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Sample records for toxic metals beneath

  1. Coupled Geochemical and Hydrological Processes Governing the Fate and Transport of Radionuclides and Toxic Metals Beneath the Hanford Tank Farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott Fendorf; Phil Jardine

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this research was to provide an improved understanding and predictive capability of coupled hydrological and geochemical mechanisms that are responsible for the accelerated migration and immobilization of radionuclides and toxic metals in the vadose zone beneath the Hanford Tank Farms

  2. Gingival pigmentation beneath a metallic crown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, T.; Hirayasu, R.; Sakai, H.; Hashimoto, N.

    1988-01-01

    Light and electron microscopic studies and energy dispersive X-ray analysis disclosed that the essential cause of gingival discoloration following the placement of a metallic crown, was marked deposition of melanin pigment. Deposition of melanin pigment was observed in epithelial cells, on basement membranes, and in fibroblasts, macrophages and among intercellular ground substance of the proprial layer. Brown or dark brown colored granules were observed in the deep portion of the proprial layer. Some metallic elements as silver and sulfur were detected. It was presumed that these materials were dental metals accidentally implanted in gingival tissues during the therapeutic procedure. The deposition of melanin pigment closely corresponded with mucosal tissue where these materials were present in the deep portion of the proprial layer. These findings suggested that these materials influenced the physiological metabolism of melanin and induced its pathological deposition in the proprial tissue. (author)

  3. Toxic metals and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sarmishtha; Sarkar, Shuvasree; Bhattacharya, Shelley

    2014-11-17

    The earth's resources are finite, and it can no longer be considered a source of inexhaustible bounty for the human population. However, this realization has not been able to contain the human desire for rapid industrialization. The collateral to overusing environmental resources is the high-level contamination of undesirable toxic metals, leading to bioaccumulation and cellular damage. Cytopathological features of biological systems represent a key variable in several diseases. A review of the literature revealed that autophagy (PCDII), a high-capacity process, may consist of selective elimination of vital organelles and/or proteins that intiate mechanisms of cytoprotection and homeostasis in different biological systems under normal physiological and stress conditions. However, the biological system does survive under various environmental stressors. Currently, there is no consensus that specifies a particular response as being a dependable biomarker of toxicology. Autophagy has been recorded as the initial response of a cell to a toxic metal in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Various signaling pathways are triggered through cellular proteins and/or protein kinases that can lead to autophagy, apoptosis (or necroptosis), and necrosis. Although the role of autophagy in tumorigenesis is associated with promoting tumor cell survival and/or acting as a tumor suppressive mechanism, PCDII in metal-induced toxicity has not been extensively studied. The aim of this review is to analyze the comparative cytotoxicity of metals/metalloids and nanoparticles (As, Cd, Cr, Hg, Fe, and metal-NP) in cells enduring autophagy. It is noted that metals/metalloids and nanoparticles prefer ATG8/LC3 as a potent inducer of autophagy in several cell lines or animal cells. MAP kinases, death protein kinases, PI3K, AKT, mTOR, and AMP kinase have been found to be the major components of autophagy induction or inhibition in the context of cellular responses to metals/metalloids and

  4. Toxicity of heavy metals in the environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Oehme, F.W

    1978-01-01

    ... as the fundamental mechanisms of toxicity resulting from heavy metal chemicals. The more common toxic heavy metals, along with their biochemistry and associated clinical syndromes, are then described...

  5. Plant responses to metal toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briat, J.F. [Montpellier-2 Univ., 34 (France). Biochimie et physiologie moleculaire des plantes, CNRS, URA 2133; Lebrun, M. [Montpellier-2 Univ., 34 (France). Biochimie et physiologie vegetale appliquee

    1999-01-01

    Increased metal concentration in the soils, up to toxic levels, is becoming an important environmental problem. Safety rule evolution will require solutions in order to cope with food safety rules, and to freeze metal leakage from heavily metal-poisoned soils, such as those from industrial fallows. In this context, plants could serve to develop bio-assays in order to promote new standards, more realistic than the mass of a given metal per kg of soil, that does not consider the metal bio-disponibility. Plants could also be used for phyto-extraction and/or phyto-stabilization. To reach these objectives, a genetic approach could be useful to generate metal-tolerant plants with enough biomass. In this work is more particularly studied the plant responses to metal toxicity. Metal toxicity for living organisms involves oxidative and /or genotoxic mechanisms. Plant protection against metal toxicity occurs, at least in part, through control of root metal uptake and of long distance metal transport. Inside cells, proteins such as ferritins and metallothioneins, and glutathione-derived peptides named phyto-chelatins, participate in excess metal storage and detoxification. Low molecular weight organic molecules, mainly organic acids and amino acids and their derivatives, also play an important role in plant metal homeostasis. When these systems are overloaded, oxidative stress defense mechanisms are activated. Molecular and cellular knowledge of these processes will be necessary to improve plant metal resistance. Occurrence of naturally tolerant plants which hyper accumulate metals provides helpful tools for this research. (authors) 130 refs.

  6. Toxic metal pollution in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nriagu, J O

    1992-06-30

    The available information suggests that the concentrations of toxic metals in many ecosystems of Africa are reaching unprecedented levels. Because of the heavy load of contaminated dusts in the air of the overcrowded cities, the ambient concentrations of toxic metals are now among the highest being reported anywhere. Lead pollution from the increasing number of automobiles and cottage industries represents a major health hazard, and it is estimated that 15-30% of the infants in some urban areas may already be suffering from lead poisoning. The cultural and lifestyle determinants of lead exposure and the greater susceptibility of African populations to environmental metal poisoning are highlighted. The suggestion is made that the environmental health criteria for toxic metals in the developed countries may not provide adequate protection for many African communities.

  7. Metal metabolism and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Larsen, R.P.; Whelton, B.D.; Moretti, E.S.; Peterson, D.P.; Oldham, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    This research focuses on the role of pregnancy and lactation in susceptibility to the toxic effects of cadmium and lead. Responses under investigation include lead-induced changes in pathways for vitamin D and calcium metabolism and cadmium-induced alterations in kidney function and skeletal structure. The second area focuses on the gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium and other actinide elements. Studies currently being conducted in nonhuman primates to develop a procedure to determine GI absorption values of uranium and plutonium that does not require sacrifice of the animal. 6 refs

  8. Different interactions of fungi with toxic metals

    OpenAIRE

    Fanelli, Corrado; Fabbri, Anna Adele; Pilo, Giuseppina; Luongo, Laura; Corazza, Luciana; Melis, Pietro

    1994-01-01

    Many papers have reported the uptake and translocation of toxic metals and radionuclides to fruit bodies of edible fungi and also to mycelia biomass. Our aim is to study how to reduce the metal phytotoxicity by mychorrizal fungi pointing at land reclamation and at the detoxification of metal/radionuclides-containing industrial effluents.

  9. Speciation in Metal Toxicity and Metal-Based Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M. Templeton

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Metallic elements, ions and compounds produce varying degrees of toxicity in organisms with which they come into contact. Metal speciation is critical to understanding these adverse effects; the adjectives “heavy” and “toxic” are not helpful in describing the biological properties of individual elements, but detailed chemical structures are. As a broad generalization, the metallic form of an element is inert, and the ionic salts are the species that show more significant bioavailability. Yet the salts and other chelates of a metal ion can give rise to quite different toxicities, as exemplified by a range of carcinogenic potential for various nickel species. Another important distinction comes when a metallic element is organified, increasing its lipophilicity and hence its ability to penetrate the blood brain barrier, as is seen, for example, with organic mercury and tin species. Some metallic elements, such as gold and platinum, are themselves useful therapeutic agents in some forms, while other species of the same element can be toxic, thus focusing attention on species interconversions in evaluating metal-based drugs. The therapeutic use of metal-chelating agents introduces new species of the target metal in vivo, and this can affect not only its desired detoxification, but also introduce a potential for further mechanisms of toxicity. Examples of therapeutic iron chelator species are discussed in this context, as well as the more recent aspects of development of chelation therapy for uranium exposure.

  10. Behavior as a sentry of metal toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, B.

    1978-01-01

    Many of the toxic properties of metals are expressed as behavioral aberrations. Some of these arise from direct actions on the central nervous system. Others arise from primary events elsewhere, but still influence behavior. Toxicity may be expressed either as objectively measurable phenomena, such as ataxia, or as subjective complaints, such as depression. In neither instance is clinical medicine equipped to provide assessments of subtle, early indices of toxicity. Reviewers of visual disturbances, paresthesia, and mental retardation exemplify the potential contribution of psychology to the toxicology of metals. Behavior and nervous system functions act as sensitive mirrors of metal toxicity. Sensitivity is the prime aim in environmental health assessments. Early detection of adverse effects, before they progress to irreversibility, underlies the strategy for optimal health protection. Some of the toxic actions of metals originate in direct nervous system dysfunction. Others may reflect disturbances of systems less directly linked to behavior than the central nervous system. But behavior, because it expresses the integrated functioning of the organism, can indicate flaws in states and processes outside the nervous system.

  11. CORRELATION AMONG PHENOLIC, TOXIC METALS AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    KEY WORDS: Toxic metals, Phenols, Flavonoids, Antioxidant activity, Correlation analysis. INTRODUCTION. Humans consume ... treat intestinal worms, fluid retention, poor appetite, and trouble sleeping (insomnia). It is also used as a sedative to ... Treatment of skin diseases, diabetes, anti- hepatotoxic activity. 13, 14. Pot.

  12. Role of Bioadsorbents in Reducing Toxic Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blessy Baby Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Industrialization and urbanization have led to the release of increasing amounts of heavy metals into the environment. Metal ion contamination of drinking water and waste water is a serious ongoing problem especially with high toxic metals such as lead and cadmium and less toxic metals such as copper and zinc. Several biological materials have attracted many researchers and scientists as they offer both cheap and effective removal of heavy metals from waste water. Therefore it is urgent to study and explore all possible sources of agrobased inexpensive adsorbents for their feasibility in the removal of heavy metals. The objective was to study inexpensive adsorbents like various agricultural wastes such as sugarcane bagasse, rice husk, oil palm shell, coconut shell, and coconut husk in eliminating heavy metals from waste water and their utilization possibilities based on our research and literature survey. It also shows the significance of developing and evaluating new potential biosorbents in the near future with higher adsorption capacity and greater reusable options.

  13. Predicting metal toxicity revisited: general properties vs. specific effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolterbeek, H T; Verburg, T G

    2001-11-12

    The present paper addresses the prediction of metal toxicity by evaluation of the relationships between general metal properties and toxic effects. For this, metal toxicity data were taken from 30 literature data sets, which varied largely in exposure times, organisms, effects and effect levels. General metal properties were selected on basis of literature reviewing of basic metal property classifications: used were the electrochemical potential deltaE0; the ionization potential IP; the ratio between atomic radius and atomic weight AR/AW; and the electronegativity Xm. The results suggest that toxicity prediction may be performed on basis of these fixed metal properties without any adoption to specific organisms, without any division of metals into classes, or grouping of toxicity tests. The results further indicate that metal properties contribute to the observed effects in relative importances which depend on specific effects, effect levels, exposure times, selected organisms and ambient conditions. The discussion strongly suggests that prediction should be by interpolation rather than by extrapolation of calibrated toxicity data: the concept here is that unknown metal toxicities are predicted on basis of observed metal toxicities in calibration experiments. Considering the used metal properties, the calibration covers the largest number of metals by the simultanuous use of Ge(IV), Cs(I), Li(I), Mn(VII), Sc and Bi in toxicity studies. Based on the data from the 30 studies considered, metal toxicities could be ordered in a relative way. This ordering indicates that the natural abundance of metals or metal ions in the Earth's crust may be regarded as a general comparative measure of the metal toxicities. The problems encountered in toxicity interpretation and ordering of toxicities indicate that control of the solution acidity, the metal's solubility and the metal's oxidation state may be key problems to overcome in future metal ion toxicity studies.

  14. Antibacterial properties and toxicity from metallic nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vimbela GV

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Gina V Vimbela,1,* Sang M Ngo,2,* Carolyn Fraze,3 Lei Yang,4,5 David A Stout5–7 1Department of Chemical Engineering, 2Department of Electrical Engineering, California State University, Long Beach, CA, 3Brigham Young University Idaho, Rexburg, ID, USA; 4Department of Orthopaedics, Orthopaedic Institute, The First Affiliated Hospital, 5International Research Center for Translational Orthopaedics (IRCTO, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China; 6Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 7Department of Biomedical Engineering, California State University, Long Beach, CA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The era of antibiotic resistance is a cause of increasing concern as bacteria continue to develop adaptive countermeasures against current antibiotics at an alarming rate. In recent years, studies have reported nanoparticles as a promising alternative to antibacterial reagents because of their exhibited antibacterial activity in several biomedical applications, including drug and gene delivery, tissue engineering, and imaging. Moreover, nanomaterial research has led to reports of a possible relationship between the morphological characteristics of a nanomaterial and the magnitude of its delivered toxicity. However, conventional synthesis of nanoparticles requires harsh chemicals and costly energy consumption. Additionally, the exact relationship between toxicity and morphology of nanomaterials has not been well established. Here, we review the recent advancements in synthesis techniques for silver, gold, copper, titanium, zinc oxide, and magnesium oxide nanomaterials and composites, with a focus on the toxicity exhibited by nanomaterials of multidimensions. This article highlights the benefits of selecting each material or metal-based composite for certain applications while also addressing possible setbacks and the toxic effects of the nanomaterials on the environment. Keywords

  15. Removal of soluble toxic metals from water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, L.P.; Vijayan, S.; McConeghy, G.J.; Maves, S.R.; Martin, J.F.

    1990-05-01

    The removal of selected, soluble toxic metals from aqueous solutions has been accomplished using a combination of chemical treatment and ultrafiltration. The process has been evaluated at the bench-scale and is undergoing pilot-scale testing. Removal efficiencies in excess of 95-99% have been realized. The test program at the bench-scale investigated the limitations and established the optimum range of operating parameters for the process, while the tests conducted with the pilot-scale process equipment are providing information on longer-term process efficiencies, effective processing rates, and fouling potential of the membranes. With the typically found average concentrations of the toxic metals in groundwaters at Superfund sites used as the feed solution, the process has decreased levels up to 100-fold or more. Experiments were also conducted with concentrated solutions to determine their release from silica-based matrices. The solidified wastes were subjected to EP Toxicity test procedures and met the criteria successfully. The final phase of the program involving a field demonstration at a uranium tailings site will be outlined

  16. Predicting toxic heavy metal movements in upper Sanyati catchment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water samples from boreholes located in areas where mining, mineral processing and agricultural activities were dominant, yielded the highest values of toxic heavy metals. Dilution Attenuation Factor (DAF) for each toxic heavy metal was calculated to observe metal behaviour along the contaminant path for each season.

  17. Metal-metal interactions among dietary toxic and essential trace metals in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsenhans, B.; Schmolke, G.; Kolb, K.; Stokes, J.; Forth, W.

    1987-12-01

    Exposure to toxic and essential metals is thought to be reflected by corresponding metal concentrations in tissues. However, toxic and essential metals may influence each other in regard to their retention in the body. Therefore, a basic diet containing four toxic metals (As 7, Cd 9, Ni 13, and Pb 20 ppm) and adequate amounts of essential metals was fed to rats for 2 weeks. Test groups received the basic diet with increasing concentrations of one of the toxic metals (up to 90 ppm As, 180 ppm Cd, 365 ppm Ni, and 394 ppm Pb). As, Cd, Ni, Pb, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn were determined by atomic emission spectroscopy in liver, kidney, intestine, brain, muscle, bone, skin, hair, and blood. A linear relationship between diet and tissue concentration is observed for As and Ni in the kidney, for Cd in the liver, and for Pb in the bone. In other tissues saturation was observed. While Cd-Fe interactions were common to most of the tissues, other interactions were detected only in specific tissues, e.g., As-Cu in the kidney, Cd-Zn in the liver, and As-Mn, Cd-Mn, or Ni-Cu in the intestine. Increases of renal Pb and intestinal Cd by dietary Ni, and a decrease in bone As by dietary Pb were the most pronounced interactions between the toxic metals. The results demonstrate that potential target organs for the evaluation of metal exposure need to be carefully analyzed for interfering metal-metal interactions.

  18. Nanotoxicity: the toxicity research progress of metal and metal-containing nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lingling; Liu, Zhidong; Aggrey, Mike Okweesi; Li, Chunhua; Chen, Jing; Tong, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Along with the exuberant development of nanotechnology, a large number of nanoformulations or non materials are successfully applied in the clinics, biomedicine, cosmetics and industry. Despite some unique advantages of nanoformulations, there exist potentially worrying toxic effects, particularly those related to metal and metal-containing nanoparticles (NPs). Although various researches have been conducted to assess the metallic and metal-containing nanoparticles toxic effects, only little is known about the toxicity expressive types and evaluation, reasons and mechanisms, influencing factors and research methods of metal and metal-containing nanotoxicity. Therefore, it is of importance to acquire a better understanding of metal and metal-containing nanoparticles toxicity for medical application. This review presents a summary on the metal and metal-containing nanoparticles toxicity research progress consulting relevant literature.

  19. Select toxic metals status of pregnant women with history of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toxic metals are part of the most important groups of environmental pollutants that can bind to vital cellular components and interfere with their functions via inhalation, foods, water etc. The serum levels of toxic metals (lead, mercury, cadmium and arsenic) in pregnant women with history of pregnancy complications, ...

  20. Characterizing toxicity of metal-contaminated sediments from mining areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, John M.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews methods for testing the toxicity of metals associated with freshwater sediments, linking toxic effects with metal exposure and bioavailability, and developing sediment quality guidelines. The most broadly applicable approach for characterizing metal toxicity is whole-sediment toxicity testing, which attempts to simulate natural exposure conditions in the laboratory. Standard methods for whole-sediment testing can be adapted to test a wide variety of taxa. Chronic sediment tests that characterize effects on multiple endpoints (e.g., survival, growth, and reproduction) can be highly sensitive indicators of adverse effects on resident invertebrate taxa. Methods for testing of aqueous phases (pore water, overlying water, or elutriates) are used less frequently. Analysis of sediment toxicity data focuses on statistical comparisons between responses in sediments from the study area and responses in one or more uncontaminated reference sediments. For large or complex study areas, a greater number of reference sediments is recommended to reliably define the normal range of responses in uncontaminated sediments – the ‘reference envelope’. Data on metal concentrations and effects on test organisms across a gradient of contamination may allow development of concentration-response models, which estimate metal concentrations associated with specified levels of toxic effects (e.g. 20% effect concentration or EC20). Comparisons of toxic effects in laboratory tests with measures of impacts on resident benthic invertebrate communities can help document causal relationships between metal contamination and biological effects. Total or total-recoverable metal concentrations in sediments are the most common measure of metal contamination in sediments, but metal concentrations in labile sediment fractions (e.g., determined as part of selective sediment extraction protocols) may better represent metal bioavailability. Metals released by the weak-acid extraction

  1. Evaluation of the concentration of toxic metals in cosmetic products ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The concentration of the heavy metals in the samples ranged from 0.006 to 0.207 ppm. It is obvious from the present study that the use of some cosmetic products exposes users to low concentrations of toxic heavy metals which could constitute potential health risk to users since it has been known that heavy metals can ...

  2. Assessment of Metal Toxicity in Marine Ecosystems: Comparative Toxicity Potentials for Nine Cationic Metals in Coastal Seawater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Yan; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2016-01-01

    This study is a first attempt to develop globally applicable and spatially differentiated marine Comparative Toxicity Potentials (CTPs) or ecotoxicity characterization factors for metals in coastal seawater for use in Life Cycle Assessment. The toxicity potentials are based exclusively on marine...... varies 3-4 orders of magnitude across LMEs, largely due to different seawater residence time. Therefore the highest toxicity potential for metals was found in the LMEs with the longest seawater residence times. Across metals, the highest CTPs were observed for Cd, Pb and Zn. At the concentration levels...... ecotoxicity data and take account of metal speciation and bioavailability. CTPs were developed for nine cationic metals (Cd, Cr(III), Co, Cu(II), Fe(III), Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) in 64 Large Marine Ecosystems (LMEs) covering all coastal waters in the world. The results showed that the CTP of a specific metal...

  3. Toxicity, mechanism and health effects of some heavy metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaishankar Monisha

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metal toxicity has proven to be a major threat and there are several health risks associated with it. The toxic effects of these metals, even though they do not have any biological role, remain present in some or the other form harmful for the human body and its proper functioning. They sometimes act as a pseudo element of the body while at certain times they may even interfere with metabolic processes. Few metals, such as aluminium, can be removed through elimination activities, while some metals get accumulated in the body and food chain, exhibiting a chronic nature. Various public health measures have been undertaken to control, prevent and treat metal toxicity occurring at various levels, such as occupational exposure, accidents and environmental factors. Metal toxicity depends upon the absorbed dose, the route of exposure and duration of exposure, i.e. acute or chronic. This can lead to various disorders and can also result in excessive damage due to oxidative stress induced by free radical formation. This review gives details about some heavy metals and their toxicity mechanisms, along with their health effects

  4. Determination of Levels of Essential and Toxic Heavy Metals in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The concentrations of trace essential metals (Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn) and toxic heavy metals (Cd and Pb) in lentil samples collected from Dejen (East Gojjam), Boset (East Shewa) and Molale (North Shewa), Ethiopia, were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. A wet digestion procedure, using mixtures of ...

  5. Mechanisms of metal toxicity in plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Küpper, Hendrik; Andresen, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 3 (2016), s. 269-285 ISSN 1756-5901 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Hyperaccumulator thlaspi-caerulescens * Induced oxidative stress * Iron toxicity Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.975, year: 2016

  6. Toxicity from Metals, Old Menaces and New Threats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Briner

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Metals make up the bulk of the periodic table and range from the very light (e.g., beryllium to the very heavy (e.g., the actinides. Metals are important constituents of life, drive economic activity and industry, but can also be a hazard to human health. The metals can be roughly divided into three groups. The first being those metals, such as iron and zinc, that are essential to human life and have a wide therapeutic dose range. The second group of metals, such as lead, mercury, and uranium, has no known biological role and are toxic even at low doses. The third group of metals, such as selenium and manganese, has a role in maintaining human health but has a very narrow dose range that, when exceeded, produces toxic effects. [...

  7. Levels of Some Selected (Essential-Mn, Zn and Toxic-Al, Sb) Metals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Levels of Some Selected (Essential-Mn, Zn and Toxic-Al, Sb) Metals in Clariasgariepinus (Cat Fish) Reared in Plastic Ponds in Benin City-Public Health Implication. ... standard methodsand assayed for levels of manganese, zinc, aluminum and antimony using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrophotometer (ICP-MS).

  8. Biotic Strategies for Toxic Heavy Metal Decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Rupesh K; Sharma, Vinay

    2017-01-01

    In the modern age of globalization and fast industrialization, the environmental matters are fetching more and more annoyance for human being. Patents reveal that heavy metals occur in immobilized form in sediments and as aggregates in nature. However due to the different human activities like ore mining and industrial processes, the natural biogeochemical cycles are disordered instigating amplified deposition of heavy metals in aquatic environments. The most common pollution causing heavy metals are considered to be the mercury, arsenic, lead, copper, silver, cadmium. The goal of this work is to identify the biological action of heavy metal-contaminated water and sediments which can be categorized into bioaccumulation, biosorption, oxidation/ reduction, leaching, degradation, and phytoremediation. Among the various biological methods for decontamination of heavy metals from water, biosorption is known to be the most affordable, economical and efficient option for the management of capacious water bodies encompassing low concentrations of heavy metals. However, the physicochemical properties of the aquatic bodies that would extremely affect the performances of biosorbents should be prudently measured. The precipitation is efficient in decontamination/removal of relatively high concentrations of metals in water. The bioleaching of searched sediments in regulated systems is a speedy process as compared with phytoremediation. In order to decontaminate the heavy metals from water, biological methods are very proficient and useful. These methods can be very efficient in cleaning up environment. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Photoelectrochemical detection of toxic heavy metals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chamier, J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (CVAFS). These techniques are sensitive and accurate in their detection of metals in the environment but are expensive to maintain, immobile and require sample preparation. Immobilisation of cation-selective flourophores...

  10. MicroRNAs as regulators in plant metal toxicity response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belen Mendoza-Soto

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal toxicity is a major stress affecting crop production. This includes metals that are essential for plants (copper, iron, zinc, manganese, and non-essential metals (cadmium, aluminum, cobalt, mercury. A primary common effect of high concentrations of metals such as aluminum, cooper, cadmium or mercury, is root growth inhibition. Metal toxicity triggers the accumulation of reactive oxygen species leading to damage of lipids, proteins and DNA. The plants response to metal toxicity involves several biological processes that require fine and precise regulation at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are 21 nucleotides non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. A miRNA, incorporated into a RNA induced silencing complex, promotes cleavage of its target mRNA that is recognized by an almost perfect base complementarity. In plants miRNA regulation has been involved in development and also in biotic and abiotic stress responses. We review novel advances in identifying miRNAs related to metal toxicity responses and their potential role according to their targets. Most of the targets for plant metal-responsive miRNAs are transcription factors. Information about metal-responsive miRNAs in different plants points to important regulatory roles of miR319, miR390, miR393 and miR398. The target of miR319 is the TCP transcription factor, implicated in growth control. MiR390 exerts its action through the biogenesis of trans-acting small interference RNAs that, in turn, regulate auxin responsive factors. MiR393 targets the auxin receptors TIR1/AFBs and a bHLH transcription factor. Increasing evidence points to the crucial role of miR398 and its targets Cu/Zn superoxide dismutases in the control of the oxidative stress generated after high metal copper or iron exposure.

  11. Metal uptake and acute toxicity in zebrafish: Common mechanisms across multiple metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsop, Derek, E-mail: alsopde@mcmaster.ca [Department of Biology, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1 (Canada); Wood, Chris M. [Department of Biology, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1 (Canada)

    2011-10-15

    All metals tested reduced calcium uptake in zebrafish larvae. However, it was whole body sodium loss that was functionally related to toxicity. The zebrafish larvae acute toxicity assay save time, space and resources. - Abstract: Zebrafish larvae (Danio rerio) were used to examine the mechanisms of action and acute toxicities of metals. Larvae had similar physiological responses and sensitivities to waterborne metals as adults. While cadmium and zinc have previously been shown to reduce Ca{sup 2+} uptake, copper and nickel also decreased Ca{sup 2+} uptake, suggesting that the epithelial transport of all these metals is through Ca{sup 2+} pathways. However, exposure to cadmium, copper or nickel for up to 48 h had little or no effect on total whole body Ca{sup 2+} levels, indicating that the reduction of Ca{sup 2+} uptake is not the acute toxic mechanism of these metals. Instead, mortalities were effectively related to whole body Na{sup +}, which decreased up to 39% after 48 h exposures to different metals around their respective 96 h LC50s. Decreases in whole body K{sup +} were also observed, although they were not as pronounced or frequent as Na{sup +} losses. None of the metals tested inhibited Na{sup +} uptake in zebrafish (Na{sup +} uptake was in fact increased with exposure) and the observed losses of Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} were proportional to the ionic gradients between the plasma and water, indicating diffusive ion loss with metal exposure. This study has shown that there is a common pathway for metal uptake and a common mechanism of acute toxicity across groups of metals in zebrafish. The disruption of ion uptake accompanying metal exposure does not appear to be responsible for the acute toxicity of metals, as has been previously suggested, but rather the toxicity is instead due to total ion loss (predominantly Na{sup +}).

  12. Dietary metal toxicity to the marine sea hare, Aplysia californica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Tayler A; Capo, Thomas R; Bielmyer-Fraser, Gretchen K

    2015-01-01

    Metal pollution from anthropogenic inputs is a concern in many marine environments. Metals accumulate in tissue and in excess cause toxicity in marine organisms. This study investigated the accumulation and effects of dietary metals in a macroinvertebrate. The green seaweed, Ulva lactuca and the red seaweed, Agardhiella subulata were each concurrently exposed to two concentrations (100 or 1000 μg/L) of five metals (Cu, Ni, Pb, Cd, and Zn). Additionally, U. lactuca was exposed to 10 μg/L of the metal mixture as well as 10 or 100 μg/L of each metal individually for 48 h. The seaweeds were then used as food for the sea hare, Aplysia californica for two to three weeks depending on the exposure concentration. Body mass of A. californica was measured weekly, and at the end of the exposure duration, metal concentrations were quantified in dissected organs (mouth, esophagus, crop, gizzard, ovotestis, heart, hepatopancreas, gill, and the carcass). Metal distribution and accumulation in the organs of A. californica varied with the metal. A. californica fed the metal-exposed diets had significantly reduced body weight by the end of the exposure periods, as compared to controls; however, differences were observed in the extent of growth reductions, dependent on exposure concentration, duration, and exposure regime (metal mixture versus individual metal-exposed diet). Metal mixture diets decreased A. californica growth more so than comparable individual metal diets, despite more metal accumulating in the individual metal diets. Additionally, Zn- and Cu-contaminated algal diets decreased control-normalized growth of A. californica significantly more than comparable Cd-, Pb-, or Ni-contaminated diets. The seaweed diets in this study contained environmentally relevant tissue metal burdens. Therefore, these results have implications for metals in marine systems. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Comparative metal oxide nanoparticle toxicity using embryonic zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Wehmas, Leah C.; Anders, Catherine; Chess, Jordan; Punnoose, Alex; Pereira, Cliff B.; Greenwood, Juliet A.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Engineered metal oxide nanoparticles (MO NPs) are finding increasing utility in the medical field as anticancer agents. Before validation of in vivo anticancer efficacy can occur, a better understanding of whole-animal toxicity is required. We compared the toxicity of seven widely used semiconductor MO NPs made from zinc oxide (ZnO), titanium dioxide, cerium dioxide and tin dioxide prepared in pure water and in synthetic seawater using a five-day embryonic zebrafish assay. We hypothesized tha...

  14. Environment-friendly approach for the removal of toxic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahra, N.; Mehmood, F.; Sheikh, S.T.; Javed, K.; Amin, A.

    2006-01-01

    Water pollution is serious economical problem and the presence of toxic metals like lead causes contamination of plants and then through nutritional chain it affects the health of humans and animals. This research work describes the removal of lead from wastewater using natural bentonites taken from various areas of Pakistan. The batch adsorption process was applied to remove this toxic metal. The quantities of lead metal before and after the treatment of standard solutions with different samples of bentonite were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopic method. The studies were carried out at room temperature, pH 7 and -200 mesh particle size using 50 ml of metal solutions. The time taken to maintain equilibrium was one hour. Then percentage adsorption was estimated on bentonite samples. (author)

  15. Principles for prevention of toxic effects from metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landrigan, Philip J.; Kotelchuk, David; Grandjean, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    of the Toxic Effects of Metals Aluminum Antimony Arsenic Barium Beryllium Bismuth Cadmium Chromium Cobalt Copper Gallium and Semiconductor Compounds Germanium Indium Iron Lead Manganese Mercury Molybdenum Nickel Palladium Platinum Selenium Silver Tellurium Thallium Tin Titanium Tungsten Uranium Vanadium Zinc......Description Handbook of the Toxicology of Metals is the standard reference work for physicians, toxicologists and engineers in the field of environmental and occupational health. This new edition is a comprehensive review of the effects on biological systems from metallic elements...... and their compounds. An entirely new structure and illustrations represent the vast array of advancements made since the last edition. Special emphasis has been placed on the toxic effects in humans with chapters on the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of metal poisoning. This up-to-date reference provides easy...

  16. Comparative toxicity of metals to freshwater life in tropical Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markich, S.J. [ANSTO, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia). Environmental Science Program; Camilleri, C. [ERISS, Jabiru (Australia); Baird, D.J. [Univ. of Stirling (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31

    At present, there is a paucity of internally consistent datasets on the toxicity of metals (and other contaminants) in the tropics, relative to the cool and warm temperate regions of the world. Such information is considered mandatory before a proper comparison of the toxicity of metals to aquatic life between tropical and temperate regions is possible. As part of a larger study to investigate whether the toxicity of metals to aquatic life differs between the tropical and temperate regions of Australia, several species of tropical freshwater organisms, comprising a molluscs, fish, hydra, Daphnia and an alga were employed to obtain an internally consistent data set on the comparative toxicity of selected metals, such as U and Cu, that are of potential concern in the wet-dry tropics of Australia as a result of man`s activities. Both acute and chronic ecologically relevant sublethal endpoints, such as growth and reproduction (EC{sub 50}, BEC{sub 10}) were measured for the five species, which cover a variety of trophic levels. A synthetic water quality that closely resembled the inorganic composition of the natural waters in which the organisms inhabit, was used in all experiments. This facilitated the use of the geochemical modelling code, HARPHRQ, to predict the speciation, and hence, bioavailability of the selected metals. A knowledge of the bioavailable fraction of a metal is necessary for setting up national water quality guidelines for the protection of aquatic life. The results from this study are discussed and related to the derivation of both site-specific and national water quality-guidelines for metals.

  17. Monitoring of essential and toxic metals in imported herbal teas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    concentrated and in turn enter the food chain and ultimately pose serious human health risk to consumers (Ansari et al., 2007; Weldegebriel et al.,. 2012; Rezaee et al., 2014). However, the evaluation of essential and toxic metals in teas is of great importance considering the potential health risk to habitual tea drinkers if ...

  18. Pre-concentration of Toxic Metals using Electrospun Amino ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    order kinetics. The highest pre-concentration achieved using the sorbent was 41.99 (Ni in treated wastewater). The capacity of the sorbent to pre-concentrate the toxic metals was compared with those of aqua regia and HNO3 + H2O2 digestions.

  19. Acute toxicity of selected heavy metals to Oreochromis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Copper was more toxic than lead and iron to both life stages. The species sensitivity distributions of O. mossambicus, as well as those of freshwater fish species from the ECOTOX database and literature, were closely predicted by the models for all three metals. The sensitivity of O. mossambicus to copper, iron and lead ...

  20. Dietary compounds as modulators of metals and metalloids toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadán-Piedra, Carlos; Chiocchetti, Gabriela Matuoka; Clemente, María Jesús; Vélez, Dinoraz; Devesa, Vicenta

    2017-07-07

    A large part of the population is exposed to metals and metalloids through the diet. Most of the in vivo studies on its toxicokinetics and toxicity are conducted by means of exposure through drinking water or by intragastric or intraperitoneal administration of aqueous standards, and therefore they do not consider the effect of the food matrix on the exposure. Numerous studies show that some components of the diet can modulate the toxicity of these food contaminants, reducing their effect on a systemic level. Part of this protective role may be due to a reduction of intestinal absorption and subsequent tissue accumulation of the toxic element, although it may also be a consequence of their ability to counteract the toxicity directly by their antioxidant and/or anti-inflammatory activity, among other factors. The present review provides a compilation of existing information about the effect that certain components of the diet have on the toxicokinetics and toxicity of the metals and metalloids of greatest toxicological importance that are present in food (arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury), and of their most toxic chemical species.

  1. Determination of Toxic Metals in Indian Smokeless Tobacco Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanashri Dhaware

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study targets the lesser-known ingredients of smokeless tobacco products, i.e., the toxic metals, in Indian brands. The metals selected in the study included lead (Pb, cadmium (Cd, arsenic (As, copper (Cu, mercury (Hg, and selenium (Se. The differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV technique was used for estimating the metals Pb, Cd, and Cu; square wave voltammetry for As; and the cold vapor atomic absorption technique for Hg. The resulting levels of the metals were compared to the daily consumption of the smokeless tobacco products. It was observed that almost 30% of gutkha brand samples exceeded the permissible levels of metals Pb and Cu, when compared to the provisional tolerable intake limits determined by the FAO/WHO. The reliability of data was assured by analyzing standard reference materials.

  2. Metal-tolerant thermophiles: metals as electron donors and acceptors, toxicity, tolerance and industrial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranawat, Preeti; Rawat, Seema

    2018-02-01

    Metal-tolerant thermophiles are inhabitants of a wide range of extreme habitats like solfatara fields, hot springs, mud holes, hydrothermal vents oozing out from metal-rich ores, hypersaline pools and soil crusts enriched with metals and other elements. The ability to withstand adverse environmental conditions, like high temperature, high metal concentration and sometimes high pH in their niche, makes them an interesting subject for understanding mechanisms behind their ability to deal with multiple duress simultaneously. Metals are essential for biological systems, as they participate in biochemistries that cannot be achieved only by organic molecules. However, the excess concentration of metals can disrupt natural biogeochemical processes and can impose toxicity. Thermophiles counteract metal toxicity via their unique cell wall, metabolic factors and enzymes that carry out metal-based redox transformations, metal sequestration by metallothioneins and metallochaperones as well as metal efflux. Thermophilic metal resistance is heterogeneous at both genetic and physiology levels and may be chromosomally, plasmid or transposon encoded with one or more genes being involved. These effective response mechanisms either individually or synergistically make proliferation of thermophiles in metal-rich habitats possibly. This article presents the state of the art and future perspectives of responses of thermophiles to metals at genetic as well as physiological levels.

  3. Metal uptake and acute toxicity in zebrafish: common mechanisms across multiple metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsop, Derek; Wood, Chris M

    2011-10-01

    Zebrafish larvae (Danio rerio) were used to examine the mechanisms of action and acute toxicities of metals. Larvae had similar physiological responses and sensitivities to waterborne metals as adults. While cadmium and zinc have previously been shown to reduce Ca(2+) uptake, copper and nickel also decreased Ca(2+) uptake, suggesting that the epithelial transport of all these metals is through Ca(2+) pathways. However, exposure to cadmium, copper or nickel for up to 48 h had little or no effect on total whole body Ca(2+) levels, indicating that the reduction of Ca(2+) uptake is not the acute toxic mechanism of these metals. Instead, mortalities were effectively related to whole body Na(+), which decreased up to 39% after 48 h exposures to different metals around their respective 96 h LC50s. Decreases in whole body K(+) were also observed, although they were not as pronounced or frequent as Na(+) losses. None of the metals tested inhibited Na(+) uptake in zebrafish (Na(+) uptake was in fact increased with exposure) and the observed losses of Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) were proportional to the ionic gradients between the plasma and water, indicating diffusive ion loss with metal exposure. This study has shown that there is a common pathway for metal uptake and a common mechanism of acute toxicity across groups of metals in zebrafish. The disruption of ion uptake accompanying metal exposure does not appear to be responsible for the acute toxicity of metals, as has been previously suggested, but rather the toxicity is instead due to total ion loss (predominantly Na(+)). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative metal oxide nanoparticle toxicity using embryonic zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah C. Wehmas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineered metal oxide nanoparticles (MO NPs are finding increasing utility in the medical field as anticancer agents. Before validation of in vivo anticancer efficacy can occur, a better understanding of whole-animal toxicity is required. We compared the toxicity of seven widely used semiconductor MO NPs made from zinc oxide (ZnO, titanium dioxide, cerium dioxide and tin dioxide prepared in pure water and in synthetic seawater using a five-day embryonic zebrafish assay. We hypothesized that the toxicity of these engineered MO NPs would depend on physicochemical properties. Significant agglomeration of MO NPs in aqueous solutions is common making it challenging to associate NP characteristics such as size and charge with toxicity. However, data from our agglomerated MO NPs suggests that the elemental composition and dissolution potential are major drivers of toxicity. Only ZnO caused significant adverse effects of all MO particles tested, and only when prepared in pure water (point estimate median lethal concentration = 3.5–9.1 mg/L. This toxicity was life stage dependent. The 24 h toxicity increased greatly (∼22.7 fold when zebrafish exposures started at the larval life stage compared to the 24 h toxicity following embryonic exposure. Investigation into whether dissolution could account for ZnO toxicity revealed high levels of zinc ion (40–89% of total sample were generated. Exposure to zinc ion equivalents revealed dissolved Zn2+ may be a major contributor to ZnO toxicity.

  5. Essential and toxic metals in rice and fishes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, M.Z.A.; Monir uddin, M.; Alam, F.; Reaz uddin, M.; Hossain, M.J.; Alam, M.S.

    2003-01-01

    The amount of essential metals such as Na, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, Cu and Mn in some selected rice and fishes consumed largely by the general people of Chittagong are determined by using the flame photometric and atomic absorption spectrophotometric methods, and are found to be in the range of human necessity. The amounts of some metals such as Pb, Cd, As and Cr in the same samples of rice and fishes are also determined with the help of AAS. The concentration of these toxic metals are actually higher than the tolerance limit of human body. Particularly, the samples produced in the land and hinterland of Chittagong are found to contain considerably higher concentration of lead and chromium than the samples collected from the sea. This indicates that the soil, water and air of land are more contaminated by these metals than the sea-water. The possible sources of lead and chromium are pointed out and the possible ways for remaining away from their contaminations are indicated. The information obtained from these studies are expected to be useful to the general people of this region to select any food for their daily diet on the basis of the abundances of the essential metals or to avoid any food by considering the concentration of the toxic metals. (author)

  6. Effect of new soil metal immobilizing agents on metal toxicity to terrestrial invertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lock, K.; Janssen, C.R.

    2003-01-01

    Organisms with different exposure routes should be used to simultaneously assess risks of metals in soils. - Application of 5% (w:w) novel metal immobilizing agent reduced the water soluble, the calcium chloride extracted as well as the pore water concentration of zinc in soils from Maatheide, a metal contaminated site in the northeast of Belgium. Addition of the metal immobilizing agents also eliminated acute toxicity to the potworm Enchytraeus albidus and the earthworm Eisenia fetida and chronic toxicity to the springtail Folsomia candida. Cocoon production by E. fetida, however, was still adversely affected. These differences may be explained by the species dependent routes of metal uptake: F. candida is probably mainly exposed via pore water while in E. fetida dietary exposure is probably also important. From these results it is clear that organisms with different exposure routes should be used simultaneously to assess the environmental risk of metal contaminated soils

  7. Effect of new soil metal immobilizing agents on metal toxicity to terrestrial invertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lock, K.; Janssen, C.R

    2003-01-01

    Organisms with different exposure routes should be used to simultaneously assess risks of metals in soils. - Application of 5% (w:w) novel metal immobilizing agent reduced the water soluble, the calcium chloride extracted as well as the pore water concentration of zinc in soils from Maatheide, a metal contaminated site in the northeast of Belgium. Addition of the metal immobilizing agents also eliminated acute toxicity to the potworm Enchytraeus albidus and the earthworm Eisenia fetida and chronic toxicity to the springtail Folsomia candida. Cocoon production by E. fetida, however, was still adversely affected. These differences may be explained by the species dependent routes of metal uptake: F. candida is probably mainly exposed via pore water while in E. fetida dietary exposure is probably also important. From these results it is clear that organisms with different exposure routes should be used simultaneously to assess the environmental risk of metal contaminated soils.

  8. Fabrication of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles by Algae and their Toxic Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqi, Khwaja Salahuddin; Husen, Azamal

    2016-01-01

    Of all the aquatic organisms, algae are a good source of biomolecules. Since algae contain pigments, proteins, carbohydrates, fats, nucleic acids and secondary metabolites such as alkaloids, some aromatic compounds, macrolides, peptides and terpenes, they act as reducing agents to produce nanoparticles from metal salts without producing any toxic by-product. Once the algal biomolecules are identified, the nanoparticles of desired shape or size may be fabricated. The metal and metal oxide nano...

  9. Metal Nanomaterial Toxicity Variations Within the Vascular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abukabda, Alaeddin B; Stapleton, Phoebe A; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R

    2016-12-01

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENM) are anthropogenic materials with at least one dimension less than 100 nm. Their ubiquitous employment in biomedical and industrial applications in the absence of full toxicological assessments raises significant concerns over their safety on human health. This is a significant concern, especially for metal and metal oxide ENM as they may possess the greatest potential to impair human health. A large body of literature has developed that reflects adverse systemic effects associated with exposure to these materials, but an integrated mechanistic framework for how ENM exposure influences morbidity remains elusive. This may be due in large part to the tremendous diversity of existing ENM and the rate at which novel ENM are produced. In this review, the influence of specific ENM physicochemical characteristics and hemodynamic factors on cardiovascular toxicity is discussed. Additionally, the toxicity of metallic and metal oxide ENM is presented in the context of the cardiovascular system and its discrete anatomical and functional components. Finally, future directions and understudied topics are presented. While it is clear that the nanotechnology boom has increased our interest in ENM toxicity, it is also evident that the field of cardiovascular nanotoxicology remains in its infancy and continued, expansive research is necessary in order to determine the mechanisms via which ENM exposure contributes to cardiovascular morbidity.

  10. Fatal Cobalt Toxicity after a Non-Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinne M. Peters

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This case illustrates the potential for systemic cobalt toxicity in non-metal-on-metal bearings and its potentially devastating consequences. We present a 71-year-old male with grinding sensations in his right hip following ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty (THA. After diagnosing a fractured ceramic liner, the hip prosthesis was revised into a metal-on-polyethylene bearing. At one year postoperatively, X-rays and MARS-MRI showed a fixed reversed hybrid THA, with periarticular densities, flattening of the femoral head component, and a pattern of periarticular metal wear debris and pseudotumor formation. Before revision could take place, the patient was admitted with the clinical picture of systemic cobalt toxicity, supported by excessively high serum cobalt and chromium levels, and ultimately died. At autopsy dilated cardiomyopathy as cause of death was hypothesized. A third body wear reaction between ceramic remnants and the metal femoral head very likely led to excessive metal wear, which contributed systemic cobalt toxicity leading to neurotoxicity and heart failure. This case emphasizes that fractured ceramic-on-ceramic bearings should be revised to ceramic-on-ceramic or ceramic-on-polyethylene bearings, but not to metal-on-polyethylene bearings. We aim to increase awareness among orthopedic surgeons for clinical clues for systemic cobalt intoxication, even when there is no metal-on-metal bearing surface.

  11. Neutralization by metal ions of the toxicity of sodium selenide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Dauplais

    Full Text Available Inert metal-selenide colloids are found in animals. They are believed to afford cross-protection against the toxicities of both metals and selenocompounds. Here, the toxicities of metal salt and sodium selenide mixtures were systematically studied using the death rate of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells as an indicator. In parallel, the abilities of these mixtures to produce colloids were assessed. Studied metal cations could be classified in three groups: (i metal ions that protect cells against selenium toxicity and form insoluble colloids with selenide (Ag⁺, Cd²⁺, Cu²⁺, Hg²⁺, Pb²⁺ and Zn²⁺, (ii metal ions which protect cells by producing insoluble metal-selenide complexes and by catalyzing hydrogen selenide oxidation in the presence of dioxygen (Co²⁺ and Ni²⁺ and, finally, (iii metal ions which do not afford protection and do not interact (Ca²⁺, Mg²⁺, Mn²⁺ or weakly interact (Fe²⁺ with selenide under the assayed conditions. When occurring, the insoluble complexes formed from divalent metal ions and selenide contained equimolar amounts of metal and selenium atoms. With the monovalent silver ion, the complex contained two silver atoms per selenium atom. Next, because selenides are compounds prone to oxidation, the stabilities of the above colloids were evaluated under oxidizing conditions. 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid (DTNB, the reduction of which can be optically followed, was used to promote selenide oxidation. Complexes with cadmium, copper, lead, mercury or silver resisted dissolution by DTNB treatment over several hours. With nickel and cobalt, partial oxidation by DTNB occurred. On the other hand, when starting from ZnSe or FeSe complexes, full decompositions were obtained within a few tens of minutes. The above properties possibly explain why ZnSe and FeSe nanoparticles were not detected in animals exposed to selenocompounds.

  12. Extraction of toxic and valuable metals from foundry sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vite T, J.

    1996-01-01

    There were extracted valuable metals from foundry sands such as: gold, platinum, silver, cobalt, germanium, nickel and zinc among others, as well as highly toxic metals such as chromium, lead, vanadium and arsenic. The extraction efficiency was up to 100% in some cases. For this reason there were obtained two patents at the United States, patent number 5,356,601, in October 1994, given for the developed process and patent number 5,376,000, in December 1994, obtained for the equipment employed. Therefore, the preliminary parameters for the installation of a pilot plant have also been developed. (Author)

  13. Fluorescent bioassays for toxic metals in milk and yoghurt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddiki Mohammad Shohel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From a human health viewpoint, contaminated milk and its products could be a source of long-term exposure to toxic metals. Simple, inexpensive, and on-site assays would enable constant monitoring of their contents. Bioassays that can measure toxic metals in milk or yoghurt might reduce the risk. For this purpose, the green fluorescent protein (GFP-tagged trans factors, ArsR-GFP and CadC-GFP, together with their cis elements were used to develop such bioassays. Results ArsR-GFP or CadC-GFP, which binds either toxic metal or DNA fragment including cis element, was directly mixed with cow’s milk or yoghurt within a neutral pH range. The fluorescence of GFP, which is reflected by the association/dissociation ratio between cis element and trans factor, significantly changed with increasing externally added As (III or Cd (II whereas smaller responses to externally added Pb (II and Zn (II were found. Preparation and dilution of whey fraction at low pH were essential to intrinsic zinc quantification using CadC-GFP. Using the extraction procedure and bioassay, intrinsic Zn (II concentrations ranging from 1.4 to 4.8 mg/l for milk brands and from 1.2 to 2.9 mg/kg for yoghurt brands were determined, which correlated to those determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Conclusions GFP-tagged bacterial trans factors and cis elements can work in the neutralized whole composition and diluted whey fraction of milk and yoghurt. The feature of regulatory elements is advantageous for establishment of simple and rapid assays of toxic metals in dairy products.

  14. Presence of Toxic Heavy Metals in Human Breast Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Özçetin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available      Aim: In breast-fed infants, toxic chemicals previously been exposed to the mother are also a potential risk to the baby. The aim of this study is to investigate the presence of Ni, Cd, Pb and Sb in mother’s milk and to highlight the possible potential risks of toxic heavy metals in the light of published epidemiological studies and scientific literature. Material and Method: For the study, milk samples were collected from 58 breast-feeding mothers who were residing in their provinces for more than five years and gave birth here and applied to follow up in any time after the first month period. Ni, Cd, Pb and Sb levels of milk samples were measured by ICP (Inductively Coupled Plasma spectroscopy device. Results: In examined breast milks, 53.4% Ni, 17.2% Cd, 12.1% Pb and 15.5% Sb were found. Out of 58 mothers enrolled in the study, none of the heavy metals was detected in only 13 (22.4% mother’s milk, one or more heavy metal was found in the rest of the milks of mothers. Discusssion: In rural and urban areas, the environment is widely contaminated with heavy metals. This toxic substances come to be found in breast  milk. In the earth, the main source of environmental toxins that breast-feed infants faced with is breast milk. To minimize the exposure of toxins with breast milk, the risk of confrontation with mothers and toxic agents should be reduced.  

  15. Oral bioaccessibility of toxic metals in contaminated oysters and relationships with metal internal sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shi; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2014-12-01

    The Hong Kong oysters Crassostrea hongkongensis are widely farmed in the estuarine waters of Southern China, but they accumulate Cu and Zn to alarmingly high concentrations in the soft tissues. Health risks of seafood consumption are related to contaminants such as toxic metals which are bioaccessible to humans. In the present study, we investigated the oral bioaccessibility of five toxic metals (Ag, Pb, Cd, Cu and Zn) in contaminated oysters collected from different locations of a large estuary in southern China. In all oysters, total Zn concentration was the highest whereas total Pb concentration was the lowest. Among the five metals, Ag had the lowest oral bioaccessibility (38.9-60.8%), whereas Cu and Zn had the highest bioaccessibility (72.3-93.1%). Significant negative correlation was observed between metal bioaccessibility and metal concentration in the oysters for Ag, Cd, and Cu. We found that the oral bioaccessibility of the five metals was positively correlated with their trophically available metal fraction (TAM) in the oyster tissues, and negatively correlated with metal distribution in the cellular debris. Thus, metal partitioning in the TAM and cellular debris controlled the oral bioaccessibility to humans. Given the dependence of oral bioaccessibility on tissue metal contamination, bioaccessibility needs to be incorporated in the risk assessments of contaminated shellfish. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cardiac transplant due to metal toxicity associated with hip arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheldon Moniz, MBBS (UWA

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Concerns regarding metal-on-metal (MoM bearing couples in total hip arthroplasty are well documented in the literature with cobalt (Co and chromium (Cr toxicity causing a range of both local and systemic adverse reactions. We describe the case of a patient undergoing cardiac transplantation as a direct result of Co and Cr toxicity following a MoM hip replacement. Poor implant positioning led to catastrophic wear generating abundant wear particles leading to Co and Cr toxicity, metallosis, bony destruction, elevated metal ion levels, and adverse biological responses. Systemic symptoms continued for 3 years following cardiac transplantation with resolution only after revision hip arthroplasty. There was no realization in the initial cardiac assessment and subsequent transplant workup that the hip replacement was the likely cause of the cardiac failure, and the hip replacement was not recognized as the cause until years after the heart transplant. This case highlights the need for clinicians to be aware of systemic MoM complications as well as the importance of positioning when using these prostheses.

  17. Assessment of toxic metals in waste personal computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolias, Konstantinos; Hahladakis, John N; Gidarakos, Evangelos

    2014-08-01

    Considering the enormous production of waste personal computers nowadays, it is obvious that the study of their composition is necessary in order to regulate their management and prevent any environmental contamination caused by their inappropriate disposal. This study aimed at determining the toxic metals content of motherboards (printed circuit boards), monitor glass and monitor plastic housing of two Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) monitors, three Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) monitors, one LCD touch screen monitor and six motherboards, all of which were discarded. In addition, concentrations of chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and mercury (Hg) were compared with the respective limits set by the RoHS 2002/95/EC Directive, that was recently renewed by the 2012/19/EU recast, in order to verify manufacturers' compliance with the regulation. The research included disassembly, pulverization, digestion and chemical analyses of all the aforementioned devices. The toxic metals content of all samples was determined using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results demonstrated that concentrations of Pb in motherboards and funnel glass of devices with release dates before 2006, that is when the RoHS Directive came into force, exceeded the permissible limit. In general, except from Pb, higher metal concentrations were detected in motherboards in comparison with plastic housing and glass samples. Finally, the results of this work were encouraging, since concentrations of metals referred in the RoHS Directive were found in lower levels than the legislative limits. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Toxic metals contained in cosmetics: a status report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocca, Beatrice; Pino, Anna; Alimonti, Alessandro; Forte, Giovanni

    2014-04-01

    The persistence of metals in the environment and their natural occurrence in rocks, soil and water cause them to be present in the manufacture of pigments and other raw materials used in the cosmetic industry. Thus, people can be exposed to metals as trace contaminants in cosmetic products they daily use. Cosmetics may have multiple forms, uses and exposure scenarios, and metals contained in them can cause skin local problems but also systemic effects after their absorption via the skin or ingestion. Even this, cosmetics companies are not obliged to report on this kind of impurities and so consumers have no way of knowing about their own risk. This paper reviewed both the concentration of metals in different types of cosmetics manufactured and sold worldwide and the data on metals' dermal penetration and systemic toxicology. The eight metals of concern for this review were antimony (Sb), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), mercury (Hg), nickel (Ni) and lead (Pb). This was because they are banned as intentional ingredients in cosmetics, have draft limits as potential impurities in cosmetics and are known as toxic. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Toxicity of heavy metals to fish: an important consideration for sucessful aquaculture

    OpenAIRE

    Nnaji, J.C.; Okoye, F.C.

    2007-01-01

    Heavy metals are toxic to man, animals and plants once safe limits are exceeded. Then ability to bio accumulate in plant and animal tissues makes them particularly hazardous. Heavy metals are toxic to all aquatic biota and cause high mortality of fish larva, fry, fingerling and adult fish. They accumulate in the gills, heart, liver, kidneys, brain, bones and muscles of fish. The physico-chemical forms of heavy metals determine their mobility, availability and toxicity to fish. These metals en...

  20. Evaluation of metals, metalloids, and ash mixture toxicity using sediment toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojak, Amber; Bonnevie, Nancy L; Jones, Daniel S

    2015-01-01

    In December 2008, a release of 4.1 million m(3) of coal ash from the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant occurred. Ash washed into the Emory River and migrated downstream into the Clinch and Tennessee Rivers. A Baseline Ecological Risk Assessment evaluated risks to ecological receptors from ash in the river system post-dredging. This article describes the approach used and results from sediment toxicity tests, discussing any causal relationships between ash, metals, and toxicity. Literature is limited in the realm of aquatic coal combustion residue (CCR) exposures and the potential magnitude of effects on benthic invertebrates. Sediment samples along a spectrum of ash content were used in a tiered toxicity testing approach and included a combination of 10 day sediment toxicity acute tests and longer-term, partial life cycle "definitive" tests with 2 species (Hyalella azteca and Chironomus dilutus). Arsenic, and to a lesser extent Se, in the ash was the most likely toxicant causing observed effects in the laboratory toxicity tests. Sites in the Emory River with the greatest statistical and biologically significant effects had As concentrations in sediments twice the probable effects concentration of 33 mg/kg. These sites contained greater than 50% ash. Sites with less than approximately 50% ash in sediments exhibited fewer significant toxic responses relative to the reference sediment in the laboratory. The results discussed here present useful evidence of only limited effects occurring from a worst-case exposure pathway. These results provided a valuable line of evidence for the overall assessment of risks to benthic invertebrates and to other ecological receptors, and were crucial to risk management and development of project remediation goals. © 2014 SETAC.

  1. Toxicity of Metals to a Freshwater Snail, Melanoides tuberculata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shuhaimi-Othman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult freshwater snails Melanoides tuberculata (Gastropod, Thiaridae were exposed for a four-day period in laboratory conditions to a range of copper (Cu, cadmium (Cd, zinc (Zn, lead (Pb, nickel (Ni, iron (Fe, aluminium (Al, and manganese (Mn concentrations. Mortality was assessed and median lethal times (LT50 and concentrations (LC50 were calculated. LT50 and LC50 increased with the decrease in mean exposure concentrations and times, respectively, for all metals. The LC50 values for the 96-hour exposures to Cu, Cd, Zn, Pb, Ni, Fe, Al, and Mn were 0.14, 1.49, 3.90, 6.82, 8.46, 8.49, 68.23, and 45.59 mg L−1, respectively. Cu was the most toxic metal to M. tuberculata, followed by Cd, Zn, Pb, Ni, Fe, Mn, and Al (Cu > Cd > Zn > Pb > Ni > Fe > Mn > Al. Metals bioconcentration in M. tuberculata increases with exposure to increasing concentrations and Cu has the highest accumulation (concentration factor in the soft tissues. A comparison of LC50 values for metals for this species with those for other freshwater gastropods reveals that M. tuberculata is equally sensitive to metals.

  2. Potentially toxic metals in rivers upstream of Pantanal Norte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geizibel Campos de Magalhães

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cuiabá (CBA and São Lourenço (SL rivers are considered strategic once they integrate regions, which are economically, socially and environmentally relevant for Brazil and the world. However, several activities developed in their watersheds may represent sources of metals and be a threat to the environmental quality. Thus, in this study we evaluated the spatial and temporal variability of potentially toxic metals in water and sediment and the relationship of their concentration with water quality parameters. Surface water samples were collected monthly in 15 points and bottom sediment in nine points distributed throughout both rivers from August 2012 to July 2013. Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn were determined in water by inducted coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and in sediment by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Fe, Mn, Pb and Cr had high concentrations in water and sediment but only Pb and Cr represent environmental risk. Fe and Mn were in higher concentrations in at the upper points of SL River and Cu and Pb in the urban area of both rivers. Temporally, the metal concentrations were associated with precipitation variation. The observed correlations amongst metal concentrations indicate common sources. Thus, the metals occurrence and concentrations in water and sediment of both rivers showed a natural contribution, as a reflex of soil type associated to the region's precipitation regimen as well as the anthropic contribution due to agricultural and cattle breeding activities, and disposal of untreated urban effluents.

  3. Drosophila melanogaster Models of Metal-Related Human Diseases and Metal Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calap-Quintana, Pablo; González-Fernández, Javier; Sebastiá-Ortega, Noelia; Llorens, José Vicente; Moltó, María Dolores

    2017-07-06

    Iron, copper and zinc are transition metals essential for life because they are required in a multitude of biological processes. Organisms have evolved to acquire metals from nutrition and to maintain adequate levels of each metal to avoid damaging effects associated with its deficiency, excess or misplacement. Interestingly, the main components of metal homeostatic pathways are conserved, with many orthologues of the human metal-related genes having been identified and characterized in Drosophila melanogaster . Drosophila has gained appreciation as a useful model for studying human diseases, including those caused by mutations in pathways controlling cellular metal homeostasis. Flies have many advantages in the laboratory, such as a short life cycle, easy handling and inexpensive maintenance. Furthermore, they can be raised in a large number. In addition, flies are greatly appreciated because they offer a considerable number of genetic tools to address some of the unresolved questions concerning disease pathology, which in turn could contribute to our understanding of the metal metabolism and homeostasis. This review recapitulates the metabolism of the principal transition metals, namely iron, zinc and copper, in Drosophila and the utility of this organism as an experimental model to explore the role of metal dyshomeostasis in different human diseases. Finally, a summary of the contribution of Drosophila as a model for testing metal toxicity is provided.

  4. Phytoextraction of toxic metals by sunflower and corn plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soudek, Petr; Petrová, Šárka; Benešová, Dagmar; Vaněk, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 8, 3-4 (2010), s. 383-390 ISSN 1459-0255 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B08058; GA MŠk 1M06030; GA MŠk OC09082 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Toxic metals * lead * zinc Subject RIV: DK - Soil Contamination ; De-contamination incl. Pesticides Impact factor: 0.425, year: 2010 www.isfae.org/scientficjournal/2010/issue3/abstracts/abstract68.php

  5. Evaluation of levels of select toxic metals in commonly used herbal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Even at low concentrations or levels of exposure, toxic metals have also been reported to pose health risks to man. Aim: To ... Materials/Methods :Herbal medicines (n=8) were purchased from on-the-street vendors and evaluated for levels of five toxic metals (Lead, Nickel, Mercury, Cadmium and Arsenic).Analysis of toxic ...

  6. Occurrence of Trace and Toxic metals in River Narmada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Arif

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Deteriorating water quality has become a serious problem in developing countries. Almost 70% of Indian’s surface water resources have become contaminated due to the discharge of untreated sewage and industrial effluents. The results reveals that out of nine water quality stations monitored, water samples collected at 5 water quality stations (Amarkantak, Dindori, Manot, Barmanghat and Handia are found to be within the permissible limit for all purposes in respect to trace & toxic metals. While Sandia, Hoshangabad, Mandleshwar and Garudeshwar stations were beyond the permissible limit due to presence of chromium, copper and iron metals. The major source of pollution to the Narmada river is the anthropogenic municipal solid waste and sewage from nearby towns/habitations, agricultural runoff and native soil erosion. The quality of the Narmada River is degraded due to the municipal and industrial discharges from the catchment.

  7. Nanotoxicity: oxidative stress mediated toxicity of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Abhijit; Ghosh, Manoranjan; Sil, Parames Chandra

    2014-01-01

    Metal and metal oxide nanoparticles are often used as industrial catalysts or to improve product's functional properties. Recent advanced nanotechnology have been expected to be used in various fields, ranging from sensors, environmental remediation to biomedicine, medical biology and imaging, etc. However, the growing use of nanoparticles has led to their release into environment and increased levels of these particles at nearby sites or the surroundings of their manufacturing factories become obvious. The toxicity of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles on humans, animals, and certainly to the environment has become a major concern to our community. However, controversies still remain with respect to the toxic effects and the mechanisms of these nanoparticles. The scientific community now feels that an understanding of the toxic effects is necessary to handle these nanoparticles and their use. A new discipline, named nanotoxicology, has therefore been developed that basically refers to the study of the interactions of nanoparticles with biological systems and also measures the toxicity level related to human health. Nanoparticles usually generate reactive oxygen species to a greater extent than micro-sized particles resulting in increased pro-inflammatory reactions and oxidative stress via intracellular signaling pathways. In this review, we mainly focus on the routes of exposure of some metal and metal oxide nanoparticles and how these nanoparticles affect us or broadly the cells of our organs. We would also like to discuss the responsible mechanism(s) of the nanoparticle-induced reactive oxygen species mediated organ pathophysiology. A brief introduction of the characterization and application of these nanoparticles has also been included in the article.

  8. Toxicity of Metals to a Freshwater Ostracod: Stenocypris major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shuhaimi-Othman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Adults of freshwater ostracod Stenocypris major (Crustacea, Candonidae were exposed for a four-day period in laboratory conditions to a range of copper (Cu, cadmium (Cd, zinc (Zn, lead (Pb, nickel (Ni, iron (Fe, aluminium (Al, and manganese (Mn concentrations. Mortality was assessed, and median lethal times (LT50 and concentrations (LC50 were calculated. LT50 and LC50 increased with the decrease in mean exposure concentrations and times, respectively, for all metals. LC50s for 96 hours for Cu, Cd, Zn, Pb, Ni, Fe, Al, and Mn were 25.2, 13.1, 1189.8, 526.2, 19743.7, 278.9, 3101.9, and 510.2 μg/L, respectively. Metals bioconcentration in S. major increases with exposure to increasing concentrations, and Cd was the most toxic to S. major, followed by Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn, Al, and Ni (Cd>Cu>Fe>Mn>Pb>Zn>Al>Ni. Comparison of LC50 values for metals for this species with those for other freshwater crustacean reveals that S. major is equally or more sensitive to metals than most other tested crustacean.

  9. Self-reported neurological clinical manifestations of metal toxicity in metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lingen, Christiaan P.; Ettema, Harmen B.; Van Der Straeten, Catherine; Kollen, Bouwdewijn J.; Verheyen, Cees C. P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Adverse reactions to metal particle debris have been increasingly reported as a complication following large head metal-on-metal (MoM) hip arthroplasty. Elevated metal ion levels are a cause for concern. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether exposure to cobalt is associated with patient

  10. Fabrication and optimizing of metal nano silicate as toxic metal absorbent from sea water

    OpenAIRE

    Solgi, Leila

    2013-01-01

    Pure Water, is a crucial demand of creature life. Following industrial development, extra amount of toxic metals such as chromium enters the environmental cycle through the sewage, which is considered as a serious threat for organisms. One of the modern methods of filtration and removal of contaminants in water, is applying Nano-technology. According to specific property of silicate materials, in this article we try to survey increased power in composites and various absorption in several mor...

  11. Deposition of toxic metal particles on rough nanofiltration membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agboola, Oluranti; Maree, Jannie; Mbaya, Richard; Zvinowanda, Caliphs Musa; Molelekwa, Gomotsegang Fred; Jullok, Nora; Bruggen, Bart Van der; Volodine, Alexander; Haesendonck, Chris Van

    2014-01-01

    Two nanofiltration (NF90 and Nano-Pro-3012) membranes were investigated for their capacity to remove metal ions. This study presents the effect of membrane roughness on the removal of toxic metal ions during dead end membrane filtration. Atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, WSXM software and ImageJ were used to characterize the roughness of the membranes. Gradual decrease in filtration permeate flux was observed as foulants accumulated at the interface of the membranes; filtration permeate flux varied from 20 L/m 2 /h to 14 L/m 2 /h and 11 L/ m 2 /h to 6 L/m 2 /h for NF90 and Nano-Pro-3012, respectively. NF90 membrane was more prone to fouling than the Nano-Pro-3012 membrane: the percentage flux reduction was higher for NF90 (3.6%) than Nano-Pro-3012 (0.98%). The bearing ratio of the fouled NF90 exhibited a high peak of 7.09 nm than the fouled Nano-Pro-3012 with the peak of 6.8 nm

  12. Metals and cocoa products: a study on characterization of toxic and essential metals in chocolates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, S.; Husnain, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Metals (Pb, Cd, Ni, Fe, Cu, Zn and Mn) were assessed in 32 commonly consumed cocoa products (chocolates) prepared by different national and multinational companies. Significant differences were observed between the micro element contents of these varieties (P < 0.01). Frequent consumption of chocolates can enhance the intake of toxic metals in children. The concentration of Pb and Cd in cocoa powder is found to be highest 492 and 197 mu g/L followed by cocoa based chocolates 306 and 46.8 mu g/L, sugar based chocolates 209.8 and 40.3 mu g/L whereas it is least in milk based chocolates samples 88.3 and 33 mu g/L respectively. Weekly intake of toxic metals Pb, Cd and Ni was also calculated. Mean concentration of Pb and Cd was found below the provisional tolerable weekly intake defined by FAO/WHO. All essential elements were assessed for their weekly intake with the dietary reference intakes (DRI). Results were validated through the analysis of certified reference materials and determined metals concentrations were quite in good agreement with certified levels. Data was interpreted through cluster analysis and pattern recognition as depicted. The concentrations of Pb, Cd, Ni and Fe were found to be highest in the cocoa-based followed by milk-based and sugar-based chocolates. The daily intake of cocoa-based chocolates must be reduced as lead and cadmium intake can otherwise cross the limits set by Codex Alimentarius (FAO/WHO 2006). Raw materials should be checked before use for metal contents in order to decrease the concentrations of these metals in final chocolate products. (Orig./A.B.)

  13. Toxicity of chlortetracycline and its metal complexes to model microorganisms in wastewater sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulicharla, Rama; Das, Ratul Kumar; Brar, Satinder Kaur; Drogui, Patrick; Sarma, Saurabh Jyoti; Verma, Mausam; Surampalli, Rao Y; Valero, Jose R

    2015-11-01

    Complexation of antibiotics with metals is a well-known phenomenon. Wastewater treatment plants contain metals and antibiotics, thus it is essential to know the effect of these complexes on toxicity towards microorganisms, typically present in secondary treatment processes. In this study, stability constants and toxicity of chlortetracycline (CTC) and metal (Ca, Mg, Cu and Cr) complexes were investigated. The calculated stability constants of CTC-metal complexes followed the order: Mg-CTC>Ca-CTC>Cu-CTC>Cr-CTC. Gram positive Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and Gram negative Enterobacter aerogenes (Ea) bacteria were used as model microorganisms to evaluate the toxicity of CTC and its metal complexes. CTC-metal complexes were more toxic than the CTC itself for Bt whereas for Ea, CTC and its metal complexes showed similar toxicity. In contrast, CTC spiked wastewater sludge (WWS) did not show any toxic effect compared to synthetic sewage. This study provides evidence that CTC and its metal complexes are toxic to bacteria when they are biologically available. As for WWS, CTC was adsorbed to solid part and was not biologically available to show measurable toxic effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. artocarpus altilis proving its worth in toxic metal removal from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    2012-12-02

    Dec 2, 2012 ... breadfruit nuts have been applied in its natural form for the biosorption removal of some toxic (heavy) metal ions (Cd2+, Pb2+ and Ni2+) from aqueous systems. Since it is suspected that polar functional groups could be a strong factor in the biosorption of toxic metal ions (Ricordel et al, 2011), the infared (IR).

  15. Correlations of acute toxicity of metal ions and the covalent/ionic character of their bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, J.E.; Williams, M.W.; Jacobson, K.B.; Hingerty, B.E.

    1984-01-01

    We have investigated correlations between physicochemical properties of 24 metal ions and their acute toxicity in mice and Drosophila. A high correlation for a softness parameter suggests that the relative covalent/ionic character of the bonds formed by the metal ions may be important in determining their toxicity. This hypothesis is reinforced by model calculations of metal binding to dinucleotides in water. Since the nature of bonds depends on ligand electronegativity, we searched for correlations involving this parameter. Although electronegativity is useful for interpreting some aspects of metal-ion behavior related to toxicity, it does not yield improved correlations. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Dysregulation of transition metal ion homeostasis is the molecular basis for cadmium toxicity in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    OpenAIRE

    Begg, Stephanie L.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Luo, Zhenyao; Cou?ago, Rafael M.; Morey, Jacqueline R.; Maher, Megan J.; Ong, Cheryl-lynn Y.; McEwan, Alastair G.; Kobe, Bostjan; O?Mara, Megan L.; Paton, James C.; McDevitt, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium is a transition metal ion that is highly toxic in biological systems. Although relatively rare in the Earth?s crust, anthropogenic release of cadmium since industrialization has increased biogeochemical cycling and the abundance of the ion in the biosphere. Despite this, the molecular basis of its toxicity remains unclear. Here we combine metal-accumulation assays, high-resolution structural data and biochemical analyses to show that cadmium toxicity, in Streptococcus pneumoniae, occu...

  17. Gender differences in the disposition and toxicity of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahter, Marie; Akesson, Agneta; Liden, Carola; Ceccatelli, Sandra; Berglund, Marika

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that health effects of toxic metals differ in prevalence or are manifested differently in men and women. However, the database is small. The present work aims at evaluating gender differences in the health effects of cadmium, nickel, lead, mercury and arsenic. There is a markedly higher prevalence of nickel-induced allergy and hand eczema in women compared to men, mainly due to differences in exposure. Cadmium retention is generally higher in women than in men, and the severe cadmium-induced Itai-itai disease was mainly a woman's disease. Gender differences in susceptibility at lower exposure are uncertain, but recent data indicate that cadmium has estrogenic effects and affect female offspring. Men generally have higher blood lead levels than women. Lead accumulates in bone and increased endogenous lead exposure has been demonstrated during periods of increased bone turnover, particularly in women in pregnancy and menopause. Lead and mercury, in the form of mercury vapor and methylmercury, are easily transferred from the pregnant women to the fetus. Recent data indicate that boys are more susceptible to neurotoxic effects of lead and methylmercury following exposure early in life, while experimental data suggest that females are more susceptible to immunotoxic effects of lead. Certain gender differences in the biotransformation of arsenic by methylation have been reported, and men seem to be more affected by arsenic-related skin effect than women. Experimental studies indicate major gender differences in arsenic-induced cancer. Obviously, research on gender-related differences in health effects caused by metals needs considerable more focus in the future

  18. Hazard and risk assessment of human exposure to toxic metals using in vitro digestion assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hani A. Alhadrami

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Clean-up targets for toxic metals require that the site be “fit for purpose”. This means that targets are set with respect to defined receptors that reflect intended land-use. In this study, the likely threat of human exposure to toxic metals has been evaluated by simulating the human digestion process in vitro. The effects of key attributes (i.e. sample fraction size, pH, Kd and total metal concentrations on the bioavailability of Cu and Ni were also investigated. Total metal concentration was the key explanatory factor for Cu and Ni bioavailability. A comparative ranking of metal concentrations in the context of tolerable daily intakes for Cu and Ni confirmed that the pH has the greatest impact on metals bioavailability. Rapid screening of key attributes and total toxic metal doses can reveal the relative hazard imposed on human, and this approach should be considered when defining threshold values for human protection.

  19. A review of toxicity and mechanisms of individual and mixtures of heavy metals in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiangyang; Cobbina, Samuel J; Mao, Guanghua; Xu, Hai; Zhang, Zhen; Yang, Liuqing

    2016-05-01

    The rational for the study was to review the literature on the toxicity and corresponding mechanisms associated with lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd), and arsenic (As), individually and as mixtures, in the environment. Heavy metals are ubiquitous and generally persist in the environment, enabling them to biomagnify in the food chain. Living systems most often interact with a cocktail of heavy metals in the environment. Heavy metal exposure to biological systems may lead to oxidation stress which may induce DNA damage, protein modification, lipid peroxidation, and others. In this review, the major mechanism associated with toxicities of individual metals was the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Additionally, toxicities were expressed through depletion of glutathione and bonding to sulfhydryl groups of proteins. Interestingly, a metal like Pb becomes toxic to organisms through the depletion of antioxidants while Cd indirectly generates ROS by its ability to replace iron and copper. ROS generated through exposure to arsenic were associated with many modes of action, and heavy metal mixtures were found to have varied effects on organisms. Many models based on concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA) have been introduced to help predict toxicities and mechanisms associated with metal mixtures. An integrated model which combines CA and IA was further proposed for evaluating toxicities of non-interactive mixtures. In cases where there are molecular interactions, the toxicogenomic approach was used to predict toxicities. The high-throughput toxicogenomics combines studies in genetics, genome-scale expression, cell and tissue expression, metabolite profiling, and bioinformatics.

  20. Disentangling the effects of low pH and metal mixture toxicity on macroinvertebrate diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaroli, Riccardo; Ippolito, Alessio; Tolkkinen, Mari J.; Mykrä, Heikki; Muotka, Timo; Balistrieri, Laurie S.; Schmidt, Travis S.

    2018-01-01

    One of the primary goals of biological assessment of streams is to identify which of a suite of chemical stressors is limiting their ecological potential. Elevated metal concentrations in streams are often associated with low pH, yet the effects of these two potentially limiting factors of freshwater biodiversity are rarely considered to interact beyond the effects of pH on metal speciation. Using a dataset from two continents, a biogeochemical model of the toxicity of metal mixtures (Al, Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn) and quantile regression, we addressed the relative importance of both pH and metals as limiting factors for macroinvertebrate communities. Current environmental quality standards for metals proved to be protective of stream macroinvertebrate communities and were used as a starting point to assess metal mixture toxicity. A model of metal mixture toxicity accounting for metal interactions was a better predictor of macroinvertebrate responses than a model considering individual metal toxicity. We showed that the direct limiting effect of pH on richness was of the same magnitude as that of chronic metal toxicity, independent of its influence on the availability and toxicity of metals. By accounting for the direct effect of pH on macroinvertebrate communities, we were able to determine that acidic streams supported less diverse communities than neutral streams even when metals were below no-effect thresholds. Through a multivariate quantile model, we untangled the limiting effect of both pH and metals and predicted the maximum diversity that could be expected at other sites as a function of these variables. This model can be used to identify which of the two stressors is more limiting to the ecological potential of running waters.

  1. Citrate coated silver nanoparticles change heavy metal toxicities and bioaccumulation of Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Injeong; Lee, Byung-Tae; Kim, Hyun-A; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Kim, Sang Don; Hwang, Yu-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Citrate-coated AgNPs (c-AgNPs) have negatively charged surfaces and their surface interactions with heavy metals can affect metal toxicity in aquatic environments. This study used Daphnia magna to compare the acute toxicities and bioaccumulation of As(V), Cd, and Cu when they interact with c-AgNPs. The 24-h acute toxicities of As(V) and Cu were not affected by the addition of c-AgNPs, while bioaccumulation significantly decreased in the presence of c-AgNPs. In contrast, both the 24-h acute toxicity and bioaccumulation of Cd increased in the presence of c-AgNPs. These toxicity and bioaccumulation trends can be attributed to the interactions between the AgNP surface and the heavy metals. As(V) and c-AgNPs compete by negative charge, decreasing As(V) toxicity. Copper adheres readily to c-AgNP citrate, decreasing Cu bioavailability, and thus reducing Cu toxicity and bioaccumulation. Citrate complexes with divalent cations such as Ca and Mg reduce the competition between divalent cations and Cd on biotic ligand, increasing toxicity and bioaccumulation of Cd. This study shows that surface properties determine the effect of c-AgNPs on heavy metal toxicities and bioaccumulations; hence, further studies on the effect of nanoparticle by it surface properties are warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A Selective Bioreduction of Toxic Heavy Metal Ions from Aquatic Environment by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Rahatgaonkar, A. M.; Mahore, N. R.

    2008-01-01

    The need to remove or recover metal ions from industrial wastewater has been established in financial as well as environmental terms. This need has been proved financially in terms of cost saving through metal reuse or sale and environmentally as heavy metal toxicity can affect organisms throughout the food chain, including humans. Bioremediation of heavy metal pollution remains a major challenge in environmental biotechnology. Current removal strategies are mainly based on bioreduction of Co...

  3. Influence of the soil Ca on the tolerance of Festuca rubra populations against toxic metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karataglis, S.S.

    1981-02-15

    Festuca rubra populations from toxic or non-toxic areas were studied. Their tolerance against the soil content in toxic metals and in combination with the Ca content was also correlated. It was demonstrated that the Festuca rubra populations developed in an environment with high concentrations of toxic metals and with high concentrations of Ca at the same time, showed very little or almost no tolerance against these metals. On the contrary, populations from other mines with normal Ca concentrations in their soil indicated increased tolerance against the toxic metals found in it. This behaviour expressed by the Festuca rubra populations of the Ecton mine is probably due to the high Ca concentration found in the soil in the form of CaCO/sub 2/. CaCO/sub 3/ along with the heavy metals has the ability to form undissolved or not easily dissolved carbonate salts. As a result there are no free ions of toxic metals in the immediate environment of the root and consequently the plants cannot be selected against these metals.

  4. Fabrication of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles by Algae and their Toxic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, Khwaja Salahuddin; Husen, Azamal

    2016-08-01

    Of all the aquatic organisms, algae are a good source of biomolecules. Since algae contain pigments, proteins, carbohydrates, fats, nucleic acids and secondary metabolites such as alkaloids, some aromatic compounds, macrolides, peptides and terpenes, they act as reducing agents to produce nanoparticles from metal salts without producing any toxic by-product. Once the algal biomolecules are identified, the nanoparticles of desired shape or size may be fabricated. The metal and metal oxide nanoparticles thus synthesized have been investigated for their antimicrobial activity against several gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial strains and fungi. Their dimension is controlled by temperature, incubation time, pH and concentration of the solution. In this review, we have attempted to update the procedure of nanoparticle synthesis from algae, their characterization by UV-vis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and application in cutting-edge areas.

  5. Toxicity of heavy metals to bromeliads and orchids in greenhouse cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irmer, U.; Poppendiek, H.H.; Zechmeister, A.; Lorch, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    Symptoms of heavy metal toxicity were observed in greenhouse cultures of bromeliads and orchids. Samples of water, plants and substrate were analysed. The concentrations of zinc, cadmium, and lead were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. In all plants high concentration of zinc, cadmium, and lead were observed. The source of these heavy metals was found in the zinc-coated structural elements of the greenhouse from which acid rains extracted the heavy metals. The rainwater collected was used for watering the cultures and caused the symptoms of toxicity. Differences in the accumulation of heavy metals by the species examined are discussed.

  6. Portable Sensor for Rapid In Situ Measurement of Trace Toxic Metals in Water Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a sensor to detect select trace toxic heavy metals (Ag, Cd, Mn, Ni, and Zn) in water is proposed. Using an automatic side-stream sampling technique,...

  7. Webinar Presentation: Vitamins, Minerals and Metals: Do Healthy Diets Counteract Health Effects of Toxicants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation, Vitamins, Minerals and Metals: Do Healthy Diets Counteract Health Effects of Toxicants?, was given at the NIEHS/EPA Children's Centers 2015 Webinar Series: Food and Children's Health held on Dec. 9, 2015.

  8. Application of INAA in the study of metallic ions related to toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogero, Sizue O.; Amaral, Renata H.; Costa, Isolda; Saiki, Mitiko [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); E-mails: sorogero@ipen.br; rhamaral@ipen.br; icosta@ipen.br; mitiko@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    The 316L stainless steel which is commonly used as biomaterial in metallic implants has shown toxic effect in cytotoxicity in vitro assay by neutral red uptake methodology. Instrumental neutron activation analysis was applied to evaluate metal composition in the steel and in the extract composed by cell culture medium (MEM) where the sample remained immersed during 10 days at 37 deg C. The aim of this study was to determine the level and identify the elements related to cytotoxicity, in solutions containing metallic ions with different associations and concentrations. The results showed Co, Cr and Ni elements in the extract which are metallic elements previously associated to toxicity. The association of Cr and Ni resulted in toxicity although these elements when individually present in the medium did not show any toxicity effect. On the other hand, the association of Co to Cr + Ni reduced the cytotoxic effect. (author)

  9. Occupational and Community Exposures to Toxic Metals: Lead, Cadmium, Mercury and Arsenic

    OpenAIRE

    Landrigan, Philip J.

    1982-01-01

    Lead, cadmium, mercury and arsenic are widely dispersed in the environment. Adults are primarily exposed to these contaminants in the workplace. Children may be exposed to toxic metals from numerous sources, including contaminated air, water, soil and food.

  10. Sorption of toxic metal ions in aqueous environment using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    carbodithioate and imidazole-1-carbodithioate were employed as sorbents for heavy metals from aqueous environments. The equilibrating time, initial metal concentrations and sorbent mass for optimal adsorption were 40 min, 5 mg/ℓ and 8 mg, ...

  11. Study of the migration of toxic metals in steelmaking waste using radioactive tracing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andre, C.; Jauzein, M.; Charentus, T.; Margrita, R.; Dechelette, O.

    1991-01-01

    The danger presented by toxic metals contained in steelmaking wastes put into slag piles may be neutralized by suitably chosen alternation of these wastes when they are deposited. Presentation of a study method using radioactive tracing of the migration of toxic metal (cadmium, zinc, chromium) in steelmaking wastes (slag, blast furnace sludge). This non destructive method was used in columns in the laboratory, but may be used in on-site slag piles [fr

  12. Bioaccumulation and toxic effects of some heavy metals in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The contamination of the aquatic systems with heavy metals from natural anthropogenic sources has become a global problem which poses threats to ecosystems and natural communities. Hence this study reviews the effects of heavy metals in freshwater fishes. Fishes bioaccumulate heavy metals (including cadmium, zinc ...

  13. Pre-concentration of Toxic Metals using Electrospun Amino ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    matrice interference.1 Pre-concentration strategies are therefore needed to enhance the detectability of the metals for their deter- mination. Water samples are routinely digested with acids to release the metals into solution and also to pre-concentrate the metal ions prior to their determination. Even though the acid digestion ...

  14. Toxic effect of metal cation binary mixtures to the seaweed Gracilaria domingensis (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Luiz Fernando; Stevani, Cassius Vinicius; Zambotti-Villela, Leonardo; Yokoya, Nair Sumie; Colepicolo, Pio

    2014-01-01

    The macroalga Gracilaria domingensis is an important resource for the food, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and biotechnology industries. G. domingensis is at a part of the food web foundation, providing nutrients and microelements to upper levels. As seaweed storage metals in the vacuoles, they are considered the main vectors to magnify these toxic elements. This work describes the evaluation of the toxicity of binary mixtures of available metal cations based on the growth rates of G. domingensis over a 48-h exposure. The interactive effects of each binary mixture were determined using a toxic unit (TU) concept that was the sum of the relative contribution of each toxicant and calculated using the ratio between the toxicant concentration and its endpoint. Mixtures of Cd(II)/Cu(II) and Zn(II)/Ca(II) demonstrated to be additive; Cu(II)/Zn(II), Cu(II)/Mg(II), Cu(II)/Ca(II), Zn(II)/Mg(II), and Ca(II)/Mg(II) mixtures were synergistic, and all interactions studied with Cd(II) were antagonistic. Hypotheses that explain the toxicity of binary mixtures at the molecular level are also suggested. These results represent the first effort to characterize the combined effect of available metal cations, based on the TU concept on seaweed in a total controlled medium. The results presented here are invaluable to the understanding of seaweed metal cation toxicity in the marine environment, the mechanism of toxicity action and how the tolerance of the organism.

  15. A multi-pH-dependent, single optical mesosensor/captor design for toxic metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, Sherif A; Shenashen, Mohamed A; Ismail, Adel A

    2012-10-07

    The fabrication of low-cost, simple nanodesigns with sensing/capture functionality has been called into question by the toxicity and non-degradability of toxic metals, as well as the persistent threat they pose to human lives. In this study, a single, pH-dependent, mesocaptor/sensor was developed for the optical and selective removal of toxic ions from drinking water and physiological systems such as blood.

  16. Genetic basis and importance of metal resistant genes in bacteria for bioremediation of contaminated environments with toxic metal pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Surajit; Dash, Hirak R; Chakraborty, Jaya

    2016-04-01

    Metal pollution is one of the most persistent and complex environmental issues, causing threat to the ecosystem and human health. On exposure to several toxic metals such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, and mercury, several bacteria has evolved with many metal-resistant genes as a means of their adaptation. These genes can be further exploited for bioremediation of the metal-contaminated environments. Many operon-clustered metal-resistant genes such as cadB, chrA, copAB, pbrA, merA, and NiCoT have been reported in bacterial systems for cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, and nickel resistance and detoxification, respectively. The field of environmental bioremediation has been ameliorated by exploiting diverse bacterial detoxification genes. Genetic engineering integrated with bioremediation assists in manipulation of bacterial genome which can enhance toxic metal detoxification that is not usually performed by normal bacteria. These techniques include genetic engineering with single genes or operons, pathway construction, and alternations of the sequences of existing genes. However, numerous facets of bacterial novel metal-resistant genes are yet to be explored for application in microbial bioremediation practices. This review describes the role of bacteria and their adaptive mechanisms for toxic metal detoxification and restoration of contaminated sites.

  17. A general mechanism for intracellular toxicity of metal-containing nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Sabella, Stefania

    2014-04-09

    The assessment of the risks exerted by nanoparticles is a key challenge for academic, industrial, and regulatory communities worldwide. Experimental evidence points towards significant toxicity for a range of nanoparticles both in vitro and in vivo. Worldwide efforts aim at uncovering the underlying mechanisms for this toxicity. Here, we show that the intracellular ion release elicited by the acidic conditions of the lysosomal cellular compartment-where particles are abundantly internalized-is responsible for the cascading events associated with nanoparticles-induced intracellular toxicity. We call this mechanism a "lysosome-enhanced Trojan horse effect" since, in the case of nanoparticles, the protective cellular machinery designed to degrade foreign objects is actually responsible for their toxicity. To test our hypothesis, we compare the toxicity of similar gold particles whose main difference is in the internalization pathways. We show that particles known to pass directly through cell membranes become more toxic when modified so as to be mostly internalized by endocytosis. Furthermore, using experiments with chelating and lysosomotropic agents, we found that the toxicity mechanism for different metal containing NPs (such as metallic, metal oxide, and semiconductor NPs) is mainly associated with the release of the corresponding toxic ions. Finally, we show that particles unable to release toxic ions (such as stably coated NPs, or diamond and silica NPs) are not harmful to intracellular environments. The Royal Society of Chemistry 2014.

  18. Metal and pharmaceutical mixtures: Is ion loss the mechanism underlying acute toxicity and widespread additive toxicity in zebrafish?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsop, Derek, E-mail: alsopde@mcmaster.ca; Wood, Chris M.

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: •Zebrafish larvae were used to test the acute toxicity of contaminant mixtures. •Interactions were observed between metals, ammonia and pharmaceuticals. •Larval Na{sup +} loss was observed with exposure to all acutely toxic contaminants tested. •Water quality criteria should recognize the toxic interactions between contaminants. -- Abstract: The acute toxicities and mechanisms of action of a variety of environmental contaminants were examined using zebrafish larvae (Danio rerio; 4–8 days post fertilization). Toxic interactions were observed between metals. For example, the addition of a sublethal level of nickel (15% of the LC{sub 50}, one third of the LC{sub 01}) to all copper treatments decreased the copper 96 h LC{sub 50} by 58%, while sublethal copper exposure (6% of the copper LC{sub 50}, 13% of the LC{sub 01}) decreased the cadmium 96 h LC{sub 50} by 47%. Two predictive models were assessed, the concentration addition (CA) model, which assumes similar mechanisms of action, and the independent action (IA) model, which assumes different mechanisms of action. Quantitative comparisons indicated the CA model performed better than the IA model; the latter tended to underestimate combined toxicity to a greater extent. The effects of mixtures with nickel or ammonia were typically additive, while mixtures with copper or cadmium were typically greater than additive. Larvae exposed to cadmium, copper or nickel experienced whole body ion loss. Decreases were greatest for Na{sup +} followed by K{sup +} (as high as 19% and 9%, respectively, in 24 h). Additive toxicity between copper and other pharmaceutical compounds such as fluoxetine (Prozac™), β-naphthoflavone, estrogen and 17α-ethinylestradiol were also observed. Similar to metals, acutely toxic concentrations of fluoxetine, β-naphthoflavone and ammonia all decreased whole body Na{sup +} and K{sup +}. Overall, whole body Na{sup +} loss showed the greatest correlation with mortality across a

  19. Metals and cocoa products: a study on characterization of toxic and essential metals in chocolates (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, S.; Husnain, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a sophisticated analytical technique, atomic absorption spectrometer (both with FAAS and GFAAS modes of atomization), was used for analyzing essential and toxic metal (Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Ni, Pb and Cd) contents in 32 commonly consumed cocoa products (chocolates) prepared by different national and multinational companies. Significant differences were observed between the micro element contents of the 32 varieties (P < 0.01). The risk posed by the quantity of heavy metals lead, cadmium and nickel present in cocoa products (chocolates) is of serious apprehension and weekly intake was calculated. The Concentration of Pb and Cd in cocoa powder is found to be highest 492 and 197 mu g/L followed by cocoa based chocolates 306 and 46.8 mu g/L, sugar based chocolates 209.8 and 40.3 mu g/L whereas it is least in milk based chocolates samples 88.3 and 33 mu g/L respectively. The concentration of Pb and Cd was found below the provisional tolerable weekly intake defined by FAO/WHO. All essential elements were assessed for their weekly intake with the dietary reference intakes. In order to validate our results, certified reference material (Wheat flour 1589, Milk powder A-11 and Milk Powder A-8) were analyzed for Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Ni, Pb and Cd levels. Determined concentrations were quite in good agreement with certified levels. Data was interpreted through cluster analysis and pattern recognition. (author)

  20. Mechanisms of silicon-mediated alleviation of heavy metal toxicity in plants: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrees, Muhammad; Ali, Shafaqat; Rizwan, Muhammad; Zia-Ur-Rehman, Muhammad; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Abbas, Farhat; Farid, Mujahid; Qayyum, Muhammad Farooq; Irshad, Muhammad Kashif

    2015-09-01

    In present era, heavy metal pollution is rapidly increasing which present many environmental problems. These heavy metals are mainly accumulated in soil and are transferred to food chain through plants grown on these soils. Silicon (Si) is the second most abundant element in the soil. It has been widely reported that Si can stimulate plant growth and alleviate various biotic and abiotic stresses, including heavy metal stress. Research to date has explored a number of mechanisms through which Si can alleviate heavy metal toxicity in plants at both plant and soil levels. Here we reviewed the mechanisms through which Si can alleviate heavy metal toxicity in plants. The key mechanisms evoked include reducing active heavy metal ions in growth media, reduced metal uptake and root-to-shoot translocation, chelation and stimulation of antioxidant systems in plants, complexation and co-precipitation of toxic metals with Si in different plant parts, compartmentation and structural alterations in plants and regulation of the expression of metal transport genes. However, these mechanisms might be associated with plant species, genotypes, metal elements, growth conditions, duration of the stress imposed and so on. Further research orientation is also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Removal of toxic heavy metal ions in runoffs by modified alfalfa and juniper

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.S. Han; J.K. Park; S.H. Min

    2000-01-01

    A series of batch isotherm tests was performed with alfalfa and juniper fibers to evaluate the effectiveness in filtering toxic heavy metals from stormwater. The adsorption of the heavy metal ions on the alfalfa and juniper fibers was strongly dependent on the equilibrium pH value of the solution. The change in sorption rate over time showed that two different sorption...

  2. [INVOLVEMENT OF PLANT CYTOSKELETON INTO CELLULAR MECHANISMS OF METALS TOXICITY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiunova, L; Krasylenko, Yu A; Yemets, A I; Blume, Ya B

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes published date and the results of the author's own researches cantering the participation of plant cells cytoskeleton. It is considered cytotoxic impact of metals on the cytoskeleton's components, including microtubules and actin filaments. Particular attention is paid to the cellular and molecular mechanisms of influence of metals on cytoskeleton. We discussed the most probable binding sites of heavy metals and alternative mechanisms of their impact on the cytoskeleton.

  3. Comparison of metal toxic impacts between aquatic and terrestrial organisms: is the free ion concentration a sufficient descriptor?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owsianiak, Mikolaj; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Larsen, Henrik Fred

    2011-01-01

    to be a sufficient indicator of metal toxicity for both aquatic and terrestrial species. With the aim of deriving extrapolations to predict terrestrial toxic impacts of metals from aquatic effect data, we compared copper toxicity of aquatic organisms with that of terrestrial organisms, testing the hypothesis...... of the free metal ion concentration to reflect toxicity, as the presence of protons and other cations reacting with biological binding sites has been shown to affect the toxicity of copper to D. magna. Similar patterns, albeit with smaller variations, are observed for terrestrial organisms. Up to three orders......Characterization of metal toxic impacts in comparative risk assessment and life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) should take into account metal speciation and interactions with soil/water organic constituents, because these mechanisms control metal bioavailability and may influence their toxic...

  4. Enzyme leaching of surficial geochemical samples for detecting hydromorphic trace-element anomalies associated with precious-metal mineralized bedrock buried beneath glacial overburden in northern Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Robert J.; Meier, A.L.; Riddle, G.; ,

    1990-01-01

    One objective of the International Falls and Roseau, Minnesota, CUSMAP projects was to develop a means of conducting regional-scale geochemical surveys in areas where bedrock is buried beneath complex glacially derived overburden. Partial analysis of B-horizon soils offered hope for detecting subtle hydromorphic trace-element dispersion patterns. An enzyme-based partial leach selectively removes metals from oxide coatings on the surfaces of soil materials without attacking their matrix. Most trace-element concentrations in the resulting solutions are in the part-per-trillion to low part-per-billion range, necessitating determinations by inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry. The resulting data show greater contrasts for many trace elements than with other techniques tested. Spatially, many trace metal anomalies are locally discontinuous, but anomalous trends within larger areas are apparent. In many instances, the source for an anomaly seems to be either basal till or bedrock. Ground water flow is probably the most important mechanism for transporting metals toward the surface, although ionic diffusion, electrochemical gradients, and capillary action may play a role in anomaly dispersal. Sample sites near the Rainy Lake-Seine River fault zone, a regional shear zone, often have anomalous concentrations of a variety of metals, commonly including Zn and/or one or more metals which substitute for Zn in sphalerite (Cd, Ge, Ga, and Sn). Shifts in background concentrations of Bi, Sb, and As show a trend across the area indicating a possible regional zoning of lode-Au mineralization. Soil anomalies of Ag, Co, and Tl parallel basement structures, suggesting areas that may have potential for Cobalt/Thunder Baytype silver viens. An area around Baudette, Minnesota, which is underlain by quartz-chlorite-carbonate-altered shear zones, is anomalous in Ag, As, Bi, Co, Mo, Te, Tl, and W. Anomalies of Ag, As, Bi, Te, and W tend to follow the fault zones, suggesting potential

  5. Metal Oxide Nanomaterial QNAR Models: Available Structural Descriptors and Understanding of Toxicity Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiali Ying

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Metal oxide nanomaterials are widely used in various areas; however, the divergent published toxicology data makes it difficult to determine whether there is a risk associated with exposure to metal oxide nanomaterials. The application of quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR modeling in metal oxide nanomaterials toxicity studies can reduce the need for time-consuming and resource-intensive nanotoxicity tests. The nanostructure and inorganic composition of metal oxide nanomaterials makes this approach different from classical QSAR study; this review lists and classifies some structural descriptors, such as size, cation charge, and band gap energy, in recent metal oxide nanomaterials quantitative nanostructure activity relationship (QNAR studies and discusses the mechanism of metal oxide nanomaterials toxicity based on these descriptors and traditional nanotoxicity tests.

  6. Dysregulation of transition metal ion homeostasis is the molecular basis for cadmium toxicity in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, Stephanie L; Eijkelkamp, Bart A; Luo, Zhenyao; Couñago, Rafael M; Morey, Jacqueline R; Maher, Megan J; Ong, Cheryl-Lynn Y; McEwan, Alastair G; Kobe, Bostjan; O'Mara, Megan L; Paton, James C; McDevitt, Christopher A

    2015-03-03

    Cadmium is a transition metal ion that is highly toxic in biological systems. Although relatively rare in the Earth's crust, anthropogenic release of cadmium since industrialization has increased biogeochemical cycling and the abundance of the ion in the biosphere. Despite this, the molecular basis of its toxicity remains unclear. Here we combine metal-accumulation assays, high-resolution structural data and biochemical analyses to show that cadmium toxicity, in Streptococcus pneumoniae, occurs via perturbation of first row transition metal ion homeostasis. We show that cadmium uptake reduces the millimolar cellular accumulation of manganese and zinc, and thereby increases sensitivity to oxidative stress. Despite this, high cellular concentrations of cadmium (~17 mM) are tolerated, with negligible impact on growth or sensitivity to oxidative stress, when manganese and glutathione are abundant. Collectively, this work provides insight into the molecular basis of cadmium toxicity in prokaryotes, and the connection between cadmium accumulation and oxidative stress.

  7. Understanding cellular responses to toxic agents: a model for mechanism-choice in bacterial metal resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouch, D A; Lee, B T; Morby, A P

    1995-02-01

    Bacterial resistances to metals are heterogeneous in both their genetic and biochemical bases. Metal resistance may be chromosomally-, plasmid- or transposon-encoded, and one or more genes may be involved: at the biochemical level at least six different mechanisms are responsible for resistance. Various types of resistance mechanisms can occur singly or in combination and for a particular metal different mechanisms of resistance can occur in the same species. To understand better the diverse responses of bacteria to metal ion challenge we have constructed a qualitative model for the selection of metal resistance in bacteria. How a bacterium becomes resistant to a particular metal depends on the number and location of cellular components sensitive to the specific metal ion. Other important selective factors include the nature of the uptake systems for the metal, the role and interactions of the metal in the normal metabolism of the cell and the availability of plasmid (or transposon) encoded resistance mechanisms. The selection model presented is based on the interaction of these factors and allows predictions to be made about the evolution of metal resistance in bacterial populations. It also allows prediction of the genetic basis and of mechanisms of resistance which are in substantial agreement with those in well-documented populations. The interaction of, and selection for resistance to, toxic substances in addition to metals, such as antibiotics and toxic analogues, involve similar principles to those concerning metals. Potentially, models for selection of resistance to any substance can be derived using this approach.

  8. Influences of sediment geochemistry on metal accumulation rates and toxicity in the aquatic oligochaete Tubifex tubifex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Fernández, Leire; De Jonge, Maarten; Bervoets, Lieven

    2014-12-01

    Metal bioaccumulation and toxicity in the aquatic oligochaete Tubifex tubifex exposed to three metal-contaminated field-sediments was studied in order to assess whether sediment-geochemistry (AVS, TOC) plays a major role in influencing these parameters, and to assess if the biodynamic concept can be used to explain observed effects in T. tubifex tissue residues and/or toxicity. An active autotomy promotion was observed in three studied sediments at different time points and reproduction impairment could be inferred in T. tubifex exposed to two of the tested sites after 28 days. The present study showed that sediment metal concentration and tissue residues followed significant regression models for four essential metals (Cu, Co, Ni and Zn) and one non-essential metal (Pb). Organic content normalization for As also showed a significant relationship with As tissue residue. Porewater was also revealed to be an important source of metal uptake for essential metals (e.g. Cu, Ni and Zn) and for As, but AVS content was not relevant for metal uptake in T. tubifex in studied sediments. Under the biodynamic concept, it was shown that influx rate from food (IF, sediment ingestion) in T. tubifex, in a range of sediment geochemistry, was able to predict metal bioaccumulation, especially of the essential metals Cu, Ni and Zn, and for the non-essential metal Pb. Additionally, IF appeared to be a better predictor for metal bioaccumulation in T. tubifex compared to sediment geochemistry normalization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Surface interactions affect the toxicity of engineered metal oxide nanoparticles toward Paramecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kungang; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Wen; Pu, Zhichao; Jiang, Lin; Chen, Yongsheng

    2012-08-20

    To better understand the potential impacts of engineered metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) in the ecosystem, we investigated the acute toxicity of seven different types of engineered metal oxide NPs against Paramecium multimicronucleatum, a ciliated protozoan, using the 48 h LC(50) (lethal concentration, 50%) test. Our results showed that the 48 h LC(50) values of these NPs to Paramecium ranged from 0.81 (Fe(2)O(3) NPs) to 9269 mg/L (Al(2)O(3) NPs); their toxicity to Paramecium increased as follows: Al(2)O(3) Paramecium; this implies that metal oxide NPs with strong association with the cell surface might induce more severe cytotoxicity in unicellular organisms.

  10. Safety Evaluation of Potential Toxic Metals Exposure from Street Foods Consumed in Mid-West Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. C. Ekhator

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Street-vended foods offer numerous advantages to food security; nevertheless, the safety of street food should be considered. This study has investigated the level of potential toxic metal (Pb, Cd, Hg, Sb, Mn, and Al contamination among street-vended foods in Benin City and Umunede. Methods. Twenty street food samples were purchased from vendors at bus stops. Metals were analyzed with atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The methods developed by the US EPA were employed to evaluate the potential health risk of toxic metals. Results. The concentrations of the toxic metals in mg/kg were in the range of Pb (0.014–1.37, Cd (0.00–0.00017, Hg (0.00–0.00014, Sb (0.00–0.021, Mn (0.00–0.012, and Al (0.00–0.22. All the toxic metals except Pb were below permissible limit set by WHO, EU, and USEPA. The daily intake, hazard quotient, and hazard index of all toxic metals except for Pb in some street foods were below the tolerable daily intake and threshold value of 1, indicating an insignificant health risk. Total cancer risk was within the priority risk level of 1.0E-04 but higher than the acceptable risk level of 1E-06. Conclusion. Consumption of some of these street foods is of public health concern.

  11. Toxicity of Transition Metal Oxide Nanoparticles: Recent Insights from in vitro Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S. Aronstam

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology has evolved to play a prominent role in our economy. Increased use of nanomaterials poses potential human health risk. It is therefore critical to understand the nature and origin of the toxicity imposed by nanomaterials (nanotoxicity. In this article we review the toxicity of the transition metal oxides in the 4th period that are widely used in industry and biotechnology. Nanoparticle toxicity is compellingly related to oxidative stress and alteration of calcium homeostasis, gene expression, pro-inflammatory responses, and cellular signaling events. The precise physicochemical properties that dictate the toxicity of nanoparticles have yet to be defined, but may include element-specific surface catalytic activity (e.g., metallic, semiconducting properties, nanoparticle uptake, or nanoparticle dissolution. These in vitro studies substantially advance our understanding in mechanisms of toxicity, which may lead to safer design of nanomaterials.

  12. Potential risks of metal toxicity in contaminated sediments of Deule river in Northern France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lourino-Cabana, Beatriz; Lesven, Ludovic; Charriau, Adeline [Equipe de Chimie Analytique et Marine, Universite de Lille 1, FRE CNRS Geosystemes 3298, Bat. C8, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Billon, Gabriel, E-mail: gabriel.billon@univ-lille1.fr [Equipe de Chimie Analytique et Marine, Universite de Lille 1, FRE CNRS Geosystemes 3298, Bat. C8, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Ouddane, Baghdad [Equipe de Chimie Analytique et Marine, Universite de Lille 1, FRE CNRS Geosystemes 3298, Bat. C8, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Boughriet, Abdel [Universite Lille Nord de France, Rue de l' Universite, P.O. Box 819, 62408 Bethune (France)

    2011-02-28

    Research highlights: {yields} A historical environmental pollution is evidenced with reference to background levels. {yields} Sedimentary trace metals partitioning is examined under undisturbed conditions. {yields} Anoxia and diagenetic processes induce geochemical and mineralogical variabilities. {yields} Do metals present in particles and pore waters exhibit a potential toxicity risk? {yields} Behaviour of binding fractions contributes to trace metals scavenging. - Abstract: The aim of this paper was to evaluate the potential sediment cumulative damage and toxicity due to metal contamination in a polluted zone of Deule river (in northern France) from nearby two smelters. Metal-enrichment factors and geoaccumulation indices measured with sediment depth revealed that - compared to background levels either in local reference soils or in world rivers sediments/suspended particulate matter - Cd contributed to the highest pollution levels, followed by Zn, Pb and to a much lesser extent Cu and Ni. A comparison of the vertical distribution of AVS (acid volatile sulfides), SEM (simultaneously extracted metals), TMC (total metal concentrations), TOC (total organic carbon) and interstitial water-metal concentrations in the sediment allowed us to highlight the extent of toxicity caused by Cd, Pb, Zn, Ni and Cu and to raise the possibility of their association with certain geochemical phases. To assess the actual environmental impacts of these metals in Deule river, numerical sediment quality guidelines were further used in the present work. Sedimentary Pb, Zn, and Cd contents largely exceeded PEC (probable effect concentration) values reported as consensus-based sediment quality guidelines for freshwater ecosystems. As for risks of toxicity from pore waters, metal concentrations reached their maxima at the surficial layers of the sediment (1-3 cm) and IWCTU (Interstitial Water Criteria Toxicity Unit) observed for Pb and to a lesser extent Cd, violated the corresponding water

  13. Potential risks of metal toxicity in contaminated sediments of Deule river in Northern France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lourino-Cabana, Beatriz; Lesven, Ludovic; Charriau, Adeline; Billon, Gabriel; Ouddane, Baghdad; Boughriet, Abdel

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → A historical environmental pollution is evidenced with reference to background levels. → Sedimentary trace metals partitioning is examined under undisturbed conditions. → Anoxia and diagenetic processes induce geochemical and mineralogical variabilities. → Do metals present in particles and pore waters exhibit a potential toxicity risk? → Behaviour of binding fractions contributes to trace metals scavenging. - Abstract: The aim of this paper was to evaluate the potential sediment cumulative damage and toxicity due to metal contamination in a polluted zone of Deule river (in northern France) from nearby two smelters. Metal-enrichment factors and geoaccumulation indices measured with sediment depth revealed that - compared to background levels either in local reference soils or in world rivers sediments/suspended particulate matter - Cd contributed to the highest pollution levels, followed by Zn, Pb and to a much lesser extent Cu and Ni. A comparison of the vertical distribution of AVS (acid volatile sulfides), SEM (simultaneously extracted metals), TMC (total metal concentrations), TOC (total organic carbon) and interstitial water-metal concentrations in the sediment allowed us to highlight the extent of toxicity caused by Cd, Pb, Zn, Ni and Cu and to raise the possibility of their association with certain geochemical phases. To assess the actual environmental impacts of these metals in Deule river, numerical sediment quality guidelines were further used in the present work. Sedimentary Pb, Zn, and Cd contents largely exceeded PEC (probable effect concentration) values reported as consensus-based sediment quality guidelines for freshwater ecosystems. As for risks of toxicity from pore waters, metal concentrations reached their maxima at the surficial layers of the sediment (1-3 cm) and IWCTU (Interstitial Water Criteria Toxicity Unit) observed for Pb and to a lesser extent Cd, violated the corresponding water quality data recommended

  14. Speciation Studies of Some Toxic Metal Complexes of Glycylglycine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    mixtures apart from its established utility in understanding ... Chemical speciation of metals is important for an understand- ... Titrations with differ- ent ratios (1:2.5, 1:3.5 and 1:5) of metal-ligand were performed with 0.4 mol L–1 sodium hydroxide solution. The mixtures obtained from PG and water are non-ideal due.

  15. Toxic effect of heavy metals on aquatic environment | Baby ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The indiscriminate discharge of industrial effluents, raw sewage wastes and other waste pollute most of the environments and affect survival and physiological activities of target organisms. Metals in particular have a tendency to accumulate and undergo food chain magnification. Heavy metals affect all groups of organisms ...

  16. Managing heavy metal toxicity stress in plants: biological and biotechnological tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovečka, M; Takáč, T

    2014-01-01

    The maintenance of ion homeostasis in plant cells is a fundamental physiological requirement for sustainable plant growth, development and production. Plants exposed to high concentrations of heavy metals must respond in order to avoid the deleterious effects of heavy metal toxicity at the structural, physiological and molecular levels. Plant strategies for coping with heavy metal toxicity are genotype-specific and, at least to some extent, modulated by environmental conditions. There is considerable interest in the mechanisms underpinning plant metal tolerance, a complex process that enables plants to survive metal ion stress and adapt to maintain growth and development without exhibiting symptoms of toxicity. This review briefly summarizes some recent cell biological, molecular and proteomic findings concerning the responses of plant roots to heavy metal ions in the rhizosphere, metal ion-induced reactions at the cell wall-plasma membrane interface, and various aspects of heavy metal ion uptake and transport in plants via membrane transporters. The molecular and genetic approaches that are discussed are analyzed in the context of their potential practical applications in biotechnological approaches for engineering increased heavy metal tolerance in crops and other useful plants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Characterization and Quantification of Hexavalent Chromium and Other Toxic Metals in the Air of Communities Surrounding Metal Processing Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikelnaya, O.; Polidori, A.; Low, J.

    2017-12-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] and other toxic metals are often emitted during metal forging, cutting, grinding and plating operations. In the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB) many of such operations are conducted by relatively small facilities intertwined within residential communities in the cities of Paramount, Compton, Long Beach and Anaheim. In response to the city of Paramount community members' complaints of "metallic" odors, the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) initiated a local air sampling study for toxic metals, which found elevated Cr(VI) and nickel levels in the community downwind of selected metal processing facilities. SCAQMD worked with these facilities to reduce the emissions from their metal grinding operations, which resulted in substantial reduced nickel levels, but did not reduce Cr(VI) levels. In order to fully understand the source(s) of these emissions, SCAQMD has been deploying portable samplers for Cr(VI) monitoring throughout the city of Paramount since October 2016. During this presentation we will discuss the results of more than a year of Cr(VI) analyses of samplers collected throughout the City of Paramount, as well as data from a continuous metal monitor deployed at one of the sites. We will also discuss options and challenges for expanding of Cr(VI) monitoring to other communities in the SCAB that are adjacent to metal forging and grinding operations; and explore emerging new technologies to address such monitoring challenges.

  18. Determination of toxic heavy metals in indigenous medicinal plants used in Rawalpindi and Islamabad cities, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Adeel; Rashid, Sadia; Malik, Riffat Naseem

    2013-06-21

    History of medicinal plants used in local healthcare systems dates back centuries as the user considers them safe from toxic effects. Present study was aimed to document the commonly used indigenous medicinal plants and to investigate the metal toxicity and impact of pollution load in most frequently used medicinal plants from study area. Semi-structured interviews and rapid appraisal approach were employed to record the ethnomedicinal information and toxic metals were analyzed through flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer. A total of 21 wild medicinal plants was reported, and 7 were screened for toxic metal analysis. Oral mode of application (93%) was the chief route of herbal remedy administration, and leaves were found to be used as major plant part against different diseases. Main sources of remedies were wild herb (68%) followed by wild trees (18%), wild spiny shrubs (09%) and wild shrubs (5%). Trend of metal concentration was found as Fe>Ni>Cr>Pb>Cu>Zn>Mn>Cd. Indigenous medicinal plants of both cities posed the toxicity risk for Ni, Cu, Fe and crossed the safety limits set by WHO. Medicinal plants of Rawalpindi were more toxic compared to the medicinal plants of Islamabad. Prolonged intake or over dose of these medicinal plants may lead to chronic accumulation of various elements that may cause severe hazardous effect upon human health. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Heavy Metal Toxicity in Bioremediation: Microbial Cultures and Microscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goodbody, Jason

    1997-01-01

    .... Phase contrast, Gram stain, fluorescent microscopy, were used to compare and document a wide variety of bacteria resulting from different metal treatments as well as from environmental changes within...

  20. Migration of Toxic Metals from Ceramic Food Packaging Materials into Acid Food Simulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanhua Dong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term extraction experiments were carried out on glazed tile specimens with 4 and 10% (v/v acetic acid, 1% (w/v citric acid, and 1% (v/v lactic acid solution in three temperature conditions (20, 40, and 60°C to investigate the effect of temperature and pH value on extraction of lead, cobalt, nickel, and zinc from ceramic food packaging materials and to study the extraction kinetics of toxic metals. Results showed that except at 60°C the amount of extraction of lead, cobalt, nickel, and zinc had linear dependence on time at longer times and removal of these toxic metals under other conditions increased linearly with the square root of the time, indicating a diffusion-controlled process. The amount of these toxic metals leached out from ceramic food packaging materials into the leachate, and the leaching rate increased with temperature and decreased with pH value of the food simulants. In addition, among these four toxic metals lead was the least leachable element, and nickel was the most leachable one. Disagreement between the ratios of the oxide of lead, cobalt, nickel, and zinc in the glaze and their release in the leachate suggested that extraction of these toxic metals was an incongruent dissolution process.

  1. Assessment of metal leachability and toxicity from sediment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-10-05

    Oct 5, 2015 ... Mobility of pollutants leached from the sediments, expressed as their susceptibility ... e-mail: baranaga1@wp.pl; Agnieszka.Baran@ur.krakow.pl. Received: 18 July 2014; accepted in ..... K, ZALEWSKI M and SAWICKI J (2008) Application of microbi- otest battery for complete toxicity assessment of rivers.

  2. The Severity of Autism Is Associated with Toxic Metal Body Burden and Red Blood Cell Glutathione Levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, J.B.; Mitchell, I.J.; Baral, M.; Bradstreet, J.; Geis, E.; Ingram, J.; Hensley, A.; Zappia, I.; Gehn, E.; Mitchell, K.; Newmark, S.; Rubin, R.A.; Bradstreet, J.; El-Dahrn, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship of children's autism symptoms with their toxic metal body burden and red blood cell (RBC) glutathione levels. In children ages 38 years, the severity of autism was assessed using four tools: ADOS, PDD-BI, ATEC, and SAS. Toxic metal body burden was assessed by measuring urinary excretion of toxic metals, both before and after oral dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). Multiple positive correlations were found between the severity of autism and the urinary excretion of toxic metals. Variations in the severity of autism measurements could be explained, in part, by regression analyses of urinary excretion of toxic metals before and after DMSA and the level of RBC glutathione (adjusted R2 of 0.220.45, P<.005 in all cases). This study demonstrates a significant positive association between the severity of autism and the relative body burden of toxic metals.

  3. Monitoring of heavy/toxic metals and halides in surface/ground water (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viqar-un-Nisa; Ahmed, R.; Husain, M.

    1999-01-01

    Water is essential for maintaining physical and social life. Human and animal consumption is perhaps the most evident essential use of water. Water quality and quantity have become critical issues, affecting all life. The importance of water in our lives, combined with the threats, make water resources use a global problem. Among the different pollutants toxic metals, metalloids and halides have special significance. Industrial effluents and municipal wastewater are normally drained into water streams, rivers and other reservoirs thus polluting these significantly. Quality of our water resources especially is an issue, which continues to arouse the attention of concerned scientists, legislators and the general public. Among various pollutant chemicals, the heavy metals and metalloids are present at trace levels in various compartments of the environment. Some metals become toxic even at trace levels because of the important features that distinguishes metals from other pollutants is that they are not biodegradable. The halides like Cl, Br, and I from different sources can enter easily into water systems and then they make their way directly into the human body. The intake of toxic as wells as essential elements through water and other food items like vegetables, milk wheat flour etc. is significant. The abundance or deficiency of these meals as well as halides results in abnormal metabolic functions. Due to excessive demand for trace analysis in water and other materials a variety of techniques and instrumentation has been developed. Determination of heavy metals ions is of the highest interest in environmental analysis. Among the food materials water is most important because of their large consumption by man. Also toxic metals in water may be in dissolved ionic form, which directly go into human metabolism and start their toxic action. Presence of even small amounts of toxic metals in drinking water can produce serious health hazards. (author)

  4. Evaluation of Metal Toxicity in Streams Affected by Abandoned Mine Lands, Upper Animas River Watershed, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, John M.; Allert, Ann L.; Hardesty, Douglas K.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; May, Thomas W.; Wang, Ning; Leib, Kenneth J.

    2001-01-01

    Acid drainage from abandoned mines and from naturally-acidic rocks and soil in the upper Animas River watershed of Colorado generates elevated concentrations of acidity and dissolved metals in stream waters and deposition of metal-contaminated particulates in streambed sediments, resulting in both toxicity and habitat degradation for stream biota. High concentrations of iron (Fe), aluminum (Al), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb) occur in acid streams draining headwaters of the upper Animas River watershed, and high concentrations of some metals, especially Zn, persist in circumneutral reaches of the Animas River and Mineral Creek, downstream of mixing zones of acid tributaries. Seasonal variation of metal concentrations is reflected in variation in toxicity of stream water. Loadings of dissolved metals to the upper Animas River and tributaries are greatest during summer, during periods of high stream discharge from snowmelt and monsoonal rains, but adverse effects on stream biota may be greater during winter low-flow periods, when stream flows are dominated by inputs of groundwater and contain greatest concentrations of dissolved metals. Fine stream-bed sediments of the upper Animas River watershed also contain elevated concentrations of potentially toxic metals. Greatest sediment metal concentrations occur in the Animas River upstream from Silverton, where there are extensive deposits of mine and mill tailings, and in mixing zones in the Animas River and lower Mineral Creek, where precipitates of Fe and Al oxides also contain high concentrations of other metals. This report summarizes the findings of a series of toxicity studies in streams of the upper Animas River watershed, conducted on-site and in the laboratory between 1998 and 2000. The objectives of these studies were: (1) to determine the relative toxicity of stream water and fine stream-bed sediments to fish and invertebrates; (2) to determine the seasonal range of toxicity in stream

  5. A novel approach for rapidly and cost-effectively assessing toxicity of toxic metals in acidic water using an acidophilic iron-oxidizing biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shih-Hung; Cheng, Kuo-Chih; Liao, Vivian Hsiu-Chuan

    2017-11-01

    Contamination by heavy metals and metalloids is a serious environmental and health concern. Acidic wastewaters are often associated with toxic metals which may enter and spread into agricultural soils. Several biological assays have been developed to detect toxic metals; however, most of them can only detect toxic metals in a neutral pH, not in an acidic environment. In this study, an acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacterium (IOB) Strain Y10 was isolated, characterized, and used to detect toxic metals toxicity in acidic water at pH 2.5. The colorimetric acidophilic IOB biosensor was based on the inhibition of the iron oxidizing ability of Strain Y10, an acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacterium, by metals toxicity. Our results showed that Strain Y10 is acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacterium. Thiobacillus caldus medium (TCM) (pH 2.5) supplied with both S 4 O 6 2- and glucose was the optimum growth medium for Strain Y10. The optimum temperature and pH for the growth of Strain Y10 was 45 °C and pH 2.5, respectively. Our study demonstrates that the color-based acidophilic IOB biosensor can be semi-quantitatively observed by eye or quantitatively measured by spectrometer to detect toxicity from multiple toxic metals at pH 2.5 within 45 min. Our study shows that monitoring toxic metals in acidic water is possible by using the acidophilic IOB biosensor. Our study thus provides a novel approach for rapid and cost-effective detection of toxic metals in acidic conditions that can otherwise compromise current methods of chemical analysis. This method also allows for increased efficiency when screening large numbers of environmental samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Heavy and Toxic Metals in Staple Foodstuffs and Agriproducts From Contaminated Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frontasyeva, M.V.; Lyapunov, S.M.; Ramadan, A.B.

    2004-01-01

    This study presents basic data on the contents of Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Pb in staple foodstuffs and agriproducts grown in Russia (Astrakhansaia region and Belovo town) and Egypt (Helwan region). The dependence of the concentration of metals in agriproducts on the content and chemical form of existence in irrigation water and soils is indicated. The existence of high concentrations of heavy and toxic metals in food and agriproducts depends on the extent of soil contamination in the area, the quality of water used for irrigation purposes and the technology of growing and processing of a given product. The concentration of heavy and toxic metals in agriproducts directly depends on the chemical form of their existence in the soil, high concentrations of heavy metals if present as low mobility compounds in the soil, do not affect essentially their concentrations in plants. High content of some toxic metals (Cd, Hg, Pb) in livestock nutrition plants may prompt the conclusion that similar high concentration of the elements are in the livestock output such as red or white meat and eggs. It is hardly probable, however, that there is instant dependence between them. This problem needs further investigation. The irrigation of agricultural lands with sewage water of a plant, or even more, of a whole region must be done with great caution. The experience of the Helwan region shows this kind of irrigation results in a dramatic increase of the concentration of heavy and toxic metals in end products

  7. Calculated distortions induced by metal-ion binding to simple oligonucleotide systems: Implications for toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, J.E.; Hingerty, B.E.; England, M.W.; Jacobson, K.B.

    1990-01-01

    We have previously published detailed results of calculations of the binding of the metal ions, Cd{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+}, to the dinucleoside monophosphate GpC in water. These ions, which have the same charge and radius, differ enormously in their toxicity to man and other biological systems. Our calculations showed contrasting behavior in the binding of these two metal ions to GpC. We suggest the hypothesis that structural distortions calculated for metal ions binding to simple nucleic-acid systems might serve as a indicator of an ion's potential ability to alter molecular activity and hence to be toxic to an organism. Furthermore, the degree of distortion might be correlated with the degree of toxicity as measured by some suitable criteria. The present paper reports the results of binding calculations for a number of other metal ions, of different valence states, with several dinucleoside monophosphates in water. A general trend of distortion with the type of binding of the metal ions is found. We are seeking quantitative measures of distortion to correlate with indicators of acute toxicity that we have measured for 24 metal ions using mice, Drosophila, and CHO cells. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Toxicity and Bioaccumulation of Heavy Metals in Spinach (Spinacia oleracea Grown in a Controlled Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naz Alia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The impact of heavy metal toxicity on the shoot and root lengths, total protein, fiber characteristics, moisture content and nutrient composition of spinach (Spinacia oleracea was evaluated. Plants were grown in pots containing soil and treated with different concentrations (mg/kg of lead (Pb; 300, 400 and 500, cadmium (Cd; 0.5, 1 and 1.5 and zinc (Zn; 250, 500, and 700 as well as mixtures of Cd and Pb (0.5/300, 1/400, 1.5/500, Cd and Zn (0.5/250, 1/500, 1.5/700, and Pb and Zn (300/250, 400/500, 500/700. Soil contaminated by long-term irrigation with wastewater containing heavy metals was simulated. An increase in concentrations of heavy metals both individually and as mixtures significantly (p < 0.05 reduced the growth parameters and nutrient contents of S. oleracea. The uptake patterns of heavy metals in mixtures showed antagonistic impacts on each other. The toxicities of the mixtures Cd and Pb, Cd and Zn as well as Pb and Zn were higher than those observed in separate heavy metal applications but less than their additive sums. The toxicity caused by individual heavy metals was the highest for Cd followed by Pb and Zn. The highest toxicity was observed in plants grown in soil contaminated by Cd and Pb.

  9. Investigation of metal toxicity to tropical biota. Recommendations for revision of Australian water quality guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchich, S. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). Environment Div.; Camilleri, C. [Environmental Research Inst of the Supervising Scientist, Jabiru, NT (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    The specific objectives of this study were to: review available data on the toxicity of metals to aquatic biota in tropical Australia; identify metals considered to be priority toxicants to aquatic biota in tropical Australia; and employ previously developed toxicity testing protocols for two tropical freshwater species to obtain preliminary toxicity data for two priority metals. From the literature review, it was concluded that insufficient metal toxicity data exist for Australian tropical species. Data were absent for a range of metals (eg Ag, As, Al, Cr, Hg, Ni, Sb and Se) listed in the current Australian water quality guidelines. Aluminium, Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Mn, Pb, U, V and Zn were identified as priority metals of potential ecotoxicological concern in aquatic ecosystems of tropical Australia, largely as a consequence of mining activities, but also from urban impacts. Instead of testing the toxicity of the priority metals for which data do not currently exist (ie Al, Co, Ni and V), it was deemed more important to conduct further experimental work on Cu and U, in the context of elucidating the relatively high variability in the toxic response of these two metals. As a result, Cu and U were selected and toxicity tests conducted using two tropical freshwater species (green hydra (Hydra viridissima) and gudgeon fish (Mogurnda mogurnda)) from the Australian wet/dry tropics using test protocols designed to maximise the greatest sensitivity of metal response in the shortest period of time. Hydra viridissima was about eight times more sensitive to Cu than U, whereas M. mogurnda was about twenty times more sensitive. Once differences between the sublethal and lethal endpoints of the two organisms were corrected by statistical extrapolation, H. viridissima was approximately seven times more sensitive than M. mogurnda to U, but only about three times more sensitive to Cu. Both species were more sensitive to Cu than U. These results are generally consistent with those from

  10. Investigation of metal toxicity to tropical biota. Recommendations for revision of Australian water quality guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchich, S.

    1997-01-01

    The specific objectives of this study were to: review available data on the toxicity of metals to aquatic biota in tropical Australia; identify metals considered to be priority toxicants to aquatic biota in tropical Australia; and employ previously developed toxicity testing protocols for two tropical freshwater species to obtain preliminary toxicity data for two priority metals. From the literature review, it was concluded that insufficient metal toxicity data exist for Australian tropical species. Data were absent for a range of metals (eg Ag, As, Al, Cr, Hg, Ni, Sb and Se) listed in the current Australian water quality guidelines. Aluminium, Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Mn, Pb, U, V and Zn were identified as priority metals of potential ecotoxicological concern in aquatic ecosystems of tropical Australia, largely as a consequence of mining activities, but also from urban impacts. Instead of testing the toxicity of the priority metals for which data do not currently exist (ie Al, Co, Ni and V), it was deemed more important to conduct further experimental work on Cu and U, in the context of elucidating the relatively high variability in the toxic response of these two metals. As a result, Cu and U were selected and toxicity tests conducted using two tropical freshwater species (green hydra (Hydra viridissima) and gudgeon fish (Mogurnda mogurnda)) from the Australian wet/dry tropics using test protocols designed to maximise the greatest sensitivity of metal response in the shortest period of time. Hydra viridissima was about eight times more sensitive to Cu than U, whereas M. mogurnda was about twenty times more sensitive. Once differences between the sublethal and lethal endpoints of the two organisms were corrected by statistical extrapolation, H. viridissima was approximately seven times more sensitive than M. mogurnda to U, but only about three times more sensitive to Cu. Both species were more sensitive to Cu than U. These results are generally consistent with those from

  11. Heavy metals toxicity after acute exposure of cultured renal cells. Intracellular accumulation and repartition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khodja, Hicham; Carriere, Marie; Avoscan, Laure; Gouget, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd) and uranium (U) present no known biological function but are toxic in various concentration ranges. Pb and Cd lead generally to nephrotoxicity consisting in proximal renal tubular dysfunction and accumulation while U has been reported to induce chemical kidney toxicity, functional and histological damages being as well mainly observed in proximal tubule cells. This work address the question of Cd, Pb, and U cytotoxicity, intracellular accumulation and repartition after acute intoxication of renal proximal tubule epithelial cells. After cells exposure to different concentrations of metals for various times, morphological changes were observed and intracellular concentrations and distributions of toxic metals were specified by PIXE coupled to RBS. Cell viability, measured by biochemical tests, was used as toxicity indicator. A direct correlation between cytotoxicity and intracellular accumulation in renal epithelial cells have been established. Finally, intracellular Pb and U localizations were detected while Cd was found to be uniformly distributed in renal cells. (author)

  12. Toxicity assessment of free form of heavy metals in aqueous media on earthworm Eudrillus eugeniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, V; Chaudhari, P R; Satyanarayan, S

    2011-01-01

    Metals are found in free and also in combined forms. In order to get information on the effect of free forms of heavy metals on earthworms the aqueous extracts of metals were tested on earthworms both in individual form and also in combined form. Different concentrations, i.e. 1 ppm, 5 ppm, and 10 ppm, were selected arbitrarily and were used in the experiments. Metals like copper, cadmium, chromium, zinc and lead were used. Earthworms' Eudrillus eugeniae activity, i.e. their response to the toxicity of metals, was monitored continuously for 5 h. It can be concluded that free form/ionic form/dissolved form of heavy metals are more toxic for earthworms, concurrent with findings of workers who have drawn same inference during studies on aquatic organisms. Earthworms can serve as biomarkers for wastewater and sludge treatment studies as they have shown typical adverse body reactions and symptoms altogether different in reaction to each of the metals during aqueous medium studies. It can be inferred that, if earthworms are utilised for treating wastewater and sludges containing these five heavy metals, one can ascertain the presence of individual metal concentrations in the wastewaters and sludges by studying the typical body reactions of earthworms during the treatment.

  13. Recovery of toxic metal ions from washing effluent containing excess aminopolycarboxylate chelant in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Rahman, Ismail M M; Nakano, Masayoshi; Begum, Zinnat A; Egawa, Yuji; Maki, Teruya; Furusho, Yoshiaki; Mizutani, Satoshi

    2011-10-15

    Aminopolycarboxylate chelants (APCs) are extremely useful for a variety of industrial applications, including the treatment of toxic metal-contaminated solid waste materials. Because non-toxic matrix elements compete with toxic metals for the binding sites of APCs, an excess of chelant is commonly added to ensure the adequate sequestration of toxic metal contaminants during waste treatment operations. The major environmental impacts of APCs are related to their ability to solubilize toxic heavy metals. If APCs are not sufficiently eliminated from the effluent, the aqueous transport of metals can occur through the introduction of APCs into the natural environment, increasing the magnitude of associated toxicity. Although several techniques that focus primarily on the degradation of APCs at the pre-release step have been proposed, methods that recycle not only the processed water, but also provide the option to recover and reuse the metals, might be economically feasible, considering the high costs involved due to the chelants used in metal ion sequestration. In this paper, we propose a separation process for the recovery of metals from effluents that contain an excess of APCs. Additionally, the option of recycling the processed water using a solid phase extraction (SPE) system with an ion-selective immobilized macrocyclic material, commonly known as a molecular recognition technology (MRT) gel, is presented. Simulated effluents containing As(V), Cd(II), Cr(III), Pb(II) or Se(IV) in the presence of APCs at molar ratios of 1:50 in H2O were studied with a flow rate of 0.2 mL min(-1). The 'captured' ions in the SPE system were quantitatively eluted with HNO3. The effects of solution pH, metal-chelant stability constants and matrix elements were assessed. Better separation performance for the metals was achieved with the MRT-SPE compared to other SPE materials. Our proposed technique offers the advantage of a non-destructive separation of both metal ions and chelants

  14. Determination of toxic metals in salt deposits in Bormanda, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lawal

    Heavy metals which may co-exist with soil salt, when present above their threshold levels could be hazardous to the body system. Common salt samples extracted from soil samples from Bormanda and. Karim Lamido Local Government Areas in Taraba State, Nigeria, were digested in aqua-regia and analysed for Lead ...

  15. Release of Metal Impurities from Carbon Nanomaterials Influences Aquatic Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    next-generation pharmaceuticals to high- efficiency photovoltaics (3-9). Growing demand for products containing engineered nanomaterials has prompted...metals (23), and their frequent use in ecotoxicological evaluations of surface waters, in- dustrial effluents, and a broad spectrum of chemicals used

  16. Monitoring of essential and toxic metals in imported herbal teas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty eight samples of commonly consumed herbal tea bags were purchased from major supermarkets in Port-Harcourt, Yenagoa and Owerri in Southern Nigeria. They were digested, ashed and analysed using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Heavy metal concentration varied among the different brands of herbal ...

  17. Sorption of toxic metal ions in aqueous environment using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-03-08

    Mar 8, 2012 ... efficient sorbents for divalent heavy metal ions in aqueous environments as their efficiencies exceeded those of chitosan microspheres, ion-imprinted composites, ..... field strength of 1.67 kV/cm. Under these optimised condi- ..... extraction on modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Cent. Eur. J. Chem.

  18. Iron Drinking Water Pipe Corrosion Products: Concentrators of Toxic Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    health risk. In addition Pb corrosion products may be sinks for other metals such as chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), and zinc (Zn). These...biological role of strontium’. Bone , 35, (2004): p. 583. 10. P. Watts and P. Howe: ’Strontium and Strontium Compounds’, Concise International Chemical

  19. Assessment of combined toxicity of heavy metals from industrial wastewaters on Photobacterium phosphoreum T3S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeb, BibiSaima; Ping, Zheng; Mahmood, Qaisar; Lin, Qiu; Pervez, Arshid; Irshad, Muhammad; Bilal, Muhammad; Bhatti, Zulfiqar Ahmad; Shaheen, Shahida

    2017-07-01

    This research work is focusing on the toxicities of heavy metals of industrial origin to anaerobic digestion of the industrial wastewater. Photobacterium phosphoreum T3S was used as an indicator organism. The acute toxicities of heavy metals on P. phosphoreum T3S were assessed during 15-min half inhibitory concentration (IC50) as indicator at pH 5.5-6. Toxicity assays involved the assessment of multicomponent mixtures using TU and MTI approaches. The results of individual toxicity indicated that the toxicity of Cd, Cu and Pb on P. phosphoreum increased with increasing concentrations and there was a linear correlation. The 15-min IC50 values of Cd, Cu and Pb were 0.537, 1.905 and 1.231 mg/L, respectively, and their toxic order was Cd > Pb > Cu. The combined effects of Cd, Cu and Pb were assayed by equivalent concentration mixing method. The results showed that the combined effects of Cd + Cu, Cd + Pb, Cu + Pb, Cd + Cu + Pb were antagonistic, antagonistic and partly additive. The combined effect of three heavy metals was partly additive.

  20. Heavy metal toxicity as a kill mechanism in impact caused mass extinctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wdowiak, T. J.; Davenport, S. A.; Jones, D. D.; Wdowiak, P.

    1988-01-01

    Heavy metals that are known to be toxic exist in carbonaceous chrondrites at abundances considerably in excess to that of the terrestrial crust. An impactor of relatively undifferentiated cosmic matter would inject into the terrestrial environment large quantities of toxic elements. The abundances of toxic metals found in the Allende CV carbonaceous chondrite and the ratio of meteoritic abundance to crustal abundance are: Cr, 3630 PPM, 30X; Co, 662 PPM, 23X; ni, 13300 PPm, 134X; se, 8.2 PPM, 164X; Os, 0.828 PPM, 166X. The resulting areal density for global dispersal of impactor derived heavy metals and their dilution with terrestrial ejecta are important factors in the determination of the significance of impactor heavy metal toxicity as a kill mechanism in impact caused mass extinctions. A 10 km-diameter asteroid having a density of 3 gram per cu cm would yield a global areal density of impact dispersed chondritic material of 3 kg per square meter. The present areal density of living matter on the terrestrial land surface is 1 kg per square meter. Dilution of impactor material with terrestrial ejecta is determined by energetics, with the mass of ejecta estimated to be in the range of 10 to 100 times that of the mass of the impactor. Because a pelagic impact would be the most likely case, the result would be a heavy metal rainout.

  1. Metal toxicity in a sediment-dwelling polychaete: Threshold body concentrations or overwhelming accumulation rates?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmen Casado-Martinez, M.; Smith, Brian D.; Luoma, Samuel N.; Rainbow, Philip S.

    2010-01-01

    We followed the net accumulation of As, Cu and Zn in the deposit-feeding polychaete Arenicola marina exposed in the laboratory to natural metal-contaminated sediments, one exposure leading to mass mortality between day 10 and 20, and the other not causing lethality over a period of 60 days of exposure. The worms showed lower total accumulated metal concentrations just before mortality occurred (<20 days) at the lethal exposure, than after 30 days of exposure to sediments not causing mortality. Moreover rates of accumulation of As, Cu and Zn were significantly higher in the lethal exposure than in the sublethal exposure. Our results show that it is not possible to link mortality to a critical total body concentration, and we add to a growing body of literature indicating that metal toxicity occurs when organisms cannot cope with overwhelming influx and subsequent accumulation rates. - Laboratory exposures with the deposit-feeding polychaete Arenicola marina suggest that toxicity is not caused by the accumulated concentration of toxic metals in the body of the animal, but by the rate at which the toxic metal is accumulated.

  2. Effect of keratin on heavy metal chelation and toxicity to aquatic organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coello, W.F.; Khan, M.A.Q. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1998-12-31

    The presence of fresh scales and human hair in water can reduce the toxicity of lead nitrate at and above 6 ppb to fish. This ability is lost on drying and storage, but can be restored if dried hair or scales are treated with a solution of amino acids. The chelation ability of keratin in amino acid-treated scales or hair is retained for months on dry storage. Addition of these hair and/or scales to solutions of lead nitrate, mercuric chloride and a mixture of both, and cupric sulfate reduced the toxicity of these solutions to Daphnia magna and Dreissena polymorpha (zebra mussels). Toxicity of 10 ppm solutions of salts of 27 different metals to daphnids was similarly reduced after filtration through scales or hair. A mixture of a 2 ppb concentration of each of these 27 metals also became nonlethal to daphnids in the presence of, or filtration through, treated scales or hair. 0.25 g of treated hair or scale can be used indefinitely, again and again, to remove the mixture of these 27 metals from their fresh solution in 1 L water if the keratin is frequently rinsed with 0.1% nitric acid to remove the bound metals. The keratin in scales, this, may be the most important ectodermal secretion in absorbing metals from polluted environments and in providing protection against their toxic levels.

  3. Atmospheric toxic metals emission inventory and spatial characteristics from anthropogenic sources of Guangdong province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cher, S.; Menghua, L.; Xiao, X.; Yuqi, W.; Zhuangmin, Z.; Zhijiong, H.; Cheng, L.; Guanglin, J.; Zibing, Y.; Junyu, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric toxic metals (TMs) are part of particulate matters, and may create adverse effects on the environment and human health depending upon their bioavailability and toxicity. Localized emission inventory is fundamental for parsing of toxic metals to identify key sources in order to formulate efficient toxic metals control strategies. With the use of the latest municipal level environment statistical data, this study developed a bottom-up emission inventory of five toxic metals (Hg, As, Pb, Cd, Cr) from anthropogenic activities in Guangdong province for the year of 2014. Major atmospheric toxic metals sources including combustion sources (coal, oil, biomass, municipal solid waste) and industrial process sources (cement production, nonferrous metal smelting, iron and steel industry, battery and fluorescent lamp production) were investigated. Results showed that: (1) The total emissions of Hg, As, Pb, Cd, Cr in Guangdong province were 18.14, 32.59, 411.34, 13.13, 84.16 t, respectively. (2) Different pollutants have obvious characteristics of emission sources. For total Hg emission, 46% comes from combustion sources, of which 32% from coal combustion and 8% from MSW combustion. Other 54% comes from industrial processes, which dominated by the cement (19%), fluorescent lamp (18%) and battery production (13%). Of the total Hg emission, 69% is released as Hg0 , 29% as Hg2+ , and only 2% as Hgp due to strict particulate matters controls policies. For As emissions, coal combustion, nonferrous metal smelting and iron and steel industry contributed approximate 48%, 25% and 24%, respectively. Pb emissions primarily come from battery production (42%), iron and steel industry (21%) and on-road mobile gasoline combustion (17%). Cd and Cr emissions were dominated by nonferrous metal smelting (71%) and iron and steel industry (82%), respectively. (3) In term of the spatial distribution, emissions of atmospheric toxic metals are mainly concentrated in the central region of

  4. Polyurethane and alginate immobilized algal biomass for the removal of aqueous toxic metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, I.V.; Mehlhorn, R.J.

    1992-12-01

    We describe the development of immobilized, processed algal biomass for use as an adsorptive filter in the removal of toxic metals from waste water. To fabricate an adsorptive filter from precessed biomass several crucial criteria must be met, including: (1) high metal binding capacity, (2) long term stability (both mechanical and chemical), (3) selectivity for metals of concern (with regard to ionic competition), (4) acceptable flow capacity (to handle large volumes in short time frames), (5) stripping/regeneration (to recycle the adsorptive filter and concentrate the toxic metals to manageable volumes). This report documents experiments with processed algal biomass (Spirulina platensis and Spirulina maxima) immobilized in either alginate gel or preformed polyurethane foam. The adsorptive characteristics of these filters were assessed with regard to the criteria listed above.

  5. The 9th Conference on Metal Toxicity and Carcinogenesis: The conference overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, James T F; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin

    2017-09-15

    Heavy metals, such as arsenic, chromium, cadmium, nickel, mercury, and uranium are known to cause many human diseases and health complications after occupational or environmental exposure. Consequently, metals are environmental health concerns. This manuscript is an overview of the 9th Conference on Metal Toxicity and Carcinogenesis held in October 2016 in Lexington, Kentucky. Since 2000, this biennial meeting brings together experts in the field to discuss current and prospective research in an effort to advance research pertaining to metal toxicity and carcinogenesis. In this review we summarize the major topics discussed and provide insight regarding current research in the field and an account of the direction in which the field is progressing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessment of metal contamination, bioavailability, toxicity and bioaccumulation in extreme metallic environments (Iberian Pyrite Belt) using Corbicula fluminea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnail, E; Sarmiento, A M; DelValls, T A; Nieto, J M; Riba, I

    2016-02-15

    The Iberian Pyrite Belt (SW Iberian Peninsula) has intense mining activity. Currently, its fluvial networks receive extremely acid lixiviate residue discharges that are rich in sulphates and metals in solution (acid mine drainage, AMD) from abandoned mines. In the current study, the sediment and water quality were analysed in three different areas of the Odiel River to assess the risk associated with the metal content and its speciation and bioavailability. Furthermore, sediment contact bioassays were performed using the freshwater clam Corbicula fluminea to determine its adequacy as a biomonitoring tool in relation to theoretical risk indexes and regulatory thresholds. Reburial activity and mortality were used as the toxic responses of clams when exposed to contaminated sediment. The results showed coherence between the water and sediment chemical contamination for most of the metals. The reburial activity was correlated with the metal toxicity, but no clam mortality was registered. The bioaccumulation of the studied metals in the clam did not have a significant correlation with the bioavailable fraction of the metal content in the environment, which could be related to a potential different speciation in this singular environment. The bioaccumulation responses were negative for As, Cd and Zn in highly contaminated environments and were characterized as severe, considerable and low potential environmental risks, respectively. The results show that C. fluminea is a good biomonitor of Cu and Pb. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Biometal Dyshomeostasis and Toxic Metal Accumulations in the Development of Alzheimer’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yong; Jiao, Qian; Xu, Huamin; Du, Xixun; Shi, Limin; Jia, Fengju; Jiang, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Biometal dyshomeostasis and toxic metal accumulation are common features in many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease. The neurotoxic effects of metal imbalance are generally associated with reduced enzymatic activities, elevated protein aggregation and oxidative stress in the central nervous system, in which a cascade of events lead to cell death and neurodegeneration. Although the links between biometal imbalance and ...

  8. Are Free Ion Activity Models Sufficient Alternatives to Biotic Ligand Models in Evaluating Metal Toxic Impacts in Terrestrial Environments?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owsianiak, Mikolaj; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Larsen, Henrik Fred

    Metal partitioning between solid and aqueous phases and speciation in soil pore water control the bioavailability of toxic forms of metals, while protons and base cations can mitigate metal ecotoxicity by competitive interactions with biotic ligands. e employment of BLMs to evaluate toxicity...... potential of metals in soils results in site-specic toxicity scores due to large variability of soil properties and dierences in ionic composition. Unfortunately, terrestrial BMLs are available only for few metals and few organisms, thus their applicability to hazard ranking or toxic impact assessment...... is low and alternatives must be found. In this study, we compared published terrestrial BLMs and their potential alternatives such as free ion activity models (FIAM), for applicability in addressing metal toxic impacts in terrestrial environments. A set of 1300 soils representative for the whole world...

  9. Removal of Toxic Metals from Aqueous Solution by Saw Dust ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work, feasibility studies of using a natural and low cost adsorbent; saw dust for the removal of Cr(VI), Ni(II), Fe(II) and Cd(II) from aqueous solution was carried out. The efficiency of the adsorbent was judged from the variation of the % adsorption with (i) contact time, (ii) adsorbent dose, (iii) initial metal ion concentration ...

  10. Application of reverse osmosis membrane for separation of toxic metal in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syahril Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    Experimental separation of toxic metal in water has been done using reverse osmosis membrane made from composite material. Experiment was done by simulation in which metals that will be observed solved with water in different concentration and then used as feed solution in reverse osmosis process. Metals observed were Cr 6+ , Mn 2+ and Pb 2+ and reverse osmosis process was done at pressure of 40 Bar for all metals. Experiment result showed that value of feed solution concentration would affect flux and coefficient rejection of membrane. Composite membrane with polyacrylamide as active layer of membrane can reject metals observed with value of rejection coefficient more than 90%, except for Mn 2+ metal that have concentration 250 ppm and 500 ppm. (author)

  11. Pollution by metals and toxicity assessment using Caenorhabditis elegans in sediments from the Magdalena River, Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tejeda-Benitez, Lesly; Flegal, Russell; Odigie, Kingsley; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus

    2016-01-01

    The Magdalena River is the most important river in Colombia, supplying over 70% of the population of fish and drinking water, and it also is the main river transportation way of the country. It receives effluents from multiple sources along its course such as contaminant agricultural and industrial discharges. To evaluate the toxicity profile of Magdalena River sediments through endpoints such as survival, locomotion, and growth, wild type strains of Caenorhabditis elegans were exposed to aqueous extracts of the sediments. To identify changes in gene expression, GFP transgenic strains were used as reporter genes. Physiological and biochemical data were correlated with metal concentration in the sediments, identifying patterns of toxicity along the course of the river. Levels of some metals such as Cd, Cu, and Ni were above TEC and PEC limits. Effects in survival, growth, and locomotion were observed in most of the samples, and changes in gene expression were evident in the genes mtl-2, sod-4, and gst-1 using fluorescence expression. Cadmium and lead were the metals which were primarily associated with sediment toxicity, and the sampling sites with the highest increased expression of stress response genes were Barrancabermeja and Girardot. However, the diverse nature of toxic profiles observed in C. elegans in the study area showed the pervasiveness of different types of discharges throughout the river system. - Highlights: • The Magdalena River has high levels of some metals such as Cd, Cu, and Ni. • Most sediment extracts affected lethality, growth, and locomotion of C. elegans. • Sediment extracts induced expression changes in mtl-2, sod-4, and gst-1. • Sediment toxicity was primarily associated with Cd and Pb. • Highest toxicity was observed for samples collected in mining and industrial areas. - In Magdalena River sediments, Cd and Pb were associated with toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans and expression of stress response genes were related to

  12. Distribution, relationship, and risk assessment of toxic heavy metals in walnuts and growth soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yongxiang; Ni, Zhanglin; Li, Shiliang; Qu, Minghua; Tang, Fubin; Mo, Runhong; Ye, Caifen; Liu, Yihua

    2018-04-14

    Walnut is one of the most popular nuts worldwide and contains various mineral nutrients. Little is known, however, about the relationship between toxic heavy metals in walnuts and growth soil. In this study, we investigated the distribution, relationship, and risk assessment of five toxic heavy metals-lead (Pb), arsenic (As), chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd), and mercury (Hg)-in walnuts and growth soil in the main production areas of China. The results showed that the main heavy metal pollution in walnut and soil was Pb and Cd. Regionally, positive relationships existed between heavy metals and the pH and organic matter of soil. In addition, we observed a notable uptake effect between walnut and growth soil. In this study, we found a significant correlation (r = 0.786, P toxic heavy metal pollution in walnuts and growth soil could be helpful to screen suitable planting sites to prevent and control heavy metal pollution and improve the quality and safety of walnut.

  13. Depth Profiling (ICP-MS Study of Toxic Metal Buildup in Concrete Matrices: Potential Environmental Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Bassioni

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the potential of concrete material to accumulate toxic trace elements using ablative laser technology (ICP-MS. Concrete existing in offshore structures submerged in seawater acts as a sink for hazardous metals, which could be gradually released into the ocean creating pollution and anoxic conditions for marine life. Ablative laser technology is a valuable tool for depth profiling concrete to evaluate the distribution of toxic metals and locate internal areas where such metals accumulate. Upon rapid degradation of concrete these “hotspots” could be suddenly released, thus posing a distinct threat to aquatic life. Our work simulated offshore drilling conditions by immersing concrete blocks in seawater and investigating accumulated toxic trace metals (As, Be, Cd, Hg, Os, Pb in cored samples by laser ablation. The experimental results showed distinct inhomogeneity in metal distribution. The data suggest that conditions within the concrete structure are favorable for random metal accumulation at certain points. The exact mechanism for this behavior is not clear at this stage and has considerable scope for extended research including modeling and remedial studies.

  14. Influence of S. mutans on base-metal dental casting alloy toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, E L; Dowling, A H; Moran, G P; Fleming, G J P

    2013-01-01

    We have highlighted that exposure of base-metal dental casting alloys to the acidogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans significantly increases cellular toxicity following exposure to immortalized human TR146 oral keratinocytes. With Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), S. mutans-treated nickel-based (Ni-based) and cobalt-chromium-based (Co-Cr-based) dental casting alloys were shown to leach elevated levels of metal ions compared with untreated dental casting alloys. We targeted several biological parameters: cell morphology, viable cell counts, cell metabolic activity, cell toxicity, and inflammatory cytokine expression. S. mutans-treated dental casting alloys disrupted cell morphology, elicited significantly decreased viable cell counts (p dental casting alloys induced elevated levels of cellular toxicity compared with S. mutans-treated Co-Cr-based dental casting alloys. While our findings indicated that the exacerbated release of metal ions from S. mutans-treated base-metal dental casting alloys was the likely result of the pH reduction during S. mutans growth, the exact nature of mechanisms leading to accelerated dissolution of alloy-discs is not yet fully understood. Given the predominance of S. mutans oral carriage and the exacerbated cytotoxicity observed in TR146 cells following exposure to S. mutans-treated base-metal dental casting alloys, the implications for the long-term stability of base-metal dental restorations in the oral cavity are a cause for concern.

  15. Toxic metals in tissues of fishes from the Black Sea and associated human health risk exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plavan, Gabriel; Jitar, Oana; Teodosiu, Carmen; Nicoara, Mircea; Micu, Dragos; Strungaru, Stefan-Adrian

    2017-03-01

    The anthropogenic activities in the Black Sea area are responsible for toxic metal contamination of sea food products. In this study, several toxic metals: cadmium, lead, nickel, chromium, and copper were quantified in different tissues (digestive tract, muscle, skeleton, skin) of nine fish species (Neogobius melanostomus, Belone belone, Solea solea, Trachurus mediterraneus ponticus, Sardina pilchardus, Engraulis encrasicolus, Pomatomus saltatrix, Sprattus sprattus, Scorpaena porcus) by using atomic absorption spectrometer with a high-resolution continuum source and graphite furnace technique (HR-CS GF-AAS), and the risk of fish meat consumption by the young human population was evaluated. These metals are used in high amounts in industries located near the coastline such as shipyard construction and industrial plants. Toxic metal accumulation depends on fish feeding behavior, abiotic conditions, metal chemistry, and animal physiology. For instance, cadmium was measured in the muscle of the investigated species and average values of 0.0008-0.0338 mg kg -1 were obtained. The lowest average value of this metal was measured at benthic species N. melanostomus and the highest at the pelagic predator T. mediterraneus ponticus. Generally, the highest metal concentration was measured in the digestive tract that has the role of biofilter for these contaminants. The risk of contamination is significantly reduced by avoiding the consumption of certain fish tissues (digestive tract and skin for copper and skeleton for nickel). An estimation of the dietary metal intake to young consumers was realized for each of the studied species of fish from Romanian, Bulgarian, and Turkish waters, during the period 2001-2014 in order to evaluate the risks of chronic exposure in time due to metal toxicity. This estimation is important for the prevention of chronic exposure due to metal toxicity. Food exposure to studied metals showed a negative trend for Romania, Turkey, and Bulgaria based

  16. Insights into aquatic toxicities of the antibiotics oxytetracycline and ciprofloxacin in the presence of metal: Complexation versus mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yu; Cai Xiyun; Lang Xianming; Qiao Xianliang; Li Xuehua; Chen Jingwen

    2012-01-01

    Co-contamination of ligand-like antibiotics (e.g., tetracyclines and quinolones) and heavy metals prevails in the environment, and thus the complexation between them is involved in environmental risks of antibiotics. To understand toxicological significance of the complex, effects of metal coordination on antibiotics' toxicity were investigated. The complexation of two antibiotics, oxytetracycline and ciprofloxacin, with three heavy metals, copper, zinc, and cadmium, was verified by spectroscopic techniques. The antibiotics bound metals via multiple coordination sites and rendered a mixture of various complexation speciations. Toxicity analysis indicated that metal coordination did modify the toxicity of the antibiotics and that antibiotic, metal, and their complex acted primarily as concentration addition. Comparison of EC 50 values revealed that the complex commonly was highest toxic and predominately correlated in toxicity to the mixture. Finally, environmental scenario analysis demonstrated that ignoring complexation would improperly classify environmental risks of the antibiotics. - Highlights: ► The complex of antibiotic with metal is a mixture of various complexation modes. ► Antibiotic and metal act as various combined interactions when their complexation is ignored. ► Antibiotic, metal, and their complex act as concentration addition interaction. ► Complex commonly is the highest toxicant. ► Neglecting complexation renders improper classification of risks for antibiotics. - Antibiotic, heavy metal and their complex act primarily as concentration addition interaction and the complex commonly is highest toxic.

  17. Hair Toxic Metal Concentrations and Autism Spectrum Disorder Severity in Young Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa K. Sykes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have found a higher body-burden of toxic metals, particularly mercury (Hg, among subjects diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD in comparison to neurotypical controls. Moreover, Hg body-burden was associated with ASD severity. This cross-sectional study examined the potential correlation between hair toxic metal concentrations and ASD severity in a prospective cohort of participants diagnosed with moderate to severe ASD. The Institutional Review Board at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas (Dallas, TX approved the present study. Qualifying study participants (n = 18 were evaluated for ASD severity using the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS and quantitatively for arsenic, Hg, cadmium, lead, chromium, cobalt, nickel, aluminum, tin, uranium, and manganese using hair toxic element testing by Doctor’s Data (a CLIA-approved laboratory. CARS scoring and hair toxic element testing were blinded to one another. Increasing hair Hg concentrations significantly correlated with increased ASD severity. In contrast, no significant correlations were observed between any other of the hair toxic metals examined and ASD severity. This study helps to provide additional mechanistic support for Hg in the etiology of ASD severity, and is supported by an increasing number of recent critical reviews that provide biological plausibility for the role of Hg exposure in the pathogenesis of ASDs.

  18. Geochemical assessment of toxic metals stocking in top-soil within ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All the samples were processed and extracted with nitrate acid solution and analysed using smart spectrophotometer methods. The results suggested varying organic contents in soil, sand, silt, clay ... a need for protective measures of the quarry workers. Key words: Top-soil, heavy toxic metal, limestone quarry, air pollution.

  19. Imprinted Genes and the Environment: Links to the Toxic Metals Arsenic, Cadmium and Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeester, Lisa; Yosim, Andrew E.; Nye, Monica D.; Hoyo, Cathrine; Murphy, Susan K.; Fry, Rebecca C.

    2014-01-01

    Imprinted genes defy rules of Mendelian genetics with their expression tied to the parent from whom each allele was inherited. They are known to play a role in various diseases/disorders including fetal growth disruption, lower birth weight, obesity, and cancer. There is increasing interest in understanding their influence on environmentally-induced disease. The environment can be thought of broadly as including chemicals present in air, water and soil, as well as food. According to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), some of the highest ranking environmental chemicals of concern include metals/metalloids such as arsenic, cadmium, and lead. The complex relationships between toxic metal exposure, imprinted gene regulation/expression and health outcomes are understudied. Herein we examine trends in imprinted gene biology, including an assessment of the imprinted genes and their known functional roles in the cell, particularly as they relate to toxic metals exposure and disease. The data highlight that many of the imprinted genes have known associations to developmental diseases and are enriched for their role in the TP53 and AhR pathways. Assessment of the promoter regions of the imprinted genes resulted in the identification of an enrichment of binding sites for two transcription factor families, namely the zinc finger family II and PLAG transcription factors. Taken together these data contribute insight into the complex relationships between toxic metals in the environment and imprinted gene biology. PMID:24921406

  20. Imprinted Genes and the Environment: Links to the Toxic Metals Arsenic, Cadmium and Lead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Smeester

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Imprinted genes defy rules of Mendelian genetics with their expression tied to the parent from whom each allele was inherited. They are known to play a role in various diseases/disorders including fetal growth disruption, lower birth weight, obesity, and cancer. There is increasing interest in understanding their influence on environmentally-induced disease. The environment can be thought of broadly as including chemicals present in air, water and soil, as well as food. According to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR, some of the highest ranking environmental chemicals of concern include metals/metalloids such as arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury. The complex relationships between toxic metal exposure, imprinted gene regulation/expression and health outcomes are understudied. Herein we examine trends in imprinted gene biology, including an assessment of the imprinted genes and their known functional roles in the cell, particularly as they relate to toxic metals exposure and disease. The data highlight that many of the imprinted genes have known associations to developmental diseases and are enriched for their role in the TP53 and AhR pathways. Assessment of the promoter regions of the imprinted genes resulted in the identification of an enrichment of binding sites for two transcription factor families, namely the zinc finger family II and PLAG transcription factors. Taken together these data contribute insight into the complex relationships between toxic metals in the environment and imprinted gene biology.

  1. Imprinted genes and the environment: links to the toxic metals arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeester, Lisa; Yosim, Andrew E; Nye, Monica D; Hoyo, Cathrine; Murphy, Susan K; Fry, Rebecca C

    2014-06-11

    Imprinted genes defy rules of Mendelian genetics with their expression tied to the parent from whom each allele was inherited. They are known to play a role in various diseases/disorders including fetal growth disruption, lower birth weight, obesity, and cancer. There is increasing interest in understanding their influence on environmentally-induced disease. The environment can be thought of broadly as including chemicals present in air, water and soil, as well as food. According to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), some of the highest ranking environmental chemicals of concern include metals/metalloids such as arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury. The complex relationships between toxic metal exposure, imprinted gene regulation/expression and health outcomes are understudied. Herein we examine trends in imprinted gene biology, including an assessment of the imprinted genes and their known functional roles in the cell, particularly as they relate to toxic metals exposure and disease. The data highlight that many of the imprinted genes have known associations to developmental diseases and are enriched for their role in the TP53 and AhR pathways. Assessment of the promoter regions of the imprinted genes resulted in the identification of an enrichment of binding sites for two transcription factor families, namely the zinc finger family II and PLAG transcription factors. Taken together these data contribute insight into the complex relationships between toxic metals in the environment and imprinted gene biology.

  2. Immobilization of toxic metals in solidified systems of siloxo-sial networks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanzlíček, Tomáš; Steinerová, Michaela

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 3 (2006), s. 968-970 ISSN 0002-7820 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS3046004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : waste toxic metals * siloxo-sial network * anorganic polymer Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 1.396, year: 2006

  3. Remediation of toxic ad hazardous wastes: plants as biological agents to mitigate heavy metal pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadiz, Nina M.; Principe, Eduardo B.

    2005-01-01

    This papers introduced the plants as biological agents to control heavy metal pollution and the process used the green plants to clean contaminated soils or to render the toxic ions harmless is a new technology called phytoremediation with two levels, the phytostabilization and phytoextraction

  4. heavy metal fixation in contaminated soil using non-toxic agents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2013-05-08

    May 8, 2013 ... agricultural ecosystems (Chukwuka and Omotayo,. 2008), as well as remediation of former industrial sites which have been exposed to diffuse pollution by toxic heavy metals (Finžgar et al., 2006; Belviso et al., 2010). Among the remediation technologies available for contaminated sites, in situ (in place) ...

  5. Can commonly measurable traits explain differences in metal accumulation and toxicity in earthworm species?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qiu, H.; Peijnenburg, W.J.G.M.; van Gestel, C.A.M.; Vijver, M.G.

    2014-01-01

    There is no clear consensus in the literature on the metal accumulation pattern and sensitivity of different earthworm species. In the present study, accumulation and toxicity of Cu, Cd, Ni, and Zn in the earthworms Lumbricus rubellus (epigeic), Aporrectodea longa (anecic), and Eisenia fetida

  6. Assessment of Toxic Metals and feed habits of the snail Pomacea specie from the Amatitlan Lake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesch Palomo, R.R.

    1998-01-01

    In the present thesis an assesment of cadmium, cooper, cromium VI, and lead was made in samples of snail pomacea specie from the Amatitlan Lake. We conclude that the comsuption of this mollusk is toxic for human health. The concentration of heavy metals like cadmium, cooper shows that are not recomended for human comsuption according to Spanish and FAO/PAHO standards

  7. Assessment of concentrations of trace and toxic heavy metals in soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study reports on determination of concentrations of trace and toxic heavy metals in soil and vegetables grown near of Manyoni uranium deposit. Soil and vegetable samples were collected from five sites namely Mitoo Mbuga, farming area, Miyomboni, Tambukareli and near water pump. The concentrations of heavy ...

  8. Evaluation of toxic trace metals Cd and Pb in Arabian Sea waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sanzgiri, S.; Mesquita, A.; Kureishy, T.W.; SenGupta, R.

    An attempt has been made to present a picture of the distribution of toxic trace elements Cd and Pb in the Northern Arabian Sea by applying an improved analytical technique for the detection of dissolved forms of the metals at nanogram levels...

  9. Combined toxic effect of airborne heavy metals on human lung cell line A549.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yeowool; Park, Kihong; Kim, Injeong; Kim, Sang D

    2018-02-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that heavy metals existing as a mixture in the atmospheric environment cause adverse effects on human health and are important key factors of cytotoxicity; however, little investigation has been conducted on a toxicological study of a metal mixture from atmospheric fine particulate matter. The objective of this study was to predict the combined effects of heavy metals in aerosol by using in vitro human cells and obtain a suitable mixture toxicity model. Arsenic, nickel, and lead were selected for mixtures exposed to A549 human lung cancer cells. Cell proliferation (WST-1), glutathione (GSH), and interleukin (IL)-8 inhibition were observed and applied to the prediction models of mixture toxicity, concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA). The total mixture concentrations were set by an IC 10 -fixed ratio of individual toxicity to be more realistic for mortality and enzyme inhibition tests. The results showed that the IA model was statistically closer to the observed results than the CA model in mortality, indicating dissimilar modes of action. For the GSH inhibition, the results predicted by the IA and CA models were highly overestimated relative to mortality. Meanwhile, the IL-8 results were stable with no significant change in immune reaction related to inflammation. In conclusion, the IA model is a rapid prediction model in heavy metals mixtures; mortality, as a total outcome of cell response, is a good tool for demonstrating the combined toxicity rather than other biochemical responses.

  10. Toxic heavy metal contamination assessment and speciation in sugarcane soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaofei; Deng, Chaobing; Yin, Juan; Tang, Xiang

    2018-01-01

    The increasing heavy metal pollution in the sugarcane soils along the Great Huanjiang River was caused by leakage and spills of Lead (Pb) and Zinc (Zn) tailing dams during a flood event. Copper (Cu), Zn, Pb, Cadmium (Cd), and Arsenic (As) concentrations of soil samples collected from 16 different sites along the Great Huanjiang River coast typical pollution area were analyzed by Inductive Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The mean concentrations of Pb, Cd, Zn, Cu, and As in the sugarcane soils were 151.57 mg/kg, 0.33 mg/kg, 155.52 mg/kg, 14.19 mg/kg, and 18.74 mg/kg, respectively. Results from the analysis of heavy metal speciation distribution showed that Cu, Zn, Pb, and Cd existed in weak acid, reducible, and oxidizable fractions, and the sum of these fractions accounted for significant proportions in sugarcane soils. However, the residual fraction of As with high proportion of reducible fraction indicated that this trace element still poses some environmental risk in the sugarcane soils because of its high content. Assessments of pollution levels revealed that the highest environmental risk was arouse by Pb. In addition, moderate to strong Cd and Zn pollution were found, while As has zero to medium level of pollution and Cu has zero level.

  11. The role of organic matter on metal toxicity and bio-availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calace, Nicoletta; Petronio, Bianca Maria

    2004-01-01

    A short review concerning the role of organic matter on metal toxicity and bio-availability in aqueous systems is carried out. The complexity of the issue derives both from the high number of natural and anthropogenic organic compounds and from the variability of their structures. In fact, the binding capacity and affinity is dependent on the number and type of ligands, on their position in the structures, on the ligand/metal ratio. It is also necessary to develop analytical protocol in order to carry out speciation studies of organic carbon and of metals bound to organic compounds, and at the same time to characterise the nature of the complexes.

  12. Omics technologies and their applications to evaluate metal toxicity in mice M. spretus as a bioindicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sevillano, Miguel Ángel; García-Barrera, Tamara; Abril, Nieves; Pueyo, Carmen; López-Barea, Juan; Gómez-Ariza, José Luis

    2014-06-02

    Metals are important components of living organisms since many biological functions critically depend on their interaction with some metal in the cell. However, human activities have increased toxic metal levels in the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems affecting living organisms. The impact of metals on cellular metabolism and global homeostasis has been traditionally assessed in free-living organisms by using conventional biomarkers; however, to obtain a global vision of metal toxicity mechanisms and the responses that metals elicit in the organisms, new analytical methodologies are needed. We review the use of omics approaches to assess the response of living organisms under metal stress illustrating the possibilities of different methodologies on the basis of our previous results. Most of this research has been based on free-living mice Mus spretus, a conventional bioindicator used to monitor metal pollution in Doñana National Park (DNP) (SW Spain), which is an important European biological reserve for migrating birds affected by agricultural, mining and industrial activities. The benefits of using omic techniques such as heterologous microarrays, proteomics methodologies (2-DE, iTRAQ®), metallomics, ionomics or metabolomics has been remarked; however, the complexity of these areas requires the integration of omics to achieve a comprehensive assessment of their environmental status. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Environmental and structural proteomics. This work presents new contributions in the study of environmental metal pollution in terrestrial ecosystems using Mus spretus mice as bioindicator in Doñana National Park (SW Spain) and surroundings. In addition, it has been demonstrated that the integration of omics multi-analytical approaches provides a very suitable approach for the study of the biological response and metal interactions in exposed and free-living mice (Mus musculus and Mus spretus, respectively) under metal pollution

  13. In Vitro Pulmonary Toxicity of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cupi, Denisa; Dreher, Kevin

    Nanomaterials (NMs) encompass a diversity of materials with unique physicochemical characteristics which raise concerns about their potential risk to human health. Rapid predictive testing methods are needed to characterize NMs health effects as well as to screen and prioritize NMs for comprehens......Nanomaterials (NMs) encompass a diversity of materials with unique physicochemical characteristics which raise concerns about their potential risk to human health. Rapid predictive testing methods are needed to characterize NMs health effects as well as to screen and prioritize NMs...... particles induced similar increases in HO-1 mRNA levels at 6hr and 24hr post-exposure, respectively. The pattern of HO-1 gene induction was inconsistent with a role of oxidative stress in metal oxide induced BEAS2B cytokine gene expression. Pretreatment of BEAS2B cells with IKK inhibitor III BMS-345541...

  14. pH-Dependent metal ion toxicity influences the antibacterial activity of two natural mineral mixtures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya M Cunningham

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that several mineral products sold for medicinal purposes demonstrate antimicrobial activity, but little is known about the physicochemical properties involved in antibacterial activity.Using in vitro mineral suspension testing, we have identified two natural mineral mixtures, arbitrarily designated BY07 and CB07, with antibacterial activity against a broad-spectrum of bacterial pathogens. Mineral-derived aqueous leachates also exhibited antibacterial activity, revealing that chemical, not physical, mineral characteristics were responsible for the observed activity. The chemical properties essential for bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli were probed by testing antibacterial activity in the presence of metal chelators, the hydroxyl radical scavenger, thiourea, and varying pH levels. Chelation of the BY07 minerals with EDTA or desferrioxamine eliminated or reduced BY07 toxicity, respectively, suggesting a role of an acid-soluble metal species, particularly Fe(3+ or other sequestered metal cations, in mineral toxicity. This conclusion was supported by NMR relaxation data, which indicated that BY07 and CB07 leachates contained higher concentrations of chemically accessible metal ions than leachates from non-bactericidal mineral samples.We conclude that the acidic environment of the hydrated minerals significantly contributes to antibacterial activity by increasing the availability and toxicity of metal ions. These findings provide impetus for further investigation of the physiological effects of mineral products and their applications in complementary antibacterial therapies.

  15. Metal toxicity assessment of mobile phone parts using Milli Q water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sudesh; Yadav, Satyamanyu; Kumar, Pawan

    2014-07-01

    Environmentally safe disposal of end-of-life (EoL) or discarded mobile phone is a serious problem on account of their ever increasing number and toxic metals contents. In the present work, metal toxicity of mobile phone plastics, printed wire boards (PWBs) and batteries were assessed through dynamic batch leaching using Milli Q (MQ) water. Phone plastics failed Toxicity Characterization Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and Waste Extraction Test (WET) for Pb as the cumulative amount of Pb leached from plastics (5.33 mg/l) exceeded the regulatory limits (5.0mg/l) used in characterizing a waste as hazardous. Similarly, the average cumulative amount (21.83 mg/l) of Ni leached from PWBs exceeded the regulatory limit of 20mg/l and thus PWBs failed WET. Metals leached from batteries in small amounts (Cr: 0.40 mg/l and Ni: 0.15 mg/l). The presence of Fe in the batteries and its precipitation as oxides/hydroxides in the leaching solution hindered the leaching of other metals in MQ water. Both plastics and PWBs should be treated as hazardous waste and should not be disposed in open landfills. Further, MQ water leaching could provide good simulation of metals leaching from the mobile phones disposed at landfill sites. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Microencapsulated Aliivibrio fischeri in Alginate Microspheres for Monitoring Heavy Metal Toxicity in Environmental Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedi Futra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article a luminescence fiber optic biosensor for the microdetection of heavy metal toxicity in waters based on the marine bacterium Aliivibrio fischeri (A. fischeri encapsulated in alginate microspheres is described. Cu(II, Cd(II, Pb(II, Zn(II, Cr(VI, Co(II, Ni(II, Ag(I and Fe(II were selected as sample toxic heavy metal ions for evaluation of the performance of this toxicity microbiosensor. The loss of bioluminescence response from immobilized A. fischeri bacterial cells corresponds to changes in the toxicity levels. The inhibition of the luminescent biosensor response collected at excitation and emission wavelengths of 287 ± 2 nm and 487 ± 2 nm, respectively, was found to be reproducible and repeatable within the relative standard deviation (RSD range of 2.4–5.7% (n = 8. The toxicity biosensor based on alginate micropsheres exhibited a lower limit of detection (LOD for Cu(II (6.40 μg/L, Cd(II (1.56 μg/L, Pb(II (47 μg/L, Ag(I (18 μg/L than Zn(II (320 μg/L, Cr(VI (1,000 μg/L, Co(II (1700 μg/L, Ni(II (2800 μg/L, and Fe(III (3100 μg/L. Such LOD values are lower when compared with other previous reported whole cell toxicity biosensors using agar gel, agarose gel and cellulose membrane biomatrices used for the immobilization of bacterial cells. The A. fischeri bacteria microencapsulated in alginate biopolymer could maintain their metabolic activity for a prolonged period of up to six weeks without any noticeable changes in the bioluminescence response. The bioluminescent biosensor could also be used for the determination of antagonistic toxicity levels for toxicant mixtures. A comparison of the results obtained by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS and using the proposed luminescent A. fischeri-based biosensor suggests that the optical toxicity biosensor can be used for quantitative microdetermination of heavy metal toxicity in environmental water samples.

  17. Low concentration toxic metal mixture interactions: Effects on essential and non-essential metals in brain, liver, and kidneys of mice on sub-chronic exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbina, Samuel J; Chen, Yao; Zhou, Zhaoxiang; Wu, Xueshan; Feng, Weiwei; Wang, Wei; Mao, Guanghua; Xu, Hai; Zhang, Zhen; Wu, Xiangyang; Yang, Liuqing

    2015-08-01

    The deleterious effects of long term exposure to individual toxic metals in low doses are well documented. There is however, a paucity of information on interaction of low dose toxic metal mixtures with toxic and essential metals. This study reports on interactions between low dose mixtures of lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) and toxic and essential metals. For 120d, six groups of forty mice each were exposed to metal mixtures, however, the control group was given distilled water. Exposure to Pb+Cd increased brain Pb by 479% in 30d, whiles Pb+Hg+As+Cd reduced liver Hg by 46.5%, but increased kidney As by 130% in 30d. Brain Cu, increased by 221% on Pb+Hg+As+Cd exposure, however, liver Ca reduced by 36.1% on Pb+Hg exposure in 60-d. Interactions within metal mixtures were largely synergistic. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that low dose metal exposures influenced greatly levels of Hg (in brain and liver) and As (brain). The influence exerted on essential metals was highest in liver (PC1) followed by kidney (PC2) and brain (PC3). Exposure to low dose metal mixtures affected homeostasis of toxic and essential metals in tissues of mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis of toxic and heavy metals in cataract extraction from human eyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanvir, R.; Qureshi, S.A.; Ahmed, R.

    1999-01-01

    Surma and many other substances are frequently used for the treatment of eyes and for cosmetic purposes, which may contain large quantities of toxic and heavy metals particularly lead. Toxic metals may also enter into the body through different food chain system and also due to heavy traffic and contaminated dusts in the air of the overcrowded cities. Eyes being exposed part of human body has maximum chances to get in contact with polluted atmosphere. This study has been undertaken to find the role of toxic elements in the formation of cataract in eyes. Samples of eye lenses were collected and carefully digested in 3 ml of conc. HClO/sub 4/ and 1 ml of conc. HNO/sub 3/. Then analysis of Zn, Cd, Pb, Cu, was carried out in 0.02 m HClO/sub 4/ using differential pulse anodic stripping voltametry. Levels of Zn, Cd, Pb and Cu in eye lenses are from 324 - 5746 mug/g, 3 - 240 mug/g, 3 - 240 mug/g, 25 - 120 mug /g and 23 - 485 mug/g, respectively. Chemical composition of ocular fluid indicates that Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn are not present in it normally. In addition to other factors , role of heavy and toxic metals in the formation of cataract cannot be overlooked. Therefore, use of surma and other cosmetics should be discouraged. (author)

  19. Microalgal motility measurement microfluidic chip for toxicity assessment of heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Guoxia [Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Department of Biotechnology, Dalian, Liaoning (China); Dalian University, Dalian, Liaoning (China); Wang, Yunhua [Dalian University, Dalian, Liaoning (China); Qin, Jianhua [Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Department of Biotechnology, Dalian, Liaoning (China)

    2012-12-15

    A polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic chip has been developed for the estimation of toxic heavy metals based on measurement of mobility of marine microalgae. The chip is mainly composed of an upstream concentration gradient generator and a downstream perfusion-based chemotatic module. The processes of toxic liquid dilution and diffusion, microalgal culturing, cell stimulation, and online screening can be integrated in this chip, which makes it an attractive approach to simplify toxicity testing procedures. The microalgal motility was adopted as a microfluidic bioassay signal and was evaluated as the percentage of motile cells, curvilinear velocity, average path velocity, and straight line velocity. Two mobile marine microalgae, Platymonas subcordiformis and Platymonas helgolandica var. tsingtaoensis, were confined in the chemotatic module and stimulated by the eight concentration gradients of Cu and Cd generated by the concentration gradient generator. In all cases, a toxic response was detected (i.e., a dose-related inhibition of motility was observed). Only 1.5 h was needed to predict EC{sub 50} values. Thus, the microfluidic chip developed was proved to be useful as a simple and rapid approach in heavy metal detection and might be expanded as a conventional test method in environmental toxicity assessment. (orig.)

  20. Contribution of glutathione to the control of cellular redox homeostasis under toxic metal and metalloid stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Luis E; Sobrino-Plata, Juan; Montero-Palmero, M Belén; Carrasco-Gil, Sandra; Flores-Cáceres, M Laura; Ortega-Villasante, Cristina; Escobar, Carolina

    2015-05-01

    The accumulation of toxic metals and metalloids, such as cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), or arsenic (As), as a consequence of various anthropogenic activities, poses a serious threat to the environment and human health. The ability of plants to take up mineral nutrients from the soil can be exploited to develop phytoremediation technologies able to alleviate the negative impact of toxic elements in terrestrial ecosystems. However, we must select plant species or populations capable of tolerating exposure to hazardous elements. The tolerance of plant cells to toxic elements is highly dependent on glutathione (GSH) metabolism. GSH is a biothiol tripeptide that plays a fundamental dual role: first, as an antioxidant to mitigate the redox imbalance caused by toxic metal(loid) accumulation, and second as a precursor of phytochelatins (PCs), ligand peptides that limit the free ion cellular concentration of those pollutants. The sulphur assimilation pathway, synthesis of GSH, and production of PCs are tightly regulated in order to alleviate the phytotoxicity of different hazardous elements, which might induce specific stress signatures. This review provides an update on mechanisms of tolerance that depend on biothiols in plant cells exposed to toxic elements, with a particular emphasis on the Hg-triggered responses, and considering the contribution of hormones to their regulation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Evaluation of toxic heavy metals in ayurvedic syrups sold in local markets of hazara, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajra, B.; Orakzai, S.; Hussain, F.; Farya, U.

    2015-01-01

    Herbal and Ayurvedic preparations, widely used in Pakistan and the developing world, present serious risk of heavy metal toxicity related to their medicinal content and prolonged use by patients. The objective of this study was to find out the concentration of heavy metals in Herbal and Ayurvedic liquid preparations commonly used for treatment of different diseases, from local markets of Hazara. Methods: The cross sectional survey of traditional herbal and Ayurvedic medicine shops included ten liquid preparations selected from local shops of Mansehra and Abbottabad after interviewing the shopkeepers; so as to select the most commonly sold preparations along with their indications. All samples were analysed on standard Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy for qualitative and quantitative study of toxic heavy metals (Mercury, Iron, Zinc, Lead, Manganese and Arsenic). Results: Toxic levels of Mercury were present in seven syrups, i.e., (Kashneeze, Akseer e Pachas, Tankar, Sharbat e folad, Urosinal, Akseer e Jigar and Amrat dhara) while Arsenic was present only in Urosinal. Iron, Zinc, Manganese and Lead were present in permissible limits in all syrups. Conclusion: Mercury and Arsenic are present in local Herbal and Ayurvedic liquid preparations far beyond the permissible limits as proposed by the International Regulatory Authorities for health drugs while the rest of metals, i.e., Zinc, Manganese, and Iron are within the therapeutic limits. (author)

  2. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: From Cluster Ions to Toxic metal Ions in Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lentz, Nicholas B. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation focused on using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to study cluster ions and toxic metal ions in biology. In Chapter 2, it was shown that primary, secondary and quarternary amines exhibit different clustering characteristics under identical instrument conditions. Carbon chain length also played a role in cluster ion formation. In Chapters 3 and 4, the effects of solvent types/ratios and various instrumental parameters on cluster ion formation were examined. It was found that instrument interface design also plays a critical role in the cluster ion distribution seen in the mass spectrum. In Chapter 5, ESI-MS was used to investigate toxic metal binding to the [Gln11]-amyloid β-protein fragment (1-16). Pb and Cd bound stronger than Zn, even in the presence of excess Zn. Hg bound weaker than Zn. There are endless options for future work on cluster ions. Any molecule that is poorly ionized in positive ion mode can potentially show an increase in ionization efficiency if an appropriate anion is used to produce a net negative charge. It is possible that drug protein or drug/DNA complexes can also be stabilized by adding counter-ions. This would preserve the solution characteristics of the complex in the gas phase. Once in the gas phase, CID could determine the drug binding location on the biomolecule. There are many research projects regarding toxic metals in biology that have yet to be investigated or even discovered. This is an area of research with an almost endless future because of the changing dynamics of biological systems. What is deemed safe today may show toxic effects in the future. Evolutionary changes in protein structures may render them more susceptible to toxic metal binding. As the understanding of toxicity evolves, so does the demand for new toxic metal research. New instrumentation designs and software make it possible to perform research that could not be done in the past. What was undetectable yesterday will

  3. Metal toxicity characterization factors for marine ecosystems: considering the importance of the estuary for freshwater emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Yan; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2017-01-01

    for metal emissions to freshwater and coastal seawater, respectively. The new CFs were applied to calculate endpoint impact scores for the same amount of metal emission to each compartment, to compare the relative ecotoxicity damages in freshwater and marine ecosystems in LCA. Site-dependent marine CFs...... as the best one. Endpoint marine and freshwater metals CFs were developed to calculate endpoint ecotoxicity impact scores. Marine ecotoxicity CFs are 1.5 orders of magnitude lower for emission to freshwater than for emission to seawater for Cr, Cu, and Pb, due to notable removal fractions both in freshwater...... CFs for emission to seawater are 1–4 orders of magnitude lower except for Pb. The new site-generic marine CFs for emission to freshwater lie within two orders of magnitude difference from USES-LCA 2.0 CFs. The comparative contribution share analysis shows a poor agreement of metal toxicity ranking...

  4. Assessment of toxicity of heavy metal contaminated soils for Collembola in the field and laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Jie; Krogh, Paul Henning; Luo, Yongming

    2008-01-01

    of Zhejiang province, Fuyang county. We addressed the questions: 1) how do different collembolan life-forms respond to heavy metals in long-time pollution field site. 2) Are laboratory toxicity testing of field collected polluted soil predictable for the population effects observed in aged heavy metal...... pollutions. Effects of the heavy metals in the soil from the paddy fields were assessed for growth, survival and reproduction under laboratory conditions. For the tests we used two soil arthropod species: the parthenogenetic, Folsomia candida Willem 1902, and the sexually reproducing, Sinella curviseta Brook......We present a field and laboratory investigation of effects of increasing levels of heavy metal contamination on the biodiversity and performance of collembolans. A 40 year old pollution with Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd pollution due to Cu smelting over 40 years was investigated in a paddy field area...

  5. Extraction, identification and quantification of heavy metals in Venice lagoon sediments using toxicity tests with microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passarini, F.; Rampazzo, G.; Volpi Ghirardini, A.; Sperni, L.; Salizzato, M.; Pavoni, B. [Venice Univ., Venice (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Ambientali

    2000-02-01

    Sediments are the major sink for metal pollutants in the aquatic ecosystem but also an important source for the release of them in the water. In order to assess the contribution of heavy metals to the total sediment toxicity, a methodology that permits to integrate the chemical approach with a direct toxicological approach has been ste up. Toxicological results using Microtox test are compared with analytical results. [Italian] I sedimenti sono il principale deposito per contaminanti metalli nel''ecosistema acquatico, ma anche una fonte importnate di rilascio nell'acqua. Al fine di valutare il contributo dei metalli pesanti alla tossicita' totale del sedimento, e' stata messa a punto una metodologia che permette di integrare l'appoccio chimico con un approccio tossicologico diretto. I risultati dei test di tossicita' Microtox vengono confrontati con i risultati analitici.

  6. Development of Comparative Toxicity Potentials of 14 cationic metals in freshwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Yan; Gandhi, Nilima; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2014-01-01

    . CTPs were calculated for 7 EUarchetypes, taking bioavailability and speciation pattern into account. The resulting site-dependent CTPs showed up to 2.4–6.5 orders of magnitude variation across archetypes for those metals that form stable hydroxyl compounds in slightly alkaline waters (Al(III), Be, Cr......Site-dependent and site-generic Comparative Toxicity Potentials (CTPs) (also known as Characterization Factors (CFs)) were calculated for 14 cationic metals (Al(III), Ba, Be, Cd, Co, Cr(III), Cs, Cu(II), Fe(II), Fe(III), Mn(II), Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn), to be applied in Life Cycle Impact Assessment......(III), Cu(II) and Fe(III)), emphasizing the importance of using site-dependent CTPs for these metals where possible. For the other metals, CTPs stayed within around 0.9 orders of magnitude, making spatial differentiation less important. In acidic waters (pH

  7. Toxicities and risk assessment of heavy metals in sediments of Taihu Lake, China, based on sediment quality guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Han, Yuwei; Yang, Jinxi; Zhu, Lingyan; Zhong, Wenjue

    2017-12-01

    The occurrence, toxicities, and ecological risks of five heavy metals (Pb, Cu, Cd, Zn and Ni) in the sediment of Taihu Lake were investigated in this study. To evaluate the toxicities caused by the heavy metals, the toxicities induced by organic contaminants and ammonia in the sediments were screened out with activated carbon and zeolite. The toxicities of heavy metals in sediments were tested with benthic invertebrates (tubificid and chironomid). The correlations between toxicity of sediment and the sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) derived previously were evaluated. There were significant correlations (pheavy metals based on SQGs, indicating that threshold effect level (TEL) and probable effect level (PEL) were reliable to predict the toxicities of heavy metals in the sediments of Taihu Lake. By contrast, the method based on acid volatile sulfides (AVS) and simultaneously extracted metals (SEM), such as ∑SEM/AVS and ∑SEM-AVS, did not show correlations with the toxicities. Moreover, the predictive ability of SQGs was confirmed by a total predicting accuracy of 77%. Ecological risk assessment based on TELs and PELs showed that the contaminations of Pb, Cu, Cd and Zn in the sediments of Taihu Lake were at relatively low or medium levels. The risks caused by heavy metals in the sediments of northern bay of the lake, which received more wastewater discharge from upper stream, were higher than other area of the lake. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Sources, distribution, bioavailability, toxicity, and risk assessment of heavy metal(loid)s in complementary medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolan, Shiv; Kunhikrishnan, Anitha; Seshadri, Balaji; Choppala, Girish; Naidu, Ravi; Bolan, Nanthi S; Ok, Yong Sik; Zhang, Ming; Li, Chun-Guang; Li, Feng; Noller, Barry; Kirkham, Mary Beth

    2017-11-01

    The last few decades have seen the rise of alternative medical approaches including the use of herbal supplements, natural products, and traditional medicines, which are collectively known as 'Complementary medicines'. However, there are increasing concerns on the safety and health benefits of these medicines. One of the main hazards with the use of complementary medicines is the presence of heavy metal(loid)s such as arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and mercury (Hg). This review deals with the characteristics of complementary medicines in terms of heavy metal(loid)s sources, distribution, bioavailability, toxicity, and human risk assessment. The heavy metal(loid)s in these medicines are derived from uptake by medicinal plants, cross-contamination during processing, and therapeutic input of metal(loid)s. This paper discusses the distribution of heavy metal(loid)s in these medicines, in terms of their nature, concentration, and speciation. The importance of determining bioavailability towards human health risk assessment was emphasized by the need to estimate daily intake of heavy metal(loid)s in complementary medicines. The review ends with selected case studies of heavy metal(loid) toxicity from complementary medicines with specific reference to As, Cd, Pb, and Hg. The future research opportunities mentioned in the conclusion of review will help researchers to explore new avenues, methodologies, and approaches to the issue of heavy metal(loid)s in complementary medicines, thereby generating new regulations and proposing fresh approach towards safe use of these medicines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. THE IMPACT OF TOXIC HEAVY METALS ON THE HEMATOLOGICAL PARAMETERS IN COMMON CARP (CYPRINUS CARPIO L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Vinodhini ، M. Narayanan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present investigation was to determine the effect of heavy metal pollutants such as cadmium, chromium, nickel and lead in aquatic system on common carp (Cyprinus carpio L. by using a set of biochemical parameters. The experimental group of fish was exposed to a sublethal concentration of 5 mg/L of combined (Cd+Pb+Cr+Ni metal solution containing 1.25 mg/L of each metal ion (1/10th of LC 50/48 h for a period of 32 days. The results indicated that the values of the hemoglobin were in the range of 55.30±1.20 g/L to 74.55±1.33 g/L (p<0.001 and the packed cell volume was in the range of 26.72±0.26% to 30.68±0.43% (p<0.01. Concentrations of red blood cells, blood glucose and total cholesterol were significantly elevated. The level of serum iron and copper was increased. The results showed the decreased activity of vitamin C during chronic exposure to toxic heavy metals, which indicates the presence of reactive oxygen species–induced peroxidation. The study suggested that the presence of toxic heavy metals in aquatic environment has strong influence on the hematological parameters in the fresh water fish common carp (Cyprinus carpio L..

  10. IOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE AND TOXICITY OF HEAVY METALS FOR BIOTA OF FRESHWATER BODIES (REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Hrytsyniak

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the sources of scientific information on biological functions of heavy metals (Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu, Ni, Co, Pb, Cd and their negative effect on biota of fresh water bodies. Findings. A review of works of a variety of scientists showed that the majority of the studied heavy metals (Fe, Zn, Mn, Cum and Co played an important role in vital functions of freshwater organisms. The significance of other studied heavy metals (Ni, Pb, and Cd is probable or unknown. Besides biological importance, we also know about toxicity of heavy metals – a group of mineral polluting substances, which are the most distributed and dangerous for biota. Their negative effect includes drastic deterioration of conditions for existence of the majority of aquatic organisms, some species disappear, others reduce their number, components of trophic chains are lost, links in ecosystems become broken, and productivity of biocenoses decreases. Practical value. An array of generalized information will be useful for scientists who investigate freshwater ecosystems and effect of toxicants on them, in particular heavy metals.

  11. Digital Mapping of Toxic Metals in Qatari Soils Using Remote Sensing and Ancillary Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Yi; Bou Kheir, Rania; Adhikari, Kabindra

    2016-01-01

    After decades of mining and industrialization in Qatar, it is important to estimate their impact on soil pollution with toxic metals. The study utilized 300 topsoil (0–30 cm) samples, multi-spectral images (Landsat 8), spectral indices and environmental variables to model and map the spatial...... distribution of arsenic (As), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) in Qatari soils. The prediction model used condition-based rules generated in the Cubist tool. In terms of R2 and the ratio of performance to interquartile distance (RPIQ), the models showed good predictive...... metals’ monitoring in arid soils, due to the climate and the vegetation cover during this season. Topsoil maps of the six toxic metals were generated. The maps can be used to prioritize the choice of remediation measures and can be applied to other arid areas of similar environmental...

  12. Determination of toxic metals in different brand of chocolates and candies, marketed in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalbani, N.; Kazi, T.G.; Afridi, H.I.; Arain, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    In present study three toxic metals, cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni) and lead (Pb) were determined in chocolates and candy samples available in local markets of Hyderabad, Pakistan. Concentrations of understudy toxic metals (TMs) were determined by electro thermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) prior to microwave assisted acid digestion. Validation of the methodology was performed by standard addition method and conventional acid digestion on electric hot plate to obtained TMs concentration, for comparative purpose to obtain results within the 95% confidence level. No significant differences were observed for TMs obtained from both methods (P 0.05). The concentration of Cd, Ni and Pb were observed in chocolates and candy samples is ranged as of 0.099 - 0.353, 1.45 - 4.33 and 1.11 - 2.48 mu g/g, respectively. The results indicated that cocoa-based chocolates have higher contents of TMs than milk- based chocolates and candies. (author)

  13. Antitumor Activity and Toxicity of Salts of Inorganic Group IIIa Metals: Aluminum, Gallium, Indium, and Thallium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Michael M.; Adamson, Richard H.

    1971-01-01

    The toxicity and antitumor activity of salts of the Group IIIa metals aluminum, gallium, indium, and thallium were determined. With the (lethal dose)50 as a measure, the decreasing order of toxicity was TlCl3 ≥ In(NO3)3 > Ga(NO3)3 > Al(NO3)3. All four metals exhibited antitumor activity, but when the tumor was inoculated by a route different from that of the drug, only Ga+3 and, to a lesser extent, In+3 inhibited tumor growth. Ga(NO3)3 was found to inhibit the growth of three out of four rodent solid tumors. Gallium therefore has potential therapeutic usefulness for treatment of solid tumors in man. PMID:5283954

  14. The Liquid-Liquid Extraction of Toxic Metals (Cd, Hg and Pb by Calixarenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Max Roundhill

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Toxic metals (Cd, Hg and Pb are mostly present in the environment due to natural phenomenon and human activities as well. Exposure of these non-essential elements in the environment causes severe effects. They are known to cause problems in humans as well as in aquatic life. In this work, we demonstrate various studies regarding liquid-liquid extraction of selected ions with different functionalized calixarenes. This review article briefly discusses several molecular designs of calixarenes for divalent ion (Cd2+, Hg2+ and Pb2+ recognition; as well as the relationship between structure and selectivity of the macrocycles is elaborated. The article does not, however, attempt to cover all of the different approaches to these toxic metal ions extraction.

  15. Maximum permissible concentrations for water, sediment and soil derived from toxicity data for nine trace metals

    OpenAIRE

    van de Plassche EJ; Polder MD; Canton JH

    1992-01-01

    In this report Maximum Permissible Concentrations (MPC) are derived for 9 trace metals based on ecotoxicological data. The elements are: antimony, barium, beryllium, cobalt, molybdenum, selenium, thallium, tin, and vanadium The study was carried out in the framework of the project "Setting integrated environmental quality objectives". For the aquatic environment MPCs could be derived for all trace elements. These values were based on toxicity data for freshwater as well as saltwater...

  16. Toxicity of some metals on the fish Therapon Jarbua (Forsskal, 1775)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishnakumari, L.; Varshney, P.K.; Gajbhiye, S.N.; Govindan, K.; Nair, V.R.

    Hg, V and Pb were more toxic to Therapon jarbua than the other metals studied. Recorded 86 h LC sub(50) for Hg, V, Pb, As, Cu, Zn, Ni and Co was respectively at 0.06, 0.62, 1.23, 3.38, 4.5, 11.0, 19.4 and 52.5 mg.l/1. The 90% survival for 96 h...

  17. Pelletized ponderosa pine bark for adsorption of toxic heavy metals from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoung Oh; Mandla A. Tshabalala

    2007-01-01

    Bark flour from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) was consolidated into pellets using citric acid as cross-linking agent. The pellets were evaluated for removal of toxic heavy metals from synthetic aqueous solutions. When soaked in water, pellets did not leach tannins, and they showed high adsorption capacity for Cu(ll), Zn(ll), Cd(ll). and Ni(ll) under both equilibrium...

  18. A Selective Bioreduction of Toxic Heavy Metal Ions from Aquatic Environment by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Rahatgaonkar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The need to remove or recover metal ions from industrial wastewater has been established in financial as well as environmental terms. This need has been proved financially in terms of cost saving through metal reuse or sale and environmentally as heavy metal toxicity can affect organisms throughout the food chain, including humans. Bioremediation of heavy metal pollution remains a major challenge in environmental biotechnology. Current removal strategies are mainly based on bioreduction of Co++, Ni++, Cu++ and Cd++ to their metallic forms by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in buffered aqueous solution. The rate of biotransformation was significantly influenced by pH of aqueous solution, concentration of biomass and hardness of water. All reaction conditions were optimized and maximum reduction of Co++, Cd++, Ni++ and Cu++ were observed as 80%, 63%, 50%, and 44% respectively. Unreacted Co++, Cd++, Ni++metal ions were extracted by 8-hydroxyquinoline and Cu++ by diethylthio carbamate in CHCl3 at different pH. Furthermore, the concentrations of unreacted metal ions were established spectrophotometrically.

  19. Understanding Dissolved and Colloidal Metal Transport and Transformation - Pathways for Aquatic Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, B. A.; Besser, J. M.

    2004-05-01

    Hundreds of miles of streams in the western United States are affected by the release of metals from weathering of mineralized bedrock and mine wastes. In many cases, historical mining has accelerated these weathering processes and increased concentrations of metals in affected streams. Copper and zinc are two metals that affect aquatic health in such streams. Aquatic toxicity from copper and zinc is thought to be related principally to their dissolved concentrations. But there are alternative pathways that may lead to toxicity. Movement of many metals associated with mine drainage is affected by iron colloidal solids. The initial precipitation of iron hydroxides results in nanometer-sized colloids that subsequently aggregate to form a continuum of particle sizes from about one nanometer to greater than one micrometer. This behavior makes the popular or legal definition of dissolved metals at 0.45 micrometers meaningless in streams affected by mine drainage. Ultrafiltration, using tangential-flow across 10,000-Dalton membranes, provides a means to understand dissolved and colloidal metal concentrations. When ultrafiltration is combined with methods to determine mass loading, it is possible to quantify sources and chemical reactions affecting metals. For example, results from a mass-loading study in Mineral Creek, Colorado, indicate that copper and zinc are contributed to the stream from both mined and unmined sources. As the pH of Mineral Creek changes in response to both neutral and acidic inflows, copper was repeatedly transferred between dissolved and colloidal phases through sorption reactions. When the colloidal phase was dominant, the total load of copper consistently decreased because the colloids are entrained by algae on cobbles and strained by the streambed during hyporheic exchange. Zinc load also decreased during transport, but this was a result of the physical process of water exchange with the hyporheic zone, and not a result of colloidal

  20. Toxicity to Eisenia andrei and Folsomia candida of a metal mixture applied to soil directly or via an organic matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natal-da-Luz, T; Ojeda, G; Pratas, J; Van Gestel, C A M; Sousa, J P

    2011-09-01

    Regulatory limits for chemicals and ecological risk assessment are usually based on the effects of single compounds, not taking into account mixture effects. The ecotoxicity of metal-contaminated sludge may, however, not only be due to its metal content. Both the sludge matrix and the presence of other toxicants may mitigate or promote metal toxicity. To test this assumption, the toxicity of soils recently amended with an industrial sludge predominantly contaminated with chromium, copper, nickel, and zinc and soils freshly spiked with the same mixture of metals was evaluated through earthworm (Eisenia andrei) and collembolan (Folsomia candida) reproduction tests. The sludge was less toxic than the spiked metal mixture for E. andrei but more toxic for F. candida. Results obtained for the earthworms suggest a decrease in metal bioavailability promoted by the high organic matter content of the sludge. The higher toxicity of the sludge for F. candida was probably due to the additive toxic effect of other pollutants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cobalt bioavailability from hard metal particles. Further evidence that cobalt alone is not responsible for the toxicity of hard metal particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lison, D; Lauwerys, R

    1994-01-01

    Hard metal is an alloy of tungsten carbide (WC) in a matrix of cobalt metal (Co). The inhalation of hard metal dust can cause an alveolitis which may progress to interstitial fibrosis. This study was undertaken to compare, both in vivo and in vitro, the bioavailability of cobalt metal when mixed or not with WC and to assess whether this factor had any influence on the cellular toxicity of hard metal particles. In vivo, non-toxic doses of cobalt metal were administered intratracheally in the rat, alone (Co, 0.03 mg/100 g) or mixed with tungsten carbide (WC-Co, 0.5 mg/100 g containing 6.3% of cobalt metal particles). Sequential measurements of cobalt in the lung and in urine demonstrated that the retention time of the metal in the lung was longer in Co- than in WC-Co-treated animals. In vitro, the cellular cobalt uptake was higher when the metal was presented to the macrophages as WC-Co. However, there was no relationship between the cellular uptake of cobalt and the occurrence of toxicity, since the intracellular concentration of cobalt associated with the occurrence of a cytotoxic effect of WC-Co particles was insufficient to exert the same effect when resulting from exposure to Co alone. This clearly indicates that increased bioavailability of cobalt is not the mechanism by which hard metal particles exhibit their cellular toxicity. These observations confirm and extend our previous findings supporting the view that cobalt is not the only component responsible for the toxicity of hard metal particles which should be considered as a specific toxic entity.

  2. Remediation of toxic metal contaminated soil by washing with biodegradable aminopolycarboxylate chelants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Zinnat A; Rahman, Ismail M M; Tate, Yousuke; Sawai, Hikaru; Maki, Teruya; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    Ex situ soil washing with synthetic extractants such as, aminopolycarboxylate chelants (APCs) is a viable treatment alternative for metal-contaminated site remediation. EDTA and its homologs are widely used among the APCs in the ex situ soil washing processes. These APCs are merely biodegradable and highly persistent in the aquatic environments leading to the post-use toxic effects. Therefore, an increasing interest is focused on the development and use of the eco-friendly APCs having better biodegradability and less environmental toxicity. The paper deals with the results from the lab-scale washing treatments of a real sample of metal-contaminated soil for the removal of the ecotoxic metal ions (Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) using five biodegradable APCs, namely [S,S]-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid, imminodisuccinic acid, methylglycinediacetic acid, DL-2-(2-carboxymethyl) nitrilotriacetic acid (GLDA), and 3-hydroxy-2,2'-iminodisuccinic acid. The performance of those biodegradable APCs was evaluated for their interaction with the soil mineral constituents in terms of the solution pH and metal-chelant stability constants, and compared with that of EDTA. Speciation calculations were performed to identify the optimal conditions for the washing process in terms of the metal-chelant interactions as well as to understand the selectivity in the separation ability of the biodegradable chelants towards the metal ions. A linear relationship between the metal extraction capacity of the individual chelants towards each of the metal ions from the soil matrix and metal-chelant conditional stability constants for a solution pH greater than 6 was observed. Additional considerations were derived from the behavior of the major potentially interfering cations (Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, and Mn), and it was hypothesized that use of an excess of chelant may minimize the possible competition effects during the single-step washing treatments. Sequential extraction procedure was used to determine the

  3. Determination of toxic metals in drinking water sources in the Chief Albert Luthuli Local Municipality in Mpumalanga, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nthunya, Lebea N.; Masheane, Monaheng L.; Malinga, Soraya P.; Nxumalo, Edward N.; Mamba, Bhekie B.; Mhlanga, Sabelo D.

    2017-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine the presence and levels of toxic metals on selected water sources in a rural community in Lochiel, South Africa. Collection of water samples from identified drinking water sources (open wells, community tanks, water treatment works and boreholes) was done in all seasons of the year (winter, spring, summer and autumn) between 2014 and 2015. The concentrations of identified toxic metals (cobalt, chromium, copper, lead, zinc, manganese and iron) were measured using ICP-OES. Some water sources were found to contain concentrations of toxic metals at levels slightly higher than USEPA, WHO and SANS241 set limits (e.g. manganese and cobalt), while others were found to be within the acceptable limits. This suggested that the residents residing in locations that have water sources containing toxic metals at the concentrations above the set limits are at risk and susceptible to suffer diseases caused by these toxic metals. The side effects of the metals may not be acute; however prolonged exposure to the toxic metals may result in detrimental effects since they are known to bioaccumulate in the body.

  4. Spatiotemporal trend analysis of metal concentrations in sediments of a residential California stream with toxicity and regulatory implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Lenwood W; Anderson, Ronald D; Killen, William D

    2017-06-07

    The objective of this study was to determine if concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, nickel and zinc measured in the sediments of a residential stream in California (Pleasant Grove Creek) have changed temporally or spatially from 2006 to 2016. Threshold Effect Levels (TELs), conservative ecological effects benchmarks, and exceedances for the seven metals were also evaluated over the 11-year time period to provide insight into potential metal toxicity to resident benthic communities. In addition, the bioavailability of metals in sediments was also determined by calculating Simultaneous Extracted Metal/Acid Volatle Sulfide (SEM/AVS) ratios to allow an additional assessment of toxicity. Regulatory implications of this data set and the role of metal toxicity are also discussed. Stream-wide temporal trend analysis showed no statistically significant trends for any of the metals. However, spatial analysis for several sites located near storm drains did show a significant increase for most metals over the 11-year period. TEL exceedances during the 7 years of sampling, spanning 2006-2016, were reported for all metals with the number of exceedances ranging from 47 for copper and zinc to 1 for lead. A spatial analysis showed that the highest number of TEL exceedances and the highest number of SEM/AVS ratios greater than one with at least one metal exceeding a TEL occurred at upstream sites. The potentially toxic metal concentrations reported in Pleasant Grove Creek should be used in the 303 (d) listing process for impaired water bodies in California.

  5. Metal release from contaminated leaf litter and leachate toxicity for the freshwater crustacean Gammarus fossarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maunoury-Danger, Florence; Felten, Vincent; Bojic, Clément; Fraysse, Fabrice; Cosin Ponce, Mar; Dedourge-Geffard, Odile; Geffard, Alain; Guérold, François; Danger, Michael

    2017-06-18

    Industrialization has left large surfaces of contaminated soils, which may act as a source of pollution for contiguous ecosystems, either terrestrial or aquatic. When polluted sites are recolonized by plants, dispersion of leaf litter might represent a non-negligible source of contaminants, especially metals. To evaluate the risks associated to contaminated leaf litter dispersion in aquatic ecosystems, we first measured the dynamics of metal loss from leaf litter during a 48-h experimental leaching. We used aspen (Populus tremula L.), a common tree species on these polluted sites, and collected leaf litter on three polluted sites (settling pond of a former steel mill) and three control sites situated in the same geographic area. Then, toxicity tests were carried out on individuals of a key detritivore species widely used in ecotoxicology tests, Gammarus fossarum (Crustacea, Amphipoda), with uncontaminated and contaminated leaf litter leachates, using a battery of biomarkers selected for their sensitivity to metallic stress. Leaf litters collected on polluted sites exhibited not only significantly higher cadmium and zinc concentrations but also lower lignin contents. All leaf litters released high amounts of chemical elements during the leaching process, especially potassium and magnesium, and, in a lesser extent, phosphorus, calcium, and trace metals (copper, cadmium, and zinc but not lead). Toxicity tests revealed that the most important toxic effects measured on G. fossarum were due to leaf litter leachates by themselves, whatever the origin of litter (from polluted or control sites), confirming the toxicity of such substances, probably due to their high content in phenolic compounds. Small additional toxic effects of leachates from contaminated leaf litters were only evidenced on gammarid lipid peroxidation, indicating that contaminated leaf litter leachates might be slightly more toxic than uncontaminated ones, but in a very reduced manner. Further studies will

  6. Combined toxicity and underlying mechanisms of a mixture of eight heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qi; Gu, Yuanliang; Yue, Xia; Mao, Guochuan; Wang, Yafei; Su, Hong; Xu, Jin; Shi, Hongbo; Zou, Baobo; Zhao, Jinshun; Wang, Renyuan

    2017-02-01

    With the rapid development of modernization and industrialization in China, a large quantity of heavy metals, including zinc, copper, lead, cadmium and mercury, have been entering the atmosphere, soil and water, the latter being the primary route of pollution. In the present study, in vitro experiments were performed to examine the joint toxicity and the underlying mechanisms of the eight most common heavy metals contaminating offshore waters on the eastern coast of Ningbo region. Using a cell cycle assay, cell apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) detection methods, the present study demonstrated that the heavy metal mixture arrested JB6 cells at the S phase, induced the generation of ROS and cell apoptosis. A luciferase assay indicated that the levels of activator protein‑1 and nuclear factor‑κB transcription factors were upregulated. Upregulation of the protein levels of C‑jun and p65 were detected in the JB6 cells by western blot analysis; these two genes have important roles in cell carcinogenesis. These results provide a useful reference for further investigations on the combined toxicity of the exposure to multiple heavy metals.

  7. Heavy Metals and Human Health: Mechanistic Insight into Toxicity and Counter Defense System of Antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Tasleem Jan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals, which have widespread environmental distribution and originate from natural and anthropogenic sources, are common environmental pollutants. In recent decades, their contamination has increased dramatically because of continuous discharge in sewage and untreated industrial effluents. Because they are non-degradable, they persist in the environment; accordingly, they have received a great deal of attention owing to their potential health and environmental risks. Although the toxic effects of metals depend on the forms and routes of exposure, interruptions of intracellular homeostasis include damage to lipids, proteins, enzymes and DNA via the production of free radicals. Following exposure to heavy metals, their metabolism and subsequent excretion from the body depends on the presence of antioxidants (glutathione, α-tocopherol, ascorbate, etc. associated with the quenching of free radicals by suspending the activity of enzymes (catalase, peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase. Therefore, this review was written to provide a deep understanding of the mechanisms involved in eliciting their toxicity in order to highlight the necessity for development of strategies to decrease exposure to these metals, as well as to identify substances that contribute significantly to overcome their hazardous effects within the body of living organisms.

  8. Heavy Metals and Human Health: Mechanistic Insight into Toxicity and Counter Defense System of Antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Arif Tasleem; Azam, Mudsser; Siddiqui, Kehkashan; Ali, Arif; Choi, Inho; Haq, Qazi Mohd Rizwanul

    2015-12-10

    Heavy metals, which have widespread environmental distribution and originate from natural and anthropogenic sources, are common environmental pollutants. In recent decades, their contamination has increased dramatically because of continuous discharge in sewage and untreated industrial effluents. Because they are non-degradable, they persist in the environment; accordingly, they have received a great deal of attention owing to their potential health and environmental risks. Although the toxic effects of metals depend on the forms and routes of exposure, interruptions of intracellular homeostasis include damage to lipids, proteins, enzymes and DNA via the production of free radicals. Following exposure to heavy metals, their metabolism and subsequent excretion from the body depends on the presence of antioxidants (glutathione, α-tocopherol, ascorbate, etc.) associated with the quenching of free radicals by suspending the activity of enzymes (catalase, peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase). Therefore, this review was written to provide a deep understanding of the mechanisms involved in eliciting their toxicity in order to highlight the necessity for development of strategies to decrease exposure to these metals, as well as to identify substances that contribute significantly to overcome their hazardous effects within the body of living organisms.

  9. A simple scheme to determine potential aquatic metal toxicity from mining wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildeman, T.R.; Smith, K.S.; Ranville, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    A decision tree (mining waste decision tree) that uses simple physical and chemical tests has been developed to determine whether effluent from mine waste material poses a potential toxicity threat to the aquatic environment. For the chemical portion of the tree, leaching tests developed by the United States Geological Survey, the Colorado Division of Minerals and Geology (Denver, CO), and a modified 1311 toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) test of the United States Environmental Protection Agency have been extensively used as a surrogate for readily available metals that can be released into the environment from mining wastes. To assist in the assessment, element concentration pattern graphs (ECPG) are produced that compare concentrations of selected groups of elements from the three leachates and any water associated with the mining waste. The MWDT makes a distinction between leachates or waters with pH less than or greater than 5. Generally, when the pH values are below 5, the ECPG of the solutions are quite similar, and potential aquatic toxicity from cationic metals, such as Pb, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Al, is assumed. Below pH 5, these metals are mostly dissolved, generally are not complexed with organic or inorganic ligands, and hence are more bioavailable. Furthermore, there is virtually no carbonate alkalinity at pH less than 5. All of these factors promote metal toxicity to aquatic organisms. On the other hand, when the pH value of the water or the leachates is above 5, the ECPG from the solutions are variable, and inferred aquatic toxicity depends on factors in addition to the metals released from the leaching tests. Hence, leachates and waters with pH above 5 warrant further examination of their chemical composition. Physical ranking criteria provide additional information, particularly in areas where waste piles exhibit similar chemical rankings. Rankings from physical and chemical criteria generally are not correlated. Examples of how this

  10. The insects as an assessment tool of ecotoxicology associated with metal toxic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmat, Rafia; Moin, Sumeira; Saleem, Ailyan

    2018-04-01

    In this article, the assessment of lethal effects of Copper (Cu) on Luffa acutangula and Spinacia oleracea plants investigated in relation to the presence of insect species Oxycarenus hyalinipennis. The analysis of Cu-treated plants displays the information of rapid growth of Oxycarenus hyalinipennis species in triplicate. However, results showed that the impact of metal toxicity appeared as the reduced growth rate of plants, and dense growth of the insect species Oxycarenus halinipennis followed by the chewing/degradation of the toxic plant. The insect's inductees into polluted plants were justified by morphological and primary molecular level using plant stress hypothesis through analysis of the primary chemistry of leaves and roots. That includes various sugar contents which substantiated that these compounds act as the best feeding stimulant from oviposition to adult stage of the insects and accountable for the enactment of insects in the toxic plants. The relationship of these insects to the toxic plants linked with the higher contents of glucose, carbohydrates, and cellulose. The higher carbohydrate and cellulose content in both plants species under Cu accumulation exhibited more signs of insect mutilation over control plants and the lack of chemical resistances allowed the adult insects to spread, survive, reproduce and live long. The presence of insects developed relationships that assimilate all developmental, biological, and the interactive toxicity of Cu in both plant species which indicate the risk associated with these plants. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. p-Benzoquinone-mediated amperometric biosensor developed with Psychrobacter sp. for toxicity testing of heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuejiang; Liu, Mian; Wang, Xin; Wu, Zhen; Yang, Lianzhen; Xia, Siqing; Chen, Ling; Zhao, Jianfu

    2013-03-15

    A rapid and reliable p-benzoquinone-mediated amperometric biosensor (ToxTell) incorporated with Psychrobacter sp. to detect toxicities of heavy metal ions has been developed. This ToxTell biosensor relied on the real-time monitoring of inhibition effect for metabolism by toxicant to provide early detection and assessment of the degree of toxicity to living cells. The effect of growth phase on the sensitivity of Psychrobacter sp. biosensor was studied. The results showed that at the middle of the logarithmic phase or transition from logarithmic to stationary phase, the Psychrobacter sp. ToxTell biosensor had a higher sensitivity to toxicants. The effects of pH, salinity in respiratory substrates and incubation time on the performance of Psychrobacter sp. biosensor were also investigated. EC(50) values of Cu(2+), Cd(2+), Zn(2+), Cr(6+), Hg(2+) and Pb(2+) to Psychrobacter sp. determined at incubation time 30 min were 2.6 mg/L, 47.3 mg/L, 10.9 mg/L, 14.0 mg/L, 0.8 mg/L and 110.1 mg/L, respectively. The ToxTell microbial biosensor developed in this work demonstrated excellent storage stability for more than 60 days. The biosensor could incorporate different microbial species as biocomponent to reflect the comprehensive values for toxicants in real samples and the results therefore had high degree of validity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Testing WHAM-FTOX with laboratory toxicity data for mixtures of metals (Cu, Zn, Cd, Ag, Pb).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipping, Edward; Lofts, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    The Windermere humic aqueous model using the toxicity function (WHAM-FTOX ) describes cation toxicity to aquatic organisms in terms of 1) accumulation by the organism of metabolically active protons and metals at reversible binding sites, and 2) differing toxic potencies of the bound cations. Cation accumulation (νi , in mol g(-1) ) is estimated through calculations with the WHAM chemical speciation model by assuming that organism binding sites can be represented by those of humic acid. Toxicity coefficients (αi ) are combined with νi to obtain the variable FTOX (= Σ αi νi ) which, between lower and upper thresholds (FTOX,LT , FTOX,UT ), is linearly related to toxic effect. Values of αi , FTOX,LT , and FTOX,LT are obtained by fitting toxicity data. Reasonable fits (72% of variance in toxic effect explained overall) were obtained for 4 large metal mixture acute toxicity experiments involving daphnids (Cu, Zn, Cd), lettuce (Cu, Zn, Ag), and trout (Zn, Cd, Pb). Strong nonadditive effects, most apparent in results for tests involving Cd, could be explained approximately by purely chemical competition for metal accumulation. Tentative interpretation of parameter values obtained from these and other experimental data suggests the following order of bound cation toxicity: H < Al < (Cu Zn Pb UO2 ) < (Cd Ag). Another trend is a strong increase in Cd toxicity relative to that of Zn as organism complexity increases (from bacteria to fish). © 2014 SETAC.

  13. Imaging of intracellular metal partitioning in marine diatoms exposed to metal pollution: consequences to cellular toxicity and metal fate in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho, Rita M; Cabrita, Maria Teresa; Alves, Luís C; Pinheiro, Teresa

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates the metal content and compartmentalization changes in whole cells of diatom Coscinodiscus eccentricus exposed to metal overload, examining consequences to cellular toxicity, tolerance mechanisms, and metal fate in the environment. Cells exposed to Ni, Cu and Zn were analysed using nuclear microprobe techniques. Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), and scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) were used simultaneously to obtain high-resolution imaging of morphological and quantitative elemental distribution data. Elemental partitioning within cell compartments, such as cell wall, cytoplasm and major organelles, was assessed. Diatoms clearly responded to excess metal levels, by changing cytoplasm morphology, concentrating added metals, and altering Fe transport mechanisms. Different metal accumulation patterns indicated high susceptibility to Cu, retained in the cytoplasm, and detoxification capability for Ni and Zn, mobilized to the vacuole. Iron and Zn were accumulated in the siliceous wall. Different metal distributions within the cell imply distinct environmental fates, Cu and Ni remain available with potential for biomagnification through the food web, whereas Fe and Zn are deposited at the bottom through frustule sedimentation.

  14. Bio-functionalized silver nanoparticles for selective colorimetric sensing of toxic metal ions and antimicrobial studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinod Kumar, V.; Anbarasan, S.; Christena, Lawrence Rene; SaiSubramanian, Nagarajan; Philip Anthony, Savarimuthu

    2014-08-01

    Hibiscus Sabdariffa (Gongura) plant extracts (leaves (HL) and stem (HS) were used for the first time in the green synthesis of bio-functionalized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The bio-functionality of AgNPs has been successfully utilized for selective colorimetric sensing of potentially health and environmentally hazardous Hg2+, Cd2+ and Pb2+ metal ions at ppm level in aqueous solution. Importantly, clearly distinguishable colour for all three metal ions was observed. The influence of extract preparation condition and pH were also explored on the formation of AgNPs. Both selectivity and sensitivity differed for AgNPs synthesized from different parts of the plant. Direct correlation between the stability of green synthesized AgNPs at different pH and its antibacterial effects has been established. The selective colorimetric sensing of toxic metal ions and antimicrobial effect of green synthesized AgNPs demonstrated the multifunctional applications of green nanotechnology.

  15. Presence of toxic metals and their effects in finished leather goods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rana, B.B.; Ehsan, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the presence of heavy metals in different types of leather finished goods. Various leather items like gloves, shoe soles and leather pieces for jackets were tested using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry and their toxic effects in our environment are discussed. Cadmium, lead and chromium are the most common heavy metals present in leather finished goods and are a cause for concern. Many countries in Europe and America have banned or limited their use in leather processing. This study reveals that the levels of heavy metals in most of the leather goods manufactured by different companies in Pakistan are within permissible limits. However, in some of the samples tested in this study, the amounts of cadmium, lead and chromium are considerably high which requires special attention from all stakeholders to bring it down to acceptable level. Failing to do so will be detrimental for export of these leather goods to Europe and America. (author)

  16. Leaching Behavior of Heavy Metals from Cement Pastes Using a Modified Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Minrui; Feng, Huajun; Shen, Dongsheng; Li, Na; Chen, Yingqiang; Shentu, Jiali

    2016-03-01

    As the standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) can not exhaust the acid neutralizing capacity of the cement rotary kiln co-processing solid wastes products which is particularly important for the assessment of the leaching concentrations of heavy metals. A modified TCLP was proposed. The extent of leaching of heavy metals is low using the TCLP and the leaching performance of the different metals can not be differentiated. Using the modified TCLP, however, Zn leaching was negligible during the first 180 h and then sharply increased (2.86 ± 0.18 to 3.54 ± 0.26 mg/L) as the acidity increased (pH cement rotary kiln co-processing products.

  17. Characterization of large plasmids encoding resistance to toxic heavy metals in Salmonella abortus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, A; Singh, A; Ramteke, P W; Singh, V P

    2000-05-27

    Salmonella abortus equi vaccine strains were found to be resistant to high levels of toxic heavy metals--arsenic, chromium, cadmium, and mercury. The two strains 157 and 158 were resistant to ampicillin also. Curing of these strains resulted in loss of one or more resistance marker indicating plasmid borne resistance. Plasmid profile of strain 157 showed presence of three plasmids of 85, 54, and 0.1 Kb, whereas 158 strain showed presence of 85 Kb and 2 Kb plasmids. Plasmids were isolated from strain 157 and introduced into E. coli DH5alpha with a transformation efficiency of 2 x 10(3) transformants/microg DNA. Interestingly the transformants were resistant to antibiotics, heavy metals (As, Cr, Cd, Hg) and was also able to utilize citrate, a trait specific to Salmonella species. We report and establish for the first time the transferable large plasmids encoding resistance to various heavy metals, antibiotics and biochemical nature of S. abortus equi.

  18. Bioavailability assessment of essential and toxic metals in edible nuts and seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreda-Piñeiro, Jorge; Herbello-Hermelo, Paloma; Domínguez-González, Raquel; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio

    2016-08-15

    Bioavailability of essential and toxic metals in edible nuts and seeds has been assessed by using an in vitro dialyzability approach. The samples studied included walnuts, Brazil nuts, Macadamia nuts, pecans, hazelnuts, chestnuts, cashews, peanuts, pistachios and seeds (almond, pine, pumpkin and sunflower). Metals were measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry in dialyzates and also in samples after a microwave assisted acid digestion pre-treatment. Low dialyzability percentages were found for Al, Fe and Hg; moderate percentages were found for Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, P, Pb, Se, Sr, Tl and Zn; and high dialyzability ratios were found for As, Cr and Ni. The highest dialyzability percentages were found in raw chestnuts and raw hazelnuts. Metal dialyzability was found to be negatively affected by fat content. Positive correlation was found between carbohydrate content and metal dialyzability ratios. Protein and dietary fibre content did not influence metal bioavailability. Predicted dialyzability for some metals based on fat and protein content could also be established. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The eco-toxic effects of pesticide and heavy metal mixtures towards earthworms in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwizeyimana, Herman; Wang, Meie; Chen, Weiping; Khan, Kifayatullah

    2017-10-01

    Earthworms are the key soil organisms, contribute to many positive ecological services that could be degraded by pesticides and other soil pollutants such as heavy metals. Chemicals usually occur as mixtures in the environmental systems which can lead synergistic effects. The assessment and characterization of soil pollutants that effects risks are very difficult due to the complexity of soil matrix, poor understanding about the fate and effects of chemical combinations like pesticide and metal mixtures in terrestrial systems, and scarcity of toxicological data on mixtures of pollutants. In this review we summarized the current studies on individual and joint effects of pesticides and metals on earthworms and indicate the mixture that cause the synergistic interactions. The review explores the methods and models used previously to evaluate the toxicity of chemical mixtures, and suggests the perspective approaches for a better knowledge of combine effects as well as research methods The summarized report indicates that pesticide and metal mixtures at all organization levels affect the earthworms negatively. Whereas, the combined pollution generated by mixtures of pesticides and metal ions could induce the DNA damage, disruption in enzyme activities, reduction in individual survival, production and growth rate, change in individual behavior such as feeding rate, and decrease in the total earthworm community biomass and density. Among the pesticides organophosphates were identified the most toxic pesticides causing the synergistic effects. The findings indicate the scarcity of toxicological data concerning the assessment of pesticide and metal mixtures at genome level; while the mechanisms causing synergism were still not sufficiently explored. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Significant Association of Urinary Toxic Metals and Autism-Related Symptoms?A Nonlinear Statistical Analysis with Cross Validation

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, James; Howsmon, Daniel P.; Kruger, Uwe; Geis, Elizabeth; Gehn, Eva; Fimbres, Valeria; Pollard, Elena; Mitchell, Jessica; Ingram, Julie; Hellmers, Robert; Quig, David; Hahn, Juergen

    2017-01-01

    Introduction A number of previous studies examined a possible association of toxic metals and autism, and over half of those studies suggest that toxic metal levels are different in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Additionally, several studies found that those levels correlate with the severity of ASD. Methods In order to further investigate these points, this paper performs the most detailed statistical analysis to date of a data set in this field. First morning urine sampl...

  1. Apoprotein Structure and Metal Binding Characterization of a de Novo Designed Peptide, α3DIV, that Sequesters Toxic Heavy Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plegaria, Jefferson S; Dzul, Stephen P; Zuiderweg, Erik R P; Stemmler, Timothy L; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2015-05-12

    De novo protein design is a biologically relevant approach that provides a novel process in elucidating protein folding and modeling the metal centers of metalloproteins in a completely unrelated or simplified fold. An integral step in de novo protein design is the establishment of a well-folded scaffold with one conformation, which is a fundamental characteristic of many native proteins. Here, we report the NMR solution structure of apo α3DIV at pH 7.0, a de novo designed three-helix bundle peptide containing a triscysteine motif (Cys18, Cys28, and Cys67) that binds toxic heavy metals. The structure comprises 1067 NOE restraints derived from multinuclear multidimensional NOESY, as well as 138 dihedral angles (ψ, φ, and χ1). The backbone and heavy atoms of the 20 lowest energy structures have a root mean square deviation from the mean structure of 0.79 (0.16) Å and 1.31 (0.15) Å, respectively. When compared to the parent structure α3D, the substitution of Leu residues to Cys enhanced the α-helical content of α3DIV while maintaining the same overall topology and fold. In addition, solution studies on the metalated species illustrated metal-induced stability. An increase in the melting temperatures was observed for Hg(II), Pb(II), or Cd(II) bound α3DIV by 18-24 °C compared to its apo counterpart. Further, the extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis on Hg(II)-α3DIV produced an average Hg(II)-S bond length at 2.36 Å, indicating a trigonal T-shaped coordination environment. Overall, the structure of apo α3DIV reveals an asymmetric distorted triscysteine metal binding site, which offers a model for native metalloregulatory proteins with thiol-rich ligands that function in regulating toxic heavy metals, such as ArsR, CadC, MerR, and PbrR.

  2. Chronic toxicity of binary-metal mixtures of cadmium and zinc to Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Edgar; Hoang, Tham C

    2017-10-01

    The present study characterized the chronic effect of binary-metal mixtures of cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) on Daphnia magna. The titration design was chosen to characterize the 21-d chronic effects of the binary-metal mixtures on survival, growth, reproduction, and metal accumulation in D. magna. Using this design, increasing concentrations of Zn (10, 20, 40, 80, 120, 160, and 200 μg/L) were titrated against a constant concentration of 1.5 μg/L Cd. The results demonstrated that Cd was highly toxic to D. magna. In a mixture with Cd and Zn, sublethal concentrations of 10 and 20 μg/L Zn were insufficient to protect D. magna from chronic Cd toxicity, whereas mixtures containing 40, 80, and 120 μg/L Zn provided strong protective effects to D. magna at all endpoints and resulted in less-than-additive effects. At higher Zn concentrations, such as 160 and 200 μg/L, Zn appeared to contribute to the toxicity. The less-than-additive effects observed in the Cd-Zn mixture can be explained by the decrease in body Cd concentration when the Zn concentration was increased in the exposure media. Embryos analyzed for morphological alterations in the Cd-Zn mixtures demonstrated severe developmental defects. The effect of Cd on undeveloped embryos while both Zn and Cd are present in the organisms raises a question of whether the competitive binding mechanism of Zn and Cd is still happening at the cellular level in the organisms. The results of the present study are useful for development of the biotic ligand model and environmental quality guidelines for metal mixtures. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2739-2749. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  3. Toxic effects of heavy metals in three worm species exposed in artificially contaminated soil substrates and contaminated field soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posthuma L; Notenboom J; ECO

    1996-01-01

    The toxicity of chemicals is often determined in standardised laboratory experiments. OECD artificial soil (artisoil) is often used to determine chemical toxicity for soil organisms. This report presents exposure and effect assessments of metals for three worm species (Eisenia andrei, Enchytraeus

  4. Investigation of Hyporheic Microbial Biofilms as Indicators of Heavy Metal Toxicity in the Clark Fork Basin, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, E. P.; Hwang, C.; Bouskill, N.; Hornberger, M.; Fields, M. W.

    2015-12-01

    Water-saturated sediments that underlie a stream channel contain microbial biofilms that are often responsible for the majority of the metabolic activity in river and stream ecosystems. Metal contamination from mining effluent can modify the biofilm community structure, diversity, and activity. Developing a mechanistic understanding of the biofilm response to metal contamination could provide a useful bioindicator of metal toxicity due to the ease of standard biofilm sampling, environmental ubiquity of biofilms and the rapid response of biofilms to environmental perturbation and metal toxicity. Here we present data on the structure of the biofilm community (e.g., microbial population composition and diversity) and trace metal concentrations in water, bed sediment and biota (benthic insects) across 15 sites in the Clark Fork Basin. Sample sites were selected across a historically-monitored metal pollution gradient at shallow riffles with bed sediment predominantly composed of pebbles, cobbles, and sand. Bed-sediment samples (for biofilm analysis) were obtained from the top 20 centimeters of the hyporheic zone and sieved using sterile sieves to obtain homogeneous sediment samples with particle sizes ranging from 1.70 to 2.36 millimeters. Linear discriminant analysis and effect size statistical methods were used to integrate the metals concentration data (for water and benthic-insects samples) with the microbial community analysis to identify microbial biomarkers of metal toxicity. The development of rapid microbial biomarker tools could provide reproducible and quantitative insights into the effectiveness of remediation activities on metal toxicity and advances in the field of environmental biomonitoring.

  5. Systemic and local toxicity of metal debris released from hip prostheses: A review of experimental approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijukumar, Divya Rani; Segu, Abhijith; Souza, Júlio C M; Li, XueJun; Barba, Mark; Mercuri, Louis G; J Jacobs, Joshua; Mathew, Mathew Thoppil

    2018-01-12

    Despite the technological improvements in orthopedic joint replacement implants, wear and corrosion products associated with the metal components of these implants may result in adverse local tissue and perhaps systemic reactions and toxicities. The current review encompasses a literature review of the local and systemic toxicity studies concerning the effect of CoCrMo wear debris released from wear and corrosion of orthopedic implants and prostheses. Release of metallic debris is mainly in the form of micro- and nano-particles, ions of different valences, and oxides composed of Co and Cr. Though these substances alter human biology, their direct effects of these substances on specific tissue types remain poorly understood. This may partially be the consequence of the multivariate research methodologies employed, leading to inconsistent reports. This review proposes the importance of developing new and more appropriate in-vitro methodologies to study the cellular responses and toxicity mediated by joint replacement wear debris in-vivo. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of stress at dosing on organophosphate and heavy metal toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jortner, Bernard S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews recent studies assessing the effect of well-defined, severe, transient stress at dosing on two classical models of toxicity. These are the acute (anticholinesterase) toxicity seen following exposure to the organophosphate insecticide chlorpyrifos, and the nephrotoxicity elicited by the heavy metal depleted uranium, in rats. Stress was induced by periods of restraint and forced swimming in days to weeks preceding toxicant exposure. Forced swimming was far more stressful, as measured by marked, if transient, elevation of plasma corticosterone. This form of stress was administered immediately prior to administration of chlorpyrifos or depleted uranium. Chlorpyrifos (single 60 mg/kg subcutaneously) elicited marked inhibition of brain acetylcholinesterase 4-day post-dosing. Depleted uranium (single intramuscular doses of 0.1, 0.3 or 1.0 mg/kg uranium) elicited dose-dependent increase in kidney concentration of the metal, with associated injury to proximal tubular epithelium and increases in serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine during the 30-day post-dosing period. Stress at dosing had no effect on these toxicologic endpoints

  7. Digital Mapping of Toxic Metals in Qatari Soils Using Remote Sensing and Ancillary Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Peng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available After decades of mining and industrialization in Qatar, it is important to estimate their impact on soil pollution with toxic metals. The study utilized 300 topsoil (0–30 cm samples, multi-spectral images (Landsat 8, spectral indices and environmental variables to model and map the spatial distribution of arsenic (As, chromium (Cr, nickel (Ni, copper (Cu, lead (Pb and zinc (Zn in Qatari soils. The prediction model used condition-based rules generated in the Cubist tool. In terms of R2 and the ratio of performance to interquartile distance (RPIQ, the models showed good predictive capabilities for all elements. Of all of the prediction results, Cu had the highest R2 = 0.74, followed by As > Pb > Cr > Zn > Ni. This study found that all of the models only chose images from January and February as predictors, which indicates that images from these two months are important for soil toxic metals’ monitoring in arid soils, due to the climate and the vegetation cover during this season. Topsoil maps of the six toxic metals were generated. The maps can be used to prioritize the choice of remediation measures and can be applied to other arid areas of similar environmental/socio-economic conditions and pollution causes.

  8. Eco-toxicity and metal contamination of paddy soil in an e-wastes recycling area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Junhui; Hang Min

    2009-01-01

    Paddy soil samples taken from different sites in an old primitive electronic-waste (e-waste) processing region were examined for eco-toxicity and metal contamination. Using the environmental quality standard for soils (China, Grade II) as reference, soil samples of two sites were weakly contaminated with trace metal, but site G was heavily contaminated with Cd (6.37 mg kg -1 ), and weakly contaminated with Cu (256.36 mg kg -1 ) and Zn (209.85 mg kg -1 ). Zn appeared to be strongly bound in the residual fraction (72.24-77.86%), no matter the soil was metal contaminated or not. However, more than 9% Cd and 16% Cu was present in the non-residual fraction in the metal contaminated soils than in the uncontaminated soil, especially for site G and site F. Compared with that of the control soil, the micronucleus rates of site G and site F soil treatments increased by 2.7-fold and 1.7-fold, respectively. Low germination rates were observed in site C (50%) and site G (50%) soil extraction treated rice seeds. The shortest root length (0.2377 cm) was observed in site G soil treated groups, which is only 37.57% of that of the control soil treated groups. All of the micronucleus ratio of Vicia faba root cells, rice germination rate and root length after treatment of soil extraction indicate the eco-toxicity in site F and G soils although the three indexes are different in sensitivity to soil metal contamination.

  9. Determination of toxic metals in some herbal drugs through atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hina, Bushra; Rizwani, Ghazala Hafeez; Naseem, Shahid

    2011-07-01

    This study presents a picture of occurrence of heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cu, Cr, Co, Fe, Ni, Zn) in some selected valuable herbal drugs (G. glabra, O. bracteatum, V. odorata , F. vulgare, C. cyminum, C. sativum, and Z. officinalis) purchased from three different zones (southern, eastern, and western) of Karachi city using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Heavy metal concentrations in these drugs were found in the range of: 3.26-30.46 for Pb, 1.6-4.91 for Cd, 0.65-120.21 for Cu, 83.74-433.76 for Zn, 1.61-186.75 for Cr, 0.48-76.97 for Ni, 5.54-77.97 for Co and 65.68-1652.89 µg/g for Fe. Percentage of heavy metals that were found beyond the permissible limits were: 71.4% for Pb, 28.51% for Cd, 14.2% for Cu, and 9.5 % for Cr. Significant difference was noticed for each heavy metal among herbal drugs as well as their zones of collection using two way ANOVA followed by least significant (LSD) test at pmetal contaminant of herbal drugs by environmental pollution, as well as to highlight the health risks associated with the use of such herbal drugs that contain high levels of toxic heavy metals.

  10. Dispersion and toxicity of metals from abandoned gold mine tailings at Goldenville, Nova Scotia, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, H.K.T. [National Water Research Institute, P.O. Box 5050, Burlington (Canada); Gauthier, A. [Environmental Protection Branch, Environment Canada, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia (Canada); Nriagu, J.O. [Department of Environmental and Industrial Health, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1999-03-22

    As its name indicates, Goldenville was a famous gold mining area in Nova Scotia where large quantities of mercury were used in the gold recovery process. It is estimated that the 3 million tons of tailings left from the mining activities which lasted from 1860 to 1945 contain 470 kg of Cd, 37-300 kg of Pb, 6800 kg of Hg, 20-700 kg of As and 2600 kg of Tl. Analysis of metal contents of stream water, stream and lake sediments, tailings, and vegetation show that the tailings have been distributed over time across the stream basin to form a tailing field of approximately 2 km{sup 2}. There is a continuous release of As, Hg, Pb, Tl and other metals from the tailing field, resulting in contamination of ecosystems downstream including the Gagogan Harbor of the Atlantic Ocean. Stream water and sediments of Lake Gagogan located downstream from the mine were found toxic to the benthic community. A loss of fish habitat was observed. Although the mines were closed over 50 years ago, sedimentary records of metal loadings into Lake Gagogan show that the release of metals from the tailings has not slowed down. Analysis of metal tolerant species in the area suggests that horsetails (Equisetum rubiaceae and E. sylvaticum) can be used in phytoremediation of sites contaminated with arsenic and mercury. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  11. Heavy-metal toxicity phenomena in laboratory-scale ANFLOW bioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, A.L.

    1982-04-01

    An energy-conserving wastewater treatment system was developed based on an anaerobic, upflow (ANFLOW) bioreactor. Since many applications of the ANFLOW process could involve the treatment of wastewaters containing heavy metals, the potentially toxic effects of these metals on the biological processes occurring in ANFLOW columns (primarily acetogenesis and methanogenesis) were investigated. Both step and pulse inputs of zinc ranging from 100 to 1000 mg/L were added to synthetic wastewaters being treated in ANFLOW columns with 0.057-m/sup 3/ volumes. Column responses were used to develop descriptive models for toxicity phenomena in such systems. It was found that an inhibition function could be defined and used to modify a model based on plugflow with axial dispersion and first-order kinetics for soluble substrate removal. The inhibitory effects of zinc on soluble substrate removal were found to be predominantly associated with its sorption by biosolids. Sorption initially occurred in the lower regions of the column, but was gradually observed in higher regions as the sorption capacity of the lower regions was exhausted. Sorption phenomena could be described with the Freundlich equation. Sorption processes were accompanied by shifts of biological processes to regions higher in the columns. A regenerative process was observed when feeding of wastewaters without zinc was resumed. It was postulated that regeneration could be based on sloughing of layers of biofilms, or other biosolids involved in zinc sorption, followed by continued growth of lower layers of biofilms not involved in heavy-metal sorption.

  12. Preparation of Zeolite/Zinc Oxide Nanocomposites for toxic metals removal from water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah A. Alswata

    Full Text Available This research work has proposed preparation of Zeolite/Zinc Oxide Nanocomposite (Zeolite/ZnO NCs by using a co-precipitation method. Then, the prepared Nanocomposite has been tested for adsorption of Lead Pb (II and Arsenic As (V from aqueous solution under the room pressure and temperature. After that, the prepared adsorbent has been studied by several techniques. For adsorption process; the effect of the adsorbent masses, contact time, PH and initial metals concentration as well as, the kinetics and isotherm for adsorption process have been investigated. The results revealed that; ZnO nanoparticles (NPs with average diameter 4.5 nm have successfully been loaded into Zeolite. The optimum parameters for the removal of the toxic metals 93% and 89% of Pb (II and As (V, respectively, in 100 mg/L aqua solutions were pH4, 0.15 g and 30 min. According to the obtained results; pseudo second-order kinetic and Langmuir isotherm model have higher correlation coefficients and provided a better agreement with the experimental data. The prepared sorbent showed an economical and effective way to remove the heavy toxic metals due to its ambient operation conditions, low- consumption energy and facile regeneration method. Keywords: Zeolite, ZnO, Nanocomposites, Adsorbent, Kinetic, Isotherm

  13. In vivo monitoring of toxic metals: assessment of neutron activation and x-ray fluorescence techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    To date, cadmium, lead, aluminum, and mercury have been measured in vivo in humans. The possibilities of monitoring other toxic metals have also been demonstrated, but no human studies have been performed. Neutron activation analysis appears to be most suitable for Cd and Al measurements, while x-ray fluorescence is ideally suited for measurement of lead in superficial bone. Filtered neutron beams and polarized x-ray sources are being developed which will improve in vivo detection limits. Even so, several of the current facilities are already suitable for use in epidemiological studies of selected populations with suspected long-term low-level ''environmental'' exposures. Evaluation and diagnosis of patients presenting with general clinical symptoms attributable to possible toxic metal exposure may be assisted by in vivo examination. Continued in vivo monitoring of industrial workers, especially follow-up measurements, will provide the first direct assessment of changes in body burden and a direct measure of the biological life-times of these metals in humans. 50 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Evaluating the suitability of Hydrobia ulvae as a test species for sediment metal toxicity testing applying a tissue residue approach to metal mixtures in laboratory and field exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, Olivia; Rodríguez, Antonio; Blasco, Julián

    2013-05-01

    A major weakness in evaluating the suitability of a biomonitor organism is the poor ability to predict the variability of the bioavailability of metals from measured environmental concentrations. In this study, the intertidal gastropod Hydrobia ulvae was used to evaluate its suitability as a test organism for assessing sediment metal toxicity. Toxicity tests were run with sediments spiked with copper, cadmium and zinc applied both as single metal and as a mixture to investigate toxicological interactions evaluating different lethal and sublethal effects. Dose-response relationships were constructed based both on tissue residue approach and particulate metal concentrations. Because metal-spiked sediments used in routine toxicity tests often do not exhibit the same adsorption/desorption kinetics as the natural sediments, the laboratory results were compared to 10-d bioassays conducted with natural field sediments collected from the Guadalete estuary (SW Spain). Highly significant correlations between tissue residue concentrations and particulate metal concentrations were found for all metal-spiked or field-collected and demonstrated that: (i) H. ulvae readily accumulated copper and cadmium in response to contamination and (ii) dietary uptake was determined to be the most significant route of metal exposure. The comparison of the modeled tissue residue-response curve developed from the mixture tests was in good agreement with the results from the bioassay conducted with field sediments and strongly demonstrated that H. ulvae is also a suitable test organism for assessing copper sediment toxicity. In contrast, the dose-response curve expressed as a function of total particulate metal concentrations would fail in predicting effect, erroneously assessing higher metal toxicity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles in Escherichia coli correlates with conduction band and hydration energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaweeteerawat, Chitrada; Ivask, Angela; Liu, Rong; Zhang, Haiyuan; Chang, Chong Hyun; Low-Kam, Cecile; Fischer, Heidi; Ji, Zhaoxia; Pokhrel, Suman; Cohen, Yoram; Telesca, Donatello; Zink, Jeffrey; Mädler, Lutz; Holden, Patricia A; Nel, Andre; Godwin, Hilary

    2015-01-20

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (MOx NPs) are used for a host of applications, such as electronics, cosmetics, construction, and medicine, and as a result, the safety of these materials to humans and the environment is of considerable interest. A prior study of 24 MOx NPs in mammalian cells revealed that some of these materials show hazard potential. Here, we report the growth inhibitory effects of the same series of MOx NPs in the bacterium Escherichia coli and show that toxicity trends observed in E. coli parallel those seen previously in mammalian cells. Of the 24 materials studied, only ZnO, CuO, CoO, Mn2O3, Co3O4, Ni2O3, and Cr2O3 were found to exert significant growth inhibitory effects; these effects were found to relate to membrane damage and oxidative stress responses in minimal trophic media. A correlation of the toxicological data with physicochemical parameters of MOx NPs revealed that the probability of a MOx NP being toxic increases as the hydration enthalpy becomes less negative and as the conduction band energy approaches those of biological molecules. These observations are consistent with prior results observed in mammalian cells, revealing that mechanisms of toxicity of MOx NPs are consistent across two very different taxa. These results suggest that studying nanotoxicity in E. coli may help to predict toxicity patterns in higher organisms.

  16. TOXIC METALS IN THE ENVIRONMENT: THERMODYNAMIC CONSIDERATIONS FOR POSSIBLE IMMOBILIZATION STRATEGIES FOR PB, CD, AS, AND HG

    Science.gov (United States)

    The contamination of soils by toxic metals is a widespread, serious problem that demands immediate action either by removal or immobilization, which is defined as a process which puts the metal into a chemical form, probably as a mineral, which will be inert and highly insoluble ...

  17. Optical nanosphere sensor based on shell-by-shell fabrication for removal of toxic metals from human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, S A; Abdellatef, S; Ismael, M; Shahat, A

    2013-06-01

    Because toxic heavy metals tend to bioaccumulate, they represent a substantial human health hazard. Various methods are used to identify and quantify toxic metals in biological tissues and environment fluids, but a simple, rapid, and inexpensive system has yet to be developed. To reduce the necessity for instrument-dependent analysis, we developed a single, pH-dependent, nanosphere (NS) sensor for naked-eye detection and removal of toxic metal ions from drinking water and physiological systems (i.e., blood). The design platform for the optical NS sensor is composed of double mesoporous core-shell silica NSs fabricated by one-pot, template-guided synthesis with anionic surfactant. The dense shell-by-shell NS construction generated a unique hierarchical NS sensor with a hollow cage interior to enable accessibility for continuous monitoring of several different toxic metal ions and efficient multi-ion sensing and removal capabilities with respect to reversibility, longevity, selectivity, and signal stability. Here, we examined the application of the NS sensor for the removal of toxic metals (e.g., lead ions from a physiological system, such as human blood). The findings show that this sensor design has potential for the rapid screening of blood lead levels so that the effects of lead toxicity can be avoided. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Detoxification of toxic heavy metals by marine bacteria highly resistant to mercury

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    De; Ramaiah, N.; Vardanyan, L.

    -resistance (De Rore et al., 1994). Hg 2+ , Pb 2+ and Cd 2+ are of serious concern as they are non-biodegradable, highly toxic and are present in a variety of waste streams that contaminate the environment. These three metals are included on the US..., Sn, Cu, and Pb was found in a bacterium isolated on the basis of tributyltin resistance (Pain and Cooney, 1998). The present study focuses on 13 marine bacterial strains that are highly resistant to mercury (De et al., 2003) and investigates...

  19. A new method of in vitro prescreening evaluation of the relationship between toxic and common metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bara, M; Guiet-Bara, A; Durlach, J

    1992-05-01

    The human amniotic membrane, an asymmetrical and nonexcitable epithelium with sites differently situated on the fetal and maternal sides, may be considered a model for investigating the relationship between toxic and common metal ions. The method is based on the observation of the ionic transfer across the amnion, estimated by measuring the total ionic conductance Gt from the mother to the fetus and from the fetus to the mother. It is important to note that opposite effects between two ions are not necessarily correlated with antagonism; indeed, pollutants decrease ionic conductance Gt and Mg increases it, but Mg is not an antagonist of all pollutants. To define antagonism between two ions, the Dixon curves theory should be applied. These curves represent the variation of Gt when the concentration of common metal increases (1 mM, 3 mM), while the concentration of toxic metal is maintained constant (3 concentrations of toxic metal are used). The straight lines obtained are either parallel to each other (noncompetitive inhibition), parallel to the x axis (no interaction between common and toxic metals), or the 3 lines intersect at a common point equal to the inhibition constant. At pharmacological doses, there is competitive inhibition (specific antagonism) between Mg and Cd, Zn and Cd, Ca and Cd, and Mg and Pb, and noncompetitive inhibition between Mg and Hg. This method may rapidly indicate a membrane interaction between common and toxic metals.

  20. Toxic metals enrichment in the surficial sediments of a eutrophic tropical estuary (Cochin Backwaters, Southwest coast of India)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Martin, G.D.; Rejomon G.; Shaiju, P.; Muraleedharan, K.R.; Nair, S.M.; Chandramohanakumar, N.

    Journal Volume 2012, Article ID 972839, 17 pages doi:10.1100/2012/972839 The cientificWorldJOURNAL Research Article Toxic Metals Enrichment in the Surficial Sediments of a Eutrophic Tropical Estuary (Cochin Backwaters, Southwest Coast of India) G. D... into aquatic systems, their analysis offers significant advantages over water analysis for the assessment and monitoring of metal contamination in estuaries, assuming that those metals are substantially not mobilized following the deposition [2– 4]. Therefore...

  1. Impact of Saw Dust Application on the Distribution of Potentially Toxic Metals in Contaminated Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awokunmi, Emmmanuel E

    2017-12-01

    The need to develop an approach for the reclamation of contaminated site using locally available agricultural waste has been considered. The present study investigated the application of sawdust as an effective amendment in the immobilization of potentially toxic metals (PTMs) by conducting a greenhouse experiment on soil collected from an automobile dumpsite. The amended and non-amended soil samples were analyzed for their physicochemical parameters and sequential extraction of PTMs. The results revealed that application of amendment had positive impact on the physicochemical parameters as organic matter content and cation exchange capacity increased from 12.1% to 12.8% and 16.4 to 16.8 meq/100 g respectively. However, the mobility and bioavalability of these metals was reduced as they were found to be distributed mostly in the non-exchangeable phase of soil. Therefore, application of sawdust successfully immobilized PTMs and could be applied for future studies in agricultural soil reclamation.

  2. Distribution and assessment of heavy metal toxicity in sediment cores from Bizerte Lagoon, Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mna, Haïfa Ben; Oueslati, Walid; Helali, Mohamed Amine; Zaaboub, Noureddine; Added, Ayed; Aleya, Lotfi

    2017-07-01

    To examine the state of pollution of Bizerte Lagoon which is exposed to intense anthropogenic pressure, two sediment cores were taken at two sites, one undergoes the dual effects of both marine waters arriving from the Mediterranean Sea through the Channel, and also of freshwater from the Tinja River; the other core is located at the center of the lagoon where water depth is maximal (12 m). Heavy metal concentrations in the two cores were assessed, with calculated enrichment factors and geo-accumulation indexes. Core sediments were also studied for chemical speciation and their monosulfide contents were measured. Results from enrichment factors and geo-accumulation indexes show an accumulation of Cd, Zn, Cr, and Pb, while chemical speciation revealed a risk only from Cd and Mn. Comparison of sequential extraction values with those of acid volatile sulfides revealed that non-toxic effects may be caused by any of the studied metals in the sediment.

  3. INAA of toxic heavy metals in solid wastes from Indian cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, A.N.; Ramakrishna, V.V.S.; Singh, V.

    1997-01-01

    Solid wastes and sewage sludges in metropolitan cities are potential health hazards due to toxic heavy metal pollutants. Sewage sludges from six Indian cities viz., Ahmedabad, Bikaner, Bombay, Calcutta, Jaipur, Kanpur and solid wastes from six different disposal sites of the capital city of Delhi have been analyzed for 26 elements (As, Au, Ba, Br, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Eu, Fe, Hg, Hf, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, P, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sr, Th and Zn) by employing instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Sewage sludges from Bombay after different treatments (settled, digested, aerobic, anaerobic) along with several environmental SRMs were also analyzed. An attempt has been made to attribute the pollutant sources to the degree of urbanisation and industrialization of the city. Role of treatment processes in the removal/retention of heavy metals is discussed. (author)

  4. From basic physics to mechanisms of toxicity: the ``liquid drop'' approach applied to develop predictive classification models for toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizochenko, Natalia; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Gajewicz, Agnieszka; Kuz'min, Victor; Puzyn, Tomasz; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2014-10-01

    Many metal oxide nanoparticles are able to cause persistent stress to live organisms, including humans, when discharged to the environment. To understand the mechanism of metal oxide nanoparticles' toxicity and reduce the number of experiments, the development of predictive toxicity models is important. In this study, performed on a series of nanoparticles, the comparative quantitative-structure activity relationship (nano-QSAR) analyses of their toxicity towards E. coli and HaCaT cells were established. A new approach for representation of nanoparticles' structure is presented. For description of the supramolecular structure of nanoparticles the ``liquid drop'' model was applied. It is expected that a novel, proposed approach could be of general use for predictions related to nanomaterials. In addition, in our study fragmental simplex descriptors and several ligand-metal binding characteristics were calculated. The developed nano-QSAR models were validated and reliably predict the toxicity of all studied metal oxide nanoparticles. Based on the comparative analysis of contributed properties in both models the LDM-based descriptors were revealed to have an almost similar level of contribution to toxicity in both cases, while other parameters (van der Waals interactions, electronegativity and metal-ligand binding characteristics) have unequal contribution levels. In addition, the models developed here suggest different mechanisms of nanotoxicity for these two types of cells.Many metal oxide nanoparticles are able to cause persistent stress to live organisms, including humans, when discharged to the environment. To understand the mechanism of metal oxide nanoparticles' toxicity and reduce the number of experiments, the development of predictive toxicity models is important. In this study, performed on a series of nanoparticles, the comparative quantitative-structure activity relationship (nano-QSAR) analyses of their toxicity towards E. coli and HaCaT cells were

  5. Accumulation and translocation of toxic heavy metals in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) growing in agricultural soil of Zhengzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W-X; Liu, J-W; Wu, M-Z; Li, Y; Zhao, Y; Li, S-R

    2009-03-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the accumulation of toxic heavy metals by winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown in the agricultural soil in the suburb of Zhengzhou City, China. The quantities of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Pb, As, Hg) were determined in different parts of wheat plant. The content of five toxic metals was found significantly higher in roots than in the aerial parts of wheat (stems and leaves, and grains). Additionally, wheat roots were enriched in Cd, Pb, and Hg from the soil, while Cr and As were hardly taken up by the roots. On the other hand, the winter wheat transported five toxic heavy metals very weakly from root to grain in the various irrigation regions.

  6. Significant Association of Urinary Toxic Metals and Autism-Related Symptoms-A Nonlinear Statistical Analysis with Cross Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, James; Howsmon, Daniel P; Kruger, Uwe; Geis, Elizabeth; Gehn, Eva; Fimbres, Valeria; Pollard, Elena; Mitchell, Jessica; Ingram, Julie; Hellmers, Robert; Quig, David; Hahn, Juergen

    2017-01-01

    A number of previous studies examined a possible association of toxic metals and autism, and over half of those studies suggest that toxic metal levels are different in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Additionally, several studies found that those levels correlate with the severity of ASD. In order to further investigate these points, this paper performs the most detailed statistical analysis to date of a data set in this field. First morning urine samples were collected from 67 children and adults with ASD and 50 neurotypical controls of similar age and gender. The samples were analyzed to determine the levels of 10 urinary toxic metals (UTM). Autism-related symptoms were assessed with eleven behavioral measures. Statistical analysis was used to distinguish participants on the ASD spectrum and neurotypical participants based upon the UTM data alone. The analysis also included examining the association of autism severity with toxic metal excretion data using linear and nonlinear analysis. "Leave-one-out" cross-validation was used to ensure statistical independence of results. Average excretion levels of several toxic metals (lead, tin, thallium, antimony) were significantly higher in the ASD group. However, ASD classification using univariate statistics proved difficult due to large variability, but nonlinear multivariate statistical analysis significantly improved ASD classification with Type I/II errors of 15% and 18%, respectively. These results clearly indicate that the urinary toxic metal excretion profiles of participants in the ASD group were significantly different from those of the neurotypical participants. Similarly, nonlinear methods determined a significantly stronger association between the behavioral measures and toxic metal excretion. The association was strongest for the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (including subscales on Irritability, Stereotypy, Hyperactivity, and Inappropriate Speech), but significant associations were found

  7. Significant Association of Urinary Toxic Metals and Autism-Related Symptoms—A Nonlinear Statistical Analysis with Cross Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, James; Kruger, Uwe; Geis, Elizabeth; Gehn, Eva; Fimbres, Valeria; Pollard, Elena; Mitchell, Jessica; Ingram, Julie; Hellmers, Robert; Quig, David; Hahn, Juergen

    2017-01-01

    Introduction A number of previous studies examined a possible association of toxic metals and autism, and over half of those studies suggest that toxic metal levels are different in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Additionally, several studies found that those levels correlate with the severity of ASD. Methods In order to further investigate these points, this paper performs the most detailed statistical analysis to date of a data set in this field. First morning urine samples were collected from 67 children and adults with ASD and 50 neurotypical controls of similar age and gender. The samples were analyzed to determine the levels of 10 urinary toxic metals (UTM). Autism-related symptoms were assessed with eleven behavioral measures. Statistical analysis was used to distinguish participants on the ASD spectrum and neurotypical participants based upon the UTM data alone. The analysis also included examining the association of autism severity with toxic metal excretion data using linear and nonlinear analysis. “Leave-one-out” cross-validation was used to ensure statistical independence of results. Results and Discussion Average excretion levels of several toxic metals (lead, tin, thallium, antimony) were significantly higher in the ASD group. However, ASD classification using univariate statistics proved difficult due to large variability, but nonlinear multivariate statistical analysis significantly improved ASD classification with Type I/II errors of 15% and 18%, respectively. These results clearly indicate that the urinary toxic metal excretion profiles of participants in the ASD group were significantly different from those of the neurotypical participants. Similarly, nonlinear methods determined a significantly stronger association between the behavioral measures and toxic metal excretion. The association was strongest for the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (including subscales on Irritability, Stereotypy, Hyperactivity, and Inappropriate

  8. Effects of metals on enantioselective toxicity and biotransformation of cis-bifenthrin in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ye; Ji, Dapeng; Huang, Xin; Zhang, Jianyun; Liu, Jing

    2017-08-01

    Co-occurrence of pyrethroids and metals in watersheds previously has been reported to pose great risk to aquatic species. Pyrethroids are a class of chiral insecticides that have been shown to have enantioselective toxicity and biotransformation. However, the influence of metals on enantioselectivity of pyrethroids has not yet been evaluated. In the present study, the effects of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), and lead (Pb) on the enantioselective toxicity and metabolism of cis-bifenthrin (cis-BF) were investigated in zebrafish at environmentally relevant concentrations. The addition of Cd, Cu, or Pb significantly increased the mortality of zebrafish in racemate and R-enantiomer of cis-BF-treated groups. In rac-cis-BF- or 1R-cis-BF-treated groups, the addition of Cd, Cu, or Pb caused a decrease in enantiomeric fraction (EF) and an increased ratio of R-enantiomer residues in zebrafish. In 1S-cis-BF-treated groups, coexposure to Cd led to a lower EF and decreased residue levels of S-enantiomer. In addition, coexposure to the 3 metals resulted in different biodegradation characteristics of each enantiomer accompanied with differential changes in the expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP)1, CYP2, and CYP3 genes, which might be responsible for the enantioselective biodegradation of cis-BF in zebrafish. These results suggest that the influence of coexistent metals should be considered in the ecological risk assessment of chiral pyrethroids in aquatic environments. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2139-2146. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  9. Risk and toxicity assessments of heavy metals in sediments and fishes from the Yangtze River and Taihu Lake, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jie; Hu, Xin; Tao, Xiancong; Yu, Hongxia; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2013-11-01

    Heavy metal pollution is one of the most serous environmental issues globally. To evaluate the metal pollution in Jiangsu Province of China, the total concentrations of heavy metals in sediments and fishes from the Yangtze River and Taihu Lake were analyzed. Ecological risk of sediments and human health risk of fish consumption were assessed respectively. Furthermore, toxicity of samples on expression of the stress responsive genes was evaluated using microbial live cell-array method. The results showed that the heavy metals concentrations in sediments from the Yangtze River were much higher than those in sediments from the Taihu Lake. However, the fishes from the Taihu Lake had higher concentrations of heavy metals than fishes from the Yangtze River. Ecological risk evaluation showed that the heavy metal contaminants in sediments from the Yangtze River posed higher risk of adverse ecological effects, while sediments from the study areas of Taihu Lake were relatively safe. Health risk assessment suggested that the heavy metals in fishes of both Yangtze River and Taihu Lake might have risk of adverse health effects to human. The toxicity assessment indicated that the heavy metals in these sediments and fishes showed transcriptional effects on the selected 21 stress responsive genes, which were involved in the pathways of DNA damage response, chemical stress, and perturbations of electron transport. Together, this field investigation combined with chemical analysis, risk assessment and toxicity bioassay would provide useful information on the heavy metal pollution in Jiangsu Province. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The use of biogas plant fermentation residue for the stabilisation of toxic metals in agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geršl, Milan; Šotnar, Martin; Mareček, Jan; Vítěz, Tomáš; Koutný, Tomáš; Kleinová, Jana

    2015-04-01

    Our department has been paying attention to different methods of soil decontamination, including the in situ stabilisation. Possible reagents to control the toxic metals mobility in soils include a fermentation residue (FR) from a biogas plant. Referred to as digestate, it is a product of anaerobic decomposition taking place in such facilities. The fermentation residue is applied to soils as a fertiliser. A new way of its use is the in situ stabilisation of toxic metals in soils. Testing the stabilisation of toxic metals made use of real soil samples sourced from five agriculturally used areas of the Czech Republic with 3 soil samples taken from sites contaminated with Cu, Pb and Zn and 2 samples collected at sites of natural occurrence of Cu, Pb and Zn ores. All the samples were analysed using the sequential extraction procedure (BCR) (determine the type of Cu, Pb and Zn bonds). Stabilisation of toxic metals was tested in five soil samples by adding reagents as follows: dolomite, slaked lime, goethite, compost and fermentation residue. A single reagent was added at three different concentrations. In the wet state with the added reagents, the samples were left for seven days, shaken twice per day. After seven days, metal extraction was carried out: samples of 10 g soil were shaken for 2 h in a solution of 0.1M NH4NO3 at a 1:2.5 (g.ml-1), centrifuged for 15 min at 5,000 rpm and then filtered through PTFE 0.45 μm mesh filters. The extracts were analysed by ICP-OES. Copper The best reduction of Cu concentration in the extract was obtained at each of the tested sites by adding dolomite (10 g soil + 0.3 g dolomite). The concentration of Cu in the leachate decreased to 2.1-18.4% compare with the leachate without addition. Similar results were also shown for the addition of fermentation residue (10 g soil + 1 g FR). The Cu concentration in the leachate decreased to 16.7-26.8% compared with the leachate without addition. Lead The best results were achieved by adding

  11. Rapid screening of aquatic toxicity of several metal-based nanoparticles using the MetPLATE™ bioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokhrel, Lok R.; Silva, Thilini; Dubey, Brajesh; El Badawy, Amro M.; Tolaymat, Thabet M.; Scheuerman, Phillip R.

    2012-01-01

    Current understanding of potential toxicity of engineered nanomaterials to aquatic microorganisms is limited for risk assessment and management. Here we evaluate if the MetPLATE™ test can be used as an effective and rapid screening tool to test for potential aquatic toxicity of various metal-based nanoparticles (NPs). The MetPLATE bioassay is a heavy metal sensitive test based on β-galactosidase activity in Escherichia coli. Five different types of metal-based NPs were screened for toxicity: (1) citrate coated nAg (Citrate-nanosilver), (2) polyvinylpyrrolidone coated nAg (PVP-nAg), (3) uncoated nZnO, (4) uncoated nTiO 2 and (5) 1-Octadecylamine coated CdSe Quantum Dots (CdSe QDs); and compared with their corresponding ionic salt toxicity. Citrate-nAg was further fractionated into clean Citrate-nAg, unclean Citrate-nAg and permeate using a tangential flow filtration (TFF) system to eliminate residual ions and impurities from the stock Citrate-nAg suspension and also to differentiate between ionic- versus nano-specific toxicity. Our results showed that nAg, nZnO and CdSe QDs were less toxic than their corresponding ionic salts tested, while nano- or ionic form of TiO 2 was not toxic as high as 2.5 g L −1 to the MetPLATE™ bacteria. Although coating-dependent toxicity was noticeable between two types of Ag NPs evaluated, particle size and surface charge were not adequate to explain the observed toxicity; hence, the toxicity appeared to be material-specific. Overall, the toxicity followed the trend: CdCl 2 > AgNO 3 > PVP-nAg > unclean Citrate-nAg > clean Citrate-nAg > ZnSO 4 > nZnO > CdSe QDs > nTiO 2 /TiO 2 . These results indicate that an evaluation of β-galactosidase inhibition in MetPLATE™ E. coli can be an important consideration for rapid screening of metal-based NP toxicity, and should facilitate ecological risk assessment of these emerging contaminants. - Highlights: ► MetPLATE bioassay was evaluated as a rapid screening tool for nanotoxicity.

  12. Biometal Dyshomeostasis and Toxic Metal Accumulations in the Development of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Biometal dyshomeostasis and toxic metal accumulation are common features in many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease. The neurotoxic effects of metal imbalance are generally associated with reduced enzymatic activities, elevated protein aggregation and oxidative stress in the central nervous system, in which a cascade of events lead to cell death and neurodegeneration. Although the links between biometal imbalance and neurodegenerative disorders remain elusive, a major class of endogenous proteins involved in metal transport has been receiving increasing attention over recent decades. The abnormal expression of these proteins has been linked to biometal imbalance and to the pathogenesis of AD. Here, we present a brief overview of the physiological roles of biometals including iron, zinc, copper, manganese, magnesium and calcium, and provide a detailed description of their transporters and their synergistic involvement in the development of AD. In addition, we also review the published data relating to neurotoxic metals in AD, including aluminum, lead, cadmium, and mercury.

  13. Comparison of three sequential extraction protocols for the fractionation of potentially toxic metals in coastal sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyeyiola, Aderonke Oluwabukola; Olayinka, Kehinde O; Alo, Babajide I

    2011-01-01

    In the determination of the best sequential extraction procedures (SEP) for the speciation of metals in sediment samples from the Lagos lagoon system, three sequential extraction procedures were compared for the fractionation of Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn. The SEP compared included a modified Tessier's procedure carried out in five steps, while the two other procedures were the three-step original Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) and the modified BCR techniques (four steps). Quantification of the metal concentration was achieved with a flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results obtained by the three methods were compared, and the modified BCR and Tessier SEP were found to extract more Cu, Cr, Pb, and Zn in the reducible phase and therefore a decrease in the oxidizable phase than the original BCR SEP. The most mobile elements were found to be Cd, Pb, and Zn. These are of environmental concern, as these potentially toxic metals could be easily released into the aquatic environment with consequent ingestion by aquatic organisms, thereby entering the food chain. The mass balance (percent recovery) was found to be between 85% and 115% in most cases. Prior to the comparison, the analytical performance of the laboratory was tested using a secondary reference material, GLAURM, using the three-step modified BCR procedure. The results showed high reliability of the analytical performance of the laboratory for all the metals considered.

  14. Biomarker Levels of Toxic Metals among Asian Populations in the United States: NHANES 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awata, Hiroshi; Linder, Stephen; Mitchell, Laura E; Delclos, George L

    2017-03-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently found that Asians have considerably higher biomarker levels of cadmium, lead, mercury, and arsenic than whites, blacks, Mexican Americans, and other Hispanics in the United States. Our goal was to further evaluate the higher metal biomarker levels among Asians. Biomarker data (blood cadmium, blood lead, blood mercury, urinary total arsenic, and urinary dimethylarsinic acic) from individuals ≥ 6 years of age were obtained from the 2011-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). We compared geometric mean levels of these five metal biomarkers in Asians with those of four other NHANES race/ethnic groups (white, black, Mexican American, and other Hispanic), and across three Asian subgroups (Chinese, Asian Indian, and other Asian). We also evaluated associations between biomarker levels and sociodemographic, physical, dietary, and behavioral covariates across the Asian subgroups. Asians had significantly higher levels of all five metal biomarkers than other race/ethnic groups ( p LE, Delclos GL. 2017. Biomarker levels of toxic metals among Asian populations in the United States: NHANES 2011-2012. Environ Health Perspect 125:306-313; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP27.

  15. Engineering Metal Ion Coordination to Regulate Amyloid Fibril Assembly And Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, J.; Canfield, J.M.; Mehta, A.K.; Shokes, J.E.; Tian, B.; Childers, W.S.; Simmons, J.A.; Mao, Z.; Scott, R.A.; Warncke, K.; Lynn, D.G.

    2009-06-02

    Protein and peptide assembly into amyloid has been implicated in functions that range from beneficial epigenetic controls to pathological etiologies. However, the exact structures of the assemblies that regulate biological activity remain poorly defined. We have previously used Zn{sup 2+} to modulate the assembly kinetics and morphology of congeners of the amyloid {beta} peptide (A{beta}) associated with Alzheimer's disease. We now reveal a correlation among A{beta}-Cu{sup 2+} coordination, peptide self-assembly, and neuronal viability. By using the central segment of A{beta}, HHQKLVFFA or A{beta}(13-21), which contains residues H13 and H14 implicated in A{beta}-metal ion binding, we show that Cu{sup 2+} forms complexes with A{beta}(13-21) and its K16A mutant and that the complexes, which do not self-assemble into fibrils, have structures similar to those found for the human prion protein, PrP. N-terminal acetylation and H14A substitution, Ac-A{beta}(13-21)H14A, alters metal coordination, allowing Cu{sup 2+} to accelerate assembly into neurotoxic fibrils. These results establish that the N-terminal region of A{beta} can access different metal-ion-coordination environments and that different complexes can lead to profound changes in A{beta} self-assembly kinetics, morphology, and toxicity. Related metal-ion coordination may be critical to the etiology of other neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Testing an application of a biotic ligand model to predict acute toxicity of metal mixtures to rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Yuichi; Kamo, Masashi; Naito, Wataru

    2015-04-01

    The authors tested the applicability of a previously developed biotic ligand model (BLM) to predict acute toxicity of single metals and metal mixtures (cadmium, lead, and zinc) to rainbow trout fry (Oncorhynchus mykiss) from a single available dataset. The BLM used in the present study hypothesizes that metals inhibit an essential cation (calcium) and organisms die as a result of its deficiency, leading to an assumption that the proportion of metal-binding ligand (f) is responsible for the toxic effects of metals on the survival of rainbow trout. The f value is a function of free-ion concentrations of metals computed by a chemical speciation model, and the function has affinity constants as model parameters. First, the survival effects of single metals were statistically modeled separately (i.e., f-survival relationship) by using the generalized linear mixed model with binomial distribution. The modeled responses of survival rates to f overlapped reasonably irrespective of metals tested, supporting the theoretical prediction from the BLM that f-survival relationships are comparable regardless of metal species. The authors thus developed the generalized linear mixed model based on all data pooled across the single-metal tests. The best-fitted model well predicted the survival responses observed in mixture tests (r = 0.97), providing support for the applicability of the BLM to predict effects of metal mixtures. © 2014 SETAC.

  17. Role of phosphate fertilizers in heavy metal uptake and detoxification of toxic metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, D K; Chatterjee, S; Datta, S; Veer, V; Walther, C

    2014-08-01

    As a nonrenewable resource, phosphorus (P) is the second most important macronutrient for plant growth and nutrition. Demand of phosphorus application in the agricultural production is increasing fast throughout the globe. The bioavailability of phosphorus is distinctively low due to its slow diffusion and high fixation in soils which make phosphorus a key limiting factor for crop production. Applications of phosphorus-based fertilizers improve the soil fertility and agriculture yield but at the same time concerns over a number of factors that lead to environmental damage need to be addressed properly. Phosphate rock mining leads to reallocation and exposure of several heavy metals and radionuclides in crop fields and water bodies throughout the world. Proper management of phosphorus along with its fertilizers is required that may help the maximum utilization by plants and minimum run-off and wastage. Phosphorus solubilizing bacteria along with the root rhizosphere of plant integrated with root morphological and physiological adaptive strategies need to be explored further for utilization of this extremely valuable nonrenewable resource judiciously. The main objective of this review is to assess the role of phosphorus in fertilizers, their uptake along with other elements and signaling during P starvation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Acute Toxicity of Ternary Cd-Cu-Ni and Cd-Ni-Zn Mixtures to Daphnia magna: Dominant Metal Pairs Change along a Concentration Gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traudt, Elizabeth M; Ranville, James F; Meyer, Joseph S

    2017-04-18

    Multiple metals are usually present in surface waters, sometimes leading to toxicity that currently is difficult to predict due to potentially non-additive mixture toxicity. Previous toxicity tests with Daphnia magna exposed to binary mixtures of Ni combined with Cd, Cu, or Zn demonstrated that Ni and Zn strongly protect against Cd toxicity, but Cu-Ni toxicity is more than additive, and Ni-Zn toxicity is slightly less than additive. To consider multiple metal-metal interactions, we exposed D. magna neonates to Cd, Cu, Ni, or Zn alone and in ternary Cd-Cu-Ni and Cd-Ni-Zn combinations in standard 48 h lethality tests. In these ternary mixtures, two metals were held constant, while the third metal was varied through a series that ranged from nonlethal to lethal concentrations. In Cd-Cu-Ni mixtures, the toxicity was less than additive, additive, or more than additive, depending on the concentration (or ion activity) of the varied metal and the additivity model (concentration-addition or independent-action) used to predict toxicity. In Cd-Ni-Zn mixtures, the toxicity was less than additive or approximately additive, depending on the concentration (or ion activity) of the varied metal but independent of the additivity model. These results demonstrate that complex interactions of potentially competing toxicity-controlling mechanisms can occur in ternary-metal mixtures but might be predicted by mechanistic bioavailability-based toxicity models.

  19. Toxic metals distribution in different components of Pakistani and imported cigarettes by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazi, T.G.; Jalbani, N.; Arain, M.B.; Jamali, M.K.; Afridi, H.I.; Sarfraz, R.A.; Shah, A.Q.

    2009-01-01

    It was extensively investigated that a significant flux of toxic metals, along with other toxins, reaches the lungs through smoking. In present study toxic metals (TMs) (Al, Cd, Ni and Pb) were determined in different components of Pakistani local branded and imported cigarettes, including filler tobacco (FT), filter (before and after normal smoking by a single volunteer) and ash by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer (ETAAS). Microwave-assisted digestion method was employed. The validity and accuracy of methodology were checked by using certified sample of Virginia tobacco leaves (ICHTJ-cta-VTL-2). The percentages (%) of TMs in different components of cigarette were calculated with respect to their total contents in FT of all branded cigarettes before smoking, while smoke concentration has been calculated by subtracting the filter and ash contents from the filler tobacco content of each branded cigarette. The highest percentage (%) of Al was observed in ash of all cigarettes, with range 97.3-99.0%, while in the case of Cd, a reverse behaviour was observed, as a range of 15.0-31.3% of total contents were left in the ash of all branded cigarettes understudy

  20. Toxic metals distribution in different components of Pakistani and imported cigarettes by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazi, T.G. [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan)], E-mail: tgkazi@yahoo.com; Jalbani, N. [PCSIR Laboratories Karachi (Pakistan)], E-mail: nusratjalbani_21@yahoo.com; Arain, M.B. [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan)], E-mail: bilal_KU2004@yahoo.com; Jamali, M.K. [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan)], E-mail: mkhanjamali@yahoo.com; Afridi, H.I. [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan)], E-mail: hassanimranafridi@yahoo.com; Sarfraz, R.A. [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan)], E-mail: rajaadilsarfraz@gmail.com; Shah, A.Q. [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan)], E-mail: aqshah07@yahoo.com

    2009-04-15

    It was extensively investigated that a significant flux of toxic metals, along with other toxins, reaches the lungs through smoking. In present study toxic metals (TMs) (Al, Cd, Ni and Pb) were determined in different components of Pakistani local branded and imported cigarettes, including filler tobacco (FT), filter (before and after normal smoking by a single volunteer) and ash by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer (ETAAS). Microwave-assisted digestion method was employed. The validity and accuracy of methodology were checked by using certified sample of Virginia tobacco leaves (ICHTJ-cta-VTL-2). The percentages (%) of TMs in different components of cigarette were calculated with respect to their total contents in FT of all branded cigarettes before smoking, while smoke concentration has been calculated by subtracting the filter and ash contents from the filler tobacco content of each branded cigarette. The highest percentage (%) of Al was observed in ash of all cigarettes, with range 97.3-99.0%, while in the case of Cd, a reverse behaviour was observed, as a range of 15.0-31.3% of total contents were left in the ash of all branded cigarettes understudy.

  1. Autophagy as an ultrastructural marker of heavy metal toxicity in human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Gioacchino, Mario [Aging Research Center, ' G. d' Annunzio' University Foundation, Via Colle dell' Ara, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Medicine and Science of Ageing University of Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 1, 66100 Chieti (Italy)], E-mail: m.digioacchino@unich.it; Petrarca, Claudia; Perrone, Angela [Aging Research Center, ' G. d' Annunzio' University Foundation, Via Colle dell' Ara, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Medicine and Science of Ageing University of Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 1, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Farina, Massimo; Sabbioni, Enrico; Hartung, Thomas [Oncology and Neurosciences University of Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 1, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Martino, Simone [Department of Experimental Medicine, University La Sapienza, Viale Regina Elena 324, 00161 Rome (Italy); Esposito, Diana L. [Aging Research Center, ' G. d' Annunzio' University Foundation, Via Colle dell' Ara, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Oncology and Neurosciences University of Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 1, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Lotti, Lavinia Vittoria [Department of Experimental Medicine, University La Sapienza, Viale Regina Elena 324, 00161 Rome (Italy); Mariani-Costantini, Renato [Aging Research Center, ' G. d' Annunzio' University Foundation, Via Colle dell' Ara, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Oncology and Neurosciences University of Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 1, 66100 Chieti (Italy)

    2008-03-15

    Stem cells are a key target of environmental toxicants, but little is known about their toxicological responses. We aimed at developing an in-vitro model based on adult human stem cells to identify biomarkers of heavy metal exposure. To this end we investigated the responses of human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells to hexavalent chromium (Cr[VI]) and cadmium (Cd). Parallel cultures of CD34+ cells isolated from umbilical cord blood were exposed for 48 h to 0.1 {mu}M and 10 {mu}M Cr(VI) or Cd. Cultures treated with 10 {mu}M Cr(VI) or Cd showed marked cell loss. Ultrastructural analysis of surviving cells revealed prominent autophagosomes/autophagolysosomes, which is diagnostic of autophagy, associated with mitochondrial damage and replication, dilatation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex, cytoplasmic lipid droplets and chromatin condensation. Treated cells did not show the morphologic hallmarks of apoptosis. Treatment with 0.1 {mu}M Cr(VI) or Cd did not result in cell loss, but at the ultrastructural level cells showed dilated endoplasmic reticulum and evidence of mitochondrial damage. We conclude that autophagy is implicated in the response of human hematopoietic stem cells to toxic concentrations of Cr(VI) and Cd. Autophagy, which mediates cell survival and death under stress, deserves further evaluation to be established as biomarker of metal exposure.

  2. Autophagy as an ultrastructural marker of heavy metal toxicity in human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Gioacchino, Mario; Petrarca, Claudia; Perrone, Angela; Farina, Massimo; Sabbioni, Enrico; Hartung, Thomas; Martino, Simone; Esposito, Diana L.; Lotti, Lavinia Vittoria; Mariani-Costantini, Renato

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells are a key target of environmental toxicants, but little is known about their toxicological responses. We aimed at developing an in-vitro model based on adult human stem cells to identify biomarkers of heavy metal exposure. To this end we investigated the responses of human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells to hexavalent chromium (Cr[VI]) and cadmium (Cd). Parallel cultures of CD34+ cells isolated from umbilical cord blood were exposed for 48 h to 0.1 μM and 10 μM Cr(VI) or Cd. Cultures treated with 10 μM Cr(VI) or Cd showed marked cell loss. Ultrastructural analysis of surviving cells revealed prominent autophagosomes/autophagolysosomes, which is diagnostic of autophagy, associated with mitochondrial damage and replication, dilatation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex, cytoplasmic lipid droplets and chromatin condensation. Treated cells did not show the morphologic hallmarks of apoptosis. Treatment with 0.1 μM Cr(VI) or Cd did not result in cell loss, but at the ultrastructural level cells showed dilated endoplasmic reticulum and evidence of mitochondrial damage. We conclude that autophagy is implicated in the response of human hematopoietic stem cells to toxic concentrations of Cr(VI) and Cd. Autophagy, which mediates cell survival and death under stress, deserves further evaluation to be established as biomarker of metal exposure

  3. Determination of Toxic Metals in Little Cigar Tobacco with 'Triple Quad' ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, R Steven; Martone, Naudia; Gonzalez-Jimenez, Nathalie; Fresquez, Mark R; Watson, Clifford H

    2015-06-01

    Smoking remains the leading cause of preventable death in the USA. Much of the focus on harmful and potentially harmful constituents (HPHCs) in tobacco products has been on cigarettes. Little cigars gained popularity over the last decade until tobacco taxes made cigarettes more expensive in the USA. Many little cigar brands are similar in size with cigarettes and may be smoked in a similar manner. Scant data are available on HPHC concentrations in little cigars, therefore we developed and applied a new analytical method to determine concentrations of 10 toxic metals in little cigar tobacco. The method utilizes 'triple quadrupole' ICP-MS. By optimizing octapole bias, energy discrimination and cell gas flow settings, we were able to accurately quantify a range of elements including those for which the cell gas reactions were endothermic. All standard modes (Single Quad No Gas, MS-MS NH3/He and MS-MS O2) were utilized for the quantitation of 10 toxic metals in little cigar tobacco, including uranium, which was added as an analyte in the new method. Because of the elimination of interfering ions at 'shifted analyte masses', detection limits were lower compared with a previous method. Tobacco selenium concentrations were below the limit of detection in the previous method, but the new technology made it possible to report all selenium concentrations. Published by Oxford University Press 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  4. Determination of Toxic Metals in Little Cigar Tobacco with “Triple Quad” ICP-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, R. Steven; Martone, Naudia; Gonzalez-Jimenez, Nathalie; Fresquez, Mark R.; Watson, Clifford H.

    2015-01-01

    Smoking remains the leading cause of preventable death in the United States. Much of the focus on harmful constituents (HPHCs) in tobacco products has been on cigarettes. Little cigars have gained popularity over the last decade as tobacco taxes made cigarettes more expensive in the U.S. Many little cigar brands are similar in size with cigarettes and may be smoked in a similar manner. Scant data are available on HPHC levels in little cigars, therefore we developed and applied a new analytical method to determine concentrations of ten toxic metals in little cigar tobacco. The method utilizes “triple quadrupole” ICP-MS. By optimizing octapole bias, energy discrimination, and cell gas flow settings, we were able to accurately quantify a range of elements including those for which the cell gas reactions were endothermic. All standard modes (Single Quad No Gas, MS/MS NH3/He, and MS/MS O2) were utilized for the quantitation of ten toxic metals in little cigar tobacco, including uranium, which was added as an analyte in the new method. Because of the elimination of interfering ions at “shifted analyte masses,” detection limits were lower compared to a previous method. Tobacco selenium concentrations were below the limit of detection in the previous method, but the new technology made it possible to report all selenium concentrations. PMID:25724197

  5. Assessment of toxic metals in raw and processed milk samples using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Jalbani, Nusrat; Baig, Jameel Ahmed; Kandhro, Ghulam Abbas; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Arain, Mohammad Balal; Jamali, Mohammad Khan; Shah, Abdul Qadir

    2009-09-01

    Milk and dairy products have been recognized all over the world for their beneficial influence on human health. The levels of toxic metals (TMs) are an important component of safety and quality of milk. A simple and efficient microwave assisted extraction (MAE) method has been developed for the determination of TMs (Al, Cd, Ni and Pb), in raw and processed milk samples. A Plackett-Burman experimental design and 2(3)+star central composite design, were applied in order to determine the optimum conditions for MAE. Concentrations of TMs were measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The accuracy of the optimized procedure was evaluated by standard addition method and conventional wet acid digestion method (CDM), for comparative purpose. No significant differences were observed (P>0.05), when comparing the values obtained by the proposed MAE method and CDM (paired t-test). The average relative standard deviation of the MAE method varied between 4.3% and 7.6% based on analyte (n=6). The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of understudy TMs in milk samples. The results of raw and processed milk indicated that environmental conditions and manufacturing processes play a key role in the distribution of toxic metals in raw and processed milk.

  6. Architecture of optical sensor for recognition of multiple toxic metal ions from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenashen, M A; El-Safty, S A; Elshehy, E A

    2013-09-15

    Here, we designed novel optical sensor based on the wormhole hexagonal mesoporous core/multi-shell silica nanoparticles that enabled the selective recognition and removal of these extremely toxic metals from drinking water. The surface-coating process of a mesoporous core/double-shell silica platforms by several consequence decorations using a cationic surfactant with double alkyl tails (CS-DAT) and then a synthesized dicarboxylate 1,5-diphenyl-3-thiocarbazone (III) signaling probe enabled us to create a unique hierarchical multi-shell sensor. In this design, the high loading capacity and wrapping of the CS-DAT and III organic moieties could be achieved, leading to the formation of silica core with multi-shells that formed from double-silica, CS-DAT, and III dressing layers. In this sensing system, notable changes in color and reflectance intensity of the multi-shelled sensor for Cu(2+), Co(2+), Cd(2+), and Hg(2+) ions, were observed at pH 2, 8, 9.5 and 11.5, respectively. The multi-shelled sensor is added to enable accessibility for continuous monitoring of several different toxic metal ions and efficient multi-ion sensing and removal capabilities with respect to reversibility, selectivity, and signal stability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Concentration addition and independent action model: Which is better in predicting the toxicity for metal mixtures on zebrafish larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yongfei; Feng, Jianfeng; Kang, Lili; Xu, Xin; Zhu, Lin

    2018-01-01

    The joint toxicity of chemical mixtures has emerged as a popular topic, particularly on the additive and potential synergistic actions of environmental mixtures. We investigated the 24h toxicity of Cu-Zn, Cu-Cd, and Cu-Pb and 96h toxicity of Cd-Pb binary mixtures on the survival of zebrafish larvae. Joint toxicity was predicted and compared using the concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA) models with different assumptions in the toxic action mode in toxicodynamic processes through single and binary metal mixture tests. Results showed that the CA and IA models presented varying predictive abilities for different metal combinations. For the Cu-Cd and Cd-Pb mixtures, the CA model simulated the observed survival rates better than the IA model. By contrast, the IA model simulated the observed survival rates better than the CA model for the Cu-Zn and Cu-Pb mixtures. These findings revealed that the toxic action mode may depend on the combinations and concentrations of tested metal mixtures. Statistical analysis of the antagonistic or synergistic interactions indicated that synergistic interactions were observed for the Cu-Cd and Cu-Pb mixtures, non-interactions were observed for the Cd-Pb mixtures, and slight antagonistic interactions for the Cu-Zn mixtures. These results illustrated that the CA and IA models are consistent in specifying the interaction patterns of binary metal mixtures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of the stabilizers on the toxicity of metallic nanomaterials in aquatic organisms and human cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreani, Tatiana; Nogueira, Verónica; Pinto, Vera V; Ferreira, Maria José; Rasteiro, Maria Graça; Silva, Amélia M; Pereira, Ruth; Pereira, Carlos M

    2017-12-31

    In this study, following a systematic approach, we used aquatic species (bacteria Vibrio fischeri and microalgae Raphidocelis subcapitata) and different human cell lines (Caco-2, HepG2, SV-80 and HaCaT) representing different tissues and exposure pathways, to investigate how two organic stabilizers (PVA and DMSO) used for NMs dispersion influence their physicochemical properties, the persistence of metals in suspension and the toxicity/ecotoxicity of two metallic NMs (nano-Ag and nano-Cu). Although the stabilizers are expected to contribute to improve the dispersion and stability of NMs, the results obtained clearly showed that no similar changes in toxicity and morphological properties of the nano-Ag can be expected after its stabilization with PVA. Thus, regarding human cell lines, the reduction in the average size of the PVA-nano-Ag was followed by a reduction or maintenance of its toxicity, but the opposite was observed for the aquatic species tested since an increase in the average size enhanced its toxicity. As far as nano-Cu is considered DMSO contributed for a better dispersion of this nanomaterial, however this was not translated in a similar toxicity/ecotoxicity modification. In summary, even for nano-Cu, for which few or no data exists regarding its toxicity after stabilization with organic compounds, it was confirmed with consistent data, that the toxicity of metallic NMs is a complex combination of average size, chemical composition, solubilization or persistence in suspension of the metallic forms, interaction with test medium components and sensitivity of test species and cell lines. The combination of all of these factors makes the toxicity of metallic NMs unpredictable and points for the need of an extensive evaluation of each new formulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Chemical form of metals in traditional medicines underlines potential toxicity in cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qin; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Shi, Jing-Zhen; Liang, Shi-Xia; Shi, Jin-Shan; Liu, Jie

    2011-04-12

    Mercury (Hg) and arsenic (As) are frequently found in traditional medicines as sulfides, such as cinnabar (HgS) and realgar (As(4)S(4)). There is a general perception that any medicinal use of such metal-containing remedies is unacceptable. An opposing opinion is that different chemical forms of arsenic and mercury have different toxic potentials. To clarify this question, cinnabar, realgar, and cinnabar- and realgar-containing traditional medicine An-Gong-Niu-HuangWan (AGNH), were compared to well-known mercurials (HgS, HgCl(2) and MeHg) and arsenicals (As(2)S(2), As(2)O(3), NaAsO(2), and Na(2)HAsO(4)) for their cytotoxicity in human and rodent cell lines. Cultured cells derived from target organs such as brain (HAPI) and liver (Hep3B, HepG2 and TRL1215) were treated with chemicals for 48 h and cytotoxicity was determined by the MTS assay. MeHg was most toxic with LC(50) of 4-20μM, followed by NaAsO(2) (LC(50), 25-250 μM) and HgCl(2) (LC(50,) 50-100 μM), Na(2)HAsO(4)(LC(50), 60-400μM), As(2)O(3)(LC(50), 30-900 μM), and As(2)S(2) (LC(50), 100-500 μM). In comparison, the LC(50) of realgar ranged from 250 to1500 μM; whereas cinnabar or HgS were approximately 20,000 μM and the toxicity of AGNH was in the range of 1500-8000 μM. Approximately 5000-fold differences exist between MeHg and HgS, and over 10-fold differences exist between NaAsO(2) and As(4)S(4). Chemical forms of metals are important factor in determining their toxicity in traditional medicines, both cinnabar and realgar are much less toxic than well-known mercurial and arsenicals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Residual organic matter and microbial respiration in bottom ash: Effects on metal leaching and eco-toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyas, A; Persson, K M; Persson, M

    2015-09-01

    A common assumption regarding the residual organic matter, in bottom ash, is that it does not represent a significant pool of organic carbon and, beyond metal-ion complexation process, it is of little consequence to evolution of ash/leachate chemistry. This article evaluates the effect of residual organic matter and associated microbial respiratory processes on leaching of toxic metals (i.e. arsenic, copper, chromium, molybdenum, nickel, lead, antimony and zinc), eco-toxicity of ash leachates. Microbial respiration was quantified with help of a respirometric test equipment OXITOP control system. The effect of microbial respiration on metal/residual organic matter leaching and eco-toxicity was quantified with the help of batch leaching tests and an eco-toxicity assay - Daphnia magna. In general, the microbial respiration process decreased the leachate pH and eco-toxicity, indicating modification of bioavailability of metal species. Furthermore, the leaching of critical metals, such as copper and chromium, decreased after the respiration in both ash types (fresh and weathered). It was concluded that microbial respiration, if harnessed properly, could enhance the stability of fresh bottom ash and may promote its reuse. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Metabolomics reveals differences of metal toxicity in cultures of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707 grown on different carbon sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Cameron Booth

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Co-contamination of metals and organic pollutants is a global problem as metals interfere with the metabolism of complex organics by bacteria. Based on a prior observation that metal tolerance was altered by the sole carbon source being used for growth, we sought to understand how metal toxicity specifically affects bacteria using an organic pollutant as their sole carbon source. To this end metabolomics was used to compare cultures of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707 grown on either biphenyl or succinate as the sole carbon source in the presence of either aluminum or copper. Using multivariate statistical analysis it was found that the metals caused perturbations to more cellular processes in the cultures grown on biphenyl than those grown on succinate. Aluminum induced many changes that were indicative of increased oxidative stress as metabolites involved in DNA damage and protection, the Krebs cycle and anti-oxidant production were altered. Copper also caused metabolic changes that were indicative of similar stress, as well as appearing to disrupt other key enzymes such as fumarase. Additionally, both metals caused the accumulation of biphenyl degradation intermediates indicating that they interfered with biphenyl metabolism. Together these results provide a basic understanding of how metal toxicity specifically affects bacteria at a biochemical level during the degradation of an organic pollutant and implicate the catabolism of this carbon source as a major factor that exacerbates metal toxicity.

  12. E-cigarettes as a source of toxic and potentially carcinogenic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, Catherine Ann; Olmedo, Pablo; Navas-Acien, Ana; Goessler, Walter; Cohen, Joanna E.; Rule, Ana Maria

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims: The popularity of electronic cigarette devices is growing worldwide. The health impact of e-cigarette use, however, remains unclear. E-cigarettes are marketed as a safer alternative to cigarettes. The aim of this research was the characterization and quantification of toxic metal concentrations in five, nationally popular brands of cig-a-like e-cigarettes. Methods: We analyzed the cartomizer liquid in 10 cartomizer refills for each of five brands by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). Results: All of the tested metals (cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese and nickel) were found in the e-liquids analyzed. Across all analyzed brands, mean (SD) concentrations ranged from 4.89 (0.893) to 1970 (1540) μg/L for lead, 53.9 (6.95) to 2110 (5220) μg/L for chromium and 58.7 (22.4) to 22,600 (24,400) μg/L for nickel. Manganese concentrations ranged from 28.7 (9.79) to 6910.2 (12,200) μg/L. We found marked variability in nickel and chromium concentration within and between brands, which may come from heating elements. Conclusion: Additional research is needed to evaluate whether e-cigarettes represent a relevant exposure pathway for toxic metals in users. - Highlights: • Certain brands of cig-a-like e-cigarettes contain high levels of nickel and chromium. • Cig-a-likes contain low levels of cadmium, compared to tobacco cigarettes. • Nickel and chromium in the e-liquid of cig-a-likes may come from nichrome heating coils.

  13. Potential hazards of toxic metals found in toothpastes commonly used in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orisakwe, Orish Ebere; Okolo, Kenneth Obinna; Igweze, Zelinjo Nkeiruka; Ajaezi, Godwin Chukwuebuka; Udowelle, Nnaemeka Arinze

    2016-01-01

    Toothpastes have multi-functional configurations as oral care products. They can however constitute a pos- sible source, amongst others, of toxic metal exposure in public health. Indeed, the public health impact of personal hygiene and consumer products is largely unknown. To determine the level of toxic metals (lead, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, nickel) in toothpastes available in Nigeria, (home produced and imported), and assess the potential risk to the people. The samples of toothpastes commonly used in Nigeria were tested. Using a market basket protocol thirty five different brands of toothpaste were used. Samples were digest by addition of 10 mL mixture of conc. nitric and hydrochloric acids (HCl:HNO(3), 3:1), followed by heating to dryness. 20 mL deionized water was added, stirred and filtered. The filtrate was made up in standard volumetric flask and lead, cadmium, chromium, cobalt and nickel concentrations were determined using the atomic absorption spectrophotometry 205A. The daily intake of metals and target hazard quotient (THQ) were then calculated. Pepsodent and Flodent had the highest levels of lead at respectively 23.575 and 18.092 mg/kg while Colgate Herbal had the highest nickel of 18.535 mg/kg. The daily intake estimates of all imported toothpaste samples were below the stated upper limits (UL). All target hazard quotients were also found to be below one. Although the UL, THQ and daily intake rates were all normal, the high levels of lead in some of the tooth- pastes an important concern to public health suggesting that pre-marketing safety studies of toothpastes may be worthwhile for the regulatory authorities.

  14. Dioxins, metals, and fish toxicity in ash residue from space heaters burning used motor oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delistraty, Damon; Stone, Alex

    2007-06-01

    Ash residue, generated from burning used motor oil, is a complex and ubiquitous waste stream. Ash samples were collected from space heaters and analyzed for dioxins (N=10), expressed as toxic equivalents (TEQ), and heavy metals (N=9). TEQ averaged 148-164 ng kg(-1) (standard deviation [SD] 385-416 ng kg(-1)), depending on methods used for non-detects (NDs) and toxic equivalency factors (TEFs). It is notable that median TEQ (2.89-3.49 ng kg(-1)) was about 50 fold lower, reflecting the influence of several high end values on the mean. The proportion of NDs among 17 polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in each sample averaged 38.2% (range 0-94.1%). Total metals averaged 103,000 mg kg(-1) (SD 26,600 mg kg(-1)), with Zn, Cu, and Pb contributing 89.3%, 6.4%, and 3.0% of the total, respectively. Rainbow trout bioassays resulted in median mortalities of 3.2% and 42.0% (respective SD 25.3% and 43.2%) at ash concentrations of 10 and 100 mg l(-1), respectively. Nominal concentrations of several metals (e.g., Cu, Zn) in the fish bioassay exceeded their reported median lethal concentrations (LC50s) for the test species. Multiple regressions (Bonferroni Poil ash ranked on the high end of TEQ content in other environmental matrices, including wood ash, cement kiln dust, biosolids, and soils. Overall, these results suggest that suitable disposal methods are needed for ash generated from burning used motor oil.

  15. The heavy metal ions (Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd+) toxic compounds influence on triticale plants growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezoczki, V. M.; Filip, G. M.

    2017-05-01

    The presence of the heavy metals toxic compounds (CuSO4 · 5H2O, ZnSO4 · 7H2O and 3CdSO4·8H2O) in water and soil can be observed by their negative effects on the germination and growth process for different vegetable (barley, oat, maize) who are used for human and animal consumption. This paper it aims the determination of germination and growth inhibition negative effects for triticale plants in the heavy metals ions presence by ecotoxicological laboratory tests. The triticale plants was chosen for their different characteristics to the other grasses respectively: a very good resistance for a wide range of diseases, an accelerated growth and a very good tolerance for aluminum ions presents in acid soils. The determinations were conducted step by step, first, we put the triticale grains in contact with the heavy metal solutions with different concentration then for 3 days we noticed the triticale germination inhibition effects and finally we noticed the growth inhibition process for triticale plants respectively in 7th and 9th day from the start of the experiment. At the end of the tests we can conclude that the triticale roots have a very great sensibility to a CuSO4 solutions compared to the effects for their stalks. A positive effect for triticale stalks we can see for low CuSO4 solution concentrations thus for 5 mg Cu/l the growth is 19,44%. A positive effect for triticale roots it can see for low ZnSO4 solution concentrations so for 5 - 15 mg Zn/l the growth is 24,4%. In the presence of the CdSO4 solution all the processes are inhibited (germination and growth for triticale plants) even for a low concentrations for this toxic.

  16. Development of the removal technology for toxic heavy metal ions by surface-modified activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Geun Il; Song, Kee Chan; Kim, Kwang Wook; Kim, In Tae; Cho, Il Hoon; Kim, Joon Hyung

    2001-01-01

    Adsorption capacities of both radionuclides(uranium, cobalt) and toxic heavy metals (lead, cadmium and chromium) using double surface-modified activated carbon in wide pH ranges are extensively evaluated. Surface-modified activated carbons are classified as AC(as-received carbon), OAC(single surface-modified carbon with nitric acid solution) and OAC-Na(double surface-modified carbon with various alkali solutions). It is established that optimal condition for the second surface modification of OAC is to use the mixed solution of both NaOH and NaCl with total concentration of 0.1 N based on adsorption efficiencies of uranium and cobalt. Variations of adsorption efficiencies in pH ranges of 2{approx}10 and the adsorption capacities in batch adsorber and fixed bed for removal of both radionuclides and toxic heavy metals using OAC-Na were shown to be superior to that of the AC and OAC even in a low pH range. Capacity factors of OAC-Na for the removal of various metal ions are also excellent to that of AC or OAC. Quantitative analysis of capacity factors for each ions showed that adsorption capacity of OAC-Na increased by 30 times for uranium, 60 times for cobalt, 9 times for lead, 30 times for cadmium, 3 times for chromium compared to that of AC at pH 5, respectively. Adsorption capacity of OAC-Na is comparable to that of XAD-16-TAR used as commercial ion exchange resin.

  17. Palladium Nanoparticle Incorporated Porous Activated Carbon: Electrochemical Detection of Toxic Metal Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerakumar, Pitchaimani; Veeramani, Vediyappan; Chen, Shen-Ming; Madhu, Rajesh; Liu, Shang-Bin

    2016-01-20

    A facile method has been developed for fabricating selective and sensitive electrochemical sensors for the detection of toxic metal ions, which invokes incorporation of palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) on porous activated carbons (PACs). The PACs, which were derived from waste biomass feedstock (fruit peels), possess desirable textural properties and porosities favorable for dispersion of Pd NPs (ca. 3-4 nm) on the graphitic PAC substrate. The Pd/PAC composite materials so fabricated were characterized by a variety of different techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, field-emission transmission electron microscopy, gas physisorption/chemisorption, thermogravimetric analysis, and Raman, Fourier-transform infrared, and X-ray photon spectroscopies. The Pd/PAC-modified glassy carbon electrodes (GCEs) were exploited as electrochemical sensors for the detection of toxic heavy metal ions, viz., Cd(2+), Pb(2+), Cu(2+), and Hg(2+), which showed superior performances for both individual as well as simultaneous detections. For simultaneous detection of Cd(2+), Pb(2+), Cu(2+), and Hg(2+), a linear response in the ion concentration range of 0.5-5.5, 0.5-8.9, 0.5-5.0, and 0.24-7.5 μM, with sensitivity of 66.7, 53.8, 41.1, and 50.3 μA μM(-1) cm(-2), and detection limit of 41, 50, 66, and 54 nM, respectively, was observed. Moreover, the Pd/PAC-modified GCEs also show perspective applications in detection of metal ions in real samples, as illustrated in this study for a milk sample.

  18. Quantitative analysis of potentially toxic metals in alginates for dental use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. BRAGA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Alginate is one the materials most employed in practice to make dental impressions. Substances like zinc, cadmium and lead silicate, which are included in several alginate brands with the aim of improving their physical, chemical and mechanical properties, are a source of serious concern as regards their toxicity. The most serious chronic effect of oral exposure to cadmium is renal toxicity. Assimilation of lead has deleterious effects on the gastrointestinal tract, hematopoietic system, cardiovascular system, central and peripheral nervous systems, kidneys, immune system, and reproductive system. Chronic oral exposures to zinc have resulted in hypochromic and microcyte anemia in some individuals. The aim of the present study was to measure the cadmium, lead and zinc contents of seven brands of alginate for dental use on sale in Brazil. The samples were weighed and placed in the Teflon cups of a closedsystem microwave oven. Aqua regia (4mL concentrated HCl:HNO3, 3:1 v/v and hydrofluoric acid (2mL concentrated HF were added to the samples, which were then subjected to heating. The samples were then cooled to room temperature and diluted to 25 mL in deionized water in a volumetric glass flask. The samples were diluted in duplicate and analyzed against a reagent blank. The analyses were performed in an atomic absorption flame spectrophotometer. Neither lead nor cadmium was detected. Zinc contents ranged from 0.001% to 1.36% by weight. The alginates exhibited low contents of the metals under study and gave no cause for concern regarding toxicity; even so, it is advisable to monitor potentially toxic materials continually and to analyze their plasmatic levels in the professionals working with them. Keywords: Cadmium, lead, zinc, alginates, intoxication, irreversible hydrocolloid.

  19. Luminescent lanthanide metal-organic frameworks for chemical sensing and toxic anion detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rui-Zhi; Yang, Xing; Zhang, Liang-Wei; Zhou, Pan-Pan

    2017-08-01

    Prototype lanthanide metal-organic frameworks (LnMOFs), Ln(BTC) (Ln = Eu and Tb; BTC = benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate), have been considered as luminescent sensors for detecting toxic anions, while their neutral pore structures have limited the entrance and encapsulation of anions to produce highly anion-responsive photoluminescence (PL). To facilitate anions to enter the pore space of Ln(BTC), a one-pot synthesis method was proposed in which BTC was partially replaced with its structural analogue L·BF 4 (H 3 L·BF 4 = 2,4,6-tricarboxy-1-methylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate) which consists of an anion affinity site of cationic methylpyridinium. Compared to the original Ln(BTC), the co-doped cationic framework Eu 0.05 Tb 0.95 -BTC 0.9 L 0.1 is highly sensitive for detecting different toxic anions by tuning the energy absorption of organic chromophores, the energy transfer efficiency to Ln 3+ ions and the energy allocation between different Ln 3+ ions in the PL spectra. We demonstrated that the Eu 0.05 Tb 0.95 -BTC 0.9 L 0.1 PL sensor has the capability of decoding various toxic anions with a clearly differentiable and unique emission intensity ratio of 5 D 4 → 7 F 5 (Tb 3+ , 545 nm) to 5 D 0 → 7 F 2 (Eu 3+ , 618 nm) transitions (I Tb /I Eu ). Compared to Ln(BTC), the co-doped Eu 0.05 Tb 0.95 -BTC 0.9 L 0.1 presents self-calibrating, high distinguishable and stable PL signals for detecting toxic anions.

  20. Metales pesados y toxicidad de aguas del Río Aconcagua en Chile Heavy metals and toxicity of waters of the Aconcagua River in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernán Gaete

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The toxicity of surface waters in a zone with mining activity in the Aconcagua River was determined through growth inhibition bioassays of Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, and correlated with heavy metal concentrations. Results show that the waters near the discharge of the mining effluent displayed toxicity during all periods of study; the molybdenum and copper concentration exceeded the norms of water quality. The correlations between the concentrations of metals and the growth rate of P. subcapitata varied in the different periods of the study; inverse and significant correlations with copper stand out in some periods.

  1. Toxicity and DNA damage in tobacco and potato plants growing on soil polluted with heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gichner, Tomás; Patková, Zdenka; Száková, Jirina; Demnerová, Katerina

    2006-11-01

    Heterezygous tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum var. xanthi) and potato (Solanum tuberosum var. Korela) plants were cultivated on soil from the site Strimice which is highly polluted with heavy metals and on nonpolluted soil from the recreational site Jezerí, both in North Bohemia, Czech Republic. The total content, the content of bioavailable, easily mobile, and potentially mobile components of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) in the tested soils, and the accumulation of these metals in the above-ground biomass and roots of tested plants were analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry or flameless atomic absorption spectrometry. The average tobacco leaf area and potato plant height were significantly reduced in plants growing on the polluted soil. We have measured the DNA damage in nuclei of leaves of both plant species using the Comet assay. A small but significant increase in DNA damage was noted in plants growing on the polluted soil versus controls. As the tobacco and potato plants with increased DNA damage were severely injured (inhibited growth, distorted leaves), this increase may be associated with necrotic or apoptotic DNA fragmentation. No increase in the frequency of somatic mutation was detected in tobacco plants growing on the polluted soil. Thus, the polluted soil probably induced toxic but not genotoxic effects on tobacco and potato plants.

  2. Evaluation of potential relationships between benthic community structure and toxic metals in Laizhou Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin; Song, Jinming; Li, Xuegang

    2014-10-15

    The objective of the present study was to examine the relationships between benthic community structure and toxic metals using bivariate/multivariate techniques at 17 sediment locations in Laizhou Bay, North China. Sediment chemical data were evaluated against geochemical background values and sediment quality guidelines, which identified Cu and As as contaminants of concern with a moderate potential for adverse effects. Benthic community data were subjected to non-metric multidimensional scaling, which generated four groups of stations. Spearman rank correlation was then employed to explore the relationships between the major axes of heavy metals and benthic community structure. However, weak and insignificant correlations were found between these axes, indicating that contaminants of concern may not be the primary explanatory factors. Polychaeta were abundant in southern Laizhou Bay, serving as a warning regarding the health status of the ecosystem. Integrated sediment quality assessment showed sediments from northern central locations were impaired, displaying less diverse benthos and higher metal contamination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Bio-functionalized silver nanoparticles for selective colorimetric sensing of toxic metal ions and antimicrobial studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinod Kumar, V; Anbarasan, S; Christena, Lawrence Rene; SaiSubramanian, Nagarajan; Philip Anthony, Savarimuthu

    2014-08-14

    Hibiscus Sabdariffa (Gongura) plant extracts (leaves (HL) and stem (HS)) were used for the first time in the green synthesis of bio-functionalized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The bio-functionality of AgNPs has been successfully utilized for selective colorimetric sensing of potentially health and environmentally hazardous Hg(2+), Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) metal ions at ppm level in aqueous solution. Importantly, clearly distinguishable colour for all three metal ions was observed. The influence of extract preparation condition and pH were also explored on the formation of AgNPs. Both selectivity and sensitivity differed for AgNPs synthesized from different parts of the plant. Direct correlation between the stability of green synthesized AgNPs at different pH and its antibacterial effects has been established. The selective colorimetric sensing of toxic metal ions and antimicrobial effect of green synthesized AgNPs demonstrated the multifunctional applications of green nanotechnology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Selective removal of dissolved toxic metals from groundwater by ultrafiltration in combination with chemical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, L.P.; Le, V.T.; McConeghy, G.J.; Martin, J.F.

    1989-09-01

    An alternative in-place process for the removal of toxic heavy metals based on aqueous solution chemistry and treatment is being evaluated under the auspices of the Emerging Technologies Program funded through the USEPA's Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program. The technique involves the contacting of aqueous solutions containing the heavy metal contaminants with low concentrations of polyelectrolytes, and then removing the polyelectrolytes from solution with ultrafiltration membranes. The first phase of the program is considered complete. Success has been achieved for the separation of soluble, heavy metal ions: cadmium, lead, and mercury even in the presence of an organic compound, toluene. Removal was successful at alkaline conditions, using any combination of membrane material or polyelectrolyte. Arsenic was removed, but not effectively, using the current polyelectrolytes, simply because arsenic is present as an anionic species rather than as a cationic species. Optimization of the process variables is nearing completion and pilot and field testing will take place in the second year of the program to verify the process under realistic conditions and to establish process economics

  5. Removal of toxic metal ions from solution by inactivated cells of plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza, R.; Khattak, I.M.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper to present the study of plant Larrea tridentate (bush) that grows abundantly in the desert environment of Hub, Balochistan toward the industrial area of Karachi (Pakistan). The binding of Ni(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Cr(III), and Cr(VI) to Larrea tridentataroots. Stems, and leaves has been shown to be dependent upon pH, with best binding occurring between pH 5 and 6. This effect in pH suggests that the binding mechanism may be an ion exchange type process. Also, the binding mechanism for these metals is a stable, rapid process which implies that the binding is taking place on the cell wall surface of the creosote bush. Capacity and recovery experiments have demonstrated that Larrea tridentate possessed the ability to bind appreciable amounts of Ni(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), and Cr(III) as compared to other biosorbents. This ability to remove and recover heavy metals from solution indicates the tremendous potential that the creosote bush could have for cleansing the environment and industrial waste effluents from toxic metal ions. (author)

  6. Evaluation of heavy metals, cytotoxicity, and antioxidant activity of tomatoes grown in toxic muddy soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommonaro, Giuseppina; Nicolaus, Barbara; De Prisco, Rocco; Pergamo, Rita; Marra, Nancy; Caporale, Angelamaria; Popolo, Ada; Saturnino, Carmela

    2015-04-01

    This research studies tomatoes grown in polluted soils to ascertain their phytochemical and nutritive features. Pulp and seeds from tomatoes grown in muddy soils were analyzed for their antioxidant power and their toxicity because of the possibility that heavy metals were present in the soils. An antioxidant assay on methanol extracts was made by using DDPH, while an ABTS [2,2'-Azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)] assay was used to evaluate the antioxidant activity of lipophilic fractions. Results of the antioxidant assay showed that the tomatoes maintained a high level of antioxidant activity especially in the lipophilic fractions which contain the most representative compounds. Cytotoxic activity was performed on HeLa, PDAC, and A375 cell lines by [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-phenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide] (MTT) assay. Results showed that neither the seeds, nor the pulp, of the extracts was cytotoxic. The presence of heavy metals was evaluated by using spectroscopy of atomic absorption with a graphite oven. Test results show the absence of heavy metals and these results have an interesting scientific role because they provide useful information for promoting food safety.

  7. Study on the Effect of Heavy metals toxicity according to changing Hardness concentration using D.magna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun Sang, H.

    2016-12-01

    n order to determine and prevent the number of ecological effects of heavy metals in the materials, we have to accurately measure the heavy metals present in the water-based protection ecosystems and may determine the effects to humans. Heavy metals occurred in the industrial effluent which is a state in which the monitor, based on the emission standards are made by the Ministry of Environment and managed and waste water contained Copper, Zinc, lead, etc. These heavy metals are able to express the toxic effects only when present in the free-ions in the aqueous condition, which appears differently affected by the degree to hardness change in accordance with the season, precipitation. Generally changing hardness concentration can not precisely evaluate toxic effects of heavy metals in the water system. Anderson announced a study on bioassay for heavy metals from industrial waste water using Daphnia magna(Anderson, 1944, 1948). Breukelman published study the resitivity difference for the mercury Chloride(HgCl2). Braudouin(1974) compared the zooplankton(Daphnia sp.) acute toxicity of the different heavy metals and confirmed the sensitivity. Shcherban(1979) presented for toxicity evaluation results for the heavy metal of the Daphnia magna according to different temperature conditions. In the United States Environmental Protection Agency(EPA) established a standard test method for water fleas, managed and supervised water ecosystems, and announced the adoption of a bioassay standard method. This study was performed to evaluate acute inhibition using the Daphnia magna for the biological effect of heavy metal ions in water-based toxicity in the hardness change. Evaluation methods were conducted in EPA Water Quality process test criteria. TU(Toxic Unit), NOEC (No Observable Effect Concentration), LOEC (Lowest Observable Effect Concentration), EC50 (Median Effective Concentration) was calculated by Toxcalc 5.0 Program. Keywords : D. magna, Hardness, Toxic Unit, Heavy metal

  8. Formal recycling of e-waste leads to increased exposure to toxic metals: an occupational exposure study from Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julander, Anneli; Lundgren, Lennart; Skare, Lizbet; Grandér, Margaretha; Palm, Brita; Vahter, Marie; Lidén, Carola

    2014-12-01

    Electrical and electronic waste (e-waste) contains multiple toxic metals. However, there is currently a lack of exposure data for metals on workers in formal recycling plants. The objective of this study was to evaluate workers' exposure to metals, using biomarkers of exposure in combination with monitoring of personal air exposure. We assessed exposure to 20 potentially toxic metals among 55 recycling workers and 10 office workers at three formal e-waste recycling plants in Sweden. Workers at two of the plants were followed-up after 6 months. We collected the inhalable fraction and OFC (37-mm) fraction of particles, using personal samplers, as well as spot samples of blood and urine. We measured metal concentrations in whole blood, plasma, urine, and air filters using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry following acid digestion. The air sampling indicated greater airborne exposure, 10 to 30 times higher, to most metals among the recycling workers handling e-waste than among the office workers. The exposure biomarkers showed significantly higher concentrations of chromium, cobalt, indium, lead, and mercury in blood, urine, and/or plasma of the recycling workers, compared with the office workers. Concentrations of antimony, indium, lead, mercury, and vanadium showed close to linear associations between the inhalable particle fraction and blood, plasma, or urine. In conclusion, our study of formal e-waste recycling shows that workers performing recycling tasks are exposed to multiple toxic metals. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Effects of a chelating resin on metal bioavailability and toxicity to estuarine invertebrates: Divergent results of field and laboratory tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkie, Emma M., E-mail: ewilkie@bio.mq.edu.a [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Technology Sydney, Broadway, NSW 2007 (Australia); Ecotoxicology and Environmental Contaminants Section, Department of Environment and Climate Change, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia); Roach, Anthony C. [Ecotoxicology and Environmental Contaminants Section, Department of Environment and Climate Change, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia); Micevska, Tina [Centre for Environmental Contaminants Research, CSIRO Land and Water, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Kelaher, Brendan P.; Bishop, Melanie J. [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Technology Sydney, Broadway, NSW 2007 (Australia)

    2010-05-15

    Benthic invertebrates can uptake metals through diffusion of free ion solutes, or ingestion of sediment-bound forms. This study investigated the efficacy of the metal chelating resin SIR 300{sup TM} in adsorbing porewater metals and isolating pathways of metal exposure. A field experiment (Botany Bay, Sydney, Australia) and a laboratory toxicity test each manipulated the availability of porewater metals within contaminated and uncontaminated sediments. It was predicted that within contaminated sediments, the resin would adsorb porewater metals and reduce toxicity to invertebrates, but in uncontaminated sediments, the resin would not significantly affect these variables. Whereas in the laboratory, the resin produced the predicted results, in the field the resin increased porewater metal concentrations of contaminated sediments for at least 34 days and decreased abundances of four macroinvertebrate groups, and richness in all sediments. These contrasting findings highlight the limits of extrapolating the results of laboratory experiments to the field environment. - Laboratory experiments do not predict the effects on porewater metals or macroinvertebrates of adding a chelating resin to metal-contaminated field sediments.

  10. Effect of salinity on acute copper and zinc toxicity to Tigriopus japonicus: the difference between metal ions and nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Junbeom; Kim, Soyoun; Yoo, Jisu; Lee, Jae-Seong; Park, June-Woo; Jung, Jinho

    2014-08-30

    We investigated the effects of salinity (5‰, 15‰, 25‰ and 35‰) on metal ion (Cu and Zn) and nanoparticle (NP) CuO and ZnO toxicity to Tigriopus japonicus. Increasing the test media volume without renewal increased the 96-h LC50 for Cu (32.75 mg L(-1)) compared to the reported value (3.9 mg L(-1)). There was no significant difference in acute toxicity at different salinities between acclimated and unacclimated T. japonicus (p>0.05). Increasing salinity decreased the dissolved concentrations of Cu and Zn ions due to the precipitation of the metal ions, consequently reducing the acute toxicity to T. japonicus. The effect of salinity on acute CuO and ZnO NP toxicity was similar to that on metal ion toxicity. Since the aggregation of NPs generally enhanced at higher salinities, both the dissolution and aggregation of CuO and ZnO NPs may control the effect of salinity on acute toxicity to T. japonicus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Chronic toxicity of five metals to the polar marine microalga Cryothecomonas armigera - Application of a new bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Darren J; Gissi, Francesca; Adams, Merrin S; King, Catherine K; Jolley, Dianne F

    2017-09-01

    The paucity of ecotoxicological data for Antarctic organisms is impeding the development of region-specific water quality guidelines. To address this limitation, toxicity testing protocols need to be developed to account for the unique physiology of polar organisms, in particular their slow growth rates. In this study, a toxicity test protocol was developed to investigate the toxicities of five metals to the polar marine microalga Cryothecomonas armigera. The concentrations which reduced population growth rate by 10% (EC10) after 24-d for Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd and Ni were 21.6, 152, 366, 454, and 1220 μg.L -1 , respectively. At the concentrations used in tests, only Cu and Ni were sufficiently toxic to enable the derivation of EC50 values of 63.1 and 1570 μg.L -1 respectively. All metals affected C. armigera's cellular physiology including cellular chlorophyll a fluorescence, cell complexity and size, and lipid concentrations. However, no changes to cellular membrane permeability were observed. The reduction in cellular lipid concentrations was a more sensitive indicator of toxicity for Cd, Ni, and Pb than growth rate inhibition, with EC10 values of 89, 894, and 11 μg.L -1 , respectively, highlighting its potential as a sensitive measure of metal toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. In vitro alveolar cytotoxicity of soluble components of airborne particulate matter: effects of serum on toxicity of transition metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeson, C D; Riley, M R; Riley-Saxton, E

    2004-10-01

    Respiration of fossil fuel-derived airborne particulate matter (PM) has been linked to various pulmonary disorders. Transition metals contained in such PM, such as zinc, iron and vanadium, have been suggested as the primary culprits in PM-induced pulmonary distress by rat instillation studies. In this study, the cytotoxicity of zinc, iron, and vanadium on confluent monolayers of rat alveolar epithelial cells was evaluated as the inhibition of cellular succinate dehydrogenase metabolic activity as quantified via the MTT assay. In addition, the effect of culture medium serum concentration on the toxicities of these three metals was investigated. Of the three metals tested, zinc was the most toxic, with an EC50 of 0.6 mM in culture medium with 10% serum; vanadium and iron had EC50's of 3 and 4 mM, respectively. Serum in culture medium was found to substantially reduce the apparent toxicity of zinc: EC50's for zinc ranged from 0.6 mM in 10% serum to 0.1 mM in serum-free medium. Zinc toxicity analyses in various culture medium conditions demonstrated that the toxicity-reducing effect of serum was due largely and perhaps entirely, to serum albumin. Some, but not all of the effect of serum and albumin on zinc toxicity is apparently due to zinc-albumin binding.

  13. Toxic aluminium and heavy metals in groundwater of middle Russia: health risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momot, Olga; Synzynys, Boris

    2005-08-01

    Two approaches are distinguished in modern ecological monitoring. The first one is physicochemical analysis of environmental objects with respect to maximum allowable concentrations (MACs) of chemical substances, which is performed by standards methods in accordance with state regulations. The second approach (biological monitoring) is based on the methodology of biotesting and bio indication. The task of this work is to create biotests for estimation of Al and other metals toxicity in ground water and to compare these results with physicochemical analysis dates. Risk assessment for heavy metals contaminated groundwater was also performed. Risk assessment was performed accordingly EPA US recommendation and gave results about 90 per 100000 citizens for Al and 402 per 100000 for mixture of different heavy metals. For comparison: risk for earth background radiation for Middle Russia is (Individual dose 1 millisivert per year) consist 5 per 100000 people. It was shown that groundwater consist HCO3- ions (360 mg/l), sometimes Al compounds 0.21-0.65 mg/l (MAC for Al is 0.5 mg/l for Russia). Other groundwater contain Hg - 0.004 mg/l (MAC - 0.0005 mg/l); Cr - 0.072 mg/l (MAC - 0.05 mg/l); As - less than 0.03 mg/l (MAC - 0.05 mg/l). We developed plant biotest for estimation of groundwater quality with barley roots, tradescatia and others. Some biotests parameters correlate with HCO3-, Cl-, SO(4)2- and metal ions content positively, for another biotest this correlation is strongly negative. The quality of groundwater near Obninsk and in Kaluga Region is very different but hasnit been changed since the year 1998.

  14. Effect of pyrolysis on solvent extractability of toxic metals from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakitani, Tomo; Hata, Toshimitsu; Kajimoto, Takeshi; Imamura, Yuji

    2004-06-18

    Solvent extraction was conducted to investigate the behavior of toxic metals in chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood and its pyrolysis residue. Four kinds of solvents, along with sulfuric and phosphoric acid as mineral agents, and citric and oxalic acid as complexing agents, were used. The CCA elements from the wood treated without pyrolysis were easily extracted. However, only a small amount of CCA elements were extracted from the pyrolyzed residue, even under very low pH conditions. The toxic elements in the pyrolyzed wood showed high stabilization against the solvent extraction. Pyrolysis strongly immobilized the toxic elements in the residue. Therefore, pyrolysis is not suitable as a pretreatment.

  15. Effect of temperature on heavy metal toxicity to earthworm Lumbricus terrestris (Annelida: Oligochaeta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M A Q; Ahmed, S A; Salazar, A; Gurumendi, J; Khan, A; Vargas, M; von Catalin, B

    2007-10-01

    Earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) acclimated at 2 degrees C above their habitat temperature (10-12 degrees C) showed about 5% increase in basal rate of oxygen consumption, which increased to about 38% in 14-16 degrees C- and 40% in 16-18 degrees C-, but decreased by 84% in 20-22 degrees C-acclimated worms. Temperature also increased the blood hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, which decreased slightly in 20-22 degrees C-acclimated worms. The worms acclimated at 20-22 degrees C showed their blood to be hypovolemic than that of 10-12 degrees C worms indicating dehydration. Pre-exposure of 10-14 degrees C-acclimated worms to sublethal concentrations of zinc, copper, and lead did not significantly affect the rate of respiration. However, at higher temperatures all these metals inhibited oxygen consumption; zinc, lead, and cadmium by approximately 11% and copper by approximately 18% of that at 14-16 degrees C. At 20-22 degrees C, the respiration was further inhibited, 36% by copper, 18% by cadmium, and approximately 10% by lead and zinc. Copper, lead, and zinc decreased the temperature-enhanced increase in blood Hb concentration at all temperatures. In 20-22 degrees C-acclimated worms heavy metal exposure slightly lowered the oxygen affinity of Hb as well as caused shifts in carbon monoxide difference spectra. The acute toxicity of these metals was not affected by a 2 degrees C rise in acclimation temperature but increased by 17% (lead), 33% (copper), and 5% (zinc) in 14-16 degrees C- and by 40% (lead), 149% (copper), and 132% (zinc) in 20-22 degrees C-acclimated worms. The increase in toxicity of metals caused by high temperatures may be due to limiting the scope of aerobic metabolism (oxygen extraction, transport, and utilization) via quantitative and qualitative effects on Hb. This terrestrial species appears to be tolerant of slight increases in habitat temperature, such as that expected with current global climate change. 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Effects of prenatal exposure to endocrine disruptors and toxic metals on the fetal epigenome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommarito, Paige A; Martin, Elizabeth; Fry, Rebecca C

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to environmental contaminants during pregnancy has been linked to adverse outcomes at birth and later in life. The link between prenatal exposures and latent health outcomes suggests that these exposures may result in long-term epigenetic reprogramming. Toxic metals and endocrine disruptors are two major classes of contaminants that are ubiquitously present in the environment and represent threats to human health. In this review, we present evidence that prenatal exposures to these contaminants result in fetal epigenomic changes, including altered global DNA methylation, gene-specific CpG methylation and microRNA expression. Importantly, these changes may have functional cellular consequences, impacting health outcomes later in life. Therefore, these epigenetic changes represent a critical mechanism that warrants further study. PMID:28234024

  17. Toxic metals' concentration in water of Kriveljska Reka and its tributaries and influence of water there

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukic, D.; Zlatkovic, S.; Vuckovic, M.; Jovanovic, R.

    2002-01-01

    Kriveljska reka is near Bor, a big mining basin in East Serbia. This river is formed from two not so big rivers: Cerova reka and Valja Mare. Kriveljska reka flow past village Veliki Krivelj. Veliki Krivelj is one of the most important mining strip in Bor area. Therefore, Kriveljska reka is the reception for waste waters of some sections of Mining Basin Bor, situated on its banks. We will present to you concentrations of 7 toxic metals, pH-value and chemical oxygen demand in 8 points at Kriveljska reka and waste waters' influence on quality of this river's water. Based on our results, we can conclude that waste waters from Mining Basin Bor contaminate Kriveljska reka and at last we have a dead river. (author)

  18. Seasonal changes in the tests of fish Puntius ticto, and their relation to heavy metal toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pundir, R. (Holkar Science College, Indore (India)); Saxena, A.B. (Vikram Univ., Ujjain (India))

    1990-08-01

    An integrated hypothesis explaining the implications of environmental influence on the reproductive process has not emerged owing to paucity of data. Nevertheless, evidence is at hand to show that favorable physiological disposition for reproduction is brought about with external and internal factors through the mediation of the neuroendocrine mechanisms. It is now clear that the environmental factors impinge on the exteroreceptors and through them affect the central nervous system, the hypothalamus, the pituitary and finally the gonad. Another endogenous factor is the internal rhythm, which is known to regulate at least in part the seasonal reproductive activity. A review of literature reveals that comparatively much work has been done on the structure and seasonal changes of the testes of fishes. The aim of the present study is to observe seasonal changes in the testes of fish Puntius ticto and their relation to heavy metal toxicity.

  19. Interference of CuO nanoparticles with metal homeostasis in hepatocytes under sub-toxic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuillel, Martine; Chevallet, Mireille; Charbonnier, Peggy; Fauquant, Caroline; Pignot-Paintrand, Isabelle; Arnaud, Josiane; Cassio, Doris; Michaud-Soret, Isabelle; Mintz, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NP) were studied for their toxicity and mechanism of action on hepatocytes (HepG2), in relation to Cu homeostasis disruption. Indeed, hepatocytes, in the liver, are responsible for the whole body Cu balance and should be a major line of defence in the case of exposure to CuO-NP. We investigated the early responses to sub-toxic doses of CuO-NP and compared them to equivalent doses of Cu added as salt to see if there is a specific nano-effect related to Cu homeostasis in hepatocytes. The expression of the genes encoding the Cu-ATPase ATP7B, metallothionein 1X, heme oxygenase 1, heat shock protein 70, superoxide dismutase 1, glutamate cysteine ligase modifier subunit, metal responsive element-binding transcription factor 1 and zinc transporter 1 was analyzed by qRT-PCR. These genes are known to be involved in response to Cu, Zn and/or oxidative stresses. Except for MTF1, ATP7B and SOD1, we clearly observed an up regulation of these genes expression in CuO-NP treated cells, as compared to CuCl2. In addition, ATP7B trafficking from the Golgi network to the bile canaliculus membrane was observed in WIF-B9 cells, showing a need for Cu detoxification. This shows an increase in the intracellular Cu concentration, probably due to Cu release from endosomal CuO-NP solubilisation. Our data show that CuO-NP enter hepatic cells, most probably by endocytosis, bypassing the cellular defence mechanism against Cu, thus acting as a Trojan horse. Altogether, this study suggests that sub-toxic CuO-NP treatments induce successively a Cu overload, a Cu-Zn exchange on metallothioneins and MTF1 regulation on both Cu and Zn homeostasis.Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NP) were studied for their toxicity and mechanism of action on hepatocytes (HepG2), in relation to Cu homeostasis disruption. Indeed, hepatocytes, in the liver, are responsible for the whole body Cu balance and should be a major line of defence in the case of exposure to CuO-NP. We investigated

  20. Microbial leaching of toxic metals and arsenic from a heap consisting of heavily polluted soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groudev, Stoyan; Georgiev, Plamen; Spasova, Irena; Nicolova, Marina

    2014-05-01

    Soil heavily polluted with toxic heavy metals (mainly Cu, Zn, Cd) and arsenic was subjected to microbial cleanup in a heap specially constructed for this purpose. The heap was located on an impermeable geomembrane, had the shape of a truncated pyramid and contained about 240 tons of soil collected mainly from the horizon A. The soil was highly acidic (with an initial pH of about 3.2) and was preliminarily crushed to minus 2.5 cm particle size. The pollutants were present mainly as the relevant sulphide minerals and the soil was inhabited by different microorganisms, including some acidophilic chemolithotrophic bacteria able to oxidize sulphides and to solubilize the relevant toxic elements. The heap possessed systems for irrigation and aeration and was surrounded by ditches to collect the drainage heap effluents containing the dissolved pollutants. The treatment of the soil was carried out by means of interrupted irrigation with leach solutions containing diluted sulphuric acid (to maintain pH in the heap within the range of about 2.5 - 2.8) and ammonium and phosphate ions to maintain the microbial growth. The treatment was carried out for a period of about two years during different climatic seasons. After the end of leaching the soil was subjected to some conventional melioration procedures such as liming, grassing, moulching, addition of fertilizers and animal manure and periodic ploughing and irrigation to increase its quality to levels suitable for agricultural utilization.

  1. Protection of tobacco cells from oxidative copper toxicity by catalytically active metal-binding DNA oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, Junichiro; Furukawa, Hiroka; Hiramatsu, Takuya; Bouteau, François; Mancuso, Stefano; Tanaka, Kenichiro; Okazaki, Toshihiko; Kawano, Tomonori

    2014-03-01

    The impact of copper ions on the oxidative and calcium signal transductions, leading to cell death in plant cells, have been documented. Copper induces a series of biological and chemical reactions in plant cells including the oxidative burst reflecting the production of reactive oxygen species and the stimulation of calcium channel opening allowing a transient increase in cytosolic calcium concentrations. These early events, completed within a few minutes after the contact with copper, are known to trigger the development of cell death. The effects of DNA fragments with copper-binding motifs as novel plant cell-protecting agents were assessed using cell suspension cultures of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L., cell line BY-2) expressing the aequorin gene. The addition of GC-rich double-stranded DNA fragments, prior to the addition of copper ions, effectively blocked both the copper-induced calcium influx and cell death. In addition, the DNA-Cu complex examined was shown to possess superoxide-scavenging catalytic activity, suggesting that DNA-mediated protection of the cells from copper toxicity is due to the removal of superoxide. Lastly, a possible mechanism of DNA-Cu interaction and future applications of these DNA fragments in the protection of plant roots from metal toxicity or in aid of phyto-remediation processes are discussed.

  2. An examination of the association of selected toxic metals with total and central obesity indices: NHANES 99-02.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Miguel A; Elobeid, Mai; Ruden, Douglas M; Allison, David B

    2010-09-01

    It is conceivable that toxic metals contribute to obesity by influencing various aspects of metabolism, such as by substituting for essential micronutrients and vital metals, or by inducing oxidative stress. Deficiency of the essential metal zinc decreases adiposity in humans and rodent models, whereas deficiencies of chromium, copper, iron, and magnesium increases adiposity. This study utilized the NHANES 99-02 data to explore the association between waist circumference and body mass index with the body burdens of selected toxic metals (barium, cadmium, cobalt, cesium, molybdenum, lead, antimony, thallium, and tungsten). Some of the associations were significant direct relationships (barium and thallium), and some of the associations were significant inverse relationships (cadmium, cobalt, cesium, and lead). Molybdenum, antimony, and tungsten had mostly insignificant associations with waist circumference and body mass index. This is novel result for most of the toxic metals studied, and a surprising result for lead because high stored lead levels have been shown to correlate with higher rates of diabetes, and obesity may be a key risk factor for developing diabetes. These associations suggest the possibility that environmental exposure to metals may contribute to variations in human weight gain/loss. Future research, such as prospective studies rather than the cross-sectional studies presented here, is warranted to confirm these findings.

  3. An Examination of the Association of Selected Toxic Metals with Total and Central Obesity Indices: NHANES 99-02

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M. Ruden

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available It is conceivable that toxic metals contribute to obesity by influencing various aspects of metabolism, such as by substituting for essential micronutrients and vital metals, or by inducing oxidative stress. Deficiency of the essential metal zinc decreases adiposity in humans and rodent models, whereas deficiencies of chromium, copper, iron, and magnesium increases adiposity. This study utilized the NHANES 99-02 data to explore the association between waist circumference and body mass index with the body burdens of selected toxic metals (barium, cadmium, cobalt, cesium, molybdenum, lead, antimony, thallium, and tungsten. Some of the associations were significant direct relationships (barium and thallium, and some of the associations were significant inverse relationships (cadmium, cobalt, cesium, and lead. Molybdenum, antimony, and tungsten had mostly insignificant associations with waist circumference and body mass index. This is novel result for most of the toxic metals studied, and a surprising result for lead because high stored lead levels have been shown to correlate with higher rates of diabetes, and obesity may be a key risk factor for developing diabetes. These associations suggest the possibility that environmental exposure to metals may contribute to variations in human weight gain/loss. Future research, such as prospective studies rather than the cross-sectional studies presented here, is warranted to confirm these findings.

  4. Screen-Printed Electrodes Modified with “Green” Metals for Electrochemical Stripping Analysis of Toxic Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasios Economou

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This work reviews the field of screen-printed electrodes (SPEs modified with “green” metals for electrochemical stripping analysis of toxic elements. Electrochemical stripping analysis has been established as a useful trace analysis technique offering many advantages compared to competing optical techniques. Although mercury has been the preferred electrode material for stripping analysis, the toxicity of mercury and the associated legal requirements in its use and disposal have prompted research towards the development of “green” metals as alternative electrode materials. When combined with the screen-printing technology, such environment-friendly metals can lead to disposable sensors for trace metal analysis with excellent operational characteristics. This review focuses on SPEs modified with Au, Bi, Sb, and Sn for stripping analysis of toxic elements. Different modification approaches (electroplating, bulk modification, use of metal precursors, microengineering techniques are considered and representative applications are described. A developing related field, namely biosensing based on stripping analysis of metallic nanoprobe labels, is also briefly mentioned.

  5. A dipeptide-based superhydrogel: Removal of toxic dyes and heavy metal ions from waste water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Nibedita; Baral, Abhishek; Basu, Kingshuk; Roy, Subhasish; Banerjee, Arindam

    2017-01-01

    A short peptide-based molecule has been found to form a strong hydrogel at phosphate buffer solution of pH 7.46. The hydrogel has been characterized thoroughly using various techniques including field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), wide angle powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and rheological analysis. It has been observed from FE-SEM images that entangled nanofiber network is responsible for gelation. Rheological investigation demonstrates that the self-assembly of this synthetic dipeptide results in the formation of mechanically strong hydrogel with storage modulus (G') around 10 4 Pa. This gel has been used for removing both cationic and anionic toxic organic dyes (Brilliant Blue, Congo red, Malachite Green, Rhodamine B) and metal ions (Co 2+ and Ni 2+ ) from waste water. Moreover, only a small amount of the gelator is required (less than 1 mg/mL) for preparation of this superhydrogel and even this hydrogel can be reused three times for dye/metal ion absorption. This signifies the importance of the hydrogel towards waste water management. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Evaluation of potentially toxic metals pollution in the sediments of the Kor river, southwest Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheykhi, V; Moore, F

    2013-04-01

    This study is carried out to evaluate potentially toxic metal concentrations (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mo, Ni, Pb, and Zn) together with their spatial distribution, degree of pollution, and potential ecological risk in Kor river sediments (southwest Iran) using sediment quality guidelines, geoaccumulation index (I geo), Hakanson potential ecological risk index (RI), and standard methods of statistical analysis. The study area stretches some 140 km from the Drodzan Dam to Bakhtegan Lake, a stretch of river where different industrial and domestic activities (e.g., petrochemical complex, oil refinery, industrial meat processing complex, Marvdasht city sewage) and ecological value overlap with each other. Calculated geoaccumulation index indicate that 50 % of the stations are moderately to very extremely polluted. The potential ecological risk for nine investigated metals in Kor river is Hg (948) > Mo (51.9) > Ni (37.8) > Cd (29.8) > As (22) > Cu (16.6) > Pb (13.3) > Zn (3.3) > Cr (1). Results show that sediments in parts of Kor river sediments are heavily affected by effluents discharged from industrial plants and other parts are affected by agriculture and urban runoff from nearby lands. These phenomena may cause a risk of secondary water pollution under sediment disturbance and/or changes in the physical-chemical characteristics of the aquatic system.

  7. Application of magnetic chitosan composites for the removal of toxic metal and dyes from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, D Harikishore Kumar; Lee, Seung-Mok

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic chitosan composites (MCCs) are a novel material that exhibits good sorption behavior toward various toxic pollutants in aqueous solution. These magnetic composites have a fast adsorption rate and high adsorption efficiency, efficient to remove various pollutants and they are easy to recover and reuse. These features highlight the suitability of MCCs for the treatment of water polluted with metal and organic materials. This review outlines the preparation of MCCs as well as methods to characterize these materials using FTIR, XRD, TGA and other microscopy-based techniques. Additionally, an overview of recent developments and applications of MCCs for metal and organic pollutant removal is discussed in detail. Based on current research and existing materials, some new and futuristic approaches in this fascinating area are also discussed. The main objective of this review is to provide up-to-date information about the most important features of MCCs and to show their advantages as adsorbents in the treatment of polluted aqueous solutions. © 2013.

  8. Do trace metals (chromium, copper, and nickel) influence toxicity of diesel fuel for free-living marine nematodes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedfi, Amor; Boufahja, Fehmi; Ben Ali, Manel; Aïssa, Patricia; Mahmoudi, Ezzeddine; Beyrem, Hamouda

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypotheses that (1) free-living marine nematodes respond in a differential way to diesel fuel if it is combined with three trace metals (chromium, copper, and nickel) used as smoke suppressants and that (2) the magnitude of toxicity of diesel fuel differs according to the level of trace metal mixture added. Nematodes from Sidi Salem beach (Tunisia) were subjected separately for 30 days to three doses of diesel fuel and three others of a trace metals mixture. Simultaneously, low-dose diesel was combined with three amounts of a trace metal mixture. Results from univariate and multivariate methods of data evaluation generally support our initial hypothesis that nematode assemblages exhibit various characteristic changes when exposed to different types of disturbances; the low dose of diesel fuel, discernibly non-toxic alone, became toxic when trace metals were added. For all types of treatments, biological disturbance caused severe specific changes in assemblage structure. For diesel fuel-treated microcosms, Marylynnia bellula and Chromaspirinia pontica were the best positive indicative species; their remarkable presence in given ecosystem may predict unsafe seafood. The powerful toxicity of the combination between diesel fuel and trace metals was expressed with only negative bioindicators, namely Trichotheristus mirabilis, Pomponema multipapillatum, Ditlevsenella murmanica, Desmodora longiseta, and Bathylaimus capacosus. Assemblages with high abundances of these species should be an index of healthy seafood. When nematodes were exposed to only trace metals, their response looks special with a distinction of a different list of indicative species; the high presence of seven species (T. mirabilis, P. multipapillatum, Leptonemella aphanothecae, D. murmanica, Viscosia cobbi, Gammanema conicauda, and Viscosia glabra) could indicate a good quality of seafood and that of another species (Oncholaimellus mediterraneus) appeared an

  9. Assessment of potentially toxic metal contamination in the soils of a legacy mine site in Central Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Joji; Dowling, Kim; Florentine, Singarayer

    2018-02-01

    The environmental impact of toxic metal contamination from legacy mining activities, many of which had operated and were closed prior to the enforcement of robust environmental legislation, is of growing concern to modern society. We have carried out analysis of As and potentially toxic metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in the surface soil of a legacy gold mining site in Maldon, Victoria, Australia, to reveal the status of the current metal concentration. The results revealed the median concentrations of metals from highest to lowest, in the order: Mn > Zn > As > Cr > Cu > Pb > Ni > Co > Hg > Cd. The status of site was assessed directly by comparing the metal concentrations in the study area with known Australian and Victorian average top soil levels and the health investigation levels set by the National Environmental Protection Measures (NEPM) and the Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC) of the State of Western Australia. Although, median concentrations of As, Hg, Pb, Cu and Zn exceeded the average Australian and Victorian top soil concentrations, only As and Hg exceeded the ecological investigation levels (EIL) set by DEC and thus these metals are considered as risk to the human and aquatic ecosystems health due to their increase in concentration and toxicity. In an environment of climate fluctuation with increased storm events and forest fires may mobilize these toxic metals contaminants, pose a real threat to the environment and the community. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessment of toxic metal contamination using a regional lithogenic geochemical background, Pampean area river basin, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Liliana Norma; Rendina, Alicia Elena; Orgeira, Maria Julia

    2018-06-15

    Contamination assessment in riverbed sediments depends on the accurate determination of the background values. The aim of this study is to assess the degree of contamination and to evaluate the most adequate background for the determination of anthropogenic contamination in Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn in bed sediments of the Pampean area river basin (Matanza-Riachuelo River and tributary streams), Argentina. The geo-accumulation index (Igeo) values were calculated using selected lithogenic backgrounds (loess, loessoid sediments and paleosoils), the metal concentrations in the residual fraction (F4) in riverbed sediments and a global average shale often applied in the estimation of toxic metal Igeo. The IgeoF4, IgeoLZB and most of the others Igeos, indicated that in land areas used mainly for agriculture and cattle grazing, the superficial sediments were uncontaminated with Cd, Cr, Cu and Zn, and slightly contaminated with Ni and Pb. Conversely, in those areas dedicated to urban and industrial use, the metal contamination was greater. Overall, the relatively significant anthropogenic contamination of Cr > Pb ≥ Cu > Zn > Ni > Cd in the Riachuelo River area was associated with metallurgic activities, tanning and industrial waste. The comparative analysis of different values suggested that Buenos Aires' "pristine" loess could be recommended to evaluate the Igeo index of riverbed sediments in the Pampean area. To enhance the use of the selected background, the normalized enrichment factor using Al. In this study case, the Igeo and the EF using LZB background display the same trend, showing the greatest degree of contamination, as would be expected, in Riachuelo samples (RIA 1 and RIA 2) located in the urban/industrial area. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of climate change on the toxicity of soils polluted by metal mine wastes to Enchytraeus crypticus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez Alcaraz, M.N.; Tsitsiou, E.; Wieldraaijer, R.; Verweij, R.A.; van Gestel, C.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to assess the effects of climate change on the toxicity of metal-polluted soils. Bioassays with Enchytraeus crypticus were performed in soils polluted by mine wastes (mine tailing, forest, and watercourse) and under different combinations of temperature (20°C and 25°C) and

  12. Stormwater filtration of toxic heavy metal ions using lignocellulosic materials selection process, fiberization, chemical modification, and mat formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    James S. Han

    1999-01-01

    Lignocellulosic materials were evaluated for their effectiveness in filtering toxic heavy metals from stormwater. Kenaf, alfalfa, juniper, and aspen fibers were used as models to evaluate the effectiveness and limitations of chemical modification and the extent of fiber degradation. Individual and mixed aqueous solutions of nickel, copper, zinc, and cadmium in various...

  13. Modified composites based on mesostructured iron oxyhydroxide and synthetic minerals: a potential material for the treatment of various toxic heavy metals and its toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seung-Gun; Ryu, Jae-Chun; Song, Mi-Kyung; An, Byungryul; Kim, Song-Bae; Lee, Sang-Hyup; Choi, Jae-Woo

    2014-02-28

    The composites of mesostructured iron oxyhydroxide and/or commercial synthetic zeolite were investigated for use in the removal of toxic heavy metals, such as cadmium, copper, lead and arsenic, from aqueous solution. Four types of adsorbents, dried alginate beads (DABs), synthetic-zeolite impregnated beads (SZIBs), meso-iron-oxyhydroxide impregnated beads (MIOIBs) and synthetic-zeolite/meso-iron-oxyhydroxide composite beads (SZMIOIBs), were prepared for heavy metal adsorption tests. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the removal efficiencies of cations and anions of heavy metals and the possibility of regenerating the adsorbents. Among these adsorbents, the MIOIBs can simultaneously remove cations and anions of heavy metals; they have high adsorption capacities for lead (60.1mgg(-1)) and arsenic (71.9mgg(-1)) compared with other adsorbents, such as DABs (158.1 and 0.0mgg(-1)), SZIB (42.9 and 0.0mgg(-1)) and SZMIOIB (54.0 and 5.9mgg(-1)) for lead and arsenic, respectively. Additionally, the removal efficiency was consistent at approximately 90%, notwithstanding repetitive regeneration. The characteristics of meso-iron-oxyhydroxide powder were confirmed by X-ray diffraction, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller and transmission electron microscopy. We also performed a comparative toxicity study that indicated that much lower concentrations of the powdered form of mesostructured iron oxyhydroxide had stronger cytotoxicity than the granular form. These results suggest that the granular form of meso iron oxyhydroxide is a more useful and safer adsorbent for heavy metal treatment than the powdered form. This research provides promising results for the application of MIOIBs as an adsorbent for various heavy metals from wastewater and sewage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Accumulation dynamics and acute toxicity of silver nanoparticles to Daphnia magna and Lumbriculus variegatus: implications for metal modeling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Farhan R; Paul, Kai B; Dybowska, Agnieszka D; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Lead, Jamie R; Stone, Vicki; Fernandes, Teresa F

    2015-04-07

    Frameworks commonly used in trace metal ecotoxicology (e.g., biotic ligand model (BLM) and tissue residue approach (TRA)) are based on the established link between uptake, accumulation and toxicity, but similar relationships remain unverified for metal-containing nanoparticles (NPs). The present study aimed to (i) characterize the bioaccumulation dynamics of PVP-, PEG-, and citrate-AgNPs, in comparison to dissolved Ag, in Daphnia magna and Lumbriculus variegatus; and (ii) investigate whether parameters of bioavailability and accumulation predict acute toxicity. In both species, uptake rate constants for AgNPs were ∼ 2-10 times less than for dissolved Ag and showed significant rank order concordance with acute toxicity. Ag elimination by L. variegatus fitted a 1-compartment loss model, whereas elimination in D. magna was biphasic. The latter showed consistency with studies that reported daphnids ingesting NPs, whereas L. variegatus biodynamic parameters indicated that uptake and efflux were primarily determined by the bioavailability of dissolved Ag released by the AgNPs. Thus, principles of BLM and TRA frameworks are confounded by the feeding behavior of D. magna where the ingestion of AgNPs perturbs the relationship between tissue concentrations and acute toxicity, but such approaches are applicable when accumulation and acute toxicity are linked to dissolved concentrations. The uptake rate constant, as a parameter of bioavailability inclusive of all available pathways, could be a successful predictor of acute toxicity.

  15. A suite of recombinant luminescent bacterial strains for the quantification of bioavailable heavy metals and toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivask, Angela; Rõlova, Taisia; Kahru, Anne

    2009-05-08

    Recombinant whole-cell sensors have already proven useful in the assessment of the bioavailability of environmental pollutants like heavy metals and organic compounds. In this work 19 recombinant bacterial strains representing various Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens) bacteria were constructed to express the luminescence encoding genes luxCDABE (from Photorhabdus luminescens) as a response to bioavailable heavy metals ("lights-on" metal sensors containing metal-response elements, 13 strains) or in a constitutive manner ("lights-off" constructs, 6 strains). The bioluminescence of all 13 "lights-on" metal sensor strains was expressed as a function of the sub-toxic metal concentrations enabling the quantitative determination of metals bioavailable for these strains. Five sensor strains, constructed for detecting copper and mercury, proved to be target metal specific, whereas eight other sensor strains were simultaneously induced by Cd2+, Hg2+, Zn2+and Pb2+. The lowest limits of determination of the "lights-on" sensor strains for the metals tested in this study were (microg l-1): 0.002 of CH3HgCl, 0.03 of HgCl2, 1.8 of CdCl2, 33 of Pb(NO3)2, 1626 of ZnSO4, 24 of CuSO4 and 340 of AgNO3. In general, the sensitivity of the "lights-on" sensor strains was mostly dependent on the metal-response element used while the selection of host bacterium played a relatively minor role. In contrast, toxicity of metals to the "lights-off" strains was only dependent on the bacterial host so that Gram-positive strains were remarkably more sensitive than Gram-negative ones. The constructed battery of 19 recombinant luminescent bacterial strains exhibits several novel aspects as it contains i) metal sensor strains with similar metal-response elements in different host bacteria; ii) metal sensor strains with metal-response elements in different copies and iii) a "lights-off" construct (control) for every

  16. A suite of recombinant luminescent bacterial strains for the quantification of bioavailable heavy metals and toxicity testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahru Anne

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant whole-cell sensors have already proven useful in the assessment of the bioavailability of environmental pollutants like heavy metals and organic compounds. In this work 19 recombinant bacterial strains representing various Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria were constructed to express the luminescence encoding genes luxCDABE (from Photorhabdus luminescens as a response to bioavailable heavy metals ("lights-on" metal sensors containing metal-response elements, 13 strains or in a constitutive manner ("lights-off" constructs, 6 strains. Results The bioluminescence of all 13 "lights-on" metal sensor strains was expressed as a function of the sub-toxic metal concentrations enabling the quantitative determination of metals bioavailable for these strains. Five sensor strains, constructed for detecting copper and mercury, proved to be target metal specific, whereas eight other sensor strains were simultaneously induced by Cd2+, Hg2+, Zn2+and Pb2+. The lowest limits of determination of the "lights-on" sensor strains for the metals tested in this study were (μg l-1: 0.002 of CH3HgCl, 0.03 of HgCl2, 1.8 of CdCl2, 33 of Pb(NO32, 1626 of ZnSO4, 24 of CuSO4 and 340 of AgNO3. In general, the sensitivity of the "lights-on" sensor strains was mostly dependent on the metal-response element used while the selection of host bacterium played a relatively minor role. In contrast, toxicity of metals to the "lights-off" strains was only dependent on the bacterial host so that Gram-positive strains were remarkably more sensitive than Gram-negative ones. Conclusion The constructed battery of 19 recombinant luminescent bacterial strains exhibits several novel aspects as it contains i metal sensor strains with similar metal-response elements in different host bacteria; ii metal sensor strains with metal-response elements in different copies and iii

  17. Human health and ecological toxicity potentials due to heavy metal content in waste electronic devices with flat panel displays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Seong-Rin; Schoenung, Julie M.

    2010-01-01

    Display devices such as cathode-ray tube (CRT) televisions and computer monitors are known to contain toxic substances and have consequently been banned from disposal in landfills in the State of California and elsewhere. New types of flat panel display (FPD) devices, millions of which are now purchased each year, also contain toxic substances, but have not previously been systematically studied and compared to assess the potential impact that could result from their ultimate disposal. In the current work, the focus is on the evaluation of end-of-life toxicity potential from the heavy metal content in select FPD devices with the intent to inform material selection and design-for-environment (DfE) decisions. Specifically, the metals antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, silver, vanadium, and zinc in plasma TVs, LCD (liquid crystal display) TVs, LCD computer monitors and laptop computers are considered. The human health and ecotoxicity potentials are evaluated through a life cycle assessment perspective by combining data on the respective heavy metal contents, the characterization factors in the U.S. EPA Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other environmental Impacts (TRACI), and a pathway and impact model. Principal contributors to the toxicity potentials are lead, arsenic, copper, and mercury. Although the heavy metal content in newer flat panel display devices creates less human health toxicity potential than that in CRTs, for ecological toxicity, the new devices are worse, especially because of the mercury in LCD TVs and the copper in plasma TVs.

  18. Human health and ecological toxicity potentials due to heavy metal content in waste electronic devices with flat panel displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seong-Rin; Schoenung, Julie M

    2010-05-15

    Display devices such as cathode-ray tube (CRT) televisions and computer monitors are known to contain toxic substances and have consequently been banned from disposal in landfills in the State of California and elsewhere. New types of flat panel display (FPD) devices, millions of which are now purchased each year, also contain toxic substances, but have not previously been systematically studied and compared to assess the potential impact that could result from their ultimate disposal. In the current work, the focus is on the evaluation of end-of-life toxicity potential from the heavy metal content in select FPD devices with the intent to inform material selection and design-for-environment (DfE) decisions. Specifically, the metals antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, silver, vanadium, and zinc in plasma TVs, LCD (liquid crystal display) TVs, LCD computer monitors and laptop computers are considered. The human health and ecotoxicity potentials are evaluated through a life cycle assessment perspective by combining data on the respective heavy metal contents, the characterization factors in the U.S. EPA Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other environmental Impacts (TRACI), and a pathway and impact model. Principal contributors to the toxicity potentials are lead, arsenic, copper, and mercury. Although the heavy metal content in newer flat panel display devices creates less human health toxicity potential than that in CRTs, for ecological toxicity, the new devices are worse, especially because of the mercury in LCD TVs and the copper in plasma TVs. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Pollution and health risk of potentially toxic metals in urban road dust in Nanjing, a mega-city of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Enfeng; Yan, Ting; Birch, Gavin; Zhu, Yuxin

    2014-01-01

    Spatial variations in concentrations of a suite of potentially toxic metals (Ba, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) and Ca in road dusts (n = 99) from urban trunk roads (TR) in Nanjing, a mega-city in China, were established. Metal pollution levels, sources and human health risk (non-carcinogenic) were studied. In contrast to previous studies, we labeled the indicative metals relating to non-exhaust traffic emissions by comparing metal pollution between crossroad and park road dusts, and then anthropogenic sources of metals in TR dusts were assessed combining their spatial pollution patterns, principal component analysis and Pb isotopic compositions. Results showed that the metals were enriched in TR dusts compared to background soil concentrations with mean enrichment factors (EFs) of 2.2–23, indicating considerable anthropogenic influence. The degrees of metal pollution ranged from minimal to extremely high and ranked by Ca > Cu > Pb ≈ Zn > Cr ≈ Fe > Ni ≈ Ba > Mn on average. Pollution of Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn in TR dusts resulted primarily from industrial emissions (e.g., coal combustion and smelting) and high pollution levels were found close to suburb industrial complexes, whereas pollution of Ba and Ca was mainly related to construction/demolition sources and was generally distributed homogeneously. The relatively minor contribution of non-exhaust traffic emissions to metal pollution in TR dusts was considered to be due to overwhelming industrial and construction/demolition contributions, as well as to the dilution effect of natural soil particles. Ingestion appears to be the major route of exposure for road dust for both adults and children, followed by dermal contact. The non-carcinogenic health risk resulting from exposure to the potentially toxic metals in TR dusts was within the safe level based on the Hazard Index (HI), except in pollution hotspots where exposure to Pb, Cr, and Cu may be hazardous to children. - Highlights: • Pollution and

  20. Toxic Aluminium and Heavy Metals in Groundwater of Middle Russia: Health Risk Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Synzynys

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Two approaches are distinguished in modern ecological monitoring. The first one is physicochemical analysis of environmental objects with respect to maximum allowable concentrations (MACs of chemical substances, which is performed by standards methods in accordance with state regulations. The second approach (biological monitoring is based on the methodology of biotesting and bio indication. The task of this work is to create biotests for estimation of Al and other metals toxicity in ground water and to compare these results with physicochemical analysis dates. Risk assessment for heavy metals contaminated groundwater was also performed. Risk assessment was performed accordingly EPA US recommendation and gave results about 90 per 100000 citizens for Al and 402 per 100000 for mixture of different heavy metals. For comparison: risk for earth background radiation for Middle Russia is (Individual dose 1 millisivert per year consist 5 per 100000 people. It was shown that groundwater consist HCO3- ions (360 mg/l, sometimes Al compounds 0.21-0.65 mg/l (MAC for Al is 0.5 mg/l for Russia. Other groundwater contain Hg – 0.004 mg/l (MAC – 0.0005 mg/l; Cr – 0.072 mg/l (MAC – 0.05 mg/l; As – less than 0.03 mg/l (MAC – 0.05 mg/l. We developed plant biotest for estimation of groundwater quality with barley roots, tradescatia and others. Some biotests parameters correlate with HCO3-, Cl-, SO42- and metal ions content positively, for another biotest this correlation is strongly negative. The quality of groundwater near Obninsk and in Kaluga Region is very different but hasn’t been changed since the year 1998.

  1. Prediction of mono-, bi-, and trivalent metal cation relative toxicity to the seaweed Gracilaria domingensis (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta) in synthetic seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Luiz Fernando; Zambotti-Villela, Leonardo; Yokoya, Nair Sumie; Bastos, Erick Leite; Stevani, Cassius Vinicius; Colepicolo, Pio

    2013-11-01

    The present study reports a 48-h aquatic metal-toxicity assay based on daily growth rates of the red seaweed Gracilaria domingensis (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta) in synthetic seawater. The median inhibitory concentration (IC50) for each metal cation was experimentally determined, and the ratios of free ions (aqueous complex) were calculated by software minimization of the total equilibrium activity (MINTEQA2) to determine the free median inhibitory concentration (IC50F). A model for predicting the toxicity of 14 metal cations was developed using the generic function approximation algorithm (GFA) with log IC50F values as the dependent variables and the following properties as independent variables: ionic radius (r), atomic number (AN), electronegativity (Xm ), covalent index (Xm (2) r), first hydrolysis constant (|log KOH |), softness index (σp ), ion charge (Z), ionization potential (ΔIP), electrochemical potential (ΔEo ), atomic number divided by ionization potential (AN/ΔIP), and the cation polarizing power for Z(2) /r and Z/AR. The 3-term independent variables were predicted as the best-fit model (log IC50F: -23.64 + 5.59 Z/AR + 0.99 |log KOH | + 37.05 σp ; adjusted r(2) : 0.88; predicted r(2) : 0.68; Friedman lack-of-fit score: 1.6). This mathematical expression can be used to predict metal-biomolecule interactions, as well as the toxicity of mono-, bi-, and trivalent metal cations, which have not been experimentally tested in seaweed to date. Quantitative ion-character relationships allowed the authors to infer that the mechanism of toxicity might involve an interaction between metals and functional groups of biological species containing sulfur or oxygen. © 2013 SETAC.

  2. Effect of Pre-Gamma Irradiation Induction of Metallothionein on potentially Radiation-Induced Toxic Heavy Metals Ions In Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shamy, El.

    2004-01-01

    Metallothionein, which is a cystein-rich metal binding protein, can act as free radical scavenger and involved in resistance to heavy metal toxicity. The induction of synthesis has been shown to protect organs from the toxic effect of radiation. This study aimed to stud the effects of pre-irradiation induction of by heavy metal (Zinc sulfate) on potentially gamma radiation-induced toxic heavy metals ions in rate liver and kidney tissues. Forty eight albino rats were included in this study. They were divided into eight groups each of six animals. Two control groups injected with saline. Two Zinc sulfate-treated groups injected with zinc sulfate, two Irradiated groups exposed to a single dose level (7 Gy) of whole body gamma irradiation and two combined zinc sulfate and irradiation groups injected with zinc sulfate and exposed to whole body gamma irradiation (at dose 7 Gy). Animals of all groups were sacrificed 24 and 48 hours after last either zinc sulfate dose or irradiation. Samples of liver and kidney's tissues were subjected to the following investigations: Estimation of tissue heavy Metals (Zinc, Iron and Copper), and tissue (MT). After irradiation, liver and kidney MT were increased approximately 10-fold and 2-fold respectively after irradiation. Accumulation of zinc and iron in both liver and kidney tissues were detected, while accumulation of copper only in the liver tissues. The pre-irradiation treatment with zinc sulfate (Zn SO4) resulted in highly significant decrease in zinc, iron, and copper levels in both liver and kidney tissues in comparison with irradiation groups. Conclusion, it can be supposed that pre-irradiation injection of ZnSO 4 exerted protective effect against the potentially radiation-induced toxic heavy metals ions through MT induction

  3. Potential environmental impacts of light-emitting diodes (LEDs): metallic resources, toxicity, and hazardous waste classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seong-Rin; Kang, Daniel; Ogunseitan, Oladele A; Schoenung, Julie M

    2011-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are advertised as environmentally friendly because they are energy efficient and mercury-free. This study aimed to determine if LEDs engender other forms of environmental and human health impacts, and to characterize variation across different LEDs based on color and intensity. The objectives are as follows: (i) to use standardized leachability tests to examine whether LEDs are to be categorized as hazardous waste under existing United States federal and California state regulations; and (ii) to use material life cycle impact and hazard assessment methods to evaluate resource depletion and toxicity potentials of LEDs based on their metallic constituents. According to federal standards, LEDs are not hazardous except for low-intensity red LEDs, which leached Pb at levels exceeding regulatory limits (186 mg/L; regulatory limit: 5). However, according to California regulations, excessive levels of copper (up to 3892 mg/kg; limit: 2500), Pb (up to 8103 mg/kg; limit: 1000), nickel (up to 4797 mg/kg; limit: 2000), or silver (up to 721 mg/kg; limit: 500) render all except low-intensity yellow LEDs hazardous. The environmental burden associated with resource depletion potentials derives primarily from gold and silver, whereas the burden from toxicity potentials is associated primarily with arsenic, copper, nickel, lead, iron, and silver. Establishing benchmark levels of these substances can help manufacturers implement design for environment through informed materials substitution, can motivate recyclers and waste management teams to recognize resource value and occupational hazards, and can inform policymakers who establish waste management policies for LEDs.

  4. Modified composites based on mesostructured iron oxyhydroxide and synthetic minerals: A potential material for the treatment of various toxic heavy metals and its toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Seung-Gun [Center for Water Resource Cycle Research, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jae-Chun; Song, Mi-Kyung [Center for Integrated Risk Research, Cellular and Molecular Toxicology Laboratory, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); An, Byungryul [Center for Water Resource Cycle Research, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Song-Bae [Environmental Functional Materials and Biocolloids Laboratory, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang-Hyup [Center for Water Resource Cycle Research, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of Convergence Green Technology and Policy, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jae-Woo, E-mail: plead36@kist.re.kr [Center for Water Resource Cycle Research, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Meso-iron-oxyhydroxide was found to be efficient for anion heavy metal adsorption. • The composite bead can simultaneously remove the cations and anions of heavy metals. • Powdered form had stronger cytotoxicity than did the granular form. • Adsorbent recovery is facilitated by granulation process of powder-type. - Abstract: The composites of mesostructured iron oxyhydroxide and/or commercial synthetic zeolite were investigated for use in the removal of toxic heavy metals, such as cadmium, copper, lead and arsenic, from aqueous solution. Four types of adsorbents, dried alginate beads (DABs), synthetic-zeolite impregnated beads (SZIBs), meso-iron-oxyhydroxide impregnated beads (MIOIBs) and synthetic-zeolite/meso-iron-oxyhydroxide composite beads (SZMIOIBs), were prepared for heavy metal adsorption tests. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the removal efficiencies of cations and anions of heavy metals and the possibility of regenerating the adsorbents. Among these adsorbents, the MIOIBs can simultaneously remove cations and anions of heavy metals; they have high adsorption capacities for lead (60.1 mg g{sup −1}) and arsenic (71.9 mg g{sup −1}) compared with other adsorbents, such as DABs (158.1 and 0.0 mg g{sup −1}), SZIB (42.9 and 0.0 mg g{sup −1}) and SZMIOIB (54.0 and 5.9 mg g{sup −1}) for lead and arsenic, respectively. Additionally, the removal efficiency was consistent at approximately 90%, notwithstanding repetitive regeneration. The characteristics of meso-iron-oxyhydroxide powder were confirmed by X-ray diffraction, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller and transmission electron microscopy. We also performed a comparative toxicity study that indicated that much lower concentrations of the powdered form of mesostructured iron oxyhydroxide had stronger cytotoxicity than the granular form. These results suggest that the granular form of meso iron oxyhydroxide is a more useful and safer adsorbent for

  5. Assessment of metal toxicity and bioavailability in metallophyte leaf litters and metalliferous soils using Eisenia fetida in a microcosm study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirola, Ramkrishna; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Venkateswarlu, Kadiyala; Aryal, Rupak; Correll, Ray; Naidu, Ravi

    2016-07-01

    The leaf litters of tree species, Acacia pycnantha (Ap) and Eucalyptus camaldulensis (Ec), predominantly growing at an abandoned copper (Cu) mine and mine soils including controls, were assessed for determining the metal toxicity and bioavailability using earthworm species Eisenia fetida, in a microcosm. Significant reduction in body weight as well as mortality were observed when the worms were introduced into mine soil or its combination with mine Ap litter. Virtually, there were no juveniles when the worms were fed on substratum that contained mine soil or mine leaf litter. The extent of bioaccumulation was dependent on water-soluble fraction of a metal in soil. The accumulation of cadmium, lead and copper in worm tissue was significantly more in treatments that received mine soil with or without mine leaf litter. However, the tissue concentration of zinc did not differ much in earthworms irrespective of its exposure to control or contaminated samples. Mine leaf litter from Ec, a known Cu hyperaccumulator, was more hospitable to earthworm survival and juvenile than that of Ap litter. Validation of the data on bioaccumulation of metals indicated that the mine leaf litter significantly contributed to metal bioavailability. However, it was primarily the metal concentration in mine soil that was responsible for earthworm toxicity and bioavailability. Our data also indicate that detrivores like earthworm is greatly responsible for heavy metal transfer from mines into the ecosystem. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Correlation among phenolic, toxic metals and antioxidant activity of the extracts of plant species from Southeast Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.B. Arsic

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The content of metals, total phenols, flavonoids and antioxidant activities of different plant extracts, used in Serbian traditional medicine, were determined. Phenol content determined using UV-Vis spectrophotometer measurements at 765 nm in the tested plant extracts obtained by standard extraction procedure decreases in the order Origanum vulgare L. Delphinum consolida L. Cichorium intybus L. Calendula officinalis L. The tested extracts, examined by DPPH (di(phenyl-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyliminoazanium method, showed high antioxidant activity that correlates significantly with the content of phenols and flavonoids. The contents of metals (Zn,Fe, Cu, Mn, Cd, Cr, Pb were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometer. Toxic metals, such as Cd, Cr, Pb, were not detected in the investigated plants. Content of other metals in plants and their extracts were low, except content of Fe. We examined the correlation of metals (Zn, Fe, Cu, Mn and phenolic compounds content in the extracts using PCA (principal component analysis. The investigated plants from Southeastern Serbia are suitable for the preparation of teas and herbal extracts, due to the low content of toxic metals (Zn, Fe, Cu, Mn, the high content of phenolic compounds and high antioxidant activity.

  7. Determination of toxic metals, trace and essentials, and macronutrients in Sarpa salpa and Chelon labrosus: risk assessment for the consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Aridani; Gutiérrez, Angel J; Lozano, Gonzalo; González-Weller, Dailos; Rubio, Carmen; Caballero, José M; Hardisson, Arturo; Revert, Consuelo

    2017-04-01

    Due to increased environmental pollution, monitoring of contaminants in the environment and marine organisms is a fundamental tool for assessing the existence of risk from their consumption to human health. The levels of toxic heavy metals (Cd, Pb, and Al), trace and essential metals (B, Ba, Co, Cu, Cr, Fe, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, Sr, V, and Zn), and macronutrients (Ca, K, Mg, Na) in two species of fish for human consumption were quantified in the present study. Eighty samples of muscle tissue and 80 samples of liver tissue belonging to two species of Osteichthyes fish; Sarpa salpa and Chelon labrosus were analyzed. The studied specimens were caught on the northern coast of Gran Canaria (Canary Islands) with fishing rods. As they caught from the shore, they are suitable samples for assessing the toxic levels of representative species caught by local amateur fishermen. The results show that both species are fit for human consumption since they have toxic levels of heavy metals (Cd, Pb, and Al) which are below the maximum established levels; however, the toxic levels of the liver samples are several orders of magnitude higher than the muscle samples, so we discourage their regular consumption. The risk assessment indicated that the two species of fish are safe for the average consumer; however, if the livers of these species are consumed, there could be risks because they exceed the PTWI for Pb and the TWI for Cd.

  8. Health risk implications of potentially toxic metals in street dust and surface soil of Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Sharareh; Moore, Farid; Keshavarzi, Behnam; Hale, Beverley A

    2017-02-01

    In this study a total of 30 street dusts and 10 surface soils were collected in the central district of Tehran and analyzed for major potentially toxic metals. Street dust was found to be greatly enriched in Sb, Pb, Cu and Zn and moderately enriched in Cr, Mn, Mo and Ni. Contamination of Cu, Sb, Pb and Zn was clearly related to anthropogenic sources such as brake wear, tire dust, road abrasion and fossil fuel combustion. Spatial distribution of pollution load index in street dust suggested that industries located south-west of the city intensify street dust pollution. Microscopic studies revealed six dominant group of morphological structures in calculation of the exposurethe street dusts and surface soils, with respect to different geogenic and anthropogenic sources. The BCR (the European Community Bureau of Reference) sequential extraction results showed that Sb, Ni, Mo, As and Cr bonded to silicates and sulfide minerals were highly resistant to dissolution. In contrast, Zn, Cd, and Mn were mostly associated with the exchangeable phase and thus would be easily mobilized in the environment. Cu was the most abundant metal in the reducible fraction, indicating its adsorption to iron and manganese oxy-hydroxides. Pb was equally extracted from exchangeable and reducible fractions. Anthropogenic sources related to traffic apparently play a small role in Cr, Ni and Mo contamination and dispersed them as bioavailable forms but with reduced mobility and bioavailablity due to high potential of complexation and adsorption to organic matter and iron and manganese oxy-hydroxides. Calculated Hazard Index (HI) suggests ingestion as the most important pathway for the majority of PTMs in children and dermal contact as the main exposure route for Cr, Cd and Sb for adults. The HIs and fractionation pattern of elements revealed Pb as the sole element that bears potential health risk in street dust and surface soil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Studies of toxic metals removal in industrial wastewater after electron-beam treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Marcia Almeida

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Oxidation Process, using electron-beam, have been studied by scientific community due to its capacity to mineralize the toxic organic compound from highly reactive radical's formation. The electron-beam treatment process has been adopted by several countries for organic compounds removal and to effluents and sewers biological degradation. In this work, studies of metals removal in the simulated aqueous solutions and in the actual industrial effluents were carried out, using electron-beam treatment. The effluents samples were collected at ETE/SABESP (Governmental Wastewater Treatment Plant) in Suzano, SP city. The sampling was outlined at three distinctive sites: Industrial Receiver Unit, Medium Bar, and Final Effluent. The effluents samples were irradiated using different irradiation doses (20, 50, 100, 200 and 500 kGy). The removal behavior of metals Ca, CI, S, P, K, Al, Fe, As, Ni, Cr, Zn, Si, Co, Mn, As, Se, Cd, Hg and Pb was verified. The elements determination was accomplished with the x-ray fluorescence (WD-XRFS) technique using Fundamental Parameters method and thin film samples. The elements Fe, Zn, Cr and Co presented a removal > 99% to 200 kGy of irradiation dose in industrial effluent. At the same dose, P, Al and Si presented a removal of 81.8%, 97.6% and 98.7%, respectively. Ca and S were removed more than 80% at 20 kGy and Na, CI and K did not presented any degree of removal. As, Se, Cd, Hg and Pb removal was studied in the simulated aqueous solutions and industrial effluents with scavengers addition (EDTA and HCOONa). The elements As and Hg presented a removal of 92% and 99%, respectively, with HCOONa, at 500 kGy irradiation dose. The Se presented a 96.5% removal at same irradiation dose without scavengers addition. The removal of Cd and Pb did not give a significant removal, once all of the assay were carried out in the oxidant medium. (author)

  10. Acute and subchronic toxicity of metal complex azo acid dye and anionic surfactant oil on fish Oreochromis niloticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amwele, Hilma Rantilla; Papirom, Pittaya; Chukanhom, Kanit; Beamish, Fredrick Henry William; Petkam, Rakpong

    2015-01-01

    The acute toxicity study of metal complex dark green azo acid dye, anionic surfactant oil and their mixture determined the 96 hr LC50, and fish behaviours. Subchronic toxicity determined haematology parameters and concentrations of copper and chromium in blood. The 96 hr LC50 was determined by probit analysis and subchronic toxicity was conducted in 90 days. No mortalities were observed in control and anionic surfactant oil treatments. The 96 hr LC50 value of mixture was 26.7 mg I(-1) (95% CL = 20.7 - 46.8) and that of metal complex dark green azo acid dye was not met as the percentage of dead was below 50% of tested organisms. In a treatment of anionic surfactant oil and that of mixture observed behaviours were respiration response, uncoordinated movement, loss of equilibrium, erratic posture and loss of responsiveness. Subchronic toxicity indicated fluctuations in number of erythrocytes, leukocytes and thrombocytes in all chemical treatments. Erythrocyte morphology such as anisocytosis, erythrocytes hypertrophy, karyolysis, cytoplasm vacuolation, ghost cell were observed in fish blood in all chemical treatments. An inverse relation was observed between total copper and chromium concentration in blood. However, the toxicity effect was chemical dose dependent and length of exposure.

  11. Effects of Cr III and Pb on the bioaccumulation and toxicity of Cd in tropical periphyton communities: Implications of pulsed metal exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bere, Taurai; Chia, Mathias Ahii; Tundisi, José Galizia

    2012-01-01

    Metal exposure pattern, timing, frequency, duration, recovery period, metal type and interactions, has obscured effects on periphyton communities in lotic systems. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of intermittent exposures of Cr III and Pb on Cd toxicity and bioaccumulation in tropical periphyton communities. Natural periphyton communities were transferred to artificial stream chambers and exposed to metal mixtures at different pulse timing, duration, frequency and recovery periods. Chlorophyll a, dry mass and metal accumulation kinetics were recorded. Cr and Pb decrease the toxic effects of Cd on periphyton communities. Periphyton has high Cd, Cr and Pb accumulation capacity. Cr and Pb reduced the levels of Cd sequestrated by periphyton communities. The closer the frequency and duration of the pulse is to a continuous exposure, the greater the effects of the contaminant on periphyton growth and metal bioaccumulation. Light increased toxic and accumulative effects of metals on the periphyton community. - Highlights: ► We investigated toxicity effects of pulsed metal exposures on bioaccumulation and toxicity in periphyton. ► High frequency of short duration pulses has effects equal to long duration exposures. ► Important role of light in modulating metal toxicity on periphyton demonstrated. ► Factors other than magnitude and duration must be considered in water quality criteria. ► Accurate prediction of metal effects on biofilms requires data on effluent variability. - The study highlights the importance of pulse timing, frequency, duration, recovery period and chemical type on aquatic life.

  12. An in vitro cytotoxic approach to assess the toxicity of heavy metals and their binary mixtures on hippocampal HT-22 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karri, Venkatanaidu; Kumar, Vikas; Ramos, David; Oliveira, Eliandre; Schuhmacher, Marta

    2018-01-05

    Humans are exposed to a cocktail of heavy metal toxicants in the environment. Though heavy metals are deleterious, there is a paucity of information on the toxicity of mixtures. In this study, four common neurotoxicity heavy metals lead (Pb) cadmium (Cd), arsenic (As), and methylmercury (MeHg) were exposed individually and as mixtures to HT-22 cell line for 8days. The study established that low dose exposures induced toxicity to the HT-22 cell line during 8days. The results indicates potency dependent response, the toxicity of single metals on the HT-22 cells; MeHg > As > Cd > Pb. The cytotoxicity data of single metals were used to determine the mixtures interaction profile by using the dose additivity and effect additivity method. Metal mixtures showed higher toxicities compared to individual metals. Synergistic, antagonistic or additive effects of the toxicity were observed in different mixtures in low dose exposure. The interactive responses of mixtures depend on the co-exposure metal and their respective concentration. We concluded that the combined effects should be considered in the risk assessment of heavy metal co-exposure and potency. In future, comprehensive mechanistic based investigations needed for understanding the real interactive mixtures effects at molecular level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A Tier Two approach to determining site specific toxicity of a metal and hydrocarbon contaminated site to terrestrial organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M. A.; Ramamoorthy, S.; Maki, S. [MAXXAM Analytics, Inc., Chemex Labs., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    1998-12-31

    Various areas of a site that showed high levels of metal and hydrocarbon contamination were sampled at various depths to get an overall picture of the extent and depth of contamination. Sites showing extreme to slight toxicity to the Microtox{sup T}M analysis were subjected to a battery of terrestrial tests. Results showed that earthworms showed hardly any toxic response at all. In general, plant species were far less sensitive to the kind of contamination found at these sites than other organisms. These analyses helped in pinpointing contamination hotspots, provided an alternative assessment of the site and suggested criteria for remediation.

  14. Biogeochemical processes controlling the mobility of major ions and trace metals in aquitard sediments beneath an oil sand tailing pond: Laboratory studies and reactive transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, A. A.; Haque, S. E.; Mayer, K. U.; Ulrich, A. C.

    2013-08-01

    Increased production and expansion of the oil sand industry in Alberta are of great benefit to the economy, but they carry major environmental challenges. The volume of fluid fine tailings requiring storage is 840 × 106 m3 and growing, making it imperative that we better understand the fate and transport of oil sand process-affected water (OSPW) seepage from these facilities. Accordingly, the current study seeks to characterize both a) the potential for major ion and trace element release, and b) the principal biogeochemical processes involved, as tailing pond OSPW infiltrates into, and interacts with, underlying glacial till sediments prior to reaching down gradient aquifers or surface waters. Objectives were addressed through a series of aqueous and solid phase experiments, including radial diffusion cells, an isotope analysis, X-ray diffraction, and sequential extractions. The diffusion cells were also simulated in a reactive transport framework to elucidate key reaction processes. The experiments indicate that the ingress and interaction of OSPW with the glacial till sediment-pore water system will result in: a mitigation of ingressing Na (retardation), displacement and then limited precipitation of exchangeable Ca and Mg (as carbonates), sulfate reduction and subsequent precipitation of the produced sulfides, as well as biodegradation of organic carbon. High concentrations of ingressing Cl (~ 375 mg L- 1) and Na (~ 575 mg L- 1) (even though the latter is delayed, or retarded) are expected to migrate through the till and into the underlying sand channel. Trace element mobility was influenced by ion exchange, oxidation-reduction, and mineral phase reactions including reductive dissolution of metal oxyhydroxides — in accordance with previous observations within sandy aquifer settings. Furthermore, although several trace elements showed the potential for release (Al, B, Ba, Cd, Mn, Pb, Si, Sr), large-scale mobilization is not supported. Thus, the present

  15. Brains of Native and Alien Mesocarnivores in Biomonitoring of Toxic Metals in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisinska, Elzbieta; Lanocha-Arendarczyk, Natalia; Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta; Budis, Halina; Podlasinska, Joanna; Popiolek, Marcin; Pirog, Agnieszka; Jedrzejewska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) are involved in mammalian brain damage. However, little is known about Pb and Cd brain levels in wildlife that reflect the geochemical background. The aims of the study include the estimation of Hg, Pb and Cd concentrations, and the determination of relationships between these elements in the brains of 94 mesocarnivores. Road-killed or hunted animals were obtained from north-western Poland near the Polish-German border. The investigation covered the native Eurasian otter Lutra lutra, badger Meles meles, pine marten Martes martes, beech marten M. foina, European polecat Mustela putorius, red fox Vulpes vulpes, and alien species: feral and ranch American mink Neovison vison, raccoon Procyon lotor and raccoon dog Nyctereutes procyonoides. Depending on the diet and environmental pollution, the carnivore brains accumulated toxic metals in varying amounts. The highest median Hg levels (in mg/kg dry weight, dw) were found in the piscivorous Eurasian otter and feral mink (2.44 and 3.96), Pb in the omnivorous raccoon (0.47), while Cd in minks (~0.06). We indicated that Pb-based ammunition is a significant source of the element in scavengers from hunting area, and we also found a significant correlation between Pb and Cd levels in the fox brain. Finally, this study is the first to suggest background levels for brain Pb and Cd in mesocarnivores (<0.50 and <0.04 mg/kg dw, respectively).

  16. Brains of Native and Alien Mesocarnivores in Biomonitoring of Toxic Metals in Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzbieta Kalisinska

    Full Text Available Mercury (Hg, lead (Pb and cadmium (Cd are involved in mammalian brain damage. However, little is known about Pb and Cd brain levels in wildlife that reflect the geochemical background. The aims of the study include the estimation of Hg, Pb and Cd concentrations, and the determination of relationships between these elements in the brains of 94 mesocarnivores. Road-killed or hunted animals were obtained from north-western Poland near the Polish-German border. The investigation covered the native Eurasian otter Lutra lutra, badger Meles meles, pine marten Martes martes, beech marten M. foina, European polecat Mustela putorius, red fox Vulpes vulpes, and alien species: feral and ranch American mink Neovison vison, raccoon Procyon lotor and raccoon dog Nyctereutes procyonoides. Depending on the diet and environmental pollution, the carnivore brains accumulated toxic metals in varying amounts. The highest median Hg levels (in mg/kg dry weight, dw were found in the piscivorous Eurasian otter and feral mink (2.44 and 3.96, Pb in the omnivorous raccoon (0.47, while Cd in minks (~0.06. We indicated that Pb-based ammunition is a significant source of the element in scavengers from hunting area, and we also found a significant correlation between Pb and Cd levels in the fox brain. Finally, this study is the first to suggest background levels for brain Pb and Cd in mesocarnivores (<0.50 and <0.04 mg/kg dw, respectively.

  17. Bio-leaching of toxic metals from geothermal waste. A preliminary engineering analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobryn, D.G.; Brisson, A.L.; Lee, C.M.; Roll, S.M.

    1986-02-01

    The feasibility of a biological facility to treat geothermal sludge from a base case 50-MW double-flash geothermal power plant in the Imperial Valley, California was evaluated. The effect of sludge and nutrient concentration, agitation air bubbling and sterility on the rate of metal solubilization by the bacteria Thiobacillus thiooxidans and ferrooxidans was examined. All experiments were performed in batch flasks and monitored daily for bacterial growth. T. Thiooxidans leached 36% of the zinc in the sludge after 288 hr but leached little chromium. T. ferrooxidans removed 60% of the chromium in the sludge after 250 hr but did not leach zinc. Sludge to medium ratios of greater than 10% were toxic to the microorganisms studied. the experimental results were used to design a biological solid-waste treatment plant. The design basis used was 5 wt % sludge in the leaching vessel with a residence time of 10 days. The non-regulated waste resulting from the treatment plant could be used for land fill or construction materials. The total capital cost for the bio-leaching plant is $3.3 million with an annual operating cost of $690,000. The total cost of this plant is about 0.2 cents/kWh of electricity produced, which is essentially the same cost as hauling the solid waste to a hazardous disposal site. This cost accounts for about 5% of the cost of producing electricity from geothermal power (4 cent/kWh).

  18. The Response of Artificial Aging to Sorption Properties of Biochar for Potentially Toxic Heavy Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frišták Vladimír

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the effect of simulated conditions of artificial aging on sorption capacity of two types of biochar. These were produced by slow pyrolysis from different feedstock - beech wood chips (BC A and garden green waste residues (BC B. Cadmium served as a model for potentially toxic metals. Twenty freeze-thaw cycles were used to simulate physical aging. The determination of biochar physicochemical properties showed main changes in CEC and SA values of aged sorbents. The maximum sorption capacities of aged BC A sorbent were higher by about 26 % and aged BC B sorbent by about 20% compared to Qmax of non-aged biochar. Qmax of aged BC B peaked at 9.4 mg g-1 whereas BC A sorbed significantly less Cd. FT-IR analyses confirmed the changes in structural composition and content of functional groups on biochar surfaces. The artificial physical aging model was assessed as an efficient tool for investigation of natural weathering conditions.

  19. Investigation of Water Safety in Non-treated Drinking Water with Trace Toxic Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Suw Young; Kim, Dae Hong; Lee, Ga Eun

    2013-09-01

    The trace toxic metal copper was assayed using mercury immobilized on a carbon nanotube electrode (MCW), with a graphite counter and a reference electrode. In this study, a macro-scale convection motor was interfaced with a MCW three-electrode system, in which a handmade MCW was optimized using cyclic- and square-wave stripping voltammetry. An analytical electrolyte for tap water was used instead of an expensive acid or base ionic solution. Under these conditions, optimum parameters were 0.09 V amplitude, 40 Hz frequency, 0.01 V incremental potential, and a 60-s accumulation time. A diagnostic working curve was obtained from 50.0 to 350 μg/L. At a constant Cu(II) concentration of 10.0 μg/L, the statistical relative standard deviation was 1.78% (RSD, n = 15), the analytical accumulation time was only 60 s, and the analytical detection limit approached 4.6 μg/L (signal/noise = 3). The results were applied to nontreated drinking water. The content of the analyzed copper using 9.0 and 4.0 μg/L standards were 8.68 μg/L and 3.96 μg/L; statistical values R(2) = 0.9987 and R(2) = 0.9534, respectively. This method is applicable to biological diagnostics or food surveys.

  20. Assessment of toxic metals and phthalates in children's toys and clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korfali, Samira I; Sabra, Rayan; Jurdi, Mey; Taleb, Robin I

    2013-10-01

    Toxic metals and phthalates are introduced in the manufacturing of plastic toys and modeling clays. In Lebanon, inexpensive plastic toys and modeling clays (sold in dollar stores) are affordable and popular, and there is no legislation to monitor or regulate such toys. This study aimed to assess the quality of inexpensive plastic toys and modeling clays imported in Lebanon. Metal concentrations in toys, namely, zinc [not detectable (ND) to 3,708 μg/g], copper (ND to 140), chromium (ND to 75 μg/g), tin (ND to 39 μg/g), and cadmium (Cd) (ND to 20 μg/g), were lower than the European Union (EU) Directive limits, whereas lead (ND to 258 μg/g) in 10% of samples and antimony (Sb) (ND to 195 μg/g) in 5% of samples were greater than the EU limits. In modeling clays, most of the metals were lower than the EU Directive limits except for Cd and arsenic (As). Cd was detected in 83% of samples, with a mean level of 9.1 μg/g, which is far greater than the EU Directive limit (1.9 μg/g). The As mean level of 4.5 μg/g was greater than the EU limit (4.0 μg/g) and was detected in 9% of samples. Phthalic acid esters (PAEs) were found in 60% of children's toys and 77% of modeling clays. Phthalic acid butyl ester had the highest-level PAE encountered and was ≤59.1 % in one type of clay. However, among children's toys, di(4-octyl) ester terephthalic acid was the highest encountered phthalate at a concentration of 25.7%. The community survey indicated that 82% of households purchase their toys from inexpensive shops and that only 17% of parents were aware of the health hazard of such toys. Consequently, an intervention plan was proposed for the provision of safe toys to children.

  1. ACUTE TOXICITY OF METALS: NICKEL AND ZINC TO PARAMECIUM BURSARIA AND ITS ENDOSYMBIONTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrycja Zagata

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Paramecium bursaria is an unicellular organism, widely distributed in the freshwater environment, where heavy metals are common contaminants. The ciliates, also including Paramecium bursaria, are a very abundant group in aquatic ecosystems, what makes them effective biological indicators of water pollutants. Paramecium bursaria is the only Paramecium which has evolved a mutualistic relationship with algae and it harbors these endosymbionts in its own cytoplasm. The algae are also very effective bioindicators of some pollutants because of their ability to biosorption and bioaccumulation of heavy metals. The aim of this study was to determine the acute toxicity of two metals’ compounds: nickel chloride (NiCl2 and zinc chloride (ZnCl2 to Paramecium bursaria and its endosymbionts. The ciliates were incubated in solutions with 5x10-8 to 5x10-2g/dm3 of NiCl2 and with 5x10-8 to 5x10-2g/dm3 of ZnCl2, at the temperature of 180C, in the light/dark conditions (12L/12D. Microscopic observations of cell divisions rate, cell shape changes as well as the swimming behavior, were conducted after 24, 48, 72 and 120 hours of incubation in the tested solutions and were compared to the control sample. Microscopic observations revealed the lethal doses for both compounds, for nickel chloride 5x10-5g/dm3 and for zinc chloride 5x10-3. These observations also revealed that in lesser concentrations than the lethal one, the slowdown and characteristic movements occur after metal addition. The PEA measurements of Fv/Fm parameter were carried out within 4 days, the first one after 24 hours of incubations. The results of this investigation has given us a view of a fluorescence efficiency by revealing that both compounds solutions can have the stimulating effect on Photosystem II, because the lowest fluorescence efficiency was measured in control samples.

  2. Fractionation and potential toxic risk of metals from superficial sediment in Itaipu Lake--boundary between Brazil and Paraguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalwa, Miguel; Quináia, Sueli Pércio; Pletsch, Adelmo L; Techy, Laura; Felsner, Maria Lurdes

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate fractions of metals (labile and pseudo-total) extracted from sediment samples collected in Itaipu Lake (boundary between Brazil and Paraguay) and to assess the dynamics and mobility of these fractions by identifying the same bioavailability and ecological risk to metals in the aquatic environment. The concentrations of metal ions were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. There was a correlation between the metal ions, both in the labile and the pseudo-total, with regard to particle size. To assess metals concentrations in sediment, numerical sediment-quality guidelines were applied. The concentrations of aluminum, cadmium, iron, manganese, lead, and zinc in all sediment samples are lower than the proposed probable effects level (PEL), thus possibly indicating that there are no harmful effects from these metals. In contrast, concentrations of copper, chromium, and nickel exceeded the PEL in some samples, thus indicating that these stations are at potential risk. The level of contamination in sediments of Itaipu Lake for all metals was evaluated using contamination factor, degree of contamination, and sum-of-metals toxic unit.

  3. Testing the toxicity of metals, phenol, effluents, and receiving waters by root elongation in Lactuca sativa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Jie; Park, Jihae; Kumar Pandey, Lalit; Choi, Soyeon; Lee, Hojun; De Saeger, Jonas; Depuydt, Stephen; Han, Taejun

    2018-03-01

    Phytotoxicity tests using higher plants are among the most simple, sensitive, and cost-effective of the methods available for ecotoxicity testing. In the present study, a hydroponic-based phytotoxicity test using seeds of Lactuca sativa was used to evaluate the water quality of receiving waters and effluents near two industrial sites (Soyo and Daejon) in Korea with respect to the toxicity of 10 metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Mn, Hg, Ni, Zn) and phenol, and of the receiving waters and effluents themselves. First, the L. sativa hydroponic bioassay was used to determine whether the receiving water or effluents were toxic; then, the responsible toxicant was identified. The results obtained with the L. sativa bioassay ranked the EC 50 toxicities of the investigated metal ions and phenol as: Cd > Ni > Cu > Zn > Hg > phenol > As > Mn > Cr > Pb > Fe. We found that Zn was the toxicant principally responsible for toxicity in Daejeon effluents. The Daejeon field effluent had a higher Zn concentration than permitted by the effluent discharge criteria of the Ministry of Environment of Korea. Our conclusion on the importance of Zn toxicity was supported by the results of the L. sativa hydroponic assay, which showed that the concentration of Zn required to inhibit root elongation in L. sativa by 50% (EC 50 ) was higher in the Daejeon field effluent than that of pure Zn. More importantly, we proved that the L. sativa hydroponic test method can be applied not only as an alternative tool for determining whether a given waste is acceptable for discharge into public water bodies, but also as an alternative method for measuring the safety of aquatic environments using EC 20 values, with respect to the water pollutants investigated (i.e., Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Mn, Hg, Ni, Zn, and phenol). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Toxicity of proton-metal mixtures in the field: Linking stream macroinvertebrate species diversity to chemical speciation and bioavailability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockdale, Anthony [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Tipping, Edward, E-mail: et@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Lofts, Stephen [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Ormerod, Stephen J. [Catchment Research Group, Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3US (United Kingdom); Clements, William H. [Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Blust, Ronny [Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology Group, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2010-10-01

    Understanding metal and proton toxicity under field conditions requires consideration of the complex nature of chemicals in mixtures. Here, we demonstrate a novel method that relates streamwater concentrations of cationic metallic species and protons to a field ecological index of biodiversity. The model WHAM-F{sub TOX} postulates that cation binding sites of aquatic macroinvertebrates can be represented by the functional groups of natural organic matter (humic acid), as described by the Windermere Humic Aqueous Model (WHAM6), and supporting field evidence is presented. We define a toxicity function (F{sub TOX}) by summing the products: (amount of invertebrate-bound cation) x (cation-specific toxicity coefficient, {alpha}{sub i}). Species richness data for Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera (EPT), are then described with a lower threshold of F{sub TOX}, below which all organisms are present and toxic effects are absent, and an upper threshold above which organisms are absent. Between the thresholds the number of species declines linearly with F{sub TOX}. We parameterised the model with chemistry and EPT data for low-order streamwaters affected by acid deposition and/or abandoned mines, representing a total of 412 sites across three continents. The fitting made use of quantile regression, to take into account reduced species richness caused by (unknown) factors other than cation toxicity. Parameters were derived for the four most common or abundant cations, with values of {alpha}{sub i} following the sequence (increasing toxicity) H{sup +} < Al < Zn < Cu. For waters affected mainly by H{sup +} and Al, F{sub TOX} shows a steady decline with increasing pH, crossing the lower threshold near to pH 7. Competition effects among cations mean that toxicity due to Cu and Zn is rare at lower pH values, and occurs mostly between pH 6 and 8.

  5. New applications in EPA’s ECOTOX Knowledge System: Assimilating relative potencies of metals across chemical and biological species from literature-based toxicity effects data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxicity of metals in field settings can vary widely among ionic chemical species and across biological receptors. Thus, a challenge often found in developing TRVs for the risk assessment of metals is identifying the most appropriate metal and biological species combinations for...

  6. Essential and toxic heavy metals in cereals and agricultural products marketed in Kermanshah, Iran, and human health risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirsaheb, Meghdad; Fattahi, Nazir; Sharafi, Kiomars; Khamotian, Razieh; Atafar, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Levels of some essential and toxic heavy metals such as lead, cadmium, chromium, nickel, zinc and copper in cereals and agricultural products obtained from the markets in Kermanshah city, west Iran, were determined by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The average concentrations for lead and cadmium in some cereals were higher than the maximum levels set by the Codex Alimentarius. A potential human health risk assessment was conducted by calculating estimated weekly intake (EWI) of the metals from eating cereals and comparison of these values with provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI) values. In combination with recent cereal consumption data, the EWIs of heavy metals were calculated for the Kermanshah population. EWI data for the studied metals through cereal consumption were lower than the PTWI values. Cr, Ni, Zn and Cu levels in all samples analysed were within the ranges reported for similar cereals from various parts of the world.

  7. Human health risk assessment based on toxicity characteristic leaching procedure and simple bioaccessibility extraction test of toxic metals in urban street dust of Tianjin, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binbin Yu

    Full Text Available The potential ecological and human health risk related with urban street dust from urban areas of Tianjin, China was quantitatively analyzed using the method of toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP and simple bioaccessibility extraction test (SBET. In the study, Hakason index, Nemerow index (P, the hazard index (HI and the cancer risk index (RI were calculated to assess the potential risk. The sequence of potential ecological risk based on Hakason index was arsenic (As > cadmium (Cd > lead (Pb > copper (Cu > chromium (Cr, in particular, As and Cd were regarded as high polluted metals. While the results of extraction of TCLP were assessed using P, the sequence was As > Pb > Cd > Cr > Cu, which mean that As and Pb should be low polluted, and Cd, Cr and Cu would barely not polluted. For human health, total carcinogenic risk for children and adults was 2.01 × 10(-3 and 1.05 × 10(-3, respectively. This could be considered to be intolerable in urban street dust exposure. The sequence in the hazard quotient (HQ of each element was As > Cr > Pb > Cu > Cd. The HI value of these toxic metals in urban street dust for children and adults was 5.88 × 10(-1 and 2.80 × 10(-1, respectively. According to the characters of chemistry, mobility, and bioavailability of metals in urban street dust, we estimated the hazards on the environment and human health, which will help us to get more reasonable information for risk management of metals in urban environment.

  8. Human health risk assessment based on toxicity characteristic leaching procedure and simple bioaccessibility extraction test of toxic metals in urban street dust of Tianjin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Binbin; Wang, Yu; Zhou, Qixing

    2014-01-01

    The potential ecological and human health risk related with urban street dust from urban areas of Tianjin, China was quantitatively analyzed using the method of toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and simple bioaccessibility extraction test (SBET). In the study, Hakason index, Nemerow index (P), the hazard index (HI) and the cancer risk index (RI) were calculated to assess the potential risk. The sequence of potential ecological risk based on Hakason index was arsenic (As) > cadmium (Cd) > lead (Pb) > copper (Cu) > chromium (Cr), in particular, As and Cd were regarded as high polluted metals. While the results of extraction of TCLP were assessed using P, the sequence was As > Pb > Cd > Cr > Cu, which mean that As and Pb should be low polluted, and Cd, Cr and Cu would barely not polluted. For human health, total carcinogenic risk for children and adults was 2.01 × 10(-3) and 1.05 × 10(-3), respectively. This could be considered to be intolerable in urban street dust exposure. The sequence in the hazard quotient (HQ) of each element was As > Cr > Pb > Cu > Cd. The HI value of these toxic metals in urban street dust for children and adults was 5.88 × 10(-1) and 2.80 × 10(-1), respectively. According to the characters of chemistry, mobility, and bioavailability of metals in urban street dust, we estimated the hazards on the environment and human health, which will help us to get more reasonable information for risk management of metals in urban environment.

  9. Biogeochemical processes controlling the mobility of major ions and trace metals in aquitard sediments beneath an oil sand tailing pond: laboratory studies and reactive transport modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, A A; Haque, S E; Mayer, K U; Ulrich, A C

    2013-08-01

    Increased production and expansion of the oil sand industry in Alberta are of great benefit to the economy, but they carry major environmental challenges. The volume of fluid fine tailings requiring storage is 840×10(6) m(3) and growing, making it imperative that we better understand the fate and transport of oil sand process-affected water (OSPW) seepage from these facilities. Accordingly, the current study seeks to characterize both a) the potential for major ion and trace element release, and b) the principal biogeochemical processes involved, as tailing pond OSPW infiltrates into, and interacts with, underlying glacial till sediments prior to reaching down gradient aquifers or surface waters. Objectives were addressed through a series of aqueous and solid phase experiments, including radial diffusion cells, an isotope analysis, X-ray diffraction, and sequential extractions. The diffusion cells were also simulated in a reactive transport framework to elucidate key reaction processes. The experiments indicate that the ingress and interaction of OSPW with the glacial till sediment-pore water system will result in: a mitigation of ingressing Na (retardation), displacement and then limited precipitation of exchangeable Ca and Mg (as carbonates), sulfate reduction and subsequent precipitation of the produced sulfides, as well as biodegradation of organic carbon. High concentrations of ingressing Cl (~375 mg L(-1)) and Na (~575 mg L(-1)) (even though the latter is delayed, or retarded) are expected to migrate through the till and into the underlying sand channel. Trace element mobility was influenced by ion exchange, oxidation-reduction, and mineral phase reactions including reductive dissolution of metal oxyhydroxides - in accordance with previous observations within sandy aquifer settings. Furthermore, although several trace elements showed the potential for release (Al, B, Ba, Cd, Mn, Pb, Si, Sr), large-scale mobilization is not supported. Thus, the present

  10. Assessing the influence of compost and biochar amendments on the mobility and toxicity of metals and arsenic in a naturally contaminated mine soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beesley, Luke; Inneh, Onyeka S.; Norton, Gareth J.; Moreno-Jimenez, Eduardo; Pardo, Tania; Clemente, Rafael; Dawson, Julian J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Amending contaminated soils with organic wastes can influence trace element mobility and toxicity. Soluble concentrations of metals and arsenic were measured in pore water and aqueous soil extracts following the amendment of a heavily contaminated mine soil with compost and biochar (10% v:v) in a pot experiment. Speciation modelling and toxicity assays (Vibrio fischeri luminescence inhibition and Lolium perenne germination) were performed to discriminate mechanisms controlling metal mobility and assess toxicity risk thereafter. Biochar reduced free metal concentrations furthest but dissolved organic carbon primarily controlled metal mobility after compost amendment. Individually, both amendments induced considerable solubilisation of arsenic to pore water (>2500 μg l −1 ) related to pH and soluble phosphate but combining amendments most effectively reduced toxicity due to simultaneous reductions in extractable metals and increases in soluble nutrients (P). Thus the measure–monitor-model approach taken determined that combining the amendments was most effective at mitigating attendant toxicity risk. -- Highlights: • Compost and biochar addition to a mine soil decreased metal solubility. • Inorganic arsenic solubility was increased furthest by compost alone. • Combining amendments most effectively reduced toxicity, assessed by bio-assays. • Field study should verify the efficacy of the amendment in the longer term. -- Individual compost and biochar amendments to a contaminated mine soil decreased metal and increased arsenic solubility, but combining amendments most effectively reduced toxicity

  11. Toxicity of some heavy metals to copepods Acartia spinicauda and Tortanus forcipatus

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhupratap, M.; Achuthankutty, C.T.; Nair, S.R.S.

    Copper was most toxic to the species tested followed by cadmium and zinc The estuarine species Acartia spinicauda was more sensitive to the toxicants that the marine species Tortanus forcipatus The 48 hr LC50 values are presented....

  12. Evaluation of toxic metals and essential elements in children with learning disabilities from a rural area of southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, Sabrina Nunes; Charão, Mariele Feiffer; Moro, Angela Maria; Roehrs, Miguel; Paniz, Clovis; Baierle, Marília; Brucker, Natália; Gioda, Adriana; Barbosa, Fernando; Bohrer, Denise; Ávila, Daiana Silva; Garcia, Solange Cristina

    2014-10-17

    Children's exposure to metals can result in adverse effects such as cognitive function impairments. This study aimed to evaluate some toxic metals and levels of essential trace elements in blood, hair, and drinking water in children from a rural area of Southern Brazil. Cognitive ability and δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALA-D) activity were evaluated. Oxidative stress was evaluated as a main mechanism of metal toxicity, through the quantification of malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. This study included 20 children from a rural area and 20 children from an urban area. Our findings demonstrated increase in blood lead (Pb) levels (BLLs). Also, increased levels of nickel (Ni) in blood and increase of aluminum (Al) levels in hair and drinking water in rural children were found. Deficiency in selenium (Se) levels was observed in rural children as well. Rural children with visual-motor immaturity presented Pb levels in hair significantly increased in relation to rural children without visual-motor immaturity (p < 0.05). Negative correlations between BLLs and ALA-D activity and positive correlations between BLLs and ALA-RE activity were observed. MDA was significantly higher in rural compared to urban children (p < 0.05). Our findings suggest that rural children were co-exposed to toxic metals, especially Al, Pb and Ni. Moreover, a slight deficiency of Se was observed. Low performance on cognitive ability tests and ALA-D inhibition can be related to metal exposure in rural children. Oxidative stress was suggested as a main toxicological mechanism involved in metal exposure.

  13. Evaluation of Toxic Metals and Essential Elements in Children with Learning Disabilities from a Rural Area of Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Nunes do Nascimento

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Children’s exposure to metals can result in adverse effects such as cognitive function impairments. This study aimed to evaluate some toxic metals and levels of essential trace elements in blood, hair, and drinking water in children from a rural area of Southern Brazil. Cognitive ability and δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALA-D activity were evaluated. Oxidative stress was evaluated as a main mechanism of metal toxicity, through the quantification of malondialdehyde (MDA levels. This study included 20 children from a rural area and 20 children from an urban area. Our findings demonstrated increase in blood lead (Pb levels (BLLs. Also, increased levels of nickel (Ni in blood and increase of aluminum (Al levels in hair and drinking water in rural children were found. Deficiency in selenium (Se levels was observed in rural children as well. Rural children with visual-motor immaturity presented Pb levels in hair significantly increased in relation to rural children without visual-motor immaturity (p < 0.05. Negative correlations between BLLs and ALA-D activity and positive correlations between BLLs and ALA-RE activity were observed. MDA was significantly higher in rural compared to urban children (p < 0.05. Our findings suggest that rural children were co-exposed to toxic metals, especially Al, Pb and Ni. Moreover, a slight deficiency of Se was observed. Low performance on cognitive ability tests and ALA-D inhibition can be related to metal exposure in rural children. Oxidative stress was suggested as a main toxicological mechanism involved in metal exposure.

  14. Gene expression profiling to identify the toxicities and potentially relevant human disease outcomes associated with environmental heavy metal exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korashy, Hesham M; Attafi, Ibraheem M; Famulski, Konrad S; Bakheet, Saleh A; Hafez, Mohammed M; Alsaad, Abdulaziz M S; Al-Ghadeer, Abdul Rahman M

    2017-02-01

    Heavy metals are the most commonly encountered toxic substances that increase susceptibility to various diseases after prolonged exposure. We have previously shown that healthy volunteers living near a mining area had significant contamination with heavy metals associated with significant changes in the expression of some detoxifying genes, xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, and DNA repair genes. However, alterations of most of the molecular target genes associated with diseases are still unknown. Thus, the aims of this study were to (a) evaluate the gene expression profile and (b) identify the toxicities and potentially relevant human disease outcomes associated with long-term human exposure to environmental heavy metals in mining area using microarray analysis. For this purpose, 40 healthy male volunteers who were residents of a heavy metal-polluted area (Mahd Al-Dhahab city, Saudi Arabia) and 20 healthy male volunteers who were residents of a non-heavy metal-polluted area were included in the study. Total RNA was isolated from whole blood using PAXgene Blood RNA tubes and then reversed transcribed and hybridized to the gene array using the Affymetrix U219 GeneChip. Microarray analysis showed about 2129 genes were identified and differentially altered, among which a shared set of 425 genes was differentially expressed in the heavy metal-exposed groups. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed that the most altered gene-regulated diseases in heavy metal-exposed groups included hematological and developmental disorders and mostly renal and urological diseases. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction closely matched the microarray data for some genes tested. Importantly, changes in gene-related diseases were attributed to alterations in the genes encoded for protein synthesis. Renal and urological diseases were the diseases that were most frequently associated with the heavy metal-exposed group. Therefore, there is a need for further studies to validate these

  15. Risk assessment of toxic metals in street dust from a medium-sized industrial city of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinwei; Wu, Xing; Wang, Yiwen; Chen, Hao; Gao, Panpan; Fu, Yi

    2014-08-01

    The concentrations of toxic metals As, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, V and Zn in street dust of Tongchuan, China were determined by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The risk of the analyzed metals to urban ecosystem and human health were evaluated by potential ecological risk index and human exposure model, respectively. The results show that, in comparison with Shaanxi soil, dust samples have elevated metal concentration as a whole expect for As, Mn, V and Ni. The assessment results of ecological risk indicate that the ecological risks of As, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, V and Zn in the dust were in the low level, while Pb and Co presented low to moderate level. Health risk assessment shows that ingestion was the main exposure route of all analyzed toxic metals in street dust to children and adults. The non-cancer risks of the studied metals to children and adults were within the safe range, and the cancer risks of As, Co, Cr and Ni were also within the currently acceptable range. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A new tropical algal test to assess the toxicity of metals in freshwaters. Supervising Scientists Report 133

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, N.; Stauber, J.; Markich, S.; Lim, R.

    1998-01-01

    Copper (Cu) and uranium (U) are of potential ecotoxicological concern to tropical Australian freshwater biota as a result of mining impacts. No local data on the toxicity of these metals to tropical freshwater algae are currently available. The aim of this study was to develop a toxicity test for an Australian tropical freshwater alga that can be added to the suite of tests currently available for tropical freshwater invertebrates and fish. This toxicity test was used to investigate the toxicity of Cu and U to the alga Chlorella sp (new species) in a synthetic softwater and to specifically determine the effect of pH on metal toxicity over the range typically found in soft fresh surface waters in tropical northern Australia. A growth inhibition toxicity test was successfully developed for this alga, which was isolated from Kakadu National Park, Northern Territory, prior to conducting the toxicity testing. Key environmental parameters including light, temperature and nutrients were optimised to obtain acceptable algal growth rates over 72 hours. HEPES buffer (2 mM at pH 6.5) was found to be a suitable and practical option for pH control that could be incorporated in the test protocol for Chlorella sp. The results obtained in this study confirmed a lack of toxic effects by HEPES on the algae, as well as negligible complexation with both Cu and U. Adequate pH control (ie -1 ) than U (13 μg L -1 ), and more sensitive than other Australian tropical freshwater species, with an order of sensitivity: Alga ≥Crustacea > Cnidaria > Mollusca > Chordata. The toxicity of Cu and U was highly pH-dependent. Copper concentrations needed to inhibit growth by 50% (72 h EC 50 ) increased from 1.5 to 35 μg Cu L -1 as the pH decreased from 6.5 to 5.7. The 72 h EC 50 for U increased from 44 to 78 μg U L -1 over the same pH range. Decreased toxicity at pH 5.7 was due to lower concentrations of cell-bound and intracellular Cu and U compared to that at pH 6.5. These results are explained

  17. Assessment of mechanisms of metal-induced reproductive toxicity in aquatic species as a biomarker of exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, M.; George, W.; Sikka, S.; Kamath, B.; Preslan, J.; Agrawal, K.; Rege, A.

    1993-01-01

    This project is designed to identify heavy metals and organic contaminants of concern which could impact on the biota in the Louisiana wetlands by assessment of uptake and bioaccumulation of contaminants and their effects on reproductive processes as biomarkers of exposure. Heavy metals (lead, cadmium, cobalt, and mercury) have been demonstrated to have toxic effects on reproduction in mammals and several aquatic species. Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is an persistent environmental contaminant which has been measured in human serum, fat, semen, and follicular fluid. HCB has been shown to be a reproductive toxin in rats and primates. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are prevalent chlorinated hydrocarbons currently contaminating our environment. PCBs resist degradation and are insoluble in water; however, they bioaccumulate in aquatic species. Disturbances of the reproductive systems are not only sensitive indicators of toxicity but threatens the propagation of a species

  18. A sensitive whole-cell biosensor for the simultaneous detection of a broad-spectrum of toxic heavy metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerminati, S; Soncini, F C; Checa, S K

    2015-04-07

    Bacterial biosensors are simple, cost-effective and efficient analytical tools for detecting bioavailable heavy metals in the environment. This work presents the design, construction and calibration of a novel whole-cell fluorescent biosensory device that, simultaneously and with high sensitivity, reports the presence of toxic mercury, lead, cadmium and/or gold ions in aqueous samples. This bio-reporter can be easily applied as an immediate alerting tool for detecting the presence of harmful pollutants in drinking water.

  19. Evaluation of the mobility and pollution index of selected essential/toxic metals in paddy soil by sequential extraction method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Maria; Kausar, Dilshad; Akhter, Gulraiz; Shah, Munir H

    2018-01-01

    Comparative distribution and mobility of selected essential and toxic metals in the paddy soil from district Sargodha, Pakistan was evaluated by the modified Community Bureau of Reference (mBCR) sequential extraction procedure. Most of the soil samples showed slightly alkaline nature while the soil texture was predominantly silty loam in nature. The metal contents were quantified in the exchangeable, reducible, oxidisable and residual fractions of the soil by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry and the metal data were subjected to the statistical analyses in order to evaluate the mutual relationships among the metals in each fraction. Among the metals, Ca, Sr and Mn were found to be more mobile in the soil. A number of significant correlations between different metal pairs were noted in various fractions. Contamination factor, geoaccumulation index and enrichment factor revealed extremely severe enrichment/contamination for Cd; moderate to significant enrichment/contamination for Ni, Zn, Co and Pb while Cr, Sr, Cu and Mn revealed minimal to moderate contamination and accumulation in the soil. Multivariate cluster analysis showed significant anthropogenic intrusions of the metals in various fractions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Estimating genetic potential of biofuel forest hardwoods to withstand metal toxicity in industrial effluent under dry tropical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor, S A; Mirza, S N; Zubair, M; Nouman, W; Hussain, S B; Mehmood, S; Irshad, A; Sarwar, N; Ammar, A; Iqbal, M F; Asim, A; Chattha, M U; Chattha, M B; Zafar, A; Abid, R

    2015-08-14

    Biofuel tree species are recognized as a promising alternative source of fuel to conventional forms. Additionally, these tree species are also effective in accumulating toxic heavy metals present in some industrial effluents. In developing countries such as Pakistan, the use of biofuel tree species is gaining popularity not only for harvesting economical and environmentally friendly biofuel, but also to sequester poisonous heavy metals from industrial wastewater. This study was aimed at evaluating the genetic potential of two biofuel species, namely, Jatropha curcas and Pongamia pinnata, to grow when irrigated with industrial effluent from the Pak-Arab Fertilizer Factory Multan, Southern Punjab, Pakistan. The growth performances of one-year-old seedlings of both species were compared in soil with adverse physiochemical properties. It was found that J. curcas was better able to withstand the toxicity of the heavy metals present in the fertilizer factory effluent. J. curcas showed maximum gain in height, diameter, and biomass production in soil irrigated with 75% concentrated industrial effluent. In contrast, P. pinnata showed a significant reduction in growth in soil irrigated with more than 50% concentrated industrial effluent, indicating that this species is less tolerant to higher toxicity levels of industrial effluent. This study identifies J. curcas as a promising biofuel tree species that can be grown using industrial wastewater.

  1. NOx, FINE PARTICLE AND TOXIC METAL EMISSIONS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE/COAL MIXTURES: A SYSTEMATIC ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jost O.L. Wendt

    2001-05-04

    This research project focuses on pollutants from the combustion of mixtures of dried municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and coal. The objective is to determine the relationship between (1) fraction sludge in the sludge/coal mixture, and (2) combustion conditions on (a) NO{sub x} concentrations in the exhaust, (b) the size segregated fine and ultra-fine particle composition in the exhaust, and (c) the partitioning of toxic metals between vapor and condenses phases, within the process. To this end we shall use an existing 17kW downflow laboratory combustor, available with coal and sludge feed capabilities. The proposed study will be conducted in concert with an existing ongoing research on toxic metal partitioning mechanisms for very well characterized pulverized coals alone. Both high NO{sub x} and low NO{sub x} combustion conditions will be investigated (unstaged and staged combustion). The proposed work uses existing analytical and experimental facilities and draws on 20 years of research on NO{sub x} and fine particles that has been funded by DOE in this laboratory. Four barrels of dried sewage sludge are currently in the laboratory. Insofar as possible pertinent mechanisms will be elucidated. Tradeoffs between CO{sub 2} control, NO{sub x} control, and inorganic fine particle and toxic metal emissions will be determined.

  2. Biogeochemical controls on the speciation and aquatic toxicity of vanadium and other metals in sediments from a river reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedrich, Sara M.; Chappaz, Anthony; Hudson, Michelle L.; Brown, Steven S.; Burton, G. Allen

    2018-01-01

    Effects of hydrologic variability on reservoir biogeochemistry are relatively unknown, particularly for less studied metals like vanadium (V). Further, few studies have investigated the fate and effects of sediment-associated V to aquatic organisms in hydrologically variable systems. Our primary objective was to assess effects of hydrologic manipulation on speciation and toxicity of V (range: 635 to 1620 mg kg- 1) and other metals to Hyalella azteca and Daphnia magna. Sediments were collected from a reservoir located in a former mining area and microcosm experiments were conducted to emulate 7-day drying and inundation periods. Despite high sediment concentrations, V bioavailability remained low with no significant effects to organism survival, growth, or reproduction. The lack of V toxicity was attributed to reduced speciation (III, IV), non-labile complexation, and sorption to Al/Fe/Mn-oxyhydroxides. Zinc (Zn) increased in surface and porewater with inundation, for some sediments exceeding the U.S. EPA threshold for chronic toxicity. While no effects of Zn to organism survival or growth were observed, Zn body concentrations were negatively correlated with H. azteca growth. Results from this study indicate that V bioavailability and environmental risk is dependent on V-speciation, and V is less influenced by hydrologic variability than more labile metals such as Zn.

  3. Levels of essential and toxic metals in fenugreek seeds (Trigonella Foenum-Graecum L. cultivated in different parts of Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mebrahtu Hagos

    Full Text Available Summary The levels of the major (Ca, K, Na, Mg, trace (Fe, Cr, Ni, Zn, Mn, Cu, Co, and toxic (Pb, Cd metals in the seeds of fenugreek cultivated in different regions of Ethiopia were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (FAAS. Wet ashing was used to digest 0.5 g of fenugreek seed flour using 1.5 mL of HNO3 and HClO4 acid mixtures (5:1 ratio, 30 min pre-digestion time, 45 min total digestion time and a temperature of 150 °C. Thirteen elements were determined, obtaining concentrations in the following ranges: Ca (15353-36771 mg kg-1 > Fe (6041-18584 mg kg-1 ≈ K (6789-11517 mg kg-1 > Pb (615-2624 mg kg-1 > Na (201-1559 mg kg-1 > Cd (285-464 mg kg-1 > Cr (3-552 mg kg-1 > Ni (31-108 mg kg-1 > Mg (31-102 mg kg-1 > Zn (15-33 mg kg-1 > Mn (16-28 mg kg-1 > Cu (ND-35 mg kg-1 > Co (4-15 mg kg-1. A statistical analysis of variance (ANOVA at the 95% confidence level revealed there were significant differences between the mean metal contents of fourteen sample means, except for Zn. Pearson’s correlation revealed weak positive or negative linear relationships, which implies that the presence of one metal did not affect the presence of the other metals within the plant, except for a few metals. The study showed that fenugreek seeds were a good source of essential metals. However, they also contained large amounts of the toxic metals Cd and Pb and therefore should not be consumed daily.

  4. Toxicity and the fractional distribution of trace metals accumulated from contaminated sediments by the clam Scrobicularia plana exposed in the laboratory and the field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalman, J., E-mail: judit.kalman@uca.es [Department of Life Sciences, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Bonnail-Miguel, E. [Department of Physical-Chemistry, University of Cadiz, Poligono Industrial Rio San Pedro s/n, 11,510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Smith, B.D. [Department of Life Sciences, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Bury, N.R. [Division of Diabetes and Nutritional Science, King' s College London, Franklin-Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London SE1 9NH (United Kingdom); Rainbow, P.S. [Department of Life Sciences, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-15

    The relationship between the subcellular distribution of accumulated toxic metals into five operational fractions (subsequently combined into presumed detoxified and non-detoxified components) and toxicity in the clam Scrobicularia plana was investigated under different laboratory exposures. Clams were exposed to metal contaminated media (water and diet) and analysed for the partitioning of accumulated As, Cu and Zn into subcellular fractions. In general, metallothionein-like proteins, metal-rich granules and cellular debris in different proportions acted as main storage sites of accumulated metals in the clam soft tissues for these three metals. No significant differences were noted in the accumulation rates of As, Cu and Zn of groups of individuals with or without apparent signs of toxicity after up to 30 days of exposure to naturally contaminated sediment mixtures. There was, however, an increased proportional accumulation of Cu in the non-detoxified fraction with increased Cu accumulation rate in the clams, suggesting that the Cu uptake rate from contaminated sediments exceeded the combined rates of elimination and detoxification of Cu, with the subsequent likelihood for toxic effects in the clams. - Highlights: • Scrobicularia plana accumulated As, Cu and Zn from naturally toxic sediments. • Toxic metals were accumulated in detoxified and non-detoxified components. • Cu accumulation in the non-detoxified pool increased with increased Cu uptake rate. • Cu uptake rate exceeded combined loss and detoxification rates to cause toxicity.

  5. Atmospheric emissions of typical toxic heavy metals from open burning of municipal solid waste in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Cheng, Ke; Wu, Weidong; Tian, Hezhong; Yi, Peng; Zhi, Guorui; Fan, Jing; Liu, Shuhan

    2017-03-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) contains considerable hazardous components and the widely-distributed open MSW burning in heavily-populated urban areas can cause direct exposure of hazardous materials to citizens. By determining the best available representation of composition-varying and time-varying emission factors with fuzzy mathematics method and S-shape curves, a comprehensive atmospheric emission inventories of 9 typical toxic heavy metals (THMs, e.g. mercury (Hg), arsenic (As), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), selenium (Se), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and nickel (Ni)) from open MSW burning activities in China is established during the period of 2000-2013 for the first time. Further, the emissions in 2013 are allocated at a high spatial resolution of 0.5° × 0.5° grid by surrogate indexes. The results show that 9 typical THMs emissions from open MSW burning are estimated at 21.25 t for Hg, 131.52 t for As, 97.12 t for Pb, 10.12 t for Cd, 50.58 t for Cr, 81.95 t for Se, 382.42 t for Cu, 1790.70 t for Zn, and 43.50 t for Ni, respectively. In terms of spatial variation, the majority of emissions are concentrated in relatively developed and densely-populated regions, especially for the eastern, central and southern regions. Moreover, future emissions are also projected for the period of 2015-2030 based on different scenarios of the independent and collaborative effects of control proposals including minimizing waste, improving MSW incineration ratio, and enhancing waste sorting and recycling, etc. The collaborative effect of the above proposals is expected to bring the most effective reduction to THMs emissions from open MSW burning in China except for Hg. The results will be supplementary to all anthropogenic emissions and useful for relevant policy-making and the improvement of urban air quality as well as human health.

  6. In-growth metal organic framework/synthetic hybrids as antimicrobial fabrics and its toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emam, Hossam E; Darwesh, Osama M; Abdelhameed, Reda M

    2018-05-01

    Bio-active synthetic fabrics based on polyester (PET) and Nylon were manufactured by in-situ formation of Cu-BTC metal organic framework (MOF). In-growth of Cu-BTC within fabrics was accomplished in one pot simple process. The scanning microscope, X-ray diffraction and infrared spectra were all confirmed the formation of Cu-BTC within fabrics structure and reflected the role of fabrics' building unit in the Cu-BTC preparation. The estimated contents of materials onto fabrics were ranged in 97.14-127.33 mg MOF/g fabric and 30.59-40.10 mg Cu/g fabric. After embracing with Cu-BTC, color of fabrics was transformed to greenish-blue. The so-produced Cu-BTC/fabric hybrids were exhibited good biological activities against three different microbial pathogens (E. coli, S. aureus and C. albicans). The minimal inhibitory concentrations from the residual Cu-BTC powder were 65-70, 60-64 and 62-67 mg/mL, for S. aureus, E. coli and C. albicans pathogens, respectively, which were similar to that reported for commercial Cu-BTC. Moreover, no toxicity was observably detected for the released Cu-BTC from fabrics against brine shrimp at 10 mg/mL. These results revealed that, the in-growth of Cu-BTC resulted in production of biocidal synthetic fabrics without any ecotoxic effects at the as-used Cu-BTC content. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Bioavailability assessment of toxic metals using the technique "acid-volatile sulfide (AVS)-simultaneously extracted metals (SEM)" in marine sediments collected in Todos os Santos Bay, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jucelino B; Nascimento, Rodrigo A; de Oliva, Sergio T; de Oliveira, Olívia M C; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports the bioavailability of the metals (cadmium, copper, zinc, lead, and nickel) in sediment samples collected in seven stations from the São Paulo Estuary, Todos os Santos Bay, Brazil. The bioavailability was determined by employing the technique "acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) and simultaneously extracted metal (SEM)". The elements cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc were determined using differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV), while nickel was quantified utilizing electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS). The accuracy of these methods was confirmed using a certified reference material of estuarine sediment (NIST 1646). The sulfide was quantified using potentiometry with selective electrode and the organic matter determination employing an indirect volumetric method using potassium dichromate and iron(II) sulfate solutions. The bioavailability of the metals was estimated by relationship between the concentration of AVS and the sum of the concentrations of the simultaneously extracted metals (ΣSEM), considering a significant toxicity when (ΣSEM)/(AVS) is higher than 1. The bioavailability values in the seven stations studied varied from 0.93 to 1.31 (June, 2014) and from 0.34 to 0.58 (September, 2014). These results demonstrated a critical condition of toxicity (bioavailability >1) in six of the seven sediment samples collected during the rainy season (June, 2014). In the other period (September, 2014), the bioavailability was always lower than 1 for all sediment samples collected in the seven stations. The individual values of the concentrations of the five metals were compared with the parameters PEL (probable effects level) and TEL (threshold effects level), which are commonly employed for characterization of ecological risk in environmental systems. This comparison revealed that all metals have concentrations lower than the PEL and only zinc and lead in some stations have contents higher than the TEL. The

  8. Analysis of four toxic metals in a single rice seed by matrix solid phase dispersion -inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiufen; Chen, Lixia; Chen, Xin; Yu, Huamei; Peng, Lixu; Han, Bingjun

    2016-12-01

    Toxic metals in rice pose great risks to human health. Metal bioaccumulation in rice grains is a criterion of breeding. Rice breeding requires a sensitive method to determine metal content in single rice grains to assist the variety selection. In the present study, four toxic metals of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr) and lead (Pb) in a single rice grain were determined by a simple and rapid method. The developed method is based on matrix solid phase dispersion using multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as dispersing agent and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The experimental parameters were systematically investigated. The limits of detection (LOD) were 5.0, 0.6, 10 and 2.1 ng g-1 for As, Cd, Cr, and Pb, respectively, with relative standard deviations (n = 6) of rice samples analyzed by this method agreed well with those obtained by the standard microwave digestion. The amount of sample required was reduced approximately 100 fold in comparison with the microwave digestion. The method has a high application potential for other sample matrices and elements with high sensitivity and sample throughput.

  9. Heavy metals produce toxicity, oxidative stress and apoptosis in the marine teleost fish SAF-1 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcillo, Patricia; Esteban, María Á; Cuesta, Alberto

    2016-02-01

    The use of cell lines to test the toxicity of aquatic pollutants is a valuable alternative to fish bioassays. In this study, fibroblast SAF-1 cells from the marine gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) were exposed for 24 h to the heavy metals Cd, Hg, MeHg (Methylmercury), As or Pb and the resulting cytotoxicity was assessed. Neutral red (NR), MTT-tetrazolio (MTT), crystal violet (CV) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) viability tests showed that SAF-1 cells exposed to the above heavy metals produced a dose-dependent reduction in the number of viable cells. Methylmercury showed the highest toxicity (EC50 = 0.01 mM) followed by As, Cd, Hg and Pb. NR was the most sensitive method followed by MTT, CV and LDH. SAF-1 cells incubated with each of the heavy metals also exhibited an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis cell death. Moreover, the corresponding gene expression profiles pointed to the induction of the metallothionein protective system, cellular and oxidative stress and apoptosis after heavy metal exposure for 24 h. This report describes and compares tools for evaluating the potential effects of marine contamination using the SAF-1 cell line. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Heavy metal content of selected personal care products (PCPs available in Ibadan, Nigeria and their toxic effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunday Samuel Omenka

    Full Text Available There is a growing concern on heavy metals in consumer products due to their potential human health risks and environmental effects. In this study, the levels of zinc, cadmium, lead and nickel were assessed in 3 different classes of personal care products commonly used in Ibadan, Nigeria. Samples were analysed for heavy metals using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS after acid digestion. Estimated daily intake (EDI of the metals and Health Risk Index (HRI were calculated to assess the human health risks associated with the use of these PCPs. The concentrations (mg/kg of zinc ranged from 3.75 to 19.3, 1.88 to 112,000 and 19.8 to 217 respectively in creams, powders and eyeliners. Cadmium ranged from ND—0.50, ND—36.3 and ND—0.50 mg/kg while lead ranged from ND—6.25, ND—468 and 3.73–27.5 mg/kg and nickel ranged from ND—6.25, 0.13–107 and 2.75–22.7 mg/kg respectively. There were high concentrations of Cd, Pb and Ni in some of the samples when compared with the available permissible limits in cosmetics (Cd: 0.3 ppm, Pb: 10 ppm and Ni: 0.6 ppm while there is no permissible limit for Zn in cosmetics currently available. Prolonged use of PCPs may pose human health and environmental risks due to toxic metal loading through dermal contact and accumulation over a period of time. Hence, the need for necessary government agencies to regulate and enforce toxic metals in consumer products including cosmetics produced and imported into Nigeria to safeguard public health and the environment, which is the final sink. Keywords: Heavy metals, Personal care products, Health effects, Dermal contact, Exposure

  11. The red mud accident in ajka (hungary): plant toxicity and trace metal bioavailability in red mud contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruyters, Stefan; Mertens, Jelle; Vassilieva, Elvira; Dehandschutter, Boris; Poffijn, André; Smolders, Erik

    2011-02-15

    The red mud accident of October 4, 2010, in Ajka (Hungary) contaminated a vast area with caustic, saline red mud (pH 12) that contains several toxic trace metals above soil limits. Red mud was characterized and its toxicity for plants was measured to evaluate the soil contamination risks. Red mud radioactivity (e.g., (238)U) is about 10-fold above soil background and previous assessments revealed that radiation risk is limited to indoor radon. The plant toxicity and trace metal availability was tested with mixtures of this red mud and a local noncontaminated soil up to a 16% dry weight fraction. Increasing red mud applications increased soil pH to maximally 8.3 and soil solution EC to 12 dS m(-1). Shoot yield of barley seedlings was affected by 25% at 5% red mud in soil and above. Red mud increased shoot Cu, Cr, Fe, and Ni concentrations; however, none of these exceed toxic limits reported elsewhere. Moreover, NaOH amended reference treatments showed similar yield reductions and similar changes in shoot composition. Foliar diagnostics suggest that Na (>1% in affected plants) is the prime cause of growth effects in red mud and in corresponding NaOH amended soils. Shoot Cd and Pb concentrations decreased by increasing applications or were unaffected. Leaching amended soils (3 pore volumes) did not completely remove the Na injury, likely because soil structure was deteriorated. The foliar composition and the NaOH reference experiment allow concluding that the Na salinity, not the trace metal contamination, is the main concern for this red mud in soil.

  12. Comparative In Vitro Toxicity Evaluation of Heavy Metals (Lead, Cadmium, Arsenic, and Methylmercury) on HT-22 Hippocampal Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karri, Venkatanaidu; Kumar, Vikas; Ramos, David; Oliveira, Eliandre; Schuhmacher, Marta

    2017-10-09

    Heavy metals are considered some of the most toxic environmental pollutants. Exposure to heavy metals including lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), arsenic (As), and methyl mercury (MeHg) has long been known to cause damage to human health. Many recent studies have supported the hippocampus as the major target for these four metals for inflicting cognitive dysfunction. In the present study, we proposed hippocampal relevant in vitro toxicity of Pb, Cd, As, and MeHg in HT-22 cell line. This study reports, initially, cytotoxic effects in acute, subchronic, chronic exposures. We further investigated the mechanistic potency of DNA damage and apoptosis damage with the observed cytotoxicity. The genotoxicity and apoptosis were measured by using the comet assay, annexin-V FTIC / propidium iodide (PI) assay, respectively. The results of cytotoxicity assay clearly demonstrated significant concentration and time-dependent effects on HT-22 cell line. The genotoxic and apoptosis effects also concentration-dependent fashion with respect to their potency in the range of IC 10 -IC 30, maximal level of damage observed in MeHg. In conclusion, the obtained result suggests concentration and potency-dependent response; the maximal level of toxicity was observed in MeHg. These novel findings support that Pb, Cd, As, and MeHg induce cytotoxic, genotoxic, and apoptotic effects on HT-22 cells in potency-dependent manner; MeHg> As> Cd> Pb. Therefore, the toxicity of Pb, Cd, As, and MeHg could be useful for knowing the common underlying molecular mechanism, and also for estimating the mixture impacts on HT-22 cell line.

  13. USE OF HYDROGEN RESPIROMETRY TO DETERMINE METAL TOXICITY TO SULFATE REDUCING BACTERIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acid mine drainage (AMD), an acidic metal-bearing wastewater poses a severe pollution problem attributed to post-mining activities. The metals (metal sulfates) encountered in AMD and considered of concern for risk assessment are: arsenic, cadmium, aluminum, manganese, iron, zinc ...

  14. NOx, FINE PARTICLE AND TOXIC METAL EMISSIONS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE/COAL MIXTURES: A SYSTEMATIC ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jost O.L. Wendt

    2002-08-15

    This research project focuses on pollutants from the combustion of mixtures of dried municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and coal. The objective is to determine the relationship between (1) fraction sludge in the sludge/coal mixture, and (2) combustion conditions on (a) NOx concentrations in the exhaust, (b) the size segregated fine and ultra-fine particle composition in the exhaust, and (c) the partitioning of toxic metals between vapor and condenses phases, within the process. The proposed study will be conducted in concert with an existing ongoing research on toxic metal partitioning mechanisms for very well characterized pulverized coals alone. Both high NOx and low NOx combustion conditions will be investigated (unstaged and staged combustion). Tradeoffs between CO2 control, NOx control, and inorganic fine particle and toxic metal emissions will be determined. Previous research has yielded data on trace metal partitioning for MSS by itself, with natural gas assist, for coal plus MSS combustion together, and for coal alone. We have re-evaluated the inhalation health effects of ash aerosol from combustion of MSS both by itself and also together with coal. We have concluded that ash from the co-combustion of MSS and coal is very much worse from an inhalation health point of view, than ash from either MSS by itself or coal by itself. The reason is that ZnO is not the ''bad actor'' as had been suspected before, but the culprit is, rather, sulfated Zn. The MSS supplies the Zn and the coal supplies the sulfur, and so it is the combination of coal and MSS that makes that process environmentally bad. If MSS is to be burned, it should be burned without coal, in the absence of sulfur.

  15. Toxic metal levels in children residing in a smelting craft village in Vietnam: a pilot biomonitoring study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Alison P; Miller, Sloane K; Nguyen, Viet; Kotch, Jonathan B; Fry, Rebecca C

    2014-02-04

    In Vietnam, environmental pollution caused by small-scale domestic smelting of automobile batteries into lead ingot is a growing concern. The village of Nghia Lo is a smelting craft village located roughly 25 km southeast of Hanoi in the Red River Delta. Despite the concern of toxic metal exposure in the village, biomonitoring among susceptible populations, such as children, has not been previously conducted. The aim of this study was to determine the body burden of toxic metals in children residing in a smelting craft village. Twenty children from Nghia Lo, Vietnam, ages 18 months to four years were selected for capillary whole blood and toenail biomonitoring. Whole blood lead levels (BLLs) were measured using a portable lead analyzer, and toenail levels of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, and mercury were analyzed with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The findings show that all of the 20 children had detectable BLLs, and every child had levels that exceeded the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guideline level of 5 μg/dL. Eighty percent of tested subjects had BLLs higher than 10 μg/dL. Five children (25%) had BLLs greater than 45 μg/dL, the level of recommended medical intervention. In addition to blood lead, all of the children had detectable levels of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, and mercury in toenail samples. Notably, average toenail lead, manganese, and mercury levels were 157 μg/g, 7.41 μg/g, and 2.63 μg/g respectively, well above levels previously reported in children. Significant Spearman's rank correlations showed that there were relationships between blood and toenail lead levels (r = 0.65, p toxic metals. There is an urgent need for mitigation to control metal exposure related to domestic smelting.

  16. The Content of Toxic Metals in Agricultural Produce near a Coal Mine: Case Study KCB in Lazarevac, Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Koprivica

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring and analysis of concentrations of toxic metals (lead and cadmium in soils and crops indicate that farmland in Serbia is generally not polluted, and the quality of soils is naturally good. Such soils are therefore suitable for organic farming. All noted instances of contamination by toxic metals are of a local nature only, and the result of fertilizers and pesticides, municipal waste, exhaust gases, nearby production facilities, smelting plants, mines, tailings ponds, etc. Locations of this type need to be monitored regularly, and the status of the soil and crops assessed. The results presented in this paper place special emphasis on lead and cadmium. In this regard, the sampling of 67 plant foodstuffs that are being grown in Baroševac village, located in the immediate vicinity of the Kolubara coal mine, was carried out. Fruit samples represented 14.9% and vegetable samples 85.1% of the total sample. The heavy metal content (lead/cadmium in seven samples was above the limits prescribed by the Regulations. Overall exposure of the adult population of Baroševac, calculated on the basis of all samples (67 in total, was 0.89 µg lead per kg of body weight per week, representing only 3.5% provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI, and 0.46 cadmium per kg of body weight, which amounts to 6.7% PTWI. Both values point to the fact that the risk is low, even in the case of populations with high exposure to these toxic metals. This suggests that sustainable development may be possible in the near future.

  17. Heavy metal: Can molten metal technology turn toxic dross into gold? A study in alchemy, controversy, and green tech

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerner, S.

    1995-12-31

    In a Massachusetts industrial park, inside a renovated helicopter factory, stands a giant, Rube Goldbergesque machine of metal boxes and pipes. Technicians in blue uniforms, hard hats, and safety glasses attend this contraption, watching over the fire at its heart: a cauldron of molten metal, usually iron, heated to some 3,000 degrees Fahrenheit. Hazardous wastes are injected into this molten bath. There, according to its inventor, the metal acts as a catalyst for a chemical reaction that instantly reduces compound molecules to their elemental components. A considerable portion for the wastes thus digested are spit out again in the form of industrial-grade materials, ready for reuse or resale. This article describes both the processing of hazardous wastes by using molten metal to drive reactions that would recover useful materials from hazardous waste and the future possibilities for its use.

  18. Concentration and toxicity of some metals in zooplankton from nearshore waters of Bombay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gajbhiye, S.N.; Nair, V.R.; Narvekar, P.V.; Desai, B.N.

    in zooplankton collected from all stations. Bioassay tests were carried out for evaluating the acute toxicity of Cu and Ni on selected groups of zooplankton. Cu was more toxic than Ni. Among the different organisms tested Sagitta, Lucifer, Ctenophores and Medusae...

  19. Acute toxicity of binary-metal mixtures of copper, zinc, and nickel to Pimephales promelas: Evidence of more-than-additive effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Natalie R; Hoang, Tham C; O'Brien, Timothy E

    2016-02-01

    Metal mixture toxicity has been studied for decades. However, the results are not consistent, and thus ecological risk assessment and regulation of mixtures has been difficult. The objective of the present study was to use a systematic experimental design to characterize the toxicity of binary-metal mixture of Cu, Zn, and Ni to Pimephales promelas, typically to determine whether the effect of these binary-metal mixtures on P. promelas is more-than-additive. Standard 96-h toxicity tests were conducted with larval P. promelas based on US Environmental and Protection Agency methods to determine metal mixture effects. All experiments were conducted in synthetic moderately hard water with no addition of dissolved organic matter. Three different effect analysis approaches, the MixTox model, the Finney model, and the toxic unit method, were used for comparison. The results indicate that the toxicity of Cu+Zn, Cu+Ni, and Zn+Ni mixtures to P. promelas was more-than-additive. Among the 3 mixtures, the effect of the Cu+Ni mixture was the most profound. The results of the present study are useful for applications to models such as the metal mixture biotic ligand model. More research should be conducted to determine the mechanisms of acute and chronic toxicity of metal mixtures. © 2015 SETAC.

  20. Modelling the toxicity of a large set of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles using the OCHEM platform.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovalishyn, Vasyl; Abramenko, Natalia; Kopernyk, Iryna; Charochkina, Larysa; Metelytsia, Larysa; Tetko, Igor V; Peijnenburg, Willie; Kustov, Leonid

    2017-01-01

    Inorganic nanomaterials have become one of the new areas of modern knowledge and technology and have already found an increasing number of applications. However, some nanoparticles show toxicity to living organisms, and can potentially have a negative influence on environmental ecosystems. While

  1. Assessment of Toxic Metals Concentration using Pearl Oyster, Pinctada radiate, as Bioindicator on the Coast of Persian Gulf, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Mohammad Karami

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Persian Gulf is a semi-closed environment which is affected by pollution from heavy metals. Entrance of heavy metals to the water column and binding to sediment particles can affect the benthic organisms that can accumulate these materials in their body. Noticing this ability, mussels are considered as bio-monitoring agents. Methods: The pearl oyster, Pinctada radiate, and sediment samples were collected from Lengeh Port and Qeshm Island. For measuring heavy metals, 0.5g of soft tissue and 1g of shell and sediment were digested by HNO3 (69% and hot block digester. The prepared samples were evaluated for Cd, Cu, and Zn using a flame AAS Model 67OG while for Pb a graphite furnace AAS was used. Results: Higher metal accumulations were observed in soft tissues. Positive correlations between Cd, Pb, Zn, and Cu concentrations in sediments and soft tissues of oyster were observed. The use of soft tissue of P. radiata as an indicator showed the highest accumulations of Cd (9.76±0.59 and Zn (3142.60±477.10 in Lengeh Port, but there were no significant differences in Cu and Pb concentrations between the two stations. Conclusion: The higher concentrations of heavy metals in P. radiata’ soft tissue in comparison to shell suggested this material as a better heavy metals indicator than shell. Also, the correlation between heavy metals concentration in soft tissue and sediment improve this idea that soft tissue of Pinctada radiata can be considered as a biomonitoring agent for toxic metals pollutions. Hence, using this bioindicator showed Lengeh Port as more polluted station than Qeshm Island.

  2. A TEST OF THE ADDITIVITY OF ACUTE TOXICITY OF BINARY-METAL MIXTURES OF NI WITH CD, CU, AND ZN TO DAPHNIA MAGNA, USING THE INFLECTION POINT OF THE CONCENTRATION–RESPONSE CURVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traudt, Elizabeth M.; Ranville, James F.; Smith, Samantha A.; Meyer, Joseph S.

    2018-01-01

    Mixtures of metals are often present in surface waters, leading to toxicity that is difficult to predict. To provide data for development of multimetal toxicity models, Daphnia magna neonates were exposed to individual metals (Cd, Cu, Ni, Zn) and to binary combinations of those metals in standard 48-h lethality tests conducted in US Environmental Protection Agency moderately hard reconstituted water with 3 mg dissolved organic carbon (DOC)/L added as Suwannee River fulvic acid. Toxicity tests were performed with mixtures of Ni and 1) Cd, which is considerably more toxic than Ni; 2) Cu, which is less toxic than Cd but more toxic than Ni; and 3) Zn, which has a toxicity threshold similar to Ni. For each combination of metals in the binary mixtures, the concentration of 1 metal was held constant while the second metal was varied through a series that ranged from nonlethal to lethal concentrations; then the roles of the metals were reversed. Inflection points of the concentration–response curves were compared to test for additivity of toxicity. Sublethal concentrations of Ni caused less-than-additive toxicity with Cd, slightly less-than-additive toxicity with Zn, and greater-than-additive toxicity with Cu. One explanation of these results might be competition among the metals for binding to biological ligands and/or dissolved organic matter. Therefore, models might have to incorporate sometimes competing chemical interactions to accurately predict metal-mixture toxicity. PMID:26681657

  3. Heavy metal content of selected personal care products (PCPs) available in Ibadan, Nigeria and their toxic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omenka, Sunday Samuel; Adeyi, Adebola Abosede

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing concern on heavy metals in consumer products due to their potential human health risks and environmental effects. In this study, the levels of zinc, cadmium, lead and nickel were assessed in 3 different classes of personal care products commonly used in Ibadan, Nigeria. Samples were analysed for heavy metals using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS) after acid digestion. Estimated daily intake (EDI) of the metals and Health Risk Index (HRI) were calculated to assess the human health risks associated with the use of these PCPs. The concentrations (mg/kg) of zinc ranged from 3.75 to 19.3, 1.88 to 112,000 and 19.8 to 217 respectively in creams, powders and eyeliners. Cadmium ranged from ND-0.50, ND-36.3 and ND-0.50 mg/kg while lead ranged from ND-6.25, ND-468 and 3.73-27.5 mg/kg and nickel ranged from ND-6.25, 0.13-107 and 2.75-22.7 mg/kg respectively. There were high concentrations of Cd, Pb and Ni in some of the samples when compared with the available permissible limits in cosmetics (Cd: 0.3 ppm, Pb: 10 ppm and Ni: 0.6 ppm while there is no permissible limit for Zn in cosmetics currently available). Prolonged use of PCPs may pose human health and environmental risks due to toxic metal loading through dermal contact and accumulation over a period of time. Hence, the need for necessary government agencies to regulate and enforce toxic metals in consumer products including cosmetics produced and imported into Nigeria to safeguard public health and the environment, which is the final sink.

  4. Pollution, toxicity, and ecological risk of heavy metals in surface river sediments of a large basin undergoing rapid economic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wenzhong; Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Yu; Shan, Baoqing; Song, Zhixin

    2017-05-01

    A comprehensive and detailed investigation of heavy metal pollution, toxicity, and ecological risk assessment was conducted for the surface river sediments of the Haihe Basin in China based on 220 sampling sites selected in 2013. The average concentrations of Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in the sediments were 129 mg/kg, 63.4 mg/kg, 36.6 mg/kg, 50.0 mg/kg, and 202 mg/kg, respectively. As indicated by the geoaccumulation and pollution load indices, most surface river sediments of the Haihe Basin were contaminated with the investigated metals, especially in the junction region of the Zi Ya He and Hei Long Gang watersheds. The 5 heavy metals in the sediments all had anthropogenic sources, and the enrichment degrees followed the order Cu > Pb > Zn > Cr > Ni, with mean enrichment factors of 3.27, 2.77, 2.58, 1.81, and 1.44, respectively. According to the mean index of comprehensive potential ecological risk (38.9), the studied sediments of the Haihe Basin showed low potential ecological risk, but the sediments were potentially biologically toxic based on the mean probable effect concentration quotient (0.547), which may be the result of speciation of the 5 metals in the sediments. The results indicate that heavy metal pollution should be considered during the development of ecological restoration strategies in the Haihe Basin. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1149-1155. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  5. Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) alleviate heavy metal-induced toxicity in Leucaena leucocephala seedlings: A physiochemical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachalam, P; Jayaraj, M; Manikandan, R; Geetha, N; Rene, Eldon R; Sharma, N C; Sahi, S V

    2017-01-01

    The present study describes the role of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) in reversing oxidative stress symptoms induced by heavy metal (Cd and Pb) exposure in Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit. Seedling growth was significantly enhanced with the augmentation of ZnONPs following Cd and Pb exposure. Heavy metal accumulations were recorded as 1253.1 mg Cd per kg DW and 1026.8 mg Pb per kg DW for the respective treatments. Results demonstrated that ZnONPs augmentation caused an increase in photosynthetic pigment and total soluble protein contents while a significant decrease in malondialdehyde (MDA-lipid peroxidation) content in leaves. Antioxidative enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POX) were, in turn, elevated in heavy metal-exposed leaves amended with ZnONPs. The ameliorating effect of ZnO nanoparticles on oxidative stress induced toxicity was also confirmed by the reduced MDA content and the elevated level of antioxidative enzyme activities in leaf tissues of L. leucocephala seedlings. Further, addition of ZnONPs in combination with Cd and Pb metals induced distinct genomic alterations such as presence of new DNA bands and/or absence of normal bands in the RAPD pattern of the exposed plants. This study uniquely suggests a potential role of zinc oxide nanoparticles in the remediation of heavy metal contaminated media. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. How can we take advantage of halophyte properties to cope with heavy metal toxicity in salt-affected areas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutts, Stanley; Lefèvre, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Background Many areas throughout the world are simultaneously contaminated by high concentrations of soluble salts and by high concentrations of heavy metals that constitute a serious threat to human health. The use of plants to extract or stabilize pollutants is an interesting alternative to classical expensive decontamination procedures. However, suitable plant species still need to be identified for reclamation of substrates presenting a high electrical conductivity. Scope Halophytic plant species are able to cope with several abiotic constraints occurring simultaneously in their natural environment. This review considers their putative interest for remediation of polluted soil in relation to their ability to sequester absorbed toxic ions in trichomes or vacuoles, to perform efficient osmotic adjustment and to limit the deleterious impact of oxidative stress. These physiological adaptations are considered in relation to the impact of salt on heavy metal bioavailabilty in two types of ecosystem: (1) salt marshes and mangroves, and (2) mine tailings in semi-arid areas. Conclusions Numerous halophytes exhibit a high level of heavy metal accumulation and external NaCl may directly influence heavy metal speciation and absorption rate. Maintenance of biomass production and plant water status makes some halophytes promising candidates for further management of heavy-metal-polluted areas in both saline and non-saline environments. PMID:25672360

  7. Engineering MerR for Sequestration and MerA for Reduction of Toxic Metals and Radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, Anne O.

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of this project were (1) to alter a metalloregulatory protein (MerR) so that it would bind other toxic metals or radionuclides with similar affinity so that the engineered protein itself and/or bacteria expressing it could be deployed in the environment to specifically sequester such metals and (2) to alter the mercuric reductase, MerA, to reduce radionuclides and render them less mobile. Both projects had a basic science component. In the first case, such information about MerR illuminates how proteins discriminate very similar metals/elements. In the second case, information about MerA reveals the criteria for transmission of reducing equivalents from NADPH to redox-active metals. The work involved genetic engineering of all or parts of both proteins and examination of their resultant properties both in vivo and in vitro, the latter with biochemical and biophysical tools including equilibrium and non-equilibrium dialysis, XAFS, NMR, x-ray crystallography, and titration calorimetry. We defined the basis for metal specificity in MerR, devised a bacterial strain that sequesters Hg while growing, characterized gold reduction by MerA and the role of the metallochaperone domain of MerA, and determined the 3-D structure of MerB, the organomercurial lyase.

  8. Determination of toxic heavy metals in sea water by FAAS after preconcentration with a novel chelating resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivannan, D; Biju, V M

    2011-01-01

    A solid phase extraction procedure was developed for preconcentration of toxic heavy metals such as cadmium, cobalt, copper, manganese, lead and zinc in sea water samples. A microcolumn packed with 6-[(4-hydroxyphenyl)diazenyl]naphthalene-2,3-diol-formaldehyde (HPDN-F) resin acts as a sorbent to retain the analyte ions by forming metal chelates. The retained trace level metal was subsequently eluted with 1 mol/L HCl and the acid eluent was analysed by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (FAAS). The HPDN-F chelating resin and its metal chelates were characterized by spectral and thermal analysis. The chelating property of the HPDN-F resin towards divalent metal ions was studied as a function of pH and preconcentration flow rate. The recoveries of cadmium, cobalt, copper, manganese, lead and zinc under the optimum working conditions were above 95%. The relative standard deviations were < 2%. The limits of detection were < 0.1 microg/L. The method presented was applied for the determination of cadmium, cobalt, copper, manganese, lead and zinc in sea water samples.

  9. Endophytes and their Potential to Deal with Co-contamination of Organic Contaminants (Toluene) and Toxic Metals (Nickel) during Phytoremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyens, N.; van der Lelie, D.; Truyens, S.; Saenen, E.; Boulet, J.; Dupae, J.; Taghavi, S.; Carleer, R.; Vangronsveld, J.

    2011-01-15

    The aim was to investigate if engineered endophytes that are capable of degrading organic contaminants, and deal with or ideally improve uptake and translocation of toxic metals, can improve phytoremediation of mixed organic-metal pollution. As a model system, yellow lupine was inoculated with the endophyte Burkholderia cepacia VM1468 possessing (a) the pTOM-Bu61 plasmid, coding for constitutive toluene/TCE degradation, and (b) the chromosomally inserted ncc-nre Ni resistance/sequestration system. As controls, plants were inoculated with B. vietnamiensis BU61 (pTOM-Bu61) and B. cepacia BU72 (containing the ncc-nre Ni resistance/sequestration system). Plants were exposed to mixes of toluene and Ni. Only inoculation with B. cepacia VM1468 resulted in decreased Ni and toluene phytotoxicity, as measured by a protective effect on plant growth and decreased activities of enzymes involved in antioxidative defence (catalase, guaiacol peroxidase, superoxide dismutase) in the roots. Besides, plants inoculated with B. cepacia VM1468 and B. vietnamiensis BU61 released less toluene through the leaves than non-inoculated plants and those inoculated with B. cepacia BU72. Ni-uptake in roots was slightly increased for B. cepacia BU72 inoculated plants. These results indicate that engineered endophytes have the potential to assist their host plant to deal with co-contamination of toxic metals and organic contaminants during phytoremediation.

  10. Comparison of three-stage sequential extraction and toxicity characteristic leaching tests to evaluate metal mobility in mining wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margui, E.; Salvado, V.; Queralt, I.; Hidalgo, M.

    2004-01-01

    Abandoned mining sites contain residues from ore processing operations that are characterised by high concentrations of heavy metals. The form in which a metal exists strongly influences its mobility and, thus, the effects on the environment. Operational methods of speciation analysis, such as the use of sequential extraction procedures, are commonly applied. In this work, the modified three-stage sequential extraction procedure proposed by the BCR (now the Standards, Measurements and Testing Programme) was applied for the fractionation of Ni, Zn, Pb and Cd in mining wastes from old Pb-Zn mining areas located in the Val d'Aran (NE Spain) and Cartagena (SE Spain). Analyses of the extracts were performed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The procedure was evaluated by using a certified reference material, BCR-701. The results of the partitioning study indicate that more easily mobilised forms (acid exchangeable) were predominant for Cd and Zn, particularly in the sample from Cartagena. In contrast, the largest amount of lead was associated with the iron and manganese oxide fractions. On the other hand, the applicability of lixiviation tests commonly used to evaluate the leaching of toxic species from landfill disposal (US-EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure and DIN 38414-S4) to mining wastes was also investigated and the obtained results compared with the information on metal mobility derivable from the application of the three-stage sequential extraction procedure

  11. Sequential application of chelating agents and innovative surfactants for the enhanced electroremediation of real sediments from toxic metals and PAHs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahladakis, John N; Lekkas, Nikolaos; Smponias, Andreas; Gidarakos, Evangelos

    2014-06-01

    This study focused on the sequential application of a chelating agent (citric acid) followed by a surfactant in the simultaneous electroremediation of real contaminated sediments from toxic metals and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs). Furthermore, the efficiency evaluation of two innovative non-ionic surfactants, commercially known as Poloxamer 407 and Nonidet P40, was investigated. The results indicated a removal efficacy of approximately 43% and 48% for the summation of PAHs (SUM PAHs), respectively for the aforementioned surfactants, much better than the one obtained by the use of Tween 80 (nearly 21%). Individual PAHs (e.g. fluorene) were removed in percentages that reached almost 84% and 92% in the respective electrokinetic experiments when these new surfactants were introduced. In addition, the combined-enhanced sequential electrokinetic treatment with citric acid improved dramatically the removal of Zn and As, compared to the unenhanced run, but did not favor the other toxic metals examined. Since no improvement in metal removal percentages occurred when Tween 80 was used, significant contribution to this matter should also be attributed to the solubilization capacity of these innovative, in electrokinetic remediation, non-ionic surfactants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Modelling the toxicity of a large set of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles using the OCHEM platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalishyn, Vasyl; Abramenko, Natalia; Kopernyk, Iryna; Charochkina, Larysa; Metelytsia, Larysa; Tetko, Igor V; Peijnenburg, Willie; Kustov, Leonid

    2018-02-01

    Inorganic nanomaterials have become one of the new areas of modern knowledge and technology and have already found an increasing number of applications. However, some nanoparticles show toxicity to living organisms, and can potentially have a negative influence on environmental ecosystems. While toxicity can be determined experimentally, such studies are time consuming and costly. Computational toxicology can provide an alternative approach and there is a need to develop methods to reliably assess Quantitative Structure-Property Relationships for nanomaterials (nano-QSPRs). Importantly, development of such models requires careful collection and curation of data. This article overviews freely available nano-QSPR models, which were developed using the Online Chemical Modeling Environment (OCHEM). Multiple data on toxicity of nanoparticles to different living organisms were collected from the literature and uploaded in the OCHEM database. The main characteristics of nanoparticles such as chemical composition of nanoparticles, average particle size, shape, surface charge and information about the biological test species were used as descriptors for developing QSPR models. QSPR methodologies used Random Forests (WEKA-RF), k-Nearest Neighbors and Associative Neural Networks. The predictive ability of the models was tested through cross-validation, giving cross-validated coefficients q 2  = 0.58-0.80 for regression models and balanced accuracies of 65-88% for classification models. These results matched the predictions for the test sets used to develop the models. The proposed nano-QSPR models and uploaded data are freely available online at http://ochem.eu/article/103451 and can be used for estimation of toxicity of new and emerging nanoparticles at the early stages of nanomaterial development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Impact of heavy metal toxicity and constructed wetland system as a tool in remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usharani, B; Vasudevan, N

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this review is to throw light upon the global concern of heavy metal-contaminated sites and their remediation through an ecofriendly approach. Accumulated heavy metals in soil and water bodies gain entry through the food chain and pose serious threat to all forms of life. This has engendered interest in phytoremediation techniques where hyperaccumulators are used. Constructed wetland has a pivotal role and is a cost-effective technique in the remediation of heavy metals. Metal availability and mobility are influenced by the addition of chelating agents, which enhance the availability of metal uptake. This review helps in identifying the critical knowledge gaps and areas to enhance research in the future to develop strategies such as genetically engineered hyperaccumulators to attain an environment devoid of heavy metal contamination.

  14. Evaluation of the Possible Sources and Controlling Factors of Toxic Metals/Metalloids in the Florida Everglades and Their Potential Risk of Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanbin; Duan, Zhiwei; Liu, Guangliang; Kalla, Peter; Scheidt, Daniel; Cai, Yong

    2015-08-18

    The Florida Everglades is an environmentally sensitive wetland ecosystem with a number of threatened and endangered fauna species susceptible to the deterioration of water quality. Several potential toxic metal sources exist in the Everglades, including farming, atmospheric deposition, and human activities in urban areas, causing concerns of potential metal exposure risks. However, little is known about the pollution status of toxic metals/metalloids of potential concern, except for Hg. In this study, eight toxic metals/metalloids (Cd, Cr, Pb, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, and Hg) in Everglades soils were investigated in both dry and wet seasons. Pb, Cr, As, Cu, Cd, and Ni were identified to be above Florida SQGs (sediment quality guidelines) at a number of sampling sites, particularly Pb, which had a level of potential risk to organisms similar to that of Hg. In addition, a method was developed for quantitative source identification and controlling factor elucidation of toxic metals/metalloids by introducing an index, enrichment factor (EF), in the conventional multiple regression analysis. EFs represent the effects of anthropogenic sources on metals/metalloids in soils. Multiple regression analysis showed that Cr and Ni were mainly controlled by anthropogenic loading, whereas soil characteristics, in particular natural organic matter (NOM), played a more important role for Hg, As, Cd, and Zn. NOM may control the distribution of these toxic metals/metalloids by affecting their mobility in soils. For Cu and Pb, the effects of EFs and environmental factors are comparable, suggesting combined effects of loading and soil characteristics. This study is the first comprehensive research with a vast amount of sampling sites on the distribution and potential risks of toxic metals/metalloids in the Everglades. The finding suggests that in addition to Hg other metals/metalloids could also potentially be an environmental problem in this wetland ecosystem.

  15. Net acidity indicates the whole effluent toxicity of pH and dissolved metals in metalliferous saline waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degens, Bradley P; Krassoi, Rick; Galvin, Lynette; Reynolds, Brad; Micevska, Tina

    2018-05-01

    Measurements of potential acidity in water are used to manage aquatic toxicity risks of discharge from acid sulfate soils or acid mine drainage. Net acidity calculated from pH, dissolved metals and alkalinity is a common measurement of potential acidity but the relevance of current risk thresholds to aquatic organisms are unclear. Aquatic toxicity testing was carried out using four halophytic organisms with water from four saline sources in southern Western Australia (3 acidic drains and one alkaline river; 39-40 g TDS/L) where acidity was varied by adjusting pH to 4.5-6.5. The test species were brine shrimps (Artemia salina), locally sourced ostracods (Platycypris baueri), microalgae (Dunaliella salina) and amphipods (Allorchestes compressa). Testing found the EC 10 and IC 10 of net acidity ranged from -7.8 to 10.5 mg CaCO 3 /L with no survival or growth of any species at >47 mg CaCO 3 /L. Reduced net acidity indicated reduced whole effluent toxicity more reliably than increased pH alone with organisms tolerating pH up to 1.1 units lower in the absence of dissolved metals. Variation in toxicity indicated by net acidity was mostly attributed to reduced concentrations of dissolved Al and Fe combined with higher pH and alkalinity and some changes in speciation of Al and Fe with pH. These results indicate that rapid in-field assessments of net acidity in acidic, Al dominated waters may be an indicator of potential acute and sub-chronic impacts on aquatic organisms. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Coupling Between Overlying Hydrodynamics, Bioturbation, and Biogeochemical Processes Controls Metal Mobility, Bioavailability, and Toxicity in Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    communities, and posing ongoing threats to larger pelagic organisms by food web contamination .2 Sediment contamination is a major concern worldwide and has...structural heterogeneity, and biogeochemical processes controls contaminant mobility, bioavailability, and toxicity in sediments. American Geophysical...Controls Contaminant Mobility, Bioavailability, and Toxicity in Sediments 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W912HQ-10-C-0024 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  17. NOx, FINE PARTICLE AND TOXIC METAL EMISSIONS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE/COAL MIXTURES: A SYSTEMATIC ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jost O.L. Wendt

    2002-02-05

    This research project focuses on pollutants from the combustion of mixtures of dried municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and coal. The objective is to determine the relationship between (1) fraction sludge in the sludge/coal mixture, and (2) combustion conditions on (a) NO{sub x} concentrations in the exhaust, (b) the size segregated fine and ultra-fine particle composition in the exhaust, and (c) the partitioning of toxic metals between vapor and condenses phases, within the process. To this end work is progress using an existing 17kW downflow laboratory combustor, available with coal and sludge feed capabilities. The proposed study will be conducted in concert with an existing ongoing research on toxic metal partitioning mechanisms for very well characterized pulverized coals alone. Both high NO{sub x} and low NO{sub x} combustion conditions will be investigated (unstaged and staged combustion). The proposed work uses existing analytical and experimental facilities and draws on 20 years of research on NO{sub x} and fine particles that has been funded by DOE in this laboratory. Four barrels of dried sewage sludge are currently in the laboratory. Insofar as possible pertinent mechanisms will be elucidated. Tradeoffs between CO{sub 2} control, NO{sub x} control, and inorganic fine particle and toxic metal emissions will be determined. Progress in the Sixth Quarter (January 1, 2002 through March 31, 2002) was slow because of slagging problems in the combustor. These required the combustor to be rebuilt, a job that is not yet complete. A paper describing our results heretofore has been accepted by the Journal Environmental Science and Technology.

  18. Influence of toxic metal ions phenols in needles and roots, and on root respiration of Scots pine seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Karolewski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrates of aluminum, cadmium, manganese and lead cause changes in the content of phenolic compounds (o-dPh and TPh in needles and roots, and in the rate of dark respiration (DR of roots of one-year-old seedlings of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.. The changes depend on the cation, the salt concentration used, and the analyzed plant part. The observed changes in the levels of phenolic compounds in needles and roots, and the rate of respiration in roots, indicate the following rank in toxicity of the studied metal cations: Mn < Al < Pb < Cd.

  19. Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansa, E.J.; Anderson, B.L.; Wijesinghe, A.M.; Viani, B.E.

    1999-05-25

    This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced. 3 figs.

  20. Molecular mechanisms of the epithelial transport of toxic metal ions, particularly mercury, cadmium, lead, arsenic, zinc, and copper. Comprehensive progress report, October 1, 1975--December 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserman, R.H.

    1978-10-01

    Investigations were undertaken to elucidate the mode of transepithelial transport of potentially toxic metal ions across the gastrointestinal tract, with primary attention given to cadmium, zinc, and arsenic. In addition, the toxic effects of cadmium on the metabolism of vitamin D and calcium have been investigated in some detail. Several approaches have been taken, including studies on the localization of heavy metals in the intestinal mucosa, the effects of cadmium on various parameters of calcium metabolism, the modes of intestinal absorption of cadmium, arsenate, and zinc, and the interactions of heavy metals with each other and with calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D. Details of these experiments are attached in the Comprehensive Progress Report

  1. Molecular mechanisms of the epithelial transport of toxic metal ions, particularly mercury, cadmium, lead, arsenic, zinc, and copper. Comprehensive progress report, October 1, 1975--December 31, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasserman, R. H.

    1978-10-01

    Investigations were undertaken to elucidate the mode of transepithelial transport of potentially toxic metal ions across the gastrointestinal tract, with primary attention given to cadmium, zinc, and arsenic. In addition, the toxic effects of cadmium on the metabolism of vitamin D and calcium have been investigated in some detail. Several approaches have been taken, including studies on the localization of heavy metals in the intestinal mucosa, the effects of cadmium on various parameters of calcium metabolism, the modes of intestinal absorption of cadmium, arsenate, and zinc, and the interactions of heavy metals with each other and with calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D. Details of these experiments are attached in the Comprehensive Progress Report.

  2. Effects of temperature on the acute toxicity of heavy metals (Cr, Cd, and Hg) to the freshwater crayfish, Procambarus clarkii (Girard)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Ramo, J.; Diaz-Mayans, J.; Torreblanca, A.; Nunez, A.

    1987-05-01

    Chromium, an essential trace element for humans and animals is involved in normal carbohydrate metabolism; however, it is toxic at high concentrations. There is no evidence that cadmium and mercury are biologically essential but their toxicity for organisms is well known. Both cause toxic effects at low concentrations to most organisms, especially in combination with other environmental variables such as temperature. Lake Albufera and the surrounding rice field waters are subjected to very heavy loads of sewage and toxic industrial residues (including heavy metals) from the many urban and waste waters in this area. In 1978, the American red crayfish Procambarus clarkii appeared in lake Albufera and in the surrounding rice fields. Without adequate sanitary control, the crayfish is presently being fished commercially for human consumption. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the degree of toxicity of various heavy metals (chromium, cadmium and mercury) to freshwater crayfish Procambarus clarkii at various temperatures.

  3. Development of protein based bioremediation and drugs for heavy metal toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opella, Stanley J.

    2001-09-18

    Structural studies were performed on several proteins of the bacterial detoxification system. These proteins are responsible for binding (MerP) and transport of heavy metals, including mercury, across membranes. The structural information obtained from NMR experiments provides insight into the selectivity and sequestration processes towards heavy metal toxins.

  4. Effect of surface modification of microfiltration membrane on capture of toxic heavy metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaeni, Sayed Siavash; Heidary, Farhad

    2012-01-01

    A novel complexing membrane containing 8-hydroxyquinoline groups was used for the removal of heavy metal ions (Cd2+ and Ni2+) from aqueous solution. The functionalized membranes were characterized by FTIR-ATR, SEM and EDAX for the presence of functional groups, the physical structure of the membranes and the analysis of the particles deposited on the membrane, respectively. The influence of 8-hydroxyquinoline concentration, feed concentration, pH and temperature of the solution on capture capability was studied. The modified membrane showed a higher affinity to Cd2+ cations than to Ni2+. The metal ion rejection was increased with an increase in concentration of 8-hydroxyquinoline from 0.5 to 2.0 wt%. However at a ligand concentration higher than 2.0 wt%, no significant change was observed in the metal rejection. The experimental results revealed that the metal rejection was decreased with an increase in metal ion concentration in the feed. Moreover the rejection depended on feed pH and is higher for elevated pH. By changing the temperature in the range of 23-28 degrees C, no considerable effect on metal rejection was observed. However, a higher temperature resulted in a decline in metal rejection. For filtration of a mixture of the two metal ions, the retention was similar to that of the single cations, i.e. Cd > Ni but with smaller absolute rejections.

  5. Toenail as Non-invasive Biomarker in Metal Toxicity Measurement of Welding Fumes Exposure - A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakri, S. F. Z.; Hariri, A.; Ma'arop, N. F.; Hussin, N. S. A. W.

    2017-01-01

    Workers are exposed to a variety of heavy metal pollutants that are released into the environment as a consequence of workplace activities. This chemical pollutants are incorporated into the human by varies of routes entry and can then be stored and distributed in different tissues, consequently have a potential to lead an adverse health effects and/or diseases. As to minimize the impact, a control measures should be taken to avoid these effects and human biological marker is a very effective tool in the assessment of occupational exposure and potential related risk as the results is normally accurate and reproducible. Toenail is the ideal matrix for most common heavy metals due to its reliability and practicality compared to other biological samples as well as it is a non-invasive and this appears as a huge advantage of toenail as a biomarker. This paper reviews studies that measure the heavy metals concentration in toenail as non-invasive matrix which later may adapt in the investigation of metal fume emitted from welding process. The development of new methodology and modern analytical techniques has allowed the use of toenail as non-invasive approach. The presence of a heavy metal in this matrix reflects an exposure but the correlations between heavy metal levels in the toenail must be established to ensure that these levels are related to the total body burden. These findings suggest that further studies on interactions of these heavy metals in metal fumes utilizing toenail biomarker endpoints are highly warranted especially among welders.

  6. Application of carbon foam for heavy metal removal from industrial plating wastewater and toxicity evaluation of the adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Gu; Song, Mi-Kyung; Ryu, Jae-Chun; Park, Chanhyuk; Choi, Jae-Woo; Lee, Sang-Hyup

    2016-06-01

    Electroplating wastewater contains various types of toxic substances, such as heavy metals, solvents, and cleaning agents. Carbon foam was used as an adsorbent for the removal of heavy metals from real industrial plating wastewater. Its sorption capacity was compared with those of a commercial ion-exchange resin (BC258) and a heavy metal adsorbent (CupriSorb™) in a batch system. The experimental carbon foam has a considerably higher sorption capacity for Cr and Cu than commercial adsorbents for acid/alkali wastewater and cyanide wastewater. Additionally, cytotoxicity test showed that the newly developed adsorbent has low cytotoxic effects on three kinds of human cells. In a pilot plant, the carbon foam had higher sorption capacity for Cr (73.64 g kg(-1)) than for Cu (14.86 g kg(-1)) and Ni (7.74 g kg(-1)) during 350 h of operation time. Oxidation pretreatments using UV/hydrogen peroxide enhance heavy metal removal from plating wastewater containing cyanide compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Pathogenic bacteria and heavy metals toxicity assessments in evaluating unpasteurized raw milk quality through biochemical tests collected from dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Iqbal

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the hygienic quality by determining the presence of predominant pathogenic microbial contaminants (contagious or environmental and indiscriminate heavy metals contained in unpasteurized milk samples collected from cattle specie of cow. Methods: Raw milk samples were collected in October, 2014 from different regions of District Kohat, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan and cultured on the selective media plates according to the manufacturer instructions to observe pathogenic microbial flora and confirm it with relevant biochemical tests to specify bacterial specie. Results: Milk samples analyzed on MacConkey and nutrient agar media were found contaminated mostly with coliform, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter aerogenes and Proteus vulgaris. Similarly, result of the heavy metals analysis performed using atomic absorption spectrophotometer flame photometry showed that raw milk contains heavy metals residues of lead and cadmium contents at higher levels while copper, zinc and chromium were observed lower than permissible limits whereas manganese within specified recommended values. Conclusions: Microbial contamination of milk and toxic metals is mainly accredited to the scrupulous unhygienic measures during processing of milk exhibiting a wide array of hazardous impacts on human health.

  8. Layered Double Hydroxides as Effective Adsorbents for U(VI and Toxic Heavy Metals Removal from Aqueous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Pshinko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Capacities of different synthesized Zn,Al-hydrotalcite-like adsorbents, including the initial carbonate [Zn4Al2(OH12]·CO3·8H2O and its forms intercalated with chelating agents (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA, and hexamethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (HMDTA and heat-treated form Zn4Al2O7, to adsorb uranium(VI and ions of toxic heavy metals have been compared. Metal sorption capacities of hydrotalcite-like adsorbents have been shown to correlate with the stability of their complexes with the mentioned chelating agents in a solution. The synthesized layered double hydroxides (LDHs containing chelating agents in the interlayer space are rather efficient for sorption purification of aqueous media free from U(VI irrespective of its forms of natural abundance (including water-soluble bi- and tricarbonate forms and from heavy metal ions. [Zn4Al2(OH12]·EDTA·nH2O is recommended for practical application as one of the most efficient and inexpensive synthetic adsorbents designed for recovery of both cationic and particularly important anionic forms of U(VI and other heavy metals from aqueous media. Carbonate forms of LDHs turned out to be most efficient for recovery of Cu(II from aqueous media with pH0≥7 owing to precipitation of Cu(II basic carbonates and Cu(II hydroxides. Chromate ions are efficiently adsorbed from water only by calcinated forms of LDHs.

  9. Surfactants present complex joint effects on the toxicities of metal oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dali; Lin, Zhifen; Yao, Zhifeng; Yu, Hongxia

    2014-08-01

    The potential toxicities of nanoparticles (NPs) have been intensively discussed over the past decade. In addition to their single toxicities, NPs can interact with other environmental chemicals and thereby exert joint effects on biological systems and the environment. The present study investigated the combined toxicities of NPs and surfactants, which are among the chemicals that most likely coexist with NPs. Photobacterium phosphoreum was employed as the model organism. The results indicate that surfactants with different ion types can alter the properties of NPs (i.e., particle size and surface charge) in different ways and present complex joint effects on NP toxicities. Mixtures of different NPs and surfactants exhibited antagonistic, synergistic, and additive effects. In particular, the toxicity of ZnO was observed to result from its dissolved Zn(2+); thus, the joint effects of the ZnO NPs and surfactants can be explained by the interactions between the Zn ions and the surfactants. Our study suggests that the potential hazards caused by mixtures of NPs and surfactants are different from those caused by single NPs. Because surfactants are extensively used in the field of nanotechnology and are likely to coexist with NPs in natural waters, the ecological risk assessments of NPs should consider the impacts of surfactants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Human Sperm Quality and Metal Toxicants: Protective Effects of some Flavonoids on Male Reproductive Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaffari Mohammad Ali

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Metals can cause male infertility through affection of spermatogenesis and sperm quality. Strong evidences confirm that male infertility in metal-exposed humans is mediated via various mechanisms such as production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Flavonoids have antioxidant and metal chelating properties which make them suitable candidates for neutralizing adverse effects of metals on semen quality. In the current study, we have evaluated the effects of five types of flavonoids (rutin, naringin, kaempferol, quercetin, and catechin on recovery of sperm motility and prevention of membrane oxidative damage from aluminum chloride (AlCl3, cadmium chloride (CdCl2, and lead chloride (PbCl4. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, motility and lipid peroxidation of metalexposed sperm was investigated in the presence of different concentrations of five kinds of flavonoids. Malondialdehyde (MDA production was assessed as a lipid peroxidation marker. Results Aluminum chloride (AlCl3, cadmium chloride (CdCl2, and lead chloride (PbCl4 diminished sperm motility. Treatment of metal-exposed sperm with rutin, naringin, and kaempferol attenuated the negative effects of the metals on sperm motility. Quercetin and catechin decreased the motility of metal-exposed sperm. Conclusion Based on the MDA production results, only AlCl3 significantly induced lipid peroxidation. Treatment with rutin, naringin, and kaempferol significantly decreased MDA production.

  11. Removal and recovery of radionuclides and toxic metals from wastes, soils and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.J.

    1993-07-01

    A process has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the removal of metals and radionuclides from contaminated materials, soils, and waste sites (Figure 1). In this process, citric acid, a naturally occurring organic complexing agent, is used to extract metals such as Ba, Cd, Cr, Ni, Zn, and radionuclides Co, Sr, Th, and U from solid wastes by formation of water soluble, metal-citrate complexes. Citric acid forms different types of complexes with the transition metals and actinides, and may involve formation of a bidentate, tridentate, binuclear, or polynuclear complex species. The extract containing radionuclide/metal complex is then subjected to microbiological degradation followed by photochemical degradation under aerobic conditions. Several metal citrate complexes are biodegraded and the metals are recovered in a concentrated form with the bacterial biomass. Uranium forms binuclear complex with citric acid and is not biodegraded. The supernatant containing uranium citrate complex is separated and upon exposure to light, undergoes rapid degradation resulting in the formation of an insoluble, stable polymeric form of uranium. Uranium is recovered as a precipitate (uranium trioxide) in a concentrated form for recycling or for appropriate disposal. This treatment process, unlike others which use caustic reagents, does not create additional hazardous wastes for disposal and causes little damage to soil which can then be returned to normal use

  12. Metal release from hip prostheses: cobalt and chromium toxicity and the role of the clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jonathon R; Estey, Mathew P

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with advanced hip disease suffer from pain, impaired hip function, and decreased quality of life. Roughly one million metal-on-metal (MoM) hip prostheses have been implanted worldwide in order to ameliorate these issues. While most MoM hip replacements are successful, some patients suffer from serious adverse effects secondary to the release of metal debris due to implant wear and corrosion. MoM hip prostheses are comprised predominantly of cobalt and chromium, and the serum concentration of these metal ions has been shown to correlate with both implant wear and the accumulation of metal debris in the periprosthetic tissue. Consequently, measurement of cobalt and chromium concentrations may be useful in the assessment of implant function and the potential for adverse effects in the follow-up of patients with MoM hip prostheses. The purpose of this Mini Review is to describe the adverse biological consequences of metal release from hip prostheses, provide an overview of the clinical utility of cobalt and chromium measurement and the current recommendations for testing, and alert laboratorians and physicians to the many challenges associated with measuring these metal ions.

  13. A geochemical study of toxic metal translocation in an urban brownfield wetland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Yu; Gallagher, Frank J.; Feng Huan; Wu Meiyin

    2012-01-01

    Rhizosphere soil and dominant plant samples were collected at a brownfield site in New Jersey, USA, during summer 2005 to evaluate plant metal uptake from the contaminated soils. Metal concentrations varied from 4.25 to 978 μg g −1 for As, 9.68–209 μg g −1 for Cr, 23.9–1870 μg g −1 for Cu, and 24.8–6502 μg g −1 for Zn. A wide range of metal uptake efficiencies in the roots, stems and leaves was found in this study. Data showed that (1) Betula populifolia has high Zn, Cu and As accumulations in the root, and high concentrations of Cu and Zn in the stem and the leaf; (2) Rhus copallinum has high accumulation of Zn and Cr in the leaf and Cu in the stem; (3) Polygonum cuspidatum has high accumulations of Cu and As in the root; and (4) Artemisia vulgaris shows high Cu accumulation in the leaf and the stem. - Highlights: ► Rhizosphere soil and dominant plant samples were studied at a brownfield. ► Plant roots showed exceptional capacity of heavy metal accumulation. ► Metal uptake efficiency decrease with the increases of pH and organic matter. ► Variations in metal uptake efficiency in the root, stem and leave were found. - Metal uptake by brownfield wetland plants in the New York/New Jersey metropolitan area.

  14. IOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE AND TOXICITY OF HEAVY METALS FOR BIOTA OF FRESHWATER BODIES (REVIEW)

    OpenAIRE

    I. Hrytsyniak; N. Kolesnyk

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the sources of scientific information on biological functions of heavy metals (Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu, Ni, Co, Pb, Cd) and their negative effect on biota of fresh water bodies. Findings. A review of works of a variety of scientists showed that the majority of the studied heavy metals (Fe, Zn, Mn, Cum and Co) played an important role in vital functions of freshwater organisms. The significance of other studied heavy metals (Ni, Pb, and Cd) is probable or unknown. Besides bi...

  15. Identifying Toxic Impacts of Metals Potentially Released during Deep-Sea Mining—A Synthesis of the Challenges to Quantifying Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Hauton

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In January 2017, the International Seabed Authority released a discussion paper on the development of Environmental Regulations for deep-sea mining (DSM within the Area Beyond National Jurisdiction (the “Area”. With the release of this paper, the prospect for commercial mining in the Area within the next decade has become very real. Moreover, within nations' Exclusive Economic Zones, the exploitation of deep-sea mineral ore resources could take place on very much shorter time scales and, indeed, may have already started. However, potentially toxic metal mixtures may be released at sea during different stages of the mining process and in different physical phases (dissolved or particulate. As toxicants, metals can disrupt organism physiology and performance, and therefore may impact whole populations, leading to ecosystem scale effects. A challenge to the prediction of toxicity is that deep-sea ore deposits include complex mixtures of minerals, including potentially toxic metals such as copper, cadmium, zinc, and lead, as well as rare earth elements. Whereas the individual toxicity of some of these dissolved metals has been established in laboratory studies, the complex and variable mineral composition of seabed resources makes the a priori prediction of the toxic risk of DSM extremely challenging. Furthermore, although extensive data quantify the toxicity of metals in solution in shallow-water organisms, these may not be representative of the toxicity in deep-sea organisms, which may differ biochemically and physiologically and which will experience those toxicants under conditions of low temperature, high hydrostatic pressure, and potentially altered pH. In this synthesis, we present a summation of recent advances in our understanding of the potential toxic impacts of metal exposure to deep-sea meio- to megafauna at low temperature and high pressure, and consider the limitation of deriving lethal limits based on the paradigm of exposure to

  16. Comparative leaching of six toxic metals from raw and chemically stabilized MSWI fly ash using citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huawei; Fan, Xinxiu; Wang, Ya-Nan; Li, Weihua; Sun, Yingjie; Zhan, Meili; Wu, Guizhi

    2018-02-15

    The leaching behavior of six typical toxic metals (Pb, Zn, Cr, Cd, Cu and Ni) from raw and chemically stabilized (phosphate and chelating agent) municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash were investigated using citric acid. Leaching tests indicated that phosphate stabilization can effectively decrease the leaching of Zn, Cd and Cr; whereas chelating agent stabilization shows a strong ability to lower the release of Pb, Cd and Cu, but instead increases the solubility of Zn and Cr at low pH conditions. Sequential extraction results suggested that the leaching of Pb, Zn and Cd in both the stabilized MSWI fly ash samples led to the decrease in Fe/Mn oxide fraction and the increase in exchangeable and carbonate fractions. The leaching of Cr was due to the decrease in exchangeable, carbonate and Fe/Mn oxide fractions in phosphate-stabilized and chelating agent-stabilized MSWI fly ash. The leaching of Cu in both stabilized MSWI fly ash was greatly ascribed to the decrease in Fe/Mn oxide and oxidisable fractions. Moreover, predicted curves by geochemical model indicated that both stabilized MSWI fly ash have the risk of releasing toxic metals under strong acid environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Estimating the extractability of potentially toxic metals in urban soils: A comparison of several extracting solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madrid, F.; Reinoso, R.; Florido, M.C.; Diaz Barrientos, E.; Ajmone-Marsan, F.; Davidson, C.M.; Madrid, L.

    2007-01-01

    Metals released by the extraction with aqua regia, EDTA, dilute HCl and sequential extraction (SE) by the BCR protocol were studied in urban soils of Sevilla, Torino, and Glasgow. By multivariate analysis, the amounts of Cu, Pb and Zn liberated by any method were statistically associated with one another, whereas other metals were not. The mean amounts of all metals extracted by HCl and by SE were well correlated, but SE was clearly underestimated by HCl. Individual data for Cu, Pb and Zn by both methods were correlated only if each city was considered separately. Other metals gave poorer relationships. Similar conclusions were reached comparing EDTA and HCl, with much lower values for EDTA. Dilute HCl extraction cannot thus be recommended for general use as alternative to BCR SE in urban soils. - Dilute HCl extraction is tested as an alternative to the BCR sequential extraction in urban soils

  18. Degradation of Toxic Chemicals by Zero-Valent Metal Nanoparticles - A Literature Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McDowall, Lyndal

    2005-01-01

    .... Published research into zero-valent metal particles (ZVMs), in particular iron, shows that these particles, particularly those whose size is on the nanoscale, have the potential to be used as a decontaminant...

  19. Estimating the extractability of potentially toxic metals in urban soils: A comparison of several extracting solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madrid, F. [Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiologia de Sevilla (CSIC), Apartado 1052, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); Reinoso, R. [Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiologia de Sevilla (CSIC), Apartado 1052, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); Florido, M.C. [Departamento de Cristalografia, Mineralogia y Quimica Agricola, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes, s/n, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Diaz Barrientos, E. [Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiologia de Sevilla (CSIC), Apartado 1052, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); Ajmone-Marsan, F. [DI.VA.P.R.A., Chimica Agraria, Universita di Torino, Via Leonardo da Vinci, 44, 10095 Grugliasco, Torino (Italy); Davidson, C.M. [Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of Strathclyde, 295 Cathedral Street, Glasgow G1 1XL, Scotland (United Kingdom); Madrid, L. [Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiologia de Sevilla (CSIC), Apartado 1052, 41080 Sevilla (Spain)]. E-mail: madrid@irnase.csic.es

    2007-06-15

    Metals released by the extraction with aqua regia, EDTA, dilute HCl and sequential extraction (SE) by the BCR protocol were studied in urban soils of Sevilla, Torino, and Glasgow. By multivariate analysis, the amounts of Cu, Pb and Zn liberated by any method were statistically associated with one another, whereas other metals were not. The mean amounts of all metals extracted by HCl and by SE were well correlated, but SE was clearly underestimated by HCl. Individual data for Cu, Pb and Zn by both methods were correlated only if each city was considered separately. Other metals gave poorer relationships. Similar conclusions were reached comparing EDTA and HCl, with much lower values for EDTA. Dilute HCl extraction cannot thus be recommended for general use as alternative to BCR SE in urban soils. - Dilute HCl extraction is tested as an alternative to the BCR sequential extraction in urban soils.

  20. Evaluation of growth and reproduction as indicators of soil metal toxicity to the Collembolan, Sinella curviseta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Jie; Ke, Xin; Krogh, Paul Henning

    2009-01-01

    in large numbers of progeny and no significant mortality compared to controls. Adult growth rate decreased for all metal treatments compared to the controls, suggesting that metals affect S. curviseta metabolism and result in slower growth. We showed that reproduction is a slightly more sensitive parameter...... than growth. Since a growth test needs fewer juveniles and takes less time than a reproduction test, we conclude that the two parameters are complementary and could be used for a better ecotoxicological evaluation of contaminant levels. However, relative growth and reproduction sensitivities should......Laboratory studies evaluated the sensitivity of Sinella curviseta Brook (Collembola: Entomobryidae) to selected heavy metals (Cu, Pb and Zn). Survival, reproduction and growth of S. curviseta were determined in a 4-week exposure test in an agricultural soil amended with metals to concentrations...

  1. Heavy and toxic metal uptake by mesoporous hypercrosslinked SMA beads: Isotherms and kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renuka Gonte

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypercrosslinked styrene-maleic acid copolymer beads were used for the removal of metal ions from mimicked industrial effluents. The polymer was characterized by SEM which revealed the presence of a porous network. Carboxyl acid groups of the polymer were identified as active sites for metal uptake. Highly porous surface enhanced metal ion uptake was achieved through a physicochemical process. Equilibrium sorption of metal ions was best described by the Freundlich and Temkin model with R2 > 0.99. Adsorption followed pseudo first and pseudo second order reaction kinetics. Intraparticle diffusion model suggested a three step equilibrium. Desorption was a fast process with ∼90% in 60 min.

  2. FINE PARTICAL AND TOXIC METAL EMISSIONS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE/COAL MIXTURES: A SYSTEMATIC ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jost O.L. Wendt; Wayne S. Seames; Art Fernandez

    2003-09-21

    This research project focuses on pollutants from the combustion of mixtures of dried municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and pulverized coal. The objective was to determine potential tradeoffs between CO{sub 2} mitigation through using a CO{sub 2} neutral fuel, such as municipal sewage sludge, and the emergence of other potential problems such as the emission of toxic fly ash particles. The work led to new insight into mechanisms governing the partitioning of major and trace metals from the combustion of sewage sludge, and mixtures of coal and sewage sludge. The research also showed that the co-combustion of coal and sewage sludge emitted fine particulate matter that might potentially cause greater lung injury than that from the combustion of either coal alone or municipal sewage sludge alone. The reason appeared to be that the toxicity measured required the presence of large amounts of both zinc and sulfur in particles that were inhaled. MSS provided the zinc while coal provided the sulfur. Additional research showed that the toxic effects could most likely be engineered out of the process, through the introduction of kaolinite sorbent downstream of the combustion zone, or removing the sulfur from the fuel. These results are consequences of applying ''Health Effects Engineering'' to this issue. Health Effects Engineering is a new discipline arising out of this work, and is derived from using a collaboration of combustion engineers and toxicologists to mitigate the potentially bad health effects from combustion of this biomass fuel.

  3. Biological Processes Affecting Bioaccumulation, Transfer, and Toxicity of Metal Contaminants in Estuarine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    delta 15N..…………...p. 28 Figure 6. Relationship of BSCF to TOC in 5 benthic species across field site….p. 30 Figure 7. Relationship of biota to...In addition, Biota-Sediment Concentration Factors ( BSCF ) were calculated for the five focal taxa collected in 2006 ( BSCF = metal concentration in...biota/metal concentration in sediment). The relationship between BSCF values and % TOC or SEM-AVS across sites were determined using analysis of

  4. Toxicity of cadmium and lead in Gallus gallus domesticus assessment of body weight and metal content in tissues after metal dietary supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abduljaleel, Salwa A; Shuhaimi-Othman, M

    2013-11-15

    The influence of dietary cadmium on the accumulation and effects of dietary lead, examined in chicken. This experiment was conducted to investigate the toxic effects of dietary Cd and Pb on chick's body weight and organ, content of the tissues of these two metals was also detected. One day age chicks of Gallus gallus domesticus fed diet supplemented with 25, 50, 100 ppm of Cd, second group exposure to 300, 500, 1000 ppm of Pb in feed daily during 4 weeks. The control groups were fed without supplementation of metals. The concentrations of Cd and Pb resulted in increased of Cd and Pb content in liver, gizzard and muscle. While Cd 100 ppm and Pb 1000 ppm were increased metals content in feather. Body weight of chicks was not influenced by Cd treatment. In contrary Pb treatment was significantly (p body weight of chicks after dietary treatment. On the other hand, Liver weigh in chicks was significantly (p < 0.05) decreased after Cd and Pb treatments.

  5. Single and combined toxicity of copper and cadmium to H. vulgare growth and heavy metal bioaccumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žaltauskaitė J.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The single and combined effects of copper (Cu and cadmium (Cd (0.1-10 mg L−1 in spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L. plants grown in hydroponics are investigated. The aim of the study was to investigate the interactive effect of the binary mixture of Cu and Cd to the growth of H. vulgare and accumulation of these metals by the plants. Single and combined metal treatment led to major effects in the growth of roots and shoots and dry weight of barley. Exposure to metals altered the content of photosynthetic pigments and caused lipid peroxidation. It was observed that combined effects of heavy metals to plants are endpoint and concentration depending. The binary mixture Cu+Cd exhibited additive or less than additive interaction for dry weight, root length and shoot height. Analysis of tissue metal concentrations showed that Cu and Cd were mainly accumulated in the roots and the combination of Cu+Cd had less than additive response of metal bioaccumulation in the leaves and roots.

  6. Assessment of toxic metals in wheat crops grown on selected soils, irrigated by different water sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeid A. Al-Othman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe a comparative study of the concentration of different metals (e.g., Cd, Pb, As, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mn, and Cr in various parts of wheat plants (e.g., roots, stem, leaves and seeds collected at several locations in Khyber Pukhtoon Khaw, Pakistan. The wheat crop in these areas was irrigated using different irrigation sources, including rain, tube well, river, and canal. In wheat samples, the concentration of metals was analyzed using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Among the various parts of the plant, the roots had the highest levels of heavy metals, followed by the vegetative parts. By comparison, the seeds and grains had the lowest levels of heavy metals. The levels of heavy metals in all of the studied areas were not significantly localized to any particular area. The general order for the accumulation of studied metals in wheat was found to be Mn > Zn > Cu > Ni > Cr > As > Pb > Cd.

  7. Assessment of toxicity potential of metallic elements in discarded electronics: a case study of mobile phones in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, B Y; Chan, Y C; Middendorf, A; Gu, X; Zhong, H W

    2008-01-01

    The electronic waste (e-waste) is increasingly flooding Asia, especially China. E-waste could precipitate a growing volume of toxic input to the local environment if it was not handed properly. This makes the evaluation of environmental impact from electronics an essentially important task for the life cycle assessment (LCA) and the end-of-life management of electronic products. This study presented a quantitative investigation on the environmental performance of typical electronics. Two types of disposed mobile phones (MPs), as a representative of consumer electronics, were evaluated in terms of toxicity potential indicator (TPI) with an assumption of worst-case scenario. It is found that the composition and the percentages of constituents in MPs are similar. More than 20 metallic elements make up 35 wt.%-40 wt.% of the total weight, of which 12 elements are identified to be highly hazardous and 12 are less harmful. With the TPI technique, the environmental performance of Pb is attributed to be 20.8 mg(-1). The total TPIs of metallic elements in the old and new type MP is 255,403 and 127,639 units, respectively, which is equivalent to the effect of releasing 6.14 and 12.28 g Pb into the environment. The average TPI of the old and new type MP is 4.1 and 4.5 mg(-1), respectively, which suggests a similar eco-efficiency per unit mass. The new model of MP is more eco-effective than the old one, which is not due to a reduction in the type of hazardous elements, but rather due to a significant miniaturization of the package with less weight. A single MP can have a considerable toxicity to the environment as referred to Pb, which suggests a major concern for the environmental impact of the total e-waste with a huge quantity and a heavy mass in China.

  8. Earthworm nano‐ecotoxicology: Towards an integrated approach in toxicity testing of metal nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashi, Yuya; Pedersen, Henrik; Wang, Jing

    Manufactured nanoparticles (NPs) belong to an emerging class of potential environmental pollutants. Of particular interest are the characteristics of NP toxicity under different exposure conditions e.g. cell culture, aquatic or soil media. NPs are thought to behave differently depending...

  9. Impregnated Metal-Organic Frameworks for the Removal of Toxic Industrial Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    enhance reactivity towards toxic chemicals. Typical impregnations of current materials, such as ASZM-TEDA, are done in an aqueous and/or ammoniacal ...ammonium hydroxide/ammonium carbonate/water solution (referred to as ammoniacal solution). Clearly, this solution would not be suitable for impregnation

  10. Evaluation of some toxic metals in blood samples of smokers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine some toxic elements in the blood of cigarette and tobacco pipe smokers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Methods: The study setting was Riyadh, the capital city of Saudi Arabia, Riyadh City. Male volunteers, aged 20 - 58 year, whose blood samples were collected, were classified into three groups of ...

  11. Multi-decadal Records of Ocean Acidification and Toxic Heavy Metal Pollution in Coral Cores from Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, J.; Tolliver, R.; Field, D. B.; Young, C.; Stafford, G.; Day, R. D.

    2016-12-01

    Monitoring of the physiological/ecological response of marine calcifying organisms to the combination of lower pH and toxic metal pollutants (e.g. Cu and Sn from boat anti-fouling paints) into the oceans requires detailed knowledge of the rates and spatial distribution of ocean acidification (OA) and trace metal composition over time. Yet, measurement of metal concentrations and carbonate system parameters in the modern ocean from seawater bottle data is patchy (e.g. CDIAC/WOCE Carbon Data; http://cdiac.ornl.gov) and there remain few long-term surface water pH monitoring stations; the two longest continuous records of ocean pH extend back less than 30 years (Bermuda - BATS, 31°40'N, 64°10'W; Hawaii - HOTs, 22°45'N, 158°00'W). Much attention has therefore been focused on trace metal and ocean carbonate system proxy development to allow reconstruction of seawater metal content and pH in the past. Of particular promise is the boron isotope (δ11B) pH-proxy measured in marine calcifying organisms such as coral that can be cored enabling multi-decadal, annual-resolution, records of trace element incorporation and seawater pH to be generated. Here we present continuous Cu/Ca and Sn/Ca records in addition to δ11B data from three coral cores of Porites lutea. collected from waters proximal to Oahu, Hawaii. The diagenetic integrity of samples is verified using X-ray diffraction to assess the degree of calcite replacement. These cores reach a maximum depth of 80 cm and represent approximately 80 years of coral growth and seawater chemistry.

  12. Quantitative analysis and reduction of the eco-toxicity risk of heavy metals for the fine fraction of automobile shredder residue (ASR) using H2O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jiwan; Yang, Jae-Kyu; Chang, Yoon-Young

    2016-02-01

    Automobile shredder residue (ASR) fraction (size <0.25mm) can be considered as hazardous due to presence of high concentrations of heavy metals. Hydrogen peroxide combined with nitric acid has been used for the recovery of heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Mn, Fe, Ni, Pb, Cd and Cr) from the fine fraction of ASR. A sequential extraction procedure has also been used to determine the heavy metal speciation in the fine fraction of ASR before and after treatment. A risk analysis of the fine fraction of ASR before and after treatment was conducted to assess the bioavailability and eco-toxicity of heavy metals. These results showed that the recovery of heavy metals from ASR increased with an increase in the hydrogen peroxide concentration. A high concentration of heavy metals was found to be present in Cbio fractions (the sum of the exchangeable and carbonate fractions) in the fine fraction of ASR, indicating high toxicity risk. The Cbio rate of all selected heavy metals was found to range from 8.6% to 33.4% of the total metal content in the fine fraction of ASR. After treatment, Cbio was reduced to 0.3-3.3% of total metal upon a treatment with 2.0% hydrogen peroxide. On the basis of the risk assessment code (RAC), the environmental risk values for heavy metals in the fine fraction of ASR reflect high risk/medium risk. However, after treatment, the heavy metals would be categorized as low risk/no risk. The present study concludes that hydrogen peroxide combined with nitric acid is a promising treatment for the recovery and reduction of the eco-toxicity risk of heavy metals in ASR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Geopolymers with a high percentage of bottom ash for solidification/immobilization of different toxic metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boca Santa, Rozineide A Antunes; Soares, Cíntia; Riella, Humberto Gracher

    2016-11-15

    Geopolymers are produced using alkali-activated aluminosilicates, either as waste or natural material obtained from various sources. This study synthesized geopolymers from bottom ash and metakaolin (BA/M) in a 2:1wt ratio to test the solidification/immobilization (S/I) properties of heavy metals in geopolymer matrices, since there is very little research using BA in this type of matrices. Therefore, a decision was made to use more than 65% of BA in geopolymer synthesis with and without the addition of heavy metals. The S/I tests with metals used 10, 15 and 30ml of a waste solution after pickling of printed circuit boards containing metals, including Pb, Cr, Cu, Fe, Sn, As and Ni, in different proportions. As alkali activator, the NaOH and KOH were used in the concentrations of 8 and 12M in the composition of Na2SiO3 in 1:2vol ratios. To test S/I efficiency, tests were conducted to obtain the leached and solubilized extract. The analysis was carried out through X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and compressive strength tests. The geopolymer showed a high degree of S/I of the metals; in some samples, the results reached nearly 100%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The Role of the Component Metals in the Toxicity of Military-Grade Tungsten Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christy A. Emond

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten-based composites have been recommended as a suitable replacement for depleted uranium. Unfortunately, one of these mixtures composed of tungsten (W, nickel (Ni and cobalt (Co induced rhabdomyosarcomas when implanted into the leg muscle of laboratory rats and mice to simulate a shrapnel wound. The question arose as to whether the neoplastic effect of the mixture could be solely attributed to one or more of the metal components. To investigate this possibility, pellets with one or two of the component metals replaced with an identical amount of the biologically-inert metal tantalum (Ta were manufactured and implanted into the quadriceps of B6C3F1 mice. The mice were followed for two years to assess potential adverse health effects. Implantation with WTa, CoTa or WNiTa resulted in decreased survival, but not to the level reported for WNiCo. Sarcomas in the implanted muscle were found in 20% of the CoTa-implanted mice and 5% of the WTa- and WCoTa-implanted rats and mice, far below the 80% reported for WNiCo-implanted mice. The data obtained from this study suggested that no single metal is solely responsible for the neoplastic effects of WNiCo and that a synergistic effect of the three metals in tumor development was likely.

  15. Purification of PON1 from human serum and assessment of enzyme kinetics against metal toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekinci, Deniz; Beydemir, Sükrü

    2010-06-01

    Paraoxonase-1 (PON1) is an organophosphate hydrolyser enzyme which has also antioxidant properties in metabolism. Due to its crucial functions, inhibition of the enzyme is undesirable and very dangerous. PON1 enzyme activity should not be altered in any case. Inhibitory investigations of this enzyme are therefore important and useful. Metal toxicology of enzymes has become popular in the recent years. Here, we report the in vitro inhibitory effects of some metal ions, including Pb(+2), Cr(+2), Fe(+2), and Zn(+2), on the activity of human serum PON1 (hPON1; EC 3.1.8.1.). For this purpose, we purified the enzyme from human serum and analyzed the alterations in the enzyme activity in the presence of metal ions. The results show that metal ions exhibit inhibitory effects on hPON1 at low concentrations with IC (50) values ranging from 0.838 to 7.410 mM. Metal ions showed different inhibition mechanisms: lead and iron were competitive, chrome was noncompetitive, and zinc was uncompetitive. Lead was determined to be the most effective inhibitor.

  16. Enterobacter asburiae KE17 association regulates physiological changes and mitigates the toxic effects of heavy metals in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S-M; Radhakrishnan, R; You, Y-H; Khan, A-L; Lee, K-E; Lee, J-D; Lee, I-J

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the role played by Enterobacter asburiae KE17 in the growth and metabolism of soybeans during copper (100 μm Cu) and zinc (100 μm Zn) toxicity. When compared to controls, plants grown under Cu and Zn stress exhibited significantly lower growth rates, but inoculation with E. asburiae KE17 increased growth rates of stressed plants. The concentrations of plant hormones (abscisic acid and salicylic acid) and rates of lipid peroxidation were higher in plants under heavy metal stress, while total chlorophyll, carotenoid content and total polyphenol concentration were lower. While the bacterial treatment reduced the abscisic acid and salicylic acid content and lipid peroxidation rate of Cu-stressed plants, it also increased the concentration of photosynthetic pigments and total polyphenol. Moreover, the heavy metals induced increased accumulation of free amino acids such as aspartic acid, threonine, serine, glycine, alanine, leucine, isoleucine, tyrosine, proline and gamma-aminobutyric acid, while E. asburiae KE17 significantly reduced concentrations of free amino acids in metal-affected plants. Co-treatment with E. asburiae KE17 regulated nutrient uptake by enhancing nitrogen content and inhibiting Cu and Zn accumulation in soybean plants. The results of this study suggest that E. asburiae KE17 mitigates the effects of Cu and Zn stress by reprogramming plant metabolic processes. © 2015 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  17. In vitro antimicrobial, antiprotozoal activities and heavy metals toxicity of different parts of Ballota pseudodictamnus (L.) Benth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Najeeb; Ahmad, Ijaz; Ahmad, Nisar; Fozia, -

    2017-11-01

    The study was done to check the antimicrobial and antiprotozoal activity of different parts of Ballota pseudodictamnus (L.) Benth. These activities were then compared with the heavy metals toxicity of different parts, which plants accumulate in different concentrations in different parts. In in-vitro antileishmanial results ethanolic extract, chloroform and ethyl acetate fractions in roots of Ballota pseudodictamnus (L.) Benth showed antileishmanial activity. The ethanol, n-butanol and ethyl acetate fraction in stem revealed inhibition of amastigote form of leishmania. The ethanolic extract, chloroform, and n-butanol fraction in leaves showed inhibition of leishmanial parasite. In heavy metals study, Chromium was above permissible value in all parts except in leaves. Nickel was above WHO limit in roots. Cadmium and lead were beyond permissible limits in entire plant parts. Results revealed that different parts of the plant have different inhibition properties. So each part of plant should be checked for antimicrobial and antiprotozoal assay separately. It is concluded that various metals accumulates with miscellaneous concentrations in different plant parts.

  18. Characterization of toxic metals in tobacco, tobacco smoke, and cigarette ash from selected imported and local brands in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajab, Huma; Yaqub, Asim; Malik, Salman Akbar; Junaid, Muhammad; Yasmeen, Sadia; Abdullah, Mohd Azmuddin

    2014-01-01

    In this study, concentrations of Cd, Ni, Pb, and Cr were determined in tobacco, tobacco smoke-condensate, and cigarette ash for selected brands used in Pakistan. Smoking apparatus was designed for metal extraction from cigarette smoke. Samples were digested through microwave digester and then analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer (FAAS). Higher concentration of Ni was detected in imported brands than the counterparts in the local brands. Pb levels were however higher in local brands while significant concentration of Cd was observed in both brands. For Cr, the level in tobacco of local brands was higher than their emitted smoke, whereas imported brands showed higher level in smoke than in tobacco. The cigarette ash retained 65 to 75% of the metal and about 25 to 30% went into the body. While this study revealed the serious requirement to standardize the manufacturing of tobacco products, more importantly is the urgent need for stronger enforcements to put in place to alert the general population about the hazardous effects of cigarettes and the health risks associated with these toxic metals.

  19. Characterization of Toxic Metals in Tobacco, Tobacco Smoke, and Cigarette Ash from Selected Imported and Local Brands in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huma Ajab

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, concentrations of Cd, Ni, Pb, and Cr were determined in tobacco, tobacco smoke-condensate, and cigarette ash for selected brands used in Pakistan. Smoking apparatus was designed for metal extraction from cigarette smoke. Samples were digested through microwave digester and then analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer (FAAS. Higher concentration of Ni was detected in imported brands than the counterparts in the local brands. Pb levels were however higher in local brands while significant concentration of Cd was observed in both brands. For Cr, the level in tobacco of local brands was higher than their emitted smoke, whereas imported brands showed higher level in smoke than in tobacco. The cigarette ash retained 65 to 75% of the metal and about 25 to 30% went into the body. While this study revealed the serious requirement to standardize the manufacturing of tobacco products, more importantly is the urgent need for stronger enforcements to put in place to alert the general population about the hazardous effects of cigarettes and the health risks associated with these toxic metals.

  20. Inorganic concepts relevant to metal binding, activity, and toxicity in a biological system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeschele, J.D. (Warner-Lambert Co., Ann Arbor, MI (USA). Parke-Davis Pharmaceutical Research Div.); Turner, J.E.; England, M.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review selected physical and inorganic concepts and factors which might be important in assessing and/or understanding the fact and disposition of a metal system in a biological environment. Hopefully, such inquiries will ultimately permit us to understand, rationalize, and predict differences and trends in biological effects as a function of the basic nature of a metal system and, in optimal cases, serve as input to a system of guidelines for the notion of Chemical Dosimetry.'' The plan of this paper is to first review, in general terms, the basic principles of the Crystal Field Theory (CFT), a unifying theory of bonding in metal complexes. This will provide the necessary theoretical background for the subsequent discussion of selected concepts and factors. 21 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Geopolymers with a high percentage of bottom ash for solidification/immobilization of different toxic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boca Santa, Rozineide A. Antunes; Soares, Cíntia; Riella, Humberto Gracher

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Geopolymers from bottom ash and metakaolin (BA/M). • Solidification/immobilization (S/I) waste of heavy metals. • Activators: Sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH) and sodium silicate (Na 2 SiO 3 ). - Abstract: Geopolymers are produced using alkali-activated aluminosilicates, either as waste or natural material obtained from various sources. This study synthesized geopolymers from bottom ash and metakaolin (BA/M) in a 2:1 wt ratio to test the solidification/immobilization (S/I) properties of heavy metals in geopolymer matrices, since there is very little research using BA in this type of matrices. Therefore, a decision was made to use more than 65% of BA in geopolymer synthesis with and without the addition of heavy metals. The S/I tests with metals used 10, 15 and 30 ml of a waste solution after pickling of printed circuit boards containing metals, including Pb, Cr, Cu, Fe, Sn, As and Ni, in different proportions. As alkali activator, the NaOH and KOH were used in the concentrations of 8 and 12 M in the composition of Na 2 SiO 3 in 1:2 vol ratios. To test S/I efficiency, tests were conducted to obtain the leached and solubilized extract. The analysis was carried out through X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and compressive strength tests. The geopolymer showed a high degree of S/I of the metals; in some samples, the results reached nearly 100%.

  2. Geopolymers with a high percentage of bottom ash for solidification/immobilization of different toxic metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boca Santa, Rozineide A. Antunes, E-mail: roosebs@gmail.com; Soares, Cíntia; Riella, Humberto Gracher

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Geopolymers from bottom ash and metakaolin (BA/M). • Solidification/immobilization (S/I) waste of heavy metals. • Activators: Sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH) and sodium silicate (Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}). - Abstract: Geopolymers are produced using alkali-activated aluminosilicates, either as waste or natural material obtained from various sources. This study synthesized geopolymers from bottom ash and metakaolin (BA/M) in a 2:1 wt ratio to test the solidification/immobilization (S/I) properties of heavy metals in geopolymer matrices, since there is very little research using BA in this type of matrices. Therefore, a decision was made to use more than 65% of BA in geopolymer synthesis with and without the addition of heavy metals. The S/I tests with metals used 10, 15 and 30 ml of a waste solution after pickling of printed circuit boards containing metals, including Pb, Cr, Cu, Fe, Sn, As and Ni, in different proportions. As alkali activator, the NaOH and KOH were used in the concentrations of 8 and 12 M in the composition of Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3} in 1:2 vol ratios. To test S/I efficiency, tests were conducted to obtain the leached and solubilized extract. The analysis was carried out through X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and compressive strength tests. The geopolymer showed a high degree of S/I of the metals; in some samples, the results reached nearly 100%.

  3. Radioisotopic-excited x-ray fluorescent system for PPM measurement of toxic heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leddicotte, G.W.; Tolea, F.; Hansen, J.S.

    1974-01-01

    In agricultural research there is a continual awareness of the need to determine the role trace elements have as micronutrients in soil-plant systems. Similarly, these agronomic needs have a strong relationship to the concern other life sciences researchers have about the roles and effects of toxic trace elements on the natural environment and the physiological well-being of man and animals. However, in order for these interest areas to carry out more effective study efforts, more practical and precise analytical methodology and devices need to be developed. This report describes a research effort to develop an analytical system for micronutient as well as toxic elements based on x-ray fluorescence

  4. Impact of toxic heavy metals and pesticide residues in herbal products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nema S. Shaban

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants have a long history of use in therapy throughout the world and still make an important part of traditional medicine. The World Health Organization (WHO estimates that 65%–80% of the world's populations depend on the herbal products as their primary form of health care. This review is conducted to provide a general idea about chemical contaminants such as heavy metals and pesticide residues as major common contaminants of the herbal medicine, which impose serious health risks to human health. Additionally, we aim to provide different analytical methods for analysis of heavy metals and pesticide residues in the herbal medicine.

  5. Use of human milk in the assessment of toxic metal exposure and essential element status in breastfeeding women and their infants in coastal Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzunov Letinić, Judita; Matek Sarić, Marijana; Piasek, Martina; Jurasović, Jasna; Varnai, Veda Marija; Sulimanec Grgec, Antonija; Orct, Tatjana

    2016-12-01

    Pregnant and lactating women and infants are vulnerable population groups for adverse effects of toxic metals due to their high nutritional needs and the resultant increased gastrointestinal absorption of both, essential and toxic elements. Although breastfeeding is recommended for infants worldwide, as human milk is the best source of nutrients and other required bioactive factors, it is also a pathway of maternal excretion of toxic substances including toxic metals and thus a source of infant exposure. The aim of this research was to assess health risks in breastfeeding women in the coastal area of the Republic of Croatia and their infants (N=107) due to maternal exposure to Cd and Pb via cigarette smoking, and Hg via seafood and dental amalgam fillings, and their interaction with essential elements. Biological markers of exposure were the concentrations of main toxic metals Pb, Cd and Hg in maternal blood and three types of breast milk throughout lactation stages. Biological markers of effects were the levels of essential elements Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in maternal serum and breast milk. With regard to cigarette smoking as a source of exposure to Cd and Pb, there were effects of smoking on Cd concentration in blood and correlations between the smoking index and Cd concentrations in maternal blood (ρ=0.593; Pserum decreased by 10% in persons who continued smoking during pregnancy compared to non-smokers. In conclusion, the levels of main toxic metals Cd, Pb and Hg and essential elements Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in maternal blood and three types of breast milk samples in the studied area of coastal Croatia showed no risk of disrupted essential element levels with regard of toxic metal exposure in both breastfeeding women and their infants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Cross-sectional assessment of infants’ exposure to toxic metals through breast milk in a prospective cohort study of mining communities in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kwaku Bansa

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although breastfeeding of infants is recommended globally, the fact that maternal toxic metal stores are mobilised into breast milk implies infants, whose mothers live and work in mining communities, are at risk of multiple exposure to mining related toxic metals, such as Lead (Pb, Mercury (Hg, Cadmium (Cd and Arsenic (As, through breast milk intake, in addition to in utero exposure. Method A total of 114 mother-baby pairs, recruited from two community hospitals servicing mining communities in two different regions in Ghana (57 each, were involved in this study. When the babies were 3 months old, the amount of breast milk intake, concentrations of selected toxic metals in the breast milk and therefore the amount of toxic metals exposure through breast milk were determined. The study also, determined the amount of these toxic metals in the hair and urine of each mother-baby pair at 3 months postpartum. Results Based on the amounts of milk intake and non-milk oral intakes (geometric mean of 0.701 (95% CL 0.59–0.81 Kg/day and median of 0.22 Kg/day respectively, 90% of the babies were determined to have been exclusively breastfed. The amounts of most of the toxic metals in breast milk were higher than the WHO set limits and for 46.4%, 33.3% and 4.4% of the babies, their intake of As, Hg and Pb respectively were above the WHO provisional tolerable daily intake (PTDI values. Conclusion An appreciable proportion of babies living within the communities served by the Mangoasi Community Hospital in the Obuasi Municipality of the Ashanti Region and the Dompime Health Centre in the Tarkwa Municipality of the Western Region were exposed to Hg, As and Pb through breast milk in excess of what they should and these may have health implication for the infants and therefore calls for interventions.

  7. Cross-sectional assessment of infants' exposure to toxic metals through breast milk in a prospective cohort study of mining communities in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansa, David Kwaku; Awua, Adolf Kofi; Boatin, Rose; Adom, Theodosia; Brown-Appiah, Edward Christian; Amewosina, Kennedy Kwame; Diaba, Akusika; Datoghe, Dominic; Okwabi, Wilhelmina

    2017-05-25

    Although breastfeeding of infants is recommended globally, the fact that maternal toxic metal stores are mobilised into breast milk implies infants, whose mothers live and work in mining communities, are at risk of multiple exposure to mining related toxic metals, such as Lead (Pb), Mercury (Hg), Cadmium (Cd) and Arsenic (As), through breast milk intake, in addition to in utero exposure. A total of 114 mother-baby pairs, recruited from two community hospitals servicing mining communities in two different regions in Ghana (57 each), were involved in this study. When the babies were 3 months old, the amount of breast milk intake, concentrations of selected toxic metals in the breast milk and therefore the amount of toxic metals exposure through breast milk were determined. The study also, determined the amount of these toxic metals in the hair and urine of each mother-baby pair at 3 months postpartum. Based on the amounts of milk intake and non-milk oral intakes (geometric mean of 0.701 (95% CL 0.59-0.81) Kg/day and median of 0.22 Kg/day respectively), 90% of the babies were determined to have been exclusively breastfed. The amounts of most of the toxic metals in breast milk were higher than the WHO set limits and for 46.4%, 33.3% and 4.4% of the babies, their intake of As, Hg and Pb respectively were above the WHO provisional tolerable daily intake (PTDI) values. An appreciable proportion of babies living within the communities served by the Mangoasi Community Hospital in the Obuasi Municipality of the Ashanti Region and the Dompime Health Centre in the Tarkwa Municipality of the Western Region were exposed to Hg, As and Pb through breast milk in excess of what they should and these may have health implication for the infants and therefore calls for interventions.

  8. In vitro profiling of epigenetic modifications underlying heavy metal toxicity of tungsten-alloy and its components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Ranjana; Xu, Xiufen; Jaiswal, Manoj K.; Olsen, Cara; Mears, David; Caretti, Giuseppina; Galdzicki, Zygmunt

    2011-01-01

    Tungsten-alloy has carcinogenic potential as demonstrated by cancer development in rats with intramuscular implanted tungsten-alloy pellets. This suggests a potential involvement of epigenetic events previously implicated as environmental triggers of cancer. Here, we tested metal induced cytotoxicity and epigenetic modifications including H3 acetylation, H3-Ser10 phosphorylation and H3-K4 trimethylation. We exposed human embryonic kidney (HEK293), human neuroepithelioma (SKNMC), and mouse myoblast (C2C12) cultures for 1-day and hippocampal primary neuronal cultures for 1-week to 50-200 μg/ml of tungsten-alloy (91% tungsten/6% nickel/3% cobalt), tungsten, nickel, and cobalt. We also examined the potential role of intracellular calcium in metal mediated histone modifications by addition of calcium channel blockers/chelators to the metal solutions. Tungsten and its alloy showed cytotoxicity at concentrations > 50 μg/ml, while we found significant toxicity with cobalt and nickel for most tested concentrations. Diverse cell-specific toxic effects were observed, with C2C12 being relatively resistant to tungsten-alloy mediated toxic impact. Tungsten-alloy, but not tungsten, caused almost complete dephosphorylation of H3-Ser10 in C2C12 and hippocampal primary neuronal cultures with H3-hypoacetylation in C2C12. Dramatic H3-Ser10 dephosphorylation was found in all cobalt treated cultures with a decrease in H3 pan-acetylation in C2C12, SKNMC and HEK293. Trimethylation of H3-K4 was not affected. Both tungsten-alloy and cobalt mediated H3-Ser10 dephosphorylation were reversed with BAPTA-AM, highlighting the role of intracellular calcium, confirmed with 2-photon calcium imaging. In summary, our results for the first time reveal epigenetic modifications triggered by tungsten-alloy exposure in C2C12 and hippocampal primary neuronal cultures suggesting the underlying synergistic effects of tungsten, nickel and cobalt mediated by changes in intracellular calcium homeostasis and

  9. Heavy metal toxicity and bioavailability of dissolved nutrients to a bacterivorous flagellate are linked to suspended particle physical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boenigk, Jens; Wiedlroither, Anneliese; Pfandl, Karin

    2005-01-01

    Many dissolved substances attach easily to sediment particles. In the presence of suspended sediments bioavailability of dissolved substances is therefore, usually reduced and clays are even applied to 'wash' natural waters upon pollution. In organisms which feed on food organisms in the size range of these suspended sediment particles, however, bioavailability of such substances may even increase. For microorganisms the interaction with dissolved substances and suspended sediment particles so far has hardly been investigated. We specifically tested: (1) the importance of suspended particles as an uptake route for dissolved substances; and (2) the significance of particle surface properties, i.e. surface load and mineralogy. As a model system we used an axenically cultured strain of a widespread and often abundant flagellate ('Spumella-like' flagellate strain JBM10). We tested the toxicity of cadmium (II) and mercury (II) as well as availability of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the absence as well as in the presence of different natural clays, i.e. a kaolinite, a montmorillonite, and a mixed clay, and of artificial silicate particles of different surface charge. When applied separately the presence of the heavy metals cadmium and mercury as well as of suspended particles negatively affected the investigated flagellate but nutritive organics supported growth of the investigated flagellate. Toxic stress response comprises behavioral changes including enhanced swimming activity and stress egestion of ingested particles and was generally similar for a variety of different flagellate species. In combination with suspended particles, the respective effect of trace metals and nutritive substances decreased. Regarding the particle quality, cadmium toxicity increased with increasingly negative surface charge, i.e. increasing surface density of silanol groups (Pearson's product moment, P = 0.005). For mercury particle mineralogy still had a significant effect (P < 0

  10. Artocarpus altilis proving its worth in toxic metal removal from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These mixtures were shaken for 30 min after which they were filtered and the filtrate used for Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometric (AAS) analysis. The same process was repeated using Cd2+ and Ni2+ ions, respectively. The effects of particulate size (surface area), temperature, initial metal ion (adsorbate) concentration ...

  11. assessment of concentrations of trace and toxic heavy metals in soil

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Windows User

    from five sites namely Mitoo Mbuga, farming area, Miyomboni, Tambukareli and near water pump. The concentrations of heavy metals in soil ... mining tailings dams may leak, leach or fail, hence releasing radioactive material into the .... detection limit and therefore lower than the concentration of 3.9 μg/g obtained in area A.

  12. Study of toxic metals during combustion of RDF in a fluidized bed pilot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crujeira, T.; Lopes, H.; Abelha, P.; Sargaco, C.; Goncalves, R.; Freire, M.; Cabrita, I.; Gulyurtlu, I. [DEECA, INETI, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2005-04-01

    The study of the behavior of heavy metals during combustion of refuse-derived fuel (RDF) in a pilot fluidized bed was performed. The results of co-combustion were compared with coal combustion and RDF monocombustion. The amounts of heavy metals retained by the ash were different during co-firing in comparison with monocombustion due to the mechanisms leading to different partitioning of ash. It was verified that heavy metal emissions increased with introduction of RDF, but remained below regulated levels, with the exception of chromium (Cr) and nickel (Ni). For RDF monocombustion the emissions were, however, more severe, especially for cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and copper (Cu). This seems to be related not only to larger input amounts, but also to higher volatilisation during monocombustion caused by the presence of higher chlorine and lower sulphur contents in the RDF. Hence, as far as heavy metals are concerned, the utilization of RDF as a co-firing combustible for coal seems to be more environmental favorable than when RDF is fired alone.

  13. Heavy and Toxic Metals in Staple Foodstuffs and Agriproduct from Contaminated Soils

    CERN Document Server

    Gorbunov, A V; Kistanov, A A; Lyapunov, S M; Okina, O I; Ramadan, A B

    2002-01-01

    This article presents basic data on the content of Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Sb, Hg, and Pb in staple foodstuffs and agriproduct grown in Russia (Astrakhan region and the town of Belovo) and Egypt (Helwan region). The dependence of the concentration of metals in agriproducts on the content and chemical form of existence in irrigation water and soils is indicated.

  14. The Assessment of Toxic Metals in Plants Used in Cosmetics and Cosmetology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Agnieszka; Brodziak-Dopierała, Barbara; Loska, Krzysztof; Stojko, Jerzy

    2017-01-01

    Heavy metals polluting the natural environment are absorbed by plants. The use of herbs as components of cosmetics may pose a health risk for humans. The aim of the study was to determine the concentrations of Pb, Cd and Hg in selected species of herbs (horsetail Equisetum arvense, nettle Urtica dioica, St. John’s wort Hypericum perforatum, wormwood Artemisia absinthium, yarrow Achillea millefolium, cottonwood Solidago virgaurea) self-collected from the natural environment in two different locations, and purchased in stores on the territory of Poland. The concentration of the metals studied was: 4.67–23.8 mg/kg Pb, 0.01–1.51 mg/kg Cd, 0.005–0.028 mg/kg Hg. Different concentrations of metals, depending on species and origin of plants, were found. The mean concentration of all studied metals was the lowest in St. John’s wort, and the highest in nettle. In herbs purchased in Polish stores, the concentration of Pb was higher than in plants self-collected in the natural environment. PMID:29064437

  15. Dynamics of metal availability and toxicity in historically polluted floodplain sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geest, H.G.; León Paumen, M.

    2008-01-01

    Many floodplains contain high concentrations of sediment associated contaminants that might be subjected to large changes in terms of mobility, transformation and bioavailability. Therefore, this study describes 1) changes in the redox conditions and the mobility of metals in artificially uncovered

  16. Dynamics of metal availability and toxicity in historically polluted floodplain sediments.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geest, H.G.; Leon Paumen, M.

    2008-01-01

    Many floodplains contain high concentrations of sediment associated contaminants that might be subjected to large changes in terms of mobility, transformation and bioavailability. Therefore, this study describes 1) changes in the redox conditions and the mobility of metals in artificially uncovered

  17. Heavy and toxic metals in staple foodstuffs and agriproduct from contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbunov, A.V.; Kistanov, A.A.; Lyapunov, S.M.; Okina, O.I.; Frontas'eva, M.V.; Ramadan, A.B.

    2002-01-01

    This article presents basic data on the content of Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Sb, Hg, and Pb in staple foodstuffs and agriproducts grown in Russia (Astrakhan region and the town of Belovo) and Egypt (Helwan region). The dependence of the concentration of metals in agriproducts on the content and chemical form of existence in irrigation water and soils is indicated

  18. determination of levels of essential and toxic heavy metals in lentil

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IICBA01

    (Cd and Pb) in lentil samples collected from Dejen (East Gojjam), Boset (East Shewa) and Molale (North. Shewa), Ethiopia, were ... These methods are most commonly used for the determination of metals in environmental samples because of their ... The samples were packed into Polyethylene plastic bags, labeled and ...

  19. RESPIROMETRY AS A TOOL TO DETERMINE METAL TOXICITY IN A SULFATE REDUCING BACTERIAL CULTURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    A novel method under development for treatment of acid mine drainage waste uses biologically- generated hydrogen sulfide (H2S) to precipitate the metals in acid mine drainage (principally zinc, copper, aluminum, nickel, cadmium, arsenic, manganese, iron, and cobalt). The insolub...

  20. In situ immobilisation of toxic metals in soil using Maifan stone and illite/smectite clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Jieyong; Li, Hong; Yan, Zengguang; Zhou, Youya; Bai, Liping; Zhang, Chaoyan; Wang, Xuedong; Chen, Guikui

    2018-03-15

    Clay minerals have been proposed as amendments for remediating metal-contaminated soils owing to their abundant reserves, high performance, simplicity of use and low cost. Two novel clay minerals, Maifan stone and illite/smectite clay, were examined in the in situ immobilisation of soil metals. The application of 0.5% Maifan stone or illite/smectite clay to field soils significantly decreased the fractions of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)-extractable Cd, Ni, Cr, Zn, Cu and Pb. Furthermore, reductions of 35.4% and 7.0% in the DTPA-extractable fraction of Cd were obtained with the Maifan stone and illite/smectite clay treatments, respectively, which also significantly reduced the uptake of Cd, Ni, Cr, Zn, Cu and Pb in the edible parts of Brassica rapa subspecies pekinensis, Brassica campestris and Spinacia oleracea. Quantitatively, the Maifan stone treatment reduced the metal uptake in B. rapa ssp. Pekinensis, B. campestris and S. oleracea from 11.6% to 62.2%, 4.6% to 41.8% and 11.3% to 58.2%, respectively, whereas illite/smectite clay produced reductions of 8.5% to 62.8% and 4.2% to 37.6% in the metal uptake in B. rapa ssp. Pekinensis and B. campestris, respectively. Therefore, both Maifan stone and illite/smectite clay are promising amendments for contaminated soil remediation.

  1. Maximum permissible concentrations for water, sediment and soil derived from toxicity data for nine trace metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Plassche EJ; Polder MD; Canton JH

    1992-01-01

    In this report Maximum Permissible Concentrations (MPC) are derived for 9 trace metals based on ecotoxicological data. The elements are: antimony, barium, beryllium, cobalt, molybdenum, selenium, thallium, tin, and vanadium The study was carried out in the framework of the project "Setting

  2. The Assessment of Toxic Metals in Plants Used in Cosmetics and Cosmetology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Agnieszka; Brodziak-Dopierała, Barbara; Loska, Krzysztof; Stojko, Jerzy

    2017-10-24

    Heavy metals polluting the natural environment are absorbed by plants. The use of herbs as components of cosmetics may pose a health risk for humans. The aim of the study was to determine the concentrations of Pb, Cd and Hg in selected species of herbs (horsetail Equisetum arvense , nettle Urtica dioica , St. John's wort Hypericum perforatum , wormwood Artemisia absinthium , yarrow Achillea millefolium , cottonwood Solidago virgaurea ) self-collected from the natural environment in two different locations, and purchased in stores on the territory of Poland. The concentration of the metals studied was: 4.67-23.8 mg/kg Pb, 0.01-1.51 mg/kg Cd, 0.005-0.028 mg/kg Hg. Different concentrations of metals, depending on species and origin of plants, were found. The mean concentration of all studied metals was the lowest in St. John's wort, and the highest in nettle. In herbs purchased in Polish stores, the concentration of Pb was higher than in plants self-collected in the natural environment.

  3. determination of levels of essential and toxic heavy metals in lentil

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IICBA01

    content and ability to grow in low water stress conditions are the main attributes that make lentils important legume ... Trace metals like lead, cadmium and mercury are, on the other hand, known for their detrimental ... Each of the lentil samples were thoroughly washed with tap water and there after with distilled water to ...

  4. Heavy metal toxicity in rice and soybean plants cultivated in contaminated soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lígia de Souza Silva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals can accumulate in soil and cause phytotoxicity in plants with some specific symptoms. The present study evaluated the specific symptoms on rice and soybeans plants caused by excess of heavy metals in soil. Rice and soybean were grown in pots containing soil with different levels of heavy metals. A completely randomized design was used, with four replications, using two crop species and seven sample soils with different contamination levels. Rice and soybean exhibited different responses to the high concentrations of heavy metals in the soil. Rice plants accumulated higher Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn concentrations and were more sensitive to high concentrations of these elements in the soil, absorbing them more easily compared to the soybean plants. However, high available Zn concentrations in the soil caused phytotoxicity symptoms in rice and soybean, mainly chlorosis and inhibited plant growth. Further, high Zn concentrations in the soil reduced the Fe concentration in the shoots of soybean and rice plants to levels considered deficient.

  5. The Assessment of Toxic Metals in Plants Used in Cosmetics and Cosmetology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Fischer

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals polluting the natural environment are absorbed by plants. The use of herbs as components of cosmetics may pose a health risk for humans. The aim of the study was to determine the concentrations of Pb, Cd and Hg in selected species of herbs (horsetail Equisetum arvense, nettle Urtica dioica, St. John’s wort Hypericum perforatum, wormwood Artemisia absinthium, yarrow Achillea millefolium, cottonwood Solidago virgaurea self-collected from the natural environment in two different locations, and purchased in stores on the territory of Poland. The concentration of the metals studied was: 4.67–23.8 mg/kg Pb, 0.01–1.51 mg/kg Cd, 0.005–0.028 mg/kg Hg. Different concentrations of metals, depending on species and origin of plants, were found. The mean concentration of all studied metals was the lowest in St. John’s wort, and the highest in nettle. In herbs purchased in Polish stores, the concentration of Pb was higher than in plants self-collected in the natural environment.

  6. The idol beneath the altar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Norman A

    2014-03-01

    Drawing on the imagery of a Mayan idol hidden beneath the altar of a Catholic mission church imposed on a Mayan city by Spanish conquerors, the author discusses the role of deeply rooted core beliefs that are not always evident on the surface-and the observation that, in clinical practice, things are not always as they seem. Psychotherapists may unconsciously be seen as invading cultural enemies.

  7. Contamination level, distribution and health risk assessment of heavy and toxic metallic and metalloid elements in a cultivated mushroom Pleurotus florida (Mont.) singer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khani, Rouhollah; Moudi, Maryam; Khojeh, Vahid

    2017-02-01

    There are great concentrations of toxic metallic and metalloid elements such as lead, arsenic, mercury, cadmium or silver in many species of mushrooms comparative to other fruits and vegetables. In this study, contamination with heavy and toxic metallic and metalloid elements in the cultivated mushroom of (Pleurotus florida (Mont.) Singer) is investigated. P. florida was cultivated on different substrates; wheat straw (as blank), wheat straw + pine cone, wheat straw + soybean straw and wheat straw + urea and the effects of these substrates on contamination levels of Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, and Pb were analyzed. The results showed that the concentrations of essential elements (Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn) in the target mushroom are at the typical levels. The estimated daily intakes of studied metallic and metalloid elements were below their oral reference dosage mentioned by the international regulatory bodies. Health risk index (HRI) was calculated to evaluate the consumer's health risk assessment from the metal intake that contaminated in the cultivated mushroom of P. florida on the different nutrient sources. In this study, the individual HRIs were less than 1, which indicates insignificant potential health risk associated with the consumption of target mushroom from the studied substrates. Based on the HRIs values among the toxic metallic and metalloid elements, As in the target mushroom in the substrate of the wheat straw + pine cone is the main sources of risk, and it may cause severe health problems. Thus, this study suggests that the concentrations of heavy and toxic elements should be periodically monitored in cultivated mushrooms.

  8. Selective Removal of Toxic Metals like Copper and Arsenic from Drinking Water Using Phenol-Formaldehyde Type Chelating Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasis Mohanty

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of different toxic metals has increased beyond environmentally and ecologically permissible levels due to the increase in industrial activity. More than 100 million people of Bangladesh and West Bengal in India are affected by drinking ground water contaminated with arsenic and some parts of India is also affected by poisoning effect of copper, cadmium and fluoride. Different methods have been evolved to reduce the arsenic concentration in drinking water to a maximum permissible level of 10 μg/L where as various methods are also available to separate copper from drinking water. Of the proven methods available today, removal of arsenic by polymeric ion exchangers has been most effective. While chelating ion exchange resins having specific chelating groups attached to a polymer have found extensive use in sorption and pre concentration of Cu2+ ions. Both the methods are coupled here to separate and preconcentrate toxic metal cation Cu2+ and metal anion arsenate(AsO4– at the same time. We have prepared a series of low-cost polymeric resins, which are very efficient in removing copper ion from drinking water and after coordinating with copper ion they act as polymeric ligand exchanger, which are efficiently removing arsenate from drinking water. For this purpose Schiff bases were prepared by condensing o-phenylenediamine with o-, m-, and p-hydroxybenzaldehydes. Condensing these phenolic Schiff bases with formaldehyde afforded the chelating resins in high yields. These resins are loaded with Cu2+, Ni2+ 2+, and Fe3+ ions. The resins and the polychelates are highly insoluble in water. In powdered form the metal ion-loaded resins are found to very efficiently remove arsenate ion from water at neutral pH. Resins loaded with optimum amount of Cu2+ ion is more effective in removing arsenate ions compared to those with Fe3+ ion, apparently because Cu2+ is a stronger Lewis acid than Fe3+. Various parameters influencing the removal of the

  9. Alterations in growth, oxidative damage, and metal uptake of five aromatic rice cultivars under lead toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Umair; Hussain, Saddam; Anjum, Shakeel Ahmad; Abbas, Farhat; Tanveer, Mohsin; Noor, Mehmood Ali; Tang, Xiangru

    2017-06-01

    Lead (Pb) affects plant growth and its related physio-biochemical functions negatively. The present study investigated the responses of five different fragrant rice cultivars viz., Meixiangzhan (MXZ-2), Xiangyaxiangzhan (XYXZ), Guixiangzhan (GXZ), Basmati-385 (B-385), and Nongxiang-18 (NX-18) to four different Pb concentrations viz., 0, 400, 800 and 1200 μM. Results depicted that Pb toxicity significantly (P rice plants; nonetheless, a significant variation was found in the sensitivity of rice cultivars to Pb toxicity. Soluble sugars increased significantly only at 1200 μM in GXZ and 800 μM in B-385, whilst the maximum reductions in protein contents were observed at 1200 μM Pb for all rice cultivars. Proline contents were reduced for XYXZ and NX-18 at Pb1200 μM. Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) as well as reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) showed differential behavior among Pb treatments and rice cultivars. Among rice cultivars, GXZ showed better antioxidative defense system under Pb toxicity compared with all other cultivars. For all rice cultivars, the trend for Pb accumulation was recorded as: roots > stems > leaves. Furthermore, significant but negative correlations among Pb uptake and plant height (r = -0.79), tillers per plant (r = -0.91) and plant dry biomass (r = -0.81) were recorded for all rice cultivars whereas the values of translocation factor (TF) from stems to leaves were higher than roots to stems. In sum, Pb reduced the early growth and caused physio-biochemical changes in all rice cultivars, nonetheless, GXZ proved better able to tolerate Pb stress than all other rice cultivars under study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Acute toxicity of heavy metals to acetate-utilizing mixed cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria: EC100 and EC50.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utgikar, V P; Chen, B Y; Chaudhary, N; Tabak, H H; Haines, J R; Govind, R

    2001-12-01

    Acid mine drainage from abandoned mines and acid mine pit lakes is an important environmental concern and usually contains appreciable concentrations of heavy metals. Because sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are involved in the treatment of acid mine drainage, knowledge of acute metal toxicity levels for SRB is essential for the proper functioning of the treatment system for acid mine drainage. Quantification of heavy metal toxicity to mixed cultures of SRB is complicated by the confounding effects of metal hydroxide and sulfide precipitation, biosorption, and complexation with the constituents of the reaction matrix. The objective of this paper was to demonstrate that measurements of dissolved metal concentrations could be used to determine the toxicity parameters for mixed cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria. The effective concentration, 100% (EC100), the lowest initial dissolved metal concentrations at which no sulfate reduction is observed, and the effective concentration, 50% (EC50), the initial dissolved metal concentrations resulting in a 50% decrease in sulfate reduction, for copper and zinc were determined in the present study by means of nondestructive, rapid physical and chemical analytical techniques. The reaction medium used in the experiments was designed specifically (in terms of pH and chemical composition) to provide the nutrients necessary for the sulfidogenic activity of the SRB and to preclude chemical precipitation of the metals under investigation. The toxicity-mitigating effects of biosorption of dissolved metals were also quantified. Anaerobic Hungate tubes were set up (at least in triplicate) and monitored for sulfate-reduction activity. The onset of SRB activity was detected by the blackening of the reaction mixture because of formation of insoluble ferrous sulfide. The EC100 values were found to be 12 mg/L for copper and 20 mg/L for zinc. The dissolved metal concentration measurements were effective as the indicators of the effect of the

  11. Increased Suicide Risk among Workers following Toxic Metal Exposure at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant From 1952 to 2003: A Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    LW Figgs; H Holsinger; SJ Freitas; GM Brion; RW Hornung; CH Rice; D Tollerud

    2011-01-01

    Background: Suicide is a problem worldwide and occupation is an important risk factor. In the last decade, 55 200 deaths in the US were attributed to occupational risk factors. Objective: To determine if toxic metal exposure was associated with suicide risk among Paducah gaseous diffusion plant (PGDP) workers. Methods: We assembled a cohort of 6820 nuclear industry workers employed from 1952 to 2003. A job-specific exposure matrix (JEM) was used to determine metal exposure likelihoo...

  12. The Assessment of Toxic Metals in Plants Used in Cosmetics and Cosmetology

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Agnieszka; Brodziak-Dopierała, Barbara; Loska, Krzysztof; Stojko, Jerzy

    2017-01-01

    Heavy metals polluting the natural environment are absorbed by plants. The use of herbs as components of cosmetics may pose a health risk for humans. The aim of the study was to determine the concentrations of Pb, Cd and Hg in selected species of herbs (horsetail Equisetum arvense, nettle Urtica dioica, St. John’s wort Hypericum perforatum, wormwood Artemisia absinthium, yarrow Achillea millefolium, cottonwood Solidago virgaurea) self-collected from the natural environment in two different lo...

  13. ASSESSMENT OF PRESENCE AND LEACHING TOXIC METALS IN SAMPLES OF THREE TRADEMARKS OF ALGINATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabíole Jordana Los

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A material widely used in dental offices for making dental impressions is alginate. The objective of this work was to study three different brands of alginate by fluorescence and X-ray diffraction and extractions using the method of Tessier, followed by the determination of the concentrations of metals in the extracts by atomic absorption spectrometry. Through X-ray fluorescence, was observed that the most representative in the samples are Si, Ca, K, S, Al, Mg, Fe and P, and the sum of these elements reaches values above 97%. By X-ray diffraction, it was observed that the peak was indicative of a higher concentration of SiO2 (cristobalite and the compounds found in all specimens were CaSO4.2H2O, SiO2 (cristobalite and SiO 2. The assessment of mobilization (leaching of metals performed by the method of Tessier and its comparison with the CONAMA 430/11 has shown potential risks of improper disposal of such material in the environment due to concentrations (above PMV of lead in the fractions of the metal on the carbonates and organic matter.

  14. In vitro tests to assess toxic effects of airborne PM(10) samples. Correlation with metals and chlorinated dioxins and furans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, Neus; Sierra, Jordi; Rovira, Joaquim; Schuhmacher, Marta; Domingo, José L; Nadal, Martí

    2013-01-15

    Inhalation is an important exposure pathway to airborne pollutants such as heavy metals, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) and particulate matter. Chronic exposure to those chemicals, which form part of complex environmental mixtures, may mean important human health risks. In the present study, the suitability of different in vitro tests to evaluate the toxic effects of air PM(10) pollutants is investigated. In addition, it is also assessed how to distinguish the contribution of chemical pollutants to toxicity. Sixty-three air samples were collected in various areas of Catalonia (Spain), and the levels of ecotoxicity, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were evaluated. Aqueous acidic extractions of quartz fiber filters, where PM(10) had been retained, were performed. The photo-luminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri (Microtox®) bioassay was performed to assess ecotoxicity. Moreover, MTT and Comet Assays, both using human lung epithelial cells A549 as target cells, were applied to assess the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of air samples, respectively. The results show that Microtox® is an excellent screening test to perform a first evaluation of air quality, as it presented a significant correlation with chemical contaminants, contrasting with MTT Assay. Although none of the samples exhibited genotoxicity, a high correlation was found between this in vitro test and carcinogenic agents. Urban samples from traffic-impacted areas would be significantly more toxic. Finally, environmental temperature was identified as a key parameter, as higher values of ecotoxicity were found in winter. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Improvement of heavy metal stress and toxicity assays by coupling a transgenic reporter in a mutant nematode strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, K.-W. [Department of Biology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Chan, Shirley K.W. [Atmospheric, Marine and Coastal Environment Program, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Chow, King L. [Department of Biology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China) and Atmospheric, Marine and Coastal Environment Pro