: Nigerian gospel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Like melody, language and rhythm, pitch and tonality are major indicators of African identity in music. In traditional African musical forms, these elements are obvious, but in contemporary African musical expressions which are influenced by several external factors, it is necessary to know the extent to which the elements ...

  9. 76 FR 32851 - African-American Music Appreciation Month, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-07

    ... community and reminding us of our shared values. During African-American Music Appreciation Month, we honor..., and brought hope to slaves toiling in fields. The soulfulness of jazz and storytelling in the blues... musicians continue to create new musical genres and transform the scope of traditional musical formats. The...

  10. Ghost Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Geolocative AR concert for Arts Festival of North Norway (Festspillene i Nord-Norge), Harstad, Norge. In cooperation with The Norwegian Academy of Music, Oslo.......Geolocative AR concert for Arts Festival of North Norway (Festspillene i Nord-Norge), Harstad, Norge. In cooperation with The Norwegian Academy of Music, Oslo....

  11. Caribbean Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Kris

    1991-01-01

    The Caribbean is a rich breeding ground for African-derived music. A synopsis is given of the music of the following countries and styles: (1) Jamaica; (2) Trinidad and Tobago; (3) Calypso; (4) steel pan; (5) Haiti; (6) Dominican Republic; (7) Cuba; (8) Puerto Rico; and (9) other islands. (SLD)

  12. Visualizing Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overby, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    Music has always been an important aspect of teenage life, but with the portability of the newest technological devices, it is harder and harder to separate students from their musical influences. In this article, the author describes a lesson wherein she incorporated their love of song into an engaging art project. In this lesson, she had…

  13. The Squiggle: A Digital Musical Instrument

    OpenAIRE

    Sheehan, Brian

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the issues pertaining to thedesign of digital musical instruments that are to effectively fillthe role of traditional instruments (i.e. those based on physicalsound production mechanisms). The design andimplementation of a musical instrument that addresses some ofthese issues, using scanned synthesis coupled to a "smart"physical system, is described.

  14. Music Provision in UK Public Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorney, Carl; McKnight, Cliff

    2004-01-01

    Public library music provision, as a less traditional role for public libraries, has always caused contention: a vital source of cultural materials within the community though never confirmed to be a core part of library services by the Government. This article concerns itself with a detailed consideration of the decline of music services over the…

  15. Peer Learning in Specialist Higher Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanken, Ingrid Maria

    2016-01-01

    Research on peer learning in higher education indicates that learning from and together with peers can benefit students in a number of ways. Within higher music education in Western, classical music, however, the master-apprentice tradition with its dominant one-to-one mode of tuition focuses predominantly on knowledge transmission from teacher to…

  16. Musical appreciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Maria del Consuelo

    2002-11-01

    Pre-school listening to music is the principal way that leads to the appreciation of music that later facilitates knowledge and pleasure in the history of music. At the prescholastic age it is a very important aspect of education, and reasons and suggestions will be given. The activities must be brief, the teachers of music can at the most develop the activity every five minutes, leaving time for rest or expansion. Another suitable way to bring the child to music is through stories, which please all children; let them go to an unreal and fantastic world and listen to a story or an exciting adventure. The story then, should be brief, simple, with action, with familiar characters, but with some mystery; some repetitive element; and an ending both surprising and happy. It is preferable to include small folkloric tales from the universal repertoire, with works of simple and clear structure.

  17. Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanfi, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    may cause detrimental long-term effects. Three studies have examined the effect of music therapy procedural support (MTPS) under needle procedures. Consequently, this study aims at examining the effects of MTPS in an RCT. Moreover, the study addresses clinical aspects of the applied MT intervention...... and provides research-based clinical tools. Methods 41 children (1 to 10 years) were enrolled and underwent a single PIVA procedure. The children were randomly assigned to either an MT or a comparable control group receiving PIVA. In addition, the music therapy (MT) group received individualised MTPS (i.......e. music alternate engagement) before, during, and after PIVA. The intervention was performed by a trained music therapist and comprised preferred songs, improvised songs/music, and instrument playing. The study was carried out in accordance with the rules in force regarding research ethics and clinical MT...

  18. Seven Steps to Heaven: Time and Tide in 21st Century Contemporary Music Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Annie K.

    2018-01-01

    Throughout the time of my teaching career, the tide has exposed changes in the nature of music, students and music education. This paper discusses teaching and learning in contemporary music at seven critical stages of 21st century music education: i) diverse types of undergraduate learners; ii) teaching traditional classical repertoire and skills…

  19. Exploring the Rhythmic Timelines of Southern Benin in the General Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellizo, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    The inclusion of world music from a variety of cultures and traditions within the general music curriculum creates valuable opportunities for students to experience music in ways that are both culturally and pedagogically beneficial. By exploring the connection between the fields of ethnomusicology and music education, we can expand our current…

  20. Impact of music type on motor coordination task performance among introverted and extroverted students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidzad, Maryam; Maghsoudipour, Maryam; Zakerian, Seyed Abolfazl; Bakhshi, Enayatollah; Coh, Paul

    2018-06-26

    People are interested in music. In this study, we assessed the impact of music type on objective performance. We distributed 64 medical science students in Tehran into four groups: Iranian pop music, traditional music, Mozart's classical music and control groups. All participants performed the two-arm coordination test once without music and once with music (except for the control group), with an interval of 1 week. In the music groups, music was playing during the performance of the test. Participants were categorized as either introverted or extroverted and were distributed equally in the groups. There was a significant decrease of test time in the second trial, observed in all music groups, and no significant difference identified in the control group. The traditional music group had less difference of mean time compared to the pop music group. The differences in the traditional and classical groups were not significantly different. In the music groups, both extroverted and introverted students decreased their test time significantly after music intervention, but extroverted students decreased more. Listening to music would enhance the speed of performance. Music with a higher tempo, such as pop music, increased the speed more.

  1. Re-Examining Patriotism in Japanese Education: Analysis of Japanese Elementary School Moral Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzai, Shinobu

    2015-01-01

    In 1947 the Fundamental Law of Education (FLE) defined the pacifist principles for post-war Japanese education and was revised in 2006 for the first time in nearly 60 years. The revised FLE stipulates the importance of teaching love for country and region and Japanese culture and traditions with special emphasis on moral education. Today, this…

  2. A Mobile System for Music Anamnesis and Receptive Music Therapy in the Personal Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denecke, Kerstin

    2017-01-01

    Receptive music therapy is active hearing of music that is specifically selected to cause a certain effect on a person, such as pain reduction, mental opening, confrontation etc. This active, guided hearing could be helpful as a supporting ritual for patients at home and could extend traditional therapy. However, patients are often unable to select the music pieces that might be helpful for them in a current situation. We are suggesting a self-learning decision support system that allows a patient to answer questions on music anamnesis, is ready for inclusion into an electronic health record, and which enables a therapist to compile a therapeutic music program for the patient at home. Beyond this, the system also suggests appropriate music and duration of listening based on the patient's reported current mental state. In this paper, a concept for such a mobile system for receptive music therapy will be proposed.

  3. Skills and Life Strategies of Japanese Business Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwao, Sumiko

    In this paper, case studies of two successful Japanese businesswomen illustrate how traditional Japanese cultural values and female sex roles have enabled women to succeed in business. These two cases were chosen as representative from a sample of 56. The businesses discussed are in very different sectors of the economy. One is a traditional and…

  4. Music after the rain

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The group Home Cooking (left to right: Jean-Marie Planche, Tony Arnold, Serge Waeffler, Django Manglunki) entertains the crowd with a humoristic blues/rock performance. The earth moved in Prévessin on 29 July. This was not an earthquake but an 'international' music event, the seventeenth CERN Hardronic Festival, which saw musicians from many different countries, including Russia, Britain, Spain, France, Belgium and the USA, take to the stage. The audience rocked to music from eight different groups until the early hours. About a thousand people flocked to CERN to hear what the best of its musical talents had to offer. The evening was very nearly a wash-out, though. After a week of scorching hot temperatures, the heavens suddenly opened and the rain didn't stop until a few minutes before the first act came on stage. Thanks to this narrow escape, the organisers can boast a 17-year run of rain-free Hardronic festivals. All the different musical styles were given a warm reception, from traditional Russian folk...

  5. Studies in musical acoustics and psychoacoustics

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book comprises twelve articles which cover a range of topics from musical instrument acoustics to issues in psychoacoustics and sound perception as well as neuromusicology. In addition to experimental methods and data acquisition, modeling (such as FEM or wave field synthesis) and numerical simulation plays a central role in studies addressing sound production in musical instruments as well as interaction of radiated sound with the environment. Some of the studies have a focus on psychoacoustic aspects in regard to virtual pitch and timbre as well as apparent source width (for techniques such as stereo or ambisonics) in music production. Since musical acoustics imply subjects playing instruments or singing in order to produce sound according to musical structures, this area is also covered including a study that presents an artifical intelligent agent capable to interact with a real ('analog') player in musical genres such as traditional and free jazz. .

  6. Art Music by Caribbean Composers: Guadeloupe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangelhoff, Christine

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Guadeloupe retains more than its colonial and cultural roots from France. It has been an Overseas Department of that country since 1946. Many of the art-musical styles of Guadeloupe are derived from the ballroom and couple-dance traditions of old, reinvented in a creole tradition: quadrilles, waltzes, biguines and mazurkas (Gerstin, 2007-2011. Two of the most influential and consumed popular music genres are gwoka and compas. The Festival Internationale Saint-Georges, held annually since 2010, was created to celebrate the music of Saint-Georges, to promote artists of colour and to perform classical music written by composers of African descent, though the main focus of the festival is classical music.

  7. Art Music by Caribbean Composers: Guadeloupe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Gangelhoff

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Guadeloupe retains more than its colonial and cultural roots from France. It has been an Overseas Department of that country since 1946. Many of the art-musical styles of Guadeloupe are derived from the ballroom and couple-dance traditions of old, reinvented in a creole tradition: quadrilles, waltzes, biguines and mazurkas (Gerstin, 2007-2011. Two of the most influential and consumed popular music genres are gwoka and compas. The Festival Internationale Saint-Georges, held annually since 2010, was created to celebrate the music of Saint-Georges, to promote artists of colour and to perform classical music written by composers of African descent, though the main focus of the festival is classical music.

  8. Music engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Brice, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Music Engineering is a hands-on guide to the practical aspects of electric and electronic music. It is both a compelling read and an essential reference guide for anyone using, choosing, designing or studying the technology of modern music. The technology and underpinning science are introduced through the real life demands of playing and recording, and illustrated with references to well known classic recordings to show how a particular effect is obtained thanks to the ingenuity of the engineer as well as the musician. In addition, an accompanying companion website containing over 50 specially chosen tracks for download, provides practical demonstrations of the effects and techniques described in the book. Written by a music enthusiast and electronic engineer, this book covers the electronics and physics of the subject as well as the more subjective aspects. The second edition includes an updated Digital section including MPEG3 and fact sheets at the end of each chapter to summarise the key electronics and s...

  9. Music therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    alternate with clear and lucid mental states. These states are important as it is here that it is possible to meet the person’s psychosocial needs. Ketil Normann’s conceps of periods of lucidity are presented and connected to clinical music therapy practice and how it is possible to use music in order...... as a consequence of person-centred care. Umeå University Medical Dissertations. New Series. Ridder, H.M. (2005). Music therapy as a way to enhance lucidity in persons with dementia in advanced stages. In: Esch, A.; Frohne-Hagemann, I.; Laqua, M.; Schirmer, H.; Seitz, E. (Eds.) Jahrbuch Musicktherapie. Forschung...... und Entwicklung Music Therapy Annual. Research and Development. 2005 (1), pp. 25-40. Reichert Verlag Wiesbaden....

  10. Investigation of global and local network properties of music perception with culturally different styles of music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Rui, Xue; Li, Shuyu; Pu, Fang

    2014-11-01

    Graph theoretical analysis has recently become a popular research tool in neuroscience, however, there have been very few studies on brain responses to music perception, especially when culturally different styles of music are involved. Electroencephalograms were recorded from ten subjects listening to Chinese traditional music, light music and western classical music. For event-related potentials, phase coherence was calculated in the alpha band and then constructed into correlation matrices. Clustering coefficients and characteristic path lengths were evaluated for global properties, while clustering coefficients and efficiency were assessed for local network properties. Perception of light music and western classical music manifested small-world network properties, especially with a relatively low proportion of weights of correlation matrices. For local analysis, efficiency was more discernible than clustering coefficient. Nevertheless, there was no significant discrimination between Chinese traditional and western classical music perception. Perception of different styles of music introduces different network properties, both globally and locally. Research into both global and local network properties has been carried out in other areas; however, this is a preliminary investigation aimed at suggesting a possible new approach to brain network properties in music perception. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [The relations between music and medicine in history and present].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasenzer, E R; Neugebauer, E A M

    2011-12-01

    Since the ancient world relations exist between music and medicine. In the prehistoric music, dance, rhythm and religious practice were important parts of shamanism and early medical procedures. Important philosophers of the classic period already began with the scientific research of musical and medical questions. During the middle age convents conserved ancient knowledge. They offered medical care and taught the ancient knowledge of medicine, arts and music. The Gregorian choral was created. Traditions of popular believe expressed the relations between music and medicine. The Renaissance became the great époque of art, music and science. Leonardo da Vinci and Andreas Vesalius presented a new style of artistic working and scientific knowledge. Also the basics of western music, like tonality was developed. With the separation of scientific subjects in natural sciences and humanities, the relationships between music and medicine fall into oblivion. During the classic and romantic era music and art were important parts of cultural live of the well educated society. With the development of neurology, psychiatry and psychoanalysis more physicians and scientists were interested in musical questions. Questions about the role of music in human behavior and the ancient method to use music in medical treatment became popular. In the early 20th century the music therapy was developed. Today the effects of music to the human brain are investigated with radionuclear methods. A lot of investigations showed the effect of music and music performance to humans. Music plays an important part in psychotherapy, therapeutic pedagogy and medical care, the importance of music and music therapy increases. In the 80ies of the 20th century the performing arts medicine was developed, which asks for the medical problems of performing musicians. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Music and communication in music psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Cross, Ian Ralph

    2014-01-01

    There is a general consensus that music is both universal and communicative, and musical dialogue is a key element in much music-therapeutic practice. However, the idea that music is a communicative medium has, to date, received little attention within the cognitive sciences, and the limited amount of research that addresses how and what music communicates has resulted in findings that appear to be of limited relevance to music therapy. This paper will draw on ethnomusicological evidence and ...

  13. Music as EDAE: Implications for Music Therapy Nigeria | Aluede ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of music under social, political, apolitical, moral, amoral and religious circumstances in Africa is evidenced not just by the quality and quantity of the work done in this area of scholarship but, by the corpus of traditional songs whose texts, when critically examined lead us to important conclusions in forming opinions ...

  14. While the music lasts : on music and dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smilde, Rineke; Page, Kate; Alheit, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This book has been written for musicians who want to engage with audiences beyond the concert hall and other traditional venues. The study is equally worthwhile for conservatoires and music academies aiming to change the increasingly unrealistic goal of training young musicians solely for the stage.

  15. Polyphony in Iranian Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Massoudieh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Although Iranian regional music, like Iranian traditional[*] music, is basically monophonic and follows the rules of heterophony, we occasionally run across polyphonic pieces, although most have been unwittingly formed as such. This study shows that these polyphonic pieces could be found in the following forms: 1. The meeting of two vocal parts, where the second singer starts singing before the melody is completed by the first. 2. Imitations, as a result of singing the same melody by a few singers who consecutively start singing with some delay between their parts. 3. Simultaneous playing of variants of the same melody by two players (variant heterophony. 4. Changing between the soloist and the chorus (in the responsorial form or between one chorus and another (in an antiphoner[**] where a chorus begins the next part of the lyrics before the soloist or the other chorus is finished with their own part. 5. Polyphony resulting from the playing of a melody by a few singers where each singer sings the melody based on their own voice register depending on their physiological features. 6. Accompanying the first singer using alternate changes to the drone note or following the up-going or down-going movement of the melody in playing the tamira (in Lorestan, the dotār (in Khorasan and tamderā (in Turkman leads to the conscious parallelism of two voices. The radif of traditional music and the Iranian regional music, like those of other Middle East countries, is monophonic and follows the forms of heterophony; that is, the same melody is played and changed by two or more players. The change of a specific melody by two players, or a player and a singer, sometimes leads to the simultaneous playing of two different notes. Such an interference or combination of two sounds is a matter of heterophony, and by no means of harmony or accord. Interference of notes or combinations of notes in heterophony are not predictable. Since the melody is played extempore

  16. Musical examination to bridge audio data and sheet music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xunyu; Cross, Timothy J.; Xiao, Liangliang; Hei, Xiali

    2015-03-01

    The digitalization of audio is commonly implemented for the purpose of convenient storage and transmission of music and songs in today's digital age. Analyzing digital audio for an insightful look at a specific musical characteristic, however, can be quite challenging for various types of applications. Many existing musical analysis techniques can examine a particular piece of audio data. For example, the frequency of digital sound can be easily read and identified at a specific section in an audio file. Based on this information, we could determine the musical note being played at that instant, but what if you want to see a list of all the notes played in a song? While most existing methods help to provide information about a single piece of the audio data at a time, few of them can analyze the available audio file on a larger scale. The research conducted in this work considers how to further utilize the examination of audio data by storing more information from the original audio file. In practice, we develop a novel musical analysis system Musicians Aid to process musical representation and examination of audio data. Musicians Aid solves the previous problem by storing and analyzing the audio information as it reads it rather than tossing it aside. The system can provide professional musicians with an insightful look at the music they created and advance their understanding of their work. Amateur musicians could also benefit from using it solely for the purpose of obtaining feedback about a song they were attempting to play. By comparing our system's interpretation of traditional sheet music with their own playing, a musician could ensure what they played was correct. More specifically, the system could show them exactly where they went wrong and how to adjust their mistakes. In addition, the application could be extended over the Internet to allow users to play music with one another and then review the audio data they produced. This would be particularly

  17. Recorded Music and Graphic Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterer, Irv

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the history of art as an element of music-recording packaging. Describes a project in which students design a jacket for either cassette or CD using a combination of computerized and traditional rendering techniques. Reports that students have been inspired to look into careers in graphic design. (DSK)

  18. Introducing Group Theory through Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Craig M.

    2009-01-01

    The central ideas of postcalculus mathematics courses offered in college are difficult to introduce in middle and secondary schools, especially through the engineering and sciences examples traditionally used in algebra, geometry, and trigonometry textbooks. However, certain concepts in music theory can be used to expose students to interesting…

  19. Music etnopedagogycal in the context of Ivan Franco's scientific and popular studies

    OpenAIRE

    Myron Vovk; Volodymyr Savchuk

    2018-01-01

    On the bases of study, analyses and systematization of archival materials, folk tendencies of development of music ethnopedagogics in Ivan Franco's creation are revealed. Key words: creation, music, traditions, customs, folk pedagogics.

  20. Cognitive approaches to analysis of emotions in music listening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels Chr.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years research into music cognition and perception has increasingly gained territory. A fact which is not always realised by music theorists is that, from the perspective of cognitive psychology and empirical methodology, the representatives of the expanding field of cognitive music...... research frequently address questions and propose theoretical frameworks that ought to have implications for music theory of a more traditional kind. Yet, such cognitive theories and empirical findings have not had radical impact on general analytical practice and teaching of music theory. For theorists...... interested in musical meaning the emotional impact of music has always been a major concern. In this paper I will explore how multiple cognitive theories and empirical findings can be applied to account for emotional response to three subjectively chosen excerpts of strongly emotion-inducing music: Namely...

  1. Handling Japanese without a Japanese Operating System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatasa, Kazumi; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The Macintosh HyperCard environment has become a popular platform for Japanese language courseware because of its flexibility and ease of programing. This project created Japanese bitmap font files for the JIS Levels 1 and 2, and writing XFCNs for font manipulation, Japanese kana input, and answer correction. (12 references) (Author/LB)

  2. Analyzing Music Services Positioning Through Qualitative Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Cuadrado

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Information technologies have produced new ways of distributing and consuming music, mainly by youth, in relation to both goods and services. In the case of goods, there has been a dramatic shift from traditional ways of buying and listening to music to new digital platforms. There has also been an evolution in relation to music services. In this sense, live music concerts have been losing their audiences over the past few years, as have music radio stations, in favor of streaming platforms. Curious about this phenomenon, we conducted an exploratory research in order to analyze how all these services, both traditional and new ones were perceived. Specifically, we aimed to study youth´s assessment of the three most relevant music service categories: music radio stations, digital streaming platforms, and pop-rock music festivals. To do so, we used the projective technique of image association to gather information. The population of the study consisted of individuals between 18 and 25 years of age. Our results, after using content analysis, were poor due to spontaneous recall. Therefore, we duplicated the study, but in a more focus-oriented way. Information gathered this time allowed us not only to better know how all these organizations are positioned but also to obtain a list of descriptors to be used in a subsequent descriptive research study.

  3. Music, memory and emotion

    OpenAIRE

    J?ncke, Lutz

    2008-01-01

    Because emotions enhance memory processes and music evokes strong emotions, music could be involved in forming memories, either about pieces of music or about episodes and information associated with particular music. A recent study in BMC Neuroscience has given new insights into the role of emotion in musical memory. Music has a prominent role in the everyday life of many people. Whether it is for recreation, distraction or mood enhancement, a lot of people listen to music from early in t...

  4. Human Computer Music Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Dannenberg, Roger B.

    2012-01-01

    Human Computer Music Performance (HCMP) is the study of music performance by live human performers and real-time computer-based performers. One goal of HCMP is to create a highly autonomous artificial performer that can fill the role of a human, especially in a popular music setting. This will require advances in automated music listening and understanding, new representations for music, techniques for music synchronization, real-time human-computer communication, music generation, sound synt...

  5. Isawa Shuji, Nineteenth-Century Administrator and Music Educator in Japan and Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Sondra Wieland; Lai, Mei-Ling; Liou, Lin-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Isawa Shuji studied in the United States and made major contributions to the development of the music education in Japan and Taiwan. This paper provides a perspective of Isawa's activities based on sources in Japanese, Chinese, and English. Isawa was familiar with Western education and music before he went to the United States. In Massachusetts,…

  6. Variations on a theme : the role of music in Toni Morrison´s Jazz

    OpenAIRE

    Berre, Tone

    2008-01-01

    African American music and contemporary African American literature are connected both thematically and structurally. This thesis examines the various ways in which Toni Morrison draws on the cultural traditions of her ancestors, especially blues and jazz music, in creating her sixth novel, Jazz. My analysis includes the important contexts of the history and culture of black Americans from slavery and to the present. Slaves brought with them their traditions and music, out of which musical fo...

  7. Concepts of context in music therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolvsjord, Randi; Stige, Brynjulf

    2015-01-02

    In contemporary music therapy as well as in related interdisciplinary fields, the importance of context in relation to theory, research, and practice has been emphasized. However, the word context seems to be used in several different ways and conceptualizations of contextual approaches vary too. The objective of this theoretical article is to clarify traditions of language use in relation to context in music therapy. In reviewing and discussing the literature, we focus on the field of mental health care. When discussing issues related to context, this literature partly focuses on the surroundings of music therapy practice, partly on the ecology of reciprocal influences within and between situations or systems. On this basis, three types of context awareness in music therapy are identified: music therapy in context; music therapy as context; and music therapy as interacting contexts. The identified types of context awareness are exemplified through references to music therapy literature and then discussed in relation to two very different metaphors, namely context as frame and context as link. Implications for practice, research, and theory development in music therapy are suggested.

  8. Concepts of context in music therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolvsjord, Randi; Stige, Brynjulf

    2015-01-01

    In contemporary music therapy as well as in related interdisciplinary fields, the importance of context in relation to theory, research, and practice has been emphasized. However, the word context seems to be used in several different ways and conceptualizations of contextual approaches vary too. The objective of this theoretical article is to clarify traditions of language use in relation to context in music therapy. In reviewing and discussing the literature, we focus on the field of mental health care. When discussing issues related to context, this literature partly focuses on the surroundings of music therapy practice, partly on the ecology of reciprocal influences within and between situations or systems. On this basis, three types of context awareness in music therapy are identified: music therapy in context; music therapy as context; and music therapy as interacting contexts. The identified types of context awareness are exemplified through references to music therapy literature and then discussed in relation to two very different metaphors, namely context as frame and context as link. Implications for practice, research, and theory development in music therapy are suggested. PMID:26157199

  9. Music and speech prosody: a common rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausen, Maija; Torppa, Ritva; Salmela, Viljami R; Vainio, Martti; Särkämö, Teppo

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of music and speech perception, known as amusia and aphasia, have traditionally been regarded as dissociated deficits based on studies of brain damaged patients. This has been taken as evidence that music and speech are perceived by largely separate and independent networks in the brain. However, recent studies of congenital amusia have broadened this view by showing that the deficit is associated with problems in perceiving speech prosody, especially intonation and emotional prosody. In the present study the association between the perception of music and speech prosody was investigated with healthy Finnish adults (n = 61) using an on-line music perception test including the Scale subtest of Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA) and Off-Beat and Out-of-key tasks as well as a prosodic verbal task that measures the perception of word stress. Regression analyses showed that there was a clear association between prosody perception and music perception, especially in the domain of rhythm perception. This association was evident after controlling for music education, age, pitch perception, visuospatial perception, and working memory. Pitch perception was significantly associated with music perception but not with prosody perception. The association between music perception and visuospatial perception (measured using analogous tasks) was less clear. Overall, the pattern of results indicates that there is a robust link between music and speech perception and that this link can be mediated by rhythmic cues (time and stress).

  10. Music and speech prosody: A common rhythm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maija eHausen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Disorders of music and speech perception, known as amusia and aphasia, have traditionally been regarded as dissociated deficits based on studies of brain damaged patients. This has been taken as evidence that music and speech are perceived by largely separate and independent networks in the brain. However, recent studies of congenital amusia have broadened this view by showing that the deficit is associated with problems in perceiving speech prosody, especially intonation and emotional prosody. In the present study the association between the perception of music and speech prosody was investigated with healthy Finnish adults (n = 61 using an on-line music perception test including the Scale subtest of Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA and Off-Beat and Out-of-key tasks as well as a prosodic verbal task that measures the perception of word stress. Regression analyses showed that there was a clear association between prosody perception and music perception, especially in the domain of rhythm perception. This association was evident after controlling for music education, age, pitch perception, visuospatial perception and working memory. Pitch perception was significantly associated with music perception but not with prosody perception. The association between music perception and visuospatial perception (measured using analogous tasks was less clear. Overall, the pattern of results indicates that there is a robust link between music and speech perception and that this link can be mediated by rhythmic cues (time and stress.

  11. Music and speech prosody: a common rhythm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausen, Maija; Torppa, Ritva; Salmela, Viljami R.; Vainio, Martti; Särkämö, Teppo

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of music and speech perception, known as amusia and aphasia, have traditionally been regarded as dissociated deficits based on studies of brain damaged patients. This has been taken as evidence that music and speech are perceived by largely separate and independent networks in the brain. However, recent studies of congenital amusia have broadened this view by showing that the deficit is associated with problems in perceiving speech prosody, especially intonation and emotional prosody. In the present study the association between the perception of music and speech prosody was investigated with healthy Finnish adults (n = 61) using an on-line music perception test including the Scale subtest of Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA) and Off-Beat and Out-of-key tasks as well as a prosodic verbal task that measures the perception of word stress. Regression analyses showed that there was a clear association between prosody perception and music perception, especially in the domain of rhythm perception. This association was evident after controlling for music education, age, pitch perception, visuospatial perception, and working memory. Pitch perception was significantly associated with music perception but not with prosody perception. The association between music perception and visuospatial perception (measured using analogous tasks) was less clear. Overall, the pattern of results indicates that there is a robust link between music and speech perception and that this link can be mediated by rhythmic cues (time and stress). PMID:24032022

  12. Music Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Music Club

    2011-01-01

    MUSIC ON THE LAWN 2011 As part of the Fete de la Musique 2011, the CERN MusiClub is organizing Music on the Lawn, an informal concert for Club musicians/bands. The event will take place from 14h00 to 20h00 on Saturday 25th June on the terrace of restaurant no 1. This year 8 MusiClub bands will be performing… WOT Home Cookin’ Picture Flame DANGLERZ The Nearlies RISE A Drop of Red The Groovy Gang So put the date in your diaries and spend a sunny afternoon listening to some great live music (and unlike Paleo and Montreux it’s FREE!!!!) For more information on the CERN MusiClub see http://muzipod.free.fr/  

  13. Style in Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannenberg, Roger B.

    Because music is not objectively descriptive or representational, the subjective qualities of music seem to be most important. Style is one of the most salient qualities of music, and in fact most descriptions of music refer to some aspect of musical style. Style in music can refer to historical periods, composers, performers, sonic texture, emotion, and genre. In recent years, many aspects of music style have been studied from the standpoint of automation: How can musical style be recognized and synthesized? An introduction to musical style describes ways in which style is characterized by composers and music theorists. Examples are then given where musical style is the focal point for computer models of music analysis and music generation.

  14. The Future of Japanese Nationalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    cultural heritage that is the legacy of their ancestors and the source of their amour propre. The controversy in 1982 over the revision of high school social ...elites, particularly the .J bureaucracy; 3) it was created by the manipulation of LL- traditional cultural symbols; 4j) it had its social basis in the... responsibility during the remainder of this century. They have a swelling self-confidence but a weak sense of Japanese identity. Having no memory of war

  15. Sonidos de un Chile profundo: Hacia un análisis crítico del Archivo Sonoro de Música Tradicional Chilena en relación a la conformación del folclore en Chile Sounds from the Depth of Chile: Toward a Critical Analysis of the Sound Archive of Chilean Traditional Music as regards the establishing of Folklore in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana León Villagra

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available La revisión del proceso de rescate patrimonial del Archivo Sonoro de Música Tradicional permite criticar los conceptos de patrimonio e identidad pertinentes, a la luz de la actual situación de las músicas locales y tradicionales en el contexto globalizado de las tecnologías digitales. Según esta perspectiva, es necesario recrear la historia del desarrollismo cultural chileno de la década de los 40 y de los 50, mediante el análisis de la construcción de la identidad nacional bajo el concepto de folclore. Al poner en valor estas músicas y sonoridades tradicionales, fortalecemos la presencia de las identidades locales en la cultura chilena, destacando su importancia para una democratización real de las políticas culturales del estado.The process of rescueing from destruction the patrimonial legacy contained in the Sound Archive of Chilean Traditional Music serves as a basis for a critical review of the concepts of identity and patrimony within the current situation of traditional and local musics in the worldwide context of digital technologies. According to this perspective, it is necessary to review the history of the Chilean cultural development of the 40's and 50's, focusing on the construction of a national identity based on the concept of folklore. Ifthe value of these traditional musics and sounds is brought to light it is possible to strengthen the presence of local identities in the Chilean culture, thus emphasizing their importance for cultural state policies aiming to be truly democratic.

  16. Music, memory and emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäncke, Lutz

    2008-01-01

    Because emotions enhance memory processes and music evokes strong emotions, music could be involved in forming memories, either about pieces of music or about episodes and information associated with particular music. A recent study in BMC Neuroscience has given new insights into the role of emotion in musical memory. PMID:18710596

  17. We "Are" Musical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Graham F.

    2005-01-01

    The challenge for music education is to nurture and develop each individual's basic musicality. Assuming normal neurological functioning and development, we are all musical. Our musical development begins pre-birth, with musical behaviours in one form or another being evident across the lifespan. Nevertheless, early enculturation can both foster…

  18. Music, memory and emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäncke, Lutz

    2008-08-08

    Because emotions enhance memory processes and music evokes strong emotions, music could be involved in forming memories, either about pieces of music or about episodes and information associated with particular music. A recent study in BMC Neuroscience has given new insights into the role of emotion in musical memory.

  19. Educating the Music User

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    To better serve students' evolving needs in music, music educators must connect classroom learning with how students use and interact with music in their daily lives. One way to accomplish this is by approaching classrooms with the music user in mind, which can open new possibilities for meaningful music making and remove students from the…

  20. How musical are music video game players?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasinski, Amanda C; Hannon, Erin E; Snyder, Joel S

    2016-10-01

    Numerous studies have shown that formal musical training is associated with sensory, motor, and cognitive advantages in individuals of various ages. However, the nature of the observed differences between musicians and nonmusicians is poorly understood, and little is known about the listening skills of individuals who engage in alternative types of everyday musical activities. Here, we show that people who have frequently played music video games outperform nonmusicians controls on a battery of music perception tests. These findings reveal that enhanced musical aptitude can be found among individuals who play music video games, raising the possibility that music video games could potentially enhance music perception skills in individuals across a broad spectrum of society who are otherwise unable to invest the time and/or money required to learn a musical instrument.

  1. American Music Therapy Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login Quick Links Facts About Music Therapy Qualifications ... with AMTA Sponsor AMTA Events Social Networking Support Music Therapy When you shop at AmazonSmile, Amazon will ...

  2. Young people's topography of musical functions: personal, social and cultural experiences with music across genders and six societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boer, Diana; Fischer, Ronald; Tekman, Hasan Gürkan; Abubakar, Amina; Njenga, Jane; Zenger, Markus

    2012-01-01

    How can we understand the uses of music in daily life? Music is a universal phenomenon but with significant interindividual and cultural variability. Listeners' gender and cultural background may influence how and why music is used in daily life. This paper reports the first investigation of a holistic framework and a new measure of music functions (RESPECT-music) across genders and six diverse cultural samples (students from Germany, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines, and Turkey). Two dimensions underlie the mental representation of music functions. First, music can be used for contemplation or affective functions. Second, music can serve intrapersonal, social, and sociocultural functions. Results reveal that gender differences occur for affective functions, indicating that female listeners use music more for affective functions, i.e., emotional expression, dancing, and cultural identity. Country differences are moderate for social functions (values, social bonding, dancing) and strongest for sociocultural function (cultural identity, family bonding, political attitudes). Cultural values, such as individualism-collectivism and secularism-traditionalism, can help explain cross-cultural differences in the uses of music. Listeners from more collectivistic cultures use music more frequently for expressing values and cultural identity. Listeners from more secular and individualistic cultures like to dance more. Listeners from more traditional cultures use music more for expressing values and cultural identity, and they bond more frequently with their families over music. The two dimensions of musical functions seem systematically underpinned by listeners' gender and cultural background. We discuss the uses of music as behavioral expressions of affective and contemplative as well as personal, social, and sociocultural aspects in terms of affect proneness and cultural values.

  3. Music therapy in kindergarten

    OpenAIRE

    Šírová, Michaela

    2017-01-01

    This work deals with the subject of music therapy in a special kindergarten for the children with combined disabilities. In the theoretical part it clarifies the concept and principle of music therapy and characterizes the types of disabilities that occur at researched clients. As a research method were used observation and interviews with three music therapists from the institution. KEYWORDS Music therapy, preschool education, special pedagogy, group music therapy,individual music therapy, p...

  4. Symmetry in music

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrero, O F, E-mail: o.f.herrero@hotmail.co [Conservatorio Superior de Musica ' Eduardo Martinez Torner' Corrada del Obispo s/n 33003 - Oviedo - Asturias (Spain)

    2010-06-01

    Music and Physics are very close because of the symmetry that appears in music. A periodic wave is what music really is, and there is a field of Physics devoted to waves researching. The different musical scales are the base of all kind of music. This article tries to show how this musical scales are made, how the consonance is the base of many of them and how symmetric they are.

  5. Symmetry in music

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrero, O F

    2010-01-01

    Music and Physics are very close because of the symmetry that appears in music. A periodic wave is what music really is, and there is a field of Physics devoted to waves researching. The different musical scales are the base of all kind of music. This article tries to show how this musical scales are made, how the consonance is the base of many of them and how symmetric they are.

  6. The complexity of classical music networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolla, Vitor; Kestenberg, Juliano; Velho, Luiz

    2018-02-01

    Previous works suggest that musical networks often present the scale-free and the small-world properties. From a musician's perspective, the most important aspect missing in those studies was harmony. In addition to that, the previous works made use of outdated statistical methods. Traditionally, least-squares linear regression is utilised to fit a power law to a given data set. However, according to Clauset et al. such a traditional method can produce inaccurate estimates for the power law exponent. In this paper, we present an analysis of musical networks which considers the existence of chords (an essential element of harmony). Here we show that only 52.5% of music in our database presents the scale-free property, while 62.5% of those pieces present the small-world property. Previous works argue that music is highly scale-free; consequently, it sounds appealing and coherent. In contrast, our results show that not all pieces of music present the scale-free and the small-world properties. In summary, this research is focused on the relationship between musical notes (Do, Re, Mi, Fa, Sol, La, Si, and their sharps) and accompaniment in classical music compositions. More information about this research project is available at https://eden.dei.uc.pt/~vitorgr/MS.html.

  7. ['Sensus Intellectualis': Pietro de Abano's musical thoughts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanni, Matteo

    2008-01-01

    With the discovery of the Aristotelian works on "natural philosophy" the philosophical discourse expands its subject of study to the physical and material dimension of men's nature. This philosophical tendency would also influence the reflections on musical topics. This paper shows how the physiological and physical view of the human being had influenced the theory of music. From a terminological and a conceptual perspective Pietro de Abano moves away from the Boethian authority. Comparing the musical theory of Pietro de Abano with the traditional "musica theorica" it becomes evident that there is no opposition between sensitiveness and intellect.

  8. Audio-based deep music emotion recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong; Han, Li; Ma, Liangkai; Guo, Dongwei

    2018-05-01

    As the rapid development of multimedia networking, more and more songs are issued through the Internet and stored in large digital music libraries. However, music information retrieval on these libraries can be really hard, and the recognition of musical emotion is especially challenging. In this paper, we report a strategy to recognize the emotion contained in songs by classifying their spectrograms, which contain both the time and frequency information, with a convolutional neural network (CNN). The experiments conducted on the l000-song dataset indicate that the proposed model outperforms traditional machine learning method.

  9. Mobile radiography at a music festival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, A; Brenchley, J; Hughes, N

    2009-08-01

    Limb injuries are common at music festival sites and traditionally patients seen by on-site medical services require referral to hospital emergency departments for radiographic exclusion of bony injury. This takes clinical personnel off site, increases demand on local emergency departments and is inconvenient for revellers. This is an audit of the use of a portable digital radiography system at the Virgin music festival in Staffordshire over a 3-year period.

  10. Concepts of context in music therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Rolvsjord, Randi; Stige, Brynjulf

    2013-01-01

    In contemporary music therapy as well as in related interdisciplinary fields, the importance of context in relation to theory, research, and practice has been emphasized. However, the word context seems to be used in several different ways and conceptualizations of contextual approaches vary too. The objective of this theoretical article is to clarify traditions of language use in relation to context in music therapy. In reviewing and discussing the literature, we focus on t...

  11. Chimpanzees prefer African and Indian music over silence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingle, Morgan E; Eppley, Timothy M; Campbell, Matthew W; Hall, Katie; Horner, Victoria; de Waal, Frans B M

    2014-10-01

    [Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 40(4) of Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Learning and Cognition (see record 2014-35305-001). For the article, the below files were used to create the audio used in this study. The original West African akan and North Indian raga pieces were used in their entirety and the Japanese taiko piece was used from the 0:19 second mark through the end. The tempo of each piece was adjusted so that they maintained an identical base tempo of 90 beats per minute, then looped to create 40 minutes of continuous music. Additionally, the volume of the music was standardized at 50 dB so that the all music maintained the same average amplitude. All audio manipulations were completed using GarageBand © (Apple Inc.).] All primates have an ability to distinguish between temporal and melodic features of music, but unlike humans, in previous studies, nonhuman primates have not demonstrated a preference for music. However, previous research has not tested the wide range of acoustic parameters present in many different types of world music. The purpose of the present study is to determine the spontaneous preference of common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) for 3 acoustically contrasting types of world music: West African akan, North Indian raga, and Japanese taiko. Sixteen chimpanzees housed in 2 groups were exposed to 40 min of music from a speaker placed 1.5 m outside the fence of their outdoor enclosure; the proximity of each subject to the acoustic stimulus was recorded every 2 min. When compared with controls, subjects spent significantly more time in areas where the acoustic stimulus was loudest in African and Indian music conditions. This preference for African and Indian music could indicate homologies in acoustic preferences between nonhuman and human primates. .

  12. Portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer system containing a low-level radioisotope and its application to the non-destructive analysis of inorganic colorants used for the traditional Japanese votive picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimoyama, Susumu; Noda, Yasuko

    2000-01-01

    A portable RI X-ray fluorescence spectrometer having a weight of 1800 g was constructed by using a radiation annular source ( 241 Am sealed up with ceramics, 1.85 MBq), a small Si-PIN photodiode X-ray detector mounted on a Peltier cooling device, an amplifier and a pocket-type multi-channel pulse-height analyzer. It could also be applied to a non-destructive analysis of the blue colorant in the original Japanese votive picture 'Rashoumon-zu', offered to shrine in 1682. Consequently, it was clarified that the blue colorant (X) was 'Smalt' containing Ga, Fe, Co, Ni and As as major elements. (author)

  13. An abstract approach to music.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaper, H. G.; Tipei, S.

    1999-04-19

    In this article we have outlined a formal framework for an abstract approach to music and music composition. The model is formulated in terms of objects that have attributes, obey relationships, and are subject to certain well-defined operations. The motivation for this approach uses traditional terms and concepts of music theory, but the approach itself is formal and uses the language of mathematics. The universal object is an audio wave; partials, sounds, and compositions are special objects, which are placed in a hierarchical order based on time scales. The objects have both static and dynamic attributes. When we realize a composition, we assign values to each of its attributes: a (scalar) value to a static attribute, an envelope and a size to a dynamic attribute. A composition is then a trajectory in the space of aural events, and the complex audio wave is its formal representation. Sounds are fibers in the space of aural events, from which the composer weaves the trajectory of a composition. Each sound object in turn is made up of partials, which are the elementary building blocks of any music composition. The partials evolve on the fastest time scale in the hierarchy of partials, sounds, and compositions. The ideas outlined in this article are being implemented in a digital instrument for additive sound synthesis and in software for music composition. A demonstration of some preliminary results has been submitted by the authors for presentation at the conference.

  14. Music and Music Intervention for Therapeutic Purposes in Patients with Ventilator Support; Gamelan Music Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Suhartini Suhartini

    2011-01-01

    Background: Gamelan music is one of folk music for Javanese people. Several research studies testing the effects of music were conducted in Western countries. The music studies for therapeutic purposes used classical music commonly. Even in Indonesia, some researchers may use that music for therapeutic purposes. This concern article explains the perspective music and music intervention as therapeutic purposes, view with Javanese classical music.Objectives: To explore the evidence of music and...

  15. Tanko Bushi: Designing a Japanese-American Dance Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeting, Terry; Werner, Peter; Williams, Lori H.; Crump, Alyssa

    2012-01-01

    Many folk dances reflect the everyday activities of the people, celebrating the commonplace through physical forms of expression. The traditional Japanese folk dance, Tanko Bushi, is still performed in Japan and among Japanese-Americans today, and its theme of coal mining makes it relatable to many cultures around the world. With its traditional…

  16. Singing Well-Becoming: Student Musical Therapy Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphey, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Much research supports the everyday therapeutic and deeper social-neurophysiological influence of singing songs alone and in groups (Austin, 2008; Cozolino, 2013; Sacks, 2007). This study looks at what happens when Japanese students teach short English affirmation songlet-routines to others out of the classroom (clandestine folk music therapy). I…

  17. Communicative Musicality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Ulla

    2010-01-01

    university, Stephen Malloch listened to tapes of mothers and their babies ‘chatting’ with each other, recorded by Trevarthen in the 70’s. One of the first tapes was the vocal interaction of Laura and her mother. “As I listened, intrigued by the fluid give and take of the communication, and the lilting speech...... of the mother as she chatted with her baby, I began to tap my foot. I am, by training, a musician, so I was very used to automatically feeling the beat as I listened to musical sounds.… I replaced the tape, and again, I could sense a distinct rhythmicity and melodious give and take to the gentle prompting...... therapy as purely protomusic. But with Malloch & Trevarthen’s focus on musicality as the innate human abilities that make music production and appreciation possible, this discussion can easily move on. These and many other essential discussions await us – thanks to this comprehensive – and demanding...

  18. Stakeholder involvement - a japanese perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, S.

    2004-01-01

    Traditional societal and cultural background of Japanese in general indicates the intrinsic difficulty in involving the public as stakeholders in the process of any type of decision making in policy matters. It is characterized by the long-taught virtue of harmonization and obedience to others. In addition, characteristic system of Japanese traditional industrial society, such as lifetime employment, seniority-based wage system, and enterprise-based labour union, encourages the loyalty to the employer/company, but not to the public. The public or ordinary citizens would seldom come out as stakeholders and express their true feelings or real opinions, even though younger generation is notably getting out from such a trend. On the other hand, it is a common practice in Japanese society for any business or administrative transactions to try to obtain 'consensus' among relevant parties concerned (stakeholders) by negotiations behind the curtain prior to the formal discussion. In this sense, 'stakeholders involvement' is accepted and practised as a matter of course, but mostly for actions between parties of equivalently influential status levels or between 'directly relevant' parties such as those between the different government agencies, between regulators and industries. The concept of 'Involving the public in decision making as stakeholders' is not yet fully understood nor accepted in Japan both by regulators and by the public so far as the issue of radiation protection is concerned. These situations are explained with some examples. (author)

  19. Musics, Cultures and Meanings: Music as Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Cross

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This commentary explores interpretations of concepts that lie at the focus of Richard Widdess's paper—"music", and "culture"—with the aim of specifying frameworks within which issues of musical meaning can fruitfully be addressed.

  20. Musical intervention enhances infants' neural processing of temporal structure in music and speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T Christina; Kuhl, Patricia K

    2016-05-10

    Individuals with music training in early childhood show enhanced processing of musical sounds, an effect that generalizes to speech processing. However, the conclusions drawn from previous studies are limited due to the possible confounds of predisposition and other factors affecting musicians and nonmusicians. We used a randomized design to test the effects of a laboratory-controlled music intervention on young infants' neural processing of music and speech. Nine-month-old infants were randomly assigned to music (intervention) or play (control) activities for 12 sessions. The intervention targeted temporal structure learning using triple meter in music (e.g., waltz), which is difficult for infants, and it incorporated key characteristics of typical infant music classes to maximize learning (e.g., multimodal, social, and repetitive experiences). Controls had similar multimodal, social, repetitive play, but without music. Upon completion, infants' neural processing of temporal structure was tested in both music (tones in triple meter) and speech (foreign syllable structure). Infants' neural processing was quantified by the mismatch response (MMR) measured with a traditional oddball paradigm using magnetoencephalography (MEG). The intervention group exhibited significantly larger MMRs in response to music temporal structure violations in both auditory and prefrontal cortical regions. Identical results were obtained for temporal structure changes in speech. The intervention thus enhanced temporal structure processing not only in music, but also in speech, at 9 mo of age. We argue that the intervention enhanced infants' ability to extract temporal structure information and to predict future events in time, a skill affecting both music and speech processing.

  1. The dilemma for Japanese students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The Japanese job hunting system inhibits Japanese students from studying abroad. A Japanese professor says it is a huge dilemma for the students.......The Japanese job hunting system inhibits Japanese students from studying abroad. A Japanese professor says it is a huge dilemma for the students....

  2. Music as word: Film music - superlibretto?

    OpenAIRE

    Ćirić Marija

    2013-01-01

    The aim of his paper is to prove that film music can be understood as authentic narrative force: film music as word / discourse and its superlibretto status. Superlibretto is the status of music in a film which is constructing its own (aural) reality and is narrating, speaking its own text which creates a wholesome film meaning. The existence of superlibretto is substantiated by fundamental theoretic concepts of film music and practically proven by analyses...

  3. 3 CFR 8389 - Proclamation 8389 of June 2, 2009. African-American Music Appreciation Month, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... music tradition also reflects creativity and individualism. Blues, jazz, soul, and rock and roll... periods in our Nation’s history. Years later, spirituals contributed to the advent of a new form of music... Appreciation Month, we recall the known and unknown musicians who helped create this musical history. Their...

  4. A Comparative Study of Music Education in Shanghai and Taipei: Westernization and Nationalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai-Chung, Ho

    2004-01-01

    This study compares the music taught and its associated cultural values in Shanghai and Taipei primary and secondary schools. Both owe their cultural ascendancy to traditional Chinese music and western musicology. How do the music education systems of these two Chinese communities reflect their respective public cultures and political ideologies?…

  5. Cracking the Rhythm Codes in the Music of the Lumko District ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rhythm systems in traditional Xhosa music have long baffled musicologists. When the author began to work with African church music at Lumko Institute in the late 1970s he undertook to study the music of the local people, who are Thembu Xhosa. With the help of Andrew Tracey he set out to try to 'crack' the rhythmic ...

  6. A Knowledge-Based Tutor for Music Composition. CITE Report No. 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Simon

    The work described here forms part of a project using models of musical ideas within an artificial intelligence and education framework whose goal is to encourage and facilitate music composition by novices. Formal knowledge of the domain (popular music) is too incomplete and fragmented to support a traditional expert-based tutor for precisely…

  7. "It Makes You Think Anything Is Possible": Representing Diversity in Music Theory Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Robert; Lupton, Mandy

    2016-01-01

    This paper critiques a traditional approach to music theory pedagogy. It argues that music theory courses should draw on pedagogies that reflect the diversity and pluralism inherent in 21st century music making. It presents the findings of an action research project investigating the experiences of undergraduate students undertaking an innovative…

  8. What Is Right? What Is Wrong?: Music Education in a World of Pluralism and Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolle, Christian

    2017-01-01

    We are living in a time of social and cultural changes. As in other disciplines, the foundations of music education are being increasingly challenged. Thus, it is no longer possible to specify reliably the aims and contents of music education and their implementation in school by simply basing them on lasting musical traditions and changeless…

  9. Investigating Musical Performance: Commonality and Diversity among Classical and Non-Classical Musicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creech, Andrea; Papageorgi, Ioulia; Duffy, Celia; Morton, Frances; Hadden, Elizabeth; Potter, John; De Bezenac, Christophe; Whyton, Tony; Himonides, Evangelos; Welch, Graham

    2008-01-01

    The research project "Investigating Musical Performance: Comparative Studies in Advanced Musical Learning" was devised to investigate how classical, popular, jazz and Scottish traditional musicians deepen and develop their learning about performance in undergraduate, postgraduate and wider music community contexts. The aim of this paper is to…

  10. The Japanese Mind: Understanding Contemporary Japanese Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Roger J., Ed.; Ikeno, Osamu, Ed.

    This collection of essays offers an overview of contemporary Japanese culture, and can serve as a resource for classes studying Japan. The 28 essays offer an informative, accessible look at the values, attitudes, behavior patterns, and communication styles of modern Japan from the unique perspective of the Japanese people. Filled with examples…

  11. Music Making, Transcendence, Flow, and Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Rhoda

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between flow, transcendent music making experiences, transcendent religious experiences, and music education. As a teacher-researcher, I studied my graduate students' autobiographical accounts of their experiences making music. Across these narrative writings produced over the past four years, a pattern…

  12. THE PERFORMANCE PRACTICE IN AYELE MUSIC AND DANCE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. This paper focuses on Ayele music and dance of the Unuwazi village in Uromi, Esan North East Local Government Area of Edo State. It examines the term Ayele, its tradition of origin, its musical instruments, context of performance and performance practices. So as to be able to elicit data from the field, ...

  13. Re-Setting Music Education's "Default Settings"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regelski, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the effects and problems of one highly influential default setting of the "normal style template" of music education and proposes some alternatives. These do not require abandoning all traditional templates for school music. But re-setting the default settings does depend on reconsidering the promised function of…

  14. Perceptions and Predictions of Expertise in Advanced Musical Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgi, Ioulia; Creech, Andrea; Haddon, Elizabeth; Morton, Frances; De Bezenac, Christophe; Himonides, Evangelos; Potter, John; Duffy, Celia; Whyton, Tony; Welch, Graham

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article was to compare musicians' views on (a) the importance of musical skills and (b) the nature of expertise. Data were obtained from a specially devised web-based questionnaire completed by advanced musicians representing four musical genres (classical, popular, jazz, Scottish traditional) and varying degrees of professional…

  15. Towards an Epistemology of Authenticity in Higher Popular Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Tom; Smith, Gareth Dylan

    2015-01-01

    Popular music education is becoming firmly established as an academic field, in the UK and internationally. In order to help ensure that scholarship and practice within the field develop in reflexive and ethical ways appropriate to particular traditions, musics, people and institutional contexts, the authors advocate a discursive and iterative…

  16. Perpetuating Nigerian Cultures in Musical Arts Education within the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our inadequacies in playing or singing our indigenous music and inability to identify the folk taxonomies of our traditional musical instruments are glaring. Research conducted in selected Primary Schools in Anambra State, Nigeria over a period of five years (2003 – 2008) has proved that the Nigerian child still has the ...

  17. Six Functions of Conducting: A New Foundation for Music Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumm, Alan J.

    2012-01-01

    This article poses six functions of conducting as a new foundation for music educators. Two traditional functions focus on music: the mechanical precision function indicates beat, tempo, meter, rhythm, cues, entrances and cutoff releases, and the expressive function indicates dynamics and other expressive characteristics interpreted in a score.…

  18. Multicultural Choral Music Pedagogy Based on the Facets Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hyesoo

    2017-01-01

    Multicultural choral music has distinct characteristics in that indigenous folk elements are frequently incorporated into a Western European tonal system. Because of this, multicultural choral music is often taught using Western styles (e.g., "bel canto") rather than through traditional singing techniques from their cultures of origin.…

  19. Potential Contributions of Music Education to Peacebuilding: Curricular Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the potential role of music education in peacebuilding, specifically concentrating on issues of structural, indirect violence often unwittingly perpetuated through Eurocentric music curricula. I point out that such violence occurs not only in curricula that represent only European classical traditions, but moreover in…

  20. Conceptions of Musical Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallam, Susan; Papageorgi, Ioulia

    2016-01-01

    Music can be understood in many ways. This has important implications for music education. The research reported here explored how groups of people conceptualise musical understanding and what they believe supports its acquisition. In this study 463 participants completed two statements: "Musical understanding is" and "You learn to…

  1. Music You Can See

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Shannon Sweny

    2012-01-01

    Children of all ages love painting to music. Aside from discovering the natural correlation between music and art, the author's students learned about Mozart's life and work in music class. In this article, students discover the influence that music can have on their art. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  2. Music and Health Promotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    Thematic analysis of 13 personal narratives on the meaning of music in the life of 13 contributing authors to the book "Musical Life Stories"......Thematic analysis of 13 personal narratives on the meaning of music in the life of 13 contributing authors to the book "Musical Life Stories"...

  3. Music Listening Is Creative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratus, John

    2017-01-01

    Active music listening is a creative activity in that the listener constructs a uniquely personal musical experience. Most approaches to teaching music listening emphasize a conceptual approach in which students learn to identify various characteristics of musical sound. Unfortunately, this type of listening is rarely done outside of schools. This…

  4. Supporting Music Teacher Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaffini, Erin Dineen

    2015-01-01

    While much discussion and research is focused on the importance of music teacher mentors for preservice teachers and novice in-service music educators, little discussion has been devoted to the topic of how we, as members of the music education profession, can support the role of music teacher mentors. This article explores some of the benefits…

  5. Montessori and Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Elise Braun

    1999-01-01

    Discusses principles of Montessori music education, examining the fundamental characteristics of childhood and the role that music plays in development. Explores the inner satisfaction that comes from experiencing movement with music through compositions and folk music. Emphasizes the Montessori practices of meeting sensorimotor needs of children…

  6. Japanese fences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitri Malko

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In Japan, there is an inclination towards obscuring the demarcation between the private and the public space. The high palisades surrounding “skya” style constructions enclose the gardens where the low fences line the vegetation.In the religious domain, the palisades that separate the sacred space from the secular space, called “tama-gaki”, are found neighbouring “koran” style fences.Stone can sometimes be used as part or only component of the barrier.The barriers and palisades in Japan are utilized to hide the buildings and gardens from the public space, but they stay entirely as art works in which the carpenters of the archipelago put sense of aesthetic and tradition, preserving the privacy, harmony of the landscape and calm.

  7. Persian music meets West

    OpenAIRE

    Ardalan, Afshin

    2012-01-01

    I have based my bachelor Thesis on the presentation of a completely different musical world, compared with the western musical world, which is Persian Music. As a Persian, I started to study music as a Persian Setar player; then I followed my musical experience through western classical music by playing classical guitar. As an ambition I have always thought about how to express Persian music in an understandable way for that of non-Persians. In this thesis I began with a short history of Pers...

  8. Music retrieval in ICOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterle, Lutz; Fischer, Stephan; Rimac, Ivica; Steinmetz, Ralf

    1999-08-01

    In this paper we describe music retrieval in ICOR, a project of Darmstadt TU. It is the goal of ICOR to find new interfaces to support applications of music video and music CDs. Although the project consists of audio and video analysis we concentrate on a description of the audio algorithms in this paper. We describe our MPEG-7 like data structure to store meta information for music pieces and explain which algorithms we use to analyze the content of music pieces automatically. We currently use an applause detection to distinguish live music from studio recordings, a genre classifier to distinguish pieces with beats form classical music, and a singer recognition.

  9. The role of music in music education research : reflections on musical experience

    OpenAIRE

    Varkøy, Øivind

    2009-01-01

    First in this article the role of theories of musicology in music education research is considered. Second, the case in point is examined where the focus of music education research is brought bo bear directly on music education, to wit music. By concentrating on music in music education research, the focus remains firmly on musical experience as a basis of reflection in music education research. The author has chosen to focus in particular on a specific kind of musical experience - more p...

  10. "Two Souls, Alas, Reside within My Breast": Reflections on German and American Music Education Regarding the Internationalization of Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertz-Welzel, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the internationalization of music education has become an important topic. Scholars of various research traditions try to find the best solutions for problems in music education theory and practice by taking a look at what other countries do. English as common language seems to facilitate this recent development. However, in spite…

  11. Music therapy improvisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Kuzma

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the technique of music therapy – music therapy improvisation is introduced. In this form of music therapy the improvising partners share meaning through the improvisation: the improvisation is not an end in itself: it portrays meaning that is personal, complex and can be shared with the partner. The therapeutic work, then, is meeting and matching the client's music in order to give the client an experience of "being known", being responded through sounds and being able to express things and communicate meaningfully. Rather than the client playing music, the therapy is about developing the engagement through sustained, joint improvisations. In music therapy, music and emotion share fundamental features: one may represent the other, i.e., we hear the music not as music but as dynamic emotional states. The concept of dynamic structure explains why music makes therapeutic sense.

  12. INTRODUCTION TOTHE RUSSIAN MUSIC CULTURE AS A WAY OF CHINESE MUSIC TEACHERS TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. G. Таgiltseva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Article purpose – to open the ways of introduction of the Chinese students who are trained in Chinese pedagogical higher education institutions to musical culture of Russia.Methods. The paper is based on ideas of extrapolation of the Russian and Chinese teachers about interrelation of arts and types of art activity of children in the process of vocational performing cello training of future music teachers at pedagogical universities of China; the traditional methods and means of music education that proved the efficiency in pedagogics of professional music education in Russia. The research methods involve the analysis, generalization of literature, the analysis of a condition of modern process of professional pedagogical education of future music teachers at universities of China and Russia.Results: The methods and means of introduction of the Chinese students – future music teachers to cello musical culture of Russia are shown on the basis of interrelation of arts and different means of art activities, and mastering at cello fingering techniques. It is noted that such means and ways serve mutual enrichment of national cultures, and strengthening of international relations.Scientific novelty. The most effective methods of vocational training of music teachers are revealed: polyart education that is based on comparison of different types of art (music, poetry, dance, theater, the fine arts and search of their crossing for deeper penetration into plasticity of intonations of a piece of music; the method of a retrospective and prospect consisting in the comparative analysis of the classical, borrowed from an arsenal recognized masters and modern manners of performance and ways of training at fingering and playing the chosen musical instrument; the method of the Russian teacher, musician and composer D. B. Kabalevsky based on perception and reflection about music, expanding ideas of the range of bag, opportunities of interpretation of a piece of

  13. The Italian Music Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Barbarito Luca; Ardizzone Antonella

    2010-01-01

    The Music Industry is a complex system in which many different actors interact. In this system there are suppliers of musical instruments, music schools, authors, singers, the phonographic industry, live events organizations and also the suppliers of those electronic devices necessary to listen to the music. This paper tries to analyze the size of those segments, their changes, and which are the key nodes in this system. Also the way we listen to music has changed a lot in this last 10 years,...

  14. Innovation In Music

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The music industry is a fast moving field with new technology and methodological advances combining to catalyse innovations all the time. 'Innovation in Music 2013' was an international conference exploring this topic, held in December 2013 in York, Uk. The event covered specific and cross-disciplinary aspects of the music industry including music creation, technology, production and business, sound engineering, mastering, post production and sound design, games music and cross-disciplinary t...

  15. The Fictional Black Blues Figure: Blues Music and the Art of Narrative Self-Invention

    OpenAIRE

    Mack, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    The Fictional Black Blues Figure: Blues Music and the Art of Narrative Self-Invention, Kimberly MackMy dissertation examines representations of black American blues musicians in contemporary American fiction, drama, and popular music, and it argues that blues music can be examined as a narrative art rooted in the tradition of fictionalized autobiographical self-fashioning. I contend that the contemporary, multi-racial, literary and musical characters in my project who participate in so-called...

  16. The Digital Music Lab: A Big Data Infrastructure for Digital Musicology

    OpenAIRE

    Abdallah, S.; Benetos, E.; Gold, N. E.; Hargreaves, S.; Weyde, T.; Wolff, D.

    2017-01-01

    In musicology and music research generally, the increasing availability of digital music, storage capacities, and computing power enable and require new and intelligent systems. In the transition from traditional to digital musicology, many techniques and tools have been developed for the analysis of individual pieces of music, but large-scale music data that are increasingly becoming available require research methods and systems that work on the collection-level and at scale. Although many ...

  17. The digital music lab: A big data infrastructure for digital musicology

    OpenAIRE

    Abdallah, S.; Benetos, E.; Gold, N.; Hargreaves, S.; Weyde, T.; Wolff, D.

    2017-01-01

    In musicology and music research generally, the increasing availability of digital music, storage capacities, and computing power enable and require new and intelligent systems. In the transition from traditional to digital musicology, many techniques and tools have been developed for the analysis of individual pieces of music, but large-scale music data that are increasingly becoming available require research methods and systems that work on the collection-level and at scale. Although many ...

  18. Japanese wives in Japanese-Australian intermarriages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared Denman

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The diasporic experiences of Japanese partners married to Australians and living in Australia are largely unexamined. This article is based on a study, conducted for an honours thesis, which invited four Japanese wives living in South East Queensland to describe, together with their Australian husbands, their family’s interactions with Japan, its language and culture, and the local Japanese community. It was recognised that the extensive social networks these wives had established and maintained with local Japanese women from other Japanese-Australian intermarriage families were an important part of their migrant experience. This article will firstly review the literature on contemporary Japanese- Australian intermarriage in Australia and Japanese lifestyle migration to Australia. It will then describe and examine the involvement and motivations of the four wives in their social networks. Entry into motherhood was found to be the impetus for developing and participating in informal, autonomous networks. Additionally, regular visits to Japan were focused on engagement with existing family and friendship networks. The contemporary experience of intermarriage for these women is decidedly transnational and fundamentally different from that of the war brides, or sensō hanayome.

  19. Music and the Mind: Music's Healing Powers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroilyn S. Ticker

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Music makes you smarter: or at least that is what the "experts" are saying. CDs are sold of Mozart's Sonatas for babies, and parents are urged to give their children music lessons in the belief that music does something to our brains which in turn makes us more intelligent. But is this really true? Does music really affect the brain in the powerful way that scientists are suggesting, or is it hearsay? In this paper I investigate the effects of music on our brain's plasticity and cognition by looking at several different experimental studies. Specifically I will address how music affects brain plasticity, emotion, physical health and linguistic processing, and how these effects in turn make music a beneficial tool for therapy, particularly in patients with Traumatic-Brain Injury (TBI and Autism-Spectrum Disorder.

  20. Music Education and Music Therapy. Introduction to Plenary Session 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2002-01-01

    Chairman's introduction to plenary session on the relationship between music therapy and music pedagogics......Chairman's introduction to plenary session on the relationship between music therapy and music pedagogics...

  1. Using music structure to improve beat tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannenberg, Roger B.

    2005-09-01

    Beats are an important feature of most music. Beats are used in music information retrieval systems for genre classification, similarity search, and segmentation. However, beats can be difficult to identify, especially in music audio. Traditional beat trackers attempt to (1) match predicted beats to observations of likely beats, and (2) maintain a fairly steady tempo. A third criterion can be added: when repetitions of musical passages occur, the beats in the first repetition should align with the beats in all other repetitions. This third criterion improves beat tracking performance significantly. Repetitions of musical passages are discovered in audio data by searching for similar sequences of chroma vectors. Beats are ``tracked'' by first locating a sequence of likely beats in the music audio using high frequency energy as an indicator of beat likelihood. This beat sequence is then extended by searching forward and backward for more matching beats, allowing slight variations in tempo, and using a relaxation algorithm to optimize the proposed beat locations with respect to the three criteria. Other high-level music features may offer further improvements in beat identification.

  2. Expressiveness in musical performance: Pedagogic aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jović Natalija R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of our research relates to pedagogic aspects of expressive vocal-instrumental musical performance. We intended to examine: (1 how undergraduate students see/conceptualize and evaluate expressiveness in musical performance; (2 whether and how they were trained in the skill of expressive musical performance during their musical training; (3 whether and in which way they rehearse the expressive component of musical performance and interpretation and (4 whether there are any differences regarding gender, age, instrument, department, year of study and years of instrument playing in relation to the group of dependant variables related to expressiveness, tuition and practice. The sample for the research included 82 students of instrumental and theory departments at the Faculty of Music in Belgrade. Psychological and pedagogical aspects of musical expressiveness during vocal-instrumental performance were analyzed. The results show that students highly evaluate expressiveness but its place is secondary compared to mastering technical and tonal requirements. Statistically significant differences were shown regarding gender, age and departments. It can be concluded that there is a potential for the development and enhancement of expressiveness of students if we abandon the traditional view that expressiveness is linked exclusively to talent. The findings indicate that pedagogical work should be directed towards finding purposeful strategies for training individual expressiveness.

  3. Bana etlong retlobapala : examining children's musical games on a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bana etlong retlobapala : examining children's musical games on a Soweto playground. ... This article reports on research that investigated the rich tradition of South African urban township children's games. ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  4. Effects of Tempo and Performing Medium on Children's Music Preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Albert; Cote, Richard

    1983-01-01

    This study measured the effect of three levels of tempo and two levels of performing medium, vocal and instrumental, on the expressed preference of fifth- and sixth-grade students for traditional jazz music listening examples. (Author/SR)

  5. THE SOCIO-CULTURAL IMPLICATIONS OF AFRICAN MUSIC AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and continuing with the games of childhood and the songs and ... seen in the close relationship between body movement and music. In the dance arena it is .... traditional forms, foster the development of choreographed dance forms which are ...

  6. Chaotic Music Generation System Using Music Conductor Gesture

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Shuai; Maeda, Yoichiro; Takahashi, Yasutake

    2013-01-01

    In the research of interactive music generation, we propose a music generation method, that the computer generates the music, under the recognition of human music conductor's gestures.In this research, the generated music is tuned by the recognized gestures for the parameters of the network of chaotic elements in real time. The music conductor's hand motions are detected by Microsoft Kinect in this system. Music theories are embedded in the algorithm, as a result, the generated music will be ...

  7. Music Conductor Gesture Recognized Interactive Music Generation System

    OpenAIRE

    CHEN, Shuai; MAEDA, Yoichiro; TAKAHASHI, Yasutake

    2012-01-01

    In the research of interactive music generation, we propose a music generation method, that the computer generates the music automatically, and then the music will be arranged under the human music conductor's gestures, before it outputs to us. In this research, the generated music is processed from chaotic sound, which is generated from the network of chaotic elements in realtime. The music conductor's hand motions are detected by Microsoft Kinect in this system. Music theories are embedded ...

  8. EyeMusic: Making Music with the Eyes

    OpenAIRE

    Hornof, Anthony J.; Sato, Linda

    2004-01-01

    Though musical performers routinely use eye movements to communicate with each other during musical performances, very few performers or composers have used eye tracking devices to direct musical compositions and performances. EyeMusic is a system that uses eye movements as an input to electronic music compositions. The eye movements can directly control the music, or the music can respond to the eyes moving around a visual scene. EyeMusic is implemented so that any composer using established...

  9. MUSIC CLUB

    CERN Document Server

    MUSIC CLUB

    2010-01-01

    FESTIVAL HARDRONIC The CERN MusiClub is proud to announce that the 21st edition of the famous CERN Hardronic Festival will take place on   Friday 16th July from 17h30 and Saturday 17th July from 16h00   on the terrace beside restaurant N°3 on the CERN Prevessin site. The Festival will feature music by your favourite bands and artists from the Club. Food and drink will be on sale and there will be stuff for kids (organized by http://www.adventureart.org/) including face-painting and a bouncy castle. Entrance is free and the event is open to Club Members, CERN staff and Visitors, all those working on the CERN site, plus families and friends. For more information, either send an e-mail mailto:music.club@cern.ch or see http://musiclub.cern.ch/ The CERN MusiClub would like to thank the CERN Staff Association and the CERN Management for their continued support. Without this support this event could not take place.

  10. A biological rationale for musical scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Kamraan Z; Purves, Dale

    2009-12-03

    Scales are collections of tones that divide octaves into specific intervals used to create music. Since humans can distinguish about 240 different pitches over an octave in the mid-range of hearing, in principle a very large number of tone combinations could have been used for this purpose. Nonetheless, compositions in Western classical, folk and popular music as well as in many other musical traditions are based on a relatively small number of scales that typically comprise only five to seven tones. Why humans employ only a few of the enormous number of possible tone combinations to create music is not known. Here we show that the component intervals of the most widely used scales throughout history and across cultures are those with the greatest overall spectral similarity to a harmonic series. These findings suggest that humans prefer tone combinations that reflect the spectral characteristics of conspecific vocalizations. The analysis also highlights the spectral similarity among the scales used by different cultures.

  11. Musician Map: visualizing music collaborations over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Ji-Dong; Shaw, Chris D.; Bartram, Lyn

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we introduce Musician Map, a web-based interactive tool for visualizing relationships among popular musicians who have released recordings since 1950. Musician Map accepts search terms from the user, and in turn uses these terms to retrieve data from MusicBrainz.org and AudioScrobbler.net, and visualizes the results. Musician Map visualizes relationships of various kinds between music groups and individual musicians, such as band membership, musical collaborations, and linkage to other artists that are generally regarded as being similar in musical style. These relationships are plotted between artists using a new timeline-based visualization where a node in a traditional node-link diagram has been transformed into a Timeline-Node, which allows the visualization of an evolving entity over time, such as the membership in a band. This allows the user to pursue social trend queries such as "Do Hip-Hop artists collaborate differently than Rock artists".

  12. Inventing the Carnival: Contemporary Festivities, Tradition and Imaginaries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stavělová, Daniela; Kratochvíl, Matěj

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 4 (2016), s. 569-595 ISSN 0009-0794 Institutional support: RVO:68378076 Keywords : carnival * festivity * city * tradition * collective memory * music * dance Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  13. Engaging Musical Practices: A Sourcebook for Middle School General Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Suzanne L., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Middle school general music may be a student's last encounter with school music. A practical book with accessible pedagogical resources on middle school general music is needed for methods courses and music practitioners' use. The book "Engaging Musical Practices: A Sourcebook for Middle School General Music" presents numerous ways to engage…

  14. Perceived Properties of Parameterised Music for Interactive Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Berg

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Traditional implementations of sound and music in interactive contexts have their limitations. One way to overcome these and to expand the possibilities of music is to handle the music in a parameterised form. To better understand the properties of the musical parameters resulting from parameterisation, two experiments were carried out. The first experiment investigated selected parameters' capability to change the music; the second experiment examined how the parameters can contribute to express emotions. From these experiments, it is concluded that users without musical training perform differently from musicians on some of the parameters. There is also a clear association between the parameters and the expressed basic emotions. The paper is concluded with observations on how parameterisation might be used in interactive applications.

  15. Expression of emotion in Eastern and Western music mirrors vocalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, Daniel Liu; Sundararajan, Janani; Han, Shui'er; Purves, Dale

    2012-01-01

    In Western music, the major mode is typically used to convey excited, happy, bright or martial emotions, whereas the minor mode typically conveys subdued, sad or dark emotions. Recent studies indicate that the differences between these modes parallel differences between the prosodic and spectral characteristics of voiced speech sounds uttered in corresponding emotional states. Here we ask whether tonality and emotion are similarly linked in an Eastern musical tradition. The results show that the tonal relationships used to express positive/excited and negative/subdued emotions in classical South Indian music are much the same as those used in Western music. Moreover, tonal variations in the prosody of English and Tamil speech uttered in different emotional states are parallel to the tonal trends in music. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the association between musical tonality and emotion is based on universal vocal characteristics of different affective states.

  16. Expression of emotion in Eastern and Western music mirrors vocalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Liu Bowling

    Full Text Available In Western music, the major mode is typically used to convey excited, happy, bright or martial emotions, whereas the minor mode typically conveys subdued, sad or dark emotions. Recent studies indicate that the differences between these modes parallel differences between the prosodic and spectral characteristics of voiced speech sounds uttered in corresponding emotional states. Here we ask whether tonality and emotion are similarly linked in an Eastern musical tradition. The results show that the tonal relationships used to express positive/excited and negative/subdued emotions in classical South Indian music are much the same as those used in Western music. Moreover, tonal variations in the prosody of English and Tamil speech uttered in different emotional states are parallel to the tonal trends in music. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the association between musical tonality and emotion is based on universal vocal characteristics of different affective states.

  17. Japanese Buddhism, Relativization, and Glocalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugo Dessì

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the field of study on Japanese religions, the issue of globalization tends to be associated with the missionary activities of some successful new religious movements, and there is a certain reluctance to approach analytically the dynamics of glocalization/hybridization and the power issues at stake. In this article, I address these and other related problems by taking my cue from the relativizing effects of globalization and a working definition of religion based on the concept of authority. To this aim, I focus on two case studies. The first concerns the ongoing greening of Japanese Buddhism. The second revolves around the adoption of meditational techniques by priests and lay practitioners in Hawaiian Shin Buddhism. My findings show that there are at least four factors underlying the glocalization of Japanese Buddhism, that is, global consciousness, resonance with the local tradition, decontextualization, and quest for power. Moreover, they indicate that it is possible to distinguish between two types of glocalization (glocalization and chauvinistic glocalization and two configurations of glocalization (juxtaposition and integration.

  18. Nigerian Music Review: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. Nigerian Music Review is aimed at the scholarly review of the developments in various musical practices in Nigeria. It considers well researched articles in any of the following areas: Musicology, Ethnomusicology, African Music, Music Education, Performance, Composition, Music Technology, Music ...

  19. Musical Markov Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volchenkov, Dima; Dawin, Jean René

    A system for using dice to compose music randomly is known as the musical dice game. The discrete time MIDI models of 804 pieces of classical music written by 29 composers have been encoded into the transition matrices and studied by Markov chains. Contrary to human languages, entropy dominates over redundancy, in the musical dice games based on the compositions of classical music. The maximum complexity is achieved on the blocks consisting of just a few notes (8 notes, for the musical dice games generated over Bach's compositions). First passage times to notes can be used to resolve tonality and feature a composer.

  20. Defining death: organ transplants, tradition and technology in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, E A

    1988-01-01

    This article explores Japanese attitudes about brain death and organ transplantation. First, ancient burial customs and death-related rituals associated with Shinto and Buddhism are examined. Next, contemporary attitudes towards the dead are discussed in the context of current controversies surrounding brain death and organ transplantation. Finally, an attempt is made to link the traditional Japanese views of death with modern medical dilemmas.

  1. Sacred byzantine music and its influence on old East Slavic Orthodox music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Włodzimierz Wołosiuk

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Sacred Byzantine music originates from three sources: “the liturgy of heaven”, synagogue music as well as old Greek theory of music and lays at the bottom of the East Slavs liturgical chant. The tonal base of the Byzantine music formed tetrachords. From them the so called Diatonic mode took shape. It was the easiest and the most popular sound arrangement steming from Greek music. The Cristian Church considered it to be in accordance with its Spirit and needs. From the tetrachords mentioned above other tones were created, namely Doric tones, Lydian, Phrygian and Mixolydian and, together withall their derivatives they gave beginning to the Oktoechos tradition. Byzantine music was flourishing in monasteries and in town areas andmany different forms were elaborated on like troparions, kontakions, stichiry, canons, etc. If one speaks about composers then certainly some names cannot be omitted. These are: St. Anatolius (Patriarchof Constantinople, St. Andrew of Crete, St. Romanos the Melodist,St. Sophronius of Jerusalem and, above all, St. John of Damascus who collected and systematized the liturgical chants creating mentioned Oktoechos. The acceptance of the Greek form of Christianity by Rus’ caused a cultivation of the sacred Greek vocal art on its territory which manifested in a form of so called Znamenny chant. This type of chant was at first similar to the Greek model but later on it moved away from it. Musical notation of the Old East Slavic singing was based on neumes which names in Old East Slavic have changed a little and only few survived. Furthermore, liturgical note books together with their genre and music content have been taken over from Byzantium. Especially visible in the Old East Slavic monody, Byzantine patterns were pervading also the later polyphony which proves they were always current. Moreover, this allows to claim that Rus’ became the real successor of the Greek Orthodox traditions in new circumstances of sacral

  2. Loud music listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, Nicolae

    2008-07-01

    Over the past four decades, there has been increasing interest in the effects of music listening on hearing. The purpose of this paper is to review published studies that detail the noise levels, the potential effects (e.g. noise-induced hearing loss), and the perceptions of those affected by music exposure in occupational and non-occupational settings. The review employed Medline, PubMed, PsychINFO, and the World Wide Web to find relevant studies in the scientific literature. Considered in this review are 43 studies concerning the currently most significant occupational sources of high-intensity music: rock and pop music playing and employment at music venues, as well as the most significant sources of non-occupational high-intensity music: concerts, dicotheques (clubs), and personal music players. Although all of the activities listed above have the potential for hearing damage, the most serious threat to hearing comes from prolonged exposures to amplified live music (concerts). The review concludes that more research is needed to clarify the hearing loss risks of music exposure from personal music players and that current scientific literature clearly recognizes an unmet hearing health need for more education regarding the risks of loud music exposure and the benefits of wearing hearing protection, for more hearing protection use by those at risk, and for more regulations limiting music intensity levels at music entertainment venues.

  3. Reference Japanese man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Giichiro

    1985-01-01

    To make real and accurate dose assessment method so far, it is necessitated to provide ''Reference Japanese Man'' based on anotomical, physiological and biochemical data of Japanese people instead of the Reference Man presented in ICRP Publications 23 and 30. This review describes present status of researched for the purpose of establishing of Reference Japanese Man. The Reference Japanese Man is defined as a male or female adult who lives in Japan with a Japanese life-style and food custom. His stature and body weight, and the other data was decided as mean values of male or female people of Japan. As for food custom, Japanese people take significantly smaller amount of meat and milk products than Western people, while larger intake amount of cereals and marine products such as fish or seaweeds. Weight of organs is a principal factor for internal dose assessment and mean values for living Japanese adult has been investigated and the value employable for dose assessment for organs and tissues are shown. To employ these values of Reference Japanese Man, it should be taken into account of age. Metabolic parameters should also be considered. Iodine metabolism in Japanese is quite different from that of Western people. The above-mentioned data are now tentatively employing in modification of table of MIRD method and others. (Takagi, S.)

  4. 学校音楽教育における伝統音楽の導入についての考察 -中国、アメリカ、イギリスの事例を通して-

    OpenAIRE

    劉, 麟玉; リース, ヘレン

    2012-01-01

    Japanese government guidelines established between 1947 and 2008 refer to the teaching in schools of Japanese traditional music as well as foreign music. 1950s guidelines focused principally on Western music, plus a few Japanese traditional songs; those from the 1990s require performance on Japanese instruments and of other countries' folk music. However, public school music teachers have only been trained at university in Western music. Therefore, the question arises as to how they can teach...

  5. Music as word: Film music - superlibretto?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćirić Marija

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of his paper is to prove that film music can be understood as authentic narrative force: film music as word / discourse and its superlibretto status. Superlibretto is the status of music in a film which is constructing its own (aural reality and is narrating, speaking its own text which creates a wholesome film meaning. The existence of superlibretto is substantiated by fundamental theoretic concepts of film music and practically proven by analyses of examples taken from the opus of Serbian film composer Zoran Simjanović.

  6. Music and language: musical alexia and agraphia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brust, J C

    1980-06-01

    Two aphasic right-handed professional musicians with left hemispheric lesions had disturbed musical function, especially musical alexia and agraphia. In Case 1 aphasia was of transcortical sensory type, with severe agraphia and decreased comprehension of written words, although she could match them with pictures. Except for reading and writing, musical ability was normal; she could sing in five languages. Musical alexia and agraphia affected pitch symbols more than rhythm. Case 2 had conduction aphasia and severe expressive amusia, especially for rhythm. Although his language alexia and agraphia were milder than Case 1's, his musical alexia and agraphia were more severe, affecting rhythm as much as pitch. In neither patient were those aspects of musical notation either closest to verbal language or most dependent upon temporal (sequential) processing maximally impaired. These cases are consistent with the literature in suggesting that the presence or absence of aphasia or of right or left hemispheric damage fails to predict the presence, type, or severity of amusia, including musical alexia and agraphia. The popular notion that receptive amusia follows lesions of the language-dominant temporal lobe, whereas expressive amusia follows non-dominant frontal lobe damage, is an over-simplification, as is the view that increasing musical sophistication causes a shift of musical processing from the right hemisphere to the left.

  7. The effects of music listening after a stressful task on immune functions, neuroendocrine responses, and emotional states in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirokawa, Eri; Ohira, Hideki

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of listening to high-uplifting or low-uplifting music after a stressful task on (a) immune functions, (b) neuroendocrine responses, and (c) emotional states in college students. Musical selections that were evaluated as high-uplifting or low-uplifting by Japanese college students were used as musical stimuli. Eighteen Japanese subjects performed stressful tasks before they experienced each of these experimental conditions: (a) high-uplifting music, (b) low-uplifting music, and (c) silence. Subjects' emotional states, the Secretory IgA (S-IgA) level, active natural killer (NK) cell level, the numbers of T lymphocyte CD4+, CD8+, CD16+, dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine levels were measured before and after each experimental condition. Results indicated low-uplifting music had a trend of increasing a sense of well-being. High-uplifting music showed trends of increasing the norepinephrine level, liveliness, and decreasing depression. Active NK cells were decreased after 20 min of silence. Results of the study were inconclusive, but high-uplifting and low-uplifting music had different effects on immune, neuroendocrine, and psychological responses. Classification of music is important to research that examines the effects of music on these responses. Recommendations for future research are discussed.

  8. Merit Pay and the Music Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elpus, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Current proponents of education reform are at present seeking to fundamentally change the system of teacher compensation by eliminating the traditional single salary schedule and instituting a merit pay system that directly links teacher pay to student achievement. To date, the scholarly literature in music education has been silent on the subject…

  9. Tempo Preferences of Different Age Music Listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Albert; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Measures the effect of four levels of tempo on the self-reported preferences of six different age-groups for traditional jazz music listening examples. Stated that listener age exerted a strong influence on overall preference scores. Reported an analysis of variance showing that there is a significant preference for increasingly faster tempo at…

  10. Japanese Encephalitis: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the vaccine, what should I do? What is Japanese encephalitis? Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a potentially severe ... cause inflammation of the brain (encephalitis). Where does Japanese encephalitis occur? JE occurs in Asia and parts ...

  11. Effect of music on power, pain, depression and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedliecki, Sandra L; Good, Marion

    2006-06-01

    This paper reports a study testing the effect of music on power, pain, depression and disability, and comparing the effects of researcher-provided music (standard music) with subject-preferred music (patterning music). Chronic non-malignant pain is characterized by pain that persists in spite of traditional interventions. Previous studies have found music to be effective in decreasing pain and anxiety related to postoperative, procedural and cancer pain. However, the effect of music on power, pain, depression, and disability in working age adults with chronic non-malignant pain has not been investigated. A randomized controlled clinical trial was carried out with a convenience sample of 60 African American and Caucasian people aged 21-65 years with chronic non-malignant pain. They were randomly assigned to a standard music group (n = 22), patterning music group (n = 18) or control group (n = 20). Pain was measured with the McGill Pain Questionnaire short form; depression was measured with the Center for Epidemiology Studies Depression scale; disability was measured with the Pain Disability Index; and power was measured with the Power as Knowing Participation in Change Tool (version II). The music groups had more power and less pain, depression and disability than the control group, but there were no statistically significant differences between the two music interventions. The model predicting both a direct and indirect effect for music was supported. Nurses can teach patients how to use music to enhance the effects of analgesics, decrease pain, depression and disability, and promote feelings of power.

  12. [Examples of the use of music in clinical medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myskja, A; Lindbaek, M

    2000-04-10

    Music has been an element in medical practice throughout history. There is growing interest in music as a therapeutic tool. Since there is no generally accepted standard for how, when and where music should be applied within a medical framework, this literature study endeavours to present an overview of central areas of application of music in medicine. It further attempts to find tentative conclusions that may be drawn from existing clinical research on the efficacy of music as a medical tool. Traditionally, music has been linked to the treatment of mental illness, and has been used successfully to treat anxiety and depression and improve function in schizophrenia and autism. In clinical medicine several studies have shown analgetic and anxiolytic properties that have been used in intensive care units, both in diagnostic procedures like gastroscopy and in larger operations, in preoperative as well as postoperative phases, reducing the need for medication in several studies. The combination of music with guided imagery and deep relaxation has shown reduction of symptoms and increased well-being in chronic pain syndromes, whether from cancer or rheumatic origin. Music has been used as support in pregnancy and gestation, in internal medicine, oncology, paediatrics and other related fields. The use of music with geriatric patients could prove to be especially fruitful, both in its receptive and its active aspect. Studies have shown that music can improve function and alleviate symptoms in stroke rehabilitation, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia. The role of music in medicine is primarily supportive and palliative. The supportive role of music has a natural field of application in palliative medicine and terminal care. Music is well tolerated, inexpensive, with good compliance and few side effects.

  13. Reliability studies of diagnostic methods in Indian traditional Ayurveda medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurande, Vrinda Hitendra; Waagepetersen, Rasmus; Toft, Egon

    2013-01-01

    as prakriti classification), method development (pulse diagnosis), quality assurance for diagnosis and treatment and in the conduct of clinical studies. Several reliability studies are conducted in western medicine. The investigation of the reliability of traditional Chinese, Japanese and Sasang medicine...

  14. MUSIC RADIO-JOURNALISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubovtceva Ludmila I.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is based on years of practical experience, the author highlights the main radio genres in which music correspondent, music reviewer, music commentator, and music leading and a disc jockey work. Theoretical principles of their creative activities are analyzed in common journalistic genres, such as interview, reportage, talk show, live broadcast, radiofilm, as well as specialized genres like concert on demand and music competition. Journalist’ speech is seen as a logical element, the incoming with music in art-structural relationships. However, it does not become the predominant sound layer and aims to harmonious correlation or local penetration into music opus. In addition, important links in music journalism are defined the auxiliary "offscreen" editor's job and keeping the original sound archive. The author cites a number of own work examples on the air.

  15. Music, Meaning and Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Widdess

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper situates musical meaning in culture, addressing music as social symbol and as ongoing process of meaning creation. Three examples of non- Western musical practice are used to illustrate the embedding of musical meaning in cultural context. The performance of an Australian Aboriginal song is shown to exemplify the interdependence of song style and social structure as a matrix for the emergence of cultural meanings; an example of North Indian performance is adduced to demonstrate the multi-layered nature of meaning as embodied in musical performance; and an example of collective festival performance from Nepal illustrates ways in which the structure of musical performance can mirror local cultural forms. Each of the three examples lends weight to the idea that music's meanings are often non-linguistic and reflect foundational schemas that are specific to the cultures from the musics are drawn.

  16. Musical Students’ Concert Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr S. Plokhotnyuk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available . The article presents detailed analysis of performance training of future teachers of music at higher educational establishments and offers ways to overcome the problem of musical students’ concert practice organization.

  17. Music, Mathematics and Bach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Western music allows the idea of 'modulation' from one key to another. ... 'tonic' in Indian music the tonic 'sa' is played throughout by the tanpura, and ... rules and greater freedom. A fugue ..... theorem and artificial intelligence but an excellent.

  18. LISTENING TO MUSIC AND MUSIC PREFERENCES IN EARLY ADOLESCENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Ercegovac, Ina Reić; Dobrota, Snježana; Surić, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Music plays an important role in the life of adolescents. Dealing with music represents a very important free-time activity during adolescence, while by listening to music or performing music adolescents can satisfy a range of needs, both personal and those of social nature. Therefore, this paper presents the results of research on musical taste and listening to music habits in early adolescence. We hypothesized that students generally like listening to music and that they mostly prefer do...

  19. Affective Music Information Retrieval

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ju-Chiang; Yang, Yi-Hsuan; Wang, Hsin-Min

    2015-01-01

    Much of the appeal of music lies in its power to convey emotions/moods and to evoke them in listeners. In consequence, the past decade witnessed a growing interest in modeling emotions from musical signals in the music information retrieval (MIR) community. In this article, we present a novel generative approach to music emotion modeling, with a specific focus on the valence-arousal (VA) dimension model of emotion. The presented generative model, called \\emph{acoustic emotion Gaussians} (AEG)...

  20. Music and memory

    OpenAIRE

    Haefliger, Anna Berenika

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Music and its different forms of use seem to benefit people in a number of ways. Research has suggested that extensive musical practice and musical listening enhances mental functioning in healthy adults and patients with neurodegenerative disease. Yet, the findings presented have not yet examined the effects both musical training and stimuli enhancement have on episodic memory recognition. 20 musicians and 20 non-musicians took part in an episodic memory task which evaluated m...

  1. Psychiatry and music

    OpenAIRE

    Nizamie, Shamsul Haque; Tikka, Sai Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Vocal and/or instrumental sounds combined in such a way as to produce beauty of form, harmony and expression of emotion is music. Brain, mind and music are remarkably related to each other and music has got a strong impact on psychiatry. With the advent of music therapy, as an efficient form of alternative therapy in treating major psychiatric conditions, this impact has been further strengthened. In this review, we deliberate upon the historical aspects of the relationship between psychiatry...

  2. Embodied Music Listening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2017-01-01

    The chapter presents the receptive music therapy model "Guided Imagery of Music (GIM)" as an embodied way of music listening with documented effects on a number of physiological and psychological symptoms and problems. Relaxation, guiding and (classical) music stimulates and supports the work......, underlying theories, selected research/evidence and illustrative clinical vignettes. Based on a study of cancer survivors’ GIM therapy, grounded theories of the therapeutic process and music’s role in the process are presented and discussed....

  3. Beyond Mentoring: A Review of Literature Detailing the Need for Additional and Alternative Forms of Support for Novice Music Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell-Robertson, Catherine G.

    2015-01-01

    Support for music teachers new to the profession is important and necessary. Some school districts use traditional mentor-mentee pairings as their primary support for novice music teachers; however, many factors in the professional lives of music teachers, such as traveling among multiple schools or a lack of subject-specific colleagues often…

  4. Beliefs and values in Japanese acupuncture: an ethnography of Japanese trained acupuncture practitioners in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Chant

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Beliefs and values are an underrepresented, yet extremely important aspect of philosophical concepts influencing acupuncture practice in Japan. Uniquely Japanese beliefs and values that do not rely on a commitment to any spiritual or religious affiliations or proprietary knowledge of traditional or biomedicine may be successfully exported from Japan to advance acupuncture education, research and practice in international contexts.

  5. Community Music in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Gillian

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a historical perspective to the development of community music in Australia. Finding political support in Australia's progressive arts policies of the late 1970s, community music is discussed as embracing the principles of access and equity and supporting the development of musical skills in the context of social change and…

  6. Constructivism in Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shively, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Over the past twenty years, constructivism, as a theory of learning, has taken on an increasingly important role in music education. Efforts to shift music education toward a more constructivist practice have significant implications for policymaking at all levels of music education. In this article, I seek to recalibrate our thinking about what…

  7. Pop Music's Middle Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Peter

    1979-01-01

    Surveys important music styles that preceded the emergence of rock and roll in the 1950s. Included are swing, bebop, rhythm and blues, country-western, gospel, and urban folk music. Lists of selected readings and recordings are appended. Part of a theme issue on popular music. (Editor/SJL)

  8. Concept Analysis: Music Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrock, Carolyn J; Bekhet, Abir K

    2016-01-01

    Down through the ages, music has been universally valued for its therapeutic properties based on the psychological and physiological responses in humans. However, the underlying mechanisms of the psychological and physiological responses to music have been poorly identified and defined. Without clarification, a concept can be misused, thereby diminishing its importance for application to nursing research and practice. The purpose of this article was for the clarification of the concept of music therapy based on Walker and Avant's concept analysis strategy. A review of recent nursing and health-related literature covering the years 2007-2014 was performed on the concepts of music, music therapy, preferred music, and individualized music. As a result of the search, the attributes, antecedents, and consequences of music therapy were identified, defined, and used to develop a conceptual model of music therapy. The conceptual model of music therapy provides direction for developing music interventions for nursing research and practice to be tested in various settings to improve various patient outcomes. Based on Walker and Avant's concept analysis strategy, model and contrary cases are included. Implications for future nursing research and practice to use the psychological and physiological responses to music therapy are discussed.

  9. [Music therapy and depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Assche, E; De Backer, J; Vermote, R

    2015-01-01

    Music therapy is a predominantly non-verbal psychotherapy based on music improvisation, embedded in a therapeutic relationship. This is the reason why music therapy is also used to treat depression. To examine the efficacy of music therapy and to report on the results of recent research into the value of music therapy as a treatment for depression. We reviewed the literature on recent research into music therapy and depression, reporting on the methods used and the results achieved, and we assessed the current position of music therapy for depression in the context of evidence-based scientific research. A wide variety of research methods was used to investigate the effects of using music therapy as a psychotherapy. Most studies focused usually on the added value that music therapy brings to the standard form of psychiatric treatment, when administered with or without psychopharmacological support. Music therapy produced particularly significant and favourable results when used to treat patients with depression. Current research into music therapy and depression points to a significant and persistent reduction in patients' symptoms and to improvements in their quality of life. However, further research is needed with regard to the best methods of illustrating the effects of music therapy.

  10. Learning Science Using Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolinski, Keith

    2011-01-01

    For thousands of years, people have used music to transfer information and narrate stories. The musical structure, consisting of words set to melodies in rhythmic patterns, made the content easier to remember. Researchers have investigated the long- and short-term effects of song on memory and found that music aided in the recall of information.…

  11. Saving Malta's music memory

    OpenAIRE

    Sant, Toni

    2013-01-01

    Maltese music is being lost. Along with it Malta loses its culture, way of life, and memories. Dr Toni Sant is trying to change this trend through the Malta Music Memory Project (M3P) http://www.um.edu.mt/think/saving-maltas-music-memory-2/

  12. This Too Is Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upitis, Rena

    This book focuses on music as a subject relating to all other disciplines. "On the Teaching of Music," the first of 12 chapters, sets the theoretical and philosophical basis for a child-centered, subject-integrated teaching approach through autobiographical narrative. Chapter 2, "A Music Playground," advocates the presentation of materials and…

  13. World Music Ensemble: Kulintang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beegle, Amy C.

    2012-01-01

    As instrumental world music ensembles such as steel pan, mariachi, gamelan and West African drums are becoming more the norm than the exception in North American school music programs, there are other world music ensembles just starting to gain popularity in particular parts of the United States. The kulintang ensemble, a drum and gong ensemble…

  14. Make a Little Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pica, Rae

    2009-01-01

    Music is vital to the development of language and listening skills. Both music and language arts consist of symbols and ideas; when the two content areas are used in combination, abstract concepts become more concrete. This article provides information that shows the role of music in helping children meet early learning standards, including those…

  15. Selling digital music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Tvede, Mich

    This paper considers the market for digital music. We claim that the combination of the MP3 format and peer-to-peer networks has made music non-excludable and this feature is essential for the understanding of the economics of the music market. We study optimal business models for selling non...

  16. Popular music from Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otte, Andreas Roed

    a sense of place in popular music. The second probes different strategies for co-branding popular music and Greenland. The third is concerned with music consumption patterns among Greenlandic youth. And the fourth article engages with an alternative form of nationalism found within the Nuuk underground...

  17. Pediatric Music Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathom-Radocy, Wanda B.

    This book on music therapy includes relevant medical, psychological, and developmental information to help service providers, particularly music therapists, and parents to understand children with disabilities. The first two chapters describe the process of assessment and delineation of goals in music therapy that leads to the design of the music…

  18. Nigerian Music Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Music Reveiw. ... Nigerian Music Review is aimed at the scholarly review of the developments in various musical practices in Nigeria. It considers well ... Performance practice and functions of local wine and beer parlor songs in rural Yoruba Communities in Ogbomoso · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT

  19. Music Education for All

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    This article argues that a systematic, developmental and comprehensive music education should be at the heart of every child's formal education within the state education system. The benefits of a music education are briefly explored before a presentation of recent research data that demonstrates a decline in music education as a result of poorly…

  20. AP Music Theory Applied

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieker, Matthew H.

    2016-01-01

    Some American high schools include Advanced Placement (AP) Music Theory within their course offerings. Students who pass the AP exam can receive college credit either as a music or humanities credit. An AP class, however, offers music students more than future college credit; it ultimately improves musicianship skills and promotes deeper…

  1. RESOURCES OF MUSICAL EDUCATION IN CENTRAL ASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feza TANSUĞ

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This essay also gives an idea of recent research trends and topics in music education in Central Asia. It consists of five parts including teaching music history, teaching epics, teaching songs and instrumental music, teaching traditional instruments, and dictionaries and language resources. Because of the extraordinary increase in the number of books published recently, a careful selection has been made in order to keep the references section to an acceptable length. Hence, the bibliography does not embody all of the works of a single author on the topic. This essay covers books and textbooks dealing with the music of Kazakhstan and the Kyrgyz Republic—two neighboring countries with strong common historical roots and closely related musical traditions. In addition to reviewing textbooks published in Kazakhstan and the Kyrgyz Republic, this article includes some relevant works by Russian authors. However, the extensive body of works authored by Central Asian scholars abroad was excluded from this essay. It contains references only in Kazakh, Kyrgyz, and Russian languages.

  2. The Role of Music in Work Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Raquel Motta

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the role of music in work activities by considering music an intersemiotic discursive practice. It uses an interdisciplinary approach composed of discourse analysis, ethonomusicology and ergology in order to be able to examine the topic including music and work factors, put together by discourse. Firstly, the boundaries of traditional work songs are expanded through two unconventional examples: one in an advertisement, and the other one in a product packaging. Then through that expanded framework, it explores examples of two Brazilian communities, one from Bahia and the other one from Maranhão (both in Brazilian Northeast that sing while they work in extractivist and agricultural activities. The conclusion points out that the relationship between music and work far surpasses the traditional framing of work songs. To better understand the role of music in the discourse of work activities, scholars need to take into account the renormalization which is brought into play and the discursive communities concerned by those complex discursive practices.

  3. Japanese Media in English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Sachiko Oda

    1995-01-01

    Describes the use of English in the media in Japan, focusing on the role and history of English-language newspapers, radio, and television programs, as well as the proliferation of English-language films shown in Japanese cinemas. Discusses the implications of English in the Japanese media. (20 references) (MDM)

  4. Factors Influencing Japanese Women to Choose Two-Year Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzai, Shinobu

    2009-01-01

    Two-year colleges in Japan have traditionally absorbed the major portion of female college entrants due at least partially to long-held gender stereotypes: women are to prepare themselves for marriage and homemaking at a two-year college. Recently, Japanese women began to explore selfhood outside the traditional realm of motherhood and womanhood.…

  5. Musical competence of preschool teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Grdešič, Irena

    2012-01-01

    My diploma deals with musical competencies of preschool teachers. Music education includes many different activities: singing various songs, playing different instruments, listening to music, being creative while listening to music and creating the music itself. It is of utmost importance that kindergarten teachers are capable of mediating music to the children and are able to incorporate it into the every day of their kindergarten activities. Music helps calm children down, it relaxes them, ...

  6. On music Therapy : Music and Healing

    OpenAIRE

    栗林, 文雄

    1996-01-01

    The theory of sound as energy is based on the relationship between music and positive humanfeelings. It was discussed the music therapy is effective in the care and cure of elderly with behavioral disorderssuch as senile dementia, and in patients in palliative medicine wards with cancer and in patientswith various kinds of mental disorders such as schizophrenia. alcohol. drug addiction and so on.

  7. African Oral Tradition Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Doris

    1985-01-01

    Presents the basic principles of two systems for notating African music and dance: Labanotation (created to record and analyze movements) and Greenotation (created to notate musical instruments of Africa and to parallel Labanotation whereby both music and dance are incorporated into one integrated score). (KH)

  8. Silent Bodies: Japanese taciturnity and image thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Došen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A nonverbal transmission and an implicit way of communication are highly encouraged in Japanese society. The reason for this “silence prerogative” is often found in historical facts of lengthy feudal era or in ancient philosophies and religions such as Buddhism and Confucianism and their various concepts which privilege taciturn way of communication. Moreover, the unspoken comprehension is often complemented by the attitude which equates truthfulness with silence. This paper explores the silence as a communicative act in the domain of Japanese art, where the body takes over the place of the language. In traditional Japanese theatrical performance, such as noh, words are often inadequate to convey emotion and therefore the aesthetics of emptiness, understatement and abstraction is transcended by the masks with "nonmoving lips". Drawing on theoretical perspectives from both East and West, I argue that the silent bodies operate as deliberate and integral determinants of Japanese non-silent art forms – especially in cinema and theatre. In the Eastern thought, visual perception is fundamental in cognition of the world, whereas auditory discernment is secondary to "image-thinking" (Yuasa. Accustomed to taciturnity, Japanese audience effectively corresponds to the performance and "completes" it in silence.

  9. Music therapy and music medicine for children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yinger, Olivia Swedberg; Gooding, Lori

    2014-07-01

    This article summarizes the research on music therapy and music medicine for children and adolescents with diagnoses commonly treated by psychiatrists. Music therapy and music medicine are defined, effects of music on the brain are described, and music therapy research in psychiatric treatment is discussed. Music therapy research with specific child/adolescent populations is summarized, including disorders usually diagnosed in childhood, substance abuse, mood/anxiety disorders, and eating disorders. Clinical implications are listed, including suggestions for health care professionals seeking to use music medicine techniques. Strengths and weaknesses of music therapy treatment are discussed, as well as areas for future research. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. A computational study on outliers in world music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetos, Emmanouil; Dixon, Simon

    2017-01-01

    The comparative analysis of world music cultures has been the focus of several ethnomusicological studies in the last century. With the advances of Music Information Retrieval and the increased accessibility of sound archives, large-scale analysis of world music with computational tools is today feasible. We investigate music similarity in a corpus of 8200 recordings of folk and traditional music from 137 countries around the world. In particular, we aim to identify music recordings that are most distinct compared to the rest of our corpus. We refer to these recordings as ‘outliers’. We use signal processing tools to extract music information from audio recordings, data mining to quantify similarity and detect outliers, and spatial statistics to account for geographical correlation. Our findings suggest that Botswana is the country with the most distinct recordings in the corpus and China is the country with the most distinct recordings when considering spatial correlation. Our analysis includes a comparison of musical attributes and styles that contribute to the ‘uniqueness’ of the music of each country. PMID:29253027

  11. Clinical investigations of receptive and expressive musical functions after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken eRosslau

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a long tradition of investigating various disorders of musical abilities after stroke. These impairments, associated with acquired amusia, can be highly selective, affecting only music perception (i.e., receptive abilities/functions or expression (music production abilities, and some patients report that these may dramatically influence their emotional state. The aim of this study was to systematically test both the melodic and rhythmic domains of music perception and expression in left- and right-sided stroke patients compared to healthy subjects. Music perception was assessed using rhythmic and melodic discrimination tasks, while tests of expressive function involved the vocal or instrumental reproduction of rhythms and melodies. Our approach revealed deficits in receptive and expressive functions in stroke patients, mediated by musical expertise. Those patients who had experienced a short period of musical training in childhood and adolescence performed better in the receptive and expressive subtests compared to those without any previous musical training. While discrimination of specific musical patterns was unimpaired after a right-sided stroke, patients with a left-sided stroke had worse results for fine melodic and rhythmic analysis. In terms of expressive testing, the most consistent results were obtained from a test that required patients to reproduce sung melodies. This implies that the means of investigating production abilities can impact the identification of deficits.

  12. A comparative phylogenetic study of genetics and folk music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamjav, Horolma; Juhász, Zoltán; Zalán, Andrea; Németh, Endre; Damdin, Bayarlkhagva

    2012-04-01

    Computer-aided comparison of folk music from different nations is one of the newest research areas. We were intrigued to have identified some important similarities between phylogenetic studies and modern folk music. First of all, both of them use similar concepts and representation tools such as multidimensional scaling for modelling relationship between populations. This gave us the idea to investigate whether these connections are merely accidental or if they mirror population migrations from the past. We raised the question; does the complex structure of musical connections display a clear picture and can this system be interpreted by the genetic analysis? This study is the first to systematically investigate the incidental genetic background of the folk music context between different populations. Paternal (42 populations) and maternal lineages (56 populations) were compared based on Fst genetic distances of the Y chromosomal and mtDNA haplogroup frequencies. To test this hypothesis, the corresponding musical cultures were also compared using an automatic overlap analysis of parallel melody styles for 31 Eurasian nations. We found that close musical relations of populations indicate close genetic distances (music; maternal lineages have a more important role in folk music traditions than paternal lineages. Furthermore, the combination of these disciplines establishing a new interdisciplinary research field of "music-genetics" can be an efficient tool to get a more comprehensive picture on the complex behaviour of populations in prehistoric time.

  13. Clinical investigations of receptive and expressive musical functions after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosslau, Ken; Steinwede, Daniel; Schröder, C; Herholz, Sibylle C; Lappe, Claudia; Dobel, Christian; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    There is a long tradition of investigating various disorders of musical abilities after stroke. These impairments, associated with acquired amusia, can be highly selective, affecting only music perception (i.e., receptive abilities/functions) or expression (music production abilities), and some patients report that these may dramatically influence their emotional state. The aim of this study was to systematically test both the melodic and rhythmic domains of music perception and expression in left- and right-sided stroke patients compared to healthy subjects. Music perception was assessed using rhythmic and melodic discrimination tasks, while tests of expressive function involved the vocal or instrumental reproduction of rhythms and melodies. Our approach revealed deficits in receptive and expressive functions in stroke patients, mediated by musical expertise. Those patients who had experienced a short period of musical training in childhood and adolescence performed better in the receptive and expressive subtests compared to those without any previous musical training. While discrimination of specific musical patterns was unimpaired after a left-sided stroke, patients with a right-sided stroke had worse results for fine melodic and rhythmic analysis. In terms of expressive testing, the most consistent results were obtained from a test that required patients to reproduce sung melodies. This implies that the means of investigating production abilities can impact the identification of deficits.

  14. A computational study on outliers in world music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteli, Maria; Benetos, Emmanouil; Dixon, Simon

    2017-01-01

    The comparative analysis of world music cultures has been the focus of several ethnomusicological studies in the last century. With the advances of Music Information Retrieval and the increased accessibility of sound archives, large-scale analysis of world music with computational tools is today feasible. We investigate music similarity in a corpus of 8200 recordings of folk and traditional music from 137 countries around the world. In particular, we aim to identify music recordings that are most distinct compared to the rest of our corpus. We refer to these recordings as 'outliers'. We use signal processing tools to extract music information from audio recordings, data mining to quantify similarity and detect outliers, and spatial statistics to account for geographical correlation. Our findings suggest that Botswana is the country with the most distinct recordings in the corpus and China is the country with the most distinct recordings when considering spatial correlation. Our analysis includes a comparison of musical attributes and styles that contribute to the 'uniqueness' of the music of each country.

  15. Assyrian Music and Iconography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Maria Paim Pozzer

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The sources about music in ancient Mesopotamia are numerous, there are hundreds of cuneiform tablets in Sumerian and Akkadian language, and also iconic representations of material culture have been rescued by archeology. The texts of varied nature show myths, staves and musical theories, displaying speci?c vocabulary about the act of musical performance, on musicians and musical instruments. In these documents, the rich iconography of war among the Assyrians is also revealing of musical practice, including in military contexts. There is evidence of foreign musicians within the Assyrian royal courts in the cuneiform tablets, in the stone

  16. Music Therapy for Seniors

    OpenAIRE

    SLUNEČKOVÁ, Petra

    2014-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with the use of music therapy in the lives of seniors. The target of this thesis is to map the possibilities of using music therapy ways with seniors and to recommend a suitable music therapy resources on the basis of the research and evaluation of obtained dates. The theoretical part describes the term "the music therapy", e.g. concept, definition, types and forms, the development of music therapy, the history, methods and techniques. This age group is defined in t...

  17. Virtual Reality Musical Instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serafin, Stefania; Erkut, Cumhur; Kojs, Juraj

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development and availability of low-cost technologies have created a wide interest in virtual reality. In the field of computer music, the term “virtual musical instruments” has been used for a long time to describe software simulations, extensions of existing musical instruments......, and ways to control them with new interfaces for musical expression. Virtual reality musical instruments (VRMIs) that include a simulated visual component delivered via a head-mounted display or other forms of immersive visualization have not yet received much attention. In this article, we present a field...

  18. Music and movement

    OpenAIRE

    Nasev, Lence

    2012-01-01

    Rhythm is one of the fundamental elements without which music would not exist. In plays with singing, a child learns to synchronize its movements with the rhythm of music from a very early age. The skill of movement plays a major role in the learning of music and thus deserves an important place in the school curriculum. In this paper, an overview is made of the most important music pedagogues who introduced movement, and at the same time perceived its importance in learning musical conte...

  19. Music as design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh

    2012-01-01

    The incorporation of the sounds of the surrounding world in music is today a familiar phenomenon on the electronic music and audio art scenes, and to some extent also in contemporary music. It is rarer for a contemporary audio or visual artist to use music as the form-giving element for a semi......-realistic event or narrative. In a way the phenomenon can be compared to Puccini's operas, or to the ground-breaking dance performances for which the choreographer Pina Bauch became famous, where musicalization produced stylizations fo everyday events. Familiar, readable events were reinforced and relocated...

  20. Library Resources in Special Areas of Music: Film Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, H. Stephen

    Intended as an orientation for music librarians unfamiliar with the film music field, this presentation addresses the most common film music questions received from library patrons, including queries about composers, soundtrack albums, the subject of the music, and scores, and describes the basic film music reference sources to consult for…

  1. Music Teachers and Music Therapists: Helping Children Together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Allyson

    2003-01-01

    Provides background information on music therapy. Discusses how music therapy works in the public school setting and offers advice to music teachers. Explores music therapy and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, addressing the benefits of having access to music therapists. (CMK)

  2. From the Functions of Music to Music Preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Thomas; Sedlmeier, Peter

    2009-01-01

    To date, not much is known about how the functions of music relate to music preference. This article examines the basic hypothesis that the strength of preference for a given kind of music depends on the degree to which that kind of music serves the needs of the listener; that is, how well the respective functions of music are fulfilled. Study 1,…

  3. Observable Flow Experience in a Two-Year-Old Japanese Child's Violin Playing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akutsu, Taichi

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated the flow experience of Jiro, a 2-year-old Japanese boy, regarding his violin playing in a social context. In this study, Jiro's violin playing was videotaped at home and during musical sessions for young children and families, guided by the author as a violinist-teacher-researcher. The method adopted a single case study…

  4. Music season coming soon

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin in collaboration with Julio Rosenfeld

    2012-01-01

    On 16 June, CERN’s music season will open with Music on the Lawn. The event is the CERN Music Club’s contribution to the Fete de la Musique and will take place on the terrace of Restaurant 1 from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. The Hardronic Festival, CERN’s long-running rock festival, will be held on the evenings of 20 and 21 July in Prévessin, on the terrace behind Restaurant 3. If you would like to help with the organisation, please contact the Music Club by e-mail: music.club@cern.ch.   The Canettes Blues Band during the 2011 Hardronic Festival. (© Christoph Balle, 2010). Summer is coming, and along with it comes the music season. CERN will be hosting its two annual rock music concerts: Music on the Lawn and the Hardronic Festival. The two events are organised by the CERN Music Club, which has been sharing the enjoyment of good music with its numerous fans for many years. “Music on the Lawn was originally created so that the members of the Mus...

  5. The Music Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2006-01-01

    http://www.njmt.no/bookreview_2006071.html "The music effect is not about a particular composer, musical style, geographic location, language, or performance group. It is, at once, about all of these" (p. 249). This book is written by two people with very different educational backgrounds. Dr...... into music physiology. We have already seen them working together in 2001 in Berger’s book Music Therapy, Sensory Integration and the Autistic Child published by Jessica Kingsley, and this time their collaboration results in a book that is about the attributes of scientific reality (physics) as embedded....... Schneck is a fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering and Dorita S. Berger, MA, is a Board Certified music therapist. They have in common that both play music and perform professionally, and together they integrate various theories from scientific reality and music aesthetic...

  6. Selling digital music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Tvede, Mich

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers the market for digital music. We claim that the combination of the MP3 format and peer-to-peer networks has made music non-excludable and this feature is essential for the understanding of the economics of the music market. We study optimal business models for selling non-exc......, the music industry should concentrate on alternative ways of creating profit such as selling access to listeners, concerts, merchandise, ringtones etc.......This paper considers the market for digital music. We claim that the combination of the MP3 format and peer-to-peer networks has made music non-excludable and this feature is essential for the understanding of the economics of the music market. We study optimal business models for selling non...

  7. Computational Music Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book provides an in-depth introduction and overview of current research in computational music analysis. Its seventeen chapters, written by leading researchers, collectively represent the diversity as well as the technical and philosophical sophistication of the work being done today...... on well-established theories in music theory and analysis, such as Forte's pitch-class set theory, Schenkerian analysis, the methods of semiotic analysis developed by Ruwet and Nattiez, and Lerdahl and Jackendoff's Generative Theory of Tonal Music. The book is divided into six parts, covering...... music analysis, the book provides an invaluable resource for researchers, teachers and students in music theory and analysis, computer science, music information retrieval and related disciplines. It also provides a state-of-the-art reference for practitioners in the music technology industry....

  8. Aesthetic responses to music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Istok, Eva; Brattico, Elvira; Jacobsen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We explored the content and structure of the cognitive, knowledge-based concept underlying aesthetic responses to music. To this aim, we asked 290 Finnish students to verbally associate the aesthetic value of music and to write down a list of appropriate adjectives within a given time limit....... No music was presented during the task. In addition, information about participants' musical background was collected. A variety of analysis techniques was used to determine the key results of our study. The adjective "beautiful" proved to be the core item of the concept under question. Interestingly......, the adjective "touching" was often listed together with "beautiful". In addition, we found music-specific vocabulary as well as adjectives related to emotions and mood states indicating that affective processes are an essential part of aesthetic responses to music. Differences between music experts and laymen...

  9. Keeping Tradition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zenhong, C.; Buwalda, P.L.

    2011-01-01

    Chinese dumplings such as Jiao Zi and Bao Zi are two of the popular traditional foods in Asia. They are usually made from wheat flour dough (rice flour or starch is sometimes used) that contains fillings. They can be steamed, boiled and fried and are consumed either as a main meal or dessert. As

  10. Music holographic physiotherapy by laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Changhuan

    1996-09-01

    Based on the relationship between music and nature, the paper compares laser and light with music sound on the principles of synergetics, describes music physically and objectively, and proposes a music holographic therapy by laser. Maybe it will have certain effects on mechanism study and clinical practice of the music therapy.

  11. Film Music. Factfile No. 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsas, Diana, Ed.; And Others

    Organizations listed here with descriptive information include film music clubs and music guilds and associations. These are followed by a representative list of schools offering film music and/or film sound courses. Sources are listed for soundtrack recordings, sound effects/production music, films on film music, and oral history programs. The…

  12. Music and Movement. Beginnings Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cindy; Moore, Thomas; Carlton, Elizabeth B.; Kranowitz, Carol Stock

    2000-01-01

    Four articles address music and movement in early childhood education: (1) "For the Love of Music--and Children"(Cindy Smith); (2) "Music: The Great Connector" (Thomas Moore); (3) "Learning through Music: The Support of Brain Research" (Elizabeth B. Carlton); and (4) "Music and Movement Bring Together Children of…

  13. The Effects of Music Salience on the Gait Performance of Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Natalie; Kempster, Cody; Doucette, Angelica; Doan, Jon B; Hu, Bin; Brown, Lesley A

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a rhythmic beat in the form of a metronome tone or beat-accentuated original music can modulate gait performance; however, it has yet to be determined whether gait modulation can be achieved using commercially available music. The current study investigated the effects of commercially available music on the walking of healthy young adults. Specific aims were (a) to determine whether commercially available music can be used to influence gait (i.e., gait velocity, stride length, cadence, stride time variability), (b) to establish the effect of music salience on gait (i.e., gait velocity, stride length, cadence, stride time variability), and (c) to examine whether music tempi differentially effected gait (i.e., gait velocity, stride length, cadence, stride time variability). Twenty-five participants walked the length of an unobstructed walkway while listening to music. Music selections differed with respect to the salience or the tempo of the music. The genre of music and artists were self-selected by participants. Listening to music while walking was an enjoyable activity that influenced gait. Specifically, salient music selections increased measures of cadence, velocity, and stride length; in contrast, gait was unaltered by the presence of non-salient music. Music tempo did not differentially affect gait performance (gait velocity, stride length, cadence, stride time variability) in these participants. Gait performance was differentially influenced by music salience. These results have implications for clinicians considering the use of commercially available music as an alternative to the traditional rhythmic auditory cues used in rehabilitation programs. © the American Music Therapy Association 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. The Japanese diet from 1975 delays senescence and prolongs life span in SAMP8 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kazushi; E, Shuang; Hatakeyama, Yu; Sakamoto, Yu; Honma, Taro; Jibu, Yuri; Kawakami, Yuki; Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Life expectancy in Japan is high, suggesting that the Japanese diet, Nihon shoku (Japanese food), has significant health benefits. However, these benefits have been called into question over the past 50 y, during which time the Japanese diet has become increasingly Westernized. The aim of the present study was to focus on senescence delay and to examine the effects of Japanese diets from different years to identify which Japanese diet is most effective in enhancing life expectancy and delaying senescence. Weekly menus from the years 1960, 1975, 1990, and 2005 were reproduced based on the National Health and Nutrition Survey in Japan and prepared as powdered foods. The senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice were fed standard laboratory chow supplemented with a 30% mix of Japanese meals from various years ad libitum throughout their lifetime. Additionally, the control group was given standard laboratory chow only, to examine the development of mice reared under standard conditions. In the group that ingested the traditional 1975 Japanese diet, life span was prolonged, senescence was delayed, and learning and memory capacities were maintained compared with the group fed the 2005 Japanese diet. The life span of the group that ingested the 1990 Japanese diet showed a tendency to be longer than SAMP8 mice fed the 2005 diet. The results of the present study suggested that the traditional Japanese diet is more effective in enhancing life expectancy and delaying senescence than the current Japanese diet. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nonlinearities and synchronization in musical acoustics and music psychology

    CERN Document Server

    Bader, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinearities are a crucial and founding principle in nearly all musical systems, may they be musical instruments, timbre or rhythm perception and production, or neural networks of music perception. This volume gives an overview about present and past research in these fields. In Musical Acoustics, on the one hand the nonlinearities in musical instruments often produce the musically interesting features. On the other, musical instruments are nonlinear by nature, and tone production is the result of synchronization and self-organization within the instruments. Furthermore, as nearly all musical instruments are driven by impulses an Impulse Pattern Formulation (IPF) is suggested, an iterative framework holding for all musical instruments. It appears that this framework is able to reproduce the complex and perceptionally most salient initial transients of musical instruments. In Music Psychology, nonlinearities are present in all areas of musical features, like pitch, timbre, or rhythm perception. In terms of r...

  16. Correlations in the population structure of music, genes and language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Steven; Savage, Patrick E.; Ko, Albert Min-Shan; Stoneking, Mark; Ko, Ying-Chin; Loo, Jun-Hun; Trejaut, Jean A.

    2014-01-01

    We present, to our knowledge, the first quantitative evidence that music and genes may have coevolved by demonstrating significant correlations between traditional group-level folk songs and mitochondrial DNA variation among nine indigenous populations of Taiwan. These correlations were of comparable magnitude to those between language and genes for the same populations, although music and language were not significantly correlated with one another. An examination of population structure for genetics showed stronger parallels to music than to language. Overall, the results suggest that music might have a sufficient time-depth to retrace ancient population movements and, additionally, that it might be capturing different aspects of population history than language. Music may therefore have the potential to serve as a novel marker of human migrations to complement genes, language and other markers. PMID:24225453

  17. Music-colour synaesthesia: Concept, context and qualia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curwen, Caroline

    2018-05-01

    This review provides a commentary on coloured-hearing arising on hearing music: music-colour synaesthesia. Although traditionally explained by the hyperconnectivity theory (Ramachandran & Hubbard, 2001a) and the disinhibited feedback theory (Grossenbacher & Lovelace, 2001) as a purely perceptual phenomenon, the review of eight coloured-hearing neuroimaging studies shows that it may not be assumed that these explanations are directly translatable to music-colour synaesthesia. The concept of 'ideaesthesia' (Nikolić, 2009) and the role of conceptual and semantic inducers challenge the likelihood of a single mechanism underlying the cause of synaesthesia and argue for a move away from a purely sensory to sensory explanation. Finally, music-colour synaesthesia forms a challenge for established philosophical theories and the position of synaesthesia is considered within the larger context of musical qualia. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Music Industry Conference Guide for Music Educators. A Supplement to the Music Educators Journal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Music Educators Journal, 1988

    1988-01-01

    This supplement is a comprehensive guide to the music industry designed for music teachers. Included are tips for contacting music businesses and suggestions on ordering music, robes, instruments, computer software, and other supplies. Includes an annotated directory of Music Industry Conference members. (JDH)

  19. Preservice Music Teachers' Attitudes toward Popular Music in the Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, D. Gregory; Gooding, Lori F.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine preservice music educators' attitudes toward popular music in the music classroom. On a survey instrument designed by the investigators, participants ("N" = 82) rated (a) the effectiveness of popular music in addressing the National Standards for Music Education, (b) the appropriateness of popular…

  20. Creative Transformation in African Art Music: A Case Study # | Adjei ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examines and analyses the significance of the style of music composition employing traditional and contemporary models noted in the solo voice and piano works of Nketia. It argues that an imaginative African contemporary composer can elect to work within the limitations of selected traditional instruments and ...

  1. A Historical Overview of Iranian Music Pedagogy (1905-2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastaninezhad, Arya

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the recent developments and changes concerning Iranian music education from the constitutional revolution of 1905 to 2014. This concentrates on the five major chronological events referred to as Nationalism, Modernism, Conservatism, Neo-Traditionalism (Shirin-navazi) and Revivalism of the Traditions. This provides a source of…

  2. Musicality Development Among Primary School Pupils in Music Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Vilde, Ilze

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Research goal. To explore the structure of musicality, to examine components that characterize musicality among primary school pupils and the pedagogic logic of its development during music lessons in primary school. As a result of the theoretical study, characterizing components and criteria of musicality among primary school pupils were researched and described and the description of musicality was broadened. The created model for music studies for facilitating the developme...

  3. TABLET (MOBILE TECHNOLOGY FOR PROFESSIONAL MUSIC EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbunova Irina B.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights issues associated with the introduction of cloud-centric and tablet (mobile devices in music education, use of which confronts the teacher-musician fundamentally new challenges. So, it's a development of practical teaching skills with the assistance of modern technology, a search of approaches to the organization of educational process, a creation of conditions for the continuity between traditional music learning and information technologies in educational process. Authors give the characteristics of cloud computing and the perspective of its use in music schools (distance learning, sharing, cloud services, etc.. Also you can see in this article the overview of some mobile applications (for OS Android and iOS and their use in the educational process.

  4. Musical Stories: Strategies for Integrating Literature and Music for Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niland, Amanda

    2007-01-01

    Humans have communicated through arts such as storytelling, music and dance throughout history, and have often used combinations of different art forms to express ideas. Just as traditional storytellers have done in many cultures through the ages, early childhood practitioners can use a variety of art forms when they share books and stories with…

  5. Dalcroze Meets Technology: Integrating Music, Movement and Visuals with the Music Paint Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijs, Luc

    2018-01-01

    New interactive music educational technologies are often seen as a 'force of change', introducing new approaches that address the shortcomings (e.g. score-based, teacher-centred and disembodied) of the so-called traditional teaching approaches. And yet, despite the growing belief in their educational potential, these new technologies have been…

  6. 2011 Japanese Nuclear Incident

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s RadNet system monitored the environmental radiation levels in the United States and parts of the Pacific following the Japanese Nuclear Incident. Learn about EPA’s response and view historical laboratory data and news releases.

  7. Japanese views on ASSET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, M [Department of Reactor Safety Research, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst. (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The presentation briefly reviews the following aspects directed to ensuring NPP safety: Japanese participation in ASSET activities; views to ASSET activities; recent operating experience in Japan; future ASSET activities.

  8. Japanese supercomputer technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzbee, B.L.; Ewald, R.H.; Worlton, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    In February 1982, computer scientists from the Los Alamos National Laboratory and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory visited several Japanese computer manufacturers. The purpose of these visits was to assess the state of the art of Japanese supercomputer technology and to advise Japanese computer vendors of the needs of the US Department of Energy (DOE) for more powerful supercomputers. The Japanese foresee a domestic need for large-scale computing capabilities for nuclear fusion, image analysis for the Earth Resources Satellite, meteorological forecast, electrical power system analysis (power flow, stability, optimization), structural and thermal analysis of satellites, and very large scale integrated circuit design and simulation. To meet this need, Japan has launched an ambitious program to advance supercomputer technology. This program is described

  9. Japanese views on ASSET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, M.

    1997-01-01

    The presentation briefly reviews the following aspects directed to ensuring NPP safety: Japanese participation in ASSET activities; views to ASSET activities; recent operating experience in Japan; future ASSET activities

  10. Is memory for music special?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulkind, Matthew D

    2009-07-01

    Although psychologists since Hermann Ebbinghaus have studied memory, research in this area has focused on visual and verbal stimuli with little attention paid to music. This bias is surprising because of the ubiquity of music in human cultures across history as well as current cultural beliefs that memory for music is "special." This paper examines the question of whether memory for music is special by addressing two related questions: First, do cultural beliefs about the mnemonic power of music stand up to empirical test? Second, can theories designed to explain memory for non-musical stimuli be applied to musical stimuli? A review of the literature suggests that music is special in some circumstances but not others and that some theories designed to explain cognitive processing of linguistic stimuli apply reasonably well to musical stimuli. Thus, although the question of whether memory for music is special remains open, the unique structure of musical stimuli strongly suggests that memory for music is indeed special.

  11. Pain, music creativity and music therapy in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, C C

    1996-01-01

    An analysis of the music therapy literature yields numerous reports to support the role of music in the alleviation of pain in palliative care. Four theoretical perspectives that support why many patients report reduced pain sensation after music therapy include: the psychological relationship between music and pain; the psychophysiological theory; spinal mechanisms involved in pain modulation; and the role of endorphins. Considerations significant to the use of music in pain relief include how music, used inappropriately, can aggravate pain sensation. Case studies, which include the use of creative music therapy techniques, point to the efficacy of music therapy in alleviating the pain experiences of both palliative care patients and their significant others.

  12. Reference Japanese man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, G.-I.; Kawamura, H.; Nakahara, Y.

    1979-01-01

    The weight of organs from autopsy cases of normal Japanese adults, children, and infants is presented for the purpose of approaching a Reference Japanese Man. The skeletal content and the daily intake of alkaline earth elements are given. A lower rate of transfer (K 2 ) to the thyroid gland of ingested radioiodine, as well as a remarkably shorter biological half-life than the data adopted by ICRP, is also proved as a result of this study. (author)

  13. The Influence of Japanese Modern Culture Value Toward Purchase Decision Making Process on Youth Society in Manado

    OpenAIRE

    Ngurawan, Ahmad Maulana; Pangemanan, Sifrid S; Tielung, Maria V.J

    2016-01-01

    The Japanese trending of new way on the modern culture now affects many aspects all around the country. From the technology aspect, film industry, music and also in fashion with odd ways. In Indonesia we are getting support by everything by in daily life, for example, in transportation, there so many Japanese products in automotive. Also, the aspect of new modern culture also is happening in Indonesia like otaku, anime, manga, and cosplay. Many incoming events helds in Indonesia from local sc...

  14. Evolving building blocks of rhythm: how human cognition creates music via cultural transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravignani, Andrea; Thompson, Bill; Grossi, Thomas; Delgado, Tania; Kirby, Simon

    2018-03-06

    Why does musical rhythm have the structure it does? Musical rhythm, in all its cross-cultural diversity, exhibits commonalities across world cultures. Traditionally, music research has been split into two fields. Some scientists focused on musicality, namely the human biocognitive predispositions for music, with an emphasis on cross-cultural similarities. Other scholars investigated music, seen as a cultural product, focusing on the variation in world musical cultures. Recent experiments found deep connections between music and musicality, reconciling these opposing views. Here, we address the question of how individual cognitive biases affect the process of cultural evolution of music. Data from two experiments are analyzed using two complementary techniques. In the experiments, participants hear drumming patterns and imitate them. These patterns are then given to the same or another participant to imitate. The structure of these initially random patterns is tracked along experimental "generations." Frequentist statistics show how participants' biases are amplified by cultural transmission, making drumming patterns more structured. Structure is achieved faster in transmission within rather than between participants. A Bayesian model approximates the motif structures participants learned and created. Our data and models suggest that individual biases for musicality may shape the cultural transmission of musical rhythm. © 2018 New York Academy of Sciences.

  15. Teaching Japanese Popular Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Shamoon

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Japanese popular culture has arrived on American college campuses as never before. Student interest in Japanese manga (comic books, anime (animated films and television shows, and video games drives much of the enrollment in Japanese courses and Japanese majors and minors. In response to student interest, as well as the establishment of popular culture as a topic of serious academic scholarship, the demand for courses on Japanese popular culture has never been higher. Yet the number of scholars specializing in the study of popular culture is still relatively small. This can potentially create problems, as faculty teach outside their expertise, and perhaps face an uncomfortable situation in which the students know more about the topic than the professor. In this article, I will offer some suggestions and advice for faculty creating a popular culture course for the first time, based on my experiences teaching undergraduates at the University of Notre Dame. The course I developed reflects my background in Japanese literature and film, and is but one example of many possible approaches to the topic. The sample syllabus and list of resources at the end of this article provide citations for all text and media sources mentioned.

  16. The Effects of Musical Experience and Hearing Loss on Solving an Audio-Based Gaming Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjetil Falkenberg Hansen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We conducted an experiment using a purposefully designed audio-based game called the Music Puzzle with Japanese university students with different levels of hearing acuity and experience with music in order to determine the effects of these factors on solving such games. A group of hearing-impaired students (n = 12 was compared with two hearing control groups with the additional characteristic of having high (n = 12 or low (n = 12 engagement in musical activities. The game was played with three sound sets or modes; speech, music, and a mix of the two. The results showed that people with hearing loss had longer processing times for sounds when playing the game. Solving the game task in the speech mode was found particularly difficult for the group with hearing loss, and while they found the game difficult in general, they expressed a fondness for the game and a preference for music. Participants with less musical experience showed difficulties in playing the game with musical material. We were able to explain the impacts of hearing acuity and musical experience; furthermore, we can promote this kind of tool as a viable way to train hearing by focused listening to sound, particularly with music.

  17. Reading the Music and Understanding the Therapeutic Process: Documentation, Analysis and Interpretation of Improvisational Music Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Parker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is concerned primarily with the challenges of presenting clinical material from improvisational music therapy. My aim is to propose a model for the transcription of music therapy material, or “musicotherapeutic objects” (comparable to Bion’s “psychoanalytic objects”, which preserves the integrated “gestalt” of the musical experience as far as possible, whilst also supporting detailed analysis and interpretation. Unwilling to resort to use of visual documentation, but aware that many important indicators in music therapy are non-sounding, I propose a richly annotated score, where traditional music notation is integrated with graphic and verbal additions, in order to document non-sounding events. This model is illustrated within the context of a clinical case with a high functioning autistic woman. The four transcriptions, together with the original audio tracks, present significant moments during the course of music therapy, attesting to the development of the dyadic relationship, with reference to John Bowlby’s concept of a “secure base” as the most appropriate dynamic environment for therapy.

  18. Materiality for Musical Expressions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindell, Rikard; Tahiroğlu, Koray; Riis, Morten S.

    2016-01-01

    Nordic universities. Electronic music instrument makers participated in providing the course. In eleven days the students designed and built interfaces for musical expressions , composed a piece, and performed at the Norberg electronic music festival. The students explored the relationship between......We organised an elven day intense course in materiality for musical expressions to explore underlying principles of New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME) in higher education. We grounded the course in different aspects of ma-teriality and gathered interdisciplinary student teams from three...... technology and possible musical expression with a strong connection to culture and place. The emphasis on performance provided closure and motivated teams to move forward in their design and artistic processes. On the basis of the course we discuss an interdisciplinary NIME course syllabus, and we infer...

  19. Music therapy in dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDermott, Orii; Crellin, Nadia; Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2013-01-01

    Objective Recent reviews on music therapy for people with dementia have been limited to attempting to evaluate whether it is effective, but there is a need for a critical assessment of the literature to provide insight into the possible mechanisms of actions of music therapy. This systematic review......, five studies investigated hormonal and physiological changes, and five studies focused on social and relational aspects of music therapy. The musical interventions in the studies were diverse, but singing featured as an important medium for change. Conclusions Evidence for short-term improvement...... in mood and reduction in behavioural disturbance was consistent, but there were no high-quality longitudinal studies that demonstrated long-term benefits of music therapy. Future music therapy studies need to define a theoretical model, include better-focused outcome measures, and discuss how the findings...

  20. Auditory expectation: the information dynamics of music perception and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Marcus T; Wiggins, Geraint A

    2012-10-01

    Following in a psychological and musicological tradition beginning with Leonard Meyer, and continuing through David Huron, we present a functional, cognitive account of the phenomenon of expectation in music, grounded in computational, probabilistic modeling. We summarize a range of evidence for this approach, from psychology, neuroscience, musicology, linguistics, and creativity studies, and argue that simulating expectation is an important part of understanding a broad range of human faculties, in music and beyond. Copyright © 2012 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  1. The Stroop effect in English-Japanese bilinguals: the effect of phonological similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiya, Hiromi; Healy, Alice F

    2008-01-01

    English-Japanese bilinguals performed a Stroop color-word interference task with both English and Japanese stimuli and responded in both English and Japanese. The Japanese stimuli were either the traditional color terms (TCTs) written in Hiragana or loanwords (LWs) from English written in Katakana. Both within-language and between-language interference were found for all combinations of stimuli and responses. The between-language interference was larger for Katakana LWs (phonologically similar to English) than for Hiragana TCTs, especially with Japanese responses. The magnitude of this phonological effect increased with self-rated reading fluency in Japanese. Overall responding was slower and the Stroop effect larger with English than with Japanese stimuli. These results suggest that unintentional lexical access elicits automatic phonological processing even with intermediate-level reading proficiency.

  2. [Developmental status and prospect of musical electroacupuncture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fan; Xu, Chun-Lan; Dong, Gui-Rong; Dong, Hong-Sheng

    2014-12-01

    Through searching domestic and foreign medical journals in CNKI, Wanfang database, VIP database and Pubmed database from January of 2003 to November of 2013, 39 articles regarding musical electroacupuncture (MEA) were analyzed. The result showed that MEA was clinically used to treat neurological and psychotic disorders; because it was combined with musical therapy and overcame the acupuncture tolerability, and MEA was superior to traditional electroacupuncture. However, problems such as low research efficiency and the mechanism of MEA superiority and the musical specificity not being revealed by research design still exist. In future, large-sample multi-center RCT researches should be performed to clarify MEA clinical efficacy. With modern science and technology and optimized study design, guided by five-element theory of TCM, researches on different musical elements and characteristics of musical pulse current as well as MEA's correlation with meridians and organs should be studied, so as to make a further exploration on MEA mechanisms and broaden the range of its clinical application.

  3. What makes us like music?

    OpenAIRE

    Schäfer, Thomas; Sedlmeier, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Why do we like the music we like and why do different people like different kinds of music? Existing models try to explain music preference as an interplay of musical features, the characteristics of the listener, and the listening context. Hereby, they refer to short-term preference decisions for a given piece of music rather than to the question why we listen to music at all and why we select a particular musical style. In this paper, it is hypothesized that the motivation for music listeni...

  4. Musical ensembles in Ancient Mesapotamia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krispijn, T.J.H.; Dumbrill, R.; Finkel, I.

    2010-01-01

    Identification of musical instruments from ancient Mesopotamia by comparing musical ensembles attested in Sumerian and Akkadian texts with depicted ensembles. Lexicographical contributions to the Sumerian and Akkadian lexicon.

  5. Modernism and tradition and the traditions of modernism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kros Džonatan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventionally, the story of musical modernism has been told in terms of a catastrophic break with the (tonal past and the search for entirely new techniques and modes of expression suitable to a new age. The resulting notion of a single, linear, modernist mainstream (predicated on the basis of a Schoenbergian model of musical progress has served to conceal a more subtle relationship between past and present. Increasingly, it is being recognized that there exist many modernisms and their various identities are forged from a continual renegotiation between past and present, between tradition(s and the avant-garde. This is especially relevant when attempting to discuss the reception of modernism outside central Europe, where the adoption of (Germanic avant-garde attitudes was often interpreted as being "unpatriotic". The case of Great Britain is examined in detail: Harrison Birtwistle’s opera The Mask of Orpheus (1973–83 forms the focus for a wider discussion of modernism within the context of late/post-modern thought.

  6. Evaluating music emotion recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturm, Bob L.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental problem with nearly all work in music genre recognition (MGR)is that evaluation lacks validity with respect to the principal goals of MGR. This problem also occurs in the evaluation of music emotion recognition (MER). Standard approaches to evaluation, though easy to implement, do...... not reliably differentiate between recognizing genre or emotion from music, or by virtue of confounding factors in signals (e.g., equalization). We demonstrate such problems for evaluating an MER system, and conclude with recommendations....

  7. Nigerian Art Music

    OpenAIRE

    Omojola, Bode; Omibiyi-Obidike, Mosunmola

    2013-01-01

    ART MUSIC IN NIGERIA is the most comprehensive book on the works of modem Nigerian composers who have been influenced by European classical music. Relying on over 500 scores, archival materials and interviews with many Nigerian composers, the author traces the historical developments of this new idiom in Nigeria and provides a critical and detailed analysis of certain works. Written in a refreshing and lucid style and amply illustrated with music examples, the book represents a milestone in m...

  8. Music: Specialized to Integrate?

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo Estêvão Andrade; Joydeep Bhattacharya

    2015-01-01

    In her paper Schaefer (2014) provides a relevant amount of behavioral and neuroimaging evidence within and outside the realm of music favoring the notion that predictive processing plays a prominent role in the coupling of perception, cognition and action, and further, that imagery and active perception are closely associated with each other. Central to this review is that research into music imagery is exceptionally suitable and informative since prediction has a prominent role in music proc...

  9. Lenguaje musical o solfeo

    OpenAIRE

    Esteve-Faubel, José-María; Espinosa Zaragoza, Juan Antonio; Molina Valero, Miguel Ángel; Botella Quirant, María Teresa

    2008-01-01

    En esta sesión se estudiará el origen del lenguaje musical y sus aportaciones a la educación musical. Objetivos del tema. Lenguaje Musical o Solfeo. Su definición. Elementos esenciales y su origen histórico. Signos musicales. Materias que comprenden la altura del sonido. La Clave. Clases de clave. Necesidad del uso de las claves.

  10. Women, New Music and the Composition of Becomings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Macarthur

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that ‘new’ music continues to replicate itself by being based on a set of outdated, inflexible practices which foster the centrality of the male, entrepreneurial, composing subject. Aesthetic distinctiveness has been muzzled because too many composers are competing for the same recognition and the same small ‘pot of money’, giving rise to musical mediocrity. The article notes that while the number of women composers studying music has increased in tertiary music institutions and points out that their representation by the Australian Music Centre has improved significantly over the past decade, these statistics are not reflected in the concert hall where women continue to be side-lined. It argues that the entrepreneurial performer is focused on the products created out of the already known and out of its masculinity and explores what would happen if music were composed out of its femininity and the unknown. It draws on Deleuze’s concept of ‘becoming’ to disturb the old ways of thinking, and to imagine a transformation of music practice which would make viable that music which has been traditionally silenced.

  11. Women, new music and the composition of becomings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarthur, Sally

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that ‘new’ music continues to replicate itself by being based on a set of outdated, inflexible practices which foster the centrality of the male, entrepreneurial, composing subject. Aesthetic distinctiveness has been muzzled because too many composers are competing for the same recognition and the same small ‘pot of money’, giving rise to musical mediocrity. The article notes that while the number of women composers studying music has increased in tertiary music institutions and points out that their representation by the Australian Music Centre has improved significantly over the past decade, these statistics are not reflected in the concert hall where women continue to be side-lined. It argues that the entrepreneurial performer is focused on the products created out of the already known and out of its masculinity and explores what would happen if music were composed out of its femininity and the unknown. It draws on Deleuze’s concept of ‘becoming’ to disturb the old ways of thinking, and to imagine a transformation of music practice which would make viable that music which has been traditionally silenced.

  12. [Traditional nostrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Shigeru

    2006-01-01

    The commercialization of drugs started toward the end of Heian period (794-1192) when not only aristocrats and monks who were traditional patrons to drug makers, but also local clans and landlords who became powerful as a result of the disbanding of aristocratic manors accumulated enough wealth to spend money on medicine. Although traveling around the country was still a dangerous endeavor, merchants assembled groups to bring lucrative foreign drugs (mainly Chinese) to remote areas. The spread of commercial drugs to common people, however, did not happen until the early Edo period (1603-1867), when the so-called barrier system was installed nationwide to make domestic travel safe. Commercialization started in large cities and gradually spread to other areas. Many nostrums popular until recently appeared in the Genroku period (1688-1703) or later. Many such nostrums were all-cures, often consisting of such active ingredients as Saussureae radix, Agalloch, or Gambir. Even in the Edo period, many people living in agricultural or fishing villages, as well as those in the lower tier, were still poor. Much of the medication available to those people was therefore made of various plant or animal-derived substances that were traditionally used as folk medicines.

  13. The representation of women in Japanese written media The representation of women in Japanese written media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiko Yasumoto

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to investigate the representation of women in Japanese society in relation to men with respect to the use of language. One selected section of the published media has been used to determine if the Japanese language still propagates the traditional role of women as being different to and beneath that of men or if there has been some change. The traditional relationship of women to men is called in Japanese dan-son jo-hi and dates back to before the Meiji era. dan-son jo-hi involves the idea that men should be respected and not women, that women have lower status than men in society. As a case study, the magazine AERA that purports to be the “Time magazine of Japan” was selected. Thirty articles published between 2000 and 2002 from “Josei” the women’s section of AERA, were examined by using three analytical techniques: Content analysis; Foregrounding analysis; Gender control and Gender image analysis. These three analyses show that the messages about a woman’s role vary from one of promoting historical traditional attitudes through to more current “Western attitudes” with respect to equal status for women. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the representation of women in Japanese society in relation to men with respect to the use of language. One selected section of the published media has been used to determine if the Japanese language still propagates the traditional role of women as being different to and beneath that of men or if there has been some change. The traditional relationship of women to men is called in Japanese dan-son jo-hi and dates back to before the Meiji era. dan-son jo-hi involves the idea that men should be respected and not women, that women have lower status than men in society. As a case study, the magazine AERA that purports to be the “Time magazine of Japan” was selected. Thirty articles published between 2000 and 2002 from “Josei” the women’s section

  14. Music and Public Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole; Juel, Knud; Ekholm, Ola

    2016-01-01

    Background: ‘Music and public health’ is a new field of study. Few scientific studies with small samples have documented health implications of musical participation. Research questions in this epidemiological study were: 1) Is there an association between self-rated health and active use of musi......: 57%. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate associations between musical background/activities and health-related indicators. Discussion: The study documents that a majority of informants use music to regulate physical and psychological states......Background: ‘Music and public health’ is a new field of study. Few scientific studies with small samples have documented health implications of musical participation. Research questions in this epidemiological study were: 1) Is there an association between self-rated health and active use of music...... in daily life? 2) What associations can be observed between musical background, uses and understanding of music as a health factor, and self-reported health? Method: Data came from the Danish Health and Morbidity Survey 2013, based on a simple random sample of 25.000 adult Danes (16+ years). Response rate...

  15. Amusia and musical functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alossa, Nicoletta; Castelli, Lorys

    2009-01-01

    Music, as language, is a universal and specific trait to humans; it is a complex ability with characteristics that are unique compared to other cognitive abilities. Nevertheless, several issues are still open to debate, such as, for example, whether music is a faculty that is independent from the rest of the cognitive system, and whether musical skills are mediated by a single mechanism or by a combination of processes that are independent from one another. Moreover, the anatomical correlations of music have yet to be clarified. The goal of this review is to illustrate the current condition of the neuropsychology of music and to describe different approaches to the study of the musical functions. Hereby, we will describe the neuropsychological findings, suggesting that music is a special function carried out by different and dedicated processes that are probably subserved by different anatomical regions of the brain. Moreover, we will review the evidence obtained by working with brain-damaged patients suffering from music agnosia, a selective impairment in music recognition. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Feminist music therapy pedagogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahna, Nicole; Swantes, Melody

    2011-01-01

    This study surveyed 188 music therapy educators regarding their views and use of feminist pedagogy and feminist music therapy. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (a) to determine how many music therapy educators used feminist pedagogy and (b) to determine if there was a relationship between......) participatory learning, (b) validation of personal experience/development of confidence, (c) political/social activism, and (d) critical thinking/ open-mindedness. The results revealed that 46% (n = 32) of participants identified as feminist music therapists and 67% (n = 46) of participants identified as using...

  17. Evaluating musical instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, D. Murray

    2014-01-01

    Scientific measurements of sound generation and radiation by musical instruments are surprisingly hard to correlate with the subtle and complex judgments of instrumental quality made by expert musicians

  18. [Music and Glaucoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plange, N

    2017-02-01

    Music may have multiple influences on the human organism. A possible therapeutic effect for patients with glaucoma has been postulated, aside from the known impact of music on the cardiovascular system, psychogenic effects and a short-term improvement in mental performance (Mozart effect). The higher level of mental stress in patients with glaucoma and type-A personality behaviour may be related to higher intraocular pressure in patients with glaucoma. Relaxing music may have a positive impact in these patients, related to a reduction in intraocular pressure or its fluctuations. However, only limited data exist on the effects of music on intraocular pressure. No clinical studies have yet been performed to investigate the effect of music or music therapy on glaucoma progression. The music of Mozart may influence visual field examinations, possibly due to a positive short term effect on mental performance. This factor needs to be addressed in studies dealing with the effect of music in glaucoma. The relevance of intraocular pressure increases in professional wind instrument players is controversial. An increased level of care might be advisable in patients with advanced glaucoma. The influences of music on humans, altered personality profiles in patients with glaucoma and the studies showing some effect of stress on intraocular pressure stress the relevance of psychological support for glaucoma patients, who are confronted with a disease with a high longterm risk of blindness. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Convolutional Neural Network Achieves Human-level Accuracy in Music Genre Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Mingwen

    2018-01-01

    Music genre classification is one example of content-based analysis of music signals. Traditionally, human-engineered features were used to automatize this task and 61% accuracy has been achieved in the 10-genre classification. However, it's still below the 70% accuracy that humans could achieve in the same task. Here, we propose a new method that combines knowledge of human perception study in music genre classification and the neurophysiology of the auditory system. The method works by trai...

  20. VIOLENCE TO WOMEN IN ENTERTAINMANT INDUSTRY and MEDIA: MUSIC PERFORMER BERGEN EXAMPLE

    OpenAIRE

    Mihalis KUYUCU

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to make emphasize how the traditional printed media use violence to woman on the example of music performer Bergen. Women are mostly regarded with their sexuality more than their artistic performance in entertainment industry. In music industry which is a part of entertainment industry women face violence, discrimination and abuse in their carrier, These things sometimes can cost to the life of a woman. In this search the music performer Bergen and the violence that s...