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Sample records for track reconstructing low-latency

  1. A track reconstructing low-latency trigger processor for high-energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuveland, Jan de

    2009-01-01

    The detection and analysis of the large number of particles emerging from high-energy collisions between atomic nuclei is a major challenge in experimental heavy-ion physics. Efficient trigger systems help to focus the analysis on relevant events. A primary objective of the Transition Radiation Detector of the ALICE experiment at the LHC is to trigger on high-momentum electrons. In this thesis, a trigger processor is presented that employs massive parallelism to perform the required online event reconstruction within 2 μs to contribute to the Level-1 trigger decision. Its three-stage hierarchical architecture comprises 109 nodes based on FPGA technology. Ninety processing nodes receive data from the detector front-end at an aggregate net bandwidth of 2.16 Tbit/s via 1080 optical links. Using specifically developed components and interconnections, the system combines high bandwidth with minimum latency. The employed tracking algorithm three-dimensionally reassembles the track segments found in the detector's drift chambers based on explicit value comparisons, calculates the momentum of the originating particles from the course of the reconstructed tracks, and finally leads to a trigger decision. The architecture is capable of processing up to 20 000 track segments in less than 2 μs with high detection efficiency and reconstruction precision for high-momentum particles. As a result, this thesis shows how a trigger processor performing complex online track reconstruction within tight real-time requirements can be realized. The presented hardware has been built and is in continuous data taking operation in the ALICE experiment. (orig.)

  2. A track reconstructing low-latency trigger processor for high-energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuveland, Jan de

    2009-09-17

    The detection and analysis of the large number of particles emerging from high-energy collisions between atomic nuclei is a major challenge in experimental heavy-ion physics. Efficient trigger systems help to focus the analysis on relevant events. A primary objective of the Transition Radiation Detector of the ALICE experiment at the LHC is to trigger on high-momentum electrons. In this thesis, a trigger processor is presented that employs massive parallelism to perform the required online event reconstruction within 2 {mu}s to contribute to the Level-1 trigger decision. Its three-stage hierarchical architecture comprises 109 nodes based on FPGA technology. Ninety processing nodes receive data from the detector front-end at an aggregate net bandwidth of 2.16 Tbit/s via 1080 optical links. Using specifically developed components and interconnections, the system combines high bandwidth with minimum latency. The employed tracking algorithm three-dimensionally reassembles the track segments found in the detector's drift chambers based on explicit value comparisons, calculates the momentum of the originating particles from the course of the reconstructed tracks, and finally leads to a trigger decision. The architecture is capable of processing up to 20 000 track segments in less than 2 {mu}s with high detection efficiency and reconstruction precision for high-momentum particles. As a result, this thesis shows how a trigger processor performing complex online track reconstruction within tight real-time requirements can be realized. The presented hardware has been built and is in continuous data taking operation in the ALICE experiment. (orig.)

  3. A Track Reconstructing Low-latency Trigger Processor for High-energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067518

    2009-01-01

    The detection and analysis of the large number of particles emerging from high-energy collisions between atomic nuclei is a major challenge in experimental heavy-ion physics. Efficient trigger systems help to focus the analysis on relevant events. A primary objective of the Transition Radiation Detector of the ALICE experiment at the LHC is to trigger on high-momentum electrons. In this thesis, a trigger processor is presented that employs massive parallelism to perform the required online event reconstruction within 2 µs to contribute to the Level-1 trigger decision. Its three-stage hierarchical architecture comprises 109 nodes based on FPGA technology. Ninety processing nodes receive data from the detector front-end at an aggregate net bandwidth of 2.16 Tbps via 1080 optical links. Using specifically developed components and interconnections, the system combines high bandwidth with minimum latency. The employed tracking algorithm three-dimensionally reassembles the track segments found in the detector's dr...

  4. Detailed analysis of latencies in image-based dynamic MLC tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Cho, Byungchul; Sawant, Amit; Ruan, Dan; Keall, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    calculation (16 ms), and MLC adjustment (52 ms) were considerably faster. For ΔT image =1000 ms, the total time from image acquisition to completed MLC adjustment increased to 1030±62 ms (MV) and 1330±52 ms (kV) mainly because of delayed image file writing. The MLC adjustment duration was constant 52 ms (±3 ms) for MLC adjustments below 1.1 mm and increased linearly for larger MLC adjustments. Conclusions: A method for detailed time analysis of each individual real-time position signal for DMLC tracking has been developed and applied to image-based tracking. The method allows identification of the major contributors to latency and therefore a focus for reducing this latency. The method could be an important tool for the reconstruction of the delivered target dose during DMLC tracking as it provides synchronization between target motion and MLC motion.

  5. Detailed analysis of latencies in image-based dynamic MLC tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Cho, Byungchul; Sawant, Amit; Ruan, Dan; Keall, Paul J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Oncology and Department of Medical Physics, Aarhus University Hospital, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    ), MLC position calculation (16 ms), and MLC adjustment (52 ms) were considerably faster. For {Delta}T{sub image}=1000 ms, the total time from image acquisition to completed MLC adjustment increased to 1030{+-}62 ms (MV) and 1330{+-}52 ms (kV) mainly because of delayed image file writing. The MLC adjustment duration was constant 52 ms ({+-}3 ms) for MLC adjustments below 1.1 mm and increased linearly for larger MLC adjustments. Conclusions: A method for detailed time analysis of each individual real-time position signal for DMLC tracking has been developed and applied to image-based tracking. The method allows identification of the major contributors to latency and therefore a focus for reducing this latency. The method could be an important tool for the reconstruction of the delivered target dose during DMLC tracking as it provides synchronization between target motion and MLC motion.

  6. An "artificial retina" processor for track reconstruction at the full LHC crossing rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abba, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Caponio, F.; Cenci, R.; Citterio, M.; Cusimano, A.; Fu, J.; Geraci, A.; Grizzuti, M.; Lusardi, N.; Marino, P.; Morello, M. J.; Neri, N.; Ninci, D.; Petruzzo, M.; Piucci, A.; Punzi, G.; Ristori, L.; Spinella, F.; Stracka, S.; Tonelli, D.; Walsh, J.

    2016-07-01

    We present the latest results of an R&D study for a specialized processor capable of reconstructing, in a silicon pixel detector, high-quality tracks from high-energy collision events at 40 MHz. The processor applies a highly parallel pattern-recognition algorithm inspired to quick detection of edges in mammals visual cortex. After a detailed study of a real-detector application, demonstrating that online reconstruction of offline-quality tracks is feasible at 40 MHz with sub-microsecond latency, we are implementing a prototype using common high-bandwidth FPGA devices.

  7. Scalla: Structured Cluster Architecture for Low Latency Access

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanushevsky, Andrew; Wang, Daniel L.; /SLAC

    2012-03-20

    Scalla is a distributed low-latency file access system that incorporates novel techniques that minimize latency and maximize scalability over a large distributed system with a distributed namespace. Scalla's techniques have shown to be effective in nearly a decade of service for the high-energy physics community using commodity hardware and interconnects. We describe the two components used in Scalla that are instrumental in its ability to provide low-latency, fault-tolerant name resolution and load distribution, and enable its use as a high-throughput, low-latency communication layer in the Qserv system, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope's (LSST's) prototype astronomical query system. Scalla arguably exceeded its three main design objectives: low latency, scaling, and recoverability. In retrospect, these objectives were met using a simple but effective design. Low latency was met by uniformly using linear or constant time algorithms in all high-use paths, avoiding locks whenever possible, and using compact data structures to maximize the memory caching efficiency. Scaling was achieved by architecting the system as a 64-ary tree. Nodes can be added easily and as the number of nodes increases, search performance increases at an exponential rate. Recoverability is inherent in that no permanent state information is maintained and whatever state information is needed it can be quickly constructed or reconstructed in real time. This allows dynamic changes in a cluster of servers with little impact on over-all performance or usability. Today, Scalla is being deployed in environments and for uses that were never conceived in 2001. This speaks well for the systems adaptability but the underlying reason is that the system can meet its three fundamental objectives at the same time.

  8. An “artificial retina” processor for track reconstruction at the full LHC crossing rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abba, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Caponio, F.; Cenci, R.; Citterio, M.; Cusimano, A.; Fu, J.; Geraci, A.; Grizzuti, M.; Lusardi, N.; Marino, P.; Morello, M.J.; Neri, N.; Ninci, D.; Petruzzo, M.; Piucci, A.; Punzi, G.; Ristori, L.; Spinella, F.

    2016-01-01

    We present the latest results of an R&D study for a specialized processor capable of reconstructing, in a silicon pixel detector, high-quality tracks from high-energy collision events at 40 MHz. The processor applies a highly parallel pattern-recognition algorithm inspired to quick detection of edges in mammals visual cortex. After a detailed study of a real-detector application, demonstrating that online reconstruction of offline-quality tracks is feasible at 40 MHz with sub-microsecond latency, we are implementing a prototype using common high-bandwidth FPGA devices.

  9. An “artificial retina” processor for track reconstruction at the full LHC crossing rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abba, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Sez. di Milano, Milano (Italy); Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Bedeschi, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Sez. di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Caponio, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Sez. di Milano, Milano (Italy); Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Cenci, R., E-mail: riccardo.cenci@pi.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Sez. di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy); Citterio, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Sez. di Milano, Milano (Italy); Cusimano, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Sez. di Milano, Milano (Italy); Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Fu, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Sez. di Milano, Milano (Italy); Geraci, A.; Grizzuti, M.; Lusardi, N. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Sez. di Milano, Milano (Italy); Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Marino, P.; Morello, M.J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Sez. di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy); Neri, N. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Sez. di Milano, Milano (Italy); Ninci, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Sez. di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Università di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Petruzzo, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Sez. di Milano, Milano (Italy); Università di Milano, Milano (Italy); Piucci, A.; Punzi, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Sez. di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Università di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Ristori, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); Spinella, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Sez. di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); and others

    2016-07-11

    We present the latest results of an R&D study for a specialized processor capable of reconstructing, in a silicon pixel detector, high-quality tracks from high-energy collision events at 40 MHz. The processor applies a highly parallel pattern-recognition algorithm inspired to quick detection of edges in mammals visual cortex. After a detailed study of a real-detector application, demonstrating that online reconstruction of offline-quality tracks is feasible at 40 MHz with sub-microsecond latency, we are implementing a prototype using common high-bandwidth FPGA devices.

  10. Advanced LIGO low-latency searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanner, Jonah; LIGO Scientific Collaboration, Virgo Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Advanced LIGO recently made the first detection of gravitational waves from merging binary black holes. The signal was first identified by a low-latency analysis, which identifies gravitational-wave transients within a few minutes of data collection. More generally, Advanced LIGO transients are sought with a suite of automated tools, which collectively identify events, evaluate statistical significance, estimate source position, and attempt to characterize source properties. This low-latency effort is enabling a broad multi-messenger approach to the science of compact object mergers and other transients. This talk will give an overview of the low-latency methodology and recent results.

  11. The artificial retina for track reconstruction at the LHC crossing rate

    CERN Document Server

    Abba, A.; Citterio, M.; Caponio, F.; Cusimano, A.; Geraci, A.; Marino, P.; Morello, M.J.; Neri, N.; Punzi, G.; Piucci, A.; Ristori, L.; Spinella, F.; Stracka, S.; Tonelli, D.

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of an R&D study for a specialized processor capable of precisely reconstructing events with hundreds of charged-particle tracks in pixel and silicon strip detectors at $40\\,\\rm MHz$, thus suitable for processing LHC events at the full crossing frequency. For this purpose we design and test a massively parallel pattern-recognition algorithm, inspired to the current understanding of the mechanisms adopted by the primary visual cortex of mammals in the early stages of visual-information processing. The detailed geometry and charged-particle's activity of a large tracking detector are simulated and used to assess the performance of the artificial retina algorithm. We find that high-quality tracking in large detectors is possible with sub-microsecond latencies when the algorithm is implemented in modern, high-speed, high-bandwidth FPGA devices.

  12. The artificial retina for track reconstruction at the LHC crossing rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abba, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Citterio, M.; Caponio, F.; Cusimano, A.; Geraci, A.; Marino, P.; Morello, M. J.; Neri, N.; Punzi, G.; Piucci, A.; Ristori, L.; Spinella, F.; Stracka, S.; Tonelli, D.

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of an R&D study for a specialized processor capable of precisely reconstructing events with hundreds of charged-particle tracks in pixel and silicon strip detectors at 40 MHz, thus suitable for processing LHC events at the full crossing frequency. For this purpose we design and test a massively parallel pattern-recognition algorithm, inspired to the current understanding of the mechanisms adopted by the primary visual cortex of mammals in the early stages of visual-information processing. The detailed geometry and charged-particle's activity of a large tracking detector are simulated and used to assess the performance of the artificial retina algorithm. We find that high-quality tracking in large detectors is possible with sub-microsecond latencies when the algorithm is implemented in modern, high-speed, high-bandwidth FPGA devices.

  13. Simulation and track reconstruction for beam telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Maqbool, Salman

    2017-01-01

    Beam telescopes are used for testing new detectors under development. Sensors are placed and a particle beam is passed through them. To test these novel detectors and determine their properties, the particle tracks need to be reconstructed from the known detectors in the telescope. Based on the reconstructed track, it’s predicted hits on the Device under Test (DUT) are compared with the actual hits on the DUT. Several methods exist for track reconstruction, but most of them don’t account for the effects of multiple scattering. General Broken Lines is one such algorithm which incorporates these effects during reconstruction. The aim of this project was to simulate the beam telescope and extend the track reconstruction framework for the FE-I4 telescope, which takes these effects into account. Section 1 introduces the problem, while section 2 focuses on beam telescopes. This is followed by the Allpix2 simulation framework in Section 3. And finally, Section 4 introduces the Proteus track reconstruction framew...

  14. Simulation and Track Reconstruction for Beam Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Maqbool, Salman

    2017-01-01

    Beam telescopes are an important tool to test new detectors under development in a particle beam. To test these novel detectors and determine their properties, the particle tracks need to be reconstructed from the known detectors in the telescope. Based on the reconstructed track, its predicted position on the Device under Test (DUT) are compared with the actual hits on the DUT. Several methods exist for track reconstruction, but most of them do not account for the effects of multiple scattering. General Broken Lines is one such algorithm which incorporates these effects during reconstruction. The aim of this project was to simulate the beam telescope and extend the track reconstruction framework for the FE-I4 telescope, which takes these effects into account. Section 1 introduces the problem, while section 2 focuses on beam telescopes. This is followed by the Allpix2 simulation framework in Section 3. And finally, Section 4 introduces the Proteus track reconstruction framework along with the General Broken ...

  15. Track reconstruction in CMS high luminosity environment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067159

    2016-01-01

    The CMS tracker is the largest silicon detector ever built, covering 200 square meters and providing an average of 14 high-precision measurements per track. Tracking is essential for the reconstruction of objects like jets, muons, electrons and tau leptons starting from the raw data from the silicon pixel and strip detectors. Track reconstruction is widely used also at trigger level as it improves objects tagging and resolution.The CMS tracking code is organized in several levels, known as iterative steps, each optimized to reconstruct a class of particle trajectories, as the ones of particles originating from the primary vertex or displaced tracks from particles resulting from secondary vertices. Each iterative step consists of seeding, pattern recognition and fitting by a kalman filter, and a final filtering and cleaning. Each subsequent step works on hits not yet associated to a reconstructed particle trajectory.The CMS tracking code is continuously evolving to make the reconstruction computing load compat...

  16. Track reconstruction in CMS high luminosity environment

    CERN Document Server

    Goetzmann, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The CMS tracker is the largest silicon detector ever built, covering 200 square meters and providing an average of 14 high-precision measurements per track. Tracking is essential for the reconstruction of objects like jets, muons, electrons and tau leptons starting from the raw data from the silicon pixel and strip detectors. Track reconstruction is widely used also at trigger level as it improves objects tagging and resolution.The CMS tracking code is organized in several levels, known as iterative steps, each optimized to reconstruct a class of particle trajectories, as the ones of particles originating from the primary vertex or displaced tracks from particles resulting from secondary vertices. Each iterative step consists of seeding, pattern recognition and fitting by a kalman filter, and a final filtering and cleaning. Each subsequent step works on hits not yet associated to a reconstructed particle trajectory.The CMS tracking code is continuously evolving to make the reconstruction computing load compat...

  17. Track reconstruction method in a small volume self-shunted streamer chamber - analysis of the errors for low energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parizet, M.J.; Augerat, J.; Avan, M.; Ballet, M.; Vialle, M.

    1977-01-01

    A programme has been worked out to reconstruct electron tracks of low energy (from 100 keV to 2 MeV) curved by a magnetic field in a small streamer chamber (size 10x11x51 cm 3 ). Before a study of the problems involved in the experimental set-up, the geometrical programme is described and the different errors are evaluated. Finally the accuracies on kinetic energies and angles which can be obtained for low energy elctron tracks are given. (Auth.)

  18. Online track reconstruction at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amerio, Silvia; Bettini, Marco; Nicoletto, Marino; Crescioli, Francesco; Bucciantonio, Martina; DELL'ORSO, Mauro; Piendibene, Marco; VOLPI, Guido; Annovi, Alberto; Catastini, Pierluigi; Giannetti, Paola; Lucchesi, Donatella

    2010-01-01

    Real time event reconstruction plays a fundamental role in High Energy Physics experiments. Reducing the rate of data to be saved on tape from millions to hundreds per second is critical. In order to increase the purity of the collected samples, rate reduction has to be coupled with the capability to simultaneously perform a first selection of the most interesting events. A fast and efficient online track reconstruction is important to effectively trigger on leptons and/or displaced tracks from b-quark decays. This talk will be an overview of online tracking techniques in different HEP environments: we will show how H1 experiment at HERA faced the challenges of online track reconstruction implementing pattern matching and track linking algorithms on CAMs and FPGAs in the Fast Track Processor (FTT). The pattern recognition technique is also at the basis of the Silicon Vertex Trigger (SVT) at the CDF experiment at Tevatron: coupled to a very fast fitting phase, SVT allows to trigger on displaced tracks, thus greatly increasing the efficiency for the hadronic B decay modes. A recent upgrade of the SVT track fitter, the Giga-fitter, can perform more than 1 fit/ns and further improves the CDF online trigger capabilities at high luminosity. At SLHC, where luminosities will be 2 orders of magnitude greater than Tevatron, online tracking will be much more challenging: we will describe CMS future plans for a Level-1 track trigger and the Fast Tracker (FTK) processor at the ATLAS experiment, based on the Giga-fitter architecture and designed to provide high quality tracks reconstructed over the entire detector in time for a Level-2 trigger decision.luminosity. At SLHC, where luminosities will be 2 orders of magnitude greater than Tevatron, online tracking will be much more challenging: we will describe CMS future plans for a Level-1 track trigger and the Fast Tracker (FTK) processor at the Atlas experiment, based on the Giga-fitter architecture and designed to provide high

  19. Reconstructing events, from electronic signals to tracks

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Reconstructing tracks in the events taken by LHC experiments is one of the most challenging and computationally expensive software tasks to be carried out in the data processing chain. A typical LHC event is composed of multiple p-p interactions, each leaving signals from many charged particles in the detector and jus building up an environment of unprecedented complexity. In the lecture I will give an overview of event reconstruction in a typical High Energy Physics experiment. After an introduction to particle tracking detectors I will discuss the concepts and techniques required to master the tracking challenge at the LHC. I will explain how track propagation in a realistic detector works, present different techniques for track fitting and track finding. At the end we will see how all of those techniques play together in the ATLAS track reconstruction application.

  20. Detector independent cellular automaton algorithm for track reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kisel, Ivan; Kulakov, Igor; Zyzak, Maksym [Goethe Univ. Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    Track reconstruction is one of the most challenging problems of data analysis in modern high energy physics (HEP) experiments, which have to process per second of the order of 10{sup 7} events with high track multiplicity and density, registered by detectors of different types and, in many cases, located in non-homogeneous magnetic field. Creation of reconstruction package common for all experiments is considered to be important in order to consolidate efforts. The cellular automaton (CA) track reconstruction approach has been used successfully in many HEP experiments. It is very simple, efficient, local and parallel. Meanwhile it is intrinsically independent of detector geometry and good candidate for common track reconstruction. The CA implementation for the CBM experiment has been generalized and applied to the ALICE ITS and STAR HFT detectors. Tests with simulated collisions have been performed. The track reconstruction efficiencies are at the level of 95% for majority of the signal tracks for all detectors.

  1. Track Simulation and Reconstruction in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Salzburger, Andreas; Elsing, Markus

    The reconstruction and simulation of particle trajectories is an inevitable part of the analysis strate- gies for data taken with the ATLAS detector. Many aspects and necessary parts of a high-quality track reconstruction will be presented and discussed in this work. At first, the technical realisation of the data model and the reconstruction geometry will be given; the reconstruction geometry is charac- terised by a newly developed navigation model and an automated procedure for the synchronisation of the detailed simulation geometry description with the simplified reconstruction geometry model, which allows a precise description of the tracker material in track reconstruction. Both components help the coherent and fast integration of material effects in a newly established track extrapolation package, that is discussed in the following. The extrapolation engine enables a highly precise trans- port of the track parameterisation and the associated covariances through the complex magnetic field and the detec...

  2. Integer-valued Lévy processes and low latency financial econometrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole; Pollard, David G.; Shephard, Neil

    Motivated by features of low latency data in financial econometrics we study in detail integervalued Lévy processes as the basis of price processes for high frequency econometrics. We propose using models built out of the difference of two subordinators. We apply these models in practice to low...... latency data for a variety of different types of futures contracts.futures markets, high frequency econometrics, low latency data, negative binomial, Skellam, tempered stable...

  3. Testbeam results of the first real-time embedded tracking system with artificial retina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neri, N., E-mail: nicola.neri@mi.infn.it; Abba, A.; Caponio, F.; Citterio, M.; Coelli, S.; Fu, J.; Merli, A.; Monti, M.; Petruzzo, M.

    2017-02-11

    We present the testbeam results of the first real-time embedded tracking system based on artificial retina algorithm. The tracking system prototype is capable of fast track reconstruction with a latency of the response below 1 μs and track parameter resolutions that are comparable with the offline results. The artificial retina algorithm was implemented in hardware in a custom data acquisition board based on commercial FPGA. The system was tested successfully using a 180 GeV/c proton beam at the CERN SPS with a maximum track rate of about 280 kHz. Online track parameters were found in good agreement with offline results and with the simulated response. - Highlights: • First real-time tracking system based on artificial retina algorithm tested on beam. • Fast track reconstruction within one microsecond latency and offline like quality. • Fast tracking algorithm implemented in commercial FPGAs.

  4. Optimisation of the ATLAS Track Reconstruction Software for Run-2

    CERN Document Server

    Salzburger, Andreas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Track reconstruction is one of the most complex element of the reconstruction of events recorded by ATLAS from collisions delivered by the LHC. It is the most time consuming reconstruction component in high luminosity environments. The flat budget projections for computing resources for Run-2 of the LHC together with the demands of reconstructing higher pile-up collision data at rates more than double those in Run-1 (an increase from 400 Hz to 1 kHz in trigger output) have put stringent requirements on the track reconstruction software. The ATLAS experiment has performed a two year long software campaign which aimed to reduce the reconstruction rate by a factor of three to meet the resource limitations for Run-2: the majority of the changes to achieve this were improvements to the track reconstruction software. The CPU processing time of ATLAS track reconstruction was reduced by more than a factor of three during this campaign without any loss of output information of the track reconstruction. We present the ...

  5. Track reconstruction in liquid hydrogen ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbekov, V.I.; Baranov, A.M.; Krasnokutski, R.N.; Perelygin, V.P.; Rasuvaev, E.A.; Shuvalov, R.S.; Zhigunov, V.P.; Lebedenko, V.N.; Stern, B.E.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown that particle track parameters can be reconstructed by the currents in the anode cells of the ionization chamber. The calculations are carried out for the chamber with 10 cm anode-cathode gap width. For simplicity a two-dimensional chamber model is used. To make the calculations simpler the charge density along the track is considered to be constant and equal to 10 4 electrons/mm. The drift velocity of electrons is assumed to be 5x10 6 cm/s. The anode is devided into cells 2 cm in width. The events in the chamber is defined with the coordinates X and Z of the event vertex, polar angles THETA of each track and track length l. The coordinates x, y and track angle THETA are reconstructed by currents with errors of up to millimetre and milliradian. The reconstruction errors are proportional to noise levels of electronics and also depend on the track geometry and argon purification. The energy resolution of the chamber is calculated for high energy electrons by means of computer program based on a Monter-Carlo method. The conclusion is made that the energy resolution depends on the gap width as a square root. Two ways to solve the track reconstruction problem are considered: 1. the initial charge density is determined by measuring the charges induced in anode strips at some discrete moments of time; 2. the evaluation of the parameters ia made by traditional minimization technique. The second method is applicable only for a not very large number of hypothesis, but it is less time consuming

  6. Low-latency situational awareness for UxV platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berends, David C.

    2012-06-01

    Providing high quality, low latency video from unmanned vehicles through bandwidth-limited communications channels remains a formidable challenge for modern vision system designers. SRI has developed a number of enabling technologies to address this, including the use of SWaP-optimized Systems-on-a-Chip which provide Multispectral Fusion and Contrast Enhancement as well as H.264 video compression. Further, the use of salience-based image prefiltering prior to image compression greatly reduces output video bandwidth by selectively blurring non-important scene regions. Combined with our customization of the VLC open source video viewer for low latency video decoding, SRI developed a prototype high performance, high quality vision system for UxV application in support of very demanding system latency requirements and user CONOPS.

  7. ACTS: from ATLAS software towards a common track reconstruction software

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00349786; The ATLAS collaboration; Salzburger, Andreas; Kiehn, Moritz; Hrdinka, Julia; Calace, Noemi

    2017-01-01

    Reconstruction of charged particles' trajectories is a crucial task for most particle physics experiments. The high instantaneous luminosity achieved at the LHC leads to a high number of proton-proton collisions per bunch crossing, which has put the track reconstruction software of the LHC experiments through a thorough test. Preserving track reconstruction performance under increasingly difficult experimental conditions, while keeping the usage of computational resources at a reasonable level, is an inherent problem for many HEP experiments. Exploiting concurrent algorithms and using multivariate techniques for track identification are the primary strategies to achieve that goal. Starting from current ATLAS software, the ACTS project aims to encapsulate track reconstruction software into a generic, framework- and experiment-independent software package. It provides a set of high-level algorithms and data structures for performing track reconstruction tasks as well as fast track simulation. The software is de...

  8. Low-momentum track finding in Belle II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lettenbichler, J; Frühwirth, R; Nadler, M; Glattauer, R

    2012-01-01

    The Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) of the Belle II experiment is a newly developed device with four measurement layers. Track finding in the SVD will be done both in conjunction with the Central Drift Chamber and in stand-alone mode. The reconstruction of very-low-momentum tracks in stand-alone mode is a big challenge, especially in view of the low redundancy and the large expected background. We describe an approach for track finding in this domain, where a cellular automaton and a Kalman filter is combined with a Hopfield network which finds an optimal subset of non-overlapping tracks. We present results on simulated data and evaluate them in terms of efficiency and purity.

  9. Low-Latency Science Exploration of Planetary Bodies: How ISS Might Be Used as Part of a Low-Latency Analog Campaign for Human Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thronson, Harley; Valinia, Azita; Bleacher, Jacob; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Garvin, Jim; Petro, Noah

    2014-01-01

    We suggest that the International Space Station be used to examine the application and validation of low-latency telepresence for surface exploration from space as an alternative, precursor, or potentially as an adjunct to astronaut "boots on the ground." To this end, controlled experiments that build upon and complement ground-based analog field studies will be critical for assessing the effects of different latencies (0 to 500 milliseconds), task complexity, and alternate forms of feedback to the operator. These experiments serve as an example of a pathfinder for NASA's roadmap of missions to Mars with low-latency telerobotic exploration as a precursor to astronaut's landing on the surface to conduct geological tasks.

  10. ACTS: from ATLAS software towards a common track reconstruction software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumpert, C.; Salzburger, A.; Kiehn, M.; Hrdinka, J.; Calace, N.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    Reconstruction of charged particles’ trajectories is a crucial task for most particle physics experiments. The high instantaneous luminosity achieved at the LHC leads to a high number of proton-proton collisions per bunch crossing, which has put the track reconstruction software of the LHC experiments through a thorough test. Preserving track reconstruction performance under increasingly difficult experimental conditions, while keeping the usage of computational resources at a reasonable level, is an inherent problem for many HEP experiments. Exploiting concurrent algorithms and using multivariate techniques for track identification are the primary strategies to achieve that goal. Starting from current ATLAS software, the ACTS project aims to encapsulate track reconstruction software into a generic, framework- and experiment-independent software package. It provides a set of high-level algorithms and data structures for performing track reconstruction tasks as well as fast track simulation. The software is developed with special emphasis on thread-safety to support parallel execution of the code and data structures are optimised for vectorisation to speed up linear algebra operations. The implementation is agnostic to the details of the detection technologies and magnetic field configuration which makes it applicable to many different experiments.

  11. Three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry using dynamic vision sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borer, D.; Delbruck, T.; Rösgen, T.

    2017-12-01

    A fast-flow visualization method is presented based on tracking neutrally buoyant soap bubbles with a set of neuromorphic cameras. The "dynamic vision sensors" register only the changes in brightness with very low latency, capturing fast processes at a low data rate. The data consist of a stream of asynchronous events, each encoding the corresponding pixel position, the time instant of the event and the sign of the change in logarithmic intensity. The work uses three such synchronized cameras to perform 3D particle tracking in a medium sized wind tunnel. The data analysis relies on Kalman filters to associate the asynchronous events with individual tracers and to reconstruct the three-dimensional path and velocity based on calibrated sensor information.

  12. Hopfield neural network in HEP track reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muresan, R.; Pentia, M.

    1997-01-01

    In experimental particle physics, pattern recognition problems, specifically for neural network methods, occur frequently in track finding or feature extraction. Track finding is a combinatorial optimization problem. Given a set of points in Euclidean space, one tries the reconstruction of particle trajectories, subject to smoothness constraints.The basic ingredients in a neural network are the N binary neurons and the synaptic strengths connecting them. In our case the neurons are the segments connecting all possible point pairs.The dynamics of the neural network is given by a local updating rule wich evaluates for each neuron the sign of the 'upstream activity'. An updating rule in the form of sigmoid function is given. The synaptic strengths are defined in terms of angle between the segments and the lengths of the segments implied in the track reconstruction. An algorithm based on Hopfield neural network has been developed and tested on the track coordinates measured by silicon microstrip tracking system

  13. Track reconstruction at the ILC: the ILD tracking software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaede, Frank; Aplin, Steven; Rosemann, Christoph; Voutsinas, Georgios; Glattauer, Robin

    2014-01-01

    One of the key requirements for Higgs physics at the International Linear Collider ILC is excellent track reconstruction with very good momentum and impact parameter resolution. ILD is one of the two detector concepts at the ILC. Its central tracking system comprises of an outer Si-tracker, a highly granular TPC, an intermediate silicon tracker and a pixel vertex detector, and it is complemented by silicon tracking disks in the forward direction. Large hit densities from beam induced coherent electron-positron pairs at the ILC pose an additional challenge to the pattern recognition algorithms. We present the recently developed new ILD tracking software, the pattern recognition algorithms that are using clustering techniques, Cellular Automatons and Kalman filter based track extrapolation. The performance of the ILD tracking system is evaluated using a detailed simulation including dead material, gaps and imperfections.

  14. STAR reconstruction improvements for tracking with the heavy flavor tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Jason C.; Lauret, Jérôme; Perevotchikov, Victor; Smirnov, Dmitri; Van Buren, Gene

    2017-10-01

    The reconstruction and identification of charmed hadron decays provides an important tool for the study of heavy quark behavior in the Quark Gluon Plasma. Such measurements require high resolution to topologically identify decay daughters at vertices displaced demands on track reconstruction software. To enable these measurements at RHIC, the STAR experiment has designed and employed the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT). It is composed of silicon-based tracking detectors, providing four layers of high-precision position measurements which are used in combination with hits from the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) to reconstruct track candidates. The STAR integrated tracking software (Sti) has delivered a decade of world-class physics. It was designed to leverage the discrete azimuthal symmetry of the detector and its simple radial ordering of components, permitting a flat representation of the detector geometry in terms of concentric cylinders and planes, and an approximate track propagation code. These design choices reflected a careful balancing of competing priorities, trading precision for speed in track reconstruction. To simplify the task of integrating new detectors, tools were developed to automatically generate the Sti geometry model, tying both reconstruction and simulation to the single source AgML geometry model. The increased precision and complexity of the HFT detector required a careful reassessment of this single geometry path and implementation choices. In this paper we will discuss the test suite and regression tools developed to improve reconstruction with the HFT, our lessons learned in tracking with high precision detectors and the tradeoffs between precision, speed and ease of use which were required.

  15. Track reconstruction in the CMS experiment for the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2087955; Innocente, Vincenzo

    Tracking is one of the crucial parts in the event reconstruction because of its importance in the estimation of particle momenta, their identification, and in the estimation of decay vertices. This task is very challenging at the LHC, given the hundreds or even thousands of particles generated in each bunch crossing. Track reconstruction in CMS was developed following an iterative philosophy. It uses an adaptation of the combinatorial KF algorithm to allow pattern recognition and track fitting to occur in the same framework. For ttbar events under typical Run-1 pile-up conditions, the average track reconstruction efficiency for charged particles with transverse momenta of $p_T > 0.9$ GeV is 94\\% for $| \\eta | < 0.9$ and 85% for $0.9 < | \\eta | < 2.5$. During LS1, some developments were made in different aspects of tracking. In particular, I implemented the DAF algorithm to protect track reconstruction against wrong hit assignments in noisy environments or in high track density environments. The DAF a...

  16. Fast response electromagnetic follow-ups from low latency GW triggers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, E J; Chu, Q; Rowlinson, A; Wen, L; Gao, H; Zhang, B; Tingay, S J; Boër, M

    2016-01-01

    We investigate joint low-latency gravitational wave (GW) detection and prompt electromagnetic (EM) follow-up observations of coalescing binary neutron stars (BNSs). Assuming that BNS mergers are associated with short duration gamma ray bursts (SGRBs), we evaluate if rapid EM follow-ups can capture the prompt emission, early engine activity or reveal any potential by-products such as magnetars or fast radio bursts. To examine the expected performance of extreme low-latency search pipelines, we simulate a population of coalescing BNSs and use these to estimate the detectability and localisation efficiency at different times before merger. Using observational SGRB flux data corrected to the range of the advanced GW interferometric detectors, we determine what EM observations could be achieved from low-frequency radio up to high energy γ-ray. We show that while challenging, breakthrough multi-messenger science is possible through low latency pipelines. (paper)

  17. Time-based Reconstruction of Free-streaming Data in CBM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akishina, Valentina; Kisel, Ivan; Vassiliev, Iouri; Zyzak, Maksym

    2018-02-01

    Traditional latency-limited trigger architectures typical for conventional experiments are inapplicable for the CBM experiment. Instead, CBM will ship and collect time-stamped data into a readout buffer in a form of a time-slice of a certain length and deliver it to a large computer farm, where online event reconstruction and selection will be performed. Grouping measurements into physical collisions must be performed in software and requires reconstruction not only in space, but also in time, the so-called 4-dimensional track reconstruction and event building. The tracks, reconstructed with 4D Cellular Automaton track finder, are combined into event-corresponding clusters according to the estimated time in the target position and the errors, obtained with the Kalman Filter method. The reconstructed events are given as inputs to the KF Particle Finder package for short-lived particle reconstruction. The results of time-based reconstruction of simulated collisions in CBM are presented and discussed in details.

  18. Track Reconstruction in the ATLAS Experiment The Deterministic Annealing Filter

    CERN Document Server

    Fleischmann, S

    2006-01-01

    The reconstruction of the trajectories of charged particles is essential for experiments at the LHC. The experiments contain precise tracking systems structured in layers around the collision point which measure the positions where particle trajectories intersect those layers. The physics analysis on the other hand mainly needs the momentum and direction of the particle at the estimated creation or reaction point. It is therefore needed to determine these parameters from the initial measurements. At the LHC one has to deal with high backgrounds while even small deficits or artifacts can reduce the signal or may produce additional background after event selection. The track reconstruction does not only contain the estimation of the track parameters, but also a pattern recognition deciding which measurements belong to a track and how many particle tracks can be found. Track reconstruction at the ATLAS experiment suffers from the high event rate at the LHC resulting in a high occupancy of the tracking devices. A...

  19. L1Track: A fast Level 1 track trigger for the ATLAS high luminosity upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerri, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    With the planned high-luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC), the ATLAS detector will see its collision rate increase by approximately a factor of 5 with respect to the current LHC operation. The earliest hardware-based ATLAS trigger stage (“Level 1”) will have to provide a higher rejection factor in a more difficult environment: a new improved Level 1 trigger architecture is under study, which includes the possibility of extracting with low latency and high accuracy tracking information in time for the decision taking process. In this context, the feasibility of potential approaches aimed at providing low-latency high-quality tracking at Level 1 is discussed. - Highlights: • HL-LH requires highly performing event selection. • ATLAS is studying the implementation of tracking at the very first trigger level. • Low latency and high-quality seem to be achievable with dedicated hardware and adequate detector readout architecture.

  20. Optimisation of the ATLAS Track Reconstruction Software for Run-2

    CERN Document Server

    Salzburger, Andreas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The reconstruction of particle trajectories in the tracking detectors of experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the most complex parts in analysing the collected data from beam-beam collisions. To achieve the desired integrated luminosity during Run-1 of the LHC data taking period, the number of simultaneous proton-proton interactions per beam crossing (pile-up) was steadily increased. The track reconstruction is the most time consuming reconstruction component and scales non-linear in high luminosity environments. Flat budget projections (at best) for computing resources during the upcoming Run-2 of the LHC together with the demands of reconstructing higher pile-up collision data at rates more than double compared to Run-1 have put pressure on the track reconstruction software to stay within the available computing resources. The ATLAS experiment has thus performed a two year long software campaign which led to a reduction of the reconstruction time for Run-2 conditions by a factor of four:...

  1. Construction and Evaluation of an Ultra Low Latency Frameless Renderer for VR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friston, Sebastian; Steed, Anthony; Tilbury, Simon; Gaydadjiev, Georgi

    2016-04-01

    Latency - the delay between a user's action and the response to this action - is known to be detrimental to virtual reality. Latency is typically considered to be a discrete value characterising a delay, constant in time and space - but this characterisation is incomplete. Latency changes across the display during scan-out, and how it does so is dependent on the rendering approach used. In this study, we present an ultra-low latency real-time ray-casting renderer for virtual reality, implemented on an FPGA. Our renderer has a latency of ~1 ms from 'tracker to pixel'. Its frameless nature means that the region of the display with the lowest latency immediately follows the scan-beam. This is in contrast to frame-based systems such as those using typical GPUs, for which the latency increases as scan-out proceeds. Using a series of high and low speed videos of our system in use, we confirm its latency of ~1 ms. We examine how the renderer performs when driving a traditional sequential scan-out display on a readily available HMO, the Oculus Rift OK2. We contrast this with an equivalent apparatus built using a GPU. Using captured human head motion and a set of image quality measures, we assess the ability of these systems to faithfully recreate the stimuli of an ideal virtual reality system - one with a zero latency tracker, renderer and display running at 1 kHz. Finally, we examine the results of these quality measures, and how each rendering approach is affected by velocity of movement and display persistence. We find that our system, with a lower average latency, can more faithfully draw what the ideal virtual reality system would. Further, we find that with low display persistence, the sensitivity to velocity of both systems is lowered, but that it is much lower for ours.

  2. HyspIRI Low Latency Concept and Benchmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandl, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Topics include HyspIRI low latency data ops concept, HyspIRI data flow, ongoing efforts, experiment with Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS) approach to injecting new algorithms into SensorWeb, low fidelity HyspIRI IPM testbed, compute cloud testbed, open cloud testbed environment, Global Lambda Integrated Facility (GLIF) and OCC collaboration with Starlight, delay tolerant network (DTN) protocol benchmarking, and EO-1 configuration for preliminary DTN prototype.

  3. Fast neural-net based fake track rejection in the LHCb reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    De Cian, Michel; Seyfert, Paul; Stahl, Sascha

    2017-01-01

    A neural-network based algorithm to identify fake tracks in the LHCb pattern recognition is presented. This algorithm, called ghost probability, retains more than 99 % of well reconstructed tracks while reducing the number of fake tracks by 60 %. It is fast enough to fit into the CPU time budget of the software trigger farm and thus reduces the combinatorics of the decay reconstructions, as well as the number of tracks that need to be processed by the particle identification algorithms. As a result, it strongly contributes to the achievement of having the same reconstruction online and offline in the LHCb experiment in Run II of the LHC.

  4. Low-Latency Embedded Vision Processor (LLEVS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    algorithms, low-latency video processing, embedded image processor, wearable electronics, helmet-mounted systems, alternative night / day imaging...external subsystems and data sources with the device. The establishment of data interfaces in terms of data transfer rates, formats and types are...video signals from Near-visible Infrared (NVIR) sensor, Shortwave IR (SWIR) and Longwave IR (LWIR) is the main processing for Night Vision (NI) system

  5. CMS reconstruction improvements for the tracking in large pileup events

    CERN Document Server

    Rovere, M

    2015-01-01

    The CMS tracking code is organized in several levels, known as iterative steps, each optimized to reconstruct a class of particle trajectories, as the ones of particles originating from the primary vertex or displaced tracks from particles resulting from secondary vertices. Each iterative step consists of seeding, pattern recognition and fitting by a kalman filter, and a final filtering and cleaning. Each subsequent step works on hits not yet associated to a reconstructed particle trajectory.The CMS tracking code is continuously evolving to make the reconstruction computing load compatible with the increasing instantaneous luminosity of LHC, resulting in a large number of primary vertices and tracks per bunch crossing.The major upgrade put in place during the present LHC Long Shutdown will allow the tracking code to comply with the conditions expected during RunII and the much larger pileup. In particular, new algorithms that are intrinsically more robust in high occupancy conditions were developed, iteration...

  6. Track Reconstruction and b-Jet Identification for the ATLAS Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Coccaro, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    A sophisticated trigger system, capable of real-time track reconstruction, is in place in the ATLAS experiment, to reject most of the events containing uninteresting background collisions while preserving as much as possible the interesting physics signals. The strategy adopted for fast reconstruction of charged tracks and in particular its application to the selection of jets from the hadronization of b-quarks is reviewed. Track reconstruction is routinely used for selection based on various physics objects while b-jet triggers are actively selecting events from the beginning of the 2011 LHC data-taking campaign.

  7. Track and vertex reconstruction in the ATLAS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacuesta, V

    2013-01-01

    The track and vertex reconstruction algorithms of the ATLAS Inner Detector have demonstrated excellent performance in the early data from the LHC. However, the rapidly increasing number of interactions per bunch crossing introduces new challenges both in computational aspects and physics performance. The combination of both silicon and gas based detectors provides high precision impact parameter and momentum measurement of charged particles, with high efficiency and small fake rate. Vertex reconstruction is used to identify with high efficiency the hard scattering process and to measure the amount of pile-up interactions, both aspects are crucial for many physics analyses. The performance of track and vertex reconstruction efficiency and resolution achieved in the 2011 and 2012 data-taking period are presented.

  8. Track and Vertex Reconstruction in the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lacuesta, V; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The track and vertex reconstruction algorithms of the ATLAS Inner Detector have demonstrated excellent performance in the early data from the LHC. However, the rapidly increas- ing number of interactions per bunch crossing introduces new challenges both in computational aspects and physics performance. The combination of both silicon and gas based detectors provides high precision impact parameter and momentum measurement of charged particles, with high efficiency and small fake rate. Vertex reconstruction is used to identify with high efficiency the hard scattering process and to measure the amount of pile-up interactions, both aspects are cru- cial for many physics analyses. The performance of track and vertex reconstruction efficiency and resolution achieved in the 2011 and 2012 data-taking period are presented.

  9. Track and Vertex Reconstruction in the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lacuesta, V; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The track and vertex reconstruction algorithms of the ATLAS Inner Detector have demonstrated excellent performance in the early data from the LHC. However, the rapidly increas- ing number of interactions per bunch crossing introduces new challenges both in computational aspects and physics performance. The combination of both silicon and gas based detectors pro- vides high precision impact parameter and momentum measurement of charged particles, with high efficiency and small fake rate. Vertex reconstruction is used to identify with high efficiency the hard scattering process and to measure the amount of pile-up interactions, both aspects are cru- cial for many physics analyses. The performance of track and vertex reconstruction efficiency and resolution achieved in the 2011 and 2012 data-taking period are presented.

  10. Track reconstruction for the P2 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyukin, Alexey [JGU, Mainz (Germany); Collaboration: P2-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The P2 experiment at the future MESA accelerator in Mainz will measure elastically scattered electrons from a hydrogen or lead target in order to determine the parity violating asymmetry for different beam polarisations, which is created due to the weak charge of the target. The asymmetry can provide access to the Weinberg angle and the neutron skin of heavy nuclei. These quantities depend heavily on the momentum transfer Q{sup 2}, thus a reconstruction of single electron tracks in an inhomogeneous magnetic field is necessary. For this, the P2 detector will have four tracking planes of thin high voltage monolithic active pixel sensors (HV-MAPS). The scattered electrons propagate through a magnetic field and hit all four planes. In order to fit the hit positions the General Broken Lines method is used. As a fast propagator, a variation of the Runge-Kutta algorithm is applied, which solves the equation of motion in an inhomogeneous magnetic field numerically, such that the final state momentum and scattering angle can be reconstructed. The initial momentum and incident angle can vary strongly due to the thickness of the target, limiting the reconstruction quality. The average single track Q{sup 2} value of 0.006 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2} can be reconstructed with about 4 % uncertainty in a first analysis of the Geant4 simulation, leading to a high total precision due to large electron numbers in the experiment.

  11. A novel standalone track reconstruction algorithm for the LHCb upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Quagliani, Renato

    2018-01-01

    During the LHC Run III, starting in 2020, the instantaneous luminosity of LHCb will be increased up to 2×1033 cm−2 s−1, five times larger than in Run II. The LHCb detector will then have to be upgraded in 2019. In fact, a full software event reconstruction will be performed at the full bunch crossing rate by the trigger, in order to profit of the higher instantaneous luminosity provided by the accelerator. In addition, all the tracking devices will be replaced and, in particular, a scintillating fiber tracker (SciFi) will be installed after the magnet, allowing to cope with the higher occupancy. The new running conditions, and the tighter timing constraints in the software trigger, represent a big challenge for the track reconstruction. This talk presents the design and performance of a novel algorithm that has been developed to reconstruct track segments using solely hits from the SciFi. This algorithm is crucial for the reconstruction of tracks originating from long-lived particles such as KS and Λ. ...

  12. Fast motion-including dose error reconstruction for VMAT with and without MLC tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravkilde, Thomas; Keall, Paul J.; Grau, Cai

    2014-01-01

    of the algorithm for reconstruction of dose and motion-induced dose errors throughout the tracking and non-tracking beam deliveries was quantified. Doses were reconstructed with a mean dose difference relative to the measurements of -0.5% (5.5% standard deviation) for cumulative dose. More importantly, the root...... validate a simple model for fast motion-including dose error reconstruction applicable to intrafractional QA of MLC tracking treatments of moving targets. MLC tracking experiments were performed on a standard linear accelerator with prototype MLC tracking software guided by an electromagnetic transponder......-mean-square deviation between reconstructed and measured motion-induced 3%/3 mm γ failure rates (dose error) was 2.6%. The mean computation time for each calculation of dose and dose error was 295 ms. The motion-including dose reconstruction allows accurate temporal and spatial pinpointing of errors in absorbed dose...

  13. Distributed MRI reconstruction using Gadgetron-based cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Hui; Inati, Souheil; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Kellman, Peter; Hansen, Michael S

    2015-03-01

    To expand the open source Gadgetron reconstruction framework to support distributed computing and to demonstrate that a multinode version of the Gadgetron can be used to provide nonlinear reconstruction with clinically acceptable latency. The Gadgetron framework was extended with new software components that enable an arbitrary number of Gadgetron instances to collaborate on a reconstruction task. This cloud-enabled version of the Gadgetron was deployed on three different distributed computing platforms ranging from a heterogeneous collection of commodity computers to the commercial Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud. The Gadgetron cloud was used to provide nonlinear, compressed sensing reconstruction on a clinical scanner with low reconstruction latency (eg, cardiac and neuroimaging applications). The proposed setup was able to handle acquisition and 11 -SPIRiT reconstruction of nine high temporal resolution real-time, cardiac short axis cine acquisitions, covering the ventricles for functional evaluation, in under 1 min. A three-dimensional high-resolution brain acquisition with 1 mm(3) isotropic pixel size was acquired and reconstructed with nonlinear reconstruction in less than 5 min. A distributed computing enabled Gadgetron provides a scalable way to improve reconstruction performance using commodity cluster computing. Nonlinear, compressed sensing reconstruction can be deployed clinically with low image reconstruction latency. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Track reconstruction algorithms for the CBM experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, Andrey; Hoehne, Claudia; Kisel, Ivan; Ososkov, Gennady

    2010-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future FAIR accelerator complex at Darmstadt is being designed for a comprehensive measurement of hadron and lepton production in heavy-ion collisions from 8-45 AGeV beam energy, producing events with large track multiplicity and high hit density. The setup consists of several detectors including as tracking detectors the silicon tracking system (STS), the muon detector (MUCH) or alternatively a set of Transition Radiation Detectors (TRD). In this contribution, the status of the track reconstruction software including track finding, fitting and propagation is presented for the MUCH and TRD detectors. The track propagation algorithm takes into account an inhomogeneous magnetic field and includes accurate calculation of multiple scattering and energy losses in the detector material. Track parameters and covariance matrices are estimated using the Kalman filter method and a Kalman filter modification by assigning weights to hits and using simulated annealing. Three different track finder algorithms based on track following have been developed which either allow for track branches, just select nearest hits or use the mentioned weighting method. The track reconstruction efficiency for central Au+Au collisions at 25 AGeV beam energy using events from the UrQMD model is at the level of 93-95% for both detectors.

  15. Low Latency Audio Video: Potentials for Collaborative Music Making through Distance Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Holly; MacLeod, Rebecca B.; Libera, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the potential of LOw LAtency (LOLA), a low latency audio visual technology designed to allow simultaneous music performance, as a distance learning tool for musical styles in which synchronous playing is an integral aspect of the learning process (e.g., jazz, folk styles). The secondary purpose was…

  16. Fast emulation of track reconstruction in the CMS simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Komm, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Simulated samples of various physics processes are a key ingredient within analyses to unlock the physics behind LHC collision data. Samples with more and more statistics are required to keep up with the increasing amounts of recorded data. During sample generation, significant computing time is spent on the reconstruction of charged particle tracks from energy deposits which additionally scales with the pileup conditions. In CMS, the FastSimulation package is developed for providing a fast alternative to the standard simulation and reconstruction workflow. It employs various techniques to emulate track reconstruction effects in particle collision events. Several analysis groups in CMS are utilizing the package, in particular those requiring many samples to scan the parameter space of physics models (e.g. SUSY) or for the purpose of estimating systematic uncertainties. The strategies for and recent developments in this emulation are presented, including a novel, flexible implementation of tracking emulation w...

  17. Measurement of the track reconstruction efficiency at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; van den Brand, Johannes; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gavrilov, Gennadii; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Giani', Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kaballo, Michael; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lu, Haiting; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pazos Alvarez, Antonio; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Roa Romero, Diego; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrie, Mauro; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Seco, Marcos; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szilard, Daniela; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; Voss, Helge; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wu, Suzhi; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2015-02-12

    The determination of track reconstruction efficiencies at LHCb using $J/\\psi\\rightarrow\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ decays is presented. Efficiencies above $95\\%$ are found for the data taking periods in 2010, 2011, and 2012. The ratio of the track reconstruction efficiency of muons in data and simulation is compatible with unity and measured with an uncertainty of $0.8\\,\\%$ for data taking in 2010, and at a precision of $0.4\\,\\%$ for data taking in 2011 and 2012. For hadrons an additional $1.4\\,\\%$ uncertainty due to material interactions is assumed. This result is crucial for accurate cross section and branching fraction measurements in LHCb.

  18. Fast algorithm of track reconstruction for the Delphy TPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillard, J.

    1984-01-01

    We describe a simple geometrical method (polar inversion) to reconstruct tracks. When the magnetic field is constant in magnitude and direction. This method uses geometrical properties of the trajectories. In the case of the DELPHI apparatus, the track reconstruction is done using TPC informations. After explaining the algorithm, we give results on ''GEANT'' simulated events using the ''Lund'' generator. Today we get a computer time of the order of 1.2 milliseconds on a CDC 7600 and an efficiency of 98% [fr

  19. Charged track reconstruction and b-tagging performance in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Favareto, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Inner Detector is designed to provide precision tracking informa- tion at LHC luminosities with a hermetic detector covering 5 units in pseudo- rapidity. It features a large silicon tracker subdivided into a pixel and a strip system for precise tracking and primary/secondary vertex reconstruction and to provide excellent b-tagging capabilities. A Transition Radiation Tracker improves the momentum reconstruction and provides electron identification information. The subject of these proceedings is the performance of the ATLAS Inner Detector achieved after its first 2 years of operation. The excellent detector performance and more than a decade of simulation studies provided a good basis for the commissioning of the offline track and vertex reconstruction. Early studies with cosmic events and the ever increasing amount of high quality p-p collision data allowed for rapid progress in understanding of the detector. Today the ATLAS Inner Detector approaches its design values in most relevant performance c...

  20. Improvements to ATLAS Track Reconstruction for Run-II

    CERN Document Server

    Cairo, Valentina Maria; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Run-II of the LHC will provide new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction with higher energies, denser jets and higher rates. In addition, the Insertable B-layer (IBL) is a fourth pixel layer, which has been inserted at the centre of ATLAS during the shutdown of the LHC. We will discuss improvements to track reconstruction developed during the two year shutdown of the LHC. These include novel techniques developed to improve the performance in the dense cores of jets, optimisation for the expected conditions, and a big software campaign which lead to more than a factor of three decrease in the CPU time needed to process each recorded event.

  1. Measurement of the track reconstruction efficiency at LHCb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collaboration, The LHCb

    2015-01-01

    The determination of track reconstruction efficiencies at LHCb using J/ψ→μ + μ - decays is presented. Efficiencies above 95% are found for the data taking periods in 2010, 2011, and 2012. The ratio of the track reconstruction efficiency of muons in data and simulation is compatible with unity and measured with an uncertainty of 0.8 % for data taking in 2010, and at a precision of 0.4 % for data taking in 2011 and 2012. For hadrons an additional 1.4 % uncertainty due to material interactions is assumed. This result is crucial for accurate cross section and branching fraction measurements in LHCb

  2. A New Track Reconstruction Algorithm suitable for Parallel Processing based on Hit Triplets and Broken Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schöning André

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Track reconstruction in high track multiplicity environments at current and future high rate particle physics experiments is a big challenge and very time consuming. The search for track seeds and the fitting of track candidates are usually the most time consuming steps in the track reconstruction. Here, a new and fast track reconstruction method based on hit triplets is proposed which exploits a three-dimensional fit model including multiple scattering and hit uncertainties from the very start, including the search for track seeds. The hit triplet based reconstruction method assumes a homogeneous magnetic field which allows to give an analytical solutions for the triplet fit result. This method is highly parallelizable, needs fewer operations than other standard track reconstruction methods and is therefore ideal for the implementation on parallel computing architectures. The proposed track reconstruction algorithm has been studied in the context of the Mu3e-experiment and a typical LHC experiment.

  3. Muon track reconstruction and data selection techniques in AMANDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahrens, J.; Bai, X.; Bay, R.; Barwick, S.W.; Becka, T.; Becker, J.K.; Becker, K.-H.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Biron, A.; Boersma, D.J.; Boeser, S.; Botner, O.; Bouchta, A.; Bouhali, O.; Burgess, T.; Carius, S.; Castermans, T.; Chirkin, D.; Collin, B.; Conrad, J.; Cooley, J.; Cowen, D.F.; Davour, A.; De Clercq, C.; DeYoung, T.; Desiati, P.; Dewulf, J.-P.; Ekstroem, P.; Feser, T.; Gaug, M.; Gaisser, T.K.; Ganugapati, R.; Geenen, H.; Gerhardt, L.; Gross, A.; Goldschmidt, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hardtke, R.; Harenberg, T.; Hauschildt, T.; Helbing, K.; Hellwig, M.; Herquet, P.; Hill, G.C.; Hubert, D.; Hughey, B.; Hulth, P.O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hundertmark, S.; Jacobsen, J.; Karle, A.; Kestel, M.; Koepke, L.; Kowalski, M.; Kuehn, K.; Lamoureux, J.I.; Leich, H.; Leuthold, M.; Lindahl, P.; Liubarsky, I.; Madsen, J.; Marciniewski, P.; Matis, H.S.; McParland, C.P.; Messarius, T.; Minaeva, Y.; Miocinovic, P.; Mock, P.C.; Morse, R.; Muenich, K.S.; Nam, J.; Nahnhauer, R.; Neunhoeffer, T.; Niessen, P.; Nygren, D.R.; Oegelman, H.; Olbrechts, Ph.; Perez de los Heros, C.; Pohl, A.C.; Porrata, R.; Price, P.B.; Przybylski, G.T.; Rawlins, K.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richter, S.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Ross, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Schinarakis, K.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, D.; Schwarz, R.; Silvestri, A.; Solarz, M.; Spiczak, G.M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Steele, D.; Steffen, P.; Stokstad, R.G.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Streicher, O.; Taboada, I.; Thollander, L.; Tilav, S.; Wagner, W.; Walck, C.; Wang, Y.-R.; Wiebusch, C.H.; Wiedemann, C.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Yodh, G.

    2004-01-01

    The Antarctic Muon And Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA) is a high-energy neutrino telescope operating at the geographic South Pole. It is a lattice of photo-multiplier tubes buried deep in the polar ice between 1500 and 2000 m. The primary goal of this detector is to discover astrophysical sources of high-energy neutrinos. A high-energy muon neutrino coming through the earth from the Northern Hemisphere can be identified by the secondary muon moving upward through the detector. The muon tracks are reconstructed with a maximum likelihood method. It models the arrival times and amplitudes of Cherenkov photons registered by the photo-multipliers. This paper describes the different methods of reconstruction, which have been successfully implemented within AMANDA. Strategies for optimizing the reconstruction performance and rejecting background are presented. For a typical analysis procedure the direction of tracks are reconstructed with about 2 deg. accuracy

  4. A low-latency, low-overhead encoder for data transmission in the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter trigger upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Le [Department of Physics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan, Hubei 430079 (China); Department of Physics, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75275 (United States); Li, Xiaoting [Department of Physics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan, Hubei 430079 (China); Gong, Datao, E-mail: dgong@mail.smu.edu [Department of Physics, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75275 (United States); Chen, Jinghong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77004 (United States); Deng, Binwei [School of Electric and Electronic Information Engineering, Hubei Polytechnic University, Huangshi, Hubei 435003 (China); Fan, Qingjun; Feng, Yulang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77004 (United States); Guo, Di [Department of Physics, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75275 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); He, Huiqin [Department of Physics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan, Hubei 430079 (China); Department of Physics, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75275 (United States); Shenzhen Polytechnic, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Hou, Suen [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nangang 11529, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Guangming, E-mail: gmhuang@phy.ccnu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan, Hubei 430079 (China); Liu, Chonghan; Liu, Tiankuan [Department of Physics, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75275 (United States); Sun, Xiangming [Department of Physics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan, Hubei 430079 (China); Tang, Yuxuan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77004 (United States); Teng, Ping-Kun [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nangang 11529, Taipei, Taiwan (China); and others

    2016-09-21

    In this paper, we present the design and test results of an encoder integrated circuit for the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter trigger upgrade. The encoder implements a low-latency and low-overhead line code called LOCic. The encoder operates at 320 MHz with a latency of no greater than 21 ns. The overhead of the encoder is 14.3%. The encoder is an important block of the transmitter ASIC LOCx2, which is prototyped with a commercial 0.25 μm Silicon-on-Sapphire CMOS technology and packaged in a 100-pin QFN package. - Highlights: • We present the design and test results of an encoder integrated circuit for the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter trigger upgrade. • The encoder implements a low-latency and low-overhead line code called LOCic. The encoder operates at 320 MHz with a latency of no greater than 21 ns. The overhead of the encoder is 14.3%. • The encoder is an important block of the transmitter ASIC LOCx2, which is prototyped with a commercial 0.25 μm Silicon-on-Sapphire CMOS technology for radiation-tolerance and packaged in a 100-pin QFN package.

  5. Study on a cellmap for the reconstruction of cosmic ray tracks in drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Yu; Ma Yuqian

    2005-01-01

    Taking 13 Cosmic experiment (L3+C) as an example, the authors discussed a new Cellmap to reconstruct the hit in drift chamber of magnetic spectrometer for the very inclined comic-ray tracks, and compared the reconstruction results with the standard Cellmap of L3+C. It shows that, for the very inclined cosmic-ray tracks, the new Cellmap can reconstruct more hits than the standard Cellmap, and the distribution of χ 2 of track reconstruction is also improved. (authors)

  6. GPU-based online track reconstruction for PANDA and application to the analysis of D→Kππ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herten, Andreas

    2015-07-02

    The PANDA experiment is a new hadron physics experiment which is being built for the FAIR facility in Darmstadt, Germany. PANDA will employ a novel scheme of data acquisition: the experiment will reconstruct the full stream of events in realtime to make trigger decisions based on the event topology. An important part of this online event reconstruction is online track reconstruction. Online track reconstruction algorithms need to reconstruct particle trajectories in nearly realtime. This work uses the high-throughput devices of Graphics Processing Units to benchmark different online track reconstruction algorithms. The reconstruction of D{sup ±}→K{sup -+}π{sup ±}π{sup ±} is studied extensively and one online track reconstruction algorithm applied.

  7. Improvements to ATLAS track reconstruction for Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cairo, Valentina Maria Martina, E-mail: valentina.maria.cairo@cern.ch [University of Calabria, Arcavacata di Rende (Italy); CERN, Meyrin (Switzerland)

    2016-07-11

    Run II of the LHC will provide new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction with higher energies, denser jets and higher rates. A major change to the Inner Detector layout during the shutdown period has been the installation of the Insertable B-Layer, a fourth pixel layer located at a radius of 33 mm. This contribution discusses improvements to track reconstruction developed during the two year shutdown of the LHC. These include novel techniques developed to improve the performance in the dense cores of jets, optimisation for the expected conditions, and a big software campaign which lead to more than a factor of three decrease in the CPU time needed to process each recorded event.

  8. Low-latency data analysis for the spherical detector Mario Schenberg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Carlos Filipe Da Silva; Costa, César Augusto; Aguiar, Odylio Denys

    2014-01-01

    The confrontation of gravitational waves (GWs) with their electromagnetic (EM) counterparts will be rich with information about astrophysical events. Initially, this confrontation will corroborate GW detections; afterwards, when GW detections become more recurrent, it will allow astrophysics to combine information from different channels (GW, EM and also neutrinos). A low-latency data analysis which provides the direction of an incoming GW candidate is required to confront it with fast follow-up EM observations. Until now, no low-latency data analysis has been developed for spherical detectors. One spherical detector alone is capable of determining both the GW direction and polarization. By using this capability, we have developed a low-latency data analysis pipeline for the Mario Schenberg detector. This pipeline is able to retrieve the direction of GW triggers with an average angular resolution from δs ∼ 8° at SNR ∼ 12 to δs ∼ 1° at SNR ∼ 80, in a timespan of a 4 s for 32 s of data being analyzed. We apply a veto which reduces fake events up to 90% when maintaining the GW efficiency above 90% for high SNRs. We provide here a description of the method and its efficiency: resolution on the direction, false alarm rate and computational time. (paper)

  9. Optimized Interface Diversity for Ultra-Reliable Low Latency Communication (URLLC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmy Jessen; Liu, Rongkuan; Popovski, Petar

    2017-01-01

    An important ingredient of the future 5G systems will be Ultra-Reliable Low-Latency Communication (URLLC). A way to offer URLLC without intervention in the baseband/PHY layer design is to use interface diversity and integrate multiple communication interfaces, each interface based on a different...... technology. Our approach is to use rateless codes to seamlessly distribute coded payload and redundancy data across multiple available communication interfaces. We formulate an optimization problem to find the payload allocation weights that maximize the reliability at specific target latency values...

  10. A tracking algorithm for the reconstruction of the daughters of long-lived particles in LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Dendek, Adam Mateusz

    2018-01-01

    A tracking algorithm for the reconstruction of the daughters of long-lived particles in LHCb 5 Jun 2018, 16:00 1h 30m Library, Centro San Domenico () LHC experiments Posters session Speaker Katharina Mueller (Universitaet Zuerich (CH)) Description The LHCb experiment at CERN operates a high precision and robust tracking system to reach its physics goals, including precise measurements of CP-violation phenomena in the heavy flavour quark sector and searches for New Physics beyond the Standard Model. The track reconstruction procedure is performed by a number of algorithms. One of these, PatLongLivedTracking, is optimised to reconstruct "downstream tracks", which are tracks originating from decays outside the LHCb vertex detector of long-lived particles, such as Ks or Λ0. After an overview of the LHCb tracking system, we provide a detailed description of the LHCb downstream track reconstruction algorithm. Its computational intelligence part is described in details, including the adaptation of the employed...

  11. Inner Detector Track Reconstruction and Alignment at the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Danninger, Matthias; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Inner Detector of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC is responsible for reconstructing the trajectories of charged particles (‘tracks’) with high efficiency and accuracy. It consists of three subdetectors, each using a different technology to provide measurements points. An overview of the use of each of these subdetectors in track reconstruction, as well as the algorithmic approaches taken to the specific tasks of pattern recognition and track fitting, is given. The performance of the Inner Detector tracking will be summarised. Of crucial importance for optimal tracking performance is precise knowledge of the relative positions of the detector elements. ATLAS uses a sophisticated, highly granular software alignment procedure to determine and correct for the positions of the sensors, including time-dependent effects appearing within single data runs. This alignment procedure will be discussed in detail, and its effect on Inner Detector tracking for LHC Run 2 proton-proton collision data highlighted.

  12. Achieving low latency and energy consumption by 5G TDD mode optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lähetkangas, Eeva; Pajukoski, Kari; Vihriälä, Jaakko

    2014-01-01

    and discussing on the consequent frame length limits. We then provide a description on how the achieved short TDD latency can further be utilized to enable remarkably low energy consumption. A numerical analysis comparing the battery life time of the suggested 5G TDD air interface and LTE is provided, showing......The target for a new 5G radio access technology is to support multi-Gbps and ms latency connectivity simultaneously at noticeably lower energy consumption and cost compared to the existing 4G technologies, such as LTE-Advanced. Extremely short air interface latency is required to achieve...... these requirements in a TDD-based local area network. In this paper, we discuss how the required short TDD latency can be achieved and further utilized in 5G physical air interface. First, we investigate the enablers and limits of TDD latency by analyzing the performance of OFDM in different channel environments...

  13. Low-power low-latency MAC protocol for aeronautical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabater, Jordi; Kluge, Martin; Bovelli, Sergio; Schalk, Josef

    2007-05-01

    This paper describes asynchronous MAC (Medium Access Control) strategies based on the IEEE 802.15.4 physical layer for wireless aeronautical applications where low power and low latency are important requirements as well as security and data integrity. Sensor data is acquired and collected on request, by means of a mobile device, and later stored in a centralized database. In order to have the smallest power consumption the wireless sensor has to remain in deep sleep mode as long as possible and wake up and listen periodically for RF activity. If its unique ID is mentioned in the destination address field, the complete frame is received, processed and replied if necessary. If the detected packet is addressed to another sensor the reception will stop immediately and the wireless sensor will go into deep sleep mode again. Listening instead of sending actively does not 'pollute' the already crowded 2.45GHz spectrum, reduces collisions and increases security. The mobile data concentrator can not be synchronized with all the sensors installed in a distributed environment, therefore smart asynchronous data transmission strategies are needed to reduce latencies and increase throughput. For the considered application, sensors are independent of each other, simply share the medium and together with the data concentrator are organized in a star network topology. The centre of the star is the concentrator which is rarely in range. It coordinates and activates the wireless sensor nodes to collect the measured data.

  14. Low-Latency Teleoperations for Human Exploration and Evolvable Mars Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupisella, Mark; Wright, Michael; Arney, Dale; Gershman, Bob; Stillwagen, Fred; Bobskill, Marianne; Johnson, James; Shyface, Hilary; Larman, Kevin; Lewis, Ruthan; hide

    2015-01-01

    NASA has been analyzing a number of mission concepts and activities that involve low-latency telerobotic (LLT) operations. One mission concept that will be covered in this presentation is Crew-Assisted Sample Return which involves the crew acquiring samples (1) that have already been delivered to space, and or acquiring samples via LLT from orbit to a planetary surface and then launching the samples to space to be captured in space and then returned to the earth with the crew. Both versions of have key roles for low-latency teleoperations. More broadly, the NASA Evolvable Mars Campaign is exploring a number of other activities that involve LLT, such as: (a) human asteroid missions, (b) PhobosDeimos missions, (c) Mars human landing site reconnaissance and site preparation, and (d) Mars sample handling and analysis. Many of these activities could be conducted from Mars orbit and also with the crew on the Mars surface remotely operating assets elsewhere on the surface, e.g. for exploring Mars special regions and or teleoperating a sample analysis laboratory both of which may help address planetary protection concerns. The operational and technology implications of low-latency teleoperations will be explored, including discussion of relevant items in the NASA Technology Roadmap and also how previously deployed robotic assets from any source could subsequently be used by astronauts via LLT.

  15. Real-Time 3D Tracking and Reconstruction on Mobile Phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisacariu, Victor Adrian; Kähler, Olaf; Murray, David W; Reid, Ian D

    2015-05-01

    We present a novel framework for jointly tracking a camera in 3D and reconstructing the 3D model of an observed object. Due to the region based approach, our formulation can handle untextured objects, partial occlusions, motion blur, dynamic backgrounds and imperfect lighting. Our formulation also allows for a very efficient implementation which achieves real-time performance on a mobile phone, by running the pose estimation and the shape optimisation in parallel. We use a level set based pose estimation but completely avoid the, typically required, explicit computation of a global distance. This leads to tracking rates of more than 100 Hz on a desktop PC and 30 Hz on a mobile phone. Further, we incorporate additional orientation information from the phone's inertial sensor which helps us resolve the tracking ambiguities inherent to region based formulations. The reconstruction step first probabilistically integrates 2D image statistics from selected keyframes into a 3D volume, and then imposes coherency and compactness using a total variational regularisation term. The global optimum of the overall energy function is found using a continuous max-flow algorithm and we show that, similar to tracking, the integration of per voxel posteriors instead of likelihoods improves the precision and accuracy of the reconstruction.

  16. From Motion to Photons in 80 Microseconds: Towards Minimal Latency for Virtual and Augmented Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Peter; Blate, Alex; Singh, Montek; Whitted, Turner; State, Andrei; Lastra, Anselmo; Fuchs, Henry

    2016-04-01

    We describe an augmented reality, optical see-through display based on a DMD chip with an extremely fast (16 kHz) binary update rate. We combine the techniques of post-rendering 2-D offsets and just-in-time tracking updates with a novel modulation technique for turning binary pixels into perceived gray scale. These processing elements, implemented in an FPGA, are physically mounted along with the optical display elements in a head tracked rig through which users view synthetic imagery superimposed on their real environment. The combination of mechanical tracking at near-zero latency with reconfigurable display processing has given us a measured average of 80 µs of end-to-end latency (from head motion to change in photons from the display) and also a versatile test platform for extremely-low-latency display systems. We have used it to examine the trade-offs between image quality and cost (i.e. power and logical complexity) and have found that quality can be maintained with a fairly simple display modulation scheme.

  17. Electron track reconstruction and improved modulation for photoelectric X-ray polarimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tenglin [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education (China); Zeng, Ming, E-mail: zengming@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education (China); Feng, Hua [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education (China); Center for Astrophysics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Cang, Jirong [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education (China); Li, Hong; Zhang, Heng [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education (China); Center for Astrophysics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zeng, Zhi; Cheng, Jianping; Ma, Hao; Liu, Yinong [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education (China)

    2017-06-21

    The key to photoelectric X-ray polarimetry is the determination of the emission direction of photoelectrons. Because of the low mass of an electron, the ionisation trajectory is not straight and the useful information needed for polarimetry is stored mostly in the initial part of the track where less energy is deposited. We present a new algorithm, based on the shortest path problem in graph theory, to reconstruct the 2D electron track from the measured image that is blurred due to transversal diffusion along drift and multiplication in the gas chamber. Compared with previous methods based on moment analysis, this algorithm allows us to identify the photoelectric interaction point more accurately and precisely for complicated tracks resulting from high energy photons or low pressure chambers. This leads to a better position resolution and a higher degree of modulation toward high energy X-rays. The new algorithm is justified using simulations and measurements with the gas pixel detector (GPD), and it should also work for other polarimetric techniques such as a time projection chamber (TPC). As the improvement is restricted in the high energy band, this new algorithm shows limited improvement for the sensitivity of GPD polarimeters, but it may have a larger potential for low-pressure TPC polarimeters.

  18. Low Latency MAC Protocol in Wireless Sensor Networks Using Timing Offset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung Sik

    This paper proposes a low latency MAC protocol that can be used in sensor networks. To extend the lifetime of sensor nodes, the conventional solution is to synchronize active/sleep periods of all sensor nodes. However, due to these synchronized sensor nodes, packets in the intermediate nodes must wait until the next node wakes up before it can forward a packet. This induces a large delay in sensor nodes. To solve this latency problem, a clustered sensor network which uses two types of sensor nodes and layered architecture is considered. Clustered heads in each cluster are synchronized with different timing offsets to reduce the sleep delay. Using this concept, the latency problem can be solved and more efficient power usage can be obtained.

  19. Strategy for fitting source strength and reconstruction procedure in radioactive particle tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosorov, Volodymyr

    2015-01-01

    The Radioactive Particle Tracking (RPT) technique is widely applied to study the dynamic properties of flows inside a reactor. Usually, a single radioactive particle that is neutrally buoyant with respect to the phase is used as a tracker. The particle moves inside a 3D volume of interest, and its positions are determined by an array of scintillation detectors, which count the incoming photons. The particle position coordinates are calculated by using a reconstruction procedure that solves a minimization problem between the measured counts and calibration data. Although previous studies have described the influence of specified factors on the RPT resolution and sensitivities, the question of how to choose an appropriate source strength and reconstruction procedure for the given RPT setup remains an unsolved problem. This work describes and applies the original strategy for fitting both the source strength and the sampling time interval to a specified RPT setup to guarantee a required accuracy of measurements. Additionally, the measurement accuracy of an RPT setup can be significantly increased by changing the reconstruction procedure. The results of the simulations, based on the Monte Carlo approach, have demonstrated that the proposed strategy allows for the successful implementation of the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle when designing the RPT setup. The limitations and drawbacks of the proposed procedure are also presented. - Highlights: • We develop an original strategy for fitting source strength and measurement time interval in radioactive particle tracking (RPT) technique. • The proposed strategy allows successfully to implement the ALAPA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle in designing of a RPT setup. • Measurement accuracy of a RPT setup can be significantly increased by improvement of the reconstruction procedure. • The algorithm can be applied to monitor the motion of the radioactive tracer in a reactor

  20. Track reconstruction of normal muon decays in the LAMPF TPC: one working scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    A working scheme for track reconstruction of normal muon decays in the LAMPF TPC is here outlined. Muon tracks stopping in the TPC and helical electron tracks from muon decay are both identified and fitted for complete event reconstruction. Because of certain geometrical characteristics of the TPC, novel techniques are deployed to find the tracks. Normal road tracing methods do not work reliably; they are replaced by, among other things, a random search technique that locates the helix's planar projection and a carefully worked-out method for correctly putting each coordinate on its proper turn in the helix

  1. Low-latency video transmission over high-speed WPANs based on low-power video compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belyaev, Evgeny; Turlikov, Andrey; Ukhanova, Ann

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents latency-constrained video transmission over high-speed wireless personal area networks (WPANs). Low-power video compression is proposed as an alternative to uncompressed video transmission. A video source rate control based on MINMAX quality criteria is introduced. Practical...

  2. Mobile Low Latency Services in 5G

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cattoni, Andrea Fabio; Chandramouli, Devaki; Sartori, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    Networks beyond 2020 will experience 10000-fold increase in wireless traffic, connect 10-100 times more devices and support the most diverse use cases. Thus, the 5G architecture needs to be flexible and cater for both traffic volumes and diversity of service requirements. Among the set of new use...... cases, support of delay sensitive "mobile" applications, such as vehicular communications (V2X, where X stands for either Vehicle or Infrastructure), require architecture enhancements to natively offer low latency and high mobility. In this paper we propose the necessary technology enablers...

  3. An FPGA-based track finder for the L1 trigger of the CMS experiment at the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Cieri, Davide; Harder, Kristian; Manolopoulos, Konstantinos; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Tomalin, Ian; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Brooke, Jim; Clement, Emyr; Newbold, Dave; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Hobson, Peter; Morton, Alexander Davide; Reid, Ivan; Hall, Geoff; Iles, Gregory; James, Thomas Owen; Matsushita, Takashi; Pesaresi, Mark; Rose, Andrew William; Shtipliyski, Antoni; Summers, Sioni; Tapper, Alex; Uchida, Kirika; Vichoudis, Paschalis; Ardila-Perez, Luis; Balzer, Matthias; Caselle, Michele; Sander, Oliver; Schuh, Thomas; Weber, Marc

    2017-01-01

    A new tracking detector is under development for use by the CMS experiment at the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). A crucial component of this upgrade will be the ability to reconstruct within a few microseconds all charged particle tracks with transverse momentum above 3 GeV, so they can be used in the Level-1 trigger decision. A concept for an FPGA-based track finder using a fully time-multiplexed architecture is presented, where track candidates are reconstructed using a projective binning algorithm based on the Hough Transform followed by a track fitting based on the linear regression technique. A hardware demonstrator using MP7 processing boards has been assembled to prove the entire system, from the output of the tracker readout boards to the reconstruction of tracks with fitted helix parameters. It successfully operates on one eighth of the tracker solid angle at a time, processing events taken at 40 MHz, each with up to 200 superimposed proton-proton interactions, whilst satisfying latency constraints. T...

  4. Multi-User Preemptive Scheduling For Critical Low Latency Communications in 5G Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdul-Mawgood Ali Ali Esswie, Ali; Pedersen, Klaus

    2018-01-01

    5G new radio is envisioned to support three major service classes: enhanced mobile broadband (eMBB), ultrareliable low-latency communications (URLLC), and massive machine type communications. Emerging URLLC services require up to one millisecond of communication latency with 99.999% success...... probability. Though, there is a fundamental trade-off between system spectral efficiency (SE) and achievable latency. This calls for novel scheduling protocols which cross-optimize system performance on user-centric; instead of network-centric basis. In this paper, we develop a joint multi-user preemptive...... scheduling strategy to simultaneously cross-optimize system SE and URLLC latency. At each scheduling opportunity, available URLLC traffic is always given higher priority. When sporadic URLLC traffic appears during a transmission time interval (TTI), proposed scheduler seeks for fitting the URLLC-eMBB traffic...

  5. Track and vertex reconstruction: From classical to adaptive methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strandlie, Are; Fruehwirth, Rudolf

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews classical and adaptive methods of track and vertex reconstruction in particle physics experiments. Adaptive methods have been developed to meet the experimental challenges at high-energy colliders, in particular, the CERN Large Hadron Collider. They can be characterized by the obliteration of the traditional boundaries between pattern recognition and statistical estimation, by the competition between different hypotheses about what constitutes a track or a vertex, and by a high level of flexibility and robustness achieved with a minimum of assumptions about the data. The theoretical background of some of the adaptive methods is described, and it is shown that there is a close connection between the two main branches of adaptive methods: neural networks and deformable templates, on the one hand, and robust stochastic filters with annealing, on the other hand. As both classical and adaptive methods of track and vertex reconstruction presuppose precise knowledge of the positions of the sensitive detector elements, the paper includes an overview of detector alignment methods and a survey of the alignment strategies employed by past and current experiments.

  6. Track Reconstruction with Cosmic Ray Data at the Tracker Integration Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, Wolfgang; Dragicevic, Marko; Friedl, Markus; Fruhwirth, R; Hansel, S; Hrubec, Josef; Krammer, Manfred; Oberegger, Margit; Pernicka, Manfred; Schmid, Siegfried; Stark, Roland; Steininger, Helmut; Uhl, Dieter; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Widl, Edmund; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Cardaci, Marco; Beaumont, Willem; de Langhe, Eric; de Wolf, Eddi A; Delmeire, Evelyne; Hashemi, Majid; Bouhali, Othmane; Charaf, Otman; Clerbaux, Barbara; Elgammal, J.-P. Dewulf. S; Hammad, Gregory Habib; de Lentdecker, Gilles; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wickens, John; Adler, Volker; Devroede, Olivier; De Weirdt, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Goorens, Robert; Heyninck, Jan; Maes, Joris; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Lancker, Luc; Van Mulders, Petra; Villella, Ilaria; Wastiels, C; Bonnet, Jean-Luc; Bruno, Giacomo; De Callatay, Bernard; Florins, Benoit; Giammanco, Andrea; Gregoire, Ghislain; Keutgen, Thomas; Kcira, Dorian; Lemaitre, Vincent; Michotte, Daniel; Militaru, Otilia; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertermont, L; Roberfroid, Vincent; Rouby, Xavier; Teyssier, Daniel; Daubie, Evelyne; Anttila, Erkki; Czellar, Sandor; Engstrom, Pauli; Harkonen, J; Karimaki, V; Kostesmaa, J; Kuronen, Auli; Lampen, Tapio; Linden, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Maenpaa, T; Michal, Sebastien; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Ageron, Michel; Baulieu, Guillaume; Bonnevaux, Alain; Boudoul, Gaelle; Chabanat, Eric; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Della Negra, Rodolphe; Dupasquier, Thierry; Gelin, Georges; Giraud, Noël; Guillot, Gérard; Estre, Nicolas; Haroutunian, Roger; Lumb, Nicholas; Perries, Stephane; Schirra, Florent; Trocme, Benjamin; Vanzetto, Sylvain; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Blaes, Reiner; Drouhin, Frédéric; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Berst, Jean-Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Didierjean, Francois; Goerlach, Ulrich; Graehling, Philippe; Gross, Laurent; Hosselet, J; Juillot, Pierre; Lounis, Abdenour; Maazouzi, Chaker; Olivetto, Christian; Strub, Roger; Van Hove, Pierre; Anagnostou, Georgios; Brauer, Richard; Esser, Hans; Feld, Lutz; Karpinski, Waclaw; Klein, Katja; Kukulies, Christoph; Olzem, Jan; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Pandoulas, Demetrios; Pierschel, Gerhard; Raupach, Frank; Schael, Stefan; Schwering, Georg; Sprenger, Daniel; Thomas, Maarten; Weber, Markus; Wittmer, Bruno; Wlochal, Michael; Beissel, Franz; Bock, E; Flugge, G; Gillissen, C; Hermanns, Thomas; Heydhausen, Dirk; Jahn, Dieter; Kaussen, Gordon; Linn, Alexander; Perchalla, Lars; Poettgens, Michael; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Zoeller, Marc Henning; Buhmann, Peter; Butz, Erik; Flucke, Gero; Hamdorf, Richard Helmut; Hauk, Johannes; Klanner, Robert; Pein, Uwe; Schleper, Peter; Steinbruck, G; Blum, P; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Dirkes, Guido; Fahrer, Manuel; Frey, Martin; Furgeri, Alexander; Hartmann, Frank; Heier, Stefan; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Kaminski, Jochen; Ledermann, Bernhard; Liamsuwan, Thiansin; Muller, S; Muller, Th; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Steck, Pia; Zhukov, Valery; Cariola, P; De Robertis, Giuseppe; Ferorelli, Raffaele; Fiore, Luigi; Preda, M; Sala, Giuliano; Silvestris, Lucia; Tempesta, Paolo; Zito, Giuseppe; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Giordano, Domenico; Maggi, Giorgio; Manna, Norman; My, Salvatore; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Albergo, Sebastiano; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Galanti, Mario; Giudice, Nunzio; Guardone, Nunzio; Noto, Francesco; Potenza, Renato; Saizu, Mirela Angela; Sparti, V; Sutera, Concetta; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Brianzi, Mirko; Civinini, Carlo; Maletta, Fernando; Manolescu, Florentina; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Broccolo, B; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Focardi, R. D'Alessandro. E; Frosali, Simone; Genta, Chiara; Landi, Gregorio; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Macchiolo, Anna; Magini, Nicolo; Parrini, Giuliano; Scarlini, Enrico; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Candelori, Andrea; Dorigo, Tommaso; Kaminsky, A; Karaevski, S; Khomenkov, Volodymyr; Reznikov, Sergey; Tessaro, Mario; Bisello, Dario; De Mattia, Marco; Giubilato, Piero; Loreti, Maurizio; Mattiazzo, Serena; Nigro, Massimo; Paccagnella, Alessandro; Pantano, Devis; Pozzobon, Nicola; Tosi, Mia; Bilei, Gian Mario; Checcucci, Bruno; Fano, Livio; Servoli, Leonello; Ambroglini, Filippo; Babucci, Ezio; Benedetti, Daniele; Biasini, Maurizio; Caponeri, Benedetta; Covarelli, Roberto; Giorgi, Marco; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Marcantonini, Marta; Postolache, Vasile; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiga, Daniele; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Balestri, Gabriele; Berretta, Luca; Bianucci, S; Boccali, Tommaso; Bosi, Filippo; Bracci, Fabrizio; Castaldi, Rino; Ceccanti, Marco; Cecchi, Roberto; Cerri, Claudio; Cucoanes, Andi Sebastian; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Dobur, Didar; Dutta, Suchandra; Giassi, Alessandro; Giusti, Simone; Kartashov, Dmitry; Kraan, Aafke; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Lungu, George-Adrian; Magazzu, Guido; Mammini, Paolo; Mariani, Filippo; Martinelli, Giovanni; Moggi, Andrea; Palla, Fabrizio; Palmonari, Francesco; Petragnani, Giulio; Profeti, Alessandro; Raffaelli, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Domenico; Sanguinetti, Giulio; Sarkar, Subir; Sentenac, Daniel; Serban, Alin Titus; Slav, Adrian; Soldani, A; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tolaini, Sergio; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Vos, Marcel; Zaccarelli, Luciano; Avanzini, Carlo; Basti, Andrea; Benucci, Leonardo; Bocci, Andrea; Cazzola, Ugo; Fiori, Francesco; Linari, Stefano; Massa, Maurizio; Messineo, Alberto; Segneri, Gabriele; Tonelli, Guido; Azzurri, Paolo; Bernardini, Jacopo; Borrello, Laura; Calzolari, Federico; Foa, Lorenzo; Gennai, Simone; Ligabue, Franco; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Rizzi, Andrea; Yang, Zong-Chang; Benotto, Franco; Demaria, Natale; Dumitrache, Floarea; Farano, R; Borgia, Maria Assunta; Castello, Roberto; Costa, Marco; Migliore, Ernesto; Romero, Alessandra; Abbaneo, Duccio; Abbas, M; Ahmed, Ijaz; Akhtar, I; Albert, Eric; Bloch, Christoph; Breuker, Horst; Butt, Shahid Aleem; Buchmuller, Oliver; Cattai, Ariella; Delaere, Christophe; Delattre, Michel; Edera, Laura Maria; Engstrom, Pauli; Eppard, Michael; Gateau, Maryline; Gill, Karl; Giolo-Nicollerat, Anne-Sylvie; Grabit, Robert; Honma, Alan; Huhtinen, Mika; Kloukinas, Kostas; Kortesmaa, Jarmo; Kottelat, Luc-Joseph; Kuronen, Auli; Leonardo, Nuno; Ljuslin, Christer; Mannelli, Marcello; Masetti, Lorenzo; Marchioro, Alessandro; Mersi, Stefano; Michal, Sebastien; Mirabito, Laurent; Muffat-Joly, Jeannine; Onnela, Antti; Paillard, Christian; Pal, Imre; Pernot, Jean-Francois; Petagna, Paolo; Petit, Patrick; Piccut, C; Pioppi, Michele; Postema, Hans; Ranieri, Riccardo; Ricci, Daniel; Rolandi, Gigi; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Sigaud, Christophe; Syed, A; Siegrist, Patrice; Tropea, Paola; Troska, Jan; Tsirou, Andromachi; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Vasey, François; Alagoz, Enver; Amsler, Claude; Chiochia, Vincenzo; Regenfus, Christian; Robmann, Peter; Rochet, Jacky; Rommerskirchen, Tanja; Schmidt, Alexander; Steiner, Stefan; Wilke, Lotte; Church, Ivan; Cole, Joanne; Coughlan, John A; Gay, Arnaud; Taghavi, S; Tomalin, Ian R; Bainbridge, Robert; Cripps, Nicholas; Fulcher, Jonathan; Hall, Geoffrey; Noy, Matthew; Pesaresi, Mark; Radicci, Valeria; Raymond, David Mark; Sharp, Peter; Stoye, Markus; Wingham, Matthew; Zorba, Osman; Goitom, Israel; Hobson, Peter R; Reid, Ivan; Teodorescu, Liliana; Hanson, Gail; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Liu, Haidong; Pasztor, Gabriella; Satpathy, Asish; Stringer, Robert; Mangano, Boris; Affolder, K; Affolder, T; Allen, Andrea; Barge, Derek; Burke, Samuel; Callahan, D; Campagnari, Claudio; Crook, A; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Dietch, J; Garberson, Jeffrey; Hale, David; Incandela, H; Incandela, Joe; Jaditz, Stephen; Kalavase, Puneeth; Kreyer, Steven Lawrence; Kyre, Susanne; Lamb, James; Mc Guinness, C; Mills, C; Nguyen, Harold; Nikolic, Milan; Lowette, Steven; Rebassoo, Finn; Ribnik, Jacob; Richman, Jeffrey; Rubinstein, Noah; Sanhueza, S; Shah, Yousaf Syed; Simms, L; Staszak, D; Stoner, J; Stuart, David; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; White, Dean; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Bagby, Linda; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Burkett, Kevin; Cihangir, Selcuk; Gutsche, Oliver; Jensen, Hans; Johnson, Mark; Luzhetskiy, Nikolay; Mason, David; Miao, Ting; Moccia, Stefano; Noeding, Carsten; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Skup, Ewa; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Yumiceva, Francisco; Zatserklyaniy, Andriy; Zerev, E; Anghel, Ioana Maria; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Khalatian, S; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Chen, Jie; Hinchey, Carl Louis; Martin, Christophe; Moulik, Tania; Robinson, Richard; Gritsan, Andrei; Lae, Chung Khim; Tran, Nhan Viet; Everaerts, Pieter; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Harris, Philip; Nahn, Steve; Rudolph, Matthew; Sung, Kevin; Betchart, Burton; Demina, Regina; Gotra, Yury; Korjenevski, Sergey; Miner, Daniel Carl; Orbaker, Douglas; Christofek, Leonard; Hooper, Ryan; Landsberg, Greg; Nguyen, Duong; Narain, Meenakshi; Speer, Thomas; Tsang, Ka Vang

    2008-01-01

    The subsystems of the CMS silicon strip tracker were integrated and commissioned at the Tracker Integration Facility (TIF) in the period from November 2006 to July 2007. As part of the commissioning, large samples of cosmic ray data were recorded under various running conditions in the absence of a magnetic field. Cosmic rays detected by scintillation counters were used to trigger the readout of up to 15\\,\\% of the final silicon strip detector, and over 4.7~million events were recorded. This document describes the cosmic track reconstruction and presents results on the performance of track and hit reconstruction as from dedicated analyses.

  7. Fission track thermochronology : reconstructing the thermal and tectonic evolution of the crust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleadow, A.J.W.

    1990-01-01

    The basis and current status of fission track analysis is reviewed showing the kinds of patterns of fission track parameters which result from a variety of thermal and tectonic histories. Fission track thermochronology is a well established method for reconstructing the thermal histories of rocks with particularly important applications in tectonic studies. Quantitative modelling of the thermal annealing of tracks in apatite shows that distinctive profiles of apparent fission track age can be related to a number of simple thermal history styles. The main types of profiles observed tend to be either an essentially linear decrease of apparent age with increasing depth, which relates to continuous uplift and denudation, or a concave-upwards profile produced by partial annealing in environments of tectonic stability or burial. More complex thermal histories produce compound profiles which are essentially just combinations of these two elements. Track length information allows the apparent age profiles to be interpreted in much greater detail. Examples of the major profile types have been identified in various geological environments and can be analysed to give information about, for example, uplift and denudation rates, the timing of uplift or low-grade thermal events and maximum palaeotemperatures experienced during burial. 25 refs., 8 figs

  8. NaNet: a low-latency NIC enabling GPU-based, real-time low level trigger systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammendola, Roberto; Biagioni, Andrea; Frezza, Ottorino; Cicero, Francesca Lo; Lonardo, Alessandro; Paolucci, Pier Stanislao; Rossetti, Davide; Simula, Francesco; Tosoratto, Laura; Vicini, Piero; Fantechi, Riccardo; Lamanna, Gianluca; Pantaleo, Felice; Piandani, Roberto; Sozzi, Marco; Pontisso, Luca

    2014-01-01

    We implemented the NaNet FPGA-based PCIe Gen2 GbE/APElink NIC, featuring GPUDirect RDMA capabilities and UDP protocol management offloading. NaNet is able to receive a UDP input data stream from its GbE interface and redirect it, without any intermediate buffering or CPU intervention, to the memory of a Fermi/Kepler GPU hosted on the same PCIe bus, provided that the two devices share the same upstream root complex. Synthetic benchmarks for latency and bandwidth are presented. We describe how NaNet can be employed in the prototype of the GPU-based RICH low-level trigger processor of the NA62 CERN experiment, to implement the data link between the TEL62 readout boards and the low level trigger processor. Results for the throughput and latency of the integrated system are presented and discussed.

  9. NaNet: a low-latency NIC enabling GPU-based, real-time low level trigger systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammendola, Roberto [INFN, Rome – Tor Vergata (Italy); Biagioni, Andrea; Frezza, Ottorino; Cicero, Francesca Lo; Lonardo, Alessandro; Paolucci, Pier Stanislao; Rossetti, Davide; Simula, Francesco; Tosoratto, Laura; Vicini, Piero [INFN, Rome – Sapienza (Italy); Fantechi, Riccardo [CERN, Geneve (Switzerland); Lamanna, Gianluca; Pantaleo, Felice; Piandani, Roberto; Sozzi, Marco [INFN, Pisa (Italy); Pontisso, Luca [University, Rome (Italy)

    2014-06-11

    We implemented the NaNet FPGA-based PCIe Gen2 GbE/APElink NIC, featuring GPUDirect RDMA capabilities and UDP protocol management offloading. NaNet is able to receive a UDP input data stream from its GbE interface and redirect it, without any intermediate buffering or CPU intervention, to the memory of a Fermi/Kepler GPU hosted on the same PCIe bus, provided that the two devices share the same upstream root complex. Synthetic benchmarks for latency and bandwidth are presented. We describe how NaNet can be employed in the prototype of the GPU-based RICH low-level trigger processor of the NA62 CERN experiment, to implement the data link between the TEL62 readout boards and the low level trigger processor. Results for the throughput and latency of the integrated system are presented and discussed.

  10. NaNet:a low-latency NIC enabling GPU-based, real-time low level trigger systems

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00646837; Biagioni, Andrea; Fantechi, Riccardo; Frezza, Ottorino; Lamanna, Gianluca; Lo Cicero, Francesca; Lonardo, Alessandro; Paolucci, Pier Stanislao; Pantaleo, Felice; Piandani, Roberto; Pontisso, Luca; Rossetti, Davide; Simula, Francesco; Sozzi, Marco; Tosoratto, Laura; Vicini, Piero

    2014-01-01

    We implemented the NaNet FPGA-based PCI2 Gen2 GbE/APElink NIC, featuring GPUDirect RDMA capabilities and UDP protocol management offloading. NaNet is able to receive a UDP input data stream from its GbE interface and redirect it, without any intermediate buffering or CPU intervention, to the memory of a Fermi/Kepler GPU hosted on the same PCIe bus, provided that the two devices share the same upstream root complex. Synthetic benchmarks for latency and bandwidth are presented. We describe how NaNet can be employed in the prototype of the GPU-based RICH low-level trigger processor of the NA62 CERN experiment, to implement the data link between the TEL62 readout boards and the low level trigger processor. Results for the throughput and latency of the integrated system are presented and discussed.

  11. Automated track recognition and event reconstruction in nuclear emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deines-Jones, P.; Aranas, A.; Cherry, M.L.; Dugas, J.; Kudzia, D.; Nilsen, B.S.; Sengupta, K.; Waddington, C.J.; Wefel, J.P.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Wosiek, B.

    1997-01-01

    The major advantages of nuclear emulsion for detecting charged particles are its submicron position resolution and sensitivity to minimum ionizing particles. These must be balanced, however, against the difficult manual microscope measurement by skilled observers required for the analysis. We have developed an automated system to acquire and analyze the microscope images from emulsion chambers. Each emulsion plate is analyzed independently, allowing coincidence techniques to be used in order to reject background and estimate error rates. The system has been used to analyze a sample of high-multiplicity Pb-Pb interactions (charged particle multiplicities ∝ 1100) produced by the 158 GeV/c per nucleon 208 Pb beam at CERN. Automatically measured events agree with our best manual measurements on 97% of all the tracks. We describe the image analysis and track reconstruction techniques, and discuss the measurement and reconstruction uncertainties. (orig.)

  12. On the Impact of Multi-User Traffic Dynamics on Low Latency Communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerardino, Guillermo Andrés Pocovi; Pedersen, Klaus I.; Alvarez, Beatriz Soret

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study the downlink latency performance in a multi-user cellular network. We use a flexible 5G radio frame structure, where the TTI size is configurable on a per-user basis according to their specific service requirements. Results show that at low system loads using a short TTI (e.......g. 0.25 ms) is an attractive solution to achieve low latency communications (LLC). The main benefits come from the low transmission delay required to transmit the payloads. However, as the load increases, longer TTI configurations with lower relative control overhead (and therefore higher spectral...... efficiency) provide better performance as these better cope with the non-negligible queuing delay. The presented results allow to conclude that support for scheduling with different TTI sizes is important for LLC and should be included in the future 5G....

  13. An FPGA based track finder for the L1 trigger of the CMS experiment at the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Tomalin, Ian; Ball, Fionn Amhairghen; Balzer, Matthias Norbert; Boudoul, Gaelle; Brooke, James John; Caselle, Michele; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Clement, Emyr John; Dutta, Suchandra; Hall, Geoffrey; Harder, Kristian; Hobson, Peter; Iles, Gregory Michiel; James, Thomas Owen; Manolopoulos, Konstantinos; Matsushita, Takashi; Morton, Alexander; Newbold, David; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Pesaresi, Mark Franco; Pozzobon, Nicola; Reid, Ivan; Rose, A. W; Sander, Oliver; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Shtipliyski, Antoni; Schuh, Thomas; Skinnari, Louise; Summers, Sioni Paris; Tapper, Alexander; Thea, Alessandro; Uchida, Kirika; Vichoudis, Paschalis; Viret, Sebastien; Weber, M; Aggleton, Robin Cameron

    2017-12-14

    A new tracking detector is under development for use by the CMS experiment at the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). A crucial requirement of this upgrade is to provide the ability to reconstruct all charged particle tracks with transverse momentum above 2-3 GeV within 4$\\mu$s so they can be used in the Level-1 trigger decision. A concept for an FPGA-based track finder using a fully time-multiplexed architecture is presented, where track candidates are reconstructed using a projective binning algorithm based on the Hough Transform, followed by a combinatorial Kalman Filter. A hardware demonstrator using MP7 processing boards has been assembled to prove the entire system functionality, from the output of the tracker readout boards to the reconstruction of tracks with fitted helix parameters. It successfully operates on one eighth of the tracker solid angle acceptance at a time, processing events taken at 40 MHz, each with up to 200 superimposed proton-proton interactions, whilst satisfying the latency requirement. ...

  14. An 'artificial retina' processor for track reconstruction at the full LHC crossing rate

    OpenAIRE

    Abba, A; Bedeschi, F; Caponio, F; Cenci, R; Citterio, M; Cusimano, A; Fu, J; Geraci, A; Grizzuti, M; Lusardi, N; Marino, P; Morello, M J; Neri, N; Ninci, D; Petruzzo, M

    2016-01-01

    We present the latest results of an R&D; study for a specialized processor capable of reconstructing, in a silicon pixel detector, high-quality tracks from high-energy collision events at 40 MHz. The processor applies a highly parallel pattern-recognition algorithm inspired to quick detection of edges in mammals visual cortex. After a detailed study of a real-detector application, demonstrating that online reconstruction of offline-quality tracks is feasible at 40 MHz with sub-microsecond lat...

  15. Hopfield neural network in HEP track reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muresan, Raluca; Pentia, Mircea

    1996-01-01

    This work uses neural network technique (Hopfield method) to reconstruct particle tracks starting from a data set obtained with a coordinate detector system placed around a high energy accelerated particle interaction region. A learning algorithm for finding the optimal connection of the signal points have been elaborated and tested. We used a single layer neutral network with constraints in order to obtain the particle tracks drawn through the detected signal points. The dynamics of the systems is given by the MFT equations which determine the system evolution to a minimum energy function. We carried out a computing program that has been tested on a lot of Monte Carlo simulated data. With this program we obtained good results even for noise/signal ratio 200. (authors)

  16. Improved electromagnetic tracking for catheter path reconstruction with application in high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugez, Elodie; Sadjadi, Hossein; Joshi, Chandra P; Akl, Selim G; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2017-04-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) catheter tracking has recently been introduced in order to enable prompt and uncomplicated reconstruction of catheter paths in various clinical interventions. However, EM tracking is prone to measurement errors which can compromise the outcome of the procedure. Minimizing catheter tracking errors is therefore paramount to improve the path reconstruction accuracy. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) was employed to combine the nonlinear kinematic model of an EM sensor inside the catheter, with both its position and orientation measurements. The formulation of the kinematic model was based on the nonholonomic motion constraints of the EM sensor inside the catheter. Experimental verification was carried out in a clinical HDR suite. Ten catheters were inserted with mean curvatures varying from 0 to [Formula: see text] in a phantom. A miniaturized Ascension (Burlington, Vermont, USA) trakSTAR EM sensor (model 55) was threaded within each catheter at various speeds ranging from 7.4 to [Formula: see text]. The nonholonomic EKF was applied on the tracking data in order to statistically improve the EM tracking accuracy. A sample reconstruction error was defined at each point as the Euclidean distance between the estimated EM measurement and its corresponding ground truth. A path reconstruction accuracy was defined as the root mean square of the sample reconstruction errors, while the path reconstruction precision was defined as the standard deviation of these sample reconstruction errors. The impacts of sensor velocity and path curvature on the nonholonomic EKF method were determined. Finally, the nonholonomic EKF catheter path reconstructions were compared with the reconstructions provided by the manufacturer's filters under default settings, namely the AC wide notch and the DC adaptive filter. With a path reconstruction accuracy of 1.9 mm, the nonholonomic EKF surpassed the performance of the manufacturer's filters (2.4 mm) by 21% and the raw EM

  17. Coexistence of enhanced mobile broadband communications and ultra-reliable low-latency communications in mobile front-haul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Kai; Kowalski, John M.; Nogami, Toshizo; Yin, Zhanping; Sheng, Jia

    2018-01-01

    5G systems are supposed to support coexistence of multiple services such as ultra reliable low latency communications (URLLC) and enhanced mobile broadband (eMBB) communications. The target of eMBB communications is to meet the high-throughput requirement while URLLC are used for some high priority services. Due to the sporadic nature and low latency requirement, URLLC transmission may pre-empt the resource of eMBB transmission. Our work is to analyze the URLLC impact on eMBB transmission in mobile front-haul. Then, some solutions are proposed to guarantee the reliability/latency requirements for URLLC services and minimize the impact to eMBB services at the same time.

  18. Robust Visual Tracking via Online Discriminative and Low-Rank Dictionary Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tao; Liu, Fanghui; Bhaskar, Harish; Yang, Jie

    2017-09-12

    In this paper, we propose a novel and robust tracking framework based on online discriminative and low-rank dictionary learning. The primary aim of this paper is to obtain compact and low-rank dictionaries that can provide good discriminative representations of both target and background. We accomplish this by exploiting the recovery ability of low-rank matrices. That is if we assume that the data from the same class are linearly correlated, then the corresponding basis vectors learned from the training set of each class shall render the dictionary to become approximately low-rank. The proposed dictionary learning technique incorporates a reconstruction error that improves the reliability of classification. Also, a multiconstraint objective function is designed to enable active learning of a discriminative and robust dictionary. Further, an optimal solution is obtained by iteratively computing the dictionary, coefficients, and by simultaneously learning the classifier parameters. Finally, a simple yet effective likelihood function is implemented to estimate the optimal state of the target during tracking. Moreover, to make the dictionary adaptive to the variations of the target and background during tracking, an online update criterion is employed while learning the new dictionary. Experimental results on a publicly available benchmark dataset have demonstrated that the proposed tracking algorithm performs better than other state-of-the-art trackers.

  19. An image-warping architecture for VR : low latency versus image quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, F.A.; Liere, van R.; Beck, S.; Fröhlich, B.; Steed, A.; Reiners, D.; Lindeman, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    Designing low end-to-end latency system architectures for virtual reality is still an open and challenging problem. We describe the design, implementation and evaluation of a client-server depth-image warping architecture that updates and displays the scene graph at the refresh rate of the display.

  20. Track reconstruction for the Mu3e experiment based on a novel Multiple Scattering fit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozlinskiy Alexandr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mu3e experiment is designed to search for the lepton flavor violating decay μ+ → e+e+e−. The aim of the experiment is to reach a branching ratio sensitivity of 10−16. In a first phase the experiment will be performed at an existing beam line at the Paul-Scherrer Institute (Switzerland providing 108 muons per second, which will allow to reach a sensitivity of 2 · 10−15. The muons with a momentum of about 28 MeV/c are stopped and decay at rest on a target. The decay products (positrons and electrons with energies below 53MeV are measured by a tracking detector consisting of two double layers of 50 μm thin silicon pixel sensors. The high granularity of the pixel detector with a pixel size of 80 μm × 80 μm allows for a precise track reconstruction in the high multiplicity environment of the Mu3e experiment, reaching 100 tracks per reconstruction frame of 50 ns in the final phase of the experiment. To deal with such high rates and combinatorics, the Mu3e track reconstruction uses a novel fit algorithm that in the simplest case takes into account only the multiple scattering, which allows for a fast online tracking on a GPU based filter farm. An implementation of the 3-dimensional multiple scattering fit based on hit triplets is described. The extension of the fit that takes into account energy losses and pixel size is used for offline track reconstruction. The algorithm and performance of the offline track reconstruction based on a full Geant4 simulation of the Mu3e detector are presented.

  1. An Ultra-Low-Latency Geo-Routing Scheme for Team-Based Unmanned Vehicular Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Bader, Ahmed

    2016-02-26

    Results and lessons learned from the implementation of a novel ultra low-latency geo-routing scheme are presented in this paper. The geo-routing scheme is intended for team-based mobile systems whereby a cluster of unmanned autonomous vehicles are deployed to accomplish a critical mission under human supervision. The contention-free nature of the developed scheme lends itself to jointly achieve lower latency and higher throughput. Implementation challenges are presented and corresponding resolutions are discussed herewith. © 2015 IEEE.

  2. A Mobility-Aware Adaptive Duty Cycling Mechanism for Tracking Objects during Tunnel Excavation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taesik Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tunnel construction workers face many dangers while working under dark conditions, with difficult access and egress, and many potential hazards. To enhance safety at tunnel construction sites, low latency tracking of mobile objects (e.g., heavy-duty equipment and construction workers is critical for managing the dangerous construction environment. Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs are the basis for a widely used technology for monitoring the environment because of their energy-efficiency and scalability. However, their use involves an inherent point-to-point delay caused by duty cycling mechanisms that can result in a significant rise in the delivery latency for tracking mobile objects. To overcome this issue, we proposed a mobility-aware adaptive duty cycling mechanism for the WSNs based on object mobility. For the evaluation, we tested this mechanism for mobile object tracking at a tunnel excavation site. The evaluation results showed that the proposed mechanism could track mobile objects with low latency while they were moving, and could reduce energy consumption by increasing sleep time while the objects were immobile.

  3. Development of the Plate Boundary Observatory GPS Low Latency Salton Trough Radio Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, C.; Miller, S.; Wilson, B.; Lawrence, S.; Arnitz, E.

    2008-05-01

    UNAVCO is developing a 20 GPS station low latency radio network that spans the San Andreas and San Jacinto faults in the region of highest strain in southern California and the narrowest part of the North America-Pacific plate boundary. The Salton Trough Radio Network (STRN) is instrumented with Ethernet bridge Intuicom EB6+ (900 MHz) radios to transmit a high rate low latency data stream from each permanent GPS site for the purpose of the following: 1) telemeter 15 second data (1 MB/day/station) to the Plate Boundary Observatory archive, 2) accommodate the timely download of 1 and 5 sample per second data following large earthquakes (4 MB/hour/station), and 3) test the UStream of 1Hz BINEX and RTCM data. Three of four phases have been completed. Office radio testing yielded transfer rates of 30-50 KB/s with subsecond latency while streaming 1 Hz data. Latency climbed to ~1.8 seconds while simultaneously streaming 1 Hz and downloading hourly 1 and 5 sample per second data files. Field testing demonstrated rates on the order of 30 KB/s. At present the radios are installed and have transfer rates of 10-40 KB/s between sites that span 10-32 km. The final phase will be the installation of the main telemetry relay where master radios will be connected to a high speed ISP near the town of Brawley. The high-rate low latency UStream data will be available to researchers who are developing prototype earthquake early warning systems in Southern California. A goal of the STRN is to make the data available rapidly enough for GPS-derived coseismic and dynamic displacements to be integrated into early warning system earthquake models. The improved earthquake models will better assist emergency response. UStream data will also aid surveyors who wish to use PBO GPS stations as permanent, high-quality base stations in real-time kinematic surveys.

  4. A stand-alone track reconstruction algorithm for the scintillating fibre tracker at the LHCb upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Quagliani, Renato

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb upgrade detector project foresees the presence of a scintillating fiber tracker (SciFi) to be used during the LHC Run III, starting in 2020. The instantaneous luminosity will be increased up to $2\\times10^{33}$, five times larger than in Run II and a full software event reconstruction will be performed at the full bunch crossing rate by the trigger. The new running conditions, and the tighter timing constraints in the software trigger, represent a big challenge for track reconstruction. This poster presents the design and performance of a novel algorithm that has been developed to reconstruct track segments using solely hits from the SciFi. This algorithm is crucial for the reconstruction of tracks originating from long-lived particles such as $K_{S}^{0}$ and $\\Lambda$ and allows to greatly enhance the physics potential and capabilities of the LHCb upgrade when compared to its previous implementation.

  5. Systematic studies on the reconstruction efficiency and accuracy of a track drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appelshaeuser, H.

    1993-02-01

    The author has studied the reconstruction efficiency of the NA35-TPC by means of a simulation of the tracks by means of laser radiation. He has obtained results on the diffusion constant and the track resolution. (HSI) [de

  6. GPU-based online track reconstruction for the MuPix-telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grzesik, Carsten [JGU, Mainz (Germany); Collaboration: Mu3e-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The MuPix telescope is a beam telescope consisting of High Voltage Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (HV-MAPS). This type of sensor is going to be used for the Mu3e experiment, which is aiming to measure the lepton flavor violating decay μ→ eee with an ultimate sensitivity of 10{sup -16}. This sensitivity requires a high muon decay rate in the order of 1 GHz leading to a data rate of about 1 TBit/s for the whole detector. This needs to be reduced by a factor 1000 using online event selection algorithms on Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) before passing the data to the storage. A test setup for the MuPix sensors and parts of the Mu3e tracking detector readout is realized in a four plane telescope. The telescope can also be used to show the usability of an online track reconstruction using GPUs. As a result the telescope can provide online information about efficiencies of a device under test or the alignment of the telescope itself. This talk discusses the implementation of the GPU based track reconstruction and shows some results from recent testbeam campaigns.

  7. Precise 3D track reconstruction algorithm for the ICARUS T600 liquid argon time projection chamber detector

    CERN Document Server

    Antonello, M

    2013-01-01

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr TPC) detectors offer charged particle imaging capability with remarkable spatial resolution. Precise event reconstruction procedures are critical in order to fully exploit the potential of this technology. In this paper we present a new, general approach of three-dimensional reconstruction for the LAr TPC with a practical application to track reconstruction. The efficiency of the method is evaluated on a sample of simulated tracks. We present also the application of the method to the analysis of real data tracks collected during the ICARUS T600 detector operation with the CNGS neutrino beam.

  8. Precise 3D Track Reconstruction Algorithm for the ICARUS T600 Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Antonello

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr TPC detectors offer charged particle imaging capability with remarkable spatial resolution. Precise event reconstruction procedures are critical in order to fully exploit the potential of this technology. In this paper we present a new, general approach to 3D reconstruction for the LAr TPC with a practical application to the track reconstruction. The efficiency of the method is evaluated on a sample of simulated tracks. We present also the application of the method to the analysis of stopping particle tracks collected during the ICARUS T600 detector operation with the CNGS neutrino beam.

  9. FTK status and track triggers in ATLAS at HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    ATLAS Collaboration; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The expected instantaneous luminosities delivered by the Large Hadron Collider will place continually increasing burdens on the trigger systems of the ATLAS detector. The use of tracking information is key to maintaining a manageable trigger rate while keeping a high efficiency. At the same time, however, track finding is one of the more resource-intensive tasks in the software-based processing farms of the high level trigger system. To support the trigger, ATLAS is building and currently installing the Fast TracK Finder (FTK), a hardware-based system that uses massively parallel pattern recognition in Associative Memory to reconstruct tracks above transverse momenta of 1 GeV across the entire detector at 100 kHz with a latency of ~100 microseconds. In the first-stage of track finding, FTK compares hits in ATLAS silicon detectors against ~1 billion pre-computed track pattern candidates. Track parameters for these candidates, including goodness-of-fit tests, are calculated in FPGAs using a linear approximation...

  10. A parallel algorithm for 3D particle tracking and Lagrangian trajectory reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, Douglas; Zhang, Yuanhui; Lifflander, Jonathan; Arya, Anshu

    2012-01-01

    Particle-tracking methods are widely used in fluid mechanics and multi-target tracking research because of their unique ability to reconstruct long trajectories with high spatial and temporal resolution. Researchers have recently demonstrated 3D tracking of several objects in real time, but as the number of objects is increased, real-time tracking becomes impossible due to data transfer and processing bottlenecks. This problem may be solved by using parallel processing. In this paper, a parallel-processing framework has been developed based on frame decomposition and is programmed using the asynchronous object-oriented Charm++ paradigm. This framework can be a key step in achieving a scalable Lagrangian measurement system for particle-tracking velocimetry and may lead to real-time measurement capabilities. The parallel tracking algorithm was evaluated with three data sets including the particle image velocimetry standard 3D images data set #352, a uniform data set for optimal parallel performance and a computational-fluid-dynamics-generated non-uniform data set to test trajectory reconstruction accuracy, consistency with the sequential version and scalability to more than 500 processors. The algorithm showed strong scaling up to 512 processors and no inherent limits of scalability were seen. Ultimately, up to a 200-fold speedup is observed compared to the serial algorithm when 256 processors were used. The parallel algorithm is adaptable and could be easily modified to use any sequential tracking algorithm, which inputs frames of 3D particle location data and outputs particle trajectories

  11. Low-latency Science Exploration of Planetary Bodies: a Demonstration Using ISS in Support of Mars Human Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thronson, Harley A.; Valinia, Azita; Bleacher, Jacob; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Garvin, Jim; Petro, Noah

    2014-01-01

    We summarize a proposed experiment to use the International Space Station to formally examine the application and validation of low-latency telepresence for surface exploration from space as an alternative, precursor, or potentially as an adjunct to astronaut "boots on the ground." The approach is to develop and propose controlled experiments, which build upon previous field studies and which will assess the effects of different latencies (0 to 500 msec), task complexity, and alternate forms of feedback to the operator. These experiments serve as an example of a pathfinder for NASA's roadmap of missions to Mars with low-latency telerobotic exploration as a precursor to astronaut's landing on the surface to conduct geological tasks.

  12. Measurement-based analysis of error latency. [in computer operating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chillarege, Ram; Iyer, Ravishankar K.

    1987-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a practical methodology for the study of error latency under a real workload. The method is illustrated with sampled data on the physical memory activity, gathered by hardware instrumentation on a VAX 11/780 during the normal workload cycle of the installation. These data are used to simulate fault occurrence and to reconstruct the error discovery process in the system. The technique provides a means to study the system under different workloads and for multiple days. An approach to determine the percentage of undiscovered errors is also developed and a verification of the entire methodology is performed. This study finds that the mean error latency, in the memory containing the operating system, varies by a factor of 10 to 1 (in hours) between the low and high workloads. It is found that of all errors occurring within a day, 70 percent are detected in the same day, 82 percent within the following day, and 91 percent within the third day. The increase in failure rate due to latency is not so much a function of remaining errors but is dependent on whether or not there is a latent error.

  13. Reconstructed storm tracks reveal three centuries of changing moisture delivery to North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Erika K; Dannenberg, Matthew P

    2017-06-01

    Moisture delivery to western North America is closely linked to variability in the westerly storm tracks of midlatitude cyclones, which are, in turn, modified by larger-scale features such as the El Niño-Southern Oscillation system. Instrumental and modeling data suggest that extratropical storm tracks may be intensifying and shifting poleward due to anthropogenic climate change, but it is difficult to separate recent trends from natural variability because of the large amount of decadal and longer variation in storm tracks and their limited instrumental record. We reconstruct cool-season, midlatitude Pacific storm-track position and intensity from 1693 to 1995 CE using existing tree-ring chronologies along with a network of newly developed chronologies from the U.S. Pacific Northwest, where small variations in storm-track position can have a major influence on hydroclimate patterns. Our results show high interannual-to-multidecadal variability in storm-track position and intensity over the past 303 years, with spectral signatures characteristic of tropical and northern Pacific influences. Comparison with reconstructions of precipitation and tropical sea surface temperature confirms the relationship between shifting drought patterns in the Pacific Northwest and storm-track variability through time and demonstrates the long-term influence of El Niño. These results allow us to place recent storm-track changes in the context of decadal and multidecadal fluctuations across the long-term record, showing that recent changes in storm-track intensity likely represent a warming-related increase amplified by natural decadal variability.

  14. A Hybrid Model Based on Wavelet Decomposition-Reconstruction in Track Irregularity State Forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaolong Jia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wavelet is able to adapt to the requirements of time-frequency signal analysis automatically and can focus on any details of the signal and then decompose the function into the representation of a series of simple basis functions. It is of theoretical and practical significance. Therefore, this paper does subdivision on track irregularity time series based on the idea of wavelet decomposition-reconstruction and tries to find the best fitting forecast model of detail signal and approximate signal obtained through track irregularity time series wavelet decomposition, respectively. On this ideology, piecewise gray-ARMA recursive based on wavelet decomposition and reconstruction (PG-ARMARWDR and piecewise ANN-ARMA recursive based on wavelet decomposition and reconstruction (PANN-ARMARWDR models are proposed. Comparison and analysis of two models have shown that both these models can achieve higher accuracy.

  15. Low-latency analysis pipeline for compact binary coalescences in the advanced gravitational wave detector era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, T; Buskulic, D; Germain, V; Marion, F; Mours, B; Guidi, G M; Montani, M; Piergiovanni, F; Wang, G

    2016-01-01

    The multi-band template analysis (MBTA) pipeline is a low-latency coincident analysis pipeline for the detection of gravitational waves (GWs) from compact binary coalescences. MBTA runs with a low computational cost, and can identify candidate GW events online with a sub-minute latency. The low computational running cost of MBTA also makes it useful for data quality studies. Events detected by MBTA online can be used to alert astronomical partners for electromagnetic follow-up. We outline the current status of MBTA and give details of recent pipeline upgrades and validation tests that were performed in preparation for the first advanced detector observing period. The MBTA pipeline is ready for the outset of the advanced detector era and the exciting prospects it will bring. (paper)

  16. An Ultra-Low-Latency Geo-Routing Scheme for Team-Based Unmanned Vehicular Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Bader, Ahmed; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2016-01-01

    Results and lessons learned from the implementation of a novel ultra low-latency geo-routing scheme are presented in this paper. The geo-routing scheme is intended for team-based mobile systems whereby a cluster of unmanned autonomous vehicles

  17. Tap Arduino: An Arduino microcontroller for low-latency auditory feedback in sensorimotor synchronization experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Benjamin G; van Vugt, Floris T

    2016-12-01

    Timing abilities are often measured by having participants tap their finger along with a metronome and presenting tap-triggered auditory feedback. These experiments predominantly use electronic percussion pads combined with software (e.g., FTAP or Max/MSP) that records responses and delivers auditory feedback. However, these setups involve unknown latencies between tap onset and auditory feedback and can sometimes miss responses or record multiple, superfluous responses for a single tap. These issues may distort measurements of tapping performance or affect the performance of the individual. We present an alternative setup using an Arduino microcontroller that addresses these issues and delivers low-latency auditory feedback. We validated our setup by having participants (N = 6) tap on a force-sensitive resistor pad connected to the Arduino and on an electronic percussion pad with various levels of force and tempi. The Arduino delivered auditory feedback through a pulse-width modulation (PWM) pin connected to a headphone jack or a wave shield component. The Arduino's PWM (M = 0.6 ms, SD = 0.3) and wave shield (M = 2.6 ms, SD = 0.3) demonstrated significantly lower auditory feedback latencies than the percussion pad (M = 9.1 ms, SD = 2.0), FTAP (M = 14.6 ms, SD = 2.8), and Max/MSP (M = 15.8 ms, SD = 3.4). The PWM and wave shield latencies were also significantly less variable than those from FTAP and Max/MSP. The Arduino missed significantly fewer taps, and recorded fewer superfluous responses, than the percussion pad. The Arduino captured all responses, whereas at lower tapping forces, the percussion pad missed more taps. Regardless of tapping force, the Arduino outperformed the percussion pad. Overall, the Arduino is a high-precision, low-latency, portable, and affordable tool for auditory experiments.

  18. Arbitration in crossbar interconnect for low latency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmacht, Martin; Sugavanam, Krishnan

    2013-02-05

    A system and method and computer program product for reducing the latency of signals communicated through a crossbar switch, the method including using at slave arbitration logic devices associated with Slave devices for which access is requested from one or more Master devices, two or more priority vector signals cycled among their use every clock cycle for selecting one of the requesting Master devices and updates the respective priority vector signal used every clock cycle. Similarly, each Master for which access is requested from one or more Slave devices, can have two or more priority vectors and can cycle among their use every clock cycle to further reduce latency and increase throughput performance via the crossbar.

  19. Performance of the ATLAS track reconstruction algorithms in dense environments in LHC Run 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

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Scannicchio, D A; Scarcella, M; Scarfone, V; Schaarschmidt, J; Schacht, P; Schachtner, B M; Schaefer, D; Schaefer, L; Schaefer, R; Schaeffer, J; Schaepe, S; Schaetzel, S; Schäfer, U; Schaffer, A C; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scharf, V; Schegelsky, V A; Scheirich, D; Schernau, M; Schiavi, C; Schier, S; Schildgen, L K; Schillo, C; Schioppa, M; Schlenker, S; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K R; Schmieden, K; Schmitt, C; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, S; Schnoor, U; Schoeffel, L; Schoening, A; Schoenrock, B D; Schopf, E; Schott, M; Schouwenberg, J F P; Schovancova, J; Schramm, S; Schuh, N; Schulte, A; Schultens, M J; Schultz-Coulon, H-C; Schulz, H; Schumacher, M; Schumm, B A; Schune, Ph; Schwartzman, A; Schwarz, T A; Schweiger, H; Schwemling, Ph; Schwienhorst, R; Schwindling, J; Sciandra, A; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Scutti, F; Searcy, J; Seema, P; Seidel, S C; Seiden, A; Seixas, J M; Sekhniaidze, G; Sekhon, K; Sekula, S J; Semprini-Cesari, N; Senkin, S; Serfon, C; Serin, L; Serkin, L; Sessa, M; Seuster, R; Severini, H; Sfiligoj, T; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shabalina, E; Shaikh, N W; Shan, L Y; Shang, R; Shank, J T; Shapiro, M; Shatalov, P B; Shaw, K; Shaw, S M; Shcherbakova, A; Shehu, C Y; Shen, Y; Sherafati, N; Sherwood, P; Shi, L; Shimizu, S; Shimmin, C O; Shimojima, M; Shipsey, I P J; Shirabe, S; Shiyakova, M; Shlomi, J; Shmeleva, A; Shoaleh Saadi, D; Shochet, M J; Shojaii, S; Shope, D R; Shrestha, S; Shulga, E; Shupe, M A; Sicho, P; Sickles, A M; Sidebo, P E; Sideras Haddad, E; Sidiropoulou, O; Sidoti, A; Siegert, F; Sijacki, Dj; Silva, J; Silverstein, S B; Simak, V; Simic, Lj; Simion, S; Simioni, E; Simmons, B; Simon, M; Sinervo, P; Sinev, N B; Sioli, M; Siragusa, G; Siral, I; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Sjölin, J; Skinner, M B; Skubic, P; Slater, M; Slavicek, T; Slawinska, M; Sliwa, K; Slovak, R; Smakhtin, V; Smart, B H; Smiesko, J; Smirnov, N; Smirnov, S Yu; Smirnov, Y; Smirnova, L N; Smirnova, O; Smith, J W; Smith, M N K; Smith, R W; Smizanska, M; Smolek, K; Snesarev, A A; Snyder, I M; Snyder, S; Sobie, R; Socher, F; Soffer, A; Søgaard, A; Soh, D A; Sokhrannyi, G; Solans Sanchez, C A; Solar, M; Soldatov, E Yu; Soldevila, U; Solodkov, A A; Soloshenko, A; Solovyanov, O V; Solovyev, V; Sommer, P; Son, H; Sopczak, A; Sosa, D; Sotiropoulou, C L; Soualah, R; Soukharev, A M; South, D; Sowden, B C; Spagnolo, S; Spalla, M; Spangenberg, M; Spanò, F; Sperlich, D; Spettel, F; Spieker, T M; Spighi, R; Spigo, G; Spiller, L A; Spousta, M; St Denis, R D; Stabile, A; Stamen, R; Stamm, S; Stanecka, E; Stanek, R W; Stanescu, C; Stanitzki, M M; Stapf, B S; Stapnes, S; Starchenko, E A; Stark, G H; Stark, J; Stark, S H; Staroba, P; Starovoitov, P; Stärz, S; Staszewski, R; Steinberg, P; Stelzer, B; Stelzer, H J; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stenzel, H; Stewart, G A; Stockton, M C; Stoebe, M; Stoicea, G; Stolte, P; Stonjek, S; Stradling, A R; Straessner, A; Stramaglia, M E; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strauss, M; Strizenec, P; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D M; Stroynowski, R; Strubig, A; Stucci, S A; Stugu, B; Styles, N A; Su, D; Su, J; Suchek, S; Sugaya, Y; Suk, M; Sulin, V V; Sultan, Dms; Sultansoy, S; Sumida, T; Sun, S; Sun, X; Suruliz, K; Suster, C J E; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, S; Svatos, M; Swiatlowski, M; Swift, S P; Sykora, I; Sykora, T; Ta, D; Tackmann, K; Taenzer, J; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Tahirovic, E; Taiblum, N; Takai, H; Takashima, R; Takasugi, E H; Takeshita, T; Takubo, Y; Talby, M; Talyshev, A A; Tanaka, J; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanaka, S; Tanioka, R; Tannenwald, B B; Tapia Araya, S; Tapprogge, S; Tarem, S; Tartarelli, G F; Tas, P; Tasevsky, M; Tashiro, T; Tassi, E; Tavares Delgado, A; Tayalati, Y; Taylor, A C; Taylor, G N; Taylor, P T E; Taylor, W; Teixeira-Dias, P; Temple, D; Ten Kate, H; Teng, P K; Teoh, J J; Tepel, F; Terada, S; Terashi, K; Terron, J; Terzo, S; Testa, M; Teuscher, R J; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T; Thomas, J P; Thomas-Wilsker, J; Thompson, P D; Thompson, A S; Thomsen, L A; Thomson, E; Tibbetts, M J; Ticse Torres, R E; Tikhomirov, V O; Tikhonov, Yu A; Timoshenko, S; Tipton, P; Tisserant, S; Todome, K; Todorova-Nova, S; Tojo, J; Tokár, S; Tokushuku, K; Tolley, E; Tomlinson, L; Tomoto, M; Tompkins, L; Toms, K; Tong, B; Tornambe, P; Torrence, E; Torres, H; Torró Pastor, E; Toth, J; Touchard, F; Tovey, D R; Treado, C J; Trefzger, T; Tresoldi, F; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I M; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tripiana, M F; Trischuk, W; Trocmé, B; Trofymov, A; Troncon, C; Trottier-McDonald, M; Trovatelli, M; Truong, L; Trzebinski, M; Trzupek, A; Tsang, K W; Tseng, J C-L; Tsiareshka, P V; Tsipolitis, G; Tsirintanis, N; Tsiskaridze, S; Tsiskaridze, V; Tskhadadze, E G; Tsui, K M; Tsukerman, I I; Tsulaia, V; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Tu, Y; Tudorache, A; Tudorache, V; Tulbure, T T; Tuna, A N; Tupputi, S A; Turchikhin, S; Turgeman, D; Turk Cakir, I; Turra, R; Tuts, P M; Ucchielli, G; Ueda, I; Ughetto, M; Ukegawa, F; Unal, G; Undrus, A; Unel, G; Ungaro, F C; Unno, Y; Unverdorben, C; Urban, J; Urquijo, P; Urrejola, P; Usai, G; Usui, J; Vacavant, L; Vacek, V; Vachon, B; Vadla, K O H; Vaidya, A; Valderanis, C; Valdes Santurio, E; Valente, M; Valentinetti, S; Valero, A; Valéry, L; Valkar, S; Vallier, A; Valls Ferrer, J A; Van Den Wollenberg, W; van der Graaf, H; van Gemmeren, P; Van Nieuwkoop, J; van Vulpen, I; van Woerden, M C; Vanadia, M; Vandelli, W; Vaniachine, A; Vankov, P; Vardanyan, G; Vari, R; Varnes, E W; Varni, C; Varol, T; Varouchas, D; Vartapetian, A; Varvell, K E; Vasquez, J G; Vasquez, G A; Vazeille, F; Vazquez Schroeder, T; Veatch, J; Veeraraghavan, V; Veloce, L M; Veloso, F; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Venturi, M; Venturi, N; Venturini, A; Vercesi, V; Verducci, M; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, A T; Vermeulen, J C; Vetterli, M C; Viaux Maira, N; Viazlo, O; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Vickey Boeriu, O E; Viehhauser, G H A; Viel, S; Vigani, L; Villa, M; Villaplana Perez, M; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinogradov, V B; Vishwakarma, A; Vittori, C; Vivarelli, I; Vlachos, S; Vlasak, M; Vogel, M; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; von der Schmitt, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vorobev, K; Vos, M; Voss, R; Vossebeld, J H; Vranjes, N; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Wagner, P; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wahlberg, H; Wahrmund, S; Wakabayashi, J; Walder, J; Walker, R; Walkowiak, W; Wallangen, V; Wang, C; Wang, C; Wang, F; Wang, H; Wang, H; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, Q; Wang, R; Wang, S M; Wang, T; Wang, W; Wang, W; Wang, Z; Wanotayaroj, C; Warburton, A; Ward, C P; Wardrope, D R; Washbrook, A; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, B M; Webb, A F; Webb, S; Weber, M S; Weber, S W; Weber, S A; Webster, J S; Weidberg, A R; Weinert, B; Weingarten, J; Weirich, M; Weiser, C; Weits, H; Wells, P S; Wenaus, T; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M D; Werner, P; Wessels, M; Weston, T D; Whalen, K; Whallon, N L; Wharton, A M; White, A S; White, A; White, M J; White, R; Whiteson, D; Whitmore, B W; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik-Fuchs, L A M; Wildauer, A; Wilk, F; Wilkens, H G; Williams, H H; Williams, S; Willis, C; Willocq, S; Wilson, J A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winkels, E; Winklmeier, F; Winston, O J; Winter, B T; Wittgen, M; Wobisch, M; Wolf, T M H; Wolff, R; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wong, V W S; Worm, S D; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Wozniak, K W; Wu, M; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wu, Y; Wyatt, T R; Wynne, B M; Xella, S; Xi, Z; Xia, L; Xu, D; Xu, L; Yabsley, B; Yacoob, S; Yamaguchi, D; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, S; Yamanaka, T; Yamatani, M; Yamauchi, K; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, H; Yang, Y; Yang, Z; Yao, W-M; Yap, Y C; Yasu, Y; Yatsenko, E; Yau Wong, K H; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yeletskikh, I; Yigitbasi, E; Yildirim, E; Yorita, K; Yoshihara, K; Young, C; Young, C J S; Yu, J; Yu, J; Yuen, S P Y; Yusuff, I; Zabinski, B; Zacharis, G; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zakharchuk, N; Zalieckas, J; Zaman, A; Zambito, S; Zanzi, D; Zeitnitz, C; Zemaityte, G; Zemla, A; Zeng, J C; Zeng, Q; Zenin, O; Ženiš, T; Zerwas, D; Zhang, D; Zhang, F; Zhang, G; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, P; Zhang, R; Zhang, R; Zhang, X; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhao, X; Zhao, Y; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zhou, B; Zhou, C; Zhou, L; Zhou, M; Zhou, M; Zhou, N; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhukov, K; Zibell, A; Zieminska, D; Zimine, N I; Zimmermann, C; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Zinser, M; Ziolkowski, M; Živković, L; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zou, R; Zur Nedden, M; Zwalinski, L

    2017-01-01

    With the increase in energy of the Large Hadron Collider to a centre-of-mass energy of 13 [Formula: see text] for Run 2, events with dense environments, such as in the cores of high-energy jets, became a focus for new physics searches as well as measurements of the Standard Model. These environments are characterized by charged-particle separations of the order of the tracking detectors sensor granularity. Basic track quantities are compared between 3.2 fb[Formula: see text] of data collected by the ATLAS experiment and simulation of proton-proton collisions producing high-transverse-momentum jets at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 [Formula: see text]. The impact of charged-particle separations and multiplicities on the track reconstruction performance is discussed. The track reconstruction efficiency in the cores of jets with transverse momenta between 200 and 1600 [Formula: see text] is quantified using a novel, data-driven, method. The method uses the energy loss, [Formula: see text], to identify pixel clusters originating from two charged particles. Of the charged particles creating these clusters, the measured fraction that fail to be reconstructed is [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] for jet transverse momenta of 200-400 [Formula: see text] and 1400-1600 [Formula: see text], respectively.

  20. Implementation of a Low-Latency Contention-Free Geographical Routing Scheme for Mobile Cyber-Physical Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Bader, Ahmed

    2015-07-09

    Results and lessons learned from the implementation of a novel ultra low-latency geo-routing scheme are presented in this paper. The geo-routing scheme is intended for team-based mobile cyber-physical systems whereby a cluster of unmanned vehicles (robots) are deployed to accomplish a critical mission under human supervision. The contention-free nature of the developed scheme lends itself to jointly achieve lower latency and higher throughput. Implementation challenges are presented and corresponding resolutions are discussed herewith.

  1. Controllable thousand-port low-latency optical packet switch architecture for short link applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Lucente, S.; Nazarathy, J.; Raz, O.; Calabretta, N.; Dorren, H.J.S.; Bienstman, P.; Morthier, G.; Roelkens, G.; et al., xx

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of a low-latency optical packet switch architecture that is controllable while scaling to over thousand ports is investigated in this paper. Optical packet switches with thousand of input/output ports are promising devices to improve the performance of short link applications in

  2. Performance of the ATLAS track reconstruction algorithms in dense environments in LHC Run 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaboud, M. [Univ. Mohamed Premier et LPTPM, Oujda (Morocco). Faculte des Sciences; Aad, G. [CPPM, Aix-Marseille Univ. et CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Abbott, B. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States). Homer L. Dodge Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Collaboration: ATLAS Collaboration; and others

    2017-10-15

    With the increase in energy of the Large Hadron Collider to a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV for Run 2, events with dense environments, such as in the cores of high-energy jets, became a focus for new physics searches as well as measurements of the Standard Model. These environments are characterized by charged-particle separations of the order of the tracking detectors sensor granularity. Basic track quantities are compared between 3.2 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the ATLAS experiment and simulation of proton-proton collisions producing high-transverse-momentum jets at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The impact of charged-particle separations and multiplicities on the track reconstruction performance is discussed. The track reconstruction efficiency in the cores of jets with transverse momenta between 200 and 1600 GeV is quantified using a novel, data-driven, method. The method uses the energy loss, dE/dx, to identify pixel clusters originating from two charged particles. Of the charged particles creating these clusters, the measured fraction that fail to be reconstructed is 0.061 ± 0.006(stat.) ± 0.014(syst.) and 0.093 ± 0.017(stat.) ± 0.021(syst.) for jet transverse momenta of 200-400 GeV and 1400-1600 GeV, respectively. (orig.)

  3. Novel methods and expected run II performance of ATLAS track reconstruction in dense environments

    CERN Document Server

    Jansky, Roland Wolfgang; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Detailed understanding and optimal track reconstruction performance of ATLAS in the core of high pT objects is paramount for a number of techniques such as jet energy and mass calibration, jet flavour tagging, and hadronic tau identification as well as measurements of physics quantities like jet fragmentation functions. These dense environments are characterized by charged particle separations on the order of the granularity of ATLAS’s inner detector. With the insertion of a new innermost layer in this tracking detector, which allows measurements closer to the interaction point, and an increase in the centre of mass energy, these difficult environments will become even more relevant in Run II, such as in searches for heavy resonances. Novel algorithmic developments to the ATLAS track reconstruction software targeting these topologies as well as the expected improved performance will be presented.

  4. Reducing the PAPR in FBMC-OQAM systems with low-latency trellis-based SLM technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulusu, S. S. Krishna Chaitanya; Shaiek, Hmaied; Roviras, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    Filter-bank multi-carrier (FBMC) modulations, and more specifically FBMC-offset quadrature amplitude modulation (OQAM), are seen as an interesting alternative to orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) for the 5th generation radio access technology. In this paper, we investigate the problem of peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) reduction for FBMC-OQAM signals. Recently, it has been shown that FBMC-OQAM with trellis-based selected mapping (TSLM) scheme not only is superior to any scheme based on symbol-by-symbol approach but also outperforms that of the OFDM with classical SLM scheme. This paper is an extension of that work, where we analyze the TSLM in terms of computational complexity, required hardware memory, and latency issues. We have proposed an improvement to the TSLM, which requires very less hardware memory, compared to the originally proposed TSLM, and also have low latency. Additionally, the impact of the time duration of partial PAPR on the performance of TSLM is studied, and its lower bound has been identified by proposing a suitable time duration. Also, a thorough and fair comparison of performance has been done with an existing trellis-based scheme proposed in literature. The simulation results show that the proposed low-latency TSLM yields better PAPR reduction performance with relatively less hardware memory requirements.

  5. Track recognition in the central drift chamber of the SAPHIR detector at ELSA and first reconstruction of real tracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korn, P.

    1991-02-01

    The FORTRAN program for pattern recognition in the central drift chamber of SAPHIR has been modified in order to find tracks with more than one missing wire signal and has been optimized in resolving the left/right ambiguities. The second part of this report deals with the reconstruction of some real tracks (γ → e + e - ), which were measured with SAPHIR. The efficiency of the central drift chamber and the space-to-drift time-relation are discussed. (orig.)

  6. A comparative study of track reconstruction methods in the context of CMS physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, M.

    2002-05-01

    This thesis deals mainly with the problem of reconstructing the tracks of charged particles from the measurements recorded by the CMS Tracker, in particular with track fitting. The task of the track fit is to use the available information (the subsets of hits belonging to the track of a particle found by a track finder) in a statistically optimal way for the estimation of the track parameters and the associated errors. Due to the high track multiplicity at LHC and the large background of noise hits, combinatorial methods such as the Kalman filter may have problems in the association of hits to tracks, and their results will be biased in the case of wrong hits assigned to a track. Recently developped non-linear, adaptive methods such as the deterministic annealing filter and the multi track filter try to solve the assignment problem during the track fit, by determining an assignment probability of a hit to a track. The methods are studied in the CMS Tracker using various event topologies. (author)

  7. Configurable Crossbar Switch for Deterministic, Low-latency Inter-blade Communications in a MicroTCA Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamooz, Saeed [Vadatech Inc. (United States); Breeding, John Eric [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Justice, T Alan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    As MicroTCA expands into applications beyond the telecommunications industry from which it originated, it faces new challenges in the area of inter-blade communications. The ability to achieve deterministic, low-latency communications between blades is critical to realizing a scalable architecture. In the past, legacy bus architectures accomplished inter-blade communications using dedicated parallel buses across the backplane. Because of limited fabric resources on its backplane, MicroTCA uses the carrier hub (MCH) for this purpose. Unfortunately, MCH products from commercial vendors are limited to standard bus protocols such as PCI Express, Serial Rapid IO and 10/40GbE. While these protocols have exceptional throughput capability, they are neither deterministic nor necessarily low-latency. To overcome this limitation, an MCH has been developed based on the Xilinx Virtex-7 690T FPGA. This MCH provides the system architect/developer complete flexibility in both the interface protocol and routing of information between blades. In this paper, we present the application of this configurable MCH concept to the Machine Protection System under development for the Spallation Neutron Sources's proton accelerator. Specifically, we demonstrate the use of the configurable MCH as a 12x4-lane crossbar switch using the Aurora protocol to achieve a deterministic, low-latency data link. In this configuration, the crossbar has an aggregate bandwidth of 48 GB/s.

  8. Scalable optical packet switch architecture for low latency and high load computer communication networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calabretta, N.; Di Lucente, S.; Nazarathy, Y.; Raz, O.; Dorren, H.J.S.

    2011-01-01

    High performance computer and data-centers require PetaFlop/s processing speed and Petabyte storage capacity with thousands of low-latency short link interconnections between computers nodes. Switch matrices that operate transparently in the optical domain are a potential way to efficiently

  9. Simulation of eye-tracker latency, spot size, and ablation pulse depth on the correction of higher order wavefront aberrations with scanning spot laser systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueeler, Michael; Mrochen, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this theoretical work was to investigate the robustness of scanning spot laser treatments with different laser spot diameters and peak ablation depths in case of incomplete compensation of eye movements due to eye-tracker latency. Scanning spot corrections of 3rd to 5th Zernike order wavefront errors were numerically simulated. Measured eye-movement data were used to calculate the positioning error of each laser shot assuming eye-tracker latencies of 0, 5, 30, and 100 ms, and for the case of no eye tracking. The single spot ablation depth ranged from 0.25 to 1.0 microm and the spot diameter from 250 to 1000 microm. The quality of the ablation was rated by the postoperative surface variance and the Strehl intensity ratio, which was calculated after a low-pass filter was applied to simulate epithelial surface smoothing. Treatments performed with nearly ideal eye tracking (latency approximately 0) provide the best results with a small laser spot (0.25 mm) and a small ablation depth (250 microm). However, combinations of a large spot diameter (1000 microm) and a small ablation depth per pulse (0.25 microm) yield the better results for latencies above a certain threshold to be determined specifically. Treatments performed with tracker latencies in the order of 100 ms yield similar results as treatments done completely without eye-movement compensation. CONCWSIONS: Reduction of spot diameter was shown to make the correction more susceptible to eye movement induced error. A smaller spot size is only beneficial when eye movement is neutralized with a tracking system with a latency <5 ms.

  10. Design and performance of a high resolution, low latency stripline beam position monitor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apsimon, R. J.; Bett, D. R.; Blaskovic Kraljevic, N.; Burrows, P. N.; Christian, G. B.; Clarke, C. I.; Constance, B. D.; Dabiri Khah, H.; Davis, M. R.; Perry, C.; Resta López, J.; Swinson, C. J.

    2015-03-01

    A high-resolution, low-latency beam position monitor (BPM) system has been developed for use in particle accelerators and beam lines that operate with trains of particle bunches with bunch separations as low as several tens of nanoseconds, such as future linear electron-positron colliders and free-electron lasers. The system was tested with electron beams in the extraction line of the Accelerator Test Facility at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) in Japan. It consists of three stripline BPMs instrumented with analogue signal-processing electronics and a custom digitizer for logging the data. The design of the analogue processor units is presented in detail, along with measurements of the system performance. The processor latency is 15.6 ±0.1 ns . A single-pass beam position resolution of 291 ±10 nm has been achieved, using a beam with a bunch charge of approximately 1 nC.

  11. Technologies for low-bandwidth high-latency unmanned ground vehicle control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Teresa; Cogan, Ken; Hunt, Lee; Restine, Paul

    2014-05-01

    Automation technology has evolved at a rapid pace in recent years; however, many real-world problems require contextual understanding, problem solving, and other forms of higher-order thinking that extends beyond the capabilities of robots for the foreseeable future. This limits the complexity of automation which can be supplied to modern unmanned ground robots (UGV) and necessitates human-in-the-loop monitoring and control for some portions of missions. In order for the human operator to make decisions and provide tasking during key portions of the mission, existing solutions first derive significant information from a potentially dense reconstruction of the scene utilizing LIDAR, video, and other onboard sensors. A dense reconstruction contains too much data for real-time transmission over a modern wireless data link, so the robot electronics must first condense the scene representation prior to transmission. The control station receives this condensed scene representations and provides visual information to the human operator; the human operator then provides tele-operation commands in real-time to the robot. This paper discusses approaches to dense scene reduction of the data required to transmit to a human-in-the loop as well as the challenges associated with them. In addition, the complex and unstructured nature of real-world environments increases the need for tele-operation. Furthermore, many environments reduce the bandwidth and increase the latency of the link. Ultimately, worsening conditions will cause the tele-operation control process to break down, rendering the robot ineffective. In a worst-case scenario, extreme conditions causing a complete loss-of-communications could result in mission failure and loss of the vehicle.

  12. Topological track reconstruction in liquid scintillator and LENA as a far-detector in an LBNO experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Sebastian

    2016-12-15

    Unsegmented liquid scintillator (LSc) neutrino detectors have proven to be successful instruments of neutrino physics. They usually measure terrestrial and astrophysical low-energy (LE) neutrinos and antineutrinos with energies up to some tens of MeV. Designs for next-generation detectors based on this technology intend to use several tens of kilotons of LSc. Two examples are the Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy (LENA) project with 50 kt considered in Europe and the Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) with 20 kt already under construction in China. A key factor to reach the scientific goals of these projects, e.g., the determination of the neutrino mass ordering (MO) in the case of JUNO, will be the efficient rejection of background from radioisotopes produced by cosmogenic muons. This requires accurate reconstructions of extended muon event topologies in the LSc volume.The first part of this work is about the implementation of a novel, iterative track reconstruction procedure for unsegmented LSc detectors and a basic evaluation of its performance with the LENA detector simulation. The ultimate goal of the new method is to reconstruct the spatial number density distribution of optical photon emissions. This will give access to a charged particle's differential energy loss dE/dx in LSc and resolve details of an event's topology, e.g., induced particle showers. Visual comparisons of reconstruction outcomes with Monte Carlo (MC) truths already provide evidence for this capability. First quantitative results were extracted from the 3D reconstruction data of fully-contained muons in the kinetic energy range from 1 to 10 GeV: Despite some well understood systematic effects in the current method to find start and end point of a track, resolutions reconstructed track were ascertained for these spots. The determined angular resolution of ∝1.4 at 1 GeV improves to ∝0.3 with rising muon energy. With the current analysis

  13. Topological track reconstruction in liquid scintillator and LENA as a far-detector in an LBNO experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, Sebastian

    2016-12-01

    Unsegmented liquid scintillator (LSc) neutrino detectors have proven to be successful instruments of neutrino physics. They usually measure terrestrial and astrophysical low-energy (LE) neutrinos and antineutrinos with energies up to some tens of MeV. Designs for next-generation detectors based on this technology intend to use several tens of kilotons of LSc. Two examples are the Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy (LENA) project with 50 kt considered in Europe and the Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) with 20 kt already under construction in China. A key factor to reach the scientific goals of these projects, e.g., the determination of the neutrino mass ordering (MO) in the case of JUNO, will be the efficient rejection of background from radioisotopes produced by cosmogenic muons. This requires accurate reconstructions of extended muon event topologies in the LSc volume.The first part of this work is about the implementation of a novel, iterative track reconstruction procedure for unsegmented LSc detectors and a basic evaluation of its performance with the LENA detector simulation. The ultimate goal of the new method is to reconstruct the spatial number density distribution of optical photon emissions. This will give access to a charged particle's differential energy loss dE/dx in LSc and resolve details of an event's topology, e.g., induced particle showers. Visual comparisons of reconstruction outcomes with Monte Carlo (MC) truths already provide evidence for this capability. First quantitative results were extracted from the 3D reconstruction data of fully-contained muons in the kinetic energy range from 1 to 10 GeV: Despite some well understood systematic effects in the current method to find start and end point of a track, resolutions < or similar 25 cm lateral to the reconstructed track were ascertained for these spots. The determined angular resolution of ∝1.4 at 1 GeV improves to ∝0.3 with rising muon energy. With the current analysis method

  14. Methods of reconstruction of multi-particle events in the new coordinate-tracking setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobyev, V. S.; Shutenko, V. V.; Zadeba, E. A.

    2018-01-01

    At the Unique Scientific Facility NEVOD (MEPhI), a large coordinate-tracking detector based on drift chambers for investigations of muon bundles generated by ultrahigh energy primary cosmic rays is being developed. One of the main characteristics of the bundle is muon multiplicity. Three methods of reconstruction of multiple events were investigated: the sequential search method, method of finding the straight line and method of histograms. The last method determines the number of tracks with the same zenith angle in the event. It is most suitable for the determination of muon multiplicity: because of a large distance to the point of generation of muons, their trajectories are quasiparallel. The paper presents results of application of three reconstruction methods to data from the experiment, and also first results of the detector operation.

  15. A novel String Banana Template Method for Tracks Reconstruction in High Multiplicity Events with significant Multiple Scattering and its Firmware Implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Kulinich, P; Krylov, V

    2004-01-01

    Novel String Banana Template Method (SBTM) for track reconstruction in difficult conditions is proposed and implemented for off-line analysis of relativistic heavy ion collision events. The main idea of the method is in use of features of ensembles of tracks selected by 3-fold coincidence. Two steps model of track is used: the first one - averaged over selected ensemble and the second - per event dependent. It takes into account Multiple Scattering (MS) for this particular track. SBTM relies on use of stored templates generated by precise Monte Carlo simulation, so it's more time efficient for the case of 2D spectrometer. All data required for track reconstruction in such difficult conditions could be prepared in convenient format for fast use. Its template based nature and the fact that the SBTM track model is actually very close to the hits implies that it can be implemented in a firmware processor. In this report a block diagram of firmware based pre-processor for track reconstruction in CMS-like Si tracke...

  16. Design and performance of a high resolution, low latency stripline beam position monitor system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Apsimon

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A high-resolution, low-latency beam position monitor (BPM system has been developed for use in particle accelerators and beam lines that operate with trains of particle bunches with bunch separations as low as several tens of nanoseconds, such as future linear electron-positron colliders and free-electron lasers. The system was tested with electron beams in the extraction line of the Accelerator Test Facility at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK in Japan. It consists of three stripline BPMs instrumented with analogue signal-processing electronics and a custom digitizer for logging the data. The design of the analogue processor units is presented in detail, along with measurements of the system performance. The processor latency is 15.6±0.1  ns. A single-pass beam position resolution of 291±10  nm has been achieved, using a beam with a bunch charge of approximately 1 nC.

  17. L1 track trigger for the CMS HL-LHC upgrade using AM chips and FPGAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedi, Giacomo

    2017-08-01

    The increase of luminosity at the HL-LHC will require the introduction of tracker information in CMS's Level-1 trigger system to maintain an acceptable trigger rate when selecting interesting events, despite the order of magnitude increase in minimum bias interactions. To meet the latency requirements, dedicated hardware has to be used. This paper presents the results of tests of a prototype system (pattern recognition ezzanine) as core of pattern recognition and track fitting for the CMS experiment, combining the power of both associative memory custom ASICs and modern Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices. The mezzanine uses the latest available associative memory devices (AM06) and the most modern Xilinx Ultrascale FPGAs. The results of the test for a complete tower comprising about 0.5 million patterns is presented, using as simulated input events traversing the upgraded CMS detector. The paper shows the performance of the pattern matching, track finding and track fitting, along with the latency and processing time needed. The pT resolution over pT of the muons measured using the reconstruction algorithm is at the order of 1% in the range 3-100 GeV/c.

  18. L1 track trigger for the CMS HL-LHC upgrade using AM chips and FPGAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedi Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase of luminosity at the HL-LHC will require the introduction of tracker information in CMS’s Level-1 trigger system to maintain an acceptable trigger rate when selecting interesting events, despite the order of magnitude increase in minimum bias interactions. To meet the latency requirements, dedicated hardware has to be used. This paper presents the results of tests of a prototype system (pattern recognition ezzanine as core of pattern recognition and track fitting for the CMS experiment, combining the power of both associative memory custom ASICs and modern Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA devices. The mezzanine uses the latest available associative memory devices (AM06 and the most modern Xilinx Ultrascale FPGAs. The results of the test for a complete tower comprising about 0.5 million patterns is presented, using as simulated input events traversing the upgraded CMS detector. The paper shows the performance of the pattern matching, track finding and track fitting, along with the latency and processing time needed. The pT resolution over pT of the muons measured using the reconstruction algorithm is at the order of 1% in the range 3-100 GeV/c.

  19. Track reconstruction in the emulsion-lead target of the OPERA experiment using the ESS microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrabito, L.; Bozza, C.; Buontempo, S.; Consiglio, L.; Cozzi, M.; D'Ambrosio, N.; DeLellis, G.; DeSerio, M.; Di Capua, F.; Di Ferdinando, D.; Di Marco, N.; Ereditato, A.; Esposito, L. S.; Fini, R. A.; Giacomelli, G.; Giorgini, M.; Grella, G.; Ieva, M.; Janicsko Csathy, J.; Juget, F.; Kreslo, I.; Laktineh, I.; Manai, K.; Mandrioli, G.; Marotta, A.; Migliozzi, P.; Monacelli, P.; Moser, U.; Muciaccia, M. T.; Pastore, A.; Patrizii, L.; Petukhov, Y.; Pistillo, C.; Pozzato, M.; Romano, G.; Rosa, G.; Russo, A.; Savvinov, N.; Schembri, A.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Simone, S.; Sioli, M.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Strolin, P.; Tioukov, V.; Waelchli, T.

    2007-05-01

    The OPERA experiment, designed to conclusively prove the existence of νμ→ντ oscillations in the atmospheric sector, makes use of a massive lead-nuclear emulsion target to observe the appearance of ντ's in the CNGS νμ beam. The location and analysis of the neutrino interactions in quasi real-time required the development of fast computer-controlled microscopes able to reconstruct particle tracks with sub-micron precision and high efficiency at a speed of ~20 cm2/h. This paper describes the performance in particle track reconstruction of the European Scanning System, a novel automatic microscope for the measurement of emulsion films developed for OPERA.

  20. Track reconstruction in the emulsion-lead target of the OPERA experiment using the ESS microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrabito, L; Bozza, C; Buontempo, S

    2007-01-01

    The OPERA experiment, designed to conclusively prove the existence of ν μ →ν τ oscillations in the atmospheric sector, makes use of a massive lead-nuclear emulsion target to observe the appearance of ν τ 's in the CNGS ν μ beam. The location and analysis of the neutrino interactions in quasi real-time required the development of fast computer-controlled microscopes able to reconstruct particle tracks with sub-micron precision and high efficiency at a speed of ∼20 cm 2 /h. This paper describes the performance in particle track reconstruction of the European Scanning System, a novel automatic microscope for the measurement of emulsion films developed for OPERA

  1. Latency in Distributed Acquisition and Rendering for Telepresence Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, Stephan; Willert, Malte; Staadt, Oliver

    2015-12-01

    Telepresence systems use 3D techniques to create a more natural human-centered communication over long distances. This work concentrates on the analysis of latency in telepresence systems where acquisition and rendering are distributed. Keeping latency low is important to immerse users in the virtual environment. To better understand latency problems and to identify the source of such latency, we focus on the decomposition of system latency into sub-latencies. We contribute a model of latency and show how it can be used to estimate latencies in a complex telepresence dataflow network. To compare the estimates with real latencies in our prototype, we modify two common latency measurement methods. This presented methodology enables the developer to optimize the design, find implementation issues and gain deeper knowledge about specific sources of latency.

  2. Fiber Bragg gratings-based sensing for real-time needle tracking during MR-guided brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borot de Battisti, Maxence, E-mail: M.E.P.Borot@umcutrecht.nl; Maenhout, Metha; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Vulpen, Marco van; Moerland, Marinus A. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, Utrecht 3584 CX (Netherlands); Denis de Senneville, Baudouin [Imaging Division, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, Utrecht 3584 CX, The Netherlands and IMB, UMR 5251 CNRS/University of Bordeaux, Talence 33400 (France); Hautvast, Gilion; Binnekamp, Dirk [Philips Group Innovation Biomedical Systems, Eindhoven 5656 AE (Netherlands)

    2016-10-15

    Purpose: The development of MR-guided high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is under investigation due to the excellent tumor and organs at risk visualization of MRI. However, MR-based localization of needles (including catheters or tubes) has inherently a low update rate and the required image interpretation can be hampered by signal voids arising from blood vessels or calcifications limiting the precision of the needle guidance and reconstruction. In this paper, a new needle tracking prototype is investigated using fiber Bragg gratings (FBG)-based sensing: this prototype involves a MR-compatible stylet composed of three optic fibers with nine sets of embedded FBG sensors each. This stylet can be inserted into brachytherapy needles and allows a fast measurement of the needle deflection. This study aims to assess the potential of FBG-based sensing for real-time needle (including catheter or tube) tracking during MR-guided intervention. Methods: First, the MR compatibility of FBG-based sensing and its accuracy was evaluated. Different known needle deflections were measured using FBG-based sensing during simultaneous MR-imaging. Then, a needle tracking procedure using FBG-based sensing was proposed. This procedure involved a MR-based calibration of the FBG-based system performed prior to the interventional procedure. The needle tracking system was assessed in an experiment with a moving phantom during MR imaging. The FBG-based system was quantified by comparing the gold-standard shapes, the shape manually segmented on MRI and the FBG-based measurements. Results: The evaluation of the MR compatibility of FBG-based sensing and its accuracy shows that the needle deflection could be measured with an accuracy of 0.27 mm on average. Besides, the FBG-based measurements were comparable to the uncertainty of MR-based measurements estimated at half the voxel size in the MR image. Finally, the mean(standard deviation) Euclidean distance between MR- and FBG-based needle position

  3. Reconfigurable PCI Express cards for low-latency data transport in HEP experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammendola, R.; Biagioni, A.; Cretaro, P.; Frezza, O.; Lo Cicero, F.; Lonardo, A.; Martinelli, M.; Paolucci, P.S.; Pastorelli, E.; Simula, F.; Vicini, P.; Lamanna, G.; Pontisso, L.

    2017-01-01

    State-of-the-art technology supports the High Energy Physics community in addressing the problem of managing an overwhelming amount of experimental data. From the point of view of communication between the detectors’ readout system and computing nodes, the critical issues are the following: latency, moving data in a deterministic and low amount of time; bandwidth, guaranteeing the maximum capability of the link and communication protocol adopted; endpoint consolidation, tight aggregation of channels on a single board. This contribution describes the status and performances of the NaNet project, whose goal is the design of a family of FPGA-based PCIe network interface cards. The efforts of the team are focused on implementing a low-latency, real-time data transport mechanism between the board network multi-channel system and CPU and GPU accelerators memories on the host. Several opportunities concerning technical solutions and scientific applications have been explored: NaNet-1 with a single GbE I/O interface, and NaNet-10, offering four 10GbE ports, for activities related to the GPU-based real-time trigger of NA62 experiment at CERN; NaNet"3, with four 2.5 Gbit optical channels, developed for the KM3NeT-ITALIA underwater neutrino telescope.

  4. Reconfigurable PCI Express cards for low-latency data transport in HEP experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammendola, R.; Biagioni, A.; Cretaro, P.; Frezza, O.; Lamanna, G.; Lo Cicero, F.; Lonardo, A.; Martinelli, M.; Paolucci, P. S.; Pastorelli, E.; Pontisso, L.; Simula, F.; Vicini, P.

    2017-01-01

    State-of-the-art technology supports the High Energy Physics community in addressing the problem of managing an overwhelming amount of experimental data. From the point of view of communication between the detectors' readout system and computing nodes, the critical issues are the following: latency, moving data in a deterministic and low amount of time; bandwidth, guaranteeing the maximum capability of the link and communication protocol adopted; endpoint consolidation, tight aggregation of channels on a single board. This contribution describes the status and performances of the NaNet project, whose goal is the design of a family of FPGA-based PCIe network interface cards. The efforts of the team are focused on implementing a low-latency, real-time data transport mechanism between the board network multi-channel system and CPU and GPU accelerators memories on the host. Several opportunities concerning technical solutions and scientific applications have been explored: NaNet-1 with a single GbE I/O interface, and NaNet-10, offering four 10GbE ports, for activities related to the GPU-based real-time trigger of NA62 experiment at CERN; NaNet ^3 , with four 2.5Gbit optical channels, developed for the KM3NeT-ITALIA underwater neutrino telescope.

  5. 12-bit 32 channel 500 MS/s low-latency ADC for particle accelerators real-time control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnitski, Anton; Baranauskas, Dalius; Zelenin, Denis; Baranauskas, Gytis; Zhankevich, Alexander; Gill, Chris

    2017-09-01

    Particle beam control systems require real-time low latency digital feedback with high linearity and dynamic range. Densely packed electronic systems employ high performance multichannel digitizers causing excessive heat dissipation. Therefore, low power dissipation is another critical requirement for these digitizers. A described 12-bit 500 MS/s ADC employs a sub-ranging architecture based on a merged sample & hold circuit, a residue C-DAC and a shared 6-bit flash core ADC. The core ADC provides a sequential coarse and fine digitization featuring a latency of two clock cycles. The ADC is implemented in a 28 nm CMOS process and consumes 4 mW of power per channel from a 0.9 V supply (interfacing and peripheral circuits are excluded). Reduced power consumption and small on-chip area permits the implementation of 32 ADC channels on a 10.7 mm2 chip. The ADC includes a JESD204B standard compliant output data interface operated at the 7.5 Gbps/ch rate. To minimize the data interface related time latency, a special feature permitting to bypass the JESD204B interface is built in. DoE Phase I Award Number: DE-SC0017213.

  6. Three-dimensional triplet tracking for LHC and future high rate experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schöning, A

    2014-01-01

    The hit combinatorial problem is a main challenge for track reconstruction and triggering at high rate experiments. At hadron colliders the dominant fraction of hits is due to low momentum tracks for which multiple scattering (MS) effects dominate the hit resolution. MS is also the dominating source for hit confusion and track uncertainties in low energy precision experiments. In all such environments, where MS dominates, track reconstruction and fitting can be largely simplified by using three-dimensional (3D) hit-triplets as provided by pixel detectors. This simplification is possible since track uncertainties are solely determined by MS if high precision spatial information is provided. Fitting of hit-triplets is especially simple for tracking detectors in solenoidal magnetic fields. The over-constrained 3D-triplet method provides a complete set of track parameters and is robust against fake hit combinations. Full tracks can be reconstructed step-wise by connecting hit triplet combinations from different layers, thus heavily reducing the combinatorial problem and accelerating track linking. The triplet method is ideally suited for pixel detectors where hits can be treated as 3D-space points. With the advent of relatively cheap and industrially available CMOS-sensors the construction of highly granular full scale pixel tracking detectors seems to be possible also for experiments at LHC or future high energy (hadron) colliders. In this paper tracking performance studies for full-scale pixel detectors, including their optimisation for 3D-triplet tracking, are presented. The results obtained for different types of tracker geometries and different reconstruction methods are compared. The potential of reducing the number of tracking layers and - along with that - the material budget using this new tracking concept is discussed. The possibility of using 3D-triplet tracking for triggering and fast online reconstruction is highlighted

  7. Toward Massive, Ultrareliable, and Low-Latency Wireless Communication With Short Packets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durisi, Giuseppe; Koch, Tobias; Popovski, Petar

    2016-01-01

    Most of the recent advances in the design of high-speed wireless systems are based on information-theoretic principles that demonstrate how to efficiently transmit long data packets. However, the upcoming wireless systems, notably the fifth-generation (5G) system, will need to support novel traffic...... that should be received with low latency and ultrahigh reliability. Current wireless systems are not designed to support short-packet transmissions. For example, the design of current systems relies on the assumption that the metadata (control information) is of negligible size compared to the actual...

  8. An artificial retina processor for track reconstruction at the LHC crossing rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedeschi, F.; Cenci, R.; Marino, P.; Morello, M. J.; Ninci, D.; Piucci, A.; Punzi, G.; Ristori, L.; Spinella, F.; Stracka, S.; Tonelli, D.; Walsh, J.

    2017-10-01

    The goal of the INFN-RETINA R&D project is to develop and implement a computational methodology that allows to reconstruct events with a large number (> 100) of charged-particle tracks in pixel and silicon strip detectors at 40 MHz, thus matching the requirements for processing LHC events at the full bunch-crossing frequency. Our approach relies on a parallel pattern-recognition algorithm, dubbed artificial retina, inspired by the early stages of image processing by the brain. In order to demonstrate that a track-processing system based on this algorithm is feasible, we built a sizable prototype of a tracking processor tuned to 3 000 patterns, based on already existing readout boards equipped with Altera Stratix III FPGAs. The detailed geometry and charged-particle activity of a large tracking detector currently in operation are used to assess its performances. We report on the test results with such a prototype.

  9. Modelling of Track Reconstruction Inside Jets with the 2016 ATLAS $\\sqrt{s}= 13$ TeV pp dataset

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Inside the core of high transverse momentum jets, the particle density is so high that the tracks of charged particles begin to overlap, and due to the different charged particles, pixel clusters in the ATLAS inner detector begin to merge. This high density environment results in a degradation of track reconstruction. Recent innovations to the ambiguity solving in the charged particle pattern recognition partially mitigate the loss in performance. However, it is critical for all physics results using tracks inside jets that the algorithms be well modeled by simulation. This note presents new measurements of the charged particle reconstruction inefficiency and fake rate inside jets with the $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV $pp$ dataset collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC in 2016.

  10. FTK: A Hardware Track Finder for the ATLAS Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Tompkins, L; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The LHC experiments are preparing for instantaneous luminosities above $1 imes 10^{34} cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ as early as 2015. In order to select the rare events of interest in such dense environments, detailed event information is necessary. In particular, the highly granular single particle information of tracking detectors is crucial for the selection of isolated leptons, taus and b-jets in the face of large vertex multiplicities. We report on the developement of the ATLAS FastTracker (FTK), a hardware based track finder which will reconstruct all tracks with a momentum greater than 1 GeV/c up to luminosties of $3 imes 10^{34} cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ at an event input rate of 100 kHz and a latency of a few hundred microseconds. The track information will be available to the Level 2 processors at the beginning of event processing. Significant progress towards a phased installation beginning in 2015 has been achieved. A pre-prototype of the pattern recognition board is taking data in the fall of 2012 and prototypes for all ...

  11. Online real-time reconstruction of adaptive TSENSE with commodity CPU / GPU hardware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roujol, Sebastien; de Senneville, Baudouin; Vahala, E.

    2009-01-01

    A real-time reconstruction for adaptive TSENSE is presented that is optimized for MR-guidance of interventional procedures. The proposed method allows high frame-rate imaging with low image latencies, even when large coil arrays are employed and can be implemented on affordable commodity hardware....

  12. Implementation of an object oriented track reconstruction model into multiple LHC experiments*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Irwin; Gonzalez, Saul; Qian, Sijin

    2001-10-01

    An Object Oriented (OO) model (Gaines et al., 1996; 1997; Gaines and Qian, 1998; 1999) for track reconstruction by the Kalman filtering method has been designed for high energy physics experiments at high luminosity hadron colliders. The model has been coded in the C++ programming language and has been successfully implemented into the OO computing environments of both the CMS (1994) and ATLAS (1994) experiments at the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. We shall report: how the OO model was adapted, with largely the same code, to different scenarios and serves the different reconstruction aims in different experiments (i.e. the level-2 trigger software for ATLAS and the offline software for CMS); how the OO model has been incorporated into different OO environments with a similar integration structure (demonstrating the ease of re-use of OO program); what are the OO model's performance, including execution time, memory usage, track finding efficiency and ghost rate, etc.; and additional physics performance based on use of the OO tracking model. We shall also mention the experience and lessons learned from the implementation of the OO model into the general OO software framework of the experiments. In summary, our practice shows that the OO technology really makes the software development and the integration issues straightforward and convenient; this may be particularly beneficial for the general non-computer-professional physicists.

  13. NaNet: a flexible and configurable low-latency NIC for real-time trigger systems based on GPUs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammendola, R; Biagioni, A; Frezza, O; Lonardo, A; Cicero, F Lo; Paolucci, P S; Rossetti, D; Simula, F; Tosoratto, L; Vicini, P; Lamanna, G; Pantaleo, F; Sozzi, M

    2014-01-01

    NaNet is an FPGA-based PCIe X8 Gen2 NIC supporting 1/10 GbE links and the custom 34 Gbps APElink channel. The design has GPUDirect RDMA capabilities and features a network stack protocol offloading module, making it suitable for building low-latency, real-time GPU-based computing systems. We provide a detailed description of the NaNet hardware modular architecture. Benchmarks for latency and bandwidth for GbE and APElink channels are presented, followed by a performance analysis on the case study of the GPU-based low level trigger for the RICH detector in the NA62 CERN experiment, using either the NaNet GbE and APElink channels. Finally, we give an outline of project future activities

  14. NaNet: a flexible and configurable low-latency NIC for real-time trigger systems based on GPUs

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00646837; Biagioni, A.; Frezza, O.; Lamanna, G.; Lonardo, A.; Lo Cicero, F.; Paolucci, P.S.; Pantaleo, F.; Rossetti, D.; Simula, F.; Sozzi, M.; Tosoratto, L.; Vicini, P.

    2014-02-21

    NaNet is an FPGA-based PCIe X8 Gen2 NIC supporting 1/10 GbE links and the custom 34~Gbps APElink channel. The design has GPUDirect RDMA capabilities and features a network stack protocol offloading module, making it suitable for building low-latency, real-time GPU-based computing systems. We provide a detailed description of the NaNet hardware modular architecture. Benchmarks for latency and bandwidth for GbE and APElink channels are presented, followed by a performance analysis on the case study of the GPU-based low level trigger for the RICH detector in the NA62 CERN experiment, using either the NaNet GbE and APElink channels. Finally, we give an outline of project future activities.

  15. NaNet: a flexible and configurable low-latency NIC for real-time trigger systems based on GPUs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammendola, R [INFN Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 1 - 00133 Roma (Italy); Biagioni, A; Frezza, O; Lonardo, A; Cicero, F Lo; Paolucci, P S; Rossetti, D; Simula, F; Tosoratto, L; Vicini, P [INFN Sezione di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro, 2 - 00185 Roma (Italy); Lamanna, G; Pantaleo, F; Sozzi, M [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Via F. Buonarroti 2 - 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2014-02-01

    NaNet is an FPGA-based PCIe X8 Gen2 NIC supporting 1/10 GbE links and the custom 34 Gbps APElink channel. The design has GPUDirect RDMA capabilities and features a network stack protocol offloading module, making it suitable for building low-latency, real-time GPU-based computing systems. We provide a detailed description of the NaNet hardware modular architecture. Benchmarks for latency and bandwidth for GbE and APElink channels are presented, followed by a performance analysis on the case study of the GPU-based low level trigger for the RICH detector in the NA62 CERN experiment, using either the NaNet GbE and APElink channels. Finally, we give an outline of project future activities.

  16. High-Throughput and Low-Latency Network Communication with NetIO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Jörn; Plessl, Christian; Vandelli, Wainer

    2017-10-01

    HPC network technologies like Infiniband, TrueScale or OmniPath provide low- latency and high-throughput communication between hosts, which makes them attractive options for data-acquisition systems in large-scale high-energy physics experiments. Like HPC networks, DAQ networks are local and include a well specified number of systems. Unfortunately traditional network communication APIs for HPC clusters like MPI or PGAS exclusively target the HPC community and are not suited well for DAQ applications. It is possible to build distributed DAQ applications using low-level system APIs like Infiniband Verbs, but it requires a non-negligible effort and expert knowledge. At the same time, message services like ZeroMQ have gained popularity in the HEP community. They make it possible to build distributed applications with a high-level approach and provide good performance. Unfortunately, their usage usually limits developers to TCP/IP- based networks. While it is possible to operate a TCP/IP stack on top of Infiniband and OmniPath, this approach may not be very efficient compared to a direct use of native APIs. NetIO is a simple, novel asynchronous message service that can operate on Ethernet, Infiniband and similar network fabrics. In this paper the design and implementation of NetIO is presented and described, and its use is evaluated in comparison to other approaches. NetIO supports different high-level programming models and typical workloads of HEP applications. The ATLAS FELIX project [1] successfully uses NetIO as its central communication platform. The architecture of NetIO is described in this paper, including the user-level API and the internal data-flow design. The paper includes a performance evaluation of NetIO including throughput and latency measurements. The performance is compared against the state-of-the- art ZeroMQ message service. Performance measurements are performed in a lab environment with Ethernet and FDR Infiniband networks.

  17. Latency and User Performance in Virtual Environments and Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    System rendering latency has been recognized by senior researchers, such as Professor Fredrick Brooks of UNC (Turing Award 1999), as a major factor limiting the realism and utility of head-referenced displays systems. Latency has been shown to reduce the user's sense of immersion within a virtual environment, disturb user interaction with virtual objects, and to contribute to motion sickness during some simulation tasks. Latency, however, is not just an issue for external display systems since finite nerve conduction rates and variation in transduction times in the human body's sensors also pose problems for latency management within the nervous system. Some of the phenomena arising from the brain's handling of sensory asynchrony due to latency will be discussed as a prelude to consideration of the effects of latency in interactive displays. The causes and consequences of the erroneous movement that appears in displays due to latency will be illustrated with examples of the user performance impact provided by several experiments. These experiments will review the generality of user sensitivity to latency when users judge either object or environment stability. Hardware and signal processing countermeasures will also be discussed. In particular the tuning of a simple extrapolative predictive filter not using a dynamic movement model will be presented. Results show that it is possible to adjust this filter so that the appearance of some latencies may be hidden without the introduction of perceptual artifacts such as overshoot. Several examples of the effects of user performance will be illustrated by three-dimensional tracking and tracing tasks executed in virtual environments. These experiments demonstrate classic phenomena known from work on manual control and show the need for very responsive systems if they are indented to support precise manipulation. The practical benefits of removing interfering latencies from interactive systems will be emphasized with some

  18. Description and performance of track and primary-vertex reconstruction with the CMS tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Beaumont, Willem; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Luyckx, Sten; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Devroede, Olivier; Heracleous, Natalie; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Keaveney, James; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Lancker, Luc; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Dildick, Sven; Garcia, Guillaume; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; De Callatay, Bernard; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Michotte, Daniel; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Malek, Magdalena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Plestina, Roko; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Yifei; Li, Qiang; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Morovic, Srecko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Nayak, Aruna; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Daci, Nadir; Dahms, Torsten; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Sabes, David; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Bonnin, Christian; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Charles, Laurent; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Drouhin, Frédéric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Gross, Laurent; Juillot, Pierre; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Baulieu, Guillaume; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Boudoul, Gaelle; Brochet, Sébastien; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Lumb, Nicholas; Mathez, Hervé; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Zoccarato, Yannick; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Bontenackels, Michael; Calpas, Betty; Edelhoff, Matthias; Esser, Hans; Feld, Lutz; Hindrichs, Otto; Karpinski, Waclaw; Klein, Katja; Kukulies, Christoph; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Pierschel, Gerhard; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Schwering, Georg; Sprenger, Daniel; Verlage, Tobias; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Wlochal, Michael; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Caudron, Julien; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Weber, Martin; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Perchalla, Lars; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Gunnellini, Paolo; Habib, Shiraz; Hampe, Jan; Hansen, Karsten; Hauk, Johannes; Hellwig, Gregor; Hempel, Maria; Horton, Dean; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krämer, Mira; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Maser, Holger; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Muhl, Carsten; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Friederike; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Petrukhin, Alexey; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Riedl, Caroline; Ron, Elias; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Saxena, Pooja; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Spannagel, Simon; Stein, Matthias; Vargas Trevino, Andrea Del Rocio; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Zuber, Adam; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Berger, Lutz Olaf; Biskop, Heike; Blobel, Volker; Buhmann, Peter; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Enderle, Holger; Erfle, Joachim; Frensche, Benno; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Görner, Martin; Gosselink, Martijn; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lange, Jörn; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Maettig, Stefan; Marchesini, Ivan; Matysek, Michael; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Pietsch, Niklas; Pöhlsen, Thomas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Seidel, Markus; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Barth, Christian; Barvich, Tobias; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Boegelspacher, Felix; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Eber, Robert; Feindt, Michael; Guthoff, Moritz; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Martschei, Daniel; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Nürnberg, Andreas; Oberst, Oliver; Printz, Martin; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Röcker, Steffen; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schott, Gregory; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Steck, Pia; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Wolf, Roger; Zeise, Manuel; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Gouskos, Loukas; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Aslanoglou, Xenofon; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Jones, John; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Karancsi, János; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Kaur, Manjit; Mehta, Manuk Zubin; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Sharma, Archana; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Modak, Atanu; Mukherjee, Swagata; Roy, Debarati; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Singh, Anil; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Cariola, Pasquale; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; De Robertis, Giuseppe; Fiore, Luigi; Franco, Michele; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Loddo, Flavio; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pacifico, Nicola; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Sala, Giuliano; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Singh, Gurpreet; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Meneghelli, Marco; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Saizu, Mirela Angela; Scinta, Manuel; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Brianzi, Mirko; Ciaranfi, Roberto; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Scarlini, Enrico; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Ferretti, Roberta; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Musenich, Riccardo; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; D'Angelo, Pasqualino; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellato, Marco; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Galanti, Mario; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Giubilato, Piero; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Passaseo, Marina; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pegoraro, Matteo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Gaioni, Luigi; Manazza, Alessia; Manghisoni, Massimo; Ratti, Lodovico; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Traversi, Gianluca; Vitulo, Paolo; Zucca, Stefano; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Bissi, Lucia; Checcucci, Bruno; Ciangottini, Diego; Conti, Elia; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Magalotti, Daniel; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Passeri, Daniele; Placidi, Pisana; Romeo, Francesco; Saha, Anirban; Salvatore, Michele; Santocchia, Attilio; Servoli, Leonello; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Arezzini, Silvia; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Basti, Andrea; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Bosi, Filippo; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Calzolari, Federico; Castaldi, Rino; Ciampa, Alberto; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Kraan, Aafke; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Magazzu, Guido; Martini, Luca; Mazzoni, Enrico; Messineo, Alberto; Moggi, Andrea; Moon, Chang-Seong; Palla, Fabrizio; Raffaelli, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Vernieri, Caterina; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Grassi, Marco; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Soffi, Livia; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Ortona, Giacomo; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Potenza, Alberto; Rivetti, Angelo; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Trapani, Pier Paolo; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kim, Tae Yeon; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Ji Eun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Park, Hyangkyu; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Jae Yool; Kim, Zero Jaeho; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Kyong Sei; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Jongseok; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Martínez-Ortega, Jorge; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Villasenor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Doesburg, Robert; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Butt, Jamila; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Wolszczak, Weronika; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Kaminskiy, Alexandre; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Dordevic, Milos; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Graziano, Alberto; Jaramillo Echeverria, Richard William; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Moya, David; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Ahmed, Imtiaz; Albert, Eric; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Bernet, Colin; Berruti, Gaia Maria; Bianchi, Giovanni; Blanchot, Georges; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Bondu, Olivier; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Ceresa, Davide; Cerminara, Gianluca; Christiansen, Jorgen; Christiansen, Tim; Chávez Niemelä, Aleksis Osku; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; Colafranceschi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Auria, Andrea; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daguin, Jerome; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Detraz, Stephane; Deyrail, Dominique; Dobson, Marc; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Eugster, Jürg; Faccio, Federico; Felici, Daniele; Frank, Norbert; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Giffels, Manuel; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Giunta, Marina; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Gowdy, Stephen; Guida, Roberto; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Honma, Alan; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kaplon, Jan; Karavakis, Edward; Katopodis, Theodoros; Kottelat, Luc-Joseph; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Kovács, Márk István; Krajczar, Krisztian; Krzempek, Lukasz; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Marchioro, Alessandro; Marconi, Sara; Marques Pinho Noite, João; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Michelis, Stefano; Moll, Michael; Moortgat, Filip; Mulders, Martijn; Musella, Pasquale; Onnela, Antti; Orsini, Luciano; Pakulski, Tymon; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Pavis, Steven; Perez, Emmanuelle; Pernot, Jean-Francois; Perrozzi, Luca; Petagna, Paolo; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Plagge, Michael; Postema, Hans; Racz, Attila; Reece, William; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Rzonca, Marcin; Sakulin, Hannes; Santanastasio, Francesco; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sekmen, Sezen; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Szwarc, Tomasz; Tropea, Paola; Troska, Jan; Tsirou, Andromachi; Vasey, François; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Verlaat, Bart; Vichoudis, Paschalis; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Zwalinski, Lukasz; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; König, Stefan; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Meier, Beat; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Streuli, Silvan; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Becker, Robert; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Da Silva Di Calafiori, Diogo Raphael; Deisher, Amanda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Djambazov, Lubomir; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Hits, Dmitry; Horisberger, Urs; Hoss, Jan; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meister, Daniel; Mohr, Niklas; Nägeli, Christoph; Nef, Pascal; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pape, Luc; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Quittnat, Milena; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Röser, Ulf; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Tauscher, Ludwig; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Treille, Daniel; von Gunten, Hans Peter; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Amsler, Claude; Bösiger, Kurt; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Favaro, Carlotta; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Maier, Reto; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Robmann, Peter; Snoek, Hella; Taroni, Silvia; Verzetti, Mauro; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Ferro, Cristina; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Li, Syue-Wei; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartalini, Paolo; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Shi, Xin; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wang, Minzu; Wilken, Rachel; Asavapibhop, Burin; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sogut, Kenan; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Aliev, Takhmasib; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Deniz, Muhammed; Gamsizkan, Halil; Guler, Ali Murat; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Ozpineci, Altug; Serin, Meltem; Sever, Ramazan; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Bahtiyar, Hüseyin; Barlas, Esra; Cankocak, Kerem; Günaydin, Yusuf Oguzhan; Vardarli, Fuat Ilkehan; Yücel, Mete; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Frazier, Robert; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Williams, Thomas; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Ilic, Jelena; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Burton, Darren; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Guneratne Bryer, Arlo; Hall, Geoffrey; Hatherell, Zoe; Hays, Jonathan; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Marrouche, Jad; Mathias, Bryn; Nandi, Robin; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Pioppi, Michele; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Sparrow, Alex; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wakefield, Stuart; Wardle, Nicholas; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Kasmi, Azeddine; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Heister, Arno; Lawson, Philip; Lazic, Dragoslav; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sperka, David; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Alimena, Juliette; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Christopher, Grant; Cutts, David; Demiragli, Zeynep; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Heintz, Ulrich; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Swanson, Joshua; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Flores, Chad; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Kopecky, Alexandra; Lander, Richard; Miceli, Tia; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Rutherford, Britney; Searle, Matthew; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Thomson, John; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Andreev, Valeri; Cline, David; Cousins, Robert; Erhan, Samim; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Felcini, Marta; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Jarvis, Chad; Rakness, Gregory; Schlein, Peter; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Babb, John; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Jandir, Pawandeep; Lacroix, Florent; Liu, Hongliang; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Nguyen, Harold; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Sturdy, Jared; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Evans, David; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Barge, Derek; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Danielson, Thomas; Dishaw, Adam; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Kyre, Susanne; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Pavlunin, Viktor; Richman, Jeffrey; Rossin, Roberto; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; White, Dean; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Di Marco, Emanuele; Duarte, Javier; Kcira, Dorian; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Rogan, Christopher; Spiropulu, Maria; Timciuc, Vladlen; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carroll, Ryan; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Jang, Dong Wook; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Drell, Brian Robert; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Eggert, Nicholas; Gibbons, Lawrence Kent; Hopkins, Walter; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Kreis, Benjamin; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Chetluru, Vasundhara; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Chramowicz, John; Cihangir, Selcuk; Cooper, William; Deptuch, Grzegorz; Derylo, Greg; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Gingu, V Cristinel; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hoff, Jim R; Hooberman, Benjamin; Howell, Joseph; Hrycyk, Michael; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Kaadze, Ketino; Klima, Boaz; Kwan, Simon; Lei, Chi Meng; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Los, Serguei; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; Matulik, Michael S; McBride, Patricia; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Prosser, Alan; Ratnikova, Natalia; Rivera, Ryan; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Trimpl, Marcel; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Voirin, Erik; Whitbeck, Andrew; Whitmore, Juliana; Wu, Weimin; Yang, Fan; Yun, Jae Chul; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Cheng, Tongguang; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Dobur, Didar; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Fu, Yu; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Hugon, Justin; Kim, Bockjoo; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Shchutska, Lesya; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Snowball, Matthew; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Gaultney, Vanessa; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Chen, Jie; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Dorney, Brian; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kapustka, Brian; Khalatyan, Samvel; Kurt, Pelin; Moon, Dong Ho; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Akgun, Ugur; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Duru, Firdevs; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sen, Sercan; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Nash, Kevin; Osherson, Marc; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Gray, Julia; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Sekaric, Jadranka; Stringer, Robert; Tinti, Gemma; Wang, Quan; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Barfuss, Anne-Fleur; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Shrestha, Shruti; Svintradze, Irakli; Taylor, Russell; Toda, Sachiko; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Marionneau, Matthieu; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Skuja, Andris; Temple, Jeffrey; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Bauer, Gerry; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Klute, Markus; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Yoon, Sungho; Zanetti, Marco; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; De Benedetti, Abraham; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Kroeger, Rob; Oliveros, Sandra; Perera, Lalith; Sanders, David A; Summers, Don; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malik, Sudhir; Meier, Frank; Monroy, Jose; Snow, Gregory R; Dolen, James; George, Jimin; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Jain, Supriya; Kaisen, Josh; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Haley, Joseph; Massironi, Andrea; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Trocino, Daniele; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Anastassov, Anton; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Lusito, Letizia; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Sevova, Stanislava; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Berry, Douglas; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Chan, Kwok Ming; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Kolb, Jeff; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Morse, David Michael; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Slaunwhite, Jason; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Smith, Geoffrey; Vuosalo, Carl; Winer, Brian L; Wolfe, Homer; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Berry, Edmund; Elmer, Peter; Halyo, Valerie; Hebda, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Hunt, Adam; Jindal, Pratima; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Raval, Amita; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Zuranski, Andrzej; Brownson, Eric; Lopez, Angel; Mendez, Hector; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Alagoz, Enver; Arndt, Kirk; Benedetti, Daniele; Bolla, Gino; Bortoletto, Daniela; Bubna, Mayur; Cervantes, Mayra; De Mattia, Marco; Everett, Adam; Hu, Zhen; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Kress, Matthew; Leonardo, Nuno; Lopes Pegna, David; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Miner, Daniel Carl; Petrillo, Gianluca; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Zielinski, Marek; Bhatti, Anwar; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Malik, Sarah; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Bartz, Ed; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Rekovic, Vladimir; Robles, Jorge; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Seitz, Claudia; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; Yang, Zong-Chang; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Safonov, Alexei; Sakuma, Tai; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Toback, David; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Kunori, Shuichi; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Gollapinni, Sowjanya; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Belknap, Donald; Borrello, Laura; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Klukas, Jeffrey; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Palmonari, Francesco; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ross, Ian; Sakharov, Alexandre; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Woods, Nathaniel

    2014-10-16

    A description is provided of the software algorithms developed for the CMS tracker both for reconstructing charged-particle trajectories in proton-proton interactions and for using the resulting tracks to estimate the positions of the LHC luminous region and individual primary-interaction vertices. Despite the very hostile environment at the LHC, the performance obtained with these algorithms is found to be excellent. For $t\\bar{t}$ events under typical 2011 pileup conditions, the average track-reconstruction efficiency for promptly-produced charged particles with transverse momenta of $p_T$ > 0.9 GeV is 94% for pseudorapidities of |$\\eta$| < 0.9 and 85% for |$\\eta$| between 0.9 and 2.5. The inefficiency is caused mainly by hadrons that undergo nuclear interactions in the tracker material. For isolated muons, the corresponding efficiencies are essentially 100%. For isolated muons of $p_T$ = 100 GeV emitted at |$\\eta$| lower than 1.4, the resolutions are approximately 2.8% in $p_T$, and respectively, 10 mi...

  19. Online dose reconstruction for tracked volumetric arc therapy: Real-time implementation and offline quality assurance for prostate SBRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamerling, Cornelis Ph; Fast, Martin F; Ziegenhein, Peter; Menten, Martin J; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe

    2017-11-01

    Firstly, this study provides a real-time implementation of online dose reconstruction for tracked volumetric arc therapy (VMAT). Secondly, this study describes a novel offline quality assurance tool, based on commercial dose calculation algorithms. Online dose reconstruction for VMAT is a computationally challenging task in terms of computer memory usage and calculation speed. To potentially reduce the amount of memory used, we analyzed the impact of beam angle sampling for dose calculation on the accuracy of the dose distribution. To establish the performance of the method, we planned two single-arc VMAT prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy cases for delivery with dynamic MLC tracking. For quality assurance of our online dose reconstruction method we have also developed a stand-alone offline dose reconstruction tool, which utilizes the RayStation treatment planning system to calculate dose. For the online reconstructed dose distributions of the tracked deliveries, we could establish strong resemblance for 72 and 36 beam co-planar equidistant beam samples with less than 1.2% deviation for the assessed dose-volume indicators (clinical target volume D98 and D2, and rectum D2). We could achieve average runtimes of 28-31 ms per reported MLC aperture for both dose computation and accumulation, meeting our real-time requirement. To cross-validate the offline tool, we have compared the planned dose to the offline reconstructed dose for static deliveries and found excellent agreement (3%/3 mm global gamma passing rates of 99.8%-100%). Being able to reconstruct dose during delivery enables online quality assurance and online replanning strategies for VMAT. The offline quality assurance tool provides the means to validate novel online dose reconstruction applications using a commercial dose calculation engine. © 2017 The Authors. Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  20. Advances in High-Throughput Speed, Low-Latency Communication for Embedded Instrumentation (7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Scott

    2012-06-01

    Scott Jordan on "Advances in high-throughput speed, low-latency communication for embedded instrumentation" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  1. High-throughput and low-latency network communication with NetIO

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2088631; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    HPC network technologies like Infiniband, TrueScale or OmniPath provide low-latency and high-throughput communication between hosts, which makes them attractive options for data-acquisition systems in large-scale high-energy physics experiments. Like HPC networks, DAQ networks are local and include a well specified number of systems. Unfortunately traditional network communication APIs for HPC clusters like MPI or PGAS target exclusively the HPC community and are not suited well for DAQ applications. It is possible to build distributed DAQ applications using low-level system APIs like Infiniband Verbs, but it requires a non-negligible effort and expert knowledge. At the same time, message services like ZeroMQ have gained popularity in the HEP community. They allow building distributed applications with a high-level approach and provide good performance. Unfortunately their usage usually limits developers to TCP/IP-based networks. While it is possible to operate a TCP/IP stack on top of Infiniband and OmniPath...

  2. JPEG XS, a new standard for visually lossless low-latency lightweight image compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descampe, Antonin; Keinert, Joachim; Richter, Thomas; Fößel, Siegfried; Rouvroy, Gaël.

    2017-09-01

    JPEG XS is an upcoming standard from the JPEG Committee (formally known as ISO/IEC SC29 WG1). It aims to provide an interoperable visually lossless low-latency lightweight codec for a wide range of applications including mezzanine compression in broadcast and Pro-AV markets. This requires optimal support of a wide range of implementation technologies such as FPGAs, CPUs and GPUs. Targeted use cases are professional video links, IP transport, Ethernet transport, real-time video storage, video memory buffers, and omnidirectional video capture and rendering. In addition to the evaluation of the visual transparency of the selected technologies, a detailed analysis of the hardware and software complexity as well as the latency has been done to make sure that the new codec meets the requirements of the above-mentioned use cases. In particular, the end-to-end latency has been constrained to a maximum of 32 lines. Concerning the hardware complexity, neither encoder nor decoder should require more than 50% of an FPGA similar to Xilinx Artix 7 or 25% of an FPGA similar to Altera Cyclon 5. This process resulted in a coding scheme made of an optional color transform, a wavelet transform, the entropy coding of the highest magnitude level of groups of coefficients, and the raw inclusion of the truncated wavelet coefficients. This paper presents the details and status of the standardization process, a technical description of the future standard, and the latest performance evaluation results.

  3. Complexity optimization and high-throughput low-latency hardware implementation of a multi-electrode spike-sorting algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragas, Jelena; Jackel, David; Hierlemann, Andreas; Franke, Felix

    2015-03-01

    Reliable real-time low-latency spike sorting with large data throughput is essential for studies of neural network dynamics and for brain-machine interfaces (BMIs), in which the stimulation of neural networks is based on the networks' most recent activity. However, the majority of existing multi-electrode spike-sorting algorithms are unsuited for processing high quantities of simultaneously recorded data. Recording from large neuronal networks using large high-density electrode sets (thousands of electrodes) imposes high demands on the data-processing hardware regarding computational complexity and data transmission bandwidth; this, in turn, entails demanding requirements in terms of chip area, memory resources and processing latency. This paper presents computational complexity optimization techniques, which facilitate the use of spike-sorting algorithms in large multi-electrode-based recording systems. The techniques are then applied to a previously published algorithm, on its own, unsuited for large electrode set recordings. Further, a real-time low-latency high-performance VLSI hardware architecture of the modified algorithm is presented, featuring a folded structure capable of processing the activity of hundreds of neurons simultaneously. The hardware is reconfigurable “on-the-fly” and adaptable to the nonstationarities of neuronal recordings. By transmitting exclusively spike time stamps and/or spike waveforms, its real-time processing offers the possibility of data bandwidth and data storage reduction.

  4. Recent developments in track reconstruction and hadron identification at MPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudrokh, A.; Zinchenko, A.

    2017-03-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of real detector effects with as many details as possible has been carried out instead of a simplified Geant point smearing approach during the study of the detector performance. Some results of realistic simulation of the MPD TPC (Time Projection Chamber) including digitization in central Au+Au collisions have been obtained. Particle identification (PID) has been tuned to account for modifications in the track reconstruction. Some results on hadron identification in the TPC and TOF (Time Of Flight) detectors with realistically simulated response have been also obtained.

  5. Low luminance/eyes closed and monochromatic stimulations reduce variability of flash visual evoked potential latency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil Kumar Subramanian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Visual evoked potentials are useful in investigating the physiology and pathophysiology of the human visual system. Flash visual evoked potential (FVEP, though technically easier, has less clinical utility because it shows great variations in both latency and amplitude for normal subjects. Aim: To study the effect of eye closure, low luminance, and monochromatic stimulation on the variability of FVEPs. Subjects and Methods: Subjects in self-reported good health in the age group of 18-30 years were divided into three groups. All participants underwent FVEP recording with eyes open and with white light at 0.6 J luminance (standard technique. Next recording was done in group 1 with closed eyes, group 2 with 1.2 and 20 J luminance, and group 3 with red and blue lights, while keeping all the other parameters constant. Two trials were given for each eye, for each technique. The same procedure was repeated at the same clock time on the following day. Statistical Analysis: Variation in FVEP latencies between the individuals (interindividual variability and the variations within the same individual for four trials (intraindividual variability were assessed using coefficient of variance (COV. The technique with lower COV was considered the better method. Results: Recording done with closed eyes, 0.6 J luminance, and monochromatic light (blue > red showed lower interindividual and intraindividual variability in P2 and N2 as compared to standard techniques. Conclusions: Low luminance flash stimulations and monochromatic light will reduce FVEP latency variability and may be clinically useful modifications of FVEP recording technique.

  6. Real-time automatic fiducial marker tracking in low contrast cine-MV images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Wei-Yang; Lin, Shu-Fang; Yang, Sheng-Chang; Liou, Shu-Cheng; Nath, Ravinder; Liu Wu

    2013-01-01

    standard deviations of the results from the 6 researchers are 2.3 and 2.6 pixels. The proposed framework takes about 128 ms to detect four markers in the first MV images and about 23 ms to track these markers in each of the subsequent images. Conclusions: The unified framework for tracking of multiple markers presented here can achieve marker detection accuracy similar to manual detection even in low-contrast cine-MV images. It can cope with shape deformations of fiducial markers at different gantry angles. The fast processing speed reduces the image processing portion of the system latency, therefore can improve the performance of real-time motion compensation.

  7. Real-time automatic fiducial marker tracking in low contrast cine-MV images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Wei-Yang; Lin, Shu-Fang; Yang, Sheng-Chang; Liou, Shu-Cheng; Nath, Ravinder; Liu Wu [Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan, 62102 (China); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06510-3220 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    standard deviations of the results from the 6 researchers are 2.3 and 2.6 pixels. The proposed framework takes about 128 ms to detect four markers in the first MV images and about 23 ms to track these markers in each of the subsequent images. Conclusions: The unified framework for tracking of multiple markers presented here can achieve marker detection accuracy similar to manual detection even in low-contrast cine-MV images. It can cope with shape deformations of fiducial markers at different gantry angles. The fast processing speed reduces the image processing portion of the system latency, therefore can improve the performance of real-time motion compensation.

  8. Three-Dimensional Triplet Tracking for LHC and Future High Rate Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Schöning, Andre

    2014-10-20

    The hit combinatorial problem is a main challenge for track reconstruction and triggering at high rate experiments. At hadron colliders the dominant fraction of hits is due to low momentum tracks for which multiple scattering (MS) effects dominate the hit resolution. MS is also the dominating source for hit confusion and track uncertainties in low energy precision experiments. In all such environments, where MS dominates, track reconstruction and fitting can be largely simplified by using three-dimensional (3D) hit-triplets as provided by pixel detectors. This simplification is possible since track uncertainties are solely determined by MS if high precision spatial information is provided. Fitting of hit-triplets is especially simple for tracking detectors in solenoidal magnetic fields. The over-constrained 3D-triplet method provides a complete set of track parameters and is robust against fake hit combinations. The triplet method is ideally suited for pixel detectors where hits can be treated as 3D-space poi...

  9. Scattered and Fluorescent Photon Track Reconstruction in a Biological Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria N. Kholodtsova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate analysis of biological tissue deep regions is important for tumor targeting. This paper is concentrated on photons’ paths analysis in such biotissue as brain, because optical probing depth of fluorescent and excitation radiation differs. A method for photon track reconstruction was developed. Images were captured focusing on the transparent wall close and parallel to the source fibres, placed in brain tissue phantoms. The images were processed to reconstruct the photons most probable paths between two fibres. Results were compared with Monte Carlo simulations and diffusion approximation of the radiative transfer equation. It was shown that the excitation radiation optical probing depth is twice more than for the fluorescent photons. The way of fluorescent radiation spreading was discussed. Because of fluorescent and excitation radiation spreads in different ways, and the effective anisotropy factor, geff, was proposed for fluorescent radiation. For the brain tissue phantoms it were found to be 0.62±0.05 and 0.66±0.05 for the irradiation wavelengths 532 nm and 632.8 nm, respectively. These calculations give more accurate information about the tumor location in biotissue. Reconstruction of photon paths allows fluorescent and excitation probing depths determination. The geff can be used as simplified parameter for calculations of fluorescence probing depth.

  10. Data latency and the user community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, V. M.; Brown, M. E.; Carroll, M.

    2013-12-01

    The community using NASA Earth science observations in applications has grown significantly, with increasing sophistication to serve national interests. The National Research Council's Earth Science Decadal Survey report stated that the planning for applied and operational considerations in the missions should accompany the acquisition of new knowledge about Earth (NRC, 2007). This directive has made product applications at NASA an integral part of converting the data collected into actionable knowledge that can be used to inform policy. However, successfully bridging scientific research with operational decision making in different application areas requires looking into user data requirements and operational needs. This study was conducted to determine how users are incorporating NASA data into applications and operational processes. The approach included a review of published materials, direct interviews with mission representatives, and an online professional review, which was distributed to over 6000 individuals. We provide a complete description of the findings with definitions and explanations of what goes into measuring latency as well as how users and applications utilize NASA data products. We identified 3 classes of users: operational (need data in 3 hours or less), near real time (need data within a day of acquisition), and scientific users (need highest quality data, time independent). We also determined that most users with applications are interested in specific types of products that may come from multiple missions. These users will take the observations when they are available, however the observations may have additional applications value if they are available either by a certain time of day or within a period of time after acquisition. NASA has supported the need for access to low latency data on an ad-hoc basis and more substantively in stand-alone systems such as the MODIS Rapid Response system and more recently with LANCE. The increased level

  11. A Type of Low-Latency Data Gathering Method with Multi-Sink for Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Chao; Qiu, Jian-mei; Li, Shu-yan; Qiang, Meng-ye; Wang, Ru-chuan

    2016-01-01

    To balance energy consumption and reduce latency on data transmission in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), a type of low-latency data gathering method with multi-Sink (LDGM for short) is proposed in this paper. The network is divided into several virtual regions consisting of three or less data gathering units and the leader of each region is selected according to its residual energy as well as distance to all of the other nodes. Only the leaders in each region need to communicate with the mobile Sinks which have effectively reduced energy consumption and the end-to-end delay. Moreover, with the help of the sleep scheduling and the sensing radius adjustment strategies, redundancy in network coverage could also be effectively reduced. Simulation results show that LDGM is energy efficient in comparison with MST as well as MWST and its time efficiency on data collection is higher than one Sink based data gathering methods. PMID:27338401

  12. A Type of Low-Latency Data Gathering Method with Multi-Sink for Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Sha

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To balance energy consumption and reduce latency on data transmission in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs, a type of low-latency data gathering method with multi-Sink (LDGM for short is proposed in this paper. The network is divided into several virtual regions consisting of three or less data gathering units and the leader of each region is selected according to its residual energy as well as distance to all of the other nodes. Only the leaders in each region need to communicate with the mobile Sinks which have effectively reduced energy consumption and the end-to-end delay. Moreover, with the help of the sleep scheduling and the sensing radius adjustment strategies, redundancy in network coverage could also be effectively reduced. Simulation results show that LDGM is energy efficient in comparison with MST as well as MWST and its time efficiency on data collection is higher than one Sink based data gathering methods.

  13. First evaluation of the feasibility of MLC tracking using ultrasound motion estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, Martin F., E-mail: martin.fast@icr.ac.uk; O’Shea, Tuathan P., E-mail: tuathan.oshea@nhs.net; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe; Harris, Emma J. [Joint Department of Physics, The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London SM2 5NG (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: To quantify the performance of the Clarity ultrasound (US) imaging system (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) for real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking. Methods: The Clarity calibration and quality assurance phantom was mounted on a motion platform moving with a periodic sine wave trajectory. The detected position of a 30 mm hypoechogenic sphere within the phantom was continuously reported via Clarity’s real-time streaming interface to an in-house tracking and delivery software and subsequently used to adapt the MLC aperture. A portal imager measured MV treatment field/MLC apertures and motion platform positions throughout each experiment to independently quantify system latency and geometric error. Based on the measured range of latency values, a prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivery was performed with three realistic motion trajectories. The dosimetric impact of system latency on MLC tracking was directly measured using a 3D dosimeter mounted on the motion platform. Results: For 2D US imaging, the overall system latency, including all delay times from the imaging and delivery chain, ranged from 392 to 424 ms depending on the lateral sector size. For 3D US imaging, the latency ranged from 566 to 1031 ms depending on the elevational sweep. The latency-corrected geometric root-mean squared error was below 0.75 mm (2D US) and below 1.75 mm (3D US). For the prostate SBRT delivery, the impact of a range of system latencies (400–1000 ms) on the MLC tracking performance was minimal in terms of gamma failure rate. Conclusions: Real-time MLC tracking based on a noninvasive US input is technologically feasible. Current system latencies are higher than those for x-ray imaging systems, but US can provide full volumetric image data and the impact of system latency was measured to be small for a prostate SBRT case when using a US-like motion input.

  14. First evaluation of the feasibility of MLC tracking using ultrasound motion estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast, Martin F.; O’Shea, Tuathan P.; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe; Harris, Emma J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the performance of the Clarity ultrasound (US) imaging system (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) for real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking. Methods: The Clarity calibration and quality assurance phantom was mounted on a motion platform moving with a periodic sine wave trajectory. The detected position of a 30 mm hypoechogenic sphere within the phantom was continuously reported via Clarity’s real-time streaming interface to an in-house tracking and delivery software and subsequently used to adapt the MLC aperture. A portal imager measured MV treatment field/MLC apertures and motion platform positions throughout each experiment to independently quantify system latency and geometric error. Based on the measured range of latency values, a prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivery was performed with three realistic motion trajectories. The dosimetric impact of system latency on MLC tracking was directly measured using a 3D dosimeter mounted on the motion platform. Results: For 2D US imaging, the overall system latency, including all delay times from the imaging and delivery chain, ranged from 392 to 424 ms depending on the lateral sector size. For 3D US imaging, the latency ranged from 566 to 1031 ms depending on the elevational sweep. The latency-corrected geometric root-mean squared error was below 0.75 mm (2D US) and below 1.75 mm (3D US). For the prostate SBRT delivery, the impact of a range of system latencies (400–1000 ms) on the MLC tracking performance was minimal in terms of gamma failure rate. Conclusions: Real-time MLC tracking based on a noninvasive US input is technologically feasible. Current system latencies are higher than those for x-ray imaging systems, but US can provide full volumetric image data and the impact of system latency was measured to be small for a prostate SBRT case when using a US-like motion input.

  15. Towards Kilo-Hertz 6-DoF Visual Tracking Using an Egocentric Cluster of Rolling Shutter Cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bapat, Akash; Dunn, Enrique; Frahm, Jan-Michael

    2016-11-01

    To maintain a reliable registration of the virtual world with the real world, augmented reality (AR) applications require highly accurate, low-latency tracking of the device. In this paper, we propose a novel method for performing this fast 6-DOF head pose tracking using a cluster of rolling shutter cameras. The key idea is that a rolling shutter camera works by capturing the rows of an image in rapid succession, essentially acting as a high-frequency 1D image sensor. By integrating multiple rolling shutter cameras on the AR device, our tracker is able to perform 6-DOF markerless tracking in a static indoor environment with minimal latency. Compared to state-of-the-art tracking systems, this tracking approach performs at significantly higher frequency, and it works in generalized environments. To demonstrate the feasibility of our system, we present thorough evaluations on synthetically generated data with tracking frequencies reaching 56.7 kHz. We further validate the method's accuracy on real-world images collected from a prototype of our tracking system against ground truth data using standard commodity GoPro cameras capturing at 120 Hz frame rate.

  16. A line code with quick-resynchronization capability and low latency for the optical data links of LHC experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, B; He, M; Chen, J; Guo, D; Hou, S; Teng, P-K; Li, X; Liu, C; Xiang, A C; Ye, J; Gong, D; Liu, T; You, Y

    2014-01-01

    We propose a line code that has fast resynchronization capability and low latency. Both the encoder and decoder have been implemented in FPGAs. The encoder has also been implemented in an ASIC. The latency of the whole optical link (not including the optical fiber) is estimated to be less than 73.9 ns. In the case of radiation-induced link synchronization loss, the decoder can recover the synchronization in 25 ns. The line code will be used in the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter Phase-I trigger upgrade and can also be potentially used in other LHC experiments

  17. Large Radius Tracking at the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lutz, Margaret Susan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Many exotics and SUSY models include particles which are long lived resulting in decays which are highly displaced from the proton-proton interaction point (IP). The standard track reconstruction algorithm used by the ATLAS collaboration is optimized for tracks from “primary” particles, which originate close to the IP. Thus, tight restrictions on the transverse and longitudinal impact parameters, as well as on several other tracking variables, are applied to improve the track reconstruction performance and to reduce the fake rate. This track reconstruction is very efficient for primary particles, but not for the non-prompt particles mentioned above.  In order to reconstruct tracks with large impact parameters due to displaced decays, a tracking algorithm has been optimized to re-run with loosened requirements over the hits left over after standard track reconstruction has finished. Enabling this “retracking” has significantly increased the efficiency of reconstructing tracks from displaced decays, wh...

  18. Tracking polar lows in CLM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahn, M.; Storch, H. von [Inst. for Coastal Research, GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht (Germany); Meteorological Inst., Univ. of Hamburg (Germany)

    2008-08-15

    Polar lows are severe cyclones in sub-polar oceans sized beyond the resolved scale of existing global reanalysis products. We used the NCEP/NCAR reanalyses data to drive a regional climate model (CLM) in order to reproduce finer resolved atmospheric fields over the North Atlantic over a two year period. In these fields we detected polar lows by means of a detection algorithm based on a spatial digital bandpass filter. CLM was run in two different ways, the conventional way and with additionally prescribing the analysed large scale situation. The resulting temporal and spatial distributions of polar lows between the different simulations are compared. A reasonable seasonal cycle and spatial distribution was found for all simulations. A lower number of polar lows in the spectral nudged simulation indicates a closer vicinity to reality. Higher temporal and spatial variability between the conventional simulations suggest a more random generation of polar lows. Frequency distributions of track-lengths reveal shorter tracks when nudging is applied. Maximum wind speeds reveal only minor, insignificant differences between all runs and are higher in conventional mode. (orig.)

  19. Motion correction in neurological fan beam SPECT using motion tracking and fully 3D reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulton, R.R.; Hutton, B.; Eberl, S.; Meikle, S.; Braun, M.; Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW; University of Technology, Sydney, NSW

    1998-01-01

    Full text: We have previously proposed the use of fully three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and continuous monitoring of head position to correct for motion artifacts in neurological SPECT and PET. Knowledge of the motion during acquisition provided by a head tracking system can be used to reposition the projection data in space in such a way as to negate motion effects during reconstruction. The reconstruction algorithm must deal with variations in the projection geometry resulting from differences in the timing and nature of motion between patients. Rotational movements about any axis other than the camera's axis of rotation give rise to projection geometries which necessitate the use of a fully 3D reconstruction algorithm. Our previous work with computer simulations assuming parallel hole collimation demonstrated the feasibility of correcting for motion. We have now refined our iterative 3D reconstruction algorithm to support fan beam data and attenuation correction, and developed a practical head tracking system for use on a Trionix Triad SPECT system. The correction technique has been tested in fan beam SPECT studies of the 3D Hoffman brain phantom. Arbitrary movements were applied to the phantom during acquisition and recorded by the head tracker which monitored the position and orientation of the phantom throughout the study. 3D reconstruction was then performed using the motion data provided by the tracker. The accuracy of correction was assessed by comparing the corrected images with a motion free study acquired immediately beforehand, visually and by calculating mean squared error (MSE). Motion correction reduced distortion perceptibly and, depending on the motions applied, improved MSE by up to an order of magnitude. 3D reconstruction of the 128x128x128 data set took 20 minutes on a SUN Ultra 1 workstation. The results of these phantom experiments suggest that the technique can effectively compensate for head motion under clinical SPECT imaging

  20. Comparative assessment of pressure field reconstructions from particle image velocimetry measurements and Lagrangian particle tracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gent, P.L.; Michaelis, D; van Oudheusden, B.W.; Weiss, P.E.; de Kat, R.; Laskari, A.; Jeon, Y.J.; David, L; Schanz, D; Huhn, F.; Gesemann, S; Novara, M.; McPhaden, C.; Neeteson, N. J.; Rival, David E.; Schneiders, J.F.G.; Schrijer, F.F.J.

    2017-01-01

    A test case for pressure field reconstruction from particle image velocimetry (PIV) and Lagrangian particle tracking (LPT) has been developed by constructing a simulated experiment from a zonal detached eddy simulation for an axisymmetric base flow at Mach 0.7. The test case comprises sequences

  1. Impact of wave propagation delay on latency in optical communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanishi, Tetsuya; Kanno, Atsushi; Yoshida, Yuki; Kitayama, Ken-ichi

    2012-12-01

    Latency is an important figure to describe performance of transmission systems for particular applications, such as data transfer for earthquake early warning, transaction for financial businesses, interactive services such as online games, etc. Latency consists of delay due to signal processing at nodes and transmitters, and of signal propagation delay due to propagation of electromagnetic waves. The lower limit of the latency in transmission systems using conventional single mode fibers (SMFs) depends on wave propagation speed in the SMFs which is slower than c. Photonic crystal fibers, holly fibers and large core fibers can have low effective refractive indices, and can transfer light faster than in SMFs. In free-space optical systems, signals propagate with the speed c, so that the latency could be smaller than in optical fibers. For example, LEO satellites would transmit data faster than optical submarine cables, when the transmission distance is longer than a few thousand kilometers. This paper will discuss combination of various transmission media to reduce negative impact of the latency, as well as applications of low-latency systems.

  2. SDN Low Latency for Medical Big Data Using Wavelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadia Shah

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available New era is the age of 5G. The network has moved from the simple internet connection towards advanced LTE connections and transmission. The information and communication technology has reshaped telecommunication. For this, among many types of big data, Medical Big Data is one of the most sensitive forms of data. Wavelet is a technical tool to reduce the size of this data to make it available for the user for more time. It is also responsible for low latency and high speed data transmission over the network. The key concern is the Medical Big Data should be accurate and reliable enough so that the recommended treatment should be the concerned one. This paper proposed the scheme to support the concept of data availability without losing crucial information, via Wavelet the Medical Data compression and through SDN supportive architecture by making data availability over the wireless network. Such scheme is in favor of the efficient use of technology for the benefit of human beings in the support of medical treatments.

  3. Comparison of 2D and 3D modeled tumor motion estimation/prediction for dynamic tumor tracking during arc radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wu; Ma, Xiangyu; Yan, Huagang; Chen, Zhe; Nath, Ravinder; Li, Haiyun

    2017-05-01

    Many real-time imaging techniques have been developed to localize a target in 3D space or in a 2D beam’s eye view (BEV) plane for intrafraction motion tracking in radiation therapy. With tracking system latency, the 3D-modeled method is expected to be more accurate even in terms of 2D BEV tracking error. No quantitative analysis, however, has been reported. In this study, we simulated co-planar arc deliveries using respiratory motion data acquired from 42 patients to quantitatively compare the accuracy between 2D BEV and 3D-modeled tracking in arc therapy and to determine whether 3D information is needed for motion tracking. We used our previously developed low kV dose adaptive MV-kV imaging and motion compensation framework as a representative of 3D-modeled methods. It optimizes the balance between additional kV imaging dose and 3D tracking accuracy and solves the MLC blockage issue. With simulated Gaussian marker detection errors (zero mean and 0.39 mm standard deviation) and ~155/310/460 ms tracking system latencies, the mean percentage of time that the target moved  >2 mm from the predicted 2D BEV position are 1.1%/4.0%/7.8% and 1.3%/5.8%/11.6% for the 3D-modeled and 2D-only tracking, respectively. The corresponding average BEV RMS errors are 0.67/0.90/1.13 mm and 0.79/1.10/1.37 mm. Compared to the 2D method, the 3D method reduced the average RMS unresolved motion along the beam direction from ~3 mm to ~1 mm, resulting in on average only  <1% dosimetric advantage in the depth direction. Only for a small fraction of the patients, when tracking latency is long, the 3D-modeled method showed significant improvement of BEV tracking accuracy, indicating potential dosimetric advantage. However, if the tracking latency is short (~150 ms or less), those improvements are limited. Therefore, 2D BEV tracking has sufficient targeting accuracy for most clinical cases. The 3D technique is, however, still important in solving the MLC blockage problem

  4. High-throughput and low-latency 60GHz small-cell network architectures over radio-over-fiber technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleros, N.; Kalfas, G.; Mitsolidou, C.; Vagionas, C.; Tsiokos, D.; Miliou, A.

    2017-01-01

    Future broadband access networks in the 5G framework will need to be bilateral, exploiting both optical and wireless technologies. This paper deals with new approaches and synergies on radio-over-fiber (RoF) technologies and how those can be leveraged to seamlessly converge wireless technology for agility and mobility with passive optical networks (PON)-based backhauling. The proposed convergence paradigm is based upon a holistic network architecture mixing mm-wave wireless access with photonic integration, dynamic capacity allocation and network coding schemes to enable high bandwidth and low-latency fixed and 60GHz wireless personal area communications for gigabit rate per user, proposing and deploying on top a Medium-Transparent MAC (MT-MAC) protocol as a low-latency bandwidth allocation mechanism. We have evaluated alternative network topologies between the central office (CO) and the access point module (APM) for data rates up to 2.5 Gb/s and SC frequencies up to 60 GHz. Optical network coding is demonstrated for SCM-based signaling to enhance bandwidth utilization and facilitate optical-wireless convergence in 5G applications, reporting medium-transparent network coding directly at the physical layer between end-users communicating over a RoF infrastructure. Towards equipping the physical layer with the appropriate agility to support MT-MAC protocols, a monolithic InP-based Remote Antenna Unit optoelectronic PIC interface is shown that ensures control over the optical resource allocation assisting at the same time broadband wireless service. Finally, the MT-MAC protocol is analysed and simulation and analytical theoretical results are presented that are found to be in good agreement confirming latency values lower than 1msec for small- to mid-load conditions.

  5. Automated Proton Track Identification in MicroBooNE Using Gradient Boosted Decision Trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, Katherine [New Mexico State U.

    2017-10-02

    MicroBooNE is a liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) neutrino experiment that is currently running in the Booster Neutrino Beam at Fermilab. LArTPC technology allows for high-resolution, three-dimensional representations of neutrino interactions. A wide variety of software tools for automated reconstruction and selection of particle tracks in LArTPCs are actively being developed. Short, isolated proton tracks, the signal for low- momentum-transfer neutral current (NC) elastic events, are easily hidden in a large cosmic background. Detecting these low-energy tracks will allow us to probe interesting regions of the proton's spin structure. An effective method for selecting NC elastic events is to combine a highly efficient track reconstruction algorithm to find all candidate tracks with highly accurate particle identification using a machine learning algorithm. We present our work on particle track classification using gradient tree boosting software (XGBoost) and the performance on simulated neutrino data.

  6. Photosensor-Based Latency Measurement System for Head-Mounted Displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Woo Seo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a photosensor-based latency measurement system for head-mounted displays (HMDs is proposed. The motion-to-photon latency is the greatest reason for motion sickness and dizziness felt by users when wearing an HMD system. Therefore, a measurement system is required to accurately measure and analyze the latency to reduce these problems. The existing measurement system does not consider the actual physical movement in humans, and its accuracy is also very low. However, the proposed system considers the physical head movement and is highly accurate. Specifically, it consists of a head position model-based rotary platform, pixel luminance change detector, and signal analysis and calculation modules. Using these modules, the proposed system can exactly measure the latency, which is the time difference between the physical movement for a user and the luminance change of an output image. In the experiment using a commercial HMD, the latency was measured to be up to 47.05 ms. In addition, the measured latency increased up to 381.17 ms when increasing the rendering workload in the HMD.

  7. Online data reduction with FPGA-based track reconstruction for the Belle II DEPFET pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deschamps, Bruno; Wessel, Christian; Marinas, Carlos; Dingfelder, Jochen [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The innermost two layers of the Belle II vertex detector at the KEK facility in Tsukuba, Japan, will be covered by high-granularity DEPFET pixel sensors (PXD). The large number of pixels leads to a maximum data rate of 256 Gbps, which has to be significantly reduced by the Data Acquisition System (DATCON). For the data reduction the hit information of the surrounding Silicon strip Vertex Detector (SVD) is utilized to define so-called Regions of Interest (ROI). Only hit information of the pixels located inside these ROIs are saved. The ROIs for the PXD are computed by reconstructing track segments from SVD data and extrapolation to the PXD. The goal is to achieve a data reduction of at least a factor of 10 with this ROI selection. All the necessary processing stages, the receiving, decoding and multiplexing of SVD data on 48 optical fibers, the track reconstruction and the definition of the ROIs, will be performed by the presented system. The planned hardware design is based on a distributed set of Advanced Mezzanine Cards (AMC) each equipped with a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and 4 optical transceivers. In this talk, the status and plans for the DATCON prototype and the FPGA-based tracking algorithm are introduced as well as the plans for their test in the upcoming test beam at DESY.

  8. Do our reconstructions of ENSO have too much low-frequency variability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loope, G. R.; Overpeck, J. T.

    2017-12-01

    Reconstructing the spectrum of Pacific SST variability has proven to be difficult both because of complications with proxy systems such as tree rings and the relatively small number of records from the tropical Pacific. We show that the small number of long coral δ18O and Sr/Ca records has caused a bias towards having too much low-frequency variability in PCR, CPS, and RegEM reconstructions of Pacific variability. This occurs because the individual coral records used in the reconstructions have redder spectra than the shared signal (e.g. ENSO). This causes some of the unshared, low-frequency signal from local climate, salinity and possibly coral biology to bleed into the reconstruction. With enough chronologies in a reconstruction, this unshared noise cancels out but the problem is exacerbated in our longest reconstructions where fewer records are available. Coral proxies tend to have more low-frequency variability than SST observations so this problem is smaller but can still be seen in pseudoproxy experiments using observations and reanalysis data. The identification of this low-frequency bias in coral reconstructions helps bring the spectra of ENSO reconstructions back into line with both models and observations. Although our analysis is mostly constrained to the 20th century due to lack of sufficient data, we expect that as more long chronologies are developed, the low-frequency signal in ENSO reconstructions will be greatly reduced.

  9. Low-dose CT image reconstruction using gain intervention-based dictionary learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Yadunath; Arya, K. V.; Tiwari, Shailendra

    2018-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) approach is extensively utilized in clinical diagnoses. However, X-ray residue in human body may introduce somatic damage such as cancer. Owing to radiation risk, research has focused on the radiation exposure distributed to patients through CT investigations. Therefore, low-dose CT has become a significant research area. Many researchers have proposed different low-dose CT reconstruction techniques. But, these techniques suffer from various issues such as over smoothing, artifacts, noise, etc. Therefore, in this paper, we have proposed a novel integrated low-dose CT reconstruction technique. The proposed technique utilizes global dictionary-based statistical iterative reconstruction (GDSIR) and adaptive dictionary-based statistical iterative reconstruction (ADSIR)-based reconstruction techniques. In case the dictionary (D) is predetermined, then GDSIR can be used and if D is adaptively defined then ADSIR is appropriate choice. The gain intervention-based filter is also used as a post-processing technique for removing the artifacts from low-dose CT reconstructed images. Experiments have been done by considering the proposed and other low-dose CT reconstruction techniques on well-known benchmark CT images. Extensive experiments have shown that the proposed technique outperforms the available approaches.

  10. Jagiellonian University Drift Chamber Calibration and Track Reconstruction in the P349 Antiproton Polarization Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Alfs, D; Moskal, P; Zieliński, M; Grzonka, D; Hauenstein, F; Kilian, K; Lersch, D; Ritman, J; Sefzick, T; Oelert, W; Diermaier, M; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J; Wolke, M; Nadel-Turonski, P; Carmignotto, M; Horn, T; Mkrtchyan, H; Asaturyan, A; Mkrtchyan, A; Tadevosyan, V; Zhamkochyan, S; Malbrunot-Ettenauer, S; Eyrich, W; Zink, A

    2017-01-01

    The goal of the P349 experiment is to test whether the antiproton production process can be itself a source of antiproton polarization. In this article, we present the motivation and details of the performed measurement. We report on the status of the analysis focusing mainly on calibration of the drift chambers and 3d track reconstruction.

  11. Quantum interferences reconstruction with low homodyne detection efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esposito, Martina; Randi, Francesco [Universita degli studi di Trieste, Dipartimento di Fisica, Trieste (Italy); Titimbo, Kelvin; Zimmermann, Klaus; Benatti, Fabio [Universita degli studi di Trieste, Dipartimento di Fisica, Trieste (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Kourousias, Georgios; Curri, Alessio [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Trieste (Italy); Floreanini, Roberto [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Parmigiani, Fulvio [Universita degli studi di Trieste, Dipartimento di Fisica, Trieste (Italy); Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Trieste (Italy); University of Cologne, Institute of Physics II, Cologne (Germany); Fausti, Daniele [Universita degli studi di Trieste, Dipartimento di Fisica, Trieste (Italy); Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Trieste (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    Optical homodyne tomography consists in reconstructing the quantum state of an optical field from repeated measurements of its amplitude at different field phases (homodyne data). The experimental noise, which unavoidably affects the homodyne data, leads to a detection efficiency η<1. The problem of reconstructing quantum states from noisy homodyne data sets prompted an intense scientific debate about the presence or absence of a lower homodyne efficiency bound (η>0.5) below which quantum features, like quantum interferences, cannot be retrieved. Here, by numerical experiments, we demonstrate that quantum interferences can be effectively reconstructed also for low homodyne detection efficiency. In particular, we address the challenging case of a Schroedinger cat state and test the minimax and adaptive Wigner function reconstruction technique by processing homodyne data distributed according to the chosen state but with an efficiency η>0.5. By numerically reproducing the Schroedinger's cat interference pattern, we give evidence that quantum state reconstruction is actually possible in these conditions, and provide a guideline for handling optical tomography based on homodyne data collected by low efficiency detectors. (orig.)

  12. A Fault Tolerant, Dynamic and Low Latency BDII Architecture for Grids

    CERN Document Server

    Osman, Asif; Batool, Naheed; McClatchey, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The current BDII model relies on information gathering from agents that run on each core node of a Grid. This information is then published into a Grid wide information resource known as Top BDII. The Top level BDIIs are updated typically in cycles of a few minutes each. A new BDDI architecture is proposed and described in this paper based on the hypothesis that only a few attribute values change in each BDDI information cycle and consequently it may not be necessary to update each parameter in a cycle. It has been demonstrated that significant performance gains can be achieved by exchanging only the information about records that changed during a cycle. Our investigations have led us to implement a low latency and fault tolerant BDII system that involves only minimal data transfer and facilitates secure transactions in a Grid environment.

  13. Track Finding for the Level-1 Trigger of the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    James, Thomas Owen

    2017-01-01

    A new tracking system is under development for the CMS experiment at the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), located at CERN. It includes a silicon tracker that will correlate clusters in two closely spaced sensor layers, for the rejection of hits from low transverse momentum tracks. This will allow tracker data to be read out to the Level-1 trigger at 40\\,MHz. The Level-1 track-finder must be able to identify tracks with transverse momentum above 2--3\\,$\\mathrm{GeV}/c$ within latency constraints. A concept for an FPGA-based track finder using a fully time-multiplexed architecture is presented, where track candidates are identified using a Hough Transform, and then refined with a Kalman Filter. Both steps are fully implemented in FPGA firmware. A hardware system built from MP7 MicroTCA processing cards has been assembled, which demonstrates a realistic slice of the track finder in order to help gauge the performance and requirements for a final system.

  14. Monitoring data transfer latency in CMS computing operations

    CERN Document Server

    Bonacorsi, D; Magini, N; Sartirana, A; Taze, M; Wildish, T

    2015-01-01

    During the first LHC run, the CMS experiment collected tens of Petabytes of collision and simulated data, which need to be distributed among dozens of computing centres with low latency in order to make efficient use of the resources. While the desired level of throughput has been successfully achieved, it is still common to observe transfer workflows that cannot reach full completion in a timely manner due to a small fraction of stuck files which require operator intervention.For this reason, in 2012 the CMS transfer management system, PhEDEx, was instrumented with a monitoring system to measure file transfer latencies, and to predict the completion time for the transfer of a data set. The operators can detect abnormal patterns in transfer latencies while the transfer is still in progress, and monitor the long-term performance of the transfer infrastructure to plan the data placement strategy.Based on the data collected for one year with the latency monitoring system, we present a study on the different fact...

  15. Low-rank sparse learning for robust visual tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tianzhu

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new particle-filter based tracking algorithm that exploits the relationship between particles (candidate targets). By representing particles as sparse linear combinations of dictionary templates, this algorithm capitalizes on the inherent low-rank structure of particle representations that are learned jointly. As such, it casts the tracking problem as a low-rank matrix learning problem. This low-rank sparse tracker (LRST) has a number of attractive properties. (1) Since LRST adaptively updates dictionary templates, it can handle significant changes in appearance due to variations in illumination, pose, scale, etc. (2) The linear representation in LRST explicitly incorporates background templates in the dictionary and a sparse error term, which enables LRST to address the tracking drift problem and to be robust against occlusion respectively. (3) LRST is computationally attractive, since the low-rank learning problem can be efficiently solved as a sequence of closed form update operations, which yield a time complexity that is linear in the number of particles and the template size. We evaluate the performance of LRST by applying it to a set of challenging video sequences and comparing it to 6 popular tracking methods. Our experiments show that by representing particles jointly, LRST not only outperforms the state-of-the-art in tracking accuracy but also significantly improves the time complexity of methods that use a similar sparse linear representation model for particles [1]. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  16. Track structure for low energy ions including charge exchange processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, S.; Nikjoo, H.

    2002-01-01

    The model and development is described of a new generation of Monte Carlo track structure codes. The code LEAHIST simulates full slowing down of low-energy proton history tracks in the range 1 keV-1 MeV and the code LEAHIST simulates low-energy alpha particle history tracks in the range 1 keV-8 MeV in water. All primary ion interactions are followed down to 1 keV and all electrons to 1 eV. Tracks of secondary electrons ejected by ions were traced using the electron code KURBUC. Microdosimetric parameters derived by analysis of generated tracks are presented. (author)

  17. Combination of various data analysis techniques for efficient track reconstruction in very high multiplicity events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siklér, Ferenc

    2017-08-01

    A novel combination of established data analysis techniques for reconstructing charged-particles in high energy collisions is proposed. It uses all information available in a collision event while keeping competing choices open as long as possible. Suitable track candidates are selected by transforming measured hits to a binned, three- or four-dimensional, track parameter space. It is accomplished by the use of templates taking advantage of the translational and rotational symmetries of the detectors. Track candidates and their corresponding hits, the nodes, form a usually highly connected network, a bipartite graph, where we allow for multiple hit to track assignments, edges. In order to get a manageable problem, the graph is cut into very many minigraphs by removing a few of its vulnerable components, edges and nodes. Finally the hits are distributed among the track candidates by exploring a deterministic decision tree. A depth-limited search is performed maximizing the number of hits on tracks, and minimizing the sum of track-fit χ2. Simplified but realistic models of LHC silicon trackers including the relevant physics processes are used to test and study the performance (efficiency, purity, timing) of the proposed method in the case of single or many simultaneous proton-proton collisions (high pileup), and for single heavy-ion collisions at the highest available energies.

  18. Fast track segment finding in the Monitored Drift Tubes (MDT) of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer using a Legendre transform algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Ntekas, Konstantinos; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Many of the physics goals of ATLAS in the High Luminosity LHC era, including precision studies of the Higgs boson, require an unprescaled single muon trigger with a 20 GeV threshold. The selectivity of the current ATLAS first-level muon trigger is limited by the moderate spatial resolution of the muon trigger chambers. By incorporating the precise tracking of the MDT, the muon transverse momentum can be measured with an accuracy close to that of the offline reconstruction at the trigger level, sharpening the trigger turn-on curves and reducing the single muon trigger rate. A novel algorithm is proposed which reconstructs segments from MDT hits in an FPGA and find tracks within the tight latency constraints of the ATLAS first-level muon trigger. The algorithm represents MDT drift circles as curves in the Legendre space and returns one or more segment lines tangent to the maximum possible number of drift circles.  This algorithm is implemented without the need of resource and time consuming hit position calcul...

  19. The track finding algorithm of the Belle II vertex detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilka Tadeas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Belle II experiment is a high energy multi purpose particle detector operated at the asymmetric e+e− - collider SuperKEKB in Tsukuba (Japan. In this work we describe the algorithm performing the pattern recognition for inner tracking detector which consists of two layers of pixel detectors and four layers of double sided silicon strip detectors arranged around the interaction region. The track finding algorithm will be used both during the High Level Trigger on-line track reconstruction and during the off-line full reconstruction. It must provide good efficiency down to momenta as low as 50 MeV/c where material effects are sizeable even in an extremely thin detector as the VXD. In addition it has to be able to cope with the high occupancy of the Belle II detectors due to the background. The underlying concept of the track finding algorithm, as well as details of the implementation are outlined. The algorithm is proven to run with good performance on simulated ϒ(4S → BB̄ events with an efficiency for reconstructing tracks of above 90% over a wide range of momentum.

  20. An Optimized WSN Design for Latency-Critical Smart Grid Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mounib Khanafer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing popularity of the Internet of Things (IoT systems such as the smart grid, Body Area Networks (BANs, and the Intelligent Transportation System (ITS is driving Wireless Sensor Network (WSN systems to the limit in terms of abilities and performance. WSNs were initially designed for low power, low data rate, and latency-tolerant applications. However, this paradigm is changing because of the nature of the new applications. Therefore, instead of only focusing on power-efficient WSN design, researchers and industries are now developing Quality of Service (QoS protocols for WSNs. In addition to that, latency- and reliability-critical protocol designs are also becoming significantly important in WSNs. In this paper, we present an overview of some important smart grid latency-critical applications and highlight WSNs implementation challenges for these smart grid applications. Furthermore, we develop and evaluate two novel optimization models that solve for the optimum values of the end-to-end latency and power consumption in a clustered WSN given lower bounds on reliability and other network parameters.

  1. Parallelized Kalman-Filter-Based Reconstruction of Particle Tracks on Many-Core Architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerati, Giuseppe [Fermilab; Elmer, Peter [Princeton U.; Krutelyov, Slava [UC, San Diego; Lantz, Steven [Cornell U., Phys. Dept.; Lefebvre, Matthieu [Princeton U.; Masciovecchio, Mario [UC, San Diego; McDermott, Kevin [Cornell U., Phys. Dept.; Riley, Daniel [Cornell U., Phys. Dept.; Tadel, Matevž [UC, San Diego; Wittich, Peter [Cornell U., Phys. Dept.; Würthwein, Frank [UC, San Diego; Yagil, Avi [UC, San Diego

    2017-11-16

    Faced with physical and energy density limitations on clock speed, contemporary microprocessor designers have increasingly turned to on-chip parallelism for performance gains. Examples include the Intel Xeon Phi, GPGPUs, and similar technologies. Algorithms should accordingly be designed with ample amounts of fine-grained parallelism if they are to realize the full performance of the hardware. This requirement can be challenging for algorithms that are naturally expressed as a sequence of small-matrix operations, such as the Kalman filter methods widely in use in high-energy physics experiments. In the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), for example, one of the dominant computational problems is expected to be finding and fitting charged-particle tracks during event reconstruction; today, the most common track-finding methods are those based on the Kalman filter. Experience at the LHC, both in the trigger and offline, has shown that these methods are robust and provide high physics performance. Previously we reported the significant parallel speedups that resulted from our efforts to adapt Kalman-filter-based tracking to many-core architectures such as Intel Xeon Phi. Here we report on how effectively those techniques can be applied to more realistic detector configurations and event complexity.

  2. Towards Controlling Latency in Wireless Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Bouacida, Nader

    2017-04-24

    , we propose a novel design called “LearnQueue” based on reinforcement learning that can effectively control the latency in wireless networks. LearnQueue adapts quickly and intelligently to changes in the wireless environment using a sophisticated reward structure. Testbed results prove that LearnQueue can guarantee low latency while preserving throughput.

  3. Gamma regularization based reconstruction for low dose CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Junfeng; Chen, Yang; Hu, Yining; Luo, Limin; Shu, Huazhong; Li, Bicao; Liu, Jin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    Reducing the radiation in computerized tomography is today a major concern in radiology. Low dose computerized tomography (LDCT) offers a sound way to deal with this problem. However, more severe noise in the reconstructed CT images is observed under low dose scan protocols (e.g. lowered tube current or voltage values). In this paper we propose a Gamma regularization based algorithm for LDCT image reconstruction. This solution is flexible and provides a good balance between the regularizations based on l 0 -norm and l 1 -norm. We evaluate the proposed approach using the projection data from simulated phantoms and scanned Catphan phantoms. Qualitative and quantitative results show that the Gamma regularization based reconstruction can perform better in both edge-preserving and noise suppression when compared with other norms. (paper)

  4. CMS detector tracking performance in Run-II

    CERN Document Server

    Brondolin, Erica

    2017-01-01

    Since the start of Run-II in June 2015, LHC has delivered pp collisions at a center of mass energy of 13TeV and with a bunch time separation of 25 ns. On avarage, more than 25 inelastic collisions are superimposed on the event of interest. Under these new conditions, the CMS collaboration has re-calibrated and verified the performance of the whole detector. In particular, the CMS tracking performance has been measured both directly and indirectly. Direct measurements are, among others, the beam spot determination, the vertex resolution and the muon reconstruction efficiency with the tag and probe technique. An indirect assessment can be given by the pion reconstruction efficiency and the low-mass resonance parameters as a function of different single track kinematics.

  5. GPU accelerated CT reconstruction for clinical use: quality driven performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Michael S.; Sneyders, Yuri; McLin, Matthew; Ricker, Alan; Kimpe, Tom

    2007-03-01

    We present performance and quality analysis of GPU accelerated FDK filtered backprojection for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstruction. Our implementation of the FDK CT reconstruction algorithm does not compromise fidelity at any stage and yields a result that is within 1 HU of a reference C++ implementation. Our streaming implementation is able to perform reconstruction as the images are acquired; it addresses low latency as well as fast throughput, which are key considerations for a "real-time" design. Further, it is scaleable to multiple GPUs for increased performance. The implementation does not place any constraints on image acquisition; it works effectively for arbitrary angular coverage with arbitrary angular spacing. As such, this GPU accelerated CT reconstruction solution may easily be used with scanners that are already deployed. We are able to reconstruct a 512 x 512 x 340 volume from 625 projections, each sized 1024 x 768, in less than 50 seconds. The quoted 50 second timing encompasses the entire reconstruction using bilinear interpolation and includes filtering on the CPU, uploading the filtered projections to the GPU, and also downloading the reconstructed volume from GPU memory to system RAM.

  6. Effect of squatting velocity on hip muscle latency in women with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Chavez, Ignacio; Mendez-Rebolledo, Guillermo

    2018-03-01

    [Purpose] Neuromuscular activity has been evaluated in patellofemoral pain syndrome but movement velocity has not been considered. The aim was to determine differences in onset latency of hip and knee muscles between individuals with and without patellofemoral pain syndrome during a single leg squat, and whether any differences are dependent on movement velocity. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four females with patellofemoral pain syndrome and 24 healthy females participated. Onset latency of gluteus maximus, anterior and posterior gluteus medius, rectus femoris, vastus medialis, vastus lateralis and biceps femoris during a single leg squat at high and low velocity were evaluated. [Results] There was an interaction between velocity and diagnosis for posterior gluteus medius. Healthy subjects showed a later posterior gluteus medius onset latency at low velocity than high velocity; and also later than patellofemoral pain syndrome subjects at low velocity and high velocity. [Conclusion] Patellofemoral pain syndrome subjects presented an altered latency of posterior gluteus medius during a single leg squat and did not generate adaptations to velocity variation, while healthy subjects presented an earlier onset latency in response to velocity increase.

  7. Performance of the ATLAS Track Reconstruction Algorithms in Dense Environments in LHC run 2

    CERN Document Server

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Alstaty, Mahmoud; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Angerami, Aaron; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antel, Claire; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antrim, Daniel Joseph; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Araujo Ferraz, Victor; Arce, Ayana; Ardell, Rose Elisabeth; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Armitage, Lewis James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Artz, Sebastian; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahrasemani, Sina; Baines, John; Bajic, Milena; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska-Blenessy, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barranco Navarro, Laura; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; 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Boerner, Daniela; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bokan, Petar; Bold, Tomasz; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bolz, Arthur Eugen; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortoletto, Daniela; Bortolotto, Valerio; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Bossio Sola, Jonathan David; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Boutle, Sarah Kate; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Briglin, Daniel Lawrence; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Broughton, James; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruni, Lucrezia Stella; Brunt, Benjamin; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryant, Patrick; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burch, Tyler James; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burger, Angela Maria; Burghgrave, Blake; Burka, Klaudia; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Burr, Jonathan Thomas Peter; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Callea, Giuseppe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvente Lopez, Sergio; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Calvet, Thomas Philippe; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Camincher, Clement; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Camplani, Alessandra; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Carbone, Ryne Michael; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Ina; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carlson, Benjamin Taylor; Carminati, Leonardo; Carney, Rebecca; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrá, Sonia; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Casper, David William; Castelijn, Remco; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavallaro, Emanuele; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Celebi, Emre; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerda Alberich, Leonor; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Stephen Kam-wah; Chan, Wing Sheung; Chan, Yat Long; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Che, Siinn; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Shion; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Huajie; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chitan, Adrian; Chiu, Yu Him Justin; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chomont, Arthur Rene; Chouridou, Sofia; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming Chung; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Michael; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Constantinescu, Serban; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cormier, Felix; Cormier, Kyle James Read; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crawley, Samuel Joseph; Creager, Rachael; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cueto, Ana; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cukierman, Aviv Ruben; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cúth, Jakub; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'amen, Gabriele; D'Auria, Saverio; D'eramo, Louis; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dado, Tomas; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey; Daneri, Maria Florencia; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dann, Nicholas Stuart; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Daubney, Thomas; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Merlin; Davis, Douglas; Davison, Peter; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; 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Forcolin, Giulio Tiziano; Formica, Andrea; Förster, Fabian Alexander; Forti, Alessandra; Foster, Andrew Geoffrey; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; Fressard-Batraneanu, Silvia; Freund, Benjamin; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Louis Guillaume; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Ganguly, Sanmay; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gascon Bravo, Alberto; Gasnikova, Ksenia; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Gee, Norman; Geisen, Jannik; Geisen, Marc; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Geng, Cong; Gentile, Simonetta; Gentsos, Christos; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Geß{}ner, Gregor; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghneimat, Mazuza; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giannetti, Paola; Gibson, Stephen; Gignac, Matthew; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuli, Francesco; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gkountoumis, Panagiotis; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Gama, Rafael; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Giulia; Gonella, Laura; Gongadze, Alexi; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gottardo, Carlo Alberto; Goudet, Christophe Raymond; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gravila, Paul Mircea; Gray, Chloe; Gray, Heather; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Grevtsov, Kirill; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Sabrina; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Grummer, Aidan; Guan, Liang; Guan, Wen; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Gui, Bin; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Wen; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Ruchi; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Guzik, Marcin Pawel; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Hadef, Asma; Hageböck, Stephan; Hagihara, Mutsuto; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Han, Shuo; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Haney, Bijan; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartmann, Nikolai Marcel; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, Ahmed; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havener, Laura Brittany; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hayakawa, Daiki; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heidegger, Kim Katrin; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Jochen Jens; Heinrich, Lukas; Heinz, Christian; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Held, Alexander; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Herde, Hannah; Herget, Verena; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herr, Holger; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Herwig, Theodor Christian; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Higashino, Satoshi; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hils, Maximilian; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hiti, Bojan; Hladik, Ondrej; Hoad, Xanthe; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Honda, Shunsuke; Honda, Takuya; Hong, Tae Min; Hooberman, Benjamin Henry; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Hoya, Joaquin; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hrdinka, Julia; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Shuyang; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Huo, Peng; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuriy; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Isacson, Max Fredrik; Ishijima, Naoki; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ito, Fumiaki; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Paul; Jacobs, Ruth Magdalena; Jain, Vivek; Jakobi, Katharina Bianca; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Janus, Piotr Andrzej; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Javurkova, Martina; Jeanneau, Fabien; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jelinskas, Adomas; Jenni, Peter; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Hai; Jiang, Yi; Jiang, Zihao; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Jivan, Harshna; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Johnson, Christian; Johnson, William Joseph; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Roger; Jones, Samuel David; Jones, Sarah; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Köhler, Markus Konrad; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kaji, Toshiaki; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kaluza, Adam; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kanjir, Luka; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kasahara, Kota; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawade, Kentaro; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kay, Ellis; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Kendrick, James; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khader, Mazin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Kharlamova, Tatyana; Khodinov, Alexander; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kilby, Callum; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; Kirchmeier, David; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, Thorwald; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klingl, Tobias; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Köhler, Nicolas Maximilian; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolb, Mathis; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Koulouris, Aimilianos; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kourlitis, Evangelos; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Kowalewska, Anna Bozena; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozakai, Chihiro; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitrii; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Krauss, Dominik; Kremer, Jakub Andrzej; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Jiri; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Mark; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuechler, Jan Thomas; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kulinich, Yakov Petrovich; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kupfer, Tobias; Kuprash, Oleg; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurchaninov, Leonid; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurth, Matthew Glenn; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lammers, Sabine; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lanfermann, Marie Christine; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Langenberg, Robert Johannes; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Lapertosa, Alessandro; Laplace, Sandrine; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Lazzaroni, Massimo; Le, Brian; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Quilleuc, Eloi; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Benoit; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Lerner, Giuseppe; Leroy, Claude; Lesage, Arthur; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Dave; Li, Bing; Li, Changqiao; Li, Haifeng; Li, Liang; Li, Qi; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Lionti, Anthony Eric; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Hao; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Jesse Kar Kee; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanlin; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo, Cheuk Yee; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina Maria; Loch, Peter; Loebinger, Fred; Loesle, Alena; Loew, Kevin Michael; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Longo, Luigi; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopez, Jorge; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lopez Solis, Alvaro; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Haonan; Lu, Nan; Lu, Yun-Ju; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luedtke, Christian; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Luzi, Pierre Marc; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Lyubushkin, Vladimir; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Ma, Yanhui; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majersky, Oliver; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Claire; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Maneira, José; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manousos, Athanasios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mansour, Jason Dhia; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Manzoni, Stefano; Mapelli, Livio; Marceca, Gino; March, Luis; Marchese, Luigi; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Martensson, Mikael; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Christopher Blake; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Lorenzo; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Maznas, Ioannis; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mc Fadden, Neil Christopher; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McClymont, Laurie; McDonald, Emily; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McNamara, Peter Charles; McPherson, Robert; Meehan, Samuel; Megy, Theo Jean; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meideck, Thomas; Meier, Karlheinz; Meirose, Bernhard; Melini, Davide; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Mellenthin, Johannes Donatus; Melo, Matej; Meloni, Federico; Menary, Stephen Burns; Meng, Lingxin; Meng, Xiangting; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Miano, Fabrizio; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Minegishi, Yuji; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mistry, Khilesh; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mizukami, Atsushi; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Mkrtchyan, Tigran; Mlynarikova, Michaela; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mogg, Philipp; Mohapatra, Soumya; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monden, Ryutaro; Mondragon, Matthew Craig; Mönig, Klaus; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montalbano, Alyssa; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Stefanie; Mori, Daniel; Mori, Tatsuya; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moschovakos, Paris; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Harry James; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Muškinja, Miha; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naryshkin, Iouri; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Michael Edward; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Newman, Paul; Ng, Tsz Yu; Nguyen Manh, Tuan; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nielsen, Jason; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishu, Nishu; Nisius, Richard; Nitsche, Isabel; Nobe, Takuya; Noguchi, Yohei; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nomura, Marcelo Ayumu; Nooney, Tamsin; Nordberg, Markus; Norjoharuddeen, Nurfikri; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'connor, Kelsey; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Rourke, Abigail Alexandra; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Pacheco Rodriguez, Laura; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganini, Michela; Paige, Frank; Palacino, Gabriel; Palazzo, Serena; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panagoulias, Ilias; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Adam Jackson; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pascuzzi, Vincent; Pasner, Jacob Martin; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Francesca; Pataraia, Sophio; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penwell, John; Peralva, Bernardo; Perego, Marta Maria; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrov, Mariyan; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Peyaud, Alan; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Forrest Hays; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pin, Arnaud Willy J; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Pluth, Daniel; Podberezko, Pavel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggi, Riccardo; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Ponomarenko, Daniil; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Poulard, Gilbert; Poulsen, Trine; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozo Astigarraga, Mikel Eukeni; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Proklova, Nadezda; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Puri, Akshat; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Raine, John Andrew; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rashid, Tasneem; Raspopov, Sergii; Ratti, Maria Giulia; Rauch, Daniel; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravinovich, Ilia; Rawling, Jacob Henry; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Reale, Marilea; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reed, Robert; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reichert, Joseph; Reiss, Andreas; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resseguie, Elodie Deborah; Rettie, Sebastien; Reynolds, Elliot; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rifki, Othmane; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rimoldi, Marco; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ripellino, Giulia; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Rizzi, Chiara; Roberts, Rhys Thomas; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Rocco, Elena; Roda, Chiara; Rodina, Yulia; Rodriguez Bosca, Sergi; Rodriguez Perez, Andrea; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Daniel; Roe, Shaun; Rogan, Christopher Sean; Røhne, Ole; Roloff, Jennifer; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosien, Nils-Arne; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Jonatan; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; 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Shipsey, Ian Peter Joseph; Shirabe, Shohei; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shlomi, Jonathan; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyed Ruhollah; Shope, David Richard; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sickles, Anne Marie; Sidebo, Per Edvin; Sideras Haddad, Elias; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Manuel; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sioli, Maximiliano; Siragusa, Giovanni; Siral, Ismet; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Slovak, Radim; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smiesko, Juraj; Smirnov, Nikita; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Joshua Wyatt; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snyder, Ian Michael; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Sokhrannyi, Grygorii; Solans Sanchez, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Son, Hyungsuk; Sopczak, Andre; Sosa, David; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spangenberg, Martin; Spanò, Francesco; Sperlich, Dennis; Spettel, Fabian; Spieker, Thomas Malte; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stabile, Alberto; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapf, Birgit Sylvia; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Giordon; Stark, Jan; Stark, Simon Holm; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Stärz, Steffen; Staszewski, Rafal; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stewart, Graeme; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Suchek, Stanislav; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultan, D M S; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Suruliz, Kerim; Suster, Carl; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Svatos, Michal; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Swift, Stewart Patrick; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takasugi, Eric Hayato; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Masahiro; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanioka, Ryo; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tapia Araya, Sebastian; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Aaron; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Pierre Thor Elliot; Taylor, Wendy; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temple, Darren; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todome, Kazuki; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Baojia(Tony); Tornambe, Peter; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Treado, Colleen Jennifer; Trefzger, Thomas; Tresoldi, Fabio; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Trofymov, Artur; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsang, Ka Wa; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsui, Ka Ming; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tu, Yanjun; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tulbure, Traian Tiberiu; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turgeman, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Ucchielli, Giulia; Ueda, Ikuo; Ughetto, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usui, Junya; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valdes Santurio, Eduardo; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valéry, Lo\\"ic; Valkar, Stefan; Vallier, Alexis; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; van der Graaf, Harry; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varni, Carlo; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vasquez, Jared Gregory; Vasquez, Gerardo; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Ambrosius Thomas; Vermeulen, Jos; Vetterli, Michel; Viaux Maira, Nicolas; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigani, Luigi; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vishwakarma, Akanksha; Vittori, Camilla; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wallangen, Veronica; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chao; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Qing; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Wei; Wang, Wenxiao; Wang, Zirui; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Washbrook, Andrew; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Aaron Foley; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Weber, Stephen; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weirich, Marcel; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Michael David; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Whalen, Kathleen; Whallon, Nikola Lazar; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Aaron; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; Whiteson, Daniel; Whitmore, Ben William; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilk, Fabian; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkels, Emma; Winklmeier, Frank; Winston, Oliver James; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wobisch, Markus; Wolf, Tim Michael Heinz; Wolff, Robert; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wong, Vincent Wai Sum; Worm, Steven; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xi, Zhaoxu; Xia, Ligang; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamaguchi, Daiki; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamatani, Masahiro; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zongchang; Yao, Weiming; Yap, Yee Chinn; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yigitbasi, Efe; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuen, Stephanie P; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zacharis, Georgios; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zakharchuk, Nataliia; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zemaityte, Gabija; Zemla, Andrzej; Zeng, Jian Cong; Zeng, Qi; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Guangyi; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Liqing; Zhang, Matt; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Maosen; Zhou, Mingliang; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; Zou, Rui; zur Nedden, Martin; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2017-10-11

    Abstract: With the increase in energy of the Large Hadron Collider to a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV for Run 2, events with dense environments, such as in the cores of high-energy jets, became a focus for new physics searches as well as measurements of the Standard Model. These environments are characterized by charged-particle separations of the order of the tracking detectors sensor granularity. Basic track quantities are compared between 3.2 fb$^{-1}$ of data collected by the ATLAS experiment and simulation of proton-proton collisions producing high-transverse-momentum jets at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The impact of charged-particle separations and multiplicities on the track reconstruction performance is discussed. The efficiency in the cores of jets with transverse momenta between 200 GeV and 1600 GeV is quantified using a novel, data-driven, method. The method uses the energy loss, dE/dx, to identify pixel clusters originating from two charged particles. Of the charged particles creating the...

  8. GPU-based low-level trigger system for the standalone reconstruction of the ring-shaped hit patterns in the RICH Cherenkov detector of NA62 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammendola, R.; Biagioni, A.; Cretaro, P.; Frezza, O.; Cicero, F. Lo; Lonardo, A.; Martinelli, M.; Paolucci, P.S.; Pastorelli, E.; Chiozzi, S.; Ramusino, A. Cotta; Fiorini, M.; Gianoli, A.; Neri, I.; Lorenzo, S. Di; Fantechi, R.; Piandani, R.; Pontisso, L.; Lamanna, G.; Piccini, M.

    2017-01-01

    This project aims to exploit the parallel computing power of a commercial Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) to implement fast pattern matching in the Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector for the level 0 (L0) trigger of the NA62 experiment. In this approach, the ring-fitting algorithm is seedless, being fed with raw RICH data, with no previous information on the ring position from other detectors. Moreover, since the L0 trigger is provided with a more elaborated information than a simple multiplicity number, it results in a higher selection power. Two methods have been studied in order to reduce the data transfer latency from the readout boards of the detector to the GPU, i.e., the use of a dedicated NIC device driver with very low latency and a direct data transfer protocol from a custom FPGA-based NIC to the GPU. The performance of the system, developed through the FPGA approach, for multi-ring Cherenkov online reconstruction obtained during the NA62 physics runs is presented.

  9. Nanoscale measurements of proton tracks using fluorescent nuclear track detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawakuchi, Gabriel O., E-mail: gsawakuchi@mdanderson.org; Sahoo, Narayan [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Ferreira, Felisberto A. [Department of Nuclear Physics, University of Sao Paulo, SP 05508-090 (Brazil); McFadden, Conor H. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Hallacy, Timothy M. [Biophysics Program, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Granville, Dal A. [Department of Medical Physics, The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8L6 (Canada); Akselrod, Mark S. [Crystal Growth Division, Landauer, Inc., Stillwater, Oklahoma 74074 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: The authors describe a method in which fluorescence nuclear track detectors (FNTDs), novel track detectors with nanoscale spatial resolution, are used to determine the linear energy transfer (LET) of individual proton tracks from proton therapy beams by allowing visualization and 3D reconstruction of such tracks. Methods: FNTDs were exposed to proton therapy beams with nominal energies ranging from 100 to 250 MeV. Proton track images were then recorded by confocal microscopy of the FNTDs. Proton tracks in the FNTD images were fit by using a Gaussian function to extract fluorescence amplitudes. Histograms of fluorescence amplitudes were then compared with LET spectra. Results: The authors successfully used FNTDs to register individual proton tracks from high-energy proton therapy beams, allowing reconstruction of 3D images of proton tracks along with delta rays. The track amplitudes from FNTDs could be used to parameterize LET spectra, allowing the LET of individual proton tracks from therapeutic proton beams to be determined. Conclusions: FNTDs can be used to directly visualize proton tracks and their delta rays at the nanoscale level. Because the track intensities in the FNTDs correlate with LET, they could be used further to measure LET of individual proton tracks. This method may be useful for measuring nanoscale radiation quantities and for measuring the LET of individual proton tracks in radiation biology experiments.

  10. Imaging the Iceland Hotspot Track Beneath Greenland with Seismic Noise Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordret, A.

    2017-12-01

    During the past 65 million years, the Greenland craton drifted over the Iceland hotspot; however, uncertainties in geodynamic modeling and a lack of geophysical evidence prevent an accurate reconstruction of the hotspot track. I image the Greenland lithosphere down to 300 km depth with seismic noise tomography. The hotspot track is observed as a linear high-velocity anomaly in the middle crust associated with magmatic intrusions. In the upper mantle, the remnant thermal signature of the hotspot manifests as low velocity and low viscosity bodies. This new detailed picture of the Greenland lithosphere will drive more accurate geodynamic reconstructions of tectonic plate motions and prediction of Greenland heat flow, which in turn will enable more precise estimations of the Greenland ice-sheet mass balance.

  11. Online 4D ultrasound guidance for real-time motion compensation by MLC tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipsen, Svenja; Bruder, Ralf; O'Brien, Rick; Keall, Paul J; Schweikard, Achim; Poulsen, Per R

    2016-10-01

    With the trend in radiotherapy moving toward dose escalation and hypofractionation, the need for highly accurate targeting increases. While MLC tracking is already being successfully used for motion compensation of moving targets in the prostate, current real-time target localization methods rely on repeated x-ray imaging and implanted fiducial markers or electromagnetic transponders rather than direct target visualization. In contrast, ultrasound imaging can yield volumetric data in real-time (3D + time = 4D) without ionizing radiation. The authors report the first results of combining these promising techniques-online 4D ultrasound guidance and MLC tracking-in a phantom. A software framework for real-time target localization was installed directly on a 4D ultrasound station and used to detect a 2 mm spherical lead marker inside a water tank. The lead marker was rigidly attached to a motion stage programmed to reproduce nine characteristic tumor trajectories chosen from large databases (five prostate, four lung). The 3D marker position detected by ultrasound was transferred to a computer program for MLC tracking at a rate of 21.3 Hz and used for real-time MLC aperture adaption on a conventional linear accelerator. The tracking system latency was measured using sinusoidal trajectories and compensated for by applying a kernel density prediction algorithm for the lung traces. To measure geometric accuracy, static anterior and lateral conformal fields as well as a 358° arc with a 10 cm circular aperture were delivered for each trajectory. The two-dimensional (2D) geometric tracking error was measured as the difference between marker position and MLC aperture center in continuously acquired portal images. For dosimetric evaluation, VMAT treatment plans with high and low modulation were delivered to a biplanar diode array dosimeter using the same trajectories. Dose measurements with and without MLC tracking were compared to a static reference dose using 3%/3 mm and 2

  12. Latency in Visionic Systems: Test Methods and Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Randall E.; Arthur, J. J., III; Williams, Steven P.; Kramer, Lynda J.

    2005-01-01

    A visionics device creates a pictorial representation of the external scene for the pilot. The ultimate objective of these systems may be to electronically generate a form of Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC) to eliminate weather or time-of-day as an operational constraint and provide enhancement over actual visual conditions where eye-limiting resolution may be a limiting factor. Empirical evidence has shown that the total system delays or latencies including the imaging sensors and display systems, can critically degrade their utility, usability, and acceptability. Definitions and measurement techniques are offered herein as common test and evaluation methods for latency testing in visionics device applications. Based upon available data, very different latency requirements are indicated based upon the piloting task, the role in which the visionics device is used in this task, and the characteristics of the visionics cockpit display device including its resolution, field-of-regard, and field-of-view. The least stringent latency requirements will involve Head-Up Display (HUD) applications, where the visionics imagery provides situational information as a supplement to symbology guidance and command information. Conversely, the visionics system latency requirement for a large field-of-view Head-Worn Display application, providing a Virtual-VMC capability from which the pilot will derive visual guidance, will be the most stringent, having a value as low as 20 msec.

  13. Relation between derived-band auditory brainstem response latencies and behavioral frequency selectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strelcyk, Olaf; Christoforidis, Dimitrios; Dau, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    response times. For the same listeners, auditory-filter bandwidths at 2 kHz were estimated using a behavioral notched-noise masking paradigm. Generally, shorter derived-band latencies were observed for the HI than for the NH listeners. Only at low click sensation levels, prolonged latencies were obtained...

  14. High-Speed Automatic Microscopy for Real Time Tracks Reconstruction in Nuclear Emulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ambrosio, N.

    2006-06-01

    The Oscillation Project with Emulsion-tRacking Apparatus (OPERA) experiment will use a massive nuclear emulsion detector to search for /spl nu//sub /spl mu///spl rarr//spl nu//sub /spl tau// oscillation by identifying /spl tau/ leptons through the direct detection of their decay topology. The feasibility of experiments using a large mass emulsion detector is linked to the impressive progress under way in the development of automatic emulsion analysis. A new generation of scanning systems requires the development of fast automatic microscopes for emulsion scanning and image analysis to reconstruct tracks of elementary particles. The paper presents the European Scanning System (ESS) developed in the framework of OPERA collaboration.

  15. Parallelized Kalman-Filter-Based Reconstruction of Particle Tracks on Many-Core Processors and GPUs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerati, Giuseppe; Elmer, Peter; Krutelyov, Slava; Lantz, Steven; Lefebvre, Matthieu; Masciovecchio, Mario; McDermott, Kevin; Riley, Daniel; Tadel, Matevž; Wittich, Peter; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avi

    2017-08-01

    For over a decade now, physical and energy constraints have limited clock speed improvements in commodity microprocessors. Instead, chipmakers have been pushed into producing lower-power, multi-core processors such as Graphical Processing Units (GPU), ARM CPUs, and Intel MICs. Broad-based efforts from manufacturers and developers have been devoted to making these processors user-friendly enough to perform general computations. However, extracting performance from a larger number of cores, as well as specialized vector or SIMD units, requires special care in algorithm design and code optimization. One of the most computationally challenging problems in high-energy particle experiments is finding and fitting the charged-particle tracks during event reconstruction. This is expected to become by far the dominant problem at the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), for example. Today the most common track finding methods are those based on the Kalman filter. Experience with Kalman techniques on real tracking detector systems has shown that they are robust and provide high physics performance. This is why they are currently in use at the LHC, both in the trigger and offine. Previously we reported on the significant parallel speedups that resulted from our investigations to adapt Kalman filters to track fitting and track building on Intel Xeon and Xeon Phi. Here, we discuss our progresses toward the understanding of these processors and the new developments to port the Kalman filter to NVIDIA GPUs.

  16. Parallelized Kalman-Filter-Based Reconstruction of Particle Tracks on Many-Core Processors and GPUs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerati Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For over a decade now, physical and energy constraints have limited clock speed improvements in commodity microprocessors. Instead, chipmakers have been pushed into producing lower-power, multi-core processors such as Graphical Processing Units (GPU, ARM CPUs, and Intel MICs. Broad-based efforts from manufacturers and developers have been devoted to making these processors user-friendly enough to perform general computations. However, extracting performance from a larger number of cores, as well as specialized vector or SIMD units, requires special care in algorithm design and code optimization. One of the most computationally challenging problems in high-energy particle experiments is finding and fitting the charged-particle tracks during event reconstruction. This is expected to become by far the dominant problem at the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC, for example. Today the most common track finding methods are those based on the Kalman filter. Experience with Kalman techniques on real tracking detector systems has shown that they are robust and provide high physics performance. This is why they are currently in use at the LHC, both in the trigger and offine. Previously we reported on the significant parallel speedups that resulted from our investigations to adapt Kalman filters to track fitting and track building on Intel Xeon and Xeon Phi. Here, we discuss our progresses toward the understanding of these processors and the new developments to port the Kalman filter to NVIDIA GPUs.

  17. Parallelized Kalman-Filter-Based Reconstruction of Particle Tracks on Many-Core Processors and GPUs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerati, Giuseppe [Fermilab; Elmer, Peter [Princeton U.; Krutelyov, Slava [UC, San Diego; Lantz, Steven [Cornell U.; Lefebvre, Matthieu [Princeton U.; Masciovecchio, Mario [UC, San Diego; McDermott, Kevin [Cornell U.; Riley, Daniel [Cornell U., LNS; Tadel, Matevž [UC, San Diego; Wittich, Peter [Cornell U.; Würthwein, Frank [UC, San Diego; Yagil, Avi [UC, San Diego

    2017-01-01

    For over a decade now, physical and energy constraints have limited clock speed improvements in commodity microprocessors. Instead, chipmakers have been pushed into producing lower-power, multi-core processors such as Graphical Processing Units (GPU), ARM CPUs, and Intel MICs. Broad-based efforts from manufacturers and developers have been devoted to making these processors user-friendly enough to perform general computations. However, extracting performance from a larger number of cores, as well as specialized vector or SIMD units, requires special care in algorithm design and code optimization. One of the most computationally challenging problems in high-energy particle experiments is finding and fitting the charged-particle tracks during event reconstruction. This is expected to become by far the dominant problem at the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), for example. Today the most common track finding methods are those based on the Kalman filter. Experience with Kalman techniques on real tracking detector systems has shown that they are robust and provide high physics performance. This is why they are currently in use at the LHC, both in the trigger and offine. Previously we reported on the significant parallel speedups that resulted from our investigations to adapt Kalman filters to track fitting and track building on Intel Xeon and Xeon Phi. Here, we discuss our progresses toward the understanding of these processors and the new developments to port the Kalman filter to NVIDIA GPUs.

  18. Robust Visual Tracking Via Consistent Low-Rank Sparse Learning

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tianzhu

    2014-06-19

    Object tracking is the process of determining the states of a target in consecutive video frames based on properties of motion and appearance consistency. In this paper, we propose a consistent low-rank sparse tracker (CLRST) that builds upon the particle filter framework for tracking. By exploiting temporal consistency, the proposed CLRST algorithm adaptively prunes and selects candidate particles. By using linear sparse combinations of dictionary templates, the proposed method learns the sparse representations of image regions corresponding to candidate particles jointly by exploiting the underlying low-rank constraints. In addition, the proposed CLRST algorithm is computationally attractive since temporal consistency property helps prune particles and the low-rank minimization problem for learning joint sparse representations can be efficiently solved by a sequence of closed form update operations. We evaluate the proposed CLRST algorithm against 14 state-of-the-art tracking methods on a set of 25 challenging image sequences. Experimental results show that the CLRST algorithm performs favorably against state-of-the-art tracking methods in terms of accuracy and execution time.

  19. The ATLAS Track Extrapolation Package

    CERN Document Server

    Salzburger, A

    2007-01-01

    The extrapolation of track parameters and their associated covariances to destination surfaces of different types is a very frequent process in the event reconstruction of high energy physics experiments. This is amongst other reasons due to the fact that most track and vertex fitting techniques are based on the first and second momentum of the underlying probability density distribution. The correct stochastic or deterministic treatment of interactions with the traversed detector material is hereby crucial for high quality track reconstruction throughout the entire momentum range of final state particles that are produced in high energy physics collision experiments. This document presents the main concepts, the algorithms and the implementation of the newly developed, powerful ATLAS track extrapolation engine. It also emphasises on validation procedures, timing measurements and the integration into the ATLAS offline reconstruction software.

  20. Evaluating low pass filters on SPECT reconstructed cardiac orientation estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Shekhar

    2009-02-01

    Low pass filters can affect the quality of clinical SPECT images by smoothing. Appropriate filter and parameter selection leads to optimum smoothing that leads to a better quantification followed by correct diagnosis and accurate interpretation by the physician. This study aims at evaluating the low pass filters on SPECT reconstruction algorithms. Criteria for evaluating the filters are estimating the SPECT reconstructed cardiac azimuth and elevation angle. Low pass filters studied are butterworth, gaussian, hamming, hanning and parzen. Experiments are conducted using three reconstruction algorithms, FBP (filtered back projection), MLEM (maximum likelihood expectation maximization) and OSEM (ordered subsets expectation maximization), on four gated cardiac patient projections (two patients with stress and rest projections). Each filter is applied with varying cutoff and order for each reconstruction algorithm (only butterworth used for MLEM and OSEM). The azimuth and elevation angles are calculated from the reconstructed volume and the variation observed in the angles with varying filter parameters is reported. Our results demonstrate that behavior of hamming, hanning and parzen filter (used with FBP) with varying cutoff is similar for all the datasets. Butterworth filter (cutoff > 0.4) behaves in a similar fashion for all the datasets using all the algorithms whereas with OSEM for a cutoff < 0.4, it fails to generate cardiac orientation due to oversmoothing, and gives an unstable response with FBP and MLEM. This study on evaluating effect of low pass filter cutoff and order on cardiac orientation using three different reconstruction algorithms provides an interesting insight into optimal selection of filter parameters.

  1. Low-dose X-ray CT reconstruction via dictionary learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiong; Yu, Hengyong; Mou, Xuanqin; Zhang, Lei; Hsieh, Jiang; Wang, Ge

    2012-09-01

    Although diagnostic medical imaging provides enormous benefits in the early detection and accuracy diagnosis of various diseases, there are growing concerns on the potential side effect of radiation induced genetic, cancerous and other diseases. How to reduce radiation dose while maintaining the diagnostic performance is a major challenge in the computed tomography (CT) field. Inspired by the compressive sensing theory, the sparse constraint in terms of total variation (TV) minimization has already led to promising results for low-dose CT reconstruction. Compared to the discrete gradient transform used in the TV method, dictionary learning is proven to be an effective way for sparse representation. On the other hand, it is important to consider the statistical property of projection data in the low-dose CT case. Recently, we have developed a dictionary learning based approach for low-dose X-ray CT. In this paper, we present this method in detail and evaluate it in experiments. In our method, the sparse constraint in terms of a redundant dictionary is incorporated into an objective function in a statistical iterative reconstruction framework. The dictionary can be either predetermined before an image reconstruction task or adaptively defined during the reconstruction process. An alternating minimization scheme is developed to minimize the objective function. Our approach is evaluated with low-dose X-ray projections collected in animal and human CT studies, and the improvement associated with dictionary learning is quantified relative to filtered backprojection and TV-based reconstructions. The results show that the proposed approach might produce better images with lower noise and more detailed structural features in our selected cases. However, there is no proof that this is true for all kinds of structures.

  2. Optimization on fixed low latency implementation of the GBT core in FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K.; Chen, H.; Wu, W.; Xu, H.; Yao, L.

    2017-07-01

    In the upgrade of ATLAS experiment [1], the front-end electronics components are subjected to a large radiation background. Meanwhile high speed optical links are required for the data transmission between the on-detector and off-detector electronics. The GBT architecture and the Versatile Link (VL) project are designed by CERN to support the 4.8 Gbps line rate bidirectional high-speed data transmission which is called GBT link [2]. In the ATLAS upgrade, besides the link with on-detector, the GBT link is also used between different off-detector systems. The GBTX ASIC is designed for the on-detector front-end, correspondingly for the off-detector electronics, the GBT architecture is implemented in Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA). CERN launches the GBT-FPGA project to provide examples in different types of FPGA [3]. In the ATLAS upgrade framework, the Front-End LInk eXchange (FELIX) system [4, 5] is used to interface the front-end electronics of several ATLAS subsystems. The GBT link is used between them, to transfer the detector data and the timing, trigger, control and monitoring information. The trigger signal distributed in the down-link from FELIX to the front-end requires a fixed and low latency. In this paper, several optimizations on the GBT-FPGA IP core are introduced, to achieve a lower fixed latency. For FELIX, a common firmware will be used to interface different front-ends with support of both GBT modes: the forward error correction mode and the wide mode. The modified GBT-FPGA core has the ability to switch between the GBT modes without FPGA reprogramming. The system clock distribution of the multi-channel FELIX firmware is also discussed in this paper.

  3. Optimization on fixed low latency implementation of the GBT core in FPGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.; Chen, H.; Wu, W.; Xu, H.; Yao, L.

    2017-01-01

    In the upgrade of ATLAS experiment [1], the front-end electronics components are subjected to a large radiation background. Meanwhile high speed optical links are required for the data transmission between the on-detector and off-detector electronics. The GBT architecture and the Versatile Link (VL) project are designed by CERN to support the 4.8 Gbps line rate bidirectional high-speed data transmission which is called GBT link [2]. In the ATLAS upgrade, besides the link with on-detector, the GBT link is also used between different off-detector systems. The GBTX ASIC is designed for the on-detector front-end, correspondingly for the off-detector electronics, the GBT architecture is implemented in Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA). CERN launches the GBT-FPGA project to provide examples in different types of FPGA [3]. In the ATLAS upgrade framework, the Front-End LInk eXchange (FELIX) system [4, 5] is used to interface the front-end electronics of several ATLAS subsystems. The GBT link is used between them, to transfer the detector data and the timing, trigger, control and monitoring information. The trigger signal distributed in the down-link from FELIX to the front-end requires a fixed and low latency. In this paper, several optimizations on the GBT-FPGA IP core are introduced, to achieve a lower fixed latency. For FELIX, a common firmware will be used to interface different front-ends with support of both GBT modes: the forward error correction mode and the wide mode. The modified GBT-FPGA core has the ability to switch between the GBT modes without FPGA reprogramming. The system clock distribution of the multi-channel FELIX firmware is also discussed in this paper.

  4. Primary display latency criteria based on flying qualities and performance data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, John D., Jr.; Beck, Corin P.; Johns, John B.

    1993-01-01

    With a pilots' increasing use of visual cue augmentation, much requiring extensive pre-processing, there is a need to establish criteria for new avionics/display design. The timeliness and synchronization of the augmented cues is vital to ensure the performance quality required for precision mission task elements (MTEs) where augmented cues are the primary source of information to the pilot. Processing delays incurred while transforming sensor-supplied flight information into visual cues are unavoidable. Relationships between maximum control system delays and associated flying qualities levels are documented in MIL-F-83300 and MIL-F-8785. While cues representing aircraft status may be just as vital to the pilot as prompt control response for operations in instrument meteorological conditions, presently, there are no specification requirements on avionics system latency. To produce data relating avionics system latency to degradations in flying qualities, the Navy conducted two simulation investigations. During the investigations, flying qualities and performance data were recorded as simulated avionics system latency was varied. Correlated results of the investigation indicates that there is a detrimental impact of latency on flying qualities. Analysis of these results and consideration of key factors influencing their application indicate that: (1) Task performance degrades and pilot workload increases as latency is increased. Inconsistency in task performance increases as latency increases. (2) Latency reduces the probability of achieving Level 1 handling qualities with avionics system latency as low as 70 ms. (3) The data suggest that the achievement of desired performance will be ensured only at display latency values below 120 ms. (4) These data also suggest that avoidance of inadequate performance will be ensured only at display latency values below 150 ms.

  5. Tracking by Machine Learning Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Jofrehei, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Current track reconstructing methods start with two points and then for each layer loop through all possible hits to find proper hits to add to that track. Another idea would be to use this large number of already reconstructed events and/or simulated data and train a machine on this data to find tracks given hit pixels. Training time could be long but real time tracking is really fast Simulation might not be as realistic as real data but tacking has been done for that with 100 percent efficiency while by using real data we would probably be limited to current efficiency.

  6. A low-latency pipeline for GRB light curve and spectrum using Fermi/GBM near real-time data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Xiong, Shao-Lin; Long, Xi; Zhang, Qiang; Song, Li-Ming; Sun, Jian-Chao; Wang, Yuan-Hao; Li, Han-Cheng; Bu, Qing-Cui; Feng, Min-Zi; Li, Zheng-Heng; Wen, Xing; Wu, Bo-Bing; Zhang, Lai-Yu; Zhang, Yong-Jie; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Shao, Jian-Xiong

    2018-05-01

    Rapid response and short time latency are very important for Time Domain Astronomy, such as the observations of Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) and electromagnetic (EM) counterparts of gravitational waves (GWs). Based on near real-time Fermi/GBM data, we developed a low-latency pipeline to automatically calculate the temporal and spectral properties of GRBs. With this pipeline, some important parameters can be obtained, such as T 90 and fluence, within ∼ 20 min after the GRB trigger. For ∼ 90% of GRBs, T 90 and fluence are consistent with the GBM catalog results within 2σ errors. This pipeline has been used by the Gamma-ray Bursts Polarimeter (POLAR) and the Insight Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (Insight-HXMT) to follow up the bursts of interest. For GRB 170817A, the first EM counterpart of GW events detected by Fermi/GBM and INTEGRAL/SPI-ACS, the pipeline gave T 90 and spectral information 21 min after the GBM trigger, providing important information for POLAR and Insight-HXMT observations.

  7. Low-Dose X-ray CT Reconstruction via Dictionary Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiong; Zhang, Lei; Hsieh, Jiang; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    Although diagnostic medical imaging provides enormous benefits in the early detection and accuracy diagnosis of various diseases, there are growing concerns on the potential side effect of radiation induced genetic, cancerous and other diseases. How to reduce radiation dose while maintaining the diagnostic performance is a major challenge in the computed tomography (CT) field. Inspired by the compressive sensing theory, the sparse constraint in terms of total variation (TV) minimization has already led to promising results for low-dose CT reconstruction. Compared to the discrete gradient transform used in the TV method, dictionary learning is proven to be an effective way for sparse representation. On the other hand, it is important to consider the statistical property of projection data in the low-dose CT case. Recently, we have developed a dictionary learning based approach for low-dose X-ray CT. In this paper, we present this method in detail and evaluate it in experiments. In our method, the sparse constraint in terms of a redundant dictionary is incorporated into an objective function in a statistical iterative reconstruction framework. The dictionary can be either predetermined before an image reconstruction task or adaptively defined during the reconstruction process. An alternating minimization scheme is developed to minimize the objective function. Our approach is evaluated with low-dose X-ray projections collected in animal and human CT studies, and the improvement associated with dictionary learning is quantified relative to filtered backprojection and TV-based reconstructions. The results show that the proposed approach might produce better images with lower noise and more detailed structural features in our selected cases. However, there is no proof that this is true for all kinds of structures. PMID:22542666

  8. The Accuracy and Precision of Position and Orientation Tracking in the HTC Vive Virtual Reality System for Scientific Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diederick C. Niehorster

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The advent of inexpensive consumer virtual reality equipment enables many more researchers to study perception with naturally moving observers. One such system, the HTC Vive, offers a large field-of-view, high-resolution head mounted display together with a room-scale tracking system for less than a thousand U.S. dollars. If the position and orientation tracking of this system is of sufficient accuracy and precision, it could be suitable for much research that is currently done with far more expensive systems. Here we present a quantitative test of the HTC Vive’s position and orientation tracking as well as its end-to-end system latency. We report that while the precision of the Vive’s tracking measurements is high and its system latency (22 ms is low, its position and orientation measurements are provided in a coordinate system that is tilted with respect to the physical ground plane. Because large changes in offset were found whenever tracking was briefly lost, it cannot be corrected for with a one-time calibration procedure. We conclude that the varying offset between the virtual and the physical tracking space makes the HTC Vive at present unsuitable for scientific experiments that require accurate visual stimulation of self-motion through a virtual world. It may however be suited for other experiments that do not have this requirement.

  9. Fast, automatic, and accurate catheter reconstruction in HDR brachytherapy using an electromagnetic 3D tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulin, Eric; Racine, Emmanuel; Beaulieu, Luc, E-mail: Luc.Beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca [Département de physique, de génie physique et d’optique et Centre de recherche sur le cancer de l’Université Laval, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Département de radio-oncologie et Axe Oncologie du Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Binnekamp, Dirk [Integrated Clinical Solutions and Marketing, Philips Healthcare, Veenpluis 4-6, Best 5680 DA (Netherlands)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), current catheter reconstruction protocols are relatively slow and error prone. The purpose of this technical note is to evaluate the accuracy and the robustness of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system for automated and real-time catheter reconstruction. Methods: For this preclinical study, a total of ten catheters were inserted in gelatin phantoms with different trajectories. Catheters were reconstructed using a 18G biopsy needle, used as an EM stylet and equipped with a miniaturized sensor, and the second generation Aurora{sup ®} Planar Field Generator from Northern Digital Inc. The Aurora EM system provides position and orientation value with precisions of 0.7 mm and 0.2°, respectively. Phantoms were also scanned using a μCT (GE Healthcare) and Philips Big Bore clinical computed tomography (CT) system with a spatial resolution of 89 μm and 2 mm, respectively. Reconstructions using the EM stylet were compared to μCT and CT. To assess the robustness of the EM reconstruction, five catheters were reconstructed twice and compared. Results: Reconstruction time for one catheter was 10 s, leading to a total reconstruction time inferior to 3 min for a typical 17-catheter implant. When compared to the μCT, the mean EM tip identification error was 0.69 ± 0.29 mm while the CT error was 1.08 ± 0.67 mm. The mean 3D distance error was found to be 0.66 ± 0.33 mm and 1.08 ± 0.72 mm for the EM and CT, respectively. EM 3D catheter trajectories were found to be more accurate. A maximum difference of less than 0.6 mm was found between successive EM reconstructions. Conclusions: The EM reconstruction was found to be more accurate and precise than the conventional methods used for catheter reconstruction in HDR-B. This approach can be applied to any type of catheters and applicators.

  10. Fast, automatic, and accurate catheter reconstruction in HDR brachytherapy using an electromagnetic 3D tracking system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulin, Eric; Racine, Emmanuel; Beaulieu, Luc; Binnekamp, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), current catheter reconstruction protocols are relatively slow and error prone. The purpose of this technical note is to evaluate the accuracy and the robustness of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system for automated and real-time catheter reconstruction. Methods: For this preclinical study, a total of ten catheters were inserted in gelatin phantoms with different trajectories. Catheters were reconstructed using a 18G biopsy needle, used as an EM stylet and equipped with a miniaturized sensor, and the second generation Aurora ® Planar Field Generator from Northern Digital Inc. The Aurora EM system provides position and orientation value with precisions of 0.7 mm and 0.2°, respectively. Phantoms were also scanned using a μCT (GE Healthcare) and Philips Big Bore clinical computed tomography (CT) system with a spatial resolution of 89 μm and 2 mm, respectively. Reconstructions using the EM stylet were compared to μCT and CT. To assess the robustness of the EM reconstruction, five catheters were reconstructed twice and compared. Results: Reconstruction time for one catheter was 10 s, leading to a total reconstruction time inferior to 3 min for a typical 17-catheter implant. When compared to the μCT, the mean EM tip identification error was 0.69 ± 0.29 mm while the CT error was 1.08 ± 0.67 mm. The mean 3D distance error was found to be 0.66 ± 0.33 mm and 1.08 ± 0.72 mm for the EM and CT, respectively. EM 3D catheter trajectories were found to be more accurate. A maximum difference of less than 0.6 mm was found between successive EM reconstructions. Conclusions: The EM reconstruction was found to be more accurate and precise than the conventional methods used for catheter reconstruction in HDR-B. This approach can be applied to any type of catheters and applicators

  11. The silicon tracking system of the CBM experiment at FAIR. Development of microstrip sensors and signal transmission lines for a low-mass, low-noise system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singla, Minni

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, different physical and electrical aspects of silicon microstrip sensors and low-mass multi-line readout cables have been investigated. These silicon microstrip sensors and readout cables will be used in the Silicon Tracking System (STS) of the fixed-target heavy-ion Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment which is under development at the upcoming Facility for Antiproton and ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany. The highly segmented low-mass tracking system is a central CBM detector system to resolve the high tracking densities of charged particles originating from beam-target interactions. Considering the low material budget requirement the double-sided silicon microstrip detectors have been used in several planar tracking stations. The readout electronics is planned to be installed at the periphery of the tracking stations along with the cooling system. Low-mass multi-line readout cables shall bridge the distance between the microstrip sensors and the readout electronics. The CBM running operational scenario suggests that some parts of the tracking stations are expected to be exposed to a total integrated particle fluence of the order of 1 x 10 14 n eq /cm 2 . After 1 x 10 14 n eq /cm 2 the damaged modules in the tracking stations will be replaced. Thus radiation hard sensor is an important requirement for the sensors. Moreover, to cope with the high reaction rates, free-streaming (triggerless) readout electronics with online event reconstruction must be used which require high signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio (i.e., high signal efficiency, low noise contributions). Therefore, reduction in noise is a major goal of the sensor and cable development. For better insight into the different aspects of the silicon microstrip sensors and multi-line readout cables, the simulation study has been performed using SYNOPSYS TCAD tools. 3D models of the silicon microstrip sensors and the readout cables were implemented which is motivated by the stereoscopic

  12. A low-latency optical switch architecture using integrated μm SOI-based contention resolution and switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourgias-Alexandris, G.; Moralis-Pegios, M.; Terzenidis, N.; Cherchi, M.; Harjanne, M.; Aalto, T.; Vyrsokinos, K.; Pleros, N.

    2018-02-01

    The urgent need for high-bandwidth and high-port connectivity in Data Centers has boosted the deployment of optoelectronic packet switches towards bringing high data-rate optics closer to the ASIC, realizing optical transceiver functions directly at the ASIC package for high-rate, low-energy and low-latency interconnects. Even though optics can offer a broad range of low-energy integrated switch fabrics for replacing electronic switches and seamlessly interface with the optical I/Os, the use of energy- and latency-consuming electronic SerDes continues to be a necessity, mainly dictated by the absence of integrated and reliable optical buffering solutions. SerDes undertakes the role of optimally synergizing the lower-speed electronic buffers with the incoming and outgoing optical streams, suggesting that a SerDes-released chip-scale optical switch fabric can be only realized in case all necessary functions including contention resolution and switching can be implemented on a common photonic integration platform. In this paper, we demonstrate experimentally a hybrid Broadcast-and-Select (BS) / wavelength routed optical switch that performs both the optical buffering and switching functions with μm-scale Silicon-integrated building blocks. Optical buffering is carried out in a silicon-integrated variable delay line bank with a record-high on-chip delay/footprint efficiency of 2.6ns/mm2 and up to 17.2 nsec delay capability, while switching is executed via a BS design and a silicon-integrated echelle grating, assisted by SOA-MZI wavelength conversion stages and controlled by a FPGA header processing module. The switch has been experimentally validated in a 3x3 arrangement with 10Gb/s NRZ optical data packets, demonstrating error-free switching operation with a power penalty of <5dB.

  13. Computer-aided method for recognition of proton track in nuclear emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruan Jinlu; Li Hongyun; Song Jiwen; Zhang Jianfu; Chen Liang; Zhang Zhongbing; Liu Jinliang

    2014-01-01

    In order to overcome the shortcomings of the manual method for proton-recoil track recognition in nuclear emulsions, a computer-aided track recognition method was studied. In this method, image sequences captured by a microscope system were processed through image convolution with composite filters, binarization by multi thresholds, track grains clustering and redundant grains removing to recognize the track grains in the image sequences. Then the proton-recoil tracks were reconstructed from the recognized track grains through track reconstruction. The proton-recoil tracks in the nuclear emulsion irradiated by the neutron beam at energy of 14.9 MeV were recognized by the computer-aided method. The results show that proton-recoil tracks reconstructed by this method consist well with those reconstructed by the manual method. This compute-raided track recognition method lays an important technical foundation of developments of a proton-recoil track automatic recognition system and applications of nuclear emulsions in pulsed neutron spectrum measurement. (authors)

  14. VeloTT tracking for LHCb Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Bowen, Espen Eie; Tresch, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This note describes track reconstruction in the LHCb tracking system upstream of the magnet, combining VELO tracks with hits in the TT sub-detector. The implementation of the VeloTT algorithm and its performance in terms of track reconstruction efficiency, ghost rate and execution time are presented. The algorithm has been rewritten for use in the first software trigger level for LHCb Run II. The momentum and charge information obtained for the VeloTT tracks (due to a fringe magnetic field between the VELO and TT sub-detectors) can reduce the total execution time for the full tracking sequence.

  15. Evaluation of bias and variance in low-count OSEM list mode reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jian, Y; Carson, R E; Planeta, B

    2015-01-01

    Statistical algorithms have been widely used in PET image reconstruction. The maximum likelihood expectation maximization reconstruction has been shown to produce bias in applications where images are reconstructed from a relatively small number of counts. In this study, image bias and variability in low-count OSEM reconstruction are investigated on images reconstructed with MOLAR (motion-compensation OSEM list-mode algorithm for resolution-recovery reconstruction) platform. A human brain ([ 11 C]AFM) and a NEMA phantom are used in the simulation and real experiments respectively, for the HRRT and Biograph mCT. Image reconstructions were repeated with different combinations of subsets and iterations. Regions of interest were defined on low-activity and high-activity regions to evaluate the bias and noise at matched effective iteration numbers (iterations × subsets). Minimal negative biases and no positive biases were found at moderate count levels and less than 5% negative bias was found using extremely low levels of counts (0.2 M NEC). At any given count level, other factors, such as subset numbers and frame-based scatter correction may introduce small biases (1–5%) in the reconstructed images. The observed bias was substantially lower than that reported in the literature, perhaps due to the use of point spread function and/or other implementation methods in MOLAR. (paper)

  16. FPGA helix tracking algorithm for PANDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Yutie; Galuska, Martin; Gessler, Thomas; Kuehn, Wolfgang; Lange, Jens Soeren; Muenchow, David [II. Physikalisches Institut, University of Giessen (Germany); Ye, Hua [Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS (China); Collaboration: PANDA-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The PANDA detector is a general-purpose detector for physics with high luminosity cooled antiproton beams, planed to operate at the FAIR facility in Darmstadt, Germany. The central detector includes a silicon Micro Vertex Detector (MVD) and a Straw Tube Tracker (STT). Without any hardware trigger, large amounts of raw data are streaming into the data acquisition system. The data reduction task is performed in the online system by reconstruction algorithms programmed on FPGAs (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) as first level and on a farm of GPUs or PCs as a second level. One important part in the system is the online track reconstruction. In this presentation, an online tracking algorithm for helix tracking reconstruction in the solenoidal field is shown. The VHDL-based algorithm is tested with different types of events, at different event rate. Furthermore, a study of T0 extraction from the tracking algorithm is performed. A concept of simultaneous tracking and T0 determination is presented.

  17. Track finding and track reconstruction in the internal forward drift chamber of SAPHIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umlauf, G.

    1993-03-01

    A track finding algorithm has been developed for the inner forward drift chamber of the SAPHIR detector (at ELSA in Bonn) using the Principal Components Analysis as a tool for interpolating track coordinates. The drift chamber consists of twelve planar layers with six different inclinations and is being operated in an inhomogenous magnetic field. The task of track finding is basicly split into a primary stage that defines track candidates without the use of drift-time information and a second stage that serves to verify the track candidate and to resolve the intrinsic left-right ambiguities of the drift chamber signals. Tracks with at most three missing signals can be found. (orig.) [de

  18. L1 track triggering with associative memory for the CMS HL-LHC tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabes, D.

    2014-01-01

    One of the proposed solutions currently under study in Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) collaboration [1] to reconstruct tracks at the first level trigger (L1) for the High Luminosity - Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) is based on the usage of Associative Memory [2] (AM) chips. The tracker information is first reduced to suppress low p T tracks and sent to boards equipped with AM chips. Each AM compares the tracker information with pre-calculated expectations (pattern matching) in a very short time (order of a μs), therefore providing a solution to the challenging computational problem of pattern recognition in a very busy environment. Associated to fast track fit methods, like the Hough transform, the AM approach should be able to fulfil the very demanding requirements of L1 tracking. The proposed architecture for the AM-based L1 track reconstruction system will be presented, together with the latest results obtained using a complete software emulation of this system

  19. gamma-ray tracking in germanium the backtracking method

    CERN Document Server

    Marel, J V D

    2002-01-01

    In the framework of a European TMR network project the concept for a gamma-ray tracking array is being developed for nuclear physics spectroscopy in the energy range of approx 10 keV up to several MeV. The tracking array will consist of a large number of position-sensitive germanium detectors in a spherical geometry around a target. Due to the high segmentation, a Compton scattered gamma-ray will deposit energy in several different segments. A method has been developed to reconstruct the tracks of multiple coincident gamma-rays and to find their initial energies. By starting from the final point the track can be reconstructed backwards to the origin with the help of the photoelectric and Compton cross-sections and the Compton scatter formula. Every reconstructed track is given a figure of merit, thus allowing suppression of wrongly reconstructed tracks and gamma-rays that have scattered out of the detector system. This so-called backtracking method has been tested on simulated events in a shell-like geometry ...

  20. γ-ray tracking in germanium: the backtracking method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marel, J. van der; Cederwall, B.

    2002-01-01

    In the framework of a European TMR network project the concept for a γ-ray tracking array is being developed for nuclear physics spectroscopy in the energy range of ∼10 keV up to several MeV. The tracking array will consist of a large number of position-sensitive germanium detectors in a spherical geometry around a target. Due to the high segmentation, a Compton scattered γ-ray will deposit energy in several different segments. A method has been developed to reconstruct the tracks of multiple coincident γ-rays and to find their initial energies. By starting from the final point the track can be reconstructed backwards to the origin with the help of the photoelectric and Compton cross-sections and the Compton scatter formula. Every reconstructed track is given a figure of merit, thus allowing suppression of wrongly reconstructed tracks and γ-rays that have scattered out of the detector system. This so-called backtracking method has been tested on simulated events in a shell-like geometry for germanium and in planar geometries for silicon, germanium and CdTe

  1. Rein: Taming Tail Latency in Key-Value Stores via Multiget Scheduling

    KAUST Repository

    Reda, Waleed

    2017-04-17

    We tackle the problem of reducing tail latencies in distributed key-value stores, such as the popular Cassandra database.We focus on workloads of multiget requests, which batch together access to several data elements and parallelize read operations across the data store machines. We first analyze a production trace of a real system and quantify the skew due to multiget sizes, key popularity, and other factors. We then proceed to identify opportunities for reduction of tail latencies by recognizing the composition of aggregate requests and by carefully scheduling bottleneck operations that can otherwise create excessive queues. We design and implement a system called Rein, which reduces latency via inter-multiget scheduling using low overhead techniques. We extensively evaluate Rein via experiments in Amazon Web Services (AWS) and simulations. Our scheduling algorithms reduce the median, 95, and 99 percentile latencies by factors of 1.5, 1.5, and 1.9, respectively.

  2. VeloUT tracking for the LHCb Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Bowen, E

    2014-01-01

    This note describes track reconstruction in the LHCb tracking system upstream of the magnet, namely the VELO and UT sub-detectors. The implementation of the VeloUT algorithm and its performance in terms of track reconstruction efficiency, ghost rate and execution time per event are presented. The algorithm has been optimised for use in the Upgrade software trigger of LHCb. The momentum information obtained for the VeloUT tracks (due to a fringe magnetic field between the VELO and UT sub-detectors) can reduce the total execution time per event for the full tracking sequence. The performance of the tracking sequence with and without the use of VeloUT tracks is also presented.

  3. Latency Analysis of Systems with Multiple Interfaces for Ultra-Reliable M2M Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmy Jessen; Popovski, Petar

    2016-01-01

    One of the ways to satisfy the requirements of ultra-reliable low latency communication for mission critical Machine-type Communications (MTC) applications is to integrate multiple communication interfaces. In order to estimate the performance in terms of latency and reliability of such an integr...

  4. Bias in iterative reconstruction of low-statistics PET data: benefits of a resolution model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, M D; Asselin, M-C; Julyan, P J; Feldmann, M; Matthews, J C [School of Cancer and Enabling Sciences, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, Manchester M20 3LJ (United Kingdom); Talbot, P S [Mental Health and Neurodegeneration Research Group, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, Manchester M20 3LJ (United Kingdom); Jones, T, E-mail: matthew.walker@manchester.ac.uk [Academic Department of Radiation Oncology, Christie Hospital, University of Manchester, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-21

    Iterative image reconstruction methods such as ordered-subset expectation maximization (OSEM) are widely used in PET. Reconstructions via OSEM are however reported to be biased for low-count data. We investigated this and considered the impact for dynamic PET. Patient listmode data were acquired in [{sup 11}C]DASB and [{sup 15}O]H{sub 2}O scans on the HRRT brain PET scanner. These data were subsampled to create many independent, low-count replicates. The data were reconstructed and the images from low-count data were compared to the high-count originals (from the same reconstruction method). This comparison enabled low-statistics bias to be calculated for the given reconstruction, as a function of the noise-equivalent counts (NEC). Two iterative reconstruction methods were tested, one with and one without an image-based resolution model (RM). Significant bias was observed when reconstructing data of low statistical quality, for both subsampled human and simulated data. For human data, this bias was substantially reduced by including a RM. For [{sup 11}C]DASB the low-statistics bias in the caudate head at 1.7 M NEC (approx. 30 s) was -5.5% and -13% with and without RM, respectively. We predicted biases in the binding potential of -4% and -10%. For quantification of cerebral blood flow for the whole-brain grey- or white-matter, using [{sup 15}O]H{sub 2}O and the PET autoradiographic method, a low-statistics bias of <2.5% and <4% was predicted for reconstruction with and without the RM. The use of a resolution model reduces low-statistics bias and can hence be beneficial for quantitative dynamic PET.

  5. Low latency network and distributed storage for next generation HPC systems: the ExaNeSt project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammendola, R.; Biagioni, A.; Cretaro, P.; Frezza, O.; Lo Cicero, F.; Lonardo, A.; Martinelli, M.; Paolucci, P. S.; Pastorelli, E.; Pisani, F.; Simula, F.; Vicini, P.; Navaridas, J.; Chaix, F.; Chrysos, N.; Katevenis, M.; Papaeustathiou, V.

    2017-10-01

    With processor architecture evolution, the HPC market has undergone a paradigm shift. The adoption of low-cost, Linux-based clusters extended the reach of HPC from its roots in modelling and simulation of complex physical systems to a broader range of industries, from biotechnology, cloud computing, computer analytics and big data challenges to manufacturing sectors. In this perspective, the near future HPC systems can be envisioned as composed of millions of low-power computing cores, densely packed — meaning cooling by appropriate technology — with a tightly interconnected, low latency and high performance network and equipped with a distributed storage architecture. Each of these features — dense packing, distributed storage and high performance interconnect — represents a challenge, made all the harder by the need to solve them at the same time. These challenges lie as stumbling blocks along the road towards Exascale-class systems; the ExaNeSt project acknowledges them and tasks itself with investigating ways around them.

  6. Sparse/Low Rank Constrained Reconstruction for Dynamic PET Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingjian Yu

    Full Text Available In dynamic Positron Emission Tomography (PET, an estimate of the radio activity concentration is obtained from a series of frames of sinogram data taken at ranging in duration from 10 seconds to minutes under some criteria. So far, all the well-known reconstruction algorithms require known data statistical properties. It limits the speed of data acquisition, besides, it is unable to afford the separated information about the structure and the variation of shape and rate of metabolism which play a major role in improving the visualization of contrast for some requirement of the diagnosing in application. This paper presents a novel low rank-based activity map reconstruction scheme from emission sinograms of dynamic PET, termed as SLCR representing Sparse/Low Rank Constrained Reconstruction for Dynamic PET Imaging. In this method, the stationary background is formulated as a low rank component while variations between successive frames are abstracted to the sparse. The resulting nuclear norm and l1 norm related minimization problem can also be efficiently solved by many recently developed numerical methods. In this paper, the linearized alternating direction method is applied. The effectiveness of the proposed scheme is illustrated on three data sets.

  7. Accurate gamma and MeV-electron track reconstruction with an ultra-low diffusion Xenon/TMA TPC at 10 atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    González-Díaz, Diego; Borges, F.I.G.; Camargo, M.; Cárcel, S.; Cebrián, S.; Cervera, A.; Conde, C.A.N.; Dafni, T.; Díaz, J.; Esteve, R.; Fernandes, L.M.P.; Ferrario, P.; Ferreira, A.L.; Freitas, E.D.C.; Gehman, V.M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez-Cadenas, J.J.; Gutiérrez, R.M.; Hauptman, J.; Hernando Morata, J.A.; Herrera, D.C.; Irastorza, I.G.; Labarga, L.; Laing, A.; Liubarsky, I.; Lopez-March, N.; Lorca, D.; Losada, M.; Luzón, G.; Marí, A.; Martín-Albo, J.; Martínez-Lema, G.; Martínez, A.; Miller, T.; Monrabal, F.; Monserrate, M.; Monteiro, C.M.B.; Mora, F.J.; Moutinho, L.M.; Muñoz Vidal, J.; Nebot-Guinot, M.; Nygren, D.; Oliveira, C.A.B.; Pérez, J.; Pérez Aparicio, J.L.; Querol, M.; Renner, J.; Ripoll, L.; Rodríguez, J.; Santos, F.P.; dos Santos, J.M.F.; Serra, L.; Shuman, D.; Simón, A.; Sofka, C.; Sorel, M.; Toledo, J.F.; Torrent, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Veloso, J.F.C.A.; Villar, J.A.; Webb, R.; White, J.T.; Yahlali, N.; Azevedo, C.; Aznar, F.; Calvet, D.; Castel, J.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; García, J.A.; Giomataris, I.; Gómez, H.; Iguaz, F.J.; Lagraba, A.; Le Coguie, A.; Mols, J.P.; Şahin, Ö.; Rodríguez, A.; Ruiz-Choliz, E.; Segui, L.; Tomás, A.; Veenhof, R.

    2015-01-01

    We report the performance of a 10 atm Xenon/trimethylamine time projection chamber (TPC) for the detection of X-rays (30 keV) and gamma-rays (0.511-1.275 MeV) in conjunction with the accurate tracking of the associated electrons. When operated at such a high pressure and in 1%-admixtures, trimethylamine (TMA) endows Xenon with an extremely low electron diffusion (1.3 +-0.13 mm-sigma (longitudinal), 0.8 +-0.15 mm-sigma (transverse) along 1 m drift) besides forming a convenient Penning-Fluorescent mixture. The TPC, that houses 1.1 kg of gas in its active volume, operated continuously for 100 live-days in charge amplification mode. The readout was performed through the recently introduced microbulk Micromegas technology and the AFTER chip, providing a 3D voxelization of 8mm x 8mm x 1.2mm for approximately 10 cm/MeV-long electron tracks. This work was developed as part of the R&D program of the NEXT collaboration for future detector upgrades in the search of the 0bbnu decay in 136Xe, specifically those based ...

  8. Two-level modulation scheme to reduce latency for optical mobile fronthaul networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jiun-Yu; Chow, Chi-Wai; Yeh, Chien-Hung; Chang, Gee-Kung

    2016-10-31

    A system using optical two-level orthogonal-frequency-division-multiplexing (OFDM) - amplitude-shift-keying (ASK) modulation is proposed and demonstrated to reduce the processing latency for the optical mobile fronthaul networks. At the proposed remote-radio-head (RRH), the high data rate OFDM signal does not need to be processed, but is directly launched into a high speed photodiode (HSPD) and subsequently emitted by an antenna. Only a low bandwidth PD is needed to recover the low data rate ASK control signal. Hence, it is simple and provides low-latency. Furthermore, transporting the proposed system over the already deployed optical-distribution-networks (ODNs) of passive-optical-networks (PONs) is also demonstrated with 256 ODN split-ratios.

  9. Trigger tracking for the LHCb upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Dungs, K

    2014-01-01

    This poster presents a trigger system for the upgraded LHCb detector, scheduled to begin operation in 2020. The proposed trigger system is implemented entirely in software. We show that track reconstruction of a similar quality to that available in the offline algorithms can be performed on the full inelastic pp-collision rate. A track finding efficiency of 98.8% relative to offline can be achieved for good trigger tracks. The CPU time required for this reconstruction is less than 60% of the available budget.

  10. The CMS Modular Track Finder Boards, MTF6 and MTF7

    CERN Document Server

    Acosta, Darin Edward; Carnes, Andrew Mathew; Carver, Matthew Robert; Curry, David Alexander; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Madorsky, Alexander; Matveev, Mikhail; Padley, Paul; Rank, Douglas; Reeves, C; Scurlock, Bobby; Wang, S

    2013-01-01

    To satisfy these requirements, a new Sector Processor unit for muon track finding is being designed. This unit follows the micro-TCA standard recently adopted by CMS. It consists of three modules. The Core Logic module houses the large FPGA that contains the processing logic and multi-gigabit serial links for data exchange. The Optical module contains optical receivers and transmitters; it communicates with the Core Logic module via a custom backplane section. The Look-up Table module contains a large amount of low-latency memory that is us...

  11. Development of a modular and scalable sensor system for the gathering of position and orientation of moved objects; Entwicklung eines modularen und skalierbaren Sensorsystems zur Erfassung von Position und Orientierung bewegter Objekte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klingbeil, L.

    2006-02-15

    A modular and scalable sensor system for the estimation of position and orientation of moving objects has been developed and characterized. A sensor unit, which is mounted to the moving object, consists of acceleration -, angular rate - and magnetic field sensors for every spatial axis. Customized Kalman filter algorithms provide a robust and low latency reconstruction of the sensor's orientation. Additionally an ultrasound transducer network is used to measure the distance of a sensor unit with respect to several reference points in the room. This allows reconstruction of the absolute position using trilateration methods. The system is scalable with respect to the number of sensor units and the covered tracking volume. It is suitable for various applications for example the analysis of body movements or head tracking in augmented or virtual reality environments. (orig.)

  12. Development of a modular and scalable sensor system for the gathering of position and orientation of moved objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klingbeil, L.

    2006-02-01

    A modular and scalable sensor system for the estimation of position and orientation of moving objects has been developed and characterized. A sensor unit, which is mounted to the moving object, consists of acceleration -, angular rate - and magnetic field sensors for every spatial axis. Customized Kalman filter algorithms provide a robust and low latency reconstruction of the sensor's orientation. Additionally an ultrasound transducer network is used to measure the distance of a sensor unit with respect to several reference points in the room. This allows reconstruction of the absolute position using trilateration methods. The system is scalable with respect to the number of sensor units and the covered tracking volume. It is suitable for various applications for example the analysis of body movements or head tracking in augmented or virtual reality environments. (orig.)

  13. Parameterization-based tracking for the P2 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, Iurii

    2017-08-01

    The P2 experiment in Mainz aims to determine the weak mixing angle θW at low momentum transfer by measuring the parity-violating asymmetry of elastic electronproton scattering. In order to achieve the intended precision of Δ(sin2 θW)/sin2θW = 0:13% within the planned 10 000 hours of running the experiment has to operate at the rate of 1011 detected electrons per second. Although it is not required to measure the kinematic parameters of each individual electron, every attempt is made to achieve the highest possible throughput in the track reconstruction chain. In the present work a parameterization-based track reconstruction method is described. It is a variation of track following, where the results of the computation-heavy steps, namely the propagation of a track to the further detector plane, and the fitting, are pre-calculated, and expressed in terms of parametric analytic functions. This makes the algorithm extremely fast, and well-suited for an implementation on an FPGA. The method also takes implicitly into account the actual phase space distribution of the tracks already at the stage of candidate construction. Compared to a simple algorithm, that does not use such information, this allows reducing the combinatorial background by many orders of magnitude, down to O(1) background candidate per one signal track. The method is developed specifically for the P2 experiment in Mainz, and the presented implementation is tightly coupled to the experimental conditions.

  14. An innovative seeding technique for photon conversion reconstruction at CMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giordano, D; Sguazzoni, G

    2012-01-01

    The conversion of photons into electron-positron pairs in the detector material is a nuisance in the event reconstruction of high energy physics experiments, since the measurement of the electromagnetic component of interaction products results degraded. Nonetheless this unavoidable detector effect can also be extremely useful. The reconstruction of photon conversions can be used to probe the detector material and to accurately measure soft photons that come from radiative decays in heavy flavor physics. In fact a converted photon can be measured with very high momentum resolution by exploiting the excellent reconstruction of charged tracks of a tracking detector as the one of CMS at LHC. The main issue is that photon conversion tracks are difficult to reconstruct for standard reconstruction algorithms. They are typically soft and very displaced from the primary interaction vertex. An innovative seeding technique that exploits the peculiar photon conversion topology, successfully applied in the CMS track reconstruction sequence, is presented. The performances of this technique and the substantial enhancement of photon conversion reconstruction efficiency are discussed. Application examples are given.

  15. 3D-LIN: A Configurable Low-Latency Interconnect for Multi-Core Clusters with 3D Stacked L1 Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Beanato, Giulia; Loi, Igor; De Micheli, Giovanni; Leblebici, Yusuf; Benini, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Shared L1 memories are of interest for tightly- coupled processor clusters in programmable accelerators as they provide a convenient shared memory abstraction while avoiding cache coherence overheads. The performance of a shared-L1 memory critically depends on the architecture of the low-latency interconnect between processors and memory banks, which needs to provide ultra-fast access to the largest possible L1 working set. The advent of 3D technology provides new opportunities to improve the...

  16. CATS, a low pressure multiwire proportional chamber for secondary beam tracking at GANIL

    CERN Document Server

    Ottini-Hustache, S; Auger, F; Musumarra, A; Alamanos, N; Cahan, B; Gillibert, A; Lagoyannis, A; Maillard, O; Pollacco, E; Sida, J L; Riallot, M

    1999-01-01

    A beam detector system, CATS (Chambre A Trajectoires de Saclay), was designed to provide event-by-event particle tracking in experiments with radioactive beams at GANIL. It consists of two low pressure multiwire proportional chambers with one plane of anode wires placed between two cathode planes (active area: 70x70 mm sup 2), respectively segmented into 28 vertical or horizontal strips (2.54 mm wide). The anode wires deliver a time signal allowing a time of flight measurement with an accuracy between 440 ps and 1.2 ns, depending on the energy loss of incident particles in the detector. The cathode strips are individually read out and the position of incoming particles is reconstructed using a charge centroid finding algorithm. A spatial resolution of 400 mu m (700 mu m) was achieved during in beam experiment, with a counting rate of 1.5x10 sup 5 (10 sup 6) particles per second. (author)

  17. FPGA helix tracking algorithm for PANDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Yutie; Galuska, Martin; Gessler, Thomas; Kuehn, Wolfgang; Lange, Jens Soeren; Muenchow, David; Spruck, Bjoern [II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen University (Germany); Ye, Hua [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Collaboration: PANDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The PANDA detector is a general-purpose detector for physics with high luminosity cooled antiproton beams, planed to operate at the FAIR facility in Darmstadt, Germany. The central detector includes a silicon Micro Vertex Detector (MVD) and a Straw Tube Tracker (STT). Without any hardware trigger, large amounts of raw data are streaming into the data acquisition system. The data reduction task is performed in the online system by reconstruction algorithms programmed on FPGAs (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) as first level and on a farm of GPUs or PCs as a second level. One important part in the system is the online track reconstruction. In this presentation, an online tracking algorithm for helix tracking reconstruction in the solenoidal field is shown. The tracking algorithm is composed by two parts, a road finding module followed by an iterative helix parameter calculation module. A performance study using C++ and the status of the VHDL implementation are presented.

  18. Reconstruction of data in low-mass magnetostrictive chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daley, H.M.

    1983-01-01

    The reconstruction of spark positions in a set of low-mass spark chambers with remote magnetostrictive readout, used in a study of the reaction π - p → K 0 Λ, is described. The main detectors used were optical spark chambers but in order to provide information close to the vertices low-mass magnetostrictive chambers were fitted inside the cone of the superconducting polarised target magnet. (U.K.)

  19. FTK: a Fast Track Trigger for ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J; Auerbach, B; Blair, R; Andreani, A; Andreazza, A; Citterio, M; Annovi, A; Beretta, M; Castegnaro, A; Atkinson, M; Cavaliere, V; Chang, P; Bevacqua, V; Crescioli, F; Blazey, G; Bogdan, M; Boveia, A; Canelli, F; Cheng, Y; Cervigni, F

    2012-01-01

    We describe the design and expected performance of a the Fast Tracker Trigger (FTK) system for the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The FTK is a highly parallel hardware system designed to operate at the Level 1 trigger output rate. It is designed to provide global tracks reconstructed in the inner detector with resolution comparable to the full offline reconstruction as input of the Level 2 trigger processing. The hardware system is based on associative memories for pattern recognition and fast FPGAs for track reconstruction. The FTK is expected to dramatically improve the performance of track based isolation and b-tagging with little to no dependencies of pile-up interactions.

  20. Track-based improvement in the jet transverse momentum resolution for ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, Z; Schwartzmann, A

    2011-01-01

    We present a track-based method for improving the jet momentum resolution in ATLAS. Information is added to the reconstructed jet after the standard jet energy scale corrections have been applied. Track-based corrections are implemented, and a 10 − 15% improvement in the jet transverse momentum resolution at low pT is achieved. The method is explained, and some validation and physics results are presented. Additional variables are described and analyzed for their resolution improvement potential.

  1. A simultaneous localization and tracking method for a worm tracking system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalski Mateusz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The idea of worm tracking refers to the path analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes and is an important tool in neurobiology which helps to describe their behavior. Knowledge about nematode behavior can be applied as a model to study the physiological addiction process or other nervous system processes in animals and humans. Tracking is performed by using a special manipulator positioning a microscope with a camera over a dish with an observed individual. In the paper, the accuracy of a nematode’s trajectory reconstruction is investigated. Special attention is paid to analyzing errors that occurred during the microscope displacements. Two sources of errors in the trajectory reconstruction are shown. One is due to the difficulty in accurately measuring the microscope shift, the other is due to a nematode displacement during the microscope movement. A new method that increases path reconstruction accuracy based only on the registered sequence of images is proposed. The method Simultaneously Localizes And Tracks (SLAT the nematodes, and is robust to the positioning system displacement errors. The proposed method predicts the nematode position by using NonParametric Regression (NPR. In addition, two other methods of the SLAT problem are implemented to evaluate the NPR method. The first consists in ignoring the nematode displacement during microscope movement, and the second is based on a Kalman filter. The results suggest that the SLAT method based on nonparametric regression gives the most promising results and decreases the error of trajectory reconstruction by 25% compared with reconstruction based on data from the positioning system

  2. TH-AB-202-05: BEST IN PHYSICS (JOINT IMAGING-THERAPY): First Online Ultrasound-Guided MLC Tracking for Real-Time Motion Compensation in Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ipsen, S; Bruder, R; Schweikard, A [University of Luebeck, Luebeck, DE (United States); O’Brien, R; Keall, P [University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Poulsen, P [Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: While MLC tracking has been successfully used for motion compensation of moving targets, current real-time target localization methods rely on correlation models with x-ray imaging or implanted electromagnetic transponders rather than direct target visualization. In contrast, ultrasound imaging yields volumetric data in real-time (4D) without ionizing radiation. We report the first results of online 4D ultrasound-guided MLC tracking in a phantom. Methods: A real-time tracking framework was installed on a 4D ultrasound station (Vivid7 dimension, GE) and used to detect a 2mm spherical lead marker inside a water tank. The volumetric frame rate was 21.3Hz (47ms). The marker was rigidly attached to a motion stage programmed to reproduce nine tumor trajectories (five prostate, four lung). The 3D marker position from ultrasound was used for real-time MLC aperture adaption. The tracking system latency was measured and compensated by prediction for lung trajectories. To measure geometric accuracy, anterior and lateral conformal fields with 10cm circular aperture were delivered for each trajectory. The tracking error was measured as the difference between marker position and MLC aperture in continuous portal imaging. For dosimetric evaluation, 358° VMAT fields were delivered to a biplanar diode array dosimeter using the same trajectories. Dose measurements with and without MLC tracking were compared to a static reference dose using a 3%/3 mm γ-test. Results: The tracking system latency was 170ms. The mean root-mean-square tracking error was 1.01mm (0.75mm prostate, 1.33mm lung). Tracking reduced the mean γ-failure rate from 13.9% to 4.6% for prostate and from 21.8% to 0.6% for lung with high-modulation VMAT plans and from 5% (prostate) and 18% (lung) to 0% with low modulation. Conclusion: Real-time ultrasound tracking was successfully integrated with MLC tracking for the first time and showed similar accuracy and latency as other methods while holding the

  3. Mobile Robot Positioning by using Low-Cost Visual Tracking System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruangpayoongsak Niramon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an application of visual tracking system on mobile robot positioning. The proposed method is verified on a constructed low-cost tracking system consisting of 2 DOF pan-tilt unit, web camera and distance sensor. The motion of pan-tilt joints is realized and controlled by using LQR controller running on microcontroller. Without needs of camera calibration, robot trajectory is tracked by Kalman filter integrating distance information and joint positions. The experimental results demonstrate validity of the proposed positioning technique and the obtained mobile robot trajectory is benchmarked against laser rangefinder positioning. The implemented system can successfully track a mobile robot driving at 14 cm/s.

  4. The Silicon Tracking System of the CBM Experiment at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuser, Johann M.

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR will conduct a systematic research program to explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at highest net baryon densities and moderate temperatures. These conditions are to be created in collisions of heavy-ion beams with nuclear targets in the projectile beam energy range of 2 to 45 GeV/nucleon, initially coming from the SIS 100 synchrotron (up to 14 GeV/nucleon) and in a next step from SIS 300 enabling studies at the highest net baryon densities. Collision rates up to 107 per second are required to produce very rare probes with unprecedented statistics in this energy range. Their signatures are complex. These conditions call for detector systems designed to meet the extreme requirements in terms of rate capability, momentum and spatial resolution, and a novel data acquisition and trigger concept which is not limited by latency but by throughput. In the paper we describe the concept and development status of CBM's central detector, the Silicon Tracking System (STS). The detector realizes a large, highly granular and redundant detector system with fast read-out, and lays specific emphasis on low material budget in its physics aperture to achieve for charged particle tracks a momentum resolution of δp/p ≈ 1% at p > 1 GeV/c, at >95% track reconstruction efficiency. The detector employs 1220 highly segmented double-sided silicon micro-strip sensors of 300 µm thickness, mounted into 896 modular structures of various types that are aggregated on 106 low-mass carbon fiber ladders of different sizes that build up the tracking stations. The read-out electronics with its supply and cooling infrastructure is arranged at the periphery of the ladders, and provides a total channel count of 1.8 million. The signal transmission from the silicon sensors to the electronics is realized through ultra-thin multi-line aluminum-polyimide cables of up to half a meter length. The electronics generates a free

  5. The silicon tracking system of the CBM experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuser, Johann M.

    2015-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR will conduct a systematic research program to explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at highest net baryon densities and moderate temperatures. These conditions are to be created in collisions of heavy-ion beams with nuclear targets in the projectile beam energy range of 2 to 45 GeV/nucleon, initially coming from the SIS 100 synchrotron (up to 14 GeV/nucleon) and in a next step from SIS 300 enabling studies at the highest net baryon densities. Collision rates up to 10"7 per second are required to produce very rare probes with unprecedented statistics in this energy range. Their signatures are complex. These conditions call for detector systems designed to meet the extreme requirements in terms of rate capability, momentum and spatial resolution, and a novel data acquisition and trigger concept which is not limited by latency but by throughput. In the paper we describe the concept and development status of CBM's central detector, the Silicon Tracking System (STS). The detector realizes a large, highly granular and redundant detector system with fast read-out, and lays specific emphasis on low material budget in its physics aperture to achieve for charged particle tracks a momentum resolution of δp/p≈1% at p > 1 GeV/c, at >95% track reconstruction efficiency. The detector employs 1220 highly segmented double-sided silicon micro-strip sensors of 300 μm thickness, mounted into 896 modular structures of various types that are aggregated on 106 low-mass carbon fiber ladders of different sizes that build up the tracking stations. The read-out electronics with its supply and cooling infrastructure is arranged at the periphery of the ladders, and provides a total channel count of 1.8 million. The signal transmission from the silicon sensors to the electronics is realized through ultra-thin multi-line aluminum-polyimide cables of up to half a meter length. The electronics generates a free

  6. Performance of 3DOSEM and MAP algorithms for reconstructing low count SPECT acquisitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grootjans, Willem [Radboud Univ. Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Leiden Univ. Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology; Meeuwis, Antoi P.W.; Gotthardt, Martin; Visser, Eric P. [Radboud Univ. Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Slump, Cornelis H. [Univ. Twente, Enschede (Netherlands). MIRA Inst. for Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine; Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee de [Radboud Univ. Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Univ. Twente, Enschede (Netherlands). MIRA Inst. for Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine; Leiden Univ. Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology

    2016-07-01

    Low count single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is becoming more important in view of whole body SPECT and reduction of radiation dose. In this study, we investigated the performance of several 3D ordered subset expectation maximization (3DOSEM) and maximum a posteriori (MAP) algorithms for reconstructing low count SPECT images. Phantom experiments were conducted using the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU2 image quality (IQ) phantom. The background compartment of the phantom was filled with varying concentrations of pertechnetate and indiumchloride, simulating various clinical imaging conditions. Images were acquired using a hybrid SPECT/CT scanner and reconstructed with 3DOSEM and MAP reconstruction algorithms implemented in Siemens Syngo MI.SPECT (Flash3D) and Hermes Hybrid Recon Oncology (Hyrid Recon 3DOSEM and MAP). Image analysis was performed by calculating the contrast recovery coefficient (CRC),percentage background variability (N%), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), defined as the ratio between CRC and N%. Furthermore, image distortion is characterized by calculating the aspect ratio (AR) of ellipses fitted to the hot spheres. Additionally, the performance of these algorithms to reconstruct clinical images was investigated. Images reconstructed with 3DOSEM algorithms demonstrated superior image quality in terms of contrast and resolution recovery when compared to images reconstructed with filtered-back-projection (FBP), OSEM and 2DOSEM. However, occurrence of correlated noise patterns and image distortions significantly deteriorated the quality of 3DOSEM reconstructed images. The mean AR for the 37, 28, 22, and 17 mm spheres was 1.3, 1.3, 1.6, and 1.7 respectively. The mean N% increase in high and low count Flash3D and Hybrid Recon 3DOSEM from 5.9% and 4.0% to 11.1% and 9.0%, respectively. Similarly, the mean CNR decreased in high and low count Flash3D and Hybrid Recon 3DOSEM from 8.7 and 8.8 to 3.6 and 4

  7. CT Image Reconstruction in a Low Dimensional Manifold

    OpenAIRE

    Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge; Yang, Qingsong; Hsieh, Jiang; Li, Jia; Lai, Rongjie

    2017-01-01

    Regularization methods are commonly used in X-ray CT image reconstruction. Different regularization methods reflect the characterization of different prior knowledge of images. In a recent work, a new regularization method called a low-dimensional manifold model (LDMM) is investigated to characterize the low-dimensional patch manifold structure of natural images, where the manifold dimensionality characterizes structural information of an image. In this paper, we propose a CT image reconstruc...

  8. Remote tracking of a magnetic receiver using low frequency beacons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheinker, Arie; Ginzburg, Boris; Salomonski, Nizan; Frumkis, Lev; Kaplan, Ben-Zion

    2014-01-01

    Low frequency magnetic fields feature high penetration ability, which allows communication, localization, and tracking in environments where radio or acoustic waves are blocked or distorted by multipath interferences. In the present work, we propose a method for tracking a magnetic receiver using beacons of low frequency magnetic field, where the receiver includes a tri-axial search-coil magnetometer. Measuring the beacons’ magnetic fields and calculating the total-field signals enables localization without restrictions on magnetometer orientation, allowing on-the-move tracking. The total-field signals are used by a global search method, e.g., simulated annealing (SA) algorithm, to localize the receiver. The magnetic field produced by each beacon has a dipole structure and is governed by the beacon’s position and magnetic moment. We have investigated two different methods for estimating beacons’ magnetic moments prior to localization. The first method requires directional measurements, whereas for the second method the total-field signal is used. Effectiveness of these methods has been proved in numerous field tests. In the present work, we introduce a method for tracking a moving receiver by successive localizations. Using previous localization as a starting point of the search method for the next localization can reduce execution time and chances for divergence. The proposed method has been tested using numerous computer simulations. Successful system operation has been verified in field conditions. The good tracking capability together with simple implementation makes the proposed method attractive for real-time, low power field applications, such as mobile robots navigation. (paper)

  9. Recovering task fMRI signals from highly under-sampled data with low-rank and temporal subspace constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiew, Mark; Graedel, Nadine N; Miller, Karla L

    2018-07-01

    Recent developments in highly accelerated fMRI data acquisition have employed low-rank and/or sparsity constraints for image reconstruction, as an alternative to conventional, time-independent parallel imaging. When under-sampling factors are high or the signals of interest are low-variance, however, functional data recovery can be poor or incomplete. We introduce a method for improving reconstruction fidelity using external constraints, like an experimental design matrix, to partially orient the estimated fMRI temporal subspace. Combining these external constraints with low-rank constraints introduces a new image reconstruction model that is analogous to using a mixture of subspace-decomposition (PCA/ICA) and regression (GLM) models in fMRI analysis. We show that this approach improves fMRI reconstruction quality in simulations and experimental data, focusing on the model problem of detecting subtle 1-s latency shifts between brain regions in a block-design task-fMRI experiment. Successful latency discrimination is shown at acceleration factors up to R = 16 in a radial-Cartesian acquisition. We show that this approach works with approximate, or not perfectly informative constraints, where the derived benefit is commensurate with the information content contained in the constraints. The proposed method extends low-rank approximation methods for under-sampled fMRI data acquisition by leveraging knowledge of expected task-based variance in the data, enabling improvements in the speed and efficiency of fMRI data acquisition without the loss of subtle features. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Electronics for CMS Endcap Muon Level-1 Trigger System Phase-1 and HL LHC Upgrades Summary

    CERN Document Server

    Madorsky, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    To accommodate high-luminosity LHC operation at 13 TeV collision energy, the CMS Endcap Muon Level-1 Trigger system had to be significantly modified. To provide the best track reconstruction, the trigger system must now import all available trigger primitives generated by Cathode Strip Chambers and by certain other subsystems, such as Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC). In addition to massive input bandwidth, this also required significant increase in logic and memory resources.To satisfy these requirements, a new Sector Processor unit has been designed. It consists of three modules. The Core Logic module houses the large FPGA that contains the track-finding logic and multi-gigabit serial links for data exchange. The Optical module contains optical receivers and transmitters; it communicates with the Core Logic module via a custom backplane section. The Pt Lookup Table (PTLUT) module contains 1 GB of low-latency memory that is used to assign the final Pt to reconstructed muon tracks. The µTCA architecture (ado...

  11. Vertex Reconstruction in ATLAS Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Matt; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Vertex reconstruction is the process of taking reconstructed tracks and using them to determine the locations of proton collisions. In this poster we present the performance of our current vertex reconstruction algorithm, and look at investigations into potential improvements from a new seed finding method.

  12. Identification and tracking of low energy spectator protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mussgiller, A.

    2007-07-20

    The present theses discusses the development, technical design and realization as well as the read-out electronics of a detection system for the identification and tracking of low energy spectator protons. With the knowledge of the four-momentum of such spectator protons it will be possible to use deuterium as an effective neutron target. Previous measurements with an early version of the detection system have already shown that this method works quite well to investigate for instance the {omega} or {eta}-meson production in proton-neutron collisions. Moreover, after the completion and installation of the polarized internal target (PIT) at ANKE, it will be even possible to engage in that field with double polarized experiments. To increase the luminosity the polarized target is equipped with an extended target cell. The described detection-system will provide the vertex reconstruction for this extended interaction region. In addition, it will act as an independent beam polarimeter at ANKE. The detection system consists of three layers of double-sided silicon strip detectors which are arranged in a telescope structure and placed inside the accelerator vacuum as close as 2 cm to the interaction region. The modular design of the electronics and the support structures for the detectors allows one to exchange detectors and electronics in a maximum flexible way. In a minimum configuration the telescope is equipped with two detectors, a thin ({approx} 69 {mu}m) double-sided Silicon strip detector as a first layer and a very thick ({>=} 5 mm) double-sided micro-structured Lithium-drifted Silicon detector as a second layer. With this arrangement it is possible to track and identify protons in a kinetic energy range from 2.5 MeV to 25 MeV. For deuterons this range for such a telescope configuration is from 4 MeV to 34 MeV. The performance concerning the energy determination and tracking is shown based on data taken during a beam-time in November of 2003. With the existing

  13. Identification and tracking of low energy spectator protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mussgiller, A.

    2007-01-01

    The present theses discusses the development, technical design and realization as well as the read-out electronics of a detection system for the identification and tracking of low energy spectator protons. With the knowledge of the four-momentum of such spectator protons it will be possible to use deuterium as an effective neutron target. Previous measurements with an early version of the detection system have already shown that this method works quite well to investigate for instance the ω or η-meson production in proton-neutron collisions. Moreover, after the completion and installation of the polarized internal target (PIT) at ANKE, it will be even possible to engage in that field with double polarized experiments. To increase the luminosity the polarized target is equipped with an extended target cell. The described detection-system will provide the vertex reconstruction for this extended interaction region. In addition, it will act as an independent beam polarimeter at ANKE. The detection system consists of three layers of double-sided silicon strip detectors which are arranged in a telescope structure and placed inside the accelerator vacuum as close as 2 cm to the interaction region. The modular design of the electronics and the support structures for the detectors allows one to exchange detectors and electronics in a maximum flexible way. In a minimum configuration the telescope is equipped with two detectors, a thin (∼ 69 μm) double-sided Silicon strip detector as a first layer and a very thick (≥ 5 mm) double-sided micro-structured Lithium-drifted Silicon detector as a second layer. With this arrangement it is possible to track and identify protons in a kinetic energy range from 2.5 MeV to 25 MeV. For deuterons this range for such a telescope configuration is from 4 MeV to 34 MeV. The performance concerning the energy determination and tracking is shown based on data taken during a beam-time in November of 2003. With the existing setup an energy

  14. Electromagnetic guided couch and multileaf collimator tracking on a TrueBeam accelerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rune; Ravkilde, Thomas; Worm, Esben Schjødt

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Couch and MLC tracking are two promising methods for real-time motion compensation during radiation therapy. So far, couch and MLC tracking experiments have mainly been performed by different research groups, and no direct comparison of couch and MLC tracking of volumetric modulated arc...... to characterize the geometric and dosimetric performance of electromagnetic guided couch and MLC tracking on a TrueBeam accelerator equipped with a Millennium MLC. The tracking system latency was determined without motion prediction as the time lag between sinusoidal target motion and the compensating motion...

  15. Improved magnetic resonance fingerprinting reconstruction with low-rank and subspace modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Setsompop, Kawin; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Gagoski, Borjan; Ye, Huihui; Ma, Dan; Jiang, Yun; Ellen Grant, P; Griswold, Mark A; Wald, Lawrence L

    2018-02-01

    This article introduces a constrained imaging method based on low-rank and subspace modeling to improve the accuracy and speed of MR fingerprinting (MRF). A new model-based imaging method is developed for MRF to reconstruct high-quality time-series images and accurate tissue parameter maps (e.g., T 1 , T 2 , and spin density maps). Specifically, the proposed method exploits low-rank approximations of MRF time-series images, and further enforces temporal subspace constraints to capture magnetization dynamics. This allows the time-series image reconstruction problem to be formulated as a simple linear least-squares problem, which enables efficient computation. After image reconstruction, tissue parameter maps are estimated via dictionary-based pattern matching, as in the conventional approach. The effectiveness of the proposed method was evaluated with in vivo experiments. Compared with the conventional MRF reconstruction, the proposed method reconstructs time-series images with significantly reduced aliasing artifacts and noise contamination. Although the conventional approach exhibits some robustness to these corruptions, the improved time-series image reconstruction in turn provides more accurate tissue parameter maps. The improvement is pronounced especially when the acquisition time becomes short. The proposed method significantly improves the accuracy of MRF, and also reduces data acquisition time. Magn Reson Med 79:933-942, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  16. The Retina Algorithm

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; PUNZI, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Charge particle reconstruction is one of the most demanding computational tasks found in HEP, and it becomes increasingly important to perform it in real time. We envision that HEP would greatly benefit from achieving a long-term goal of making track reconstruction happen transparently as part of the detector readout ("detector-embedded tracking"). We describe here a track-reconstruction approach based on a massively parallel pattern-recognition algorithm, inspired by studies of the processing of visual images by the brain as it happens in nature ('RETINA algorithm'). It turns out that high-quality tracking in large HEP detectors is possible with very small latencies, when this algorithm is implemented in specialized processors, based on current state-of-the-art, high-speed/high-bandwidth digital devices.

  17. LHCb Run II tracking performance and prospects for the Upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb tracking system consists of a Vertex Locator around the interaction point, a tracking station with four layers of silicon strip detectors in front of the magnet, and three tracking stations, using either straw-tubes or silicon strip detectors, behind the magnet. This system allows to reconstruct charged particles with a high efficiency (typically > 95% for particles with momentum > 5 GeV) and an excellent momentum resolution (0.5% for particles with momentum < 20 GeV). The high momentum resolution results in very narrow mass peaks, leading to a very good signal-to-background ratio in such key channels as $B_s\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$. Furthermore an optimal decay time resolution is an essential element in the studies of time dependent CP violation. For Run II a novel reconstruction strategy was adopted, allowing to run the same track reconstruction in the software trigger as offline. This convergence was possible due to a staged approach in the track reconstruction and a large reduction in the processing tim...

  18. On artefact-free reconstruction of low-energy (30–250 eV) electron holograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana, E-mail: tatiana@physik.uzh.ch; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Escher, Conrad; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2014-10-15

    Low-energy electrons (30–250 eV) have been successfully employed for imaging individual biomolecules. The most simple and elegant design of a low-energy electron microscope for imaging biomolecules is a lensless setup that operates in the holographic mode. In this work we address the problem associated with the reconstruction from the recorded holograms. We discuss the twin image problem intrinsic to inline holography and the problem of the so-called biprism-like effect specific to low-energy electrons. We demonstrate how the presence of the biprism-like effect can be efficiently identified and circumvented. The presented sideband filtering reconstruction method eliminates the twin image and allows for reconstruction despite the biprism-like effect, which we demonstrate on both, simulated and experimental examples. - Highlights: • Radiation damage-free imaging of individual biomolecules. • Elimination of the twin image in inline holograms. • Circumventing biprism-like effect in low-energy electron holograms. • Artefact-free reconstructions of low-energy electron holograms.

  19. On artefact-free reconstruction of low-energy (30–250 eV) electron holograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Escher, Conrad; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2014-01-01

    Low-energy electrons (30–250 eV) have been successfully employed for imaging individual biomolecules. The most simple and elegant design of a low-energy electron microscope for imaging biomolecules is a lensless setup that operates in the holographic mode. In this work we address the problem associated with the reconstruction from the recorded holograms. We discuss the twin image problem intrinsic to inline holography and the problem of the so-called biprism-like effect specific to low-energy electrons. We demonstrate how the presence of the biprism-like effect can be efficiently identified and circumvented. The presented sideband filtering reconstruction method eliminates the twin image and allows for reconstruction despite the biprism-like effect, which we demonstrate on both, simulated and experimental examples. - Highlights: • Radiation damage-free imaging of individual biomolecules. • Elimination of the twin image in inline holograms. • Circumventing biprism-like effect in low-energy electron holograms. • Artefact-free reconstructions of low-energy electron holograms

  20. Design of a Low-cost Oil Spill Tracking Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y.; Hu, X.; Yu, F.; Dong, S.; Chen, G.

    2017-12-01

    As the rapid development of oil exploitation and transportation, oil spill accidents, such as Prestige oil spill, Gulf of Mexico oil spill accident and so on, happened frequently in recent years which would result in long-term damage to the environment and human life. It would be helpful for rescue operation if we can locate the oil slick diffusion area in real time. Equipped with GNSS system, current tracking buoys(CTB), such as Lagrangian drifting buoy, Surface Velocity Program (SVP) drifter, iSLDMB (Iridium self locating datum marker buoy) and Argosphere buoy, have been used as oil tracking buoy in oil slick observation and as validation tools for oil spill simulation. However, surface wind could affect the movement of oil slick, which couldn't be reflected by CTB, thus the oil spill tracking performance is limited. Here, we proposed an novel oil spill tracking buoy (OSTB) which has a low cost of less than $140 and is equipped with Beidou positioning module and sails to track oil slick. Based on hydrodynamic equilibrium model and ocean dynamic analysis, the wind sails and water sails are designed to be adjustable according to different marine conditions to improve tracking efficiency. Quick release device is designed to assure easy deployment from air or ship. Sea experiment was carried out in Jiaozhou Bay, Northern China. OSTB, SVP, iSLDMB, Argosphere buoy and a piece of oil-simulated rubber sheet were deployed at the same time. Meanwhile, oil spill simulation model GNOME (general NOAA operational modeling environment) was configured with the wind and current field, which were collected by an unmanned surface vehicle (USV) mounted with acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) and wind speed and direction sensors. Experimental results show that the OSTB has better relevance with rubber sheet and GNOME simulation results, which validate the oil tracking ability of OSTB. With low cost and easy deployment, OSTB provides an effective way for oil spill numerical

  1. Performance analysis of a cellular automation algorithm for the solution of the track reconstruction problem on a manycore server at LIT, JINR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulakov, I.S.; Baginyan, S.A.; Ivanov, V.V.; Kisel', P.I.

    2013-01-01

    The results of the tests for the tracks reconstruction efficiency, the speed of the algorithm and its scalability with respect to the number of cores of the server with two Intel Xeon E5640 CPUs (in total 8 physical or 16 logical cores) are presented and discussed

  2. Reference Information Based Remote Sensing Image Reconstruction with Generalized Nonconvex Low-Rank Approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyang Lu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Because of the contradiction between the spatial and temporal resolution of remote sensing images (RSI and quality loss in the process of acquisition, it is of great significance to reconstruct RSI in remote sensing applications. Recent studies have demonstrated that reference image-based reconstruction methods have great potential for higher reconstruction performance, while lacking accuracy and quality of reconstruction. For this application, a new compressed sensing objective function incorporating a reference image as prior information is developed. We resort to the reference prior information inherent in interior and exterior data simultaneously to build a new generalized nonconvex low-rank approximation framework for RSI reconstruction. Specifically, the innovation of this paper consists of the following three respects: (1 we propose a nonconvex low-rank approximation for reconstructing RSI; (2 we inject reference prior information to overcome over smoothed edges and texture detail losses; (3 on this basis, we combine conjugate gradient algorithms and a single-value threshold (SVT simultaneously to solve the proposed algorithm. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm improves several dBs in terms of peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR and preserves image details significantly compared to most of the current approaches without reference images as priors. In addition, the generalized nonconvex low-rank approximation of our approach is naturally robust to noise, and therefore, the proposed algorithm can handle low resolution with noisy inputs in a more unified framework.

  3. Technical Note: Motion-perturbation method applied to dosimetry of dynamic MLC target tracking—A proof-of-concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feygelman, Vladimir, E-mail: vladimir.feygelman@moffitt.org; Tonner, Brian; Hunt, Dylan; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Stambaugh, Cassandra [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Nelms, Benjamin E. [Canis Lupus LLC, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Previous studies show that dose to a moving target can be estimated using 4D measurement-guided dose reconstruction based on a process called virtual motion simulation, or VMS. A potential extension of VMS is to estimate dose during dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC)-tracking treatments. The authors introduce a modified VMS method and quantify its performance as proof-of-concept for tracking applications. Methods: Direct measurements with a moving biplanar diode array were used to verify accuracy of the VMS dose estimates. A tracking environment for variably sized circular MLC apertures was simulated by sending preprogrammed control points to the MLC while simultaneously moving the accelerator treatment table. Sensitivity of the method to simulated tracking latency (0–700 ms) was also studied. Potential applicability of VMS to fast changing beam apertures was evaluated by modeling, based on the demonstrated dependence of the cumulative dose on the temporal dose gradient. Results: When physical and virtual latencies were matched, the agreement rates (2% global/2 mm gamma) between the VMS and the biplanar dosimeter were above 96%. When compared to their own reference dose (0 induced latency), the agreement rates for VMS and biplanar array track closely up to 200 ms of induced latency with 10% low-dose cutoff threshold and 300 ms with 50% cutoff. Time-resolved measurements suggest that even in the modulated beams, the error in the cumulative dose introduced by the 200 ms VMS time resolution is not likely to exceed 0.5%. Conclusions: Based on current results and prior benchmarks of VMS accuracy, the authors postulate that this approach should be applicable to any MLC-tracking treatments where leaf speeds do not exceed those of the current Varian accelerators.

  4. Technical Note: Motion-perturbation method applied to dosimetry of dynamic MLC target tracking—A proof-of-concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feygelman, Vladimir; Tonner, Brian; Hunt, Dylan; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Stambaugh, Cassandra; Nelms, Benjamin E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Previous studies show that dose to a moving target can be estimated using 4D measurement-guided dose reconstruction based on a process called virtual motion simulation, or VMS. A potential extension of VMS is to estimate dose during dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC)-tracking treatments. The authors introduce a modified VMS method and quantify its performance as proof-of-concept for tracking applications. Methods: Direct measurements with a moving biplanar diode array were used to verify accuracy of the VMS dose estimates. A tracking environment for variably sized circular MLC apertures was simulated by sending preprogrammed control points to the MLC while simultaneously moving the accelerator treatment table. Sensitivity of the method to simulated tracking latency (0–700 ms) was also studied. Potential applicability of VMS to fast changing beam apertures was evaluated by modeling, based on the demonstrated dependence of the cumulative dose on the temporal dose gradient. Results: When physical and virtual latencies were matched, the agreement rates (2% global/2 mm gamma) between the VMS and the biplanar dosimeter were above 96%. When compared to their own reference dose (0 induced latency), the agreement rates for VMS and biplanar array track closely up to 200 ms of induced latency with 10% low-dose cutoff threshold and 300 ms with 50% cutoff. Time-resolved measurements suggest that even in the modulated beams, the error in the cumulative dose introduced by the 200 ms VMS time resolution is not likely to exceed 0.5%. Conclusions: Based on current results and prior benchmarks of VMS accuracy, the authors postulate that this approach should be applicable to any MLC-tracking treatments where leaf speeds do not exceed those of the current Varian accelerators

  5. Achieving Ultra-Reliable Low-Latency Communications: Challenges and Envisioned System Enhancements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pocovi Gerardino, Guillermo Andres; Shariatmadari, Hamidreza; Berardinelli, Gilberto

    2018-01-01

    URLLC have the potential to enable a new range of applications and services: from wireless control and automation in industrial environments to self-driving vehicles. 5G wireless systems are faced by different challenges for supporting URLLC. Some of the challenges, particularly in the downlink......-of-the-art solutions covering different aspects of the radio interface. In addition, system-level simulation results are presented, showing how the proposed techniques can work in harmony in order to fulfill the ambitious latency and reliability requirements of upcoming URLLC applications....

  6. Single-Photon Tracking for High-Speed Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istvan Gyongy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Quanta Imager Sensors provide photon detections at high frame rates, with negligible read-out noise, making them ideal for high-speed optical tracking. At the basic level of bit-planes or binary maps of photon detections, objects may present limited detail. However, through motion estimation and spatial reassignment of photon detections, the objects can be reconstructed with minimal motion artefacts. We here present the first demonstration of high-speed two-dimensional (2D tracking and reconstruction of rigid, planar objects with a Quanta Image Sensor, including a demonstration of depth-resolved tracking.

  7. CT colonography at low tube potential: using iterative reconstruction to decrease noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, K.J.; Heisler, M.A.; Mahesh, M.; Baird, G.L.; Mayo-Smith, W.W.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To determine the level of iterative reconstruction required to reduce increased image noise associated with low tube potential computed tomography (CT). Materials and methods: Fifty patients underwent CT colonography with a supine scan at 120 kVp and a prone scan at 100 kVp with other scan parameters unchanged. Both scans were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and increasing levels of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) at 30%, 60%, and 90%. Mean noise, soft tissue and tagged fluid attenuation, contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were collected from reconstructions at both 120 and 100 kVp and compared using a generalised linear mixed model. Results: Decreasing tube potential from 120 to 100 kVp significantly increased image noise by 30–34% and tagged fluid attenuation by 120 HU at all ASiR levels (p<0.0001, all measures). Increasing ASiR from 0% (FBP) to 30%, 60%, and 90% resulted in significant decreases in noise and increases in CNR at both tube potentials (p<0.001, all comparisons). Compared to 120 kVp FBP, ASiR greater than 30% at 100 kVp yielded similar or lower image noise. Conclusions: Iterative reconstruction adequately compensates for increased image noise associated with low tube potential imaging while improving CNR. An ASiR level of approximately 50% at 100 kVp yields similar noise to 120 kVp without ASiR. -- Highlights: •Peak kilovoltage (kVp) can be reduced to decrease radiation dose and increase contrast attenuation at a cost of increased image noise. •Utilizing iterative reconstruction can decrease image noise and increase contrast to noise ratio (CNR) independent of kVp. •Iterative reconstruction adequately compensates for increased image noise associated with low dose low kVp imaging while improving CNR. •An ASiR level of approximately 50% at 100 kVp yields similar noise to 120 kVp without ASiR

  8. Online 4-dimensional event reconstruction in the CBM experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akishina, Valentina [Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Kisel, Ivan [Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The heavy-ion experiment CBM will focus on the measurement of rare probes at interaction rates up to 10 MHz with data flow of up to 1 TB/s. The free-running data acquisition, delivering a stream of untriggered detector data, requires full event reconstruction and selection to be performed online not only in space, but also in time. The First-Level Event Selection package consists of several modules: track finding, track fitting, short-lived particles finding, event building and event selection. For track reconstruction the Cellular Automaton (CA) method is used, which allows to reconstruct tracks with high efficiency in a time-slice and perform event building. The time-based CA track finder allows to resolve tracks from a time-slice in event-corresponding groups. The algorithm is intrinsically local and the implementation is both vectorized and parallelized between CPU cores. The CA track finder shows a strong scalability on many-core systems. The speed-up factor of 10.6 on a CPU with 10 hyper-threaded physical cores was achieved.

  9. Efficient Architectures for Low Latency and High Throughput Trading Systems on the JVM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru LIXANDRU

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The motivation for our research starts from the common belief that the Java platform is not suitable for implementing ultra-high performance applications. Java is one of the most widely used software development platform in the world, and it provides the means for rapid development of robust and complex applications that are easy to extend, ensuring short time-to-market of initial deliveries and throughout the lifetime of the system. The Java runtime environment, and especially the Java Virtual Machine, on top of which applications are executed, is the principal source of concerns in regards to its suitability in the electronic trading environment, mainly because of its implicit memory management. In this paper, we intend to identify some of the most common measures that can be taken, both at the Java runtime environment level and at the application architecture level, which can help Java applications achieve ultra-high performance. We also propose two efficient architectures for exchange trading systems that allow for ultra-low latencies and high throughput.

  10. Optical losses due to tracking error estimation for a low concentrating solar collector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sallaberry, Fabienne; García de Jalón, Alberto; Torres, José-Luis; Pujol-Nadal, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A solar thermal collector with low concentration and one-axis tracking was tested. • A quasi-dynamic testing procedure for IAM was defined for tracking collector. • The adequation between the concentrator optics and the tracking was checked. • The maximum and long-term optical losses due to tracking error were calculated. - Abstract: The determination of the accuracy of a solar tracker used in domestic hot water solar collectors is not yet standardized. However, while using optical concentration devices, it is important to use a solar tracker with adequate precision with regard to the specific optical concentration factor. Otherwise, the concentrator would sustain high optical losses due to the inadequate focusing of the solar radiation onto its receiver, despite having a good quality. This study is focused on the estimation of long-term optical losses due to the tracking error of a low-temperature collector using low-concentration optics. For this purpose, a testing procedure for the incidence angle modifier on the tracking plane is proposed to determinate the acceptance angle of its concentrator even with different longitudinal incidence angles along the focal line plane. Then, the impact of maximum tracking error angle upon the optical efficiency has been determined. Finally, the calculation of the long-term optical error due to the tracking errors, using the design angular tracking error declared by the manufacturer, is carried out. The maximum tracking error calculated for this collector imply an optical loss of about 8.5%, which is high, but the average long-term optical loss calculated for one year was about 1%, which is reasonable for such collectors used for domestic hot water

  11. Making tracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1986-10-15

    In many modern tracking chambers, the sense wires, rather than being lined up uniformly, are grouped into clusters to facilitate the pattern recognition process. However, with higher energy machines providing collisions richer in secondary particles, event reconstruction becomes more complicated. A Caltech / Illinois / SLAC / Washington group developed an ingenious track finding and fitting approach for the Mark III detector used at the SPEAR electron-positron ring at SLAC (Stanford). This capitalizes on the detector's triggering, which uses programmable logic circuits operating in parallel, each 'knowing' the cell patterns for all tracks passing through a specific portion of the tracker (drift chamber)

  12. Design and Analysis of a Low Latency Deterministic Network MAC for Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Prasan Kumar; Pattanaik, Sudhir Ranjan; Wu, Shih-Lin

    2017-09-22

    The IEEE 802.15.4e standard has four different superframe structures for different applications. Use of a low latency deterministic network (LLDN) superframe for the wireless sensor network is one of them, which can operate in a star topology. In this paper, a new channel access mechanism for IEEE 802.15.4e-based LLDN shared slots is proposed, and analytical models are designed based on this channel access mechanism. A prediction model is designed to estimate the possible number of retransmission slots based on the number of failed transmissions. Performance analysis in terms of data transmission reliability, delay, throughput and energy consumption are provided based on our proposed designs. Our designs are validated for simulation and analytical results, and it is observed that the simulation results well match with the analytical ones. Besides, our designs are compared with the IEEE 802.15.4 MAC mechanism, and it is shown that ours outperforms in terms of throughput, energy consumption, delay and reliability.

  13. Low Latency DESDynI Data Products for Disaster Response, Resource Management and Other Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubleday, Joshua R.; Chien, Steve A.; Lou, Yunling

    2011-01-01

    We are developing onboard processor technology targeted at the L-band SAR instrument onboard the planned DESDynI mission to enable formation of SAR images onboard opening possibilities for near-real-time data products to augment full data streams. Several image processing and/or interpretation techniques are being explored as possible direct-broadcast products for use by agencies in need of low-latency data, responsible for disaster mitigation and assessment, resource management, agricultural development, shipping, etc. Data collected through UAVSAR (L-band) serves as surrogate to the future DESDynI instrument. We have explored surface water extent as a tool for flooding response, and disturbance images on polarimetric backscatter of repeat pass imagery potentially useful for structural collapse (earthquake), mud/land/debris-slides etc. We have also explored building vegetation and snow/ice classifiers, via support vector machines utilizing quad-pol backscatter, cross-pol phase, and a number of derivatives (radar vegetation index, dielectric estimates, etc.). We share our qualitative and quantitative results thus far.

  14. Triggering with the ALICE TRD. Results and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Jochen; Pachmayer, Yvonne [Physikalisches Institut, University of Heidelberg (Germany); Westerhoff, Uwe [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Muenster (Germany); Collaboration: ALICE-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The ALICE Transition Radiation Detector provides multiple level-1 trigger contributions. The signatures are based on tracks which are reconstructed in an FPGA array from chamber-wise track segments. The latter are calculated on the detector-mounted frontend electronics. The massive parallelization allows for the low latency trigger 8 us after the interaction. We show the performance of the triggers on electrons and jets during LHC Run 1. Further, we discuss improvements and prospects for Run 2. In particular, an online calculation of the distance of closest approach to the primary vertex shall be used to reject the dominant background from the conversion of photons at large radii. The combination of tracks over stack and sector boundaries will help to improve the efficiency of the jet trigger.

  15. FPGA helix tracking algorithm for PANDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Yutie; Galuska, Martin; Gessler, Thomas; Hu, Jifeng; Kuehn, Wolfgang; Lange, Jens Soeren; Muenchow, David; Spruck, Bjoern [II. Physikalisches, Giessen University (Germany); Ye, Hua [II. Physikalisches, Giessen University (Germany); Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Collaboration: PANDA-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    The PANDA detector is a general-purpose detector for physics with high luminosity cooled antiproton beams, planed to operate at the FAIR facility in Darmstadt, Germany. The central detector includes a silicon Micro Vertex Detector (MVD) and a Straw Tube Tracker (STT). Without any hardware trigger, large amounts of raw data are streaming into the data acquisition system. The data reduction task is performed in the online system by reconstruction algorithms programmed in VHDL (Very High Speed Integrated Circuit Hardware Description Language) on FPGAs (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) as first level and on a farm of GPUs or PCs as a second level. One important part in the system is the online track reconstruction. In this presentation, an online tracking finding algorithm for helix track reconstruction in the solenoidal field is shown. A performance study using C++ and the status of the VHDL implementation are presented.

  16. Performance of ATLAS tracking detector

    CERN Document Server

    Lacuesta, V; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The track and vertex reconstruction algorithms of the ATLAS Inner Detector have demonstrated excellent performance in the early data from the LHC. However, the rapidly increas- ing number of interactions per bunch crossing introduces new challenges both in computational aspects and physics performance. The combination of both silicon and gas based detectors provides high precision impact parameter and momentum measurement of charged particles, with high efficiency and small fake rate. Vertex reconstruction is used to identify with high efficiency the hard scattering process and to measure the amount of pile-up interactions, both aspects are cru- cial for many physics analyses. The performance of track and vertex reconstruction efficiency and resolution achieved in the 2011 and 2012 data-taking period are presented.

  17. EBV Latency Types Adopt Alternative Chromatin Conformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempera, Italo; Klichinsky, Michael; Lieberman, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) can establish latent infections with distinct gene expression patterns referred to as latency types. These different latency types are epigenetically stable and correspond to different promoter utilization. Here we explore the three-dimensional conformations of the EBV genome in different latency types. We employed Chromosome Conformation Capture (3C) assay to investigate chromatin loop formation between the OriP enhancer and the promoters that determine type I (Qp) or type III (Cp) gene expression. We show that OriP is in close physical proximity to Qp in type I latency, and to Cp in type III latency. The cellular chromatin insulator and boundary factor CTCF was implicated in EBV chromatin loop formation. Combining 3C and ChIP assays we found that CTCF is physically associated with OriP-Qp loop formation in type I and OriP-Cp loop formation in type III latency. Mutations in the CTCF binding site located at Qp disrupt loop formation between Qp and OriP, and lead to the activation of Cp transcription. Mutation of the CTCF binding site at Cp, as well as siRNA depletion of CTCF eliminates both OriP-associated loops, indicating that CTCF plays an integral role in loop formation. These data indicate that epigenetically stable EBV latency types adopt distinct chromatin architectures that depend on CTCF and mediate alternative promoter targeting by the OriP enhancer. PMID:21829357

  18. EBV latency types adopt alternative chromatin conformations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Italo Tempera

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV can establish latent infections with distinct gene expression patterns referred to as latency types. These different latency types are epigenetically stable and correspond to different promoter utilization. Here we explore the three-dimensional conformations of the EBV genome in different latency types. We employed Chromosome Conformation Capture (3C assay to investigate chromatin loop formation between the OriP enhancer and the promoters that determine type I (Qp or type III (Cp gene expression. We show that OriP is in close physical proximity to Qp in type I latency, and to Cp in type III latency. The cellular chromatin insulator and boundary factor CTCF was implicated in EBV chromatin loop formation. Combining 3C and ChIP assays we found that CTCF is physically associated with OriP-Qp loop formation in type I and OriP-Cp loop formation in type III latency. Mutations in the CTCF binding site located at Qp disrupt loop formation between Qp and OriP, and lead to the activation of Cp transcription. Mutation of the CTCF binding site at Cp, as well as siRNA depletion of CTCF eliminates both OriP-associated loops, indicating that CTCF plays an integral role in loop formation. These data indicate that epigenetically stable EBV latency types adopt distinct chromatin architectures that depend on CTCF and mediate alternative promoter targeting by the OriP enhancer.

  19. The reconstruction of tracks with the drift tubes in the muon spektrometers of the neutrino experiment OPERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wonsak, B.S.

    2007-11-01

    In this thesis the reconstruction of tracks within the OPERA muon spectrometer is described as well as parts of the simulation software concerning the drift tubes. A method minimising the χ 2 of the tracks is used for the fit, which is supported by liklyhood considerations during the pattern recognition. An analytical description of the time to distance relation for the OPERA drift tubes is introduced to be used in the fit. For simulated events of cosmics a resolution of 410±4 μm and an efficiency of more that 93% has been acquired. For real cosmic data from the OPERA detector a resolution o 374±3 μm and an efficiency of up to 84% has been reached. The acquired angular resolution of 1,2 mrad is sufficient to achieve a momentum resolution of 25% up to momentums of 25 GeV. (orig.)

  20. Rein: Taming Tail Latency in Key-Value Stores via Multiget Scheduling

    KAUST Repository

    Reda, Waleed; Canini, Marco; Suresh, Lalith; Kostić, Dejan; Braithwaite, Sean

    2017-01-01

    the composition of aggregate requests and by carefully scheduling bottleneck operations that can otherwise create excessive queues. We design and implement a system called Rein, which reduces latency via inter-multiget scheduling using low overhead techniques. We

  1. LATENCY DETERMINATION AND COMPENSATION IN REAL-TIME GNSS/INS INTEGRATED NAVIGATION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D. Solomon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV technology is now commonplace in many defence and civilian environments. However, the high cost of owning and operating a sophisticated UAV has slowed their adoption in many commercial markets. Universities and research groups are actively experimenting with UAVs to further develop the technology, particularly for automated flying operations. The two main UAV platforms used are fixed-wing and helicopter. Helicopter-based UAVs offer many attractive features over fixed-wing UAVs, including vertical take-off, the ability to loiter, and highly dynamic flight. However the control and navigation of helicopters are significantly more demanding than those of fixed-wing UAVs and as such require a high bandwidth real-time Position, Velocity, Attitude (PVA navigation system. In practical Real-Time Navigation Systems (RTNS there are delays in the processing of the GNSS data prior to the fusion of the GNSS data with the INS measurements. This latency must be compensated for otherwise it degrades the solution of the navigation filter. This paper investigates the effect of latency in the arrival time of the GNSS data in a RTNS. Several test drives and flights were conducted with a low-cost RTNS, and compared with a high quality GNSS/INS solution. A technique for the real-time, automated and accurate estimation of the GNSS latency in low-cost systems was developed and tested. The latency estimates were then verified through cross-correlation with the time-stamped measurements from the reference system. A delayed measurement Extended Kalman Filter was then used to allow for the real-time fusing of the delayed measurements, and then a final system developed for on-the-fly measurement and compensation of GNSS latency in a RTNS.

  2. Latency Determination and Compensation in Real-Time Gnss/ins Integrated Navigation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, P. D.; Wang, J.; Rizos, C.

    2011-09-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) technology is now commonplace in many defence and civilian environments. However, the high cost of owning and operating a sophisticated UAV has slowed their adoption in many commercial markets. Universities and research groups are actively experimenting with UAVs to further develop the technology, particularly for automated flying operations. The two main UAV platforms used are fixed-wing and helicopter. Helicopter-based UAVs offer many attractive features over fixed-wing UAVs, including vertical take-off, the ability to loiter, and highly dynamic flight. However the control and navigation of helicopters are significantly more demanding than those of fixed-wing UAVs and as such require a high bandwidth real-time Position, Velocity, Attitude (PVA) navigation system. In practical Real-Time Navigation Systems (RTNS) there are delays in the processing of the GNSS data prior to the fusion of the GNSS data with the INS measurements. This latency must be compensated for otherwise it degrades the solution of the navigation filter. This paper investigates the effect of latency in the arrival time of the GNSS data in a RTNS. Several test drives and flights were conducted with a low-cost RTNS, and compared with a high quality GNSS/INS solution. A technique for the real-time, automated and accurate estimation of the GNSS latency in low-cost systems was developed and tested. The latency estimates were then verified through cross-correlation with the time-stamped measurements from the reference system. A delayed measurement Extended Kalman Filter was then used to allow for the real-time fusing of the delayed measurements, and then a final system developed for on-the-fly measurement and compensation of GNSS latency in a RTNS.

  3. Low frequency vibration tests on a floating slab track in an underground laboratory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-yun DING; Wei-ning LIU; Ke-fei LI; Xiao-jing SUN; Wei-feng LIU

    2011-01-01

    Low frequency vibrations induced by underground railways have attracted increasing attention in recent years. To obtain the characteristics of low frequency vibrations and the low frequency performance of a floating slab track (FST), low frequency vibration tests on an FST in an underground laboratory at Beijing Jiaotong University were carried out. The FST and an unbalanced shaker SBZ30 for dynamic simulation were designed for use in low frequency vibration experiments. Vibration measurements were performed on the bogie of the unbalanced shaker, the rail, the slab, the tunnel invert, the tunnel wall, the tunnel apex, and on the ground surface at distances varying from 0 to 80 m from the track. Measurements were also made on several floors of an adjacent building. Detailed results of low frequency vibration tests were reported. The attenuation of low frequency vibrations with the distance from the track was presented, as well as the responses of different floors of the building. The experimental results could be regarded as a reference for developing methods to control low frequency vibrations and for adopting countermeasures.

  4. CATS: a cellular automaton for tracking in silicon for the HERA-B vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abt, I.; Emeliyanov, D.; Kisel, I.; Masciocchi, S.

    2002-01-01

    The new track reconstruction program CATS developed for the Vertex Detector System of the HERA-B experiment at DESY is presented. It employs a cellular automaton for track searching and the Kalman filter for track fitting. This results in a very fast algorithm that combines highly efficient track recognition with accurate and reliable track parameter estimation. To reduce the computational cost of the fit an optimized numerical implementation of the Kalman filter is used. Alternative approaches to the track reconstruction in the VDS are also discussed. Since 1999, after extensive tests on simulated data, CATS has been employed to reconstruct experimental data collected in HERA-B. Results regarding tracking performance, the accuracy of track parameter estimates and CPU time consumption are presented

  5. Parameterization-based tracking for the P2 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorokin, Iurii [Institut fuer Kernphysik and PRISMA Cluster of Excellence, Mainz (Germany); Collaboration: P2-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The P2 experiment at the new MESA accelerator in Mainz aims to determine the weak mixing angle by measuring the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering at low momentum transfer. To achieve an unprecedented precision an order of 10{sup 11} scattered electrons per second have to be acquired. %within the acceptance. Whereas the tracking system is not required to operate at such high rates, every attempt is made to achieve as high rate capability as possible. The P2 tracking system will consist of four planes of high-voltage monolithic active pixel sensors (HV-MAPS). With the present preliminary design one expects about 150 signal electron tracks and 20000 background hits (from bremsstrahlung photons) per plane in every 50 ns readout frame at the full rate. In order to cope with this extreme combinatorial background in on-line mode, a parameterization-based tracking is considered as a possible solution. The idea is to transform the hit positions into a set of weakly correlated quantities, and to find simple (e.g. polynomial) functions of these quantities, that would give the required characteristics of the track (e.g. momentum). The parameters of the functions are determined from a sample of high-quality tracks, taken either from a simulation, or reconstructed in a conventional way from a sample of low-rate data.

  6. Charged particle tracking in high multiplicity events at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, K.J.; Love, W.A.

    1985-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the ability to track some fraction of the charged particles produced in heavy ion collisions is very desirable. At a very minimum, one must detect the occurance of multiple interactions in a single crossing. The very tight beam structure at RHIC does not favor time separation, so the location of separate vertices seems the best solution. The limits of tracking large numbers of tracks in a solid angle approaching 4π have been explored. A model detector considered is a 2.5 m radius TPC, a true 3D tracking device. In order to estimate the particle density of a function of production angle, five Hijet Au-Au central events were used to deduce the particle density distribution as a function of polar angle. An important feature of a tracking detector is the effective ''pixel'' size - the area within which two tracks cannot be resolved. In a TPC with multistep avalanche chamber readout this is approximately 3 mm x 3 mm or approx.0.1 cm 2 . Using this pixel size we have calculated the radius at which the number of particles/pixel is 0.01 and 0.1. With the exception of the region very near the beam expect these distributions aren't expected to change very much with the application of a low (approx. 0.5 tesla) magnetic field. While the actual reconstruction efficiency will depend on the fine details of the apparatus and reconstruction program, the 1% fill fraction is safe for efficiencies in the 80 to 90% region. Tracking is found to be feasible at pseudorapidities up to 3

  7. Low dose dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging using a statistical iterative reconstruction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Yinghua [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Chen, Guang-Hong [Department of Medical Physics and Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Hacker, Timothy A.; Raval, Amish N. [Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Van Lysel, Michael S.; Speidel, Michael A., E-mail: speidel@wisc.edu [Department of Medical Physics and Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging has the potential to provide both functional and anatomical information regarding coronary artery stenosis. However, radiation dose can be potentially high due to repeated scanning of the same region. The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of statistical iterative reconstruction to improve parametric maps of myocardial perfusion derived from a low tube current dynamic CT acquisition. Methods: Four pigs underwent high (500 mA) and low (25 mA) dose dynamic CT myocardial perfusion scans with and without coronary occlusion. To delineate the affected myocardial territory, an N-13 ammonia PET perfusion scan was performed for each animal in each occlusion state. Filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction was first applied to all CT data sets. Then, a statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR) method was applied to data sets acquired at low dose. Image voxel noise was matched between the low dose SIR and high dose FBP reconstructions. CT perfusion maps were compared among the low dose FBP, low dose SIR and high dose FBP reconstructions. Numerical simulations of a dynamic CT scan at high and low dose (20:1 ratio) were performed to quantitatively evaluate SIR and FBP performance in terms of flow map accuracy, precision, dose efficiency, and spatial resolution. Results: Forin vivo studies, the 500 mA FBP maps gave −88.4%, −96.0%, −76.7%, and −65.8% flow change in the occluded anterior region compared to the open-coronary scans (four animals). The percent changes in the 25 mA SIR maps were in good agreement, measuring −94.7%, −81.6%, −84.0%, and −72.2%. The 25 mA FBP maps gave unreliable flow measurements due to streaks caused by photon starvation (percent changes of +137.4%, +71.0%, −11.8%, and −3.5%). Agreement between 25 mA SIR and 500 mA FBP global flow was −9.7%, 8.8%, −3.1%, and 26.4%. The average variability of flow measurements in a nonoccluded region was 16.3%, 24.1%, and 937

  8. Low dose dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging using a statistical iterative reconstruction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Yinghua; Chen, Guang-Hong; Hacker, Timothy A.; Raval, Amish N.; Van Lysel, Michael S.; Speidel, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging has the potential to provide both functional and anatomical information regarding coronary artery stenosis. However, radiation dose can be potentially high due to repeated scanning of the same region. The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of statistical iterative reconstruction to improve parametric maps of myocardial perfusion derived from a low tube current dynamic CT acquisition. Methods: Four pigs underwent high (500 mA) and low (25 mA) dose dynamic CT myocardial perfusion scans with and without coronary occlusion. To delineate the affected myocardial territory, an N-13 ammonia PET perfusion scan was performed for each animal in each occlusion state. Filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction was first applied to all CT data sets. Then, a statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR) method was applied to data sets acquired at low dose. Image voxel noise was matched between the low dose SIR and high dose FBP reconstructions. CT perfusion maps were compared among the low dose FBP, low dose SIR and high dose FBP reconstructions. Numerical simulations of a dynamic CT scan at high and low dose (20:1 ratio) were performed to quantitatively evaluate SIR and FBP performance in terms of flow map accuracy, precision, dose efficiency, and spatial resolution. Results: Forin vivo studies, the 500 mA FBP maps gave −88.4%, −96.0%, −76.7%, and −65.8% flow change in the occluded anterior region compared to the open-coronary scans (four animals). The percent changes in the 25 mA SIR maps were in good agreement, measuring −94.7%, −81.6%, −84.0%, and −72.2%. The 25 mA FBP maps gave unreliable flow measurements due to streaks caused by photon starvation (percent changes of +137.4%, +71.0%, −11.8%, and −3.5%). Agreement between 25 mA SIR and 500 mA FBP global flow was −9.7%, 8.8%, −3.1%, and 26.4%. The average variability of flow measurements in a nonoccluded region was 16.3%, 24.1%, and 937

  9. Tracking and vertexing with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, F.

    2011-01-01

    The Inner Detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN contains three tracking systems: The silicon Pixel Detector, the Silicon Microstrip Tracker and the Transition Radiation Tracker. In combination these detectors provide excellent track and vertex reconstruction efficiencies and resolutions. This paper describes studies which show the performance of track and vertex reconstruction on data collected at 7 TeV center-of-mass energy.

  10. SU-G-BRA-12: Development of An Intra-Fractional Motion Tracking and Dose Reconstruction System for Adaptive Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezaeian, N Hassan; Chi, Y; Tian, Z; Jiang, S; Hannan, R; Jia, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A clinical trial on stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for high-risk prostate cancer is undergoing at our institution. In addition to escalating dose to the prostate, we have increased dose to intra-prostatic lesions. Intra-fractional prostate motion deteriorates well planned radiation dose, especially for the small intra-prostatic lesions. To solve this problem, we have developed a motion tracking and 4D dose-reconstruction system to facilitate adaptive re-planning. Methods: Patients in the clinical trial were treated with VMAT using four arcs and 10 FFF beam. KV triggered x-ray projections were taken every 3 sec during delivery to acquire 2D projections of 3D anatomy at the direction orthogonal to the therapeutic beam. Each patient had three implanted prostate markers. Our developed system first determined 2D projection locations of these markers and then 3D prostate translation and rotation via 2D/3D registration of the markers. Using delivery log files, our GPU-based Monte Carlo tool (goMC) reconstructed dose corresponding to each triggered image. The calculated 4D dose distributions were further aggregated to yield the delivered dose. Results: We first tested each module in our system. MC dose engine were commissioned to our treatment planning system with dose difference of <0.5%. For motion tracking, 1789 kV projections from 7 patients were acquired. The 2D marker location error was <1 mm. For 3D motion tracking, root mean square (RMS) errors along LR, AP, and CC directions were 0.26mm, 0.36mm, and 0.01mm respectively in simulation studies and 1.99mm, 1.37mm, and 0.22mm in phantom studies. We also tested the entire system workflow. Our system was able to reconstruct delivered dose. Conclusion: We have developed a functional intra-fractional motion tracking and 4D dose re-construction system to support our clinical trial on adaptive high-risk prostate cancer SBRT. Comprehensive evaluations have shown the capability and accuracy of our system.

  11. Advanced alignment of the ATLAS tracking system

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2085334; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    In order to reconstruct the trajectories of charged particles, the ATLAS experiment exploits a tracking system built using different technologies, silicon planar modules or microstrips (PIX and SCT detectors) and gaseous drift tubes (TRT), all embedded in a 2T solenoidal magnetic field. Misalignments of the active detector elements and deformations of the structures (which can lead to \\textit{Weak Modes}) deteriorate resolution of the track reconstruction and lead to systematic biases on the measured track parameters. The applied alignment procedures exploit various advanced techniques in order to minimise track-hit residuals and remove detector deformations. For the LHC Run II, the Pixel Detector has been refurbished and upgraded with the installation of a new pixel layer, the Insertable B-layer (IBL).

  12. Low-Cost 3D Printing Orbital Implant Templates in Secondary Orbital Reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Alison B; Campbell, Ashley A; Petris, Carisa; Kazim, Michael

    Despite its increasing use in craniofacial reconstructions, three-dimensional (3D) printing of customized orbital implants has not been widely adopted. Limitations include the cost of 3D printers able to print in a biocompatible material suitable for implantation in the orbit and the breadth of available implant materials. The authors report the technique of low-cost 3D printing of orbital implant templates used in complex, often secondary, orbital reconstructions. A retrospective case series of 5 orbital reconstructions utilizing a technique of 3D printed orbital implant templates is presented. Each patient's Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine data were uploaded and processed to create 3D renderings upon which a customized implant was designed and sent electronically to printers open for student use at our affiliated institutions. The mock implants were sterilized and used intraoperatively as a stencil and mold. The final implant material was chosen by the surgeons based on the requirements of the case. Five orbital reconstructions were performed with this technique: 3 tumor reconstructions and 2 orbital fractures. Four of the 5 cases were secondary reconstructions. Molded Medpor Titan (Stryker, Kalamazoo, MI) implants were used in 4 cases and titanium mesh in 1 case. The stenciled and molded implants were adjusted no more than 2 times before anchored in place (mean 1). No case underwent further revision. The technique and cases presented demonstrate 1) the feasibility and accessibility of low-cost, independent use of 3D printing technology to fashion patient-specific implants in orbital reconstructions, 2) the ability to apply this technology to the surgeon's preference of any routinely implantable material, and 3) the utility of this technique in complex, secondary reconstructions.

  13. Tracking in full Monte Carlo detector simulations of 500 GeV e+e- collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronan, M.T.

    2000-01-01

    In full Monte Carlo simulation models of future Linear Collider detectors, charged tracks are reconstructed from 3D space points in central tracking detectors. The track reconstruction software is being developed for detailed physics studies that take realistic detector resolution and background modeling into account. At this stage of the analysis, reference tracking efficiency and resolutions for ideal detector conditions are presented. High performance detectors are being designed to carry out precision studies of e + e - annihilation events in the energy range of 500 GeV to 1.5 TeV. Physics processes under study include Higgs mass and branching ratio measurements, measurement of possible manifestations of Supersymmetry (SUSY), precision Electro-Weak (EW) studies and searches for new phenomena beyond their current expectations. The relatively-low background machine environment at future Linear Colliders will allow precise measurements if proper consideration is given to the effects of the backgrounds on these studies. In current North American design studies, full Monte Carlo detector simulation and analysis is being used to allow detector optimization taking into account realistic models of machine backgrounds. In this paper the design of tracking software that is being developed for full detector reconstruction is discussed. In this study, charged tracks are found from simulated space point hits allowing for the straight-forward addition of background hits and for the accounting of missing information. The status of the software development effort is quantified by some reference performance measures, which will be modified by future work to include background effects

  14. Image quality in children with low-radiation chest CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction and model-based iterative reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihang Sun

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate noise reduction and image quality improvement in low-radiation dose chest CT images in children using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR and a full model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR algorithm. METHODS: Forty-five children (age ranging from 28 days to 6 years, median of 1.8 years who received low-dose chest CT scans were included. Age-dependent noise index (NI was used for acquisition. Images were retrospectively reconstructed using three methods: MBIR, 60% of ASIR and 40% of conventional filtered back-projection (FBP, and FBP. The subjective quality of the images was independently evaluated by two radiologists. Objective noises in the left ventricle (LV, muscle, fat, descending aorta and lung field at the layer with the largest cross-section area of LV were measured, with the region of interest about one fourth to half of the area of descending aorta. Optimized signal-to-noise ratio (SNR was calculated. RESULT: In terms of subjective quality, MBIR images were significantly better than ASIR and FBP in image noise and visibility of tiny structures, but blurred edges were observed. In terms of objective noise, MBIR and ASIR reconstruction decreased the image noise by 55.2% and 31.8%, respectively, for LV compared with FBP. Similarly, MBIR and ASIR reconstruction increased the SNR by 124.0% and 46.2%, respectively, compared with FBP. CONCLUSION: Compared with FBP and ASIR, overall image quality and noise reduction were significantly improved by MBIR. MBIR image could reconstruct eligible chest CT images in children with lower radiation dose.

  15. Auditory brainstem response latency in forward masking, a marker of sensory deficits in listeners with normal hearing thresholds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehraei, Golbarg; Paredes Gallardo, Andreu; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G.

    2017-01-01

    -spontaneous rate fibers results in a faster recovery of wave-V latency as the slow contribution of these fibers is reduced. Results showed that in young audiometrically normal listeners, a larger change in wave-V latency with increasing masker-to-probe interval was related to a greater effect of a preceding masker......-V latency changes with increasing masker-to-probe intervals. In the same listeners, behavioral forward masking detection thresholds were measured. We hypothesized that 1) auditory nerve fiber deafferentation increases forward masking thresholds and increases wave-V latency and 2) a preferential loss of low...

  16. LHCb: The LHCb tracking concept and performance

    CERN Multimedia

    Rodrigues, E

    2009-01-01

    The LHCb tracking system is designed to reconstruct charged particle trajectories in the forward spectrometer, in view of high precision studies of CP-violating phenomena and searches for rare b-hadron decays at the LHC. The system is composed of four major subdetectors and a dedicated magnet, providing an excellent momentum resolution just above 0.4%. The tracking model is based on the innovative trajectories concept introduced by the BaBar collaboration to reconstruct and fit the tracks, and has been further developed and improved. It is now able to cope with realistic geometries and misalignments in a sophisticated, robust and detector-independent way. The LHCb tracking concept including the interplay of various complementary pattern recognition algorithms and the bi-directional Kalman fitter will be described. The current performance of the tracking, based on the latest simulations, will be presented. Recent results obtained with the first LHC beam tracks from injection tests will be discussed.

  17. Effect of Low-Dose MDCT and Iterative Reconstruction on Trabecular Bone Microstructure Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Felix K; Holzapfel, Konstantin; Baum, Thomas; Nasirudin, Radin A; Mei, Kai; Garcia, Eduardo G; Burgkart, Rainer; Rummeny, Ernst J; Kirschke, Jan S; Noël, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of low-dose multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) in combination with statistical iterative reconstruction algorithms on trabecular bone microstructure parameters. Twelve donated vertebrae were scanned with the routine radiation exposure used in our department (standard-dose) and a low-dose protocol. Reconstructions were performed with filtered backprojection (FBP) and maximum-likelihood based statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR). Trabecular bone microstructure parameters were assessed and statistically compared for each reconstruction. Moreover, fracture loads of the vertebrae were biomechanically determined and correlated to the assessed microstructure parameters. Trabecular bone microstructure parameters based on low-dose MDCT and SIR significantly correlated with vertebral bone strength. There was no significant difference between microstructure parameters calculated on low-dose SIR and standard-dose FBP images. However, the results revealed a strong dependency on the regularization strength applied during SIR. It was observed that stronger regularization might corrupt the microstructure analysis, because the trabecular structure is a very small detail that might get lost during the regularization process. As a consequence, the introduction of SIR for trabecular bone microstructure analysis requires a specific optimization of the regularization parameters. Moreover, in comparison to other approaches, superior noise-resolution trade-offs can be found with the proposed methods.

  18. Factors influencing the latency of simple reaction time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, David L; Wyma, John M; Yund, E William; Herron, Timothy J; Reed, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Simple reaction time (SRT), the minimal time needed to respond to a stimulus, is a basic measure of processing speed. SRTs were first measured by Francis Galton in the 19th century, who reported visual SRT latencies below 190 ms in young subjects. However, recent large-scale studies have reported substantially increased SRT latencies that differ markedly in different laboratories, in part due to timing delays introduced by the computer hardware and software used for SRT measurement. We developed a calibrated and temporally precise SRT test to analyze the factors that influence SRT latencies in a paradigm where visual stimuli were presented to the left or right hemifield at varying stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs). Experiment 1 examined a community sample of 1469 subjects ranging in age from 18 to 65. Mean SRT latencies were short (231, 213 ms when corrected for hardware delays) and increased significantly with age (0.55 ms/year), but were unaffected by sex or education. As in previous studies, SRTs were prolonged at shorter SOAs and were slightly faster for stimuli presented in the visual field contralateral to the responding hand. Stimulus detection time (SDT) was estimated by subtracting movement initiation time, measured in a speeded finger tapping test, from SRTs. SDT latencies averaged 131 ms and were unaffected by age. Experiment 2 tested 189 subjects ranging in age from 18 to 82 years in a different laboratory using a larger range of SOAs. Both SRTs and SDTs were slightly prolonged (by 7 ms). SRT latencies increased with age while SDT latencies remained stable. Precise computer-based measurements of SRT latencies show that processing speed is as fast in contemporary populations as in the Victorian era, and that age-related increases in SRT latencies are due primarily to slowed motor output.

  19. Factors influencing the latency of simple reaction time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Woods

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Simple reaction time (SRT, the minimal time needed to respond to a stimulus, is a basic measure of processing speed. SRTs were first measured by Francis Galton in the 19th century who reported visual SRT latencies below 190 ms in young subjects. However, recent large-scale studies have reported substantially increased SRT latencies that differ markedly in different laboratories, in part due to timing delays introduced by computer hardware and software used for SRT measurement. We developed a calibrated and temporally-precise SRT paradigm to analyze the factors that influence SRT latencies in a paradigm where visual stimuli were presented to the left or right hemifield at varying stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs. Experiment 1 examined a community sample of 1469 subjects ranging in age from 18 to 65. Mean SRT latencies were short (231 ms, 213 ms when corrected for hardware delays and increased significantly with age (0.55 ms/year, but were unaffected by sex or education. As in previous studies, SRTs were prolonged at shorter SOAs and were slightly faster for stimuli presented in the visual field contralateral to the responding hand. Stimulus detection time (SDT was estimated by subtracting movement-initiation time, measured in a speeded finger-tapping test, from SRTs. SDT latencies averaged 131 ms and were unaffected by age. Experiment 2 tested 189 subjects ranging in age from 18 to 82 years in a different laboratory using a larger range of SOAs. Both SRTs and SDTs were slightly prolonged (by 7 ms. SRT latencies increased with age while SDT latencies did not. Precise computer-based measurements of SRT latencies show that processing speed is as fast in contemporary populations as in those from the Victorian era and that age-related increases in SRT latencies are due primarily to slowed motor output.

  20. Factors influencing the latency of simple reaction time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, David L.; Wyma, John M.; Yund, E. William; Herron, Timothy J.; Reed, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Simple reaction time (SRT), the minimal time needed to respond to a stimulus, is a basic measure of processing speed. SRTs were first measured by Francis Galton in the 19th century, who reported visual SRT latencies below 190 ms in young subjects. However, recent large-scale studies have reported substantially increased SRT latencies that differ markedly in different laboratories, in part due to timing delays introduced by the computer hardware and software used for SRT measurement. We developed a calibrated and temporally precise SRT test to analyze the factors that influence SRT latencies in a paradigm where visual stimuli were presented to the left or right hemifield at varying stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs). Experiment 1 examined a community sample of 1469 subjects ranging in age from 18 to 65. Mean SRT latencies were short (231, 213 ms when corrected for hardware delays) and increased significantly with age (0.55 ms/year), but were unaffected by sex or education. As in previous studies, SRTs were prolonged at shorter SOAs and were slightly faster for stimuli presented in the visual field contralateral to the responding hand. Stimulus detection time (SDT) was estimated by subtracting movement initiation time, measured in a speeded finger tapping test, from SRTs. SDT latencies averaged 131 ms and were unaffected by age. Experiment 2 tested 189 subjects ranging in age from 18 to 82 years in a different laboratory using a larger range of SOAs. Both SRTs and SDTs were slightly prolonged (by 7 ms). SRT latencies increased with age while SDT latencies remained stable. Precise computer-based measurements of SRT latencies show that processing speed is as fast in contemporary populations as in the Victorian era, and that age-related increases in SRT latencies are due primarily to slowed motor output. PMID:25859198

  1. The molecular basis of herpes simplex virus latency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, Michael P; Proença, João T; Efstathiou, Stacey

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 is a neurotropic herpesvirus that establishes latency within sensory neurones. Following primary infection, the virus replicates productively within mucosal epithelial cells and enters sensory neurones via nerve termini. The virus is then transported to neuronal cell bodies where latency can be established. Periodically, the virus can reactivate to resume its normal lytic cycle gene expression programme and result in the generation of new virus progeny that are transported axonally back to the periphery. The ability to establish lifelong latency within the host and to periodically reactivate to facilitate dissemination is central to the survival strategy of this virus. Although incompletely understood, this review will focus on the mechanisms involved in the regulation of latency that centre on the functions of the virus-encoded latency-associated transcripts (LATs), epigenetic regulation of the latent virus genome and the molecular events that precipitate reactivation. This review considers current knowledge and hypotheses relating to the mechanisms involved in the establishment, maintenance and reactivation herpes simplex virus latency. PMID:22150699

  2. Design of a Hardware Track Finder (Fast Tracker) for the ATLAS Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00010976; Albicocco, P.; Alison, J.; Ancu, L.S.; Anderson, J.; Andari, N.; Andreani, A.; Andreazza, A.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Asbah, N.; Atkinson, M.; Baines, J.; Barberio, E.; Beccherle, R.; Beretta, M.; Bertolucci, F.; Biesuz, N.V.; Blair, R.; Bogdan, M.; Boveia, A.; Britzger, D.; Bryant, P.; Burghgrave, B.; Calderini, G.; Camplani, A.; Cavasinni, V.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, P.; Cheng, Y.; Citraro, S.; Citterio, M.; Crescioli, F.; Dawe, N.; Dell'Orso, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Drake, G.; Gadomski, S.; Gatta, M.; Gentsos, C.; Giannetti, P.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gramling, J.; Howarth, J.W.; Iizawa, T.; Ilic, N.; Jiang, Z.; Kaji, T.; Kasten, M.; Kawaguchi, Y.; Kim, Y.K.; Kimura, N.; Klimkovich, T.; Kolb, M.; Kordas, K.; Krizka, K.; Kubota, T.; Lanza, A.; Li, H.L.; Liberali, V.; Lisovyi, M.; Liu, L.; Love, J.; Luciano, P.; Luongo, C.; Magalotti, D.; Maznas, I.; Meroni, C.; Mitani, T.; Nasimi, H.; Negri, A.; Neroutsos, P.; Neubauer, M.; Nikolaidis, S.; Okumura, Y.; Pandini, C.; Petridou, C.; Piendibene, M.; Proudfoot, J.; Rados, P.; Roda, C.; Rossi, E.; Sakurai, Y.; Sampsonidis, D.; Saxon, J.; Schmitt, S.; Schoening, A.; Shochet, M.; Shojaii, S.; Soltveit, H.; Sotiropoulou, C.L.; Stabile, A.; Swiatlowski, M.; Tang, F.; Taylor, P.T.; Testa, M.; Tompkins, L.; Vercesi, V.; Volpi, G.; Wang, R.; Watari, R.; Webster, J.; Wu, X.; Yorita, K.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zeng, J.C.; Zhang, J.; Zou, R.

    2016-01-01

    The use of tracking information at the trigger level in the LHC Run II period is crucial for the trigger an data acquisition (TDAQ) system and will be even more so as contemporary collisions that occur at every bunch crossing will increase in Run III. The Fast TracKer (FTK) is part of the ATLAS trigger upgrade project; it is a hardware processor that will provide every Level-1 accepted event (100 kHz) and within 100$\\mu$s, full tracking information for tracks with momentum as low as 1 GeV. Providing fast, extensive access to tracking information, with resolution comparable to the offline reconstruction, FTK will help in precise detection of the primary and secondary vertices to ensure robust selections and improve the trigger performance.

  3. Advanced Alignment of the ATLAS Tracking System

    CERN Document Server

    Butti, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    In order to reconstruct the trajectories of charged particles, the ATLAS experiment exploits a tracking system built using different technologies, planar silicon modules or microstrips (PIX and SCT detectors) and gaseous drift tubes (TRT), all embedded in a 2T solenoidal magnetic field. Misalignments and deformations of the active detector elements deteriorate the track reconstruction resolution and lead to systematic biases on the measured track parameters. The alignment procedures exploits various advanced tools and techniques in order to determine for module positions and correct for deformations. For the LHC Run II, the system is being upgraded with the installation of a new pixel layer, the Insertable B-layer (IBL).

  4. A low-count reconstruction algorithm for Compton-based prompt gamma imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsuan-Ming; Liu, Chih-Chieh; Jan, Meei-Ling; Lee, Ming-Wei

    2018-04-01

    The Compton camera is an imaging device which has been proposed to detect prompt gammas (PGs) produced by proton–nuclear interactions within tissue during proton beam irradiation. Compton-based PG imaging has been developed to verify proton ranges because PG rays, particularly characteristic ones, have strong correlations with the distribution of the proton dose. However, accurate image reconstruction from characteristic PGs is challenging because the detector efficiency and resolution are generally low. Our previous study showed that point spread functions can be incorporated into the reconstruction process to improve image resolution. In this study, we proposed a low-count reconstruction algorithm to improve the image quality of a characteristic PG emission by pooling information from other characteristic PG emissions. PGs were simulated from a proton beam irradiated on a water phantom, and a two-stage Compton camera was used for PG detection. The results show that the image quality of the reconstructed characteristic PG emission is improved with our proposed method in contrast to the standard reconstruction method using events from only one characteristic PG emission. For the 4.44 MeV PG rays, both methods can be used to predict the positions of the peak and the distal falloff with a mean accuracy of 2 mm. Moreover, only the proposed method can improve the estimated positions of the peak and the distal falloff of 5.25 MeV PG rays, and a mean accuracy of 2 mm can be reached.

  5. A Monte Carlo track structure code for low energy protons

    CERN Document Server

    Endo, S; Nikjoo, H; Uehara, S; Hoshi, M; Ishikawa, M; Shizuma, K

    2002-01-01

    A code is described for simulation of protons (100 eV to 10 MeV) track structure in water vapor. The code simulates molecular interaction by interaction for the transport of primary ions and secondary electrons in the form of ionizations and excitations. When a low velocity ion collides with the atoms or molecules of a target, the ion may also capture or lose electrons. The probabilities for these processes are described by the quantity cross-section. Although proton track simulation at energies above Bragg peak (>0.3 MeV) has been achieved to a high degree of precision, simulations at energies near or below the Bragg peak have only been attempted recently because of the lack of relevant cross-section data. As the hydrogen atom has a different ionization cross-section from that of a proton, charge exchange processes need to be considered in order to calculate stopping power for low energy protons. In this paper, we have used state-of-the-art Monte Carlo track simulation techniques, in conjunction with the pub...

  6. Muon reconstruction with a geometrical model in JUNO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genster, C.; Schever, M.; Ludhova, L.; Soiron, M.; Stahl, A.; Wiebusch, C.

    2018-03-01

    The Jiangmen Neutrino Underground Observatory (JUNO) is a 20 kton liquid scintillator detector currently under construction near Kaiping in China. The physics program focuses on the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy with reactor anti-neutrinos. For this purpose, JUNO is located 650 m underground with a distance of 53 km to two nuclear power plants. As a result, it is exposed to a muon flux that requires a precise muon reconstruction to make a veto of cosmogenic backgrounds viable. Established muon tracking algorithms use time residuals to a track hypothesis. We developed an alternative muon tracking algorithm that utilizes the geometrical shape of the fastest light. It models the full shape of the first, direct light produced along the muon track. From the intersection with the spherical PMT array, the track parameters are extracted with a likelihood fit. The algorithm finds a selection of PMTs based on their first hit times and charges. Subsequently, it fits on timing information only. On a sample of through-going muons with a full simulation of readout electronics, we report a spatial resolution of 20 cm of distance from the detector's center and an angular resolution of 1.6o over the whole detector. Additionally, a dead time estimation is performed to measure the impact of the muon veto. Including the step of waveform reconstruction on top of the track reconstruction, a loss in exposure of only 4% can be achieved compared to the case of a perfect tracking algorithm. When including only the PMT time resolution, but no further electronics simulation and waveform reconstruction, the exposure loss is only 1%.

  7. The CLEO-III Trigger: Calorimetry and tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergfeld, T.J.; Gollin, G.D.; Haney, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    The CLEO-III Trigger provides a trigger decision every 42ns, with a latency of approximately 2.5μs. This paper describes the pipelined signal processing and pattern recognition schemes used by the calorimeter, and the axial and stereo portions of the drift chamber, to provide the information necessary to make these decisions. Field programmable gate arrays are used extensively to provide cluster filtering and location sorting for calorimetry, and path finding for tracking. Analog processing is also employed in the calorimetry to provide additional leverage on the problem. Timing information is extracted from both calorimetry and tracking

  8. More performance results and implementation of an object oriented track reconstruction model in different OO frameworks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaines, Irwin; Qian Sijin

    2001-01-01

    This is an update of the report about an Object Oriented (OO) track reconstruction model, which was presented in the previous AIHENP'99 at Crete, Greece. The OO model for the Kalman filtering method has been designed for high energy physics experiments at high luminosity hadron colliders. It has been coded in the C++ programming language and successfully implemented into a few different OO computing environments of the CMS and ATLAS experiments at the future Large Hadron Collider at CERN. We shall report: (1) more performance result: (2) implementing the OO model into the new SW OO framework 'Athena' of ATLAS experiment and some upgrades of the OO model itself

  9. Impact of mesh tracks and low-ground-pressure vehicle use on blanket peat hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKendrick-Smith, Kathryn; Holden, Joseph; Parry, Lauren

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands are subject to multiple uses including drainage, farming and recreation. Low-ground-pressure vehicle access is desirable by land owners and tracks facilitate access. However, there is concern that such activity may impact peat hydrology and so granting permission for track installation has been problematic, particularly without evidence for decision-making. We present the first comprehensive study of mesh track and low-ground-pressure vehicle impacts on peatland hydrology. In the sub-arctic oceanic climate of the Moor House World Biosphere Reserve in the North Pennines, UK, a 1.5 km long experimental track was installed to investigate hydrological impacts. Surface vegetation was cut and the plastic mesh track pinned into the peat surface. The experimental track was split into 7 treatments, designed to reflect typical track usage (0 - 5 vehicle passes per week) and varying vehicle weight. The greatest hydrological impacts were expected for sections of track subject to more frequent vehicle use and in close proximity to the track. In total 554 dipwells (including 15 automated recording at 15-min intervals) were monitored for water-table depth, positioned to capture potential spatial variability in response. Before track installation, samples for vertical and lateral hydraulic conductivity (Ks) analysis (using the modified cube method) were taken at 0-10 cm depth from a frequently driven treatment (n = 15), an infrequently driven treatment (0.5 passes per week) (n = 15) and a control site with no track/driving (n = 15). The test was repeated after 16 months of track use. We present a spatially and temporally rich water-table dataset from the study site showing how the impacts of the track on water table are spatially highly variable. Water-table depths across the site were shallow, typically within the upper 10 cm of the peat profile for > 75% of the time. We show that mesh track and low-ground-pressure vehicle impacts on water-table depth were small except

  10. Online Event Reconstruction in the CBM Experiment at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akishina, Valentina; Kisel, Ivan

    2018-02-01

    Targeting for rare observables, the CBM experiment will operate at high interaction rates of up to 10 MHz, which is unprecedented in heavy-ion experiments so far. It requires a novel free-streaming readout system and a new concept of data processing. The huge data rates of the CBM experiment will be reduced online to the recordable rate before saving the data to the mass storage. Full collision reconstruction and selection will be performed online in a dedicated processor farm. In order to make an efficient event selection online a clean sample of particles has to be provided by the reconstruction package called First Level Event Selection (FLES). The FLES reconstruction and selection package consists of several modules: track finding, track fitting, event building, short-lived particles finding, and event selection. Since detector measurements contain also time information, the event building is done at all stages of the reconstruction process. The input data are distributed within the FLES farm in a form of time-slices. A time-slice is reconstructed in parallel between processor cores. After all tracks of the whole time-slice are found and fitted, they are collected into clusters of tracks originated from common primary vertices, which then are fitted, thus identifying the interaction points. Secondary tracks are associated with primary vertices according to their estimated production time. After that short-lived particles are found and the full event building process is finished. The last stage of the FLES package is a selection of events according to the requested trigger signatures. The event reconstruction procedure and the results of its application to simulated collisions in the CBM detector setup are presented and discussed in detail.

  11. Robust Visual Tracking Via Consistent Low-Rank Sparse Learning

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tianzhu; Liu, Si; Ahuja, Narendra; Yang, Ming-Hsuan; Ghanem, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    and the low-rank minimization problem for learning joint sparse representations can be efficiently solved by a sequence of closed form update operations. We evaluate the proposed CLRST algorithm against 14 state-of-the-art tracking methods on a set of 25

  12. Low-dose X-ray computed tomography image reconstruction with a combined low-mAs and sparse-view protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Bian, Zhaoying; Huang, Jing; Zhang, Yunwan; Niu, Shanzhou; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan; Liang, Zhengrong; Ma, Jianhua

    2014-06-16

    To realize low-dose imaging in X-ray computed tomography (CT) examination, lowering milliampere-seconds (low-mAs) or reducing the required number of projection views (sparse-view) per rotation around the body has been widely studied as an easy and effective approach. In this study, we are focusing on low-dose CT image reconstruction from the sinograms acquired with a combined low-mAs and sparse-view protocol and propose a two-step image reconstruction strategy. Specifically, to suppress significant statistical noise in the noisy and insufficient sinograms, an adaptive sinogram restoration (ASR) method is first proposed with consideration of the statistical property of sinogram data, and then to further acquire a high-quality image, a total variation based projection onto convex sets (TV-POCS) method is adopted with a slight modification. For simplicity, the present reconstruction strategy was termed as "ASR-TV-POCS." To evaluate the present ASR-TV-POCS method, both qualitative and quantitative studies were performed on a physical phantom. Experimental results have demonstrated that the present ASR-TV-POCS method can achieve promising gains over other existing methods in terms of the noise reduction, contrast-to-noise ratio, and edge detail preservation.

  13. A study of epileptogenic network structures in rat hippocampal cultures using first spike latencies during synchronization events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghavan, Mohan; Amrutur, Bharadwaj; Srinivas, Kalyan V; Sikdar, Sujit K

    2012-01-01

    Study of hypersynchronous activity is of prime importance for combating epilepsy. Studies on network structure typically reconstruct the network by measuring various aspects of the interaction between neurons and subsequently measure the properties of the reconstructed network. In sub-sampled networks such methods lead to significant errors in reconstruction. Using rat hippocampal neurons cultured on a multi-electrode array dish and a glutamate injury model of epilepsy in vitro, we studied synchronous activity in neuronal networks. Using the first spike latencies in various neurons during a network burst, we extract various recurring spatio-temporal onset patterns in the networks. Comparing the patterns seen in control and injured networks, we observe that injured networks express a wide diversity in their foci (origin) and activation pattern, while control networks show limited diversity. Furthermore, we note that onset patterns in glutamate injured networks show a positive correlation between synchronization delay and physical distance between neurons, while control networks do not. (paper)

  14. Contribution to the tracking and the 3D reconstruction of scenes composed of torus from image sequences a acquired by a moving camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naudet, S.

    1997-01-01

    The three-dimensional perception of the environment is often necessary for a robot to correctly perform its tasks. One solution, based on the dynamic vision, consists in analysing time-varying monocular images to estimate the spatial geometry of the scene. This thesis deals with the reconstruction of torus by dynamic vision. Though this object class is restrictive, it enables to tackle the problem of reconstruction of bent pipes usually encountered in industrial environments. The proposed method is based on the evolution of apparent contours of objects in the sequence. Using the expression of torus limb boundaries, it is possible to recursively estimate the object three-dimensional parameters by minimising the error between the predicted projected contours and the image contours. This process, which is performed by a Kalman filter, does not need a precise knowledge of the camera displacement or any matching of the tow limbs belonging to the same object. To complete this work, temporal tracking of objects which deals with occlusion situations is proposed. The approach consists in modeling and interpreting the apparent motion of objects in the successive images. The motion interpretation, based on a simplified representation of the scene, allows to recover pertinent three-dimensional information which is used to manage occlusion situations. Experiments, on synthetic and real images, proves he validity of the tracking and the reconstruction processes. (author)

  15. Org.Lcsim: Event Reconstruction in Java

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, Norman

    2011-01-01

    Maximizing the physics performance of detectors being designed for the International Linear Collider, while remaining sensitive to cost constraints, requires a powerful, efficient, and flexible simulation, reconstruction and analysis environment to study the capabilities of a large number of different detector designs. The preparation of Letters Of Intent for the International Linear Collider involved the detailed study of dozens of detector options, layouts and readout technologies; the final physics benchmarking studies required the reconstruction and analysis of hundreds of millions of events. We describe the Java-based software toolkit (org.lcsim) which was used for full event reconstruction and analysis. The components are fully modular and are available for tasks from digitization of tracking detector signals through to cluster finding, pattern recognition, track-fitting, calorimeter clustering, individual particle reconstruction, jet-finding, and analysis. The detector is defined by the same xml input files used for the detector response simulation, ensuring the simulation and reconstruction geometries are always commensurate by construction. We discuss the architecture as well as the performance.

  16. Low-voltage electroosmotic pumping using polyethylene terephthalate track-etched membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Ceming; Wang Lin [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Xue Jianming, E-mail: jmxue@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2012-09-01

    We present experimental investigations of electroosmotic (EO) pumping using polyethylene terephthalate (PET) track-etched membrane at a low applied voltage. An EO pump based on PET track-etched membrane has been designed and fabricated. Pumping performance of the device is experimentally studied in terms of flow rate as a function of applied voltage and KCl aqueous concentration. The PET track-etched membrane EO pump can generate flow rates on the order of 10 {mu}l min{sup -1} cm{sup -2} at several applied volts. The measured flow rate tends to decrease with increasing KCl aqueous concentration. In addition, we study the EO flow in cylindrical nanopore with use of a continuum model, composed of Nernst Planck equations, Poisson equation and Navier Stokes equations.

  17. Statistical Multiplexing of Computations in C-RAN with Tradeoffs in Latency and Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalør, Anders Ellersgaard; Agurto Agurto, Mauricio Ignacio; Pratas, Nuno

    2017-01-01

    frame duration, then this may result in additional access latency and limit the energy savings. In this paper we investigate the tradeoff by considering two extreme time-scales for the resource multiplexing: (i) long-term, where the computational resources are adapted over periods much larger than...... the access frame durations; (ii) short-term, where the adaption is below the access frame duration.We develop a general C-RAN queuing model that models the access latency and show, for Poisson arrivals, that long-term multiplexing achieves savings comparable to short-term multiplexing, while offering low...

  18. Development of the ZEUS central tracking detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, C. B.; Bullock, F. W.; Cashmore, R. J.; Devenish, R. C.; Foster, B.; Fraser, T. J.; Gibson, M. D.; Gilmore, R. S.; Gingrich, D.; Harnew, N.; Hart, J. C.; Heath, G. P.; Hiddleston, J.; Holmes, A. R.; Jamdagni, A. K.; Jones, T. W.; Llewellyn, T. J.; Long, K. R.; Lush, G. J.; Malos, J.; Martin, N. C.; McArthur, I.; McCubbin, N. A.; McQuillan, D.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Morgado, C.; Nash, J.; Nixon, G.; Parham, A. G.; Payne, B. T.; Roberts, J. H. C.; Salmon, G.; Saxon, D. H.; Sephton, A. J.; Shaw, D.; Shaw, T. B.; Shield, P. D.; Shulman, J.; Silvester, I.; Smith, S.; Strachan, D. E.; Tapper, R. J.; Tkaczyk, S. M.; Toudup, L. W.; Wallis, E. W.; Wastie, R.; Wells, J.; White, D. J.; Wilson, F. F.; Yeo, K. L.; ZEUS-UK Collaboration

    1989-11-01

    The design concept and development of the ZEUS central tracking detector is described. This is a cylindrical drift chamber designed for track reconstruction, electron identification and event triggering in a high-crossing-rate, high-magnetic-field environment.

  19. Machine Learning and Parallelism in the Reconstruction of LHCb and its Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cian, Michel

    2016-11-01

    The LHCb detector at the LHC is a general purpose detector in the forward region with a focus on reconstructing decays of c- and b-hadrons. For Run II of the LHC, a new trigger strategy with a real-time reconstruction, alignment and calibration was employed. This was made possible by implementing an offline-like track reconstruction in the high level trigger. However, the ever increasing need for a higher throughput and the move to parallelism in the CPU architectures in the last years necessitated the use of vectorization techniques to achieve the desired speed and a more extensive use of machine learning to veto bad events early on. This document discusses selected improvements in computationally expensive parts of the track reconstruction, like the Kalman filter, as well as an improved approach to get rid of fake tracks using fast machine learning techniques. In the last part, a short overview of the track reconstruction challenges for the upgrade of LHCb, is given. Running a fully software-based trigger, a large gain in speed in the reconstruction has to be achieved to cope with the 40 MHz bunch-crossing rate. Two possible approaches for techniques exploiting massive parallelization are discussed.

  20. Machine Learning and Parallelism in the Reconstruction of LHCb and its Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cian, Michel De

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb detector at the LHC is a general purpose detector in the forward region with a focus on reconstructing decays of c- and b-hadrons. For Run II of the LHC, a new trigger strategy with a real-time reconstruction, alignment and calibration was employed. This was made possible by implementing an offline-like track reconstruction in the high level trigger. However, the ever increasing need for a higher throughput and the move to parallelism in the CPU architectures in the last years necessitated the use of vectorization techniques to achieve the desired speed and a more extensive use of machine learning to veto bad events early on. This document discusses selected improvements in computationally expensive parts of the track reconstruction, like the Kalman filter, as well as an improved approach to get rid of fake tracks using fast machine learning techniques. In the last part, a short overview of the track reconstruction challenges for the upgrade of LHCb, is given. Running a fully software-based trigger, a large gain in speed in the reconstruction has to be achieved to cope with the 40 MHz bunch-crossing rate. Two possible approaches for techniques exploiting massive parallelization are discussed

  1. Track structure analysis illustrating the prominent role of low-energy electrons in radiobiological effects of low-LET radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikjoo, H.; Goodhead, D.T.

    1991-01-01

    Monte Carlo track structure methods have been used to illustrate the importance of low-energy electrons produced by low-LET radiations. It is shown that these low-energy secondary electrons contribute substantially to the dose in all low-LET irradiations and are particularly efficient at producing highly localized clusters of atomic damage which may be responsible for a major part of the biological effectiveness of low-LET radiations. The data generated by Monte Carlo track structure techniques and by earlier semi-analytical methods based on the LET concept have been compared in terms of cumulative and differential fractions of total dose absorbed as a function of electron energy. The data show that low-energy secondary electrons account for up to nearly 50% of the total dose imparted to a medium when irradiated with electrons or photons. (author)

  2. Tracking properties of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT)

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00349845; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The tracking performance parameters of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) as part of the ATLAS Inner Detector (ID) are described for different data taking conditions in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These studies are performed using data collected during the first (Run 1) and the second (Run 2) periods of LHC operation and are compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The performance of the TRT, operating with Xe-based (Xe-based) and Argon-based (Ar-based) gas mixtures and its dependence on the TRT occupancy is presented. No significant degradation of position measurement accuracy was found up to occupancies of about 20\\% in Run 1. The relative number of reconstructed tracks in ID that also have a extension in the TRT was observed to be almost constant with the increase of occupancies up to 50\\%. Even in configurations where tracks are close to each other, the reconstruction algorithm is still able to find the correct TRT hits and properly reconstruct the tracks.

  3. Architecture of a Level 1 Track Trigger for the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Heintz, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    The luminosity goal for the Super-LHC is 1035/cm2/s. At this luminosity the number of proton-proton interactions in each beam crossing will be in the hundreds. This will stress many components of the CMS detector. One system that has to be upgraded is the trigger system. To keep the rate at which the level 1 trigger fires manageable, information from the tracker has to be integrated into the level 1 trigger. Current design proposals foresee tracking detectors that perform on-detector filtering to reject hits from low-momentum particles. In order to build a trigger system, the filtered hit data from different layers and sectors of the tracker will have to be transmitted off the detector and brought together in a logic processor that generates trigger tracks within the time window allowed by the level 1 trigger latency. I will describe a possible architecture for the off-detector logic that accomplishes this goal.

  4. Charged particle track reconstruction using artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glover, C.; Fu, P.; Gabriel, T.; Handler, T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current state of our research in developing and applying artificial neural network (ANN) algorithm described here is based on a crude model of the retina. It takes as input the coordinates of each charged particle's interaction point (''hit'') in the tracking chamber. The algorithm's output is a set of vectors pointing to other hits that most likely to form a track

  5. FPGA curved track fitter with very low resource usage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jin-Yuan; Wang, M.; Gottschalk, E.; Shi, Z.; /Fermilab

    2006-11-01

    Standard least-squares curved track fitting process is tailored for FPGA implementation. The coefficients in the fitting matrices are carefully chosen so that only shift and accumulation operations are used in the process. The divisions and full multiplications are eliminated. Comparison in an application example shows that the fitting errors of the low resource usage implementation are less than 4% bigger than the fitting errors of the exact least-squares algorithm. The implementation is suitable for low-cost, low-power applications such as high energy physics detector trigger systems.

  6. Development of the ZEUS central tracking detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, C.B.; Cashmore, R.J.; Gingrich, D.; Harnew, N.; Heath, G.P.; Holmes, A.R.; Martin, N.C.; McArthur, I.; Nash, J.; Salmon, G.; Shield, P.D.; Silvester, I.; Smith, S.; Wastie, R.; Wells, J.; Jamdagni, A.K.; McQuillan, D.; Miller, D.B.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Shulman, J.; Toudup, L.W.

    1989-01-01

    The design concept and development of the ZEUS central tracking detector is described. This is a cylindrical drift chamber designed for track reconstruction, electron identification and event triggering in a high-crossing-rate, high-magnetic-field environment. (orig.)

  7. Online tracking applications of the general purpose EDRO Board

    CERN Document Server

    Annovi, A; The ATLAS collaboration; Cervini, F; Crescioli, F; Fabbri, L; Franchini, M; Giannetti, P; Giannuzzi, F; Giorgi, F; Magalotti, D; Piendibene, M; Sbarra, C; Valentinetti, S; Mauro, V; Zoccoli, A

    2012-01-01

    The capability to perform extremely fast track reconstruction online is becoming more and more important for the LHC upgrade as well as the next generation of HEP experiments, where the expected instantaneous luminosities (in excess of 10^34 /cm2/s) and the very low signal/background ratio ask for fast and clean identification of the main characteristics of interesting events. The Slim5 R&D project studied different aspects of fast and high-precision tracking in dedicated hardware: data-push silicon sensors, high bandwidth DAQ systems and Associative Memories (AM) for fast track identification. The central element of the development system is a high traffic board, called EDRO, capable of collecting and processing digital data with an input rate of 16 Gbps. The input hits, suitably formatted or clusterized, are sent to an AM board sending back candidate tracks, which are identified at a rate of 40 MHz. The EDRO board is then able to deliver triggers and formatted events for further processing. The EDRO-AM ...

  8. Advanced Alignment of the ATLAS Tracking System

    CERN Document Server

    Pedraza Lopez, S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    In order to reconstruct trajectories of charged particles, ATLAS is equipped with a tracking system built using different technologies embedded in a 2T solenoidal magnetic field. ATLAS physics goals require high resolution, unbiased measurement of all charged particle kinematic parameters in order to assure accurate invariant mass reconstruction and interaction and decay vertex finding. These critically depend on the systematic effects related to the alignment of the tracking system. In order to eliminate malicious systematic deformations, various advanced tools and techniques have been put in place. These include information from known mass resonances, energy of electrons and positrons measured by the electromagnetic calorimeters, etc. Despite being stable under normal running conditions, ATLAS tracking system responses to sudden environ-mental changes (temperature, magnetic field) by small collective deformations. These have to be identified and corrected in order to assure uniform, highest quality tracking...

  9. Machine learning and parallelism in the reconstruction of LHCb and its upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00260810

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb detector at the LHC is a general purpose detector in the forward region with a focus on reconstructing decays of c- and b-hadrons. For Run II of the LHC, a new trigger strategy with a real-time reconstruction, alignment and calibration was employed. This was made possible by implementing an oine-like track reconstruction in the high level trigger. However, the ever increasing need for a higher throughput and the move to parallelism in the CPU architectures in the last years necessitated the use of vectorization techniques to achieve the desired speed and a more extensive use of machine learning to veto bad events early on. This document discusses selected improvements in computationally expensive parts of the track reconstruction, like the Kalman filter, as well as an improved approach to get rid of fake tracks using fast machine learning techniques. In the last part, a short overview of the track reconstruction challenges for the upgrade of LHCb, is given. Running a fully software-based trigger, a l...

  10. Spectrotemporal CT data acquisition and reconstruction at low dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Darin P.; Badea, Cristian T.; Lee, Chang-Lung; Kirsch, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: X-ray computed tomography (CT) is widely used, both clinically and preclinically, for fast, high-resolution anatomic imaging; however, compelling opportunities exist to expand its use in functional imaging applications. For instance, spectral information combined with nanoparticle contrast agents enables quantification of tissue perfusion levels, while temporal information details cardiac and respiratory dynamics. The authors propose and demonstrate a projection acquisition and reconstruction strategy for 5D CT (3D + dual energy + time) which recovers spectral and temporal information without substantially increasing radiation dose or sampling time relative to anatomic imaging protocols. Methods: The authors approach the 5D reconstruction problem within the framework of low-rank and sparse matrix decomposition. Unlike previous work on rank-sparsity constrained CT reconstruction, the authors establish an explicit rank-sparse signal model to describe the spectral and temporal dimensions. The spectral dimension is represented as a well-sampled time and energy averaged image plus regularly undersampled principal components describing the spectral contrast. The temporal dimension is represented as the same time and energy averaged reconstruction plus contiguous, spatially sparse, and irregularly sampled temporal contrast images. Using a nonlinear, image domain filtration approach, the authors refer to as rank-sparse kernel regression, the authors transfer image structure from the well-sampled time and energy averaged reconstruction to the spectral and temporal contrast images. This regularization strategy strictly constrains the reconstruction problem while approximately separating the temporal and spectral dimensions. Separability results in a highly compressed representation for the 5D data in which projections are shared between the temporal and spectral reconstruction subproblems, enabling substantial undersampling. The authors solved the 5D reconstruction

  11. Selected event reconstruction algorithms for the CBM experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, Semen; Höhne, Claudia; Lebedev, Andrey; Ososkov, Gennady

    2014-01-01

    Development of fast and efficient event reconstruction algorithms is an important and challenging task in the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future FAIR facility. The event reconstruction algorithms have to process terabytes of input data produced in particle collisions. In this contribution, several event reconstruction algorithms are presented. Optimization of the algorithms in the following CBM detectors are discussed: Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector, Transition Radiation Detectors (TRD) and Muon Chamber (MUCH). The ring reconstruction algorithm in the RICH is discussed. In TRD and MUCH track reconstruction algorithms are based on track following and Kalman Filter methods. All algorithms were significantly optimized to achieve maximum speed up and minimum memory consumption. Obtained results showed that a significant speed up factor for all algorithms was achieved and the reconstruction efficiency stays at high level.

  12. Real-Time Motion Tracking for Mobile Augmented/Virtual Reality Using Adaptive Visual-Inertial Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wei; Zheng, Lianyu; Deng, Huanjun; Zhang, Hongbo

    2017-05-05

    In mobile augmented/virtual reality (AR/VR), real-time 6-Degree of Freedom (DoF) motion tracking is essential for the registration between virtual scenes and the real world. However, due to the limited computational capacity of mobile terminals today, the latency between consecutive arriving poses would damage the user experience in mobile AR/VR. Thus, a visual-inertial based real-time motion tracking for mobile AR/VR is proposed in this paper. By means of high frequency and passive outputs from the inertial sensor, the real-time performance of arriving poses for mobile AR/VR is achieved. In addition, to alleviate the jitter phenomenon during the visual-inertial fusion, an adaptive filter framework is established to cope with different motion situations automatically, enabling the real-time 6-DoF motion tracking by balancing the jitter and latency. Besides, the robustness of the traditional visual-only based motion tracking is enhanced, giving rise to a better mobile AR/VR performance when motion blur is encountered. Finally, experiments are carried out to demonstrate the proposed method, and the results show that this work is capable of providing a smooth and robust 6-DoF motion tracking for mobile AR/VR in real-time.

  13. CMS Tracking Performance Results from Early LHC Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Haensel, Stephan; Hoch, Michael; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Krammer, Manfred; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Teischinger, Florian; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Benucci, Leonardo; Ceard, Ludivine; De Wolf, Eddi A.; Janssen, Xavier; Maes, Thomas; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Adler, Volker; Beauceron, Stephanie; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Devroede, Olivier; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Joris; Maes, Michael; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Villella, Ilaria; Chabert, Eric Christian; Charaf, Otman; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wickens, John; Costantini, Silvia; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Marinov, Andrey; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Vanelderen, Lukas; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Julien; De Favereau De Jeneret, Jerome; Delaere, Christophe; Demin, Pavel; Favart, Denis; Giammanco, Andrea; Grégoire, Ghislain; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Militaru, Otilia; Ovyn, Severine; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Schul, Nicolas; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Alves, Gilvan; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Carvalho, Wagner; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Santoro, Alberto; Silva Do Amaral, Sheila Mara; Sznajder, Andre; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, Felipe; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Ferreira Dias, Marco Andre; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Novaes, Sergio F.; Padula, Sandra; Darmenov, Nikolay; Dimitrov, Lubomir; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Trayanov, Rumen; Vankov, Ivan; Dyulendarova, Milena; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Marinova, Evelina; Mateev, Matey; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Yang, Min; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Ban, Yong; Guo, Shuang; Hu, Zhen; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Zhu, Bo; Cabrera, Andrés; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Lelas, Karlo; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Dzelalija, Mile; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Fereos, Reginos; Galanti, Mario; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A.; Rykaczewski, Hans; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Hektor, Andi; Kadastik, Mario; Kannike, Kristjan; Müntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Azzolini, Virginia; Eerola, Paula; Czellar, Sandor; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Klem, Jukka; Kortelainen, Matti J.; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Sarkar, Subir; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Sillou, Daniel; Besancon, Marc; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Descamps, Julien; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Gentit, François-Xavier; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Marionneau, Matthieu; Millischer, Laurent; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Rousseau, Delphine; Titov, Maksym; Verrecchia, Patrice; Baffioni, Stephanie; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bluj, Michal; Broutin, Clementine; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Elgammal, Sherif; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Haguenauer, Maurice; Kalinowski, Artur; Miné, Philippe; Paganini, Pascal; Sabes, David; Sirois, Yves; Thiebaux, Christophe; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Besson, Auguste; Bloch, Daniel; Bodin, David; Brom, Jean-Marie; Cardaci, Marco; Conte, Eric; Drouhin, Frédéric; Ferro, Cristina; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Greder, Sebastien; Juillot, Pierre; Karim, Mehdi; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Mikami, Yoshinari; Speck, Joaquim; Van Hove, Pierre; Fassi, Farida; Mercier, Damien; Baty, Clement; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bedjidian, Marc; Bondu, Olivier; Boudoul, Gaelle; Boumediene, Djamel; Brun, Hugues; Chanon, Nicolas; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Le Grand, Thomas; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Sordini, Viola; Tosi, Silvano; Tschudi, Yohann; Verdier, Patrice; Xiao, Hong; Roinishvili, Vladimir; Anagnostou, Georgios; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heracleous, Natalie; Hindrichs, Otto; Jussen, Ruediger; Klein, Katja; Merz, Jennifer; Mohr, Niklas; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Weber, Martin; Wittmer, Bruno; Actis, Oxana; Ata, Metin; Bender, Walter; Biallass, Philipp; Erdmann, Martin; Frangenheim, Jens; Hebbeker, Thomas; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Hof, Carsten; Kirsch, Matthias; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Kreuzer, Peter; Lanske, Dankfried; Magass, Carsten; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Papacz, Paul; Pieta, Holger; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Sowa, Michael; Steggemann, Jan; Teyssier, Daniel; Zeidler, Clemens; Bontenackels, Michael; Davids, Martina; Duda, Markus; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Giffels, Manuel; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Heydhausen, Dirk; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Linn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Sauerland, Philip; Stahl, Achim; Thomas, Maarten; Tornier, Daiske; Zoeller, Marc Henning; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bergholz, Matthias; Borras, Kerstin; Campbell, Alan; Castro, Elena; Dammann, Dirk; Eckerlin, Guenter; Flossdorf, Alexander; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Hauk, Johannes; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katkov, Igor; Kleinwort, Claus; Kluge, Hannelies; Knutsson, Albert; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Marienfeld, Markus; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Olzem, Jan; Parenti, Andrea; Raspereza, Alexei; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Sen, Niladri; Stein, Matthias; Tomaszewska, Justyna; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Wissing, Christoph; Autermann, Christian; Bobrovskyi, Sergei; Draeger, Jula; Eckstein, Doris; Enderle, Holger; Gebbert, Ulla; Kaschube, Kolja; Kaussen, Gordon; Klanner, Robert; Mura, Benedikt; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nowak, Friederike; Pietsch, Niklas; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schröder, Matthias; Schum, Torben; Schwandt, Joern; Srivastava, Ajay Kumar; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Thomsen, Jan; Wolf, Roger; Bauer, Julia; Buege, Volker; Cakir, Altan; Chwalek, Thorsten; Daeuwel, Daniel; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Dirkes, Guido; Feindt, Michael; Gruschke, Jasmin; Hackstein, Christoph; Hartmann, Frank; Heinrich, Michael; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Honc, Simon; Kuhr, Thomas; Martschei, Daniel; Mueller, Steffen; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Oberst, Oliver; Oehler, Andreas; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Piparo, Danilo; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Renz, Manuel; Sabellek, Andreas; Saout, Christophe; Scheurer, Armin; Schieferdecker, Philipp; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schott, Gregory; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Troendle, Daniel; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Zeise, Manuel; Zhukov, Valery; Ziebarth, Eva Barbara; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Manolakos, Ioannis; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Mavrommatis, Charalampos; Petrakou, Eleni; Gouskos, Loukas; Katsas, Panagiotis; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Evangelou, Ioannis; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Patras, Vaios; Triantis, Frixos A.; Aranyi, Attila; Bencze, Gyorgy; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Debreczeni, Gergely; Hajdu, Csaba; Horvath, Dezso; Kapusi, Anita; Krajczar, Krisztian; Laszlo, Andras; Sikler, Ferenc; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Beni, Noemi; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Veszpremi, Viktor; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Jindal, Monika; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Mehta, Manuk Zubin; Nishu, Nishu; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Sharma, Archana; Sharma, Richa; Singh, Anil; Singh, Jas Bir; Singh, Supreet Pal; Ahuja, Sudha; Chauhan, Sushil; Choudhary, Brajesh C.; Gupta, Pooja; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Kumar, Ashok; Ranjan, Kirti; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Choudhury, Rajani Kant; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kataria, Sushil Kumar; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Suggisetti, Praveenkumar; Aziz, Tariq; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Devdatta; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Saha, Anirban; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dugad, Shashikant; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Fahim, Ali; Hashemi, Majid; Jafari, Abideh; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Dimitrov, Anton; Fedele, Francesca; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lusito, Letizia; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Manna, Norman; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Romano, Francesco; Roselli, Giuseppe; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Trentadue, Raffaello; Tupputi, Salvatore; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Giunta, Marina; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gianni; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Frosali, Simone; Gallo, Elisabetta; Genta, Chiara; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Musenich, Riccardo; Benaglia, Andrea; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; De Guio, Federico; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malberti, Martina; Malvezzi, Sandra; Martelli, Arabella; Massironi, Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Miccio, Vincenzo; Moroni, Luigi; Negri, Pietro; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Sala, Silvano; Salerno, Roberto; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Tancini, Valentina; Taroni, Silvia; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cimmino, Anna; De Cosa, Annapaola; De Gruttola, Michele; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Noli, Pasquale; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellan, Paolo; Bisello, Dario; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Conti, Enrico; De Mattia, Marco; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Fanzago, Federica; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Giubilato, Piero; Gresele, Ambra; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Margoni, Martino; Mazzucato, Mirco; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Perrozzi, Luca; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Baesso, Paolo; Berzano, Umberto; Riccardi, Cristina; Torre, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Viviani, Claudio; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Caponeri, Benedetta; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Lucaroni, Andrea; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Nappi, Aniello; Santocchia, Attilio; Servoli, Leonello; Valdata, Marisa; Volpe, Roberta; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Castaldi, Rino; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Kraan, Aafke; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Palmonari, Francesco; Segneri, Gabriele; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Di Marco, Emanuele; Diemoz, Marcella; Franci, Daniele; Grassi, Marco; Longo, Egidio; Organtini, Giovanni; Palma, Alessandro; Pandolfi, Francesco; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Biino, Cristina; Botta, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Castello, Roberto; Costa, Marco; Demaria, Natale; Graziano, Alberto; Mariotti, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Mila, Giorgia; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Trocino, Daniele; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ambroglini, Filippo; Belforte, Stefano; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Kim, Hyunsoo; Chang, Sunghyun; Chung, Jin Hyuk; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Ji Eun; Kong, Dae Jung; Park, Hyangkyu; Son, Dohhee; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Jaeho; Kim, Jae Yool; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Hong, Byung-Sik; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Moon, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Keun; Rhee, Han-Bum; Sim, Kwang Souk; Choi, Minkyoo; Kang, Seokon; Kim, Hyunyong; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Lee, Jongseok; Lee, Sungeun; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Janulis, Mindaugas; Martisiute, Dalia; Petrov, Pavel; Sabonis, Tomas; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Reyes-Santos, Marco A.; Allfrey, Philip; Krofcheck, David; Tam, Jason; Butler, Philip H.; Signal, Tony; Williams, Jennifer C.; Ahmad, Muhammad; Ahmed, Ijaz; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Hoorani, Hafeez R.; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Frueboes, Tomasz; Gokieli, Ryszard; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Almeida, Nuno; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Sá Martins, Pedro; Mini, Giuliano; Musella, Pasquale; Nayak, Aruna; Raposo, Luis; Ribeiro, Pedro Quinaz; Seixas, Joao; Silva, Pedro; Soares, David; Varela, Joao; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Belotelov, Ivan; Bunin, Pavel; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr., Michael; Golutvin, Igor; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Bondar, Nikolai; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Matveev, Viktor; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Toropin, Alexander; Troitsky, Sergey; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Kaftanov, Vitali; Kossov, Mikhail; Krokhotin, Andrey; Kuleshov, Sergey; Oulianov, Alexei; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Shreyber, Irina; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Rusakov, Sergey V.; Vinogradov, Alexey; Azhgirey, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Datsko, Kirill; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Kachanov, Vassili; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Slabospitsky, Sergey; Sobol, Andrei; Sytine, Alexandre; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Djordjevic, Milos; Krpic, Dragomir; Maletic, Dimitrije; Milosevic, Jovan; Puzovic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Arce, Pedro; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cepeda, Maria; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M.; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chuang, Shan-Huei; Diaz Merino, Irma; Diez Gonzalez, Carlos; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Jorda, Clara; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Matorras, Francisco; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Sobron Sanudo, Mar; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Beaudette, Florian; Bell, Alan James; Benedetti, Daniele; Bernet, Colin; Bialas, Wojciech; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bolognesi, Sara; Breuker, Horst; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cano, Eric; Cattai, Ariella; Cerminara, Gianluca; Christiansen, Tim; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; Covarelli, Roberto; Curé, Benoît; Dahms, Torsten; De Roeck, Albert; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Funk, Wolfgang; Gaddi, Andrea; Gennai, Simone; Gerwig, Hubert; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Gowdy, Stephen; Guiducci, Luigi; Hansen, Magnus; Hartl, Christian; Harvey, John; Hegner, Benedikt; Henderson, Conor; Hoffmann, Hans Falk; Honma, Alan; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Lecoq, Paul; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Lourenco, Carlos; Macpherson, Alick; Maki, Tuula; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moser, Roland; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mulders, Martijn; Nesvold, Erik; Orsini, Luciano; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrilli, Achille; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovelli, Chiara; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Segoni, Ilaria; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Spiropulu, Maria; Stöckli, Fabian; Stoye, Markus; Tropea, Paola; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vichoudis, Paschalis; Voutilainen, Mikko; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Gabathuler, Kurt; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; König, Stefan; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Meier, Frank; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Sibille, Jennifer; Starodumov, Andrei; Caminada, Lea; Chen, Zhiling; Cittolin, Sergio; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Eugster, Jürg; Freudenreich, Klaus; Grab, Christoph; Hervé, Alain; Hintz, Wieland; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Marchica, Carmelo; Meridiani, Paolo; Milenovic, Predrag; Moortgat, Filip; Nardulli, Alessandro; Nef, Pascal; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pape, Luc; Pauss, Felicitas; Punz, Thomas; Rizzi, Andrea; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Sala, Leonardo; Sanchez, Ann - Karin; Sawley, Marie-Christine; Schinzel, Dietrich; Stieger, Benjamin; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thea, Alessandro; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Treille, Daniel; Weber, Matthias; Wehrli, Lukas; Weng, Joanna; Aguiló, Ernest; Amsler, Claude; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Visscher, Simon; Favaro, Carlotta; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Jaeger, Andreas; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Regenfus, Christian; Robmann, Peter; Rommerskirchen, Tanja; Schmidt, Alexander; Tsirigkas, Dimitrios; Wilke, Lotte; Chang, Yuan-Hann; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Chen, Wan-Ting; Go, Apollo; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Li, Syue-Wei; Lin, Willis; Liu, Ming-Hsiung; Lu, Yun-Ju; Wu, Jing-Han; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartalini, Paolo; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Lin, Sheng-Wen; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Ueno, Koji; Wang, Chin-chi; Wang, Minzu; Wei, Jui-Te; Adiguzel, Aytul; Ayhan, Aydin; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Demir, Zahide; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gökbulut, Gül; Güler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Karaman, Turker; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Nart, Alisah; Önengüt, Gülsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatöz, Ayse; Sahin, Ozge; Sengul, Ozden; Sogut, Kenan; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Uzun, Dilber; Vergili, Latife Nukhet; Vergili, Mehmet; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Aliev, Takhmasib; Bilmis, Selcuk; Deniz, Muhammed; Gamsizkan, Halil; Guler, Ali Murat; Ocalan, Kadir; Ozpineci, Altug; Serin, Meltem; Sever, Ramazan; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yildirim, Eda; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Deliomeroglu, Mehmet; Demir, Durmus; Gülmez, Erhan; Halu, Arda; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Özbek, Melih; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Sonmez, Nasuf; Levchuk, Leonid; Bell, Peter; Bostock, Francis; Brooke, James John; Cheng, Teh Lee; Cussans, David; Frazier, Robert; Goldstein, Joel; Hansen, Maria; Heath, Greg P.; Heath, Helen F.; Hill, Christopher; Huckvale, Benedickt; Jackson, James; Kreczko, Lukasz; Mackay, Catherine Kirsty; Metson, Simon; Newbold, Dave M.; Nirunpong, Kachanon; Smith, Vincent J.; Ward, Simon; Basso, Lorenzo; Bell, Ken W.; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M.; Camanzi, Barbara; Cockerill, David J.A.; Coughlan, John A.; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Kennedy, Bruce W.; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Tomalin, Ian R.; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Bainbridge, Robert; Ball, Gordon; Ballin, Jamie; Beuselinck, Raymond; Buchmuller, Oliver; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Foudas, Costas; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Guneratne Bryer, Arlo; Hall, Geoffrey; Hatherell, Zoe; Hays, Jonathan; Iles, Gregory; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Marrouche, Jad; Nandi, Robin; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Papageorgiou, Anastasios; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Pioppi, Michele; Raymond, David Mark; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Rose, Andrew; Ryan, Matthew John; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Sparrow, Alex; Tapper, Alexander; Tourneur, Stephane; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wakefield, Stuart; Wardrope, David; Whyntie, Tom; Barrett, Matthew; Chadwick, Matthew; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R.; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Teodorescu, Liliana; Bose, Tulika; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Clough, Andrew; Fantasia, Cory; Heister, Arno; St. John, Jason; Lawson, Philip; Lazic, Dragoslav; Rohlf, James; Sulak, Lawrence; Andrea, Jeremy; Avetisyan, Aram; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Chou, John Paul; Cutts, David; Esen, Selda; Ferapontov, Alexey; Heintz, Ulrich; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Landsberg, Greg; Narain, Meenakshi; Nguyen, Duong; Speer, Thomas; Tsang, Ka Vang; Borgia, Maria Assunta; Breedon, Richard; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Cebra, Daniel; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Cox, Peter Timothy; Dolen, James; Erbacher, Robin; Friis, Evan; Ko, Winston; Kopecky, Alexandra; Lander, Richard; Liu, Haidong; Maruyama, Sho; Miceli, Tia; Nikolic, Milan; Pellett, Dave; Robles, Jorge; Schwarz, Thomas; Searle, Matthew; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Tripathi, Mani; Vasquez Sierra, Ricardo; Veelken, Christian; Andreev, Valeri; Arisaka, Katsushi; Cline, David; Cousins, Robert; Deisher, Amanda; Erhan, Samim; Farrell, Chris; Felcini, Marta; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Jarvis, Chad; Plager, Charles; Rakness, Gregory; Schlein, Peter; Tucker, Jordan; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Wallny, Rainer; Babb, John; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Giordano, Ferdinando; Hanson, Gail; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Liu, Feng; Liu, Hongliang; Luthra, Arun; Nguyen, Harold; Pasztor, Gabriella; Satpathy, Asish; Shen, Benjamin C.; Stringer, Robert; Sturdy, Jared; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wilken, Rachel; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G.; Dusinberre, Elizabeth; Evans, David; Golf, Frank; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Mangano, Boris; Muelmenstaedt, Johannes; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pi, Haifeng; Pieri, Marco; Ranieri, Riccardo; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Barge, Derek; Bellan, Riccardo; Blume, Michael; Campagnari, Claudio; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Danielson, Thomas; Garberson, Jeffrey; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Kalavase, Puneeth; Koay, Sue Ann; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Lamb, James; Lowette, Steven; Pavlunin, Viktor; Rebassoo, Finn; Ribnik, Jacob; Richman, Jeffrey; Rossin, Roberto; Stuart, David; To, Wing; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Witherell, Michael; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Gataullin, Marat; Kcira, Dorian; Litvine, Vladimir; Ma, Yousi; Newman, Harvey B.; Rogan, Christopher; Shin, Kyoungha; Timciuc, Vladlen; Traczyk, Piotr; Veverka, Jan; Wilkinson, Richard; Yang, Yong; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Akgun, Bora; Carroll, Ryan; Ferguson, Thomas; Jang, Dong Wook; Jun, Soon Yung; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Terentyev, Nikolay; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Drell, Brian Robert; Edelmaier, Christopher; Ford, William T.; Heyburn, Bernadette; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Zang, Shi-Lei; Agostino, Lorenzo; Alexander, James; Blekman, Freya; Chatterjee, Avishek; Das, Souvik; Eggert, Nicholas; Fields, Laura Johanna; Gibbons, Lawrence Kent; Heltsley, Brian; Henriksson, Kristofer; Hopkins, Walter; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Kreis, Benjamin; Kuznetsov, Valentin; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Puigh, Darren; Riley, Daniel; Ryd, Anders; Saelim, Michael; Shi, Xin; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Vaughan, Jennifer; Weng, Yao; Wittich, Peter; Biselli, Angela; Cirino, Guy; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Atac, Muzaffer; Bakken, Jon Alan; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar A.T.; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C.; Bloch, Ingo; Borcherding, Frederick; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Chetluru, Vasundhara; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Demarteau, Marcel; Eartly, David P.; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Gottschalk, Erik; Green, Dan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hahn, Alan; Hanlon, Jim; Harris, Robert M.; Hirschauer, James; James, Eric; Jensen, Hans; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Khatiwada, Rakshya; Kilminster, Benjamin; Klima, Boaz; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Kunori, Shuichi; Kwan, Simon; Limon, Peter; Lipton, Ron; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; McCauley, Thomas; Miao, Ting; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Popescu, Sorina; Pordes, Ruth; Prokofyev, Oleg; Saoulidou, Niki; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Smith, Richard P.; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J.; Spiegel, Leonard; Tan, Ping; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitmore, Juliana; Wu, Weimin; Yumiceva, Francisco; Yun, Jae Chul; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Chen, Mingshui; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Dobur, Didar; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Field, Richard D.; Fisher, Matthew; Fu, Yu; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gartner, Joseph; Kim, Bockjoo; Klimenko, Sergey; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kotov, Khristian; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Kypreos, Theodore; Matchev, Konstantin; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Prescott, Craig; Remington, Ronald; Schmitt, Michael; Scurlock, Bobby; Sellers, Paul; Wang, Dayong; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Ceron, Cristobal; Gaultney, Vanessa; Kramer, Laird; Lebolo, Luis Miguel; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Mesa, Dalgis; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Chen, Jie; Diamond, Brendan; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Jenkins, Merrill; Johnson, Kurtis F.; Prosper, Harrison; Sekmen, Sezen; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Baarmand, Marc M.; Guragain, Samir; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Ralich, Robert; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Adams, Mark Raymond; Anghel, Ioana Maria; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Betts, Russell Richard; Callner, Jeremy; Cavanaugh, Richard; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Lacroix, Florent; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Smoron, Agata; Strom, Derek; Varelas, Nikos; Akgun, Ugur; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Cankocak, Kerem; Clarida, Warren; Duru, Firdevs; Lae, Chung Khim; McCliment, Edward; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Newsom, Charles Ray; Norbeck, Edwin; Olson, Jonathan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Sen, Sercan; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bonato, Alessio; Eskew, Christopher; Fehling, David; Giurgiu, Gavril; Gritsan, Andrei; Guo, Zijin; Hu, Guofan; Maksimovic, Petar; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Swartz, Morris; Tran, Nhan Viet; Whitbeck, Andrew; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Grachov, Oleg; Murray, Michael; Radicci, Valeria; Sanders, Stephen; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Zhukova, Victoria; Bandurin, Dmitry; Bolton, Tim; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Maravin, Yurii; Shrestha, Shruti; Svintradze, Irakli; Wan, Zongru; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Boutemeur, Madjid; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferencek, Dinko; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G.; Kirn, Malina; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Rossato, Kenneth; Rumerio, Paolo; Santanastasio, Francesco; Skuja, Andris; Temple, Jeffrey; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C.; Twedt, Elizabeth; Alver, Burak; Bauer, Gerry; Bendavid, Joshua; Busza, Wit; Butz, Erik; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; D'Enterria, David; Everaerts, Pieter; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Harris, Philip; Kim, Yongsun; Klute, Markus; Lee, Yen-Jie; Li, Wei; Loizides, Constantinos; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Nahn, Steve; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Rudolph, Matthew; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Sung, Kevin; Wenger, Edward Allen; Wyslouch, Bolek; Xie, Si; Yang, Mingming; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Yoon, Sungho; Zanetti, Marco; Cole, Perrie; Cooper, Seth; Cushman, Priscilla; Dahmes, Bryan; De Benedetti, Abraham; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Franzoni, Giovanni; Haupt, Jason; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Rekovic, Vladimir; Rusack, Roger; Sasseville, Michael; Singovsky, Alexander; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Godang, Romulus; Kroeger, Rob; Perera, Lalith; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sanders, David A; Sonnek, Peter; Summers, Don; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Butt, Jamila; Claes, Daniel R.; Dominguez, Aaron; Eads, Michael; Keller, Jason; Kelly, Tony; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Lundstedt, Carl; Malbouisson, Helena; Malik, Sudhir; Snow, Gregory R.; Baur, Ulrich; Iashvili, Ia; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Smith, Kenneth; Zennamo, Joseph; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Boeriu, Oana; Chasco, Matthew; Reucroft, Steve; Swain, John; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Anastassov, Anton; Kubik, Andrew; Ofierzynski, Radoslaw Adrian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael; Stoynev, Stoyan; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Antonelli, Louis; Berry, Douglas; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kolb, Jeff; Kolberg, Ted; Lannon, Kevin; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Morse, David Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Slaunwhite, Jason; Valls, Nil; Warchol, Jadwiga; Wayne, Mitchell; Ziegler, Jill; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Gu, Jianhui; Killewald, Phillip; Ling, Ta-Yung; Rodenburg, Marissa; Williams, Grayson; Adam, Nadia; Berry, Edmund; Elmer, Peter; Gerbaudo, Davide; Halyo, Valerie; Hunt, Adam; Jones, John; Laird, Edward; Lopes Pegna, David; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Acosta, Jhon Gabriel; Huang, Xing Tao; Lopez, Angel; Mendez, Hector; Oliveros, Sandra; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Zatserklyaniy, Andriy; Alagoz, Enver; Barnes, Virgil E.; Bolla, Gino; Borrello, Laura; Bortoletto, Daniela; Everett, Adam; Garfinkel, Arthur F.; Gecse, Zoltan; Gutay, Laszlo; Jones, Matthew; Koybasi, Ozhan; Laasanen, Alvin T.; Leonardo, Nuno; Liu, Chang; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Potamianos, Karolos; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Jindal, Pratima; Parashar, Neeti; Cuplov, Vesna; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank J.M.; Liu, Jinghua H.; Morales, Jafet; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Chung, Yeon Sei; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Flacher, Henning; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Gotra, Yury; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Miner, Daniel Carl; Orbaker, Douglas; Petrillo, Gianluca; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Zielinski, Marek; Bhatti, Anwar; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Lungu, Gheorghe; Mesropian, Christina; Yan, Ming; Atramentov, Oleksiy; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hits, Dmitry; Lath, Amitabh; Rose, Keith; Schnetzer, Steve; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Cerizza, Giordano; Hollingsworth, Matthew; Spanier, Stefan; Yang, Zong-Chang; York, Andrew; Asaadi, Jonathan; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Gurrola, Alfredo; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Montalvo, Roy; Nguyen, Chi Nhan; Pivarski, James; Safonov, Alexei; Sengupta, Sinjini; Toback, David; Weinberger, Michael; Akchurin, Nural; Bardak, Cemile; Damgov, Jordan; Jeong, Chiyoung; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Lee, Sung Won; Mane, Poonam; Roh, Youn; Sill, Alan; Volobouev, Igor; Wigmans, Richard; Yazgan, Efe; Appelt, Eric; Brownson, Eric; Engh, Daniel; Florez, Carlos; Gabella, William; Johns, Willard; Kurt, Pelin; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Sheldon, Paul; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Balazs, Michael; Boutle, Sarah; Buehler, Marc; Conetti, Sergio; Cox, Bradley; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Neu, Christopher; Yohay, Rachel; Gollapinni, Sowjanya; Gunthoti, Kranti; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Mattson, Mark; Milstène, Caroline; Sakharov, Alexandre; Anderson, Michael; Bachtis, Michail; Bellinger, James Nugent; Carlsmith, Duncan; Dasu, Sridhara; Dutta, Suchandra; Efron, Jonathan; Gray, Lindsey; Grogg, Kira Suzanne; Grothe, Monika; Herndon, Matthew; Klabbers, Pamela; Klukas, Jeffrey; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Leonard, Jessica; Lomidze, David; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Polese, Giovanni; Reeder, Don; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H.; Swanson, Joshua; Weinberg, Marc

    2010-01-01

    The first LHC pp collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 0.9 and 2.36 TeV were recorded by the CMS detector in December 2009. The trajectories of charged particles produced in the collisions were reconstructed using the all-silicon Tracker and their momenta were measured in the 3.8 T axial magnetic field. Results from the Tracker commissioning are presented including studies of timing, efficiency, signal-to-noise, resolution, and ionization energy. Reconstructed tracks are used to benchmark the performance in terms of track and vertex resolutions, reconstruction of decays, estimation of ionization energy loss, as well as identification of photon conversions, nuclear interactions, and heavy-flavour decays.

  14. Reconstructing the calibrated strain signal in the Advanced LIGO detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viets, A. D.; Wade, M.; Urban, A. L.; Kandhasamy, S.; Betzwieser, J.; Brown, Duncan A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Cahillane, C.; Goetz, E.; Izumi, K.; Karki, S.; Kissel, J. S.; Mendell, G.; Savage, R. L.; Siemens, X.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Weinstein, A. J.

    2018-05-01

    Advanced LIGO’s raw detector output needs to be calibrated to compute dimensionless strain h(t) . Calibrated strain data is produced in the time domain using both a low-latency, online procedure and a high-latency, offline procedure. The low-latency h(t) data stream is produced in two stages, the first of which is performed on the same computers that operate the detector’s feedback control system. This stage, referred to as the front-end calibration, uses infinite impulse response (IIR) filtering and performs all operations at a 16 384 Hz digital sampling rate. Due to several limitations, this procedure currently introduces certain systematic errors in the calibrated strain data, motivating the second stage of the low-latency procedure, known as the low-latency gstlal calibration pipeline. The gstlal calibration pipeline uses finite impulse response (FIR) filtering to apply corrections to the output of the front-end calibration. It applies time-dependent correction factors to the sensing and actuation components of the calibrated strain to reduce systematic errors. The gstlal calibration pipeline is also used in high latency to recalibrate the data, which is necessary due mainly to online dropouts in the calibrated data and identified improvements to the calibration models or filters.

  15. The flex track: flexible partitioning between low- and high-acuity areas of an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laker, Lauren F; Froehle, Craig M; Lindsell, Christopher J; Ward, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    Emergency departments (EDs) with both low- and high-acuity treatment areas often have fixed allocation of resources, regardless of demand. We demonstrate the utility of discrete-event simulation to evaluate flexible partitioning between low- and high-acuity ED areas to identify the best operational strategy for subsequent implementation. A discrete-event simulation was used to model patient flow through a 50-bed, urban, teaching ED that handles 85,000 patient visits annually. The ED has historically allocated 10 beds to a fast track for low-acuity patients. We estimated the effect of a flex track policy, which involved switching up to 5 of these fast track beds to serving both low- and high-acuity patients, on patient waiting times. When the high-acuity beds were not at capacity, low-acuity patients were given priority access to flexible beds. Otherwise, high-acuity patients were given priority access to flexible beds. Wait times were estimated for patients by disposition and Emergency Severity Index score. A flex track policy using 3 flexible beds produced the lowest mean patient waiting time of 30.9 minutes (95% confidence interval [CI] 30.6 to 31.2 minutes). The typical fast track approach of rigidly separating high- and low-acuity beds produced a mean patient wait time of 40.6 minutes (95% CI 40.2 to 50.0 minutes), 31% higher than that of the 3-bed flex track. A completely flexible ED, in which all beds can accommodate any patient, produced mean wait times of 35.1 minutes (95% CI 34.8 to 35.4 minutes). The results from the 3-bed flex track scenario were robust, performing well across a range of scenarios involving higher and lower patient volumes and care durations. Using discrete-event simulation, we have shown that adding some flexibility into bed allocation between low and high acuity can provide substantial reductions in overall patient waiting and a more efficient ED. Copyright © 2014 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc

  16. Atmospheric muons reconstruction with Antares; Reconstruction de muons atmospheriques avec ANTARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melissas, M

    2007-09-15

    The ANTARES collaboration is building a neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. This detector contains 900 photomultiplier tubes, dispatched on 12 lines, in order to detect Cerenkov light from muon induced by neutrino interactions in the the vicinity of the detector. Currently the first 5 lines have been deployed. A first task consists in studying the stability of the detector calibration, which is a necessary step to understand the detector response. Then we studied optical properties of water, for this we developed a reconstruction method dedicated to LED Beacon. The extracted parameters are compatible with earlier measurements. A quality criteria to reject badly reconstructed track has been developed based on the likelihood of the tracks fit versus point fit. This has been applied to real data and a preliminary analysis of atmospheric muons with a 5-lines detector is performed. (author)

  17. Methodology for Calculating Latency of GPS Probe Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Stanley E [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wang, Zhongxiang [University of Maryland; Hamedi, Masoud [University of Maryland

    2017-10-01

    Crowdsourced GPS probe data, such as travel time on changeable-message signs and incident detection, have been gaining popularity in recent years as a source for real-time traffic information to driver operations and transportation systems management and operations. Efforts have been made to evaluate the quality of such data from different perspectives. Although such crowdsourced data are already in widespread use in many states, particularly the high traffic areas on the Eastern seaboard, concerns about latency - the time between traffic being perturbed as a result of an incident and reflection of the disturbance in the outsourced data feed - have escalated in importance. Latency is critical for the accuracy of real-time operations, emergency response, and traveler information systems. This paper offers a methodology for measuring probe data latency regarding a selected reference source. Although Bluetooth reidentification data are used as the reference source, the methodology can be applied to any other ground truth data source of choice. The core of the methodology is an algorithm for maximum pattern matching that works with three fitness objectives. To test the methodology, sample field reference data were collected on multiple freeway segments for a 2-week period by using portable Bluetooth sensors as ground truth. Equivalent GPS probe data were obtained from a private vendor, and their latency was evaluated. Latency at different times of the day, impact of road segmentation scheme on latency, and sensitivity of the latency to both speed-slowdown and recovery-from-slowdown episodes are also discussed.

  18. Large scale and low latency analysis facilities for the CMS experiment: development and operational aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Riahi, Hassen

    2010-01-01

    While a majority of CMS data analysis activities rely on the distributed computing infrastructure on the WLCG Grid, dedicated local computing facilities have been deployed to address particular requirements in terms of latency and scale. The CMS CERN Analysis Facility (CAF) was primarily designed to host a large variety of latency-critical workfows. These break down into alignment and calibration, detector commissioning and diagnosis, and high-interest physics analysis requiring fast turnaround. In order to reach the goal for fast turnaround tasks, the Workload Management group has designed a CRABServer based system to fit with two main needs: to provide a simple, familiar interface to the user (as used in the CRAB Analysis Tool[7]) and to allow an easy transition to the Tier-0 system. While the CRABServer component had been initially designed for Grid analysis by CMS end-users, with a few modifications it turned out to be also a very powerful service to manage and monitor local submissions on the CAF. Tran...

  19. Geometrical optimization of a particle tracking system for proton computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penfold, S.N.; Rosenfeld, A.B.; Schulte, R.W.; Sadrozinksi, H.-F.W.

    2011-01-01

    Proton computed tomography (pCT) is currently being developed as an imaging modality for improving the accuracy of treatment planning in proton therapy. A tracking telescope comprising eight planes of single-sided silicon strip detectors (SSDs) forms an integral part of our present pCT design. Due to the currently maximum available Si wafer size, the sensitive area of 9 cm × 18 cm of the pCT tracker requires each tracking plane to be composed of two individual SSDs, which creates potential reconstruction problems due to overlap or gaps of the sensitive SSD areas. Furthermore, the spacing of the tracking planes creates competing design requirements between compactness and spatial resolution. Two Monte Carlo simulations were performed to study the effect of tracking detector location on pCT image quality. It was found that a “shingled” detector design suppressed reconstruction artefacts and, for the spatial resolution of the current detector hardware, reconstructed spatial resolution was not improved with a tracking separation of greater than 8 cm.

  20. L1 track trigger for the CMS HL-LHC upgrade using AM chips and FPGAs

    CERN Document Server

    Fedi, Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    The increase of luminosity at the HL-LHC will require the introduction of tracker information in CMS's Level-1 trigger system to maintain an acceptable trigger rate when selecting interesting events, despite the order of magnitude increase in minimum bias interactions. To meet the latency requirements, dedicated hardware has to be used. This paper presents the results of tests of a prototype system (pattern recognition mezzanine) as core of pattern recognition and track fitting for the CMS experiment, combining the power of both associative memory custom ASICs and modern Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices. The mezzanine uses the latest available associative memory devices (AM06) and the most modern Xilinx Ultrascale FPGAs. The results of the test for a complete tower comprising about 0.5 million patterns is presented, using as simulated input events traversing the upgraded CMS detector. The paper shows the performance of the pattern matching, track finding and track fitting, along with the latency...

  1. WE-A-17A-10: Fast, Automatic and Accurate Catheter Reconstruction in HDR Brachytherapy Using An Electromagnetic 3D Tracking System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulin, E; Racine, E; Beaulieu, L [CHU de Quebec - Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Binnekamp, D [Integrated Clinical Solutions and Marketing, Philips Healthcare, Best, DA (Netherlands)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), actual catheter reconstruction protocols are slow and errors prompt. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and robustness of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system for improved catheter reconstruction in HDR-B protocols. Methods: For this proof-of-principle, a total of 10 catheters were inserted in gelatin phantoms with different trajectories. Catheters were reconstructed using a Philips-design 18G biopsy needle (used as an EM stylet) and the second generation Aurora Planar Field Generator from Northern Digital Inc. The Aurora EM system exploits alternating current technology and generates 3D points at 40 Hz. Phantoms were also scanned using a μCT (GE Healthcare) and Philips Big Bore clinical CT system with a resolution of 0.089 mm and 2 mm, respectively. Reconstructions using the EM stylet were compared to μCT and CT. To assess the robustness of the EM reconstruction, 5 catheters were reconstructed twice and compared. Results: Reconstruction time for one catheter was 10 seconds or less. This would imply that for a typical clinical implant of 17 catheters, the total reconstruction time would be less than 3 minutes. When compared to the μCT, the mean EM tip identification error was 0.69 ± 0.29 mm while the CT error was 1.08 ± 0.67 mm. The mean 3D distance error was found to be 0.92 ± 0.37 mm and 1.74 ± 1.39 mm for the EM and CT, respectively. EM 3D catheter trajectories were found to be significantly more accurate (unpaired t-test, p < 0.05). A mean difference of less than 0.5 mm was found between successive EM reconstructions. Conclusion: The EM reconstruction was found to be faster, more accurate and more robust than the conventional methods used for catheter reconstruction in HDR-B. This approach can be applied to any type of catheters and applicators. We would like to disclose that the equipments, used in this study, is coming from a collaboration with Philips Medical.

  2. WE-A-17A-10: Fast, Automatic and Accurate Catheter Reconstruction in HDR Brachytherapy Using An Electromagnetic 3D Tracking System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulin, E; Racine, E; Beaulieu, L; Binnekamp, D

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), actual catheter reconstruction protocols are slow and errors prompt. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and robustness of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system for improved catheter reconstruction in HDR-B protocols. Methods: For this proof-of-principle, a total of 10 catheters were inserted in gelatin phantoms with different trajectories. Catheters were reconstructed using a Philips-design 18G biopsy needle (used as an EM stylet) and the second generation Aurora Planar Field Generator from Northern Digital Inc. The Aurora EM system exploits alternating current technology and generates 3D points at 40 Hz. Phantoms were also scanned using a μCT (GE Healthcare) and Philips Big Bore clinical CT system with a resolution of 0.089 mm and 2 mm, respectively. Reconstructions using the EM stylet were compared to μCT and CT. To assess the robustness of the EM reconstruction, 5 catheters were reconstructed twice and compared. Results: Reconstruction time for one catheter was 10 seconds or less. This would imply that for a typical clinical implant of 17 catheters, the total reconstruction time would be less than 3 minutes. When compared to the μCT, the mean EM tip identification error was 0.69 ± 0.29 mm while the CT error was 1.08 ± 0.67 mm. The mean 3D distance error was found to be 0.92 ± 0.37 mm and 1.74 ± 1.39 mm for the EM and CT, respectively. EM 3D catheter trajectories were found to be significantly more accurate (unpaired t-test, p < 0.05). A mean difference of less than 0.5 mm was found between successive EM reconstructions. Conclusion: The EM reconstruction was found to be faster, more accurate and more robust than the conventional methods used for catheter reconstruction in HDR-B. This approach can be applied to any type of catheters and applicators. We would like to disclose that the equipments, used in this study, is coming from a collaboration with Philips Medical

  3. Online real-time reconstruction of adaptive TSENSE with commodity CPU / GPU hardware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roujol, Sebastien; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Vahalla, Erkki

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive temporal sensitivity encoding (TSENSE) has been suggested as a robust parallel imaging method suitable for MR guidance of interventional procedures. However, in practice, the reconstruction of adaptive TSENSE images obtained with large coil arrays leads to long reconstruction times...... image sizes used in interventional imaging (128 × 96, 16 channels, sensitivity encoding (SENSE) factor 2-4), the pipeline is able to reconstruct adaptive TSENSE images with image latencies below 90 ms at frame rates of up to 40 images/s, rendering the MR performance in practice limited...... by the constraints of the MR acquisition. Its performance is demonstrated by the online reconstruction of in vivo MR images for rapid temperature mapping of the kidney and for cardiac catheterization....

  4. Identifying Tracks Duplicates via Neural Network

    CERN Document Server

    Sunjerga, Antonio; CERN. Geneva. EP Department

    2017-01-01

    The goal of the project is to study feasibility of state of the art machine learning techniques in track reconstruction. Machine learning techniques provide promising ways to speed up the pattern recognition of tracks by adding more intelligence in the algorithms. Implementation of neural network to process of track duplicates identifying will be discussed. Different approaches are shown and results are compared to method that is currently in use.

  5. MO-DE-207A-05: Dictionary Learning Based Reconstruction with Low-Rank Constraint for Low-Dose Spectral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Q; Liu, H; Xing, L; Yu, H; Wang, G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Spectral CT enabled by an energy-resolved photon-counting detector outperforms conventional CT in terms of material discrimination, contrast resolution, etc. One reconstruction method for spectral CT is to generate a color image from a reconstructed component in each energy channel. However, given the radiation dose, the number of photons in each channel is limited, which will result in strong noise in each channel and affect the final color reconstruction. Here we propose a novel dictionary learning method for spectral CT that combines dictionary-based sparse representation method and the patch based low-rank constraint to simultaneously improve the reconstruction in each channel and to address the inter-channel correlations to further improve the reconstruction. Methods: The proposed method has two important features: (1) guarantee of the patch based sparsity in each energy channel, which is the result of the dictionary based sparse representation constraint; (2) the explicit consideration of the correlations among different energy channels, which is realized by patch-by-patch nuclear norm-based low-rank constraint. For each channel, the dictionary consists of two sub-dictionaries. One is learned from the average of the images in all energy channels, and the other is learned from the average of the images in all energy channels except the current channel. With average operation to reduce noise, these two dictionaries can effectively preserve the structural details and get rid of artifacts caused by noise. Combining them together can express all structural information in current channel. Results: Dictionary learning based methods can obtain better results than FBP and the TV-based method. With low-rank constraint, the image quality can be further improved in the channel with more noise. The final color result by the proposed method has the best visual quality. Conclusion: The proposed method can effectively improve the image quality of low-dose spectral

  6. MO-DE-207A-05: Dictionary Learning Based Reconstruction with Low-Rank Constraint for Low-Dose Spectral CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Q [Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an (China); Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Liu, H; Xing, L [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Yu, H [University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA (United States); Wang, G [Rensselaer Polytechnic Instute., Troy, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Spectral CT enabled by an energy-resolved photon-counting detector outperforms conventional CT in terms of material discrimination, contrast resolution, etc. One reconstruction method for spectral CT is to generate a color image from a reconstructed component in each energy channel. However, given the radiation dose, the number of photons in each channel is limited, which will result in strong noise in each channel and affect the final color reconstruction. Here we propose a novel dictionary learning method for spectral CT that combines dictionary-based sparse representation method and the patch based low-rank constraint to simultaneously improve the reconstruction in each channel and to address the inter-channel correlations to further improve the reconstruction. Methods: The proposed method has two important features: (1) guarantee of the patch based sparsity in each energy channel, which is the result of the dictionary based sparse representation constraint; (2) the explicit consideration of the correlations among different energy channels, which is realized by patch-by-patch nuclear norm-based low-rank constraint. For each channel, the dictionary consists of two sub-dictionaries. One is learned from the average of the images in all energy channels, and the other is learned from the average of the images in all energy channels except the current channel. With average operation to reduce noise, these two dictionaries can effectively preserve the structural details and get rid of artifacts caused by noise. Combining them together can express all structural information in current channel. Results: Dictionary learning based methods can obtain better results than FBP and the TV-based method. With low-rank constraint, the image quality can be further improved in the channel with more noise. The final color result by the proposed method has the best visual quality. Conclusion: The proposed method can effectively improve the image quality of low-dose spectral

  7. ATLAS Fast Tracker Status and Tracking at High luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Ilic, Nikolina; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The LHC’s increase in centre of mass energy and luminosity in 2015 makes controlling trigger rates with high efficiency challenging. The ATLAS Fast TracKer (FTK) is a hardware processor built to reconstruct tracks at a rate of up to 100 kHz and provide them to the high level trigger. The FTK reconstructs tracks by matching incoming detector hits with pre-defined track patterns stored in associative memory on custom ASICs. Inner detector hits are fit to these track patterns using modern FPGAs. This talk describes the electronics system used for the FTK’s massive parallelization. The installation, commissioning and running of the system is happening in 2016, and is detailed in this talk. Tracking at High luminosity LHC is also presented.

  8. SDN-controlled topology-reconfigurable optical mobile fronthaul architecture for bidirectional CoMP and low latency inter-cell D2D in the 5G mobile era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvijetic, Neda; Tanaka, Akihiro; Kanonakis, Konstantinos; Wang, Ting

    2014-08-25

    We demonstrate the first SDN-controlled optical topology-reconfigurable mobile fronthaul (MFH) architecture for bidirectional coordinated multipoint (CoMP) and low latency inter-cell device-to-device (D2D) connectivity in the 5G mobile networking era. SDN-based OpenFlow control is used to dynamically instantiate the CoMP and inter-cell D2D features as match/action combinations in control plane flow tables of software-defined optical and electrical switching elements. Dynamic re-configurability is thereby introduced into the optical MFH topology, while maintaining back-compatibility with legacy fiber deployments. 10 Gb/s peak rates with <7 μs back-to-back transmission latency and 29.6 dB total power budget are experimentally demonstrated, confirming the attractiveness of the new approach for optical MFH of future 5G mobile systems.

  9. Accelerated Computing in Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Real-Time Imaging Using Nonlinear Inverse Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Schaetz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To develop generic optimization strategies for image reconstruction using graphical processing units (GPUs in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and to exemplarily report on our experience with a highly accelerated implementation of the nonlinear inversion (NLINV algorithm for dynamic MRI with high frame rates. Methods. The NLINV algorithm is optimized and ported to run on a multi-GPU single-node server. The algorithm is mapped to multiple GPUs by decomposing the data domain along the channel dimension. Furthermore, the algorithm is decomposed along the temporal domain by relaxing a temporal regularization constraint, allowing the algorithm to work on multiple frames in parallel. Finally, an autotuning method is presented that is capable of combining different decomposition variants to achieve optimal algorithm performance in different imaging scenarios. Results. The algorithm is successfully ported to a multi-GPU system and allows online image reconstruction with high frame rates. Real-time reconstruction with low latency and frame rates up to 30 frames per second is demonstrated. Conclusion. Novel parallel decomposition methods are presented which are applicable to many iterative algorithms for dynamic MRI. Using these methods to parallelize the NLINV algorithm on multiple GPUs, it is possible to achieve online image reconstruction with high frame rates.

  10. Studies for the ALICE inner tracking system upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reidt, Felix

    2016-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC identifies D"0 mesons via secondary-vertex reconstruction and topological cuts to reduce the corresponding combinatorial background in heavy-ion collisions. The D"0 meson is produced promptly in initial, hard scatterings via the strong interaction or as feed-down from weakly decaying B hadrons. Within this thesis, a novel method for the separation of prompt and feed-down D"0 mesons using cut variations was implemented and applied to data from p-Pb collisions at √(s_N_N)=5.02 TeV. The effectiveness of the secondary-vertex reconstruction strongly depends on the performance and in particular the pointing resolution of the Inner Tracking System. The upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System for the Long Shutdown 2 of the LHC in 2019/2020 will significantly improve its vertex-reconstruction and tracking capabilities. It will be equipped with Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors manufactured using the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS process on wafers with a high-resistivity epitaxial layer. In another part of this thesis, several pixel-chip prototypes of the ALPIDE architecture with in-pixel amplification and discrimination as well as in-matrix data reduction were characterised. The pALPIDE-2 prototype was measured to fulfil the requirements in terms of detection efficiency, fake-hit rate, position resolution and tolerance to irradiation with non-ionising energy loss. Based on simulations modelling the tracking and vertex-reconstruction performance of the upgraded Inner Tracking System, the perspective of the feed-down separation using cut variations after the upgrade was assessed within this thesis.

  11. A Highly Selective First-Level Muon Trigger With MDT Chamber Data for ATLAS at HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00390105

    2016-07-11

    Highly selective triggers are essential for the physics programme of the ATLAS experiment at HL-LHC where the instantaneous luminosity will be about an order of magnitude larger than the LHC instantaneous luminosity in Run 1. The first level muon trigger rate is dominated by low momentum muons below the nominal trigger threshold due to the moderate momentum resolution of the Resistive Plate and Thin Gap trigger chambers. The resulting high trigger rates at HL-LHC can be su?ciently reduced by using the data of the precision Muon Drift Tube chambers for the trigger decision. This requires the implementation of a fast MDT read-out chain and of a fast MDT track reconstruction algorithm with a latency of at most 6 microseconds. A hardware demonstrator of the fast read-out chain has been successfully tested at the HL-LHC operating conditions at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility. The fast track reconstruction algorithm has been implemented on a fast trigger processor.

  12. A Highly Selective First-Level Muon Trigger With MDT Chamber Data for ATLAS at HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Nowak, Sebastian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Highly selective triggers are essential for the physics programme of the ATLAS experiment at HL-LHC where the instantaneous luminosity will be about an order of magnitude larger than the LHC design luminosity. The Level-1 muon trigger rate is dominated by low momentum muons below the nominal trigger threshold due to the limited momentum resolution of the Resistive Plate and Thin Gap trigger chambers. The resulting high trigger rates at HL-LHC can be sufficient reduced by using the data of the precision Muon Drift Tube chambers for the trigger decision. This requires the implementation of a fast MDT read-out chain and of a fast MDT track reconstruction algorithm with a latency of at most 6~$\\mu$s. A hardware demonstrator of the fast read-out chain has been successfully tested at the high HL-LHC background rates at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility. The fast track reconstruction algorithm has been implemented on a fas trigger processor.

  13. A new Highly Selective First Level ATLAS Muon Trigger With MDT Chamber Data for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Nowak, Sebastian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Highly selective first level triggers are essential for the physics programme of the ATLAS experiment at the HL-LHC where the instantaneous luminosity will exceed the LHC's instantaneous luminosity by almost an order of magnitude. The ATLAS first level muon trigger rate is dominated by low momentum sub-trigger threshold muons due to the poor momentum resolution at trigger level caused by the moderate spatial resolution of the resistive plate and thin gap trigger chambers. This limitation can be overcome by including the data of the precision muon drift tube chambers in the first level trigger decision. This requires the implementation of a fast MDT read-out chain and a fast MDT track reconstruction. A hardware demonstrator of the fast read-out chain was successfully tested under HL-LHC operating conditions at CERN's Gamma Irradiation Facility. It could be shown that the data provided by the demonstrator can be processed with a fast track reconstruction algorithm on an ARM CPU within the 6 microseconds latency...

  14. Low-noise magnetic observatory variometer with race-track sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janošek, M; Petrucha, V; Vlk, M

    2016-01-01

    We present a low-noise, high-stability observatory magnetometer with race-track sensors, as developed by the Czech Technical University in Prague for National Observatory of Athens. As opposed to the standard instruments, we used our novel race-track fluxgate sensors with planar oval core which were cut by state-of-the art pico-second UV-laser. The noise performance of the complete electronics and sensor chain is below 6 pT/√Hz @ 1 Hz. The electronics uses 24-bit 200-Hz A/D converter with simultaneous sampling and all digital processing is done in FPGA. The variometer with the sensors mounted on a MACOR cube has been successfully calibrated by scalar method. (paper)

  15. Auditory brainstem response latency in forward masking, a marker of sensory deficits in listeners with normal hearing thresholds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehraei, Golbarg; Paredes Gallardo, Andreu; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G.

    2017-01-01

    In rodent models, acoustic exposure too modest to elevate hearing thresholds can nonetheless cause auditory nerve fiber deafferentation, interfering with the coding of supra-threshold sound. Low-spontaneous rate nerve fibers, important for encoding acoustic information at supra-threshold levels...... and in noise, are more susceptible to degeneration than high-spontaneous rate fibers. The change in auditory brainstem response (ABR) wave-V latency with noise level has been shown to be associated with auditory nerve deafferentation. Here, we measured ABR in a forward masking paradigm and evaluated wave......-V latency changes with increasing masker-to-probe intervals. In the same listeners, behavioral forward masking detection thresholds were measured. We hypothesized that 1) auditory nerve fiber deafferentation increases forward masking thresholds and increases wave-V latency and 2) a preferential loss of low...

  16. Coronary CT angiography: Comparison of a novel iterative reconstruction with filtered back projection for reconstruction of low-dose CT—Initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takx, Richard A.P.; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Moscariello, Antonio; Das, Marco; Rowe, Garrett; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Fink, Christian; Henzler, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively compare subjective and objective image quality in 20% tube current coronary CT angiography (cCTA) datasets between an iterative reconstruction algorithm (SAFIRE) and traditional filtered back projection (FBP). Materials and methods: Twenty patients underwent a prospectively ECG-triggered dual-step cCTA protocol using 2nd generation dual-source CT (DSCT). CT raw data was reconstructed using standard FBP at full-dose (Group 1 a) and 80% tube current reduced low-dose (Group 1 b). The low-dose raw data was additionally reconstructed using iterative raw data reconstruction (Group 2 ). Attenuation and image noise were measured in three regions of interest and signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) as well as contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) was calculated. Subjective diagnostic image quality was evaluated using a 4-point Likert scale. Results: Mean image noise of group 2 was lowered by 22% on average when compared to group 1 b (p 2 compared to group 1 b (p 2 (1.88 ± 0.63) was also rated significantly higher when compared to group 1 b (1.58 ± 0.63, p = 0.004). Conclusions: Image quality of 80% tube current reduced iteratively reconstructed cCTA raw data is significantly improved when compared to standard FBP and consequently may improve the diagnostic accuracy of cCTA

  17. The EDRO board connected to the Associative Memory: a "Baby" FastTracKer processor for the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Annovi, A; Bevacqua, V; Cervigni, F; Crescioli, F; Fabbri, L; Giannetti, P; Giorgi, F; Magalotti, D; Negri, A; Piendibene, M; Roda, C; Sbarra, C; Villa, M; Vitillo, RA; Volpi, G

    2012-01-01

    The FastTracKer (FTK), a hardware dedicated processor, performs fast and precise online full track reconstruction at the ATLAS experiment, within an average latency of few dozens of microseconds. \\ It is made of two pipelined processors, the Associative Memory finding low precision tracks, and the Track Fitter refining the track quality with high precision fits. FTK has to face the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Phase I luminosity. So, while the new processor requires the best of the available technology for tracking in high occupancy conditions, we want to use already existing prototypes to exercise soon the FTK functions in the new ATLAS environment. Few boards connected together constitute a "baby FTK" that will grow soon becoming the "vertical slice".\\ The vertical slice will cover a small projective wedge in the detector, but it will be functionally complete. It will provide a full test of the entire FTK data chain, in the laboratory first and on beam-on conditions after. It will require early development a...

  18. The EDRO board connected to the Associative Memory: a "Baby" FastTracKer processor for the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Annovi, A; The ATLAS collaboration; Villa, M; Bevacqua, V; Vitillo, R A; Giorgi, F; Magalotti, D; Roda, C; Cervigni, F; Giannetti, P; Negri, A; Piendibene, M; Volpi, G; Fabbri, L; Sbarra, C

    2011-01-01

    The FastTracKer (FTK) is a dedicated hardware system able to perform online fast and precise track reconstruction of the full events at the Atlas experiment, within an average latency of few dozens of microseconds. It is made of two pipelined processors: the Associative Memory (AM), finding low precision tracks called "roads", and the Track Fitter (TF), refining the track quality with high precision fits. The FTK design [1] that works well at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Phase I luminosity requires the best of the available technology for tracking in high occupancy conditions. While the new processor is designed for the most demanding LHC conditions, we want to use already existing prototypes, part of them developed for the SLIM5 collaboration [2], to exercise the FTK functions in the new Atlas environment. During Laboratory tests, the EDRO board (Event Dispatch and Read-Out) receives on a clustering mezzanine (able to calculate the pixel and SCT cluster centroids) "fake" detector raw data on S-links from ...

  19. GPU-accelerated low-latency real-time searches for gravitational waves from compact binary coalescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yuan; Du Zhihui; Chung, Shin Kee; Hooper, Shaun; Blair, David; Wen Linqing

    2012-01-01

    We present a graphics processing unit (GPU)-accelerated time-domain low-latency algorithm to search for gravitational waves (GWs) from coalescing binaries of compact objects based on the summed parallel infinite impulse response (SPIIR) filtering technique. The aim is to facilitate fast detection of GWs with a minimum delay to allow prompt electromagnetic follow-up observations. To maximize the GPU acceleration, we apply an efficient batched parallel computing model that significantly reduces the number of synchronizations in SPIIR and optimizes the usage of the memory and hardware resource. Our code is tested on the CUDA ‘Fermi’ architecture in a GTX 480 graphics card and its performance is compared with a single core of Intel Core i7 920 (2.67 GHz). A 58-fold speedup is achieved while giving results in close agreement with the CPU implementation. Our result indicates that it is possible to conduct a full search for GWs from compact binary coalescence in real time with only one desktop computer equipped with a Fermi GPU card for the initial LIGO detectors which in the past required more than 100 CPUs. (paper)

  20. PixTrig: a Level 2 track finding algorithm based on pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Baratella, A; Morettini, P; Parodi, F

    2000-01-01

    This note describes an algorithm for track search at Level 2 based on pixel detector. Using three pixel clusters we can produce a reconstruction of the track parameter in both z and R-phi plane. These track segments can be used as seed for more sophisticated track finding algorithms or used directly, especially when impact parameter resolution is crucial. The algorithm efficiency is close to 90% for pt > 1 GeV/c and the processing time is small enough to allow a complete detector reconstruction (non RoI guided) within the Level 2 processing.

  1. Study of Track Irregularity Time Series Calibration and Variation Pattern at Unit Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaolong Jia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Focusing on problems existing in track irregularity time series data quality, this paper first presents abnormal data identification, data offset correction algorithm, local outlier data identification, and noise cancellation algorithms. And then proposes track irregularity time series decomposition and reconstruction through the wavelet decomposition and reconstruction approach. Finally, the patterns and features of track irregularity standard deviation data sequence in unit sections are studied, and the changing trend of track irregularity time series is discovered and described.

  2. Studies for the ALICE Inner Tracking System Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2079168; Musa, Luciano

    The ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC identifies D0 mesons via secondary-vertex reconstruction and topological cuts to reduce the corresponding combinatorial background in heavy-ion collisions. The D0 meson is produced promptly in initial, hard scatterings via the strong interaction or as feed-down from weakly decaying B hadrons. Within this thesis, a novel method for the separation of prompt and feed-down D0 mesons using cut variations was implemented and applied to data from p–Pb collisions at $\\sqrt(s_\\mathrm{NN})=5.02$ TeV. The effectiveness of the secondary-vertex reconstruction strongly depends on the performance and in particular the pointing resolution of the Inner Tracking System. The upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System for the Long Shutdown 2 of the LHC in 2019/2020 will significantly improve its vertex-reconstruction and tracking capabilities. It will be equipped with Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors manufactured using the TowerJazz 180nm CMOS process on wafers with a high-resistivity epitax...

  3. Low rank alternating direction method of multipliers reconstruction for MR fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assländer, Jakob; Cloos, Martijn A; Knoll, Florian; Sodickson, Daniel K; Hennig, Jürgen; Lattanzi, Riccardo

    2018-01-01

    The proposed reconstruction framework addresses the reconstruction accuracy, noise propagation and computation time for magnetic resonance fingerprinting. Based on a singular value decomposition of the signal evolution, magnetic resonance fingerprinting is formulated as a low rank (LR) inverse problem in which one image is reconstructed for each singular value under consideration. This LR approximation of the signal evolution reduces the computational burden by reducing the number of Fourier transformations. Also, the LR approximation improves the conditioning of the problem, which is further improved by extending the LR inverse problem to an augmented Lagrangian that is solved by the alternating direction method of multipliers. The root mean square error and the noise propagation are analyzed in simulations. For verification, in vivo examples are provided. The proposed LR alternating direction method of multipliers approach shows a reduced root mean square error compared to the original fingerprinting reconstruction, to a LR approximation alone and to an alternating direction method of multipliers approach without a LR approximation. Incorporating sensitivity encoding allows for further artifact reduction. The proposed reconstruction provides robust convergence, reduced computational burden and improved image quality compared to other magnetic resonance fingerprinting reconstruction approaches evaluated in this study. Magn Reson Med 79:83-96, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  4. Positron emission zone plate holography for particle tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gundogdu, O. [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: o.gundogdu@surrey.ac.uk

    2006-01-15

    Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) is a powerful non-invasive technique that has been used extensively for tracking a single particle. In this paper, we present a study of zone plate holography method in order to track multiple particles, mainly two particles. The main aim is to use as small number of events as possible in the order to make it possible to track particles in fast moving industrial systems. A zone plate with 100% focal efficiency is simulated and applied to the Positron Emission Tomography (PET) data for multiple particle tracking. A simple trajectory code was employed to explore the effects of the nature of the experimental trajectories. A computer holographic reconstruction code that simulates optical reconstruction was developed. The different aspects of the particle location, particle activity ratios for enabling tagging of particles and zone plate and hologram locations are investigated. The effect of the shot noise is investigated and the limitations of the zone plate holography are reported.

  5. Positron emission zone plate holography for particle tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gundogdu, O.

    2006-01-01

    Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) is a powerful non-invasive technique that has been used extensively for tracking a single particle. In this paper, we present a study of zone plate holography method in order to track multiple particles, mainly two particles. The main aim is to use as small number of events as possible in the order to make it possible to track particles in fast moving industrial systems. A zone plate with 100% focal efficiency is simulated and applied to the Positron Emission Tomography (PET) data for multiple particle tracking. A simple trajectory code was employed to explore the effects of the nature of the experimental trajectories. A computer holographic reconstruction code that simulates optical reconstruction was developed. The different aspects of the particle location, particle activity ratios for enabling tagging of particles and zone plate and hologram locations are investigated. The effect of the shot noise is investigated and the limitations of the zone plate holography are reported

  6. Model tracking system for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities: License application interrogatories and responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benbennick, M.E.; Broton, M.S.; Fuoto, J.S.; Novgrod, R.L.

    1994-08-01

    This report describes a model tracking system for a low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility license application. In particular, the model tracks interrogatories (questions, requests for information, comments) and responses. A set of requirements and desired features for the model tracking system was developed, including required structure and computer screens. Nine tracking systems were then reviewed against the model system requirements and only two were found to meet all requirements. Using Kepner-Tregoe decision analysis, a model tracking system was selected.

  7. Model tracking system for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities: License application interrogatories and responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benbennick, M.E.; Broton, M.S.; Fuoto, J.S.; Novgrod, R.L.

    1994-08-01

    This report describes a model tracking system for a low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility license application. In particular, the model tracks interrogatories (questions, requests for information, comments) and responses. A set of requirements and desired features for the model tracking system was developed, including required structure and computer screens. Nine tracking systems were then reviewed against the model system requirements and only two were found to meet all requirements. Using Kepner-Tregoe decision analysis, a model tracking system was selected

  8. Distributed metadata servers for cluster file systems using shared low latency persistent key-value metadata store

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, John M.; Faibish, Sorin; Pedone, Jr., James M.; Tzelnic, Percy; Ting, Dennis P. J.; Ionkov, Latchesar A.; Grider, Gary

    2017-12-26

    A cluster file system is provided having a plurality of distributed metadata servers with shared access to one or more shared low latency persistent key-value metadata stores. A metadata server comprises an abstract storage interface comprising a software interface module that communicates with at least one shared persistent key-value metadata store providing a key-value interface for persistent storage of key-value metadata. The software interface module provides the key-value metadata to the at least one shared persistent key-value metadata store in a key-value format. The shared persistent key-value metadata store is accessed by a plurality of metadata servers. A metadata request can be processed by a given metadata server independently of other metadata servers in the cluster file system. A distributed metadata storage environment is also disclosed that comprises a plurality of metadata servers having an abstract storage interface to at least one shared persistent key-value metadata store.

  9. A Time-Multiplexed Track-Trigger architecture for CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Geoffrey; Pesaresi, Mark Franco; Rose, A

    2014-01-01

    The CMS Tracker under development for the High Luminosity LHC includes an outer tracker based on ``PT-modules'' which will provide track stubs based on coincident clusters in two closely spaced sensor layers, aiming to reject low transverse momentum track hits before data transmission to the Level-1 trigger. The tracker data will be used to reconstruct track segments in dedicated processors before onward transmission to other trigger processors which will combine tracker information with data originating from the calorimeter and muon detectors, to make the final L1 trigger decision. The architecture for processing the tracker data is still an open question. One attractive option is to explore a Time Multiplexed design similar to one which is currently being implemented in the CMS calorimeter trigger as part of the Phase I trigger upgrade. The Time Multiplexed Trigger concept is explained, the potential benefits of applying it for processing future tracker data are described and a possible design based on cur...

  10. Track etch parameters and annealing kinetics assessment of protons of low energy in CR-39 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, R.K.; Kumar, Ashok; Singh, B.K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We calibrate CR-39 detector with very low energy protons. ► We establish linear relationship between track diameter and time/energy up to 200 keV. ► We determine activation energy of annealing using different models. ► We justify concept of single annealing activation energy in CR-39. - Abstract: In this paper threshold of the registration sensitivity of very low energy proton in CR-39 is investigated. Irradiation of CR-39 (poly-allyl-diglycol carbonate) was carried out with very low energy mono energetic protons of 20–60 keV from a mini proton accelerator. Nearly 10 4 /cm 2 fluence of protons was used. The variation of track diameter with etching time as well as proton energy response curve was carefully calibrated. The bulk and track etch rates were measured by using proton track diameters. Bulk etch rate was also measured by the thickness of removed surface layer. The thermal annealing of proton track at temperatures ranging from 100 to 200 °C in CR-39 was studied by several models. Activation energy of annealed CR-39 detectors was calculated by slope of track etch rate and temperature plot. The data of proton tracks of 200, 250 and 300 keV from 400 kV Van-de-Graaff accelerator was also used and compared with the track diameters of different energies of proton.

  11. D0 central tracking chamber performance studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzuto, D.

    1991-12-01

    The performance of the completed DO central tracking chamber was studied using cosmic rays at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Also studied was a prototype tracking chamber identical in design to the completed DO tracking chamber. The prototype chamber was exposed to a collimated beam of 150 GeV pions at the Fermilab NWA test facility. Results indicate an RΦ tracking resolution compatible with the limitations imposed by physical considerations, excellent 2 track resolution, and a high track reconstruction efficiency along with a good rejection power against γ → e + e - events

  12. Testing of Track Point Resolution of Gas Electron Multiplier with Pion Beam at CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Adak, R P; Das, S; Dubey, A K; Ganti, M S; Saini, J; Singaraju, R

    2015-01-01

    A muon detection system using segmented and instrumented absorber has been designed for high-energy heavy-ion collision experiments to be held at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany. The muon detector system is mounted downstream of a Silicon Tracking System. The reconstructed tracks from the STS are to be matched to the hits in the GEM detector. For reconstructing track in the GEM Detector, track point resolution is an important issue. We report her first time the track point resolution of the GEM detector.

  13. Reduced evolutionary rates in HIV-1 reveal extensive latency periods among replicating lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immonen, Taina T; Leitner, Thomas

    2014-10-16

    HIV-1 can persist for the duration of a patient's life due in part to its ability to hide from the immune system, and from antiretroviral drugs, in long-lived latent reservoirs. Latent forms of HIV-1 may also be disproportionally involved in transmission. Thus, it is important to detect and quantify latency in the HIV-1 life cycle. We developed a novel molecular clock-based phylogenetic tool to investigate the prevalence of HIV-1 lineages that have experienced latency. The method removes alternative sources that may affect evolutionary rates, such as hypermutation, recombination, and selection, to reveal the contribution of generation-time effects caused by latency. Our method was able to recover latent lineages with high specificity and sensitivity, and low false discovery rates, even on relatively short branches on simulated phylogenies. Applying the tool to HIV-1 sequences from 26 patients, we show that the majority of phylogenetic lineages have been affected by generation-time effects in every patient type, whether untreated, elite controller, or under effective or failing treatment. Furthermore, we discovered extensive effects of latency in sequence data (gag, pol, and env) from reservoirs as well as in the replicating plasma population. To better understand our phylogenetic findings, we developed a dynamic model of virus-host interactions to investigate the proportion of lineages in the actively replicating population that have ever been latent. Assuming neutral evolution, our dynamic modeling showed that under most parameter conditions, it is possible for a few activated latent viruses to propagate so that in time, most HIV-1 lineages will have been latent at some time in their past. These results suggest that cycling in and out of latency plays a major role in the evolution of HIV-1. Thus, no aspect of HIV-1 evolution can be fully understood without considering latency - including treatment, drug resistance, immune evasion, transmission, and pathogenesis.

  14. Tracking of Polycarbonate Films using Low-energy Ions Final Report CRADA No. TC-774-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musket, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-01-24

    Ion tracking is performed almost exclusively using ions with energies near or above the maximum in electronic stopping. For the present study, we have examined the results of etching ion tracks created by ions bombarding polycarbonate films with energies corresponding to stopping well below the maximum and just above the anticipated threshold for creating etchable latent tracks. Low-energy neon and argon ions with 18-60 keV /amu and fluences of about 108/cm2 were used to examine the limits for producing etchable tracks in polycarbonate films. By concentrating on the early stages of etching (i.e., -20 nm < SEM hole diameter < -100 nm), we can directly relate the energy deposition calculated for the incident ion to the creation of etchable tracks. The experimental results will be discussed with regard to the energy losses of the ions in the polycarbonate films and to the formation of continuous latent tracks through the entire thickness the films. These results have significant implications with respect to the threshold for formation of etchable tracks and to the use of low-energy ions for lithographic applications.

  15. Studies for the ALICE inner tracking system upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reidt, Felix

    2016-04-28

    The ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC identifies D{sup 0} mesons via secondary-vertex reconstruction and topological cuts to reduce the corresponding combinatorial background in heavy-ion collisions. The D{sup 0} meson is produced promptly in initial, hard scatterings via the strong interaction or as feed-down from weakly decaying B hadrons. Within this thesis, a novel method for the separation of prompt and feed-down D{sup 0} mesons using cut variations was implemented and applied to data from p-Pb collisions at √(s{sub NN})=5.02 TeV. The effectiveness of the secondary-vertex reconstruction strongly depends on the performance and in particular the pointing resolution of the Inner Tracking System. The upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System for the Long Shutdown 2 of the LHC in 2019/2020 will significantly improve its vertex-reconstruction and tracking capabilities. It will be equipped with Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors manufactured using the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS process on wafers with a high-resistivity epitaxial layer. In another part of this thesis, several pixel-chip prototypes of the ALPIDE architecture with in-pixel amplification and discrimination as well as in-matrix data reduction were characterised. The pALPIDE-2 prototype was measured to fulfil the requirements in terms of detection efficiency, fake-hit rate, position resolution and tolerance to irradiation with non-ionising energy loss. Based on simulations modelling the tracking and vertex-reconstruction performance of the upgraded Inner Tracking System, the perspective of the feed-down separation using cut variations after the upgrade was assessed within this thesis.

  16. Shift of the Muscular Inhibition Latency during On-Line Acquisition of Anticipatory Postural Adjustments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Barlaam

    Full Text Available During action, Anticipatory Postural Adjustments (APAs cancel the consequences of a movement on postural stabilization. Their muscular expression is characterized by early changes in the activity of the postural muscles, before the movement begins. To explore the mechanisms enabling the acquisition of APAs, a learning paradigm was designed in which the voluntary lifting of a load with one hand triggered the unloading of another load suspended below the contralateral forearm. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in the muscular expression that uncovers the progressive learning of new APAs. A trial-by-trial analysis of kinematic and electromyographic signals recorded on the right arm was conducted in twelve adults through six sessions of learning. Kinematic results reported an enhancement of the postural stabilization across learning. The main EMG pattern found during learning consisted of a flexor inhibition, where latency was shifted towards an earlier occurrence in parallel with the improvement of the postural performance. A linear regression analysis conducted between the inhibition latency and the maximal amplitude of elbow rotation showed that the earlier the inhibition onset, the better the postural stabilization. This study revealed that the progressive shift of the postural flexor inhibition latency could be considered as a reliable neurophysiological marker of the progressive learning of new APAs. Importantly, this marker could be used to track motor learning abnormalities in pathology. We relate our findings to the update of a forward predictive model of action, defined as a system that predicts beforehand the consequences of the action on posture.

  17. TV-constrained incremental algorithms for low-intensity CT image reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Sean D.; Andersen, Martin S.; Sidky, Emil Y.

    2015-01-01

    constraint can be guided by an image reconstructed by filtered backprojection (FBP). We apply our algorithm to low-dose synchrotron X-ray CT data from the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Labs (ANL) to demonstrate its potential utility. We find that the algorithm provides a means of edge-preserving...

  18. Low dose CBCT reconstruction via prior contour based total variation (PCTV) regularization: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingxuan; Yin, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Yawei; Zhang, You; Ren, Lei

    2018-04-01

    Purpose: compressed sensing reconstruction using total variation (TV) tends to over-smooth the edge information by uniformly penalizing the image gradient. The goal of this study is to develop a novel prior contour based TV (PCTV) method to enhance the edge information in compressed sensing reconstruction for CBCT. Methods: the edge information is extracted from prior planning-CT via edge detection. Prior CT is first registered with on-board CBCT reconstructed with TV method through rigid or deformable registration. The edge contours in prior-CT is then mapped to CBCT and used as the weight map for TV regularization to enhance edge information in CBCT reconstruction. The PCTV method was evaluated using extended-cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom, physical CatPhan phantom and brain patient data. Results were compared with both TV and edge preserving TV (EPTV) methods which are commonly used for limited projection CBCT reconstruction. Relative error was used to calculate pixel value difference and edge cross correlation was defined as the similarity of edge information between reconstructed images and ground truth in the quantitative evaluation. Results: compared to TV and EPTV, PCTV enhanced the edge information of bone, lung vessels and tumor in XCAT reconstruction and complex bony structures in brain patient CBCT. In XCAT study using 45 half-fan CBCT projections, compared with ground truth, relative errors were 1.5%, 0.7% and 0.3% and edge cross correlations were 0.66, 0.72 and 0.78 for TV, EPTV and PCTV, respectively. PCTV is more robust to the projection number reduction. Edge enhancement was reduced slightly with noisy projections but PCTV was still superior to other methods. PCTV can maintain resolution while reducing the noise in the low mAs CatPhan reconstruction. Low contrast edges were preserved better with PCTV compared with TV and EPTV. Conclusion: PCTV preserved edge information as well as reduced streak artifacts and noise in low dose CBCT reconstruction

  19. The ATLAS Fast Tracker and Tracking at the High-Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00236423; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The LHC’s increase in centre of mass energy and luminosity in 2015 makes controlling trigger rates with high efficiency challenging. The ATLAS Fast TracKer (FTK) is a hardware processor built to reconstruct tracks at a rate of up to 100 kHz and provide them to the high level trigger. The FTK reconstructs tracks by matching incoming detector hits with pre-defined track patterns stored in associative memory on custom ASICs. Inner detector hits are fit to these track patterns using modern FPGAs. These procedings describe the electronics system used for the FTK’s massive parallelization. An overview of the installation, commissioning and running of the system is given. The ATLAS upgrades planned to enable tracking at the High Luminosity LHC are also discussed.

  20. Low Latency Workflow Scheduling and an Application of Hyperspectral Brightness Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, P. T.; Chapman, D. R.; Halem, M.

    2012-12-01

    the Nino 4 region, as well as a 1.9 Kelvin decadal Arctic warming in the 4u and 12u spectral regions. Additionally, we will present the frequency of extreme global warming events by the use of a normalized maximum BT in a grid cell relative to its local standard deviation. A low-latency Hadoop scheduling environment maintains data integrity and fault tolerance in a MapReduce data intensive Cloud environment while improving the "time to solution" metric by 35% when compared to a more traditional parallel processing system for the same dataset. Our next step will be to improve the usability of our Hadoop task scheduling system, to enable rapid prototyping of data intensive experiments by means of processing "kernels". We will report on the performance and experience of implementing these experiments on the NEX testbed, and propose the use of a graphical directed acyclic graph (DAG) interface to help us develop on-demand scientific experiments. Our workflow system works within Hadoop infrastructure as a replacement for the FIFO or FairScheduler, thus the use of Apache "Pig" latin or other Apache tools may also be worth investigating on the NEX system to improve the usability of our workflow sched