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Sample records for toxic substances control act

  1. Toxic Substances Control Act

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Toxic Substances Control Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  2. 78 FR 64210 - Extension of Review Periods Under the Toxic Substances Control Act; Certain Chemicals and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... Under the Toxic Substances Control Act; Certain Chemicals and Microorganisms; Premanufacture... 325 and 324110), e.g., chemical manufacturing and petroleum refineries. The North American Industrial... Agency under section 5 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), received by EPA on or before October 1...

  3. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) 8(e) Notices and FYI Submissions

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Section 8(e) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) requires U.S. chemical manufacturers, importers, processors and distributors to notify EPA within 30 calendar...

  4. Toxic Substances Control Act Test Submissions 2.0 (TSCATS 2.0)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxic Substances Control Act Test Submissions 2.0 (TSCATS 2.0) tracks the submissions of health and safety data submitted to the EPA either as required or...

  5. 40 CFR 261.8 - PCB wastes regulated under Toxic Substance Control Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false PCB wastes regulated under Toxic... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE General § 261.8 PCB wastes regulated under Toxic Substance Control Act. The disposal of PCB-containing dielectric fluid and electric...

  6. 48 CFR 1552.235-78 - Data Security for Toxic Substances Control Act Confidential Business Information (DEC 1997).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...: Data Security for Toxic Substances Control Act Confidential Business Information (DEC 1997) The... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Data Security for Toxic Substances Control Act Confidential Business Information (DEC 1997). 1552.235-78 Section 1552.235-78 Federal...

  7. Toxic Substances Control Act test submissions database (TSCATS) - comprehensive update. Data file

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Toxic Substances Control Act Test Submissions Database (TSCATS) was developed to make unpublished test data available to the public. The test data is submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency by industry under the Toxic Substances Control Act. Test is broadly defined to include case reports, episodic incidents, such as spills, and formal test study presentations. The database allows searching of test submissions according to specific chemical identity or type of study when used with an appropriate search retrieval software program. Studies are indexed under three broad subject areas: health effects, environmental effects and environmental fate. Additional controlled vocabulary terms are assigned which describe the experimental protocol and test observations. Records identify reference information needed to locate the source document, as well as the submitting organization and reason for submission of the test data

  8. Environmental Guidance Program reference book: Toxic substances control act. Revision 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Toxic Substances Control Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  9. Toxic Substances Control Act. Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: Revision 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Toxic Substances Control Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  10. 48 CFR 1552.235-75 - Access to Toxic Substances Control Act Confidential Business Information (APR 1996).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Control Act Confidential Business Information (APR 1996). 1552.235-75 Section 1552.235-75 Federal... Confidential Business Information (APR 1996). As prescribed in 1535.007(b), insert the following provision: Access to Toxic Substances Control Act Confidential Business Information (APR 1996) In order to perform...

  11. Testing of TSCA [Toxic Substances Control Act] incinerator for destruction of PCBs in uranium contaminated wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    A Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) incinerator for environmentally safe destruction of PCBs and hazardous organic materials contaminated with low level radioactive wastes from seven DOE facilities has been constructed at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and has undergone performance testing with PCB surrogates. The system incorporates state-of-the-art off-gas treatment, a highly instrumented kiln and secondary combustion chamber, and an inert atmosphere solids handling feed system. Release of organic during an upset event, which triggers opening of the secondary combustion chamber relief vent, will be prevented by maintaining excess oxygen in the kiln and a high temperature in the secondary combustion chamber with an operating burner. Mixtures of chlorinated benzenes used in performance testing to simulate destruction of PCB, worst case studies to satisfy regulatory concerns, and implications of performance test results will be discussed. 4 refs

  12. Privacy Impact Assessment for the Confidential Business Information Records Access System for the Toxic Control Substances Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    This system collects submission data from the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and contact information for EPA contractors and employees who are CBI cleared. Learn how this data is collected, how it will be used, and the purpose of data collection.

  13. Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator test bed for continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, L.V. Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator, located on the K-25 Site at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, continues to be the only operational incinerator in the country that can process hazardous and radioactively contaminated polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste. During 1996, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology (EM-50) and Lockheed Martin Energy Systems established a continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS) test bed and began conducting evaluations of CEMS under development to measure contaminants from waste combustion and thermal treatment stacks. The program was envisioned to promote CEMS technologies meeting requirements of the recently issued Proposed Standards for Hazardous Waste Combustors as well as monitoring technologies that will allay public concerns about mixed waste thermal treatment and accelerate the development of innovative treatment technologies. Fully developed CEMS, as well as innovative continuous or semi-continuous sampling systems not yet interfaced with a pollutant analyzer, were considered as candidates for testing and evaluation. Complementary to other Environmental Protection Agency and DOE sponsored CEMS testing and within compliant operating conditions of the TSCA Incinerator, prioritization was given to multiple metals monitors also having potential to measure radionuclides associated with particulate emissions. In August 1996, developers of two multiple metals monitors participated in field activities at the incinerator and a commercially available radionuclide particulate monitor was acquired for modification and testing planned in 1997. This paper describes the CEMS test bed infrastructure and summarizes completed and planned activities

  14. In the arc of history: AIHA and the movement to reform the Toxic Substances Control Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael P

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Michael P. Wilson of UC Berkeley delivered his keynote address before the general assembly of the American Industrial Hygiene Conference and Exhibition (AIHce) in Portland, Oregon, in May 2011. Here, Dr. Wilson again discusses the political and economic drivers of occupational disease in the United States and proposes a role for AIHA in helping to highlight and resolve them. He proposes that until these underlying drivers are acknowledged and ameliorated, the toll of occupational disease will persist, despite the hard work of industrial hygienists in the workplace. Among these drivers, Dr. Wilson points to the decline of labor rights and unionization; economic inequality; economic insecurity; political resistance to public health protections for workers, notably the OSHA and NIOSH programs; and weaknesses in the Federal Toxic Substances Control Act of 1976 (TSCA). Of these, Dr. Wilson calls on the AIHA to participate in the historic effort to rewrite TSCA. He points to weaknesses in TSCA that have produced a chemicals market dominated by the function, price, and performance of chemicals, with little attention given to their health and environmental effects. Under these conditions, he argues, hazardous chemicals have remained economically competitive, and innovation in inherently safer chemicals-in green chemistry-has been held back by a lack of market transparency and public accountability in the industry. TSCA reform has the potential to shift the market toward green chemistry, with long-term implications for occupational disease prevention, industrial investment, and renewed energy in the industrial hygiene profession. Dr. Wilson proposes that, like previous legislative changes in the United States, TSCA reform is likely to occur in response to myriad social pressures, which include the emergence of the European Union's REACH regulation; recent chemicals policy actions in 18 U.S. states; growing support from downstream businesses; increasing public awareness

  15. Review of organic nitrile incineration at the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-10-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES) operates the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), formerly called the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, where uranium was enriched under contract with the US Department of Energy (DOE). Currently, ETTP missions include environmental management, waste management (WM), and the development of new technologies. As part of its WM mission, ETTP operates the TSCA (Toxic Substances Control Act) Incinerator (TSCAI) for treatment of hazardous waste and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) contaminated with low-level radioactivity. Beginning in the autumn of 1995, employees from diverse ETTP buildings and departments reported experiencing headaches, fatigue, depression, muscle aches, sleeplessness, and muscle tremors. These symptoms were judged by a physician in the ETTP Health Services Department to be consistent with chronic exposures to hydrogen cyanide (HCN). The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) was called in to perform a health hazard evaluation to ascertain whether the employees' illnesses were in fact caused by occupational exposure to HCN. The NIOSH evaluation found no patterns for employees' reported symptoms with respect to work location or department. NIOSH also conducted a comprehensive air sampling study, which did not detect airborne cyanides at the ETTP. Employees, however, expressed concerns that the burning of nitrile-bearing wastes at the TSCAI might have produced HCN as a combustion product. Therefore, LMES and DOE established a multidisciplinary team (TSCAI Technical Review Team) to make a more detailed review of the possibility that combustion of nitrile-bearing wastes at the TSCAI might have either released nitriles or created HCN as a product of incomplete combustion (PIC)

  16. Why the toxic substances control act needs an overhaul, and how to strengthen oversight of chemicals in the interim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Sarah A; Roberts, Jody A

    2011-05-01

    The Toxic Substances Control Act gives the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) the authority to regulate industrial chemicals not covered by other statutes. Today there are more than 83,000 such chemicals. However, the law is widely perceived as weak and outdated, and various stakeholders have called for its reform, citing the EPA's inability to regulate the use of asbestos, among other substances. We analyze the flaws in the act and suggest ways in which the EPA might better position itself to manage chemical risks and protect the public's health. In addition to the new tools and technologies it is adopting, the agency needs new allies-both inside and outside the government-in its efforts to identify and control hazardous chemicals.

  17. 76 FR 38169 - Toxic Substances Control Act Chemical Testing; Receipt of Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... (7405M), Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics, Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania... gold leaf, dyeing mixtures, antifreeze mixtures, extraction of resins and waxes, preservative for...: June 21, 2011. Maria J. Doa, Director, Chemical Control Division, Office of Pollution Prevention and...

  18. 78 FR 66700 - Toxic Substances Control Act Chemical Testing; Receipt of Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ... additive for food Rat--Up-and-Down processing, and as Procedure. ingredient in aluminum Micronucleus Test... Toxicity to Fish; Acute Toxicity to Daphnia; Toxicity to Algae; Acute Toxicity to Mammals; Bacterial..., cold Study in Zebra Fish set, and sheet-fed (Brachydanio rerio). applications. Acute Toxicity Study in...

  19. 78 FR 69414 - Toxic Substances Control Act Chemical Testing; Receipt of Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    ...; Acute emulsion polymerization in Inhalation Toxicity in paper, textile, fiber, and Rats; Bacterial.../ Reproduction Development Toxicity. Note: CAS No. = Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number. Authority: 15 U...

  20. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for the K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator Operations, Level III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    A Level III pollution prevention opportunity assessment (PPOA) was performed for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator to evaluate pollution prevention (P2) options for various waste streams: The main objective of this study was to identify and evaluate options to reduce the quantities of each waste stream generated by the TSCA Incinerator operations to realize significant environmental and/or economic benefits from P2. For each of the waste streams, P2 options were evaluated following the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) hierarchy to (1) reduce the quantity of waste generated, (2) recycle the waste, and/or (3) use alternate waste treatment or segregation methods. This report provides process descriptions, identification and evaluation of P2 options, and final recommendations

  1. Field testing of particulate matter continuous emission monitors at the DOE Oak Ridge TSCA incinerator. Toxic Substances Control Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, James E; Davis, Wayne T; Calcagno, James A; Allen, Marshall W

    2002-01-01

    A field study to evaluate the performance of three commercially available particulate matter (PM) continuous emission monitors (CEMs) was conducted in 1999-2000 at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator. This study offers unique features that are believed to enhance the collective US experience with PM CEMs. The TSCA Incinerator is permitted to treat PCB-contaminated RCRA hazardous low-level radioactive wastes. The air pollution control system utilizes MACT control technology and is comprised of a rapid quench, venturi scrubber, packed bed scrubber, and two ionizing wet scrubbers in series, which create a saturated flue gas that must be conditioned by the CEMs prior to measurement. The incinerator routinely treats a wide variety of wastes including high and low BTU organic liquids, aqueous, and solid wastes. The various possible combinations for treating liquid and solid wastes may present a challenge in establishing a single, acceptable correlation relationship for individual CEMs. The effect of low-level radioactive material present in the waste is a unique site-specific factor not evaluated in previous tests. The three systems chosen for evaluation were two beta gauge devices and a light scattering device. The performance of the CEMs was evaluated using the requirements in draft Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Performance Specification 11 (PS11) and Procedure 2. The results of Reference Method 5i stack tests for establishing statistical correlations between the reference method data and the CEMs responses are discussed.

  2. Impacts and Compliance Implementation Plans and Required Deviations for Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) Regulation of Double Shell Tanks (DST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MULKEY, C.H.

    2000-01-01

    In May 2000, the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) held meetings regarding the management of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the Hanford tank waste. It was decided that the radioactive waste currently stored in the double-shell tanks (DSTs) contain waste which will become subject to the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) (40 CFR 761). As a result, DOE-ORP directed the River Protection Project tank farm contractor (TFC) to prepare plans for managing the PCB inventory in the DSTs. Two components of the PCB management plans are this assessment of the operational impacts of TSCA regulation and the identifications of deviations from TSCA that are required to accommodate tank farm unique limitations. This plan provides ORP and CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) with an outline of TSCA PCB requirements and their applicability to tank farm activities, and recommends a compliance/implementation approach. Where strict compliance is not possible, the need for deviations from TSCA PCB requirements is identified. The purpose of assembling this information is to enhance the understanding of PCB management requirements, identify operational impacts and select impact mitigation strategies. This information should be useful in developing formal agreements with EPA where required

  3. History of EPI Suite™ and future perspectives on chemical property estimation in US Toxic Substances Control Act new chemical risk assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Card, Marcella L; Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Lee, Wen-Hsiung; Lynch, David G; Orentas, Nerija S; Lee, Mari Titcombe; Wong, Edmund M; Boethling, Robert S

    2017-03-22

    Chemical property estimation is a key component in many industrial, academic, and regulatory activities, including in the risk assessment associated with the approximately 1000 new chemical pre-manufacture notices the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) receives annually. The US EPA evaluates fate, exposure and toxicity under the 1976 Toxic Substances Control Act (amended by the 2016 Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21 st Century Act), which does not require test data with new chemical applications. Though the submission of data is not required, the US EPA has, over the past 40 years, occasionally received chemical-specific data with pre-manufacture notices. The US EPA has been actively using this and publicly available data to develop and refine predictive computerized models, most of which are housed in EPI Suite™, to estimate chemical properties used in the risk assessment of new chemicals. The US EPA develops and uses models based on (quantitative) structure-activity relationships ([Q]SARs) to estimate critical parameters. As in any evolving field, (Q)SARs have experienced successes, suffered failures, and responded to emerging trends. Correlations of a chemical structure with its properties or biological activity were first demonstrated in the late 19 th century and today have been encapsulated in a myriad of quantitative and qualitative SARs. The development and proliferation of the personal computer in the late 20 th century gave rise to a quickly increasing number of property estimation models, and continually improved computing power and connectivity among researchers via the internet are enabling the development of increasingly complex models.

  4. Effluent testing for the Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act mixed waste incinerator emissions tests of January 16 and 18, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shor, J.T.; Bostick, W.D.; Coroneos, A.C.; Bunch, D.H.; Gibson, L.V.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Shoemaker, J.L.

    1992-02-01

    On January 16 and 18, 1991, special emissions tests were conducted at the Oak Ridge, K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator. Both tests were approximately 6 h long and were performed at TSCA temperatures [1200 degrees C, secondary combustion chamber (SSC)]. Liquid feed and effluent samples were collected every 30 min. A filter was used to collect particles from stack gases to study morphology and composition during the first test. Isokinetic air samples were also taken during the second test. Metals emissions from the second test were evaluated using the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 5 sampling train. The aqueous waste was collected and fed in batches to the Central Neutralization Facility (CNF), where it was treated by iron coprecipitation and polymer flocculation and data were collected. In the first test (1-16-91), the aqueous and organic wastes were fed directly to the kiln or primary combustion chamber (PCC). In the second test (1-18-91), the remaining organic waste from the first test was fed into the SSC, and other organic waste was fed into the PCC. One objective of the two tests was to determine if feeding the same organic waste into the two combustion chambers made a difference in a partitioning of uranium and other metals. No evaluation of radionuclides other than uranium was made. The partition coefficient of uranium to the quench water was 0.3 on January 16 and 0.35 on January 18; so directing Tank 306A to the feed to the primary vs the secondary combustion chamber appears to have made little difference. The partition coefficient of uranium to the stack on January 18 was 0.0039. 5 refs., 15 figs., 26 tabs

  5. Toxic substances: Federal-provincial control. Revised edition. Current issue review No. 88-11E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, K; Johansen, D

    1993-01-01

    There is widespread public concern about the effect of toxic substances on human health and the environment. This document looks at the federal-provincial control on toxic substances. It specifically examines the control of toxic substances under the Canadian constitution; the political arena; the federal- provincial co-operation; the Green Plan; and the 1991 Auditor General's Report.

  6. Toxic substances alert program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod, T. L.

    1978-01-01

    A toxicity profile is provided, of 187 toxic substances procured by NASA Lewis Research Center during a 3 1/2 year period, including 27 known or suspected carcinogens. The goal of the program is to assure that the center's health and safety personnel are aware of the procurement and use of toxic substances and to alert and inform the users of these materials as to the toxic characteristics and the control measures needed to ensure their safe use. The program also provides a continuing record of the toxic substances procured, who procured them, what other toxic substances the user has obtained in the past, and where similar materials have been used elsewhere at the center.

  7. Progress report and technology status development of an EG and G Berthold LB-150 alpha/beta particulate monitor for use on the East Tennessee Technology Park Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shor, J.T.; Singh, S.P.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.; Gibson, L.V. Jr. [East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). ASO Customer Services Div.

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this project was to modify and evaluate a commercially available EG and G Berthold LB-150 alpha-beta radionuclide particulate monitor for the high-temperature and moisture-saturation conditions of the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly K-25 Site) Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator stack. The monitor was originally outfitted for operation at gas temperatures of 150 F on the defunct Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) controlled air incinerator, and the objective was to widen its operating envelope. A laboratory apparatus was constructed that simulated the effects of water-saturated air at the TSCA Incinerator stack-gas temperatures, 183 F. An instrumented set of heat exchangers was constructed to then condition the gas so that the radionuclide monitor could be operated without condensation. Data were collected under the conditions of the elevated temperatures and humidities and are reported herein, and design considerations of the apparatus are provided. The heat exchangers and humidification equipment performed as designed, the Mylar film held, and the instrument suffered no ill effects. However, for reasons as yet undetermined, the sensitivity of the radionuclide detection diminishes as the gas temperature is elevated, whether the gas is humidified or not. The manufacturer has had no experience with (a) the operation of the monitor under these conditions and (b) any commercial market that might exist for an instrument that operates under these conditions. The monitor was not installed into the radiologically contaminated environment of the TSCA Incinerator stack pending resolution of this technical issue.

  8. Progress report and technology status development of an EG and G Berthold LB-150 alpha/beta particulate monitor for use on the East Tennessee Technology Park Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shor, J.T.; Singh, S.P.N.; Gibson, L.V. Jr.

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this project was to modify and evaluate a commercially available EG and G Berthold LB-150 alpha-beta radionuclide particulate monitor for the high-temperature and moisture-saturation conditions of the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly K-25 Site) Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator stack. The monitor was originally outfitted for operation at gas temperatures of 150 F on the defunct Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) controlled air incinerator, and the objective was to widen its operating envelope. A laboratory apparatus was constructed that simulated the effects of water-saturated air at the TSCA Incinerator stack-gas temperatures, 183 F. An instrumented set of heat exchangers was constructed to then condition the gas so that the radionuclide monitor could be operated without condensation. Data were collected under the conditions of the elevated temperatures and humidities and are reported herein, and design considerations of the apparatus are provided. The heat exchangers and humidification equipment performed as designed, the Mylar film held, and the instrument suffered no ill effects. However, for reasons as yet undetermined, the sensitivity of the radionuclide detection diminishes as the gas temperature is elevated, whether the gas is humidified or not. The manufacturer has had no experience with (a) the operation of the monitor under these conditions and (b) any commercial market that might exist for an instrument that operates under these conditions. The monitor was not installed into the radiologically contaminated environment of the TSCA Incinerator stack pending resolution of this technical issue

  9. Assessment of the toxicity of a substance under Canadian environmental protection act, a case study. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadon, B.; Germain, A.; Coillie, R. van [Environment Canada, Montreal (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    The Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA) proclaimed in 1988 requires the Canadian Ministers of the Environment and of National Health and Welfare to assess the toxicity of different substances. A Priority Substances List containing 44 substances was developed and their assessments had to determine if they were `toxic`, according to the CEPA definition. This definition states that `a substance is toxic if it is entering or may enter the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions (a) having or that may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment, (b) constituting or that may constitute a danger to the environment on which human life depends; or (c) constituting or that may constitute a danger in Canada to human life of health.` This presentation use the assessment of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as an example of this procedure. (author)

  10. Assessment of the toxicity of a substance under Canadian environmental protection act, a case study. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadon, B; Germain, A; Coillie, R van [Environment Canada, Montreal (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    The Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA) proclaimed in 1988 requires the Canadian Ministers of the Environment and of National Health and Welfare to assess the toxicity of different substances. A Priority Substances List containing 44 substances was developed and their assessments had to determine if they were `toxic`, according to the CEPA definition. This definition states that `a substance is toxic if it is entering or may enter the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions (a) having or that may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment, (b) constituting or that may constitute a danger to the environment on which human life depends; or (c) constituting or that may constitute a danger in Canada to human life of health.` This presentation use the assessment of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as an example of this procedure. (author)

  11. Region 5 Toxic Substances Control Act Producers

    Science.gov (United States)

    This dataset represents the query results from the Envirofacts database for facilities known as Chemical Manufacturers, Processors and Formulators (MPFs) with TSCA identification numbers located in Region 5.

  12. Radioactive Substances Act 1948

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1948-01-01

    This Act regulates the use of radioactive substances and radiation producing devices in the United Kingdom. It provides for the control of import, export, sale, supply etc. of such substances and devices and lays down the safety regulations to be complied with when dealing with them. (NEA) [fr

  13. 77 FR 6801 - Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry; Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... Individuals Displaced by the Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (Pilot Project)--New--Agency for Toxic Substances and... credible research, of air quality conditions present in FEMA housing units to guide FEMA policy makers and... of the health effects among resident children. Formaldehyde testing conducted and evaluated by the...

  14. Toxic substances handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod, T. L.

    1979-01-01

    Handbook, published in conjunction with Toxic Substances Alert Program at NASA Lewis Research Center, profiles 187 toxic chemicals in their relatively pure states and include 27 known or suspected carcinogens.

  15. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Z # Search Form Controls Search The CDC submit Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Note: Javascript ... gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) , based ...

  16. A dissent from the many dissents from Attorney General Ashcroft's interpretation of the Controlled Substances Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindelman, Marc

    2003-01-01

    In this essay, Professor Marc Spindelman examines the states' rights arguments that have been deployed in the Oregon v. Ashcroft litigation to challenge Attorney General John Ashcroft's interpretation of the federal Controlled Substances Act. Professor Spindelman criticizes those arguments as reflecting bad politics--politics of complicity--that self-styled liberals should resist and reject.

  17. EXTRAN: A computer code for estimating concentrations of toxic substances at control room air intakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsdell, J.V.

    1991-03-01

    This report presents the NRC staff with a tool for assessing the potential effects of accidental releases of radioactive materials and toxic substances on habitability of nuclear facility control rooms. The tool is a computer code that estimates concentrations at nuclear facility control room air intakes given information about the release and the environmental conditions. The name of the computer code is EXTRAN. EXTRAN combines procedures for estimating the amount of airborne material, a Gaussian puff dispersion model, and the most recent algorithms for estimating diffusion coefficients in building wakes. It is a modular computer code, written in FORTRAN-77, that runs on personal computers. It uses a math coprocessor, if present, but does not require one. Code output may be directed to a printer or disk files. 25 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Toxic substances: Federal-provincial control -- rev. revised edition. Current issue review No. 88-11E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, K

    1994-12-31

    This document provides a background and analysis on federal-provincial control of toxic substances, including their control under the Canadian Constitution, legislation passed by both levels of government, political aspects, federal-provincial cooperation, the Green Plan, and the Auditor General`s report. Parliamentary action taken and a chronology of events are also included.

  19. Implementation of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Health Authority by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 greatly expanded the health authority of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. One of the federal agencies most affected by SARA is the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) of the U.S. Public Health Service. Among other responsibilities, ATSDR was mandated to conduct health assessments within strict time frames for each site on or proposed for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Priorities List. The author will review ATSDR's efforts to address this new statutory mandate, especially for federal facilities, and will focus on different conceptual frameworks for implementing the health assessment program

  20. Classification of two steroids, prostanozol and methasterone, as Schedule III anabolic steroids under the Controlled Substance Act. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    With the issuance of this Final Rule, the Administrator of the DEA classifies the following two steroids as "anabolic steroids'' under the Controlled Substances Act (CSA): prostanozol (17[beta]-hydroxy-5[alpha]-androstano[3,2-c]pyrazole) and methasterone (2[alpha],17[alpha]-dimethyl-5[alpha]-androstan-17[beta]-ol-3-one). These steroids and their salts, esters, and ethers are Schedule III controlled substances subject to the regulatory control provisions of the CSA.

  1. Assessment of Application Example for a Sodium Fire Extinguishing Facility using Safety Control of Dangerous Substances Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Minhwan; Jeong, Ji-Young; Kim, Jongman

    2014-01-01

    Sodium is under regulation of four kinds of laws including the Safety Control of Dangerous Substances Act and it is under categorized as Class 3(pyrophoric material, water-prohibiting substance). To obtain a license for a sodium experiment facility, the codes and regulations must be satisfied in the Safety Control of Dangerous Substance Act. However, there are some parts that need to be discussed in related regulations in the Safety Control of Dangerous Substance Act because there are differences with the actual features of sodium. To apply for an actual sodium facility, it is necessary to give a supplementary explanation regarding the regulations. The objective of this study is to assess the application example of a sodium experiment facility using the above mentioned laws and to propose the necessity of an amendment for conventional laws in regard to fire extinguishing systems and agents. In this work, an application example of a sodium experiment facility using the Safety Control of Dangerous Substances Act, and the necessity of amending the existing laws in regard to fire extinguishing systems including the agent used, was assessed. The safest standard was applied for cases in which the consideration of a sodium fire is not mentioned in conventional regulations. For the construction of the PGSFR (Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor), the described regulations in this work should be reviewed and improved carefully by the fire safety regulatory body

  2. The abuse potential of medical psilocybin according to the 8 factors of the Controlled Substances Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew W; Griffiths, Roland R; Hendricks, Peter S; Henningfield, Jack E

    2018-06-05

    This review assesses the abuse potential of medically-administered psilocybin, following the structure of the 8 factors of the US Controlled Substances Act (CSA). Research suggests the potential safety and efficacy of psilocybin in treating cancer-related psychiatric distress and substance use disorders, setting the occasion for this review. A more extensive assessment of abuse potential according to an 8-factor analysis would eventually be required to guide appropriate schedule placement. Psilocybin, like other 5-HT2A agonist classic psychedelics, has limited reinforcing effects, supporting marginal, transient non-human self-administration. Nonetheless, mushrooms with variable psilocybin content are used illicitly, with a few lifetime use occasions being normative among users. Potential harms include dangerous behavior in unprepared, unsupervised users, and exacerbation of mental illness in those with or predisposed to psychotic disorders. However, scope of use and associated harms are low compared to prototypical abused drugs, and the medical model addresses these concerns with dose control, patient screening, preparation and follow-up, and session supervision in a medical facility. (1) psilocybin has an abuse potential appropriate for CSA scheduling if approved as medicine; (2) psilocybin can provide therapeutic benefits that may support the development of an approvable New Drug Application (NDA) but further studies are required which this review describes; (3) adverse effects of medical psilocybin are manageable when administered according to risk management approaches; and (4) although further study is required, this review suggests that placement in Schedule IV may be appropriate if a psilocybin-containing medicine is approved. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Radioactive Substances Act 1960

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1960-01-01

    This Act regulates the keeping and use of radioactive material and makes provision for the disposal and storage of radioactive waste in the United Kingdom. It provides for a licensing system for such activities and for exemptions therefrom, in particular as concerns the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority. The Act repeals Section 4(5) of the Atomic Energy Authority Act, 1954 which made temporary provision for discharge of waste on or from premises occupied by the Authority. (NEA) [fr

  4. 78 FR 40175 - Exempt Chemical Preparations Under the Controlled Substances Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ...Standard, Inc M-8270-04-ASL, Method 8270B-- Amber ampule: 1 mL...... 1/28/2013 Base/Neutrals Mix. Accu... CSA and its implementing regulations are designed to prevent, detect, and eliminate the diversion of... controlled substances and listed chemicals for legitimate medical, scientific, research, and industrial...

  5. Schedules of controlled substances: extension of temporary placement of UR-144, XLR11, and AKB48 in schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act. Final order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-15

    The Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is issuing this final order to extend the temporary placement of (1-pentyl-1H-indol-3-yl)(2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl)methanone (UR-144), [1-(5-fluoro-pentyl)-1H-indol-3-yl](2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl)methanone (5-fluoro-UR-144, XLR11) and N-(1-adamantyl)-1-pentyl-1H-indazole-3-carboxamide (APINACA, AKB48), including their salts, isomers, and salts of isomers whenever the existence of such salts, isomers, and salts of isomers is possible, in schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act. The current final order temporarily placing UR-144, XLR11, and AKB48 in schedule I is due to expire on May 15, 2015. This final order will extend the temporary scheduling of UR-144, XLR11, and AKB48 to May 15, 2016, or until the permanent scheduling action for these three substances is completed, whichever occurs first.

  6. 40 CFR 792.107 - Test, control, and reference substance handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Test, Control, and Reference... proper storage. (b) Distribution is made in a manner designed to preclude the possibility of... the date and quantity of each batch distributed or returned. ...

  7. National Toxic Substance Incidents Program (NTSIP)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-02-03

    This podcast gives an overview of the three components of the National Toxic Substance Incidents Program: state surveillance, national database, and response teams.  Created: 2/3/2011 by Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.   Date Released: 2/3/2011.

  8. Caffeine intake, toxicity and dependence and lifetime risk for psychiatric and substance use disorders: an epidemiologic and co-twin control analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, Kenneth S; Myers, John; O Gardner, Charles

    2006-12-01

    Although caffeine is the most commonly used psychoactive substance and often produces symptoms of toxicity and dependence, little is known, especially in community samples, about the association between caffeine use, toxicity and dependence and risk for common psychiatric and substance use disorders. Assessments of lifetime maximal caffeine use and symptoms of caffeine toxicity and dependence were available on over 3600 adult twins ascertained from the population-based Virginia Twin Registry. Lifetime histories of major depression (MD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and panic disorder, alcohol dependence, adult antisocial behavior and cannabis and cocaine abuse/dependence were obtained at personal interview. Logistic regression analyses in the entire sample and within monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs were conducted in SAS. In the entire sample, measures of maximal caffeine use, heavy caffeine use, and caffeine-related toxicity and dependence were significantly and positively associated with all seven psychiatric and substance use disorders. However, within MZ twin pairs, controlling for genetic and family environmental factors, these associations, while positive, were all non-significant. These results were similar when excluding twins who denied regular caffeine use. Maximal lifetime caffeine intake and caffeine-associated toxicity and dependence are moderately associated with risk for a wide range of psychiatric and substance use disorders. Analyses of these relationships within MZ twin pairs suggest that most of the observed associations are not causal. Rather, familial factors, which are probably in part genetic, predispose to both caffeine intake, toxicity and dependence and the risk for a broad array of internalizing and externalizing disorders.

  9. Symposium on Toxic Substance Control: Decontamination, April 22 - 24, 1980, Columbus, Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    the form of water and carbon dioxide or nontoxic solids that can be landfilled without environmental hazard. Toxic Military Wastes Disposal of...have generated sound intensities of over 100 decibels. 20 THERMAL DEFLECTION When the modulated C02 laser is abosrbed in a gas sample, both acoustic...pressure to propylene pressure. An "X" in a column denotes that the product gas was absent. Irradiation, C3H6 C 4 C2H4 C 3OHC carbon propylene methane

  10. Toxicities of selected substances to freshwater biota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohreiter, D.W.

    1980-05-01

    The amount of data available concerning the toxicity of various substances to freshwater biota is so large that it is difficult to use in a practical situation, such as environmental impact assessment. In this document, summary tables are presented showing acute and/or chronic toxicity of selected substances for various groups of aquatic biota. Each entry is referenced to its original source so that details concerning experimental conditions may be consulted. In addition, general information concerning factors modifying toxicity, synergisms, evidence of bioaccumulation, and water quality standards and criteria for the selected substances is given. The final table is a general toxicity table designed to provide an easily accessible and general indication of toxicity of selected substances in aquatic systems.

  11. Ocean Dumping Control Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    This Act provides for the control of dumping of wastes and other substances in the ocean in accordance with the London Convention of 1972 on Prevention of Marine Pollution by the Dumping of Wastes and other Matter to which Canada is a Party. Radioactive wastes are included in the prohibited and restricted substances. (NEA)

  12. TSCA Chemical Substance Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Section 8 (b) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) requires EPA to compile, keep current, and publish a list of each chemical substance that is manufactured or processed in the United States for TSCA uses.

  13. Toxicity of 56 substances to trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lauge Peter Westergaard; Trapp, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Toxicity data of substances to higher plants is needed for the purpose of risk assessment, site evaluation, phytoremediation, and plant protection. However, the results from the most common phytotoxicity tests, like the OECD algae and Lemna test, are not necessarily valid for higher terrestrial...

  14. Potential hazard by toxic substances in foods. Environmental protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unterhalt, B

    1974-01-01

    This paper reviews various toxic substances found in foods. These toxic substances include not only natural occurring toxins but also bacterial food poisons, pesticide residues, heavy metals, and food additives. The potential hazard of each toxic substance is discussed. 74 references.

  15. Summary of Model Toxics Control Act (MTCA) Potential Impacts Related to Hanford Cleanup and the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IWATATE, D.F.

    2000-07-14

    This white paper provides an initial assessment of the potential impacts of the Model Toxics Control Act (MTCA) regulations (and proposed revisions) on the Hanford site cleanup and addresses concerns that MTCA might impose inappropriate or unachievable clean-up levels and drive clean-up costs higher. The white paper and supporting documentation (Appendices A and B) provide DOE with a concise and up-to-date review of potential MTCA impacts to cost and schedule for the Hanford site activities. MTCA, Chapter 70.105D RCW, is the State of Washington's risk based law governing clean-up of contaminated sites and is implemented by The Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) under the MTCA Clean-up Regulations, Chapter 173-340 WAC. Hanford cleanup is subject to the MTCA requirements as Applicable, Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) for those areas of Hanford being managed under the authority of the Federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the state Dangerous Waste Regulations. MTCA provides Ecology with authority to implement site clean-up actions under both the federal RCRA and CERCLA regulations as well as the state regulations. Most of the Hanford clean-up actions are being implemented under the CERCLA program, however, there is a trend is toward increased use of MTCA procedures and standards. The application of MTCA to the Hanford clean-up has been an evolving process with some of the Hanford clean-up actions considering MTCA standards as an ARAR and using MTCA procedures for remedy selection. The increased use and application of MTCA standards and procedures could potentially impact both cost and schedule for the Hanford cleanup.

  16. Persistent toxic substances: sources, fates and effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ming H; Armour, Margaret-Ann; Naidu, Ravi; Man, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Persistent toxic substances (PTS) include the Stockholm persistent organic pollutants, like dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxin/furan, etc., and organometallic compounds, like organomercury, organotin, and organolead, which all share the same characteristics of being persistent, toxic, bioaccumulative, and able to travel long distances through different media. The adverse health effects of some of the emerging chemicals like pentabromodiphenyl ether, bisphenol A, and di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, which are widely used in daily appliances (e.g., TVs, computers, mobile phones, plastic baby bottles), have become a public health concern due to more evidence now available showing their adverse effects like disturbance of the endocrine system and cancer. This article is an attempt to review the current status of PTS in our environment, citing case studies in China and North America, and whether our existing drinking water treatment and wastewater treatment processes are adequate in removing them from water. Some management issues of these emerging chemicals of concern are also discussed.

  17. [Acting out and psychoactive substances: alcohol, drugs, illicit substances].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, C; Polard, E; Mauduit, N; Allain, H

    2001-01-01

    In humans, some psychotropic agents (alcohol, drugs, illicit substances) have been suggested to play a role in the occurrence of major behavioural disorders, mainly due to the suppression of psychomotor inhibition. Behavioural disinhibition is a physiological mechanism which allows humans to behave appropriately according to a given environmental situation. The behavioural disinhibition induced by either therapeutic dosage or misuse involves the loss of restraint over certain types of social behaviour and may increase the risk of auto or hetero-aggression and acting out. The increased use of psychotropic agents in recent years and the occurrence of unwanted effects are worrying and must be detected and evaluated. The objective of the present study was to establish a causal relationship between psychoactive substance use and occurrence of major behavioural disorders, such as paradoxical rage reactions and suicidal behaviour, based on a literature analysis. It consisted of reviewing reports of drug-induced violent reactions in healthy volunteers and demonstrating, where possible, a cause-effect relationship. Patients with schizophrenia and psychopathic personalities were not included in our study since psychiatric comorbidity could influence behavioural responses. Psychotropic agents included drugs, licit and illicit substances already associated with violence in the past. Many reports used the "Go/No Go test" to evaluate the disinhibiting effect of psychotropic substances; this allows the "cognitive mapping" of drugs. The results suggest that only alcohol, antidepressants, benzodiazepines and cocaïne are related to aggressive behaviour. The best known precipitant of behavioural disinhibition is alcohol, which induces aggressive behaviour. However, there are large differences between individuals, and attentional mechanisms are now recognised as being important in mediating the effects of alcohol. Suicidal tendency as an adverse antidepressant reaction is rare

  18. Accident = energy/toxic substance + misinformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Weihong

    2001-01-01

    Nowadays, the ever-increasing complication of technology and management of industry, supplemented with a variety of information technology and communication skills, has made the modern safety professionals discover a new mechanism of accident occurrences. This mechanism is outstanding in that the integrity of energy and toxic substance utilized in the production processes can be effectively maintained and limited through improving and updating both the techniques and management of information and communications, and consequently, accidents are prevented from occurring, or once accidentally released, the consequences can be effectively mitigated. In light of the experience of China Guangdong Nuclear Power Corporation (CGNPC), the importance of the new mechanism and its prospects for further application in nuclear industry are depicted through case studies

  19. 76 FR 38170 - Toxic Substances Control Act Chemical Testing; Receipt of Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... must be visible at all times in the building and returned upon departure. II. Test Data Submissions EPA... required by the applicable standards for the development of test data. 3. Describe the nature of the test.... See note. Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) Cells. Activated Sludge Die-away 0275.1. Copyrighted...

  20. 77 FR 22707 - Electronic Reporting Under the Toxic Substances Control Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-17

    ... to the Agency. The tool is available for use with Windows, Macs, Linux, and UNIX based computers... a fielded format, e.g., the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) harmonized...

  1. 77 FR 11158 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Toxic Substances Control Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... Dover Chemical to pay a $1.4 million civil penalty. Dover Chemical has halted manufacture of short-chain chlorinated paraffins and committed to submit premanufacture notices (``PMNs'') for medium and long-chain chlorinated paraffins, pursuant to TSCA Section 5. The proposed Consent Decree prohibits Dover Chemical from...

  2. 78 FR 72818 - Electronic Reporting Under the Toxic Substances Control Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-04

    ... password, selects a program and role, and follows the procedures outlined in the CDX user guide available.... How will the agency provide opportunities for potential users to become familiar with the reporting tool? The Agency will offer a webinar open to the public for potential users to become familiar with...

  3. Polymer Exemption for New Chemicals under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has established an exemption for certain polymers to encourage manufacturers to make safer polymers. To learn more about this exemption, eligibility, and it's requirements, read this overview of the exemption.

  4. Predictive Models and Tools for Assessing Chemicals under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has developed databases and predictive models to help evaluate the hazard, exposure, and risk of chemicals released to the environment and how workers, the general public, and the environment may be exposed to and affected by them.

  5. A scheme for regulating toxic substances to water quality of Chamsil upstream water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Suk; Kim, Jee Hoon [Korea Environment Institute, Seoul (Korea)

    1998-12-01

    This study asserts to reflect a concept of toxicity thoroughly in the present water quality concept. It presents an appropriate solution to control toxic substances flowing into the Chamsil upstream water system. Although a regulation of toxic substances into major rivers in Korea other than Han river is also required urgently, it will be studied in future. It is expected that this study on Chamsil upstream would be a cornerstone for establishing a national regulation policy of toxic substances into water system. 28 refs., 1 fig., 36 tabs.

  6. [Examination of analytical method for triphenyltin (TPT) and tributyltin (TBT) to revise the official methods based on "Act on the Control of Household Products Containing Harmful Substances"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Tsuyoshi; Isama, Kazuo; Nakashima, Harunobu; Yoshida, Jin; Ooshima, Tomoko; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Uemura, Hitoshi; Shioda, Hiroko; Kikuchi, Yoko; Matsuoka, Atsuko; Nishimura, Tetsuji

    2012-01-01

    The use of triphenyltin (TPT) and tributyltin (TBT) in some household products is banned by "Act on the Control of Household Products Containing Harmful Substances" in Japan. To revise the official analytical method, the method for detecting these organotin compounds was examined in six laboratories using a textile product, water-based adhesive, oil-based paint, which contained known amounts of TPT and TBT (0.1, 1.0, 10 μg/g). TPT and TBT were measured by GC-MS after ethyl-derivation with sodium tetraethylborate. The TBT recoveries in the samples were 70-120%. The TPT recoveries in the water-based adhesive samples were 80-110%, while its concentrations in the textile product and oil-based paint samples decreased because of dephenylation during storage. However, the precision of the method examined was satisfactory because most coefficients of variation for TPT and TBT in the samples were less than 10%. Furthermore, the revised method was able to detect concentrations lower than the officially regulated value. However, the sample matrix and the condition of analytical instrument might affect the estimated TPT and TBT concentrations. Therefore, the revised method may not be suitable for quantitative tests; rather, it can be employed to judge the acceptable levels of these organotin compounds by comparing the values of control sample containing regulated amounts of TPT and TBT with those for an unknown sample, with deuterated TPT and TBT as surrogate substances. It is desirable that TPT in textile and oil-based paint samples are analyzed immediately after the samples obtained because of the decomposition of TPT.

  7. Charging scheme for Radioactive Substances Act regulation 1998-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    The Environment Act 1995 provides for the Environment Agency ('the Agency') to recover the costs and expenses incurred by the Agency and by the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF) in carrying out their functions in relation to the Radioactive Substances Act 1993 ('the Act'). The Act deals with the keeping and use of radioactive substances, and with the accumulation and disposal of radioactive waste

  8. Problems of substance abuse: exploitation and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, L

    1985-01-01

    The notion of substance abuse is highly problematic. There is considerable disagreement amongst 'experts' as to the relative hazards and addictive properties of both legally and illegally available substances. There are also widely divergent sub-cultural attitudes to the harmfulness or benefit of drug use. One can assume no social consensus as to the nature of the contemporary 'drug problem', nor about the most appropriate means of dealing with it. There is, however, considerable evidence that criminalization of drug use, and harsh penalties against users and suppliers, are ineffective and counter-productive. Other models of control need to be considered, and in particular the merits and de-merits of the medicalization of drug abuse require examination. However, this is only one aspect of the problem. On the other side are the national and international corporations and syndicates, both legitimate and criminal, that earn vast profits from trade in toxic substances. Tobacco is legally available in every country in the world, and the industry is rarely subject to strict control. Thus the issue of substance abuse and control should be seen in a global context, in which account is taken of both legitimate and underworld operations. In attempts to control international trade in toxic substances, the limited success and the problems of already existing legal controls should be acknowledged. Local awareness and regulation of trade in substances is essential, but not sufficient. Amongst other avenues to be explored is the possibility of diverting presently illicitly grown narcotics into indigenous pharmaceutical industries in the Third World. Some problems with this strategy are noted.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Access device for transferring toxic or radioactive substances between a flanged flask and a containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winnett, G.F.

    1980-01-01

    This invention concerns the transfer of toxic or radioactive substances between a containment and a flask in which such substances are transported. When toxic or radioactive substances are being transferred, it is important to ensure that such substances cannot excape into the surrounding atmosphere and, preferably, the appliance utilized has to be capable of making a misuse impossible, whether accidental or calculated. The flask to which this invention applies is of the type comprising lugs, near its open ends, which act in combination with a groove made around an access opening to hold and maintain the flask in position against the wall of the containment, so that its open end is aligned with an access opening provided in the containment wall [fr

  10. Control of air toxics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livengood, C.D.

    1995-01-01

    For more than 10 years, Argonne National Laboratory has supported the US DOE's Flue Gas Cleanup Program objective by developing new or improved environmental controls for industries that use fossil fuels. Argonne's pollutant emissions research has ranged from experiments in the basic chemistry of pollution-control systems, through laboratory-scale process development and testing, to pilot-scale field tests of several technologies. The work on air toxics is currently divided into two components: Investigating measures to improve the removal of mercury in existing pollution-control systems applied to coal combustion; and, Developing sensors and control techniques for emissions found in the textile industry

  11. Presence, origin and importance of toxic substances in drinking water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seemayer, N H

    1980-01-01

    The ubiquitous, environmental toxic substances representing a risk to health, and of importance with respect to the production of drinking water, largely belong to the following groups: cancerogenic, polycyclic, aromatic hydrocarbons, aromatic amines, N-nitroso compounds, pesticides. In addition the following substances: polychlorinated biphenyls, hormones, antibiotics, halogen hydrocarbons and heavy metals such as mercury, cadmium, lead, vanadium, chromium etc. Today, there is full appreciation of the qualitative aspects associated with the burdening of the environmental factor 'water' with toxic substances. However, as to the quantitative aspects, especially those relating to a combined effect of toxic substances adding to the total burden of man with noxious environmental agents, data are still lacking. The assessment of the chronic action exercised by minute and very minute concentrations of potentially toxic, cancerogenic or mutagenic substances possess a particularly complex problem for the environmental and water hygiene. Nowadays, there are basically 3 possibilities of solving this problem: epidemiological-statistical analyses, long-term animal experiments and in-vitro short-term tests. The epidemiological-statistical analysis can make a valuable contribution to the evaluation of the risk to human health of polluted drinking water and may also furnish the first clues to an incipient danger. However, it has to be considered that epidemiological studies deal with multifactorial events and that a monocausality is difficult to establish.

  12. 48 CFR 245.7310-5 - Controlled substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs) to buy controlled substances as a medical practitioner, dealer... hallucinogenic drugs, shall be subject to the following special conditions: (a) Controlled Substances. Bids will... represents and warrants that it is registered under The Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act...

  13. Toxic or dangerous substances present construction materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos Alvarado, A.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is the elaboration of a guide which could be used as a support and consultation concerning the topic of safety in the construction, specifically in the area of the use and managing of material and dangerous substances; considering the possible dangers to medium and long term that some of the common construction materials represent for the health. The gathered information is the result of the review of bibliographical material, the visits to public institutions at national level and to international offices which representation in our country, this way as a work of field and of study of the national market, among others. Besides important consult through the Internet checking many sites of interest with the finality of getting more updated information as possible, like that as the consultation to professionals and workers related to the construction area. (Author) [es

  14. Determination of Anti-nutrients and Toxic Substances of Selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    ABSTRACT: Determination of antinutrients and toxic substances in leafy vegetables is an imperative facet in nutritional studies as it establishes the baseline concentrations index for phytotoxins in the vegetables. Concentrations of cyanide, nitrate, soluble and total oxalates were quantitatively determined in the common ...

  15. Radioactive Substances Act, 1957, No 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This Act as amended regulates the possession, sale and use of radioactive materials and irradiating apparatus. It sets up a Radiological Advisory Council to advise the competent authorities on questions within the scope of the Act, also with a view to radiation protection. The Council's rules of procedure are laid down. The Act also provides that, subject to prescribed exemptions, no person may hold, use or sell radioactive materials without a licence. (NEA) [fr

  16. EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURES FOR CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE RELEASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information is provided for selecting the best spill stabilization controls for hazardous substances regulated by the Comprehensive Enviromental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Information is also provided on the onsite assessment of spill severity, app...

  17. [The biomonitoring of toxic substances in biological samples of general population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarluzea, Jesús; Aurrekoetxea, Juan José; Porta, Miquel; Sunyer, Jordi; Ballester, Ferran

    2016-11-01

    Many of the world's most developed countries have adopted biomonitoring of toxic substances in order to ascertain their levels in biological samples. These substances get into the body through different environmental exposures. Monitoring toxic substances in biological samples should allow us to ascertain their levels in vulnerable groups, assess their evolution over time, make comparisons with levels observed in other countries, identify groups at risk or with high toxic levels and promote research. The main objective of biomonitoring is to act as a policy design tool to facilitate the implementation of particular measures in various sectors: health, environmental, agricultural and livestock or food industry sectors. In Spain, information on levels of toxic substances of environmental origin is provided by specific studies on health effects from environmental sources, such as the INMA project (INfancia y Medio Ambiente [childhood and environment]). In addition, biomonitoring projects have been implemented in Catalonia and the Canary Islands, together with a national biomonitoring programme in the adult working population. However, further progress is needed to develop a system that covers the general population as well as subgroups at risk, which relies on the collaboration of the involved authorities and the participation of professionals from different sectors and citizen organisations interested in the relationship between health and the environment. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. An Act to Control and Regulate the Possession, Sale, Transport and Use of Radioactive Substances and the Possession and Use of Certain Apparatus capable of producing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1958-01-01

    This Act covers all activities involving radioactive materials and radiation sources. It sets up a Radiological Advisory Council to advise the Minister responsible for health in Queensland on administration of the Act, regulations made thereunder and on preventing and minimising dangers arising from radioactive materials and radiation sources. It lays down the Council's composition and rules of procedure. The Act also provides for the licensing, control and registration of such materials and sources, including sanctions in case of non-compliance with its provisions. (NEA) [fr

  19. Atomic Energy Control Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    This act provides for the establishment of the Atomic Energy Control Board. The board is responsible for the control and supervision of the development, application and use of atomic energy. The board is also considered necessary to enable Canada to participate effectively in measures of international control of atomic energy

  20. New DEA rules expand options for controlled substance disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, David M

    2015-03-01

    Prescription drug abuse and overdose are rapidly growing problems in the United States. The United States federal Disposal of Controlled Substances Rule became effective 9 October 2014, implementing the Secure and Responsible Drug Disposal Act of 2010 (Disposal Act). These regulations target escalating prescription drug misuse by reducing accumulation of unused controlled substances that may be abused, diverted or accidentally ingested. Clinical areas that can now participate in collecting unused controlled substances include retail pharmacies, hospitals or clinics with an onsite pharmacy, and narcotic treatment programs. Collection methods include placing a controlled substance collection receptacle or instituting a mail-back program. Because prompt onsite destruction of collected items is required of mail-back programs, collection receptacles are more likely to be used in clinical areas. Retail pharmacies and hospitals or clinics with an onsite pharmacy may also place and maintain collection receptacles at long-term care facilities. The Act and Rule are intended to increase controlled substance disposal methods and expand local involvement in collection of unused controlled substances. Potential barriers to participating in controlled substance collection include acquisition of suitable collection receptacles and liners, lack of available space meeting the necessary criteria, lack of employee time for verification and inventory requirements, and program costs.

  1. Proposed Radiation Control Act: discussion paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The history and nature of the present NSW Radioactive Substances Act passed in 1957 is outlined. The direction of reform is suggested and some options for changes presented. These include the extension of controls to cover non-ionising radiation, the introduction of controls over the mining and milling of radioactive ores, and improved licensing provisions. Professional and public comment is sought

  2. Toxic substances registry system: Index of material safety data sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS's) listed in this index reflect product inventories and associated MSDS's which were submitted to the Toxic Substances Registry database maintained by the Base Operations Contractor at the Kennedy Space Center. The purpose of this index is to provide KSC government, contractor, and tenant organizations a means to access information on the hazards associated with these chemicals. The Toxic Substance Registry Service (TSRS) was established to manage information dealing with the storage and use of toxic and otherwise hazardous materials at KSC. As a part of this service, the BOC Environmental Health Services maintains a central repository of MSDS's which were provided to TSRS. The data on the TSRS are obtained from NASA, contractor, and tenant organizations who use or store hazardous materials at KSC. It is the responsibility of these organizations to conduct inventories, obtain MSDS's, distribute Hazard Communication information to their employees, and otherwise implement compliance with appropriate Federal, State, and NASA Hazard Communication and Worker Right-to-Know regulations and policies.

  3. Upper parameters of toxicity (LDsub(50/30)) of some radioactive and chemical substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodionova, L.F.; Kupriyanova, V.M.; Zasedatelev, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    The toxicities of radioactive ( 90 Sr, 210 Po) and chemical (lead nitrate, mercuric chloride) substances were compared using equivalent procedures. Ninety six doses of toxic substances in various concentrations were tested on mice to which these substances were administered by intragastric intubation. The material was processed and analyzed by conventional methods used in toxicology. The upper limits of toxicity for the tested substances were determined from their LDsub(50/30) values by various methods of calculation

  4. Control substances and alcohol use and testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Przybylski, J.L.

    1994-07-01

    The Omnibus Transportation Employee Testing Act was signed into law in October of 1991. The Omnibus Transportation Employee Testing Act of 1991 required the United States Department of Transportation (DOT) to enact regulations requiring the testing of employees that perform ``safety sensitive functions`` for illegal controlled substance use and alcohol misuse. The Transportation Management Division, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (TMD/EM-261), United States Department of Energy (DOE), Training Program Manager is committed to promoting the availability of the necessary information to those affected members of the Department of Energy (DOE) community in an effort to attain the highest possible level of regulatory compliance and to enhance the safety of each individual in the workplace.

  5. 75 FR 4983 - Significant New Use Rules on Certain Chemical Substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    ... this substance (see Unit V. of the proposed rule). Use of most flammable refrigerants, including the... 2070-AB27 Significant New Use Rules on Certain Chemical Substances AGENCY: Environmental Protection...) under section 5(a)(2) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) for 15 chemical substances which were...

  6. Polymer Exemption Guidance Manual for premanufacture notices for new chemicals under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A technical manual to accompany, but not supersede the Premanufacture Notification Exemptions; Revisions of Exemptions for Polymers; Final Rule found at 40 CFR Part 723, (60) FR 16316-16336, published Wednesday, March 29, 1995.

  7. Sample taking device for toxic and/or radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finsterwalder, L.; Zeh, H.; Schaarschmidt, U.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus for taking samples of toxic and/or radioactive liquid substances by introducing such substances into sample vessels includes a holder for holding such a vessel, at least one needle head filling system composed of upwardly pointing hollow needles for introducing a sample of one such substance into such a vessel at a filling position, and inlet and outlet conduits for pneumatically conveying vessels to or from the holder at a transfer position. The holder is composed of a turntable having a sleeve for accommodating such vessel and is mounted to undergo rotary movement to convey a sample vessel held in the sleeve between the filling and transfer positions. The apparatus further includes a stand supporting the filling system below the holder and a lifting device connected for imparting a translational movement to the holder to bring a vessel in the holder to operative association with the filling system. The lifting device is arranged so that the translational movement which it produces is independent of the rotary movement of the turntable

  8. The Massachusetts Toxics Use Reduction Act: a model for nanomaterials regulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Jennifer

    2012-08-01

    Nanomaterials exemplify a new class of emerging technologies that have significant economic and social value, pose uncertain health and environmental risks, and are entering the marketplace at a rapid pace. Effective regimes for regulating emerging technologies generate information about known or suspected hazards and draw on private sector expertise to guide managers' behavior toward risk reduction, even in the absence of clear evidence of harm. This paper considers the extent to which the federal Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) accomplishes those objectives. It offers the approach of the Massachusetts Toxics Use Reduction Act (TURA) as a possible supplement to TSCA, filling gaps in agency knowledge and private sector capacities. TURA is notable for its focus on chemicals use and hazard and its emphasis on strengthening firms' internal management systems. Given the current deadlock in Congressional efforts to modernize federal laws such as TSCA, the role of state laws like TURA merit attention. Absent definitive information about risk, a governance strategy that generates information and focuses management attention on reducing hazards is worth considering.

  9. The Massachusetts Toxics Use Reduction Act: a model for nanomaterials regulation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Nanomaterials exemplify a new class of emerging technologies that have significant economic and social value, pose uncertain health and environmental risks, and are entering the marketplace at a rapid pace. Effective regimes for regulating emerging technologies generate information about known or suspected hazards and draw on private sector expertise to guide managers’ behavior toward risk reduction, even in the absence of clear evidence of harm. This paper considers the extent to which the federal Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) accomplishes those objectives. It offers the approach of the Massachusetts Toxics Use Reduction Act (TURA) as a possible supplement to TSCA, filling gaps in agency knowledge and private sector capacities. TURA is notable for its focus on chemicals use and hazard and its emphasis on strengthening firms’ internal management systems. Given the current deadlock in Congressional efforts to modernize federal laws such as TSCA, the role of state laws like TURA merit attention. Absent definitive information about risk, a governance strategy that generates information and focuses management attention on reducing hazards is worth considering.

  10. The NSW Radiation Control Act and regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towson, J.

    1994-01-01

    The legal control of radiation safety in New South Wales has undergone substantial change in recent years. The long-awaited Regulation to the 1990 Radiation Control Act came into effect on 1 September 1993 (of necessity, as the Regulation to the previous 1957 Radioactive Substances Act expired on that date). It has not met with unanimous acclaim. The Regulation addresses three broad areas, namely - (a) legal controls - licensing, registration, radiation 'experts'; (b) safety matters - workplace management, monitoring, research exposures, transport/disposal, accidents; and (c) miscellaneous -radiation safety officers, committees, penalties, records, This article offers a personal view of the implications for nuclear medicine practice in New South Wales

  11. Sequential assessment via daphnia and zebrafish for systematic toxicity screening of heterogeneous substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Gun Hyuk; Park, Chang-Beom; Kang, Benedict J; Kim, Young Jun; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2016-09-01

    Environment and organisms are persistently exposed by a mixture of various substances. However, the current evaluation method is mostly based on an individual substance's toxicity. A systematic toxicity evaluation of heterogeneous substances needs to be established. To demonstrate toxicity assessment of mixture, we chose a group of three typical ingredients in cosmetic sunscreen products that frequently enters ecosystems: benzophenone-3 (BP-3), ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate (EHMC), and titanium dioxide nanoparticle (TiO2 NP). We first determined a range of nominal toxic concentration of each ingredient or substance using Daphnia magna, and then for the subsequent organismal level phenotypic assessment, chose the wild-type zebrafish embryos. Any phenotype change, such as body deformation, led to further examinations on the specific organs of transgenic zebrafish embryos. Based on the systematic toxicity assessments of the heterogeneous substances, we offer a sequential environmental toxicity assessment protocol that starts off by utilizing Daphnia magna to determine a nominal concentration range of each substance and finishes by utilizing the zebrafish embryos to detect defects on the embryos caused by the heterogeneous substances. The protocol showed additive toxic effects of the mixtures. We propose a sequential environmental toxicity assessment protocol for the systematic toxicity screening of heterogeneous substances from Daphnia magna to zebrafish embryo in-vivo models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. National All Schedules Prescription Electronic Reporting Act (NASPER): balancing substance abuse and medical necessity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Brown, Keith R; Singh, Vijay

    2002-07-01

    The National All Schedules Prescription Electronic Reporting Act, or NASPER, is a bill proposed by the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians to provide and improve patient access with quality care, and protect patients and physicians from deleterious effects of controlled substance misuse, abuse and trafficking. Controlled prescription drugs, including narcotic analgesics, anxiolytics, anti-depressants, stimulants, and sedative-hypnotics play a significant and legitimate role in interventional pain management practices in managing chronic pain and related disorders. Based on the 1997 household survey on drug abuse it is estimated that 76.9 million Americans had used an illicit drug at least once in their life. In 1997, 4.2 million people used analgesics, 2.1 million used tranquillizers, and an additional 2.3 million people used various other drugs, including sedatives, tranquillizers, etc. The non-medical use of prescription drugs exceeds that of all illicit substances except for marijuana and hashish. The report on epidemiology trends in drug abuse, based on community epidemiology work group analysis showed continued increase of abuse of prescription drugs in urban, suburban, and rural areas. The most commonly abused drugs include oxycodone, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, morphine, codeine, clonazepam, alprazolam, lorazepam, diazepam and carisoprodol. The diversion of prescription controlled substances to illicit channels is a public health and safety issue. This review describes the role of controlled substances in chronic pain management, prevalence and economic impact of controlled substance abuse, prescription accountability, effectiveness of prescription monitoring programs, and rationale for national controlled substance electronic reporting system.

  13. Portugal's 2001 Drugs Liberalisation Policy: A UK Service Provider's Perspective on the Psychoactive Substances Act (2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banbury, Samantha; Lusher, Joanne; Guedelha, Francisco

    2018-01-01

    The Misuse of Drugs Act (1971) and the Psychoactive Substances Act (2016) both reinforce the criminalisation of drug use in the UK. The Psychoactive Substances Act (2016) has been developed to control and monitor the use of legal highs, particularly in institutions. This study aimed to establish drug service providers' viewpoints on how effective…

  14. Artificial saliva effect on toxic substances release from acrylic resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Milena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Acrylic-based resins are intensively used in dentistry practice as restorative or denture-base materials. The purpose of this study was to analyze the surface structure of denture base resins and the amount of released potentially toxic substances (PTS immediately upon polymerization and incubation in different types of artificial saliva. Methods. Storage of acrylic samples in two models of artificial saliva were performed in a water bath at the temperature of 37 ± 1°C. Analysis of the surface structure of samples was carried out using scanning electronic microscopy analysis immediately after polymerization and after the 30-day incubation. The amounts of PTS per day, week and month extracts were measured using high-pressure liquid chromatography. Results. Surface design and amount of PTS in acrylic materials were different and depended on the types and duration of polymerization. The surfaces of tested acrylates became flatter after immersing in solutions of artificial saliva. The degree of acrylic materials release was not dependent on the applied model of artificial saliva. Conclusion. In order to improve biological features of acrylic resin materials, it was recommended that dentures lined with soft or hard coldpolymerized acrylates should be kept at least 1 to 7 days in water before being given to a patient. So, as to reach high degree of biocompatibility preparation of prosthetic restorations from heat-polymerized acrylate was unnecessary. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 41017

  15. [Nutrition and health--toxic substances in food].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietjens, I M; Alink, G M

    2003-11-29

    With respect to food, the most important factors causing adverse health effects are: an unbalanced diet, resulting in obesity or vitamin deficiencies, overconsumption of alcohol or fat, the presence of microbial contamination and the presence of natural toxins. Two additional factors, the presence of environmental contaminants and products formed on heating food, may also be of importance. It is generally assumed that, when combined, food-related factors contribute to around 35% of overall cancer incidence. The most important groups of health-threatening compounds to be found in the food chain include natural toxins, such as those produced by plants (phytotoxins), fungi (mycotoxins), marine algae (phycotoxins) and by bacteria, and toxins present in animals for human consumption, especially fish. A second important group of toxic compounds in food consists of environmental contaminants, including heavy metals and persistent organic pollutants, such as dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls, all of which may unintentionally end up in the food chain. A third group of toxins present in food are those substances produced when food is heated, and include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, heterocyclic amines and acrylamide.

  16. Research on the Relationships between Endogenous Biomarkers and Exogenous Toxic Substances of Acute Toxicity in Radix Aconiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haonan Zhou

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Radix Aconiti, a classic traditional Chinese medicine (TCM, has been widely used throughout China for disease treatment due to its various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory, cardiotonic, and analgesic effects. However, improper use of Radix Aconiti often generated severe acute toxicity. Currently, research on the toxic substances of Radix Aconiti is not rare. In our previous study, acute toxic biomarkers of Radix Aconiti have been found. However, few studies were available to find the relationships between these endogenous biomarkers and exogenous toxic substances. Therefore, in this study, toxic substances of Radix Aconiti have been found using UPLC-Q-TOF-MS technology. Then, we used biochemical indicators as a bridge to find the relationships between biomarkers and toxic substances of Radix Aconiti through Pearson correlation analysis and canonical correlation analysis (CCA. Finally, the CCA results showed that LysoPC(22:5 is related to 14-acetyl-talatisamine, mesaconitine, talatisamine and deoxyaconitine in varying degrees; l-acetylcarnitine is negatively correlated with deoxyaconitine and demethyl-14-acetylkaracoline; shikimic acid has a good correlation with karacoline, demethyl-14-acetylkaracoline and deoxyaconitine; and valine is correlated with talatisamine and deoxyaconitine. Research on these relationships provides an innovative way to interpret the toxic mechanism of traditional Chinese medicine, and plays a positive role in the overall study of TCM toxicity.

  17. Research on the Relationships between Endogenous Biomarkers and Exogenous Toxic Substances of Acute Toxicity in Radix Aconiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Haonan; Zhang, Pengjie; Hou, Zhiguo; Xie, Jiabin; Wang, Yuming; Yang, Bin; Xu, Yanyan; Li, Yubo

    2016-11-25

    Radix Aconiti , a classic traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), has been widely used throughout China for disease treatment due to its various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory, cardiotonic, and analgesic effects. However, improper use of Radix Aconiti often generated severe acute toxicity. Currently, research on the toxic substances of Radix Aconiti is not rare. In our previous study, acute toxic biomarkers of Radix Aconiti have been found. However, few studies were available to find the relationships between these endogenous biomarkers and exogenous toxic substances. Therefore, in this study, toxic substances of Radix Aconiti have been found using UPLC-Q-TOF-MS technology. Then, we used biochemical indicators as a bridge to find the relationships between biomarkers and toxic substances of Radix Aconiti through Pearson correlation analysis and canonical correlation analysis (CCA). Finally, the CCA results showed that LysoPC(22:5) is related to 14-acetyl-talatisamine, mesaconitine, talatisamine and deoxyaconitine in varying degrees; l-acetylcarnitine is negatively correlated with deoxyaconitine and demethyl-14-acetylkaracoline; shikimic acid has a good correlation with karacoline, demethyl-14-acetylkaracoline and deoxyaconitine; and valine is correlated with talatisamine and deoxyaconitine. Research on these relationships provides an innovative way to interpret the toxic mechanism of traditional Chinese medicine, and plays a positive role in the overall study of TCM toxicity.

  18. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION-A COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.L. Senior; F. Huggins; G.P. Huffman; N. Shah; N. Yap; J.O.L. Wendt; W. Seames; M.R. Ames; A.F. Sarofim; S. Swenson; J.S. Lighty; A. Kolker; R. Finkelman; C.A. Palmer; S.J. Mroczkowski; J.J. Helble; R. Mamani-Paco; R. Sterling; G. Dunham; S. Miller

    2001-06-30

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the Electric Power Research Institute, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UK), the University of Connecticut (UC), the University of Utah (UU) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NOx combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI's existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). The work discussed in this report covers the Phase II program. Five coals were studied (three in Phase I and two new ones in Phase II). In this work UK has used XAFS and Moessbauer spectroscopies to characterize elements in project coals. For coals, the principal use was to supply direct information about certain hazardous and other key elements (iron) to complement the more complete indirect investigation of elemental modes of occurrence being carried out by colleagues at USGS. Iterative selective leaching using ammonium acetate, HCl, HF, and HNO3, used in conjunction with mineral identification/quantification, and microanalysis of individual mineral grains, has allowed USGS to delineate modes of occurrence for 44 elements. The Phase II coals show rank-dependent systematic differences in trace-element modes of occurrence. The work at

  19. Research on the Relationships between Endogenous Biomarkers and Exogenous Toxic Substances of Acute Toxicity in Radix Aconiti

    OpenAIRE

    Haonan Zhou; Pengjie Zhang; Zhiguo Hou; Jiabin Xie; Yuming Wang; Bin Yang; Yanyan Xu; Yubo Li

    2016-01-01

    Radix Aconiti, a classic traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), has been widely used throughout China for disease treatment due to its various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory, cardiotonic, and analgesic effects. However, improper use of Radix Aconiti often generated severe acute toxicity. Currently, research on the toxic substances of Radix Aconiti is not rare. In our previous study, acute toxic biomarkers of Radix Aconiti have been found. However, few studies were availabl...

  20. Uranium Mining (Environment Control) Act 1979 No 46 of 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this Act is to control the mining of uranium in the Alligator Rivers Region with a view to lessening any damage which may be caused to the environment. The Act provides for the control of mining of certain substances, for an authorization system for construction and use of facilities, equipment and processes as well as for environmental protection requirements. (NEA) [fr

  1. Toxic effect of a marine bacterium on aquatic organisms and its algicidal substances against Phaeocystis globosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuchan Yang

    Full Text Available Harmful algal blooms have caused enormous damage to the marine ecosystem and the coastal economy in China. In this paper, a bacterial strain B1, which had strong algicidal activity against Phaeocystis globosa, was isolated from the coastal waters of Zhuhai in China. The strain B1 was identified as Bacillus sp. on the basis of 16S rDNA gene sequence and morphological characteristics. To evaluate the ecological safety of the algicidal substances produced by strain B1, their toxic effects on marine organisms were tested. Results showed that there were no adverse effects observed in the growth of Chlorella vulgaris, Chaetoceros muelleri, and Isochrystis galbana after exposure to the algicidal substances at a concentration of 1.0% (v/v for 96 h. The 48h LC50 values for Brachionus plicatilis, Moina mongolica Daday and Paralichthys olivaceus were 5.7, 9.0 and 12.1% (v/v, respectively. Subsequently, the algicidal substances from strain B1 culture were isolated and purified by silica gel column, Sephadex G-15 column and high-performance liquid chromatography. Based on quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and PeakView Software, the purified substances were identified as prolyl-methionine and hypoxanthine. Algicidal mechanism indicated that prolyl-methionine and hypoxanthine inhibited the growth of P. globosa by disrupting the antioxidant systems. In the acute toxicity assessment using M. mongolica, 24h LC50 values of prolyl-methionine and hypoxanthine were 7.0 and 13.8 g/L, respectively. The active substances produced by strain B1 can be considered as ecologically and environmentally biological agents for controlling harmful algal blooms.

  2. Teale Depatment of Toxic Substance Control Regions

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — California Spatial Information System (CaSIL) is a project designed to improve access to geo-spatial and geo-spatial related data information throughout the state of...

  3. 40 CFR 710.25 - Chemical substances for which information must be reported.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT TSCA CHEMICAL INVENTORY REGULATIONS 2002 Inventory Update Reporting... the Master Inventory File at the beginning of a reporting period described in § 710.33, unless the...

  4. 16 CFR 1500.129 - Substances named in the Federal Caustic Poison Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Poison Act. 1500.129 Section 1500.129 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL... REGULATIONS § 1500.129 Substances named in the Federal Caustic Poison Act. The Commission finds that for those substances covered by the Federal Caustic Poison Act (44 Stat. 1406), the requirements of section 2(p)(1) of...

  5. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) Hazardous Waste Site Polygon Data, 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) Hazardous Waste Site Polygon Data, 1996 consists of 2042 polygons for selected hazardous waste sites...

  6. The risk of contamination of food with toxic substances present in animal feed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kan, C.A.; Meijer, G.A.L.

    2007-01-01

    Toxic substances such as dioxins, mycotoxins, heavy metals, pesticides, veterinary drugs and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are almost ubiquitous in the environment. Thus, they are also present in ingredients for animal feed. Adequate risk management depends on knowledge of absorption, metabolism,

  7. NODC Standard Format Marine Toxic Substances and Pollutants (F144) chemical identification codes (NODC Accession 9200273)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival information package contains a listing of codes and chemical names that were used in NODC Standard Format Marine Toxic Substances and Pollutants (F144)...

  8. Enhanced resistance to nanoparticle toxicity is conferred by overproduction of extracellular polymeric substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Nimisha, E-mail: joshi.nimisha@gmail.com [School of GeoSciences, Microbial Geochemistry Laboratory, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JW (United Kingdom); Ngwenya, Bryne T. [School of GeoSciences, Microbial Geochemistry Laboratory, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JW (United Kingdom); French, Christopher E. [School of Biological Sciences, Institute of Cell Biology, Darwin Building, University of Edinburgh, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JR (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstration that bacteria engineered for EPS overproduction have better survival against Ag nanotoxicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPS destabilises Ag nanoparticles and promotes their aggregation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TEM demonstration that EPS traps the Ag nanoparticles outside the cell. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPS from overexpressing strains offers protection to non-EPS strains of bacteria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPS polymer analogues such as xanthan also produce a similar response. - Abstract: The increasing production and use of engineered nanoparticles, coupled with their demonstrated toxicity to different organisms, demands the development of a systematic understanding of how nanoparticle toxicity depends on important environmental parameters as well as surface properties of both cells and nanomaterials. We demonstrate that production of the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), colanic acid by engineered Escherichia coli protects the bacteria against silver nanoparticle toxicity. Moreover, exogenous addition of EPS to a control strain results in an increase in cell viability, as does the addition of commercial EPS polymer analogue xanthan. Furthermore, we have found that an EPS producing strain of Sinorhizobium meliloti shows higher survival upon exposure to silver nanoparticles than the parent strain. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations showed that EPS traps the nanoparticles outside the cells and reduces the exposed surface area of cells to incoming nanoparticles by inducing cell aggregation. Nanoparticle size characterization in the presence of EPS and xanthan indicated a marked tendency towards aggregation. Both are likely effective mechanisms for reducing nanoparticle toxicity in the natural environment.

  9. Enhanced resistance to nanoparticle toxicity is conferred by overproduction of extracellular polymeric substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Nimisha; Ngwenya, Bryne T.; French, Christopher E.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Demonstration that bacteria engineered for EPS overproduction have better survival against Ag nanotoxicity. ► EPS destabilises Ag nanoparticles and promotes their aggregation. ► TEM demonstration that EPS traps the Ag nanoparticles outside the cell. ► EPS from overexpressing strains offers protection to non-EPS strains of bacteria. ► EPS polymer analogues such as xanthan also produce a similar response. - Abstract: The increasing production and use of engineered nanoparticles, coupled with their demonstrated toxicity to different organisms, demands the development of a systematic understanding of how nanoparticle toxicity depends on important environmental parameters as well as surface properties of both cells and nanomaterials. We demonstrate that production of the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), colanic acid by engineered Escherichia coli protects the bacteria against silver nanoparticle toxicity. Moreover, exogenous addition of EPS to a control strain results in an increase in cell viability, as does the addition of commercial EPS polymer analogue xanthan. Furthermore, we have found that an EPS producing strain of Sinorhizobium meliloti shows higher survival upon exposure to silver nanoparticles than the parent strain. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations showed that EPS traps the nanoparticles outside the cells and reduces the exposed surface area of cells to incoming nanoparticles by inducing cell aggregation. Nanoparticle size characterization in the presence of EPS and xanthan indicated a marked tendency towards aggregation. Both are likely effective mechanisms for reducing nanoparticle toxicity in the natural environment.

  10. Creating mechanisms of toxic substances emission of combustion engines

    OpenAIRE

    Jankowski Antoni; Kowalski Mirosław

    2015-01-01

    The paper analyses the mechanisms of creation of toxic exhaust gases, which mainly derived from inexact fuel metering and improper air-fuel mixture preparation. The paper describes the process of creating toxic components in the exhaust gases of piston engines during engine operation, and impact on the emission of these components determining the composition of the fuel mixture determined equivalence factor Φ. The principal mechanisms of formation of toxic exhaust gases, in particular nitroge...

  11. Did Mineral Surface Chemistry and Toxicity Contribute to Evolution of Microbial Extracellular Polymeric Substances?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jay M.; Zhang, Nianli; Hickey, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Modern ecological niches are teeming with an astonishing diversity of microbial life in biofilms closely associated with mineral surfaces, which highlights the remarkable success of microorganisms in conquering the challenges and capitalizing on the benefits presented by the mineral–water interface. Biofilm formation capability likely evolved on early Earth because biofilms provide crucial cell survival functions. The potential toxicity of mineral surfaces toward cells and the complexities of the mineral–water–cell interface in determining the toxicity mechanisms, however, have not been fully appreciated. Here, we report a previously unrecognized role for extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which form biofilms in shielding cells against the toxicity of mineral surfaces. Using colony plating and LIVE/DEAD staining methods in oxide suspensions versus oxide-free controls, we found greater viability of wild-type, EPS-producing strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 compared to their isogenic knockout mutant with defective biofilm-producing capacity. Oxide toxicity was specific to its surface charge and particle size. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images and assays for highly reactive oxygen species (hROS) on mineral surfaces suggested that EPS shield via both physical and chemical mechanisms. Intriguingly, qualitative as well as quantitative measures of EPS production showed that toxic minerals induced EPS production in bacteria. By determining the specific toxicity mechanisms, we provide insight into the potential impact of mineral surfaces in promoting increased complexity of cell surfaces, including EPS and biofilm formation, on early Earth. Key Words: Mineral toxicity—Bacteria—EPS evolution—Biofilms—Cytotoxicity—Silica—Anatase—Alumina. Astrobiology 12, 785–798. PMID:22934560

  12. 75 FR 71635 - Schedules of Controlled Substances: Temporary Placement of Five Synthetic Cannabinoids Into...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... these THC-like synthetic cannabinoids are marketed as ``legal'' alternatives to marijuana and are being...] Schedules of Controlled Substances: Temporary Placement of Five Synthetic Cannabinoids Into Schedule I... intent to temporarily place five synthetic cannabinoids into the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) pursuant...

  13. A re-evaluation of PETROTOX for predicting acute and chronic toxicity of petroleum substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Aaron D; Parkerton, Thomas F; Leon Paumen, Miriam; Butler, Josh D; Letinski, Daniel J; den Haan, Klass

    2017-08-01

    The PETROTOX model was developed to perform aquatic hazard assessment of petroleum substances based on substance composition. The model relies on the hydrocarbon block method, which is widely used for conducting petroleum substance risk assessments providing further justification for evaluating model performance. Previous work described this model and provided a preliminary calibration and validation using acute toxicity data for limited petroleum substance. The objective of the present study was to re-evaluate PETROTOX using expanded data covering both acute and chronic toxicity endpoints on invertebrates, algae, and fish for a wider range of petroleum substances. The results indicated that recalibration of 2 model parameters was required, namely, the algal critical target lipid body burden and the log octanol-water partition coefficient (K OW ) limit, used to account for reduced bioavailability of hydrophobic constituents. Acute predictions from the updated model were compared with observed toxicity data and found to generally be within a factor of 3 for algae and invertebrates but overestimated fish toxicity. Chronic predictions were generally within a factor of 5 of empirical data. Furthermore, PETROTOX predicted acute and chronic hazard classifications that were consistent or conservative in 93 and 84% of comparisons, respectively. The PETROTOX model is considered suitable for the purpose of characterizing petroleum substance hazard in substance classification and risk assessments. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2245-2252. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  14. Investigations with beagles about toxicity and radioprotective effect of the chemical radioprotection substance WR 2721

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, M.; Sedlmeier, H.; Wustrow, T.; Messerschmidt, O.

    1980-01-01

    The toxicity of the chemical radioprotection substance WR 2721 (S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethyl-thiophosphate) was examined in 25 beagles. The study showed that the toxicity of the substance increases as the dose gets higher. Between the doses 200 and 250 mg/kg of body weight, the increase of toxicity was significantly greater than could be expected on the basis of the dose difference. Until a dose of 200 mg/kg, the authors found no side effects which would have disturbed vital functions, but higher doses led to marked symptoms of intoxication. (orig.) [de

  15. Biological control of toxic cyanobacteri

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ndlela, Luyanda L

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available . Ecotoxicity studies: is toxicity reduced? (Testing on daphnids, fish and human cell lines) Resulting impacts on cyanotoxins (Toxin conformation changes, ELISA detection) Competition assays against toxic cyanobacteria (Can Bacillus etc. outcompete...

  16. 21 CFR 1307.13 - Incidental manufacture of controlled substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., manufactures a controlled substance as a result of the manufacture of a controlled substance or basic class of controlled substance for which he is registered and has been issued an individual manufacturing quota pursuant to part 1303 of this chapter (if such substance or class is listed in Schedule I or II) shall be...

  17. Hierarchy of controls applied to dangerous substances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terwoert, J.

    2014-01-01

    Too often, measures to control workers’ exposure to dangerous substances are taken on an ‘ad-hoc’ basis. Existing processes, procedures and routines are taken for granted, and ‘end-of-pipe’ solutions are installed. In many cases, one relies on the use of personal protective equipment. This may lead

  18. Doctor and pharmacy shopping for controlled substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirce, Gretchen L; Smith, Michael J; Abate, Marie A; Halverson, Joel

    2012-06-01

    Prescription drug abuse is a major health concern nationwide, with West Virginia having one of the highest prescription drug death rates in the United States. Studies are lacking that compare living subjects with persons who died from drug overdose for evidence of doctor and pharmacy shopping for controlled substances. The study objectives were to compare deceased and living subjects in West Virginia for evidence of prior doctor and pharmacy shopping for controlled substances and to identify factors associated with drug-related death. A secondary data study was conducted using controlled substance, Schedule II-IV, prescription data from the West Virginia Controlled Substance Monitoring Program and drug-related death data compiled by the Forensic Drug Database between July 2005 and December 2007. A case-control design compared deceased subjects 18 years and older whose death was drug related with living subjects for prior doctor and pharmacy shopping. Logistic regression identified factors related to the odds of drug-related death. A significantly greater proportion of deceased subjects were doctor shoppers (25.21% vs. 3.58%) and pharmacy shoppers (17.48% vs. 1.30%) than living subjects. Approximately 20.23% of doctor shoppers were also pharmacy shoppers, and 55.60% of pharmacy shoppers were doctor shoppers. Younger age, greater number of prescriptions dispensed, exposure to opioids and benzodiazepines, and doctor and pharmacy shopping were factors with greater odds of drug-related death. Doctor and pharmacy shopping involving controlled substances were identified, and shopping behavior was associated with drug-related death. Prescription monitoring programs may be useful in identifying potential shoppers at the point of care.

  19. Creating mechanisms of toxic substances emission of combustion engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jankowski Antoni

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the mechanisms of creation of toxic exhaust gases, which mainly derived from inexact fuel metering and improper air-fuel mixture preparation. The paper describes the process of creating toxic components in the exhaust gases of piston engines during engine operation, and impact on the emission of these components determining the composition of the fuel mixture determined equivalence factor Φ. The principal mechanisms of formation of toxic exhaust gases, in particular nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons, and also essential according to create each of toxic exhaust gases are the subject of the paper. Moreover, empirical relationships, by means of which it is possible to determine the time of creation of the individual components of toxic exhaust gases, are presented. For example, one of the mechanisms for prompt formation of nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons graphic illustration of formation as a function of crank angle is described. At the conclusion, the summary and significance of information on creation mechanisms of toxic components in the exhaust gases of piston engines are presented.

  20. Toxicity of binary mixtures of metals and pyrethroid insecticides to Daphnia magna Straus. Implications for multi-substance risks assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barata, Carlos [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Universitat Poltiecnica de Catalunya, CN 150 Km 14.5, Terrassa 08220 (Spain)]. E-mail: barata@intexter.upc.edu; Baird, D.J. [National Water Research Institute (Environment Canada) at Canadian Rivers Institute, 10 Bailey Drive, PO Box 45111, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton E3B 6E1, New Brunswick (Canada); Nogueira, A.J.A. [Departamento de Biologia, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Soares, A.M.V.M. [Departamento de Biologia, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Riva, M.C. [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Universitat Poltiecnica de Catalunya, CN 150 Km 14.5, Terrassa 08220 (Spain)

    2006-06-10

    Two different concepts, termed concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA), describe general relationships between the effects of single substances and their corresponding mixtures allowing calculation of an expected mixture toxicity on the basis of known toxicities of the mixture components. Both concepts are limited to cases in which all substances in a mixture influence the same experimental endpoint, and are usually tested against a 'fixed ratio design' where the mixture ratio is kept constant throughout the studies and the overall concentration of the mixture is systematically varied. With this design, interaction among toxic components across different mixture ratios and endpoints (i.e. lethal versus sublethal) is not assessed. In this study lethal and sublethal (feeding) responses of Daphnia magna individuals to single and binary combinations of similarly and dissimilarly acting chemicals including the metals (cadmium, copper) and the pyrethroid insecticides ({lambda}-cyhalothrin and deltamethrin) were assayed using a composite experimental design to test for interactions among toxic components across mixture effect levels, mixture ratios, lethal and sublethal toxic effects. To account for inter-experiment response variability, in each binary mixture toxicity assay the toxicity of the individual mixture constituents was also assessed. Model adequacy was then evaluated comparing the slopes and elevations of predicted versus observed mixture toxicity curves with those estimated for the individual components. Model predictive abilities changed across endpoints. The IA concept was able to predict accurately mixture toxicities of dissimilarly acting chemicals for lethal responses, whereas the CA concept did so in three out of four pairings for feeding response, irrespective of the chemical mode of action. Interaction effects across mixture effect levels, evidenced by crossing slopes, were only observed for the binary mixture Cd and Cu for

  1. Toxicity of binary mixtures of metals and pyrethroid insecticides to Daphnia magna Straus. Implications for multi-substance risks assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barata, Carlos; Baird, D.J.; Nogueira, A.J.A.; Soares, A.M.V.M.; Riva, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    Two different concepts, termed concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA), describe general relationships between the effects of single substances and their corresponding mixtures allowing calculation of an expected mixture toxicity on the basis of known toxicities of the mixture components. Both concepts are limited to cases in which all substances in a mixture influence the same experimental endpoint, and are usually tested against a 'fixed ratio design' where the mixture ratio is kept constant throughout the studies and the overall concentration of the mixture is systematically varied. With this design, interaction among toxic components across different mixture ratios and endpoints (i.e. lethal versus sublethal) is not assessed. In this study lethal and sublethal (feeding) responses of Daphnia magna individuals to single and binary combinations of similarly and dissimilarly acting chemicals including the metals (cadmium, copper) and the pyrethroid insecticides (λ-cyhalothrin and deltamethrin) were assayed using a composite experimental design to test for interactions among toxic components across mixture effect levels, mixture ratios, lethal and sublethal toxic effects. To account for inter-experiment response variability, in each binary mixture toxicity assay the toxicity of the individual mixture constituents was also assessed. Model adequacy was then evaluated comparing the slopes and elevations of predicted versus observed mixture toxicity curves with those estimated for the individual components. Model predictive abilities changed across endpoints. The IA concept was able to predict accurately mixture toxicities of dissimilarly acting chemicals for lethal responses, whereas the CA concept did so in three out of four pairings for feeding response, irrespective of the chemical mode of action. Interaction effects across mixture effect levels, evidenced by crossing slopes, were only observed for the binary mixture Cd and Cu for lethal effects

  2. 77 FR 45688 - Electronic Prescriptions for Controlled Substances Notice of Approved Certification Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ... Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act of 1970, often referred to as the Controlled Substances Act..., research, and industrial purposes. \\1\\ The Attorney General's delegation of authority to DEA may be found... the issuance of a paper prescription. Given advancements in technology and security capabilities for...

  3. Toxic substances or dangerous presents in the construction materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos Alvarado, A.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this work of investigation is the elaboration of a guide who serves as support and consults in the referring thing to the subject of the security in the construction, specifically in and area of the use and handling of materials and dangerous substances; Considering the possible dangers to medium and long term that some of but the common construction equipments represent for the health. The obtained data is a bibliographical review, the visits to public institutions and international offices with representation in our country, as well as a work of field and study of the national market, among others. In addition it made an important consultation through network Internet reviewing many sites of with the purpose of obtaining the data but updated interest possible, as well as the consultation to professionals and workers with the area of the construction. (Author) [es

  4. Radiation Protection and Control Act 1982. No 49 of 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This Act provides for radiation protection in the State of South Australia. It controls activities related to radioactive substances and irradiating apparatus and lays down a licensing system to this effect. The South Australia Health Commission is responsible for administering the Act and is advised by the Radiation Protection Committee created for this purpose. The powers and duties of both bodies are set out in detail. (NEA) [fr

  5. Toxic metals in WEEE: Characterization and substance flow analysis in waste treatment processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguchi, Masahiro, E-mail: oguchi.masahiro@nies.go.jp; Sakanakura, Hirofumi; Terazono, Atsushi

    2013-10-01

    Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) has received extensive attention as a secondary source of metals. Because WEEE also contains toxic substances such as heavy metals, appropriate management of these substances is important in the recycling and treatment of WEEE. As a basis for discussion toward better management of WEEE, this study characterizes various types of WEEE in terms of toxic metal contents. The fate of various metals contained in WEEE, including toxic metals, was also investigated in actual waste treatment processes. Cathode-ray tube televisions showed the highest concentration and the largest total amount of toxic metals such as Ba, Pb, and Sb, so appropriate recycling and disposal of these televisions would greatly contribute to better management of toxic metals in WEEE. A future challenge is the management of toxic metals in mid-sized items such as audio/visual and ICT equipment because even though the concentrations were not high in these items, the total amount of toxic metals contained in them is not negligible. In the case of Japan, such mid-sized WEEE items as well as small electronic items are subject to municipal solid waste treatment. A case study showed that a landfill was the main destination of toxic metals contained in those items in the current treatment systems. The case study also showed that changes in the flows of toxic metals will occur when treatment processes are modified to emphasize resource recovery. Because the flow changes might lead to an increase in the amount of toxic metals released to the environment, the flows of toxic metals and the materials targeted for resource recovery should be considered simultaneously. - Highlights: ► Appropriate management of toxic metals contained in WEEE is important during recycling and treatment of WEEE. ► CRT TVs contain large amount of toxic metals with high concentration and thus appropriate management is highly important. ► Mid-sized equipment is a future target for

  6. Toxicity assessment of 4-chlorophenol to aerobic granular sludge and its interaction with extracellular polymeric substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Dong; Wang, Yifan; Wang, Xiaodong; Li, Mengting; Han, Fei; Ju, Luyu; Zhang, Ge; Shi, Li; Li, Kai; Wang, Bingfeng [School of Resources and Environmental Sciences, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Du, Bin, E-mail: dubin61@gmail.com [School of Resources and Environmental Sciences, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Key Laboratory of Chemical Sensing & Analysis in Universities of Shandong, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Wei, Qin [Key Laboratory of Chemical Sensing & Analysis in Universities of Shandong, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China)

    2015-05-30

    Highlights: • Toxicity of 4-CP to aerobic granular sludge process was evaluated. • 3D-EEM characterized the interaction between EPS and 4-CP. • Tryptophan was the main substance result in fluorescence quenching. • The mechanism of fluorescence quenching belongs to static quenching. - Abstract: The main objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) to aerobic granular sludge in the process of treating ammonia rich wastewater. In the short-term exposure of 4-CP of 5 and 10 mg/L, ammonia nitrogen removal efficiencies in the batch reactors decreased to 87.18 ± 2.81 and 41.16 ± 3.55%, which were remarkably lower than that of control experiment (99.83 ± 0.54%). Correspondingly, the respirometric activities of heterotrophic and autotrophic bacteria of aerobic granular sludge were significantly inhibited in the presence of 4-CP. Moreover, the main components of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) including polysaccharides and proteins increased from 18.74 ± 0.29 and 22.57 ± 0.34 mg/g SS to 27.79 ± 0.51 and 24.69 ± 0.38 mg/g SS, respectively, indicating that the presence of 4-CP played an important role on the EPS production. Three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (3D-EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy further showed that the intensities of EPS samples were obviously quenched with the increased of 4-CP concentrations. To be more detailed, synchronous fluorescence spectra indicated that the interaction between EPS and 4-CP was mainly caused by tryptophan residues. The mechanism of fluorescence quenching belongs to static quenching with a formation constant (K{sub A}) of 0.07 × 10{sup 4} L/mol, implying the strong formation of EPS and 4-CP complex. The results could provide reliable and accurate information to determine the potential toxicity of 4-CP on the performance of aerobic granular sludge system.

  7. 77 FR 5848 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... October 7, 2011, 76 FR 62449, Johnson Matthey Inc., Custom Pharmaceuticals Department, 2003 Nolte Drive... substance listed in schedule II. The company plans to manufacture the listed controlled substance for sale... registration of Johnson Matthey Inc. to manufacture the listed basic class of controlled substance is...

  8. Toxic Anterior Segment Syndrome Related to Viscoelastic Substance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Gül Altıntaş

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the etiologic factors of toxic anterior segment syndrome (TASS outbreak after uneventful cataract surgery, to discuss the treatment plan, and to assess the response to medical therapy. Materials and Methods: Clinical features in twenty-two eyes of 22 patients who had TASS outbreak after uneventful cataract surgery were evaluated. Visual acuity (VA, intraocular pressure (IOP measurements, biomicroscopic and B-mode ultrasound evaluations were performed. To establish the differential diagnosis from infectious endophthalmitis, cultures were taken from different subjects such as surgical equipment, solutions, medical devices. All patients were treated as having endophthalmitis until the culture results were obtained. Results: Based on the negative culture results, absence of any symptoms of TASS in other patients who underwent different intraocular surgeries rather than cataract surgery in the same day and same surgical condition in which VES was not used, and the fact that postoperative inflammation occurred only in eyes in which the new VES made of rooster comb was used, we assume that the recently used VES is most likely responsible for the TASS outbreak. As soon as another VES was replaced with the suspected one, no other cases with TASS occurred. Conclusion: Even though the chemical compositions of VES are in physiological limits for viability to the anterior segment tissue, the suboptimal or inappropriate storage conditions may cause loss of the original chemical integrity which can be the reason of TASS. Close monitoring of each patient, early diagnosis, and correct treatment can prevent its complications. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 341-6

  9. Effect of fruiting on micronutrients, antinutrients and toxic substances ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vegetable leaves were harvested at both market maturity (vegetative phase) and fruiting (reproductive phase), and were subjected to chemical analysis. ... at fruiting stage of vegetables grown on both control and nitrogen applied soil, while the nitrate and β-carotene concentration in T. occidentalis were significantly reduced ...

  10. Persistent toxic substances released from uncontrolled e-waste recycling and actions for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Man, Ming; Naidu, Ravi; Wong, Ming H.

    2013-01-01

    The Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movement of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal was adopted on March 22, 1989 and enforced on May 5, 1992. Since then, the USA, one of the world's largest e-waste producers, has not ratified this Convention or the Basel Ban Amendment. Communities are still debating the legal loophole, which permits the export of whole products to other countries provided it is not for recycling. In January 2011, China's WEEE Directive was implemented, providing stricter control over e-waste imports to China, including Hong Kong, while emphasizing that e-waste recycling is the producers' responsibility. China is expected to supersede the USA as the principal e-waste producer, by 2020, according to the UNEP. Uncontrolled e-waste recycling activities generate and release heavy metals and POPs into the environment, which may be re-distributed, bioaccumulated and biomagnified, with potentially adverse human health effects. Greater efforts and scientific approaches are needed for future e-product designs of minimal toxic metal and compound use, reaping greater benefits than debating the definition and handling responsibilities of e-waste recycling. - Highlights: ► We recommended to ban uses of deca-BDE in addition to penta- and octa-BDEs. ► We suggested to replace PVC in electronic products with non-chlorinated polymers. ► Spend less time on debating responsibilities and definition of e-waste and recycling. ► Proposed to work more on eliminating sources and potentials of toxic substances

  11. Persistent toxic substances released from uncontrolled e-waste recycling and actions for the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Man, Ming [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, Hong Kong Baptist University (Hong Kong); Naidu, Ravi [Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of Environments (CRC CARE), University of South Australia (Australia); Wong, Ming H., E-mail: mhwong@hkbu.edu.hk [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, Hong Kong Baptist University (Hong Kong)

    2013-10-01

    The Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movement of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal was adopted on March 22, 1989 and enforced on May 5, 1992. Since then, the USA, one of the world's largest e-waste producers, has not ratified this Convention or the Basel Ban Amendment. Communities are still debating the legal loophole, which permits the export of whole products to other countries provided it is not for recycling. In January 2011, China's WEEE Directive was implemented, providing stricter control over e-waste imports to China, including Hong Kong, while emphasizing that e-waste recycling is the producers' responsibility. China is expected to supersede the USA as the principal e-waste producer, by 2020, according to the UNEP. Uncontrolled e-waste recycling activities generate and release heavy metals and POPs into the environment, which may be re-distributed, bioaccumulated and biomagnified, with potentially adverse human health effects. Greater efforts and scientific approaches are needed for future e-product designs of minimal toxic metal and compound use, reaping greater benefits than debating the definition and handling responsibilities of e-waste recycling. - Highlights: ► We recommended to ban uses of deca-BDE in addition to penta- and octa-BDEs. ► We suggested to replace PVC in electronic products with non-chlorinated polymers. ► Spend less time on debating responsibilities and definition of e-waste and recycling. ► Proposed to work more on eliminating sources and potentials of toxic substances.

  12. A Biological Model of the Effects of Toxic Substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-02-28

    show uner te hghes aenifia in (lwerrigh) te neron (arows ar ofte ovl i shpe nd "igh~up wih pace pti. mgniicaion Fig, 12 A neuron viewed under Hoffman...keyhole), the neurons seem to form a more substantial network . Scratches in the collagen surface controlled the direction of axon sprouting such that...Fig. 5). Templates could be removed without disturbing the neural network and hence might be a valuable tool in the future to focus the growth of

  13. How can we investigate the effects of small amounts of toxic substances?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    Today there is increasing concern about the possible toxic effects of tiny amounts of toxic substances in the environment of workplace. Because the incidence of effects at such levels of toxic material is likely to be very low their investigation becomes very difficult and will require new approaches to toxicological research. Only through the use of in vitro cell systems and the most modern theoretical and experimental methods in biochemistry, chemistry and molecular biolgoy can we hope to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the causation and expression of environmentally-induced diseases. Much of this research will be at the fundamental level but it must be so oriented that the information obtained is directly applicable to the realistic estimation of the risks to mankind and other living creatures from natural and man made toxicants. (orig.) [de

  14. Biological control of toxic cyanobacteria

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ndlela, L

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available harmful algal blooms and their impacts in over 30 countries. Biological control is a method of introducing natural enemies to control an organism and has been more successful using microorganisms....

  15. An interpretation of schedule 1 of the Radioactive Substances Act 1993 and related issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.; Wakerley, M.W.

    2000-09-01

    Schedule 1 of the UK's Radioactive Substances Act 1993 was originally Schedule 3 of the 1960 Act of the same name. It is possible that different methods are currently being employed to interpret how Schedule 1 should be used. This report provides an interpretation and guidance on this and related issues. It is primarily for technical specialists already familiar with the workings of the Act. This report covers the period 1999/2000

  16. Contamination by persistent toxic substances in surface sediment of urban rivers in Chaohu City, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feipeng; Zhang, Haiping; Meng, Xiangzhou; Chen, Ling; Yin, Daqiang

    2012-01-01

    The concentration and spatial distribution of persistent toxic substances (PTS) in the river sediment in Chaohu City, China were investigated. A total of nine surface sediments were collected and the selected PTS pollutants including six heavy metals and nineteen polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were analyzed. The mean heavy metal concentrations (in mg/kg, dry weight) ranged within 0.18-1.53 (Hg), 50.08-200.18 (Cu), 118.70-313.65 (Zn), 50.77-310.85 (Cr), 37.12-92.72 (Pb) and 13.29-197.24 (As), and Cu, Zn and As have been regarded as the main metal pollutants. The levels of PBDEs (1.2-12.1 ng/g) and BDE-209 (2.4-30.5 ng/g) were at the middle level of the global range. BDE-209 was the predominant congener (67.0%-85.7%), which agrees with the fact that technical deca-BDE mixtures are the dominant PBDE formulation in China. The relative high level of PTS pollutants in the western part of the city is probably owing to the intensive agricultural activities and lack of sewerage system there. The ecological risk assessment with the sediment quality guidelines (SOGs) indicates that the urban river sediments in the city have been heavily contaminated by heavy metals with probable ecotoxicological impacts on freshwater organisms and the main toxic pollutants are Hg and As. The results of current study imply that the city, and perhaps many other small cities in China as well, requires immediate pollution control measures with emphasis on not only conventional organic pollutants but also on PTS such as heavy metals and PBDEs.

  17. 76 FR 62449 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Marihuana (7360) I Tetrahydrocannabinols (7370) I The company plans to cultivate marihuana for the National Institute on Drug Abuse for research...

  18. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Facility Registry Service (FRS) Emergency Response (ER) Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Facilities - Oil and Hazardous Materials

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The purpose of this web feature service is to provide users with access to integrated facility information from FRS, limited to the subset of facilities that link to...

  19. 40 CFR 80.1005 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1005 Section 80.1005 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1005 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program? No person shall: (a...

  20. An Act to regulate the keeping and use of radioactive substances, irradiating apparatus and certain electronic products, and for matters incidental thereto (No. 440 of 1975)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    This Radiation Safety Act 1975 which applies to radioactive substances and irradiating apparatus is a framework Act governing activities involving their possession and applications including their disposal. It makes provision for the duties and powers of the authorities responsible for administering the Act (the Radiological Council), licensing requirements and exemptions therefrom, registration of such substances and apparatus, inspection procedures and liability under the Act. The Radioactive Substances Act 1954, the Radioactive Substances Act Amendment Acts 1960 and 1964 are repealed. (NEA) [fr

  1. NODC Standard Format Marine Toxic Substances and Pollutants (F144) Data (1971-1989) (NODC Accession 0014199)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data type contains data on ambient concentrations of toxic substances and other pollutants in the marine environment. The data derive from laboratory analyses...

  2. Schedules of Controlled Substances: Temporary Placement of 4-Fluoroisobutyryl Fentanyl into Schedule I. Temporary scheduling order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-03

    The Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration is issuing this temporary scheduling order to schedule the synthetic opioid, N-(4-fluorophenyl)-N-(1-phenethylpiperidin-4-yl)isobutyramide (4-fluoroisobutyryl fentanyl or para-fluoroisobutyryl fentanyl), and its isomers, esters, ethers, salts and salts of isomers, esters, and ethers, into schedule I pursuant to the temporary scheduling provisions of the Controlled Substances Act. This action is based on a finding by the Administrator that the placement of 4-fluoroisobutyryl fentanyl into schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act is necessary to avoid an imminent hazard to the public safety. As a result of this order, the regulatory controls and administrative, civil, and criminal sanctions applicable to schedule I controlled substances will be imposed on persons who handle (manufacture, distribute, reverse distribute, import, export, engage in research, conduct instructional activities or chemical analysis, or possess), or propose to handle, 4-fluoroisobutyryl fentanyl.

  3. Multiple inorganic toxic substances contaminating the groundwater of Myingyan Township, Myanmar: arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, and uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacquart, Thomas; Frisbie, Seth; Mitchell, Erika; Grigg, Laurie; Cole, Christopher; Small, Colleen; Sarkar, Bibudhendra

    2015-06-01

    In South Asia, the technological and societal shift from drinking surface water to groundwater has resulted in a great reduction of acute diseases due to water borne pathogens. However, arsenic and other naturally occurring inorganic toxic substances present in groundwater in the region have been linked to a variety of chronic diseases, including cancers, heart disease, and neurological problems. Due to the highly specific symptoms of chronic arsenic poisoning, arsenic was the first inorganic toxic substance to be noticed at unsafe levels in the groundwater of West Bengal, India and Bangladesh. Subsequently, other inorganic toxic substances, including manganese, uranium, and fluoride have been found at unsafe levels in groundwater in South Asia. While numerous drinking water wells throughout Myanmar have been tested for arsenic, relatively little is known about the concentrations of other inorganic toxic substances in Myanmar groundwater. In this study, we analyzed samples from 18 drinking water wells (12 in Myingyan City and 6 in nearby Tha Pyay Thar Village) and 2 locations in the Ayeyarwaddy River for arsenic, boron, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, fluoride, iron, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, antimony, selenium, thallium, uranium, vanadium, and zinc. Concentrations of arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, or uranium exceeded health-based reference values in most wells. In addition, any given well usually contained more than one toxic substance at unsafe concentrations. While water testing and well sharing could reduce health risks, none of the wells sampled provide water that is entirely safe with respect to inorganic toxic substances. It is imperative that users of these wells, and users of other wells that have not been tested for multiple inorganic toxic substances throughout the region, be informed of the need for drinking water testing and the health consequences of drinking water contaminated with inorganic toxic

  4. 75 FR 1812 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ... of controlled substances listed in schedule II: Drug Schedule Phenylacetone (8501) II Coca Leaves... registration or re-registration to import crude opium, poppy straw, concentrate of poppy straw or coca leaves... such basic classes of controlled substances listed in schedule I or II, which fall under the authority...

  5. 76 FR 5827 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ... basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Phenylacetone (8501) II Coca Leaves (9040) II... re-registration to import crude opium, poppy straw, concentrate of poppy straw or coca leaves. As... classes of controlled substances listed in schedule I or II, which fall under the authority of section...

  6. 75 FR 10312 - Importer of Controlled Substances Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    ...), a basic class of controlled substance listed in schedule II. The company plans to import Remifentanil for use in dosage form manufacturing. No comments or objections have been received. DEA has.... to import the basic class of controlled substance is consistent with the public interest, and with...

  7. 75 FR 64744 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-20

    ... applicants for registration to import a basic class of any controlled substance in schedule I or II are, and... this section to a bulk manufacturer of a controlled substance in schedule I or II, and prior to issuing... Enforcement Administration (DEA) to be registered as an importer of Remifentanil (9739), a basic class of...

  8. 76 FR 77253 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    ... applicants for registration to import a basic class of any controlled substance in schedule I or II are, and... this Section to a bulk manufacturer of a controlled substance in schedule I or II, and prior to issuing... Enforcement Administration (DEA) to be registered as an importer of Remifentanil (9739), a basic class of...

  9. 76 FR 17967 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ...), a basic class of controlled substance listed in schedule II. The company plans to import Remifentanil for use in dosage form manufacturing. No comments or objections have been received. DEA has.... to import the basic class of controlled substance is consistent with the public interest, and with...

  10. 76 FR 30969 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-27

    ... schedule II. The company plans to import Remifentanil in bulk for use in dosage- form manufacturing. Any... registration to import a basic class of any controlled substance in schedule I or II are, and will continue to... this Section to a bulk manufacturer of a controlled substance in schedule I or II, and prior to issuing...

  11. 76 FR 39127 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ... Administration (DEA) to be registered as a bulk manufacturer of Remifentanil (9739) the basic class of controlled substance in schedule II. The company plans to utilize this facility to manufacture small quantities of the... primary manufacturing facility in West Deptford, New Jersey. The controlled substances manufactured in...

  12. 77 FR 5849 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... (DEA) to be registered as a bulk manufacturer of Remifentanil (9739), the basic class of controlled substance in schedule II. The company plans to utilize this facility to manufacture small quantities of the... manufacturing facility in West Deptford, New Jersey. The controlled substances manufactured in bulk at this...

  13. 76 FR 81979 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ...), the company presently manufactures a small amount of this controlled substance in bulk solely to conduct manufacturing internal process development. It is the company's intention that, when the... (1105) only, the company manufactures these controlled substances in bulk solely for distribution within...

  14. Determination of the gaseous emission of toxic substances in the Curva de Rodas sanitary landfill in Medellin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Renteria, Francisco Fernando; Agudelo Garcia, Ruben Alberto

    2005-01-01

    Results of the investigation conducted at the sanitary landfill Curva de Rodas, aimed to determine the emission and migration of toxic substances are presented. Traces of benzene, toluene, hexane, vinyl chloride and xylene were found. Concentrations of these substances were, however, below threshold limits at the landfill and below detectable limits in the air of populated areas adjacent to the sanitary landfill

  15. 77 FR 43861 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Akorn, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-26

    ...), a basic class of controlled substance listed in schedule II. The company plans to import Remifentanil in bulk for use in dosage- form manufacturing. Any bulk manufacturer who is presently, or is... schedules I or II, which fall under the authority of section 1002(a)(2)(B) of the Act [21 U.S.C. 952(a)(2)(B...

  16. Underestimated impact of novel psychoactive substances: laboratory confirmation of recreational drug toxicity in Oslo, Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallersnes, Odd Martin; Persett, Per Sverre; Øiestad, Elisabeth Leere; Karinen, Ritva; Heyerdahl, Fridtjof; Hovda, Knut Erik

    2017-08-01

    Recreational drug toxicity is frequent. Availability of new psychoactive substances is steadily increasing. However, data with verified analyses from clinical settings are limited. To evaluate the impact of novel psychoactive substances (NPS) on recreational drug toxicity in Oslo, Norway, we analysed samples from a selection of patients. All the patients presenting with recreational drug toxicity at the Oslo Accident and Emergency Outpatient Clinic (OAEOC) and at the Oslo University Hospital (OUH) were registered from April through September 2014. Oral fluid samples were collected at the OAEOC. Blood samples were collected at the OUH. The samples were screened using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). Nine hundred and sixty-four cases were included, 841 (87.2%) at the OAEOC and 123 (12.8%) at the OUH. A total of 55 oral fluid samples (OAEOC) and 103 blood samples (OUH) could be analysed. NPS were not clinically suspected in any of the screened cases. At the outpatient clinic, the most commonly found substances were clonazepam in 42/55 (76.4%) cases, amfetamines in 40/55 (72.7%) and heroin in 39/55 (70.9%). In seven (12.7%) cases NPS were detected: 4-methylamfetamine in three cases, dimethyltryptamine in two, methylone in one, and N,N-dimethyl-3,4-methylenedioxyamfetamine in one. Among the hospital patients, the most commonly found substances were clonazepam in 51/103 (49.5%) cases, amfetamines in 48/103 (46.6%), heroin in 31/103 (30.1%), and diazepam in 30/103 (29.1%). In five (4.9%) cases NPS were detected: JWH-210 in two cases, AM-2201 in two, and 5-EAPB in one. NPS were clinically not suspected, though found in eight percent of cases. Still, the vast majority of patients treated for recreational drug toxicity in Oslo have taken classical drugs. Management of these patients should be based on their clinical condition. However, it is highly important to be alert to atypical presentations possibly resulting from

  17. Temperature selection of juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) as influenced by various toxic substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, R H

    1976-08-01

    Previous exposure to sodium pentachlorophenate (NaPCP), Guthion, malathion, Dursban, and Dibrom lowered the preferred temperature for juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) tested in a horizontal temperature gradient. Lindane, CuSO/sub 4/, ZnSO/sub 4/, CdSO/sub 4/, Sevin, heptachlor, and fenitrothion did not change the preferred temperature significantly. Comparison with other published results indicates that those substances that increase the preferred temperature are more toxic (based on relevant changes in 24-h LC50) at low temperatures and vice versa. It is suggested that such shifts in selected temperature may be of potential immediate, short-term, survival value to the fish. (auth)

  18. Predicting the formation and the dispersion of toxic combustion products from the fires of dangerous substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevrlý, V.; Bitala, P.; Danihelka, P.; Dobeš, P.; Dlabka, J.; Hejzlar, T.; Baudišová, B.; Míček, D.; Zelinger, Z.

    2012-04-01

    Natural events, such as wildfires, lightning or earthquakes represent a frequent trigger of industrial fires involving dangerous substances. Dispersion of smoke plume from such fires and the effects of toxic combustion products are one of the reference scenarios expected in the framework of major accident prevention. Nowadays, tools for impact assessment of these events are rather missing. Detailed knowledge of burning material composition, atmospheric conditions, and other factors are required in order to describe quantitatively the source term of toxic fire products and to evaluate the parameters of smoke plume. Nevertheless, an assessment of toxic emissions from large scale fires involves a high degree of uncertainty, because of the complex character of physical and chemical processes in the harsh environment of uncontrolled flame. Among the others, soot particle formation can be mentioned as still being one of the unresolved problems in combustion chemistry, as well as decomposition pathways of chemical substances. Therefore, simplified approach for estimating the emission factors from outdoor fires of dangerous chemicals, utilizable for major accident prevention and preparedness, was developed and the case study illustrating the application of the proposed method was performed. ALOFT-FT software tool based on large eddy simulation of buoyant fire plumes was employed for predicting the local toxic contamination in the down-wind vicinity of the fire. The database of model input parameters can be effectively modified enabling the simulation of the smoke plume from pool fires or jet fires of arbitrary flammable (or combustible) gas, liquid or solid. This work was supported by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic via the project LD11012 (in the frame of the COST CM0901 Action) and the Ministry of Environment of the Czech Republic (project no. SPII 1a10 45/70).

  19. Act No. 84 amending the decision of the Ministry of Communications on Transport of Dangerous Substances by Road

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This Act amends Decision No. 610 of 1978 of the Ministry of Communications on the Transport of Dangerous Substances by Road, which also covers radioactive substances; the amendments in their respect set out in the Annexes are of a technical nature. The Act entered into force on 1 April 1987. (NEA) [fr

  20. Metal homeostasis in Hypogymnia physodes is controlled by lichen substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Markus

    2008-05-01

    The hypothesis was tested that the lichen substances produced by the epiphytic lichen Hypogymnia physodes control the intracellular uptake of divalent transition metals. Incubating lichen thalli with and without their natural content of lichen substances with metal solutions showed that the lichen substances of H. physodes selectively inhibit the uptake of Cu(2+) and Mn(2+), but not of Fe(2+) and Zn(2+). Such behavior is ecologically beneficial, as ambient concentrations of Cu(2+) and Mn(2+) in precipitation and bark are known to limit the abundance of H. physodes, whereas limiting effects of Fe(2+) or Zn(2+) have never been found. This suggests that increasing the Cu(2+) and Mn(2+) tolerance stimulated the evolution of lichen substances in H. physodes. The depsidone physodalic acid is apparently most effective at reducing Cu(2+) and Mn(2+) uptake among the seven lichen substances produced by H. physodes. Probably lichen substances play a general role in the metal homeostasis of lichens.

  1. 75 FR 32506 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... of controlled substances listed in schedule II: Drug Schedule Raw Opium (9600) II Concentrate of... substances that are manufactured from raw opium, poppy straw, and concentrate of poppy straw. No comments or... treaties, conventions, or protocols in effect on May 1, 1971. DEA has investigated Cody Laboratories, Inc...

  2. 77 FR 5846 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... following basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Opium, raw (9600) II Poppy Straw Concentrate... substances that are manufactured from opium, raw, and poppy straw concentrate. Comments and requests for... and with United States obligations under international treaties, conventions, or protocols in effect...

  3. 76 FR 17967 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Raw Opium (9600) II Concentrate of Poppy Straw... substances that are manufactured from raw opium, poppy straw, and concentrate of poppy straw. No comments or... treaties, conventions, or protocols in effect on May 1, 1971. DEA has investigated Cody Laboratories, Inc...

  4. 76 FR 77253 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    ... Schedule Coca Leaves (9040) II Thebaine (9333) II Opium, raw (9600) II Noroxymorphone (9668) II Poppy Straw...-registration to import crude opium, poppy straw, concentrate of poppy straw, and coca leaves. Comments and... substances listed in schedule I or II, which fall under the authority of section 1002(a)(2)(B) of the Act (21...

  5. Notification of the commission on the eco-toxicity of chemical substances; Avis de la commission d'evaluation de l'ecotoxicite des substances chimiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The french commission on the evaluation of the chemical substances eco-toxicity, published recommendations concerning the use of additives for the automotive fuels, for the cooling circuit of electric power plants and for gases against fire. The risks for the public health are analysed and safety precautions are asked. (A.L.B.)

  6. Radioactive Substances Act 1960. Keeping and use of radioactive materials; list of registrations in England and Wales issued under the Radioactive Substances Act 1960 for the keeping and use of radioactive materials and mobile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    Through the Radioactive Substances Act 1960 (RSA 60), Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Pollution (Radioactive Substances) (HMIP) exercises control, on behalf of the Secretary of State for the Environment, over the keeping and use of radioactive material and the accumulation and disposal of radioactive waste in England. HMIP also provides technical advice to the Secretary of State for Wales in connection with the enforcement of RSA 60 in Wales. Registrations under RSA 60 for the keeping and use of radioactive materials in England and Wales are issued respectively by the Secretaries of State for the Environment and Wales, following careful assessment of the radiological consequences for members of the public. Registrations impose strict limits and conditions and premises and apparatus are subject to scrutiny by HMIP Inspectors to ensure compliance. A list contains names and addresses of those registered in England and Wales for the keeping and use of radioactive materials and mobile apparatus

  7. Evaluating the toxic effects of three priority hazardous and noxious substances (HNS) to rotifer Brachionus plicatilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lei; Pan, Luqing; Lin, Pengfei; Miao, Jingjing; Wang, Xiufen; Lin, Yufei; Wu, Jiangyue

    2017-12-01

    Hazardous and noxious substances (HNS) spill in the marine environment is an issue of growing concern, and it will mostly continue to do so in the future owing to the increase of high chemical traffic. Nevertheless, the effects of HNS spill on marine environment, especially on aquatic organisms are unclear. Consequently, it is emergent to provide valuable information for the toxicities to marine biota caused by HNS spill. Accordingly, the acute toxicity of three preferential HNS and sub-lethal effects of acrylonitrile on Brachionus plicatilis were evaluated. The median lethal concentration (LC 50 ) at 24 h were 47.2 mg acrylonitrile L -1 , 276.9 mg styrene L -1 , and 488.3 mg p-xylene L -1 , respectively. Sub-lethal toxicity effects of acrylonitrile on feeding behavior, development, and reproduction parameters of B. plicatilis were also evaluated. Results demonstrated that rates of filtration and ingestion were significantly reduced at 2.0, 4.0, and 8.0 mg L -1 of acrylonitrile. Additionally, reproductive period, fecundity, and life span were significantly decreased at high acrylonitrile concentrations. Conversely, juvenile period was significantly increased at the highest two doses and no effects were observed on embryonic development and post-reproductive period. Meanwhile, we found that ingestion rate decline could be a good predictor of reproduction toxicity in B. plicatilis and ecologically relevant endpoint for toxicity assessment. These data will be useful to assess and deal with marine HNS spillages.

  8. 36 CFR 1002.35 - Alcoholic beverages and controlled substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) The sale or gift of an alcoholic beverage to a person under 21 years of age, except where allowed by... by the Presidio Trust when under the influence of alcohol or a controlled substance to a degree that...

  9. 75 FR 69705 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    ... re-registration to import crude opium, poppy straw, concentrate of poppy straw, and coca leaves. As... classes of controlled substances listed in schedule I or II, which fall under the authority of section...

  10. 76 FR 14688 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-17

    ...-registration to import crude opium, poppy straw, concentrate of poppy straw or coca leaves. As explained in the... controlled substances listed in schedule I or II, which fall under the authority of section 1002(a)(2)(B) of...

  11. 75 FR 65658 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ..., and coca leaves. As explained in the Correction to Notice of Application pertaining to Rhodes... DEA to manufacture such basic classes of controlled substances listed in schedule I or II, which fall...

  12. 76 FR 35241 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ..., and coca leaves. As explained in the Correction to Notice of Application pertaining to Rhodes... DEA to manufacture such basic classes of controlled substances listed in schedule I or II, which fall...

  13. 75 FR 69462 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-12

    ... 36683), Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals, Inc., 2820 N. Normandy Drive, Petersburg, Virginia 23805, made... registration of Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals, Inc. to import the basic class of controlled substance is..., conventions, or protocols in effect on [[Page 69463

  14. 75 FR 64745 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-20

    ... classes of controlled substances listed in schedule I: Drug Schedule Marihuana (7360) I Tetrahydrocannabinols (7370) I The company plans to cultivate marihuana for the National Institute on Drug Abuse for...

  15. 76 FR 66994 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... following basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Marihuana (7360) I Cocaine (9041) II The Institute will manufacture marihuana, and cocaine derivatives for use by their customers in analytical kits...

  16. 76 FR 51401 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-18

    ... a bulk manufacturer of the following basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Marihuana... ingredients (APIs) for distribution to its customers. In reference to drug code 7360 (Marihuana), the company...

  17. 75 FR 1814 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ... controlled substances listed in schedule I: Drug Schedule Marihuana (7360) I Tetrahydrocannabinols (7370) I The company plans to cultivate marihuana for the National Institute on Drug Abuse for research...

  18. 75 FR 53720 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ... Schedule Marihuana (7360) I Tetrahydrocannabinols (7370) I Alphamethadol (9605) I Nabilone (7379) II... controlled substances in bulk for distribution to its customers. In reference to drug code 7360 (Marihuana...

  19. 75 FR 14187 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... basic classes of controlled substances listed in schedules I and II: Drug Schedule Marihuana (7360) I...-clinical, laboratory-based research only. In reference to drug code 7360 (Marihuana), the company plans to...

  20. 75 FR 6062 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... controlled substances listed in schedules I and II: Drug Schedule Marihuana (7360) I Tetrahydrocannabinols (7370) I Cocaine (9041) I The Institute will manufacture small quantities of cocaine and marihuana...

  1. 76 FR 5829 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ... bulk manufacturer of the following basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Marihuana.... In reference to drug code 7360 (Marihuana), the company plans to bulk manufacture cannabidiol as a...

  2. 76 FR 25375 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-04

    ... following basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Marihuana (7360) I Tetrahydrocannabinols... customers for non- clinical, laboratory-based research only. In reference to drug code 7360 (Marihuana), the...

  3. 76 FR 8777 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Marihuana (7360) I Tetrahydrocannabinols (7370) I The company plans to cultivate marihuana for the National Institute on Drug Abuse for research approved by the...

  4. 75 FR 10312 - Importer of Controlled Substances Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    ... classes of controlled substances listed in schedule II: Drug Schedule Opium, raw (9600) II Poppy Straw..., or protocols in effect on May 1, 1971, at this time. DEA has investigated Cambrex Charles City, Inc...

  5. 76 FR 51400 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-18

    ... classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Raw Opium (9600) II Concentrate of Poppy Straw II (9670... treaties, conventions, or protocols in effect on May 1, 1971. DEA has investigated Rhodes Technologies to...

  6. 76 FR 42732 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    ... classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Coca Leaves (9040) II Opium, raw (9600) II Poppy Straw... with United States obligations under international treaties, conventions, or protocols in effect on May...

  7. 75 FR 44285 - Importer of Controlled Substances: Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... of controlled substances listed in schedule II: Drug Schedule Coca Leaves (9040) II Opium, raw (9600... treaties, conventions, or protocols in effect on May 1, 1971, at this time. DEA has investigated Penick...

  8. Air toxics provisions of the Clean Air Act: Potential impacts on energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hootman, H.A.; Vernet, J.E.

    1991-11-01

    This report provides an overview of the provisions of the Clean Air Act and its Amendments of 1990 that identify hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions and addresses their regulation by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It defines the major energy sector sources of these HAPs that would be affected by the regulations. Attention is focused on regulations that would cover coke oven emissions; chromium emission from industrial cooling towers and the electroplating process; HAP emissions from tank vessels, asbestos-related activities, organic solvent use, and ethylene oxide sterilization; and emissions of air toxics from municipal waste combustors. The possible implications of Title III regulations for the coal, natural gas, petroleum, uranium, and electric utility industries are examined. The report discusses five major databases of HAP emissions: (1) TRI (EPA's Toxic Release Inventory); (2) PISCES (Power Plant Integrated Systems: Chemical Emissions Studies developed by the Electric Power Research Institute); (3) 1985 Emissions Inventory on volatile organic compounds (used for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program); (4) Particulate Matter Species Manual (EPA); and (5) Toxics Emission Inventory (National Aeronautics and Space Administration). It also offers information on emission control technologies for municipal waste combustors

  9. Radiation Control Act 1977 - No 66 of 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This Act regulates the use of radioactive materials and radiation-emitting devices. It sets up a Radiation Advisory Council to advise the competent authorities on questions within the scope of the Act, also with a view to radiation protection. The Act also lays down a licensing system for such materials and devices. The Radioactive Substances Acts 1954 and 1966 are repealed. (NEA) [fr

  10. FY 2000 report on the investigational study on the application of remote controlled robot to the field of treatment of toxic substances, etc.; 2000 nendo chosa hokokusho. Enkaku sosa robot no yugai busshitsu to shori bunya heno oyo ni kansuru chosa kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    The paper studied a combination of the advanced robot remote controlled technology and the latest sensing/monitoring/failure diagnosis technology and investigated the application field of the integrated remote technology and items for the R and D. As to the construction of the common platform in the integrated remote technology making full use of the most up-to-date IT, extraction of element technology and study of developmental subjects were carried out for man-machine interface, remote control, sensing/monitoring, movement on nonlevel land, etc. Concerning the integrated remote technology in application fields, concepts for the development of the following technologies were constructed: integrated remote technology in the field of treatment of toxic substances/hazardous materials; integrated remote technology in the field of places to which personnel access is an impossibility; integrated remote technology in the field of remote/simultaneous treatment; integrated remote technology in the field of man substitution; integrated remote technology in the field of work at dangerous places. (NEDO)

  11. 40 CFR Appendix H to Subpart A of... - Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances H Appendix H to Subpart A of Part 82... STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls Pt. 82, Subpt. A, App. H Appendix H to Subpart A of Part...

  12. Multiple inorganic toxic substances contaminating the groundwater of Myingyan Township, Myanmar: Arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, and uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacquart, Thomas [Better Life Laboratories, Calais, VT (United States); Frisbie, Seth [Better Life Laboratories, Calais, VT (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Norwich University, Northfield, VT (United States); Mitchell, Erika [Better Life Laboratories, Calais, VT (United States); Grigg, Laurie [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, Norwich University, Northfield, VT (United States); Cole, Christopher [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Norwich University, Northfield, VT (United States); Small, Colleen [Vermont Department of Health Laboratory, Burlington, VT (United States); Sarkar, Bibudhendra, E-mail: bsarkar@sickkids.ca [Department of Molecular Structure and Function, The Research Institute of The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-06-01

    In South Asia, the technological and societal shift from drinking surface water to groundwater has resulted in a great reduction of acute diseases due to water borne pathogens. However, arsenic and other naturally occurring inorganic toxic substances present in groundwater in the region have been linked to a variety of chronic diseases, including cancers, heart disease, and neurological problems. Due to the highly specific symptoms of chronic arsenic poisoning, arsenic was the first inorganic toxic substance to be noticed at unsafe levels in the groundwater of West Bengal, India and Bangladesh. Subsequently, other inorganic toxic substances, including manganese, uranium, and fluoride have been found at unsafe levels in groundwater in South Asia. While numerous drinking water wells throughout Myanmar have been tested for arsenic, relatively little is known about the concentrations of other inorganic toxic substances in Myanmar groundwater. In this study, we analyzed samples from 18 drinking water wells (12 in Myingyan City and 6 in nearby Tha Pyay Thar Village) and 2 locations in the Ayeyarwaddy River for arsenic, boron, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, fluoride, iron, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, antimony, selenium, thallium, uranium, vanadium, and zinc. Concentrations of arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, or uranium exceeded health-based reference values in most wells. In addition, any given well usually contained more than one toxic substance at unsafe concentrations. While water testing and well sharing could reduce health risks, none of the wells sampled provide water that is entirely safe with respect to inorganic toxic substances. It is imperative that users of these wells, and users of other wells that have not been tested for multiple inorganic toxic substances throughout the region, be informed of the need for drinking water testing and the health consequences of drinking water contaminated with inorganic toxic

  13. Multiple inorganic toxic substances contaminating the groundwater of Myingyan Township, Myanmar: Arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacquart, Thomas; Frisbie, Seth; Mitchell, Erika; Grigg, Laurie; Cole, Christopher; Small, Colleen; Sarkar, Bibudhendra

    2015-01-01

    In South Asia, the technological and societal shift from drinking surface water to groundwater has resulted in a great reduction of acute diseases due to water borne pathogens. However, arsenic and other naturally occurring inorganic toxic substances present in groundwater in the region have been linked to a variety of chronic diseases, including cancers, heart disease, and neurological problems. Due to the highly specific symptoms of chronic arsenic poisoning, arsenic was the first inorganic toxic substance to be noticed at unsafe levels in the groundwater of West Bengal, India and Bangladesh. Subsequently, other inorganic toxic substances, including manganese, uranium, and fluoride have been found at unsafe levels in groundwater in South Asia. While numerous drinking water wells throughout Myanmar have been tested for arsenic, relatively little is known about the concentrations of other inorganic toxic substances in Myanmar groundwater. In this study, we analyzed samples from 18 drinking water wells (12 in Myingyan City and 6 in nearby Tha Pyay Thar Village) and 2 locations in the Ayeyarwaddy River for arsenic, boron, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, fluoride, iron, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, antimony, selenium, thallium, uranium, vanadium, and zinc. Concentrations of arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, or uranium exceeded health-based reference values in most wells. In addition, any given well usually contained more than one toxic substance at unsafe concentrations. While water testing and well sharing could reduce health risks, none of the wells sampled provide water that is entirely safe with respect to inorganic toxic substances. It is imperative that users of these wells, and users of other wells that have not been tested for multiple inorganic toxic substances throughout the region, be informed of the need for drinking water testing and the health consequences of drinking water contaminated with inorganic toxic

  14. Toxins secreted by Bacillus isolated from lung adenocarcinomas favor the penetration of toxic substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eMerlos

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to explore the eventual role of bacteria in the induction of lung cancer by smoking habits. Viable bacteria closely related to the genus Bacillus were detected at high frequencies in lung-cancer biopsies. Similar, if not identical, microbes were isolated from cigarettes and in smog. Bacteria present in cigarettes could be transferred to a physiological solution via a smoker device that mimicked their potential transfer during smoking those bacteria produce exotoxins able to open transmembrane pores. These channels can be used as a way to penetrate cells of benzopyrenes and other toxic substances present in tobacco products. We hypothesize that Bacillaceae present in tobacco play a key role in the development of lung cancer.

  15. Application of in silico modelling to estimate toxicity of migrating substances from food packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Nicholas; Chaudhry, Qasim

    2014-09-01

    This study derived toxicity estimates for a set of 136 chemical migrants from food packaging materials using in silico (computational) modelling and read across approaches. Where available, the predicted results for mutagenicity and carcinogenicity were compared with published experimental data. As the packaging compounds are subject to safety assessment, the migrating substances were more likely to be negative for both the endpoints. A set of structural analogues with positive experimental data for carcinogenicity and/or mutagenicity was therefore used as a positive comparator. The results showed that a weight of evidence assembled from different in silico models and read-across from already-tested structurally similar compounds can provide a rapid and reliable means for rapid screening of new yet-untested intentional or unintentional chemical compounds that may migrate to packaged foodstuffs. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Alleviation of iron toxicity in Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi (Anacardiaceae) by humic substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbss, Leonardo Barros; Dos Santos, Tamires Cruz; Pittarello, Marco; de Souza, Sávio Bastos; Ramos, Alessandro Coutinho; Busato, Jader Galba

    2018-04-01

    One of the industrial pillars of Espírito Santo state, South East of Brazil, is iron-mining products processing. This activity brings to a high level of coastal pollution due to deposition of iron particulate on fragile ecosystems as mangroves and restinga. Schinus therebinthifolius (aroeira) is a widespread restinga species. This work tested iron toxicity alleviation by vermicompost humic substances (HS) added to aroeira seedlings in hydroponic conditions. Catalase, peroxidase, and ascorbate peroxidase are antioxidant enzymes that work as reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers: they increase their activity as an answer to ROS concentration rise that is the consequence of metal accumulation or humic substance stimulation. S. terebinthifolius seedlings treated with HS and Fe augmented their antioxidant enzyme activities significantly less than seedlings treated separately with HS and Fe; their significantly lower Fe accumulation and the slight increase of root and leaf area confirm the biostimulating effect of HS and their role in blocking Fe excess outside the roots. The use of HS can be useful for the recovery of areas contaminated by heavy metals.

  17. Metal homeostasis in Hypogymnia physodes is controlled by lichen substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauck, Markus

    2008-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that the lichen substances produced by the epiphytic lichen Hypogymnia physodes control the intracellular uptake of divalent transition metals. Incubating lichen thalli with and without their natural content of lichen substances with metal solutions showed that the lichen substances of H. physodes selectively inhibit the uptake of Cu 2+ and Mn 2+ , but not of Fe 2+ and Zn 2+ . Such behavior is ecologically beneficial, as ambient concentrations of Cu 2+ and Mn 2+ in precipitation and bark are known to limit the abundance of H. physodes, whereas limiting effects of Fe 2+ or Zn 2+ have never been found. This suggests that increasing the Cu 2+ and Mn 2+ tolerance stimulated the evolution of lichen substances in H. physodes. The depsidone physodalic acid is apparently most effective at reducing Cu 2+ and Mn 2+ uptake among the seven lichen substances produced by H. physodes. Probably lichen substances play a general role in the metal homeostasis of lichens. - Lichen substances in Hypogymnia physodes specifically reduce the uptake of Cu 2+ and Mn 2+ , but not Fe 2+ or Zn 2+

  18. Skin toxicity of jet fuels: ultrastructural studies and the effects of substance P

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.; Inman, Alfred O.; Riviere, Jim E.

    2004-01-01

    Topical exposure to jet fuel is a significant occupational hazard. Recent studies have focused on dermal absorption of fuel and its components, or alternatively, on the biochemical or immunotoxicological sequelae to exposure. Surprisingly, morphological and ultrastructural analyses have not been systematically conducted. Similarly, few studies have compared responses in skin to that of the primary target organ, the lung. The focus of the present investigation was 2-fold: first, to characterize the ultrastructural changes seen after topical exposure to moderate doses (335 or 67 μl/cm 2 ) of jet fuels [Jet A, Jet Propellant (JP)-8, JP-8+100] for up to 4 days in pigs, and secondly, to determine if co-administration of substance P (SP) with JP-8 jet fuel in human epidermal keratinocyte cell cultures modulates toxicity as it does to pulmonary toxicity in laboratory animal studies. The primary change seen after exposure to all fuels was low-level inflammation accompanied by formation of lipid droplets in various skin layers, mitochondrial and nucleolar changes, cleft formation in the intercellular lipid lamellar bilayers, as well as disorganization in the stratum granulosum-stratum corneum interface. An increased number of Langerhans cells were also noted in jet fuel-treated skin. These changes suggest that the primary effect of jet fuel exposure is damage to the stratum corneum barrier. SP administration decreased the release of interleukin (IL)-8 normally seen in keratinocytes after JP-8 exposure, a response similar to that reported for SP's effect on JP-8 pulmonary toxicity. These studies provide a base upon which biochemical and immunological data collected in other model systems can be compared

  19. Potassium Dichromate as a Reference Substance for Embryonic Tests of Toxicity in the Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Krejčí

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7 has already been used as a reference substance in tests of toxicity with aquatic animals. The aim of this study was to determine and compare values of LC50 for potassium dichromate during the whole period of embryonic development (i.e., 120 h and 48 h after hatching of embryos in the common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.. Fish eggs and embryos were exposed to 5 different concentrations of potassium dichromate (i.e., 372, 409, 450, 495, 545 mg l-1 during two experiments. Such characteristics as the cumulative mortality, the start and the end of hatching, the number of deformities, body length, and body mass of surviving individuals were studied during the tests. The highest mortality was found in the hatched embryos. Mortality and frequency of deformities increased with the growing concentration of potassium dichromate. The value of 120 LC50 for potassium dichromate was 464.91 ± 23.83 mg l-1 and the value of 48 LC50 was 458.94 ± 4.14 mg l-1 (mean ± SD. No statistically significant difference between values 120 LC50 a 48 LC50 was found. This is why reduction of the exposure period to only 48 h after hatching seems a reasonable method to study the control of susceptibility using potassium dichromate in embryonic tests of toxicity.

  20. Human contamination by persistent toxic substances: the rationale to improve exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, Miquel

    2015-10-01

    We know quite a lot about the generalized human contamination by environmental chemical agents; this statement is fully compatible with the view that most countries lack the necessary monitoring systems. We also know quite a lot about the toxic effects of environmental pollutants; this statement is fully compatible with the proposal that we need both more research and more energetic policies to decrease human contamination by such pollutants. Unsurprisingly, we know too little about the (environmental and social) causes and the etiopathogenesis (mechanisms) of the most prevalent diseases, and we will continue to miss relevant causes and mechanisms if we neglect the toxic chemicals that commonly contaminate humans, worldwide. Basic, clinical end environmental-epidemiological research on human health should more often consider integrating biomarkers of internal dose of environmental chemical pollutants. When we act in more responsible, rational, and scientific ways; when we become less dismissive towards environmental hazards; and when we thus neglect less the generalized human contamination by environmental chemical agents and their toxic effects, we will expand mechanistic biologic knowledge, and we shall as well increase the effectiveness of interventions and policies that enable the primary prevention of human diseases which cause huge amounts of economic burden and human suffering.

  1. Raising awareness of new psychoactive substances: chemical analysis and in vitro toxicity screening of 'legal high' packages containing synthetic cathinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Ana Margarida; Valente, Maria João; Carvalho, Márcia; Dias da Silva, Diana; Gaspar, Helena; Carvalho, Félix; de Lourdes Bastos, Maria; Guedes de Pinho, Paula

    2015-05-01

    The world's status quo on recreational drugs has dramatically changed in recent years due to the rapid emergence of new psychoactive substances (NPS), represented by new narcotic or psychotropic drugs, in pure form or in preparation, which are not controlled by international conventions, but that may pose a public health threat comparable with that posed by substances listed in these conventions. These NPS, also known as 'legal highs' or 'smart drugs', are typically sold via Internet or 'smartshops' as legal alternatives to controlled substances, being announced as 'bath salts' and 'plant feeders' and is often sought after for consumption especially among young people. Although NPS have the biased reputation of being safe, the vast majority has hitherto not been tested and several fatal cases have been reported, namely for synthetic cathinones, with pathological patterns comparable with amphetamines. Additionally, the unprecedented speed of appearance and distribution of the NPS worldwide brings technical difficulties in the development of analytical procedures and risk assessment in real time. In this study, 27 products commercialized as 'plant feeders' were chemically characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. It was also evaluated, for the first time, the in vitro hepatotoxic effects of individual synthetic cathinones, namely methylone, pentedrone, 4-methylethcathinone (4-MEC) and 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV). Two commercial mixtures ('Bloom' and 'Blow') containing mainly cathinone derivatives were also tested, and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) was used as the reference drug. The study allowed the identification of 19 compounds, showing that synthetic cathinones are the main active compounds present in these products. Qualitative and quantitative variability was found in products sold with the same trade name in matching or different 'smartshops'. In the toxicity studies performed in

  2. Schedules of controlled substances: temporary placement of three synthetic cannabinoids into Schedule I. Final order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    The Deputy Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is issuing this final order to temporarily schedule three synthetic cannabinoids under the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) pursuant to the temporary scheduling provisions of 21 U.S.C. 811(h). The substances are (1-pentyl-1H-indol-3-yl)(2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl)methanone (UR-144), [1-(5-fluoro-pentyl)-1H-indol-3-yl](2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl)methanone (5-fluoro-UR-144, XLR11) and N-(1-adamantyl)-1-pentyl-1H-indazole-3-carboxamide (APINACA, AKB48). This action is based on a finding by the Deputy Administrator that the placement of these synthetic cannabinoids and their salts, isomers and salts of isomers into Schedule I of the CSA is necessary to avoid an imminent hazard to the public safety. As a result of this order, the full effect of the CSA and the Controlled Substances Import and Export Act (CSIEA) and their implementing regulations including criminal, civil and administrative penalties, sanctions and regulatory controls of Schedule I substances will be imposed on the manufacture, distribution, possession, importation, and exportation of these synthetic cannabinoids.

  3. Accumulation of chlorinated and brominated persistent toxic substances (PTS) and their relationship to testosterone suppression in Norway rats from Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takasuga, T.; Senthilkumar, K. [Shimadzu Techno-Research Inc. (Japan); Ishizuka, M.; Fujita, S. [Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido Univ. (Japan); Tanikawa, R. [Inst. of Tech., Ikari Corp. (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    Contamination of chlorinated/brominated persistent toxic substances (PTS) such as polychlorinated, -dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), -dibenzofurans (PCDFs), -biphenyls (PCBs), - organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) {l_brace}e.g., aldrin, dieldrin, endrin, chlordane compounds [cis/transchlordane, cis/trans-nonachlor, oxychlordane, heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide], hexachlorobenzene (HCB), 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (DDTs) and its metabolities [o,p/p,p'-DDD and DDE] and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCHs){r_brace} and -brominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are considered to important class of chemicals due to persistence in nature, bioaccumulation potential and adverse health effects in wildlife and humans. Among South East Asian countries, Japan reported to contaminated with aforesaid chemicals with considerable amounts. There is no document reports contamination of PTS in wild animals, which in-habit near humans. Norway rat (NR) inhabits not only near human environment but also distributed worldwide. Especially, NR feeds on human waste and shelter in and around human environment and thus exposure of toxic contaminants in this animal considered to similar with those in humans. In addition, rats have unique physiology that match with humans (e.g., they have similar pathogens as humans have). Therefore, analysis of toxic contaminants in NR considered as indirect measure in humans. Considering those facts, in this study, we analyzed NR collected from urban area, rural area, waste dumping or land fill site and isolated remote island from Japan. Particularly several chlorinated and brominated organic contaminants such as PCDDs, PCDFs, PCBs, DDTs, HCHs, chlordane compounds, heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide, HCB, aldrin, dieldrin, endrin and PBDEs were analyzed in rat livers by isotope dilution technique using HRGC-HRMS. In addition, laboratory Wistar rats (WR) were used as control.

  4. Controlling air toxics through advanced coal preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straszheim, W.E.; Buttermore, W.H.; Pollard, J.L. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    This project involves the assessment of advanced coal preparation methods for removing trace elements from coal to reduce the potential for air toxic emissions upon combustion. Scanning electron microscopy-based automated image analysis (SEM-AIA) and advanced washability analyses are being applied with state-of-the-art analytical procedures to predict the removal of elements of concern by advanced column flotation and to confirm the effectiveness of preparation on the quality of quantity of clean coal produced. Specific objectives are to maintain an acceptable recovery of combustible product, while improving the rejection of mineral-associated trace elements. Current work has focused on determining conditions for controlling column flotation system across its operating range and on selection and analysis of samples for determining trace element cleanability.

  5. Urgent need to reevaluate the latest World Health Organization guidelines for toxic inorganic substances in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisbie, Seth H; Mitchell, Erika J; Sarkar, Bibudhendra

    2015-08-13

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has established guidelines for drinking-water quality that cover biological and chemical hazards from both natural and anthropogenic sources. In the most recent edition of Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality (2011), the WHO withdrew, suspended, did not establish, or raised guidelines for the inorganic toxic substances manganese, molybdenum, nitrite, aluminum, boron, nickel, uranium, mercury, and selenium. In this paper, we review these changes to the WHO drinking-water guidelines, examining in detail the material presented in the WHO background documents for each of these toxic substances. In some cases, these WHO background documents use literature reviews that do not take into account scientific research published within the last 10 or more years. In addition, there are instances in which standard WHO practices for deriving guidelines are not used; for example, rounding and other mathematical errors are made. According to published meeting reports from the WHO Chemical Aspects Working Group, the WHO has a timetable for revising some of its guidelines for drinking-water quality, but for many of these toxic substances the planned changes are minimal or will be delayed for as long as 5 years. Given the limited nature of the planned WHO revisions to the inorganic toxic substances and the extended timetable for these revisions, we suggest that governments, researchers, and other stakeholders might establish independent recommendations for inorganic toxic substances and possibly other chemicals to proactively protect public health, or at the very least, revert to previous editions of the Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality, which were more protective of public health.

  6. Radiation control act 1990 no. 13 (7/6/1990) New South Wales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The object of the Act is to ensure the protection of persons and the environment against exposure to ionizing radiation and harmful non-ionizing radiation, taking into account social and economic factors and recognising that radiation is needed for therapeutic purposes. The Act regulates and controls the sale, use, keeping and disposal of radioactive substances and radiation apparatus, but does not apply to radioactive ores as defined by the Mines Inspection Act 1901. It provides for a licensing system for such substances and apparatus, the licensing authority being the Director-General of the Department of Health, under the overall authority of the Minister for Health. No person may sell or use the substances or apparatus without a licence granted by the Director-General. A licence is granted only following the recommendation of the Radiation Advisory Council set up under this Act [fr

  7. Ozone-depleting-substance control and phase-out plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickels, J.M.; Brown, M.J.

    1994-07-01

    Title VI of the Federal Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 requires regulation of the use and disposal of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) (e.g., Halon, Freon). Several important federal regulations have been promulgated that affect the use of such substances at the Hanford Site. On April 23, 1993, Executive Order (EO) 12843, Procurement Requirements and Policies for Federal Agencies for Ozone-Depleting Substances (EPA 1993) was issued for Federal facilities to conform to the new US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations implementing the Clean Air Act of 1963 (CAA), Section 613, as amended. To implement the requirements of Title VI the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL), issued a directive to the Hanford Site contractors on May 25, 1994 (Wisness 1994). The directive assigns Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) the lead in coordinating the development of a sitewide comprehensive implementation plan to be drafted by July 29, 1994 and completed by September 30, 1994. The implementation plan will address several areas where immediate compliance action is required. It will identify all current uses of ODSs and inventories, document the remaining useful life of equipment that contains ODS chemicals, provide a phase-out schedule, and provide a strategy that will be implemented consistently by all the Hanford Site contractors. This plan also addresses the critical and required elements of Federal regulations, the EO, and US Department of Energy (DOE) guidance. This plan is intended to establish a sitewide management system to address the clean air requirements

  8. Thermal oxidation for air toxics control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennington, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Administration projects annual expenditures of $1.1 billion by 1995, increasing to $6.7 billion by 2005, in order to comply with the new Clean Air Act Title III hazardous air pollutant requirements. The Title III requirements include 189 hazardous air pollutants which must be reduced or eliminated by 2003. Twenty of the 189 listed pollutants account for approximately 75 percent of all hazardous air pollutant emissions. Ninety percent of these 20 pollutants can be effectively controlled through one or mote of the thermal oxidation technologies. This paper reports that the advantages and disadvantages of each thermal oxidation technology vary substantially and must be reviewed for each application in order to establish the most effective thermal oxidation solution. Effective thermal oxidation will meet MACT (maximum achievable control technology) emission standards

  9. Individual Differences in Cognitive Control Circuit Anatomy Link Sensation Seeking, Impulsivity, and Substance Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollinshead, Marisa O.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Buckner, Randy L.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals vary widely in their tendency to seek stimulation and act impulsively, early developing traits with genetic origins. Failures to regulate these behaviors increase risk for maladaptive outcomes including substance abuse. Here, we explored the neuroanatomical correlates of sensation seeking and impulsivity in healthy young adults. Our analyses revealed links between sensation seeking and reduced cortical thickness that were preferentially localized to regions implicated in cognitive control, including anterior cingulate and middle frontal gyrus (n = 1015). These associations generalized to self-reported motor impulsivity, replicated in an independent group (n = 219), and correlated with heightened alcohol, tobacco, and caffeine use. Critically, the relations between sensation seeking and brain structure were evident in participants without a history of alcohol or tobacco use, suggesting that observed associations with anatomy are not solely a consequence of substance use. These results demonstrate that individual differences in the tendency to seek stimulation, act on impulse, and engage in substance use are correlated with the anatomical structure of cognitive control circuitry. Our findings suggest that, in healthy populations, covariation across these complex multidimensional behaviors may in part originate from a common underlying biology. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Impaired cognitive control may result in a tendency to seek stimulation impulsively and an increased risk for maladaptive outcomes, including substance abuse. Here, we examined the structural correlates of sensation seeking and impulsivity in a large cohort of healthy young adults. Our analyses revealed links between sensation seeking and reduced cortical thickness that were preferentially localized to regions implicated in cognitive control, including anterior cingulate and middle frontal gyrus. The observed associations generalized to motor impulsivity, replicated in an independent group

  10. 40 CFR 710.26 - Chemical substances for which information is not required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT TSCA CHEMICAL INVENTORY REGULATIONS 2002 Inventory Update Reporting... Inventory or in the Master Inventory File, where the asterisk (*) indicates that any sets of characters may... 1985 edition of the Inventory or the Master Inventory File as siloxane and silicone, silsesquioxane, a...

  11. Welcome to the Department of Toxic Substances Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fire Cleanup Helps Northern Californians Rebuild Report: Draft Evaluation and Analysis of Metal Shredding Facilities and Metal Shredder Wastes youtubebutton_2 twitter icon, button facebook icon button Metal Shredding Riverside Agricultural Park Riverside Neighborhood Evaluation Quemetco, Inc. Santa

  12. Tenth anniversary of the Chemical Substances Act. 10 Jahre Chemikaliengesetz; Bilanz und Perspektiven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlers, J. (Umweltbundesamt, Berlin (Germany)); Arndt, R. (Bundesanstalt fuer Arbeitsschutz, Dortmund (Germany)); Bulling, W.B. (Bundesgesundheitsamt, Berlin (Germany)); Drescher, R.D. (Umweltbundesamt, Berlin (Germany)); Elstner, P. (Bundesgesundheitsamt, Berlin (Germany)); Heinemeyer, G. (Bundesgesundheitsamt, Berlin (Germany)); Kayser, D. (Bundesgesundheitsamt, Berlin (Germany)); Lange, A.W. (

    1992-11-01

    The chemical substances act is ten years old. These ten years have witnessed a stormy development in legislation on chemicals: what was new ground still at the beginning of the eighties, is now a vast area of law complemented by detailed individual regulations at the administrative level, firmly interlocked with the other areas of environmental law, and part of an overall concept for the safety of chemicals enjoying an international reputation. Currently, the chemical substances act is in a phase of inner consolidation and completion. This phase was ushered in by the proposed amendment of 1990, an amendment aimed to eliminate weak points on the basis of first experiences with the implementation of legal requirements existing under EC law. In the second part of this phase, revisions or completions which have meanwhile been effected or are being effected in community law must be integrated. Further legal regulations are to be expected in the area of prohibitions and restrictions. These are, so far, mainly attuned to individual cases and reactive in nature. Most important of all is the development of a uniform and appropriate catalogue of criteria. The aim must be to create the necessary boundary conditions for the use of chemicals in our industrial society ensuring sustainable, environmentally compatible development for a long time to come. (orig./HSCH)

  13. A novel two-dimensional liquid chromatographic system for the online toxicity prediction of pharmaceuticals and related substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jian; Xu, Li [Tongji School of Pharmacy, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Shi, Zhi-guo, E-mail: shizg@whu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Hu, Min [Hubei Instrument for Food and Drug Control, Wuhan (China)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • A novel two-dimensional liquid chromatographic system was developed. • The 1st dimension was ODS to separate components in the sample. • The 2nd dimension was biopartitioning micellar chromatography to predict toxicity. • The system was used to screen toxicity of pharmaceuticals and related substances. • It was promising for fast online toxicity screening of complex sample in one step. - Abstract: In this study, a novel two-dimensional liquid chromatographic (2D-LC) system was developed for simultaneous separation and toxicity prediction of pharmaceutical and its related substances. A conventional ODS column was used on the 1st-D to separate the sample; while, bio-partitioning micellar chromatography served as the 2nd-D to predict toxicity of the components. The established system was tested for the toxicity of ibuprofen and its impurities with known toxicity. With only one injection, ibuprofen and its impurities were separated on the 1st-D; and LC50 values of individual impurity were obtained based on the quantitative retention–activity relationships, which agreed well with the reported data. Furthermore, LC50 values of photolysis transformation products (TPs) of carprofen, ketoprofen and diclofenac acid (as unknown compounds) were screened in this 2D-LC system, which could be an indicator of the toxicity of these TPs and was meaningful for the environmental monitoring and drinking water treatment. The established 2D-LC system was cost-effective, time-saving and reliable, and was promising for fast online screening of toxicity of known and unknown analytes in the complex sample in a single step. It may find applications in environment, pharmaceutical and food, etc.

  14. A novel two-dimensional liquid chromatographic system for the online toxicity prediction of pharmaceuticals and related substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jian; Xu, Li; Shi, Zhi-guo; Hu, Min

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel two-dimensional liquid chromatographic system was developed. • The 1st dimension was ODS to separate components in the sample. • The 2nd dimension was biopartitioning micellar chromatography to predict toxicity. • The system was used to screen toxicity of pharmaceuticals and related substances. • It was promising for fast online toxicity screening of complex sample in one step. - Abstract: In this study, a novel two-dimensional liquid chromatographic (2D-LC) system was developed for simultaneous separation and toxicity prediction of pharmaceutical and its related substances. A conventional ODS column was used on the 1st-D to separate the sample; while, bio-partitioning micellar chromatography served as the 2nd-D to predict toxicity of the components. The established system was tested for the toxicity of ibuprofen and its impurities with known toxicity. With only one injection, ibuprofen and its impurities were separated on the 1st-D; and LC50 values of individual impurity were obtained based on the quantitative retention–activity relationships, which agreed well with the reported data. Furthermore, LC50 values of photolysis transformation products (TPs) of carprofen, ketoprofen and diclofenac acid (as unknown compounds) were screened in this 2D-LC system, which could be an indicator of the toxicity of these TPs and was meaningful for the environmental monitoring and drinking water treatment. The established 2D-LC system was cost-effective, time-saving and reliable, and was promising for fast online screening of toxicity of known and unknown analytes in the complex sample in a single step. It may find applications in environment, pharmaceutical and food, etc

  15. 76 FR 51398 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-18

    ..., Cambrex Charles City, Inc., 1205 11th Street, Charles City, Iowa 50616-3466, made application by renewal..., objections, or requests for any hearings will be accepted on any application for registration or re... class of any controlled substance in schedule I or II are, and will continue to be, required to...

  16. 77 FR 5849 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... October 7, 2011, 76 FR 62449, Cambrex Charles City, Inc., 1205 11th Street, Charles City, Iowa 50616, made... Sufentanil (9740) II Fentanyl (9801) II The company will manufacture the listed controlled substances in bulk... factors in 21 U.S.C. 823(a) and determined that the registration of Cambrex Charles City, Inc. to...

  17. 76 FR 10069 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-23

    ... time. DEA has investigated Johnson Matthey Inc. to ensure that the company's registration is consistent... 26, 2010, 75 FR 65659, Johnson Matthey Inc., Custom Pharmaceuticals Department, 2003 Nolte Drive... Sufentanil (9740) II Fentanyl (9801) II The company plans to manufacture the listed controlled substances in...

  18. 76 FR 7234 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-09

    ... 64743, Johnson Matthey, Inc., Pharmaceutical Materials, 2003 Nolte Drive, West Deptford, New Jersey... Concentrate of Poppy Straw (9670) II The company plans to import the listed controlled substances as raw...), and determined that the registration of Johnson Matthey, Inc. to import the basic classes of...

  19. 75 FR 32505 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... Johnson Matthey, Inc. to ensure that the company's registration is consistent with the public interest... 55858), Johnson Matthey, Inc., Pharmaceutical Materials, 2003 Nolte Drive, West Deptford, New Jersey... Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II The company plans to import the listed controlled substances as raw...

  20. 75 FR 9615 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-03

    .... DEA has investigated Johnson Matthey Inc. to ensure that the company's registration is consistent with..., 2009, (74 FR 55588), Johnson Matthey Inc., Custom Pharmaceuticals Department, 2003 Nolte Drive, West... Sufentanil (9740) II Fentanyl (9801) II The company plans to manufacture the listed controlled substances in...

  1. 76 FR 17968 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... 1, 2010, (75 FR 53720), Austin Pharma LLC., 811 Paloma Drive, Suite A, Round Rock, Texas 78665-2402...) and determined that the registration of Austin Pharma LLC. to manufacture the listed basic classes of controlled substances is consistent with the public interest at this time. DEA has investigated Austin Pharma...

  2. 77 FR 2324 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ..., 2011, 76 FR 51401, Austin Pharma LLC., 811 Paloma Drive, Suite C, Round Rock, Texas 78665-2402, made...) and determined that the registration of Austin Pharma LLC. to manufacture the listed basic classes of controlled substances is consistent with the public interest at this time. DEA has investigated Austin Pharma...

  3. 75 FR 64743 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-20

    ... Phenylacetone (8501) II Coca Leaves (9040) II Thebaine (9333) II Opium, raw (9600) II Noroxymorphone (9668) II... re-registration to import crude opium, poppy straw, concentrate of poppy straw, and coca leaves. As... such basic classes of controlled substances listed in schedule I or II, which fall under the authority...

  4. 76 FR 39123 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ... Carfentanil (9743) II Coca Leaves (9040) II Cocaine (9041) II Codeine (9050) II Dextropropoxyphene, bulk (non... registration or re-registration to import crude opium, poppy straw, concentrate of poppy straw, and coca leaves... such basic classes of controlled substances listed in schedule I or II, which fall under the authority...

  5. 76 FR 62447 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... Administration (DEA) to be registered as an importer of Remifentanil (9739), a basic class of controlled substance listed in schedule II. The company plans to import Remifentanil in bulk for use in dosage- form manufacturing. No comments or objections have been received. DEA has considered the factors in 21 U.S.C. 823(a...

  6. 76 FR 62447 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... (9600) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II The company plans to import narcotic raw materials for manufacturing and further distribution to its customers. The company is registered with DEA as a manufacturer of... 43745, all applicants for registration to import a basic class of any controlled substance in schedule I...

  7. 75 FR 65658 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... registration as an importer of the basic classes of controlled substances listed in schedule II: Drug Schedule Raw Opium (9600) II Concentrate of Poppy Straw (9670) II The company plans to import narcotic raw materials for manufacturing and further distribution to its customers. The company is registered with DEA as...

  8. 76 FR 17969 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration By Notice dated November 1, 2010, and published in the Federal Register on November 12, 2010, 75 FR 69464, Cerilliant Corporation, 811 Paloma Drive, Suite A, Round Rock, Texas 78665...

  9. 75 FR 69461 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration By Notice dated June 17, 2010, and published in the Federal Register on June 28, 2010 (75 FR 36684), Cerilliant Corporation, 811 Paloma Drive, Suite A, Round Rock, Texas 78665-2402, made application by letter...

  10. 75 FR 69464 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on July 16, 2009, Cerilliant Corporation, 811 Paloma Drive, Suite A, Round Rock...

  11. 75 FR 10313 - Importer of Controlled Substances Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances Notice of Registration By Notice dated October 21, 2009, and published in the Federal Register on October 28, 2009 (74 FR 55584), Cerilliant Corporation, 811 Paloma Drive, Suite A, Round Rock, Texas 78665-2402, made...

  12. 75 FR 10314 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration By Notice dated September 17, 2009, and published in the Federal Register on September 25, 2009, (74 FR 49020), Cerilliant Corporation, 811 Paloma Drive, Suite A, Round Rock, Texas...

  13. 76 FR 8776 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration By Notice dated November 1, 2010, and published in the Federal Register on November 12, 2010, 75 FR 69459, Cerilliant Corporation, 811 Paloma Drive, Suite A, Round Rock, Texas 78665-2402, made...

  14. 77 FR 2321 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on June 28, 2011, Cerilliant Corporation, 811 Paloma Drive, Suite A, Round Rock...

  15. 76 FR 72976 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ..., 2011, 76 FR 36577, Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals, Inc., 2820 N. Normandy Drive, Petersburg, Virginia... Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals, Inc., to manufacture the listed basic classes of controlled substances is consistent with the public interest at this time. DEA has investigated Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals, Inc...

  16. 76 FR 36577 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on May 4, 2011, Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals Inc., 2820 N. Normandy Drive...

  17. 75 FR 32506 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a) of Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on April 12, 2010, Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals Inc., 2820 N. Normandy Drive...

  18. 76 FR 36578 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    ... firm plans to manufacture the listed controlled substances for internal use and for sale to other companies. No comments or objections have been received. DEA has considered the factors in 21 U.S.C. 823(a..., Inc., to ensure that the company's registration is consistent with the public interest. The...

  19. 75 FR 44287 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... firm plans to manufacture the listed controlled substances for internal use and for sale to other companies. No comments or objections have been received. DEA has considered the factors in 21 U.S.C. 823(a..., Inc., to ensure that the company's registration is consistent with the public interest. The...

  20. 75 FR 9614 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-03

    ... manufacturer of the basic classes of controlled substances listed in schedule I: Drug Schedule Marihuana (7360) I Tetrahydrocannabinols (7370) I The company plans to manufacture small quantities of marihuana derivatives for research purposes. In reference to drug code 7360 (Marihuana), the company plans to bulk...

  1. 76 FR 21917 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-19

    ... manufacturer of the following basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Marihuana (7360) I Tetrahydrocannabinols (7370) I The company plans to manufacture small quantities of marihuana derivatives for research purposes. In reference to drug code 7360 (Marihuana), the company plans to bulk manufacture cannabidiol. In...

  2. 75 FR 64744 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-20

    ... manufacturer of the basic classes of controlled substances listed in schedule I: Drug Schedule Marihuana (7360) I Tetrahydrocannabinols (7370) I The company plans to manufacture small quantities of marihuana derivatives for research purposes. In reference to drug code 7360 (Marihuana), the company plans to bulk...

  3. 75 FR 75496 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-03

    ... controlled substances listed in schedule I and II: Drug Schedule Marijuana (7360) I Tetrahydrocannabinols... customers for non- clinical, laboratory-based research only. In reference to drug code 7360 (Marijuana), the company plans to import synthetic cannabinoid agonists. In reference to drug code 7370...

  4. 75 FR 44285 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... 21661), Almac Clinical Services Inc., (ACSI), 2661 Audubon Road, Audubon, Pennsylvania 19403, made... Services Inc. (ACSI) to import the basic classes of controlled substances is consistent with the public... effect on May 1, 1971, at this time. DEA has investigated Almac Clinical Services Inc. (ACSI) to ensure...

  5. 76 FR 51400 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-18

    ..., Almac Clinical Services Inc., (ACSI), 25 Fretz Road, Souderton, Pennsylvania 18964, made application by... Services Inc. (ACSI) to import the basic classes of controlled substances is consistent with the public... effect on May 1, 1971. DEA has investigated Almac Clinical Services Inc. (ACSI) to ensure that the...

  6. 41 CFR 105-74.610 - Controlled substance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Controlled substance. 105-74.610 Section 105-74.610 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... Administration 74-GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 105-74...

  7. 76 FR 586 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ... importer of the following basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Opium, raw (9600) II Concentrate of Poppy Straw (9670) II Tapentadol (9780) II The company plans to import the Raw Opium (9600) and... under international treaties, conventions, or protocols in effect on May 1, 1971. DEA has investigated...

  8. 75 FR 10312 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration By Notice dated October 20, 2009, and published in the Federal Register on October 28, 2009 (74 FR 55583), Formulation Technologies LLC., 11501 Domain Drive, Suite 130, Austin, Texas 78758, made...

  9. 76 FR 8775 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration By Notice dated November 1, 2010, and published in the Federal Register on November 12, 2010, 75 FR 69459, Formulation Technologies LLC., 11501 Domain Drive, Suite 130, Austin, Texas 78758, made...

  10. [Behavioral-cognitive disorders due to chronic exposure to industrial and environmental toxic substances].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangone, Carlos A; Genovese, Osvaldo; Abel, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    A review of neurotoxics is made, given the low tendency to investigate for chronic exposure to environmental and industrial potential central nervous system toxic substances (heavy metals, insecticides, organic solvents and carbon monoxide) in the history of a patient consulting for behavioral - cognitive complains, and considering the potential overturn of the disease if a correct diagnosis and early treatment is made. to determine the onset of the cognitive - behavioral features, presentation pattern, diagnosis and treatment of such neurotoxics (NT). systematized search in Cochrane and Medline reviews, Embase and Lilacs. chronic exposure to neurotoxics can produce personality changes (sleeping problems, excitation, depression, delusions and hallucinations) as well as cognitive problems (memory, learning, language and cognitive reaction problems). NT may cause changes in the neuron morphology and its sub cellular structures, affecting its normal biochemistry and physiology (proteins and neurotransmitters synthesis). The clinical history, diagnosis and treatment of each neurotoxic are discussed. The NT must be taken in consideration among the possible different etiologies when a patient with a bizarre behavioral cognitive syndrome is examined.

  11. Nutrients and natural toxic substances in commonly consumed Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) tuber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judprasong, Kunchit; Archeepsudcharit, Nidthida; Chantapiriyapoon, Kedsiri; Tanaviyutpakdee, Pharrunrat; Temviriyanukul, Piya

    2018-01-01

    This study determined nutrients, chemical contaminants, (insecticide residues and heavy metals), and natural toxic substances (nitrate, nitrite, cyanide, oxalate, phytate, and trypsin inhibitor) in tubers of Jerusalem artichokes-Kaentawan in the Thai language-grown in four major provinces in Thailand. They were purchased, prepared, homogenized, and freeze-dried for further analysis using standard methods. All Kaentawan samples contained considerable amounts of fructans and dietary fiber (15.4±0.2gand3.2±0.8g/100gfresh weight [FW], respectively), as well as potassium and iron (339±61and0.32±0.05mg/100gFW, respectively). All samples had very low amounts of insecticide residues (37 compounds), cyanide, and trypsin inhibitor, as well as Pb, Cd, nitrate, and nitrite (0.82±0.09, 0.10±0.02, 1.9-17.5, and 0.01-0.24mgkg -1 FW, respectively), in addition to oxalate and phytate (14±9and0.17±0.02mg/100gFW, respectively). This study's data can be used for food composition databases and for safety consumption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Integrated approaches for determination of environmental and human risks of persistent toxic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaha, L.; Cupr, P.; Dusek, L.; Hilscherova, K.; Holoubek, I.; Klanova, J.

    2008-01-01

    Substances that are persistent and bioaccumulative often posses toxic characteristics and cause adverse human health or environmental effects. Basic objective of the long-term research project INCHEMBIOL undertaken by the Centre RECETOX are the complex studies of interactions among chemical compounds present in environmental compartments and their biological effects and studies of the fate of mainly persistent chemical compounds in the environment, their effects on the environment and living organisms including human. Destiny in this concept consists of a summary of transport (from their input in the environment, transport within the environmental compartment, where they are discharged, transport among compartments and long-range transport in the environment) and transformation processes (abiotic and biotic transformations). It also includes study of distribution equilibriums, properties conditioning their environmental behaviour, study of the transformation processes and their products. This complex approach is a part of long-term research activities of the centre RECETOX. In the contribution methods used and results obtained in exploration of the causality among chemical (presence of chemical compounds in the environment) and biological (mechanisms of effects on the living organisms) are described.

  13. Air toxics and the 1990 Clean Air Act: Managing trace element emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, W.; Levin, L.; Miller, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has historically regulated air toxics (hazardous air pollutants) under Section 112 of the Clean Air Act. To date, EPA has established emission standards for 8 hazardous air pollutants (arsenic, asbestos, benzene, beryllium, mercury, radionuclides, coke oven emissions and vinyl chloride). The US electric utility industry was not determined to be a source category requiring regulation for any of the eight chemicals. Of the eight, radionuclides were the last species for which EPA established hazardous emissions standards. In this instance, EPA determined that the risks associated with electric utility fossil fuel power plant emissions were sufficiently low that they should not be regulated. However, the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments require a new evaluation of the electric utility industry emissions of hazardous air pollutants. This paper summarizes the key features of the air toxics provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments, describes EPRI's activities on the subject, and provides some preliminary insights from EPRI's research to date

  14. Effect of toxic substance on delayed competitive allelopathic phytoplankton system with varying parameters through stability and bifurcation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, D.; Mahapatra, G.S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We study a delayed two species competitive system with imprecise biological parameters. • We consider impreciseness in the form of interval number. • We introduce parametric functional form of interval number to study the model. • We study the effect of toxicant and time delay under impreciseness. • We discuss the chaotic behavior of the model. - Abstract: We have studied the combined effect of toxicant and fluctuation of the biological parameters on the dynamical behaviors of a delayed two-species competitive system with imprecise biological parameters. Due to the global increase of harmful phytoplankton blooms, the study of dynamic interactions between two competing phytoplankton species in the presence of toxic substances is an active field of research now days. The ordinary mathematical formulation of models for two competing phytoplankton species, when one or both the species liberate toxic substances, is unable to capture the oscillatory and highly variable growth of phytoplankton populations. The deterministic model never predicts the sudden localized behavior of certain species. These obstacles of mathematical modeling can be overcomed if we include interval variability of biological parameters in our modeling approach. In this investigation, we construct imprecise models of allelopathic interactions between two competing phytoplankton species as a parametric differential equation model. We incorporate the effect of toxicant on the species in two different cases known as toxic inhibition and toxic stimulatory system. We have discussed the existence of various equilibrium points and stability of the system at these equilibrium points. In case of toxic stimulatory system, the delay model exhibits a stable limit cycle oscillation. Analytical findings are supported through exhaustive numerical simulations.

  15. Analysis of the utilization of existing test data for phase-in substance registration under the Act on the Registration and Evaluation, etc. of Chemical Substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bong-In; Kwak, Yeong-Don; Jung, Yu-Mi; Ryu, Byung-Taek; Kim, Chang Gyun

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 2000 phase-in substances are subject to registration according to the Act on the Registration and Evaluation, etc. of Chemical Substances (KREACH), and the expected testing cost is 2.06 trillion Korean won assuming all the test data required for registration are acquired. The extent to which these enormous test costs can be reduced depends on the availability of existing data that can be used to meet the requirements of the K-REACH we examined the current availability of test data that can be used for chemical substance registration. We analyzed the possibility of utilizing the existing test data obtained from 16 reference databases for 369 of 518 kinds of phase-in substances subject to registration that were reported in last October 2014. The physical and chemical properties were available for 57.1% of substances, whereas data regarding human hazards and environmental hazards were available at considerably lower rates, 8.5% and 11.8%, respectively. Physical and chemical properties were available for a fairly high proportion, whereas human hazards and environmental hazards were reported for considerably fewer substances.

  16. Radiation Protection and Control Act, 1982 (South Australia) No.49 of 29 April 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This Act provides for the control of activities related to radioactive substances and radiation apparatus as well as for protection against the harmful effects of ionizing radiation. It also amends the Health Act, 1935-1980 by deleting certain provisions concerning, inter alia, radioactive substances and radiation apparatus. The Act states as its general objective that the competent authorities in the exercise of their duties and any person carrying on activities involving radioactive substances and equipment emitting ionizing radiation shall try to ensure that exposure of persons to ionizing radiation is kept as low as reasonably achievable, social and economic factors being taken into account (the ALARA principle recommended by the International Commission on radiological Protection). (NEA) [fr

  17. Efficiency of using green algae as biological controllers against toxic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Efficiency of using green algae as biological controllers against toxic algal taxa in cultured ... of two green algal species as biological control of the growth of toxic blue-green algae. ... African Journal of Aquatic Science 2014, 39(4): 443–450 ...

  18. Airborne persistent toxic substances (PTSs) in China: occurrence and its implication associated with air pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pu; Zhang, Qinghua; Li, Yingming; Matsiko, Julius; Zhang, Ya; Jiang, Guibin

    2017-08-16

    In recent years, China suffered from extensive air pollution due to the rapidly expanding economic and industrial developments. Its severe impact on human health has raised great concern currently. Persistent toxic substances (PTSs), a large group of environmental pollutants, have also received much attention due to their adverse effects on both the ecosystem and public health. However, limited studies have been conducted to reveal the airborne PTSs associated with air pollution at the national scale in China. In this review, we summarized the occurrence and variation of airborne PTSs in China, especially in megacities. These PTSs included polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), halogenated flame retardants (HFRs), perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals. The implication of their occurrence associated with air pollution was discussed, and the emission source of these chemicals was concluded. Most reviewed studies have been conducted in east and south China with more developed economy and industry. Severe contamination of airborne PTSs generally occurred in megacities with large populations, such as Guangzhou, Shanghai and Beijing. However, the summarized results suggested that industrial production and product consumption are the major sources of most PTSs in the urban environment, while unintentional emission during anthropogenic activities is an important contributor to airborne PTSs. It is important that fine particles serve as a major carrier of most airborne PTSs, which facilitates the long-range atmospheric transport (LRAT) of PTSs, and therefore, increases the exposure risk of the human body to these pollutants. This implied that not only the concentration and chemical composition of fine particles but also the absorbed PTSs are of particular concern when air pollution occurs.

  19. Workshop meeting on State accounting and control system for radioactive substances and waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evseev, V.F.

    2012-01-01

    On 2-6 July 2012, the fifth All-Russian workshop meeting of State Accounting and Control System for Radiation Substances (RS) and Radioactive Wastes (RAW) was conducted. The objective of the workshop was to discuss development of the State Accounting and Control System for RS and RAW in the Russian Federation, current changes to legal acts and regulations that pertain to management of RS and RAW, as well as other issues related to organisation of RS and RAW management activities and promotion of international cooperation [ru

  20. Fast-acting nuclear reactor control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotlyar, O.M.; West, P.B.

    1993-01-01

    A fast-acting nuclear reactor control device is described for controlling a safety control rod within the core of a nuclear reactor, the reactor controlled by a reactor control system, the device comprising: a safety control rod drive shaft and an electromagnetic clutch co-axial with the drive shaft operatively connected to the safety control rod for driving and positioning the safety control rod within or without the reactor core during reactor operation, the safety rod being oriented in a substantially vertical position to allow the rod to fall into the reactor core under the influence of gravity during shutdown of the reactor; the safety control rod drive shaft further operatively connected to a hydraulic pump such that operation of the drive shaft simultaneously drives and positions the safety control rod and operates the hydraulic pump such that a hydraulic fluid is forced into an accumulator, filling the accumulator with oil for the storage and supply of primary potential energy for safety control rod insertion such that the release of potential energy in the accumulator causes hydraulic fluid to flow through the hydraulic pump, converting the hydraulic pump to a hydraulic motor having speed and power capable of full length insertion and high speed driving of the safety control rod into the reactor core; a solenoid valve interposed between the hydraulic pump and the accumulator, said solenoid valve being a normally open valve, actuated to close when the safety control rod is out of the reactor during reactor operation; and further wherein said solenoid opens in response to a signal from the reactor control system calling for shutdown of the reactor and rapid insertion of the safety control rod into the reactor core, such that the opening of the solenoid releases the potential energy in the accumulator to place the safety control rod in a safe shutdown position

  1. 2001 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act SEC 313

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZALOUDEK, D.E.

    2002-01-01

    Pursuant to section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act of 1986 (EPCRA), and Executive Order 13148, Greening the Government Through Leadership in Environmental Management, the US Department of Energy has prepared and submitted a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory for the Hanford Site covering activities performed during calendar year 2001. EPCRA Section 313 requires facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use listed toxic chemicals in quantities exceeding established threshold levels to report total annual releases of those chemicals. During calendar year 2001, Hanford Site activities resulted in one chemical used in amounts exceeding an activity threshold. Accordingly, the Hanford Site 2001 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory, DOE/RL-2002-37, includes total annual amount of lead released to the environment, transferred to offsite locations, and otherwise managed as waste

  2. Time under control: time perspective and desire for control in substance use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieulaine, Nicolas; Martinez, Frederic

    2010-08-01

    To investigate the role of time perspective and desire for control in self-reported substance use and to test for a moderating effect of desire for control in the relation between time perspective and substance use. A random sample of 240 persons, aged 15 years and over, selected in various public spaces in an urban region in central France. Time perspective was measured using subscales of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI, Zimbardo & Boyd, 1999), Desire for control was measured using a translated version of the Desire for Control Scale (DCS, Burger & Cooper, 1979), and substance use was self-reported. After controlling for age and gender, significant links were found between time perspective and substance use. Desire for control did not appear to be directly related to substance use. The interaction effect between TP and desire for control appeared to be related to substance use. There was evidence that the relation between TP and substance use is buffered by low desire for control. This study converges with previous studies demonstrating the relation between TP and substance use, but provides evidence of the moderating role played by desire for control. Desire for control thus appears as worthy of interest in the analysis of self-regulatory process, and further research on the links between TP and various aspects of control is required. In order to be more effective, the design of future studies and interventions based on time-related issues should consider how desire for control plays a part in establishing vulnerability profiles. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparative analysis of the toxic effects of natural toxins and harmful substances produced by conventional processing methods or by irradiation and of toxicity tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlhelm, H.; Arndt, K.; Groeger, G.; Schreiber, G.A.; Boegl, K.W.

    1994-01-01

    In this review, tasks and methods of food toxicology as well as the application of the different toxicity tests for the risk assessment of food ingredients are described. Particular reference is made to short-term genotoxicity tests. Enzymatic digestion and extraction methods for complex foodstuffs which are used in the toxicological testing of foods in in vitro systems are described. Radiolytic products which result from irradiation of foods or components of foodstuffs and corresponding results of toxicity testing are reviewed. Foodstuffs irradiated with doses of up to 10 kGy are regarded as toxicologically safe. A survey of the toxicologically tested irradiated foodstuffs as well as the applied maximum doses are given in tables at the end of chapter 8. Among the great number of toxicological studies of irradiated foods those are especially mentioned which have given rise to discussions on the health risks involved. In addition, the difficulties associated with the testing of toxicity of irradiated foodstuffs in feeding experiments are discussed. Short-term tests used to establish the benotoxicity of irradiated foods and essential results of toxicological testing are also presented in tables. An overview is given of the occurrence, frequency and health risks of natural toxins in foods and harmful substances produced by conventional methods of cooking and preservation, in order to enable a comparison with the health risks of irradiated foods. The relevance of animal experiments and in vitro investigations for the prediction of toxic effects of harmful substances of foodstuffs in man is discussed in the final chapter. (VHE) [de

  4. Double acting stirling engine phase control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchowitz, David M.

    1983-01-01

    A mechanical device for effecting a phase change between the expansion and compression volumes of a double-acting Stirling engine uses helical elements which produce opposite rotation of a pair of crankpins when a control rod is moved, so the phase between two pairs of pistons is changed by +.psi. and the phase between the other two pairs of pistons is changed by -.psi.. The phase can change beyond .psi.=90.degree. at which regenerative braking and then reversal of engine rotation occurs.

  5. Innovations: Alcohol & drug abuse: Narcotics on the net: the availability of Web sites selling controlled substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Robert F

    2006-01-01

    The Internet is not only a vital medium for communication, entertainment, and commerce, but it is also an outlet for illicit drug sales. Although the U.S. Controlled Substances Act regulates access to certain drugs by requiring prescriptions, unique characteristics of the Internet create significant challenges for the enforcement of U.S. drug policies. In the late 1990s "no prescription Web sites" (NPWs) began to emerge, which allow persons to purchase drugs, such as opiates, without a prescription. Given the likely role of NPWs in increasing prescription drug abuse, health care professionals must develop and disseminate strategies for helping patients who are affected by these Web sites.

  6. Rapid bioassay-guided screening of toxic substances in vegetable oils that shorten the life of SHRSP rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewandowski Paul

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been consistently reported that vegetable oils including canola oil have a life shortening effect in Stroke-Prone Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHRSP and this toxic effect is not due to the fatty acid composition of the oil. Although it is possible that the phytosterol content or type of phytosterol present in vegetable oils may play some role in the life shortening effect observed in SHRSP rats this is still not completely resolved. Furthermore supercritical CO2 fractionation of canola oil with subsequent testing in SHRSP rats identified safe and toxic fractions however, the compounds responsible for life shortening effect were not characterised. The conventional approach to screen toxic substances in oils using rats takes more than six months and involves large number of animals. In this article we describe how rapid bioassay-guided screening could be used to identify toxic substances derived from vegetable oils and/or processed foods fortified with vegetable oils. The technique incorporates sequential fractionation of oils/processed foods and subsequent treatment of human cell lines that can be used in place of animal studies to determine cytotoxicity of the fractions with structural elucidation of compounds of interest determined via HPLC-MS and GC-MS. The rapid bioassay-guided screening proposed would require two weeks to test multiple fractions from oils, compared with six months if animal experiments were used to screen toxic effects. Fractionation of oil before bio-assay enhances the effectiveness of the detection of active compounds as fractionation increases the relative concentration of minor components.

  7. Group psycho-education in patients with bipolar disorder associated with a dependency of toxic substances in patients who are in abstinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia González Alegre

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The high comorbility that exists among psychiatric disorders and addictive is important. In the latest years it is produced an increase of the sensibility related to this problem. A great deal it is due to the demand of Mental Health Services and also due to drug dependency, as a consequence of the lack of an integral approach. Because of this fact and because of the mentioned demand, we though it should be pertinent developing a research project in order to check if the carrying the psycho-educative preventive group project out in patients with a diagnose of bipolar disorder with an abuse of drugs history and/or dependency of toxic substance in abstinence at the moment influents in a positive way in the course of the number of relapses in the toxic consumption during at least six months subsequent to the intervention. And at this way, these patients will purchase a greater consciousness of the important of healthy habits in the bipolar disorder and the recovery in the toxic substance abuse. The program will be developed in an experimental research where the patients will be randomly assigned in group control/ experimentally, the intervention will last twenty sessions, each session will be an hour and a half long and will be held weekly. In these sessions we will deal with topics related to the psychiatric disorder and the toxic consume. At the same time we will bank on the development of practical relaxation workshops on in some of the sessions with the object of providing a resource in view of stress situations.

  8. Export Mechanisms of Persistent Toxic Substances (PTSs) in Urban Land Uses during Rainfall-Runoff Events: Experimental and Modeling Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y.; Luo, X.; Lin, Z.

    2016-12-01

    The urban environment has a variety of Persistent Toxic Substances (PTS), such as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and mercury. Soil in pervious lands and dust deposited on impervious surfaces are two major sinks of PTSs in urbanized areas, which could contribute significant nonpoint source loadings of PTSs to adjacent waterbodies during rainfall-runoff events and therefore jeopardize aquatic ecosystems. However, PTSs have been much less understood regarding their export mechanisms in urban land uses, and efforts to model nonpoint source pollution processes of PTSs have been rare. We designed and performed in-lab rainfall-runoff simulation experiments to investigate transport of PAHs and mercury by runoff from urban soils. Organic petrology analysis (OPA) techniques were introduced to analyze the soil and sediment compositions. Our study revealed the limitation of the classic enrichment theory which attributes enrichment of pollutants in eroded sediment solely to the sediment's particle size distribution and adopts simple relationships between enrichment ratio and sediment flux. We found that carbonaceous materials (CMs) in soil are the direct and major sorbents for PAHs and mercury, and highly different in content, mobility and adsorption capacity for the PTSs. Anthropogenic CMs like black carbon components largely control the transport of soil PAHs, while humic substances have a dominant influence on the transport of soil mercury. A model was further developed to estimate the enrichment ratio of PAHs, which innovatively applies the fugacity concept.We also conducted field studies on export of PAHs by runoff from urban roads. A variable time-step model was developed to simulate the continuous cycles of PAH buildup and washoff on urban roads. The dependence of the pollution level on antecedent weather conditions was investigated and embodied in the model. The applicability of this approach and its value to environmental management was demonstrated by a case

  9. Persistent toxic substances released from uncontrolled e-waste recycling and actions for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Ming; Naidu, Ravi; Wong, Ming H

    2013-10-01

    The Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movement of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal was adopted on March 22, 1989 and enforced on May 5, 1992. Since then, the USA, one of the world's largest e-waste producers, has not ratified this Convention or the Basel Ban Amendment. Communities are still debating the legal loophole, which permits the export of whole products to other countries provided it is not for recycling. In January 2011, China's WEEE Directive was implemented, providing stricter control over e-waste imports to China, including Hong Kong, while emphasizing that e-waste recycling is the producers' responsibility. China is expected to supersede the USA as the principal e-waste producer, by 2020, according to the UNEP. Uncontrolled e-waste recycling activities generate and release heavy metals and POPs into the environment, which may be re-distributed, bioaccumulated and biomagnified, with potentially adverse human health effects. Greater efforts and scientific approaches are needed for future e-product designs of minimal toxic metal and compound use, reaping greater benefits than debating the definition and handling responsibilities of e-waste recycling. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A guide for controlling consumer products containing radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Consumer products are considered regardless of the purpose for which the radionuclide is added. For example, the purpose may be to make use of the ionising radiation emitted by the substance in the product itself (e.g. radioluminescent devices antistatic devices and ionisation chamber smoke detectors), or to make use of some other property of the material where the presence of radiation in the final product is merely adventitious (e.g. thorium gas mantles, ceramics with uranium glazes, and products containing radioactive tracers added to facilitate manufacturing and inspection processes). The Guide does not cover some products containing natural radioactive substances which have not been intentionally added, such as building materials. The Guide does not cover medicinal products and pharmaceuticals, nuclear powered cardiac pacemakers, or electronic equipment, such as television receivers, that emit X-rays. Unlike the 1970 Guide, this Guide does not consider those products, such as EXIT signs, containing gaseous tritium light sources, that would not be supplied directly to members of the public. The Guide is concerned mainly with the exposure arising from consumer products of those persons who are not subject to any regulatory controls for purposes of radiation protection in normal circumstances. Members of the public come under this heading, but not workers involved in the manufacture of consumer products. These workers will normally be subject to separate control. Radiological protection concepts and policy for the control of radioactive consumer products and licensing and post-licensing surveillance are developed

  11. Radiation Protection and Control Act, 1982, No. 47 of 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    These regulations provide for the control, administration, possession and use of radiating substances and irradiating apparatus. They contain detailed provisions concerning the licensing, sale, registration and maintenance of irradiating apparatus and radioactive substances. Provisions address the therapeutic and research purposes of radioactive substances and irradiating apparatus, as well as requirements for monitoring, record-keeping and medical examinations. Also included are detailed procedures for radiation accidents and emergencies. These Regulations revoke the Radioactive Substances and Irradiating Apparatus Regulations, 1962, and the Ionizing Radiation (radioactive ores) Regulations, 1982. (NEA) [fr

  12. The relevance of national and international initiatives on toxic substances to the management of hazardous air pollutants in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buccini, J.

    2001-03-30

    The Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME), seeking guidance on current and emerging national and international initiatives, activities, and programs that could impact on the management of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) in Canada, commissioned the author to prepare this document. In this report, HAPs are defined as toxic substances subject to airborne transport as a significant route of environmental distribution and/or exposure. Heavy metals and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) were included in this definition. A model, known as toxics cycle, represented the four distinct stages of the process of selecting substances for risk assessment and management: problem identification and priority setting, risk assessment, risk management, and monitoring and evaluation. A large number of international activities were reviewed, such as research, hazard and risk assessment, risk management, and monitoring and surveillance programs. The present report only deals with the programs that had been identified in the National Air Issues Coordinating Committee-Other Air Issues (NAICC-A) of the CCME report published in 1999 and which had recent or foreseen impacts. Five bi-lateral and multi-lateral agreements on persistent toxic substances, as well as national, regional and global programs, activities, and initiatives concerning the assessment of the hazards and risks of chemicals and actions were reviewed. It was recommended that initiatives at all levels continue to be monitored and that Environment Canada continue to be the conduit of information at the international level. Issues and opportunities must be identified by all jurisdictions with regard to risk management. It was suggested by the author that risk assessment be conducted by Environment Canada and the attention of the HAP group be drawn on specific topics as required. 2 tabs., 1 fig.

  13. Notification: Background Investigation Services EPA’s Efforts to Incorporate Environmental Justice Into Clean Air Act Inspections for Air Toxics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OPE-FY14-0017, March 7, 2014. The OIG plans to begin the preliminary research phase of an evaluation of the EPA's efforts to incorporate environmental justice into Clean Air Act (CAA) inspections for air toxics.

  14. Estudo de metais e de substâncias tóxicas em brinquedos Toys contamined by toxic substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiane Zini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the present study is the analysis of toxic elements in plastic toys commercialized in Brazil. Metals like cadmium, lead, chromium, zinc, and aluminum, along with organic substances, such as phthalates, were identified in different toys by quantitative analytical techniques. Traces of thorium were detected in one of the studied samples. Although the measured radioactive dose was rather low, the presence of such a radioactive contaminant is against to the International Agency of Atomic Energy regulations. Similar toys manufactured in Brazil were analyzed and found to observe the standards defined by the National Institute of Metrology (Inmetro.

  15. 40 CFR 82.4 - Prohibitions for class I controlled substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... violation of this subpart. Any person selling unused class I controlled substances produced or imported... substances. 82.4 Section 82.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Prohibitions for class I controlled substances. (a)(1) Prior to January 1, 1996, for all Groups of class I...

  16. On the impact of second generation mating and offspring in multi-generation reproductive toxicity studies on classification and labelling of substances in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rorije, Emiel; Muller, André; Beekhuijzen, Manon E.W.

    2011-01-01

    The possible impact on classification and labelling decisions of effects observed in second generation parental (P1) and offspring (F2) parameters in multi-generation studies was investigated. This was done for 50 substances classified as reproductive toxicants in Europe, for which a multi-genera...... and reduced animal use, provide strong further support for replacement of the classical two-generation reproductive toxicity study by the EOGRTS in regulatory reproductive toxicity assessment....

  17. 77 FR 34069 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Research Triangle Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... Carfentanil (9743) II Coca Leaves (9040) II Cocaine (9041) II Codeine (9050) II Dextropropoxyphene, bulk (non... substances listed in schedule I or II, which fall under the authority of section 1002(a)(2)(B) of the Act (21...

  18. 78 FR 21858 - Schedules of Controlled Substances: Temporary Placement of Three Synthetic Cannabinoids Into...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    ...), FDA acts as the lead agency within HHS in carrying out the Secretary's scheduling responsibilities... mixtures of these substances for the purpose of achieving intoxication has been identified as a reason for...

  19. 78 FR 28735 - Schedules of Controlled Substances: Temporary Placement of Three Synthetic Cannabinoids Into...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ... Abuse (NIDA), FDA acts as the lead agency within HHS in carrying out the Secretary's scheduling... of these substances for the purpose of achieving intoxication has been identified as a reason for...

  20. Substance use pattern, self-control and social network are associated with crime in a substance-using population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skjaervø, Ingeborg; Skurtveit, Svetlana; Clausen, Thomas; Bukten, Anne

    2017-03-01

    Crime rates are high in substance-using populations; therefore, investigation of factors associated with crime in these populations is highly relevant. We describe crime prevalence and associations between crime, pattern of substance use and psychosocial factors, such as self-control and social network. This is a cross-sectional study including substance users (n = 549; mean age 34 years; 27% women) entering treatment at 21 treatment centres across Norway (December 2012 to April 2015). Data on demographics, substance use, psychosocial variables and crime in the 6 months prior to treatment were obtained through interviews. Adjusted odds ratios (aOR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated through logistic regression. Sixty-four percent of participants had committed crime in the 6 months prior to treatment. Of these, 93% committed income-generating crime. Several factors were associated with increased likelihood of having committed crime: use of stimulants (aOR = 1.82, 95% CI 1.04-3.17), use of a higher number of different substances (aOR = 1.16, 95% CI 1.04-1.31) and spending most of their time with family or friends using addictive substances (aOR = 2.38, 95% CI 1.10-5.16 and aOR = 2.22, 95% CI 1.32-3.73). Protective factors associated with decreased likelihood of committing crime were being older (aOR = 0.95, 95% CI 0.92-0.97) and having higher self-control (aOR = 0.94, 95% CI 0.91-0.97). Stimulant use, higher number of different substances used, lower self-control, primarily a substance-using social network and being younger were associated with crime in this substance-using population. Treatment clinics should consider these risk factors for crime, and suitable interventions should be implemented and evaluated. [Skjaervø I, Skurtveit S, Clausen T, Bukten A. Substance use pattern, self-control and social network are associated with crime in a substance-using population. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017;36:245-252]. © 2016

  1. Nuclear safety and control act, chapter 9: An Act to establish the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission and to make consequential amendements to other Acts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this Act is to provide for: the limitation, to a reasonable level and in a manner that is consistent with Canada's international obligations, of the risks to national security, the health and safety of persons and the environment that are associated with the development, production and use of nuclear energy and the production, possession and use of nuclear substances, prescribed equipment and prescribed information; and the implementation in Canada of measures to which Canada has agreed respecting international control of the development, production and use of nuclear energy, including the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons and nuclear explosive devices

  2. Plasma exchange combining with plasma bilirubin adsorption effectively removes toxic substances and improves liver functions of hepatic failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, X-Q; Li, Z-Q; Chen, Z; Guo, D; Jia, Q-Y; Jiang, S-C; Cai, J

    2018-02-01

    Hepatic failure (HF) is a kind of complex disease characterizing with liver dysfunction and a few clinical complications. Artificial liver support system (ALSS) has been applied to HF patients to improve dysfunctional liver in recent years. This study aims to evaluate therapeutic effects of ALSS approaches, including plasma exchange (PE), plasma diafiltration (PDF) and plasma bilirubin adsorption (PBA), on liver function of HF patients. This study is a retrospective analysis involving 516 patients diagnosed as HF between February 2014 and February 2015. Patients were randomly divided into PE, PDF, PE plus PBA, and PDF plus PBA group. Meanwhile, single-drug group and combined-drug group were also divided. The liver functions, capability of removing toxic substances and coagulation functions were evaluated both pre-treatment and post-treatment. The side effects and hospital improvement rate were also observed post-treatment. Hospital improvement rate achieves to 69.6%. TBIL levels and MELD scores were significantly decreased post-treatment compared to pre-treatment (phigher compared to PE and PDF group (p=0.002, 0.002, respectively). MELD scores were significantly decreased post-treatment compared to pre-treatment in each group (pbetter role in removing toxic substances, improving liver functions of HF patients.

  3. Applicability of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) to releases of radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, S.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), commonly called Superfund, provided a $1.6 billion fund (financed by a tax on petrochemical feedstocks and crude oil and by general revenues) for the cleanup of releases of hazardous substances, including source, special nuclear or byproduct material, and other radioactive substances, from mostly inactive facilities. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is authorized to require private responsible parties to clean up releases of hazardous substances, or EPA, at its option, may undertake the cleanup with monies from the Fund and recover the monies through civil actions brought against responsible parties. CERCLA imposes criminal penalties for noncompliance with its reporting requirements. This paper will overview the key provisions of CERCLA which apply to the cleanup of radioactive materials

  4. Use of genetic toxicity data in GHS mutagenicity classification and labeling of substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Nicholas S; Hollnagel, Heli M

    2017-06-01

    One of the key outcomes of testing the potential genotoxicity or mutagenicity of a substance is the conclusion on whether the substance should be classified as a germ cell mutagen and the significance of this for other endpoints such as carcinogenicity. The basis for this conclusion are the criteria presented in classification and labelling systems such as the Globally Harmonized System for classification and labeling (GHS). This article reviews the classification criteria for germ cell mutagenicity and carcinogenicity and how they are applied to substances with evidence of mutagenicity. The implications and suitability of such a classification for hazard communication, risk assessment, and risk management are discussed. It is proposed that genotoxicity assessments should not focus on specifically identifying germ cell mutagens, particularly given the challenges associated with communicating this information in a meaningful way. Rather the focus should be on deriving data to characterize the mode of action and for use in the risk assessment of mutagens, which could then feed into a more robust, risk based management of mutagenic substances versus the current more hazard based approaches. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:354-360, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. 77 FR 18248 - Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry; Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-27

    ... prevent some unfavorable child and maternal health outcomes. There are important health differences... the Navajo Nation, ATSDR decided that the upcoming study must include education of women and their families about the importance of prenatal care and the potential poor health risks associated with exposure...

  6. HABIT, Toxic and Radioactive Release Hazards in Reactor Control Room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stage, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: HABIT is a package of computer codes designed to be used for the evaluation of control room habitability in the event of an accidental release of toxic chemicals or radioactive materials. 2 - Methods: Given information about the design of a nuclear power plant, a scenario for the release of toxic or radionuclides, and information about the air flows and protection systems of the control room, HABIT can be used to estimate the chemical exposure or radiological dose to control room personnel

  7. DNA repair: As influenced by age, nutrition, and exposure to toxic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, R.; Chou, Ming; Feuers, R.; Leakey, J.; Duffy, P.; Lyn-Cook, B.; Lipman, J.; Makamura, Kenji; Turturro, A.; Allaben, W.

    1992-01-01

    In evaluating the risk associated with low levels of exposure to toxicants, it is clear that DNA repair, one of the main defenses against agent damage, is not a constant. It can be modified by age, time of day, and physiological state. Nutrition, especially caloric restriction (CR), can modify almost every step in the process of protecting genomic integrity. And history of exposure can modify DNA repair. Thus, the conditions of exposure are almost as important to toxicity as the exposure itself, even at the level of DNA repair. Extrapolation from high to low dose, to be consistent with what is known, should be less a mathematical exercise than an exercise in toxicological judgement, which puts the exposure in proper perspective. This appears to be true at almost every level in the process including a response with a toxic stimulus, even those thought to be very basic, such as DNA repair

  8. 45 CFR 2543.86 - Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution... Water Pollution Control Act. Contracts and subgrants of amounts in excess of $100,000 shall contain a... regulations issued pursuant to the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.) and the Federal Water Pollution...

  9. Sorbents for waste water purification from radionuclides and other toxic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddalone, R.F.; MakKlenason, L.Ts.

    1996-01-01

    The TRW firm (USA) developed the system for sorption and disposal of radionuclides, heavy metals and organic substances, based on utilization of carbon sorbents. The sorbent is produced through processing natural coal by alkali-salt solution and has a large specific pores surface (up to 1000 m 2 /g). The sorbent carboxyl ionogenic groups are able of absorbing heavy metals cations from waste waters. Sorption by uranium constituted 30 mg/l. The sorbent with absorbed substances may be burnt (it contains no sulfur) or delivered for vitrification. The volume of disposed materials constitutes in comparison with existing techniques for uranium isotopes 420000 : 1. The costs are reduced up to 0.26 doll/m 2 of reprocessed water. 2 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  10. The pT-value as environmental policy indicator for the exposure to toxic substances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slooff W; de Zwart D

    1991-01-01

    This report contains a proposal for an indicator to measure the effectivity of the environmental policy with regard to the theme "Verspreiding" of the Directorate-General for Environmental Protection. It is recommended to use a method which indicates the toxicity of organic pollutants as

  11. Schedules of Controlled Substances: Placement of FDA-Approved Products of Oral Solutions Containing Dronabinol [(-)-delta-9-trans-

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-22

    This final rule adopts without changes an interim final rule with request for comments published in the Federal Register on March 23, 2017. On July 1, 2016, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a new drug application for Syndros, a drug product consisting of dronabinol [(-)-delta-9-trans-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC)] oral solution. The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) maintains FDA-approved products of oral solutions containing dronabinol in schedule II of the Controlled Substances Act.

  12. Update to agency for toxic substances and disease registry 2012 report on assessment of biota exposure to mercury originating from Savannah River Site.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhne, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-08-10

    The purpose of this report is to 1) update previous Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) assessment reports (Kvartek et al. 1994 and Halverson et al. 2008) on the fate of mercury in the Savannah River Site (SRS) environment and 2) address comments and recommendations from the review of SRS by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) concerning the evaluation of exposures to contaminants in biota originating from the SRS. The ATSDR reviewed and evaluated data from SRS, South Carolina Department of Health & Environmental Control (SCDHEC) and the Georgia Department of Natural Resources (GDNR) concerning the non-radioactive contaminant mercury. This report will provide a response and update to conclusions and recommendations made by the ATSDR.

  13. Materials Safety Data Sheets: the basis for control of toxic chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketchen, E.E.; Porter, W.E.

    1979-09-01

    The Material Safety Data Sheets contained in this volume are the basis for the Toxic Chemical Control Program developed by the Industrial Hygiene Department, Health Division, ORNL. The three volumes are the update and expansion of ORNL/TM-5721 and ORNL/TM-5722 Material Safety Data Sheets: The Basis for Control of Toxic Chemicals, Volume I and Volume II. As such, they are a valuable adjunct to the data cards issued with specific chemicals. The chemicals are identified by name, stores catalog number where appropriate, and sequence numbers from the NIOSH Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances, 1977 Edition, if available. The data sheets were developed and compiled to aid in apprising the employees of hazards peculiar to the handling and/or use of specific toxic chemicals. Space limitation necessitate the use of descriptive medical terms and toxicological abbreviations. A glossary and an abbreviation list were developed to define some of those sometimes unfamiliar terms and abbreviations. The page numbers are keyed to the catalog number in the chemical stores at ORNL.

  14. Impact of certain household micropollutants on bacterial behavior. Toxicity tests/study of extracellular polymeric substances in sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquini, Laure [Laboratoire Environnement et Minéralurgie-CNRS, Université de Lorraine, 15 Avenue du Charmois, 54501 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France); Merlin, Christophe [Laboratoire de Chimie, Physique et Microbiologie pour l' Environnement-CNRS, Université de Lorraine, 15 Avenue du Charmois, 54501 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France); Hassenboehler, Lucille [Laboratoire Environnement et Minéralurgie-CNRS, Université de Lorraine, 15 Avenue du Charmois, 54501 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France); Munoz, Jean-François [Laboratoire d' Hydrologie de Nancy, ANSES, 40 rue Lionnois, 54000 Nancy (France); Pons, Marie-Noëlle [Laboratoire Réactions et Génie des Procédés-CNRS, Université de Lorraine, 1 Rue Grandville, 54001 Nancy Cedex (France); Görner, Tatiana [Laboratoire Environnement et Minéralurgie-CNRS, Université de Lorraine, 15 Avenue du Charmois, 54501 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France)

    2013-10-01

    The impact of eight household micropollutants (erythromycin, ofloxacin, ibuprofen, 4-nonylphenol, triclosan, sucralose, PFOA and PFOS (PFAAs)) on the laboratory bacterial strain Escherichia coli MG1655 and on activated sludge from an urban wastewater treatment plant was studied. Growth-based toxicity tests on E. coli were performed for each micropollutants. The effect of micropollutants on activated sludge (at concentrations usually measured in wastewater up to concentrations disturbing the bacterial growth of E. coli) was examined in batch reactors and by comparison to a control reactor (without micropollutants). The bound extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) secreted by the sludge were measured by size exclusion chromatography and their overexpression was considered as an indicator of bacteria sensitivity to environmental changes. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) and the ammonium concentration were monitored to evaluate the biomass ability to remove the macropollution. Some micropollutants induced an increase of bound EPS in activated sludge flocs at concentrations depending on the micropollutant: erythromycin from 100 μg/L, ofloxacin from 10 μg/L, triclosan from 0.5 μg/L, 4-nonylphenol from 5000 μg/L and PFAAs from 0.1 μg/L. This suggests that the biomass had to cope with new conditions. Moreover, at high concentrations of erythromycin (10 mg/L) and ibuprofen (5 mg/L) bacterial populations were no longer able to carry out the removal of macropollution. Ibuprofen induced a decrease of bound EPS at all the studied concentrations, probably reflecting a decrease of general bacterial activity. The biomass was not sensitive to sucralose in terms of EPS production, however at very high concentration (1 g/L) it inhibited the COD decrease. Micropollution removal was also assessed. Ibuprofen, erythromycin, ofloxacin, 4-nonylphenol and triclosan were removed from wastewater, mainly by biodegradation. Sucralose and PFOA were not removed from wastewater at all, and

  15. Impact of certain household micropollutants on bacterial behavior. Toxicity tests/study of extracellular polymeric substances in sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquini, Laure; Merlin, Christophe; Hassenboehler, Lucille; Munoz, Jean-François; Pons, Marie-Noëlle; Görner, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    The impact of eight household micropollutants (erythromycin, ofloxacin, ibuprofen, 4-nonylphenol, triclosan, sucralose, PFOA and PFOS (PFAAs)) on the laboratory bacterial strain Escherichia coli MG1655 and on activated sludge from an urban wastewater treatment plant was studied. Growth-based toxicity tests on E. coli were performed for each micropollutants. The effect of micropollutants on activated sludge (at concentrations usually measured in wastewater up to concentrations disturbing the bacterial growth of E. coli) was examined in batch reactors and by comparison to a control reactor (without micropollutants). The bound extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) secreted by the sludge were measured by size exclusion chromatography and their overexpression was considered as an indicator of bacteria sensitivity to environmental changes. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) and the ammonium concentration were monitored to evaluate the biomass ability to remove the macropollution. Some micropollutants induced an increase of bound EPS in activated sludge flocs at concentrations depending on the micropollutant: erythromycin from 100 μg/L, ofloxacin from 10 μg/L, triclosan from 0.5 μg/L, 4-nonylphenol from 5000 μg/L and PFAAs from 0.1 μg/L. This suggests that the biomass had to cope with new conditions. Moreover, at high concentrations of erythromycin (10 mg/L) and ibuprofen (5 mg/L) bacterial populations were no longer able to carry out the removal of macropollution. Ibuprofen induced a decrease of bound EPS at all the studied concentrations, probably reflecting a decrease of general bacterial activity. The biomass was not sensitive to sucralose in terms of EPS production, however at very high concentration (1 g/L) it inhibited the COD decrease. Micropollution removal was also assessed. Ibuprofen, erythromycin, ofloxacin, 4-nonylphenol and triclosan were removed from wastewater, mainly by biodegradation. Sucralose and PFOA were not removed from wastewater at all, and

  16. Review of the use of Ceramium tenuicorne growth inhibition test for testing toxicity of substances, effluents, products sediment and soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Britta

    2017-08-01

    A growth inhibition test has been developed based on two clones of the red macroalga Ceramium tenuicorne, one originating from 7 PSU and the other from 20 PSU. The species can be adapted to different salinities and the test can be carried out between 4 and 32 PSU. This test became an ISO standard in 2010 (ISO 107 10) for testing of chemicals and water effluents. In this study new and published data has been compiled on toxicity of single substances, waste waters from pulp mills, leachates from antifouling paints, harbour sediments and soil used for maintenance of leisure boats. The results show that the alga is sensitive to both metals and organic compounds and to biocides used in antifouling paints. By testing leachates from antifouling paints these could be ranked according to their toxicity. Similarly, the toxicity of waste waters from pulp mills was determined and the efficiency of secondary treatment evaluated. Further, the test method proved useful to test the toxicity in sediment samples. Sediments from small town harbours and ship lanes were shown to be harmful and compounds originating from antifouling paints were responsible for a large part of the inhibiting effect. The alga proved to be sensitive to contaminants leaking from boat yard soil. The growth inhibition test is a robust test that has high repeatability and reproducibility and easily can be applied on water, soil and sediment samples without being too costly. The species is found worl-wide in temperate waters, which makes the results relevant for large areas. In the Baltic Sea C. tenuicorne is the most common red alga species and is thus particularly relevant for this area. The overall results show that contaminants from boat activities and the use of antifouling paints in particular pose a threat to the environment.

  17. ABILITY OF ECOSAR, TOPKAT, NEURAL NETWORKS, AND ASTER TO PREDICT TOXICITY OF CHEMICALS TO AQUATIC BIOTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA) which provides the basis for assessing and managing toxic substances in Canada, is being revised. Several new mandates have been introduced in the Act...

  18. Mixture and single-substance toxicity of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors toward algae and crustaceans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne Munch; Faaborg-Andersen, S.; Ingerslev, Flemming

    2007-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are used as antidepressant medications. primarily in the treatment of clinical depression. They are among the pharmaceuticals most often Prescribed in the industrialized countries. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are compounds with an identi......Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are used as antidepressant medications. primarily in the treatment of clinical depression. They are among the pharmaceuticals most often Prescribed in the industrialized countries. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are compounds...... with an identical mechanism of action in mammals (inhibit reuptake of serotonin), and they have been found in different aqeous as well as biological samples collected in the environment. In the present study, we tested the toxicities of five SSRIs (citalopram, fluoxetine, fluoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline.......027 to 1.6 mg/L, and in daphnids, test EC50s ranged from 0.92 to 20 mg/L, with sertraline being one of the most toxic compounds. The test design and statistical analysis of results from mixture tests were based on isobole analysis. It was demonstrated that the mixture toxicity of the SSRIs in the two...

  19. Use of environmental health-risk analysis for managing toxic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKone, T.E.

    1985-03-01

    This paper presents a set of simple models used to assess health risks based on toxicity, environmental mobility and persistence. These models use a representative landscape in order to describe the steady-state distribution of arsenic, tritiated water, and TCDD as a result of continuous additions to soil. This information is used to assess potential exposures. Application of the screening model to three chemically different carcinogens reveals that the environmental health risk does not scale with direct measures of toxicity. As estimated here, the environmental health risk of TCDD relative to tritiated water and arsenic is roughly an order of magnitude less than its cancer potency relative to these compounds. The difference is attributable in large part to the immobility of TCDD relative to tritium and the lower persistence of TCDD compared to arsenic. The purpose is to present a simple procedure for using the relative behavior of toxic species under prototype conditions as a basis for risk management. 21 refs., 4 tabs

  20. QSAR pre-screen of 70,983 substances for genotoxic carcinogenicity, mutagenicity and developmental toxicity in the EU FP7 project ChemScreen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedebye, Eva Bay; Dybdahl, Marianne; Nikolov, Nikolai Georgiev

    2014-01-01

    be performed in REACH on known genotoxic carcinogens or germ cell mutagens with appropriate risk management measures implemented, a QSAR pre-screen for genotoxic carcinogenicity, germ cell mutagenicity and (limited) developmental toxicity was included in the project. Predictions for estrogenic and anti...... algorithms were applied to combine the predictions from the individual models to reach overall predictions for genotoxic carcinogenicity, germ cell mutagenicity and developmental toxicity. Furthermore, the full list of REACH pre-registered substances (143,835) was searched for substances containing certain...

  1. 78 FR 55099 - Established Aggregate Production Quotas for Schedule I and II Controlled Substances and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-09

    ... aggregate production quotas, an additional 25% of the estimated medical, scientific, and research needs as... Production Quotas for Schedule I and II Controlled Substances and Established Assessment of Annual Needs for... initial 2014 aggregate production quotas for controlled substances in Schedules I and II of the Controlled...

  2. The toxic exposure of flamingos to per- and Polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) from firefighting foam applications in Bonaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Pepijn; Slijkerman, Diana M E; Kwadijk, Christiaan J A F; Kotterman, Michiel J J; Posthuma, Leo; de Zwart, Dick; Murk, Albertinka J; Foekema, Edwin M

    2017-11-15

    In 2010 an oil terminal next to nature reservation Saliña Goto (Bonaire) caught fire. Firefighting resulted in elevated per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) concentrations in the salt lake. Within months flamingo abundance in Goto dropped to near complete absence. After statistical analysis, rainfall was deemed an unlikely cause for this decline. Toxicological effects on abundance of prey are likely the main cause for the flamingo absence. This reduced PFAS exposure via food and thus risk towards flamingos during the first years after the fires. Although the sediment is still polluted with persistent PFAS, flamingos returned, and started to feed on organisms with PFAS levels that exceed safety thresholds, placing the birds and other wildlife at risk. Monitoring bird populations is advised to assess potential toxic effects on birds and their offspring. This case suggests that applying persistent chemicals to reduce incident impacts may be more harmful than the incident itself. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Ingestible capsule for remote controlled release of a substance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The application relates to an ingestible capsule (102) for delivery of a substance e.g. a pharmaceutical drug, to a human or animal. The ingestible capsule comprises a capsule wall structure (202) forming a substantially sealed reservoir or lumen holding the substance (204). An electrical resonance...

  4. Clearing of toxic substances: are there differences between the available liver support devices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krisper, Peter; Stadlbauer, Vanessa; Stauber, Rudolf E

    2011-09-01

    Toxins accumulating in liver failure split into water solved (e.g. ammonia) and albumin bound substances (e.g. bilirubin). Because the latter cannot be removed by conventional haemodialysis, special liver support systems have been developed. The majority of data concerning elimination efficiency exist for the cell-free devices Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS) and Prometheus, as they have been commercially available in Europe since many years. Overall, Prometheus provides higher clearances for most liver toxins, especially if they are tightly albumin bound. However, for bile acids and cytokines no such differences could be found. Single pass albumin dialysis (SPAD) can be assumed to be equally effective as MARS. None of the bioartificial liver support systems being developed is on the market today and published clearance data are scarce. In general, clearance efficiency for albumin bound substances is relatively low in all systems currently available. Besides optimizing biocompatibility and selectivity, future technologies should also focus on improved detoxification efficiency of liver support devices. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Assessment of the levels of potentially toxic substances around a transect of anthrosols in Aqaba shoreline, Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahsha, Mohammad; Al-Rousan, Saber; Al-Jawasreh, Raid

    2016-04-01

    Soils are the major sink for potentially toxic substances (PTSs) such as heavy metals released into the environment by emissions from the quickly increasing of human impact including industrial mine tailings, disposal of high metal wastes, land misuse, wastewater irrigation, spillage of petrochemicals, and atmospheric deposition. The present study concerns the properties variability and soil biological health status in abandoned salt transportation port site in the Jordanian coast of the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea. Seven sites were selected according to different morphological and pedological conditions, anthropogenic impact and the same climate conditions. Successively, all locations were sampled for topsoil in the period between spring-summer 2014. Field observations as well as laboratory analysis including heavy metal concentrations (Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn); soil chemo-physical parameters (pH, soil dry mass, carbonate, water holding, organic carbon content, soil particle size distribution), and quality of soil's biological community were determined. The anthropogenic influence related to former port activity on soils of the studied area is evident. Soils in the studied area site are highly contaminated by PTSs, mainly Cu and Zn, by 648, 298.6 mgKg-1respectively. Former activities proved to affect the microarthropods community altering both quantity and quality of soil and the chemo-physical structure of the microhabitats. The evaluation of soil biological quality index (QBS-ar) of the surface horizons from the study area is demonstrated that the area is "sufferings" since it is affected by PTSs contamination resulting in a failure in the ecological success of secondary recolonization after abandonment. However, there is an increasing need for further research in the soils of Aqaba focusing on soil health management , combining QBS-ar index with soil chemo-physical properties. Key words: Potentially Toxic Substances, Heavy Metals, Soil Quality.

  6. Current Status of Air Toxics Management and Its Strategies for Controlling Emissions in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Tien Tsai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1970s, hazardous air pollutants (HAPs, so-called air toxics, have been of great concern because they can cause serious human health effects and have adverse effects on the environment. More noticeably, some of them are known to be human carcinogens. The objective of this paper is to investigate the regulatory systems and human health effects of air toxics which have been designated by the Taiwan government under the Air Pollution Control Act. These toxic air pollutants include acutely toxic gas (i.e., ammonia, chlorine, fluorides, hydrochloric acid, hydrogen cyanide, hydrogen sulfide, nitric acid, phosphoric acid and sulfuric acid, gas containing heavy metals, and carcinogenic chemicals (including formaldehyde, vinyl chloride, asbestos and matter containing asbestos, dioxins and furans, volatile organic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls. In line with international concern about the carcinogenic risk and environmental persistence of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs and heavy metals in recent years, the current status in monitoring and reducing the emissions of PCDDs/PCDFs from stationary sources was analyzed as a case study in the present study. Furthermore, the control strategies for reducing emissions of air toxics from stationary sources in Taiwan were also addressed.

  7. Defusing the Toxics Threat: Controlling Pesticides and Industrial Waste. Worldwatch Paper 79.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postel, Sandra

    The use of pesticides in agriculture and the discarding of industrial chemical waste into the air, soil, and water constitute two major pathways of human exposure to toxic substances. It is argued that these practices release hundreds of millions of tons of potentially hazardous substances into the environment each year. Speculation continues into…

  8. Use of computer-assisted prediction of toxic effects of chemical substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon-Hettich, Brigitte; Rothfuss, Andreas; Steger-Hartmann, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The current revision of the European policy for the evaluation of chemicals (REACH) has lead to a controversy with regard to the need of additional animal safety testing. To avoid increases in animal testing but also to save time and resources, alternative in silico or in vitro tests for the assessment of toxic effects of chemicals are advocated. The draft of the original document issued in 29th October 2003 by the European Commission foresees the use of alternative methods but does not give further specification on which methods should be used. Computer-assisted prediction models, so-called predictive tools, besides in vitro models, will likely play an essential role in the proposed repertoire of 'alternative methods'. The current discussion has urged the Advisory Committee of the German Toxicology Society to present its position on the use of predictive tools in toxicology. Acceptable prediction models already exist for those toxicological endpoints which are based on well-understood mechanism, such as mutagenicity and skin sensitization, whereas mechanistically more complex endpoints such as acute, chronic or organ toxicities currently cannot be satisfactorily predicted. A potential strategy to assess such complex toxicities will lie in their dissection into models for the different steps or pathways leading to the final endpoint. Integration of these models should result in a higher predictivity. Despite these limitations, computer-assisted prediction tools already today play a complementary role for the assessment of chemicals for which no data is available or for which toxicological testing is impractical due to the lack of availability of sufficient compounds for testing. Furthermore, predictive tools offer support in the screening and the subsequent prioritization of compound for further toxicological testing, as expected within the scope of the European REACH program. This program will also lead to the collection of high-quality data which will broaden the

  9. Earlier adolescent substance use onset predicts stronger connectivity between reward and cognitive control brain networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Weissman

    2015-12-01

    Discussion: The regions that demonstrated significant positive linear relationships between the number of adolescent years using substances and connectivity with NAcc are nodes in the right frontoparietal network, which is central to cognitive control. The coupling of reward and cognitive control networks may be a mechanism through which earlier onset of substance use is related to brain function over time, a trajectory that may be implicated in subsequent substance use disorders.

  10. Integrative rodent models for assessing male reproductive toxicity of environmental endocrine active substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Auger

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present review, we first summarize the main benefits, limitations and pitfalls of conventional in vivo approaches to assessing male reproductive structures and functions in rodents in cases of endocrine active substance (EAS exposure from the postulate that they may provide data that can be extrapolated to humans. Then, we briefly present some integrated approaches in rodents we have recently developed at the organism level. We particularly focus on the possible effects and modes of action (MOA of these substances at low doses and in mixtures, real-life conditions and at the organ level, deciphering the precise effects and MOA on the fetal testis. It can be considered that the in vivo experimental EAS exposure of rodents remains the first choice for studies and is a necessary tool (together with the epidemiological approach for understanding the reproductive effects and MOA of EASs, provided the pitfalls and limitations of the rodent models are known and considered. We also provide some evidence that classical rodent models may be refined for studying the multiple consequences of EAS exposure, not only on the reproductive axis but also on various hormonally regulated organs and tissues, among which several are implicated in the complex process of mammalian reproduction. Such models constitute an interesting way of approaching human exposure conditions. Finally, we show that organotypic culture models are powerful complementary tools, especially when focusing on the MOA. All these approaches have contributed in a combinatorial manner to a better understanding of the impact of EAS exposure on human reproduction.

  11. Schedules of Controlled Substances: Placement of UR-144, XLR11, and AKB48 into Schedule I. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-11

    With the issuance of this final rule, the Drug Enforcement Administration places (1-pentyl-1H-indol-3-yl)(2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl)methanone (UR-144), [1-(5-fluoro-pentyl)-1H-indol-3-yl](2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl)methanone (5-fluoro-UR-144, XLR11), and N-(1-adamantyl)-1-pentyl-1H-indazole-3-carboxamide (APINACA, AKB48), including their salts, isomers, and salts of isomers whenever the existence of such salts, isomers, and salts of isomers is possible, into schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act. This scheduling action is pursuant to the Controlled Substances Act which requires that such actions be made on the record after opportunity for a hearing through formal rulemaking. This action imposes the regulatory controls and administrative, civil, and criminal sanctions applicable to schedule I controlled substances on persons who handle (manufacture, distribute, reverse distribute, import, export, engage in research, conduct instructional activities or chemical analysis, or possess), or propose to handle UR-144, XLR11, or AKB48.

  12. Misprescribing controlled substances: An evaluation of a professional development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, Charlene M; Ghulyan, Marine V; Swiggart, William H

    2016-01-01

    Controlled prescription drug (CPD) abuse has reached epidemic proportions in the United States. Most physicians attending a 3-day continuing medical education (CME) professional development program (PDP) lack training in identifying risk and in managing patients who misuse CPDs. To address this issue, the authors conducted an evaluation of a PDP that trains physicians on proper prescribing, identifying substance abuse, utilizing screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT), and implementing motivational interviewing (MI). The authors conducted a program evaluation to assess the efficacy and impact of the PDP on physicians' knowledge and prescribing behaviors. Participants (N = 174) were typically middle-aged (average age of 53 years), male (89%), and physicians (82%) and other health care professionals (18%). Many physicians practice in solo primary care settings (46%). Course evaluations were completed by n = 155 (89%) participants who rated the course and presenters highly (mean 4.8/5 respectively). Physicians' knowledge scores on pre/post assessments increased significantly: pretest (M = 58.7, SD = 13.12) and posttest (M = 78.28, SD = 9.83) (t(173) = 20.06, P ≤ .0001, 95% confidence interval, CI: [-21.51, -17.65]). Almost half of the participants, n = 83/174 (48%), completed the follow-up survey, and 93% agreed/strongly agreed (A/SA) they made professional practice changes. Of participants practicing with an active DEA (Drug Enforcement Administration) registration (n = 57), most agreed/strongly agreed they implemented changes to align their practices with current guidelines (89%), used CPD more appropriately (87%), implemented office policies on prescribing (81%), identified and referred more substance abuse patients to treatment (80%), shared new information/experience from course with other 25 health professionals (93%), and felt the course positively impacted their behaviors personally and professionally (90% and 96%, respectively

  13. Ameliorating effects of extracellular polymeric substances excreted by Thalassiosira pseudonana on algal toxicity of CdSe quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Saijin, E-mail: zhangs@tamug.edu [Department of Marine Science, Texas A and M University at Galveston, 200 Seawolf Parkway, Galveston, TX 77553 (United States); Jiang Yuelu, E-mail: jyuelu@gmail.com [Department of Marine Biology, Texas A and M University at Galveston, 200 Seawolf Parkway, Galveston, TX 77553 (United States); Chen, Chi-Shuo, E-mail: chen.chishuo@gmail.com [School of Engineering, University of California - Merced, Merced, CA 95344 (United States); Creeley, Danielle [Department of Marine Science, Texas A and M University at Galveston, 200 Seawolf Parkway, Galveston, TX 77553 (United States); Schwehr, Kathleen A., E-mail: schwerhk@tamug.edu [Department of Marine Science, Texas A and M University at Galveston, 200 Seawolf Parkway, Galveston, TX 77553 (United States); Quigg, Antonietta, E-mail: quigga@tamug.edu [Department of Marine Biology, Texas A and M University at Galveston, 200 Seawolf Parkway, Galveston, TX 77553 (United States); Department of Oceanography, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Chin, Wei-Chun, E-mail: wchin2@ucmerced.edu [School of Engineering, University of California - Merced, Merced, CA 95344 (United States); Santschi, Peter H., E-mail: santschi@tamug.edu [Department of Marine Science, Texas A and M University at Galveston, 200 Seawolf Parkway, Galveston, TX 77553 (United States); Department of Oceanography, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Quantum dots (QDs) are engineered nanoparticles (ENs) that have found increasing applications and shown great potential in drug delivery, biological imaging and industrial products. Knowledge of their stability, fate and transport in the aquatic environment is still lacking, including details of how these nanomaterials interact with marine phytoplankton. Here, we examined the toxicity of functionalized CdSe/ZnS QDs (amine- and carboxyl-) by exposing them for five days to Thalassiosira pseudonana (marine diatom) grown under different nutrient-conditions (enriched versus nitrogen-limited media). The released polysaccharides and proteins, the major components of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), were measured to assess their potential effects on the interactions between QDs and T. pseudonana. The partitioning of QDs was analyzed by monitoring the concentration of Cd in different size fractions of the cultures (i.e., filtrate, <0.22 {mu}m and permeate, <3 kDa). We found that the Cd release of QDs in the T. pseudonana culture was dependent on the nutrient conditions and nature of QDs' surface coating. Both amine- and carboxyl-functionalized QDs exhibited higher rates of Cd release in N-limited cultures than in nutrient enriched cultures. The results also showed that amine-functionalized QDs aggregate with minimal Cd release, independent of nutrient conditions. Laser scanning confocal microscopy images confirmed that aggregates are composed of QDs and the culture matrix (EPS). In addition, both types of QDs showed limited toxicity to T. pseudonana. The increasing production of proteins induced by QDs suggests that extracellular proteins might be involved in the detoxification of QDs to T. pseudonana via the Cd release of QDs. Our results here demonstrated that EPS can play an ameliorating role in QD toxicity, fate and transport in the aquatic environment.

  14. 41 CFR 109-27.5008 - Control of drug substances and potable alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., and Guidelines § 109-27.5008 Control of drug substances and potable alcohol. Effective procedures and... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control of drug substances and potable alcohol. 109-27.5008 Section 109-27.5008 Public Contracts and Property Management...

  15. 77 FR 24985 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Hospira Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... Remifentanil (9739), a basic class of controlled substance listed in schedule II. The company plans to import Remifentanil for use in dosage form manufacturing. No comments or objections have been received. DEA has.... to import the basic class of controlled substance is consistent with the public interest, and with...

  16. 78 FR 15975 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration: Hospira Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-13

    ... Remifentanil (9739), a basic class of controlled substance listed in schedule II. The company plans to import Remifentanil for use in dosage form manufacturing. No comments or objections have been received. DEA has.... to import the basic class of controlled substance is consistent with the public interest, and with...

  17. 77 FR 75670 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Hospira

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    ...), a basic class of controlled substance listed in schedule II. The company plans to import Remifentanil for use in dosage form manufacturing. Any bulk manufacturer who is presently, or is applying to be, registered with DEA to manufacture such basic class of controlled substance may file comments or objections...

  18. 78 FR 39337 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Akorn, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ...), a basic class of controlled substance listed in schedule II. The company plans to import Remifentanil in bulk for use in dosage- form manufacturing. Any bulk manufacturer who is presently, or is applying to be, registered with DEA to manufacture such basic class of controlled substance listed in...

  19. 78 FR 64016 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration, Akorn, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ...), a basic class of controlled substance listed in schedule II. The company plans to import Remifentanil in bulk for use in dosage form manufacturing. No comments or objections have been received. DEA... granted registration as an importer of the basic class of controlled substance listed. Dated: September 27...

  20. 77 FR 19718 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration, Norac Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... Nabilone (7379) only, the company presently manufactures a small amount of this controlled substance in bulk solely to conduct manufacturing internal process development. It is the company's intention once... (1105) only, the company manufactures these controlled substances in bulk solely for domestic...

  1. 31 CFR 598.309 - Narcotic drug; controlled substance; listed chemical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...; listed chemical. 598.309 Section 598.309 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and... SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.309 Narcotic drug; controlled substance; listed chemical. The terms narcotic drug, controlled substance, and listed chemical have the meanings given those terms...

  2. 77 FR 60143 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Cody Laboratories, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    ... importer of the following basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Opium, raw (9600) II... several controlled substances that are manufactured from opium raw, and poppy straw concentrate. The..., or protocols in effect on May 1, 1971. DEA has investigated Cody Laboratories, Inc., to ensure that...

  3. 32 CFR 700.1138 - Responsibilities concerning marijuana, narcotics, and other controlled substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Responsibilities concerning marijuana, narcotics... concerning marijuana, narcotics, and other controlled substances. (a) All personnel shall endeavor to prevent and eliminate the unauthorized use of marijuana, narcotics and other controlled substances within the...

  4. Factories Act 1961, Ionizing Radiations (Unsealed Radioactive Substances) Regulations 1968, Certificate of Approval No.1 (General)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    Under the Ionising Radiations (Unsealed Radioactive Substances) Regulations No. 780 of 1968, the Chief Inspector of Factories has wide powers to ensure the protection of workers. By this Certificate he approved, for the purpose of measuring radiation doses, any radiation dosemeter, based on the phenomenon of radiation-induced thermoluminescence, supplied by an approved laboratory. (NEA) [fr

  5. Facing Substance Abuse: Discussion-Starting Skits for Teenagers. Acting It Out Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, William R.

    This text attempts to "put a face" on the statistics surrounding drug abuse. It presents real problems, real people, and real dilemmas through the use of plays or skits that tell the story of substance abuse. It attempts to challenge readers--both teachers and students--with hard questions and asks them to look at their own behaviors and to…

  6. Stabilizing the baseline current of a microbial fuel cell-based biosensor through overpotential control under non-toxic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, N.E.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2010-01-01

    A MFC-based biosensor can act as online toxicity sensor Electrical current is a direct linear measure for metabolic activity of electrochemically active microorganisms Microorganisms gain energy from anodic overpotential and current strongly depends on anodic overpotential Therefore control of

  7. Assessment of toxic and endocrine potential of substances migrating from selected toys and baby products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepańska, Natalia; Namieśnik, Jacek; Kudłak, Błażej

    2016-12-01

    Analysis of literature data shows that there is limited information about the harmful biological effects of mixture of compounds from the EDC group that are released from the surface of toys and objects intended for children and infants. One of the tools that can be used to obtain such information is appropriate bioanalytical tests. The aim of this research involved determining whether tests that use living organisms as an active element (Vibrio fischeri-Microtox®, Heterocypris incongruens-Ostrocodtoxkit F™ and the XenoScreen YES/YAS™ test of oestrogenic/androgenic activity) can be a tool for estimating the combined toxic effects induced by xenobiotics released from objects intended for children. To reproduce the conditions to which objects are exposed during their use, liquids with a composition corresponding to that of human bodily fluids (artificial sweat and saliva) were used. This research focused on the main parameters influencing the intensification of the migration process (temperature, contact time and composition of the extraction mixture). The studies aimed to estimate the endocrine potential of the extracts showed that compounds released from the surface of studied objects exhibit antagonistic androgenic activity. While on the basis of the results of Microtox® test, one can state that the largest quantity of toxic compounds are released in the first 2 h of using the object. The FTIR spectra analyses confirmed that no degradation of polymeric material took place. On the basis of the results obtained, it was unanimously concluded that contact of the object with bodily fluids may result in the release of a large number of xenobiotics, which has disadvantageous effects on the metabolic processes of the indicator organisms.

  8. Large Scale Numerical Modelling to Study the Dispersion of Persistent Toxic Substances Over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulinger, A.; Petersen, G.

    2003-12-01

    For the past two decades environmental research at the GKSS Research Centre has been concerned with airborne pollutants with adverse effects on human health. The research was mainly focused on investigating the dispersion and deposition of heavy metals like lead and mercury over Europe by means of numerical modelling frameworks. Lead, in particular, served as a model substance to study the relationship between emissions and human exposition. The major source of airborne lead in Germany was fuel combustion until the 1980ies when its use as gasoline additive declined due to political decisions. Since then, the concentration of lead in ambient air and the deposition rates decreased in the same way as the consumption of leaded fuel. These observations could further be related to the decrease of lead concentrations in human blood measured during medical studies in several German cities. Based on the experience with models for heavy metal transport and deposition we have now started to turn our research focus to organic substances, e.g. PAHs. PAHs have been recognized as significant air borne carcinogens for several decades. However, it is not yet possible to precisely quantify the risk of human exposure to those compounds. Physical and chemical data, known from literature, describing the partitioning of the compounds between particle and gas phase and their degradation in the gas phase are implemented in a tropospheric chemistry module. In this way, the fate of PAHs in the atmosphere due to different particle type and size and different meteorological conditions is tested before carrying out large-scale and long-time studies. First model runs have been carried out for Benzo(a)Pyrene as one of the principal carcinogenic PAHs. Up to now, nearly nothing is known about degradation reactions of particle bound BaP. Thus, they could not be taken into account in the model so far. On the other hand, the proportion of BaP in the gas phase has to be considered at higher ambient

  9. 77 FR 46289 - Technical Corrections to Organizational Names, Addresses, and OMB Control Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-03

    ... Organizational Names, Addresses, and OMB Control Numbers AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). These amendments will make EPA's regulations more accurate and user... prior proposal and opportunity for comment. These changes update the organizational name of the EPA...

  10. QSAR screening of 70,983 REACH substances for genotoxic carcinogenicity, mutagenicity and developmental toxicity in the ChemScreen project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedebye, Eva Bay; Dybdahl, Marianne; Nikolov, Nikolai Georgiev

    2015-01-01

    The ChemScreen project aimed to develop a screening system for reproductive toxicity based on alternative methods. QSARs can, if adequate, contribute to the evaluation of chemical substances under REACH and may in some cases be applied instead of experimental testing to fill data gaps...... for information requirements. As no testing for reproductive effects should be performed in REACH on known genotoxic carcinogens or germ cell mutagens with appropriate risk management measures implemented, a QSAR pre-screen for 70,983 REACH substances was performed. Sixteen models and three decision algorithms...... were used to reach overall predictions of substances with potential effects with the following result: 6.5% genotoxic carcinogens, 16.3% mutagens, 11.5% developmental toxicants. These results are similar to findings in earlier QSAR and experimental studies of chemical inventories, and illustrate how...

  11. Pharmaceuticals, hormones, personal-care products, and other organic wastewater contaminants in water resources: Recent research activities of the U.S. Geological Survey's toxic substances hydrology program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focazio, Michael J.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Buxton, Herbert T.

    2003-01-01

    Recent decades have brought increasing concerns for potential contamination of water resources that could inadvertently result during production, use, and disposal of the numerous chemicals offering improvements in industry, agriculture, medical treatment, and even common household products. Increasing knowledge of the environmental occurrence or toxicological behavior of these contaminants from various studies in Europe, United States, and elsewhere has resulted in increased concern for potential adverse environmental and human health effects (Daughton and Ternes, 1999). Ecologists and public health experts often have incomplete understandings of the toxicological significance of many of these contaminants, particularly long-term, low-level exposure and when they occur in mixtures with other contaminants (Daughton and Ternes, 1999; Kümmerer, 2001). In addition, these ‘emerging contaminants’ are not typically monitored or assessed in ambient water resources. The need to understand the processes controlling the transport and fate of these contaminants in the environment, and the lack of knowledge of the significance of long-term exposures have increased the need to study environmental occurrence down to trace (nanogram per liter) levels. Furthermore, the possibility that mixtures of environmental contaminants may interact synergistically or antagonistically has increased the need to characterize the types of mixtures that are found in our waters. The U.S. Geological Survey’s Toxic Substances Hydrology Program (Toxics Program) is developing information and tools on emerging water-quality issues that will be used to design and improve water-quality monitoring and assessment programs of the USGS and others, and for proactive decision-making by industry, regulators, the research community, and the public (http://toxics.usgs.gov/regional/emc.html). This research on emerging water-quality issues includes a combination of laboratory work to develop new analytical

  12. Atomic Energy Control Act, c A.19, s.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The Revised Statutes of Canada 1985 entered into force on 12 December 1988, revoking the previous Atomic Energy Control Act and replacing it with a new version. The new Act (Chapter A-16 of the Revised Statutes) updates the previous text and makes some linguistic corrections. The Atomic Energy Control Act establishes the Atomic Energy Control Board and sets out its duties and powers which include, in particular, the making of regulations for developing, controlling and licensing the production, application and use of atomic energy [fr

  13. Acculturation, Social Self-Control, and Substance Use Among Hispanic Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Pallav; Herzog, Thaddeus A.; Sun, Ping; Rohrbach, Louise A.; Sussman, Steve

    2014-01-01

    It is unclear how acculturation is related to self-control characteristics and whether part of the effect of acculturation on Hispanic adolescents’ substance use behavior is mediated through lower self-control. We tested social self-control, peer substance use, and baseline substance use as mediators of the effect of Hispanic (predominantly Mexican or Mexican American) adolescents’ level of U.S. acculturation on their substance use behavior 1 year later. In addition, we tested gender as a possible moderator of the pathways involved in the mediation model. Participants included 1,040 self-identified Hispanic/Latino adolescents (M = 14.7; SD = 0.90; 89% Mexican/Mexican American) recruited from nine public high schools. Acculturation was measured in terms of adolescents’ extent of English language use in general, at home, with friends, and their use of the English-language entertainment media. Analyses were conducted using structural equation modeling and controlled for potential confounders such as age and parental education. Results indicated a statistically significant three-path mediation in which poor social self-control and peer substance use mediated the effects of acculturation on prospective substance use. Paths in the mediation model were not found to differ by gender. Our findings suggest that acculturation may influence adolescents’ self-control characteristics related to interpersonal functioning, which may in turn influence their affiliation with substance-using friends and substance use behavior. Implications of the findings are discussed in terms of future research and prevention programming. PMID:23772765

  14. Analytical solution using computer algebra of a biosensor for detecting toxic substances in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rúa Taborda, María. Isabel

    2014-05-01

    In a relatively recent paper an electrochemical biosensor for water toxicity detection based on a bio-chip as a whole cell was proposed and numerically solved and analyzed. In such paper the kinetic processes in a miniaturized electrochemical biosensor system was described using the equations for specific enzymatic reaction and the diffusion equation. The numerical solution shown excellent agreement with the measured data but such numerical solution is not enough to design efficiently the corresponding bio-chip. For this reason an analytical solution is demanded. The object of the present work is to provide such analytical solution and then to give algebraic guides to design the bio-sensor. The analytical solution is obtained using computer algebra software, specifically Maple. The method of solution is the Laplace transform, with Bromwich integral and residue theorem. The final solution is given as a series of Bessel functions and the effective time for the bio-sensor is computed. It is claimed that the analytical solutions that were obtained will be very useful to predict further current variations in similar systems with different geometries, materials and biological components. Beside of this the analytical solution that we provide is very useful to investigate the relationship between different chamber parameters such as cell radius and height; and electrode radius.

  15. Defining utility trace substance emissions and risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torrens, I.M.

    1993-01-01

    An update is presented on the activities of EPRI and other organizations, including DOE, aimed at improving the quality of available information on utility trace element emissions, control technologies and risks. Because of these efforts, the state of knowledge is advancing rapidly. The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments aim to reduce emissions of 189 substances that they designate as hazardous air pollutants - commonly called air toxics. The more neutral term open-quotes trace substancesclose quotes is used in this paper, since most are emitted in extremely low concentrations from utility stacks. The degree of toxicity or hazard at these concentrations is subject to considerable uncertainty, and clarifying this is one of the objectives of the work in progress. The most clear and urgent need emanating from the CAAA has been to obtain reliable information on which of the substances on the CAAA list are emitted from different types of power plants - in what amounts, what risks they pose, how much is removed by today's pollution control equipment. EPRI is addressing the issue on several fronts, e.g.; developing a data base and tools that will enable utilities to estimate emissions levels from their power facilities, given the types of fuels burned and plant characteristics; developing a better understanding of how emissions are transported and transformed before they encounter humans and ecological systems; and assessing the risk to public health and the environment posed by utility releases of these substances

  16. The testing of materials within the purview of the laws concerning the control of chemical substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosselmann, K.; Linden, W.

    1989-01-01

    The main approach adopted for this book is the question of whether and to what extent the commercially available chemical products (ranging from foodstuffs and drugs to pesticides and similar pollutants) have been assessed for environmental and health safety prior to release. The relevant existing laws concerning the testing and characterisation of substances are analysed and compared with a view to the major environmental principle, to prevent chemicals-induced hazards to health and the environment. The book reviews the following laws (and their implementing provisions): law on chemical substances, pesticides, fertilisers, drugs, detergents, leaded petrol, food and feedstuffs, explosives, and transport of hazardous materials. Environmentally significant laws reviewed include the waste management act, the atomic energy act (non-recycable wastes, plutonium, tritium), the water management act, and the act for protection against harmful effects on the environment. (orig./HP) [de

  17. MK-801, but not drugs acting at strychnine-insensitive glycine receptors, attenuate methamphetamine nigrostriatal toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layer, R T; Bland, L R; Skolnick, P

    1993-10-15

    Repeated administration of methamphetamine (METH) results in damage to nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. Both competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists and use-dependent cation channel blockers attenuate METH-induced damage. The objectives of the present study were to examine whether comparable reductions in METH-induced damage could be obtained by compounds acting at strychnine-insensitive glycine receptors on the NMDA receptor complex. Four injections of METH (5 mg/kg i.p.) resulted in a approximately 70.9% depletion of striatal dopamine (DA) and approximately 62.7% depletion of dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) content, respectively. A significant protection against METH-induced DA and DOPAC depletion was afforded by the use-dependent channel blocker, MK-801. The competitive glycine antagonist 7-chlorokynurenic acid (7-Cl-KA), the low efficacy glycine partial agonist (+)-3-amino-1-hydroxy-2-pyrrolidone ((+)-HA-966), and the high efficacy partial glycine agonist 1-aminocyclopropane-carboxylic acid (ACPC) were ineffective against METH-induced toxicity despite their abilities to attenuate glutamate-induced neurotoxicity under both in vivo and in vitro conditions. These results indicate that glycinergic ligands do not possess the same broad neuroprotective spectrum as other classes of NMDA antagonists.

  18. 76 FR 64813 - Electronic Prescriptions for Controlled Substances Clarification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ..., including security, and must address ``processing integrity'' as set forth in our regulations. Likewise... within DEA that implements and enforces Titles II and III of the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and... substances and listed chemicals for legitimate medical, scientific, research, and industrial purposes. \\1...

  19. 78 FR 5499 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Johnson Matthey, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ...; Notice of Registration; Johnson Matthey, Inc. By Notice dated May 9, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on May 21, 2012, 77 FR 30026, Johnson Matthey, Inc., Custom Pharmaceuticals Department, 2003 Nolte... substance listed in schedule II. The company plans to manufacture the listed controlled substance for sale...

  20. 49 CFR 382.121 - Employee admission of alcohol and controlled substances use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and has successfully completed education or treatment requirements in accordance with the self... substances use. 382.121 Section 382.121 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... SAFETY REGULATIONS CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES AND ALCOHOL USE AND TESTING General § 382.121 Employee admission...

  1. Control of toxic marine dinoflagellate blooms by serial parasitic killers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambouvet, Aurelie; Morin, Pascal; Marie, Dominique; Guillou, Laure

    2008-11-21

    The marine dinoflagellates commonly responsible for toxic red tides are parasitized by other dinoflagellate species. Using culture-independent environmental ribosomal RNA sequences and fluorescence markers, we identified host-specific infections among several species. Each parasitoid produces 60 to 400 offspring, leading to extraordinarily rapid control of the host's population. During 3 consecutive years of observation in a natural estuary, all dinoflagellates observed were chronically infected, and a given host species was infected by a single genetically distinct parasite year after year. Our observations in natural ecosystems suggest that although bloom-forming dinoflagellates may escape control by grazing organisms, they eventually succumb to parasite attack.

  2. 27 CFR 479.193 - Arms Export Control Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES, AND CERTAIN OTHER FIREARMS Other Laws Applicable § 479.193 Arms Export Control Act. For provisions relating to...

  3. 77 FR 70824 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Johnson Matthey, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-27

    ... Coca Leaves (9040) II Thebaine (9333) II Opium, raw (9600) II Noroxymorphone (9668) II Poppy Straw...-registration to import crude opium, poppy straw, concentrate of poppy straw, and coca leaves. Comments and... substances listed in schedule I or II, which fall under the authority of section 1002(a)(2)(B) of the Act (21...

  4. 77 FR 63766 - Schedules of Controlled Substances: Placement of Methylone Into Schedule I

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ..., fever, sweating, and hypertension. Some individuals under the influence of methylone have acted... to amphetamine, 3,4- methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), cathinone and other related substances.... Included below is a brief summary of each factor as analyzed by HHS and DEA, and as considered by DEA in...

  5. Earlier adolescent substance use onset predicts stronger connectivity between reward and cognitive control brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, David G; Schriber, Roberta A; Fassbender, Catherine; Atherton, Olivia; Krafft, Cynthia; Robins, Richard W; Hastings, Paul D; Guyer, Amanda E

    2015-12-01

    Early adolescent onset of substance use is a robust predictor of future substance use disorders. We examined the relation between age of substance use initiation and resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) of the core reward processing (nucleus accumbens; NAcc) to cognitive control (prefrontal cortex; PFC) brain networks. Adolescents in a longitudinal study of Mexican-origin youth reported their substance use annually from ages 10 to 16 years. At age 16, 69 adolescents participated in a resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. Seed-based correlational analyses were conducted using regions of interest in bilateral NAcc. The earlier that adolescents initiated substance use, the stronger the connectivity between bilateral NAcc and right dorsolateral PFC, right dorsomedial PFC, right pre-supplementary motor area, right inferior parietal lobule, and left medial temporal gyrus. The regions that demonstrated significant positive linear relationships between the number of adolescent years using substances and connectivity with NAcc are nodes in the right frontoparietal network, which is central to cognitive control. The coupling of reward and cognitive control networks may be a mechanism through which earlier onset of substance use is related to brain function over time, a trajectory that may be implicated in subsequent substance use disorders. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Overview of major hazards. Part 2: Source term; dispersion; combustion; blast, missiles, venting; fire; radiation; runaway reactions; toxic substances; dust explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilain, J.

    Approaches to major hazard assessment and prediction are reviewed. Source term: (phenomenology/modeling of release, influence on early stages of dispersion); dispersion (atmospheric advection, diffusion and deposition, emphasis on dense/cold gases); combustion (flammable clouds and mists covering flash fires, deflagration, transition to detonation; mostly unconfined/partly confined situations); blast formation, propagation, interaction with structures; catastrophic fires (pool fires, torches and fireballs; highly reactive substances) runaway reactions; features of more general interest; toxic substances, excluding toxicology; and dust explosions (phenomenology and protective measures) are discussed.

  7. 23 CFR 633.211 - Implementation of the Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Water Pollution Control Act. 633.211 Section 633.211 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...) implementing requirements with respect to the Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act are... Contracts (Appalachian Contracts) § 633.211 Implementation of the Clean Air Act and the Federal Water...

  8. 1992 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory: Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know-Act of 1986 Section 313

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act of 1986 (EPCRA) requires the annual submittal of toxic chemical release information to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The following document is the July 1993 submittal of the EPCRA Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R). Included is a Form R for chlorine and for lead, the two chemicals used in excess of the established regulatory thresholds at the Hanford Site by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office and its contractors during calendar year 1992

  9. Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magee, J.

    1980-01-01

    The long-term environmental effects of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 address the public health hazards of radioactive wastes and recognize the significance of this issue to public acceptance of nuclear energy. Title I of the Act deals with stabilizing and controlling mill tailings at inactive sites and classifies the sites by priority. It represents a major Federal commitment. Title II changes and strengthens Nuclear Regulatory Commission authority, but it will have little overall impact. It is not possible to assess the Act's effect because there is no way to know if current technology will be adequate for the length of time required. 76 references

  10. Control of Chemical Risks by Substitution of Harmful Substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    Substitution of volatile, organic solvents with non-volatile, low-toxic esters of fatty acids for cleaning purposes in offset printing has successfully been implemented in several European countries. Similar substitutions in other industrial cleaning processes seem possible, especially regarding...

  11. Improving the outcomes of children affected by parental substance abuse: a review of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calhoun S

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stacy Calhoun,1,2 Emma Conner,2 Melodi Miller,3 Nena Messina1 1UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Criminology, Law and Society, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA; 3Social Solutions International, Inc., Silver Spring, MD, USA Abstract: Substance abuse is a major public health concern that impacts not just the user but also the user's family. The effect that parental substance abuse has on children has been given substantial attention over the years. Findings from the literature suggest that children of substance-abusing parents have a high risk of developing physical and mental health and behavioral problems. A number of intervention programs have been developed for parents who have a substance abuse problem. There have also been a number of interventions that have been developed for children who have at least one parent with a substance abuse problem. However, it remains unclear how we can best mitigate the negative effects that parental substance abuse has on children due to the scarcity of evaluations that utilize rigorous methodologies such as experimental designs. The purpose of this study is to review randomized controlled trials of intervention programs targeting parents with substance abuse problems and/or children with at least one parent with a substance abuse problem in order to identify programs that show some promise in improving the behavioral and mental health outcomes of children affected by parental substance abuse. Four randomized controlled trials that met our eligibility criteria were identified using major literature search engines. The findings from this review suggest that interventions that focus on improving parenting practices and family functioning may be effective in reducing problems in children affected by parental substance abuse. However, further research utilizing rigorous methodologies are needed in order to identify other successful interventions that can

  12. The Anabolic Steroid Control Act of 2004: a study in the political economy of drug policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denham, Bryan E

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the processes by which the Anabolic Steroid Control Act of 2004, an act that added steroid precursors such as androstenedione to the list of Schedule III Controlled Substances in the United States, came to pass in both the House of Representatives and the Senate. Grounded theoretically in political economy, the article addresses, in the abstract, how the interplay of political pressures and economic influences stands to affect the actions of public officials, and how "tougher" drug policies-those touted to be more substantive and efficacious than existing regulations-often fail to effect change. The article concludes with implications for those involved in the regulation of anabolic steroids and steroid precursors.

  13. Highlights of Bill C-14, the proposed new Nuclear Control Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    If the bill is passed, the name of the regulatory body will be changed from the Atomic Energy Control Board to the Nuclear Control Board. It is intended to make the board more independent and removed from any involvement in the promotional and commercial aspects of the nuclear industry. The board will no longer answer to the same minister as AECL. Licensing applications will generally be published, except proprietary information. Public hearings will be a compulsory part of licensing major facilities. Various provisions of the bill are explained section by section. ''Prescribed substances'' under the act will definitely include all radionuclides and deuterium. A fund for decontamination will be endowed by licensees. The board will be able to make regulations for obsolete or abandoned sites, or for waste disposal sites. The part of the bill which deals with the responsibility of the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources for A.E.C.L. generally remains unchanged from the previous act

  14. 78 FR 46369 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Research Triangle Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... Anileridine (9020) II Bezitramide (9800) II Carfentanil (9743) II Coca Leaves (9040) II Cocaine (9041) II... controlled substances listed in schedule I or II, which fall under the authority of section 1002(a)(2)(B) of...

  15. 77 FR 30327 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice Of Application; Research Triangle Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ... the following basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Marihuana (7360) I Cocaine (9041) II The Institute will manufacture marihuana, and cocaine derivatives for use by their customers in...

  16. 77 FR 75670 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration, AMRI Rensselaer, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    ... bulk manufacturer of the following basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Marihuana... development and for distribution to its customers. In reference to drug code 7360 (Marihuana), the company...

  17. 78 FR 46372 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Research Triangle Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... bulk manufacturer of the following basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Marihuana (7360) I Cocaine (9041) II The Institute will manufacture marihuana, and cocaine derivatives for use by...

  18. 77 FR 55504 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Research Triangle Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-10

    ... classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Marihuana (7360) I Cocaine (9041) II The Institute will manufacture marihuana, and cocaine derivatives for use by their customers in analytical kits, reagents, and...

  19. 78 FR 33440 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration; Rhodes Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... importer of the following basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Opium Raw (9600) II Poppy... States obligations under international treaties, conventions, or protocols in effect on May 1, 1971. DEA...

  20. 78 FR 64015 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration, Siegfried (USA), LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... registered as an importer of the following basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Opium, raw... States obligations under international treaties, conventions, or protocols in effect on May 1, 1971. DEA...

  1. 77 FR 35057 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Rhodes Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... importer of the basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Opium, raw (9600) II Poppy Straw... obligations under international treaties, conventions, or protocols in effect on May 1, 1971. DEA has...

  2. 40 CFR 160.107 - Test, control, and reference substance handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Test, Control, and Reference Substances § 160.107 Test...) Distribution is made in a manner designed to preclude the possibility of contamination, deterioration, or... distributed or returned. ...

  3. 78 FR 23959 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; PCAS-Nanosyn, LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-23

    ... request of the company's customers, it manufactures derivatives of controlled substances in bulk form only... compliance with state and local laws, and a review of the company's background and history. Therefore...

  4. 77 FR 31390 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Pcas-Nanosyn, LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... request of the company's customers, it manufactures derivatives of controlled substances in bulk form only... compliance with state and local laws, and a review of the company's background and history. Therefore...

  5. 77 FR 16264 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration; Johnson Matthey Pharmaceutical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ..., Notice of Registration; Johnson Matthey Pharmaceutical Materials Inc. By Notice dated November 18, 2011... Pharmaceutical Materials Inc., Pharmaceutical Service, 25 Patton Road, Devens, Massachusetts 01434, made... Matthey Pharmaceutical Materials Inc. to manufacture the listed basic classes of controlled substances is...

  6. 78 FR 19017 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Johnson Matthey Pharmaceutical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Johnson Matthey Pharmaceutical Materials, Inc. Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title... Matthey Pharmaceutical Materials, Inc., Pharmaceutical Service, 25 Patton Road, Devens, Massachusetts...

  7. Schedules of Controlled Substances: Temporary Placement of Six Synthetic Cannabinoids (5F-ADB, 5F-AMB, 5F-APINACA, ADB-FUBINACA, MDMB-

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-21

    The Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration is issuing this notice of intent to temporarily schedule six synthetic cannabinoids: methyl 2-(1-(5-fluoropentyl)-1H-indazole-3-carboxamido)-3,3-dimethylbutanoate [5F-ADB; 5F-MDMB-PINACA]; methyl 2-(1-(5-fluoropentyl)-1H-indazole-3-carboxamido)-3-methylbutanoate [5F-AMB]; N-(adamantan-1-yl)-1-(5-fluoropentyl)-1H-indazole-3-carboxamide [5F-APINACA, 5F-AKB48]; N-(1-amino-3,3-dimethyl-1-oxobutan-2-yl)-1-(4-fluorobenzyl)-1H-indazole-3-carboxamide [ADB-FUBINACA]; methyl 2-(1-(cyclohexylmethyl)-1H-indole-3-carboxamido)-3,3-dimethylbutanoate [MDMB-CHMICA, MMB-CHMINACA] and methyl 2-(1-(4-fluorobenzyl)-1H-indazole-3-carboxamido)-3,3-dimethylbutanoate [MDMB-FUBINACA], into schedule I pursuant to the temporary scheduling provisions of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). This action is based on a finding by the Administrator that the placement of these synthetic cannabinoids into schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act is necessary to avoid an imminent hazard to the public safety. Any final order will impose the administrative, civil, and criminal sanctions and regulatory controls applicable to schedule I substances under the Controlled Substances Act on the manufacture, distribution, possession, importation, exportation of, and research and conduct with, instructional activities of these synthetic cannabinoids.

  8. Use and acute toxicity associated with the novel psychoactive substances diphenylprolinol (D2PM) and desoxypipradrol (2-DPMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, David M; Dargan, Paul I

    2012-09-01

    Over the last decade there has been greater use of novel psychoactive substances ('legal highs') across Europe and the United States, including increasing reports of use of diphenylprolinol (D2PM) and desoxypipradrol (2-DPMP). This review will discuss the pharmacology and mechanisms of action of these two compounds, available data on their sources and prevalence of use and reports of acute toxicity and fatalities associated with their use. PubMed was searched using the search terms 'D2PM', '2-DPMP', 'diphenyl-2-pyrrolidinyl-methanol', 'diphenylprolinol', '2-diphenylmethylpiperidine' and 'desoxypipradrol'. These searches identified 70 articles, only five of which were relevant. PHARMACOLOGY AND MECHANISMS OF ACTION: D2PM is a pyrrolidine analogue and 2-DPMP is a desoxy analogue of pipradrol. Animal studies have shown that 2-DPMP increases the release of dopamine and decreases dopamine re-uptake comparable to the effects of cocaine. The binding and activity of D2PM at the dopamine re-uptake transporter, based on currently published data, is also similar to cocaine, although it appears that D2PM has less biological activity. SOURCES AND PREVALENCE OF USE: D2PM and 2-DPMP is available from internet-based suppliers and street level drug dealers; there is currently no systematic data to be able to determine the relative importance of these routes of supply. There is no population level, and limited subpopulation level, data on the prevalence of use of D2PM/2-DPMP. In one 2011 study, 1.6% of 315 individuals in 'gay friendly' nightclubs in South London reported that they had used a pipradrol: 1.0% had used within the last year and 0.6% had used or were planning to use a pipradrol on the night of the survey. ACUTE TOXICITY: Reports on internet discussion fora describe prolonged euphoria and stimulant effects including euphoria, sweating and bruxism with use of D2PM and 2-DPMP. The first report of analytically confirmed acute D2PM toxicity described chest pain and

  9. 2008 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory 2008 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2009-10-01

    For reporting year 2008, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) submitted a Form R report for lead as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2008 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2008, as well as to provide background information about data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999, EPA promulgated a final rule on persistent bioaccumulative toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

  10. Exploring polyamine metabolism of Alternaria alternata to target new substances to control the fungal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estiarte, N; Crespo-Sempere, A; Marín, S; Sanchis, V; Ramos, A J

    2017-08-01

    Polyamines are essential for all living organisms as they are involved in several vital cell functions. The biosynthetic pathway of polyamines and its regulation is well established and, in this sense, the ornithine descarboxylase (ODC) enzyme acts as one of the controlling factors of the entire pathway. In this work we assessed the inhibition of the ODC with D, l-α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) on Alternaria alternata and we observed that fungal growth and mycotoxin production were reduced. This inhibition was not completely restored by the addition of exogenous putrescine. Actually, increasing concentrations of putrescine on the growth media negatively affected mycotoxin production, which was corroborated by the downregulation of pksJ and altR, both genes involved in mycotoxin biosynthesis. We also studied the polyamine metabolism of A. alternata with the goal of finding new targets that compromise its growth and its mycotoxin production capacity. In this sense, we tested two different polyamine analogs, AMXT-2455 and AMXT-3016, and we observed that they partially controlled A. alternata's viability in vitro and in vivo using tomato plants. Finding strategies to design new fungicide substances is becoming a matter of interest as resistance problems are emerging. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Digital holographic microscopy for toxicity testing and cell culture quality control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Björn

    2018-02-01

    For the example of digital holographic microscopy (DHM), it is illustrated how label-free biophysical parameter sets can be extracted from quantitative phase images of adherent and suspended cells, and how the retrieved data can be applied for in-vitro toxicity testing and cell culture quality assessment. This includes results from the quantification of the reactions of cells to toxic substances as well as data from sophisticated monitoring of cell alterations that are related to changes of cell culture conditions.

  12. Toxic Substances Portal- Arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is found at low levels in breast milk. top How can families reduce their risk for exposure to arsenic? If you use arsenic-treated wood in home projects, you should wear dust masks, gloves, and protective clothing to decrease exposure to sawdust. ...

  13. 75 FR 69459 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-12

    ..., poppy straw, concentrate of poppy straw, and coca leaves. As explained in the Correction to Notice of... schedule I or II, which fall under the authority of section 1002(a)(2)(B) of the Act [(21 U.S.C. 952 (a)(2...

  14. 77 FR 2321 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ..., poppy straw, concentrate of poppy straw, and coca leaves. As explained in the Correction to Notice of... schedule I or II, which fall under the authority of section 1002(a)(2)(B) of the Act 21 U.S.C. 952(a)(2)(B...

  15. 75 FR 36681 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... Anileridine (9020) II Bezitramide (9800) II Carfentanil (9743) II Coca Leaves (9040) II Cocaine (9041) II..., concentrate of poppy straw, and coca leaves. As explained in the Correction to Notice of Application... schedule I or II, which fall under the authority of section 1002(a)(2)(B) of the Act (21 U.S.C. 952 (a)(2...

  16. 76 FR 51399 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-18

    ..., concentrate of poppy straw or coca leaves. As explained in the Correction to Notice of Application pertaining... schedule I or II, which fall under the authority of section 1002(a)(2)(B) of the Act (21 U.S.C. 952(a)(2)(B...

  17. 77 FR 4831 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    ... (8501) II Coca Leaves (9040) II Oxycodone (9143) II Hydromorphone (9150) II Hydrocodone (9193) II... crude opium, poppy straw, poppy straw concentrate, and coca leaves. As explained in the Correction to... schedule I or II, which fall under the authority of section 1002(a)(2)(B) of the Act 21 U.S.C. 952 (a)(2)(B...

  18. Formulation of attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB) with safe EPA-exempt substance significantly diminishes the Anopheles sergentii population in a desert oasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revay, Edita E; Schlein, Yosef; Tsabari, Onie; Kravchenko, Vasiliy; Qualls, Whitney; De-Xue, Rui; Beier, John C; Traore, Sekou F; Doumbia, Seydou; Hausmann, Axel; Müller, Günter C

    2015-10-01

    Attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB) is a highly effective method which targets mosquitoes based on their sugar foraging behavior, by presenting baits of attractive compounds in combination with sugar and oral toxin to local mosquito populations. Environmental concerns and insecticide selection-pressure have prompted investigations of novel, ecologically-harmless substances which can be used as insecticides. This study examined the efficacy of microencapsulated garlic-oil as the oral toxin component of ATSB for controlling Anopheles sergentii populations inhabiting desert-surrounded wetlands in Israel. ATSB solution containing 0.4% encapsulated garlic oil was applied to local vegetation around a streamlet located in the lower Jordan Valley. To determine the propensity of bait ingestion, and assess the potential ecological impact of the method, mosquito and non-target specimens were collected and tested for the presence of natural plant- or attractive sugar bait (ASB)-derived sugars. Over the experimental period, biting-pressure values in the ATSB treatment site decreased by 97.5%, while at the control site, treated with non-toxic ASB, no significant changes were observed. Approximately 70% of the mosquitoes collected before both treatments, as well as those captured following the application of ASB at the control site, were found to have ingested sugar prior to capture. Non-target insects were minimally affected by the treatment when ATSB was applied to foliage of non-flowering plants. Of the non-Diptera species, only 0.7% of the sampled non-target insects were found to have ingested ASB-solution which was applied to green vegetation, compared with 8.5% which have foraged on ASB-derived sugars applied to flowering plants. Conversely, a high proportion of the non-target species belonging to the order Diptera, especially non-biting midges, were found to have ingested foliage-applied ASB, with more than 36% of the specimens collected determined to have foraged on bait

  19. Management of Bottom Sediments Containing Toxic Substances: Proceedings of the U.S./Japan Experts Meeting (11th) Held in Seattle, Washington, on 4-6 November 1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    potential environmental impact of organotins and their effect on the dredging permit proenp, Eighteen-day-old mysids were exposed to tributyltin ( TBT ...sediment. The TBT toxicant became a significant deleterious factor by day 8. After 10 days control survival was 100 per- cent with sediment and 95 percent...It is generally accepted that the TBT cation is the toxic component and the anion is not a factor in its toxicity . TBT degradation products are less

  20. 40 CFR 82.19 - Apportionment of baseline consumption allowances for class II controlled substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... allowances for class II controlled substances. 82.19 Section 82.19 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Consumption Controls § 82.19 Apportionment of baseline consumption allowances for class II controlled... Ineos Fluor Americas HCFC-22 2,546,305 Kivlan & Company HCFC-22 2,081,018 MDA Manufacturing HCFC-22 2...

  1. 40 CFR 82.17 - Apportionment of baseline production allowances for class II controlled substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... allowances for class II controlled substances. 82.17 Section 82.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Consumption Controls § 82.17 Apportionment of baseline production allowances for class II controlled... 1,759,681 MDA Manufacturing HCFC-22 2,383,835 Solvay Solexis HCFC-142b 6,541,764 [ 74 FR 66446, Dec...

  2. 78 FR 12102 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Mallinckrodt, LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... plans to manufacture the listed controlled substances for internal use and for sale to other companies... Enforcement Administration, Office of Diversion Control, Federal Register Representative (ODL), 8701...: February 8, 2013. Joseph T. Rannazzisi, Deputy Assistant Administrator, Office of Diversion Control, Drug...

  3. Pre-Acting Control for Shock and Impact Isolation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.V. Balandin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-acting control in shock/impact isolation systems is studied. With pre-acting control, the isolation system begins to respond to an impact before this impact has been applied to the base. The limiting performance of the isolator with pre-acting control is investigated for a single-degree-of-freedom system subject to an instantaneous impact. The isolation performance index is defined as the maximum of the absolute value of the displacement of the object to be isolated relative to the base, provided that the magnitude of the control force transmitted to the object does not exceed a prescribed value. It is shown that there is a substantial advantage in the use of pre-acting isolators over isolators without pre-action. Particular attention is given to a pre-acting isolator based on a passive elastic element (a spring separating the object to be protected from the base. An example illustrates the calculation of the design parameters of such an isolator.

  4. Availability of tobacco cessation services in substance use disorder treatment programs: Impact of state tobacco control policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Amanda J; Bagwell-Adams, Grace; Jayawardhana, Jayani

    2017-08-01

    Given the high prevalence of smoking among substance use disorder (SUD) patients, the specialty SUD treatment system is an important target for adoption and implementation of tobacco cessation (TC) services. While research has addressed the impact of tobacco control on individual tobacco consumption, largely overlooked in the literature is the potential impact of state tobacco control policies on availability of services for tobacco cessation. This paper examines the association between state tobacco control policy and availability of TC services in SUD treatment programs in the United States. State tobacco control and state demographic data (n=51) were merged with treatment program data from the 2012 National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (n=10.413) to examine availability of TC screening, counseling and pharmacotherapy services in SUD treatment programs using multivariate logistic regression models clustered at the state-level. Approximately 60% of SUD treatment programs offered TC screening services, 41% offered TC counseling services and 26% offered TC pharmacotherapy services. Results of multivariate logistic regression showed the odds of offering TC services were greater for SUD treatment programs located in states with higher cigarette excise taxes and greater spending on tobacco prevention and control. Findings indicate cigarette excise taxes and recommended funding levels may be effective policy tools for increasing access to TC services in SUD treatment programs. Coupled with changes to insurance coverage for TC under the Affordable Care Act, state tobacco control policy tools may further reduce tobacco use in the United States. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Development and evaluation of a multidisciplinary controlled substances committee within a patient-centered medical home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernant, Stephanie A; Bastien, Rachel; Lai, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    To present the development of a multidisciplinary controlled substances committee and describe its effectiveness in relation to prescribers' acceptance of committee recommendations, the number of premature deaths associated with controlled substances, and prescribers' need for education on controlled substances. A patient-centered medical home and accountable care organization in Maine that serves more than 60,000 patients across a large rural area, 70% of whom are classified as lower income. A multidisciplinary group of prescribers and PharmD residents created a committee to influence organizational culture regarding controlled substances. The Controlled Substances Initiative Committee (CSIC) updated institutional policies, developed provider education, and made personalized patient recommendations to prescribers. The primary outcome was average change in daily morphine equivalent dose (MED) in patients for whom CSIC recommended a dose reduction to the patient's prescriber. Secondary outcomes included the proportion of patients who died of a known overdose or suspected drug-related death during 2012-2013 or 2013-2014. In addition, prescriber beliefs about controlled substances were measured via a needs assessment. The average daily MED for patients whom CSIC recommended dose reduction was lower after 3 months compared with at baseline (175.5 ± 344.3 mg vs. 292.7 ± 466.5 mg; P vs. 11.1%; P = 1.00). However, a greater number of patients had a suspected drug-related death during 2013-2014 compared with during 2012-2013 (0% vs. 27.3%; P = 0.05). A multidisciplinary controlled substances committee may improve patient safety and outcomes by offering prescriber support and helping alter prescribing culture.

  6. Phytoextraction of toxic trace elements by Sorghum bicolor inoculated with Streptomyces pactum (Act12) in contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Amjad; Guo, Di; Mahar, Amanullah; Wang, Ping; Ma, Fang; Shen, Feng; Li, Ronghua; Zhang, Zengqiang

    2017-05-01

    The increasing industrial, mining and agricultural activities have intensified the release of potential toxic trace elements (PTEs), which are of great concern to human health and environment. The alarming increase in PTEs concentration, stress the need for biotechnological remediation approaches. In order to assist phytoextraction of PTEs, different combinations of Streptomyces pactum (Act12) with biochar were applied to mining and industrial polluted soils of Shaanxi and Hunan Provinces of China, respectively. Act12 affected soil physico-chemical properties in both soils. Bioavailable Zn and Pb increased due to microbial activities, while Cd decreased by adsorption on biochar surface. Phytoextraction of Zn and Pb occurred in TG and CZ soil, while Cd uptake decreased in iron rich CZ soil by conflicting effect of siderophores. Cd in sorghum shoot was below detection level, but uptake increased in the roots due to minimum available fraction in TG soil. Biochar reduced the shoot and root uptake of Cd. Sorghum shoot, root dry weight and chlorophyll significantly increased after Act12 and biochar application. β-glucosidase, alkaline phosphatase and urease activities were significantly enhanced by Act12. Antioxidant enzymatic activities (POD, PAL and PPO) and lipid peroxidation (MDA) were decreased after the application of Act12 and biochar by reduced PTEs stress. Act12 and biochar can be used for different crops to enumerate the transfer rate of PTEs into the food chain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Regulations under the Radioactive Substances Act of 1958, No. 115, 1961

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1961-01-01

    These very detailed regulations lay down the licensing system for the use of radioactive materials. They provide for monitoring and control of radiation and radiation contamination, storage, labelling and transport of radioactive materials and also for the disposal of radioactive waste. (NEA) [fr

  8. Marine chemistry, fish / shell-fish surveys, benthic organisms, and marine toxic substances and pollutants data from current meter and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from 1993-01-26 to 1994-06-13 (NODC Accession 9500088)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine chemistry, fish / shell-fish surveys, benthic organisms, and marine toxic substances and pollutants data were collected using current meter and other...

  9. Current direction, chemical, and marine toxic substances data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1978-09-09 to 1979-11-19 (NODC Accession 8000043)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, marine toxic substances, and chemical data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from...

  10. Benthic organisms and marine toxic substances and pollutants collected using sediment sampler and net casts from the GUS III and EXCELLENCE in the Gulf of Mexico from 1978-05-24 to 1979-02-26 (NODC Accession 7900304)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organisms and marine toxic substances and pollutants were collected using sediment sampler and net casts in the Gulf of Mexico. Data were submitted by Texas...

  11. Benthic organisms and marine toxic substances and pollutants collected using net and sediment samplers from the MT MITCHELL and other platforms from 22 May 1974 to 27 May 1974 (NODC Accession 7800886)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organisms and marine toxic substances and pollutants were collected using sediment sampler and net casts in the coastal waters of the East coast of US. Data...

  12. Chemical, zooplankton, and marine toxic substances data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1978-06-02 to 1979-06-02 (NODC Accession 8000002)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, zooplankton, and marine toxic substances data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from June 2, 1978...

  13. Marine toxic substance and other data from the Gulf of Alaska from the MOANA WAVE as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program from 1976-06-25 to 078 July 1976 (NCEI Accession 7601849)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from the MOANA WAVE. Data were collected by Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL)...

  14. Benthic organism and marine toxic substances and pollutants collected using net and sediment sampler casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in Gulf of Mexico from 1979-07-23 to 1980-12-13 (NODC Accession 8200103)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and marine toxic substances and pollutants were collected using net, sediment sampler, and other instruments from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other...

  15. Benthic organisms and marine toxic substances and pollutants data collected using net casts and other instruments from the GYRE and other platforms in NW Atlantic Ocean from 11 November 1983 to 30 July 1986 (NODC Accession 8800192)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organisms and marine toxic substances and pollutants were collected using net casts, sediment sampler, and other instruments from the GYRE and other...

  16. Marine toxic substances and pollutants data from sediment corer and other instruments from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other platforms in the Caribbean Sea from 1980-07-16 to 1987-11-29 (NODC Accession 8800013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and pollutants data were collected using sediment corer and other instruments in the Caribbean Sea from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other...

  17. Chemical, benthic organisms, zooplankton, marine toxic substances, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1979-08-30 to 1981-09-21 (NODC Accession 8200012)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, marine toxic substances, benthic organisms, zooplankton, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf...

  18. Perceived Sexual Control, Sex-Related Alcohol Expectancies and Behavior Predict Substance-Related Sexual Revictimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kate; Messman-Moore, Terri; Zerubavel, Noga; Chandley, Rachel B.; DeNardi, Kathleen A.; Walker, Dave P.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Although numerous studies have documented linkages between childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and later sexual revictimization, mechanisms underlying revictimization, particularly assaults occurring in the context of substance use, are not well-understood. Consistent with Traumagenic Dynamics theory, the present study tested a path model positing that lowered perceptions of sexual control resulting from CSA may be associated with increased sex-related alcohol expectancies and heightened likelihood of risky sexual behavior, which in turn, may predict adult substance-related rape. Methods Participants were 546 female college students who completed anonymous surveys regarding CSA and adult rape, perceptions of sexual control, sex-related alcohol expectancies, and likelihood of engaging in risky sexual behavior. Results The data fit the hypothesized model well and all hypothesized path coefficients were significant and in the expected directions. As expected, sex-related alcohol expectancies and likelihood of risky sexual behavior only predicted substance-related rape, not forcible rape. Conclusions Findings suggested that low perceived sexual control stemming from CSA is associated with increased sex-related alcohol expectancies and a higher likelihood of engaging in sexual behavior in the context of alcohol use. In turn these proximal risk factors heighten vulnerability to substance-related rape. Programs which aim to reduce risk for substance-related rape could be improved by addressing expectancies and motivations for risky sexual behavior in the context of substance use. Implications and future directions are discussed. PMID:23312991

  19. ACTS TDMA network control. [Advanced Communication Technology Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inukai, T.; Campanella, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents basic network control concepts for the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) System. Two experimental systems, called the low-burst-rate and high-burst-rate systems, along with ACTS ground system features, are described. The network control issues addressed include frame structures, acquisition and synchronization procedures, coordinated station burst-time plan and satellite-time plan changes, on-board clock control based on ground drift measurements, rain fade control by means of adaptive forward-error-correction (FEC) coding and transmit power augmentation, and reassignment of channel capacities on demand. The NASA ground system, which includes a primary station, diversity station, and master control station, is also described.

  20. High concentrations of protein test substances may have non-toxic effects on Daphnia magna: implications for regulatory study designs and ecological risk assessments for GM crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybould, Alan; Burns, Andrea; Hamer, Mick

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory testing for possible adverse effects of insecticidal proteins on non-target organisms (NTOs) is an important part of many ecological risk assessments for regulatory decision-making about the cultivation of insect-resistant genetically modified (IRGM) crops. To increase confidence in the risk assessments, regulatory guidelines for effects testing specify that representative surrogate species for NTOs are exposed to concentrations of insecticidal proteins that are in excess of worst-case predicted exposures in the field. High concentrations in effects tests are achieved by using protein test substances produced in microbes, such as Escherichia coli. In a study that exposed Daphnia magna to a single high concentration of a microbial test substance containing Vip3Aa20, the insecticidal protein in MIR162 maize, small reductions in growth were observed. These effects were surprising as many other studies strongly suggest that the activity of Vip3Aa20 is limited to Lepidoptera. A plausible explanation for the effect on growth is that high concentrations of test substance have a non-toxic effect on Daphnia, perhaps by reducing its feeding rate. A follow-up study tested that hypothesis by exposing D. magna to several concentrations of Vip3Aa20, and a high concentration of a non-toxic protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA). Vip3Aa20 and BSA had sporadic effects on the reproduction and growth of D. magna. The pattern of the effects suggests that they result from non-toxic effects of high concentrations of protein, and not from toxicity. The implications of these results for regulatory NTO effects testing and ERA of IRGM crops are discussed.

  1. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Mindfulness and Acceptance Group Therapy for Residential Substance Use Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorey, Ryan C; Elmquist, Joanna; Gawrysiak, Michael J; Strauss, Catherine; Haynes, Ellen; Anderson, Scott; Stuart, Gregory L

    2017-09-19

    Substance use disorders are understood as a chronically relapsing condition that is difficult to treat. However, in recent years there have been promising developments in the treatment of substance use disorders, specifically with interventions based on mindfulness and acceptance and commitment therapy. Little research has examined whether these types of interventions may positively impact residential substance use treatment outcomes. Thus, in the current study we developed and examined, in a randomized controlled trial, a 4-week, eight-session, adjunctive mindfulness and acceptance group therapy for patients in residential substance use treatment. Our primary outcomes were substance use cravings, psychological flexibility, and dispositional mindfulness at treatment discharge. Patients (N = 117) from a private residential substance use facility were randomized to receive the adjunctive mindfulness and acceptance group or treatment-as-usual. Patients were assessed at treatment intake and at discharge from a 28-30-day residential program. Although treatment groups did not statistically differ at discharge on any primary outcome, small effect sizes favored the mindfulness and acceptance group on cravings and psychological flexibility. Conclusions/Importance: Continued research is needed to determine whether the addition of mindfulness and acceptance-based interventions improve outcomes long term following residential substance use treatment.

  2. Stabilizing the baseline current of a microbial fuel cell-based biosensor through overpotential control under non-toxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Nienke E; Hamelers, Hubertus V M; Buisman, Cees N J

    2010-04-01

    A MFC-based biosensor can act as online toxicity sensor. Electrical current is a direct linear measure for metabolic activity of electrochemically active microorganisms. Microorganisms gain energy from anodic overpotential and current strongly depends on anodic overpotential. Therefore control of anodic overpotential is necessary to detect toxic events and prevent false positive alarms. Anodic overpotential and thus current is influenced by anode potential, pH, substrate and bicarbonate concentrations. In terms of overpotential all factor showed a comparable effect, anode potential 1.2% change in current density per mV, pH 0.43%/mV, bicarbonate 0.75%/mV and acetate 0.8%/mV. At acetate saturation the maximum acetate conversion rate is reached and with that a constant bicarbonate concentration. Control of acetate and bicarbonate concentration can be less strict than control of anode potential and pH. Current density changes due to changing anode potential and pH are in the same order of magnitude as changes due to toxicity. Strict control of pH and anode potential in a small range is required. The importance of anodic overpotential control for detection of toxic compounds is shown. To reach a stable baseline current under nontoxic conditions a MFC-based biosensor should be operated at controlled anode potential, controlled pH and saturated substrate concentrations. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Various possible ways to express the toxicity of radioactive substances in relation with the involved practical problems; Diverses expressions possibles de la toxicite des substances radioactives en fonction des problemes pratiques poses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jammet, H; Vacca, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    Radioelements have at the same time physico-chemical and radioactive properties. It is then possible to establish two types of toxicological classifications: one in function of the weight of the radioelement, another in function of its activity. More often, the maximum permissible amounts (MPA) in the human body and the maximum permissible concentrations (MPC) in air and water are expressed in microcuries by millilitre ({mu}c/ml), less frequently in micrograms by millilitre ({mu}g/ml). The comparison of these tables of MPA and MPC shows important differences in the classification of radioactive substances by order of decreasing toxicity. Plutonium and radium, being among the most toxic products when the activity is considered are far from being the most dangerous when the weight is considered. On the other hand, {sup 131}I and {sup 56}Mn, for instance appear to be among the most hazardous substances in this eventuality. This twofold consideration corresponds to two aspects of the problems of the toxicity of radioisotopes. The classification by activity is almost exclusively utilised because the toxicological measurements are based on the radioactive properties of the radioisotopes. In general, only these measurements allow to detect the very small amounts of substance usually involved. On the other hand, the toxicity related to internal contamination by radioisotopes depends mostly from their metabolism which is exclusively a function of their physico-chemical properties. Therefore the classification by weight gives the best representation of the hazards encountered when radioactive substances are inhaled or ingested. As a result, the relative toxicity of radioisotopes cannot be based on the classification by activity only. The present division of radioisotopes into different classes: very hazardous, moderately hazardous, slightly hazardous must be revised. (author) [French] Les radioelements presentent a la fois des proprietes physico-chimiques banales et des

  4. Advanced combustor design concept to control NOx and air toxics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eddings, E.G.; Pershing, D.W.; Molina, A.; Sarofim, A.F.; Spinti, J.P.; Veranth, J.

    1999-03-29

    Direct coal combustion needs to be a primary energy source for the electric utility industry and for heavy manufacturing during the next several decades because of the availability and economic advantage of coal relative to other fuels and because of the time required to produce major market penetration in the energy field. However, the major obstacle to coal utilization is a set of ever-tightening environmental regulations at both the federal and local level. It is, therefore, critical that fundamental research be conducted to support the development of low-emission, high-efficiency pulverized coal power systems. The objective of this program was to develop fundamental understanding regarding the impact of fuel and combustion changes on NOx formation, carbon burnout and air toxic emissions from pulverized coal (pc) combustion. During pc combustion, nitrogen in the coal can be oxidized to form nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}). The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments established much stricter NO{sub x} emissions limits for new and existing coal-fired plants, so there has been renewed interest in the processes by which NO{sub x} forms in pc flames. One of the least understood aspects of NO{sub x} formation from pc combustion is the process by which char-N (nitrogen remaining in the char after devolatilization) forms either NO{sub x} or N{sub 2}, and the development of a fundamental understanding of this process was a major focus of this research. The overall objective of this program was to improve the ability of combustion system designers and boiler manufacturers to build high efficiency, low emission pulverized coal systems by improving the design tools available to the industry. The specific program goals were to: Use laboratory experiments and modeling to develop fundamental understanding for a new submodel for char nitrogen oxidation (a critical piece usually neglected in most NOx models.); Use existing bench scale facilities to investigate alternative schemes to

  5. 76 FR 62448 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ..., Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals, Inc., 2820 N. Normandy Drive, Petersburg, Virginia 23805, made application by... Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals, Inc. to import the basic class of controlled [[Page 62449

  6. Modernizing methodology for the WHO assessment of substances for the international drug control conventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danenberg, E; Sorge, L A; Wieniawski, W; Elliott, S; Amato, L; Scholten, W K

    2013-08-01

    The WHO Executive Board revised the guidance that governs the procedures for the WHO review of psychoactive substances for international drug control in 2010. To meet the standards defined in these guidelines, the current evaluation methodology at WHO must be an evidence-based assessment. We describe the history of substance evaluation from 1912 to the present and the development of the evaluation methods over time including a description of the current assessment system, using reports from WHO and its predecessor, the League of Nations. Furthermore, we describe the current review system. We found that some substances under international control were never reviewed; other substances were reviewed decades ago. We argue that assessments do not have unlimited validity, and therefore, substances need to be re-assessed periodically, as already recommended by the Expert Committee on Drug Dependence in 1982. We propose that the evaluation time be shortened; that the influence of the route of administration and/or dosage form of the preparation is considered in the evaluation; and we recommend studying national and regional assessment systems and adopting their best practices. With this article, we make a case for the inclusion of systematic review and other methods of comprehensive analysis of substance evaluation to arrive at a process of equal rigour and quality as already applied by WHO for the development of treatment guidelines. Copyright © 2013 World Health Organization. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Quantitative study of controlled substance bedside wasting, disposal and evaluation of potential ecologic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankes, Russell F; Silver, Charles D

    2013-02-01

    Drugs in wastewater arise from many sources. For health care, these include excretion and direct disposal (bedside wasting). The present study reports on the dispensing and wasting of 15 controlled substances (CS) at two health care facilities in Albany, NY over a nearly two year period. The study considered measures of ecotoxicity, drug metabolism, excretion and disposal of these CS. Potential alternatives to flushing of CS into wastewaters from healthcare facilities are discussed. Drug medication and waste collection records (12,345) included: numbers of drugs dispensed, returned and wasted. Overall, 8528 g of 15 CS were wasted. Three (midazolam, acetaminophen-codeine and fentanyl) accounted for 87.5% of the total wasted. Wasting varied by hospital, 14 CS at the academic medical center hospital and 8 at the surgical care center were wasted. Liquids were more frequently wasted than tablets or pills. Some combination drugs (acetaminophen (APAP)-codeine) were frequently (50% of drug dispensed) wasted while others were less wasted (APAP-hydrocodone-6.3%; APAP-oxycodone-1.3%). The 8 CS judged more hazardous to aquatic life were: APAP-codeine, APAP-hydrocodone, APAP-oxycodone, alprazolam, diazepam, fentanyl, midazolam, and testosterone. Ketamine, morphine, oxycodone and zolpidem were of lesser acute toxicity based on available LC50 values. These CS might provide a therapeutically equivalent alternative to the more environmentally harmful drugs. In health care facilities, professionals dispose of CS by bedside wasting into water or other receptacles. This can be avoided by returning CS to the hospital's pharmacy department, thence to a licensed distributor. Study of this process of drug wasting can identify opportunities for process improvements. We found 3 CS (APAP-codeine, midazolam and testosterone) where ½ to 1/3 of the drug was wasted and 5 others with 30 to 13% wasted. Knowledge of the adverse impacts from the release of highly toxic drugs into the environment

  8. 1995 Toxic chemical release inventory: Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Section 313

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mincey, S.L.

    1996-08-01

    Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act (EPCRA) requires the annual submittal of toxic chemical release information to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.Executive Order 12856, 'Federal Compliance With Right-to-Know Laws and Pollution Prevention Requirements' extends the requirements of EPCRA to all Federal agencies. The following document is the August 1996 submittal of the Hanford Site Toxic Chemical Release Inventory report. Included is a Form R for ethylene glycol, the sole chemical used in excess of the established regulatory thresholds at the Hanford Site by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office and its contractors during Calendar Year 1995

  9. Processes linking parents’ and adolescents’ religiousness and adolescent substance use: Monitoring and self-control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Spoon, Jungmeen; Farley, Julee P.; Holmes, Christopher; Longo, Gregory S.; McCullough, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Empirical evidence suggests that religiousness is related negatively to adolescent substance use; yet, we know little about how such protective effects might occur. The current study examined whether parents’ and adolescents’ religiousness are associated positively with parental, religious, and self-monitoring, which in turn are related to higher self-control, thereby related to lower adolescent substance use. Participants were 220 adolescents (45% female) who were interviewed at ages 10–16 and again 2.4 years later. Structural equation modeling analyses suggested that higher adolescents’ religiousness at Time 1 was related to lower substance use at Time 2 indirectly through religious monitoring, self-monitoring, and self-control. Higher parents’ religiousness at Time 1 was associated with higher parental monitoring at Time 2, which in turn was related to lower adolescent substance use at Time 2 directly and indirectly through higher adolescent self-control. The results illustrate that adolescents with high awareness of being monitored by God are likely to show high self-control abilities and, consequently, low substance use. The findings further suggest that adolescents’ religiousness as well as their religious environments (e.g., familial context) can facilitate desirable developmental outcomes. PMID:23975353

  10. Processes linking parents' and adolescents' religiousness and adolescent substance use: monitoring and self-control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Spoon, Jungmeen; Farley, Julee P; Holmes, Christopher; Longo, Gregory S; McCullough, Michael E

    2014-05-01

    Empirical evidence suggests that religiousness is related negatively to adolescent substance use; yet, we know little about how such protective effects might occur. The current study examined whether parents' and adolescents' religiousness are associated positively with parental, religious, and self-monitoring, which in turn are related to higher self-control, thereby related to lower adolescent substance use. Participants were 220 adolescents (45 % female) who were interviewed at ages 10-16 and again 2.4 years later. Structural equation modeling analyses suggested that higher adolescents' religiousness at Time 1 was related to lower substance use at Time 2 indirectly through religious monitoring, self-monitoring, and self-control. Higher parents' religiousness at Time 1 was associated with higher parental monitoring at Time 2, which in turn was related to lower adolescent substance use at Time 2 directly and indirectly through higher adolescent self-control. The results illustrate that adolescents with high awareness of being monitored by God are likely to show high self-control abilities and, consequently, low substance use. The findings further suggest that adolescents' religiousness as well as their religious environments (e.g., familial context) can facilitate desirable developmental outcomes.

  11. 1997 toxic chemical release inventory. Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act, Section 313

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaloudek, D.E.

    1998-01-01

    Two listed toxic chemicals were used at the Hanford Site above established activity thresholds: phosphoric acid and chlorine. Because total combined quantities of chlorine released, disposed, treated, recovered through recycle operations, co-combusted for energy recovery, and transferred to off-site locations for the purpose of recycle, energy recovery, treatment, and/or disposal, amounted to less than 500 pounds, the Hanford Site qualified for the alternate one million pound threshold for chlorine. Accordingly, this Toxic Chemical Release Inventory includes a Form A for chlorine, and a Form B for phosphoric acid

  12. Demonstration of a Non-Toxic Reaction Control Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Philip J.; Turpin, Alicia A.; Veith, Eric M.

    2007-01-01

    T:hree non-toxic demonstration reaction control engines (RCE) were successfully tested at the Aerojet Sacramento facility under a technology contract sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The goals of the NASA MSFC contract (NAS8-01109) were to develop and expand the technical maturity of a non-toxic, on-orbit auxiliary propulsion system (APS) thruster under the auspices of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate. The demonstration engine utilized Liquid Oxygen (LOX) and Ethanol as propellants to produce 870 lbf thrust. The Aerojet RCE's were successfully acceptance tested over a broad range of operating conditions. Steady state tests evaluated engine response to varying chamber pressures and mixture ratios. In addition to the steady state tests, a variety of pulsing tests were conducted over a wide range of electrical pulse widths (EPW). Each EPW condition was also tested over a range of percent duty cycles (DC), and bit impulse and pulsing specific impulse were determined for each of these conditions. Subsequent to acceptance testing at Aerojet, these three engines were delivered to the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) in April 2005 for incorporation into a cryogenic Auxiliary Propulsion System Test Bed (APSTB). The APSTB is a test article that will be utilized in an altitude test cell to simulate anticipated mission applications. The objectives of this APSTB testing included evaluation of engine performance over an extended duty cycle map of propellant pressure and temperature, as well as engine and system performance at typical mission duty cycles over extended periods of time. This paper provides acceptance test results and a status of the engine performance as part of the system level testing.

  13. 76 FR 30969 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-27

    ... Opium, raw (9600) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II The company plans to import the listed controlled... international treaties, conventions, or protocols in effect on May 1, 1971. DEA has investigated Mallinckrodt...

  14. 75 FR 14186 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... Opium (9600) II Concentrate of Poppy Straw (9670) II The company plans to import the listed controlled... protocols in effect on May 1, 1971, at this time. DEA has investigated Rhodes Technologies to ensure that...

  15. Explaining the relationship between religiousness and substance use: self-control matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWall, C Nathan; Pond, Richard S; Carter, Evan C; McCullough, Michael E; Lambert, Nathaniel M; Fincham, Frank D; Nezlek, John B

    2014-08-01

    Religiousness is reliably associated with lower substance use, but little research has examined whether self-control helps explain why religiousness predicts lower substance use. Building on prior theoretical work, our studies suggest that self-control mediates the relationship between religiousness and a variety of substance-use behaviors. Study 1 showed that daily prayer predicted lower alcohol use on subsequent days. In Study 2, religiousness related to lower alcohol use, which was mediated by self-control. Study 3 replicated this mediational pattern using a behavioral measure of self-control. Using a longitudinal design, Study 4 revealed that self-control mediated the relationship between religiousness and lower alcohol use 6 weeks later. Study 5 replicated this mediational pattern again and showed that it remained significant after controlling for trait mindfulness. Studies 6 and 7 replicated and extended these effects to both alcohol and various forms of drug use among community and cross-cultural adult samples. These findings offer novel evidence regarding the role of self-control in explaining why religiousness is associated with lower substance use.

  16. Battery collection in municipal waste management in Japan: challenges for hazardous substance control and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terazono, Atsushi; Oguchi, Masahiro; Iino, Shigenori; Mogi, Satoshi

    2015-05-01

    To clarify current collection rules of waste batteries in municipal waste management in Japan and to examine future challenges for hazardous substance control and safety, we reviewed collection rules of waste batteries in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area. We also conducted a field survey of waste batteries collected at various battery and small waste electric and electronic equipment (WEEE) collection sites in Tokyo. The different types of batteries are not collected in a uniform way in the Tokyo area, so consumers need to pay attention to the specific collection rules for each type of battery in each municipality. In areas where small WEEE recycling schemes are being operated after the enforcement of the Act on Promotion of Recycling of Small Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment in Japan in 2013, consumers may be confused about the need for separating batteries from small WEEE (especially mobile phones). Our field survey of collected waste batteries indicated that 6-10% of zinc carbon and alkaline batteries discarded in Japan currently could be regarded as containing mercury. More than 26% of zinc carbon dry batteries currently being discarded may have a lead content above the labelling threshold of the EU Batteries Directive (2006/66/EC). In terms of safety, despite announcements by producers and municipalities about using insulation (tape) on waste batteries to prevent fires, only 2.0% of discarded cylindrical dry batteries were insulated. Our field study of small WEEE showed that batteries made up an average of 4.6% of the total collected small WEEE on a weight basis. Exchangeable batteries were used in almost all of mobile phones, digital cameras, radios, and remote controls, but the removal rate was as low as 22% for mobile phones. Given the safety issues and the rapid changes occurring with mobile phones or other types of small WEEE, discussion is needed among stakeholders to determine how to safely collect and recycle WEEE and waste batteries. Copyright

  17. Harms associated with taking nalmefene for substance use and impulse control disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Karina Glies Vincents; Tarp, Simon; Astrup, Arne

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Nalmefene is a newly approved drug for alcohol use disorder, but the risk of harms has not been evaluated from empirical trial evidence. OBJECTIVE: To assess the harm of nalmefene administered to individuals diagnosed with substance use or impulse control disorders by performing...... only randomised controlled trials with placebo or active controls that administered nalmefene to adult individuals for treating impulse control and/or substance use disorders. Both published and unpublished randomised controlled trials were eligible for inclusion. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS...... a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. DATA SOURCES: A search was performed in Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, 2014), MEDLINE via PubMed (1950), EMBASE via Ovid (1974), and Clinicaltrials.gov through December 2014. STUDY SELECTION: This study included...

  18. Is a combination of different natural substances suitable for slug (Arion spp.) control?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laznik, Ž.; Trdan, S.

    2016-11-01

    In a laboratory study we investigated the contact and barrier efficacy of different natural substances (wood ash, sawdust, hydrated lime, and diatomaceous earth) against slugs of the genus Arion, an important agricultural pest. Natural substances were tested individually and in combination with each other. The experiment was carried out in plastic petri dishes and in glass insectaria. Moistened tampons and fresh leaves of lettuce were placed into both experimental arenas. The slugs were starved for 48 hours prior to the experiment. Six categories of behaviour were identified for slugs in the presence of the natural substances: (1) slug survived the experiment, (2) slug died during the experiment, (3) slug crossed the barrier, (4) slug did not cross the barrier, (5) slug fed on the lettuce, and (6) slug did not feed on the lettuce. The effect of different treatments (natural substances) was significant. The results of our study have shown that hydrated lime had the best contact efficacy on slugs (the mortality of slugs was 100%), both individually and in combination with other substances. The treatments with hydrated lime also proved to be the most efficient barrier preventing slugs from feeding on lettuce. Hydrated lime shows great potential in Arion control in our investigation; however, further research is needed to investigate the practical value (how to avoid the problem when the substance becomes wet), safety and economics of hydrated lime used in this way. (Author)

  19. 75 FR 69462 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-12

    ... 53718), Cambrex Charles City, Inc., 1205 11th Street, Charles City, Iowa 50616, made application by... bulk intermediate which will be distributed in bulk to the company's customers. No comments or... that the registration of Cambrex Charles City, Inc. to import the basic classes of controlled...

  20. 76 FR 39128 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ... February 23, 2011, 76 FR 10068, Johnson Matthey Pharmaceutical Materials Inc., Pharmaceutical Service, 25...) II Sufentanil (9740) II Hydrocodone (9193) II The company plans to utilize this facility to... support of the company's primary manufacturing facility in West Deptford, New Jersey. The controlled...

  1. 75 FR 16235 - Electronic Prescriptions for Controlled Substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    ... mature standard for the formatting of prescription data, most electronic prescriptions are routed from... prescriptions prior to granting access to sign such prescriptions, two-factor authentication including a hard... practitioner can retain control of a biometric or hard token. Authentication based only on knowledge factors is...

  2. Some biochemical characteristics of a toxic substance isolated from organs of lethally irradiated animals in the course of the intestinal syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meter, J D; Sirota, N S [Tsentral' nyj Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Rentgeno-Radiologicheskij Inst., Leningrad (USSR)

    1976-05-01

    A toxic substance isolated from organs of lethally irradiated (1300 rads) animals in the period when intestinal syndrome has developed is classified according to the parameters under study (namely, the molecular weight, UV-absorption curve, extinction coefficient, specific monosaccharides, the presence and percentage of KDA, etc.) as lipopolysaccharide of Escherichia coli, the main inhabitant of the gastroenteric tract of mice. That endotoxins (sensitivity to which is increased in this period of radiation sickness) are detected in the blood and organs of lethally irradiated animals, might indicate their participation in the pathogenesis of the intestinal syndrome.

  3. Some biochemical characteristics of a toxic substance isolated from organs of lethally irradiated animals in the course of the intestinal syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meter, J.D.; Sirota, N.S.

    1976-01-01

    A toxic substance isolated from organs of lethally irradiated (1300 rads) animals in the period when intestinal syndrome has developed is classified according to the parameters under study (namely, the molecular weight, UV-absorption curve, extinction coefficient, specific monosaccharides, the presence and percentage of KDA, etc.) as lipopolysaccharide of Escherichia coli, the main inhabitant of the gastroenteric tract of mice. That endotoxins (sensitivity to which is increased in this period of radiation sickness) are detected in the blood and organs of lethally irradiated animals, might indicate their participation in the pathogenesis of the intestinal syndrome

  4. 14 CFR 1274.926 - Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts...-Water Pollution Control Acts. Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts July 2002 If this cooperative... 91-604) and section 308 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq...

  5. 40 CFR 125.66 - Toxics control program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... (1) An applicant that has known or suspected industrial sources of toxic pollutants shall have an... any applicant which has no known or suspected industrial sources of toxic pollutants or pesticides and.... (a) Chemical analysis. (1) The applicant shall submit at the time of application a chemical analysis...

  6. TOXIC METAL EMISSIONS FROM INCINERATION: MECHANISMS AND CONTROL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxic metals appear in the effluents of many combustion processes, and their release into the environment has come under regulatory scrutiny. This paper reviews the nature of the problems associated with toxic metals in combustion processes, and describes where these problems occ...

  7. Separation of special toxic substances from the air and incinerator of offgas streams, especially of radioactive iodine and polycyclic carbon hydrogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikoopour-Deylami, A.H.

    1981-11-01

    In the first part of the thesis, the adsorption of radioiodine and methyliodide on different kinds of active charcoal was studied. It was observed that untreated charcoal retains radioiodine sufficiently, while organic compounds as methyliodid could be adsorbed after pretreating with triethylenediamine even at high air velocities. In the presence of moisture in the air the efficiency dropped down to 30% of the original value. In the second part of the work an apparatus using sandfilter columns for the separation of toxic substances and thermochrome column for marking the temperature intervals was developed and posted at different places in athe filtering system of an incineration plant. After extraction of the polycyclic aromates with benzene from the column and chemical separation, the neutral fraction was split by a silicagel column and 14 toxic aromates identified by gas chromatography. It could be proven that 97 +- 2% of the polycyclic aromates were retained by the existing ceramic filter systems. (Author)

  8. Controlled release of biofunctional substances by radiation-induced polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, M.; Kumakura, M.; Kaetsu, I.

    1978-01-01

    The controlled release of potassium chloride from flat circular matrices made by radiation-induced polymerization of a glass-forming monomer at low temperatures has been studied. The water-particle phase content formed in a poly(diethylene glycol dimethacrylate) matrix was controlled by the addition of polyethylene glycol 600. The dispersed water-particle phase content in the matrix was estimated directly and by scanning electron microscopic observations. The release of potassium chloride from the matrix increased linearly with the square root of time. The water content of the matrix had an important effect on the release rate which increases roughly in proportion to water content. This effect can be attributed to the apparent increase of the rate of drug diffusion. (author)

  9. Act No. 11/87 of 7 april - Basic environment act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-04-01

    The purpose of this Act is to provide the basis for an environmental policy in Portugal. Section 25 of the Act deals with radioactive substances. It provides that any contamination likely to be caused by these substances should be controlled with a view to preventing its effects on the health and welfare of the population and specifies the methods for such control [fr

  10. 78 FR 64013 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cambrex Charles City, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... Application; Cambrex Charles City, Inc. Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations 1301.34(a), this is notice that on July 24, 2013, Cambrex Charles City, Inc., 1205 11th Street, Charles City, Iowa 50616-3466... class of any controlled substance in schedules I or II are, and will continue to be, required to...

  11. 77 FR 67397 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Johnson Matthey, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    ...; Notice of Application; Johnson Matthey, Inc. Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on September 10, 2012, Johnson Matthey, Inc., Pharmaceuticals Materials... Thebaine (9333) II The company plans to manufacture the listed controlled substances in bulk for...

  12. 78 FR 15975 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration; Johnson Matthey, Inc...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-13

    ..., Notice of Registration; Johnson Matthey, Inc., Pharmaceuticals Materials By Notice dated November 1, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on November 9, 2012, 77 FR 67397, Johnson Matthey, Inc...) II The company plans to manufacture the listed controlled substances in bulk for distribution and...

  13. 77 FR 30026 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Johnson Matthey, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ...; Notice of Application; Johnson Matthey, Inc. Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on March 26, 2012, Johnson Matthey, Inc., Custom Pharmaceuticals...), a basic class of controlled substance listed in schedule II. The company plans to manufacture the...

  14. 77 FR 30028 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Johnson Matthey, Inc...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ...; Notice of Registration; Johnson Matthey, Inc., Pharmaceuticals Materials By Notice dated January 6, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on January 17, 2012, 77 FR 2324, Johnson Matthey, Inc... (9333) II The company plans to manufacture the listed controlled substances in bulk for sale to its...

  15. 78 FR 19016 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Johnson Matthey, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ... Registration; Johnson Matthey, Inc. By Notice dated November 19, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on November 27, 2012, 77 FR 70824, Johnson Matthey, Inc., Pharmaceutical Materials, 2003 Nolte Drive, West... Concentrate (9670) II The company plans to import the listed controlled substances as raw materials, to be...

  16. Commentary: Synthetic Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids: A Plea for Controlled Substance Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, William N.

    1987-01-01

    The widespread abuse of synthetic anabolic-androgenic steriods, their habit-forming properties, and their other adverse effects are good reasons for reclassification of steriods as controlled substances under federal law, a step which may combat their abuse. (Author/CB)

  17. 77 FR 67675 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Watson Pharma, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Watson Pharma, Inc. Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations 1301.34(a), this is notice that on August 28, 2012, Watson Pharma, Inc., 2455 Wardlow Road, Corona, California 92880-2882, made...

  18. 78 FR 33440 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application; Watson Pharma, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application; Watson Pharma, Inc. Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations 1301.34 (a), this is notice that on May 3, 2013, Watson Pharma, Inc., 2455 Wardlow Road, Corona, California 92880-2882, made...

  19. 78 FR 30332 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Austin Pharma, Llc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Austin Pharma, Llc. Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on March 28, 2013, Austin Pharma, LLC., 811 Paloma Drive, Suite C...

  20. 77 FR 31388 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Capricorn Pharma, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... Registration; Capricorn Pharma, Inc. By Notice dated March 8, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on March 20, 2012, 77 FR 16262, Capricorn Pharma, Inc., 6900 English Muffin Way, Unit A, Frederick... registration of Capricorn Pharma, Inc., to import the basic class of controlled substance is consistent with...

  1. 77 FR 30027 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Austin Pharma, LLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Austin Pharma, LLC. Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on April 11, 2012, Austin Pharma, LLC., 811 Paloma Drive, Suite C...

  2. 77 FR 50163 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Catalent Pharma Solutions, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Catalent Pharma Solutions, Inc. Correction In notice document 2012-19202 appearing on page 47114 in the issue of Tuesday, August 7, 2012, make the following correction: On page 47114, in the first...

  3. 77 FR 34073 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; S&B Pharma, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; S&B Pharma, Inc. Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on April 4, 2012, S&B Pharma Inc., 405 South Motor Avenue, Azusa...

  4. 77 FR 24984 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Catalent Pharma Solutions, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Catalent Pharma Solutions, Inc. Pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 958(i), the Attorney General shall, prior... January 5, 2012, Catalent Pharma Solutions, Inc., 10381 Decatur Road, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19114...

  5. 78 FR 46613 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Siegfried (USA), LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Siegfried (USA), LLC Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on June 10, 2013, Siegfried (USA), LLC., 33 Industrial Park Road...

  6. 78 FR 5500 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application; Siegfried (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application; Siegfried (USA) Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on June 19, 2012, Siegfried (USA), 33 Industrial Park Road, Pennsville...

  7. 77 FR 70825 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Siegfried (USA), LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Siegfried (USA), LLC Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on November 5, 2012, Siegfried (USA) LLC, 33 Industrial Park Road...

  8. 78 FR 49546 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Siegfried USA, LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Siegfried USA, LLC This is notice that on June 10, 2013, Siegfried USA, LLC., 33 Industrial Park Road, Pennsville, New Jersey 08070, made application by letter to the Drug Enforcement Administration...

  9. 78 FR 32458 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Siegfried USA, LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Siegfried USA, LLC Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on April 18, 2013, Siegfried USA, LLC., 33 Industrial Park Road...

  10. 78 FR 12101 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Mallinckrodt, LLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... Coca Leaves (9040) II Opium, raw (9600) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II The company plans to... or coca leaves. Comments and requests for hearings on applications to import narcotic raw material... to manufacture such basic classes of controlled substances listed in schedules I or II, which fall...

  11. 75 FR 15642 - Schedules of Controlled Substances: Exempted Prescription Product; River Edge Pharmaceutical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ... 1117-AB28 Schedules of Controlled Substances: Exempted Prescription Product; River Edge Pharmaceutical... new applications for exemption. DEA has received one new application for exemption for River Edge... application for exemption pursuant to the provisions of 21 CFR 1308.32 for: River Edge Pharmaceutical's...

  12. Express control of migration processes of radioactive substances during drilling works in 'Ukryttya' object local zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pravdivyj, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Technical proposals are prepared to create a procedure for operative control of drilling works. Such a procedure will permit detecting the displacement of radioactively contaminated ground along borehole bore and correcting the drilling work procedure, which would prevent radioactive substance spreading, in boreholes of 'Ukryttya' object local zone and those of Exclusion Zone

  13. 40 CFR 82.13 - Recordkeeping and reporting requirements for class I controlled substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... subpart) and will not be resold or used in manufacturing. (xiii) The amount of class I, Group VI... class II controlled substances; (xii) The U.S. Customs entry form; (xiii) Dated records documenting the..., an annual list of the amount of critical use methyl bromide bought; (ii) For critical uses of class I...

  14. 77 FR 64143 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration, Akorn, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-18

    ... Enforcement Administration (DEA) to be registered as an importer of Remifentanil (9739), a basic class of controlled substance listed in schedule II. The company plans to import Remifentanil in bulk for use in dosage- form manufacturing. No comments or objections have been received. DEA has considered the factors...

  15. 78 FR 5501 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Cerilliant Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Cerilliant Corporation By Notice dated August 17, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on August 29, 2012, 77 FR 52366, Cerilliant Corporation, 811 Paloma Drive, Suite A, Round...

  16. 77 FR 70186 - Importer Of Controlled Substances; Notice Of Registration; Cerilliant Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer Of Controlled Substances; Notice Of Registration; Cerilliant Corporation By Notice dated August 17, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on August 20, 2012, 77 FR 50162, Cerilliant Corporation, 811 Paloma Drive, Suite A, Round Rock, Texas 78665...

  17. 77 FR 40087 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Cerilliant Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Cerilliant Corporation By Notice dated March 23, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on April 2, 2012, 77 FR 19717, Cerilliant Corporation, 811 Paloma Drive, Suite A, Round...

  18. 77 FR 47108 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cerilliant Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cerilliant Corporation Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations 1301.34 (a), this is notice that on July 6, 2012, Cerilliant Corporation, 811 Paloma Drive, Suite A, Round Rock...

  19. 78 FR 69130 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cerilliant Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cerilliant Corporation Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations 1301.34(a), this is notice that on July 16, 2013, Cerilliant Corporation, 811 Paloma Drive, Suite A, Round Rock, Texas 78665...

  20. 77 FR 52366 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cerilliant Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cerilliant Corporation Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on July 16, 2012, Cerilliant Corporation, 811 Paloma Drive...

  1. 78 FR 33442 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Cerilliant Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Cerilliant Corporation By Notice dated January 14, 2013, and published in the Federal Register on January 25, 2013, 78 FR 5499, Cerilliant Corporation, 811 Paloma Drive, Suite A, Round...

  2. 77 FR 31389 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Cerilliant Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Cerilliant Corporation By Notice dated March 8, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on March 20, 2012, 77 FR 16261, Cerilliant Corporation, 811 Paloma Drive, Suite A, Round Rock, Texas 78665...

  3. 78 FR 54917 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cerilliant Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cerilliant Corporation Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on July 10, 2013, Cerilliant Corporation, 811 Paloma Drive...

  4. 78 FR 5499 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cerilliant Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cerilliant Corporation Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on October 4, 2012, Cerilliant Corporation, 811 Paloma...

  5. 77 FR 24987 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Cerilliant Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Cerilliant Corporation By Notice dated January 5, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on January 17, 2012, 77 FR 2321, Cerilliant Corporation, 811 Paloma Drive, Suite A, Round...

  6. 77 FR 21999 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice Of Registration; Cerilliant Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice Of Registration; Cerilliant Corporation By Notice dated January 6, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on January 17, 2012, 77 FR 2321, Cerilliant Corporation, 811 Paloma Drive, Suite A, Round Rock, Texas 78665...

  7. 78 FR 57176 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application: Cerilliant Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application: Cerilliant Corporation Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations 1301.34(a), this is notice that on July 16, 2013, Cerilliant Corporation, 811 Paloma Drive, Suite A, Round Rock, Texas 78665...

  8. 77 FR 19717 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cerilliant Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cerilliant Corporation Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on February 17, 2012, Cerilliant Corporation, 811 Paloma...

  9. 78 FR 39337 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations 1301.34(a), this is notice that on May 31, 2013, Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals, 2820 N. Normandy Drive, Petersburg...

  10. 77 FR 43863 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals Inc. Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on June 8, 2012, Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals...

  11. 77 FR 43861 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations 1301.34(a), this is notice that on June 8, 2012, Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals, Inc., 2820 N. Normandy Drive...

  12. 78 FR 39340 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals, Inc. Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on May 31, 2013, Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals...

  13. A comparison of dysfunctional attitudes in substance abusers and control group and its psychological outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-11-01

    This research was carried out to assess the role of dysfunctional attitudes, outcomes of psychology in substance abuse behaviors of subject were referred to addiction treatment center in the city of Bandar Abbas, and to compare the with the control group. Methods: This is a retrospective study in which 100 subject substance abusers were compared with 100 subject s of control group who were selected using convenience sampling and were also demographically matched. Data were gathered using a demographic questionnaire, clinical interview, dysfunctional attitudes scale (DAS, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS. The data were analyzed via descriptive statistic method, T- Test and chi-square and variance analysis. Findings: Findings indicated that in comparison with control group, subject of substance abusers had experienced more stress, anxiety, depression, had shown a cognitively more percent of them dysfunctional attitudes in comparison with control group. Results: The results suggested that the dysfunctional attitudes could be as a Vulnerability Factor that increase abuse of substance consequently use of cognitive therapy could be helpful and effective in prevention and treatment of the addicts.

  14. 77 FR 67396 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc. Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations 1301.34(a), this is notice that on August 20, 2012, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., 7554 Schantz Road, [[Page 67397...

  15. 77 FR 60143 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc. Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations 1301.34(a), this is notice that on July 18, 2012, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., 7554 Schantz Road, Allentown...

  16. 77 FR 72409 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc. Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations 1301.34 (a), this is notice that on October 16, 2012, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., 7554 Schantz Road, Allentown...

  17. 78 FR 59064 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc. Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1301.34 (a), this is notice that on June 21, 2013, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., 7554 Schantz Road, Allentown...

  18. 78 FR 23958 - Importer of Controlled Substances: Notice of Registration; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-23

    ... Registration; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc. By Notice dated November 27, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on December 5, 2012, 77 FR 72409, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., 7554 Schantz Road, Allentown... the registration of Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., to import the basic class of controlled substance...

  19. 78 FR 5497 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ... Registration; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc. By Notice dated November 1, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on November 9, 2012, 77 FR 67396, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., 7554 Schantz Road, Allentown... the registration of Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., to import the basic class of controlled substance...

  20. 77 FR 55503 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Cambrex Charles City, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-10

    ... company plans to import the listed controlled substances for internal use, and to manufacture bulk... company's registration is consistent with the public interest. The investigation has included inspection and testing of the company's physical security systems, verification of the company's compliance with...

  1. 78 FR 32459 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Mallinckrodt, LLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-30

    ... plans to manufacture the listed controlled substances for internal use and for sale to other companies... ensure that the company's registration is consistent with the public interest. The investigation has included inspection and testing of the company's physical security systems, verification of the company's...

  2. 77 FR 24985 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI) Pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 958(i), the Attorney General shall... on March 5, 2012, Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI), 25 Fretz Road, Souderton, Pennsylvania 18964...

  3. 78 FR 46371 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Almac Clinical Services, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... Register on April 19, 2013, 78 FR 23594, Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI), 25 Fretz Road, Souderton... registration of Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI) to import the basic classes of controlled substances is..., conventions, or protocols in effect on May 1, 1971. DEA has investigated Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI...

  4. 78 FR 23594 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI) Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations 1301.34(a), this is notice that on March 5, 2013, Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI), 25 Fretz Road, Souderton...

  5. 21 CFR 1312.27 - Contents of special controlled substances invoice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... consumption within the importing country to satisfy medical, scientific or other legitimate purposes, and that... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Contents of special controlled substances invoice. 1312.27 Section 1312.27 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE...

  6. 41 CFR 101-42.1102-5 - Drugs, biologicals, and reagents other than controlled substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Drugs, biologicals, and reagents other than controlled substances. 101-42.1102-5 Section 101-42.1102-5 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS...

  7. 78 FR 17230 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration, Noramco, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-20

    ... basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Phenylacetone (8501) II Opium, raw (9600) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II Tapentadol (9780) II The company plans to import raw Opium (9600) and Poppy... treaties, conventions, or protocols in effect on May 1, 1971, at this time. DEA has investigated Noramco...

  8. 77 FR 43862 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Noramco, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-26

    ... basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Phenylacetone (8501) II Opium, raw (9600) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II Tapentadol (9780) II The company plans to import the Opium (9600) and Poppy... treaties, conventions, or protocols in effect on May 1, 1971, at this time. DEA has investigated Noramco...

  9. 31 CFR 0.204 - Use of controlled substances and intoxicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of controlled substances and intoxicants. 0.204 Section 0.204 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury... intoxicant in a manner that adversely affects their work performance. ...

  10. 78 FR 15974 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application; Meridian Medical Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application; Meridian Medical Technologies Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations 1301.34 (a), this is notice that on January 8, 2013, Meridian Medical Technologies, 2555 Hermelin Drive, St. Louis...

  11. 77 FR 19716 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application Meridian Medical Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application Meridian Medical Technologies Pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 958(i), the Attorney General shall, prior to... is notice that on January 4, 2012, Meridian Medical Technologies, 2555 Hermelin Drive, St. Louis...

  12. 40 CFR 82.3 - Definitions for class I and class II controlled substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... listed in appendix D to this subpart. Controlled products belong to one or more of the following six... substance or mixture must first be transferred from a bulk container to another container, vessel, or piece... recovered from a piece of equipment, including the name of the company responsible for, or owning the piece...

  13. Adoption of electronic prescribing for controlled substances among providers and pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufstader Gabriel, Meghan; Yang, Yi; Vaidya, Varun; Wilkins, Tricia Lee

    2014-11-01

    Electronic prescribing for Schedule II through V controlled substances was legalized in the United States by the Drug Enforcement Administration in June 2010. However, little information exists about adoption and use of the electronic prescribing of controlled substances (EPCS) at the national level. Therefore, the objective of this study is to present the first information about national trends surrounding the adoption and use of the newly allowed EPCS by providers and pharmacies in the United States. Trends of EPCS adoption and use were examined for the number of EPCS, number of pharmacies enabled to accept EPCS, and the number of providers prescribing controlled substances electronically. Using nationally representative transactional Surescripts data from July 2012 to December 2013, we examined EPCS trends. During the study period, the total number of EPCS increased from 1535 to 52,423, and the number and percentage of all pharmacies enabled for EPCS increased from 8768 (13%) to 20,498 pharmacies (30%). The proportion of all providers prescribing controlled substances electronically is currently 1%, but increasing steadily each month. There is a positive national growth for EPCS in pharmacy preparedness to accept EPCS, the number of EPCS prescriptions sent each month, and the number of providers with the ability to send EPCS.

  14. 78 FR 64018 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; GE Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; GE Healthcare Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on September 12, 2013, GE Healthcare, 3350 North Ridge Avenue...

  15. 78 FR 8583 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; GE Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; GE Healthcare Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations 1301.34 (a), this is notice that on July 28, 2011, GE Healthcare, 3350 North Ridge Avenue, Arlington Heights, Illinois 60004-1412...

  16. 78 FR 36594 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application GE Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application GE Healthcare Pursuant to Title 21, Code of Federal Regulations 1301.34(a), this is notice that on April 29, 2013, GE Healthcare, 3350 North Ridge Avenue, Arlington Heights, Illinois 60004-1412, made...

  17. 78 FR 12103 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; GE Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; GE Healthcare Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on August 31, 2012, GE Healthcare, 3350 North Ridge Avenue, Arlington...

  18. 78 FR 69447 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; GE Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; GE Healthcare Pursuant to Title 21, Code of Federal Regulations 1301.34(a), this is notice that on September 18, 2013, GE Healthcare, 3350 North Ridge Avenue, Arlington Heights, Illinois 60004-1412...

  19. 77 FR 16262 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration; Johnson Matthey, Inc., Pharmaceutical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration; Johnson Matthey, Inc., Pharmaceutical Materials By Notice dated December 2, 2011, and published in the Federal Register on December 12, 2011, 76 FR 77253, Johnson Matthey, Inc., Pharmaceutical...

  20. 77 FR 67398 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; INB Hauser Pharmaceutical Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; INB Hauser Pharmaceutical Services, Inc. Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of... Pharmaceutical Services, Inc., 6880 N. Broadway, Suite H, Denver, Colorado 80221, made application by letter to...